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Sample records for site nuussuaq peninsula

  1. The Ilugissoq graphite andesite volcano, Nuussuaq, central West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Asger Ken; Larsen, Lotte Melchior

    2006-11-01

    The Ilugissoq graphite andesite volcano on Nuussuaq belongs to the Asuk Member of the Paleocene Vaigat Formation. It is the largest eruption site within the Vaigat Formation and is recognized as the source of the majority of the graphite andesite tuffs found in marine sediments in central Nuussuaq. The volcano consists exclusively of pyroclastic rocks containing a diverse lithic assemblage including sediment xenoliths. The primary pyroclastic fragments consist of magnesian andesite with several weight percent of graphite, which formed when mafic magma established a shallow-level magma reservoir beneath the eruption site, and within older clastic sediments from the Nuussuaq Basin. Magma-modified mudstone is completely dominant in the xenolith assemblage and attests that the graphite andesite originated through prolonged high-temperature assimilation of mudstone. The eruptions took place on a marine shelf consisting of picritic hyaloclastites and subaqueous crater mounds. The volcano consists of four overlapping crater cones aligned along a more than 4 km long NNW-SSE oriented fissure system; two cones barely reached sea level whereas the other two reached up to 200 m above the sea. The morphology of the pyroclastic rocks demonstrates that the volcano evolved through phreatomagmatic activity, which diminished with time. The magma never degassed sufficiently to reach a subaerial lava stage. A moderate primary gas pressure well in excess of 100 bars in the graphite andesite magma facilitated the phreatomagmatic explosions, which created the Ilugissoq volcano. The rocks of the volcano are rich in graphite and contain little or no native iron. In comparison, the contemporaneous and chemically similar subaerial lavas and breccias from Disko and Nuussuaq contain less graphite and more iron. The differences are considered to be due to the extremely pressure-dependent redox-sensitivity of carbon-oxygen equilibria in the range 1 bar (the lavas) to 500 bars (the Ilugissoq

  2. Nuussuaq basin of west Greenland: Subsidence and structural inversion in an Albian - early Tertiary pull-apart basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tankard, A.; Ng, T. Renner, T.

    1996-12-31

    The western margin of Greenland consists of a complex of linked extensional basins which formed during opening of Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay in Albian - early Tertiary time. The Nuussuaq basin, which straddles Nuussuaq peninsula and Disko Island, is onshore. Its sedimentary succession is generally hidden beneath a cover of early Tertiary extrusives. Slim-hole exploration drilling has been based on an integrated basin analysis and magnetotelluric data acquisition. Nuussuaq basin developed at a left-lateral releasing stepover at the end of the Ungava fault, an interplate strike-slip fault zone. SW-directed extension was accommodated by several transfer faults which compartmented the Nuussuaq basin. Although the principal depocenter is only 1500 km{sup 2} in area, interpretation of the magnetotelluric: data shows basin depths greater than 10 km. Persistent overpressuring and the low resistivity lower basin fill are believed to be typical of a young basin which has subsided rapidly. The Cretaceous - lower Tertiary succession is indicative of a restricted, underfilled basin. In contrast, the mid-Paleocene paleogeography was controlled by dextral slip along the basement strike-slip fault zones, broadscale structural inversion of the earlier extensional faults, and widespread volcanism. Catastrophic crestal collapse of inversion anticlines is reflected in sudden incision and rapid filling of a suite of paleovalleys. In Paleocene time, the Nuussuag basin was generally overfilled and dominated by terrestrial depositional systems. Oil seeps are associated with crestal collapse and fracturing of inversion structures. Biomarkers suggest a source rock of Paleocene age.

  3. Nuussuaq basin of west Greenland: Subsidence and structural inversion in an Albian - early Tertiary pull-apart basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tankard, A. ); Ng, T. ) Renner, T. )

    1996-01-01

    The western margin of Greenland consists of a complex of linked extensional basins which formed during opening of Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay in Albian - early Tertiary time. The Nuussuaq basin, which straddles Nuussuaq peninsula and Disko Island, is onshore. Its sedimentary succession is generally hidden beneath a cover of early Tertiary extrusives. Slim-hole exploration drilling has been based on an integrated basin analysis and magnetotelluric data acquisition. Nuussuaq basin developed at a left-lateral releasing stepover at the end of the Ungava fault, an interplate strike-slip fault zone. SW-directed extension was accommodated by several transfer faults which compartmented the Nuussuaq basin. Although the principal depocenter is only 1500 km[sup 2] in area, interpretation of the magnetotelluric: data shows basin depths greater than 10 km. Persistent overpressuring and the low resistivity lower basin fill are believed to be typical of a young basin which has subsided rapidly. The Cretaceous - lower Tertiary succession is indicative of a restricted, underfilled basin. In contrast, the mid-Paleocene paleogeography was controlled by dextral slip along the basement strike-slip fault zones, broadscale structural inversion of the earlier extensional faults, and widespread volcanism. Catastrophic crestal collapse of inversion anticlines is reflected in sudden incision and rapid filling of a suite of paleovalleys. In Paleocene time, the Nuussuag basin was generally overfilled and dominated by terrestrial depositional systems. Oil seeps are associated with crestal collapse and fracturing of inversion structures. Biomarkers suggest a source rock of Paleocene age.

  4. Byers Peninsula: A reference site for coastal, terrestrial and limnetic ecosystem studies in maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesada, A.; Camacho, A.; Rochera, C.; Velázquez, D.

    2009-11-01

    This article describes the development of an international and multidisciplinary project funded by the Spanish Polar Programme on Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, South Shetlands). The project adopted Byers Peninsula as an international reference site for coastal and terrestrial (including inland waters) research within the framework of the International Polar Year initiative. Over 30 scientists from 12 countries and 26 institutions participated in the field work, and many others participated in the processing of the samples. The main themes investigated were: Holocene changes in climate, using both lacustrine sediment cores and palaeo-nests of penguins; limnology of the lakes, ponds, rivers and wetlands; microbiology of microbial mats, ecology of microbial food webs and viral effects on aquatic ecosystems; ornithology, with investigations on a Gentoo penguin rookery ( Pygoscelis papua) as well as the flying ornithofauna; biocomplexity and life cycles of species from different taxonomic groups; analysis of a complete watershed unit from a landscape perspective; and human impacts, specifically the effect of trampling on soil characteristics and biota. Byers Peninsula offers many features as an international reference site given it is one of the largest ice-free areas in the Antarctic Peninsula region, it has a variety of different landscape units, and it hosts diverse aquatic ecosystems. Moreover, the Byers Peninsula is a hotspot for Antarctic biodiversity, and because of its high level of environmental protection, it has been very little affected by human activities. Finally, the proximity to the Spanish polar installations on Livingston Island and the experience derived from previous expeditions to the site make it logistically feasible as a site for ongoing monitoring and research.

  5. Proposed Mars Surveyor 2001 Landing Site at 'Ibishead Peninsula', Southern Elysium Planitia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. J.; Rice, J. W., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Our objective is to propose a landing site that the Mars Surveyor 2001 Lander and Curie Rover could go to on Mars that should meet the safety requirements of the spacecraft landing system and optimize surface operations (chiefly driven by power and communications requirements). This site lies between 1.5-3.5 deg S latitude, 195-198 deg W longitude, along a sharp albedo contact between the low-viscosity flow units of southern Elysium Planitia and the eroded highlands margin east of Aeolis Mensae. A relatively-bright "peninsula-like" protrusion of the eroded highlands into the south Elysium plains in this area reminds us of the head of an Ibis, and so we nickname this site "Ibishead Peninsula". This site is designed to be situated as close to a diversity of geologic units within view of the lander instruments. Based on our experience with the visibility of horizon details from the Mars Pathfinder and Viking landing sites, we stipulate that for horizon features to be resolved suitably for detailed study from the lander, they must be no more than several kilometers distant. This is so that diversity can be placed in a geologic context in a region that we feel has some exciting science potential. This objective is different from the Mars Pathfinder requirement to land at a site with a maximum chance for containing a diversity of rocks within a few tens of meters of the lander, which resulted in the selection of a "grab bag" site.

  6. Preliminary Site Classification using the Geologic Map of the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Kim, K.; Suk, B.

    2008-12-01

    Studies of the earthquake ground motion consider the soil properties or the bed rock properties in the upper 30 m. The average shear wave velocity in the upper 30 m defined from borehole data is routinely used for classifying the site conditions. However, it is difficult to classify the site condition using the limited borehole data to cover the whole Korean Peninsula. In the study of Lee et al. (2001), site classification of Taiwan was refined using surface geology from the geologic map, geomorphologic data, and borehole data following the guidelines of National Earthquake Reduction Program (NEHRP). Wald and Allen (2007) defined shear wave velocity using slope of topography or gradient in global scale. They also compared their results in the Taiwan region to those proposed by Lee et al. (2001). In this study, we used geologic map, geomorphologic data, estimated average shear wave velocity from slope of topography, and borehole data to define the site conditions of the Korean Peninsula. We compared our results to the borehole data or seismic site condition data which include seismometer locations and ground conditions. There are some differences between our results and seismic site condition data. The discrepancy is attributed to the relatively large scale geologic map (1:250000) which may not include accurate site condition of the regions. Estimated site conditions of the study, however, agree with those from borehole data when a 1-mile buffering distance is applied to geologic condition boundaries. These results provide useful information for the further study of regional hazard estimation, risk management, and other seismological and geotechnical applications.

  7. Impact of medium-distance pollution sources in a Galician suburban site (NW Iberian peninsula).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Carracedo, M P; Andrade, J M; Ballabio, D; Prada-Rodríguez, D; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S; Consonni, V; Piñeiro-Iglesias, M; López-Mahía, P

    2015-04-15

    This work studies airborne quality in a geographical area that has not been investigated broadly: a suburban site nearby A Coruña (Galicia, NW Iberian Peninsula). In contrast to major Spanish cities, the site has Atlantic characteristics: rainy, scarce calm weather and infrequent prolonged sunny periods. The relationships between several gaseous pollutants (NO, NO2, NOx, CO, O3, PM10, PM2.5 and PM1) and their temporal trends (daily, monthly and seasonal) were evaluated. The aim was to unravel whether medium- and long-distance sources were impacting upon the site. Univariate studies focused on factorizing the pollutants according to a codifying factor (wind direction, hour of the day, season and month). Multivariate studies (Varimax-rotated factorial analysis) were done separately on both weekdays and weekends. The intensity of the daily maxima for NO, NO2, NOx and CO was lower during the weekends, with O3 behaving opposite. PM average values agreed with previous historical reports for a rural background station relatively close to the site and they decreased daily between 11:00 and 19:00 h, likely because of the marine breeze. With moderate wind speeds the pollutants were associated to medium-distance pollution sources, mainly the city of A Coruña and a combination of industrial pollution sources (a power plant, a solid waste incinerator and a regional airport). PMID:25616227

  8. New Neanderthal remains from Mani peninsula, Southern Greece: the Kalamakia Middle Paleolithic cave site.

    PubMed

    Harvati, Katerina; Darlas, Andreas; Bailey, Shara E; Rein, Thomas R; El Zaatari, Sireen; Fiorenza, Luca; Kullmer, Ottmar; Psathi, Eleni

    2013-06-01

    The Kalamakia cave, a Middle Paleolithic site on the western coast of the Mani peninsula, Greece, was excavated in 1993-2006 by an interdisciplinary team from the Ephoreia of Paleoanthropology and Speleology (Greek Ministry of Culture) and the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle (Paris). The site is dated to between ca. 100,000 and >39,000 years BP (Before Present) and has yielded Mousterian lithics, a rich fauna, and human remains from several layers. The latter include 10 isolated teeth, a cranial fragment and three postcranial elements. The remains represent at least eight individuals, two of them subadults, and show both carnivore and anthropogenic modifications. They can be identified as Neanderthal on the basis of diagnostic morphology on most specimens. A diet similar to that of Neanderthals from mixed habitat is suggested by our analysis of dental wear (occlusal fingerprint analysis) and microwear (occlusal texture microwear analysis), in agreement with the faunal and palynological analyses of the site. These new fossils significantly expand the Neanderthal sample known from Greece. Together with the human specimens from Lakonis and Apidima, the Kalamakia human remains add to the growing evidence of a strong Neanderthal presence in the Mani region during the Late Pleistocene. PMID:23490263

  9. Thermal regime of active layer at two lithologically contrasting sites on James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrbáček, Filip; Nývlt, Daniel; Láska, Kamil

    2016-04-01

    Antarctic Peninsula region (AP) represents one of the most rapidly warming parts of our planet in the last 50 years. Despite increasing research activities along both western and eastern sides of AP in last decades, there is still a lot of gaps in our knowledge relating to permafrost, active layer and its thermal and physical properties. This study brings new results of active layer monitoring on James Ross Island, which is the largest island in northern AP. Its northern part, Ulu Peninsula, is the largest ice-free area (more than 200 km2) in the region. Due its large area, we focused this study on sites located in different lithologies, which would affect local thermal regime of active layer. Study site (1) at Abernethy Flats area (41 m a.s.l.) lies ~7 km from northern coast. Lithologically is formed by disintegrated Cretaceous calcareous sandstones and siltstones of the Santa Marta Formation. Study site (2) is located at the northern slopes of Berry Hill (56 m a.s.l.), about 0.4 km from northern coastline. Lithology is composed of muddy to intermediate diamictites, tuffaceous siltstones to fine grained sandstones of the Mendel Formation. Data of air temperature at 2 meters above ground and the active layer temperatures at 75 cm deep profiles were obtained from both sites in period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014. Small differences were found when comparing mean air temperatures and active temperatures at 5 and 75 cm depth in the period 2012-2014. While the mean air temperatures varied between -7.7 °C and -7.0 °C, the mean ground temperatures fluctuated between -6.6 °C and -6.1 °C at 5 cm and -6.9 °C and -6.0 °C at 75 cm at Abernethy Flats and Berry Hill slopes respectively. Even though ground temperature differences along the profiles weren't pronounced during thawing seasons, the maximum active layer thickness was significantly larger at Berry Hill slopes (80 to 82 cm) than at Abernethy Flats (52 to 64 cm). We assume this differences are affected by

  10. The Punta Lucero Quarry site (Zierbena, Bizkaia): a window into the Middle Pleistocene in the Northern Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Sala, Nohemi; Arceredillo, Diego; García, Nuria; Martínez-Pillado, Virginia; Rios-Garaizar, Joseba; Garate, Diego; Solar, Gonzalo; Libano, Iñaki

    2015-08-01

    The period between the end of the Early Pleistocene and the mid-Middle Pleistocene (roughly between 1.0 and 0.4 Ma BP) is of great interest in Western Europe. It witnessed several climatic oscillations and changes in the fauna, the demise of a hominin species and the appearance of another, along with important cultural and technological changes. Thus, the few available sites with these chronologies is vital to the understanding of the tempo and mode of these changes. Middle Pleistocene sites in the Northern Iberian Peninsula are very rare. Here we present the study of the site found at the Punta Lucero Quarry (Biscay province, Northern Iberian Peninsula), which includes for the first time the complete collection from the site. The fossil association from this site includes several ungulates, such as a Megacerine deer, Cervus elaphus, large bovids (likely both Bos primigenius and Bison sp. are present), Stephanorhinus sp., and carnivores, such as Homotherium latidens, Panthera gombaszoegensis, Canis mosbachensis and Vulpes sp. This association is typical of a middle Middle Pleistocene chronology and would be the oldest macro-mammal site in the Eastern Cantabrian region. This site would likely correspond to a chronology after Mode 1 technological complex and before the arrival of Mode 2 technology in this region. Thus, it offers a glimpse into the paleoecological conditions slightly prior to or contemporaneous with the first Acheulian makers in the northern fringe of the Iberian Peninsula.

  11. Site fidelity in space use by spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) in the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Fernandez, Gabriel; Smith Aguilar, Sandra E; Schaffner, Colleen M; Vick, Laura G; Aureli, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Animal home ranges may vary little in their size and location in the short term but nevertheless show more variability in the long term. We evaluated the degree of site fidelity of two groups of spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) over a 10- and 13-year period, respectively, in the northeastern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico. We used the Local Convex Hull method to estimate yearly home ranges and core areas (defined as the 60% probability contour) for the two groups. Home ranges varied from 7.7 to 49.6 ha and core areas varied from 3.1 to 9.2 ha. We evaluated the degree of site fidelity by quantifying the number of years in which different areas were used as either home ranges or core areas. Large tracts were used only as home ranges and only for a few years, whereas small areas were used as either core area or home range for the duration of the study. The sum of the yearly core areas coincided partially with the yearly home ranges, indicating that home ranges contain areas used intermittently. Home ranges, and especially core areas, contained a higher proportion of mature forest than the larger study site as a whole. Across years and only in one group, the size of core areas was positively correlated with the proportion of adult males in the group, while the size of home ranges was positively correlated with both the proportion of males and the number of tree species included in the diet. Our findings suggest that spider monkey home ranges are the result of a combination of long-term site fidelity and year-to-year use variation to enable exploration of new resources. PMID:23675427

  12. Site Fidelity in Space Use by Spider Monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Fernandez, Gabriel; Smith Aguilar, Sandra E.; Schaffner, Colleen M.; Vick, Laura G.; Aureli, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Animal home ranges may vary little in their size and location in the short term but nevertheless show more variability in the long term. We evaluated the degree of site fidelity of two groups of spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) over a 10- and 13-year period, respectively, in the northeastern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico. We used the Local Convex Hull method to estimate yearly home ranges and core areas (defined as the 60% probability contour) for the two groups. Home ranges varied from 7.7 to 49.6 ha and core areas varied from 3.1 to 9.2 ha. We evaluated the degree of site fidelity by quantifying the number of years in which different areas were used as either home ranges or core areas. Large tracts were used only as home ranges and only for a few years, whereas small areas were used as either core area or home range for the duration of the study. The sum of the yearly core areas coincided partially with the yearly home ranges, indicating that home ranges contain areas used intermittently. Home ranges, and especially core areas, contained a higher proportion of mature forest than the larger study site as a whole. Across years and only in one group, the size of core areas was positively correlated with the proportion of adult males in the group, while the size of home ranges was positively correlated with both the proportion of males and the number of tree species included in the diet. Our findings suggest that spider monkey home ranges are the result of a combination of long-term site fidelity and year-to-year use variation to enable exploration of new resources. PMID:23675427

  13. Comprehensive paleoseismic geological studies in a key site in southwestern Kola Peninsula (Northeast of the Fennoscandian Shield)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, S. B.; Nikonov, A. A.; Shvarev, S. V.; Rodkin, M. V.

    2016-07-01

    This paper considers the results of detailed paleoseismic and geological investigations in a key site in the wall of the Imandra Lake depression (Kola Peninsula Region, Northeast of the Fennoscandian Shield). Study of different groups of paleoseismic deformations developed in the fault zone and the application of new methods and techniques made it possible to identify a large seismotectonic zone characterized by great earthquakes at the end of the Late Glacial and in the Holocene. The investigation data are indicative of the necessity to estimate the seismic potential in the Kola Atomic plant area in a different way.

  14. m b( Pn) Scale for the Korean Peninsula and Site-Dependent Pn Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Kiwook

    2012-11-01

    The Korean Peninsula is located in the far-eastern Eurasian plate margin where crustal structures vary laterally, causing significant raypath-dependent modulations of crustal phases. The discriminative variations of crustal phases hinder application of conventional local magnitude scales in the continental margin. The mantle-lid phase is less affected by the crustal structures than the crustal phases, providing a better constraint to magnitude estimation. A regional body-wave magnitude scale based on the mantle-lid P wave ( Pn), m b( Pn), is developed for regional events around the Korean Peninsula. The m b( Pn) scale is determined to be m b( Pn) = 0.380 (±0.299) + log A + 2.012 (±0.122) log d, where A is the peak-to-peak Pn amplitude in μm and d is the epicentral distance in km. The m b( Pn) estimates of regional events around the Korean Peninsula are determined. The m b( Pn) estimates are compared with other available magnitude estimates ( m b( Lg), M L). The influence of structures beneath stations on Pn amplification is investigated from inter-station magnitude residuals. A characteristic spatial variation of inter-station magnitude residuals with strengths mostly between -6 and 6 %, but with maximum strengths of ±10 %, is observed. The inter-station magnitude residuals appears to be correlated well with geological and seismic structures in the crust.

  15. Erythema UV-B exposure near the Antarctic Peninsula and comparison with an equatorial site.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, V W; Echer, E

    2001-07-01

    Observations of UV-B radiation in the area of the Antarctic Peninsula are described, with the objective to obtain an evaluation of the UV-B enhancements observed during ozone hole episodes, and compare these with equatorial values. The enhancements observed during Southern Hemisphere spring are described in terms of a specific case of enhancement, at the Antarctic peninsula, which has shown a maximum UV-B index of 8.7, in October 1998. The average enhancement between the autumn-unperturbed and spring-perturbed periods results in an UV-B index of 5.4, but with large fluctuations in which much larger indices are produced. These values are compared to indices normally observed in the equatorial region. For measurements obtained with the same kind of instrument at Natal (5.8 degrees S, 35.2 degrees W), the UV-B index varies between 7 and 14, which means that enhanced UV-B indices in the Antarctic Peninsula may become of the same order of magnitude of the lower limit equatorial values. PMID:11470565

  16. Annual survival and site fidelity of Steller's eiders molting along the Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, P.L.; Petersen, M.R.; Dau, C.P.; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.

    2000-01-01

    Populations of Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri) molting and wintering along the Alaska Peninsula have declined since the 1960's. We captured and marked a large sample of Steller's eiders molting in 2 lagoons along the Alaska Peninsula between 1975-97. We used mark-recapture analysis techniques to estimate annual survival and movement probabilities within and among lagoons for male and female eiders. Estimates of annual survival (??SE) were 0.899 ?? 0.032 for females and 0.765 ?? 0.044 for males. Both sexes showed high rates of fidelity to specific molting locations (>95%) within lagoons; yet we found no evidence that annual probability of survival differed among groups molting in different locations either within or among lagoons. We found weak evidence that annual survival decreased between the periods 1975-81 and 1991-97. The lower survival of males compared to females is unusual for waterfowl and may result in a female-biased sex ratio. We conclude that a decrease in adult survival may have initiated the long-term population decline. Further, a shortage of males may be limiting reproductive potential.

  17. Annual survival and site fidelity of Stellar's Eiders molting along the Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, P.L.; Petersen, M.R.; Dau, C.P.; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.

    2000-01-01

    Populations of Steller?s eiders (Polysticta stelleri) molting and wintering along the Alaska Peninsula have declined since the 1960's. We captured and marked a large sample of Steller's eiders molting in 2 lagoons along the Alaska Peninsula between 1975-97. We used mark-recapture analysis techniques to estimate annual survival and movement probabilities within and among lagoons for male and female eiders. Estimates of annual survival (?SE) were 0.899 ? 0.032 for females and 0.765 ? 0.044 for males. Both sexes showed high rates of fidelity to specific molting locations (>95%) within lagoons; yet we found no evidence that annual probability of survival differed among groups molting in different locations either within or among lagoons. We found weak evidence that annual survival decreased between the periods 1975-81 and 1991-97. The lower survival of males compared to females is unusual for waterfowl and may result in a female-biased sex ratio. We conclude that a decrease in adult survival may have initiated the long-term population decline. Further, a shortage of males may be limiting reproductive potential.

  18. Alluvial systems as archives for environmental change at a Hominid site with Oldowan archaeological occurrences: the Homa Peninsula, southwestern Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Thomas; Whitfield, Elizabeth; Kirby, Jason; Hunt, Christopher; Bishop, Laura; Plummer, Thomas; Ditchfield, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The Homa Peninsula, southwestern Kenya, preserves fossiliferous sedimentary sequences dating to the Plio-Pleistocene. Evidence of hominids inhabiting an open grassland setting and utilising Oldowan tools has been reported here, as well as some of the oldest known traces of hominin activity. Reconstructions of the palaeoenvironment have suggested that alluvial and lake marginal environments on a grassy plain, between wooded slopes and a permanent water body might be plausible. However, these interpretations are based only on field sedimentological analyses and stable isotope analysis at a single site on the peninsula (Kanjera South). It is the aim of this study to utilise a multiproxy approach to develop our understanding of the palaeoenvironmental characteristics here. Sediments will also be characterized at a new site (Nyayanga) through field analyses, as well as through analyses of particle size, siliceous microfossils (diatoms, phytoliths and sponge spicules), pollen and stable isotopes. By utilizing this approach, new insights into the palaeoecology, palaeohydromorphology and palaeoclimate of the locale may be revealed, expanding the limited data available to palaeoanthropological studies of Oldowan occurrences in east Africa. Efforts to refine palaeoenvironmental reconstructions of Kanjera South through particle size analysis have shown that sediments in the lower beds of the sequence are characterised by poor sorting, a bimodal distribution and sand/silty-sand grade material. This suggests rapid deposition and/or a variable hydrological regime and may represent the role of relatively unconfined ephemeral channels in the transportation and deposition of sediments. Fluvial reworking of aeolian sediments, most likely during unconfined flood events may also have occurred.

  19. ALERTES-SC3 Early Warning System prototype for South Iberian Peninsula: on-site approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazos, Antonio; Lopez de Mesa, Mireya; Gallego Carrasco, Javier; Martín Davila, José; Rioja del Rio, Carlos; Morgado, Arturo; Vera, Angel; Ciberia, Angel; Cabieces, Roberto; Strollo, Angelo; Hanka, Winfried; Carranza, Marta

    2016-04-01

    In recent years several Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS) have been developed for different parts of the world. The area between SW Cape St. Vicente and the Strait of Gibraltar is one of the most seismically active zones in the Ibero-Maghrebian region, with predominantly moderate and superficial seismicity, but also big events with associated tsunamis are well documented in the area, like the 1755 Lisbon earthquake. In the frame of the ALERT-ES (2011-2013) and ALERTES-RIM (2014-2016) Spanish projects, the ALERTES-SC3 EEWS, regional approach, prototype has been developed at the Royal Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA) and is being tested in near real time for south Iberia. This prototype, based on the SeisComP3 software package, is largely based on algorithms derived from the analysis of the first seconds of the P wave records. Calculation of several parameters are carried out, mainly the characteristic period (τc) and the displacement peak (Pd), but also the velocity peak (Pv), the maximum period (τPmáx), among others. In order to warm the areas closest to the hypocentre, places located inside the "blind zone", a on-site EEWS has also been developed by ROA and integrated in the ALERTES-SC3 prototype. From the on-site approach, a warm level is declared from one station as a function of the estimated characteristic period (τc) and the displacement Peak (Pd), although the earthquake location and therefore the lead time available remains unknown. This on-site EEWS is being tested in several Western Mediterranean net (WM) stations as ARNO (Arenosillo, Huelva,Spain) or CHAS (Chafarinas island, North Africa, Spain). Also an on-site low cost station is being developed based in low cost accelerometers. In this work the current state of the on-site EEWS developed, its integration in the ALERTES-SC3 EEWS system and the low cost seismic stations are shown.

  20. Study on the Application of Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis for the Nuclear Power Plant Site in Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, H. M.; Kim, M.; Sheen, D. H.; Choi, I. K.

    2014-12-01

    The necessity of study on the tsunami hazard assessment for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) site was suggested since the event of Fukushima in 2011 had been occurred. It has being emphasized because all of the NPPs in Korean Peninsula are located in coastal region. The tsunami hazard is regarded as the annual exceedance probability for the wave heights. The methodology for analysis of tsunami hazard is based on the seismic hazard analysis. The seismic hazard analysis had been performed by using both deterministic and probabilistic method. Recently, the probabilistic method had been received more attention than the deterministic method because the uncertainties of hazard analysis could be considered by using the logic tree approach. In this study, the probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis for Uljin NPP site was performed by using the information of fault sources which was published by Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). The wave parameter is the most different parameter with seismic hazard. It could be estimated from the results of tsunami propagation analysis. The TSUNAMI_ver1.0 which was developed by Japan nuclear energy safety organization (JNES), was used for the tsunami simulation. The 80 cases tsunami simulations were performed and then the wave parameters were estimated. For reducing the sensitivity which was encouraged by location of sampling point, the wave parameters were estimated from group of sampling points.The probability density function on the tsunami height was computed by using the recurrence intervals and the wave parameters. And then the exceedance probability distribution was calculated from the probability density function. The tsunami hazards for the sampling groups were calculated. The fractile curves which were shown the uncertainties of input parameters were estimated from the hazards by using the round-robin algorithm. In general, tsunami hazard analysis is focused on the maximum wave heights. But the minimum wave height should be considered

  1. Peninsula Academies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raby, Marilyn E.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the Peninsula Academies program developed by the Sequoia (California) Union High School District and 27 local high technology companies to help educationally disadvantaged students break the pattern of low academic achievement, lack of skills, and chronic unemployment. (FL)

  2. Atmospheric behaviors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a Japanese remote background site, Noto peninsula, from 2004 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ning; Hakamata, Mariko; Sato, Kousuke; Okada, Yumi; Yang, Xiaoyang; Tatematsu, Michiya; Toriba, Akira; Kameda, Takayuki; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2015-11-01

    Total suspended particulates were collected at a Japanese remote background site (Noto Air Monitoring Station; NAMS) on the Noto Peninsula from September 2004 to June 2014. Nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the particulates (fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[ghi]perylene and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene) were determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. The mean total concentrations of the nine PAHs in the cold season (November to May for the years 2004-2014) was 670 pg m-3 (range 37-4100 pg m-3). The mean total concentration in the warm season (June to October for the same period) was 170 pg m-3 (range 31-960 pg m-3). The atmospheric PAH level at NAMS decreased in recent years, although no significant change was found in the warm season. An analysis of meteorological conditions showed that the atmospheric PAHs at NAMS were long range transported from Northeast China in the cold seasons and were contributed to by Japanese domestic sources in the warm seasons. Lower concentration ratios of reactive PAHs to their isomers at NAMS also supported these results. Activities associated with the Beijing Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2008 and reconstruction after the 2007 Noto Hanto earthquake may have contributed to the yearly variations of atmospheric PAH levels at NAMS during the period 2007-2009. Source control measures implemented by the Chinese and Japanese governments appear to have been effective in decreasing the atmospheric PAH levels at NAMS in recent years.

  3. Data Report: A Search for Deposits of the Late Pliocene Impact of the Eltanin Asteroid in Rise Sediments from the Antarctic Peninsula, Site 1096

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of Ir have been measured in 87 sediment samples from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1096 in search of evidence of fallout from the impact of the Eltanin asteroid, which occurred at 2.15 Ma, approx. 1300 km northwest of the site. An additional six samples were measured from a unique sand layer and adjacent sediments that are dated at approx. 1.6 Ma. These 93 sediment samples are all silts and muds that were deposited on a continental rise drift of the Antarctic Peninsula. No evidence of the Eltanin impact deposit was found in this study.

  4. A study of a possible early reindeer domestication site on the Iamal peninsula (Russia) using geoarchaeological methods and lipid biomarkers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrault, Loic; Milek, Karen; Dawson, Lorna; Anderson, David

    2016-04-01

    In past centuries, indigenous hunters in Northern Eurasia shifted from being hunters to being herders of reindeer. Even at low human population densities, large reindeer herds can alter the landscape and leave long-term biochemical signatures in the soil. Although indigenous social-ecological systems have been thought to be resilient in space and time, most are considered to be at risk due to climate and socio-economic changes related to anthropogenic activities. This situation calls for a long-term perspective to place human-animal relations in their respective contexts. As an ancient livelihood still practiced across vast areas of Northern Eurasia, reindeer herding is a nexus for feedbacks between humans, animals and environment. The Iarte site, on the Iuribei River in the central part of the Iamal peninsula is thought to be an important site of reindeer domestication dating back to the 12th century due to the enormous quantities of butchered reindeer bones found in recent excavations. The large amount of buried reindeer bones found at the settlement suggests that herds should have stood near the site despite the lack of any architectural remains of corrals or pens. The history of a possible early relation to domesticate reindeer can be described with geoarchaeological methods, including lipid biomarkers, which can indicate the presence of past human and animal activities. Among lipid biomarkers, faecal markers such as stanols and bile acids have already been used in archaeological contexts to identify and distinguish between different species because they are persistent over time and can have a species specific profile. Near the Iarte settlement, we conducted a soil survey and sampling programme and combined geoarchaeological measurements (including electrical conductivity, magnetic susceptibility and elemental analysis) with lipid analysis of soil samples, to identify the potential presence of standing reindeer herds. The different soil layers have been

  5. Light absorption and morphological properties of soot-containing aerosols observed at an East Asian outflow site, Noto Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Sayako; Nakayama, Tomoki; Taketani, Fumikazu; Adachi, Kouji; Matsuki, Atsushi; Iwamoto, Yoko; Sadanaga, Yasuhiro; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    The coating of black carbon (BC) with inorganic salts and organic compounds can enhance the magnitude of light absorption by BC. To elucidate the enhancement of light absorption of aged BC particles and its relation to the mixing state and morphology of individual particles, we conducted observations of particles at an Asian outflow site in Noto Peninsula, Japan, in the spring of 2013. Absorption and scattering coefficients at 405, 532, and 781 nm and mass concentrations/mixing states of refractory BC in PM2.5 were measured using a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer and a single-particle soot photometer (SP2), respectively, after passage through a thermodenuder (TD) maintained at 300 or 400 °C or a bypass line maintained at room temperature (25 °C). The average enhancement factor of BC light absorption due to coating was estimated by comparing absorption coefficients at 781 nm for particles that with and without passing through the TD at 300 °C and was found to be 1.22. The largest enhancements (> 1.30) were observed under high absorption coefficient periods when the air mass was long-range transported from urban areas in China. Aerosol samples were also analyzed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. The morphological features and mixing states of soot-containing particles of four samples collected during the high absorption events were analyzed by comparing microphotographs before and after the evaporation of beam-sensitive materials by irradiation with a high-density electron beam. The majority of the soot in all samples was found as mixed particles with sulfate-containing spherules or as clusters of such spherules. For samples showing high enhancement (> 1.30) of BC light absorption, the TEM showed that the internally mixed soot-containing particles tended to have a more spherical shape and to be thickly coated. The SP2 measurements also suggested that the proportion of thickly coated

  6. Light absorption and morphological properties of soot-containing aerosols observed at an East Asian outflow site, Noto Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, S.; Nakayama, T.; Taketani, F.; Adachi, K.; Matsuki, A.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sadanaga, Y.; Matsumi, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The coating of black carbon (BC) with inorganic salts and organic compounds can enhance the magnitude of light absorption by BC. To elucidate the enhancement of light absorption of aged BC particles and its relation to the mixing state and morphology of individual particles, we conducted observations of particles at an Asian outflow site in Noto Peninsula, Japan, in the spring of 2013. Absorption and scattering coefficients at 405, 532, and 781 nm and mass concentrations/mixing states of refractory-BC in PM2.5 were measured using a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer and a single-particle soot photometer (SP2), respectively, after passage through a heater maintained at 300 or 400 °C or a bypass line maintained at room temperature (25 °C). The average enhancement of BC light absorption due to coating was estimated by comparing absorption coefficients at 781 nm for particles that with and without passing through the heater and was found to be 22-23 %. The largest enhancements (> 30 %) were observed under high absorption coefficient conditions when the air mass was long-range transported from urban areas in China. Aerosol samples were also analyzed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. The morphological features and mixing states of soot-containing particles of four samples collected during the high absorption coefficient events were analyzed by comparing microphotographs before and after the evaporation of beam-sensitive materials by irradiation with a high density electron beam. The majority of the soot in all samples was found as mixed particles with spherical sulfate or as clusters of sulfate spherules. For samples showing high enhancement (> 30 %) of BC light absorption, TEM showed that the internally mixed soot-containing particles tended to have a more spherical shape and to be embedded into the sulfate. The SP2 measurements also suggested that the proportion of thickly-coated soot was

  7. Long-term temperature monitoring at the biological community site on the Nankai accretionary prism off Kii Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, S.; Hamamoto, H.; Yamano, M.; Kinoshita, M.; Ashi, J.

    2008-12-01

    Nankai subduction zone off Kii Peninsula is one of the most intensively surveyed areas for studies on the seismogenic zone. Multichannel seismic reflection surveys carried out in this area revealed the existence of splay faults that branched from the subduction zone plate boundary [Park et al., 2002]. Along the splay faults, reversal of reflection polarity was observed, indicating elevated pore fluid pressure along the faults. Cold seepages with biological communities were discovered along a seafloor outcrop of one of the splay faults through submersible observations. Long-term temperature monitoring at a biological community site along the outcrop revealed high heat flow carried by upward fluid flow (>180 mW/m2) [Goto et al., 2003]. Toki et al. [2004] estimated upward fluid flow rates of 40-200 cm/yr from chloride distribution of interstitial water extracted from sediments in and around biological community sites along the outcrop. These observation results suggest upward fluid flow along the splay fault. In order to investigate hydrological nature of the splay fault, we conducted long-term temperature monitoring again in the same cold seepage site where Goto et al. [2003] carried out long-term temperature monitoring. In this presentation, we present results of the temperature monitoring and estimate heat flow carried by upward fluid flow from the temperature records. In this long-term temperature monitoring, we used stand-alone heat flow meter (SAHF), a probe-type sediment temperature recorder. Two SAHFs (SAHF-3 and SAHF-4) were used in this study. SAHF-4 was inserted into a bacterial mat, within several meters of which the previous long-term temperature monitoring was conducted. SAHF-3 was penetrated into ordinary sediment near the bacterial mat. The sub-bottom temperature records were obtained for 8 months. The subsurface temperatures oscillated reflecting bottom- water temperature variation (BTV). For sub-bottom temperatures measured with SAHF-3 (outside of

  8. Spatial variability of the active layer thickness at the Limnopolar Lake CALM-S site (Byers Peninsula, Livingston Island, Antarctica) and the role of snow cover.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablo, Miguel A.; Molina, Antonio; Ramos, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Since its establishment in early 2009, thaw depth has been measured in late January - early February at the Limnopolar Lake CALM-S site (A25) in Byers Peninsula, Livingston Island, Antarctica (62°38'59.1''S, 61°06'16.9''W). Ground, surface, and air temperatures have been also measured, as well as snow cover deep, derived from an array of miniature temperature loggers mounted into a wood mast (iButton from Maxim) (Lewcovicz, 2008). Thermal characterization of the active layer has been already done based on this data (de Pablo et al., 2013), as well as the interannual variability (de Pablo et al., 2014) and the snow cover evolution analyses (de Pablo et al., submitted). The results show that permafrost could exist at 120 cm depth, although the active layer is reducing, probably caused by the elongation on the snow cover duration. While the snow cover thickness remains approximately similar each winter, the snow offset delays, reducing the period in which solar radiation could heat the ground. In fact, during the last years, thaw depth was not able to be measured (in spite we visited the area in the approximately the same dates) due to thick snow layer remained covering the CALM-S site. However, we have not yet developed an analysis of the spatial variability of the thaw depth we measured each year, and how it could be conditioned by the ground properties (as slope or grain-size) or external factors, such as snow cover. In order to confirm the effect of the snow cover in the evolution of the active layer thickness, here we analyze the spatial variability of the thaw depth for the entire CALM-S site, and try to correlate it respect to the ground surface characteristics (grain-size, ground patterns, among others), the ground surface temperature and the snow cover thickness. Some of those data were acquired while the surface was visible during Antarctic field trips few years ago, and others (snow cover thickness) was measured by mechanical probing in each node. This

  9. Analysis of aerosol scattering properties measured by a nephelometer at a coastal-rural site in the Atlantic southwest of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Juan F.; Cachorro, Victoria E.; de Frutos, Angel M.

    2015-09-01

    Aerosol hemispherical scattering and the backscattering coefficients, σsp, σbsc, have been measured using a 3-wavelength (450, 550 and 700 nm) integrating nephelometer over two years (January 2006-May 2008) in the coastal area of the Gulf of Cádiz, in the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula. These coefficients have been carefully analyzed starting with the impact of corrections on the measurements of σsp: i.e., drift calibration constants do not modify the mean value in our data series. However, the selection of dry data (with RH less than 50%) modifies substantially the number of data and the resulting mean value of σsp is now 14% lower, which is compensated when the angular truncation correction is applied. The characterization and features of σsp, σbsc, and the derived parameters αsp (alpha Ångström exponent) and b (the backscatter ratio) has been analyzed, as annual, seasonal and diurnal evolution. A general statistic based on hourly data gives mean values and standard deviation of σsp (500 nm)=48±38 Mm-1 with a median of 38 Mm-1, and σbsc (500 nm)=5.6±3.8 Mm-1 with a median of 4.6 Mm-1. Thus, these values show moderate-low values but with a large range of variation considering the existing measured values over the Iberian Peninsula. The median value of σsp (500 nm) is an indicator that events of high aerosol burden are frequent presenting a substantial influence on the daily averages. The alpha Ångström exponent, αsp, derived from the pairs 450/700 nm gives a mean value 1.35±0.54 with a median of 1.47 and with the most frequent value of 1.7, thus indicating the prevalence of medium size particles but with a significant influence of fine particles. The b ratio has the same value for mean and median, 0.12±0.02, showing a decrease with increasing values of σsp. Annual and daily cycles have been also analyzed showing the complex behaviour of the optical properties at this coastal site where cold and warn periods show very different

  10. Climate and environments during Marine Isotope Stage 11 in the central Iberian Peninsula: the herpetofaunal assemblage from the Acheulean site of Áridos-1, Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Hugues-Alexandre; Santonja, Manuel; Pérez-González, Alfredo; Panera, Joaquin; Rubio-Jara, Susana

    2014-06-01

    The interglacial episodes of the Quaternary Period are currently the focus of a great deal of attention within the scientific community, primarily because they can help us to understand how the climate of the current interglacial may have evolved without human intervention and to assess the impact of these climate changes on ecological systems. In the central Iberian Peninsula, the archaeological site of Áridos-1 (Arganda, Madrid), with numeric dates of 379.7 ± 45 ka obtained by AAR for the upper part of the sedimentological unit of Arganda I, in combination with the evolved state of the small mammals, has been chronologically attributed to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11. Given the diversified faunal assemblages delivered by the 1976 excavations, Áridos-1 is probably one of the best terrestrial candidates for an understanding of the climatic and environmental conditions that prevailed in central Spain during the MIS 11 interglacial. In consequence, the fossil amphibians and squamate reptiles stored in the collections of the Museo Arqueológico Nacional of Madrid have been newly described and quantified in order to apply the mutual climatic range and habitat weighting methods for estimating quantitative data. The Mediterranean climate is shown to have been warmer and wetter than today in central Spain during MIS 11, with the mean annual temperature 1.7 °C higher and mean annual precipitation 223.9 mm higher than at present. The monthly climatic reconstruction shows differences in the distribution of precipitation over the course of the year, with more abundant precipitation during the winter months, at the beginning of spring and at the end of fall (from October to March) and less precipitation than today during the summer months and at the end of spring (from May to August), suggesting stronger rainfall seasonality between winter and summer than currently occurs. Such climate reconstruction is consistent with other European MIS 11 paleoclimatic records. The

  11. Spatial and temporal variation of surface ozone, NO and NO₂ at urban, suburban, rural and industrial sites in the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-López, D; Adame, J A; Hernández-Ceballos, M A; Vaca, F; De la Morena, B A; Bolívar, J P

    2014-09-01

    Surface ozone is one of the most important photochemical pollutants in the low atmosphere, causing damage to human health, vegetation, materials and climate. The weather (high temperatures and high solar radiation), orography (presence of the Guadalquivir valley) and anthropogenic (the cities of Cádiz, Córdoba, Huelva and Seville and two important industrial complexes) characteristics of the southwestern Iberian Peninsula make this region ideal for the formation and accumulation of ozone. To increase the knowledge of ozone behaviour in this area, the monthly, daily and weekly variations of ozone and its precursors, nitrogen oxides (NO(x) = NO + NO2), were analysed over a 4-year period (2003 to 2006). Using the k-means cluster technique, 12 representative stations of five different areas with different ozone behaviour were selected from a total of 29 monitoring sites. This is the first time that the analysis of these atmospheric pollutants has been carried out for the whole area, allowing therefore a complete understanding of the dynamics and the relationships of these compounds in this region. The results showed an opposite behaviour among ozone and NO and NO2 concentrations in urban and suburban zones, marked by maximums of ozone (minimums NO(x)) in spring and summer and minimums (maximums) in autumn and winter. A seasonal behaviour, with lower amplitude, was also observed in rural and industrial areas for ozone concentrations, with the NO and NO2 concentrations remaining at low and similar values during the year in rural zones due to the absence of emission sources in their surroundings. The daily cycles of ozone in urban, suburban and industrial sites registered a maximum value in the early afternoon (14:00-17:00 UTC) while for NOx two peaks were observed, at 7:00-10:00 UTC and 20:00-22:00. In the case of rural stations, no hourly peak of ozone or NO(x) was registered. The weekend effect was studied by using a statistical contrast tests (Student's t

  12. The Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This MODIS true-color image of the Yucatan Peninsula was acquired from data captured on October 6, 2001. The Peninsula is comprised of several Mexican states, including Yucatan in the north, Quintana Roo to the east, and Campeche to the west. Mexico also shares the Yucatan Peninsula with the countries of Belize and Guatamala, located to the south of these states. Phytoplankton show up as blue-green swirls off the western coast of Yucatan, in the center of the image, mixed in with sediment and other organic matter. Off the eastern coast of the Peninsula, running north and south along the right side of he image, the region's barrier reef is visible. Second only to Australia's Great Barrier Reef in size, the reef spans 180 miles from the northern tip of the Peninsula south into the Gulf of Honduras, and houses over 35 different species of reef-building corals.

  13. Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Temperate and green in the summer, the Kamchatka Peninsula in northeastern Russia freezes over completely in the winter. This true-color image of the Kamchatka Peninsula was acquired on December 12, 2001, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The peninsula is surrounded by the Sea of Okhotsk to the west and by the Bering Sea to the east. The ice and snow highlight the stunning valleys and tall peaks of the Sredinnyy Khrebet, which is the volcanic mountain range running down the center of the peninsula. The mountains along the range reach heights of over 3500 meters (11,484 feet). Many of the volcanoes are still active, and ash and volcanic rock has turned the snow a dark gray on the eastern side of the range. The light blue latticework of ridges, valleys, and alluvial fans extending from the center of the range were likely carved out by past and present glaciers and by run-off from spring snowmelt. The small island that extends off of the tip of the peninsula is Ostrov Paramushir (Paramushir Island). Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  14. Peninsula Academies Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sequoia Union High School District, Redwood City, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: The Peninsula Academies program helps educationally disadvantaged youth overcome the handicaps of low academic achievement, lack of skills, and chronic unemployment. This is accomplished by providing a high school curriculum that is clearly related to work, training in specific job skills, emphasis…

  15. Ambient levels of volatile organic compounds and criteria pollutants in the most industrialized area of central Iberian Peninsula: intercomparison with an urban site.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Florentina; Notario, Alberto; Tapia, Araceli; Albaladejo, José; Cabañas, Beatriz; Martínez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    This work presents observations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including carbonyls, particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) (included in the most recent ambient air quality standards because of its harmful effect on health), PM10 and other important pollutants, CO, SO2, NOx and ozone, over the most industrialized area in the central Iberian Peninsula. Nearly two years of data obtained through a mobile laboratory are used for this purpose. Different concentration ratios and correlations were calculated to assess the effect of the anthropogenic or biogenic processes on the observed VOC levels. The diurnal profile for SO2 is different in Puertollano and it does not coincide with the maxima of the other primary pollutants such as benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX), CO and NO. This behaviour could be attributed to the fact that SO2 mainly comes from industrial activities. However, an impact of the industry on air quality was detected not only by the results obtained for SO2, but also by the toluene/benzene, T/B, ratio (7.5). Finally, correlations between meteorological conditions and pollution distribution have been considered; also, the analysis of the back trajectories together with Spearman correlation coefficients have been carried out to understand the origin and pathway in some events with unusual high pollutant values. PMID:26508360

  16. Evaluation of hot dry rock exploration techniques in the Atlantic Coastal Plain: a test site on the Delmarva Peninsula of Maryland and Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Detailed investigation of a potential Hot Dry Rock (HDR) energy extraction site in the area of Crisfield, Maryland, and Wallops Island, Virginia, (referred to as the Cris-Wall site) was carried out to evaluate HDR exploration techniques in the Atlantic Coastal Plain province. The findings favor the HDR exploration program that is outlined for locating a deep test hole in an area with presumed HDR potential (higher than normal heat flow). Six potential sites for extracting HDR energy have been identified within the Cris-Wall area. Each site is thought to have temperatures at the basement rock surface in excess of 75/sup 0/C and to be at least 1 km away from the nearest fault.

  17. Gulf of Aqaba, Sinai Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Gulf of Aqaba separates the Sinai peninsula from Saudi Arabia in this scene of the Middle East (29.0N, 34.5E) showing the geomorphology and geology of this region including portions of Egypt, Israel, Jordon and Saudi Arabia. A small portion of the Gulf of Suez can be seen on the opposite side of the Sinai peninsula.

  18. Aniakchak Crater, Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Walter R.

    1925-01-01

    The discovery of a gigantic crater northwest of Aniakchak Bay (see fig. 11) closes what had been thought to be a wide gap in the extensive series of volcanoes occurring at irregular intervals for nearly 600 miles along the axial line of the Alaska Peninsula and the Aleutian Islands. In this belt there are more active and recently active volcanoes than in all the rest of North America. Exclusive of those on the west side of Cook Inlet, which, however, belong to the same group, this belt contains at least 42 active or well-preserved volcanoes and about half as many mountains suspected or reported to be volcanoes. The locations of some of these mountains and the hot springs on the Alaska Peninsula and the Aleutian Islands are shown on a map prepared by G. A. Waring. Attention has been called to these volcanoes for nearly two centuries, but a record of their activity since the discovery of Alaska is far from being complete, and an adequate description of them as a group has never been written. Owing to their recent activity or unusual scenic beauty, some of the best known of the group are Mounts Katmai, Bogoslof, and Shishaldin, but there are many other beautiful and interesting cones and craters.

  19. Anaglyph, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This anaglyph (stereoscopic view) of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula was generated entirely from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data, and shows a subtle but distinctive indication of the Chicxulub impact crater. Most scientists now agree that this impact was the cause of the Cretatious-Tertiary extinction, the event 65 million years ago that marked the demise of the dinosaurs as well as the majority of life then on Earth. The crater's rim is marked by a shallow semicircular depression arcing about an offshore center point in the upper left of the picture. (The arcing depression is just above the blue line, when viewed with the naked eye.) This depression, or trough, only about 3 to 5 meters (10 - 15 feet) deep and about 5 kilometers (3 miles) wide, was likely caused by collapse of limestone caverns preferentially above the crater rim, resulting in an arcing chain of sinkholes. The limestone that covers most of the Yucatan Peninsula post-dates the impact crater. However, the crater pattern apparently controls the subsidence pattern just enough to show through.

    This anaglyph was created by deriving a shaded relief image from the SRTM data, draping it back over the SRTM elevation model, and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. Illumination is from the north (top). When viewed through special glasses, the anaglyph is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter. The total relief (range of elevations) across this entire image is less than 300 meters (1000 feet).

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM

  20. Antarctic Peninsula and Weddell Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Numerous icebergs are breaking out of the sea ice in the Southern Ocean surrounding the Antarctic Peninsula. This true-color MODIS image from November 13, 2001, shows several icebergs drifting out of the Weddell Sea. The Antarctic Peninsula (left) reaches out into the Drake Passage, which separates the southern tip of South America from Antarctica. Warmer temperatures have cleared a tiny patch of bare ground at the Peninsula's tip. The predominant ocean current in the area is the Antarctic Circumpolar Current ('circum' meaning 'around'), which is also the 'West Wind Drift.' The current is the largest permanent current in the world, and water is moved eastward by westerly winds. Icebergs leaving the Weddell Sea are likely to be moved north and east by the current. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  1. Fires in Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Numerous thermal anomalies were detected on the Kamchatka Peninsula in northeastern Russia in late June and early July by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Some of the anomalies (red dots) were fires, but at least one was the result of ongoing volcanic activity at one of the Peninsula's numerous active volcanoes. The erupting volcano, called Sheveluch, can be seen most clearly in the image from July 8, 2002. It is located in the upper right quadrant of the image, and appears as a grayish circular patch amid the surrounding green vegetation. In its center is a red dot indicating that MODIS detected a thermal signature coming from the restless volcano. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  2. Petroleum geology of Arabian Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Billo, S.M.

    1982-05-01

    Petroleum activities in the Arabian Peninsula show new trends in the 1980s. Petroleum exploration is intensified and huge discoveries are anticipated. A giant Jurassic gas field along the coast of the Arabian Gulf discovered recently tops 150 tcf, the largest single reserve ever. Other giant oil fields in the area are undergoing expansion in development and productivity. Today, the Peninsula, with a total area that surpasses one million square miles, produces and exports more oil and gas and has greater reserves than any other area in the world. The excellent reservoir rocks are located in the Jurassic and Cretaceous formations between the Arabian Shield and the Tethyan Seaway. They represent porous and permeable marine cyclical beds sealed by impervious shales and anhydrites. Reservoir sedimentology was affected by 2 orogenies during late Cretaceous and Pliocene time portrayed by the Cratonic area to the southwest and the orthogeosynclinal area to the northeast. The eastern part was little deformed by these movements.

  3. The Spatial Coherence of Interannual Temperature Variations in the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, John C.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Over 50 years of observations from climate stations on the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula show that this is a region of extreme interannual variability in near-surface temperatures. The region has also experienced more rapid warming than any other part of the Southern Hemisphere. In this paper we use a new dataset of satellite-derived surface temperatures to define the extent of the region of extreme variability more clearly than was possible using the sparse station data. The region in which satellite surface temperatures correlate strongly with west Peninsula station temperatures is found to be quite small and is largely confined to the seas just west of the Peninsula, with a northward and eastward extension into the Scotia Sea and a southward extension onto the western slopes of Palmer Land. Correlation of Peninsula surface temperatures with surface temperatures over the rest of continental Antarctica is poor confirming that the west Peninsula is in a different climate regime. The analysis has been used to identify sites where ice core proxy records might be representative of variations on the west coast of the Peninsula. Of the five existing core sites examined, only one is likely to provide a representative record for the west coast.

  4. Heavy Metal Contamination in the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberian Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Allen-Gil, Susan M.; Ford, Jesse; Lasorsa, Brenda K.; Monetti, Matthew; Vlasova, Tamara; Landers, Dixon H.

    2003-01-01

    The Taimyr Peninsula is directly north of the world's largest heavy metal smelting complex (Norilsk, Russia). Despite this proximity, there has been little research to examine the extent of contamination of the Taimyr Peninsula. We analyzed heavy metal concentrations in lichen (Cetraria cucullata), moss (Hylocomium splendens), soils, lake sediment, freshwater fish (Salvelinus alpinus, Lota lota, and Coregonus spp.) and collared lemming (Dicrostonyx torquatus) from 13 sites between 30 and 300 km from Norilsk. Element concentrations were low in both C. cucullata and H. splendens, although concentrations of Al, Fe, Cu, Ni, and Pb were significantly higher than those in Arctic Alaska, probably due to natural differences in the geochemical environments. Inorganic surface soils had significantly higher concentrations of Cd, Zn, Pb, and Mg than inorganic soils at depth, although a lake sediment core from the eastern Taimyr Peninsula indicated no recent enrichment by atmospherically transported elements. Tissue concentrations of heavy metals in fish and lemming were not elevated relative to other Arctic sites. Our results show that the impact of the Norilsk smelting complex is primarily localized rather than regional, and does not extend northward beyond 100 km.

  5. Iberian Peninsula and Balearic Island Bathynellacea (Crustacea, Syncarida) database

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Ana I.; Dorda, Beatriz A.; Rey, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This is the first published database of Bathynellacea. It includes all data of bathynellids (Crustacea, Bathynellacea) collected in the last 64 years (1949 to 2013) on the Iberian Peninsula and Balearic Island. The samples come from groundwater (caves, springs, wells and hyporrheic habitat associated rivers) from both sampling campaigns and occasional sampling conducted throughout the Iberian Peninsula and Balearic Islands. The dataset lists occurrence data of bathynellids distribution, sampling sites (with localities, county and geographic coordinates), taxonomic information (from family to species level) and sampling sources (collector and sampling dates) for all records. The descriptions of new species and species identifications have been carried out by an expert taxonomist (AIC) with 25 years experience in the bathynellids studies (see references). Many of the sampling sites are type localities of endemic species from Iberian Peninsula. The dataset includes 409 samples record corresponding to two families, 12 genera and 58 species, 42 of them formally described plus 16 taxa unpublished and 47 samples in study. All species known from the study area are included, which nearly sum up a quarter of species of Bathynellacea known in the world (250 species). PMID:24693212

  6. Locating and managing peninsulas for nesting ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lokemoen, J.T.; Messmer, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this extension bulletin is to guide the management of nesting ducks on peninsulas on public and private lands. Managing peninsulas for ducks is a relatively new strategy that was developed in the grassland region of western North America. Information contained in this bulletin is primarily from studies conducted by biologists working at the Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center.

  7. Korean peninsula: A northeast Asian security concern. Individual study project

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, N.G.

    1993-03-22

    North and South Korea have not responded to the New World Order-that Communism is dead and the Cold War Era is over. When the Berlin Wall collapsed and Germany became one nation, Korea emerged as the only divided country remaining in the world. Today, the Korean Peninsula remains divided by ideology, mutual mistrust of national leadership, the 155-mile DMZ, US military presence, conflicting approaches to national reunification, and the North Korean nuclear issue. Thus, the traditional Cold War animosities and political, economic, military paradigms remain entrenched in a divided Korean peninsula. The US Intelligence Community has identified an extensive nuclear center at Yongbyon, 50 miles north of Pyongyang, North Korea's capital, which appears to be a nuclear reactor and reprocessing site. The threat of a nuclear-armed North Korea is a serious regional security concern that will not be taken lightly by such countries as Japan, China, Russia, South Korea, and the United States.

  8. New evidence of early Neanderthal disappearance in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Galván, Bertila; Hernández, Cristo M; Mallol, Carolina; Mercier, Norbert; Sistiaga, Ainara; Soler, Vicente

    2014-10-01

    The timing of the end of the Middle Palaeolithic and the disappearance of Neanderthals continue to be strongly debated. Current chronometric evidence from different European sites pushes the end of the Middle Palaeolithic throughout the continent back to around 42 thousand years ago (ka). This has called into question some of the dates from the Iberian Peninsula, previously considered as one of the last refuge zones of the Neanderthals. Evidence of Neanderthal occupation in Iberia after 42 ka is now very scarce and open to debate on chronological and technological grounds. Here we report thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dates from El Salt, a Middle Palaeolithic site in Alicante, Spain, the archaeological sequence of which shows a transition from recurrent to sporadic human occupation culminating in the abandonment of the site. The new dates place this sequence within MIS 3, between ca. 60 and 45 ka. An abrupt sedimentary change towards the top of the sequence suggests a strong aridification episode coinciding with the last Neanderthal occupation of the site. These results are in agreement with current chronometric data from other sites in the Iberian Peninsula and point towards possible breakdown and disappearance of the Neanderthal local population around the time of the Heinrich 5 event. Iberian sites with recent dates (<40 ka) attributed to the Middle Palaeolithic should be revised in the light of these data. PMID:25016565

  9. Geyser Valley on the Kamchatka Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On June 2, a devastating mudslide in the world-renowned Geyser Valley on the Kamchatka Peninsula virtually obliterated the natural wonder, forcing the emergency evacuation of visitors and national park personnel. The site, which is the Kamchatka Peninsula's main tourist attraction, consists of some 200 thermal pools created by the area's intense volcanic activity, including about 90 geysers covering an area of four square kilometers (2.5 square miles). It is one of only five sites in the world where the impressive eruptions of steam and boiling-hot water can be found. According to witnesses, a powerful mudslide 1.5 kilometers (one mile) long and 200 meters (600 feet) wide buried more than two-thirds of the valley beneath tens of meters of snow, dirt, trees and boulders (right image), and created a temporary lake submerging more geysers.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is

  10. Arabian peninsula: zone of ferment

    SciTech Connect

    Stookey, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Arabian Peninsula is an area which must be approached in terms of its own values and traditions. The different states, however, present difficulties for even the most well-informed policymaker because the region is not homogeneous. Some of the states are tenuous congeries of tribal and sectarian communities that do not necessarily share the aims of the ruling group. The authors of these six essays consider (1) the economic position of the states, (2) how oil exports affect the economies of the exporting states, (3) how traditional tribal and religious societies react to change, (4) whether their social values are conducive to modernization, and (5) what factors lead to the development of dissent, and how they affect the expression of dissent. Separate abstracts were prepared for two of the essays selected for the Energy Data Base (EDB) and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). 23 tables.

  11. Environmental geophysics, offshore Bush River Peninsula, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.F.; Kuecher, G.J.; Davies, B.E.

    1995-11-01

    Geophysical studies in shallow waters adjacent to the Bush River Peninsula, Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, have delineated the extent of waste disposal sites and established a hydrogeologic framework, which may control contaminant transport offshore. These studies indicate that during the Pleistocene Epoch, alternating stands of high and low sea levels resulted in a complex pattern of shallow channel-fill deposits around the Bush River Peninsula. Ground-penetrating radar studies reveal paleochannels greater than 50 ft deep. Some of the paleochannels are also imaged with marine seismic reflection. Conductivity highs measured with the EM-31 are also indicative of paleochannels. This paleochannel depositional system is environmentally significant because it may control the shallow groundwater flow regime beneath the peninsula. Magnetic, conductivity, and side-scan sonar anomalies outline anthropogenic anomalies in the study area. On the basis of geophysical data, underwater anthropogenic materials do exist in some isolated areas, but large-scale offshore dumping has not occurred in the area studied.

  12. Tropical Depression Alex hits Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's TRMM spacecraft observed this view of Tropical Depression Alex on June 27, 2010 at 2214 UTC (6:14 PM EST). Tropical depression Alex was near the western coast of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. ...

  13. QUANTITATIVE PALEOCLIMATE RECONSTRUCTIONS FROM THE MELVILLE PENINSULA, NUNAVUT, CANADA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. K.; Finkelstein, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    Arctic regions have heightened sensitivity to climatic changes, however regional scale differences exist in the magnitude and timing of response to climatic changes. Modern and paleoclimate data indicate spatial variability in Arctic climates due to local variations in topography, sea ice persistence, or proximity to the coast. Melville Peninsula in the east-central Canadian Arctic is in a modern transitional climate area, with a relatively continental climate to the west and a more maritime climate to the east. Thus, shifting climates may particularly influence the region, and may have affected Thule migration during the past millennium. The presence of Thule archaeological sites and a transitional climate make the Melville Peninsula an area of high importance for paleoclimate reconstructions. Lake sediment cores from two adjacent lakes in the Sarcpa Lake region in the interior Melville Peninsula (68°33’N and 88°17’W, 220 m a.s.l.) were analyzed for diatom assemblages. Diatoms (microscopic algae) were well preserved in these cores and thus, could be used to track paleoclimatic changes. Unofficially named SP02 and SP04, the lakes are 3 and 2.5 ha, respectively. Chronologies were constructed using 210Pb activity and AMS radiocarbon dates. All dates are presented as calendar years before AD 1950. Diatoms appear in SP02 5,900 yrs BP; coupled with high magnetic susceptibility and lower LOI550 in sediment older than 5,900 yrs BP, the appearance of diatoms at this time confirms earlier suggestions of a persistent ice cap on the Peninsula until 6,500 yrs BP. Diatom assemblages are dominated by Fragilarioid species, particularly Staurosira construens var. venter and Staurosirella pinnata. Peak diatom concentration and LOI550 between 4,200 yrs BP and 2,900 yrs BP may indicate the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) on Melville Peninsula. Timing of the HTM on the Peninsula is similar to that from the Baffin Island region to the east. High ratios of Staurosirella pinnata

  14. Shaded Relief, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This topographic image shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. The data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). On the left side are four rivers, which flow northwest to the Sea of Okhotsk. These rivers are, from the south to north, Tigil, Amanina, Voyampolka, and Zhilovaya. The broad, flat floodplains of the rivers are shown in blue. These rivers are important spawning grounds for salmon. In the right side of the image is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the 3spine2 of the peninsula. The cluster of hills to the lower right is a field of small dormant volcanoes. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and understand the hazards posed by future eruptions.

    This shaded relief image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest elevations. This image contains about 2300 meters (7500 feet) of total relief. Shaded relief maps are commonly used in applications such as geologic mapping and land use planning.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and

  15. Sredinnyy Khrebet, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia is shown in this scene created from a preliminary elevation model derived from the first data collected during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) on February 12, 2000. Sredinnyy Khrebet, the mountain range that makes up the spine of the peninsula, is a chain of active volcanic peaks. Pleistocene and recent glaciers have carved the broad valleys and jagged ridges that are common here. The relative youth of the volcanism is revealed by the topography as infilling and smoothing of the otherwise rugged terrain by lava, ash, and pyroclastic flows, particularly surrounding the high peaks in the south central part of the image. Elevations here range from near sea level up to 2,618 meters (8,590 feet). Two visualization methods were combined to produce this image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction. Northern slopes appear bright and southern slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow, red, and magenta, to white at the highest elevations. Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space

  16. Perspective View, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. The data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). In the foreground is the broad, flat floodplain of the Amanina River, shown in blue. In background of the image is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the 3spine2 of the peninsula. The cluster of hills in the upper right is a field of small dormant volcanoes. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and understand the hazards posed by future eruptions.

    This shaded relief perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest elevations. This image contains about 2300 meters (7500 feet) of total relief. To emphasize subtle differences in topography, the relief is exaggerated by a factor of 5.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the

  17. [Testaceans (Protozoa: Testacea) in quaternary permafrost sediments of Bykovsky Peninsula, arctic Yakutia].

    PubMed

    Bobrov, A A; Siegert, Ch; Schirrmeister, L; Andreev, A A

    2003-01-01

    The results of the first protozoological study in terms of paleoecology of long-term sediments and buried soils formed in the cryolite zone of northeastern Siberia are discussed. The data on testaceans (Protozoa: Testacea) inhabiting various sites of Bykovsky Peninsula, Laptev Sea coast near estuary of Lena, within the last 53,000 years (late Pleistocene and Holocene). PMID:12712585

  18. Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On the night of June 4, 2001, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 2,447 meters (8,028 feet). The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25-kilometer (15-mile) ash plume, seen as a cold 'cloud' streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred here during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964.

    Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and Asia, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The area is part of the 'Ring of Fire,' a string of volcanoes that encircles the Pacific Ocean.

    The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color-coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas.

    The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched Dec. 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA structure in the Arabian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Two potential migratory routes followed by modern humans to colonize Eurasia from Africa have been proposed. These are the two natural passageways that connect both continents: the northern route through the Sinai Peninsula and the southern route across the Bab al Mandab strait. Recent archaeological and genetic evidence have favored a unique southern coastal route. Under this scenario, the study of the population genetic structure of the Arabian Peninsula, the first step out of Africa, to search for primary genetic links between Africa and Eurasia, is crucial. The haploid and maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule has been the most used genetic marker to identify and to relate lineages with clear geographic origins, as the African Ls and the Eurasian M and N that have a common root with the Africans L3. Results To assess the role of the Arabian Peninsula in the southern route, we genetically analyzed 553 Saudi Arabs using partial (546) and complete mtDNA (7) sequencing, and compared the lineages obtained with those present in Africa, the Near East, central, east and southeast Asia and Australasia. The results showed that the Arabian Peninsula has received substantial gene flow from Africa (20%), detected by the presence of L, M1 and U6 lineages; that an 18% of the Arabian Peninsula lineages have a clear eastern provenance, mainly represented by U lineages; but also by Indian M lineages and rare M links with Central Asia, Indonesia and even Australia. However, the bulk (62%) of the Arabian lineages has a Northern source. Conclusion Although there is evidence of Neolithic and more recent expansions in the Arabian Peninsula, mainly detected by (preHV)1 and J1b lineages, the lack of primitive autochthonous M and N sequences, suggests that this area has been more a receptor of human migrations, including historic ones, from Africa, India, Indonesia and even Australia, than a demographic expansion center along the proposed southern coastal

  20. Antarctic Peninsula Tidewater Glacier Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettit, E. C.; Scambos, T. A.; Haran, T. M.; Wellner, J. S.; Domack, E. W.; Vernet, M.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Antarctic Peninsula (nAP, north of 66°S) is a north-south trending mountain range extending transverse across the prevailing westerly winds of the Southern Ocean resulting in an extreme west-to-east precipitation gradient. Snowfall on the west side of the AP is one to two orders of magnitude higher than the east side. This gradient drives short, steep, fast-flowing glaciers into narrow fjords on the west side, while longer lower-sloping glaciers flow down the east side into broader fjord valleys. This pattern in ice dynamics affects ice-ocean interaction on timescales of decades to centuries, and shapes the subglacial topography and submarine bathymetry on timescales of glacial cycles. In our study, we calculate ice flux for the western and eastern nAP using a drainage model that incorporates the modern ice surface topography, the RACMO-2 precipitation estimate, and recent estimates of ice thinning. Our results, coupled with observed rates of ice velocity from InSAR (I. Joughin, personal communication) and Landsat 8 -derived flow rates (this study), provide an estimate of ice thickness and fjord depth in grounded-ice areas for the largest outlet glaciers. East-side glaciers either still terminate in or have recently terminated in ice shelves. Sedimentary evidence from the inner fjords of the western glaciers indicates they had ice shelves during LIA time, and may still have transient floating ice tongues (tabular berg calvings are observed). Although direct oceanographic evidence is limited, the high accumulation rate and rapid ice flux implies cold basal ice for the western nAP glaciers and therefore weak subglacial discharge relative to eastern nAP glaciers and or other tidewater fjord systems such as in Alaska. Finally, despite lower accumulation rates on the east side, the large elongate drainage basins result in a greater ice flux funneled through fewer deeper glaciers. Due to the relation between ice flux and erosion, these east-side glaciers

  1. Electromagnetic induction studies in the Eyre Peninsula, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusi, Robert; White, Antony; Heinson, Graham; Milligan, Peter

    1998-03-01

    Magnetic field fluctuations have been recorded by an array of portable three-component magnetometers at 60 sites across the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia between December 1993 and March 1995. An additional 54 magnetometer data records, collected prior to 1989 and described by Milligan (1989) and Milligan, White & Chamalaun (1989), were included in the analysis. A major conductive feature in the crust, first noted by White & Milligan (1984) as the Eyre Peninsula Anomaly (EPA), is re-examined to assess its continuity to the north of the original arrays and to investigate its relationship with major tectonic features. Magnetic-field time-series were converted to induction arrows in the frequency domain. These induction arrows were initially inverted using the minimum-structure 2-D Occam approach to estimate the electrical conductance of the crust. Following this, thin-sheet forward modelling was used to examine the relationship between the conductance and the dominant tectonic features. The principal results of the modelling are that a narrow conductive feature extends inland from the coast about 160km before terminating, and the conductance is in the range 3000 to 10000S, which decreases inland. A strong correlation exists between the electrical conductance of the Eyre Peninsula and Bouguer gravity anomalies, and in particular the EPA is coincident with a significant Bouguer gravity gradient. There is also good agreement between the locations of the foci of earthquakes of magnitude greater than 4.0 and the EPA. We believe that the anomaly is associated with a geological fracture in the Precambrian upper crust as a result of crustal extension prior to the rifting of Australia from Antarctica in the Jurassic (160Ma).

  2. The Peninsula Academies. Third Yearly Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Dorothy F.

    The performance of the Peninsula Academies of Electronics and Computer Technology was assessed for the program's third year of operation in two host schools in the Sequoia Union High School District. Data were collected for approximately 190 Academy students and for a comparison group of non-Academy students. Academies students missed fewer days…

  3. Orthobunyavirus Antibodies in Humans, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Saiyasombat, Rungrat; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes G.; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.; Farfan-Ale, Jose A.; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Loroño-Pino, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    We performed a serologic investigation to determine whether orthobunyaviruses commonly infect humans in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. Orthobunyavirus-specific antibodies were detected by plaque reduction neutralization test in 146 (18%) of 823 persons tested. Further studies are needed to determine health risks for humans from this potentially deadly group of viruses. PMID:23017592

  4. Paleogene sequence on the Alaska Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Detterman, R.L.

    1985-04-01

    Paleogene strata are exposed nearly the entire length of the Alaska Peninsula. They include continental and marine volcaniclastic rocks and a thick volcanic sequence. The strata are divided into the Tolstoi, Stepovak, Meshik, and Belkofski (in part) Formations in the southern part of the peninsula, and into the nonmarine clastic West Foreland Formation and the Hemlock Conglomerate in the northern part. The Tolstoi Formation (Paleocene and Eocene), 670-1380 m thick, consists mainly of continental quartz- and chert-rich sandstone and conglomerate, siltstone, and coal. Volcanic clasts and tuffaceous detritus increase in abundance upward. Neritic strata are present as interbeds in the type area. The formation overlies, with a major unconformity, strata ranging in age from Late Jurassic to Late Cretaceous. Partly coeval strata at the north end of the peninsula (West Foreland Formation) are mainly volcanic sandstone and conglomerate. The Stepovak Formation, 1800-2000 m thick, represents two contrasting depositional environments - a lower dark siltstone and sandstone turbidite, about 975 m thick, and a shallow neritic sandstone and siltstone, rich in volcanic material, about 1000 m thick. Locally, the upper part is deltaic sandstone, siltstone, and coal. An abundant metafauna of Eocene and Oligocene age is found in the neritic deposits. A thick coeval volcanic unit, the Meshik Formation, is present in the central part of the peninsula. Andesitic to basaltic lava, breccia, tuff, and lahars, as much as 1500 m thick, have been K-Ar dated at 27-38 m.y. Similar rocks with interbedded sediment at the end of the peninsula are included with the Belkofski Formation.

  5. Ancient Land Routes On The Paximadhi Peninsula, Karystos, Euboea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, D.; Hom, E.

    Recent regional surface surveys have placed more focus on rural investigations, but the means of transport and communication within those rural surroundings has not always received adequate attention. The Southern Euboea Exploration Project has undertaken a new phase of research in the Karystos area with the goal of developing a methodology that allows for a more detailed record of the pre-modern land routes. On the Paximadhi peninsula it was possible to identify numerous fragments of suspected ancient routes dating to the Classical and Hellenistic periods. In the majority of cases these fragments were closely associated with adjacent datable ancient sites. By taking into consideration the evidence recorded during the survey it was sometimes possible to propose the extension of these ancient segments and to theorize the directions, lengths, and purposes of ancient networks.

  6. Helium and mercury in the central Seward Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Wescott, E.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D.

    1981-05-01

    The central Seward Peninsula, Alaska, has one Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) at Pilgrim Springs, and has recent volcanic flows, fault systems, topographic and tectonic features which can be explained by a rift model. As part of a geothermal reconnaissance of the area we used helium and mercury concentrations in soil as indicators of geothermal resources. The largest helium concentrations were found in the vicinity of the Pilgrims Springs KGRA, and indicate prime drilling sites. Five profile lines were run across the suspected rift system. Significant helium anomalies were found on several of the traverses, where future exploration might be concentrated. Mercury values showed a great range of variability on the traverses, and seem unreliable as geothermal indicators except in the vicinity of the Pilgrim Springs. Permafrost at the surface resulting in variations in sampling depth may contribute to the mercury variations.

  7. Statistical Analysis of Iberian Peninsula Megaliths Orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, A. C.

    2009-08-01

    Megalithic monuments have been intensively surveyed and studied from the archaeoastronomical point of view in the past decades. We have orientation measurements for over one thousand megalithic burial monuments in the Iberian Peninsula, from several different periods. These data, however, lack a sound understanding. A way to classify and start to understand such orientations is by means of statistical analysis of the data. A first attempt is done with simple statistical variables and a mere comparison between the different areas. In order to minimise the subjectivity in the process a further more complicated analysis is performed. Some interesting results linking the orientation and the geographical location will be presented. Finally I will present some models comparing the orientation of the megaliths in the Iberian Peninsula with the rising of the sun and the moon at several times of the year.

  8. A Late Holocene Slip Rate Of The North Anatolian Fault, Hersek Peninsula, Izmit Bay, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozaci, O.; Altunel, E.; Clahan, K.; Yonlu, O.; Sundermann, S. T.; Lettis, W. R.; Turner, J.; Altekruse, J.; Gumus, I.; Lindvall, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    The Hersek Peninsula has been a strategic site for at least the last two millennia as a result of its location. It extends into Izmit Bay and creates a shortcut for the historical Bagdad Road, an important section of the spice route, between Istanbul (Constantinople) and Iznik (Nicaea). It also controls the entrance of Izmit Bay to Izmit (Nicomedia). Civilizations have been investing in this location by building harbors, fortifications, baths, roads, bridges, aqueducts, and temples. The remnants of these historical structures record evidence for past destruction of both anthropogenic and tectonic origin. From an active tectonics point of view, the Hersek Peninsula is a key locality for understanding seismic hazard in the Marmara Region. It is the last place that the North Anatolian fault can be studied on land before it enters the Marmara Sea and it has experienced strong ground shaking most recently during the M7.4 Izmit earthquake in 1999. Paleoseismic trenching as well as archeoseismologic investigations were recently performed on the Hersek Peninsula for regional and site specific seismic hazard characterization. Our paleoseismic trenches north of the Hersek Lagoon provided fault exposures confirming the location of the North Anatolian fault on the peninsula. Detailed mapping of a 6th century A.D. Byzantine aqueduct offset 14 ± 1 meters along the projection of this fault trace revealed a minimum late Holocene slip rate of 13.6 +1/-3.5 mm yr-1. Rapid fan deposition and subsidence on the delta plain across the Hersek Peninsula has resulted in the relatively recent deposition of several meters of relatively young alluvium and nearshore tidal deposits. Nearly 2 km of trench exposures revealed these deposits were continuous and contain only minor evidence of ground shaking in the form of secondary liquefaction deposits and ground fractures. The lack of primary ground surface rupture evidence in these approximately 300-year-old sediments strongly suggests that the

  9. [[Characterization of the potential geographical distribution area of parrot species in Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Plasencia Vázquez, Alexis Herminio; Escalona Segura, Griselda

    2014-12-01

    Psittacidae family is one of the most endangered groups in Mexico, since many of their habitats are disappearing. In this research, we characterized the land cover of the potential geographical distribu- tion area of eight extant parrot species within the Yucatan Peninsula. We used the Maximum Entropy algorithm (MaxEnt) and species historical records. To externally validate the models, we used presence and absence records from field observations (2010-2012). To characterize the distribution area, we used the vegetation and land use maps of INEGI Series IV (2007-2010). The models showed a good performance, according to the values of the area under the curve (AUC), which ranged between 0.88-0.95 with the training data and between 0.82-0.91 with test data. We located most of the species in sites where the models predicted their presence. In the Peninsula, over 76% of the parrots' potential geographical distribution area is forested, except for Amazona oratrix. The subhumid tropical forest is the best represented, and the livestock for land use. The most affected species within the Peninsula are: Amazona farinosa and A. oratrix. The Calakmul Biosphere Reserve is the most important area for parrots' protection in the Peninsula. Knowing the characteristics of distribution areas is an essential part in the establishment of parrots' conservation strategies. PMID:25720184

  10. Qatar Peninsula, United Arab Emirates, Persian Gulf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    In this view of the Qatar Peninsula, United Arab Emirates, Persian Gulf, (25.0N, 51.0E) a large oil spill, seen as a large dark toned mass in the water covers much of the surface of the western Persian Gulf. Qatar is one of several of the oil rich United Arab Emirate states. Oil spills and oil pollution of the environment are common occurrances associated with oil tanker loading operations.

  11. Kuwait Oil Fires, Persian Gulf, Qatar Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view up the Persian Gulf from the Qatar Peninsula into southern Iraq (25.5N, 51.0E) shows an excursion of the smoke plumes from the Kuwait oil fires set during the short Persian Gulf War. Smoke from the fires north of Kuwait City, extends across the Persian Gulf while a larger smoke plume from the southern fires heads into southern Saudi Arabia before beginning to spread out and become more diffuse.

  12. Detroit and the Lower Peninsula of Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This scene displays the southeastern part of Michigan's Lower Peninsula and adjacent Ontario, Canada (43.0N, 84.0W). Detroit can be recognized by its radial pattern of development and sediment plumes in the rivers from the massive industrial activity. The area pockmarked by lakes northwest of Detroit essentially outlines the limits of the Defiance Moraine caused by the stagnation and melting of Ice Age glaciers.

  13. Plants and soil microbes respond to recent warming on the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amesbury, M. J.; Royles, J.; Hodgson, D.; Convey, P.; Griffiths, H.; Charman, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, with temperature increases of as much as 3°C recorded since the 1950s. However, the longer-term context of this change is limited and existing records are not suitably located to be able to trace the spatial signature of change over time. This paper will present the first published results from a wider project exploiting peat moss banks spanning 10 degrees of latitude along the Antarctic Peninsula as an archive of late Holocene climate variability. These moss banks are ideal archives for palaeoclimate research as they are well-preserved by freezing, generally monospecific, easily dated by radiocarbon techniques and have sufficiently high accumulation rates to permit decadal resolution. A unique time series of past moss growth and soil microbial activity has been produced from a 150 year old moss bank at Lazarev Bay, Alexander Island, a site at the southern limit of significant plant growth in the Antarctic Peninsula region. We use accumulation rates, cellulose δ13C and fossil testate amoebae to provide an indication of ecosystem productivity. We show that both moss and microbial population growth rates rose rapidly in the 1960s, consistent with temperature change, although recently may have stalled, concurrent with other evidence. The increase in terrestrial plant growth rates and soil microbial activity is unprecedented in the last 150 years. The observed relationship between moss growth, microbial activity and climate at Lazarev Bay suggests that moss bank records have the potential to test the regional expression of temperature variability shown by instrumental data on the Antarctic Peninsula over centennial to millennial timescales, by providing long-term records of summer growth conditions, complementing the more distant and widely dispersed ice core records. As a result, we will conclude by placing the Lazarev Bay record into the wider context of the latest progress of analysis of

  14. Ground-water conditions and quality in the western part of Kenai Peninsula, southcentral Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glass, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    The western part of Kenai Peninsula in southcentral Alaska is bounded by Cook Inlet and the Kenai Mountains. Ground water is the predominant source of water for commercial, industrial, and domestic uses on the peninsula. Mean daily water use in an oil, gas, and chemical processing area north of Kenai is more than 3.5 million gallons. Unconsolidated sediments of glacial and fluvial origin are the most productive aquifers. In the upper (northwestern) peninsula, almost all water used is withdrawn from unconsolidated sediments, which may be as thick as 750 feet. In the lower peninsula, unconsolidated sediments are thinner and are absent on many hills. Water supplies in the lower peninsula are obtained from unconsolidated sediments and bedrock, and a public-water supply in parts of Homer is obtained from Bridge Creek. Throughout the peninsula, ground-water flow occurs primarily as localized flow controlled by permeability of aquifer materials and surface topography. The concentration of constituents analyzed in water from 312 wells indicated that the chemical quality of ground water for human consumption varies from marginal to excellent. Even though the median concentration of dissolved solids is low (152 milligrams per liter), much of the ground water on the peninsula does not meet water-quality regulations for public drinking water established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). About 8 percent of wells sampled yielded water having concentrations of dissolved arsenic that exceeded the USEPA primary maximum contaminant level of 50 micrograms per liter. Concentrations of dissolved arsenic were as great as 94 micrograms per liter. Forty-six percent of wells sampled yielded water having concentrations of dissolved iron greater than the USEPA secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 micrograms per liter. Unconsolidated sediments generally yield water having calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate as its predominant ions. In some areas, ground water at

  15. Pleistocene leopards in the Iberian Peninsula: New evidence from palaeontological and archaeological contexts in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis, Alfred; Tormo, Carmen; Sauqué, Víctor; Sanchis, Vicent; Díaz, Rebeca; Ribera, Agustí; Villaverde, Valentín

    2015-09-01

    This study analyses the fossil record of leopards in the Iberian Peninsula. According to the systematic and morphometric features of new remains, identified mainly in Late Pleistocene palaeontological and archaeological sites of the Mediterranean region, they can be attributed to Panthera pardus Linnaeus 1758. The findings include the most complete leopard skeleton from the Iberian Peninsula and one of the most complete in Europe, found in a chasm (Avenc de Joan Guitón) south of Valencia. The new citations and published data are used to establish the leopard's distribution in the Iberian Peninsula, showing its maximum development during the Late Pleistocene. Some references suggest that the species survived for longer here (Lateglacial-Early Holocene) than in other parts of Europe. Finally, the contexts of appearance and origin of leopard remains are described and the processes of interaction with prehistoric human groups are assessed.

  16. Wildfire activity in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Mário; Trigo, Ricardo; Caramelo, Liliana; Rasilla, Domingo

    2010-05-01

    The main objective of this work is to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of the monthly wildfire activity in the Iberian Peninsula trough the first comprehensive assessment of wildfires from both countries (Portugal and Spain). This was made possible for the 28-year long period spanning between 1980 and 2007 using and comparing the Portuguese and Spanish fire databases. We use the Portuguese wildfire database kindly provided by the Forest National Authority which includes information of the fire events recorded between the 1980-2007 period and compute time series of monthly values of burnt area that will be used and the correspondent values from the Spanish database. It should be stressed that the Iberian Peninsula is characterized by very different wildfire regimes. The majority of Iberia being dominated by an intense seasonal peak in the summer, particularly the western (Portugal) and southern (Andalucía) areas. However, the greener provinces in the north present a strong secondary peak in late winter (Galicia) or even a higher activity during the months of February-March (Asturias). Furthermore, we also aim to characterize the weather conditions and the atmospheric circulation associated with high wildfire activity over different areas of the Iberian Peninsula. For this purpose a set of large-scale atmospheric fields was retrieved from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. Results obtained for the description of the individual and joint spatial and temporal analysis were based on different methodology, including multivariate statistical analysis (PCA, cluster analysis) and regression techniques, as well as the weather conditions and synoptic patterns characteristic of the months with higher values of burnt area.

  17. The superdeep well of the Kola Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlovsky, Y.A.

    1986-01-01

    The structure of continental crusts is a subject of ever increasing importance in the geological sciences. Over 15 years ago, Soviet scientist began drilling a superdeep well on the Kola Peninsula near Murmansk. The well has reached a depth of 12 km and is thereby the deepest well in the world, yielding a vast amount of information on the structure of the continental crust. The geological, geophysical and technological data from the Kola well were initially published in a monographic account entitled ''Kol'skaja sverchglubokaja''. This English translation makes the results available to non-Soviet scientists as well.

  18. Marine pelagic ecosystems: the west Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Ducklow, Hugh W; Baker, Karen; Martinson, Douglas G; Quetin, Langdon B; Ross, Robin M; Smith, Raymond C; Stammerjohn, Sharon E; Vernet, Maria; Fraser, William

    2007-01-29

    The marine ecosystem of the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) extends from the Bellingshausen Sea to the northern tip of the peninsula and from the mostly glaciated coast across the continental shelf to the shelf break in the west. The glacially sculpted coastline along the peninsula is highly convoluted and characterized by deep embayments that are often interconnected by channels that facilitate transport of heat and nutrients into the shelf domain. The ecosystem is divided into three subregions, the continental slope, shelf and coastal regions, each with unique ocean dynamics, water mass and biological distributions. The WAP shelf lies within the Antarctic Sea Ice Zone (SIZ) and like other SIZs, the WAP system is very productive, supporting large stocks of marine mammals, birds and the Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. Ecosystem dynamics is dominated by the seasonal and interannual variation in sea ice extent and retreat. The Antarctic Peninsula is one among the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, having experienced a 2 degrees C increase in the annual mean temperature and a 6 degrees C rise in the mean winter temperature since 1950. Delivery of heat from the Antarctic Circumpolar Current has increased significantly in the past decade, sufficient to drive to a 0.6 degrees C warming of the upper 300 m of shelf water. In the past 50 years and continuing in the twenty-first century, the warm, moist maritime climate of the northern WAP has been migrating south, displacing the once dominant cold, dry continental Antarctic climate and causing multi-level responses in the marine ecosystem. Ecosystem responses to the regional warming include increased heat transport, decreased sea ice extent and duration, local declines in icedependent Adélie penguins, increase in ice-tolerant gentoo and chinstrap penguins, alterations in phytoplankton and zooplankton community composition and changes in krill recruitment, abundance and availability to predators. The climate

  19. Marine pelagic ecosystems: the West Antarctic Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Ducklow, Hugh W; Baker, Karen; Martinson, Douglas G; Quetin, Langdon B; Ross, Robin M; Smith, Raymond C; Stammerjohn, Sharon E; Vernet, Maria; Fraser, William

    2006-01-01

    The marine ecosystem of the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) extends from the Bellingshausen Sea to the northern tip of the peninsula and from the mostly glaciated coast across the continental shelf to the shelf break in the west. The glacially sculpted coastline along the peninsula is highly convoluted and characterized by deep embayments that are often interconnected by channels that facilitate transport of heat and nutrients into the shelf domain. The ecosystem is divided into three subregions, the continental slope, shelf and coastal regions, each with unique ocean dynamics, water mass and biological distributions. The WAP shelf lies within the Antarctic Sea Ice Zone (SIZ) and like other SIZs, the WAP system is very productive, supporting large stocks of marine mammals, birds and the Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. Ecosystem dynamics is dominated by the seasonal and interannual variation in sea ice extent and retreat. The Antarctic Peninsula is one among the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, having experienced a 2°C increase in the annual mean temperature and a 6°C rise in the mean winter temperature since 1950. Delivery of heat from the Antarctic Circumpolar Current has increased significantly in the past decade, sufficient to drive to a 0.6°C warming of the upper 300 m of shelf water. In the past 50 years and continuing in the twenty-first century, the warm, moist maritime climate of the northern WAP has been migrating south, displacing the once dominant cold, dry continental Antarctic climate and causing multi-level responses in the marine ecosystem. Ecosystem responses to the regional warming include increased heat transport, decreased sea ice extent and duration, local declines in ice-dependent Adélie penguins, increase in ice-tolerant gentoo and chinstrap penguins, alterations in phytoplankton and zooplankton community composition and changes in krill recruitment, abundance and availability to predators. The climate/ecological gradients

  20. Climatic record of the Iberian peninsula from lake Moncortes' sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Min; Huguet, Carme; Rull, Valenti; Valero, Blas; Rosell-Mele, Antoni

    2014-05-01

    Climatic record of the Iberian peninsula from lake Moncortes' sediments Min Cao1, Carme Huguet1, Valenti Rull2, Blas L. Valero-Garces3, Antoni Rosell-Melé1,4 1Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain; 2Institut de Botanic de Barcelona (CSIC), Passeig del Migdia s/n, 08038, Barcelona, Spain, 3 Instituto Pirenaico de Ecologıa (CSIC), Avda. Montañana 1005, 50059 Zaragoza, Spain, 4Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), 08010 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. The continuing buildup of industrial greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and concomitant increase in global temperatures has made much of the world's society aware that decades to centuries of environmental change lie ahead, and that these will have profound economic, political and societal impacts. The Iberian Peninsula lies in the boundary between tropical and subtropical climates and seems to amplify the climatic signals form the northern hemisphere through both atmospheric and water circulation feedbacks, making it an ideal site to monitor Northern hemisphere climate changes. This extreme sensitivity to climatic changes also makes the Iberian Peninsula extremely vulnerable to future climate changes. This is why understanding sensitivity to climate change and the consequences it will have on both climate and the hydrological cycle is key to implement preventive measures. The aim of our study is to come up with a high resolution quantitative reconstruction of climate variability (temperature, production and precipitation) in the Iberian Peninsula from lake sediments. We also want to establish the relation between those changes and the ones observed in both ice cores from Greenland and paleotemperature records from marine sediments of the continental Iberian margin. For these reasons we sampled a core in Moncortes (42.3N, 0.99E), a lake of karstic origin with an average depth of 25m and an area of 0

  1. 78 FR 10595 - Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... Forest Service Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION... Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee (RAC). The RAC will be responsible for reviewing and recommending land... the act be reauthorized this year. RAC members represent a wide range of interests. The...

  2. HEAVY METAL CONTAMINATION IN THE TAIMYR PENINSULA, SIBERIAN ARCTIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Taimyr Peninsula is directly north of the world's largest heavy metal smelting complex (Norilsk, Russia). Despite this proximity, there has been little research to examine the extent of contamination of the Taimyr Peninsula, primarily because of the remoteness of this area. W...

  3. Military confidence building on the Korean Peninsula: possible first steps toward cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Vannoni, M.

    1997-05-01

    The Korean Peninsula is one of the world`s most tense military confrontational sites. Nearly 2 million North Korean, South Korean, and U.S. troops face each other along the 255-km long military demarcation line. Confidence building measures (CBMs), particularly military ones, that address the security needs of both countries could decrease the danger of conflict and help create an environment where a peace regime might be negotiated. In spite of the present high level of mutual distrust, steps can still be taken to prepare for future development and implementation of CBMs. This paper defines some simple and specific first steps toward CBMs that might be useful on the Korean Peninsula.

  4. Seismic Hazard Assessment for the Baku City and Absheron Peninsula, Azerbaijan

    SciTech Connect

    Babayev, Gulam R.

    2006-03-23

    This paper deals with the seismic hazard assessment for Baku and the Absheron peninsula. The assessment is based on the information on the features of earthquake ground motion excitation, seismic wave propagation (attenuation), and site effect. I analyze active faults, seismicity, soil and rock properties, geological cross-sections, the borehole data of measured shear-wave velocity, lithology, amplification factor of each geological unit, geomorphology, topography, and basic rock and surface ground motions. To estimate peak ground acceleration (PGA) at the surface, PGA at the basic rock is multiplied by the amplification parameter of each surface layers. Quaternary soft deposits, representing a high risk due to increasing PGA values at surface, are studied in detail. For a near-zone target earthquake PGA values are compared to intensity at MSK-64 scale for the Absheron peninsula. The amplification factor for the Baku city is assessed and provides estimations for a level of a seismic motion and seismic intensity of the studied area.

  5. Distribution of recoveries of Steller's Eiders banded on the lower Alaska Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dau, C.P.; Flint, P.L.; Petersen, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    Molting adult Steller's Eiders (Polysticta stelleri) were banded at Izembek Lagoon (1961-1998) and Nelson Lagoon (1995-1997) along the lower Alaska Peninsula to determine breeding distribution and movements. Of 52,985 Steller's Eiders banded, 347 were recovered. The overall low recovery rate may not be indicative of harvest levels but may be due to low reporting rates of bands. Almost all recoveries during summer were from Russia and recovery rates did not differ between sexes. We found no evidence that Steller's Eiders molting in specific locations were more likely to be recovered in specific geographic locations in Russia. Our recoveries suggest that Steller's Eiders molting along the Alaska Peninsula were from Russian breeding sites and from remnant breeding populations in Alaska.

  6. The climatology of dust aerosol over the arabian peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaby, A.; Rappenglueck, B.; Eltahir, E. A. B.

    2015-01-01

    Dust storms are considered to be a natural hazard over the Arabian Peninsula, since they occur all year round with maximum intensity and frequency in Spring and Summer. The Regional Climate Model version 4 (RegCM4) has been used to study the climatology of atmospheric dust over the Arabian Peninsula from 1999 to 2012. This relatively long simulation period samples the meteorological conditions that determine the climatology of mineral dust aerosols over the Arabian Peninsula. The modeled Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) has been compared against ground-based observations of three Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations that are distributed over the Arabian Peninsula and daily space based observations from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), the Moderate resolution Imaging SpectroRadimeter (MODIS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). The large scale atmospheric circulation and the land surface response that lead to dust uplifting have been analyzed. While the modeled AOD shows that the dust season extends from March to August with two pronounced maxima, one over the northern Arabian Peninsula in March with AOD equal to 0.4 and one over the southern Arabian Peninsula in July with AOD equal to 0.7, the observations show that the dust season extends from April to August with two pronounced maxima, one over the northern Arabian Peninsula in April with AOD equal to 0.5 and one over the southern Arabian Peninsula in July with AOD equal to 0.5. In spring a high pressure dominates the Arabian Peninsula and is responsible for advecting dust from southern and western part of the Arabian Peninsula to northern and eastern part of the Peninsula. Also, fast developed cyclones in northern Arabian Peninsula are responsible for producing strong dust storms over Iraq and Kuwait. However, in summer the main driver of the surface dust emission is the strong northerly wind ("Shamal") that transport dust from the northern Arabian Peninsula toward south parallel to the

  7. Foraminifera from the Northern Olympic Peninsula, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, Weldon W.

    1964-01-01

    Foraminifera from a Tertiary sequence that crops out on the northern part of the Olympic Peninsula, Wash., show stratigraphic and ecologic significance. Forty-two species that are important both to correlations and to ecologic interpretations are illustrated and systematically discussed. The Foraminifera indicate that some of the rocks may be as old as early Eocene. The oldest rocks are tentatively referred to the Penutian stage of Mallory. Other parts of the sequence are referred to the Ulatisian and Narizian stages of Mallory, the Refugian stage of Schenck and Kieinpell, and the Zemorrian and Saucesian stages of Kleinpell. Several short periods of shallow, sheltered sea conditions are suggested by the Foraminifera from several parts of the stratigraphic sequence, but Foraminifera from most of the rocks suggest relatively deep, open-sea conditions. With the exception of shallow, warm-water conditions in rocks of probable middle Eocene age, the Foraminifera suggest that cool-to-cold water temperatures, regardless of depth, prevailed during the deposition of most of the rocks of Tertiary age in the northern Olympic Peninsula.

  8. STS-42 Earth observation of Kamchatka Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-42 Earth observation taken aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, with an electronic still camera (ESC) is of Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia. Mid-afternoon sun projects long shadows from volcanoes on the Kamchatka Peninsula. This flat-topped volcano with the sharp summit crater is Tobachinsky, over 3,085 kilometers high. Its last major eruption was in 1975 and 1976, but it has been very active since the middle of the Sixteenth Century. The shadows cast by the low sunlight brings out the dramatic relief of the volcano as well as the smaller morphologic features. Electronic still photography is a relatively new technology that enables a camera to electronically capture and digitize an image with resolution approaching film quality. The digital images from STS-42 were stored on a disk and brought home with the flight crewmembers for processing. ESC was developed by the JSC Man-Systems Division and this mission's application of it is part of a continuing evolutionary development le

  9. STS-42 Earth observation of Kamchatka Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-42 Earth observation taken aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, with an electronic still camera (ESC) is of Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia. Mid-afternoon sun projects long shadows from volcanoes on the Kamchatka Peninsula. This flat-topped volcano with the sharp summit crater is Tobachinsky, over 3,085 kilometers high. Its last major eruption was in 1975 and 1976, but it has been very active since the middle of the Sixteenth Century. The shadows cast by the low sunlight brings out the dramatic relief of the volcano as well as the smaller morphologic features. For example, the small hills in the foreground and behind the central volcano are cinder cones, approximately only 200 meters high. Note the sharp triangular shadow from the conical volcano at right. Electronic still photography is a relatively new technology that enables a camera to electronically capture and digitize an image with resolution approaching film quality. The digital images from STS-42 were stored on a disk

  10. Sinai Peninsula, Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Sinai Peninsula, located between Africa and Asia, is a result of those two continents pulling apart from each other. Earth's crust is cracking, stretching, and lowering along the two northern branches of the Red Sea, namely the Gulf of Suez, seen here on the west (left), and the Gulf of Aqaba, seen to the east (right). This color-coded shaded relief image shows the triangular nature of the peninsula, with the coast of the Mediterranean Sea forming the northern side of the triangle. The Suez Canal can be seen as the narrow vertical blue line in the upper left connecting the Red Sea to the Mediterranean.

    The peninsula is divided into three distinct parts; the northern region consisting chiefly of sandstone, plains and hills, the central area dominated by the Tih Plateau, and the mountainous southern region where towering peaks abound. Much of the Sinai is deeply dissected by river valleys, or wadis, that eroded during an earlier geologic period and break the surface of the plateau into a series of detached massifs with a few scattered oases.

    Two visualization methods were combined to produce the image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast direction, so that northwest slopes appear bright and southeast slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot

  11. Colored Height and Shaded Relief, Kamchatka Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, lying between the Sea of Okhotsk to the west and the Bering Sea and Pacific Ocean to the east, is one of the most active volcanic regions along the Pacific Ring of Fire. It covers an area about the size of Colorado but contains more than 100 volcanoes stretching across the 1000-kilometer-long (620-mile-long) land mass. A dozen or more of these have active vents, with the youngest located along the eastern half of the peninsula. This color-coded shaded relief image, generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), shows Kamchatka's volcanic nature to dramatic effect.

    Kliuchevskoi, one of the most active and renowned volcanoes in the world, dominates the main cluster of volcanoes called the Kliuchi group, visible as a circular feature in the center-right of the image. The two other main volcanic ranges lie along northeast-southwest lines, with the older, less active range occupying the center and western half of Kamchatka. The younger, more active belt begins at the southernmost point of the peninsula and continues upward along the Pacific coastline.

    Two visualization methods were combined to produce this image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction, so northern slopes appear bright and southern slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and brown to white at the highest elevations.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission flew aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. The mission used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60

  12. Airborne pollen trends in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Galán, C; Alcázar, P; Oteros, J; García-Mozo, H; Aira, M J; Belmonte, J; Diaz de la Guardia, C; Fernández-González, D; Gutierrez-Bustillo, M; Moreno-Grau, S; Pérez-Badía, R; Rodríguez-Rajo, J; Ruiz-Valenzuela, L; Tormo, R; Trigo, M M; Domínguez-Vilches, E

    2016-04-15

    Airborne pollen monitoring is an effective tool for studying the reproductive phenology of anemophilous plants, an important bioindicator of plant behavior. Recent decades have revealed a trend towards rising airborne pollen concentrations in Europe, attributing these trends to an increase in anthropogenic CO2 emissions and temperature. However, the lack of water availability in southern Europe may prompt a trend towards lower flowering intensity, especially in herbaceous plants. Here we show variations in flowering intensity by analyzing the Annual Pollen Index (API) of 12 anemophilous taxa across 12 locations in the Iberian Peninsula, over the last two decades, and detecting the influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Results revealed differences in the distribution and flowering intensity of anemophilous species. A negative correlation was observed between airborne pollen concentrations and winter averages of the NAO index. This study confirms that changes in rainfall in the Mediterranean region, attributed to climate change, have an important impact on the phenology of plants. PMID:26803684

  13. Tropospheric ozone variability over the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Pavan S.; Bortoli, D.; Salgado, R.; Antón, M.; Costa, M. J.; Silva, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    To study tropospheric ozone variability over the Iberian Peninsula (IP), NASA Langley TOR data have been analyzed for the 1979-2005 period. The maximum tropospheric ozone concentration over the entire IP was found in June (˜41 DU) and a minimum in December (˜29 DU). However the maximum tropospheric ozone concentration was found over West Atlantic Coast (WAC) (˜44 DU), followed by Mediterranean Coast (MC) (˜42 DU), North Atlantic Coast (NAC) (˜41 DU), Central Iberian Peninsula (CIP) (˜40 DU) and Pyrenees Mountain Range (PMR) (˜39 DU) during June-July. The high concentration of tropospheric ozone in July over the Atlantic Ocean near IP is due to the presence of Azores anticyclone and related photochemistry and dynamics, and affects the observed higher tropospheric ozone concentration over WAC zone. Strong seasonal cycle in tropospheric ozone concentration has been observed with large variation over NAC (˜49%), followed by WAC (˜48%) and MC (˜41%) compared to CIP and PMR (˜38%) zones. When the data are compared over the IP for the two periods (1979-1993 and 1997-2005), a systematic increase in the number of months with higher tropospheric ozone concentration has been observed during the second period with respect to the first. These increases are almost 8% to 24% over NAC, 6% to 17% over WAC, 5% to 24% over CIP, 6% to 23% over MC and 13% to 18% over PMR, zones. It has been observed that topography, climatology and population density distribution plays a crucial role in the variability of tropospheric ozone concentration over the IP.

  14. Population model for Alaska Peninsula sea otters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, L.L.; Siniff, D.B.

    1988-12-31

    This study was conducted to provide a basis for assessing risks of oil spills to sea otter populations along the Alaska Peninsula. The principal efforts were devoted to analyzing the available data on population dynamics. Curves characterizing survivorship and reproduction for sea otters were devised and fitted to several data sets. A detailed review was conducted of methods of assessing population dynamics data, and several new techniques (e.g., bootstrapping) were applied to available data. A simplified model for use with Alaska Peninsula sea otter populations was devised and implemented in a 'spreadsheet' format. Various aspects of model development and data on population size in Alaska Peninsula areas were reviewed.

  15. Fluid Overpressure and Connections to Seismicity, Cascadia Tertiary Accretionary Prism, Olympic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, H.; Mattinson, C. G.

    2010-12-01

    Metamorphic dehydration reactions and fluid movement in accretionary prisms have been linked to the recently discovered episodic tremor and slip (ETS) earthquake events along subduction zones, but prior studies lack the detail to effectively test the hypothesis that fluid flow triggers ETS events. I conducted field work along a 52.5 km transect on the Olympic Peninsula metasedimentary accretionary prism of the Cascadia subduction zone, and collected approximately 40 representative samples of sandstone and mudrock that were buried to 6-15 km. This depth range intersects the 10-50 km depth range of ETS events. My objectives are to quantify the water flow recorded in rocks of the Olympic Peninsula via petrographic, whole rock, and isotopic analyses to test the prediction that water release increases at ~10 km depth, creating fluid overpressure needed to trigger seismicity. I calculated that on the Olympic Peninsula 1 km3 of 50% sandstone and 50% mudrock loses ~105 kg H2O/yr during burial from 6-14 km depth, comparable to the values expected from large-scale fluid budget models. Quartz veins that compose 0.5-1% of the Obstruction Peak site (~14 km burial depth) are important records of fluid flow quantity and origin. δ18O values of +11.8‰ to +15.2‰ indicate that vein H2O originated from metamorphic reactions. Flow recorded by 1 km3 of rock containing 0.5-1% quartz veins is >106 kg H2O/yr, comparable to the values 2 × 107 to 2 × 108 kg H2O/yr modeled at compositionally similar subduction zones to produce fluid overpressure conditions. I observed fibrous quartz veins, which also indicate fluid overpressure conditions were reached and support my H2O flow estimates. Therefore, Olympic Peninsula rocks at depths of ~10-14 km record dehydration and fluid overpressure large enough to trigger subduction zone seismicity.

  16. Geomorphic status of regulated rivers in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Lobera, G; Besné, P; Vericat, D; López-Tarazón, J A; Tena, A; Aristi, I; Díez, J R; Ibisate, A; Larrañaga, A; Elosegi, A; Batalla, R J

    2015-03-01

    River regulation by dams modifies flow regimes, interrupts the transfer of sediment through channel networks, and alters downstream bed dynamics, altogether affecting channel form and processes. So far, most studies on the geomorphic impacts of dams are restricted to single rivers, or even single river stretches. In this paper we analyse the geomorphic status of 74 river sites distributed across four large basins in the Iberian Peninsula (i.e. 47 sites located downstream of dams). For this purpose, we combine field data with hydrological data available from water agencies, and analyse historical (1970) and current aerial photographs. In particular, we have developed a Geomorphic Status (GS) index that allows us to assess the physical structure of a given channel reach and its change through time. The GS encompasses a determination of changes in sedimentary units, sediment availability, bar stability and channel flow capacity. Sites are statistically grouped in four clusters based on contrasted physical and climate characteristics. Results emphasise that regulation changes river's flow regime with a generalized reduction of the magnitude and frequency of floods (thus flow competence). This, in addition to the decrease downstream sediment supply, results in the loss of active bars as they are encroached by vegetation, to the point that only reaches with little or no regulation maintain exposed sedimentary deposits. The GS of regulated river reaches is negatively correlated with magnitude of the impoundment (regulation). Heavily impacted reaches present channel stabilization and, in contrast to the hydrological response, the distance and number of tributaries do not reverse the geomorphic impact of the dams. Stabilization limits river dynamics and may contribute to the environmental degradation of the fluvial ecosystem. Overall, results describe the degree of geomorphological alteration experienced by representative Iberian rivers mostly because of regulation

  17. Concentrations and sources of metals in the Antarctic Peninsula aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, A.L. )

    1991-07-01

    Aerosol samples were collected at a remote site near the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula during the austral summer of 1984/85. Filter samples were analyzed for Al (as a crustal reference element), marine cations (Na, K, and Ca), heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn), and sulfate using atomic absorption spectrometry, isotope dilution mass spectrometry, neutron activation analysis, and ion chromatography. Ultraclean sample collection and analysis procedures used to avoid sample contamination are described in detail here. Mean concentrations of heavy metals were found to be: Cd, 0.06 pg m{sup {minus}3}; Cu, 1.0 pg m{sup {minus}3}; Pb, 4.7 pg m{sup {minus}3}; and Zn, 6.1 pg m{sup {minus}3}. These are the lowest concentrations yet determined in the troposphere, but for Pb and Zn they still indicate a significant enrichment over expected crustal concentrations. For these elements, estimated marine and volcanic contributions cannot account for this excess and suggest pollution as the dominant source even at this remote location. For Cd and Cu a dominant anthropogenic source cannot be ruled out, although current estimated of crustal, marine, a volcanic emissions could account for levels determined.

  18. Heat flow through the sea bottom around the Yucatan Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Khutorskoy, M.D.; Kononov, V.I.; Polyak, B.G. ); Fernandez, R. ); Matveev, V.G.; Rot, A.A. )

    1990-02-10

    Heat flow studies were conducted in January-February 1987, off the Atlantic Coast of Mexico on board the R/V Akademik Nikolai Strakhov. Two areas were surveyed, one transecting the Salt Dome Province and the Campeche Canyon, in the Gulf of Mexico, and the other, on the eastern flank of the Yucatan Peninsula. Conductive heat flow through the bottom sediments was determined as the product of vertical temperature gradient and in situ thermal conductivity, measured with a thermal probe using a multithermistor array and real-time processing capabilities. Forward two-dimensional modeling allows one to estimate heat flow variations at both sites from local disturbances and to obtain average heat flow values of 51 mW/m{sup 2} for the transect within the Gulf of Mexico and 38 and 69 mW/m{sup 2} for two basins within the Yucatan area. Sea bottom relief has a predominant effect over other environmental factors in the scatter of heat flow determination in the Gulf of Mexico.

  19. Data Collection in the Arabian Peninsula for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Tkalcic, H; Al-Amri, A M S

    2003-07-11

    We report results from the second year of our project (ROA0101-35) to collect seismic event and waveform data recorded in and around the Arabian Peninsula. This effort involves several elements. We have a temporary broadband seismic station operating near the IMS primary array site (PS38) in central Saudi Arabia. We recently installed two temporary broadband stations in the United Arab Emirates (funded by NNSA NA-24 Office of Non-Proliferation & International Security). We are working with King Abdulaziz city for Science and Technology to collect and analyze data from the Saudi National Seismic Network, that consist of 37 digital three-component stations (26 broadband and 11 short-period). We are collaborating with Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (KISR) to analyze data from their 8 station national seismic network. We participated in the Workshop on Reference Events odnear the Dead Sea Rift held in Paris, France in October 2002. In this paper we present results of these efforts including integration of the raw data into LLNL's Seismic Research Database and preliminary analysis of event locations and source parameters and inference of earth structure.

  20. Analysis of air mass trajectories in the northern plateau of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Isidro A.; Sánchez, M. Luisa; García, M. Ángeles; Pardo, Nuria

    2015-11-01

    Air masses reaching the Iberian Peninsula, which is located between two continents and two seas, have been classified. 24-h backward air trajectories were calculated each hour for three years using the METEX model at a site in the centre of the northern plateau of the Iberian Peninsula where the air flow has scarcely been investigated to date. Rather than the usual Euclidean geometry, spherical trigonometry, together with the kernel regression method, was considered to calculate trajectory distances to the site. Numerical indicators allow for an accurate description of the results. Ranges surrounding the site from E to S evidenced a restriction in the movement of the arriving flow. However, the range to the N showed only a slight effect. A noticeable seasonal contrast was observed between winter, whose distances were the greatest, and summer, which displayed the shortest distances. Trajectory clusters, initially not considered in the METEX model, were obtained with different metrics to determine the air mass pathways reaching the site. Five clusters of trajectories were selected so as to easily explain the directions and distances covered. Regional and long range transport were observed in clusters from the NE, NW and SW. The NE cluster presented an orographic deviation and local processes were limited to the SE cluster. Finally, seasonal analysis revealed singular behaviour during autumn, when local processes centred on the N-S direction.

  1. Shaded Relief with Height as Color, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This shaded relief image of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula show a subtle, but unmistakable, indication of the Chicxulub impact crater. Most scientists now agree that this impact was the cause of the Cretatious-Tertiary Extinction, the event 65 million years ago that marked the sudden extinction of the dinosaurs as well as the majority of life then on Earth.

    Most of the peninsula is visible here, along with the island of Cozumel off the east coast. The Yucatan is a plateau composed mostly of limestone and is an area of very low relief with elevations varying by less than a few hundred meters (about 500 feet.) In this computer-enhanced image the topography has been greatly exaggerated to highlight a semicircular trough, the darker green arcing line at the upper left corner of the peninsula. This trough is only about 3 to 5 meters (10 to 15 feet) deep and is about 5 km. wide (3 miles), so subtle that if you walked across it you probably would not notice it, and is a surface expression of the crater's outer boundary. Scientists believe the impact, which was centered just off the coast in the Caribbean, altered the subsurface rocks such that the overlying limestone sediments, which formed later and erode very easily, would preferentially erode on the vicinity of the crater rim. This formed the trough as well as numerous sinkholes (called cenotes) which are visible as small circular depressions.

    Two visualization methods were combined to produce the image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast direction, so that northwestern slopes appear bright and southeastern slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    For a smaller, annotated version of this image, please select Figure 1, below: [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Large

  2. Palaeomagnetic constraints from granodioritic plutons (Jiaodong Peninsula): New insights on Late Mesozoic continental extension in Eastern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Nicolas; Chen, Yan; Augier, Romain; Gumiaux, Charles; Lin, Wei; Faure, Michel; Monié, Patrick; Choulet, Flavien; Wu, Fuyuan; Zhu, Rixiang; Wang, Qingchen

    2011-08-01

    Mechanism and kinematics of the Late Mesozoic continental extension event of Eastern Asia are still debated. In order to better constrain its evolution, two granodioritic plutons of the Jiaodong Peninsula have been chosen as targets for a time-constrained palaeomagnetic study. Indeed, plutons are devoid of visible deformation, did not experience rotation along horizontal axis and are precisely dated by U/Pb and 40Ar/ 39Ar methods. Multidomain (MD) magnetite has been identified as the principal magnetic remanent carrier. The interpolation of existing and new U/Pb and 40Ar/ 39Ar ages revealed that characteristic remanent magnetisation was acquired in a narrow range of 116 ± 2 Ma. Twenty out of 27 sites present stable magnetic directions calculated from high-temperature or high-coercive components. The observations of the solo normal magnetic polarity for this palaeomagnetic collection and of the magnetic remanent age consistent with the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (CNS) argue that the characteristic magnetic remanence may be considered as primary. Detailed field observations of the intrusive relationship between the plutons and country rocks and Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) study reveal the absence of the subsequent deformation of plutons, or rigid rotation of plutons along a horizontal axis. Two palaeomagnetic poles have been therefore calculated from these plutons. Among 12 out 15 Cretaceous palaeomagnetic poles, including the two new poles provided by this study, from the Jiaodong Peninsula and on both sides of Tan-Lu and Muping-Jimo faults are statistically consistent. As a result, the Jiaodong Peninsula behaved as a rigid block as internal deformation appears negligible. The remaining three derived poles are probably due to the secular variation or/and the vicinity of fault zones near of the palaeomagnetic sampling site. Thus, they can not be applied to the peninsula-scaled tectonics. Comparison of these time-constrained Cretaceous

  3. 3-D Perspective Kamchatka Peninsula Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. The image was generated using the first data collected during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). In the foreground is the Sea of Okhotsk. Inland from the coast, vegetated floodplains and low relief hills rise toward snow capped peaks. The topographic effects on snow and vegetation distribution are very clear in this near-horizontal view. Forming the skyline is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the spine of the peninsula. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and to understand the hazards posed by future eruptions. This image was generated using topographic data from SRTM and an enhanced true-color image from the Landsat 7 satellite. This image contains about 2,400 meters (7,880 feet) of total relief. The topographic expression was enhanced by adding artificial shading as calculated from the SRTM elevation model. The Landsat data was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. SRTM, launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a 60- meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. SRTM collected three dimensional measurements of nearly 80 percent of the Earth's surface. SRTM is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. Size: 33.3 km (20.6 miles) wide x 136 km (84 miles) coast to skyline. Location: 58.3 deg. North lat., 160 deg. East long. Orientation: Easterly view, 2 degrees

  4. 3-D Perspective View, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. The image was generated using the first data collected during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). In the foreground is the Sea of Okhotsk. Inland from the coast, vegetated floodplains and low relief hills rise toward snow capped peaks. The topographic effects on snow and vegetation distribution are very clear in this near-horizontal view. Forming the skyline is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the spine of the peninsula. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and to understand the hazards posed by future eruptions.

    This image was generated using topographic data from SRTM and an enhanced true-color image from the Landsat 7 satellite. This image contains about 2,400 meters (7,880 feet) of total relief. The topographic expression was enhanced by adding artificial shading as calculated from the SRTM elevation model. The Landsat data was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    SRTM, launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. SRTM collected three-dimensional measurements of nearly 80 percent of the Earth's surface. SRTM is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, D.C.

    Size: 33.3 km (20.6 miles) wide x

  5. Shaded Relief Color Wrapped, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This shaded relief topographic image shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. The data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). On the left side are five rivers, which flow northwest to the Sea of Okhotsk. These rivers are, from the south to north, Tigil, Amanina, Voyampolka, Zhilovaya, and Kakhtana. The broad, flat floodplains of the rivers are shown in yellow. These rivers are important spawning grounds for salmon. In the right side of the image is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the 3spine2 of the peninsula. The cluster of hills to the lower right is a field of small dormant volcanoes. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and understand the hazards posed by future eruptions.

    This image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from red through green back to red) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters, or 1300 feet)similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2300 meters (7500 feet) of total relief. For the shading, a computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. Shaded relief maps are commonly used in applications such as geologic mapping and land use planning.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast

  6. SRTM Anaglyph: Sredinnyy Khrebet, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia is shown in this scene created from a preliminary elevation model derived from the first data collected during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) on February 12, 2000. Sredinnyy Khrebet, the mountain range that makes up the spine of the peninsula, is a chain of active volcanic peaks. Pleistocene and recent glaciers have carved the broad valleys and jagged ridges that are common here. The relative youth of the volcanism is revealed by the topography as infilling and smoothing of the otherwise rugged terrain by lava, ash, and pyroclastic flows, particularly surrounding the high peaks in the south central part of the image. Elevations here range from near sea level up to 2,618 meters (8,590 feet).

    This anaglyph was produced by first shading a preliminary SRTM elevation model. The stereoscopic effect was then created by generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by

  7. Evaporite encrustations and sulphide oxidation products from the southern Antarctic peninsula.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vennum, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    White evaporite encrustations collected from 66 sites scattered over 30 000km2 of S.Antarctic Peninsula are dominantly gypsum and calcite, and subordinate aragonite and thenardite. Natrojarosite occurs as locally developed yellow surface stains on c30% of the white encrustations examined. Water, which forms by the melting of snow blown into cracks in highly fractured rocks by ground blizzards, dissolves soluble ions from minerals in these rocks as it percolates into them. The white encrustations appear to be deposited when this water later rises to the surface by capillary action and evaporates.-from Author Antarctica chemical weathering evaporites sulphide oxidation.

  8. An intersection model for estimating sea otter mortality along the Kenai Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, J.L.; Udevitz, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    We developed an intersection model to integrate parameters estimated from three distinct data sets that resulted from the Exxon Valdez oil spill: (1) the distribution, amount, and movements of spilled oil; (2) the distribution and abundance of sea otters along the Kenai Peninsula; and (3) the estimates of site-specific sea otter mortality relative to oil exposure from otters captured for rehabilitation and from collected carcasses. In this chapter, we describe the data sets and provide examples of how they can be used in the model to generate acute loss estimates. We also examine the assumptions required for the model and provide suggestions for improving and applying the model.

  9. Evidence for Bombus occidentalis (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Populations in the Olympic Peninsula, the Palouse Prairie, and Forests of Northern Idaho.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Paul R; Koch, Jonathan B; Waits, Lisette P; Strange, James P; Eigenbrode, Sanford D

    2016-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, Bombus occidentalis (Green) has declined from being one of the most common to one of the rarest bumble bee species in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Although its conservation status is unresolved, a petition to list this species as endangered or threatened was recently submitted to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. To shed light on the conservation situation and inform the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decision, we report on the detection and abundance of B. occidentalis following bumble bee collection between 2012 and 2014 across the Pacific Northwest. Collection occurred from the San Juan Islands and Olympic peninsula east to northern Idaho and northeastern Oregon, excluding the arid region in central Washington. B. occidentalis was observed at 23 collection sites out of a total of 234. With the exception of three sites on the Olympic peninsula, all of these were in the southeastern portion of the collection range. PMID:26856817

  10. Evidence for Bombus occidentalis (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Populations in the Olympic Peninsula, the Palouse Prairie, and Forests of Northern Idaho

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Paul R.; Koch, Jonathan B.; Waits, Lisette P.; Strange, James P.; Eigenbrode, Sanford D.

    2016-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, Bombus occidentalis (Green) has declined from being one of the most common to one of the rarest bumble bee species in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Although its conservation status is unresolved, a petition to list this species as endangered or threatened was recently submitted to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. To shed light on the conservation situation and inform the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decision, we report on the detection and abundance of B. occidentalis following bumble bee collection between 2012 and 2014 across the Pacific Northwest. Collection occurred from the San Juan Islands and Olympic peninsula east to northern Idaho and northeastern Oregon, excluding the arid region in central Washington. B. occidentalis was observed at 23 collection sites out of a total of 234. With the exception of three sites on the Olympic peninsula, all of these were in the southeastern portion of the collection range. PMID:26856817

  11. Trichinella pseudospiralis in the Iberian peninsula.

    PubMed

    Zamora, M J; Alvarez, M; Olmedo, J; Blanco, M C; Pozio, E

    2015-06-15

    Nematode worms of the genus Trichinella are zoonotic parasites circulating in most continents, including Europe. In Spain, Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella britovi are highly prevalent in wildlife but seldom in domestic pigs. In Portugal, only T. britovi was documented in wild carnivores. In the period 2006-2013 in Spain, 384 (0.0001%) pigs and 1399 (0.20%) wild boars (Sus scrofa) were positive for Trichinella spp. larvae, which were identified as T. spiralis or T. britovi. In 2014, Trichinella pseudospiralis larvae were isolated from a wild boar hunted in the Gerona province, Cataluña region, North-East of Spain, near the border to France. This is the first report of T. pseudospiralis in the Iberian peninsula, which suggests a broad distribution area of this zoonotic nematode in Europe. Since larvae of this Trichinella species do not encapsulate in the host muscles, they can be detected only by artificial digestion of muscle samples. T. pseudospiralis is the only Trichinella species infecting both mammals and birds. Birds can spread this pathogen over great distances including islands triggering new foci of infections in areas previously considered at low risk for this pathogen. PMID:25913596

  12. Environmental geophysics at the Southern Bush River Peninsula, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.E.; Miller, S.F.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1995-05-01

    Geophysical studies have been conducted at five sites in the southern Bush River Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The goals of the studies were to identify areas containing buried metallic objects and to provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework of the site. These studies indicate that, during the Pleistocene Epoch, alternating stands of high and low sea level resulted in a complex pattern of channel-fill deposits. Paleochannels of various sizes and orientations have been mapped throughout the study area by means of ground-penetrating radar and EM-31 techniques. The EM-31 paleochannel signatures are represented onshore either by conductivity highs or lows, depending on the depths and facies of the fill sequences. A companion study shows the features as conductivity highs where they extend offshore. This erosional and depositional system is environmentally significant because of the role it plays in the shallow groundwater flow regime beneath the site. Magnetic and electromagnetic anomalies outline surficial and buried debris throughout the areas surveyed. On the basis of geophysical measurements, large-scale (i.e., tens of feet) landfilling has not been found in the southern Bush River Peninsula, though smaller-scale dumping of metallic debris and/or munitions cannot be ruled out.

  13. Seismic Cycle Deformation and Net Coastal Uplift at San Juanillo, Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, A. J.; Marshall, J.; Morrish, S.; Ritzinger, B.; Wellington, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica lies ~60 km inboard of the Middle America Trench where the Cocos Plate subducts under the Caribbean Plate at ~9 cm/yr. This outer fore arc peninsula overlies the seismogenic zone along a mature seismic gap, with an estimated recurrence interval of ~50 yr for large megathrust earthquakes. The last major event (M 7.7, 1950) resulted in 1.0-1.5 m of coseismic uplift along the peninsula's central coast. Since then, gradual coastal subsidence has been observed as the plate interface accumulates interseismic strain. While elastic seismic-cycle deformation produces short-term shoreline fluctuations on the Nicoya Peninsula, net tectonic uplift throughout the Quaternary results in long-term coastal emergence and the formation of marine terraces. At San Juanillo, north of Punta Guiones, emergent carbonate beachrock horizons mark former Holocene shorelines with calibrated radiocarbon ages of 0.9-1.8 ka. The position of these deposits on the upper beach face is consistent with net uplift at ~0.5 m/k.y. Tidal erosion and the undermining of beachrock and adjacent cliffs may reflect coastal inundation associated with the current phase of elastic interseismic subsidence. Inland of the beach, two uplifted marine terraces mark former late Quaternary shorelines with inner edge elevations of ~30 m and ~55 m above mean sea level. The ages of these surfaces are estimated at 80 ka and 125 ka respectively, based on correlation with OSL dated terraces ~80 km to the south and the timing of late Pleistocene sea level high stands (Oxygen Isotope Stages 5a-5e). Long-term net uplift at San Juanillo therefore occurs at a rate of 0.3-0.5 m/k.y. This is the highest uplift rate recorded among seven marine terrace study sites along the Nicoya coast, with the exception of the peninsula's southern tip (Cabo Blanco) where accelerated uplift occurs in response to seamount subduction. Since the 1950 Nicoya earthquake, Costa Rica's population and tourism industry have

  14. A Study of the San Andreas Slip Rate on the San Francisco Peninsula, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, L. M.; Prentice, C.; Grove, K.; Caskey, J.; Ritz, J. F.; Leslie, S.

    2008-12-01

    The most recent large earthquake on the San Andreas Fault (SAF) along the San Francisco Peninsula was the great San Francisco earthquake of April 18, 1906, when a Mw= 7.8 event ruptured 435-470 km of the northern SAF. The slip rate for this segment of the SAF is incompletely known but is important for clarifying seismic hazard in this highly urbanized region. A previous study south of our site has found an average slip rate of 17±4 mm/yr for the late Holocene on the San Francisco Peninsula segment of the SAF. North of the Golden Gate, the SAF joins the San Gregorio Fault with an estimated slip rate of 6 mm/yr. A trench study north of where the two faults join has produced an average late Holocene slip rate of 24±3 mm/yr. To refine slip-rate estimates for the peninsula segment of the SAF, we excavated a trench across the fault where we located an abandoned channel between the San Andreas and Lower Crystal Springs reservoirs. This abandoned channel marks the time when a new channel cut across the SAF; the new channel has since been offset in a right-lateral sense about 20 m. The measured amount of offset and the age of the youngest fluvial sediments in the abandoned channel will yield a slip rate for the San Francisco Peninsula segment of the SAF. We excavated a trench across the abandoned channel and logged the exposed sediments. Our investigation revealed channel-fill alluvium incised and filled by probable debris flow sediments, and a wide fault zone in bedrock, west of the channel deposits. The most prominent fault is probably the strand that moved in 1906. We completed a total-station survey to more precisely measure the offset stream, and to confirm that the fault exposed in the trench aligns with a fence that is known to have been offset 2.8m during the 1906 earthquake. We interpret the debris flow sediments to represent the last phase of deposition prior to abandonment of the old channel. We collected samples for radiocarbon dating, optically stimulated

  15. Late Neogene to Quaternary environmental changes in the Antarctic Peninsula region: evidence from drift sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Ehrmann, Werner

    2005-02-01

    Clay-mineral composition and biogenic opal content in upper Miocene to Quaternary drift sediments recovered at two Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sites from the continental rise in the Bellingshausen Sea had been analyzed in order to reconstruct the climatic and glacial history of the Antarctic Peninsula. The clay mineral composition at both sites is dominated by smectite, illite, and chlorite, and alternates between a smectite-enriched and a chlorite-enriched assemblage throughout the last 9.3 my. The spatial distribution of clay minerals in Holocene sediments west of the Antarctic Peninsula facilitates the identification of particular source areas, and thus the reconstruction of transport pathways. The similarity to clay mineral variations reported from upper Quaternary sequences suggests that the short-term clay-mineralogical fluctuations in the ODP cores reflect glacial-interglacial cyclicity. Thus, repeated ice advances and retreats in response to a varying size of the Antarctic Peninsula ice cap are likely to have occurred throughout the late Neogene and Quaternary. The clay minerals in the drift sediments exhibit only slight long-term variations, which are caused by local changes in glacial erosion and in supply of source rocks, rather than by major climatic changes. The opal records at the ODP sites are dominated by long-term variations since the late Miocene. We infer that the opal content in the drift sediments, although it is influenced by dissolution in the water column and the sediment column and by the burial with lithogenic detritus, provides a signal of paleoproductivity. Because the annual sea-ice coverage is regarded as the main factor controlling biological productivity, the opal signal helps to reconstruct paleoceanographic changes in the Bellingshausen Sea. Slightly enhanced opal deposition during the late Miocene indicates slightly warmer climatic conditions in the Antarctic Peninsula area than at present. During the early Pliocene, enhanced

  16. Cenozoic epeirogeny of the Arabian Peninsula from drainage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. W. P.; Roberts, G. G.; Hoggard, M. J.; White, N. J.

    2014-10-01

    is generally accepted that the Arabian Peninsula has been uplifted by subcrustal processes. Positive residual depth anomalies from oceanic crust in the Red Sea and in the Gulf of Aden suggest that a region surrounding this peninsula is dynamically supported. Admittance calculations, surface wave tomography studies, and receiver function analyses all imply that regional topography is generated and maintained by some combination of mantle convective circulation and lithospheric thickness changes. Despite these significant advances, the spatial and temporal uplift rate history of the Arabian Peninsula is not well known. Here we show that a regional uplift rate history can be obtained by jointly inverting 225 longitudinal river profiles that drain this peninsula. Our strategy assumes that shapes of individual river profiles are controlled by uplift rate history and moderated by erosional processes. We used local measurements of incision rate to calibrate the relevant erosional parameters. In our inverse algorithm, uplift rate is permitted to vary smoothly as a function of space and time but upstream drainage area remains invariant. We also assume that knickzone migration is not lithologically controlled. Implications of these important assumptions have been investigated. Our results suggest that the Arabian Peninsula underwent two phases of asymmetric uplift during the last 20-30 Ma at rates of 0.05-0.1 mm a-1. The southwestern flank of the peninsula has been uplifted by 1.5-2.5 km. Regional stratigraphic constraints, the age and composition of volcanism, paleosol formation, incised peneplains, emergent marine terraces, and thermochronometric measurements corroborate our calculated patterns of uplift. Progressive development of three domal swells along the western margin of the peninsula is consistent with localized upwelling of hot asthenospheric mantle.

  17. Weather types, precipitation and soil erosion in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadal Romero, Estela; Cortesi, Nicola; Lucia, Ana; Pacheco, Edinson; Taguas, Encarnación; Francisco Martínez-Murillo, Juan; Romero Díaz, Asunción; Gómez, José Alfonso; Úbeda, Xavi; Damián Ruiz-Sinoga, José; Lasanta, Teodoro; González-Hidalgo, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    For a long time, precipitation has been recognized as one of the main factors driving soil erosion and sediment yield. In climatology, one of the most common approaches in analyzing precipitation is the circulation of weather types (WTs), which categorize the continuum of atmospheric circulation into a small number of classes or types. In the Iberian Peninsula (IP), previous researches have demonstrated the usefulness of the WT approach in determining the behavior of rainfall, and its spatial and temporal distribution. These studies have shown that specific weather types are the main driven factors of precipitation distribution accordingly different areas, and shown that precipitations depends on more WTs to the west than to the east of the IP. In this study, we present an analysis of weather types and sediment yield data from different study areas in the Iberian Peninsula. To do that we have collected and joint different research groups spread along the national Spanish land, and combine different databases with the WT classification calculated using the NMC/NCAR 40-Year Reanalysis Project. We discuss two main hypotheses: (i) there exist some links between weather types and soil erosion in the Iberian Peninsula, and then (ii) spatial patterns of sediment yield and erosion would be emerged in the Iberian Peninsula accordingly the spatial distribution of the relationship between WTs and sedimentary processes. This pioneer research, with different areas across the Iberian Peninsula will be a valuable tool in understanding the relationships between weather types, precipitation and soil erosion dynamics.

  18. Rayleigh wave ellipticity across the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez García, Clara; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Spectral amplitude ratios between horizontal and vertical components (H/V ratios) from seismic records are useful to evaluate site effects, predict ground motion and invert for S velocity in the top several hundred meters. These spectral ratios can be obtained from both ambient noise and earthquakes. H/V ratios from ambient noise depend on the content and predominant wave types: body waves, Rayleigh waves, a mixture of different waves, etc. The H/V ratio computed in this way is assumed to measure Rayleigh wave ellipticity since ambient vibrations are dominated by Rayleigh waves. H/V ratios from earthquakes are able to determine the local crustal structure at the vicinity of the recording station. These ratios obtained from earthquakes are based on surface wave ellipticity measurements. Although long period (>20 seconds) Rayleigh H/V ratio is not currently used because of large scatter has been reported and uncertainly about whether these measurements are compatible with traditional phase and group velocity measurements, we will investigate whether it is possible to obtain stable estimates after collecting statistics for many earthquakes. We will use teleseismic events from shallow earthquakes (depth ≤ 40 km) between 2007 January 1 and 2012 December 31 with M ≥ 6 and we will compute H/V ratios for more than 400 stations from several seismic networks across the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco for periods between 20 and 100 seconds. Also H/V ratios from cross-correlations of ambient noise in different components for each station pair will be computed. Shorter period H/V ratio measurements based on ambient noise cross-correlations are strongly sensitive to near-surface structure, rather than longer period earthquake Rayleigh waves. The combination of ellipticity measurements based on earthquakes and ambient noise will allow us to perform a joint inversion with Rayleigh wave phase velocity. Upper crustal structure is better constrained by the joint inversion compared

  19. Chemical constraints of groundwater management in the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, W.; Lesser, J. M.

    1981-05-01

    Two critical objectives of water management in the Yucatan are: (1) to develop regional groundwater supplies for an expanding population and tourism based on the Mayan archeological sites and excellent beaches; and (2) to control groundwater pollution in a chemically sensitive system made vulnerable by geologic conditions. The Yucatan peninsula is a coastal plain underlain by permeable limestone and has an annual rainfall of more than 1000 mm. Such a setting should provide abundant supplies of water; however, factors of climate and hydrogeology have combined to form a hydrologic system with chemical boundaries that decrease the amount of available fresh water. Management of water resources has long had a major influence on the cultural and economic development of the Yucatan. The Mayan culture of the northern Yucatan developed by extensive use of groundwater. The religion was water-oriented and the Mayan priests prayed to Chac, the water god, for assistance in water management primarily to decrease the severity of droughts. The Spaniards arrived in 1517 and augmented the supplies by digging wells, which remained the common practice for more than 300 years. Many wells now have been abandoned because of serious problems of pollution resulting from the use of a sewage disposal well adjacent to each supply well. The modern phase of water management began in 1959 when the Secretaría de Recursos Hidráulicos (S.R.H.) was charged with the responsibility for both scientific investigations and development programmes for water-supply and sewage-disposal systems for cities, villages and islands.

  20. Chemical constraints of groundwater management in the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Back, W.; Lesser, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Two critical objectives of water management in the Yucatan are: (1) to develop regional groundwater supplies for an expanding population and tourism based on the Mayan archeological sites and excellent beaches; and (2) to control groundwater pollution in a chemically sensitive system made vulnerable by geologic conditions. The Yucatan peninsula is a coastal plain underlain by permeable limestone and has an annual rainfall of more than 1000 mm. Such a setting should provide abundant supplies of water; however, factors of climate and hydrogeology have combined to form a hydrologic system with chemical boundaries that decrease the amount of available fresh water. Management of water resources has long had a major influence on the cultural and economic development of the Yucatan. The Mayan culture of the northern Yucatan developed by extensive use of groundwater. The religion was water-oriented and the Mayan priests prayed to Chac, the water god, for assistance in water management primarily to decrease the severity of droughts. The Spaniards arrived in 1517 and augmented the supplies by digging wells, which remained the common practice for more than 300 years. Many wells now have been abandoned because of serious problems of pollution resulting from the use of a sewage disposal well adjacent to each supply well. The modern phase of water management began in 1959 when the Secretari??a de Recursos Hidra??ulicos (S.R.H.) was charged with the responsibility for both scientific investigations and development programmes for water-supply and sewage-disposal systems for cities, villages and islands. ?? 1981.

  1. Volcanic Facies of the Lower Jurassic Talkeetna Formation, Iniskin Peninsula to Tuxedni Bay, Alaska Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, K. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Lower Jurassic Talkeetna Formation (Jtk), a >1,000-km-long belt of vol­canic facies within the accreted intra-oceanic Talkeetna Arc has been characterized within the Talkeetna Mountains, but on the Alaska Peninsula Jtk facies have not previously been described in detail. Here we describe facies of the Jtk stretching from the Iniskin Peninsula to Tuxedni Bay. On the Iniskin Peninsula, a high concentration and great thickness of mafic to intermediate lavas, associated autobreccias and hyaloclastites, fluidal-clast breccias and possible pillows are suggestive of one or more submarine effusive eruption centers. Also volumetrically significant are non-stratified polymictic volcaniclastic breccia facies. Minor facies include thinly bedded volcaniclastic sandstone to pebble breccia-conglomerate facies, some of which are shard- and pumice-bearing pyroclastic deposits preserved in thinly bedded deposits, indicative of episodes of explosive volcanism and the eruption-fed nature of some of the deposits. North of Chinitna Bay, coherent facies tend to be thin and relatively small in volume. Volcaniclastic facies provide evidence of subaerial-fluvial deposition, and pyroclastic activity. Thinly bedded, laterally continuous beds locally exhibit cross-laminations, channel fills, normal grading and lenticular beds, and contain plant fossils. Within this sequence is a 10-m-thick pumice breccia containing fossilized logs, underlain by a thin, weakly laminated, pumice- and lithic-bearing volcaniclastic siltstone to sandstone. The log-bearing pumice breccia and the lithic-bearing laminated basal unit represent pyroclastic density current (PDC) facies deposited in a subaerial or possibly shallow aqueous environment. Underlying the PDC deposit are several 30-cm-thick maroon and olive green volcaniclastic fine-grained sandstone and siltstone beds containing channel fills, cross-beds and lenticular beds. Marbles exposed in the contact zone between the intrusions of Alaska

  2. Rhizobium anhuiense as the predominant microsymbionts of Lathyrus maritimus along the Shandong Peninsula seashore line.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, En Tao; Liu, Yajing; Li, Xiangyue; Yu, Bing; Ren, Chenggang; Liu, Wei; Li, Yunzhao; Xie, Zhihong

    2016-09-01

    Beach pea [Lathyrus maritimus Bigelow, or Lathyrus japonicus subsp. maritimus (L.) P.W. Ball] is a wild legume distributed on the seashore line, and the rhizobia nodulating with this plant have been reported only rarely. In order to reveal the diversity of beach pea rhizobia on the seashore line of Shandong Peninsula, China, a total of 124 bacterial strains were isolated from the root nodules of beach pea plants collected from five sites. All the isolates were divided into five recA types after screening by recA gene sequence analysis and they consisted of Rhizobium anhuiense covering 122 symbiotic isolates in three recA types, as well as two single isolates Rhizobium sp. and Rhizobium lusitanum representing distinct recA types. The recA genotype III of R. anhuiense (103 isolates) represented by strain YIC11270 was dominant at all five sampling sites. Identical symbiotic genes (nodC and nifH) were detected in the three recA genotypes of R. anhuiense isolates that were closely related to those of the pea and faba rhizobia. This study clarified that R. anhuiense was the main symbiont for beach pea rhizobia on the seashore line of Shandong Peninsula. The low level genetic diversity of beach pea rhizobia revealed by both MLSA and the symbiotic genes might be related to the strong selection pressure produced by the saline-alkaline environment and the host plants. PMID:27480059

  3. Alaska peninsula stable isotope and radioisotope chemistry: a study in temporal and adaptive diversity.

    PubMed

    Coltrain, Joan Brenner

    2010-12-01

    Purified bone collagen from a small suite of human remains recovered at three sites on the Alaska Peninsula (Port Moller, Brooks River, and Mink Island) were analyzed for stable carbon and nitrogen isotope chemistry and were accelerator radiocarbon dated. Because samples sizes were small and faunal isotope chemistry lacking, results should be considered preliminary. However, these data indicate that each locality was represented by a somewhat different suite of subsistence strategies and covered a distinct temporal span. Port Moller burials (n = 7) from the Hot Springs site date to a calibrated 2σ range of 3547-1388 BP. Although marine foods clearly made the greatest contribution to these diets, individuals were not as heavily reliant on high-trophic-level marine taxa as eastern Aleutian groups to the west, given their intake of salmon and evidence of caribou hunting. Brooks River burials (n = 9) expressed an inland foraging focus with significant reliance on caribou and spawning salmon and covered a calibrated 2σ range of 1484-381 BP. In contrast, individuals from Mink Island (n = 7), dating to cal. 666-292 BP, were heavily reliant on high-trophic-level marine prey similar to but not as enriched isotopically as the Aleut, perhaps a consequence of limited access to caribou and greater reliance on invertebrates. This pattern suggests that prehistoric economic strategies on the Alaska Peninsula were diverse, characterized by fine-tuned adaptations to local ecological settings, perhaps mediated by ethnic factors and territorial and social pressures. PMID:21417886

  4. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy transect study of poultry operations on the Delmarva Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jane E; Cade-Menun, Barbara J

    2009-01-01

    Nonpoint source phosphorus (P) pollution into the Chesapeake Bay watershed from poultry operations contributes to the algal blooms, hypoxia, anoxia, and fish kill events that occur there most years. A major source of soluble, bioavailable P species is poultry litter, which is used as a crop fertilizer on fields adjacent to the tributaries of the Bay. A potentially significant source of orthophosphate in the litter is the heavily phosphorylated compound myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate), which is indigestible by poultry and thus becomes a major component of their excreta. Phytate evaluation in environmental samples is expensive; hence, its impact is not captured in standard farmer-friendly eutrophication potential guides, like Delaware's Phosphorus Site Index. In this transect study of two poultry operations on the Delmarva Peninsula, we measured the incidence of all P compounds using solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and extracts, relating them to relevant geochemical properties. The contribution of phytate to the overall pool of P declined from around 50% in manures to between 2 and 13% in down-gradient soils and sediments, corresponding to a rise in the relative proportion of orthophosphate (increasing from 39% to 65-88%). The results show that the large pool of phytate P spread onto croplands during standard operating practice at poultry farms on the Delmarva Peninsula does not appear to accumulate; rather, phytate decreases in down-gradient locations, most likely due to transport off-site and/or through in situ biological activity. PMID:19141802

  5. Composition and microstructure of Roman metallic artefacts of Southwestern Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valério, P.; Voráčová, E.; Silva, R. J. C.; Araújo, M. F.; Soares, A. M. M.; Arruda, A. M.; Pereira, C.

    2015-10-01

    The Roman invasion introduces new alloys and metallurgical practices in Iberian Peninsula. The southwestern end of this region has many evidences of connections with the Roman World, but there are no studies about the manufacture and use of copper-based artefacts during this period. Therefore, a set of about 20 ornaments, tools and small attachments recovered at the Roman sites of Monte Molião and Cidade das Rosas was studied by an analytical approach combining micro-EDXRF, optical microscopy, SEM-EDS and Vickers microhardness testing. The artefact composition shows a good correlation with function, namely pure copper for nails and rivets, low-tin bronze (2-6 wt% Sn) for basic tools, high-tin bronze (14 wt% Sn) for fibulae and high-lead bronze (19 wt% Pb) for a decorated jug handle. The manufacture also depends on function because most artefacts were subjected to thermomechanical processing, except the ornaments that would not benefit from post-casting work. Brass and gunmetal were only present in the site with a later chronology. A metallurgy visibly ruled by economical, aesthetical and technological concerns reinforces the evidences about the total integration of Southwestern Iberian Peninsula in the Roman World, but further studies will be essential to determine the evolution of copper-based alloys in Lusitania under Roman influence.

  6. Groundwater temperature transients on the Armutlu peninsula, eastern Marmara region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woith, Heiko; Caka, Deniz; Seyis, Cemil; Italiano, Francesco; Celik, Cengiz; Wang, Rongjiang; Baris, Serif

    2016-04-01

    Since many years MAM and GFZ in co-operation with Kocaeli University (KU) operate fluid monitoring stations around the Sea of Marmara. In the frame of MARsite (MARsite has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement No 308417) these networks were jointly evaluated for the first time. The on-land fluid monitoring networks continuously monitor the following parameters: soil radon (21 sites), temperature and conductivity of thermal springs (9 sites) operated by MAM covering the whole Marmara region; fluid pressure and water level/temperature (8 sites) within ARNET operated by GFZ/KU. ARNET is a combined seismological/hydrogeological monitoring network covering the Armutlu peninsula located SE of Istanbul. Additional to the geothermal wells and springs - our main target to detect transients of potentially seismo-tectonic origin - three shallow groundwater wells (tenth of meters deep) are being operated to identify and quantify seasonal variations, and meteorological influences like rainfall and snowmelt. But it turned out that these shallow aquifer systems showed very stable conditions with very small annual temperature amplitudes (0.2 - 0.3°C). One of these shallow monitoring wells is located just south of Lake Iznik (in the village of Sölöz) very close to the southern branch of the North Anatolian Fault Zone. Water level showed a steady decreasing trend since June 2012. This trend resulted in a data gap starting in January 2014, when the water level dropped below the sensor position. After adjusting the sensor position, positive spikes in the borehole temperature were recorded in June and August 2014, and again in 2015. The spikes are characterised by a sharp temperature increase followed by a decay lasting several days until the pre-event temperature was reached again. Since the spikes occurred on two independent logger systems, and since they lasted several days, a

  7. Paleomagnetism of Silver Island, Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan: Additional Support (?) for the Primary Curvature of the MCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, J. F.; Durant, A. J.; Schepke, C.

    2009-05-01

    Silver Island lies between Eagle Harbor and Copper Harbor on the NW coastline of the Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan. The island consists of a series of basaltic lava flows which dip to the north-northwest (356°) at an angle of approximately 38°. These flows constitute part of the Lake Shore Traps (LST), a series of interbedded lava flows within the Copper Harbor Conglomerate (CHC). The LST represent the youngest eruptive material associated with the 1.1 Ga Mid-Continent Rift (MCR). The most recent paleomagnetic study (now 15 years old) on the Lakeshore Traps (LST) defined three distinct directional clusters. Each cluster of directions corresponded to a different stratigraphic package of the LST within the CHC and all have extremely low between-site dispersion (s ˜ 4°) suggesting rather rapid emplacement of the LST packages. Consequently, each cluster has its own unique direction of magnetization. Since the lower two LST packages crop out along the coast line of the Peninsula with different structural trends, an opportunity was presented to test the conclusions of Hnat et al. (2006) that the curvature of the MCR was primary. To that end nine lava flows were sampled on Silver Island and their mean direction compared to the equivalent mean from lava flows sampled by Diehl and Haig (1994) from the tip of the Keweenaw Peninsula (upper lava flows of the Middle LST) which have an entirely different structural trend. Characteristic directions of magnetization of the Silver Island lava flows were isolated either using alternating field, thermal or a combination of both. The mean direction of magnetization for the nine sites is: D = 277.7°, I = 46.9°, α95 = 3.0°, k = 292.5. The mean direction recalculated from the Diehl and Haig study is: D = 277.8°, I = 40.6°, α95 = 2.9°, k = 315.7. Although the declinations of the two means are identical, interestingly the two means are statistically distinct at the 95% confidence level. Fold tests were inconclusive. Nevertheless

  8. Surface Ozone Dynamics in the Kola Peninsula Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloglazov, M. I.; Karpechko, A. Yu.; Nikulin, G. N.; Roumjantsev, S. A.

    Measurements of surface ozone from the centre of the Murmansk Region (Apatity, Kola peninsula) and its southern part (Kovda, White Sea coast) give a picture of the behaviour of this air component on the Kola peninsula and surrounding vicinity. Simultaneous measurements in Apatity and Kovda have shown that the ozone concentration in Apatity is roughly twice as much as in Kovda. This fact may be explained by the local wind circulation and the presence of bromine near the coast of the Kola Peninsula. An inverse correlation is found between the ozone and nitrogen oxide concentrations from observations near motorways in Apatity. A decrease of nitrogen oxide concentration accompanies the growth of ozone on average. Thus, Apatity is a northern city in which the air pollution by traffic emissions decreases the ozone content.

  9. Tectonic, Climatic, and Cryospheric Evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-06-01

    For millennia, Antarctica has been a frozen continent, a land of ice and snow where complex life persists rather than thrives. But Antarctica has not always been this way. Millions of years ago the southern continent was teeming with life. Changing oceans and a plummeting atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration drove a dramatic evolution of the Antarctic continent. To provide a record of these ancient climatic shifts, the 2005-2006 SHALDRIL drilling program collected sediment cores from the bed of the iceberg-filled seas off the Antarctic Peninsula. In the AGU book Tectonic, Climatic, and Cryospheric Evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula, editors John B. Anderson and Julia S. Wellner draw on the findings garnered from SHALDRIL to explore the changing Antarctic Peninsula. In this interview, Eos talks to John B. Anderson.

  10. Paleomagnetism of early Tertiary Alaska Peninsula rocks and implications for docking of peninsular terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, J.W.; Levinson, R.A.; Van Alstine, D.R.

    1985-04-01

    In order to refine the tectonic history of the peninsular terrane, Alaska, 22 sites (averaging 10 samples/site) in Paleogene Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary formations were sampled in the vicinity of Chignik, on the Pacific side of the Alaska Peninsula. Ten of the sites were drilled in the early Oligocene Meshik volcanics, ranging from andesite to basalt, and the other twelve sites were drilled in the late Eocene Tolstoi Formation sediments. Nine of the volcanic sites yielded stable R and/or N characteristic magnetization. Virtually no fine-grained, interbedded sediments occur with the Meshik volcanics at the sample sites, thus making reliable paleohorizontal determinations difficult. Although flow attitudes were tentatively used, it became rapidly apparent that problems of initial dip were insurmountable. As a result, all volcanic sites were considered unreliable for determining a meaningful paleomagnetic inclination. Upon thermal demagnetization, five of the sedimentary sites were judged stable. The mode of the paleomagnetic direction was calculated, D/I = 349.8/75.3(..beta..95 = 8.5), indicating no significant rotation. Uncertainties in structural corrections, however, may render only the inclination meaningful, which, from McFadden statistics yields, I = 75.9, ..cap alpha..95 = 7.9, corresponding to a paleolatitude of 63.3/sup 0/. This paleolatitude agrees with the expected value for the North American craton at 40 m.y. B.P., implying that the peninsular terrane had docked at at least that time.

  11. Anaglyph with Landsat Overlay, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This 3-D anaglyph shows an area on the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. Red-blue glasses are required to see the 3-D effect. The topographic data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Images from the optical Landsat satellite are overlain on the SRTM topography data. The meandering channel of the Tigil River is seen along the bottom of the image, at the base of steep cliffs. In the middle left of the image, a terrace indicates recent uplift of the terrain and downcutting by the river. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists and hydrologists to study the interplay of tectonic uplift and erosion.

    This anaglyph was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. Each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data, which are overlain on the topography.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA

  12. Interactions Between Islamic and Christian Traditions in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, A. César; Belmonte, Juan Antonio

    Pre-Romanesque churches in the Iberian Peninsula include a number of constructions from the fourth-fifth to the eleventh century when the first Romanesque churches appeared in the north of Spain. This period of time coincided with the Muslim invasion of the Peninsula. An important number of churches and mosques were built with prescriptions for the orientation, which possibly included astronomical observations. Investigations show that both groups of monuments reacted by avoiding the areas of theoretical influence of the other religion while trying to obey their own orientation rules.

  13. Water Quality in the Delmarva Peninsula, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia, 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denver, Judith M.; Ator, Scott W.; Debrewer, Linda M.; Ferrari, Matthew J.; Barbaro, Jeffrey R.; Hancock, Tracy C.; Brayton, Michael J.; Nardi, Mark R.

    2004-01-01

    This report contains the major findings of a 1999-2001 assessment of water quality in the Delmarva Peninsula. It is one of a series of reports by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program that present major findings in 51 major river basins and aquifer systems across the Nation. In these reports, water quality is assessed at many scales?from local ground-water flow paths to regional ground-water networks and in surface water?and is discussed in terms of local, State, and regional issues. Conditions in the Delmarva Peninsula are compared to conditions found elsewhere and to selected national benchmarks, such as those for drinking-water quality and the protection of aquatic organisms. This report is intended for individuals working with water-resource issues in Federal, State, or local agencies; universities; public interest groups; or in the private sector. The information will be useful in addressing a number of current issues, such as the effects of agricultural and urban land use on water quality, human health, drinking water, source-water protection, hypoxia and excessive growth of algae and plants, pesticide registration, and monitoring and sampling strategies. This report is also for individuals who wish to know more about the quality of streams and ground water in areas near where they live, and how that water quality compares to the quality of water in other areas across the Nation. Other products describing water-quality conditions in the Delmarva Peninsula are available. Detailed technical information, data and analyses, methodology, models, graphs, and maps that support the findings presented in this report can be accessed from http://md.water.usgs.gov/delmarva. Other reports in this series and data collected from other basins can be accessed from the national NAWQA Web site (http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa).

  14. Geology and timing of mineralization at the Cangshang gold deposit, north-western Jiaodong Peninsula, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, X.; Cawood, Peter A.; Wilde, S.A.; Liu, R.; Song, H.; Li, W.; Snee, L.W.

    2003-01-01

    The Cangshang gold deposit of the northwestern Jiaodong Peninsula contains reserves of greater than 50 tonnes (t) and is developed by the largest open pit gold mine in China. This deposit is a Jiaojia-style (i.e. disseminated-and-veinlet) deposit. It is controlled by the San-Cang fault zone, which trends ???040?? and dips 40-75??SE at the mine site. The main (no. 1) orebody lies between a hanging wall of Precambrian metamorphic rocks (mainly amphibolite) of the Fenzishan Group and a footwall composed of the Mesozoic Linglong granitoid. The ore zone is mainly composed of pyritized, sericitized and silicified granitoid, which has undergone variable degrees of cataclasis. SHRIMP U-Pb dating of zircon indicates that the protolith of the hanging wall amphibolite was formed at 2530 ?? 17 Ma and underwent metamorphism at 1852 ?? 37 Ma. The footwall granodiorite has been dated at 166 ?? 4 Ma, whereas zircons from the ore zone yield a younger age of 154 ?? 5 Ma. Cathodoluminescence images of zircons from the granodiorite and ore zone show oscillatory zonation indicative of an igneous origin for both and the ages of these zircons, therefore, are all interpreted to be representative of magmatic crystallization. Dating of sericite by 40Ar-39Ar has been used to directly determine the timing of formation of the Cangshang deposit, providing the first time absolute age on formation of the Jiaojia-style gold deposits. The well-defined age of 121.3 ?? 0.2 Ma provides the precise timing of gold mineralization at the Cangshang deposit. This age is consistent with those of Linglong-style (vein type) gold mineralization, also from the north-western Jiaodong Peninsula, at between 126 and 120 Ma. Therefore, our work indicates that both styles of gold deposits in the Jiaodong Peninsula were formed during the same mineralization event.

  15. Paleoclimate and Paleoenvironmental Reconstructions on the North Kola Peninsula during the Past 2000 Years According Pollen Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosevich, Ekaterina; Sapelko, Tatjana; Anisimov, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Pollen data and radiocarbon data have enabled to reconstruct the periods of vegetation that depended on the climate changes. Records from different types of deposits allow to receive more information and to make paleoclimate reconstructions. Lake and bog sediments are the best sources for palaeoreconstruction. Palaeoclimatic changes, tectonic and coastline movement during Late Holocene caused vegetation changes on the North Kola Peninsula. Our data from pollen records from different sites on the north coast of the Kola Peninsula covers the Late Holocene about last 2000 years. We studied different types of sediment cores in the area between 69° N and 70° N, 31°12' E and 35° E. We have studied peat deposits, small lake sediments and archaeological site on the Bolshoy Oleniy Island in Kola fjord, Barents Sea, and peat bog deposits in the Teriberka area. All the cores are studied by different methods where the core was pollen analysis. It has allowed tracking the periods of vegetation history in the tundra zone. Pollen reconstructions are confirmed by radiocarbon data. Our data was compared with other researches and we made correlations between pollen records from different lake deposits. Modern vegetation presents south tundra type of associations. Teriberka area is unique: almost existing types of tundra landscapes are presented here in small territory, including "typical tundra" with subshrubs formations. For paleoclimate reconstructions we have studied surface samples by pollen analysis. Samples were collected in 3 regions of Kola Peninsula. Samples have been taken on the Sredniy and Rybachiy Peninsulas (Murman region) in the south tundra with rich associations and boreal species of herbs. In the Olenegorsk region we selected vegetation associations not damaged by human and we collected surface samples on the border of forest tundra and northern taiga. In Apatity region we studied pollen records in North taiga landscapes. This data characterize regional and

  16. Trends of Rural Tropospheric Ozone at the Northwest of the Iberian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, S.; Rodríguez, A.; Souto, J. A.; Casares, J. J.; Bermúdez, J. L.; Soto, B.

    2012-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone levels around urban and suburban areas at Europe and North America had increased during 80's–90's, until the application of NOx reduction strategies. However, as it was expected, this ozone depletion was not proportional to the emissions reduction. On the other hand, rural ozone levels show different trends, with peaks reduction and average increments; this different evolution could be explained by either emission changes or climate variability in a region. In this work, trends of tropospheric ozone episodes at rural sites in the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula were analyzed and compared to others observed in different regions of the Atlantic European coast. Special interest was focused on the air quality sites characterization, in order to guarantee their rural character in terms of air quality. Both episodic local meteorological and air quality measurements along five years were considered, in order to study possible meteorological influences in ozone levels, different to other European Atlantic regions. PMID:22649298

  17. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  18. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  19. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  20. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  1. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  2. Probabilistic seismic hazard analysis for Sumatra, Indonesia and across the Southern Malaysian Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.D.; Dewey, J.; Hartzell, S.; Mueller, C.; Harmsen, S.; Frankel, A.D.; Rukstales, K.

    2004-01-01

    The ground motion hazard for Sumatra and the Malaysian peninsula is calculated in a probabilistic framework, using procedures developed for the US National Seismic Hazard Maps. We constructed regional earthquake source models and used standard published and modified attenuation equations to calculate peak ground acceleration at 2% and 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years for rock site conditions. We developed or modified earthquake catalogs and declustered these catalogs to include only independent earthquakes. The resulting catalogs were used to define four source zones that characterize earthquakes in four tectonic environments: subduction zone interface earthquakes, subduction zone deep intraslab earthquakes, strike-slip transform earthquakes, and intraplate earthquakes. The recurrence rates and sizes of historical earthquakes on known faults and across zones were also determined from this modified catalog. In addition to the source zones, our seismic source model considers two major faults that are known historically to generate large earthquakes: the Sumatran subduction zone and the Sumatran transform fault. Several published studies were used to describe earthquakes along these faults during historical and pre-historical time, as well as to identify segmentation models of faults. Peak horizontal ground accelerations were calculated using ground motion prediction relations that were developed from seismic data obtained from the crustal interplate environment, crustal intraplate environment, along the subduction zone interface, and from deep intraslab earthquakes. Most of these relations, however, have not been developed for large distances that are needed for calculating the hazard across the Malaysian peninsula, and none were developed for earthquake ground motions generated in an interplate tectonic environment that are propagated into an intraplate tectonic environment. For the interplate and intraplate crustal earthquakes, we have applied ground

  3. 77 FR 65359 - Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... Forest Service Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION... Resource Advisory Committee (RAC). The RAC will be responsible for reviewing and recommending land... the act be reauthorized this year. RAC members represent a wide range of interests. The...

  4. Blueberry Trials on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula: First Year Report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In June 2009, 9 plants each of three highbush and six half-high blueberry cultivars were planted at test plots on two commercial farms on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula. The purpose of the trials was to determine if domestic blueberry plants could survive and produce crops in Southcentral Alaska. In Octob...

  5. 77 FR 53168 - Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... of meeting. SUMMARY: The Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Olympia, WA. The... Black Lake Blvd. SW., Olympia, WA 98512. A conference call line will be made available for members of... Forest, Supervisor's Office, located in Olympia, WA. Please call ahead to Grace Haight at 360-956-2303...

  6. Pumas and Prepositions: Training Nature Guides in the Yucatan Peninsula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cynthia

    2000-01-01

    In the Yucatan Peninsula (Mexico), the 10-week Nature Guide Training Program integrates English immersion with natural history and environmental interpretation to train rural adults as nature guides and conservation leaders. Most graduates have found work as ecotourism guides or in conservation-related activities, and many have provided English…

  7. Hemorrhagic pulmonary leptospirosis: three cases from the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Velázquez, Jorge; Cárdenas-Marrufo, María; Vado-Solís, Ignacio; Cetina-Cámara, Marco; Cano-Tur, José; Laviada-Molina, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    Three leptospirosis cases with lung involvement are reported from the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. All three patients were admitted to the intensive care unit due to acute respiratory failure. Treatment with antibiotics resulted in favorable evolution despite the negative prognosis. Leptospirosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with fever and lung involvement. PMID:18853016

  8. Recent Rapid Regional Climate Warming on the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, D. G.; Marshall, G. J.; Connolley, W. M.; Parkinson, C.; Mulvaney, R.; Hodgson, D. A.; King, J. C.; Pudsey, C. J.; Turner, J.

    2002-12-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) confirmed that global warming was 0.6 ñ 0.2 degrees C during the 20th Century and cited increases in greenhouse gases as a likely contributor. But this average conceals the complexity of observed climate change, which is seasonally biased, decadally variable and geographically patchy. In particular, over the last 50 years three high-latitude areas have undergone recent rapid regional (RRR) warming ? substantially more rapid than the global mean. We discuss the spatial and temporal significance of RRR warming in one area, the Antarctic Peninsula. New analyses of station records show no ubiquitous polar amplification of global warming but significant RRR warming on the Antarctic Peninsula. We investigate the likelihood that this could be amplification of a global warming, and use climate-proxy data to indicate that this RRR warming on the Antarctic Peninsula is unprecedented over the last two millennia and unlikely to be a natural mode of variability. We can show a strong connection between RRR warming and reduced sea-ice duration in an area on the west of the Antarctic Peninsula, but here we cannot yet distinguish cause and effect. Thus for the present we cannot determine which process causes the RRR warming, and until the mechanism initiating and sustaining it is understood, and is convincingly reproduced in climate models, we lack a sound basis for predicting climate change in this region over the coming century.

  9. Phosphorus leaching from agricultural soils of the Delmarva Peninsula, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaching of phosphorus (P) mobilizes edaphic and applied sources of P and is a primary pathway of concern in agricultural soils of the Delmarva Peninsula, which defines the eastern boundary of the eutrophic Chesapeake Bay. We evaluated P leaching before and after poultry litter application from inta...

  10. 46. Photocopy of photograph (Pentran file), (from Alexander Brown's Peninsula's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photocopy of photograph (Pentran file), (from Alexander Brown's Peninsula's Last Street Cars, Daily Press, January 15, 1956) photographer unknown. The first streetcar (with dignitaries) to make the run from Newport News to a new housing development named Hilton Village in September 1918. - Newport News & Old Point Railway & Electric Company, Trolley Barn & Administration Building, 3400 Victoria Boulevard, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  11. 48. Photocopy of photograph (from Reflections, Peninsula Transportation District Commission, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Photocopy of photograph (from Reflections, Peninsula Transportation District Commission, 1985. Original three CRT buses in 1928. *FOR Photocopy of photograph (from the Charles H. Taylor Memorial Library), photographer unknown. Trolley car No. 315 shown April 25, 1929 at the Trolley Barn. SEE FIELD NOTES - Newport News & Old Point Railway & Electric Company, Trolley Barn & Administration Building, 3400 Victoria Boulevard, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  12. A Sketch of Language History in the Korean Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Among 7100 languages spoken on Earth, the Koreanic language is the 13th largest, with about 77 million speakers in and around the Korean Peninsula. In comparison to other languages of similar size, however, surprisingly little is known about the evolution of the Koreanic language. This is mainly due to two reasons. The first reason is that the genealogical relationship of the Koreanic to other neighboring languages remains uncertain, and thus inference from the linguistic comparative method provides only provisional evidence. The second reason is that, as the ancestral Koreanic speakers lacked their own writing system until around 500 years ago, there are scant historical materials to peer into the past, except for those preserved in Sinitic characters that we have no straightforward way of interpreting. Here I attempt to overcome these disadvantages and shed some light on the linguistic history of the Korean Peninsula, by analyzing the internal variation of the Koreanic language with methods adopted from evolutionary biology. The preliminary results presented here suggest that the evolutionary history of the Koreanic language is characterized by a weak hierarchical structure, and intensive gene/culture flows within the Korean Peninsula seem to have promoted linguistic homogeneity among the Koreanic variants. Despite the gene/culture flows, however, there are still three detectable linguistic barriers in the Korean Peninsula that appear to have been shaped by geographical features such as mountains, elevated areas, and ocean. I discuss these findings in an inclusive manner to lay the groundwork for future studies. PMID:26024377

  13. Stable isotopes and Antarctic moss banks: Plants and soil microbes respond to recent warming on the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royles, Jessica; Amesbury, Matthew; Ogée, Jérôme; Wingate, Lisa; Convey, Peter; Hodgson, Dominic; Griffiths, Howard; Leng, Melanie; Charman, Dan

    2014-05-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, with air temperature increases of as much as 3°C recorded since the 1950s. However, the longer-term context of this change is limited and existing records, largely relying on ice core data, are not suitably located to be able to trace the spatial signature of change over time. We are working on a project exploiting stable isotope records preserved in moss peat banks spanning 10 degrees of latitude along the Antarctic Peninsula as an archive of late Holocene climate variability. Here we present a unique time series of past moss growth and soil microbial activity that has been produced from a 150 year old moss bank at Lazarev Bay, Alexander Island (69°S), a site at the southern limit of significant plant growth in the Antarctic Peninsula region. These moss banks are ideal archives for palaeoclimate research as they are well-preserved by freezing, generally monospecific, easily dated by radiocarbon techniques, and have sufficiently high accumulation rates to permit decadal resolution. We use accumulation rates, cellulose δ13C and fossil testate amoebae to show that growth rates, assimilation and microbial productivity rose rapidly in the 1960s, consistent with temperature change, although recently may have stalled, concurrent with other evidence. The increase in biological activity is unprecedented in the last 150 years. Along with work completed on Signy Island (60°S), in the South Orkney Islands, in which we used carbon isotope evidence to show recent climate-related enhancement of CO2 assimilation and peat accumulation rates in Antarctica, the observed relationships between moss growth, microbial activity and climate suggests that moss bank records have the potential to test the regional expression of temperature variability shown by instrumental data on the Antarctic Peninsula over centennial to millennial timescales, by providing long-term records of summer growth conditions

  14. Elemental content of lichens of the Point Reyes Peninsula, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Benson, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Point Reyes peninsula in northern California is about 45 km northwest of San Francisco and occasionally receives air masses from the city contributing to haze and lowered visibility. Although gaseous pollutants are not a problem, fine particulates containing carbon and other elements are measurable at the park. In this study, five lichen species were sampled along a 40-km linear transect from southeast to northwest from the town of Bolinas at the southern end of the peninsula. Elevated levels of Na and S and the Na/S ratio at localities nearer the ocean confirmed there is a definite marine aerosol influence on lichen elemental content. Elevated potassium and mercury concentrations were also found at high elevation sites that intercept fog. However, arsenic and lead were found to decrease with distance from Bolinas along the transect, suggesting these two elements originate in the fine particulate haze that enters the park from San Francisco. Concentrations of elements were not at enriched levels for other lichen species. A possible local influence of roads on element content needs further study.

  15. Surface ozone levels in the forest and vegetation areas of the Biga Peninsula, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sari, Deniz; İncecik, Selahattin; Ozkurt, Nesimi

    2016-11-15

    Spatial and temporal variability of surface ozone in the rural, mountainous and suburban sites of Biga Peninsula, at the northwest of Turkey which is about 300km southwest of Istanbul was investigated using passive samplers and continuous analyzers. A total 10 passive samplers and two continuous analyzers were used between 1.1.2013 and 31.12.2014. OX levels in the study region were examined to understand NOx dependent or independent contribution to ozone. The influences of the meteorological parameters on ozone levels were also examined by wind speed and ambient temperature. The results clearly show that mountainous areas have higher cumulative exposure to ozone than suburban locations. In order to understand the long range transport sources contributing to the high ozone levels in the region backward trajectories were computed using HYSPLIT model and then clustering of trajectories are performed. The results clearly show the characteristics of pollutant transport from north to Biga Peninsula. Additionally, AOT40 (Accumulated hourly O3 concentrations Over a Threshold of 40ppb) cumulative index was calculated using daytime hourly measurements. The results indicate that the ozone values in the study area are much higher than the critical levels for forest and vegetation based on EU Directive 2008/50/EC. PMID:27474990

  16. Structural setting and geochemistry of Devonian dikes in the Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, E. N.; Baluev, A. S.; Przhiyalgovsky, E. S.

    2012-01-01

    The structural setting and geochemistry of the Devonian dikes in the Kola Peninsula are considered. The alkaline dikes are controlled by rift- and drift-related structural elements. The first type of structures is exemplified by the Khibiny-Kontozero Fault Zone, which is regarded as a propagation zone of the East Barents Rift. The second type comprises Early Precambrian structural elements reactivated during Devonian drift of the East European Plate. Alkaline dikes occur in the ring structures at the ends of rifts and in the accommodation zones where the polarity of the main fault plane changes. These are the sites of accumulation and abrupt relaxation of tectonic stresses. Despite the significant differences in the petrography and chemistry of alkaline dikes, all of them are enriched in REE, apparently due to the elevated concentrations of these elements in the fluids. The dolerite dikes at the Murmansk Coast are located in the outer zone of the vast, concentrically zoned plateau basalt province with the East Barents Trough as its center. According to geophysical data, basaltic flows are suggested within this trough. The dolerite dikes increase in number in the inland propagation zone of the East Barents Trough extending in the Baltic Shield. The alkaline igneous rocks of the Kola Peninsula were formed under local compression at the periphery of the plateau basalt province.

  17. Emmons Lake Volcanic Center, Alaska Peninsula: Source of the Late Wisconsin Dawson tephra, Yukon Territory, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.T.; Waythomas, C.F.; Miller, T.P.; Trusdell, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Emmons Lake Volcanic Center on the Alaska Peninsula of southwestern Alaska is the site of at least two rhyolitic caldera-forming eruptions (C1 and C2) of late Quaternary age that are possibly the largest of the numerous caldera-forming eruptions known in the Aleutian arc. The deposits produced by these eruptions are widespread (eruptive volumes of >50 km3 each), and their association with Quaternary glacial and eolian deposits on the Alaska Peninsula and elsewhere in Alaska and northwestern Canada enhances the likelihood of establishing geochronological control on Quaternary stratigraphic records in this region. The pyroclastic deposits associated with the second caldera-forming eruption (C2) consist of loose, granular, airfall and pumice-flow deposits that extend for tens of kilometres beyond Emmons Lake caldera, reaching both the Bering Sea and Pacific Ocean coastlines north and south of the caldera. Geochronological and compositional data on C2 deposits indicate a correlation with the Dawson tephra, a 24 000 14C BP (27 000 calibrated years BP), widespread bed of silicic ash found in loess deposits in west-central Yukon Territory, Canada. The correlation clearly establishes the Dawson tephra as the time-stratigraphic marker of the last glacial maximum.

  18. Drought variability and change across the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, Joan Ramon; Aguilar, Enric

    2015-04-01

    Drought variability and change is assessed in this study across the Iberian Peninsula along the 20th century and the first decade of the 21st century using state of the art drought indices: the Sc-PDSI, the SPI and the SPEI. Daily temperature and precipitation data from 24 time-series regularly spread over Iberian Peninsula are quality controlled and also homogenized in a monthly scale to create the Monthly Iberian Temperature and Precipitation Series (MITPS) for the period 1906-2010. The Sc-PDSI, the 12-month SPI and 12-month SPEI are computed on a monthly basis using the newly MITPS dataset to identify dry and wet conditions across time. Precipitation data is only required to compute SPI, but potential evapotranspiration (PET) is also needed to perform the Sc-PDSI and SPEI, which is estimated using the Tornthwaite's method. The analysis conducted in this study confirms that drought conditions are worsening for most of the Iberian Peninsula across time strongly induced by global warming especially during the last three decades. All drought indices have found a drying trend in the Pyrenees, Ebro basin, central Iberia and in the south and south-eastern area while a wetting trend is identified in the western and in the north-western region. Future projections also indicate a clear increase in hydrological drought conditions along the 21st century, thus, water saving and the application of effective water management strategies will be crucial to minimize the impact of hydrological droughts over the Iberian Peninsula into the near future. KEY WORDS: Drought, climate change, Iberian Peninsula, drought indices.

  19. Quantification of subaerial and episodic subglacial erosion rates on high latitude upland plateaus: Cumberland Peninsula, Baffin Island, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margreth, Annina; Gosse, John C.; Dyke, Arthur S.

    2016-02-01

    Long-term rates of subaerial and episodic subglacial erosion by predominately cold-based ice cover are determined for tors on weathered plateaus on Cumberland Peninsula. By measuring terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in differentially weathered surfaces on a given tor, we reconstruct the complex exposure and erosion history involving recurring cold-based ice cover. The style and rate of subaerial and subglacial erosion at multiple tor sites on Cumberland Peninsula are assessed with a Monte Carlo approach that computes plausible exposure histories based on a proxy record of global ice volume. Constant subaerial erosion rates by weathering are low (<2 mm ka-1), corroborated by nuclide concentrations measured on two tors located on coastal ridge crests that have likely never been glaciated. Summit plateaus intermittently covered by cold-based ice throughout the Quaternary have experienced episodic subglacial erosion by plucking of fractured bedrock with rates between 1 and 16 mm ka-1. Variation of episodic erosion rates is associated with topographic position of the sampled tors and bedrock fracture density. Most of the tors were last glacially plucked in pre-ultimate glaciations, not during the Wisconsinan glaciation. Furthermore, the new approach provides evidence for the extent of ice coverage during the late Wisconsinan, which is significant if no erratics are available for exposure dating. Despite late Pleistocene intervals of ice cover and glacial plucking, tor-studded landscapes of Cumberland Peninsula are of considerable antiquity.

  20. Wildlife uses and hunting patterns in rural communities of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Subsistence hunting is a traditional practice providing food and many other goods for households in the Yucatan Peninsula, southeast Mexico. Economic, demographic, and cultural change in this region drive wildlife habitat loss and local extinctions. Improving our understanding about current practices of wildlife use may support better management strategies for conserving game species and their habitat. We aimed to evaluate if wildlife use remained relevant for the subsistence of rural residents of the Yucatan Peninsula, as well as if local hunting practices were related to environmental, geographical, and cultural factors. Methods Fieldwork was done between March 2010 and March 2011. Information was obtained through conversations, interviews, and participant observation. Record forms allowed recording animals hunted, biomass extracted, distance intervals to hunting sites, habitat types and seasonality of wildlife harvests. Data were analyzed using one-way Analysis of Variance, and Generalized Linear Models. Results Forty-six terrestrial vertebrate species were used for obtaining food, medicine, tools, adornments, pets, ritual objects, and for sale and mitigating damage. We recorded 968 animals taken in 664 successful hunting events. The Great Curassow, Ocellated Turkey, paca, white-tailed deer, and collared peccary were the top harvested species, providing 80.7% of biomass (10,190 kg). The numbers of animals hunted and biomass extracted declined as hunting distances increased from villages. Average per capita consumption was 4.65 ± 2.7 kg/person/year. Hunting frequencies were similar in forested and agricultural areas. Discussion Wildlife use, hunting patterns, and technologies observed in our study sites were similar to those recorded in previous studies for rural Mayan and mestizo communities in the Yucatan Peninsula and other Neotropical sites. The most heavily hunted species were those providing more products and by-products for residents. Large

  1. Continental shelf benthos off Otago Peninsula, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probert, P. Keith; Wilson, John B.

    1984-09-01

    Benthic macrofauna of the continental shelf off Otago Peninsula, south-eastern New Zealand (45°51'S, 170°52'E) was surveyed by dredge sampling during 1973-1975. Numerical classification (Canberra metric coefficient and flexible sorting) was used to produce site groups and species groups, and three major benthic communities were recognised: a shallow-water (14-25 m) fauna inhabiting well-sorted fine sand, a mid-shelf fauna (concentrated in the depth range 50-76 m) associated with sediments containing the greatest proportions of gravel and siltclay, and a predominantly sand-bottom fauna occurring mainly on the outer shelf (87-150 m). All station groups were dominated numerically by polychaetes (mean of 36·6-56% of individuals) with Mollusca (13·8-25%) or Crustacea (12·1-19·4%) the next most abundant group. The inshore sand fauna was the most distinct, characteristic elements being the trochid gastropod Antisolarium egenum, an amphipod of the genus Hippomedon and dense patches of the spionid polychaete Spiophanes bombyx. Diagnostic species of the mid-shelf mixed sediments were Lepidonotus jacksoni, Psammolyce antipoda, Lumbrineris brevicirra and Phyllamphicteis foliata (Polychaeta), Terenochiton otagoensis, Micrelenchus caelatus caelatus, Maoricolpus roseus roseus and Zegalerus tenuis (Mollusca), Ampelisca chiltoni (Amphipoda) and Amphipholis squamata (Ophiuroidea). Outer shelf sand stations were faunally less distinct, but among the more characteristic species were Euthalenessa fimbriata, Sigalion sp. and Euchone sp. (Polychaeta) and Gari stangeri (Bivalvia). Several abundant species were widely distributed among station groups, notably Nephtys macroura, Lumbrineris magalhaensis, Phyllochaetopterus socialis and Owenia fusiformis (Polychaeta) and Nucula nitidula and Tawera spissa (Bivalvia). Free-living lunulitiform Bryozoa of the genus Otionella were a characteristic component of inner and outer shelf sand faunas, and their inshore penetration probably marks

  2. Evolution of subsidence styles in forearc basin: example from Cretaceous of southern Vizcaino Peninsula, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Busby-Spera, C.J.; Boles, J.R.

    1986-04-01

    Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous arc magmatism is represented by volcaniclastic rocks of the Eugenia Formation in the northern Vizcaino Peninsula and by the metamorphosed Cedros-San Andres volcanoplutonic complex, with a dismembered ophiolitic basement, in the southern peninsula. The Vizcaino Peninsula became the site of forearc sedimentation by the Aptian-Albian (late Early Cretaceous), when arc magmatism moved abruptly eastward to the present-day Peninsular Range. On the southern Vizcaino Peninsula, a conformable stratigraphic section, complicated by later faulting, records a gradual transition from a ridged forearc, broken by basement uplifts and grabens (the Aptian-Albian Asunction Formation), to a broadly subsiding, deep marine forearc basin (the Cenomanian Valle Formation). The basal contact of the Asunction formation has irregular relief caused by brecciated basement rocks and talus accumulated along fault zones. An upward-fining sequence several hundred meters thick records abrupt uplift and gradual denudation of adjacent metamorphic basement. Contemporaneous andesite arc volcanism to the east supplied ash and fresh volcanic detritus to the grabens. Angular sand to boulder-size detritus of the Asunction Formation was derived locally, and includes basic to intermediate meta-igneous rock fragments, with epidote, actinolite, and chlorite, as well as serpentine. Abundant calcareous fossils are commonly unbroken, suggesting local sources for these as well. Angular to subrounded, sand to cobble-sized, intermediate to mafic volcanic rock fragments were derived from a more distant island arc to the east, which occasionally provided intermediate to felsic tuffs to the basin. This source is probably represented by the Aptian-Albian Alisitos Group, which forms much of the western wall of the Late Cretaceous Peninsular Range batholith.

  3. Pan American Airways/Naval Air Transport Service/destroyer base site showing brick ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pan American Airways/Naval Air Transport Service/destroyer base site showing brick and concrete paving of patio, and circular planters. View facing east. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Pearl City Peninsula, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Pan American Airways/Naval Air Transport Service/destroyer base site showing stone ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pan American Airways/Naval Air Transport Service/destroyer base site showing stone wall around patio. View facing east-southeast. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Pearl City Peninsula, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. Hurricane Ike Deposits on the Bolivar Peninsula, Galveston Bay, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia A.; Wilkinson, M. J.; Eppler, Dean

    2011-01-01

    In September 2008, Hurricane Ike made landfall on Galveston Bay, close to the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The storm flooded much of the area with a storm surge ranging from 11 -20 feet. The Bolivar peninsula, the southeastern coast of Galveston Bay, experienced the brunt of the surge. Several agencies collected excellent imagery baselines before the storm and complementary data a few days afterward that helped define the impacts of the storm. In April of 2011, a team of scientists and astronauts from JSC conducted field mapping exercises along the Bolivar Peninsula, the section of the Galveston Bay coast most impacted by the storm. Astronauts routinely observe and document coastal changes from orbit aboard the International Space Station. As part of their basic Earth Science training, scientists at the Johnson Space Center take astronauts out for field mapping exercises so that they can better recognize and understand features and processes that they will later observe from the International Space Station. Using pre -storm baseline images of the Bolivar Peninsula near Rollover Pass and Gilchrist (NOAA/Google Earth Imagery and USGS aerial imagery and lidar data), the astronauts mapped current coastline positions at defined locations, and related their findings to specific coastal characteristics, including channel, jetties, and other developments. In addition to mapping, we dug trenches along both the Gulf of Mexico coast as well as the Galveston Bay coast of the Bolivar peninsula to determine the depth of the scouring from the storm on the Gulf side, and the amount of deposition of the storm surge deposits on the Bay side of the peninsula. The storm signature was easy to identify by sharp sediment transitions and, in the case of storm deposits, a layer of storm debris (roof shingles, PVC pipes, etc) and black, organic rich layers containing buried sea grasses in areas that were marshes before the storm. The amount of deposition was generally about 20 -25 cm

  6. Hurricane Ike Deposits on the Bolivar Peninsula, Galveston Bay, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. A.; Wilkinson, M. J.; Eppler, D.

    2011-12-01

    In September 2008, Hurricane Ike made landfall on Galveston Bay, close to the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The storm flooded much of the area with a storm surge ranging from 11-20 feet. The Bolivar peninsula, the southeastern coast of Galveston Bay, experienced the brunt of the surge. Several agencies collected excellent imagery baselines before the storm and complementary data a few days afterward that helped define the impacts of the storm. In April of 2011, a team of scientists and astronauts from JSC conducted field mapping exercises along the Bolivar Peninsula, the section of the Galveston Bay coast most impacted by the storm. Astronauts routinely observe and document coastal changes from orbit aboard the International Space Station. As part of their basic Earth Science training, scientists at the Johnson Space Center take astronauts out for field mapping exercises so that they can better recognize and understand features and processes that they will later observe from the International Space Station. Using pre-storm baseline images of the Bolivar Peninsula near Rollover Pass and Gilchrist (NOAA/Google Earth Imagery and USGS aerial imagery and lidar data), the astronauts mapped current coastline positions at defined locations, and related their findings to specific coastal characteristics, including channel, jetties, and other developments. In addition to mapping, we dug trenches along both the Gulf of Mexico coast as well as the Galveston Bay coast of the Bolivar peninsula to determine the depth of the scouring from the storm on the Gulf side, and the amount of deposition of the storm surge deposits on the Bay side of the peninsula. The storm signature was easy to identify by sharp sediment transitions and, in the case of storm deposits, a layer of storm debris (roof shingles, PVC pipes, etc) and black, organic rich layers containing buried sea grasses in areas that were marshes before the storm. The amount of deposition was generally about 20-25 cm; the

  7. Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet evolution during the Cenozoic Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Bethan J.; Hambrey, Michael J.; Smellie, John L.; Carrivick, Jonathan L.; Glasser, Neil F.

    2012-01-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula region is currently undergoing rapid environmental change, resulting in the thinning, acceleration and recession of glaciers and the sequential collapse of ice shelves. It is important to view these changes in the context of long-term palaeoenvironmental complexity and to understand the key processes controlling ice sheet growth and recession. In addition, numerical ice sheet models require detailed geological data for tuning and testing. Therefore, this paper systematically and holistically reviews published geological evidence for Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet variability for each key locality throughout the Cenozoic, and brings together the prevailing consensus of the extent, character and behaviour of the glaciations of the Antarctic Peninsula region. Major contributions include a downloadable database of 186 terrestrial and marine calibrated dates; an original reconstruction of the LGM ice sheet; and a new series of isochrones detailing ice sheet retreat following the LGM. Glaciation of Antarctica was initiated around the Eocene/Oligocene transition in East Antarctica. Palaeogene records of Antarctic Peninsula glaciation are primarily restricted to King George Island, where glacigenic sediments provide a record of early East Antarctic glaciations, but with modification of far-travelled erratics by local South Shetland Island ice caps. Evidence for Neogene glaciation is derived primarily from King George Island and James Ross Island, where glaciovolcanic strata indicate that ice thicknesses reached 500-850 m during glacials. This suggests that the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet draped, rather than drowned, the topography. Marine geophysical investigations indicate multiple ice sheet advances during this time. Seismic profiling of continental shelf-slope deposits indicates up to ten large advances of the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet during the Early Pleistocene, when the ice sheet was dominated by 40 kyr cycles. Glacials became more

  8. Primary production export flux in Marguerite Bay (Antarctic Peninsula): Linking upper water-column production to sediment trap flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Keith; Jickells, Timothy D.; Carson, Damien S.; Clarke, Andrew; Meredith, Michael P.; Brandon, Mark A.; Wallace, Margaret I.; Ussher, Simon J.; Hendry, Katharine R.

    2013-05-01

    A study was carried out to assess primary production and associated export flux in the coastal waters of the western Antarctic Peninsula at an oceanographic time-series site. New, i.e., exportable, primary production in the upper water-column was estimated in two ways; by nutrient deficit measurements, and by primary production rate measurements using separate 14C-labelled radioisotope and 15N-labelled stable isotope uptake incubations. The resulting average annual exportable primary production estimates at the time-series site from nutrient deficit and primary production rates were 13 and 16 mol C m-2, respectively. Regenerated primary production was measured using 15N-labelled ammonium and urea uptake, and was low throughout the sampling period. The exportable primary production measurements were compared with sediment trap flux measurements from 2 locations; the time-series site and at a site 40 km away in deeper water. Results showed ˜1% of the upper mixed layer exportable primary production was exported to traps at 200 m depth at the time-series site (total water column depth 520 m). The maximum particle flux rate to sediment traps at the deeper offshore site (total water column depth 820 m) was lower than the flux at the coastal time-series site. Flux of particulate organic carbon was similar throughout the spring-summer high flux period for both sites. Remineralisation of particulate organic matter predominantly occurred in the upper water-column (<200 m depth), with minimal remineralisation below 200 m, at both sites. This highly productive region on the Western Antarctic Peninsula is therefore best characterised as 'high recycling, low export'.

  9. Low-flow characteristics of streams on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haushild, W.L.; LaFrance, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    Streams in lowland basins of the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, generally have their low flows in summer and peak flows in winter, whereas streams originating at higher elevations in the mountains have their low flows in late summer-early fall and they have both winter and spring peak flows. Data from long-term stations indicate no important trend in low flows during 1940-73 but they do indicate that low flows generally were lower during the relatively dry 1940 's than during the relatively wet 1950-73 period. The magnitude and frequency of 7-day low flows were estimated for 116 sites either from frequency analyses of a data at long-term stations or from correlation of data at a short-term station with data at an appropriate long-term station. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. Elemental composition of Usnea sp lichen from Potter Peninsula, 25 de Mayo (King George) Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Bubach, Débora; Catán, Soledad Perez; Di Fonzo, Carla; Dopchiz, Laura; Arribére, Maria; Ansaldo, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Several pollutants, which include metals, are present in the Antarctic atmosphere, snow, marine and terrestrial organisms. This work reports the elements incorporated by Usnea sp thalli in Potter Peninsula, 25 de Mayo (King George) Island, South Shetlands, Antarctica. Geological origin was analyzed as possible sources of elements. For this purpose, correlations were done using a geochemical tracer, principal component analysis and enrichment factors were computed. Lithophile elements from particulate matter were present in most of the sampling sites. Bromine, Se and Hg showed the highest enrichment factors suggesting other sources than the particulate matter. Mercury values found in Usnea sp were in the same range as those reported for Deception Island (South Shetlands) and remote areas from the Patagonia Andes. PMID:26741560

  11. Magnetic Properties of Quaternary Deposits, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska -- Implications for Aeromagnetic Anomalies of Upper Cook Inlet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, R.W.; Haeussler, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    We measured magnetic susceptibilities of exposed Quaternary deposits on several beach cliffs and river banks on the Kenai Peninsula near Soldotna, Alaska. Data, descriptions, and photos from nine sites are included in this report. The mean susceptibility for Quaternary materials in this region is approximately 2.5 x 10-3 SI units. This is sufficiently magnetic to produce subtle aeromagnetic anomalies such as those observed to correlate with topographic features in the region of the measurements. The highest susceptibilities measured (greater than 20 x 10-3 SI units) may help, at least in part, to explain moderate amplitude aeromagnetic anomalies observed elsewhere in Cook Inlet, particularly those relating to structures showing Quaternary movement. Comparison of measured beach cliff susceptibility and susceptibility predicted from idealized formulas and two-dimensional cliff models suggests that measured susceptibilies underestimate true bulk susceptibility by 20 percent to 50 percent in this region.

  12. Bathymetric-based habitat model for yelloweye rockfish (Sebastes ruberrimus) on Alaska's outer Kenai Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumm, Joshua D.

    Motivated primarily as part of a habitat-based stock assessment, we explored the feasibility of modeling yelloweye rockfish (Sebastes ruberrimus) habitat in Southcentral Alaska using high-resolution multibeam bathymetry. A generalized linear model was developed with bathymetrically derived terrain metrics (rugosity, slope, bathymetric position index, and distance-to-rock) as predictor variables. The model was parameterized and validated using remotely operated vehicle observations. When evaluated for the Chiswell Island training area, the model correctly classified 96.0% (n = 100) of a reserved set of presence/absence validation points (Cohen's Kappa = 0.92; AUC = 0.98). When evaluated for the independent Nuka Island testing area, the overall accuracy was 82.5% (n=332; Kappa = 0.65; AUC = 0.95). This study demonstrates that suitable yelloweye habitat can be modeled with reasonable accuracy using high-resolution multibeam bathymetry, and such a model is fairly portable among sites along the Kenai Peninsula's outer coast.

  13. Exploring the vents, ridges, rocks, and geothermal spas of the Reykjanes Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsayer, Kate

    2012-07-01

    Renting a submarine to explore the deepsea basalt lava flows of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is a pricey proposition. But on a field trip to Iceland's Reykjanes Peninsula following the Chapman Conference on Volcanism and the Atmosphere, participants were able to stay on dry land to explore the volcanic features of the ridge where the Eurasian and North American plates are spreading apart. "If you're interested in ocean ridge basalt, the Reykjanes Ridge is your place," said Karl Grönvold, a geochemist with the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland. Grönvold led the daylong field trip to geologic sites of interest in southwest Iceland, including the ridge, fumaroles, boiling hot pots, and the geothermal spa and power plant at the Blue Lagoon.

  14. High shrew diversity on Alaska's Seward Peninsula: Community assembly and environmental change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hope, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    In September 2010, 6 species of shrews (genus: Sorex) were collected at a single locality on the Seward Peninsula of Alaska. Such high sympatric diversity within a single mammalian genus is seldom realized. This phenomenon at high latitudes highlights complex Arctic community dynamics that reflect significant turnover through time as a consequence of environmental change. Each of these shrew species occupies a broad geographic distribution collectively spanning the entire Holarctic, although the study site lies within Eastern Beringia, near the periphery of all individual ranges. A review of published genetic evidence reflects a depauperate shrew community within ice-free Beringia through the last glaciation, and recent assembly of current diversity during the Holocene.

  15. Modelling Chemical Patterns of Atmospheric Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratola, Nuno; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) such as PBDEs, PCBs, organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) or PAHs, are widespread and generated in a multitude of anthropogenic (and natural for PAHs) processes and although they are found in the environment at low concentrations, possess an extraordinary carcinogenic capacity (Baussant et al., 2001) and high ecotoxicity due to their persistence in different matrices (air, soil, water, living organisms). In particular, PAHs are originated by combustion processes or release from fossil fuels and can be transported in the atmosphere over long distances in gaseous or particulate matter (Baek et al., 1991). The establishment of strategies for sampling and chemical transport modelling of SVOCs in the atmosphere aiming the definition and validation of the spatial, temporal and chemical transport patterns of contaminants can be achieved by an integrated system of third-generation models that represent the current state of knowledge in air quality modelling and experimental data collected in field campaigns. This has implications in the fields of meteorology, atmospheric chemistry and even climate change. In this case, an extensive database already obtained on levels of atmospheric PAHs from biomonitoring schemes in the Iberian Peninsula fuelled the establishment of the first models of behaviour for PAHs. The modelling system WRF+CHIMERE was implemented with high spatial and temporal resolution to the Iberian Peninsula in this first task (9 km for the Iberian Peninsula, 3 km to Portugal, 1 hour), using PAHs atmospheric levels collected over a year-long sampling scheme comprising 4 campaigns (one per season) in over 30 sites. Daily information on meteorological parameters such as air temperature, humidity, rainfall or wind speed and direction was collected from the weather stations closest to the sampling sites. Diagnosis and forecasts of these meteorological variables using MM5 or WRF were used to feed a chemistry transport model

  16. Distribution of Radioactive Materials in the Absheron Peninsula, Azerbaijan - 13567

    SciTech Connect

    Vandergraaf, Tjalle T.; Mamedov, Gudrat G.; Ramazanov, Mahammadali A.; Badalov, Vatan H.; Naghiyev, Jalal A.; Mehdiyeva, Afat A.

    2013-07-01

    The Absheron Peninsula forms the extreme Eastern part of Azerbaijan and juts into the Caspian Sea. The region has a long history of oil and gas exploration, transport, and processing and includes a number of abandoned chemical plants that were used in the separation of iodine from formation waters. As a result of lax environmental standards during the Soviet era, the industrial activity has led to serious contamination from oils residues, heavy metals and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Radiometric surveys performed over a wide range of the Absheron Peninsula showed generally low NORM concentrations. However, radiation levels two to three orders of magnitude above background levels were detected at two abandoned iodine separation plants near the capital city, Baku. These elevated radiation levels are mainly due to Ra-226 and U-238 with lower contributions from Ra-228 and U-235. (authors)

  17. Ground-water flow and water quality in the sand aquifer of Long Beach Peninsula, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, B.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a study that was undertaken to improve the understanding of ground-water flow and water quality in the coastal sand aquifer of the Long Beach Peninsula of southwestern Washington. Data collected for the study include monthly water levels at 103 wells and 28 surface-water sites during 1992, and water-quality samples from about 40 wells and 13 surface-water sites in February and July 1992. Ground water generally flows at right angles to a ground-water divide along the spine of the low-lying peninsula. Historical water-level data indicate that there was no long-term decline in the water table from 1974 to 1992. The water quality of shallow ground water was generally good with a few local problems. Natural concentrations of dissolved iron were higher than 0.3 milligrams per liter in about one-third of the samples. The dissolved-solids concentrations were generally low, with a range of 56 to 218 milligrams per liter. No appreciable amount of seawater has intruded into the sand aquifer, chloride concentrations were low, with a maximum of 52 milligrams per liter. Agricultural activities do not appear to have significantly affected the quality of ground water. Concentrations of nutrients were low in the cranberry-growing areas, and selected pesticides were not found above the analytical detection limits. Septic systems probably caused an increase in the concentration of nitrate from medians of less than 0.05 milligrams per liter in areas of low population density to 0.74 milligrams per liter in areas of high density.

  18. Evaluation Of Elastic Strain Accumulation In The Southern Indian Peninsula By GPS-Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanababu, R.; Ec, M.; Tummala, C.

    2004-12-01

    The computed elastic strain accumulation in the southern Indian peninsula from the GPS derived velocity fields of the global network of GPS stations, in and around the Indian plate which includes Maitri, Indian Antarctic Station, show a significant departure from rigid plate behaviour in a manner consistent with the mapped intra plate stress field, observations of deformations and seismicity in the region. Our results of intraplate strain accumulation within Antarctica Plate covering three sites MAIT, CAS1 and DAV1 are 1.8x10-9yr-1, 1.6x10-9yr-1 and 1.1x10-9yr-1, respectively. Similarly, the estimates of interplate strain accumulation between Antarctica and other plates Somalia (SEY1), Africa (HARO), Australia (YAR1), and diffuse plate boundary between India and Australia (COCO) are found to be 1.1x10-9yr-1, 1.0x10-10yr-1, 1.27x10-8yr-1 and 1.18x10-8yr-1, respectively. These estimates are in good agreement with the earlier studies on estimation of global strain rate. The combined GPS and seismic analysis confirm the emergence of diffuse plate boundary between India and Australia and relates to the late Miocene Himalayan uplift. The calculated stress field in the West of the Indian Peninsula has a roughly N-S directed tensional and E-W oriented compressional character and the velocity vectors of all other sites throw a significant insight into the plausible causes of the strain accumulation processes in the Indian Ocean and the northward movement of Indian plate.

  19. Prokaryotic Community in Lacustrine Sediments of Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Maritime Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Gugliandolo, Concetta; Michaud, Luigi; Lo Giudice, Angelina; Lentini, Valeria; Rochera, Carlos; Camacho, Antonio; Maugeri, Teresa Luciana

    2016-02-01

    Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Antarctica), the largest seasonally ice-free region of the Maritime Antarctica, holds a large number of lakes, ponds, and streams. The prokaryotic structure and bacterial diversity in sediment samples collected during the 2008-2009 austral summer from five inland lakes, two coastal lakes, and an estuarine site were analyzed by Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) and 16S rRNA 454 tag pyrosequencing techniques, respectively. Differently from inland lakes, which range around the oligotrophic status, coastal lakes are eutrophic environments, enriched by nutrient inputs from marine animals. Although the prokaryotic abundances (estimated as DAPI stained cells) in sediment samples were quite similar among inland and coastal lakes, Bacteria always far dominated over Archaea. Despite the phylogenetic analysis indicated that most of sequences were affiliated to a few taxonomic groups, mainly referred to Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria, their relative abundances greatly differed from each site. Differences in bacterial composition showed that lacustrine sediments were more phyla rich than the estuarine sediment. Proteobacterial classes in lacustrine samples were dominated by Betaproteobacteria (followed by Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria), while in the estuarine sample, they were mainly related to Gammaproteobacteria (followed by Deltaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria). Higher number of sequences of Alphaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes were observed in sediments of inland lakes compared to those of coastal lakes, whereas Chloroflexi were relatively more abundant in the sediments of coastal eutrophic lakes. As demonstrated by the great number of dominant bacterial genera, bacterial diversity was higher in the sediments of inland lakes than that in coastal lakes

  20. Fossils from bore holes on the Eastern Shore Peninsula, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, Ruth; Gardner, Julia A.; Sohn, I.G.

    1955-01-01

    This report lists Foraminifera, Mollusca, and Ostracoda in five bore holes that penetrated a maximum of 445 feet of section in sediments of Pleistocene and Miocene age, and discusses the paleoecologic and stratigraphic significance of the fossils. It includes the contents of references 6, 16, and 18 of Virginia Division of Geology Mineral Resources Circular No. 2, dealing with the geology and groundwater resources of the Eastern Shore peninsula.

  1. Spatial and temporal variability of periglaciation of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, M.; Serrano, E.; Gómez-Ortiz, A.; González-Amuchastegui, M. J.; Nieuwendam, A.; Palacios, D.; Pérez-Alberti, A.; Pellitero-Ondicol, R.; Ruiz-Fernández, J.; Valcárcel, M.; Vieira, G.; Antoniades, D.

    2016-04-01

    Active periglacial processes are currently marginal in the Iberian Peninsula, spatially limited to the highest mountain ranges. However, a wide variety of periglacial deposits and landforms are distributed in low and mid-altitude environments, which shows evidence of past periods of enhanced periglacial activity. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the present knowledge of past periglacial activity in the Iberian Peninsula. The chronological framework takes four main stages into account: the last glaciation, deglaciation, Holocene and present-day processes. This study focuses on the highest massifs (Pyrenees, Cantabrian Range, NW ranges, Central Range, Iberian Range, Sierra Nevada) as well as other lower elevation environments, namely the central Iberian Meseta. During the last glaciation the periglacial belt extended to much lower altitudes than today, reaching current sea level in the NW corner of the Iberian Peninsula. A wide range of geomorphological landforms and sedimentary records is indicative of very active periglacial processes during that phase, in some cases related to permafrost conditions (i.e., block streams, rock glaciers). Most of the inactive landforms and deposits in low and mid-elevations in Iberia are also related to this phase. The massive deglaciation of the Iberian massifs was caused by a gradual increase in temperatures. The deglaciation phase was only interrupted by a short period with colder conditions (the Younger Dryas) that reactivated periglacial processes in the formerly glaciated cirques of the highest lands, specifically with the widespread development of rock glaciers. During the Holocene, periglacial processes have been only active in the highest ranges, shifting in altitude according to temperature regimes and moisture conditions. The Little Ice Age saw the reactivation of periglacial activity in lower elevations than today. Currently, periglacial processes are only active in elevations exceeding 2500 m in the southern

  2. Holocene records of geomagnetic field behavior from a north-south transect along the western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachfeld, S. A.; Shah, D. P.; St-Onge, M.; St-Onge, G.

    2013-12-01

    Geochronology is inherently difficult when working with Antarctic margin sediments. Radiocarbon dating and oxygen isotope stratigraphy are challenging or impossible in sites with poor preservation of biogenic calcite. Radiocarbon dating of the acid insoluble organic matter (AIOM) is further complicated by organically lean sediment and the presence of reworked organic carbon or detrital carbon from sedimentary rocks. These complications limit the ability to interpret a paleoclimate record. Geomagnetic paleointensity dating is a proven 'tuning' technique that has been successfully applied in several studies around the Antarctic margin. However, the reference curves to which these sites were tuned were constructed primarily from Northern Hemisphere data. Here we present paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) and relative paleointensity (RPI) data from three Antarctic Peninsula sites that possess independent chronologies and which have moderate to ultra-high sedimentation rates (40 - 700 cm/ka). Maxwell Bay, located in the volcanic South Shetland Islands, is an ultra-high-resolution site with strongly magnetic sediments from which the Shallow Drilling (SHALDRIL) program recovered a 108-m record spanning the last 14 ka. Outer Barilari Bay and Hugo Island Trough, which lie to the South along the western Antarctic Peninsula, are moderate resolution sites with a high proportion of biogenic silica. Maxwell Bay and Bariliari Bay are unique in that they possess homogenous sediment and uniform magnetic mineral assemblages, while also preserving biogenic calcite, a rare combination on the Antarctic margin. All three sites preserve strong, stable remanent magnetizations with an easily isolated characteristic component and MAD values generally < 2°, with the exception of turbidites, intervals with abundant dropstones, and biosiliceous ooze intervals. Inclination values fluctuate between the present-day value at the cores sites (-58°) and the geomagnetic axial dipole inclination

  3. Earthquake induced landslide hazard field observatory in the Avcilar peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigarre, Pascal; Coccia, Stella; Theoleyre, Fiona; Ergintav, Semih; Özel, Oguz; Yalçinkaya, Esref; Lenti, Luca; Martino, Salvatore; Gamba, Paolo; Zucca, Francesco; Moro, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Earthquake-triggered landslides have an increasing disastrous impact in seismic regions due to the fast growing urbanization and infrastructures. Just considering disasters from the last fifteen years, among which the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake, the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, and the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, these events generated tens of thousands of coseismic landslides. Those resulted in amazing death toll and considerable damages, affecting the regional landscape including its hydrological main features. Despite a strong impetus in research during past decades, knowledge on those geohazards is still fragmentary, while databases of high quality observational data are lacking. These phenomena call for further collaborative researches aiming eventually to enhance preparedness and crisis management. The MARSITE project gathers research groups in a comprehensive monitoring activity developed in the Sea of Marmara Region, one of the most densely populated parts of Europe and rated at high seismic risk level since the 1999 Izmit and Duzce devastating earthquakes. Besides the seismic threat, landslides in Turkey and in this region constitute an important source of loss. The 6th Work Package of MARSITE project gathers 9 research groups to study earthquake-induced landslides focusing on two sub-regional areas of high interest among which the Cekmece-Avcilar peninsula, located westwards of Istanbul, as a highly urbanized concentrated landslide prone area, showing high susceptibility to both rainfalls while affected by very significant seismic site effects. A multidisciplinary research program based on pre-existing studies has been designed with objectives and tasks linked to constrain and tackle progressively some challenging issues related to data integration, modeling, monitoring and mapping technologies. Since the start of the project, progress has been marked on several important points as follows. The photogeological interpretation and analysis of ENVISAT-ERS DIn

  4. Coastal-Change and Glaciological Maps of the Antarctic Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrigno, Jane G.; Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Thomson, Janet W.

    2002-01-01

    In 2000, the Glacier Studies Project (GSP) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Mapping and Geographic Information Centre (MAGIC) of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) began a formal cooperative 3-year endeavor to prepare three maps of the Antarctic Peninsula region. The maps will be based on a large variety of cartographic, aerial photograph, satellite image, and ancillary historical datasets archived at each institution. The maps will document dynamic changes on the peninsula during the past 50 years. The three maps are part of a planned 24-map series (I-2600) being published by the USGS in both paper and digital format (see USGS Fact Sheet FS-050-98 at http://pubs.usgs.gov/factsheet/fs50-98/); the maps are of the Trinity Peninsula area (I-2600-A), the Larsen Ice Shelf area (I-2600-B), and the Palmer Land area (I-2600-C). The 1:1,000,000-scale maps will encompass an area 1,800 kilometers (km) long and with an average width of 400 km (range of 200 to 600 km wide); the area is between lats 60? and 76? S. and longs 52? and 80? W. Each of the three maps will include an interpretive booklet that analyzes documented historical changes in the fronts of the ice shelves and termini of the outlet glaciers.

  5. Preliminary assessment of aridity conditions in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, C.; Corte-Real, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Aridity is one of the key elements characterizing the climate of a region, having a severe impact on human activities. Aiming at assessing aridity conditions in the Iberian Peninsula, the spatial distribution of the UNEP aridity index is analyzed during the period 1901-2012. Gridded precipitation and potential evapotranspiration datasets are used on a monthly basis. Results show that the southern half of Iberia is particularly vulnerable to water stress and hence to desertification processes. In particular, the UNEP aridity index reveals an increase and northward extension of the semi-arid regime in the Iberian Peninsula between 1901 and 2012. More than 50% of the north and western territory have experienced humid/sub-humid conditions, while the other regions underwent semi-arid settings. Results also reveal that climate was subjected to spatial and temporal variabilities with an overall statistically significant (at a 95% confidence level) trend to aridification in the south-easternmost and central regions. The remaining territory of the Iberian Peninsula does not reveal statistically significant trends.

  6. Severe dust storms over the Arabian Peninsula: Observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    shalaby, ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Dust aerosols and dust storms have tremendous effects on human health and all development activities. Also atmospheric dust plays a major role in the Earth climate system by its interaction with radiation and clouds. Severe dust storms are considered the severest phenomena in the Arabian Peninsula, since they are occurring all the year round with maximum activity and frequency in Summer. The Regional Climate Model (RegCM4) has been used to simulate severe dust storms events in the Arabian Peninsula from 1998 up to 2011. This long period simulation shows a typical pattern and dynamical features of the large-scale severe dust storm in winter seasons and summer seasons. The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from the model outputs have been compared against ground--base observations of three AERONET stations (i.e., Kuwait, Mazeria and Solar-Village) and daily space--based observations of MISR, Deepblue and OMI. The dynamical analysis of the large—scale severe dust storms reveal the difference between winter time storms and summer time storm. Winter time storm occurs when the cold air front in the north is coupled with the extension of the Red Sea trough from the south. However, the summer time storm is associated with strong Shamal wind that extend from northern Kuwait to the southern Arabian Peninsula.

  7. Mapping the HLA diversity of the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Romòn, Iñigo; Montes, Carmen; Ligeiro, Dario; Trindade, Hélder; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Nunes, José Manuel; Buhler, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    The polymorphism of HLA genes can be used to reconstruct human peopling history. However, this huge diversity impairs successful matching in stem cell transplantation, a situation which has led to the recruitment of millions of donors worldwide. In parallel to the increase of recruitment, registries are progressively relying on information from population genetics to optimize their donor pools in terms of HLA variability. In this study, the HLA data of 65,000 Spanish bone marrow donors were analyzed together with 60,000 Portuguese individuals to provide a comprehensive HLA genetic map of the Iberian Peninsula. The frequencies of many alleles were shown to vary continuously across the Peninsula, either increasing or decreasing from the Mediterranean coast to the Atlantic domain or from the Strait of Gibraltar to the Pyrenees and Bay of Biscay. Similar patterns were observed for several haplotypes. In addition, within some regions neighboring provinces share a close genetic similarity. These results outline the genetic landscape of the Iberian Peninsula, and confirm that the analysis of the HLA polymorphism may reveal relevant signatures of past demographic events even when data from donor registries are used. This conclusion stimulates future developments of the Spanish registry, presented here for the first time. PMID:27377016

  8. Rate of collisional deformation in Kamchatsky Peninsula, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhurin, A. I.; Pinegina, T. K.; Ponomareva, V. V.; Zelenin, E. A.; Mikhailyukova, P. G.

    2014-03-01

    Detailed data are discussed on the rate of Holocene horizontal and vertical movements along a fault in the southeastern Kamchatsky Peninsula, which is situated between the converging Aleutian and Kamchatka island arcs. The fault is the northern boundary of the block invading into the peninsula under pressure of the Komandorsky Block of the Aleutian arc. The rate of right-lateral slip along the fault was increasing in the Holocene and reached 18-19 mm/yr over the last 2000 years and 20 mm/yr by contemporary time. Comparison of these estimates with those that follow from offsets of older rocks also indicates acceleration of horizontal movements along the fault from the early Quaternary to the present. The results obtained from rates of GPS station migration show that about half the rate of the northwestern drift of the Komandorsky Block is consumed for movement of the block of the southern side of the fault. The remainder of movement of the Komandorsky Block is consumed for movements (probably, underthrusting) at the eastern continental slope of the Kamchatsky Peninsula.

  9. Glacial Geomorphic Characteristics of the Antarctic Peninsula Fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellner, J. S.; Munoz, Y. P.; Mead, K. A.; Hardin, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    A distinctive suite of subglacial geomorphic features, representing the grounding of an ice sheet and its subsequent retreat, has been well documented for many parts of the Antarctic continental shelf. Geomorphic features include meltwater channels, drumlins, mega-scale glacial lineations, and gullies cut into the upper slope. Many of these same features occur in more recently deglaciated fjords, but at different scales and in different combinations. We have surveyed twelve fjords on the Antarctic Peninsula, from the Graham Land Coast to Hope Bay as well as on Anvers Island and in the South Shetland Islands. Surveys include multibeam swath bathymetry, CHIRP 3.5 kHz seismic, and sediment cores. Recently, we have reprocessed much of the multibeam data using new software allowing higher-resolution imagery. Unlike on the outer continental shelf of the Antarctic Peninsula, where there is a relatively simple suite of geomorphic features and a uniform retreat history, the fjords on the inner shelf show a complex geomorphic pattern representing somewhat unique glacial retreat histories for each fjord. Several fjords have distinctive grounding zone wedge deposits, and some fjords have such wedges in multiple locations, representing multiple pauses in the retreat history, or a stepped retreat of the ice. Drumlins and mega-scale glacial lineations are present in the fjords, but extend for kms rather than the tens of kms that are typical of the outer shelf. If drumlins are interpreted to indicate acceleration of grounded ice, as they are on the outer shelf, then there must have been multiple zones of acceleration across the flow path of the ice as drumlin sets occur in multiple zones in a single flow path. The inner parts of many fjords along the coast of the peninsula are characterized by features interpreted as erosional meltwater channels, although such features are not common in fjords in the islands off the peninsula, despite the similar scale of the fjords themselves

  10. Study of Tropospheric ozone (TOR) variability over Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Pavan; Bortoli, Daniele; Salgado, Rui; Antón, Manuel; João Costa, Maria; Silva, Ana Maria

    2010-05-01

    To study tropospheric ozone (O3) variability and the increase in the number of months with higher tropospheric O3 concentration over the Iberian Peninsula, NASA Langley Tropospheric Ozone Residual (TOR) data has been analyzed for the 1979-2005 period. The maximum tropospheric O3 amount over the entire Iberian Peninsula was found in June (~41 DU) and a minimum in December (~29 DU). Over North Atlantic Coast (NAC) and Mediterranean Coast (MC) the maximum tropospheric O3 amount was found in July (~41 DU) and June (~42 DU) and the minimum was found in December (~28 DU and ~30 DU, respectively). The West Atlantic Coast (WAC), Pyrenees Mountain Range (PMR) and Central Iberian Peninsula (CIP) have an extended period of maximum tropospheric O3 amount, during June and July over WAC (~44 DU) and PMR (~39 DU), and during May, June and July over CIP (~40 DU). Similarly, WAC, PMR and CIP have an extended period of minimum tropospheric O3 amount, during December and January over WAC (~30 DU) and CIP (~29 DU) and November and December over PMR (~28 DU). The high concentration of ozone in July over the Atlantic Ocean near Iberian Peninsula are due to the presence of Azores anticyclone, extending in ridge through the Cantabrian Sea to the British Isles and West and Central Europe, and related photochemistry and dynamics, has profound effect on the observed higher ozone concentration over WAC zone. Strong seasonal cycle in tropospheric O3 amount has been observed with large variation over NAC (~49%), followed by WAC (~48%) and MC (~41%) compared to CIP and PMR (~38%). When the data are compared over the Iberian Peninsula for the two periods (1979-1993 and 1997-2005), a systematic increase in the number of months with higher tropospheric O3 concentration has been observed during the second period with respect to the first. These increases are almost 8% to 24% over NAC, 6% to 17% over WAC, 5% to 24% over CIP, 6% to 23% over MC and 13% to 18% over PMR. It has been observed that

  11. Status and distribution of the Kittlitz's Murrelet Brachyramphus brevirostris along the Alaska Peninsula and Kodiak and Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madison, Erica N.; Piatt, John F.; Arimitsu, Mayumi L.; Romano, Marc D.; van Pelt, Thomas I.; Nelson, S. Kim; Williams, Jeffrey C.; DeGange, Anthony R.

    2011-01-01

    The Kittlitz's Murrelet Brachyramphus brevirostris is adapted for life in glacial-marine ecosystems, being concentrated in the belt of glaciated fjords in the northern Gulf of Alaska from Glacier Bay to Cook Inlet. Most of the remaining birds are scattered along coasts of the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands, where they reside in protected bays and inlets, often in proximity to remnant glaciers or recently deglaciated landscapes. We summarize existing information on Kittlitz's Murrelet in this mainly unglaciated region, extending from Kodiak Island in the east to the Near Islands in the west. From recent surveys, we estimated that ~2400 Kittlitz's Murrelets were found in several large embayments along the Alaska Peninsula, where adjacent ice fields feed silt-laden water into the bays. On Kodiak Island, where only remnants of ice remain today, observations of Kittlitz's Murrelets at sea were uncommon. The species has been observed historically around the entire Kodiak Archipelago, however, and dozens of nest sites were found in recent years. We found Kittlitz's Murrelets at only a few islands in the Aleutian chain, notably those with long complex shorelines, high mountains and remnant glaciers. The largest population (~1600 birds) of Kittlitz's Murrelet outside the Gulf of Alaska was found at Unalaska Island, which also supports the greatest concentration of glacial ice in the Aleutian Islands. Significant populations were found at Atka (~1100 birds), Attu (~800) and Adak (~200) islands. Smaller numbers have been reported from Unimak, Umnak, Amlia, Kanaga, Tanaga, Kiska islands, and Agattu Island, where dozens of nest sites have been located in recent years. Most of those islands have not been thoroughly surveyed, and significant pockets of Kittlitz's Murrelets may yet be discovered. Our estimate of ~6000 Kittlitz's Murrelets along the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands is also likely to be conservative because of the survey protocols we employed (i.e. early

  12. Ice flow velocities and elevation change at Fleming Glacier, Wordie Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, A.; Wendt, J.; Bown, F.; Rivera, A.; Zamora, R.; Bravo, C.; Casassa, G.

    2009-04-01

    Glaciers in the Antarctic Peninsula have been responding to the pronounced atmospheric warming in the region (Vaughan et al. 2003) with frontal retreat (Cook et al. 2005), ice shelf collapse (Rott et al. 1996) and ice flow acceleration and thinning (Rignot et al. 2004; Shepherd et al. 2003; Pritchard & Vaughan 2007). These trends have progressively migrated southwards along the Antarctic Peninsula causing, for instance, a substantial retreat of Wilkins Ice Shelf (70.2˚ S) in 2008. At 69.3˚ S, but 300 km to the east, Wordie Ice Shelf experienced a major reduction in size in the 1980s (Doake & Vaughan 1991). Available information about this ice shelf and its feeding glaciers dates back to the 1970s when ice thickness and velocity measurements were carried out on Fleming Glacier (Doake 1975). Although initially it was thought that the post-collapse conditions of the feeding glaciers remained unchanged (Vaughan 1993), more recent evidence shows that glaciers accelerated after the ice shelf collapse and substantial glacier thinning has occurred (Rignot et al. 2005). We present data acquired during two field expeditions to Fleming Glacier. During the first season in November 2007, we installed an Automatic Weather Station (AWS) and a permanent GPS site. Additional data including a local GPS network, ground penetrating radar measurements and snow densities were collected. In December 2008, during the second field campaign, surface elevation data were acquired using an airborne laser scanner along a trajectory between Gibbs Glacier and Airy Glacier, along the ice divide between both sides of the Peninsula and on Fleming Glacier. The AWS was found protruding only 20 cm above the snow surface, demonstrating the high snow accumulation in the area, which was sufficient to cover the 4 m high tower installed in 2007 and that annual variability in the mass accumulation is significant. The station collected data for 250 days. The permanent GPS stopped collecting data after

  13. Soils and landforms from Fildes Peninsula and Ardley Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Roberto F. M.; Schaefer, Carlos E. G. R.; López-Martínez, Jerónimo; Simas, Felipe N. B.; Haus, Nick W.; Serrano, Enrique; Bockheim, James G.

    2014-11-01

    Fildes Peninsula (F.P.) and Ardley Island (A.I.) are among the first ice-free areas in Maritime Antarctica. Since the last glacial retreat in this part of Antarctica (8000 to 5000 years BP), the landscape in these areas evolved under paraglacial to periglacial conditions, with pedogenesis marked by cryogenic processes. We carried out a detailed soil and geomorphology survey, with full morphological and analytical description for both areas; forty-eight soil profiles representing different landforms were sampled, analyzed and classified according to the U.S. Soil Taxonomy and the World Reference Base for Soil Resources (WRB). Soils are mostly turbic, moderately developed, with podzolization and strong phosphatization (chemical weathering of rock minerals and formation of amorphous Al and Fe minerals) in former ornithogenic sites while in areas with poor vegetation show typical features of cryogenic weathering. Nivation, solifluction, cryoturbation, frost weathering, ablation and surface erosion are widespread. The most represented landform system by surface in Fildes Peninsula is the periglacial one, and 15 different periglacial landforms types have been identified and mapped. These features occupy about 30% of the land surface, in which patterned ground and stone fields are the most common landforms. Other significant landforms as protalus lobes, rock glaciers or debris lobes indicate the extensive presence of permafrost. Soil variability was high, in terms of morphological, physical and chemical properties, due to varying lithic contributions and mixing of different rocks, as well as to different degrees of faunal influence. Three soil taxonomy orders were identified, whereas thirty four individual pedons were differentiated. Fildes Peninsula experiences a south-north gradient from periglacial to paraglacial conditions, and apparently younger soils and landforms are located close to the Collins Glacier. Arenosols/Entisols and Cryosols/Gelisols (frequently

  14. Comparison of multi-proxy data with past1000 model output over the Terminal Classic Period (800-1000 A.D.) on the Yucatan Peninsula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Pelt, S.; Kohfeld, K. E.; Allen, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    The decline of the Mayan Civilization is thought to be caused by a series of droughts that affected the Yucatan Peninsula during the Terminal Classic Period (T.C.P.) 800-1000 AD. The goals of this study are two-fold: (a) to compare paleo-model simulations of the past 1000 years with a compilation of multiple proxies of changes in moisture conditions for the Yucatan Peninsula during the T.C.P. and (b) to use this comparison to inform the modeling of groundwater recharge in this region, with a focus on generating the daily climate data series needed as input to a groundwater recharge model. To achieve the first objective, we compiled a dataset of 5 proxies from seven locations across the Yucatan Peninsula, to be compared with temperature and precipitation output from the Community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4), which is part of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) past1000 experiment. The proxy dataset includes oxygen isotopes from speleothems and gastropod/ostrocod shells (11 records); and sediment density, mineralogy, and magnetic susceptibility records from lake sediment cores (3 records). The proxy dataset is supplemented by a compilation of reconstructed temperatures using pollen and tree ring records for North America (archived in the PAGES2k global network data). Our preliminary analysis suggests that many of these datasets show evidence of drier and warmer climate on the Yucatan Peninsula around the T.C.P. when compared to modern conditions, although the amplitude and timing of individual warming and drying events varies between sites. This comparison with modeled output will ultimately be used to inform backward shift factors that will be input to a stochastic weather generator. These shift factors will be based on monthly changes in temperature and precipitation and applied to a modern daily climate time series for the Yucatan Peninsula to produce a daily climate time series for the T.C.P.

  15. An annotated checklist of the Chilopoda and Diplopoda (Myriapoda) of the Abrau Peninsula, northwestern Caucasus, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Semenyuk, Irina I.; Tuf, Ivan H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The Abrau Peninsula is located in northwestern Caucasus between the cities of Novorossiysk and Anapa, Krasnodar Province, Russia. This paper contains an annotated checklist of the Chilopoda and Diplopoda inhabiting the Abrau Peninsula. New information The fauna of the Abrau Peninsula comprises 17 centipede (4 orders) and 16 millipede (6 orders) species. Henia taurica, hitherto known only from the Crimea, has now been reported from several localities in the studied region. The study also reveals two possibly new millipede species. Statistical analyses showed that habitat preferences of myriapod species within the Abrau Peninsula are caused by species geographic distribution pattern and microbiotope preferences. PMID:27346949

  16. Quantitative distribution and functional groups of intertidal macrofaunal assemblages in Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, South Shetland Islands, Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoshou; Wang, Lu; Li, Shuai; Huo, Yuanzi; He, Peimin; Zhang, Zhinan

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate spatial distribution pattern of intertidal macrofauna, quantitative investigation was performed in January to February, 2013 around Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, South Shetland Islands. A total of 34 species were identified, which were dominated by Mollusca, Annelida and Arthropoda. CLUSTER analysis showed that macrofaunal assemblages at sand-bottom sites belonged to one group, which was dominated by Lumbricillus sp. and Kidderia subquadrata. Macrofaunal assemblages at gravel-bottom sites were divided into three groups while Nacella concinna was the dominant species at most sites. The highest values of biomass and Shannon-Wiener diversity index were found in gravel sediment and the highest value of abundance was in sand sediment of eastern coast. In terms of functional group, detritivorous and planktophagous groups had the highest values of abundance and biomass, respectively. Correlation analysis showed that macrofaunal abundance and biomass had significant positive correlations with contents of sediment chlorophyll a, phaeophorbide and organic matter. PMID:26233302

  17. Meteorological hazard assessment based on trends and abrupt changes in rainfall characteristics on the Korean peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Jang Hyun; Chung, Eun-Sung; Kim, Yeonjoo; Lee, Bo-Ram

    2015-09-01

    This study presents a statistical approach for assessing meteorological hazards based on trends and abrupt changes in precipitation characteristics. Daily rainfall data from 64 stations in South Korea (SK) and 27 stations in North Korea (NK) were used to identify temporal patterns in the rainfall characteristics of both regions using seven rainfall indices, such as the total annual rainfall and annual number of wet days. This study suggests the use of three steps in identifying meteorological hazards based on two statistical analyses. In step 1, we conducted a trend analysis of a 10-year moving average of the rainfall index using the Mann-Kendall (MK) trend test. Most stations (65.6 %) in SK exhibit clear increasing trends in five indices, whereas far fewer have data indicating any trends in five of the indices in NK (25.9 %). In step 2, abrupt changes in all rainfall indices were identified using a Bayesian Change Point (BCP) approach. The results contradict those from the MK trend analysis. The proportion of stations in NK where trends were identified is much higher than that in SK. In step 3, the results from the two previous steps were integrated to identify the meteorological hazards based on the identified trend and change point. The BCP approach can be used to identify meteorological hazards that MK cannot, as the former approach focuses on the change point during the entire period. As a result, meteorological stability at the sites of weather stations can be identified, and then the meteorological hazards across the entire Korean peninsula can be spatially interpolated. Although SK and NK are located on the same peninsula, distinct differences in the trends were observed.

  18. Holocene deglacial history of the northeast Antarctic Peninsula - A review and new chronological constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Joanne S.; Bentley, Michael J.; Roberts, Stephen J.; Binnie, Steven A.; Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.

    2011-12-01

    The northeast Antarctic Peninsula (NEAP) region is currently showing signs of significant environmental change, evidenced by acceleration of glacial retreat and collapse of both Larsen-A and -B ice shelves within the past 15 years. However, data on the past extent of the eastern margin of the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet (APIS) and its Holocene retreat history are sparse, and hence we cannot yet put the recent changes into a long-term context. In order to investigate the timing of deglaciation, we present 16 new cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure ages from sites on northern James Ross Island (Cape Lachman, Johnson Mesa and Terrapin Hill) and Seymour Island. The majority of the ages cluster around 6-10 ka, with three significantly older (25-31 ka). We combine these ages with existing terrestrial and marine radiocarbon deglaciation ages, and a compilation of existing swath bathymetry data, to quantify the temporal and spatial character of the regional glacial history. Ice had begun to retreat from the outer shelf by 18.3 ka, reaching Seymour Island by ˜8 ka. Northern James Ross Island began to deglaciate around the time of the Early Holocene Climatic Optimum (c. 11-9.5 ka). Deglaciation continued, and a transition from grounded to floating ice in Prince Gustav Channel occurred around 8 ka, separating the James Ross Island ice cap from the APIS. This occurred shortly before Prince Gustav Channel ice shelf began to disintegrate at 6.2 ka. Our results suggest there may be a bathymetric control on the spatial pattern of deglaciation in the NEAP.

  19. Subglacial morphology and glacial evolution of the Palmer deep outlet system, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domack, Eugene; Amblàs, David; Gilbert, Robert; Brachfeld, Stefanie; Camerlenghi, Angelo; Rebesco, Michele; Canals, Miquel; Urgeles, Roger

    2006-04-01

    The Palmer Deep is an erosional, inner-shelf trough located at the convergence of ice flow from three distinct accumulation centers. It served as a funnel for ice flow out across the continental shelf of the Antarctic Peninsula. Swath mapping of 1440 km 2 of seafloor in and adjacent to the Palmer Deep basin defines a large paleo-ice stream that flowed 230 km across the Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf during the Last Glacial Maximum (MIS-2). The unique perspective and detail of the Palmer Deep physiography allow us to recognize several phases of erosion and deposition in the outlet basin. These events are uniquely constrained by two ODP drill cores (sites 1099 and 1098) that together recovered over 150 m of latest Pleistocene and Holocene sediment. We divide this region of the continental shelf into three zones based upon mega- to meso-scale bathymetric features and emphasize that all three were part of one glacial outlet during the most recent period of glaciation. These zones include from inner shelf to outer shelf: the Palmer Deep basin, the Palmer Deep Outlet Sill and the Hugo Island Trough. Specific seafloor features associated with these zones include: relict terraces, sub-glacial lake deltas, channels and levees, debris slopes, spindle and out bed forms, mega-scale glacial lineations, morainal banks, and bank breach points. The origin of many of these features can be linked to the development of a sub-glacial lake basin within the Palmer Deep during or prior to MIS-2, its subsequent drainage, and recession of the Palmer Deep ice stream system. This sub-glacial lake system is reconstructed at the head of a major paleo-ice stream.

  20. Variability on the Hypoxic Conditions in the Northwestern Region of the Baja California Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustos-Serrano, H.

    2015-12-01

    The NW region of the Baja California peninsula in México is dominated by the California Current System (CCS). Dissolved oxygen (DO) is a key variable in water bodies because it is considered as a health in biological processes. Hypoxic conditions (DO 60 to 120 μmol kg-1) occur naturally in large areas of the ocean. In the Eastern Pacific, the DO can be altered by eutrophication, derived from anthropogenic activity, especially in shallow and enclosed seas. Fluctuations in the conditions of hypoxia zones may have significant ecological and economic impact. It is of interest in assessing whether hypoxic conditions in the vicinity of Bahia de Todos Santos (BTS) and Coronado Islands in México are altered by anthropogenic activity (Figs. 1 and 2 respectively). For the present study, we worked with data collected from oceanographic expeditions during the period October 2010 to June 2015. The DO was determined using a CTD (SBE Model 25) and by sea water collection with hydrographic bottles using a modification of the Winkler method. The signs of hypoxia are evident in the area near BTS and in the vicinity of Coronado´s Islands, mainly on locations between the Todos Santos Islands and the peninsula of Punta Banda, which shows that the hypoxic zone begins to occur in shallow water between 50-200 m depth. This particular area corresponds to the point where the Mexican Navy determined as a site for dredging materials from the ports of Ensenada and El Sauzal, it is possible that the anthropogenic activity alters the natural conditions of hypoxia in the area to enlarge. In June 2012 for the first time in that region we obtained sediment samples below 700 m depth, which are mixed terrigenous clastic and oceanic sediments.

  1. Soil-landform-plant communities relationships of a periglacial landscape at Potter Peninsula, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelking, E. L.; Schaefer, C. E. R.; Fernandes Filho, E. I.; de Andrade, A. M.; Spielmann, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    Integrated studies on the interplay between soils, periglacial geomorphology and plant communities are crucial for the understanding of climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems of Maritime Antarctica, one of the most sensitive areas to global warming. Knowledge on physical environmental factors that influence plant communities can greatly benefit studies on monitoring climate change in Maritime Antarctica, where new ice-free areas are being constantly exposed, allowing plant growth and organic carbon inputs. The relationship between topography, plant communities and soils was investigated in Potter Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica. We mapped the occurrence and distribution of plant communities and identified soil-landform-vegetation relationships. The vegetation map was obtained by classification of a Quickbird image, coupled with detailed landform and characterization of 18 soil profiles. The sub-formations were identified and classified, and we also determined the total elemental composition of lichens, mosses and grasses. Plant communities at Potter Peninsula occupy 23% of the ice-free area, at different landscape positions, showing decreasing diversity and biomass from the coastal zone to inland areas where sub-desert conditions prevail. There is a clear dependency between landform and vegetated soils. Soils with greater moisture or poorly drained, and acid to neutral pH, are favourable for mosses subformations. Saline, organic-matter rich ornithogenic soils of former penguin rookeries have greater biomass and diversity, with mixed associations of mosses and grasses, while stable felseenmeers and flat rocky cryoplanation surfaces are the preferred sites for Usnea and Himantormia lugubris lichens, at the highest surface. Lichens subformations cover the largest vegetated area, showing varying associations with mosses.

  2. Soil-landform-plant-community relationships of a periglacial landscape on Potter Peninsula, maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelking, E. L.; Schaefer, C. E. R.; Fernandes Filho, E. I.; de Andrade, A. M.; Spielmann, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    Integrated studies on the interplay between soils, periglacial geomorphology and plant communities are crucial for the understanding of climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems of maritime Antarctica, one of the most sensitive areas to global warming. Knowledge on physical environmental factors that influence plant communities can greatly benefit studies on the monitoring of climate change in maritime Antarctica, where new ice-free areas are being constantly exposed, allowing plant growth and organic carbon inputs. The relationship between topography, plant communities and soils was investigated on Potter Peninsula, King George Island, maritime Antarctica. We mapped the occurrence and distribution of plant communities and identified soil-landform-vegetation relationships. The vegetation map was obtained by classification of a QuickBird image, coupled with detailed landform and characterization of 18 soil profiles. The sub-formations were identified and classified, and we also determined the total elemental composition of lichens, mosses and grasses. Plant communities on Potter Peninsula occupy 23% of the ice-free area, at different landscape positions, showing decreasing diversity and biomass from the coastal zone to inland areas where sub-desert conditions prevail. There is a clear dependency between landform and vegetated soils. Soils that have greater moisture or are poorly drained, and with acid to neutral pH, are favourable for moss sub-formations. Saline, organic-matter-rich ornithogenic soils of former penguin rookeries have greater biomass and diversity, with mixed associations of mosses and grasses, while stable felsenmeers and flat rocky cryoplanation surfaces are the preferred sites for Usnea and Himantormia lugubris lichens at the highest surface. Lichens sub-formations cover the largest vegetated area, showing varying associations with mosses.

  3. Forest response to increasing typhoon activity on the Korean peninsula: evidence from oak tree-rings.

    PubMed

    Altman, Jan; Doležal, Jiří; Cerný, Tomáš; Song, Jong-Suk

    2013-02-01

    The globally observed trend of changing intensity of tropical cyclones over the past few decades emphasizes the need for a better understanding of the effects of such disturbance events in natural and inhabited areas. On the Korean Peninsula, typhoon intensity has increased over the past 100 years as evidenced by instrumental data recorded from 1904 until present. We examined how the increase in three weather characteristics (maximum hourly and daily precipitation, and maximum wind speed) during the typhoon activity affected old-growth oak forests. Quercus mongolica is a dominant species in the Korean mountains and the growth releases from 220 individuals from three sites along a latitudinal gradient (33-38°N) of decreasing typhoon activity were studied. Growth releases indicate tree-stand disturbance and improved light conditions for surviving trees. The trends in release events corresponded to spatiotemporal gradients in maximum wind speed and precipitation. A high positive correlation was found between the maximum values of typhoon characteristics and the proportion of trees showing release. A higher proportion of disturbed trees was found in the middle and southern parts of the Korean peninsula where typhoons are most intense. This shows that the releases are associated with typhoons and also indicates the differential impact of typhoons on the forests. Finally, we present a record of the changing proportion of trees showing release based on tree-rings for the period 1770-1979. The reconstruction revealed no trend during the period 1770-1879, while the rate of forest disturbances increased rapidly from 1880 to 1979. Our results suggest that if typhoon intensity rises, as is projected by some climatic models, the number of forest disturbance events will increase thus altering the disturbance regime and ecosystem processes. PMID:23504787

  4. Dust Optical Properties Over North Africa and Arabian Peninsula Derived from the AERONET Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, D.; Chin, M.; Yu, H.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    Dust optical properties over North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula are extracted from the quality assured multi-year datasets obtained at 14 sites of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). We select the data with (a) large aerosol optical depth (AOD >= 0.4 at 440 nm) and (b) small Angstrom exponent (A(sub ext)<= 0.2) for retaining high accuracy and reducing interference of non-dust aerosols. The result indicates that the major fraction of high aerosol optical depth days are dominated by dust over these sites even though it varies depending on location and time. We have found that the annual mean and standard deviation of single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, real refractive index, and imaginary refractive index for Saharan and Arabian desert dust is 0.944 +/- 0.005, 0.752 +/- 0.014, 1.498 +/- 0.032, and 0.0024 +/- 0.0034 at 550 nm wavelength, respectively. Dust aerosol selected by this method is less absorbing than the previously reported values over these sites. The weaker absorption of dust from this study is consistent with the studies using remote sensing techniques from satellite. These results can help to constrain uncertainties in estimating global dust shortwave radiative forcing.

  5. Channel initiation by groundwater sapping in Kanozan, Boso Peninsula of central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushi, Y.; Hattanji, T.

    2006-12-01

    Groundwater sapping is known as one of the important processes for channel initiation. We examined hydro- geomorphic factors that affect channel initiation by groundwater sapping. The study site (Mt. Kanozan) is located in Boso Peninsula, 50-km southeast of Tokyo, central Japan. Unconfined sandstone with high permeability comprises the mountain. Some features of piping, boiling and seepage erosion were found along first and second-order channels. Runoff at a spring site (SS) kept a constant discharge throughout year, and did not show any responses to typhoon storms with over 100-mm total rainfall. We surveyed micro-topography of 12 channel heads. Most channel heads have steep head slope (35-45 deg.) and gentle gradient downstream (5-10 deg.). Gentle slope of groundwater table immediately above channel head (roughly 7 deg. at the spring site SS) controls channel gradient, and affects distinct gradient transition at channel heads. We could not found any significant correlation between source area and local slope at channel heads, probably due to a scattered relation between surface drainage area and spring discharge. All channel heads are located in an altitude zone of 50-100 m, while the altitude of mountain peak is 270 m. The limited altitude distribution of channel heads implies that channel initiation of this area should be controlled by a critical altitude associated with deep groundwater flow systems.

  6. Scaling Tendency of Geothermal Waters Armutlu Peninsula, Northwestern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertekin, Can

    2015-04-01

    Prediction of scaling tendencies from geothermal waters is important for taking necessary precautions to prevent or control the scale formation. This study contains scaling tendency of geothermal outlets occurring through Armutlu Peninsula in Northwestern Turkey. The E-W trending region stretches into the Marmara Sea (ca. 117 km E-W by 45 km N-S) and is bounded to the north and the south by North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). The two branches of NAFZ traversing the peninsula control not only active seismicity but also geothermal discharges of the region. Widespread basement rocks across the peninsula including metamorphic assemblage of granitic and volcanic rocks host geothermal fluids. The two distinctive geothermal discharges (Armutlu and Yalova) take place through lineaments appurtenant to the northern branch of NAFZ. Their discharge temperatures of 65 ° C (Yalova) and 70 ° C (Armutlu) are the highest of the region. According to their water chemical results, scaling tendency were computed by using WATCH for different temperature steps under the assumptions of single-stage adiabatic boiling and equilibrium degassing. To evaluate their scaling tendencies, mean geothermal reservoir temperatures were computed by using chemical geothermometers. Scaling tendencies were plotted for calcite, amorphous silica and quartz minerals for different temperature values including reservoir temperatures. Their scaling behavior reveals that oversaturation with calcite and quartz minerals are rapidly attained for the geothermal fluids (Yalova and Armutlu) at relatively lower temperatures. Regarding amorphous silica, they are completely undersaturated. Besides, Langelier Saturation Index (LSI) and Ryznar Stability Index (RSI) were calculated. Their results depict scale formation due to being positive LSI and less than 6.0 of RSI values.

  7. Cenozoic evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-05-01

    Cenozoic evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin has involved a series of ridge (Aluk Ridge)-trench collisions between the Pacific and Antarctic plates. Subduction occurred episodically between segments of the Pacific plate that are bounded by major fracture zones. The age of ridge-trench collisions decreases from south to north along the margin. The very northern part of the margin, between the Hero and Shackleton fracture zones, has the last surviving Aluk-Antarctic spreading ridge segments and the only remaining trench topography. The sedimentary cover on the northern margin is relatively thin generally less than 1.5 km, thus providing a unique setting in which to examine margin evolution using high resolution seismic methods. Over 5,000 km of high resolution (water gun) seismic profiles were acquired from the Antarctic Peninsula margin during four cruises to the region. The margin is divided into discrete fracture-zone-bounded segments; each segment displays different styles of development. Highly tectonized active margin sequences have been buried beneath a seaward-thickening sediment wedge that represents the passive stage of margin development Ice caps, which have existed in the Antarctic Peninsula region since at least the late Oligocene, have advanced onto the continental shelf on numerous occasions, eroding hundreds of meters into the shelf and depositing a thick sequence of deposits characterized by till tongues and glacial troughs. Glacial erosion has been the main factor responsible for overdeepening of the shelf; isostasy is of secondary importance. As the shelf was lowered by glacial erosion, it was able to accommodate thicker and more unstable marine ice sheets. The shelf also became a vast reservoir for cold, saline shelf water, one of the key ingredients of Antarctic bottom water.

  8. Changing structures and dynamics of western Antarctic Peninsula Ice Shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, N. F.; Holt, T. O.; Quincey, D. J.; Fricker, H.; Siegfried, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last three decades, Antarctic Peninsula Ice Shelves have shown a pattern of sustained retreat, often ending in catastrophic and rapid breakup. This study provides a detailed analysis of the structures and dynamics of three western Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves: Bach, Stange and George VI Ice Shelves. Spatial extent and glaciological surface features were mapped for each ice shelf from 1973 to 2010 using optical and radar satellite images to assess their structural evolution, historical dynamics and stability. InSAR and feature-tracking methods were used to assess the recent dynamic configurations of the ice shelves from 1989 to 2010. Repeat ICESat measurements were used to evaluate their vertical changes from 2003 to 2008. On Bach Ice Shelf, the formation of two large fractures near the ice front is linked to widespread thinning (~2 ma-1) and sustained retreat (~360 km2). It looks likely that iceberg calving along these fractures will alter the frontal geometry sufficiently to promote enhanced, irreversible retreat within the next decade. On George VI Ice Shelf, acceleration is observed at both ice fronts; linked to a release of back-stresses through continued ice loss (1995 km2 in total). The most significant changes are recorded at its southern ice front, with ice flow accelerating up to 360% between ca. 1989 and ca. 2010, coupled with widespread rifting and a mean thinning rate of 2.1 ma-1. On Stange Ice Shelf, shear-induced fracturing was observed between two flow units, also linked to widespread thinning (~4.2 ma-1). A semi-quantitative assessment reveals that the southern margin of George VI Ice Shelf is most susceptible to rapid retreat, whilst its northern ice front, Bach Ice Shelf and the northern front of Stange Ice Shelf are more vulnerable than those situated on the east Antarctic Peninsula.

  9. Self-similarity patterns of precipitation in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morata, A.; Martín, M. L.; Luna, M. Y.; Valero, F.

    2006-05-01

    An objective classification of the precipitation field over the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands is obtained. Data are derived from a high-resolution daily precipitation dataset obtained from in-situ measurements. The dataset, Iberian monthly Precipitation Dataset (IPD), consists of monthly precipitation data over a 25 km × 25 km grid from 1st January 1961 to 31st December 2003. Therefore, 960 data series over the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands are disposed over the grid for 43-year period. Multi-resolution wavelet analysis is used to extract similar information in the precipitation field at different timescales. An objective classification of the obtained wavelet coefficient series is carried out by means of the Kohonen’s neural network, also named Self-Organizing Map (SOM). SOM is formed by an unsupervised learning algorithm that may be used to find clusters of similar events in the input data and is able to identify some underlying dynamic structures of the multi-dimensional datasets. SOM is applied to the wavelet coefficients for intramonthly, intermonthly and interannual oscillations, obtaining self-organised maps which objectively identify similar zones of precipitation behaviour over the Iberian Peninsula. The homogeneity of the patterns is also studied by means of non-parametric correlations, energy scalograms and tests of significance. The intramonthly, intermonthly and interannual waves resulted in seven, five and three SOM patterns, respectively. As timescale increases, the wavelet series coefficients tend to be highly clustered. The results indicate that as the oscillation frequencies decrease, the Iberian precipitation behaves more linearly.

  10. Lichens of Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, westernmost Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, S. S.; Talbot, S.L.; Thomson, J.W.; Schofield, W.B.

    2000-01-01

    One hundred eighty-two taxa of lichens including two lichen parasites are reported from Izembek National Wildlife Refuge on the tip of the Alaska Peninsula. Metasphaeria tartarina is new to North America; Scoliciosporum umbrinum is new to Alaska. Wide-ranging, arctic-alpine, and boreal species dominate the lichen flora; a coastal element is moderately represented, while amphi-Beringian species form a minor element. Epigeic lichen abundance is described along a lowland to alpine mesotopographic gradient selected to represent major landscape variation in the refuge. Of six major community types identified, three had significant lichen components.

  11. SeaWiFS Images Fires on Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) shows dense smoke from fires in the Yucatan peninsula on April 24, 2000. In the El Nino year of 1998 fires in the region emitted enough smoke to cause authorities in Texas to issue air quality warnings. For more information, see: SeaWiFS Project Home Page Global Fire Monitoring 4km2 TRMM Fire Data Image provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  12. Late Cenozoic stress field distribution in Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozden, S.; Bekler, T.; Tutkun, S. Z.; Kurcer, A.; Ates, O.; Bekler, F. N.; Kalafat, D.

    2009-04-01

    Biga Peninsula is a seismically active region both in instrumental and historical period in NW Turkey. In this part, middle and southern branches of North Anatolian Fault are represented by Etili, Can-Biga, Yenice-Gonen, Manyas-Danisment, Lapseki, Sinekci, Terzialan, Dogruca, Uluabat, Edincik, Pazarkoy-Hamdibey-Kalkim, Edremit, Yigitler, Sarikoy-Inova, Troia and Karabiga Faults. All of these faults are responsible of the seismic activity in Biga Peninsula. Historical earthquakes happened in 29, 155, 170, 543, 620, 1440, 1737, 1855, 1865 and 1875. Furthermore, as for instrumental period, Saros Gulf-Murefte earthquakes (M:7.3 and M:6.3) in 1912, Erdek Gulf (M:6.4) and Can-Biga (M:6.3) in 1935, Edremit Gulf-Ayvaci k (M:6.8) in 1944, Yenice-Gonen (M:7.2) in 1953, Gonen (M:5.8) in 1964, Edremit-Baki rcay (M:5.5) in 1971, Biga (M:5.8) in 1983, Kusgolu-Manyas (M:5.2) and Bandirma (M:5.0) in 2006. In this study, we determined the Late Cenozoic stress field distribution and present-day tectonic regimes both fault-slip data (by 253 fault planes) and earthquake focal mechanism solutions (by 58 earthquakes) were investigated by the inversion methods. The results indicate that a transtensional stress regime is dominant with a NW-SE to WNW-ESE directed compression (1) and NE-SW to ENE-WSW directed extension (3), which yielded a NE-SW, ENE-WSW and also E-W trending strike-slip faulting faults with a normal component. While a transtensional tectonic regime has an active component in Biga Peninsula, a local and consistent transpressional tectonic regime were determined along an E-W trending narrow zone in the northern part of the Biga Peninsula also. The tectonic regime and stress field is resulted from interactions both continental collision of Eurasian/Anatolian/Arabian plate in the east and subduction processes (roll back and/or slab-pull) of the African plate along the Cyprus and Hellenic arc in the Mediterranean region.

  13. Potential Effects of Climate Change on the Distribution of Cold-Tolerant Evergreen Broadleaved Woody Plants in the Korean Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Koo, Kyung Ah; Kong, Woo-Seok; Nibbelink, Nathan P; Hopkinson, Charles S; Lee, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    Climate change has caused shifts in species' ranges and extinctions of high-latitude and altitude species. Most cold-tolerant evergreen broadleaved woody plants (shortened to cold-evergreens below) are rare species occurring in a few sites in the alpine and subalpine zones in the Korean Peninsula. The aim of this research is to 1) identify climate factors controlling the range of cold-evergreens in the Korean Peninsula; and 2) predict the climate change effects on the range of cold-evergreens. We used multimodel inference based on combinations of climate variables to develop distribution models of cold-evergreens at a physiognomic-level. Presence/absence data of 12 species at 204 sites and 6 climatic factors, selected from among 23 candidate variables, were used for modeling. Model uncertainty was estimated by mapping a total variance calculated by adding the weighted average of within-model variation to the between-model variation. The range of cold-evergreens and model performance were validated by true skill statistics, the receiver operating characteristic curve and the kappa statistic. Climate change effects on the cold-evergreens were predicted according to the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios. Multimodel inference approach excellently projected the spatial distribution of cold-evergreens (AUC = 0.95, kappa = 0.62 and TSS = 0.77). Temperature was a dominant factor in model-average estimates, while precipitation was minor. The climatic suitability increased from the southwest, lowland areas, to the northeast, high mountains. The range of cold-evergreens declined under climate change. Mountain-tops in the south and most of the area in the north remained suitable in 2050 and 2070 under the RCP 4.5 projection and 2050 under the RCP 8.5 projection. Only high-elevations in the northeastern Peninsula remained suitable under the RCP 8.5 projection. A northward and upper-elevational range shift indicates change in species composition at the alpine and subalpine

  14. Potential Effects of Climate Change on the Distribution of Cold-Tolerant Evergreen Broadleaved Woody Plants in the Korean Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Kyung Ah; Kong, Woo-Seok; Nibbelink, Nathan P.; Hopkinson, Charles S.; Lee, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    Climate change has caused shifts in species’ ranges and extinctions of high-latitude and altitude species. Most cold-tolerant evergreen broadleaved woody plants (shortened to cold-evergreens below) are rare species occurring in a few sites in the alpine and subalpine zones in the Korean Peninsula. The aim of this research is to 1) identify climate factors controlling the range of cold-evergreens in the Korean Peninsula; and 2) predict the climate change effects on the range of cold-evergreens. We used multimodel inference based on combinations of climate variables to develop distribution models of cold-evergreens at a physiognomic-level. Presence/absence data of 12 species at 204 sites and 6 climatic factors, selected from among 23 candidate variables, were used for modeling. Model uncertainty was estimated by mapping a total variance calculated by adding the weighted average of within-model variation to the between-model variation. The range of cold-evergreens and model performance were validated by true skill statistics, the receiver operating characteristic curve and the kappa statistic. Climate change effects on the cold-evergreens were predicted according to the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios. Multimodel inference approach excellently projected the spatial distribution of cold-evergreens (AUC = 0.95, kappa = 0.62 and TSS = 0.77). Temperature was a dominant factor in model-average estimates, while precipitation was minor. The climatic suitability increased from the southwest, lowland areas, to the northeast, high mountains. The range of cold-evergreens declined under climate change. Mountain-tops in the south and most of the area in the north remained suitable in 2050 and 2070 under the RCP 4.5 projection and 2050 under the RCP 8.5 projection. Only high-elevations in the northeastern Peninsula remained suitable under the RCP 8.5 projection. A northward and upper-elevational range shift indicates change in species composition at the alpine and subalpine

  15. Monitoring of Landslides using Repeated Kinematics GPS Observables in Sevketiye Town, Biga Peninsula, Çanakkale, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuneyt Erenoglu, Ramazan; Akcay, Ozgun; Karaca, Zeki; Erenoglu, Oya; Sengul Uluocak, Ebru; Yucel, Mehmet Ali

    2014-05-01

    Landslide is one of the most important natural events, and is also a result of earth's crust movements. Landslides generally result in the outward and downward movement of slope-forming materials consisting soil, rock, artificial fill and etc. Moreover, possible earthquakes are one of the main reasons of triggering landslides in active areas seismically. There have been many studies based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) observables to compute the three dimensional positioning of established sites, and to model landslides precisely. We can monitor landslide with GPS using continuous data collection or the type of campaign surveying. While continuous data collection provide a millimetre-level of accuracy, the accuracy decreases with the shorter sessions, e.g. campaign surveying, due to possible sources of error. The area, located west of the Çanakkale, has been studied to identify the landslide susceptibility and geology. Çanakkale, NW Turkey, is located on the territory of the Biga Peninsula and the Gallipoli Peninsula. The section of remaining at the west of the line from the Gulf of Edremit to the Gulf of Erdek is called Biga Peninsula, and it covers an area of approximately 10 thousand km². In the Biga Peninsula, the main morphological units are at the western, northern and southern of coastal plains, and on their behind the hills, plateaus and mountainous areas of the inland. But at the middle areas, it is often possible to find the tectonic depressions sandwiched between the masses plateau and mountainous. In general, moving down the slope of a rock, soil or debris can be defined as landslides that are ranks second in terms of caused losses after earthquakes in Turkey. Landslides, harm to urbanization as well as loss of lives and economic losses. Moreover they adversely affects to agricultural, forest areas and the quality of the rivers. For example, the gas pipeline connecting Turkey and Greece, which will provide gas to the Southern Europe passes

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete mitochondrial genome of the Korean field mouse Apodemus peninsulae (Rodentia, Murinae) from China.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mi Gyung; Kim, Ji Young; Park, Yung Chul

    2016-07-01

    We sequenced and characterized a complete mitogenome (KP671850) of the Chinese Apodemus peninsulae and compared it with a previously published mitogenome of the Korean A. peninsulae (NC016060). The total length of the Chinese A. peninsulae mitogenome is 16,457 bp. The mitogenome consists of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), two rRNA (12S rRNA and 16S rRNA) genes, 22 tRNA genes, and one D-loop region. The most common start codon was ATG, used in the nine PCGs for initiation. The mitogenomes of Chinese and Korean A. peninsulae showed 98.9% sequence similarity. The intra-/interspecific phylogeny of the Chinese A. peninsulae revealed that the Chinese A. peninsulae was well grouped with the Korean A. peninsulae. The clade of A. peninsulae was sister to that of Apodemus agrarius, Apodemus chejuensis, and Apodemus chevrieri. PMID:26006285

  17. ABCGheritage project - promoting geotourism in northern Finland, northern Norway and the Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlaja, Jouni; Johansson, Peter; Lauri, Laura S.

    2014-05-01

    Nature tourism has been a growing business sector in the Barents area during the recent decades. With the purpose to develop nature tourism in a sustainable way, a cooperation project ABCGheritage - Arctic Biological, Cultural and Geological Heritage has been carried out. Project has received partial funding from the EU Kolarctic ENPI program. In the geoheritage part of the project the main activities were aimed to develop pro-environmental ways of geotourism in the area. The three main participants in the geoheritage part of the project are the Geological Survey of Finland, Northern Finland Office, the Geological Institute of the Kola Science Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Bioforsk Soil and Environment from northeastern Norway. The duration of the project is 2012-2014 and most of the work has already been completed even if most of the results are not published yet. Totally ten different tasks have been implemented in the geological part of the project. The largest task has been the preparation of a geological outdoor map and guide book of the Khibiny Tundra locating in the central part of the Kola Peninsula. In Finland already 11 such maps have been published, and the experiences gained during their production have been used in this project, too. Geological heritage trails to the Khibiny Tundra have also been created and they will be drawn on the map. The second concrete result is the Barents Tour for Geotourist -guide, which will be published as a guide book, web pages and an exhibition. The route comprises ca 35 best geological demonstration sites along the circle route from northern Finland to northeastern Norway, from there to Kola Peninsula and then back to Finland. Information of the route will be available for all interested travelers. In addition to the geological outdoor map of the Khibiny Tundra and "Barents Tour for Geotourists"-guide, the primary outputs of the project are the geological nature trails on the field, geological

  18. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  19. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  20. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  1. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  2. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  3. Mission and modern citrus species diversity of Baja California Peninsula cases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spring-fed mission oases of the Baja California peninsula, Mexico, hold several species, varieties and unique hybrids of heritage citrus, which may represent valuable genetic resources. Citrus species first arrived to the peninsula with the Jesuit missionaries (1697-1768), and new varieties were...

  4. 75 FR 16094 - Upper Peninsula Power Company; North American Hydro Holdings, LLC; Notice of Application for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Upper Peninsula Power Company; North American Hydro Holdings, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene March 24, 2010. On March 17, 2010, Upper Peninsula...

  5. 77 FR 64330 - Upper Peninsula Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Upper Peninsula Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing.... d. Applicant: Upper Peninsula Power Company. e. Name of Project: Bond Falls Hydroelectric Project....

  6. Nutrient transfers in ditches draining heavily manured soils of the Delmarva Peninsula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drainage ditches are a ubiquitous feature of the Delmarva Peninsula, which abuts the Chesapeake Bay and is home each year to 600 million broiler poultry. Improved drainage is critical to human habitation, travel and industry on the Delmarva Peninsula where low-lying, flat topography is dappled with...

  7. Transboundary transport and deposition of Hg emission from springtime biomass burning in the Indo-China Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xun; Zhang, Hui; Lin, Che-Jen; Fu, Xuewu; Zhang, Yiping; Feng, Xinbin

    2015-09-01

    Biomass burning from the Indo-China Peninsula region is an important source of atmospheric mercury (Hg). We isolated 18 unique transport events over 2 years using observations of Hg and CO at a high-altitude background site in southwestern China (Mount Ailao Observatory Station) to assess the transport and impact of Hg emissions from biomass burning. The quantity of Hg emission and the source regions were determined using ΔTGM/ΔCO slopes coupled with backward trajectory analysis and CO emission inventories. The slopes of ΔTGM/ΔCO appeared to be a useful chemical indicator for source identification. Industrial emission sources exhibited slopes in the range of 5.1-61.0 × 10-7 (parts per trillion by volume, pptv/pptv), in contrast to a slope of 2.0-6.0 × 10-7 for typical biomass burning. Transboundary transport of Hg from biomass burning led to episodically elevated atmospheric Hg concentrations during springtime. Hg emissions from biomass burning in the Indo-China Peninsula region from 2001 to 2008 were estimated to be 11.4 ± 2.1 Mg yr-1, equivalent to 40% of annual anthropogenic emissions in the region. In addition, Hg emissions from biomass burning contained a substantial fraction of particulate bound Hg (PBM). Assuming that PBM readily deposits locally (within 50 km), the local Hg deposition caused by the PBM was estimated to be 2.2 ± 0.4 Mg yr-1, up to 1 order of magnitude higher than the PBM deposition caused by anthropogenic emissions during springtime in the region. The strong springtime emissions potentially pose a threat to the ecosystems of the Indo-China Peninsula and southwest China.

  8. Magnetotelluric measurements on the Methana Peninsula (Greece): modelling and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volti, Theodora K.

    1999-01-01

    As a first deep geophysical survey, thirteen magnetotelluric and magnetovariation soundings in the period range of 0.0085-6000 s have been carried out in the Methana Peninsula and Trizina area (Greece), which form the western part of the active Hellenic Volcanic Arc. Data have been processed using robust techniques and further analysed using decomposition methods in order to find the regional azimuth. By using the smooth inverse of Smith and Booker (J. Geophys. Res. 96, 3905-3922, 1991), the 2-D modelling has resolved a low-resistivity area (<30 Ω m) at depths of 2-3 km beneath the volcanics, whereas elsewhere the resistivity is much higher (>100 Ω m). Parkinson induction arrows also at the range 0.01-0.1 s point towards the centre of the peninsula. The conductivity anomaly is interpreted as being connected with the volcanic history of Methana, as a cooler remnant of former magmatic activity. The contrast with the much higher resistivities suggested at depths >5 km, is discussed in terms of fluid mobility, limitation of the MT method and extensional processes in the southern Aegean.

  9. Neogene paleoenvironments and tectonics of the Hongchun Peninsula, southern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S. . Taiwan Petroleum Exploration Div.); Vondra, C.F. . Geological Atmospheric Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Recent investigations in the Hongchun Peninsula in southern Taiwan provide new evidence concerning the paleoenvironmental and tectonic interpretation of the structurally complex Neogene sediments exposed there. The deposits of the peninsula have been divided into four distinct fault-bounded sequences each displaying a different lithology and style of structural development. The Mutanchi formation consists of feldspathic quartz arenites derived from a granitic provenance to the north that were deposited in a forearc basin. The lower part of the Mutanchi is dominated by thick proximal turbidities and interbedded highly contorted shales of submarine fan origin. These grade upward into shallow marine feldpathic quartz arenites and shales. The Shiman Formation consists of tuffaceous lithic arenites (proximal turbidities) and diamicites (debris flow deposits) with gravel-sized metamorphic and volcanic clasts in the lower part and interbedded lithic arenites and shales in the upper part. Although of contrasting lithology to the Mutanchi, the lower part of the Shiman Formation was also deposited on a submarine fan in a forearc tectonic setting while the upper part was deposited on a shallow marine shelf. The Kentin Formation is composed entirely of thick light green mudstones with contorted slump structures. Locally it contains very large exotic blocks (olistoliths) of variable lithology and is interpreted to be a melange -- the Kentin Melange. The above four fault-bounded units represent a forearc basin-accretionary wedge complex that developed during the late Neogene as a result of convergent interaction between the South China and Philippine plates.

  10. Alaskan Peninsula Cenozoic stratigraphy: stratigraphic sequences and current research

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, R.C.; Armentrout, J.M.

    1985-04-01

    Geology of the Alaska Peninsula-Island Arc and Continental Margin, by C.A. Burk, is the principal reference for stratigraphic studies on the Alaska Peninsula. Burk mapped the Phanerozoic stratigraphy and provided a geologic history and structural interpretation of the area between Wide Bay and Unimak Island. Cenozoic rocks were mapped as three unconformity-bounded sequences. Recognition of specific formations was difficult due to similarity of lithofacies, isolated outcrops, rapid facies changes, and alteration and burial by young volcanics. Consequently, megafossil assemblages were relied upon to facilitate correlations between study areas. The three unconformity-bounded Cenozoic sequences are: (1) the Paleogene Beaver Bay Group consisting of three formations: the dominantly nonmarine Tolstoi Formation, the dominantly marine Stepovak Formation, and the volcanic Meshik Formation. Current work suggests these units are at least in part coeval facies of late Paleocene through Oligocene age. (2) The Neogene Bear Lake Formation consisting of the lower Unga Conglomerate Member and an unnamed upper member. Rapid facies changes and incorrect reports of fossil occurrence have resulted in confusion of stratigraphic relationships within this sequence of middle to late Miocene age. (3) A late Neogene informally defined upper sequence consisting of interbedded marginal marine, coastal-plain, and volcanic facies. Current work suggests this sequence is Pliocene through Pleistocene in age.

  11. Beryllium deposits of the western Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sainsbury, C.L.

    1963-01-01

    Deposits of beryllium ore in the Lost River area of the western Seward Peninsula, Alaska, consist of replacement veins, pipes, and stringer lodes is limestone in a zone about 7 miles long and 2 to 3 miles wide which is faulted and intruded by dikes and stocks. The ores are remarkably alike and typically consist of the following minerals, in percent: fluorite, 45-65; diaspore, 5-10; tourmaline, 0-10; chrysoberyl, 3-10; white mica, 0-5; small amounts of hematite, sulfide minerals, manganese oxide, other beryllium minerals; and traces of minerals not yet identified. The ores generally are cut by late veinlets which are of the same mineralogy as the groundmass ore, or which consist of fluorite, white mica, and euclase. The ores are fine grained, and many of the individual mineral grains, except fluorite, are less than 1 mm in size. The beryllium content of bulk samples of ore ranges from 0.11 to 0.54 percent (0.31 to 1.50 percent BeO). High-grade nodules, composed principally of chrysoberyl, diaspore, fluorite, and mica, contain as much as 6 percent BeO. Geochemical reconnaissance has disclosed other areas of anomalous beryllium in stream sediments elsewhere on the Seward Peninsula, generally around biotite granites that have them associated with tin deposits; additional exploration probably will disclose other deposits.

  12. Cirques upon the Kamchatka Peninsula: palaeoglacial and palaeoclimatic inferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Iestyn; Spagnolo, Matteo

    2013-04-01

    The morphometry of more than 3,500 cirques upon the Kamchatka Peninsula, Eastern Russia, has been analysed. Volumetric analysis suggests that these cirques have developed rather isometrically—growing equally in all dimensions. The cirques show a very strong N bias in their azimuth, likely resulting from aspect-related variations in insolation. The strength of this N bias is considered to indicate that former glaciation was often 'marginal', and mainly of cirque-type. This assertion is supported by the fact that S and SE-facing cirques are the highest in the dataset, suggesting that glacier-cover was rarely sufficient to allow S and SE-facing glaciers to develop at low altitudes. The strength of these azimuth-related variations in cirque altitude is thought to reflect comparatively cloud-free conditions during former periods of glaciation. These characteristics, of marginal glaciation and comparatively cloud-free conditions, are considered to reflect the region's former aridity, at the global Last Glacial Maximum, and during earlier periods of ice advance. There is published evidence to suggest extensive glaciation of the Kamchatka Peninsula at times during the Late Quaternary, yet the cirque data appears to suggest that such phases were comparatively short-lived, and that smaller cirque-type glaciers were generally more characteristic of the period.

  13. Mantle-Lid P Wave Attenuation in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Hong, T.

    2012-12-01

    The mantle-lid P wave, Pn, is the first arrival phase in regional distances. The Pn waves are widely analyzed for estimation of event sizes. Also, it is known that analysis of Pn waves is effective for discrimination of nuclear explosions from natural earthquakes. The attenuation of Pn waves provides us information on medium properties in mantle lid. It is crucial to understand the nature of Pn attenuation for correct estimation of event sizes from Pn amplitudes. We investigate the lateral variation of Pn attenuation in the mantle lid of the Korean Peninsula from vertical regional seismograms for events around the Korean Peninsula and Japanese islands. The number of events is 149, and the focal depths are less than 50 km. The seismic records with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 1.5 are analyzed. The number of stations is 121. The Pn quality factors are calculated using a two-station method in which ratios of Pn displacement spectra of stations on the same azimuths are used. The power-law frequency dependence term is estimated using a least-squares fitting for quality factors at frequencies from 0.37 Hz to 25 Hz. The number of station pairs is 3317. The average quality factor at 1 Hz is determined to be about 67, which is consistent with previous studies. We present the resultant Pn attenuation model, and discuss the correlations with geological and geophysical properties in the medium.

  14. Regional ocean tide loading modelling around the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavent, M.; Arnoso, J.; Montesinos, F. G.

    2009-12-01

    We developed a new 1/12° resolution oceanic tide model in the complex region that surrounds the Iberian Peninsula. The model, named IBER01, allows us to obtain more accurate tidal loading computations for precise geodetic and gravimetric observations in this area. The modelling follows the scheme of data assimilation (coastal tide gauge, bottom pressure sensors and TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry) into a hydrodynamical model, which is based on two-dimensional barotropic depth averaged shallow-water equations. Detailed bathymetry data and quadratic bottom friction with a specific drag coefficient for the region have been considered. Improved ocean load maps for the Iberian Peninsula are obtained for eight harmonic constituents (Q1, P1, O1, K1, N2, M2, S2 and K2), after computing the load effect (Newtonian attraction and elastic contribution) using IBER01 and six present-day global oceanic tide models for comparison. The results achieved verify the quality of the new model. Our ocean loading computations reduce considerably the discrepancies between the theoretical Earth tide parameters and those from observations at the level of 0.3%.

  15. Modeling dynamics of tundra plant communities on the Yamal Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Q.; Epstein, H. E.; Walker, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Multiple environmental drivers, including climate, soil conditions and herbivory, affect arctic tundra vegetation dynamics. These factors may have been evaluated individually in the past; however, their interactions contribute to more complicated tundra plant community dynamics and may represent a substantial source of uncertainty in predicting tundra ecosystem properties in the changing Arctic. This study investigates the effects of soils, grazing, and climate change on tundra plant communities at the plant functional type (PFT) level, based on previous integrated modeling research at the ecosystem level. The study area encompasses the Yamal Peninsula, northwestern Siberia, where soil and biomass data were collected along the Yamal Arctic Transect (YAT), to drive a nutrient-based tundra vegetation model (ArcVeg) and to validate the simulation results. We analyzed plant functional type biomass and net primary productivity (NPP), and found that with higher temperatures (+2°C mean growing season temperature), most plant functional types responded positively with increased biomass and NPP, while grazing suppressed such responses in both high and low soil organic nitrogen (SON) sites. The magnitudes of the responses to warming depended on SON and grazing intensity. Relatively, there were greater responses of biomass and NPP in low SON sites compared to high SON sites. Moss biomass (in contrast to other plant types) declined 34% with warming in the low SON site and 28% in the high SON site in subzone E (the most southern tundra subzone). Increases in Low Arctic shrub biomass with warming were 61% in the high SON site in subzone E and 96% in the low SON site. Decrease in moss biomass due to warming was mitigated about 2% by high grazing frequency (maximum of 25% of biomass removal every two years) in the high SON site in subzone E, with an opposite effect in the low SON site. High grazing frequency caused greater relative increases in total shrub biomass for both low

  16. Vertical Methane Migration on the Hikurangi Margin off the Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, R. B.; Rose, P. S.; Yoza, B.; Boyd, T. J.; Crutchley, G. J.; Mountjoy, J. J.; Pecher, I. A.

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on gas source and vertical migration patterns in sediments on the Hikurangi Margin, east of the North Island, New Zealand off the Mahia Peninsula, collected aboard the RV Tangaroa (TAN1508) during June 2015. Seismic and Topas data collected on board were used to organize a coring plan for this expedition. Selection of piston core locations was based on spatial variation in vertical gas migration across seismic patterns indicating BSR migration toward the sediment surface. Higher molecular weight gases were not observed at this location suggesting a biogenic gas source. Across this transect, methane concentrations varied by more than an order of magnitude at stations within a few hundred meters. The highest methane concentrations were 5051.7 ppm in Core 004 at and 2413.4 ppm in Core 036. Concentrations at other sites ranged from 23.8 to 125.9 ppm. Methane concentrations showed a strong correlation with seismic and Topas data that suggested high vertical migration and large shallow gas pockets. While these data focused on locations across a BSR, higher methane concentrations, ranging from 1529 to 7862 ppm were observed in three cores from a nearby site where a BSR was not observed. This presentation will compare spatial variation in the vertical gas migration and stable isotopic composition of sediment organic and inorganic carbon, methane and porewater dissolved inorganic carbon among the core locations to better understand vertical methane migration and shallow sediment methane cycling.

  17. What shapes edaphic communities in mineral and ornithogenic soils of Cierva Point, Antarctic Peninsula?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataloni, G.; Garraza, G. González; Bölter, M.; Convey, P.; Fermani, P.

    2010-08-01

    Three mineral soil and four ornithogenic soil sites were sampled during summer 2006 at Cierva Point (Antarctic Peninsula) to study their bacterial, microalgal and faunal communities in relation to abiotic and biotic features. Soil moisture, pH, conductivity, organic matter and nutrient contents were consistently lower and more homogeneous in mineral soils. Ornithogenic soils supported larger and more variable bacterial abundances than mineral ones. Algal communities from mineral soils were more diverse than those from ornithogenic soils, although chlorophyll- a concentrations were significantly higher in the latter. This parameter and bacterial abundance were correlated with nutrient and organic matter contents. The meiofauna obtained from mineral soils was homogeneous, with one nematode species dominating all samples. The fauna of ornithogenic soils varied widely in composition and abundance. Tardigrades and rotifers dominated the meiofauna at eutrophic O2, where they supported a large population of the predatory nematode Coomansus gerlachei. At site O3, high bacterial abundance was consistent with high densities of the bacterivorous nematodes Plectus spp. This study provides evidence that Antarctic soils are complex and diverse systems, and suggests that biotic interactions (e.g. competition and predation) may have a stronger and more direct influence on community variability in space and time than previously thought.

  18. Assessing trace element contamination in Fildes Peninsula (King George Island) and Ardley Island, Antarctic.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Eduardo; Padeiro, Ana; Mão de Ferro, André; Mota, Ana Maria; Leppe, Marcelo; Verkulich, Sergey; Hughes, Kevin A; Peter, Hans-Ulrich; Canário, João

    2015-08-15

    King George Island, situated in the South Shetland Islands archipelago, is one of the most visited sites in Antarctica. This has contributed to a high density of scientific stations and shelters in the region, especially in Fildes Peninsula. In order to evaluate the natural and anthropogenic sources of trace elements (As, Cd, Cu, Zn, Pb and Hg) soil and moss samples were collected from different sites in January 2013. In general, the results revealed homogeneous concentrations (μgg(-)(1)) for each element in the majority of collected samples (As: 3.8±1.4; Cd: 0.4±0.9; Cu: 34±4; Zn: 115±13; Pb: 20±5; Hg; 0.011±0.009). However, some samples in specific areas of Fildes Bay showed the existence of local anthropogenic activities that have contributed to the enrichment of contaminants in soils and moss samples that correlated to one another (e.g. Pb: 1101μgg(-)(1)). Human presence is linked to examples of contamination and environmental perturbation, making essential the implementation of this type of study in order to understand and protect unique places in Antarctica. PMID:25982820

  19. An analysis of historical Mussel Watch Programme data from the west coast of the Cape Peninsula, Cape Town.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Conrad; Odendaal, James; Snyman, Reinette

    2014-10-15

    The concentrations of metals in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lamarck, 1819) prevalent along the west coast of the Cape Peninsula, Cape Town are presented. The mussels were sampled during the routine "Mussel Watch Programme" (MWP) between 1985 and 2008. Levels of Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, Hg, Fe and Mn at Cape Point, Hout Bay, Sea Point, Milnerton and Bloubergstrand were analysed for autumn and spring and showed consistent similar mean values for the five sites. There was a highly significant temporal (annual and seasonal) difference between all metals as well as a significant difference in metal concentrations between the five sites. The concentrations of Zn, Fe, Cd and Pb were higher than previous investigations and possibly indicative of anthropogenic sources of metals. The results provide a strong motivation to increase efforts in marine pollution research in the area. PMID:25127737

  20. Simulating the effects of soil organic nitrogen and grazing on arctic tundra vegetation dynamics on the Yamal Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qin; Epstein, Howard; Walker, Donald

    2009-10-01

    Sustainability of tundra vegetation under changing climate on the Yamal Peninsula, northwestern Siberia, home to the world's largest area of reindeer husbandry, is of crucial importance to the local native community. An integrated investigation is needed for better understanding of the effects of soils, climate change and grazing on tundra vegetation in the Yamal region. In this study we applied a nutrient-based plant community model—ArcVeg—to evaluate how two factors (soil organic nitrogen (SON) levels and grazing) interact to affect tundra responses to climate warming across a latitudinal climatic gradient on the Yamal Peninsula. Model simulations were driven by field-collected soil data and expected grazing patterns along the Yamal Arctic Transect (YAT), within bioclimate subzones C (high arctic), D (northern low arctic) and E (southern low arctic). Plant biomass and NPP (net primary productivity) were significantly increased with warmer bioclimate subzones, greater soil nutrient levels and temporal climate warming, while they declined with higher grazing frequency. Temporal climate warming of 2 °C caused an increase of 665 g m-2 in total biomass at the high SON site in subzone E, but only 298 g m-2 at the low SON site. When grazing frequency was also increased, total biomass increased by only 369 g m-2 at the high SON site in contrast to 184 g m-2 at the low SON site in subzone E. Our results suggest that high SON can support greater plant biomass and plant responses to climate warming, while low SON and grazing may limit plant response to climate change. In addition to the first order factors (SON, bioclimate subzones, grazing and temporal climate warming), interactions among these significantly affect plant biomass and productivity in the arctic tundra and should not be ignored in regional scale studies.

  1. Multichannel Seismic Investigations of Sediment Drifts off West Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula: Preliminary Results from Research Cruise JR298

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larter, R. D.; Graham, A. G. C.; Hernandez-Molina, J.; Channell, J. E. T.; Hillenbrand, C. D.; Hogan, K. A.; Uenzelmann-Neben, G.; Gohl, K.; Rebesco, M.; Hodell, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet (APIS) have exhibited significant changes over recent decades but there is still great uncertainty about how rapidly and how far they will retreat in a warmer climate. For example, it remains unclear whether or not the marine-based WAIS "collapsed" during the last interglacial period, resulting in a global sea-level rise contribution of more than 3 m. Previous studies, including Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 178, have shown that sediment drifts on the continental rise west of the Antarctic Peninsula contain a rich high-resolution archive of Antarctic margin paleoceanography and APIS history that extends back to at least the Late Miocene. The potential of existing ODP cores from the drifts is, however, compromised by the fact that composite sections are incomplete and lack of precise chronological control. A new drilling proposal (732-Full2) has been scientifically approved and is with the JOIDES Resolution Facilities Board of the International Ocean Discovery Program for scheduling. The main aims of the proposal are to obtain continuous, high-resolution records from sites on sediment drifts off both the Antarctic Peninsula and West Antarctica (southern Bellingshausen Sea) and to achieve good chronological control on them using a range of techniques. We present preliminary results from a recent site survey investigation cruise on RRS James Clark Ross (JR298) that obtained high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection data over the proposed sites and adjacent working areas. The new data provide a basis for interpretation of (i) sedimentary processes that operated during the development of the drifts, and (ii) links between depositional systems on the continental rise, paleo-ice-sheet dynamics and paleoceanographic processes. Through further analyses of seismic and other geophysical data, in combination with marine sediment cores retrieved from the proposed sites, we aim to provide insight into

  2. Expanding Ice Sheets on the Antarctic Peninsula during the Plio/Pleistocene Recorded in Continental Rise Sediment Drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, E. A.; Hillenbrand, C.

    2007-12-01

    Sediment drifts on the continental rise west of the Antarctic Peninsula are located within 125 km from the continental shelf edge, the main contributor of terrigenous sediment during both glacial and interglacial periods. The composition of drift deposits continuously recorded changes in ice sheet volume and thermal regime as well as sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and sea ice extent. The coarse-grained terrigenous sediment (pebbles and coarse sand), a proxy for iceberg-rafted debris (IRD), was analyzed in sediments spanning the last 3.1 m.y. at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 1101 and 1096. IRD is deposited in both glacial intervals, dominated by fine-grained laminated mud and interglacial units consisting of bioturbated muds enriched in biogenic components. Contents of biogenic opal, which reflect diatom abundance, are relatively high from 3.1-2.2 Ma. Calcareous nannofossils are present within interglacial sediments from 2.2-0.76 Ma. Both findings suggest warm SSTs and limited sea ice over the drifts during interglacial periods before the Late Pleistocene. Quartz grains picked from the IRD fraction and imaged with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) show an abrupt change in surface microtextures at 1.35 Ma. During the Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene, many quartz grains are completely weathered and only a few show signs of crushing and abrasion, indicating that glaciers were too small to inundate the Antarctic Peninsula topography. Debris shed from mountain peaks was transported supraglacially or englacially allowing weathered grains to pass unmodified through the glaciers. Glaciers expanded in size during glacial periods from 1.35-0.76 Ma. The IRD accumulation during those periods was very high and diverse dropstone lithologies document supply from sources throughout the Antarctica Peninsula. Conditions that spawned the large polar ice sheet identified at the Last Glacial Maximum have been present on the Antarctic Peninsula during glacial periods since

  3. Segmentation of Hypocenters and 3-D Velocity Structure around the Kii Peninsula Revealed by Onshore and Offshore Seismic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akuhara, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Nakahigashi, K.; Yamada, T.; Shinohara, M.; Sakai, S.; Kanazawa, T.; Uehira, K.; Shimizu, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Philippine Sea Plate subducts beneath the Eurasian Plate at a rate of ~4 cm/year along the Nankai Trough, southwest of Japan. Around the Kii Peninsula, the rupture boundary of the historical Tonankai and Nankai large earthquakes is located, and previous researches have revealed along-strike segmentation of hypocenters [Mochizuki et al., 2010], P-wave anisotropy [Ishise et al., 2009], low frequency earthquake (LFE) distribution [e.g., Obara, 2010] and subduction depth of the Philippine Sea (PHS) Plate, or there may exist a split in the PHS Plate [Ide et al., 2010]. To investigate such segmentation, in our previous work we determined 3-D velocity structure and hypocenters using P- and S-wave arrival times of earthquakes recorded by both ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) that were deployed from 2003 to 2007 and on-land stations [Akuhara et al., 2013]. As a result, it was discovered that Vp/Vs ratio is also segmented within the oceanic crust and at the bottom of the overriding plate, which coincides with the LFE distribution: segment A is located along the Kii Channel, segment B around the western Kii Peninsula, and segment C around the eastern Kii Peninsula. In segment B, Vp/Vs ratio is low within the oceanic crust and LFE cluster characterized by an anomalously small amount of cumulative slip, compared to the other LFE clusters around the Kii Peninsula, is located [Obara, 2010]. The difference of Vp/Vs ratio and LFE activity among segments were interpreted as difference of pore fluid pressure. In fact, similar segmentation can be seen in hypocenters: Segment A with concentrated seismicity in the oceanic mantle, segment B with that in the oceanic crust, and segment C with little seismicity. To derive characteristic patterns of the hypocenters, we conducted a cluster analysis of earthquakes based on waveform similarity represented by cross-correlation coefficients (CCs) [e.g., Cattaneo, 1999], in which we took varying structural site effects among the OBS stations

  4. Current Status and Future Directives of the Nicoya Peninsula Continuous GPS Network, Costa Rica, In Regard to Slip Style and Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psencik, K. C.; Jiang, Y.; Lafemina, P. C.; Dixon, T. H.; Protti, M.; Gonzalez, V.; Sklar, J.; Blume, F.

    2007-12-01

    The close proximity of the Nicoya Peninsula land mass to the Cocos-Caribbean subduction zone plate boundary makes it a prime location to use GPS to study such plate boundary processes as locking zone dynamics and episodic tremor and slip events. Nicoya Peninsula currently has 12 continuous GPS (CGPS) stations installed each with varying degrees of equipment and communication. Seven of these sites are currently installed with Trimble NetRS receivers and five with Trimble 5700 receivers. Of these 12 sites, four are equipped with SIM cards and modems for direct download capabilities, one of which is connected to a router for direct internet access. This site, LIMO, located in Limonal, is being monitored on the PBO network by UNAVCO with all of the quality and systems checks that this implies. The other eight sites currently require manual download. All sites with NetRS receivers are currently partitioned to record both 5Hz and 30 second position data. We will present the first years time series from these stations. The advantage to recording at a 5 Hz interval is that the receivers may be used to record long period dynamic events during large earthquakes along the Cocos-Caribbean plate boundary. One goal of the network is to investigate episodic tremor and slip events, as have been observed in the Cascadia subduction boundary. Such events have been speculated upon in this region, however due to the sparse network at that time, we were unable to resolve the event. With the expanded network of CGPS stations, we hope to better record and understand such events. We will also present an anlaysis of synthetic data to assess the spacial resolution of detectable slip patterns with the current network spacing. There is a future plan of three more installations on the interior of the peninsula to further optimize the network for seismic and locking pattern studies.

  5. Earthquake Swarm in Armutlu Peninsula, Eastern Marmara Region, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Evrim; Çaka, Deniz; Tunç, Berna; Serkan Irmak, T.; Woith, Heiko; Cesca, Simone; Lühr, Birger-Gottfried; Barış, Şerif

    2015-04-01

    The most active fault system of Turkey is North Anatolian Fault Zone and caused two large earthquakes in 1999. These two earthquakes affected the eastern Marmara region destructively. Unbroken part of the North Anatolian Fault Zone crosses north of Armutlu Peninsula on east-west direction. This branch has been also located quite close to Istanbul known as a megacity with its high population, economic and social aspects. A new cluster of microseismic activity occurred in the direct vicinity southeastern of the Yalova Termal area. Activity started on August 2, 2014 with a series of micro events, and then on August 3, 2014 a local magnitude is 4.1 event occurred, more than 1000 in the followed until August 31, 2014. Thus we call this tentatively a swarm-like activity. Therefore, investigation of the micro-earthquake activity of the Armutlu Peninsula has become important to understand the relationship between the occurrence of micro-earthquakes and the tectonic structure of the region. For these reasons, Armutlu Network (ARNET), installed end of 2005 and equipped with currently 27 active seismic stations operating by Kocaeli University Earth and Space Sciences Research Center (ESSRC) and Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ), is a very dense network tool able to record even micro-earthquakes in this region. In the 30 days period of August 02 to 31, 2014 Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) announced 120 local earthquakes ranging magnitudes between 0.7 and 4.1, but ARNET provided more than 1000 earthquakes for analyzes at the same time period. In this study, earthquakes of the swarm area and vicinity regions determined by ARNET were investigated. The focal mechanism of the August 03, 2014 22:22:42 (GMT) earthquake with local magnitude (Ml) 4.0 is obtained by the moment tensor solution. According to the solution, it discriminates a normal faulting with dextral component. The obtained focal mechanism solution is

  6. The return to the Iberian Peninsula: first Quaternary record of Muscardinus and a palaeogeographical overview of the genus in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Ibaibarriaga, Naroa; Arrizabalaga, Álvaro; Iriarte-Chiapusso, María-José; Rofes, Juan; Murelaga, Xabier

    2015-07-01

    Although the earliest record of the genus Muscardinus dates from the Middle Miocene in Spain, no mention has been reported since the Lower Pliocene in the Iberian Peninsula. In this paper, Quaternary fossil remains of a hazel dormouse (Muscardinus avellanarius) are described, for the first time, in the Iberian Peninsula. These remains constitute the south-westernmost record of the genus in the Eurasian continent during the Late Pleistocene. The fossils, one first upper molar (M1) and two second upper molars (M2), come from Lezetxiki II Cave, an early Late Pleistocene site in northern Spain. The presence of the hazel dormouse agrees with the abundance of rodent species indicative of woodland, suggesting mild climatic conditions and a landscape formed by deciduous forest. This assemblage has been arguably assigned to warm and humid conditions related to an interstadial period in MIS 5. We also present an overview of the palaeogeography of the genus in Europe. The identification of this dormouse reinforces the idea of biological corridors between western Iberia and the rest of Europe during the Pleistocene.

  7. Assessing Impacts of Disturbances and Climate Change on Carbon Stocks in Mexican Semidry Forests of the Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Z.; Birdsey, R.; Johnson, K.; Dupuy, J. M.; Hernandez-Stefanoni, J. L.; Richardson, K.

    2014-12-01

    The spatially explicit biogeochemical model Forest-DNDC was used to estimate carbon dynamics with disturbances and climate change in secondary semidry forests in Yucatan Peninsula. The model was validated using observations from 276 field plots in a 350 km2 region of semi-deciduous forest surrounding the intensive monitoring site at Kaxil Kiuic, and it performed well with high performance efficiency (E=0.79, R2=0.83). The simulation results showed substantial spatial differences in biomass in the forests due to historical disturbance patterns and heterogeneous forest environments. The simulated impacts of the disturbances that occurred from 1998-2010 revealed an estimated loss of total biomass carbon storage of 154.7 Gg due mainly to about 12 km2 of forestland loss. The results from disturbance scenarios indicate that disastrous storms, which are not uncommon in the Yucatan Peninsula, can substantially impact carbon storage in a short time. However, warming can produce a long-term impact on carbon sequestration, due principally to the decrease in biomass carbon at a mean rate of over 100 kg ha-1yr-1 with an increase in temperature by 1 degree Celsius. The forests in this area are highly sensitive to warming due to a semidry climate where the evapotranspiration is higher than precipitation. Even if each degree of warming increase is accompanied by an increase in precipitation of 10%, the significant impact of warming cannot be dismissed.

  8. Impacts of Changing Permafrost Extent on Vegetation Transitions on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, A. H.; Fastie, C. L.; Yoshikawa, K.; Hinzman, L. D.; Fraver, M.

    2002-12-01

    Permafrost is an important control over the distribution of major vegetation types in the low arctic, and temporal changes in permafrost extent may thus be tightly coupled to changes in plant community distribution. For example, spruce trees have become more widespread during the 20th century on the Seward Peninsula, but in permafrost-affected areas with low topographic relief spruce have invaded tundra only where permafrost has thawed. Two hypotheses may explain the apparent dependence of treeline advance on permafrost. First, increased soil temperature associated with thawing permafrost may enhance spruce success. Second, degradation of permafrost may increase soil drainage in areas with low topographic relief, and thus create more favorable conditions for spruce. We investigated these hypotheses at a thaw pond complex on the Seward Peninsula, comparing the relationships between soil properties (thaw depth, surface and subsurface soil moisture) and woody plant communities in three sites: within the partially drained basin of the thaw pond, along the thaw pond banks and on the flat tundra surface surrounding the thaw pond. White spruce (Picea glauca) occurred primarily on or within 10 m of the top of pond banks. Spruce have established there continuously since at least 1820, and are present in groves with densities > 1500 trees/ha. Since 1960, spruce have successfully established at lower densities (1,000 trees/ha) in tundra sites within 10 m of the top of the banks. We found no spruce > 20 m from the banks. Live spruce occur within the pond basin only on palsas, but several dead spruce were found in the basin itself. Shrub community structure also varied significantly among sites. Two relatively large-stature shrubs,Betula nana and Salix sp., were more abundant on banks than in other sites, and the height of the shrub canopy was > 50% greater on banks than in other sites. Late summer thaw depth did not differ significantly among the three site types, but soil

  9. Beachrock horizons of the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica: Implications for coastal neotectonics and paleogeodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Osborn, S.; Morrish, S.; Barnhart, A.; Wenceslao, L.; Landeros, M.; Butcher, A.; Ritzinger, B.; Wellington, K.; Protti, M.; Spotila, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Beachrock deposits are a common feature of tropical coastlines, formed by precipitation of carbonate cements (calcite or aragonite) within intergranular pore spaces of beach sediments. In this study, we employ geomorphic, petrographic, and hydrochemical analyses to evaluate the formation mechanism and neotectonic significance of uplifted Holocene beachrock horizons on the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica. The Nicoya Peninsula forms a prominent forearc high along the southern Middle America convergent margin. This emergent coastal landmass overlies the seismogenic zone and is sensitive to vertical movements of the earthquake cycle. The last major rupture of the Nicoya megathrust (M7.7, 1950) produced up to 1.5 m of coseismic coastal uplift, followed by gradual interseismic subsidence that continues today. Net Quaternary emergence is recorded by uplifted Pleistocene marine terraces and Holocene shore deposits, including carbonate-cemented beachrock. Along the rocky macro-tidal coastline of the Nicoya Peninsula, beachrock deposits occur in tabular seaward-dipping horizons (5-15o) that are 0.1-0.5 m thick, 2-5 m wide, and extend laterally 10s to 100s of m along the beach. At some sites, multiple imbricate horizons step up the beach face beyond the high tide zone. Outcrops typically occur where coastal streams or wetlands provide abundant groundwater. Radiocarbon ages (25 samples, 12 field sites) range from 0.7-3.8 ka for deposits on the modern beach, and from 4.5-5.3 ka for deposits located up to 0.5 km inland. Petrographic analyses reveal compositional and textural diversity among constituent sand grains and interstitial carbonate cements. Sands consist primarily of sub-angular to sub-rounded marine shell and coral fragments mixed with lithic and mineral grains derived from local outcrops of Cretaceous oceanic basement rock (basalt, olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, vein quartz, and radiolarian chert). Interstitial cements occur in two distinct forms: 1) acicular circum

  10. Evidence for temperate conditions along the Antarctic peninsula during the Early Tertiary

    SciTech Connect

    Zinsmeister, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Several investigators based on deep sea glacial marine sediments from the southern oceans and volcanic sequences in West Antarctica have suggested extreme glacial conditions existed around Antarctica during the early Tertiary. Their data suggest ice sheets with ice shelves greater than those today were present on Antarctica by the late Eocene. If these data are correct, conditions during the Eocene along the Peninsula were similar to those that exist today. Late Eocene faunas and floras from Seymour Island indicate that conditions along the Peninsula were temperature. No paleontologic or geologic evidence have been obtained from Seymour Island (64/degree/18'S) to support the existence of glacial conditions along the northern part of the Peninsula during the early Tertiary. The presence of large quantities of fossil wood and plant debris in the upper Eocene sediments on Seymour Island indicates the presence of dense forests on the Peninsula during the Eocene. The discovery of marsupial and land birds remains on Seymour Island also indicate the presence of abundant terrestrial life on the Peninsula. The occurrence of an abundant marine life on Seymour Island supports the existence of temperate conditions along the Peninsula. Similarities of the Eocene faunas and floras with present day biotas from Tasmania, New Zealand and southern South America indicate that conditions along the Antarctic Peninsula during the late Eocene were comparable to present day mid latitudes of the southern hemisphere.

  11. Induced seismicity in the Khibiny Massif (Kola Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremenetskaya, Elena O.; Trjapitsin, Victor M.

    1995-10-01

    The topic of this paper is to review recent processes of increasing seismic activity in the Khibiny Massif in the Kcla Peninsula. It is a typical example of induced seismicity caused by rock deformation due to the extraction of more than 2·109 tons of rock mass since the mid-1960s. The dependence of seismic activity on the amount of extracted ore is demonstrated. Some of the induced earthquakes coincide with large mining explosions, thus indicating a trigger mechanism. The largest earthquake, which occurred on 16 April 1989 ( M L= 4.1) could be traced along the surface for 1200 m and observed to a depth of at least 220 m. The maximum measured displacement was 15 20 cm.

  12. Population structure of three Psammodromus species in the Iberian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Fitze, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of a species’ population structure is essential for the development of adequate conservation actions as well as for the understanding of its evolution. The population structure is unknown in all species of the Genus Psammodromus, including the Western Sand Racer (Psammodromus occidentalis; a recently described species), the Edward’s Sand Racer (P. edwardsianus) and the Spanish Sand Racer (P. hispanicus). In this article, the genetic variability and population structure of Psammodromus edwardsianus, P. hispanicus, and P. occidentalis were studied in the Iberian Peninsula covering their natural geographic distribution. Mitochondrial DNA showed genetically different units in all species with higher genetic variability in their southern populations (latitudinal variation). Genetic differentiation was different among species and contrasted to those of species with similar characteristics. Our results therefore highlight the importance of species-specific studies analysing population structure. PMID:26056622

  13. Ocean forcing of glacier retreat in the western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, A. J.; Holland, P. R.; Meredith, M. P.; Murray, T.; Luckman, A.; Vaughan, D. G.

    2016-07-01

    In recent decades, hundreds of glaciers draining the Antarctic Peninsula (63° to 70°S) have undergone systematic and progressive change. These changes are widely attributed to rapid increases in regional surface air temperature, but it is now clear that this cannot be the sole driver. Here, we identify a strong correspondence between mid-depth ocean temperatures and glacier-front changes along the ~1000-kilometer western coastline. In the south, glaciers that terminate in warm Circumpolar Deep Water have undergone considerable retreat, whereas those in the far northwest, which terminate in cooler waters, have not. Furthermore, a mid-ocean warming since the 1990s in the south is coincident with widespread acceleration of glacier retreat. We conclude that changes in ocean-induced melting are the primary cause of retreat for glaciers in this region.

  14. Leishmania spp. Epidemiology of Canine Leishmaniasis in the Yucatan Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    López-Céspedes, A.; Longoni, S. S.; Sauri-Arceo, C. H.; Sánchez-Moreno, M.; Rodríguez-Vivas, R. I.; Escobedo-Ortegón, F. J.; Barrera-Pérez, M. A.; Bolio-González, M. E.; Marín, C.

    2012-01-01

    Canine Leishmaniasis is widespread in various Mexican states, where different species of Leishmania have been isolated from dogs. In the present study, we describe the detection of L. braziliensis, L. infantum, and L. mexicana in serum of dogs from the states of Yucatan and Quintana Roo in the Yucatan Peninsula (Mexico). A total of 412 sera were analyzed by ELISA using the total extract of the parasite and the iron superoxide dismutase excreted by different trypanosomatids as antigens. We found the prevalence of L. braziliensis to be 7.52%, L. infantum to be 6.07%, and L. mexicana to be 20.63%, in the dog population studied. The results obtained with ELISA using iron superoxide dismutase as the antigen were confirmed by western blot analysis with its greater sensitivity, and the agreement between the two techniques was very high. PMID:22927792

  15. Ocean forcing of glacier retreat in the western Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Cook, A J; Holland, P R; Meredith, M P; Murray, T; Luckman, A; Vaughan, D G

    2016-07-15

    In recent decades, hundreds of glaciers draining the Antarctic Peninsula (63° to 70°S) have undergone systematic and progressive change. These changes are widely attributed to rapid increases in regional surface air temperature, but it is now clear that this cannot be the sole driver. Here, we identify a strong correspondence between mid-depth ocean temperatures and glacier-front changes along the ~1000-kilometer western coastline. In the south, glaciers that terminate in warm Circumpolar Deep Water have undergone considerable retreat, whereas those in the far northwest, which terminate in cooler waters, have not. Furthermore, a mid-ocean warming since the 1990s in the south is coincident with widespread acceleration of glacier retreat. We conclude that changes in ocean-induced melting are the primary cause of retreat for glaciers in this region. PMID:27418507

  16. The prehistory of the Arabian peninsula: deserts, dispersals, and demography.

    PubMed

    Groucutt, Huw S; Petraglia, Michael D

    2012-05-01

    As a geographic connection between Africa and the rest of Eurasia, the Arabian Peninsula occupies a central position in elucidating hominin evolution and dispersals. Arabia has been characterized by extreme environmental fluctuation in the Quaternary, with profound evolutionary and demographic consequences. Despite the importance of the region, Arabia remains understudied. Recent years, however, have seen major developments in environmental studies and archeology, revealing that the region contains important records that should play a significant role in future paleoanthropological narratives.(1-3) The emerging picture of Arabia suggests that numerous dispersals of hominin populations into the region occurred. Populations subsequently followed autochthonous trajectories, creating a distinctive regional archeological record. Debates continue on the respective roles of regional hominin extinctions and population continuity, with the latter suggesting adaptation to arid conditions. PMID:22718479

  17. Dynamic thinning of glaciers on the Southern Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, B.; Martin-Español, A.; Helm, V.; Flament, T.; van Wessem, J. M.; Ligtenberg, S. R. M.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Bamber, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    Growing evidence has demonstrated the importance of ice shelf buttressing on the inland grounded ice, especially if it is resting on bedrock below sea level. Much of the Southern Antarctic Peninsula satisfies this condition and also possesses a bed slope that deepens inland. Such ice sheet geometry is potentially unstable. We use satellite altimetry and gravity observations to show that a major portion of the region has, since 2009, destabilized. Ice mass loss of the marine-terminating glaciers has rapidly accelerated from close to balance in the 2000s to a sustained rate of -56 ± 8 gigatons per year, constituting a major fraction of Antarctica’s contribution to rising sea level. The widespread, simultaneous nature of the acceleration, in the absence of a persistent atmospheric forcing, points to an oceanic driving mechanism.

  18. SEISMIC DATA FOR NUCLEAR EXPLOSION MONITORING IN THE ARABIAN PENINSULA

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2004-07-08

    We report results from the third and final year of our project (ROA0101-35) to collect seismic event and waveform data recorded in and around the Arabian Peninsula. This effort involves several elements. We are working with King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology to collect data from the Saudi National Seismic Network, that consists of 38 digital three-component stations (27 broadband and 11 short-period). We have an ongoing collaboration with the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, which runs the eight station Kuwait National Seismic Network. We installed two temporary broadband stations in the United Arab Emirates (funded by NNSA NA-24 Office of Non-Proliferation & International Security). In this paper we present a summary of data collected under these efforts including integration of the raw data into LLNL's Seismic Research Database and preliminary analysis of souce parameters and earth structure.

  19. Shear wave velocity structures of the Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtar, Talal A.; Al-Saeed, Mohammed M.

    1994-02-01

    The shear velocity structures of the different tectonic provinces of the Arabian Peninsula has been studied using surface wave data recorded by the RYD (Riyadh) station. The inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities indicates that the Arabian shield can be modeled by two layers, each of which is 20 km thick with a shear velocity of 3.61 km/s in the upper crust and 3.88 km/s in the lower crust. The underlying upper mantle velocity is 4.61 km/s. Inversion of both Love and Rayleigh waves group velocities shows that the Arabian platform upper and lower crusts are comparable in their thicknesses to those of the shield, but with shear velocities of 3.4 and 4 km/s, respectively. The upper mantle velocity beneath the platform is 4.4 km/s and the average total thickness of the crust is 45 km.

  20. Late Holocene tephrochronology of the northern Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björck, Svante; Sandgren, Per; Zale, Rolf

    1991-11-01

    Andesitic and basaltic andesitic tephra layers are abundant in Holocene deposits from the Antarctic Peninsula. Visually discernible tephra horizons occur in three lakes on Livingston Island. Tephra in two other lakes and in a moss bank on Elephant Island, with very low ash concentrations, were detected magnetically. Deception Island is the most likely volcanic source for the tephra. With direct 14C dating, age/depth curves, and cross-correlations at least 14 tephra horizons dating to between ca. 4700 and 250 yr B.P. were identified and now form the basis for a preliminary regional tephrochronology that will be a valuable dating tool for investigating the Holocene climatic history of Antarctica.

  1. Long-term persistence of subduction earthquake segment boundaries - evidence from Mejillones Peninsula, N-Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, P.; Sobiesiak, M.; Nielsen, S.; Glodny, J.; Oncken, O.

    2010-12-01

    The Mejillones Peninsula in N-Chile is a strong anomaly in coastline morphology along the Chilean convergent margin. The location of the Peninsula coincides with the northern limit of the 1995 Mw=8.0 Antofagasta earthquake and the southern limit of the 2007 Mw=7.8 Tocopilla earthquake and, probably, also with the southern limit of the 1877 Mw=8.5 Iquique earthquake. Although it is tempting to recognise the Mejillones Peninsula as the surface expression of a major segment boundary for large subduction earthquakes, so far evidence for its stability over multiple seismic cycles is lacking. We introduce a detailed analysis of the aftershock sequences in combination with new age data of the surface uplift evolution since the late Pliocene to test the hypothesis whether earthquake rupture propagation is limited at the latitude of Mejillones Peninsula since a longer time period. If the Peninsula really is linked to a persistent segment boundary, then the surface deformation of the Peninsula in fact holds the record about a deep-seated mechanism revealing the interaction between the subduction process and near-surface deformation. In our study we present new chronostratigraphic and structural data that allow reconstructing the evolution of the Peninsula at the surface and correlation of the latter with seismic cycle deformation on the interface. We investigated sets of paleo-strandlines preserved in beach ridges and uplifted cliffs to reconstruct the uplift history of the Peninsula. Our results show that the central graben area on the Peninsula started uplifting above sea level as an anticlinal hinge zone prior to 400 ky ago, most probably 790 ky ago. The resulting E-W trending hinge exactly overlies the limit between the rupture planes of the Antofagasta and Tocopilla earthquakes. By correlating the uplift data with the slip distribution of the Antofagasta and Tocopilla earthquakes, we demonstrate that deformation and uplift is focussed during the postseismic and

  2. Permafrost degradation after the 2002 wildfire in Kougarok, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahana, G.; Harada, K.; Uchida, M.; Kondo, M.; Saito, K.; Narita, K.; Kushida, K.; Hinzman, L. D.; Fukuda, M.; Tsuyuzaki, S.

    2014-12-01

    Geomorphological and thermo-hydrological changes after wildfire were investigated here to clarify the rates of permafrost degradation and impacts on the surrounding environment. Study sites are located in Kougarok on the central Seward Peninsula of northwestern Alaska. This area is classified as zones of either continuous and discontinuous permafrost. In 2002, wildfire burned a large area of this region. We selected an intact area and a burned area as research sites located close to one another and divided by a road. The surface organic layer was either combusted or reduced in thickness during the fire. It is assumed that the vegetation cover and subsurface conditions were similar between both sites before the fire. General vegetation at unburned sites was shrub-tussock tundra with more than 30 % evergreen shrubs, about 30 % deciduous shrubs and about 20 % sedges. Our studies of aerial photography and high-resolution satellite images showed that surface subsidence due to thermokarst developed differentially within some of the burned and vehicle-disturbed areas, exposing the polygonal reliefs on the surface. Within burned areas absent the thermokarst polygonal reliefs, soil moisture was higher at burned areas than unburned, and the active layer thickness was about 1.5-2.0 times deeper at the burned area during the initial stage of the study (2005-2007). In the following years, however, the difference in active layer thickness decreased, and thickness for the burned area seemed to be recovering to pre-fire status. Geophysical surveys demonstrated that there had been no detectable difference in the depth of the permafrost base between the burned and unburned areas. On the other hand, at the burned site with thermokarst polygonal reliefs, we confirmed using differential GPS that the polygonal reliefs actually coincides with depression lines along the subsurface ice wedge network. Near-surface unfrozen and frozen soil cores down to 1.6 m depth were sampled at seven and

  3. Paleoseismic Studies of the Peninsula San Andreas Fault near Crystal Springs Reservoir, Woodside, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, C. S.; Zachariasen, J. A.; Kozaci, O.; Clahan, K.; Sickler, R. R.; Rosa, C. M.; Hassett, W.; Feigelson, L.; Haproff, P. J.; DeLong, S.; Perkins, A.; Brooks, B. A.; Delano, J.; Baldwin, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    The Peninsula section of the San Andreas Fault (SAFP) is within 10 km of downtown San Francisco, making it among the most significant contributors to seismic hazard in the San Francisco Bay area. However, the history of earthquakes along this fault is poorly known. The most recent ground-rupturing earthquake occurred in 1906, but the ages of earlier earthquakes associated with surface rupture on this fault segment remain uncertain. Most researchers assume that the historically documented earthquake in 1838 occurred on the SAFP, but no definitive evidence of surface rupture at that time has been found. South of Crystal Springs Reservoir, the San Andreas Fault zone is expressed as a prominent fault scarp that is cut back in several locations by recent fluvial processes. At our Crystal Springs South (CSS) trench site, the fault is expressed as a low scarp with no other surface expression to suggest additional young fault traces. Excavations at this site revealed two distinct sets of faults, a younger set of faults that extend nearly to the modern ground surface that we assume represent the 1906 surface rupture, and an older set of faults that terminate lower in the stratigraphic section and are overlain by a scarp-derived colluvial deposit. Radiocarbon dating constrains the age of this older earthquake to 830-930 Cal. years BP. We determined that a buried channel deposit that dates to 790-960 Cal. years BP is displaced approximately 6-7m across both sets of faults. The closest 1906 offset measurement was made about 11 km northwest of this site, and is about 2.9m. Therefore our measurement of 6-7m of offset on the buried channel deposit at the CSS site could represent slip from 1906 and only one previous event comparable in size to the 1906 earthquake. The surprisingly old age of the earlier earthquake raises concerns that one or both of the event horizons exposed at the CSS site could represent multiple earthquakes. We therefore excavated an exploratory trench about 0

  4. [Imposex in Voluta musica (Caenogastropoda: Volutidae) from Northeastern Peninsula de Araya, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Peralta, Ana Carolina; Miloslavich, Patricia; Bigatti, Gregorio

    2014-06-01

    Voluta musica is a dioecious marine gastropod endemic of the South Caribbean. Tributyltin (TBT) and copper (Cu) are potential inducers of imposex, an endocrine disorder by which females develop a penis and/or vas deferens. The goal of this work was to determine the imposex incidence in V. musica populations from Northeastern Peninsula de Araya. For this, we selected three sites (Isla Caribe, Isla Lobos and Bajo Cuspe) and made monthly samplings of 15 snails in each site, during one year, and determined: (1) sizes; (2) sex and imposex incidence and (3) the Relative Penis Length Index (RPLI). We also performed histological analysis of the gonads, and measured TBT and Cu concentrations in sediments from the studied localities. Our results showed that the total number of sampled females affected by imposex was 24.5% at Isla Caribe, 12% at Isla Lobos, and none at Bajo Cuspe. In sediments, Cu was detected mostly in Isla Lobos. The female gonads with imposex did not show any development of male cells in any of the sampled sites. The higher percentage of females with imposex matched with the higher boat traffic locality, and higher TBT level (Isla Caribe). No esterilization was evident in this work, nevertheless, the presence of TBT and Cu in the sediments and females with imposex were considered as a potential threat to V. musica populations in this region. In Venezuela there is no control over this particular issue, possibly because of the lack of information and research in this topic, but certainly, this information will be useful in biodiversity conservation policies. PMID:25102636

  5. The imbalance of new and export production in the western Antarctic Peninsula, a potentially "leaky" ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stukel, Michael R.; Asher, Elizabeth; Couto, Nicole; Schofield, Oscar; Strebel, Stefanie; Tortell, Philippe; Ducklow, Hugh W.

    2015-09-01

    To quantify the balance between new production and vertical nitrogen export of sinking particles, we measured nitrate uptake, net nitrate drawdown, ΔO2/Ar-based net community production, sediment trap flux, and 234Th export at a coastal site near Palmer Station, Antarctica, during the phytoplankton growing season from October 2012 to March 2013. We also measured nitrate uptake and 234Th export throughout the northern western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) region on a cruise in January 2013. We used a nonsteady state 234Th equation with temporally varying upwelling rates and an irradiance-based phytoplankton production model to correct our export and new production estimates in the complex coastal site near Palmer Station. Results unequivocally showed that nitrate uptake and net community production were significantly greater than the sinking particle export on region-wide spatial scales and season-long temporal scales. At our coastal site, new production (105 ± 17.4 mg N m-2 d-1, mean ± standard error) was 5.3 times greater than vertical nitrogen export (20.4 ± 2.4 mg N m-2 d-1). On the January cruise in the northern WAP, new production (47.9 ± 14.4 mg N m-2 d-1) was 2.4 times greater than export (19.9 ± 1.4 mg N m-2 d-1). Much of this imbalance can be attributed to diffusive losses of particulate nitrogen from the surface ocean due to diapycnal mixing, indicative of a "leaky" WAP ecosystem. If these diffusive losses are common in other systems where new production exceeds export, it may be necessary to revise current estimates of the ocean's biological pump.

  6. Paleoseismic Studies of the Peninsula San Andreas Fault at the Filoli Estate, Woodside, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, C. S.; Clahan, K.; Sickler, R. R.; Salin, A.; DeLong, S. B.; McDermott, R.; Pickering, A.; Baldwin, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The Peninsula section of the San Andreas Fault (SAFP) is within 10 km of downtown San Francisco, making it among the most significant sources of seismic hazard in the San Francisco Bay area. However, the history of earthquakes along this fault segment is poorly known. The most recent ground-rupturing earthquake occurred in 1906, but the dates of earlier surface-rupturing earthquakes on this segment remain uncertain. Earlier work at the Crystal Springs South trench site showed that a ground-rupturing paleo-earthquake occurred 830-930 Cal. yr BP, but poor stratigraphic resolution hampered our ability to determine whether or not earthquakes occurred between then and 1906. We combined existing airborne LiDAR data with newly-collected terrestrial laser scanner data to create a high-resolution digital elevation model that we used to guide the locations of two trenches at a new site near Scarp Creek on the Filoli Estate, about 0.5km to the southeast along the fault. The new trenches exposed a stratigraphic section of faulted fluvial, overbank, and lacustrine deposits overlying a massive colluvial deposit. Our preliminary results show evidence for at least three surface ruptures, including the 1906 earthquake, since deposition of the colluvial material. Preliminary radiocarbon analyses show that these three earthquakes occurred during the last 900 years. We expect that radiocarbon analyses of samples of the abundant organic material exposed in the trenches will constrain more closely the ages of the prehistoric events. In addition, we anticipate that additional work at this site will provide an opportunity to test our earlier results and will provide additional data to better constrain the timing of pre-1906 surface ruptures on the SAFP.

  7. High resolution reconstruction of monthly autumn and winter precipitation of Iberian Peninsula for last 150 years.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortesi, N.; Trigo, R.; González-Hidalgo, J. C.; Ramos, A.

    2012-04-01

    Precipitation over Iberian Peninsula (IP) presents large values of interannual variability and large spatial contrasts between wet mountainous regions in the north and dry regions in the southern plains. Unlike other European regions, IP was poorly monitored for precipitation during 19th century. Here we present a new approach to fill this gap. A set of 26 atmospheric circulation weather types (Trigo R.M. and DaCamara C.C., 2000) derived from a recent SLP dataset, the EMULATE (European and North Atlantic daily to multidecadal climate variability) Project, was used to reconstruct Iberian monthly precipitation from October to March during 1851-1947. Principal Component Regression Analysis was chosen to develop monthly precipitation reconstruction back to 1851 and calibrated over 1948-2003 period for 3030 monthly precipitation series of high-density homogenized MOPREDAS (Monthly Precipitation Database for Spain and Portugal) database. Validation was conducted over 1920-1947 at 15 key site locations. Results show high model performance for selected months, with a mean coefficient of variation (CV) around 0.6 during validation period. Lower CV values were achieved in western area of IP. Trigo, R. M., and DaCamara, C.C., 2000: "Circulation weather types and their impact on the precipitation regime in Portugal". Int. J. Climatol., 20, 1559-1581.

  8. Patterns and dynamics of treeline advance on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Andrea H.; Rupp, T. Scott; Fastie, Christopher L.; Starfield, Anthony M.

    2003-01-01

    Boreal tree species are expected to invade tundra ecosystems as climate warms. Because forested ecosystems differ from tundra ecosystems in a number of climatically relevant characteristics, this advance of the altitudinal and latitudinal tree limit may ultimately feedback on regional climate. We used tree rings to reconstruct the response of the treeline ecotone on the Seward Peninsula in northwestern Alaska to 20th century warming. We further explored the sensitivity of the treeline ecotone to climate change using the spatially explicit, frame-based model ALFRESCO. Our reconstructions of forest response to past warming indicate that in upland tundra spruce have successfully established progressively farther from the forest limit since the 1880s. Shrub tundra has thus been converted to low-density forest-tundra within a band extending approximately 10 km from the forest limit. In lowland sites, where soil thermal and hydrologic properties are the primary constraint on tree distribution, trees began establishing in tundra after 1920, and establishment was restricted to areas that had experienced thermokarst activity in the past. Modeling experiments suggested that changes in disturbance regime and spruce growth response to climate may introduce strongly nonlinear responses to climate change at treeline. Field data and model experiments thus both indicate that large and nearly instantaneous responses to warming are likely at the treeline ecotone but that sensitivity to warming is likely to vary substantially over space and time.

  9. Patterns and dynamics of treeline advance on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Andrea H.; Rupp, T. Scott; Fastie, Christopher L.; Starfield, Anthony M.

    2002-01-01

    Boreal tree species are expected to invade tundra ecosystems as climate warms. Because forested ecosystems differ from tundra ecosystems in a number of climatically relevant characteristics, this advance of the altitudinal and latitudinal tree limit may ultimately feedback on regional climate. We used tree rings to reconstruct the response of the treeline ecotone on the Seward Peninsula in northwestern Alaska to 20th century warming. We further explored the sensitivity of the treeline ecotone to climate change using the spatially explicit, frame-based model ALFRESCO. Our reconstructions of forest response to past warming indicate that in upland tundra spruce have successfully established progressively farther from the forest limit since the 1880s. Shrub tundra has thus been converted to low-density forest-tundra within a band extending approximately 10 km from the forest limit. In lowland sites, where soil thermal and hydrologic properties are the primary constraint on tree distribution, trees began establishing in tundra after 1920, and establishment was restricted to areas that had experienced thermokarst activity in the past. Modeling experiments suggested that changes in disturbance regime and spruce growth response to climate may introduce strongly nonlinear responses to climate change at treeline. Field data and model experiments thus both indicate that large and nearly instantaneous responses to warming are likely at the treeline ecotone but that sensitivity to warming is likely to vary substantially over space and time.

  10. Evaluation of extreme ozone events over the Iberian Peninsula from Brewer spectrophotometers in the 2000s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, D.; Antón, M.; Sáenz, G.; Bañón, M.; Vilaplana, J. M.; García, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of extreme events is an essential key in the research of the atmospheric ozone due to their importance in biological and radiative effects. Total ozone column (TOC) databases from five ground-based sites equipped with a Brewer spectrometer are used to evaluate extreme ozone events along the Iberian Peninsula for the period 2002-2012. The monthly standard deviation is proved as a reliable metric to identify extreme cases. A total of 465 events (days) are classified as extremes events. For the database used, 2011 presents 32 events with very low TOC values (miniholes), while 2010 is the year with the maximum number (51) of events with very high TOC values (minihighs). The weight of the miniholes (minihighs) over the ozone annual mean can achieve values over the 4% (8%). The relationship between global dynamical features and ozone extreme events is also addressed in this study. Double tropopause events have explained in 2002 and 2004 up to the half of minihole events, while the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) negative phase is the condition prevalent in the majority of the minihighs in the entire period. These global characteristics are verified in the analysis of a case study (February-March 2004) exhibiting two periods with double tropopause events and a change in the sign of the NAO index with the consequent change in the tropopause pressure.

  11. Holocene glacier fluctuations inferred from lacustrine sediment, Emerald Lake, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBrecque, Taylor S.; Kaufman, Darrell S.

    2016-01-01

    Physical and biological characteristics of lacustrine sediment from Emerald Lake were used to reconstruct the Holocene glacier history of Grewingk Glacier, southern Alaska. Emerald Lake is an ice-marginal threshold lake, receiving glaciofluvial sediment when Grewingk Glacier overtops the topographic divide that separates it from the lake. Sub-bottom acoustical profiles were used to locate core sites to maximize both the length and resolution of the sedimentary sequence recovered in the 4-m-long cores. The age model for the composite sequence is based on 13 14C ages and a 210Pb profile. A sharp transition from the basal inorganic mud to organic-rich mud at 11.4 ± 0.2 ka marks the initial retreat of Grewingk Glacier below the divide of Emerald Lake. The overlaying organic-rich mud is interrupted by stony mud that records a re-advance between 10.7 ± 0.2 and 9.8 ± 0.2 ka. The glacier did not spill meltwater into the lake again until the Little Ice Age, consistent with previously documented Little Ice Ages advances on the Kenai Peninsula. The retreat of Grewingk Glacier at 11.4 ka took place as temperature increased following the Younger Dryas, and the subsequent re-advance corresponds with a climate reversal beginning around 11 ka across southern Alaska.

  12. Analysis of Glacial Change in the Northern Antarctic Peninsula Region Using Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, W.; Arkle, J.; Devillier, K.; Neely, N.; Velasco, A. A.

    2009-05-01

    Clearly and robustly documenting global climate change over this past century remains a key goal for researchers. Polar regions are an ideal place to study change, since they are particularly sensitive to temperature changes. As part of an International Polar Year (IPY) grant called IPY-ROAM (Research and Educational Opportunities in Antarctica for Minorities), faculty at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) took 29 underrepresented minority students and teachers on a research expedition to Antarctica over winter break 2007. One goal of the program was to document glacial change along the Antarctic Peninsula over the past century using photogrammetry, a technique that uses photos to make accurate geographic measurements. Prior to embarkation, we gathered historic photos of glaciers along our travel route. During the expedition, new photos were taken within the old photo sites, where we made Global Positioning System (GPS) readings and accurately measurement angles to the geographic features. The geographic features (including top and bottom of a glacier) were then mapped onto a Geographical Information Systems (GIS) that allowed us to determine location, scale and distance to these features on the photos. With the angle and distance, the height difference between the old and current photo of the glacier was calculated using basic trigonometric functions. In one case, we determined a 14 m reduction in glacier height from 1934 to 2007. Future work will include analysis from more glaciers in the region, and to determine if there is a correlation between glacier retreat and climate change. ROAM/index.html

  13. In situ measurements of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the water column off the Palos Verdes Peninsula, California

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, E.Y.; Yu, C.C.; Tran, K.

    1999-02-01

    Spatial distributions of DDT and its primary metabolites (DDTs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the water column off the Palos Verdes Peninsula, CA, were measured in the winter and summer of 1997 using an in situ sampling method. The concentrations of DDTs ranged from 0.6 to 15.8 ng/L, while those of PCBs ranged from 0.06 to 15.8 ng/L, while those of PCBs ranged from 0.06 to 1.14 ng/L at eight sampling stations. The spatial distribution patterns of DDTs and PCBs as well as the DDT/PCB concentration ratio in the water column were similar to those found in the sediment, and the vertical profiles of DDTs and PCBs at both sampling seasons exponentially decreased with increasing distance from the sea floor. In addition, the partitioning characteristics of DDTs and selected PCB congeners indicated a tendency of mobilization from sediment to water. All of these findings strongly suggest that contaminated sediments are a main source of DDT and PCB inputs to the water column surrounding the study site.

  14. Block volume estimation from the discontinuity spacing measurements of mesozoic limestone quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Elci, Hakan; Turk, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD) ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to have given in the same order of the rock block volume to the volumetric joint count (J(v)) method. Moreover, dimensions of the 2378 blocks produced between the years of 2009 and 2011 in the working quarries have been recorded. Assuming, that each block surfaces is a discontinuity, the mean block volume (V(b)), the mean volumetric joint count (J(vb)) and the mean block shape factor of the blocks are determined and compared with the estimated mean in situ block volumes (V(in)) and volumetric joint count (J(vi)) values estimated from the in situ discontinuity measurements. The established relations are presented as a chart to be used in practice for estimating the mean volume of blocks that can be obtained from a quarry site by analyzing the rock mass discontinuity spacing measurements. PMID:24696642

  15. First record of Mesopithecus (Cercopithecidae, Colobinae) from the Miocene of the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Alba, David M; Montoya, Plini; Pina, Marta; Rook, Lorenzo; Abella, Juan; Morales, Jorge; Delson, Eric

    2015-11-01

    We report dental remains of the extinct colobine monkey Mesopithecus from the Turolian (MN13, Late Miocene, ca. 6.23 Ma) locality of Venta del Moro (Valencia, Spain). They include most of the deciduous dentition and the unerupted germs of the first molars of a single infantile individual, as well as two lower left lateral incisors from two additional individuals. On the basis of morphometric comparisons, mainly based on the M1s, these remains are attributed to the Late Miocene species Mesopithecus pentelicus. They represent a significant addition to the knowledge of the deciduous dentition of this taxon, much less well-known than the permanent dentition. Although this genus was widely distributed from the Late Miocene through the Pliocene across Europe, southwestern Asia, Pakistan, and China, until now its occurence in the Late Miocene of the Iberian Peninsula had not been documented conclusively. Hence, the reported remains considerably enlarge southwestwards the known geographic distribution of Mesopithecus. The presence of this genus at Venta del Moro must be understood within the framework of the significant faunal turnover that took place in European faunas during the latest Turolian (the second Messinian mammalian dispersal), which is further documented at this locality by the occurrence of other eastern immigrants. At the same time, the presence of M. pentelicus at this site agrees well with previous paleoenvironmental and sedimentological evidence, indicating a lacustrine depositional environment with strong hydrologic seasonality. PMID:26553814

  16. Isolation and assessment of phytate-hydrolysing bacteria from the DelMarVa Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jane E; Kysela, David; Elimelech, Menachem

    2007-12-01

    The Delaware-Maryland-Virginia (DelMarVa) Peninsula, flanking one side of the Chesapeake Bay, is home to a substantial broiler chicken industry. As such, it produces a significant amount of manure that is typically composted and spread onto local croplands as a fertilizer. Phytate (myo inositol hexakisphosphate), the major form of organic phosphorus in the manure, can be hydrolysed by microorganisms to produce orthophosphate. Orthophosphate is a eutrophication agent which can lead to algal blooms, hypoxia and fish kills in the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. This transect study reveals a subpopulation of heterotrophic, thiosulfate-utilizing bacteria that can degrade phytate within the watershed as well as its receiving water sediment. Aerobic isolates were typical soil bacteria, e.g. Pseudomonad, Bacillus and Arthrobacter species, as well as a less common Staphylococcus inhabitant. Bacillus pumilus, Staphyloccocus equorum, Arthrobacter bergei and Pseudomonas marginalis strains have not been previously described as phytate-degrading. Each site along the transect - from manure pile to receiving sediment - was host to a population of bacteria that can degrade phytate and hence, each is a possible non-point source of orthophosphate pollution. Each new isolate could provide an enzyme additive for monogastric feed, thus reducing the impact of excessive phytate load on the environment. PMID:17991037

  17. The application of cooperative monitoring techniques to a conceptual limited deployment zone in the Korean peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Vannoni, M.; Duggan, R.

    1996-10-01

    The Korean peninsula is the site of a tense military confrontation. Relations between North and South Korea improved during the early 1990`s but the process is now frozen. Confidence building measures, particularly military ones, that address the security needs of both countries would decrease the danger of conflict and help create an environment for direct negotiations. The Korean Institute for Defense Analysis (KIDA) analyzed current security conditions and options. Their scenario includes a conceptual agreement to establish Limited Force Deployment Zones (LDZ) along the current demilitarized zone (DMZ) to increase mutual security. The Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) of Sandia National Laboratories, in collaboration with KIDA, developed a strategy, with examples, for cooperatively monitoring the agreement. A cooperative monitoring regime requires consideration of the agreement`s terms, the geographic, logistic, military, and political factors of the Korean environment, and the capability of technology to monitor the terms. This paper assesses the applicability of cooperative monitoring to Korea, describes the monitoring strategy for the Korean enhanced DMZ scenario, and describes the applicable technologies and procedures.

  18. The impact of sea surface temperature on winter wheat in Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capa-Morocho, Mirian; Rodríguez-Fonseca, Belen; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    Climate variability is the main driver of changes in crops yield, especially for rainfed production systems. This is also the case of Iberian Peninsula (IP) (Capa-Morocho et al., 2014), where wheat yields are strongly dependent on seasonal rainfall amount and temporal distribution of rainfall during the growing season. Previous works have shown that large-scale oceanic patterns have a significant impact on precipitation over IP (Rodriguez-Fonseca and de Castro, 2002; Rodríguez-Fonseca et al., 2006). The existence of some predictability of precipitation has encouraged us to analyze the possible predictability of the wheat yield in the IP using sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies as predictor. For this purpose, a crop model site specific calibrated for the Northeast of IP and several reanalysis climate datasets have been used to obtain long time series of attainable wheat yield and relate their variability with SST anomalies. The results show that wheat yield anomalies are associated with changes in the Tropical Pacific (El Niño) and Atlantic (TNA) SST. For these events, the regional associated atmospheric pattern resembles the NAO, which also influences directly on the maximum temperatures and precipitation experienced by the crop during flowering and grain filling. Results from this study could have important implications for predictability issues in agricultural planning and management, such as insurance coverage, changes in sowing dates and choice of species and varieties.

  19. Trace element contamination and availability in the Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Padeiro, Ana; Amaro, Eduardo; Dos Santos, Margarida M C; Araújo, Maria F; Gomes, Susana S; Leppe, Marcelo; Verkulich, Sergey; Hughes, Kevin A; Peter, Hans-Ulrich; Canário, João

    2016-06-15

    The Ardley Cove area (located on the Maxwell Bay shoreline, Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica) is characterized not only by its high biodiversity, but also by a high density of scientific stations, making it potentially one of the most impacted areas of Antarctica. In order to assess the source, contamination levels, distribution and availability of several trace elements (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pb, Cd and Hg) in and around Maxwell Bay, soil and seawater samples were collected. Soil samples were also collected in the study reference site near the Bellingshausen Dome area, as it lies far from centers of human activity and associated infrastructure. Enrichment factors (EFs) and sequential extractions were also used to assess the degree of contamination and availability of the trace elements under investigation. The results obtained in this study pointed to the existence of several contamination hotspots, mainly related to high levels of Zn, Pb, Cd, Cr and Ni. Comparison of the contaminant distribution patterns with data from earlier studies allowed the identification of anthropogenic sources. Use of the EF approach and sequential extractions confirmed these findings. In particular, higher extraction proportions were obtained for Zn and Pb (68 and 71%, respectively), which were also the same elements where the highest EFs were determined. The results obtained in this study clearly point to human impact on the natural environment in this region of Antarctica and we recommend the implementation of appropriate contamination control and remediation methods. PMID:27224418

  20. Block Volume Estimation from the Discontinuity Spacing Measurements of Mesozoic Limestone Quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Elci, Hakan; Turk, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD) ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to have given in the same order of the rock block volume to the volumetric joint count (Jv) method. Moreover, dimensions of the 2378 blocks produced between the years of 2009 and 2011 in the working quarries have been recorded. Assuming, that each block surfaces is a discontinuity, the mean block volume (Vb), the mean volumetric joint count (Jvb) and the mean block shape factor of the blocks are determined and compared with the estimated mean in situ block volumes (Vin) and volumetric joint count (Jvi) values estimated from the in situ discontinuity measurements. The established relations are presented as a chart to be used in practice for estimating the mean volume of blocks that can be obtained from a quarry site by analyzing the rock mass discontinuity spacing measurements. PMID:24696642

  1. Holocene evolution of Dahab coastline - Gulf of Aqaba, Sinai Peninsula, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdy, Torab

    2016-04-01

    Dahab was a little Bedouin-village in Sinai Peninsula at the mid-western coast of Gulf of Aqaba approx. 90 km north of Sharm-el-Sheikh City and it means "gold" in Arabic language. But in the past 20 years ago it becomes one of the most tourist sites in Egypt. The basement complex is composed mostly of biotiteaplite-granite, mica-aplitegranite, granodiorite, quartzdiorite, alaskite, and diorite. Based on correlation with similar igneous in the most southern part of Sinai and the Red Sea area. Wadi Dahab composed of igneous and metamorphic rocks and the coastline is formed of the fragments of its rocks, mixed with fragments of coral reef and fluvial deposits of Wadi Dahab. The morphology of Dahab coastline is characterized by hooked marine spit, which composed of fluvial sediments carried by marine current from wadi Dahab mouth, this spit encloses shallow lagoon, but the active deposition on the lagoon bottom will evaluate it into saline marsh. This paper dealing with the evolution of Dahab spit and lagoon during the Holocene in addition to the recent time for last 100 years, and it impacts of the future management of the coast area. The coastline mapping during the period of study depends upon GIS technique for data were collected during field measuring by using total station, aerial photo and satellite image interpretation as well as soil sample dating. Suggested geomorphological evolution of Dahab area during the Holocene depending upon geomorphic investigation of the sedimentological process into 6 stages.

  2. Foraging habitats of southern elephant seals, Mirounga leonina, from the Northern Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelbert, Monica M. C.; de Souza, Ronald B.; Lewis, Mirtha N.; Hindell, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Elephant Island (EI) is uniquely placed to provide southern elephant seals (SES) breeding there with potential access to foraging grounds in the Weddell Sea, the frontal zones of the South Atlantic Ocean, the Patagonian shelf and the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). Quantifying where seals from EI forage therefore provides insights into the types of important habitats available, and which are of particular importance to elephant seals. Twenty nine SES (5 sub-adult males—SAM and 24 adult females—AF) were equipped with SMRU CTD-SLDRs during the post-breeding (PB 2008, 2009) and post-moulting (PM 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010) trips to sea. There were striking intra-annual and inter-sex differences in foraging areas, with most of the PB females remaining within 150 km of EI. One PB AF travelled down the WAP as did 16 out of the 20 PM females and foraged near the winter ice-edge. Most PM sub-adult males remained close to EI, in areas similar to those used by adult females several months earlier, although one SAM spent the early part of the winter foraging on the Patagonian Shelf. The waters of the Northern Antarctic Peninsula (NAP) contain abundant resources to support the majority of the Islands' SES for the summer and early winter, such that the animals from this population have shorter migrations than those from most other populations. Sub-adult males and PB females are certainly taking advantage of these resources. However, PM females did not remain there over the winter months, instead they used the same waters at the ice-edge in the southern WAP that females from both King George Island and South Georgia used. Females made more benthic dives than sub-adult males—again this contrasts with other sites where SAMs do more benthic diving. Unlike most other populations studied to date EI is a relatively southerly breeding colony located on the Antarctic continental shelf. EI seals are using shelf habitats more than other SES populations but some individuals still

  3. Development of Solar Resources Map using Satellites and Numerical Prediction Data on Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, J.-B.; Jeon, S.-H.; Choi, Y.-J.; Lee, K.-T.

    2012-04-01

    results are verified and validated with ground observations from 22 KMA solar sites. Correlation coefficient is 0.95 and RMSE (Root Mean Square Error) is 67.53 W/m2. Then these hourly results are accumulated by month and year. Finally, the solar resources map is represented with mean accumulated solar radiation with and without topographic effect through 11 years. Regions with the strongest solar radiation are distributed across Andong, Daegu and Jinju which are low latitude and cloudless regions in Korea. Jeju island is located on the lowest latitude in Korean peninsula, but it is low solar energy region because it is abundant in water vapour and clouds.

  4. Late Quaternary environmental changes in Marguerite Bay, Antarctic Peninsula, inferred from lake sediments and raised beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, Dominic A.; Roberts, Stephen J.; Smith, James A.; Verleyen, Elie; Sterken, Mieke; Labarque, Minke; Sabbe, Koen; Vyverman, Wim; Allen, Claire S.; Leng, Melanie J.; Bryant, Charlotte

    2013-05-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the fastest-warming regions on Earth, but its palaeoenvironmental history south of 63° latitude is relatively poorly documented, relying principally on the marine geological record and short ice cores. In this paper, we present evidence of late-Quaternary environmental change from the Marguerite Bay region combining data from lake sediment records on Horseshoe Island and Pourquoi-Pas Island, and raised beaches at Horseshoe Island, Pourquoi-Pas Island and Calmette Bay. Lake sediments were radiocarbon dated and analysed using a combination of sedimentological, geochemical and microfossil methods. Raised beaches were surveyed and analysed for changes in clast composition, size and roundness. Results suggest a non-erosive glacial regime could have existed on Horseshoe Island from 35,780 (38,650-33,380) or 32,910 (34,630-31,370) cal yr BP onwards. There is radiocarbon and macrofossil evidence for possible local deglaciation events at 28,830 (29,370-28,320) cal yr BP, immediately post-dating Antarctic Isotopic Maximum 4, and 21,110 (21,510-20,730 interpolated) cal yr BP coinciding with, or immediately post-dating, Antarctic Isotopic Maximum 2. The Holocene deglaciation of Horseshoe Island commenced from 10,610 (11,000-10,300) cal yr BP at the same time as the early Holocene temperature maximum recorded in Antarctic ice cores. This was followed by the onset of marine sedimentation in The Narrows, Pourquoi-Pas Island, before 8850 (8480-9260) cal yr BP. Relative sea level high stands of 40.79 m above present at Pourquoi-Pas Island and 40.55 m above present at Calmette Bay occurred sometime after 9000 cal yr BP and suggest that a thicker ice sheet, including grounded ice streams, was present in this region of the Antarctic Peninsula than that recorded at sites further north. Isolation of the Narrows Lake basin on Pourquoi-Pas Island shows relative sea level in this region had fallen rapidly to 19.41 m by 7270 (7385-7155) cal yr BP

  5. 75 FR 20991 - Upper Peninsula Power Company; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Upper Peninsula Power Company; Notice of Availability of Environmental... Energy Regulatory Commission's regulations, 18 CFR part 380, Commission staff have prepared...

  6. Application of Space Technology to Discovery of Ancient Desert Trade Routes in the Southern Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blom, Ronald; Crippen, Robert; Hedges, George; Zarins, Juris

    1997-01-01

    Over the last decade, an unusual combination of historical research, traditional archaeology, and application of space technolgy has demonstrated the existence of trans-desert trade routes in the sourthern Arabian peninsula.

  7. Hematology and serum chemistries of nestling bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in the lower peninsula of MI, USA.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, W W; Stickle, J E; Giesy, J P

    2000-11-01

    Hematology constituents and serum biochemistries were determined in blood collected from 55 nestling bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from nest sites within the lower peninsula of Michigan in 1992. Hematological values were comparable to published ranges for birds for all but eosinophils, which were greater than normal. Serum chemistry values were similar to those of other birds for all but six parameters, uric acid, cholesterol, alkaline phosphatase, total protein, globulin, and urea nitrogen, which were greater and glucose which was less. Samples of blood collected from wild bald eagles can be used for hematologic parameters and serum chemistry. It is important for other studies of endangered species to obtain baseline data from healthy, wild animals in their natural environment, and for comparison of animals living in environments of greater exposure to those living in areas of lesser exposure to xenobiotics. We caution that arrangements for rapid analysis be done in advance of sample collection. PMID:11057684

  8. Analysis of Geomagnetic Variations Related to Earthquakes Location: Occurred in and around the Korean Peninsula from 2012 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, D.; Oh, S.; Hong, J.

    2015-12-01

    This study aims at the correlation analysis of geomagnetic variations related to earthquake locations occurred in and around the Korean peninsula from 2012 to 2014. The wavelet based semblance technique was used to confirm the geomagnetic variations related to earthquakes. And as a result of the analysis, a pattern of consistent geomagnetic variations has been found from the earthquake occurred within 100 km radius at observation site. And similar correlation between earthquake location and Z-field geomagnetic data was also confirmed by the wavelet-based semblance analysis of geomagnetic data. Geomagnetic data obtained from Cheong-yang observatory, which have shown high quality, was used in analysis mainly. Geomagnetic variations from the earthquakes with magnitude greater than 3 within 100 km radius of the Cheng-yang observatory (figure 1) showed meaningful result. In addition, geomagnetic data from Bohyunsan observatory were also used to ensure the validity of the correlation between earthquake and Z-field geomagnetic data.

  9. Polygonal tundra geomorphological change in response to warming alters future CO2 and CH4 flux on the Barrow Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Lara, Mark J; McGuire, A David; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; Tweedie, Craig E; Hinkel, Kenneth M; Skurikhin, Alexei N; Romanovsky, Vladimir E; Grosse, Guido; Bolton, W Robert; Genet, Helene

    2015-04-01

    The landscape of the Barrow Peninsula in northern Alaska is thought to have formed over centuries to millennia, and is now dominated by ice-wedge polygonal tundra that spans drained thaw-lake basins and interstitial tundra. In nearby tundra regions, studies have identified a rapid increase in thermokarst formation (i.e., pits) over recent decades in response to climate warming, facilitating changes in polygonal tundra geomorphology. We assessed the future impact of 100 years of tundra geomorphic change on peak growing season carbon exchange in response to: (i) landscape succession associated with the thaw-lake cycle; and (ii) low, moderate, and extreme scenarios of thermokarst pit formation (10%, 30%, and 50%) reported for Alaskan arctic tundra sites. We developed a 30 × 30 m resolution tundra geomorphology map (overall accuracy:75%; Kappa:0.69) for our ~1800 km² study area composed of ten classes; drained slope, high center polygon, flat-center polygon, low center polygon, coalescent low center polygon, polygon trough, meadow, ponds, rivers, and lakes, to determine their spatial distribution across the Barrow Peninsula. Land-atmosphere CO2 and CH4 flux data were collected for the summers of 2006-2010 at eighty-two sites near Barrow, across the mapped classes. The developed geomorphic map was used for the regional assessment of carbon flux. Results indicate (i) at present during peak growing season on the Barrow Peninsula, CO2 uptake occurs at -902.3 10(6) gC-CO2 day(-1) (uncertainty using 95% CI is between -438.3 and -1366 10(6) gC-CO2 day(-1)) and CH4 flux at 28.9 10(6) gC-CH4 day(-1) (uncertainty using 95% CI is between 12.9 and 44.9 10(6) gC-CH4 day(-1)), (ii) one century of future landscape change associated with the thaw-lake cycle only slightly alter CO2 and CH4 exchange, while (iii) moderate increases in thermokarst pits would strengthen both CO2 uptake (-166.9 10(6) gC-CO2 day(-1)) and CH4 flux (2.8 10(6) gC-CH4 day(-1)) with geomorphic change from low

  10. Increased Precipitation over the Yucatan Peninsula Inferred from the Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Late Holocene Foram Assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmallu, M.; Broach, K.; Paytan, A.; Street, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    As global climate warms, IPCC predictions suggest dry and seasonally dry regions will become dryer, increasing stress on water resources by growing urban populations (e.g. Southern California; Yucatan, Mexico). This study aims to reconstruct paleohydrologic trends during the late Holocene using foraminifera assemblages in Yucatan, Mexico to determine drought susceptibility in a region affected by migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The ITCZ affects precipitation over the Yucatan Peninsula, potentially decreasing groundwater infiltration and thus reducing discharge in submarine springs at the peninsula margins. The field site Celestun Lagoon near Merida, Yucatan, Mexico, is dominated by spring and groundwater inputs at the northern terminus and opens to the Gulf of Mexico at the southern end resulting in a strong salinity gradient dependent on freshwater influx. We analyzed the foram assemblage in the top 6 cm of a set of 7 cores collected along a lagoonal transect (from the mouth to the head) and plotted the relative abundances of Ammonia beccarii, Elphidium sp., Quinqueloculina sp., and the ostracod Hemicyprideis cf. nichuptensis against site location. A. beccarii abundance increases from 40% near the head to 70% near the middle of the lagoon before dropping to <10% toward the saline lagoon mouth (high abundance in brackish salinity). Quinqueloculina sp. increases from 0% at the upper lagoon to nearly 40% near the mouth showing an opposite trend along the same transect. Elphidium sp. showed no clear trend (abundance range 10-28% throughout), and lowest H. nichuptensis abundance occurred at the middle of the lagoon (10%) increasing to the north and south (up to 60%). The inversely correlated spatial distribution between A. beccarii and Quinqueloculina sp. occurs vertically in an upper lagoon long core from 125-96 cm below sediment-water interface (14C age dates 3968-2820 ka), implying a decreasing salinity over ~1000 yrs and increased

  11. Recent Antarctic Peninsula warming relative to Holocene climate and ice-shelf history.

    PubMed

    Mulvaney, Robert; Abram, Nerilie J; Hindmarsh, Richard C A; Arrowsmith, Carol; Fleet, Louise; Triest, Jack; Sime, Louise C; Alemany, Olivier; Foord, Susan

    2012-09-01

    Rapid warming over the past 50 years on the Antarctic Peninsula is associated with the collapse of a number of ice shelves and accelerating glacier mass loss. In contrast, warming has been comparatively modest over West Antarctica and significant changes have not been observed over most of East Antarctica, suggesting that the ice-core palaeoclimate records available from these areas may not be representative of the climate history of the Antarctic Peninsula. Here we show that the Antarctic Peninsula experienced an early-Holocene warm period followed by stable temperatures, from about 9,200 to 2,500 years ago, that were similar to modern-day levels. Our temperature estimates are based on an ice-core record of deuterium variations from James Ross Island, off the northeastern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. We find that the late-Holocene development of ice shelves near James Ross Island was coincident with pronounced cooling from 2,500 to 600 years ago. This cooling was part of a millennial-scale climate excursion with opposing anomalies on the eastern and western sides of the Antarctic Peninsula. Although warming of the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula began around 600 years ago, the high rate of warming over the past century is unusual (but not unprecedented) in the context of natural climate variability over the past two millennia. The connection shown here between past temperature and ice-shelf stability suggests that warming for several centuries rendered ice shelves on the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula vulnerable to collapse. Continued warming to temperatures that now exceed the stable conditions of most of the Holocene epoch is likely to cause ice-shelf instability to encroach farther southward along the Antarctic Peninsula. PMID:22914090

  12. Late Eocene Hydrological Conditions on the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feakins, S. J.; Deconto, R. M.; Warny, S.

    2013-12-01

    The late Eocene to Oligocene transition (EOT) witnessed a major ice advance on Antarctica. Little is known about hydrological conditions in the Antarctic Peninsula during the late Eocene prior to the major ice advance. Here we explore the hydrological conditions with proxy reconstructions from marine sediment core NBP0602A-3C, adjacent to the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, with sediments dated to approximately 35.9 × 1.1 Ma providing a snapshot of conditions prior to the EOT. We combine plant leaf wax hydrogen isotopic evidence paired with previously-published evidence from pollen assemblages from the marine core, and compare to results of climate model experiments. The pollen from late Eocene sediments of NBP0602A-3C indicate a Nothofagidites (southern beech) dominated landscape. In the same sediments, leaf wax hydrogen isotope (δDwax) values average -202×7‰ (1σ, n=22) for the C28 n-alkanoic acid. Based on an estimated net fractionation of -100‰, these values suggest paleoprecipitation δD values on the order of -118×8‰. The similarity between Late Eocene precipitation isotopic reconstructions (with no ice on what was then an island) and in situ modern isotopic values (while ice-covered) is surprising as ice-free conditions should imply warmer temperatures which would normally imply more enriched isotopic values. Convergent isotopic compositions during demonstrably different environments require a dynamical test to evaluate this validity of this isotopic result. In order to test the isotopic response to an expanding Antarctic ice sheet across the EOT, we conducted experiments with an isotope-enabled GCM. We simulated conditions before, during, and after the transition by systematically decreasing carbon dioxide levels from 1000 to 560 ppm while increasing ice volume to represent an ice-free to fully glaciated continent. Model experiments predict changes in vegetation cover from mixed forest to tundra biomes, reductions in austral summer temperature of

  13. An assessment of heat stress in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasilla Álvarez, D.; Fernandez García, F.

    2010-09-01

    The analysis of human comfort requires the inclusion of additional parameters to air temperature, such as wind, humidity or radiation, especially in areas like the Iberian Peninsula, where the summer thermal differences between the marine surfaces and the continent promotes local circulations capable to modify locally the characteristics of the air masses. A variety of bioclimatic indices that relate atmospheric conditions to human sensations have been developed so far, being the Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET, Matzarakis et al, 1999) one of the most popular. Several objectives have guided this research. First, a basic climatology of PET over the Iberian Peninsula has been elaborated. Secondly, the main modes of spatial and temporal variability in the apparent temperature field have been obtained. Aditionally, the role of the regional atmospheric circulation and local surface variables in the spatial and temporal variability of PET has been analyzed through a synoptic climatological approach. The data used have been 3 hourly synop reports from stations located in the Iberian Peninsula, Southern France and Northern Africa (Morocco and Argelia), for the period 1971-2007. 850 hPa geopotential heights, retrieved from NCEP Reanalysis web server (http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/data/reanalysis/reanalysis.shtml) were used to devise a circulation pattern catalogue, obtained following a well-known procedure that combines Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for reduction purposes and clustering (Ward plus K-means) to define the types. Additional gridded variables, like 850 u/v wind components and 850 relative humidity fields were also used to obtain composites of the synoptic patterns. The methodology followed comprised several steps. Initially, 3 hourly values of PET corresponding to selected stations was calculated with RayMan. The 12 UTC values were subsequently submitted to a regionalization using a Rotated Principal Component Analysis. The frequency of occurrence

  14. Holocene tephrochronology of the Cold Bay area, southwest Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carson, E.C.; Fournelle, J.H.; Miller, T.P.; Mickelson, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    The major-element glass geochemistry of 92 tephra samples from the southwest Alaska Peninsula provides the basis for establishing a Holocene tephrochronology for the region. Electron microprobe analysis has been combined with field descriptions of samples, stratigraphic relationships between tephra samples and sample localities, and glass shard micro-morphology to correlate these sampled distal tephra units throughout the area of Cold Bay and adjacent Morzhovoi Bay. Radiocarbon dating provides age constraints on correlated horizons. Previous research had clearly delineated only one horizon in the region, the so-called 'Funk/Fisher' ash, dating to between 8425 ?? 350 and 9130 ?? 140 14C yr BP. In addition to constraining the bimodal andesitic and dacitic glass chemistry of that horizon, this study has recognized six additional tephra layers in the area. Two horizons pre-date the Funk/Fisher ash and four are younger than it. A tephra containing dacitic and andesitic components was identified in the vicinity of Morzhovoi Bay, with a minimum age of 9300 ?? 80 14C yr BP and a maximum age of 10,200 ?? 75 14C yr BP. A rhyolitic horizon composed of cm-sized, rounded pumice clasts was identified in the vicinity of Cold Bay; it has been correlated to the ca 9500 BP eruption of Roundtop volcano on Unimak Island. The four younger tephra beds date to between 6070 ?? 340 and 3600 ?? 140 14C yr BP. The oldest of the four is rhyodacitic, followed by a mixed rhyodacitic-andesitic horizon, another rhyodacitic horizon, and finally an andesitic layer. Comparison of all the correlated horizons to proximal samples collected on Unimak Island provides conclusive geochemical evidence that the ca 9100 BP Caldera-forming eruption of Fisher volcano is the source of the Funk/Fisher ash. Correlation between the rhyodacitic tephra horizons and proximal samples from Fisher volcano suggests that Fisher Caldera is the source of one of the rhyodacitic tephra horizons that post-dates the Funk

  15. Preliminary geothermal evaluation of the Mokapu Peninsula on the Island of Oahu, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Preliminary geological, geochemical, and geophysical field surveys have been conducted on Mokapu Peninsula on the island of Oahu in an effort to determine whether sufficient indications of geothermal potential exist within or adjacent to the peninsula to justify further, more detailed, exploratory efforts. An evaluation of existing geologic data as well as recently completed mapping on Mokapu indicate that the peninsula is located on the edge of or immediately adjacent to the inferred caldera of Koolau volcano. Geochemical surveys conducted within and around the Mokapu Peninsula included mercury and radon ground gas surveys as well as a limited evaluation of groundwater chemistry. Groundwater sampling on Mokapu Peninsula was severely restricted due to the absence of wells within the study area and thus water chemistry analyses were limited to the Nuupia fish ponds. Schlumberger resistivity soundings were completed in three locations on the peninsula: KVS1, in the northeast quadrant within the Ulupau crater, KVS2 in the northwest quadrant along the main jet runway, and KVS3 in the southeast along Mokapu Road. KVS1 encountered a relatively high resistivity to a depth of approximately 20 meters below sea level which was underlain by a basement resistivity of about 2 to 3 ohm meters. KVS2 and KVS3 detected similar resistivities of 2 to 3 ohm meters at much shallower depths (approximately equivalent to local sea level) below a thin, moderately resistive layer having an impedance ranging from 15 to 118 ohm meters.

  16. Stand structure and dynamics of sand pine differ between the Florida panhandle and peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drewa, P.B.; Platt, W.J.; Kwit, C.; Doyle, T.W.

    2008-01-01

    Size and age structures of stand populations of numerous tree species exhibit uneven or reverse J-distributions that can persist after non-catastrophic disturbance, especially windstorms. Among disjunct populations of conspecific trees, alternative distributions are also possible and may be attributed to more localized variation in disturbance. Regional differences in structure and demography among disjunct populations of sand pine (Pinus clausa (Chapm. ex Engelm.) Vasey ex Sarg.) in the Florida panhandle and peninsula may result from variation in hurricane regimes associated with each of these populations. We measured size, age, and growth rates of trees from panhandle and peninsula populations and then compiled size and age class distributions. We also characterized hurricanes in both regions over the past century. Size and age structures of panhandle populations were unevenly distributed and exhibited continuous recruitment; peninsula populations were evenly sized and aged and exhibited only periodic recruitment. Since hurricane regimes were similar between regions, historical fire regimes may have been responsible for regional differences in structure of sand pine populations. We hypothesize that fires were locally nonexistent in coastal panhandle populations, while periodic high intensity fires occurred in peninsula populations over the past century. Such differences in local fire regimes could have resulted in the absence of hurricane effects in the peninsula. Increased intensity of hurricanes in the panhandle and current fire suppression patterns in the peninsula may shift characteristics of sand pine stands in both regions. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  17. Curie depth map for Sinai Peninsula, Egypt deduced from the analysis of magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboud, Essam; Salem, Ahmed; Mekkawi, Mahmoud

    2011-06-01

    Sinai Peninsula is considered as a unique region in the world due to its geographical location, tectonic and thermal activities. It is located geographically at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and Africa constituting a triple junction point between the three continents. It is also characterized by thermal manifestations represented by several hot springs with varied temperatures (30-70 °C). Most of these hot springs are located along the shoreline of the Gulf of Suez. In this study, we aim to map the Curie depth isotherm surface for Sinai Peninsula based on the analysis of ground magnetic data. Spectral analysis technique will be used to estimate the boundaries (top and bottom) of the magnetized crust. The depths obtained for the bottom of magnetized crust are assumed to correspond to Curie point depths where the magnetic layer loss its magnetization. Results of this study indicate that the shallow Curie depths (~ 15-18 km) are located at the southern part of Sinai Peninsula and along the shoreline of the Gulf of Suez and depths increase (22-25 km) towards the central and north western portions of Sinai Peninsula. The whole average Curie depth point of Sinai Peninsula is about 20 km. Generally, the shallow depths to Curie isotherm indicate that Sinai Peninsula is a promising area for further geothermal exploration particularly near the eastern side of the Gulf of Suez.

  18. Development of a diagnosis index of tropical cyclones affecting the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Won; Cha, Yumi

    2016-06-01

    This study has developed the index for diagnosis on possibility that tropical cyclones (TCs) affect Korean Peninsula. This index is closely related to the strength of the western North Pacific subtropical high (WNPSH), which is calculated as a difference in meridional wind between at the highest correlation area (around Korean Peninsula) and at the lowest correlation area (sea southeast of Japan) through a correlation analysis between TC frequency that affects Korean Peninsula and 500 hPa meridional wind. In low frequency years that selected from Korea affecting TC index, anomalous northeasterly is strengthened from Korea to the South China Sea because the center of anomalous anticyclonic circulation is located to northwest of Korean Peninsula. Thus, TCs tend to move westward from the sea east of the Philippines to the mainland China. On the other hand, in high frequency years, anomalous southwesterly serves as steering flow that more TCs move toward Korean Peninsula because the center of anomalous anticyclonic circulation is located to sea east of Japan. Consequently, this study suggests that if this index is calculated using real time 500 hPa meridional winds that forecasted by dynamic models during the movement of TCs, the possibility that TCs approach Korean Peninsula can be diagnosed in real time.

  19. Assemblages of micronektonic fishes and invertebrates in a gradient of regional warming along the Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Melanie L.; Fraser, William R.; Ashford, Julian; Patarnello, Tomaso; Zane, Lorenzo; Torres, Joseph J.

    2015-12-01

    Micronektonic fishes and invertebrates were sampled with 32 midwater trawls at nine sites along the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) in the austral fall (March-April) of 2010. Study sites were located within four hypothesized hydrographic regions: near Joinville Island in Region I, at Croker Passage, near Anvers Island, and near Renaud Island in Region II, within Marguerite Bay and the Marguerite Trough in Region III, and near Charcot Island in Region IV. A total of 62 taxa representing 12 taxonomic groups of pelagic invertebrates and 9 families of fish were captured, but assemblages were dominated by only a few species. The most numerically abundant taxa were the euphausiids, Thysanoessa macrura, Euphausia superba, and E. crystallorophias, combining to contribute nearly 79% of the total catch. Biomass dominants included E. superba, which contributed more than 44% of the total catch, the notothenioid Pleuragramma antarctica, and the salp, Salpa thompsoni. A comparison of total catches among sites revealed that the largest volumetric abundances and biomasses were captured at the Marguerite Bay site. Cluster analysis of abundance data identified distinct multispecies assemblages at Joinville Island in Region I, Croker Passage in Region II, Marguerite Bay in Region III, and Charcot Island in Region IV. A fifth distinct assemblage included samples from sites near Anvers and Renaud Island in Region II, and from the Marguerite Trough in Region III. Assemblages at Joinville Island and Croker Passage were both dominated by E. superba and S. thompsoni, but hydrographic conditions at Joinville Island favored a neritic assemblage, underscored by substantial numbers of P. antarctica. The assemblage at Croker Passage was more oceanic in nature with major inputs from the myctophid, Electrona antarctica and the hyperiid amphipod, Themisto gaudichaudii. Marguerite Bay and Charcot Island were well-mixed assemblages with strong representation by both neritic and oceanic fauna. The

  20. New Results and Future IPY Investigations in Hektoria Trough, Inner Larsen-B Embayment, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachfeld, S.; Domack, E. W.; Leventer, A.; Willmott, V.; Ishman, S.

    2007-12-01

    We present new results from a sediment core collected in the inner Larsen-B embayment, Antarctic Peninsula. The 2002 break-up of the Larsen-B Ice Shelf enabled access to the termini of glaciers that formerly fed into the ice shelf. United States Antarctic Program cruise LMG05-02 discovered and mapped an 800-m deep glacial trough off Hektoria Glacier at the northern end of the Larsen-B embayment. Sub-bottom profiling reveals the presence of at least 20-m of unconsolidated sediment in the trough, which varies in character between acoustically laminated, and packages with weak, discontinuous reflectors. A 2.5-m kasten core was recovered from the Hektoria trough during cruise LMG05-02. The sediment consists of silty clay with a minor component of very fine sand, and is laminated in the uppermost meter. Downcore magnetic and geochemical parameters were used to investigate the terrigenous sediment supplied to Hektoria Trough. Bulk sediment geochemistry suggests a constant sediment source that is chemically consistent with upper continental crust. Magnetic parameters reveal several intervals in which the magnetic material supplied to the trough varies in abundance and particle size. We observe shifts at approximately 850, 5900, and 7900 14C yr B.P., based on a preliminary age model. Superimposed on these shifts are periodic pulses of coarser material into the trough, which may be related to fluctuations in the location of the grounding line with respect to the core site. Our preliminary age model indicates an average sedimentation rate of 21 cm/kyr, which suggests that the basin fill extends back to perhaps 100,000 yr B.P., a rare archive of the late Pleistocene in an ice proximal site.

  1. Active-layer thermal monitoring on the Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, R. F. M.; Schaefer, C. E. G. R.; Simas, F. M. B.; Francelino, M. R.; Fernandes-Filho, E. I.; Lyra, G. B.; Bockheim, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    International attention to climate change phenomena has grown in the last decade; the active layer and permafrost are of great importance in understanding processes and future trends due to their role in energy flux regulation. The objective of this paper is to present active-layer temperature data for one Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring South hemisphere (CALM-S) site located on the Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, maritime Antarctica over an 57-month period (2008-2012). The monitoring site was installed during the summer of 2008 and consists of thermistors (accuracy of ±0.2 °C), arranged vertically with probes at different depths, recording data at hourly intervals in a high-capacity data logger. A series of statistical analyses was performed to describe the soil temperature time series, including a linear fit in order to identify global trends, and a series of autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models was tested in order to define the best fit for the data. The affects of weather on the thermal regime of the active layer have been identified, providing insights into the influence of climate change on permafrost. The active-layer thermal regime in the studied period was typical of periglacial environments, with extreme variation in surface during the summer resulting in frequent freeze and thaw cycles. The active-layer thickness (ALT) over the studied period shows a degree of variability related to different annual weather conditions, reaching a maximum of 117.5 cm in 2009. The ARIMA model could describe the data adequately and is an important tool for more conclusive analysis and predictions when longer data sets are available. Despite the variability when comparing temperature readings and ACT over the studied period, no trend can be identified.

  2. Active layer thermal monitoring at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, R. F. M.; Schaefer, C. E. G. R.; Simas, F. N. B.; Francelino M., R.; Fernandes-Filho, E. I.; Lyra, G. B.; Bockheim, J. G.

    2014-07-01

    International attention to the climate change phenomena has grown in the last decade; the active layer and permafrost are of great importance in understanding processes and future trends due to their role in energy flux regulation. The objective of the this paper is to present active layer temperature data for one CALM-S site located at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica over an fifth seven month period (2008-2012). The monitoring site was installed during the summer of 2008 and consists of thermistors (accuracy of ± 0.2 °C), arranged vertically with probes at different depths, recording data at hourly intervals in a~high capacity data logger. A series of statistical analysis were performed to describe the soil temperature time series, including a linear fit in order to identify global trend and a series of autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models were tested in order to define the best fit for the data. The controls of weather on the thermal regime of the active layer have been identified, providing insights about the influence of climate chance over the permafrost. The active layer thermal regime in the studied period was typical of periglacial environment, with extreme variation at the surface during summer resulting in frequent freeze and thaw cycles. The active layer thickness (ALT) over the studied period showed variability related to different annual weather conditions, reaching a maximum of 117.5 cm in 2009. The ARIMA model was considered appropriate to treat the dataset, enabling more conclusive analysis and predictions when longer data sets are available. Despite the variability when comparing temperature readings and active layer thickness over the studied period, no warming trend was detected.

  3. Feasibility study concerning remediation and rehabilitation of industrial polluted lands on the Absheron Peninsula, Republic of Azerbaijan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivin, Majorie; Helsen, Stefan; Cuyvers, Lars

    2014-05-01

    ECOREM is carrying out a feasibility study focused on the remediation and rehabilitation of industrial polluted lands, located on the Absheron Peninsula (Republic of Azerbaijan), on behalf of the State Oil Company of Azerbaijan Republic (SOCAR). The objective of this study is to support SOCAR with specific technologies and capacity building for environmental remediation works on various sectors of the Peninsula. As an independent consultancy company, ECOREM provides sustainable and quality advice, seeking the balance to the interests of the client and the environment in the broadest sense of the word. Within this study, it is important to underline that extraction activities in the country have been going on for more than a century. Given that the age of the environmental problems is equal to the history of the oil production, it is nearly impossible to point out the responsibilities of the various companies or to define the exact activities that occurred on a particular location. From the data gathered so far, more than 3600 ha of oil contaminated area are known in Baku and the Absheron Peninsula. Within this feasibility study, ECOREM will advice SOCAR on suitable and best available remediation technologies to apply on prior contaminated areas. According to the Environmental Policy of the Company, SOCAR would like to act in priority on the numerous contaminated lands of the Absheron Peninsula. Through the exploitation of the extensive GIS database provided by SOCAR, the oil contaminated sites will be examined in details in order to determine the most sensitive areas, on which remediation works or monitoring should be implemented in priority. To locate these sites, ECOREM will provide SOCAR with technical support in order to conduct risk analysis, remediation and monitoring of soil and/or groundwater oil pollutions. According to these results, practical solutions will be proposed concerning the possible reuse and management of contaminated soils and hazardous

  4. Cell-zonal textures of tinguaites from the Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovsky, Y. L.; Shpachenko, A. K.; Skiba, V. I.

    Textures of tinguaite dykes cutting the alkaline Khibiny massif in the Kola Peninsula, Russia, are described. They are characterized by a combination of a fractal microfracture network dividing rock into pencil-like cells and of a concentric rhythmical zonation in almost all of them. The latter is formed by interchange of volatile-enriched and volatile-depleted mineral zones. The location of the textures only where dykes contact host khibinites appears to point out the contraction nature of the microfracture network. The cooling time calculated agrees well with this hypothesis. The zonation appears to have arisen through autometamorphic processes with two main competing factors, namely (a) overall cooling of the system and (b) periodic depletion of it in some elements, mainly Na and K. Another mechanism which may be applied to explain the zonation is the known Marangoni Instability effect at the early stage of evolution of the volatile-saturated phonolite melt. Thus, tinguaite textures are caused by nonspecific influences external to the system and may be regarded as an example of self-organization in nature.

  5. Secondary pores in carbonate reservoirs on Arabian Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmi, R.; Waterhouse, M.; Watfa, M.

    1987-05-01

    Nearly all of the giant carbonate reservoirs on the Arabian Peninsula have both primary and secondary pore systems. There are, however, significant stratigraphic and geographic variations of origin, volume, and reservoir importance of secondary pores. The Permian Khuff reservoir zones generally has more secondary porosity than any younger, or shallower, reservoir formations. Highly permeable idiotopic (sucrosic) dolomites are commonly developed in zones which originally contained primary pores. The zones with the highest porosity often contain secondary pores, with calcite-free oomoldic dolomites having higher permeability than oomoldic limestones. Fractures resulting from halokinetics and/or salt dissolution are generally the most important secondary pores in Khuff reservoirs. The prolific Jurassic Arab reservoir zones, generally have lesser amounts of secondary pores than Khuff reservoirs, but a variety of secondary pores are present. Commonly the Arab C zone contains the greatest volume of secondary pores, generally of a moldic (grain and/or skeletal) nature. Secondary porosity associated with dolomitization is regionally more common in the eastern Gulf. Cretaceous (rudist) reefal and chalk reservoirs often contain zones of secondary porosity with enhanced permeability resulting from the leaching of aragonitic and high-magnesium calcite skeletal material. Secondary porosity is present in the western gulf in both the Minagish grainstones and dolomitized Shuaiba Formation, whereas the grainstones of the eastern gulf have little secondary porosity. Large fracture systems are present everywhere in low-permeability chalks and wackestones. An unusually high degree of porosity heterogeneity appears to be ubiquitous in Cretaceous sequences.

  6. Seismic hazard of the Iberian Peninsula: evaluation with kernel functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, M. J.; Martínez, F.; Martí, J.

    2014-05-01

    The seismic hazard of the Iberian Peninsula is analysed using a nonparametric methodology based on statistical kernel functions; the activity rate is derived from the catalogue data, both its spatial dependence (without a seismogenic zonation) and its magnitude dependence (without using Gutenberg-Richter's relationship). The catalogue is that of the Instituto Geográfico Nacional, supplemented with other catalogues around the periphery; the quantification of events has been homogenised and spatially or temporally interrelated events have been suppressed to assume a Poisson process. The activity rate is determined by the kernel function, the bandwidth and the effective periods. The resulting rate is compared with that produced using Gutenberg-Richter statistics and a zoned approach. Three attenuation relationships have been employed, one for deep sources and two for shallower events, depending on whether their magnitude was above or below 5. The results are presented as seismic hazard maps for different spectral frequencies and for return periods of 475 and 2475 yr, which allows constructing uniform hazard spectra.

  7. Seismic hazards of the Iberian Peninsula - evaluation with kernel functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, M. J.; Martínez, F.; Martí, J.

    2013-08-01

    The seismic hazard of the Iberian Peninsula is analysed using a nonparametric methodology based on statistical kernel functions; the activity rate is derived from the catalogue data, both its spatial dependence (without a seismogenetic zonation) and its magnitude dependence (without using Gutenberg-Richter's law). The catalogue is that of the Instituto Geográfico Nacional, supplemented with other catalogues around the periphery; the quantification of events has been homogenised and spatially or temporally interrelated events have been suppressed to assume a Poisson process. The activity rate is determined by the kernel function, the bandwidth and the effective periods. The resulting rate is compared with that produced using Gutenberg-Richter statistics and a zoned approach. Three attenuation laws have been employed, one for deep sources and two for shallower events, depending on whether their magnitude was above or below 5. The results are presented as seismic hazard maps for different spectral frequencies and for return periods of 475 and 2475 yr, which allows constructing uniform hazard spectra.

  8. [Deep vein thrombosis in Noto Peninsula earthquake victims].

    PubMed

    Terakami, Takako; Ohba, Noriko; Morishita, Eriko; Yoshida, Tomotaka; Asakura, Hidesaku; Kimura, Keiichi; Ohtake, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Gou; Fujita, Shinichi; Wada, Takashi

    2009-05-01

    The earthquake occurred in the Noto Peninsula in the northern part of Ishikawa prefecture, Japan, at 9:25 a.m. on March 25th 2007. Medical activities for prevention of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), early detection of DVT, and early treatment of DVT were performed immediately after the earthquake on the basis of a previous report regarding earthquake disasters. This report described the conditions involved in the development of DVT. General inhabitants in shelters were examined by questionnaires, venous ultrasonography of lower limb, and blood tests. The DVT-positive rate was 10.6% (21 cases/198 cases), and the soleal vein was the most common location of DVT accounting for 71.4% of cases(20 lower limbs/28 lower limbs). Plasma levels of fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products and D-dimer in the DVT-positive group (20 cases) were significantly higher than those in the DVT-negative group(162 cases) (P<0.03). No deaths or cases of serious illness caused by DVT were reported in the earthquake. The medical activities described here were effective due to the past experience and the cooperation of many people. PMID:19522245

  9. Stratigraphy and paleogeography of the Cretaceous in Arabian Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Alsharhan, A.S.; Nairn, A.E.M.

    1986-05-01

    The Cretaceous of the Arabian Peninsula is divided into three major units by regional unconformities: Lower Cretaceous Thamama Group (Berriasian-middle Aptian), middle Cretaceous Wasia Group (Albian-Turonian), and Upper Cretaceous Aruma Group (Coniacian-Maestrichtian). The profusion of named stratigraphic units in the area reflects not only the lithologic variation resulting from facies changes, but also terminologies adopted by different companies. The authors provide a stratigraphic nomenclature defining standard type sections and indicate synonymies, which follow the recommendation of 10th Geological Liaison Meeting and hence are acceptable to operators in the area. The sedimentologic history of the area was presented in a series of paleogeographic maps, which they relate to the regional tectonic framework. The maps show a predominantly carbonate shelf ramp bordering a land area to the north and west. The principal change in depositional environment occurs during the Upper Cretaceous, as a result of tectonic activity. Less significant changes are attributed to eustatic sea level fluctuations, on which tilting caused by tectonic movement may be superposed during the Lower and middle Cretaceous. The major producing horizons lie below the regional unconformities; secondary porosity in the shelf reefal buildups was developed during subaerial exposure in the Shuaiba Formation (early-middle Aptian), in the Mishrif Formation (late Cenomanian), and in the Simsima Formation (Maestrichtian).

  10. Recent increase in Antarctic Peninsula ice core uranium concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potocki, Mariusz; Mayewski, Paul A.; Kurbatov, Andrei V.; Simões, Jefferson C.; Dixon, Daniel A.; Goodwin, Ian; Carleton, Andrew M.; Handley, Michael J.; Jaña, Ricardo; Korotkikh, Elena V.

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the distribution of airborne uranium is important because it can result in both chemical and radiological toxicity. Ice cores offer the most robust reconstruction of past atmospheric levels of toxic substances. Here we present the first sub-annually dated, continuously sampled ice core documenting change in U levels in the Southern Hemisphere. The ice core was recovered from the Detroit Plateau, northern Antarctic Peninsula, in 2007 by a joint Brazilian-Chilean-US team. It displays a significant increase in U concentration that coincides with reported mining activities in the Southern Hemisphere, notably Australia. Raw U concentrations in the Detroit Plateau ice core increased by as much as 102 between the 1980s and 2000s accompanied by increased variability in recent years. Decadal mean U concentrations increased by a factor of ∼3 from 1980 to 2007, reaching a mean of 205 pg/L from 2000 to 2007. The fact that other terrestrial source dust elements such as Ce, La, Pr, and Ti do not show a similar increase and that the increased U concentrations are enriched above natural crustal levels, supports an anthropogenic source for the U as opposed to a change in atmospheric circulation.

  11. Pumice deposits in the Alaska Peninsula-Cook Inlet region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, R.M.

    1952-01-01

    Three principal areas of pumice deposition have been found in the Alaska Peninsula-Cook Inlet region: Katmai National Monument, Augustine Island, and the Veniaminof-Aniakchak area. Vast quantities of pumice were deposited in Katmai National Monument resulting from the eruption of Mt. Katmai and related volcanic action in 1912. The principal deposits in the coastal areas of the Monument occur in the valley of the Katmai River and in the Amalik Bay-Kukak Bay area. Several areas of pumice deposition have been found on the south and west sides of Augustine Island, located 200 miles southwest of Anchorage. Mining was carried on by the Alaska Katmalite Corporation during the period 1946-1949, but no production has taken place since that time. Pumice deposits found in the Aniakchak-Veniaminof area have probably been derived from three principal sources: Aniakchak Crater, Mt. Veniaminof and Purple Crater. The limited data available indicate the deposits of chief interest occur in the valley of the Aniakchak River and in areas adjacent to Chignik Bay.

  12. P-wave velocity structure beneath the northern Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Kim, K.; Jin, Y.

    2010-12-01

    We have imaged tomographically the tree-dimensional velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the northern Antarctic Peninsula using teleseismic P waves. The data came from the seven land stations of the Seismic Experiment in Patagonia and Antarctica (SEPA) campaigned during 1997-1999, a permanent IRIS/GSN station (PMSA), and 3 seismic stations installed at scientific bases, Esperanza (ESPZ), Jubany (JUBA), and King Sejong (KSJ), in South Shetland Islands. All of the seismic stations are located in coast area, and the signal to noise ratios (SNR) are very low. The P-wave model was inverted from 95 earthquakes resulting in 347 ray paths with P- and PKP-wave arrivals. The inverted model shows a strong low velocity anmaly beneath the Bransfield Strait, and a fast anomaly beneath the South Shetland Islands. The low velocity anomaly beneath the Bransfield might be due to a back arc extension, and the fast velocity anomaly beneath the South Shetland Islands could indicates the cold subducted slab.

  13. Methylmercury monitoring study in Karakuwacho peninsula area in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junxia; Inoue, Kayoko; Asakawa, Akihiro; Harada, Kouji H; Watanabe, Takao; Hachiya, Noriyuki; Koizumi, Akio

    2014-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a worldwide concern owing to its adverse health effects. To explore MeHg exposure burdens and the potential contributing factors in different subpopulations in a peninsula area (Karakuwacho) in Japan, a cross-sectional survey was performed. This study included 189 individuals from 102 families. The geometric means of total hair mercury (THg) were 5.74, 3.78 and 2.37 μg/g for adult males, females and children, respectively, of which 56.5 %, 30.9 % and 12.9 % had hair THg exceeding 5 μg/g, respectively. Tuna and mackerel were the common fish species that were positively correlated with hair THg levels in different subpopulations (standardized coefficient ranged from 0.20 to 0.58, p < 0.05). Frequent consumption of these fish species and a large amount of fish intake are likely major contributors of MeHg exposure in this area. Local-scale risk evaluation and risk communication should be highlighted in future studies. PMID:24599146

  14. Classificiation of Kii peninsula area by vegetation coverage level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyama, Noriko; Awa, Shinobu; Muramatu, Kanako; Daigo, Motomasa

    2005-10-01

    In order to study land cover classification and natural environment, we must analyze vegetation cover states of the local scale in which we can know the subject in detail, as well as and the global scale. Therefore, we need to analyze various satellite data sets which are measured with different wavelengths region and different number of bands. However, it is difficult to compare analysis results obtained using such data sets. By the universal pattern decomposition method (UPDM), which is sensor independent analysis method, we examined vegetation coverage of a pixel on data sets measured different wavelength range and different resolution which is acquired at the same place and time. In this study, in order to develop a generalization rule of vegetation coverage, we examine vegetation coverage of a pixel on 1-kilometer resolution data sets using results obtained by analyzing 250-m resolution data sets which are acquired at the same place and time as the pixel of 1-kilometers'. We defined the rule of classifying into five levels of vegetation coverage using results of high resolution data sets analyzed by the UPDM. Using the results of the analysis, we calculate vegetation coverage of Kii peninsula area.

  15. Speedup and fracturing of George VI Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, T. O.; Glasser, N. F.; Quincey, D. J.; Siegfried, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    George VI Ice Shelf (GVIIS) is located on the Antarctic Peninsula, a region where several ice shelves have undergone rapid breakup in response to atmospheric and oceanic warming. We use a combination of optical (Landsat), radar (ERS 1/2 SAR) and laser altimetry (GLAS) datasets to examine the response of GVIIS to environmental change and to offer an assessment on its future stability. The spatial and structural changes of GVIIS (ca. 1973 to ca. 2010) are mapped and surface velocities are calculated at different time periods (InSAR and optical feature tracking from 1989 to 2009) to document changes in the ice shelf's flow regime. Surface elevation changes are recorded between 2003 and 2008 using repeat track ICESat acquisitions. We note an increase in fracture extent and distribution at the south ice front, ice-shelf acceleration towards both the north and south ice fronts and spatially varied negative surface elevation change throughout, with greater variations observed towards the central and southern regions of the ice shelf. We propose that whilst GVIIS is in no imminent danger of collapse, it is vulnerable to on-going atmospheric and oceanic warming and is more susceptible to breakup along its southern margin in ice preconditioned for further retreat.

  16. Speedup and fracturing of George VI Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, T. O.; Glasser, N. F.; Quincey, D. J.; Siegfried, M. R.

    2013-05-01

    George VI Ice Shelf (GVIIS) is located on the Antarctic Peninsula, a region where several ice shelves have undergone rapid breakup in response to atmospheric and oceanic warming. We use a combination of optical (Landsat), radar (ERS 1/2 SAR) and laser altimetry (GLAS) datasets to examine the response of GVIIS to environmental change and to offer an assessment on its future stability. The spatial and structural changes of GVIIS (ca. 1973 to ca. 2010) are mapped and surface velocities are calculated at different time periods (InSAR and optical feature tracking from 1989 to 2009) to document changes in the ice shelf's flow regime. Surface elevation changes are recorded between 2003 and 2008 using repeat track ICESat acquisitions. We note an increase in fracture extent and distribution at the south ice front, ice-shelf acceleration towards both the north and south ice fronts and spatially varied negative surface elevation change throughout, with greater variations observed towards the central and southern regions of the ice shelf. We propose that whilst GVIIS is in no imminent danger of collapse, it is vulnerable to ongoing atmospheric and oceanic warming and is more susceptible to breakup along its southern margin in ice preconditioned for further retreat.

  17. Simulating the effects of soil organic nitrogen and grazing on arctic tundra vegetation dynamics on the Yamal Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Q.; Epstein, H. E.; Walker, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Sustainability of tundra vegetation under changing climate on the Yamal Peninsula, northwestern Siberia, home to the world’s largest area of reindeer husbandry, is of crucial importance to the local native community. An integrated investigation is needed for better understanding of the effects of soils, climate change and grazing on tundra vegetation in the Yamal region. In this study we applied a nutrient-based plant community model (ArcVeg) to evaluate how two factors (soil organic nitrogen [SON] levels and grazing) interact to affect tundra responses to climate warming across a latitudinal climatic gradient on the Yamal Peninsula. Model simulations were driven by field-collected soil data and expected grazing patterns along the Yamal Arctic Transect (YAT), within bioclimate subzones C (High Arctic), D (northern Low Arctic) and E (southern Low Arctic). Plant biomass and NPP (net primary productivity) were significantly increased with warmer bioclimate subzones, greater soil nutrient levels and temporal climate warming, while they declined with higher grazing frequency. Temporal climate warming of 2 °C caused an increase of 665 g/m2 in total biomass at the high SON site in subzone E, while only 298 g/m2 in the low SON site. When grazing frequency was also increased, total biomass increased by only 369 g/m2 in the high SON site in contrast to 184 g/m2 in the low SON site in subzone E. When comparing low grazing to high grazing effects on soil organic nitrogen pools over time (Figure 1), higher grazing frequency led to either slower SON accumulation rates or more rapid SON depletion rates. Warming accentuated these differences caused by grazing, suggesting the interaction between grazing and warming may yield greater differences in SON levels across sites. Our results suggest that low SON and grazing may limit plant response to climate change. Interactions among bioclimate subzones, soils, grazing and warming significantly affect plant biomass and productivity in

  18. Inventory Survey of Geodiversity Elements in a Regional Territory: Applied to the Biga Peninsula, Northwestern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedat Çetiner, Ziya; Ertekin, Can; Filiz, Nurdan

    2016-04-01

    Representative geodiversity elements such as minerals, rocks, fossils, landforms, etc are key components in order to obtain data for the pursuit of geo-research. The scientific worth of geodiversity is not only related to how the geosphere works but also is connected with the conservation of earth materials for present and future geo-knowledge and geoscience milieu. Hence, the nonrenewable nature of geodiversity elements in the human time scale is taken into account for the conservation of natural diversity or simply geo-conservation. Geodiversity as an abiotic element ascribes to in situ or ex situ features both of which maintain scientific value and are used by various societies such as in teaching, tourism, etc. Ex situ elements are known as fossils, minerals and rocks found in museum collections on the other hand in situ features are known as geosites for which there are certain sub-categories such as geomorphological (landform), hydrogeological, paleontological, structural, stratigraphic sequence and lithological. Due to the plethora of geological data dispersed among geodiversity elements, the first crucial step is to execute an inventory solid study. The scope of this study is to survey geodiversity features of potential natural sites distributed the entire sectors of the Biga Peninsula of Northwestern Turkey. In the territory, there are 37 natural sites with their own data set. This data describing their boundaries and administrative features were acquired from Directorate General for Preservation of Natural Heritage. Then, site boundaries, regional published geological maps, surface hydrologic and anthropic attributes were overlaid conceiving as a single unit. Before initiating the inventory survey, the criteria scale were established for geoscience value and geo-tourism potential. In these two frames, geodiversity elements were labeled and tabulated by their representativeness, integrity, rarity, scientific knowledge, scenery, interpretative potential and

  19. A palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of c. 2 million year old Oldowan archaeological occurrences on the Homa Peninsula, southwestern Kenya: a multiproxy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Thomas; Whitfield, Elizabeth; Kirby, Jason; Hunt, Christopher; Bishop, Laura; Plummer, Thomas; Ditchfield, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The Homa Peninsula, situated on the Winam Gulf of Lake Victoria, has yielded traces of hominin activity going back to at least ˜2ma BP. The best known site on the peninsula, Kanjera South, boasts large stone artefact and zooarchaeological assemblages preserved in three beds (from oldest to youngest: KS-1 to KS-3). Previous studies have used field sedimentological analyses, as well as stable isotope analysis of pedogenic carbonates to better understand the depositional and environmental contexts of hominin activities. These suggest that sediments were deposited in alluvial and lake marginal environments on a grassy plain, between wooded slopes and a permanent water body. The aim of this study is to refine previous palaeoenvironmental reconstructions of Kanjera South with the aid of particle size analysis, whilst also offering insights into the palaeoenvironment of other archaeological sites on the Homa Peninsula through a multiproxy approach. The project aims to include analyses of particle size, stable-isotopes, pollen and siliceous microfossils (phytoliths, diatoms and sponge spicules). Preliminary results of particle size and phytolith analyses have refined interpretations of the depositional environment at Kanjera South for beds KS1-3. Poor sorting, a bimodal distribution and sand/silty-sand grade material characterise the sediments. The characteristics suggest rapid deposition and/or a variable energy regime. A varying flow regime in relatively unconfined ephemeral channels might explain the transportation and deposition of sediments. Fluvial reworking of aeolian sediments, most likely during unconfined flood events may also have occurred. Phytoliths from the same beds showed grassland indicating Pooideae, as well as some Bambusoideae and woodland indicating phytoliths; this supports previous work.

  20. Evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula lithosphere: Evidence from Mesozoic mafic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, T. R.; Curtis, M. L.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Whitehouse, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    New geochronology from a thick (> 800 m) basaltic succession along the eastern margin of the Antarctic Peninsula confirm a Middle Jurassic age (178 ± 1 Ma). This marginally postdates the adjacent Ferrar large igneous province of the Transantarctic Mountains and predates the extensive silicic volcanism of the Mapple Formation (~ 170 Ma) of the Antarctic Peninsula. The geochemistry of other rare, but broadly contemporaneous, basaltic successions of the Antarctic Peninsula, along with Cretaceous-age mafic dykes, are used to interpret the influences of lithospheric and asthenospheric mantle sources during the Mesozoic. Two significant high magmatic addition rate events occurred along the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin at 170 and 110 Ma and can be correlated to events along the South American Cordillera. These 'flare-up' events are characterised by extensive silicic (mostly ignimbrite) volcanism of the Chon Aike Province (V2 event: 170 Ma) and significant granitoid batholith emplacement of the Lassiter Coast intrusive suite (110 Ma). The 170 Ma event is exposed across large parts of the northern Antarctic Peninsula, whilst the 110 Ma event is more widespread across the southern Antarctic Peninsula. The basaltic volcanism described here precedes the 'flare-up' event at 170 Ma and has geochemical characteristics that indicate a thickened lithosphere prevailed. A major dyke swarm that followed the 170 Ma event indicates that extensive lithospheric thinning had occurred, which allowed the ascent of depleted mafic melts. The thinning was the direct result of widespread lower crustal/upper lithospheric melting associated with the silicic volcanism. In the southern Antarctic Peninsula, the lithosphere remained over thickened until the emplacement of the major batholiths of the Lassiter Coast intrusive suite at 110 Ma and was then immediately followed by the emplacement of more asthenosphere-like melts indicating extensive lithospheric thinning.

  1. Long-term persistence of subduction earthquake segment boundaries: Evidence from Mejillones Peninsula, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, P.; Sobiesiak, M.; Glodny, J.; Nielsen, S. N.; Oncken, O.

    2011-02-01

    The Mejillones Peninsula in northern Chile has been recognized as the surface expression of a segment boundary for large subduction zone earthquakes. The sharp contact between the rupture planes of two instrumentally recorded earthquakes, the Mw = 8.0 Antofagasta (1995) and the Mw = 7.7 Tocopilla (2007) events, is located beneath the central part of Mejillones Peninsula. We present new chronostratigraphic and structural data that allow reconstructing the evolution of the Peninsula at the surface and correlation of the latter with seismic cycle deformation on the plate interface. Uplift commenced after 3.4 Myr, as recorded in the western highland. The central graben area on the Peninsula started uplifting above sea level as an anticlinal hinge zone prior to 400 kyr ago, most probably 790 kyr ago. The resulting E-W trending hinge exactly overlies the limit between the rupture planes of the Antofagasta and Tocopilla earthquakes. By correlating the uplift data with the slip distribution of the above earthquakes, we demonstrate that deformation and uplift is focused during the postseismic and interseismic periods of the megathrust seismic cycle with coseismic deformation opposed to the long-term motion. Additionally, the slip deficit beneath the Peninsula accumulating between events is probably largely recovered by creep. Hence we suggest that Mejillones Peninsula owes its existence to the lateral variation of the propensity for unstable slip at the interface. Since the latter is a material property, the long-term spatial stability of the Peninsula as a barrier to rupture propagation since at least the middle Pleistocene is a necessary consequence.

  2. Population increase in Kirtland's warbler and summer range expansion to Wisconsin and Michigan's Upper Peninsula, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Probst, J.R.; Donner, D.M.; Bocetti, C.I.; Sjogren, S.

    2003-01-01

    The threatened Kirtland's warbler Dendroica kirtlandii breeds in stands of young jack pine Pinus banksiana growing on well-drained soils in Michigan, USA. We summarize information documenting the range expansion of Kirtland's warbler due to increased habitat management in the core breeding range in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan during 1990?2000. We collected records and conducted searches for the species in Michigan's Upper Peninsula and Wisconsin over 1978?2000. During that time 25 males were found in Wisconsin and 90 males in the Upper Peninsula. We documented colonization of Michigan's Upper Peninsula by six ringed males from the Lower Peninsula of Michigan. Four ringed birds also moved back to the core breeding range, including two males that made two-way movements between the core breeding range and the Upper Peninsula. Thirty-seven females were observed with males from 1995 to 2000, all in Michigan. Nesting activities were noted for 25 pairs and at least nine nests fledged young. One male ringed as a fledgling returned to breed in two subsequent years. After a 19-year period of population stability, the Kirtland's warbler population increased four-fold during 1990?2000, most likely in response to a tripling in habitat area. This increase in sightings and documented breeding may be related to habitat availability in Michigan's Upper Peninsula and to saturation of habitat in the main breeding range. The increase in extra-limital records during 1995?1999 corresponds to the time when the population went from the minimum to the maximum projected population densities, and a decline in natural wildfire habitat was just offset by new managed habitat for the Kirtland's warbler.

  3. Assessing methods for developing crop forecasting in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ines, A. V. M.; Capa Morocho, M. I.; Baethgen, W.; Rodriguez-Fonseca, B.; Han, E.; Ruiz Ramos, M.

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal climate prediction may allow predicting crop yield to reduce the vulnerability of agricultural production to climate variability and its extremes. It has been already demonstrated that seasonal climate predictions at European (or Iberian) scale from ensembles of global coupled climate models have some skill (Palmer et al., 2004). The limited predictability that exhibits the atmosphere in mid-latitudes, and therefore de Iberian Peninsula (PI), can be managed by a probabilistic approach based in terciles. This study presents an application for the IP of two methods for linking tercile-based seasonal climate forecasts with crop models to improve crop predictability. Two methods were evaluated and applied for disaggregating seasonal rainfall forecasts into daily weather realizations: 1) a stochastic weather generator and 2) a forecast tercile resampler. Both methods were evaluated in a case study where the impacts of two seasonal rainfall forecasts (wet and dry forecast for 1998 and 2015 respectively) on rainfed wheat yield and irrigation requirements of maize in IP were analyzed. Simulated wheat yield and irrigation requirements of maize were computed with the crop models CERES-wheat and CERES-maize which are included in Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT v.4.5, Hoogenboom et al., 2010). Simulations were run at several locations in Spain where the crop model was calibrated and validated with independent field data. These methodologies would allow quantifying the benefits and risks of a seasonal climate forecast to potential users as farmers, agroindustry and insurance companies in the IP. Therefore, we would be able to establish early warning systems and to design crop management adaptation strategies that take advantage of favorable conditions or reduce the effect of adverse ones. ReferencesPalmer, T. et al., 2004. Development of a European multimodel ensemble system for seasonal-to-interannual prediction (DEMETER). Bulletin of the

  4. Sand dunes on the central Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denny, Charles Storrow; Owens, James Patrick

    1979-01-01

    Inconspicuous ancient sand dunes are present in parts of the central Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware. Many dunes are roughly V-shaped, built by northwest winds, especially on the east sides of some of the large rivers. On the uplands, the form and spacing of the dunes are variable. A surficial blanket composed mainly of medium and fine-grained sand-the Parsonsburg Sand-forms both the ancient dunes and the broad plains between the dunes. The sand that forms the dunes is massive and intensely burrowed in the upper part; traces of horizontal or slightly inclined bedding appear near the base. Quartz is the dominant mineral constituent of the sand. Microline is abundant in the very fine to fine sand fraction. The heavy-mineral assemblages (high zircon, tourmaline, rutile) are more mature than in most of the possible source rocks. The most abundant minerals in the clay-sized fraction are dioctahedral vermiculite, kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, and gibbsite. The first four minerals are common in deposits of late Wisconsin and Holocene age. The gibbsite may be detrital, coming from weathered rocks of Tertiary age. The soil profile in the dune sand is weakly to moderately developed. At or near the base of the Parsonsburg Sand are peaty beds that range in age from about 30,000 to about 13,000 radiocarbon years B.P. Microfloral assemblages in the peaty beds suggest that the dunes on the uplands formed in a spruce parkland during the late Wisconsin glacial maximum. The river dunes may also be of late Wisconsin age, but could be Holocene.

  5. Heterogeneous structure of the lithosphere of the Taimyr Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinova, Tamara; Petrova, Alevtina

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic anomalies of the lower crust is well manifested in the satellite measurements and their reductions for the heights H = 100 and 400 km. Currently, however, a great interest is the area of negative magnetic anomalies, allocated to the same heights. They are confined to a special permeable zones of the crust and lithosphere, having increased geothermal activity and are associated with a variety of minerals. In digital magnetic anomalies and gravity anomalies circumpolar map of the Arctic Ocean (Total) was built geomagnetic and density sections along latitudinal and longitudinal cross sections of negative magnetic anomalies (n = 100 km). In the Taimyr Peninsula they capture the largest Fadyukudinsko Kotuiskaya-ring structure. In the north-central Siberia Fadyukudinsko Kotuiskaya ring structure is the "hub" articulation largest geoblocks (Anabar, Kureisko-Tunguska and North Kara). It is manifested in the gravity and magnetic field is also a ring structure. With Fadyukudinsko Kotui-ring structure formation associated injectors and high-carbonate metasomatic rocks tectonites controlling uranium and thorium-uranium-fluorite-barite-rare earth mineralization (VF Proskurnin, et al. 2010). It hypabyssal front of the hot spots. Fadyukudinsko-Kotuiskaya structure is defined posletrappovoe place in the north of the Eurasian plate, responding to a hot spot or a spot lower mantle plumes Triassic [Kravchenko SM, Hain VE 1996 Sazonov AM, Zvyagin EA, Leontiev SI et al., 2010]. Latitude and longitude revealed Profile permeable zones of low magnetic properties and density, confined to a weakened layer in the middle crust. Negative satellite magnetic anomalies (n = 100 km) at depths of 20 - 25-30 km weakly magnetic lens revealed a low density. The upper crust they overlap and dense magnetic rocks. At the bottom of the crust, these lenses are underlain by layers of dense and magnetic structures.

  6. Focal mechanisms of recent earthquakes in the Southern Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Chan; Kim, Woohan; Chung, Tae Woong; Baag, Chang-Eob; Ree, Jin-Han

    2007-06-01

    We evaluate the stress field in and around the southern Korean Peninsula with focal mechanism solutions, using the data collected from 71 earthquakes (ML = 1.9-5.2) between 1999 and 2004. For this, the hypocentres were relocated and well-constrained fault plane solutions were obtained from the data set of 1270 clear P-wave polarities and 46 SH/P amplitude ratios. The focal mechanism solutions indicate that the prevailing faulting types in South Korea are strike-slip-dominant-oblique-slip faultings with minor reverse-slip component. The maximum principal stresses (σ1) estimated from fault-slip inversion analysis of the focal mechanism solutions show a similar orientation with E-W trend (269° -275°) and low-angle plunge (10° -25°) for all tectonic provinces in South Korea, consistent with the E-W trending maximum horizontal stress (σHmax) of the Amurian microplate reported from in situ stress measurements and earthquake focal mechanisms. The directions of the intermediate (σ2) and minimum (σ3) principal stresses of the Gyeongsang Basin are, however, about 90 deg off from those of the other tectonic provinces on a common σ2-σ3 plane, suggesting a permutation of σ2 and σ3. Our results incorporated with those from the kinematic studies of the Quaternary faults imply that NNW- to NE-striking faults (dextral strike-slip or oblique-slip with a reverse-slip component) are highly likely to generate earthquakes in South Korea.

  7. Climate change enhances primary production in the western Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Sébastien; Mostajir, Behzad; Bélanger, Simon; Schloss, Irene R; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Demers, Serge; Ferreyra, Gustavo A

    2015-06-01

    Intense regional warming was observed in the western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) over the last 50 years. Here, we investigate the impact of climate change on primary production (PP) in this highly productive region. This study is based on temporal data series of ozone thickness (1972-2010), sea ice concentration (1978-2010), sea-surface temperature (1990-2010), incident irradiance (1988-2010) and satellite-derived chlorophyll a concentration (Chl-a, 1997-2010) for the coastal WAP. In addition, we apply a photosynthesis/photoinhibition spectral model to satellite-derived data (1997-2010) to compute PP and examine the separate impacts of environmental forcings. Since 1978, sea ice retreat has been occurring earlier in the season (in March in 1978 and in late October during the 2000s) while the ozone hole is present in early spring (i.e. August to November) since the early 1990s, increasing the intensity of ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR, 280-320 nm). The WAP waters have also warmed over 1990-2010. The modelled PP rates are in the lower range of previously reported PP rates in the WAP. The annual open water PP in the study area increased from 1997 to 2010 (from 0.73 to 1.03 Tg C yr(-1) ) concomitantly with the increase in the production season length. The coincidence between the earlier sea ice retreat and the presence of the ozone hole increased the exposure to incoming radiation (UVBR, UVAR and PAR) and, thus, increased photoinhibition during austral spring (September to November) in the study area (from 0.014 to 0.025 Tg C yr(-1) ). This increase in photoinhibition was minor compared to the overall increase in PP, however. Climate change hence had an overall positive impact on PP in the WAP waters. PMID:25626857

  8. A high resolution regional paleoclimate experiment over the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Navarro, J. J.; Montavez, J. P.; Jerez, S.; Jimenez-Guerrero, P.; Garcia-Valero, J. A.; Gonzalez-Rouco, J. F.

    2009-04-01

    During the last years the use of paleoclimate simulations with models of different complexity has become an usual tool in paleoclimate studies. Progress in understanding climate variability leans on simulation and reconstruction efforts. Exercises blending both approaches present a great potential for answering questions relevant for both the simulation and reconstruction of past climate, and depend on the specific peculiarities of proxies and methods involved in climate reconstructions, as well as on the realism and limitations of model simulations. Most of paleoclimate integrations available in the literature covering the last millennium have been performed with relative rough resolution which does not allow to analyze regional climate features that can be of interest in the context of proxies evidence. In this work we present a new high resolution (30 km) regional climate simulation over the Iberian Peninsula of the last five centuries and two extensions to the future for the A2 and B2 SRES scenarios. The regional simulations were performed with a climate version of the MM5 model coupled to the Noah LSM. The driving conditions used follow the Erik1 experiment, performed with the ECHO-G global circulation model. The results indicate that the seasonal modes of variation for near surface air temperature and precipitation obtained within the regional paleoclimate experiment are consistent with the obtained using the observational databases and equivalent to regional climate integrations driven by reanalysis data. On the other hand, the main modes of variation show strong signals in historical periods such as the Maunder and Dalton Minimum. Finally, some preliminary comparisons between the global and the regional model against tree ring temperature reconstructions are also reported in this contribution.

  9. Modulation and application of PRESToPLUS on K-SEIS to the southern Korean peninsula seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Chi, H.; Lim, I.; Elia, L.; Festa, G.; Emolo, A.

    2013-12-01

    KMA(Korea Meteorological Agency) and KIGAM(Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources) have started a project to construct EEWS(Earthquake Early Warning System) from 2007 in South Korea. After preliminary test of PRESTo, we have changed PRESToPLUS to make applicable it on K-SEIS(Korea-Speedy Earthquake Information System) enlarging the number of stations and study area belong to KIGAM and KMA around the Korean Peninsula. PRESToPLUS has been changed to be applied on K-SEIS with powerful performance allowing more than 100 stations real-time streaming and larger study area including off-shore areas around the southern part of the Korean Peninsula. For the modulation the code of PRESToPLUS has been revised in the Linux OS and Windows 64 bit machines respectively. Whole earthquake catalog was play-backed in PRESToPLUS in order to get parameterization to account for Korean seismicity and existing network. A new regression law for magnitude estimation (RTMag Module) was defined by extraction of Magnitude, hypocentral distance and Pd measured on 4s P-waves signal at all stations. The new law of RTMag is logPd= -4.012+0.583M-1.033logR. With extraction of PGD, PGA, PGV, epicentral distance at stations from the earthquake catalog we can derive new Ground Motion Prediction Equations to use in PGx prediction at target sites in PRESToPLUS. The new regression law is logPGA=0.615+0.7M-1.68log(R^2+100)^(1/2). Theoretical analysis of the number of triggered stations for all possible events across Korea was done to derive the best parameterization of time windows for the earthquake detection (Binder Module). After analysis of performance PRESToPLUS we can conclude 8 picks and 8 second condition might be best for reliable event detection with current station network setting.

  10. Relative diffusion and dispersion at the Antarctic Peninsula: observations of pairs and triplets of drifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandet, Marion D.; Thompson, Andrew F.; Heywood, Karen J.; Thorpe, Sally E.

    2010-05-01

    Forty surface drifters were deployed in 2007 at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula as part of the ADELIE research project to map the near surface currents around the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula and to determine the role of these currents in the retention or dispersion of krill. Here we use the ADELIE drifters, together with 55 historical drifters that pass close to the Antarctic Peninsula, to evaluate the strength of advection and diffusion in this region. Relative eddy dispersion and diffusivities have been calculated using drifter pairs and triplets. The relative eddy diffusivity along and across isobaths is presented for various areas around the peninsula based on current paths and data availability. Combined together, the ADELIE and historical drifters provide a data set of up to 148 pairs for which we use a maximum initial separation varying between 15 and 60 km and a temporal resolution of 30 days. The triplets, although limited in number, allow the anisotropy of the diffusivity to be quantified. They provide insight into the stretching and straining deformations of krill or tracer patches. The results are compared with a previous analysis of the same data set using single drifters (Thompson et al. 2009, J. Phys. Oceanogr.). Data from ARGO floats deployed in the region will also be used to bring additional information about the flow structure in the vicinity of the Antarctic Peninsula.

  11. Combustion modeling in SI engines with a peninsula-fractal combustion model

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.D.; Hall, M.J.; Dai, W.; Davis, G.C.

    1996-09-01

    In premixed turbulent combustion models, two mechanisms have been used to explain the increase in the flame speed due to the turbulence. The newer explanation considers the full range of turbulence scales which wrinkle the flame front so as to increase the flame front area and, thus, the flame propagation speed. The fractal combustion model is an example of this concept. The older mechanism assumes that turbulence enables the penetration of unburned mixtures across the flame front via entrainment into the burned mixture zone. The entrainment combustion or eddy burning model is an example of this mechanism. The results of experimental studies of combustion regimes and the flame structures in SI engines has confirmed that most combustion takes place at the wrinkled flame front with additional combustion taking place in the form of flame fingers or peninsulas. As the ratio of the turbulence intensity to the laminar flame speed increases, the importance of the flame peninsulas should become increasingly important. While it has been shown that fractal geometry can be used to account for flame wrinkling, it may be difficult to extend this concept to account for the additional surface area resulting from the flame peninsulas. However, the flame front convolution that results in flame peninsulas can be envisioned as entrainment combustion. In the present research an effort was made to combine the fractal combustion model and the entrainment combustion model to generate the peninsula-fractal combustion model, so as to improve burn rate predictions of SI engine codes.

  12. Solar vs. Tidal Forcing of Centennial to Decadal Scale Variability in Marine Sedimentary Records from the Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkwood, G.; Domack, E.; Brachfeld, S.

    2004-12-01

    Prior studies on Holocene marine sediments from the Antarctic Peninsula, including ODP Site 1098 and USAP N. B. Palmer jumbo piston cores have revealed pronounced multi-century scale variations within a number of paleoenvironmental proxies. In order to fully understand the exact timing of this signal an ultra-high resolution jumbo piston core from the Schollaert Drift was correlated with the well-known Palmer Deep record. A precise and accurate radiocarbon chronology is now available from the former site that utilizes in-situ mollusks, rather than bulk organic matter. The resulting time series spans the last 5000 years over the 20 m length of core NBP99-03 JPC28 and the surface stratigraphy of kasten core NBP01-07 KC8. The corrected and calibrated ages (with an applied reservoir correction of 1170 years) of 10 mollusks dated by the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Facility and the University of Arizona TAMS facility were used to construct an age-depth profile for JPC28 and KC8. A linear trend (R2 value of 0.993) of the age-depth profile was used to extrapolate the constant time interval between magnetic susceptibility measurements, which were analyzed every 1 cm. Dominant periods in the upper 10 m of the time series were identified using the Arand Spectral Analysis Package (Howell, 2001). This analysis revealed a single pronounced maxima at 160 years, which is inconsistent with the dominant periods found in time series of climate proxies from other sites on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula. In particular, periods of 200 and 400 years, which are dominant in the Palmer Deep site (Warner and Domack, 2002), are not present in the Schollaert Drift. The spectral peaks derived from the two records are significantly different at the 95% confidence level. The cycles in the Palmer Deep record have been associated with solar variability, where as the 160 year cycle in the Schollaert Drift is close to a 180 year cycle in tidal forces (Keeling

  13. Receiver Function Analysis using Ocean-bottom Seismometer Records around the Kii Peninsula, Southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akuhara, T.; Mochizuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    Recent progress on receiver function (RF) analysis has provided us with new insight about the subsurface structure. The method is now gradually being more applied to records of ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs). In the present study, we conducted RF analysis using OBS records at 32 observation sites around the Kii Peninsula, southwestern Japan, from 2003 to 2007 (Mochizuki et al., 2010, GRL). We addressed problems concerning water reverberations. We first checked the effects of water reverberations on the OBS vertical component records by calculating vertical P-wave RFs (Langston and Hammer, 2001, BSSA), where the OBS vertical component records were deconvolved by stacked traces of on-land records as source functions. The resultant RFs showed strong peaks corresponding to the water reverberations. Referring to these RFs, we constructed inverse filters to remove the effects of water reverberations from the vertical component records, which were assumed to be represented by two parameters, a two-way travel time within the water layer, and a reflection coefficient at the seafloor. We then calculated radial RFs using the filtered, reverberation-free, vertical component records of OBS data as source functions. The resultant RFs showed that some phases at later times became clearer than those obtained by an ordinary method. From the comparison with a previous tomography model (Akuhara et al., 2013, GRL), we identified phases originating from the oceanic Moho, which delineates the relationship between the depth of earthquakes and the oceanic Moho: seaward intraslab seismicity is high within the oceanic crust while the landward seismicity is high within the oceanic mantle. This character may be relevant to the dehydration process.

  14. The strongest desert dust intrusion mixed with smoke over the Iberian Peninsula registered with Sun photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachorro, V. E.; Toledano, C.; Prats, N.; Sorribas, M.; Mogo, S.; Berjón, A.; Torres, B.; Rodrigo, R.; de La Rosa, J.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2008-07-01

    We present the analysis of the strongest North African desert dust (DD) intrusion that occurred over the Iberian Peninsula (IP) during the last decade, as registered by modern remote sensing techniques like Sun photometry. This event took place from 22 July to 3 August 2004. The most relevant features of this exceptional event, originated over the Saharan desert, were its great intensity and duration. We focus on the columnar aerosol properties measured by the AERONET-Cimel photometers at El Arenosillo (southwest) and Palencia (north-center) stations. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) reached a maximum of 2.7 at El Arenosillo during 22 July and 1.3 at Palencia on 23 July, with the Ånsgtröm exponent values near zero during the AOD peaks. In addition, PM10 concentration levels are also reported at various sites of the IP in order to establish the impact of this intrusion, reaching daily values as high as 200 μg/m3 and peaks near 600 μg/m3 in an hourly basis. The interest of this special event is increased because of the mixing with smoke particles from concurrent forest fires in the IP. Features of the columnar volume particle size distribution and derived microphysical parameters, the single scattering albedo, and a reliable estimation of the radiative forcing under these extreme conditions are also reported. Complementary information, as air mass back trajectories, synoptic charts, images, and AOD maps of satellite sensors (SeaWIFS, MODIS) together with NAAPS prognostic model, is used in the analysis in order to draw a detailed scenario of this dust-smoke event over the IP.

  15. Magnetostratigraphic Dating of Paleogene Sediments in the Seymour Island (Antarctic Peninsula): A Preliminary Chronostratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beamud, E.; Montes, M. J.; Santillana, S.; Nozal, F.; Marenssi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Seymour Island is located at 64 º S, close to the northeastern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. This glacier-free island contains the southernmost exposures of the K/Pg boundary and it has the most complete record of the Paleogene in Antarctica. The base of the Paleogene is represented by the Early Paleocene shallow marine shelf deposits of the Marambio Group; which are unconformably overlain by the Late Paleocene to Late Eocene Seymour Island Group. The Marambio Group is divided into the quartz-rich silty sandstones and mudstones of the López de Bertodano Fm and the mudstones to quartz-rich sandstones of the Sobral Fm. The overlaying Seymour Island Group records the erosion and filling of incised valleys. This group is made up by the Cross Valley-Wiman, La Meseta and the uppermost new Submeseta Formations. Main regressive periods are evidenced by the erosional unconformities and their related time gaps at the base of these three Formations. The La Meseta and Submeseta Formations are composed by poorly consolidated marine sandstones and siltstones deposited in a shallow coastal (possibly estuarine) environment. Several biostratigraphic and isotopic studies have been conducted in the Seymour Island due to its extremely rich fossil record, and the age of the López de Bertodano Fm has been recently refined by magnetostratigraphy. However, the overlying Paleogene formations lack a reliable absolute continuous dating. To solve this problem, a composite magnetostratigraphic section spanning more than 1300 m from the K/Pg boundary up to the top of the Submeseta Fm was conducted, with an average sampling resolution of 3 m per site. Although many samples yielded weak results, a local magnetostratigraphy was obtained which has been correlated to the GPTS. The new derived ages range from Danian (~ 66 Ma) up to Priabonian (~ 34 Ma). These results have been integrated with previous litho-, bio- and isotopic data to build a new Paleogene chronostratigraphy for the Seymour

  16. Characteristics of turbulence in the troposphere and lower stratosphere over the Indian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunilkumar, S. V.; Muhsin, M.; Parameswaran, K.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Ramkumar, Geetha; Rajeev, K.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.; Sambhu Namboodiri, K. V.; Subrahmanyam, K. V.; Kishore Kumar, K.; Shankar Das, Siddarth

    2015-10-01

    Characteristics of turbulence in the troposphere and lower stratosphere at Trivandrum (8.5°N, 76.9°E) and Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), two tropical stations located in the Indian Peninsula, are studied using GPS-radiosonde observations during the period of December 2010 to March 2014 as part of the Tropical Tropopause Dynamics (TTD) Experiment under the CAWSES-India program. This study relies on the detection of turbulence applying Thorpe analysis to the temperature profile, taking into account the impact of atmospheric moisture and instrumental noise on static stability. In general, the tropospheric turbulence is largely intermittent in space and time. The altitude region very close to the convective tropopause (COT), 10-15 km, is relatively more turbulent than the lower troposphere from 3 to 8 km. Though the occurrence of turbulence decreases significantly above the COT, occasionally a rather thin layer of turbulence (thickness <1 km) is observed in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) very close to the cold point tropopause (CPT). Even though broad turbulent layers, with thickness >2 km, are the persisting features that can be observed in the 5-15 km altitude region in multiple observations at both the sites at least during Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) season, prominent multiple thin layers of stratified turbulence in the lower troposphere lasting for a day or less are observed only at Trivandrum in all seasons. In general, the turbulence strength in the 5-15 km altitude region at Gadanki is generally larger than that at Trivandrum. Below 15 km, while the turbulence is mainly governed by the convective instability at Gadanki, wind-shear driven (dynamic) instability also contributes considerably for the generation of turbulence at Trivandrum. While the generation of turbulence above 15 km is dominated by dynamic instability, in the lower stratosphere (LS) it is mainly due to strong wind shears.

  17. Persistent Multidecadal SST Variability Since 1775 AD Recorded in Multiple Corals from the Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando Vásquez-Bedoya, L.; Blanchon, P.; Oppo, D.; Cohen, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Observational and modeling studies have shown that long term North Atlantic basin-averaged sea surface temperatures (SSTs) combine a CO2-forced global warming trend with a multi-decadal oscillation (the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation or AMO) that likely arose from internal variability. The AMO can mitigate or amplify regional climate change, and will likely play a significant role in modulating the projected 21st century North Atlantic SST increase. Numerical models have proven incapable of predicting future phase shifts in AMO in a deterministic manner and probability-based projections are hampered by the short duration of the instrumental record (130-150 years), which captures just 2 multidecadal oscillations. Longer records of past AMO behavior could help improve probability-based projections. In the absence of instrumental data (or direct observations) such records must be generated from proxy climate archives. Here we report SST reconstructions based on coral annual growth rates (linear extension) from multiple long-lived colonies of Siderastrea sideraea collected live at two sites on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexican Caribbean. Yucatan is geographically well placed to capture AMO variability: instrumental SSTs over the last 150 years show a strong positive correlation with the AMO Index (R=0.68). We demonstrate that the annual linear growth rates of three coral colonies are significantly inversely correlated with SST, and the correlation is strongest on decadal timescales. We use annual linear growth rates to extend the SST record to 1775 AD. Finally, our marine-based record of multidecadal variability compare favorably with recently published records of paleo-AMO based on terrestrial proxies. Our results provide strong motivation for extending growth-based proxy records of Atlantic SST further back in time using a combination of longer-lived S. siderea at select locations, and deceased colonies that can be independently dated by Uranium-series to extend the

  18. An 8700 Year Record of Holocene Climate Variability from the Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, D.; Byrne, R.; Anderson, L.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of Holocene climate change in the Maya lowlands of Central America has improved significantly during the last several decades thanks to the development of proxy climate records from lake cores and speleothems. One important finding is that longer-term climate changes (i.e., millennial scale) were driven primarily by precessional forcing; less clear, however, are the causes of abrupt shifts and higher frequency (centennial to decadal) change recognized in many Holocene climate reconstructions. The mechanisms driving climate change on these time scales have been difficult to identify in the region, in part because the Yucatan peninsula is influenced by climatic conditions linked to both the tropical Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Additional complications arise from the development of dense human populations following the initial introduction of agriculture ~5000 cal yr BP, which had significant impact on the environment as a whole. Here we present the results of analyses (stable isotope, pollen, magnetic susceptibility, and physical properties) of a 7.25 m sediment core from Lago Puerto Arturo, a closed basin lake in the northern Peten, Guatemala. An age-depth model, based on 6 AMS radiocarbon determinations and created using CLAM, indicates the record extends to 8700 cal yr BP. Proxy data suggest that, similar to other low latitude sites, millennial scale climate at Lago Puerto Arturo was driven by changes in insolation. Higher frequency variability is associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) dynamics, reflecting latitudinal shifts in the Intertropical Convergence Zone in both the tropical North Atlantic and North Pacific. Solar forcing may also play a role in short-term climate change. The pollen and isotope records show that the entire period of prehispanic settlement and agricultural activity, i.e. ~5000-1000 cal yr B.P., was characterized by relatively dry conditions compared to before or after.

  19. Lagrangian simulation of transport pathways and residence times along the western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñones, Andrea; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Dinniman, Michael S.; Klinck, John M.

    2011-07-01

    The relative contribution of ocean circulation in producing areas where marine mammals and other predators concentrate to produce biological hot spots along the continental shelf of the western Antarctic Peninsula (wAP) was investigated with numerical Lagrangian particle tracking simulations. Circulation distributions used in the Lagrangian simulations were obtained from the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) configured for the wAP region, with a horizontal resolution of 4 km and a vertical resolution of 24 sigma-layers. To determine release points for the floats, the simulated circulation fields were first analyzed to estimate scales of temporal variability. The temporal decorrelation scales of the simulated surface flow over most of the wAP shelf were 2-3 days. However, decorrelation scales of about 40 days were found for the surface flow in the southern part of Marguerite Bay. Temporal decorrelation scales for the flow below the permanent pycnocline at the depth of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) intrusions (below 250 m) were between 40 and 70 days along the northern flank of Marguerite Trough and extending into Marguerite Bay. Near Adelaide Island, Anvers Island and the offshore side of Alexander Island, the velocity decorrelation scales varied between 40 and 60 days. Floats were released in the wAP simulated circulation fields along the outer and mid-shelf at a range of depths in different seasons. The simulated particle trajectories showed preferred sites for across-shelf transport, with Marguerite Trough being a primary pathway for movement of floats into Marguerite Bay, Crystal Sound and the inner shelf region. The three primary biological hot spots, Crystal Sound, Laubeuf Fjord, and off Alexander Island, were sites with the longest particle residence times, being 18-27 days for Alexander Island and Crystal Sound to almost 35 days for Laubeuf Fjord. However, the source regions and circulation processes that provided the input of particles differed for each

  20. Spatial extension of the reconstruction of 1874 Santa Tecla's flash floods in Catalonia (NE Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lluís Ruiz-Bellet, Josep; Carles Balasch, Josep; Tuset, Jordi; Barriendos, Mariano; Mazón, Jordi; Pino, David

    2014-05-01

    In September 23 1874, a sudden and severe rainstorm caused multiple flash floods in many small catchments (up to 200 km2) in the Southern half of Catalonia (NE Iberian Peninsula). These floods resulted in 575 fatalities and in a huge destruction of dwellings, roads, bridges, canals and crops and, thus, rank among the heaviest events in Catalonia since 1500. The damages were so great that the economic effects of the floods lasted several years. Many flood mark plaques scattered across the affected area remember the date and keep a record of the maximum height reached by the water. This information enables the hydraulic calculation of the peak flow of the flood at the site of the flood mark; so far, this reconstructed peak flow has been calculated in seven sites: Mont-roig and Agramunt on the Sió River, Cervera and Tàrrega on the Ondara River, Vallfogona, Ciutadilla and Guimerà on the Corb River. Moreover, it has been possible to estimate the rainfall from the reconstructed hydrographs. The results agree with the destructive force of the floods: a specific flow of 10 m3•s-1•km-2 in Cervera, an approximate return period of 250 years in Tàrrega, and 150 mm of rain in nine hours in the Ondara catchment, for example. There are many other flood marks that have not been used yet: Granyena on the Vallmajor River, Arbeca on the Turull Torrent, Espluga and Montblanc on the Francolí River, and Vendrell on the Bisbal Torrent. The reconstructed peak flows and rainfalls in these sites will give more insight into the big picture, that is, the temporal and spatial distribution of the meteorological and hydrological factors that produced the fatal event. Our final objective is to compare this regional picture with the even bigger one obtained from the analysis of the synoptic meteorological situation in the days immediately prior to the floods. A secondary objective is to compare this flood with a more recent one, such as the one occurred in September 1962 near Barcelona

  1. Spatial climate dynamics in the Iberian Peninsula since 15 000 yr BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarroso, Pedro; Carrión, José; Dorado-Valiño, Miriam; Queiroz, Paula; Santos, Luisa; Valdeolmillos-Rodríguez, Ana; Célio Alves, Paulo; Brito, José Carlos; Cheddadi, Rachid

    2016-05-01

    Climate changes in the Iberian Peninsula since the Last Glacial Maximum are associated with distributional shifts of major Mediterranean and European temperate species. The dynamic relationship between climate and species in the past may be retrieved from the fossil records available in the Iberian Peninsula. We have used an extensive set of pollen records to reconstruct spatial layers (1 kyr interval) of January minimum temperature, July maximum temperature, and annual precipitation over the time period between 15 and 3 ka. A functional principal component analysis was used to summarise the spatial evolution of climate in areas that share similar climate trends. When compared between them, the identified four areas show different climate trends over the studied period and are coherent with the existence of multiple refugial areas within the Iberian Peninsula.

  2. Distribution of the sibling species of Anopheles farauti in the Cape York Peninsula, northern Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, A W; Cooper, R D; Frances, S P

    1990-09-01

    The sibling species of Anopheles farauti s.l. were collected in larval and adult surveys from 34 localities on Cape York Peninsula and were identified by isoenzyme electrophoresis. The most common species near the coast was An. farauti 1 which was often found breeding within 100 m of the sea in either brackish or freshwater habitats. Larvae of the other 2 species were not found in brackish water which accords with previous laboratory observations of their lower salinity tolerance. Anopheles farauti 2 appears to have the widest distribution of the 3 sibling species on Cape York Peninsula as it was common in both coastal and inland localities. Anopheles farauti 3 was rarely found near the coast. In one locality at Lockhart River near the east coast of the peninsula larvae of the 3 species were found together in a small muddy creek. PMID:2230771

  3. Site test for infrared solar tower in Yunnan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Ke; Liu, Zhong; Wu, Ming-Chan; Lu, Ru-Wei; Qian, Pin; Zhang, Rui-Long

    This paper describes the history of site tests for solar optical observations in Yunnan. The site test for the infrared solar tower (IST) in Yunnan began from 1996, and consisted of 3 phases: the preliminary site survey, comparison observation and the observation at the fixed stations (with S-DIMM). The best site is finalized at Lao Ying Di, a small peninsula on the bank of Fuxian Lake, Cheng Jiang county. The site for the IST station at Lao Ying Di is chosen following the comparison observation with SDIMM for over one year at two final near-water sites. The two sites are picked out from 7 sites near water and 8 sites in mountain areas with visual observation by using an 89 mm Questar telescope after on-site survey over 40 candidate locations in Yunnan. The IST station is about 68 km from Kunming. The average sunshine time is 2200 hours annually.

  4. Improving simulation of El Niño Impacts on summer cropping systems of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capa-Morocho, Mirian; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita; Rodríguez-Fonseca, Belén

    2013-04-01

    El Niño event is a main driver of seasonal climate variability that greatly impacts agriculture and regional economies (Legler et al., 1999). The relationships found between El Niño and yield can be helpful to anticipate yield anomalies (higher or lower than usual) what can help us to adapt crop systems in advance: insurance coverage, changes in sowing dates, choice of species and varieties, as well as changes in the management of fertilization and irrigation and the establishment of an early warning system. In a previous work, we found that the ENSO affects maize yield differently depending on the location in the Iberian Peninsula (Capa et al., 2012), using observed data series for periods ranging from 22 to 46 years. The specific objective of this work is 1) to confirm these results using a longer time series from re-analysis data; 2) to evaluate the yield simulations done with re-analysis regarding observed crops yields and simulations obtained with observed climate data; and 3) to use re-analysis climate data to help to explain the mechanism of the influence of El Niño. Crop yield was simulated with the ecophysiological crop model CERES-maize, included in DSSAT v.4.5 (Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer). To simulate maize yields, re-analysis daily data of radiation, maximum and minimum temperature and precipitation were used. The re-analysis climate data were obtained from NCEP/NCAR 40-year reanalysis project (NOAA National Center for Environmental Prediction) and ECMWF Data server (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts: ERA 40 and ERA Interim). Simulations were made on three locations where site- specific calibrations were done and validated with independent field data: Lugo (northwestern), Getafe (centre) and Albacete (southeastern Spain). Re-analysis data confirm the preliminary results obtained with observed data (AEMET): El Niño phenomenon affects irrigated maize depending on the location in the Iberian Peninsula. Also

  5. 75 FR 2920 - In the Matter of the Designation of al-Qa'ida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), Also Known as al...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... al-Qa'ida Organization in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), Also Known as al-Qa'ida in Yemen (AQY), Also... Organization in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), also known as al-Qa'ida in Yemen (AQY), also known as...

  6. The Nature of the Moho Beneath the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, R.; Díaz, J.; Brown, D.; Palomeras, I.; Ayarza, P.; Afonso, J. C.; Simancas, F.; Pérez-Estaún, A.; Gallart, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Mohorovičić discontinuity (Moho) was defined by Andrija Mohorovičić in 1910 on the basis of an interpretation of regional earthquake records in Eastern Europe as a relatively abrupt increase in P-wave seismic velocities. The Moho is observed/detected world wide. It is the most important boundary within the Earth's lithosphere. The high resolution subsurface geophysical images have demonstrated that the crust-mantle boundary is a far more complex structure that the initial seismological definition established. The purpose of this contribution is to bring together some of the findings related to the crust-mantle transition beneath the Iberian peninsula and to synthesize these results into a perspective that has global implications. For the last three decades an extensive acquisition of varieties of geophysical and geological data has been carried out. These data include controlled-source seismic (refraction and reflection), natural source seismic, and regional geology. In NW Iberia an analog of the continental crust-mantle transition is exposed within the Paleozoic Cabo Ortegal Complex and can be used for comparison and model building. This provides a unique view into the nature of the crust-mantle transition. From the multi-seismic data the character of the Moho is highly variable, in some areas there are no reflections visible in the normal incidence (e.g. ESCI-BETICS-1), in others reflections are prominent single events (e.g. IBERSEIS) and in still others complex geometric features are observed (ESCI-NORTE). There are also time (depth) differences between the wide-angle and the normal incidence seismic Moho's. Laboratory measurements of P- and S-wave velocities reflect an overall increase from middle to lower crustal velocities in the felsic gneisses and intermediate-to-mafic granulites to mantle velocities in the eclogites and ultramafic rocks. The surface outcrops of Cabo Ortegal complex suggests that the seismic Moho is reached at the contact between

  7. Assessment of the Climate Vulnerabilities of the Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, T.; Sultan, M.; Ahmed, M.; Chouinard, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Arabian Peninsula (AP), like many places around the world, is apparently witnessing the impacts (amount, patterns, and frequency of precipitation) of global warming. Precipitation over the AP is largely controlled by two main wind regimes, the winter (October to March) northerlies or northwesterlies, hereafter referred to as westerlies, and the summer (April to September) monsoonal wind regimes. The global monthly Climate Prediction Centers (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) data (spatial resolution: 2.5° × 2.5°; temporal resolution: monthly; operational period: January 1979 to November 2011) was used to investigate the nature and magnitude of precipitation variations over the AP throughout 1979 - 2010. Trends in CMAP-derived precipitation patterns were examined over the winter and summer seasons throughout Periods I (1979-1995) and II (1996-2010). Reversals in precipitation patterns were observed in Periods I and II, where areas witnessing an increase in precipitation in Period I showed a decrease in precipitation throughout Period II, and vice versa for the remaining areas. Our findings suggest: (1) an increase in precipitation during Period I over the southeastern and southwestern coastal areas of AP (e.g., Muscat, Sanaa, and Jeddah) that is probably related to the intensification of the monsoons at the expense of the westerlies, (2) an increase in precipitation during Period II over the northwestern and southeastern of AP (e.g., northwestern Saudi Arabia, Empty Quarter, western and southwestern Oman, and eastern Yemen) is here attributed to intensification of the westerlies, and 3) the general similarity of annual trend patterns to the summer trend (Period I) and to winter trend (Period II) suggest that the annual trends are largely controlled by monsoonal wind regimes in Period I and by the westerlies in Period II. Outputs (i.e., precipitation) of climatic models (CCSM4.0) over the AP are being extracted (for upcoming 100 years) , downscaled

  8. Recent observed climate change over the Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsarmi, Said; Washington, Richard

    2011-06-01

    We have examined trends in temperature and precipitation parameters for the Arabian Peninsula (AP) during the last 2 to 3 decades. The data set has been carefully quality controlled and checked for homogeneity. Although of low density (21 stations) and relatively short time period, a clear picture of climate change in the region has emerged. The general pattern of the AP mean annual temperature trend is one of warming, with 14 of 21 stations show statistically significant warming at 0.05 level and most at 0.001 level and only one (Seeb) showing statistically significant cooling. The highest statistically significant mean annual warming trends are found in Oman (Sur = 1.03°C decade-1) and Emirates (Dubai = 0.81°C decade-1). The season of maximum warming in mean temperature is March to April. The highest monthly mean temperature trend in the AP occurs in Sur in May (1.47°C decade-1). There is a broad statistically significant increase in mean annual maximum temperature in AP in 12 out of 21 stations, with the highest trends in central and eastern/southeastern AP. Only SW AP and the Gulf of Oman do not show warming. The highest monthly maximum temperature trend in the AP occurs in Bahrain in March (2.27°C decade-1). The second highest significant warming trends are reported in Doha in February (1.54°C decade-1). For minimum temperature, 16 out of 21 stations show statistically significant warming trends, with the highest annual trends observed in the Emirates (Dubai = 1.24°C decade-1), northwest Oman (Sohar = 1.17°C decade-1) and Qatar (Doha = 1.13°C decade-1). The highest monthly minimum temperature warming rate occurred in October. Both Dubai and Kuwait reported the highest significant rate of 2.00°C decade-1. The general mean annual diurnal temperature range trend is negative in the AP, with six out of 21 stations show statistically significant negative trends while three stations show statistically significant positive trends. Trends in mean annual

  9. Neotectonics and fluvial geomorphology of the Northern Sinai Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusky, T.; El-Baz, F.

    2000-08-01

    Large anticlinal ridges of Jurassic-Tertiary limestone in the northern Sinai Peninsula are part of the Syrian Arc Fold Belt, parts of which have been active intermittently from Late Cretaceous through the present. Recent uplift of the Syrian Arc Fold Belt is supported by quantitative indices of active tectonics including low values of mountain front sinuosity and, by recent seismicity, extending southwest past Cairo into the Fayoum Depression. The northern Sinai Desert has a climate similar to that of the adjacent part of the eastern Sahara. Sand sheets and dune fields cover its northwestern part, which is a depression extending from the Suez Canal to Wadi El-Arish. Numerous dry channels of palaeorivers and streams lead into this depression, where several temporary palaeolakes and flood overbank deposits have been identified. Some of the temporary pluvial palaeolakes developed behind natural dams formed by folds of the Syrian Arc, whereas others filled deeply-eroded fault traces. Migration of sand dunes may have blocked some channels, but the location of the dunes seems to be controlled by Recent uplift of parts of the fold belt, with the dunes residing in synclinal depressions and adjacent to fault scarps. The palaeolakes are correlated more with structures than with active dune fields. Wadi El-Arish abandoned a channel west of its present-day course, perhaps because of recent growth and uplift of the Gebel Halal Fold. This abandonment was synchronous with down-cutting of a gorge through Gebel Halal, which follows conjugate faults formed during uplift of an anticline. The presence of standing water during wetter climates in the past is supported by silt deposits and archaeological evidence of previous human habitation. The newly identified lake margin and fluvial sediments could be important targets for studying early-modern human and Neanderthal activities. In the eastern Sahara, cycles of pluvial periods that date back 320,000 years appear to correspond to

  10. Linking seasonal climate forecasts with crop models in Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capa, Mirian; Ines, Amor; Baethgen, Walter; Rodriguez-Fonseca, Belen; Han, Eunjin; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Translating seasonal climate forecasts into agricultural production forecasts could help to establish early warning systems and to design crop management adaptation strategies that take advantage of favorable conditions or reduce the effect of adverse conditions. In this study, we use seasonal rainfall forecasts and crop models to improve predictability of wheat yield in the Iberian Peninsula (IP). Additionally, we estimate economic margins and production risks associated with extreme scenarios of seasonal rainfall forecast. This study evaluates two methods for disaggregating seasonal climate forecasts into daily weather data: 1) a stochastic weather generator (CondWG), and 2) a forecast tercile resampler (FResampler). Both methods were used to generate 100 (with FResampler) and 110 (with CondWG) weather series/sequences for three scenarios of seasonal rainfall forecasts. Simulated wheat yield is computed with the crop model CERES-wheat (Ritchie and Otter, 1985), which is included in Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT v.4.5, Hoogenboom et al., 2010). Simulations were run at two locations in northeastern Spain where the crop model was calibrated and validated with independent field data. Once simulated yields were obtained, an assessment of farmer's gross margin for different seasonal climate forecasts was accomplished to estimate production risks under different climate scenarios. This methodology allows farmers to assess the benefits and risks of a seasonal weather forecast in IP prior to the crop growing season. The results of this study may have important implications on both, public (agricultural planning) and private (decision support to farmers, insurance companies) sectors. Acknowledgements Research by M. Capa-Morocho has been partly supported by a PICATA predoctoral fellowship of the Moncloa Campus of International Excellence (UCM-UPM) and MULCLIVAR project (CGL2012-38923-C02-02) References Hoogenboom, G. et al., 2010. The Decision

  11. New Geophysical L Study Northwestern Antarctic Peninsula: Geodinamic Implicances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, J. F.; Tassone, A. A.; Lippai, H. F.

    2007-05-01

    The current tectonic arrangement of Tierra del Fuego and Antarctica is the product of an extensive and complex evolution that involved the most southern part in South America (SA) from the Early Mesozoic when a subduction area settles down along the Pacific border of Gondwana (GDW) including the then continuous SA and Antarctic Peninsula (AP) (Dalziel and Elliot, 1973; Dalziel, 1982). The paleogeographic position of the AP immediately before the separation of the GDW has been a topic of controversy. The presently available information for the beginning of GDW fragmentation is contradictory. In the last years a new accretion model has been proposed for the Mesozoic development of the AP. This model requires of more data to sustain the extension of the old magmatic arc and GDW paleomargin. A geophysical campaign has been developed along Danco Coast - between Py Point to the south, and Vivot Cape to the north- with the aim of acquire new data to define the geometry, lateral relationships and tectonic development of the geologic units of the Mesozoic magmatic arc exposed in the western border of the AP. Rock outcrops mostly belong to plutonic bodies of granitic through tonalitic composition, and rhyolites, andesites and basaltic rocks. The geologic survey included the lithologic and structural sampling, a total of 216 rock cores were obtained for AMS and paleomagnetic studies. The acquired data have been GPS referred. The magnetic survey was carried out with two magnetometers of proton free- precession: a Scintrex ENVI GRAD (used as permanent base) and a Geometrics G856 magnetometer employed for sampling stations (which measured the intensity of the total magnetic field and worked synchronized with the base magnetometer in order to make the corresponding corrections). A total of 1670 registrations were acquired in the 334 GPS fixed onland stations. A Zodiac MK5 was employed for the offshore magnetic survey. 5162 stations constitute the magnetic grid in offshore areas

  12. Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia 3-D Perspective with Landsat Overlay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This three-dimensional perspective view, looking up the Tigil River, shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. The image shows that the Tigil River has eroded down from a higher and differing landscape and now flows through, rather than around the large green-colored bedrock ridge in the foreground. The older surface was likely composed of volcanic ash and debris from eruptions of nearby volcanoes. The green tones indicate that denser vegetation grows on south facing sunlit slopes at the northern latitudes. High resolution SRTM elevation data will be used by geologists to study how rivers shape the landscape, and by ecologists to study the influence of topography on ecosystems.

    This image shows how data collected by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) can be used to enhance other satellite images. Color and natural shading are provided by a Landsat 7 image acquired on January 31, 2000. Terrain perspective and shading were derived from SRTM elevation data acquired on February 12, 2000. Topography is exaggerated by about six times vertically. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) DataCenter, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet

  13. Dynamics of the Iberian Peninsula Coastal Low-Level Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semedo, Alvaro; Rijo, Nádia; Miranda, Pedro; Lima, Daniela C. A.; Cardoso, Rita; Soares, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Coastal low-level jets (CLLJ) are important mesoscale phenomena of some regional coastal climates. They are characterized by a coast-parallel flow which has a wind speed maxima within the first few hundred meters above sea level (usually below 1000 m, and most of the times around 500 m), encapsulated within the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). Coastal jets have a larger scale synoptic forcing behind them: a high pressure system over the ocean and a thermal low inland. The regions where CLLJ occur coincide with cold equator-ward eastern boundary currents in the mid-latitudes (with an exception of the coast of Oman in the Arabian Sea), where the contrast between the cold ocean and the warm land in the summer is highest. As a response of CLLJ occurrences a positive feedback mechanism is triggered: the coast-parallel wind induces upwelling currents at the coast, reducing the sea surface temperature, which in turn increase the thermal (pressure) gradient at the coast, leading to higher wind speeds. The Iberian Peninsula Coastal Jet (IPCJ) is an example of a CLLJ, developed mostly during the summer season due to the effect of the semi-present Azores high-pressure system in the North Atlantic and of a thermal low pressure system inland. This synoptic pattern drives a seasonal (western) coast parallel wind, often called the Nortada (northerly wind), where the IPCJ develops. A detailed analysis of the IPCJ structure and dynamics will be presented, trough the analysis of two case studies off the west coast of Portugal. The case studies are simulated using the WRF mesoscale model, at 9 and 3 km horizontal resolution, forced by the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) ERA-Interim reanalysis. The MABL structure off the west coast of Iberia, the interaction of the flow with the two main west Iberia capes (Finisterre and Roca), and the consequences on the cloud cover and wind speed up- and down-wind of the capes will be analysed.

  14. 50 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart E of... - Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL..., Subpt. E, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300—Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and...

  15. 75 FR 71107 - Upper Peninsula Power Company; UP Hydro; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Upper Peninsula Power Company; UP Hydro; Notice of Application for Transfer..., Upper Peninsula Power Company (transferor) and UP Hydro (transferee) filed an application for transfer... under http://www.ferc.gov/docs-filing/efiling.asp . Commenters can submit brief comments up to...

  16. Evaluation's Contribution to the Success of a Silicon Valley School/Industry Partnership: The Peninsula Academies Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Steven M.; And Others

    In an effort to encourage the participation of educationally disadvantaged youth in the Silicon Valley's high technology employment boom, the Peninsula Academies program was established utilizing a triad-partnership arrangement among the Sequoia Union High School District, high technology employers in the area, and the Stanford Mid-Peninsula Urban…

  17. Detection of surface and subsurface conditions in permafrost area after wildfire by using satellite images, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, K.; Narita, K.; Saito, K.; Iwahana, G.; Sawada, Y.; Fukuda, M.

    2013-12-01

    In 1971 and 2002, large tundra fires burned a wide area that is underlain by discontinuous permafrost near the Kougarok River on the Seward Peninsula in western Alaska. Both fires destroyed the vegetation and altered the ground surface thermal conditions. The objective of this study is to understand the characteristics of the post-fire variations in the distribution and condition of the permafrost and of the changes attributed to the wildfire in the thermal and water conditions in the active layer. Especially, we tried to detect thaw depth, surface and subsurface conditions by using satellite images. Summer field observations were conducted at both burned and unburned sites in the area beginning in 2005. The average thaw depth at the burned sites in 2012 was 30% deeper than the depths at the unburned sites. The differences in thaw depth have decreased over time. Boring surveys up to a depth of 2 m conducted in 2012 confirm the presence of massive ice at both sites, which implies the possibility of thermokarst development caused by the thawing of the permafrost after wildfires. The visible satellite image for the burned site detected white-colored areas, corresponding to Clamagrostis canadensis growing areas, surrounded by green-colored areas. The thaw depth at the white-colored areas was deeper by 60% than at the surrounding burned areas. The surface roughness values were also high at these white-colored areas. There was a significant difference in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) between the white-colored areas and the other areas. Thus, satellite images of areas after wildfires may help detect low NDVI areas that have a deeper thaw depth with the possibility of thermokarst development.

  18. Presence of the leech Placobdella costata in the south of the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Romero, David; Duarte, Jesús; Narváez-Ledesma, Lucía; Farfán, Miguel Angel; Real, Raimundo

    2014-06-01

    Placobdella costata is a leech specific to freshwater turtle Emys orbicularis. Both genera are native to North America and have co-evolved and undergone dispersion through the Palearctic. The leech is present throughout the Mediterranean area, always associated with E. orbicularis. Their only known presence in the Iberian Peninsula is in the north and center of the peninsula. Here we present the first description of the leech in southern Spain (Andalusia) in association with a small fragmented population of fresh-water turtles in which E. orbicularis and Mauremys leprosa coexist. Unusually, the leech was found attached to the carapace of a male M. leprosa. PMID:24827095

  19. An outbreak of type E botulism among common loons (Gavia immer) in Michigan's Upper Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, Christopher J.; Schmitt, Stephen; Duncan, Ruth M.; Cooley, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    An epizootic of type E botulism (Clostridium botulinum) occurred among common loons (Gavia immer) along the Lake Michigan shore of Michigan's Upper Peninsula (USA) during October and November 1983. An estimated 592 dead loons washed ashore along the Garden Peninsula. Type E botulinal toxin was demonstrated in blood samples and stomach contents of dead loons, and in samples of three species of dead fish found on the Lake Michigan shore. We suspect that loons acquired botulism by ingesting sick or dead fish containing type E toxin.

  20. Forest statistics for Michigan`s northern lower peninsula unit, 1993. Forest Service research bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Leatherberry, E.C.

    1994-10-30

    Michigan`s Northern Lower Peninsula Unit (fig. 1) is comprised of 33 counties. This region of the State is rich with resources that support a network of social, economic, and ecological processes that are forest dependent. The forest resource of the Unit presently supports an industry that operates on a sustaining basis. In 1990 nearly half of Michigan`s saw-log production--297 million board feet--was harvest in the Unit. The forests of the Northern Lower Peninsula are vital to the region. The forest contains a variety of both deciduous and coniferous forest species, which results in regionally unique ecosystems that contribute to biodiversity.

  1. GPS and GIS-Based Data Collection and Image Mapping in the Antarctic Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanchez, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    High-resolution satellite images combined with the rapidly evolving global positioning system (GPS) and geographic information system (GIS) technology may offer a quick and effective way to gather information in Antarctica. GPS- and GIS-based data collection systems are used in this project to determine their applicability for gathering ground truthing data in the Antarctic Peninsula. These baseline data will be used in a later study to examine changes in penguin habitats resulting in part from regional climate warming. The research application in this study yields important information on the usefulness and limits of data capture and high-resolution images for mapping in the Antarctic Peninsula.

  2. Evaluation of high-resolution MetUM and AMPS forecasts of near-surface meteorological variables over Larsen C ice shelf and northern Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Andrew; Kirchgaessner, Amelie; King, John; Weeks, Mark; Gadian, Alan; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; van den Broeke, Michiel; Steffen, Konrad

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution weather forecasts are an important tool for understanding the detailed patterns of surface melt on the Larsen C ice shelf (LCIS), Antarctic Peninsula. We investigate the skill of UK Met Office Unified Model (MetUM) and Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS) forecasts with horizontal grid spacing of 4-5 km for a 1 month period during January-February 2011 by comparing near-surface model output to automatic weather station measurements at 5 sites on the LCIS and 3 on the northern Antarctic Peninsula. Forecasts for the range 12-24 h showed a fairly homogeneous performance over the LCIS. The 2 m temperature simulated by AMPS has a correlation with observations of 0.5-0.6 and a systematic cold bias of around -1 degrees centigrade. By comparison, the MetUM had a higher correlation and was less negatively biased. The simulated surface pressure has a correlation of 0.99 and small biases in both models. AMPS yielded better results than the MetUM for 10 m wind speed, being able to capture particularly well synoptically-driven high wind speeds which the MetUM systematically underestimated. Both models struggle to simulate the 10 m wind direction when the wind conditions are highly variable. The simulation of specific humidity by both models was poor. Both models showed a general reduction in performance over the northern Antarctic Peninsula compared to the LCIS. Extending the analysis to consider the 12-36 h forecast range demonstrated a relatively weak dependence of model skill to the length of the forecast. The study focuses particularly on the representation of foehn wind events, which are an important contributor to surface melt over the LCIS, by examining additional ~1 km scale forecasts using the MetUM.

  3. Fossil tubeworms link coastal uplift of the northern Noto Peninsula to rupture of the Wajima-oki fault in AD 1729

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Masaaki; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Oda, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    The active fault zone on the seafloor off the northern coast of the Noto Peninsula of central Japan is divided into four segments from west to east: Monzen-oki, Saruyama-oki, Wajima-oki, and Suzu-oki. To examine the latest event that occurred in these segments, we investigated the dates and elevations of fossilized intertidal tubeworms along the northern coast of the Noto Peninsula, located on the hanging-wall sides of the faults, using radioactive carbon dating and global positioning measurements. For each fossil, we calculated the difference between the past and present elevation, thereby estimating the elevation of the sea level at the date of the fossil, using a curve for sea level change. This calculation provided us with the elevation change at each site. The vertical changes estimated from the elevations and ages of the intertidal tubeworms revealed that the coastal emergence probably occurred between 1600 and 1800 AD. This area of coastal emergence lies adjacent to active faults within the Wajima-oki segment. A model for rectangular faults with three fault planes and a moment magnitude of 6.6 for the Wajima-oki segment reproduced the observed pattern of coastal emergence well. Only one damaging earthquake, that in 1729, is known to have occurred in this part of the northern Noto Peninsula between 1600 and 1800 AD, and there has not been one since 1800 AD. The slip distribution of the fault predicted by the model is consistent with the distribution of shaking-related damage documented in 1729. We conclude that rupture of the Wajima-oki segment caused the 1729 earthquake.

  4. First Results From PBO Strainmeters On The Olympic Peninsula And Vancouver Island, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, K.; Anderson, G.; Dittmann, T.; Gladwin, M.; Hasting, M.; Johnson, W.; Mee, M.; Mueller, B.; Venator, S.; Wright, J.

    2005-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory installed six Gladwin Tensor Strainmeters (GTSMs) on the Olympic peninsula in June and July 2005. Four boreholes are currently being drilled on Vancouver Island, Canada, with strainmeter installation planned for autumn 2005. Initial results from the strainmeters on the Olympic Peninsula indicate that all are measuring an accumulation of strain and that the phase and amplitudes of the M2 and O1 Earth tides and teleseisms are resolvable at some of the strainmeters after two months of operation. These six strainmeters and the four in Vancouver Island are well placed to capture any strain transients produced by the expected Cascadia slow earthquake. GTSMs, installed at depths of up to 250 m, measure changes in strain with a precision 1 ppb over periods of hours to months. They therefore bridge the spectrum of deformation not measurable by GPS or seismometers. GTSMs record strain at sample rates of 20 samples/second, 1 sample/second and 1 sample per 600 seconds. Rainfall, pore pressure atmospheric pressure, temperature and seismic data are also measured at the strainmeter site. The strain and environmental data flow at hourly intervals to UNAVCO's Boulder Data Collection Center (BDCC) via VSAT. At the BDCC it is converted to miniSEED and sent to the Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) and to IRIS's Data Management Center (IRIS DMC) for archival via SEEDLink. In addition the raw data, in the data logger native format, are transferred to the archives via LDM. The strain data are processed at UNAVCO's Borehole Strainmeter Analysis Center (BSMAC), located at the PASSCAL Instrument Center at New Mexico Tech, in Socorro, NM. On arrival at the BSMAC the 1 sample/sec data are reviewed and spurious data and signals known to be introduced by non-tectonic activity are identified. The 1 sample/sec strain data are then reduced to 300-second interval in a multi-stage decimation process using minimum-phase decimate by 2, 3 and 5 causal

  5. Local seismic characteristics of the quarry blasts on the Korean peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, M.; Hahm, I.; Ryoo, Y.; Park, S.; Jeon, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Most explosion events occurred by chemical blast in order to get aggregate stone on Korean peninsula.The vibrations generated by the explosions are recorded at seismic stations operated by the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA), contaminating seismic data.To study the accurate seismic activities, source discrimination between explosion and earthquake is important to study the accurate seismic activities. In this study, we installed the portable seismometers around the quarry blast sites to understand the characteristics of seismic waveforms of quarry blasts and natural earthquakes. We collected the quarry blasting seismic data in local distance in Yeoncheon and Hoengseong regions. Then we analyzed the epicenter of magnitude, and P/S amplitude ratio of the blasts. For the analysis, we used seismic data recorded at KMA seismic network and temporary stations with portable seismographs. We precisely determined the locations using Hypoellipse and Genloc programs in order to compare the relocation results along the station azimuth and epicentral distance. The results showed high accuracy of hypocenter and improved reliability of the focal depth, that may be due to the close temporary stations. Comparison results between magnitude of this study and KMA's seismic analysis program (Antelope) shows magnitude differences of about 0.5 ~ 0.7. These differences may be due to the usage of different data set and magnitude scale. P/S amplitude spectral ratio of explosion is expected to have much higher ratio than that of earthquake (Walter et al., 1995; Zhao et al., 2008). P/S amplitude spectral ratio for each station was analyzed after we selected four micro earthquakes near the quarry blast site of Yeoncheon and Hoengseong regions. Although the spectral ratios appear to be scattered, the variation gets smaller as the epicentral distance becomes large. Study results indicate smoothly calculated P/S ratio in frequency domain and classified P/S ratio into two groups. The

  6. A case of bilateral macrodontia of mandibular second premolars from a Chalcolithic context in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    López-Onaindia, Diego; Otxoa de Amezaga, Amaia; Subirà, M Eulàlia

    2015-01-01

    Isolated macrodontia, consisting of the gigantism of a single tooth, is an extremely rare condition. Only 16 cases of isolated macrodontia of mandibular second premolars have been reported to date. Although the aetiology of this phenomenon remains unknown, many authors have related it to the control of the apoptotic process, leading to the patterning and size of dental cusps. There is not a clear genetic inheritance pattern since only two of those 16 cases correspond to close relatives. To our knowledge, there have been no reports of isolated macrodontia of mandibular second premolars in archaeological remains. Cova del Pantà de Foix site is a Chalcolithic sepulchral cave situated in the North-East of the Iberian Peninsula in which the remains of at least 30 individuals were recovered. Most of these individuals show several signs of environmental stressors. The current study presents the first case of isolated bilateral macrodontia of mandibular premolars from an archaeological context, corresponding to a young male individual discovered in this site. This condition could be the last consequence of environmental factors epigenetically affecting apoptosis processes in early tooth development and a possible genetic predisposition to show a shape-deviation in the dentition. PMID:26133014

  7. Seasonality of blue and fin whale calls and the influence of sea ice in the Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Širović, Ana; Hildebrand, John A.; Wiggins, Sean M.; McDonald, Mark A.; Moore, Sue E.; Thiele, Deborah

    2004-08-01

    The calling seasonality of blue ( Balaenoptera musculus) and fin ( B. physalus) whales was assessed using acoustic data recorded on seven autonomous acoustic recording packages (ARPs) deployed from March 2001 to February 2003 in the Western Antarctic Peninsula. Automatic detection and acoustic power analysis methods were used for determining presence and absence of whale calls. Blue whale calls were detected year round, on average 177 days per year, with peak calling in March and April, and a secondary peak in October and November. Lowest calling rates occurred between June and September, and in December. Fin whale calling rates were seasonal with calls detected between February and June (on average 51 days/year), and peak calling in May. Sea ice formed a month later and retreated a month earlier in 2001 than in 2002 over all recording sites. During the entire deployment period, detected calls of both species of whales showed negative correlation with sea ice concentrations at all sites, suggesting an absence of blue and fin whales in areas covered with sea ice. A conservative density estimate of calling whales from the acoustic data yields 0.43 calling blue whales per 1000 n mi 2 and 1.30 calling fin whales per 1000 n mi 2, which is about one-third higher than the density of blue whales and approximately equal to the density of fin whales estimated from the visual surveys.

  8. Southern Ocean and Antarctic Peninsula Temperatures During Critical Climate Transitions of the Cenozoic Constrained by Clumped Isotope Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, R.; Eagle, R.; Henry, D.; Praskin, S.; Mering, J. A.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Priyadarshi, A.; Rycroft, L.; Vollmer, T.; Chea, Y.; Dix, J.; Aguilar, A.; Supakkul, K.; Tran, B.; Lipel, Z.; Flores, S.; Riesselman, C. R.; Taviani, M.; Marenssi, S.; Harwood, D. M.; Lunt, D. J.; Valdes, P. J.; Meckler, A. N.; Tripati, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean and Antarctica play fundamental roles in the global climate system. These polar regions are a major area for the net loss of heat to space. Ice storage on Antarctica also influences the global water cycle. Through upwelling of deep waters, the Southern Ocean is an important regulator of atmospheric CO2. To better constrain the evolution of paleoclimate in this region over major climate transitions of the Cenozoic, we estimated ocean temperatures using clumped isotope thermometry. Clumped isotope thermometry is a thermodynamically-based stable isotope thermometer that can be used to constrain temperatures previously estimated using other paleothermometers (which in turn leads to constraints on ice volume), as it allows the exclusion of water isotope composition from temperature estimates (unlike the δ18O thermometer). We previously have published calibrations for foraminifera and mollusks, two of the major archives used in this study. Critical transitions investigated include the Eocene-Oligocene boundary and the Middle Miocene Climate Transition. Study sites include Seymour Island (Antarctic Peninsula), ANDRILL (Southern McMurdo Sounds), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 689/690 (Weddell Sea), and ODP 744 (Kerguelen Plateau). Results will be compared to GCM output.

  9. Morphological and physiological differences between two morphotypes of Zostera noltii Hornem. from the south-western Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, G.; Pérez-Lloréns, J. L.; Hernández, I.; Brun, F.; Vergara, J. J.; Bartual, A.; Gálvez, J. A.; García, C. M.

    2000-07-01

    The morphological and physiological differences between two morphotypes of Z. noltii Hornem. were studied in the intertidal meadows on the south-western Iberian Peninsula (Palmones river estuary and Ria Formosa). A small-leaved morphotype (SM) grows mainly at high intertidal sites, meadow edges or in recently deposited sandbanks, whereas a large-leaved morphotype (LM) generally thrives in well-structured beds or in deeper places. This study deals with the morphological, biochemical and physiological differences between these morphotypes as well as the ecological implications of the occurrence of different morphotypes in the same meadow. Shoot length, leaf width, rhizome internode length, roots per node, root length, leaf nutrient and pigment contents, and photosynthetic rates of both morphotypes were compared. The below-ground architecture (root and rhizome complex) of both morphotypes was more developed in sites characterized by higher hydrodynamics and/or a lower nitrogen content in sediments. Both morphotypes showed similar values for photosynthetic efficiency, dark respiration rate and compensation irradiance. On the other hand, the net photosynthetic capacity was much greater (5-fold) for the SM. This difference could explain the greater growth rate and faster leaf turnover rate of the SM compared with the LM. The occurrence of the SM in newly settled areas (and in the meadow edges) could be explained on the basis of its higher growth rate, which would allow a faster spreading of the meadow and/or better recovery after burial resulting from stormy weathers.

  10. Palynologic and geomorphic evidence for environmental change during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition at Point Reyes Peninsula, central coastal California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rypins, Steven; Reneau, Steven L.; Byrne, Roger; Montgomery, David R.

    1989-07-01

    Three sites on the Point Reyes Peninsula, California, provide evidence of major environmental change during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. A 12,300-yr-long pollen record from Coast Trail Pond reveals a change from closed canopy Pseudotsuga-Abies forest to coastal scrub and grassland about 10,000 yr B.P. The same change is also evident in pollen records from two sea cliff exposures that contain a series of buried soils interstratified with fluvial and debris-flow deposits. Eight radiocarbon dates from these exposures indicate that aggradation at both sites began ca. 12,000 yr B.P. and that the change from forest to scrub and grassland occurred between 10,300 and 9400 yr B.P. High percentages of alder pollen and bracken fern spores reflect repeated geomorphic disturbance at ca. 10,400 yr B.P. The occurrence of major aggradation accompanied by recurrent debris flows between ca. 12,000 and 10,000 yr B.P. suggests that this was a period of more frequent high-intensity storms.

  11. Geospatial variability of soil CO2-C exchange in the main terrestrial ecosystems of Keller Peninsula, Maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Thomazini, A; Francelino, M R; Pereira, A B; Schünemann, A L; Mendonça, E S; Almeida, P H A; Schaefer, C E G R

    2016-08-15

    Soils and vegetation play an important role in the carbon exchange in Maritime Antarctica but little is known on the spatial variability of carbon processes in Antarctic terrestrial environments. The objective of the current study was to investigate (i) the soil development and (ii) spatial variability of ecosystem respiration (ER), net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), gross primary production (GPP), soil temperature (ST) and soil moisture (SM) under four distinct vegetation types and a bare soil in Keller Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica, as follows: site 1: moss-turf community; site 2: moss-carpet community; site 3: phanerogamic antarctic community; site 4: moss-carpet community (predominantly colonized by Sanionia uncinata); site 5: bare soil. Soils were sampled at different layers. A regular 40-point (5×8 m) grid, with a minimum separation distance of 1m, was installed at each site to quantify the spatial variability of carbon exchange, soil moisture and temperature. Vegetation characteristics showed closer relation with soil development across the studied sites. ER reached 2.26μmolCO2m(-2)s(-1) in site 3, where ST was higher (7.53°C). A greater sink effect was revealed in site 4 (net uptake of 1.54μmolCO2m(-2)s(-1)) associated with higher SM (0.32m(3)m(-3)). Spherical models were fitted to describe all experimental semivariograms. Results indicate that ST and SM are directly related to the spatial variability of CO2 exchange. Heterogeneous vegetation patches showed smaller range values. Overall, poorly drained terrestrial ecosystems act as CO2 sink. Conversely, where ER is more pronounced, they are associated with intense soil carbon mineralization. The formations of new ice-free areas, depending on the local soil drainage condition, have an important effect on CO2 exchange. With increasing ice/snow melting, and resulting widespread waterlogging, increasing CO2 sink in terrestrial ecosystems is expected for Maritime Antarctica. PMID:27110991

  12. Forearc tectonic evolution of the South Shetland Margin, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, A.; Larter, R. D.; Aldaya, F.

    1994-12-01

    The main provinces of the South Shetland margin, Antarctic Peninsula characterized on the basis of multichannel seismic, long-range side scan sonar and swath bathymetry data, include from northwest to southeast (1) the oceanic crust of the former Phoenix Plate, flexed down toward the margin and affected by normal faulting in the upper crust; (2) a narrow trench, with a horizontally layered sediment fill which onlaps the thin sedimentary cover on the oceanic crust and shows incipient deformation near its landward edge; (3) an accretionary prism with a complex internal structure, the toe of which is overthrust above the youngest trench deposits; (4) a midslope forearc basin, with an asymmetric synformal structure; and (5) the continental shelf, which includes two distinct tectonic provinces. Calculations of the late Cenozoic convergence history at the trench indicate a rapid decrease in convergence rate after 6.7 Ma from about 60 mm/yr, resulting from the slowing and eventual cessation of spreading on the Antarctic-Phoenix ridge. Once spreading had completely ceased (3.5-2.4 Ma), the convergence rate at the trench equalled the rate of extension in Bransfield Strait, which was probably less than 10 mm/yr at first but may have increased since 1.3 Ma, and this, in turn, would imply a corresponding increase in convergence rate. Above the basal detachment the toe of the accretionary prism is composed of a stack of thrust fault bounded wedges, laterally and vertically segmented by normal faults. Most of the trench fill sediments are overthrust by the toe of the accretionary prism and subducted beneath it for as far as they can be traced on the seismic profiles. This suggests that there may be tectonic erosion of the forearc since a large part of the trench sediment appears to be derived from erosion on the forearc slope. The forearc basin records a long history of subsidence, during which the depocenter migrated landward, paralleling retrogradational erosion of the distal

  13. Genesis of a zoned granite stock, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Travis

    1977-01-01

    A composite epizonal stock of biotite granite has intruded a diverse assemblage of metamorphic rocks in the Serpentine Hot Springs area of north-central Seward Peninsula, Alaska. The metamorphic rocks include amphibolite-facies orthogneiss and paragneiss, greenschist-facies fine-grained siliceous and graphitic metasediments, and a variety of carbonate rocks. Lithologic units within the metamorphic terrane trend generally north-northeast and dip moderately toward the southeast. Thrust faults locally juxtapose lithologic units in the metamorphic assemblage, and normal faults displace both the metamorphic rocks and some parts of the granite stock. The gneisses and graphitic metasediments are believed to be late Precambrian in age, but the carbonate rocks are in part Paleozoic. Dating by the potassium-argon method indicates that the granite stock is Late Cretaceous. The stock has sharp discordant contacts, beyond which is a well-developed thermal aureole with rocks of hornblende hornfels facies. The average mode of the granite is 29 percent plagioclase, 31 percent quartz, 36 percent K-feldspar, and 4 percent biotite. Accessory minerals include apatite, magnetite, sphene, allanite, and zircon. Late-stage or deuteric minerals include muscovite, fluorite, tourmaline, quartz, and albite. The stock is a zoned complex containing rocks with several textural facies that are present in four partly concentric zones. Zone 1 is a discontinuous border unit, containing fine- to coarse-grained biotite granite, that grades inward into zone 2. Zone 2 consists of porphyritic biotite granite with oriented phenocrysts of pinkish-gray microcline in a coarse-grained equigranular groundmass of plagioclase, quartz, and biotite. It is in sharp, concordant to discordant contact with rocks of zone 3. Zone 3 consists of seriate-textured biotite granite that has been intruded by bodies of porphyritic biotite granite containing phenocrysts of plagioclase, K-feldspar, quartz, and biotite in an

  14. Perspective View, Landsat Overlay, Salalah, Oman, Southern Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view includes the city of Salalah, the second largest city in Oman. The city is located on the broad, generally bright coastal plain and includes areas of green irrigated crops. This view was generated from a Landsat image draped over a preliminary elevation model produced by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The edges of the dataset are to the upper right, left, and lower left. The Arabian Sea (lower right) is represented by the blue false-colored area. Vertical exaggeration of topography is 3X.

    This scene illustrates how topography determines local climate and, in turn, where people live. The Arabian Peninsula is very arid. However, the steep escarpment of the Qara Mountains wrings moisture from the summer monsoons allowing for growth of natural vegetation (green along the mountain fronts and in the canyons), and soil development (dark brown areas), as well as cultural development of the coastal plain. The monsoons also provide moisture for Frankincense trees growing on the desert (north) side of the mountains. In ancient times, incense derived from the sap of the Frankincense tree was the basis for an extremely lucrative trade.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot)spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center,Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was

  15. Effects of precipitation regime and soil nitrogen on leaf traits in seasonally dry tropical forests of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Roa-Fuentes, Lilia L; Templer, Pamela H; Campo, Julio

    2015-10-01

    Leaf traits are closely associated with nutrient use by plants and can be utilized as a proxy for nutrient cycling processes. However, open questions remain, in particular regarding the variability of leaf traits within and across seasonally dry tropical forests. To address this, we considered six leaf traits (specific area, thickness, dry matter content, N content, P content and natural abundance (15)N) of four co-occurring tree species (two that are not associated with N2-fixing bacteria and two that are associated with N2-fixing bacteria) and net N mineralization rates and inorganic N concentrations along a precipitation gradient (537-1036 mm per year) in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Specifically we sought to test the hypothesis that leaf traits of dominant plant species shift along a precipitation gradient, but are affected by soil N cycling. Although variation among different species within each site explains some leaf trait variation, there is also a high level of variability across sites, suggesting that factors other than precipitation regime more strongly influence leaf traits. Principal component analyses indicated that across sites and tree species, covariation in leaf traits is an indicator of soil N availability. Patterns of natural abundance (15)N in foliage and foliage minus soil suggest that variation in precipitation regime drives a shift in plant N acquisition and the openness of the N cycle. Overall, our study shows that both plant species and site are important determinants of leaf traits, and that the leaf trait spectrum is correlated with soil N cycling. PMID:26013874

  16. Three Storm Surge Events during Late Holocene in Shelly Gravel Sediments of the most Southern Coast of Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong Yoon

    2015-04-01

    Super Typhoon Haiyan which occurred in November, 2013 left as many as 5,200 people dead and destroyed towns across the Philippines. However, because of rapid climate change, we cannot disregard such a super typhoon strike probability in Korean Peninsula. If we can detect the frequency and periodicity of paleo-geohazards recorded in sediments, the extreme geohazards can be predicted and its damage can be somewhat mitigated. The geology, geochemistry and mineralogy of the island sediments ahead of Yeongjeon coast, Haenam-gun, the most southern part, Korean peninsula were investigated. Shells from the three shelly gravel layers were used for 14C age dating and cube samples were collected at 5-10cm intervals for measuring the magnetic susceptibility, grain size distribution and geochemical analyses at the study site. Granitic gneiss clasts of debris flow mixed with the weathered tuffaceous materials on the eroded face of tuff rock. The sediments of Pleistocene were also eroded almost horizontally and unconformably covered by late Holocene shelly gravel deposits characterized by some kind of shells and unsorted sub-rounded or rounded gravels to pebbles. The horizontal erosion face is 2.2m in elevation and the current erosion face of beach was observed at 1.2m in elevation. This indicates that the former erosion face would have been formed at higher sea level than those of latter one by the similar mechanism of current erosion in the study site. Three shelly gravel layers overlie the erosion face from 2.2m to 2.9m in elevation. The reflected water energy caused by stronger storm would have been needed for delivering gravels and cobbles to the erosion face. Three shell layers dated as 3200 yr BP, 1900 yr BP, and 1700 yr BP, respectively. Four sedimentary units, from unit 1 to 4 in ascending order, are distinguished on the basis of sedimentary textures, shell contents, grain size distribution and vertical color variations. The sand ratios in the grain size distribution

  17. 76 FR 6117 - Kenai Peninsula-Anchorage Borough Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ...The Kenai Peninsula-Anchorage Borough Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Portage Valley, Alaska. The committee is meeting as authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self- Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the meeting is to review and recommend proposed...

  18. Hydrogeochemistry of sulfate-affected landscapes in Keller Peninsula, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, José João L. L.; Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto G. R.; Abrahão, Walter Antônio P.; de Mello, Jaime Wilson V.; Simas, Felipe N. B.; da Silva, Juscimar; Francelino, Márcio R.

    2012-06-01

    Keller Peninsula, located in King George Island, has a typical Maritime Antarctica climatic regime, with higher temperatures and rainfall than other areas in Continental Antarctica. The main outcropping rocks are pyritized andesites, volcaniclastics and basalts. Recent pedological investigation indicated that the presence of sulfides in Keller Peninsula accelerates the weathering process. The aim of this work was the determination of the geochemical background in water channels following geomorphological gradients in Keller Peninsula, Maritime Antarctica. We delimited and mapped all catchments in Keller Peninsula using GIS techniques and field observations. Water samples were analyzed for twenty-nine elements by ICP-OES and IEC, after the proper treatments. Eight catchments were identified as sulfide-affected, although water pH was nearly neutral. The ionic concentration in solution was high, both in non-affected and sulfide-affected catchments, with a trend of greater values in the latter, and changing downslope. Concentration values are above the range of other hydrogeochemical studies from elsewhere in Antarctica. The values of molar ratio HCO3-:(Ca + Mg)2 + and Na+:Cl- indicated the absence of carbonate-bearing rocks. Local precipitation of evaporites, as gypsum and epsomite was confirmed by the Ca2 +:SO42 - and Mg2 +:SO42 - molar ratios. The high ionic concentration in sulfide-affected areas illustrates the role of sulfate soil formation in this part of Antarctica.

  19. Estimation of Water Availability Considering Climate Change in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, S.; Lee, D. K.; Hanasaki, N.

    2015-12-01

    The hydrological cycle is directly affected by climate and human intervention. Climate change is expected to affect hydrology and water resources. In Korean Peninsula, the rainfall pattern is seasonally concentrated, causing temporal and spatial variations in water availability. Many previous studies have investigated that the Korean Peninsula region is vulnerable to changes in water availability with changing climate, but a majority of the studies have focused on natural river discharge. However, the present-day hydrological cycle is not natural, but is affected by human activity, such as the water demands of agriculture, the industrial and domestic sector, and reservoir operations. In this study, water availability considering the impacts of human activity and climate change in the Korean Peninsula region is assessed in terms of water supply and demand. To assess present and future water availability, the integrated water resources model H08, which has six sub-modules to address land surfaces, river routing, crop growth, environmental flow requirements, and anthropogenic water withdrawal (Hanasaki et al., 2008), was applied to simulate historical and future hydrological processes based on climate scenarios. The model was calibrated and validated based on observed river discharge data. The simulation results show the temporal and spatial variations of water availability in the Korean Peninsula region. Results of this research could be used for spatial planning, taking into account the water availability.

  20. Spectral distribution of gravity wave momentum fluxes over the Antarctic Peninsula from Concordiasi superpressure balloon data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterscheid, R. L.; Gelinas, L. J.; Mechoso, C. R.; Schubert, G.

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves generated by flow over the steep topography of the Antarctic Peninsula transport significant amounts of zonal and meridional momentum into the stratosphere. Quantitative determination of this transport has been carried out for wave periods of 1 h or greater using data from a previous Antarctic superpressure balloon campaign in austral spring 2005 (VORCORE). The present study uses data from the later Concordiasi campaign (2010) to extend the momentum flux determination to shorter periods. Maps of the vertical fluxes of meridional and zonal momentum are presented for periods down to 12 min. We find that the momentum fluxes for periods below 1 h are comparable to those at longer periods, despite larger variances at longer periods. The momentum fluxes in the vicinity of the peninsula provide a significant zonal acceleration of the lower stratosphere, confirming a conclusion from the VORCORE data. The geographical distribution of fluxes around the peninsula has peaks both leeward and windward of the main terrain features. Numerical simulations suggest that the separate peaks may be related to wave transience caused by unsteady winds over the peninsula. Momentum fluxes comprise a main distribution maximizing at moderate flux values and a secondary distribution maximizing at high values exhibiting a high degree of intermittency. The high flux events account for the largest part of the average flux and suggest that drag parameterizations should take them into account. It is found that waves generated by the jet stream are also a significant source of momentum flux.

  1. Population genetic structure of endangered Mongolian racerunner (Eremias argus) from the Korean Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Park, Han-Chan; Suk, Ho Young; Jeong, Eu-Jin; Park, Dae-Sik; Lee, Hang; Min, Mi-Sook

    2014-11-01

    The Mongolian racerunner (Eremias argus) is a small lacertid lizard species, and its distribution range encompasses the Korean Peninsula, Mongolia, China and Russia. Eremias argus is widespread, but populations on the Korean Peninsula are small and declining, provoking concerns that genetic diversity is being lost. This species is currently listed under the Protection of Wild Fauna and Flora Act in South Korea. In this study, nine novel microsatellites for E. argus were developed with a biotin-enrichment method and used to understand its population genetic structure and delineate conservation units on the Korean Peninsula. Overall, low intrapopulation genetic diversity was observed (mean number of alleles per locus = 2.463; mean H E = 0.398) from 10 populations investigated (n = 110). Two populations (among five with n≥ 10) showed an excess of heterozygosity expected under HWE relative to that expected at mutation-drift equilibrium, indicating severe reduction in population sizes. With only a few exceptions, the overall genetic differentiation among populations was substantial with the high levels of pairwise-F ST (0.006-0.746) and -R ST (0.034-0.940) values. The results of Bayesian STRUCTURE analysis showed that E. argus populations on the Korean Peninsula were most likely partitioned into three genetic clusters. Taken all together, such low levels of gene flow and strong genetic structuring have critical implications for the conservation of this endangered species and its management. PMID:25086619

  2. First records of Cotylea (Polycladida, Platyhelminthes) for the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Noreña, Carolina; Marquina, Daniel; Perez, Jacinto; Almon, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    A study of polyclad fauna of the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula was carried out from 2010 to 2013. The paper reports nine new records belonging to three Cotylean families: the family Euryleptidae Lang, 1884, Pseudocerotidae Lang, 1884 and the family Prosthiostomidae Lang, 1884, and describes one new species, Euryleptodes galikias sp. n. PMID:24843268

  3. First records of Cotylea (Polycladida, Platyhelminthes) for the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Noreña, Carolina; Marquina, Daniel; Perez, Jacinto; Almon, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A study of polyclad fauna of the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula was carried out from 2010 to 2013. The paper reports nine new records belonging to three Cotylean families: the family Euryleptidae Lang, 1884, Pseudocerotidae Lang, 1884 and the family Prosthiostomidae Lang, 1884, and describes one new species, Euryleptodes galikias sp. n. PMID:24843268

  4. Late holocene fluctuations in the front of the Muller Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Domack, E.W. ); Stein, A.B. )

    1993-01-01

    Ice shelves are important environmental indicators along the antarctic Peninsula. This study investigates the fluctuation of the Muller Ice Shelf by collecting and analysing surface sediment samples, piston cores, and kasten cores close to the present calving line. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Northern highbush and half-high blueberries on the Alaskan Kenai peninsula:preliminary observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Home and commercial cultivation of small fruits is popular in Alaska and blueberries of several species, such as V. corymbosum and V. angustifolium, have potential as cultivated crops for local production. In June 2009, we established blueberry plantings in two locations on the Kenai Peninsula, appr...

  6. Typical Infrasonic Daily Changes Associated with Weather Conditions in Southern Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    The dominant source of infrasonic waves in Korean peninsula is associated with weather changes around 0.1 to several hertz. The microbarom are mainly observed with KMA(Korea Meteorological Administration) infrasound station and other activity associated with typhoon in summer. The period of observation was processed during year of 2012. The KMA running two permanent infrasound stations at the middle of Korean peninsula which located DeMilitarized Zone from the 2011. For the special event that recorded from the Northern Korean Peninsula was missle launch 12-Dec 2012 which was clearly recorded. The Korean peninsula is located on Northern Hemisphere that induce the typhoon visit in summer rainy season, so main infrasonic activity was associated this weather changes concentrated general weather activity frequency area. We focused on seasonal changes induced by weather activities and processed infrasonic data related with typhoon report by KMA's weather report. The progressing results was reviewed for the infrasonic noise level changes which associated with typhoon and missle launch record on Dec-2012 for the special event.

  7. Bioenergy crops grown for hyperaccumulation of phosphorus in the delmarva peninsula and their biofuels potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbaceous bioenergy crops, including sorghum, switchgrass, and miscanthus, were evaluated for their potential as phytoremedators for the uptake of phosphorus in the Delmarva Peninsula and their subsequent conversion to biofuel intermediates (bio-oil) by fast pyrolysis using pyrolysis-gas chromatogr...

  8. Suez Canal, Gulf of Suez, Sinai Peninsula, Egypt, as seen from the Apollo 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Suez Canal, Gulf of Suez, Sinai Peninsula, United Arab Republic (Egypt), Mediterranean Sea, as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft during its 13th revolution of the earth. Photographed from an altitude of 126 nautical miles, at ground elapsed time of 19 hours and 42 minutes.

  9. The gastropod Phorcus sauciatus (Koch, 1845) along the north-west Iberian Peninsula: filling historical gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubal, Marcos; Veiga, Puri; Moreira, Juan; Sousa-Pinto, Isabel

    2014-03-01

    The intertidal gastropod Phorcus sauciatus is a subtropical grazer that reaches its northern boundary in the Iberian Peninsula. Distribution of P. sauciatus along the Iberian Peninsula shows, however, gaps in its distribution. The present study was aimed at detecting possible recent changes on the population structure and distribution of P. sauciatus along the north-west Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula. To achieve this aim, we adopted a qualitative sampling design to explore the presence of P. sauciatus along a region within its historical gap of distribution (north Portuguese coast). In addition, a quantitative sampling design was adopted to test hypotheses about the abundance and size structure of P. sauciatus populations among regions with different historical records of its abundance and among shores with different exposure. Results showed that P. sauciatus was present along the north Portuguese coast. However, the abundance and size structure of the newly settled populations were significantly different to those of the historically recorded populations. Moreover, P. sauciatus was able to establish populations at sheltered shores. Considering these results, we propose models for the distribution of P. sauciatus along the Iberian Peninsula, based on effects of sea surface temperature, and to explain the size-frequency of their populations based on their density.

  10. Genesis of peat-bog soils in the northern taiga spruce forests of the Kola Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of soil formation processes in the Peat-Bog soils of waterlogged spruce phytocenoses on the Kola Peninsula are investigated. It is found that the ash composition of the peat layer is determined primarily by the composition of the buried plant residues. The effect of the chemical composition of water feeding the peat bogs is determined. (Refs. 7).

  11. Acremonium camtosporum isolated as an endophyte of Bursera simaruba from Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bursera simaruba (Burseraceae) is a frequent and co-dominant tree of tropical sub-caducifolious forest in the Yucatan Peninsula. This species is important ecologically because it can grow in poor, clay or sandy, saline soils. The Mayan communities use this plant medicinally for its analgesic, antimy...

  12. Cretaceous deposits and flora of the Muravyov-Amurskii Peninsula (Amur Bay, sea of Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volynets, E. B.

    2015-05-01

    The Cretaceous sections and plant macrofossils are investigated in detail near Vladivostok on the Muravyov-Amurskii Peninsula of southern Primorye. It is established that the Ussuri and Lipovtsy formations in the reference section of the Markovskii Peninsula rest with unconformity upon Upper Triassic strata. The continuous Cretaceous succession is revealed in the Peschanka River area of the northern Muravyov-Amurskii Peninsula, where plant remains were first sampled from the lower and upper parts of the Korkino Group, which are determined to be the late Albian-late Cenmanian in age. The taxonomic composition of floral assemblages from the Ussuri, Lipovtsy, and Galenki formations is widened owing to additional finds of plant remains. The Korkino Group received floral characteristics for the first time. The Cretaceous flora of the peninsula is represented by 126 taxa. It is established that ferns and conifers are dominant elements of the Ussuri floral assemblage, while the Lipovtsy Assemblage is dominated by ferns, conifers, and cycadphytes. In addition, the latter assemblage is characterized by the highest taxonomic diversity. The Galenki Assemblage is marked by the first appearance of rare flowering plants against the background of dominant ferns and conifers. The Korkino floral assemblage is subdivided into two subassemblages dominated by different groups: conifers in the early and flowering plants in the late.

  13. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in lichen and moss samples from the Antarctic Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Bacci, E.; Calamari, D.; Gaggi, C.; Fanelli, R.; Focardi, S.; Morosini, M.

    1986-01-01

    The concentrations of some chlorinated hydrocarbon residues (HCB, HCH isomers, p,p'DDT and DDE, PCB cogeners) in lichen and moss samples from the Antarctic Peninsula are reported and compared with available data from other parts of the world. The use of these materials as indicators of tropospheric contamination levels in Antarctica is discussed.

  14. Modeling ice dynamic contributions to sea level rise from the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schannwell, C.; Barrand, N. E.; Radić, V.

    2015-11-01

    The future ice dynamical contribution to sea level rise (SLR) from 199 ice shelf nourishing drainage basins of the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet is simulated, using the British Antarctic Survey Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet Model. Simulations of the grounded ice sheet include response to ice shelf collapse, estimated by tracking thermal ice shelf viability limits in 14 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change global climate models ensemble temperature projections. Grounding line retreat in response to ice shelf collapse is parameterized with a new multivariate linear regression model utilizing a range of glaciological and geometric predictor variables. Multimodel means project SLR up to 9.4 mm sea level equivalent (SLE) by 2200, and up to 19 mm SLE by 2300. Rates of SLR from individual drainage basins throughout the peninsula are similar to 2100, yet diverge between 2100 and 2300 due to individual basin characteristics. Major contributors to SLR are the outlet glaciers feeding southern George VI Ice Shelf, accounting for >75% of total SLR in some model runs. Ice sheet thinning induced by ice-shelf removal is large (up to ˜500 m), especially in Palmer Land in the southern Antarctic Peninsula, and may propagate as far as 135 km inland. These results emphasize the importance of the ice dynamical contribution to future sea level of the APIS on decadal to centennial timescales.

  15. INFLUENCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL TEMPERATURE ON SEX-RATIOS IN THE TIDEWATER SILVERSIDE, 'MENIDIA PENINSULAE' (PISCES: ATHERINIDAE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sex-ratios of Menidia peninsulae from Santa Rosa Island, Florida were studied during a 13 month survey. Weekly samples revealed significant deviations from the expected sex-ratio of 1:1. During May-October, young-of-the-year (YOY) females comprised 70 to 94% of the individual...

  16. Peninsula College--P.C.F.A. Agreement, 1989-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peninsula Coll., Port Angeles, WA.

    The collective bargaining agreement between Peninsula College, the Penninsula College Faculty Association, and the Board of Trustees of Community College District Number 1 is presented. This contract, covering the period from 1989 through 1992, deals with the following topics: bargaining agent recognition; compliance and conformity to law;…

  17. REPRODUCTIVE ECOLOGY OF THE TIDEWATER SILVERSIDE, 'MENIDIA PENINSULAE' (PISCES: ATHERINIDAE) FROM SANTA ROSA ISLAND, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reproductive ecology of the tidewater silverside, Menidia peninsulae, was studied during February 1982 through February 1983 along the shoreline of Santa Rosa Island, Florida. Adult Menidia were observed at low tide spawning on a red alga, Ceramium byssoideum, which was growi...

  18. Large warming trends associated with blocked winds over the Antarctic Peninsula and changes in zonal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, A.; Hunt, J.; Light, M.; Cresswell, D.

    2003-04-01

    Analysis of surface temperature (ST) anomalies of the Antarctic for the period 1982-1998 has shown that the largest warming trend in the world occurs on the western coast of the Antarctic Peninsula (by approximately 1.0{o}C over the past 20 years). This is associated with related warming of the peripheral seas and decrease of the sea-ice extent (Kwok and Comiso, 2002). This can be studied by considering how zonal winds interact with the mountains (2km high) of the peninsula. Since westerly winds are turned southwards through Coriolis forces, warmer air over the southern ocean is transported to the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula. On its eastern side (warming of approximately 0.5{o}C over the past 20 years), strong southerly katabatic winds overcome the weak northerly synoptically driven flows and flow along the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula. However for easterly winds passing over the Weddell Sea, Coriolis forces cause winds which add to the cold katabatic southerly winds from the Antarctic plateau. Both these types of wind cool the east and west sides of the peninsula. Therefore the observed increase in the frequency of westerly winds should cause a net warming, particularly on the western side, as recent synoptic data from the NCEP/ECMWF reanalysis project has shown for the past 20 years (Kwok and Comiso, 2002). This concept has been tested using detailed modelling of the stably stratified atmospheric flows over the peninsula. The idealised 2-layer model of Hunt et al. (2002) for typical mesoscale atmospheric flows with sharp variations in surface roughness and mountainous elevation verifies the above flow behaviour for easterly and westerly winds perpendicular to a `cape' such as the Antarctic Peninsula. Numerical modelling using the UK Met Office Unified Model (UM) at 12km resolution showed a flow response which agrees with observational weather station data on the eastern side. But it is less satisfactory on the western side where the

  19. Assessment of Darkling Beetle Fauna after Implementation of an Environmental Restoration Program in the Southern Iberian Peninsula Affected by the Aznalcóllar Toxic Spill

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Ana M.; Bujalance, José L.; Hidalgo, Juan M.

    2011-01-01

    This study is part of the Follow up Restoration Program of animal communities that colonize the Guadiamar River Basin. In 1998, the area was affected by a release of toxic sludge after the retention walls of the Aznalcóllar Mines (southern Iberian Peninsula) broke. The main objective of this study was to assess the current state of the population of Tenebrionidae, one of the most representative groups of edaphic Coleoptera inhabiting the Guadiamar River Basin. This paper analyses the progress made by the darkling beetle community six years after the disaster occurred and the Restoration Program was implemented. The study is based on faunistic data from systematic sampling carried out for six years to monitor plots distributed across the damaged area. To make an overall assessment of the tenebrionid fauna in relation to adjacent areas qualitative and quantitative ecological indices were applied, and temporal follow up and biogeographical comparisons were also made. The results indicate that, on the whole, tenebrionid fauna was somewhat affected by the Aznalcóllar Mine spill, and that a greater loss of fauna was detected closer to the accident site. The analysis of the temporal population dynamic suggests that the most affected zones are undergoing a process of re-colonization. However, this process varies widely by species and has not yet reached the expected levels of a non-affected river basin in the southern Iberian Peninsula. PMID:21864152

  20. Genetic differentiation of octopuses from different habitats near the Korean Peninsula and eastern China based on analysis of the mDNA cytochrome C oxidase 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Kang, J-H; Park, J-Y; Choi, T-J

    2012-01-01

    Distributed along the coastal waters of Korea and China, Octopus minor is found in various habitats, including the mud flats in the southern and western coasts of the Korean Peninsula and the rocky areas around Jeju Island; however, the genetic relationships among the different populations are unknown and have not been studied. We compared 630-nucleotide sequences of the CO1 gene from O. minor specimens collected from five regions around the Korean Peninsula and three regions from eastern China in order to determine population structure and genetic relationships. Based on the sequences at 12 polymorphic sites in this region, 11 haplotypes were identified from 85 specimens. Individuals from Jeju Island had unique haplotypes, including two haplotypes not found in the other populations. Nucleotide and haplotype diversity for all populations ranged from 0.03-0.37 and 0.20-0.64, respectively. Pairwise F(ST) values indicated significant genetic differences in populations from Korea and China. An UPGMA dendrogram showed separation of the eight populations into three clusters; one included only the Jeju population, another included the rest of the Korean populations and some from Dalian, China; a third cluster consisted of two other populations from China. We conclude that there are discrete genetic differences in O. minor from the different habitats, suggesting that the populations should be considered as management units in the ongoing recovery program. PMID:23212336

  1. Erosion rates and weathering history of rock surfaces associated with Aboriginal rock art engravings (petroglyphs) on Burrup Peninsula, Western Australia, from cosmogenic nuclide measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillans, Brad; Fifield, L. Keith

    2013-06-01

    The Burrup Peninsula and surrounding Dampier Archipelago, in Western Australia, contain the world's largest known gallery of rock art engravings (petroglyphs), estimated to number up to 1 million images. The peninsula is also the site of major industrial development and there are concerns that industrial emissions may adversely affect the stability and longevity of the rock art. We have studied the natural processes and rates of weathering and erosion, including the effects of fire, that affect the stability of rock surfaces and hence the longevity of the rock art, using cosmogenic nuclides. The concentration of 10Be in quartz yields erosion rates in the range 0.15-0.48 mm/1000 years on horizontal rock surfaces and 0.34-2.30 mm/1000 years on vertical rock faces. The former, largely caused by mm-scale surface flaking, are amongst the lowest erosion rates measured by cosmogenic nuclides anywhere in the world. The latter are inferred to represent a combination of mm-scale flaking and very rare centimetre- to metre-scale block falls, controlled by failure along joint planes. Such low erosion rates result from a combination of resistant rocks, low relief and low rainfall, favouring long-term preservation of the petroglyphs - long enough to encompass the known period of human settlement in Australia.

  2. Pan American Airways/Naval Air Transport Service/destroyer base site at the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pan American Airways/Naval Air Transport Service/destroyer base site at the east side showing walkway and building foundation. View facing west-northwest. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Pearl City Peninsula, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Homogenization dynamics and introduction routes of invasive freshwater fish in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Clavero, Miguel; García-Berthou, Emili

    2006-12-01

    Nonnative invasive species are one of the main global threats to biodiversity. The understanding of the traits characterizing successful invaders and invasion-prone ecosystems is increasing, but our predictive ability is still limited. Quantitative information on biotic homogenization and particularly its temporal dynamics is even scarcer. We used freshwater fish distribution data in the Iberian Peninsula in four periods (before human intervention, 1991, 1995, and 2001) to assess the temporal dynamics of biotic homogenization among river basins. The percentage of introduced species among fish faunas has increased in recent times (from 41.8% in 1991 to 52.5% in 2001), leading to a clear increase in the similarity of community composition among basins. The mean Jaccard's index increase (a measure of biotic homogenization) from the pristine situation to the present (17.1%) was similar to that for Californian fish but higher than for other studies. However, biotic homogenization was found to be a temporally dynamic process, with finer temporal grain analyses detecting transient stages of biotic differentiation. Introduced species assemblages were spatially structured along a latitudinal gradient in the Iberian Peninsula, with species related to sport fishing being characteristic of northern basins. Although the comparison of fish distributions in the Iberian Peninsula and France showed significant and generalized biotic homogenization, nonnative assemblages of northeastern Iberian basins were more similar to those of France than to those of the rest of the Iberian Peninsula, indicating a main introduction route. Species introduced to the Iberian Peninsula tended to be mainly piscivores or widely introduced species that previously had been introduced to France. Our results indicate that the simultaneous analysis of the spatial distribution of introduced assemblages (excluding native species that reflect other biogeographical patterns) and their specific traits can be an

  4. Habitat Selection and Foraging Behavior of Southern Elephant Seals in the Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckstadt, L.; Costa, D. P.; McDonald, B. I.; Tremblay, Y.; Crocker, D. E.; Goebel, M. E.; Fedak, M. E.

    2006-12-01

    We examined the foraging behavior of 18 southern elephant seals foraging over two seasons in the Western Antarctic Peninsula. The foraging behavior and habitat utilization of 7 females in 2005 and 12 in 2006 were followed using satellite linked Satellite Relay Data Loggers that measured diving behavior as well collected salinity and temperature profiles as the animals dove. Animals were tagged after the annual molt during February at Cape Shirreff Livngston Island, South Shetland Islands. There was significant interannual variation in the regions of the Southern Ocean used by seals from Livingston Island. In 2005 of the 7 animals tagged one foraged 4700 km due west of the Antarctic Peninsula going as far as 150 W. The remaining females headed south along the Western Antarctic Peninsula bypassing Marguerite Bay moving south along Alexander Island. Three of these animals continued to forage in the pack ice as it developed. On their return trip all females swam past Livingston Island, continuing on to South Georgia Island where they apparently bred in the austral spring. One animal returned to Cape Shirreff to molt and her tag was recovered. During 2006 animals initially followed a similar migratory pattern going south along the Antarctic Peninsula, but unlike 2005 where the majority of the animals remained in the immediate vicinity of the Western Antarctic Peninsula, most of the animals in 2006 moved well to the west foraging as far as the Amundsen Sea. We compared the area restricted search (focal foraging areas) areas of these animals using a newly developed fractal landscape technique that identifies and quantifies areas of intensive search. The fractal analysis of area restricted search shows that the area, distance and coverage (Fractal D) searched were not different between years, while the time spent in the search areas was higher in 2005. Further analysis will examine how the physical properties of the water column as determined from the CTD data derived from

  5. Radioecologycal study of {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula: Determination of {sup 239/240}Pu in marine sediment and seawater as part of baseline data collecting for sitting of candidates of first Indonesia NPP

    SciTech Connect

    Suseno, Heny; Wisnubroto, Djarot S.

    2014-03-24

    Radioisotope Pu-239/240 are alpha emitting nuclides important indicators of radioactive contamination of the marine environment. Global fallout is the main source of plutonium in the marine environment. There are very limited study on {sup 239/240}Pu in Indonesia coastal environments. The data of this radioisotopes is needed for baseline data of nuclear power plant (NPP) site candidates both in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. Bottom sediments play an important role in radioecological studies of the marine environment because a large proportion of radioactive substances entering the sea is adsorbed over time onto suspended particulate matter and deposited in sediments. Plutonium is particle reactive and deposited in marine sediment. Radioisotope {sup 239/240}Pu was determinated by alpha spectrometry after radiochemical procedure that was performed in both water and marine sediment from Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. The sediment baseline of concentration {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula were range from 0.013 to 0.021 Bq.kg{sup −1} and 0.018 to 0.024 Bq.kg{sup −1} respectively. The water baseline concentration this isotope were range from 2.73 to 4.05 mBq.m{sup −3} and 2.98 to 4.50 mBq.m{sup −3}.

  6. Landscape-scale habitat selection by fishers translocated to the Olympic Peninsula of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, Jeffrey C.; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Happe, Patricia J.; Manson, David J.; McCalmon, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The fisher was extirpated from much of the Pacific Northwestern United States during the mid- to late-1900s and is now proposed for federal listing as a threatened species in all or part of its west coast range. Following the translocation of 90 fishers from central British Columbia, Canada, to the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State from 2008 to 2010, we investigated the landscape-scale habitat selection of reintroduced fishers across a broad range of forest ages and disturbance histories, providing the first information on habitat relationships of newly reintroduced fishers in coastal coniferous forests in the Pacific Northwest. We developed 17 a priori models to evaluate several habitat-selection hypotheses based on premises of habitat models used to forecast habitat suitability for the reintroduced population. Further, we hypothesized that female fishers, because of their smaller body size than males, greater vulnerability to predation, and specific reproductive requirements, would be more selective than males for mid- to late-seral forest communities, where complex forest structural elements provide secure foraging, resting, and denning sites. We assessed 11 forest structure and landscape characteristics within the home range core-areas used by 19 females and 12 males and within randomly placed pseudo core areas that represented available habitats. We used case-controlled logistic regression to compare the characteristics of used and pseudo core areas and to assess selection by male and female fishers. Females were more selective of core area placement than males. Fifteen of 19 females (79%) and 5 of 12 males (42%) selected core areas within federal lands that encompassed primarily forests with an overstory of mid-sized or large trees. Male fishers exhibited only weak selection for core areas dominated by forests with an overstory of small trees, primarily on land managed for timber production or at high elevations. The amount of natural open area best

  7. Developmental History of an Intriguing Peat-Forming Community Along the West Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, J.; Yu, Z.; Beilman, D.; Kaiser, K.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost peatbanks along the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) have become valuable high-resolution archives for late-Holocene climatic conditions recently. We recently observed and studied a few water-saturated peatlands that had formed in rocky depressions near Vernadsky Station and in mainland Antarctica (~ 65°S, 64°W). Remarkably, we seem to be the very first ones to analyze these systems for environmental reconstructions. The similarity between these peatlands and fens from the lower latitudes is striking, and the rarity of these systems along the WAP is intriguing. We present a high-resolution, multi-proxy record of ecosystem development and paleoenvironmental conditions for Rasmussen peatland. The ecosystem is ~100 m2 in size and is characterized by a shallow water table depth at 7 cm below the surface. Surface vegetation is dominated by Calliergon spp., a wet-adapted moss found along the WAP. The studied moss deposit is 50 cm thick and has a high organic matter content (> 90% dry weight). Plant macrofossil analysis reveals that the peatland was initially a wet Sanionia spp. carpet and that a sharp transition to Calliergon spp. occurred about half way through the deposit. A distinct layer of highly decomposed organic matter was observed from 32 to 40 cm and could indicate a period of slowed peat formation, potentially due to dry conditions (enhanced peat decay) or perennial snow cover (limited plant growth). Biochemical decomposition indicators such as carbohydrate yields, acid:aldehyde ratios of lignin phenols, and hydroxyproline yields are being determined to better understand the extent of peat decay that has occurred at this site throughout its development, particularly to further address the nature of the observed stratigraphic changes. Preliminary results indicate that carbohydrate yields of the bottom half of the core are about 1/3 smaller than those of the top half, indicating substantial carbon loss due to decomposition. Overall, these peatlands

  8. Deposition, Diagenetic, or Bacterial Origin of Magnetite in Sediment Drifts From the Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulgar, S. E.; Brachfeld, S.; Ishman, S.; Ferré, E. C.

    2007-05-01

    A 607 meter sediment core from the western Antarctic Peninsula was collected during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 178 at Site 1096. An abrupt shift, first recognized during the construction of the geomagnetic reversal stratigraphy, is observed in the magnetic mineral assemblage in core 1096A at 18 meters below seafloor (mbsf). This magnetic shift led us to question the fidelity of the geomagnetic reversal record. We evaluated the magnetic mineral assemblage using rock magnetic and electron microscopy techniques. Magnetic susceptibility showed variable concentration of magnetic material with depth, but not an abrupt change in concentration at 18 mbsf. Hysteresis data reveal a grain size shift at 18 mbsf. Magnetic particle size measurements show that with increasing depth the magnetic grain size increases. One possible explanation for the grain size shift is the presence of bacterial magnetite above 18 mbsf. However, TEM analysis did not conclusively prove the presence of magnetosomes. TEM images show grains in the 20-60 nm size range, but these grains were not in chains and they do not have the typical morphologies associated with bacterial magnetite. It is possible that these ultra fine grains are authigenic. Dissolution of these ultra fine magnetic particles could cause the grain size shift, with the smaller grains dissolving below18 mbsf. Temperature dependent FORC analyses are in progress to further characterize the particle size distribution above and below 18 mbsf. Curie temperature analyses indicate that magnetite is present above and below 18 mbsf. A magnetic iron sulfide with a Curie temperature of 350° C is present above 18 mbsf. X-ray microanalysis results agree with Curie temperature analyses, and show the presence of both Ti-poor iron oxides and iron sulfides in the magnetic extract. The presence of magnetic iron sulfides above 18 mbsf suggests iron-sulfur diagenesis is occurring with pyrrhotite preserved above 18 mbsf, and non-magnetic pyrite

  9. Marine Isotope Stage 5 Climate Variability in the Central Balkan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, I.; Burns, S.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, L.; McCoy, W.; Markovic, S.; Endlicher, W.

    2012-04-01

    In this study we present results from two speleothems collected from Vernjikica Cave, situated in the central part of the Balkan Peninsula, at the fringes of the Carpathians and Balkan Mountains. The preliminary age models were determined by U-Th dating techniques that at present comprise 9 dates in stratigraphic order. The samples grew from approximately 63-113 ka BP and from 115-121 ka BP, spanning much of MIS stage 5 and the transition into MIS 4. Samples for δ18O values were micromilled from each stalagmite along the growth axis. Oxygen isotopic values of the younger sample, stalagmite V4-2, range from -9.9‰ to -6.3‰, while carbon isotopic values show an opposing general trend ranging from -8.8‰ to -3.0‰. Over the growth period, δ18O and δ13C values show frequent simultaneous and distinct high-amplitude shifts towards more positive values that coincide with pronounced accumulations of denser and darker laminae. The strongest enrichment of δ18O values is seen at approximately 107 ka and coincides with peaks of depleted oxygen values at Soreq cave, Israel, suggesting semiarid conditions at the study site at a time when sapropel layers formed in the Eastern Mediterranean. In regard to present isotopic compositions in rainfall in the study area, the V4-2 proxy record shows over its period of growth a change from more humid and warm to colder and drier environmental conditions. The distinct increases in stable isotopic ratios as seen at 107 ka reflect warm and dry intervals during which calcite precipitation is additionally affected by non-equilibrium conditions. The overall trend in isotopic data mirrors both global climatic signals as seen in δ18O variations from the NGRIP ice-core record, and regional climatic signals as seen in δ18O from speleothems from Soreq Cave or in aeolian dust records from the Vojvodina in North Serbia. However, a prominent characteristic of the Vernjikica samples is the substantial variability in isotopic values over the

  10. Geomorphological characteristics of Yedoma terrains in the northern part of Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephani, E.; Dillon, M.; Fortier, D.; Jorgenson, T.; Kanevskiy, M. Z.; Shur, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Yedoma (Ice Complex) is a Late Pleistocene periglacial formation of syngenetic permafrost with large ice wedges. These extremely ice-rich stratigraphic sequences have been widely observed and studied in northern Siberia. However, very few studies have focused on Yedoma terrain in Northern America. Occurrence of Yedoma landscape has a great significance for paleoenvironmental reconstructions because the regions where Yedoma can be observed remained unglaciated during the late Pleistocene. Understanding the dynamics of Yedoma landscape and the geotechnical properties of this permafrost unit is necessary for modeling the evolution of the periglacial landscape in the context of climate change. Degradation of Yedoma terrain triggers several geomorphological processes such as thaw settlement due to deepening of the active layer, development of thermokarst lakes, thermo-erosion gullies, and active layer detachment slides. Degradation of yedoma terrain also releases greenhouse gases (e.g. methane, CO2), water from melting ice, and various types of mineral and organic sediments which need to be accounted for in climate warming scenarios. Yedoma terrains in their contemporary state can be identified by the presence of typical geomorphological features such as erosional remnants with specific shape, baidjarakhs (ground mounds formed as a result of wedge-ice thawing), abundance of thermokarst lakes, drained lakes basins, low-gradient streams and erosion-thermokarst valleys (alas valleys) with occasional pingos. We have studied and characterized in the field the metrics of two Yedoma sites at the northern part of Seward Peninsula. Geomorphic sub-units such as drained lake basins and Yedoma remnants have been characterized in detail via optical leveling surveys. Bathymetry of thermokarst lakes was measured by lake-based sonar and GPS surveys. Drilling was conducted in several locations along the survey transects. The cores retrieved were described in the field in terms of

  11. Monitoring Regional Vegetation Changes in Seward Peninsula, Alaska, Using Optical Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jin; Ahn, Ji Young; Lee, Yoo Kyung; Yoon, Young Jun; Kim, Jeong Woo

    2013-04-01

    The vegetation at the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, has been studied and characterized by transitions from boreal forest to tundra resulting from the influences of climate change on disturbance and species composition. Most of the studies, however, focus on global scale responses, providing little information on regional vegetation changes more related to either local topography or climate patterns. Since the regional vegetation trend may change along with the variations in the gross productivity and range expansion of particular vegetation species during growing seasons, the vegetation index retrieved from optical remote sensing data is useful to monitor the vegetation transitions over long time span at the area of interest with fine spatial resolution. Landsat-5 TM and -7 ETM+ acquired during growing seasons from 1985 to 2010 over the townsite of Council in Alaska are analyzed for the temporal analysis of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) trends. The study area consists of three major vegetation groups of shrub, forest and tundra sites as researched by Arctic Transitions in the Land-Atmosphere System, but no detailed information on vegetation transitions are available to date. For improvements, the radiometric and atmospheric corrections are carried out converting 8-bit digital numbers to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or exoatmospheric Top-Of-Atmosphere (TOA) reflectance at the time of each acquisition since the Landsat data need to be preprocessed yielding high-quality science data. In addition, Dark Object Subtraction (DOS) is applied to the TOA reflectance in order to minimize atmospheric effects which contaminate NDVI values where a common radiometric scale is not assumed among the multi-temporal datasets. NDVI ranging from +1 to -1 can then be simply retrieved using red and near infra-red bands of corrected Landsat data. The trend of NDVI is expected to represent the decadal variations in regional vegetation status and will be further

  12. Diagnostic modeling of dimethylsulfide production in coastal water west of the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermann, Maria; Najjar, Raymond G.; Neeley, Aimee R.; Vila-Costa, Maria; Dacey, John W. H.; DiTullio, Giacomo, R.; Kieber, David J.; Kiene, Ronald P.; Matrai, Patricia A.; Simo, Rafel; Vernet, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The rate of gross biological dimethylsulfide (DMS) production at two coastal sites west of the Antarctic Peninsula, off Anvers Island, near Palmer Station, was estimated using a diagnostic approach that combined field measurements from 1 January 2006 through 1 March 2006 and a one-dimensional physical model of ocean mixing. The average DMS production rate in the upper water column (0-60 m) was estimated to be 3.1 +/- 0.6 nM/d at station B (closer to shore) and 2.7 +/- 0.6 nM/d1 at station E (further from shore). The estimated DMS replacement time was on the order of 1 d at both stations. DMS production was greater in the mixed layer than it was below the mixed layer. The average DMS production normalized to chlorophyll was 0.5 +/- nM/d)/(mg cubic m) at station B and 0.7 +/- 0.2 (nM/d)/(mg/cubic m3) at station E. When the diagnosed production rates were normalized to the observed concentrations of total dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSPt, the biogenic precursor of DMS), we found a remarkable similarity between our estimates at stations B and E (0.06 +/- 0.02 and 0.04 +/- 0.01 (nM DMS / d1)/(nM DMSP), respectively) and the results obtained in a previous study from a contrasting biogeochemical environment in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre (0.047 =/- 0.006 and 0.087 +/- 0.014 (nM DMS d1)/(nM DMSP) in a cyclonic and anticyclonic eddy, respectively).We propose that gross biological DMS production normalized to DMSPt might be relatively independent of the biogeochemical environment, and place our average estimate at 0.06 +/- 0.01 (nM DMS / d)/(nM DMSPt). The significance of this finding is that it can provide a means to use DMSPt measurements to extrapolate gross biological DMS production, which is extremely difficult to measure experimentally under realistic in situ conditions.

  13. Detection and Analysis of Near-Surface Explosions on the Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Steven J.; Ringdal, Frode

    2010-05-01

    Seismic and infrasonic observations of signals from a sequence of near-surface explosions at a site on the Kola Peninsula have been analyzed. NORSAR's automatic network processing of these events shows a significant scatter in the location estimates and, to improve the automatic classification of the events, we have performed full waveform cross-correlation on the data set. Although the signals from the different events share many characteristics, the waveforms do not exhibit a ripple-for-ripple correspondence and cross-correlation does not result in the classic delta-function indicative of repeating signals. Using recordings from the ARCES seismic array (250 km W of the events), we find that a correlation detector on a single channel or three-component station would not be able to detect subsequent events from this source without an unacceptable false alarm rate. However, performing the correlation on each channel of the full ARCES array, and stacking the resulting traces, generates a correlation detection statistic with a suppressed background level which is exceeded by many times its standard deviation on only very few occasions. Performing f- k analysis on the individual correlation coefficient traces, and rejecting detections indicating a non-zero slowness vector, results in a detection list with essentially no false alarms. Applying the algorithm to 8 years of continuous ARCES data identified over 350 events which we confidently assign to this sequence. The large event population provides additional confidence in relative travel-time estimates and this, together with the occurrence of many events between 2002 and 2004 when a temporary network was deployed in the region, reduces the variability in location estimates. The best seismic location estimate, incorporating phase information for many hundreds of events, is consistent with backazimuth measurements for infrasound arrivals at several stations at regional distances. At Lycksele, 800 km SW of the events

  14. Environmental impact assessment of the mining and concentration activities in the Kola Peninsula, Russia by multidate remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Rigina, Olga

    2002-04-01

    On the Kola Peninsula, the mining and concentration industry exerts anthropogenic impact on the environment. Tailing dumps cause airborne pollution through dusting, and waterborne pollution due to direct dumping and accidental releases. The objectives were: (1) to analyse multidate satellite images for 1964-1996 to assess the environmental pollution from the mining and concentration activity in the Kola in temporal perspective; (2) to evaluate remote sensing methods for integrated environmental impact assessment. The area of mining and industrial sites steadily expands and amounted to 94 km2 in 1996. The polluted water surface amounted to at least 150 km2 through dumping in 1978 and to 106 km2 in 1986 due to dusting. Thus, the impact from the mining and concentration activity should be reconsidered as more significant than it was officially anticipated. In the past the main mechanism of pollution was direct dumping into the lakes. Currently and in future, airborne pollution after dusting storms will dominate. The effective recultivation of the tailing dumps will be a long-term process. For effective assessment of impacts from the mining and concentration industry, remote sensing methods should be complemented by in-situ measurements, fieldwork, and mathematical modelling. PMID:15900663

  15. Heavy carbon travertine related to methane generation: A case study of the Big Tarkhan cold spring, Kerch Peninsula, Crimea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokh, Svetlana N.; Shnyukov, Yevgeny F.; Sokol, Ella V.; Novikova, Sofya A.; Kozmenko, Olga A.; Semenova, Dina V.; Rybak, Elena N.

    2015-07-01

    The Big Tarkhan cold spring is located within the Bulganak zone of mud volcanism in the northern Kerch Peninsula (Crimea). The spring waters mainly have Cl-HCO3-Na-Ca chemistry and temperatures from 18 to 23 °C. Active travertine deposition at the site produces abundant calcite and minor amounts of siderite, halite, tincalconite, trona, gaylussite, northupite and amorphous iron hydroxides. Calcite contains the impurities of 0.26-2.16 wt.% MgO, up to 0.87 wt.% FeO, 0.15-0.73 wt.% SrO, 0.28-0.98 BaO, up to 0.43 wt.% MnO, and 0.09-0.60 Na2O. Active travertines are depleted in REE (ΣREE = 2.6-4.8 ppm) compared to the inactive ones. The Kerch travertine calcite shows unusual carbon and oxygen isotope compositions (+ 8.1 ÷ + 12.5‰ VPDB δ13C and + 10.1 ÷ + 12.9‰ VPDB δ18O). Their isotopic and trace element signatures (including REE patterns) suggest their relation to basinal waters and origin from the organic-rich clayey Maikop Fm., which is the principal source rock of the area. The Big Tarkhan travertine deposits are associated with thermogenic methane production.

  16. Autumn migration and wintering areas of Peregrine Falcons Falco peregrinus nesting on the Kola Peninsula, northern Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganusevich, S.A.; Maechtle, T.L.; Seegar, W.S.; Yates, M.A.; McGrady, M.J.; Fuller, M.; Schueck, L.; Dayton, J.; Henny, C.J.

    2004-01-01

    Four female Peregrine Falcons Falco peregrinus breeding on the Kola Peninsula, Russia, were fitted with satellite-received transmitters in 1994. Their breeding home ranges averaged 1175 (sd = ??714) km2, and overlapped considerably. All left their breeding grounds in September and migrated generally south-west along the Baltic Sea. The mean travel rate for three falcons was 190 km/day. Two Falcons wintered on the coasts of France and in southern Spain, which were, respectively, 2909 and 4262 km from their breeding sites. Data on migration routes suggested that Falcons took a near-direct route to the wintering areas. No prolonged stopovers were apparent. The 90% minimum convex polygon winter range of a bird that migrated to Spain encompassed 213 km2 (n = 54). The area of the 50% minimum convex polygon was 21.5 km2 (n = 29). Data from this study agree with others from North America that show that Falcons breeding in a single area do not necessarily follow the same migratory path southward and do not necessarily use the same wintering grounds.

  17. Distribution of zooplankton on the continental shelf off Marguerite Bay, Antarctic Peninsula, during Austral Fall and Winter, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashjian, Carin J.; Rosenwaks, Gaelin A.; Wiebe, Peter H.; Davis, Cabell S.; Gallager, Scott M.; Copley, Nancy J.; Lawson, Gareth L.; Alatalo, Philip

    2004-08-01

    The Marguerite Bay region of the Western Antarctic Peninsula is known to support a large population of krill during the summer and is hypothesized to be a site of successful overwintering of krill. The distributions of zooplankton biomass, abundance, and taxonomic composition at six locations on or near the continental shelf at Marguerite Bay were determined for fall and winter, 2001, as a part of the Southern Ocean GLOBEC program. Water column zooplankton were sampled using a 1-m 2 MOCNESS. Samples were analyzed for taxonomic composition, size, and estimated biomass using silhouette analysis. Characteristics of four categories (small and large copepods, small and large krill) were described in detail. Total biomass and abundance were markedly reduced in winter relative to fall. The vertical distributions of total abundance and biomass, and of taxonomic composition, were associated with the hydrographic structure of the water column. Larger larval krill were observed at all locations during winter than during fall. Krill were relatively unimportant to total biomass and abundance at most locations, while copepods frequently dominated both biomass and abundance. In fall, greatest abundance and biomass of larval krill were observed on the continental shelf in association with a persistent clockwise gyre located to the west of Adelaide Island. During winter, much lower abundances of larval krill were present in the water column throughout the study region. High abundance and biomass of juvenile and adult krill were observed only in Laubeuf Fjord (Marguerite Bay) during fall.

  18. Reprint of "Pleistocene and Holocene glacier fluctuations upon the Kamchatka Peninsula"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Iestyn D.; Solomina, Olga

    2015-11-01

    This review summarises landform records and published age-estimates (largely based upon tephrochronology) to provide an overview of glacier fluctuations upon the Kamchatka Peninsula during the Holocene and, to a lesser degree, earlier phases of glaciation. The evidence suggests that following deglaciation from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the peninsula experienced numerous phases of small-scale glacial advance. During the Late Glacial, moraine sequences appear to reflect the former presence of extensive glaciers in some parts of the peninsula, though little chronological control is available for deposits of this period. During the Holocene, the earliest and most extensive phase of advance likely occurred sometime prior to c. 6.8 ka, when glaciers extended up to 8 km beyond their current margins. However, these deposits lack maximum age constrains, and pre-Holocene ages cannot be discounted. Between c. 6.8 ka and the onset of 'Neoglaciation' c. 4.5 ka, there is little evidence of glacial advance upon the peninsula, and this period likely coincides with the Holocene climatic optimum (or 'hypsithermal'). Since c. 4.5 ka, numerous moraines have been deposited, likely reflecting a series of progressively less extensive phases of ice advance during the Late Holocene. The final stage of notable ice advance occurred during the Little Ice Age (LIA), between c. 1350 and 1850 C.E., when reduced summer insolation in the Northern Hemisphere likely coincided with solar activity minima and several strong tropical volcanic eruptions to induce widespread cooling. Following the LIA, glaciers upon the peninsula have generally shown a pattern of retreat, with accelerated mass loss in recent decades. However, a number of prominent climatically and non-climatically controlled glacial advances have also occurred during this period. In general, there is evidence to suggest that millennial scale patterns in the extent and timing of glaciation upon the peninsula (encompassing much of the

  19. Characteristics of storms that contribute to extreme precipitation events over the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, Ricardo; Ramos, Alexandre M.; Ordoñez, Paulina; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Trigo, Isabel F.

    2014-05-01

    Floods correspond to one of the most deadly natural disasters in the Iberian Peninsula during the last century. Quite often these floods are associated to intense low pressure systems with an Atlantic origin. In recent years a number of episodes have been evaluated on a case-by-case approach, with a clear focus on extreme events, thus lacking a systematic assessment. In this study we focus on the characteristics of storms for the extended winter season (October to March) that are responsible for the most extreme rainfall events over large areas of the Iberian Peninsula. An objective method for ranking daily precipitation events during the extended winter is used based on the most comprehensive database of high resolution (0.2º latitude by 0.2º longitude) gridded daily precipitation dataset available for the Iberian Peninsula. The magnitude of an event is obtained after considering the total area affected as well as its intensity in every grid point (taking into account the daily normalised departure from climatology). Different precipitation rankings are studied considering the entire Iberian Peninsula, Portugal and also the six largest river basins in the Iberian Peninsula (Duero, Ebro, Tagus, Minho, Guadiana and Guadalquivir). Using an objective cyclone detecting and tracking scheme [Trigo, 2006] the storm track and characteristics of the cyclones were obtained using the ERA-Interim reanalyses for the 1979-2008 period. The spatial distribution of extratropical cyclone positions when the precipitation extremes occur will be analysed over the considered sub-domains (Iberia, Portugal, major river basins). In addition, we distinguish the different cyclone characteristics (lifetime, direction, minimum pressure, position, velocity, vorticity and radius) with significant impacts in precipitation over the different domains in the Iberian Peninsula. This work was partially supported by FEDER (Fundo Europeu de Desenvolvimento Regional) funds through the COMPETE (Programa

  20. Morphotectonic Index Analysis as an Indicator of Neotectonic Segmentation of the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrish, S.; Marshall, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Nicoya Peninsula lies within the Costa Rican forearc where the Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate at ~8.5 cm/yr. Rapid plate convergence produces frequent large earthquakes (~50yr recurrence interval) and pronounced crustal deformation (0.1-2.0m/ky uplift). Seven uplifted segments have been identified in previous studies using broad geomorphic surfaces (Hare & Gardner 1984) and late Quaternary marine terraces (Marshall et al. 2010). These surfaces suggest long term net uplift and segmentation of the peninsula in response to contrasting domains of subducting seafloor (EPR, CNS-1, CNS-2). In this study, newer 10m contour digital topographic data (CENIGA- Terra Project) will be used to characterize and delineate this segmentation using morphotectonic analysis of drainage basins and correlation of fluvial terrace/ geomorphic surface elevations. The peninsula has six primary watersheds which drain into the Pacific Ocean; the Río Andamojo, Río Tabaco, Río Nosara, Río Ora, Río Bongo, and Río Ario which range in area from 200 km2 to 350 km2. The trunk rivers follow major lineaments that define morphotectonic segment boundaries and in turn their drainage basins are bisected by them. Morphometric analysis of the lower (1st and 2nd) order drainage basins will provide insight into segmented tectonic uplift and deformation by comparing values of drainage basin asymmetry, stream length gradient, and hypsometry with respect to margin segmentation and subducting seafloor domain. A general geomorphic analysis will be conducted alongside the morphometric analysis to map previously recognized (Morrish et al. 2010) but poorly characterized late Quaternary fluvial terraces. Stream capture and drainage divide migration are common processes throughout the peninsula in response to the ongoing deformation. Identification and characterization of basin piracy throughout the peninsula will provide insight into the history of landscape evolution in response to

  1. A quantitative analysis of grid nudging effect on each process of PM2.5 production in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Wonbae; Choi, Yunsoo; Lee, Hwa Woon; Lee, Soon-Hwan; Yoo, Jung-Woo; Park, Jaehyeong; Lee, Hyo-Jung

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of assimilated meteorological fields on simulated PM2.5 concentrations in the Korean Peninsula. Two different CMAQ simulations were conducted using base WRF run (BASE) and grid-nudged WRF run (GNG) which included a simple data assimilation method for the time period of April, 2009. The simulated PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations were compared with corresponding observations. The BASE PM2.5 concentrations were significantly underestimated at Anmyeondo (AMD) and six Air Quality Monitoring Station (AQMS) sites in Korea, but GNG showed improved agreement with in-situ measurements due to the effect of grid nudging. The grid nudging effect was dominant under the PBL height and it appeared more clearly under the unstable synoptic condition (April 5-8) than stable condition (April 9-13). Additional quantitative analysis was conducted using the Integrated Process Rate (IPR) in the CMAQ model to investigate the effect of varied meteorological fields on each PM2.5 production and destruction processes. The PM2.5 production rate by aerosol process in GNG was shown to be higher than that of BASE, especially near the source region (e.g., Eastern China). The increased temperature and decreased wind speed by grid nudging effect led to increase of aerosol production rates especially during the nighttime. The change of aerosol production rates were mainly caused by increased sulfate (SO42-) and nitrate (NO3-) production rates in the day and nighttime respectively. Also, GNG provides higher PM2.5 transport rates than BASE over the whole domain. The amount of PM2.5 scavenged by wet deposition process in GNG was smaller than that of BASE over the Yellow Sea, reflecting the decreased water vapor mixing ratio by grid nudging. Thus, it resulted in the increase of simulated PM2.5 concentrations. The results indicated that understanding the effects of grid nudging on PM2.5 concentrations is crucial to enhance the performance of PM2.5 modeling

  2. Reconstructing past climate variability in the Iberian Peninsula using carbon and oxygen stable isotopes in tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreu-Hayles, L.; Helle, G.; Schleser, G. H.; Gutiérrez, E.; Barriendos, M.

    2012-12-01

    Improving the understanding of past climate in the Mediterranean basin is still a challenge due to the very distinct seasonality and high climatic variability inherent to this region. Studying the climate of the Iberian Peninsula is particularly complicated because of the complex orography, as well as the atmospheric circulation patterns composed by the influence of three climatic regimes: Atlantic, continental and Mediterranean. In this investigation, we seek climatic information recorded in several Iberian tree-ring chronologies. We found that stable carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope ratios measured in tree rings from pine forests located at the northern part of the Iberian Peninsula are very sensitive proxies to moisture variations during the summer period. While the width of the tree rings, the dendrochronological classical proxy most commonly and extensively used, is very dependent on local site conditions, the δ13C and δ18O series were able to capture a large-scale climatic signal of summer aridity. In the studied environments, the isotopic signatures seem to be mainly dominated by variations in stomatal conductance driven by changes in air relative humidity. As we were interested in the response of trees to changes in moisture or aridity conditions, we removed all the other non-climatic variability shown by the isotopic series. First, the raw δ13C series were corrected for a decreasing trend attributed to the rise of 13C depleted atmospheric CO2 due to fossil fuel burning and deforestation since industrialization (Suess effect). A second correction was also applied to remove the low-frequency variability apparently caused by tree physiological responses to changes in CO2 concentration. In contrast, no treatment was needed for δ18O. We found that both stable isotopic records were able to properly track July and August temperatures and precipitation fluctuations in the high-frequency domain. However, the climatic significance of their low

  3. Millennial δ18O oscillations from a replicated Holocene speleothem record from Iberian Peninsula and hemispherical teleconecctions affecting the water cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Villar, David; Wang, Xianfeng; Krklec, Kristina; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    We present a speleothem δ18O record from Kaite Cave in northern Iberian Peninsula covering the last 9.7 ka BP. The record is constructed from four different stalagmites that replicate each other. The age model is based on 63 U-Th dates and over 4500 laminae providing a robust time frame for the record. The δ18O record has characteristic millennial oscillations through the Holocene with periodicity around 2 ka during the Late Holocene and around 1 ka during the Early Holocene. Causes of the millennial δ18O variability are not dominated by the amount of rainfall or atmospheric temperature and other controls of the water cycle are more relevant. The aquifer at this site filters any seasonal bias and speleothems records the inter-annual δ18O variability in precipitation. On the other hand, moisture source analysis at this site shows that significant amount of precipitation is from recycled moisture (continental origin). A variable proportion of this parameter is capable to impact significantly past values of δ18O in precipitation. Thus, we interpret the millennial oscillations of the δ18O record as changes in the hydrological cycle resulting from variable percentages of the recycled precipitation over the Iberian Peninsula. We found that variable amount of recycled precipitation in Iberian Peninsula is related to the location of the Iceland Low pressure cell, although does not correlate with NAO index. Correlation of Kaite δ18O record during the Holocene with other representative records suggests that millennial oscillations are caused by variability of the Gulf Stream/North Atlantic Current that affects atmospheric pressure fields in the North Atlantic. Further correlation of Kaite δ18O record along the world supports that the recorded millennial oscillations of the water cycle are related to persistent variability on the tropical North Atlantic. Only during periods of major sea-ice variability in high-latitudes of the North Atlantic, the later region replaces

  4. Geological structures and fault distributions in the Sagami Trough offshore Boso Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, A.; Ashi, J.; Tokuyama, H.

    2011-12-01

    Around the Boso Peninsula, central Japan, the Philippine Sea Plate (PHS) is subducting beneath the Honshu Island along the Sagami Trough and the Pacific Plate is subducting beneath the PHS plate and the Honshu Island along the Japan Trench. The area offshore Boso Peninsula has very complicated geological histories by the influence of highly oblique convergence of the PHS plate and collision of the Izu-Bonin Arc since 15Ma. The geologic body of this region is composed of the accretionary prism, some part of which is exposed in the Miura and the southern Boso Peninsulas. The geologic body of the offshore Boso Peninsula is also considered as the accretionary prism. Moreover, this area is accompanied with the seismogenic zone in which the large-scale earthquakes such as the 1703 Genroku and 1923 Taisho Kanto earthquakes repeatedly occurred. Additionally, the tsunami and crustal movements also occurred together with earthquakes in this area. Although tsunami generation suggested seafloor crustal movements, the distributions of active faults as well as deep structure near the plate boundary have not been yet well understood by previous studies (ex. Nakamura et al., 1987, EPSL; Kimura et al., 2009, Tectonophysics). The objective of this study is to elucidate the submarine structure and distribution of active faults offshore Boso Peninsula in the Sagami Trough using various kinds of data sets as the bathymetric map, IZANAGI side-scan imagery, and Multi-channel seismic (MCS) reflection profiles. These data sets were acquired by JAMSTEC, Japan Coast Guard and Ocean Research Institute (now Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute), Univ. Tokyo, respectively. In the area offshore Boso Peninsula, geomorhological lineaments were recognized in high accuracy bathymetric map and side-scan sonar imagery. These lineaments are interpreted to be continuous fault scarp morphologies. Along the Katsuura canyon, an approximately 125 km-length lineament was identified. This lineament is

  5. Submarine Groundwater Discharge and Nutrient Additions to the Puerto Morelos Coast of the Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derse, E. R.; Ibarra, M. M.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Knee, K.; Gray, E.; Paytan, A.

    2008-12-01

    Coral reef ecosystems along the coast of the Caribbean are currently threatened by anthropogenic impacts such as sedimentation, nutrient loading, and rapidly expanding coastal development. Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) can contribute to large nutrient inputs in coastal ecosystems, particularly in regions such as the Yucatan Peninsula where surficial runoff is minimal, the geology is dominated by karst dissolution features, and terrestrial output occurs primarily from SGD. SGD inputs were assessed using radioisotopes, and related freshwater, nutrient, and metal fluxes were measured in the vicinity of coral reefs at Puerto Morelos along the Caribbean coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. High 223Ra and 224Ra activity in the coastal zone suggests large SGD inputs to the coastal waters off Puerto Morelos, Mexico. Concentrations and fluxes of nutrients associated with SGD will be reported.

  6. Description of three new troglobiontic species of Cybaeodes (Araneae, Liocranidae) endemic to the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Carles; De Mas, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Three new troglobiontic species of the spider genus Cybaeodes Simon endemic to caves in the southeastern Iberian Peninsula are described and illustrated: Cybaeodes indalo sp. n. from Almería, C. dosaguas sp. n. from València and C. magnus sp. n. from Alacant. The new species confirm the presence of Cybaeodes on the Iberian Peninsula and its wide distribution throughout the Western Mediterranean including Algeria, Tunisia, Italy, France, Spain and the islands of Sardinia, Sicily and Mallorca. A record of C. liocraninus (Simon), from an Iberian cave was probably based on misidentified specimens of C. magnus sp. n. C. liocraninus is known only from Algeria and should be removed from lists of the Iberian fauna. In addition, the three new species are clear candidates for protection: they have highly restricted ranges and show a high degree of adaptation to the subterranean environment. PMID:26249078

  7. Monterey peninsula water supply project supplemental draft environmental impact report/statement II. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-12

    The Monterey Peninsula Water Management District (MPWMD) has examined 5 alternatives with the basic project purpose of providing a municipal water supply to the Monterey Peninsula that would provide adequate drought protection for existing residents and meet the long term water supply needs of planned growth. The overall project purpose is to provide adequate instream flow to protect the public trust resources of the Carmel River. The 5 alternatives studied are; a 24,000 AF New Los Padres Reservoir, either alone or combined with a 3 MGD desalination plant; a 15,000 AF Canada Reservoir and 3 MGD Desalination Plant; a 7 MGD desalination Plant; and No project.... Water supply, Dams, Section 404 permits.

  8. Monterey peninsula water supply project supplemental draft environment impact report/statement II. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-12

    The Monterey Peninsula Water Management District (MPWMD) has examined 5 alternatives with the basic project purpose of providing a municipal water supply to the Monterey Peninsula that would provide adequate drought protection for existing residents and meet the long term water supply needs of planned growth. The overall project purpose is to provide adequate instream flow to protect the public trust resources of the Carmel River. The 5 alternatives studied are; a 24,000 AF New Los Padres Reservoir, either alone or combined with a 3 MGD desalination plant; a 15,000 AF Canada Reservoir and 3 MGD Desalination Plant; a 7 MGD desalination Plant; and No project.... Water supply, Dams, Section 404 permits.

  9. Monterey peninsula water supply project supplemental draft environment impact report/statement II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-12

    The Monterey Peninsula Water Management District (MPWMD) has examined 5 alternatives with the basic project purpose of providing a municipal water supply to the Monterey Peninsula that would provide adequate drought protection for existing residents and meet the long term water supply needs of planned growth. The overall project purpose is to provide adequate instream flow to protect the public trust resources of the Carmel River. The 5 alternatives studied are: a 24,000 AF New Los Padres Reservoir, either alone or combined with a 3 MGD desalination plant; a 15,000 AF Canada Reservoir and 3 MGD Desalination Plant; a 7 MGD desalination Plant; and No project.... Water supply, Dams, Section 404 permits.

  10. Electromagnetic sounding of the Kola Peninsula with a powerful extremely low frequency source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikhov, E. P.; Grigoriev, V. F.; Zhdanov, M. S.; Korotayev, S. M.; Kruglyakov, M. S.; Orekhova, D. A.; Popova, I. V.; Tereschenko, E. D.; Schors, Y. G.

    2011-05-01

    Experiment on electromagnetic sounding of the Kola Peninsula using unique mobile measuring complex of the low-frequency sounding was conducted, allowing to investigate a geoelectric section with a depth of several kilometers on distances up to 100 km from the stationary transmitting aerial. Excess on the order of amplitudes of the vertical component above the horizontal at all frequencies of sounding was registered in a number of points of measurements. This feature managed to be explained quantitatively by circulation of current on regional faults with the closure of current through the sea—before unknown galvanic coastal effect. Interpretation of the results of modeling and neural network solving of inverse problem essentially specifies the fault tectonics of the central part of the Kola Peninsula. Anomaly remote from the observation profile was found out—local pinch of a crustal conductive layer consisting of graphitized rocks and associated with the zone of overthrust.

  11. Occurrence of Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum along the southern coast of the Baja California Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Gárate-Lizárraga, Ismael; González-Armas, Rogelio

    2011-03-01

    As part of a continuing toxic microalgae monitoring program, 22 phytoplankton samples were collected from July to November 2010 at several sampling stations along the southern coast of the Baja California Peninsula. For the first time, the toxic dinoflagellate Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum was found along the southeastern and southwestern coasts of the peninsula. P. bahamense var. bahamense was first observed off San José del Cabo, which is an extension of the range of this variety. Both varieties occur as solitary cells. P. bahamense var. compressum occurred at temperatures ranging between 24.5°C and 31°C, whereas var. P.bahamense occurred at 28.5°C to 29°C, indicating its tropical and subtropical nature. Occurrence of P. bahamense var. compressum along this coastline may be related to El Niño 2009-2010. PMID:21276986

  12. A diverse assemblage of fossil hardwood from the Upper Tertiary (Miocene?) of the Arauco Peninsula, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöning, Meike; Bandel, Klaus

    2004-09-01

    Silicified woods of 10 dicotyledonous tree families of probably Miocene age from the Arauco Peninsula, central Chile are described and classified according to their anatomy. The diversity is surprisingly high, in that of the 19 samples analyzed, virtually every one could belong to a different species of tree or shrub. Almost all species document a damp climate, and most have related species living in the central zone of modern Chile. The samples were collected in a narrow zone on Punta El Fraile, west of the town of Arauco. The following families are based on woods from the Arauco Peninsula: Anacardiaceae, Boraginaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fagaceae, Lauraceae, Leguminosae, Monimiaceae, the first report of fossil Myristicaceae, Myrtaceae, and Proteaceae. Their diagenetic history is connected to tuffaceous material and calcareous concretions.

  13. Climatological classification of five sectors in the Iberian Peninsula using columnar (AOD, α) and surface (PM10, PM2.5) aerosol data supported by air mass apportioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachorro, Victoria; Mateos, David; Toledano, Carlos; Burgos, Maria A.; Bennouna, Yasmine; Torres, Benjamín; Fuertes, David; González, Ramiro; Guirado, Carmen; Román, Roberto; Velasco-Merino, Cristian; Marcos, Alberto; Calle, Abel; de Frutos, Angel M.

    2015-04-01

    The study of atmospheric aerosol over the Iberian Peninsula (IP) under a climatologic perspective is an interesting and meaningful aim due to the wide variety of conditions (geographical position, air masses, topography, among others) which cause a complex role of the distribution of aerosol properties. In the deeply investigation on the annual cycle and time evolution of the particulate matter lower than 10 µm (PM10, surface) and aerosol optical depth (AOD, columnar) in a large number of sites covering the period 2000-2013, five sectors can be distinguished in the IP. Both set of data belong to EMEP and AERONET networks respectively, as representative of aerosol air quality and climate studies, are complementary elements for a global aerosol research. The prevalence of fine-coarse particles is also analyzed over each sector. Seasonal bimodality of the PM10 annual cycle with a strong North-South gradient is observed in most sites, but this is only reported in the AOD climatology for the southern IP. The northern coast is clearly governed by the Atlantic Ocean influence, while the northeastern area is modulated by the Mediterranean Sea. The southern area, very close to the African continent, presents a large influence of desert dust intrusions. However, the southern Atlantic and Mediterranean coast present discrepancies and two sectors have been defined in this area. Finally, the center of the Peninsula is a mix of conditions, with north-south and east-west gradients of different magnitude. Overall, there is a relationship between PM10 and AOD with a proportional factor varying from 20 to 90, depending on the sector. The particular characteristic of PM10-AOD annual cycle of each geographical sector can be understood by the different climatology of the air mass origins observed at 500 and 1500 m (a.s.l.) and its apportioning to PM10 and AOD, respectively.

  14. Hosts of the exotic ornate kangaroo tick, Amblyomma triguttatum triguttatum Koch, on southern Yorke Peninsula, South Australia.

    PubMed

    Waudby, Helen P; Petit, Sophie; Dixon, Bruce; Andrews, Ross H

    2007-10-01

    Amblyomma triguttatum triguttatum is assumed to be endemic to south-western Western Australia (including Barrow Island), Queensland (excluding Cape York Peninsula), and New South Wales, south to Dubbo and Barham. The species has been recorded on a range of mammalian hosts including macropods and domestic animals. In Queensland, A. triguttatum triguttatum is implicated in the epidemiology of Q fever. In 2000, the species was detected on southern Yorke Peninsula in South Australia. We aimed to identify A. triguttatum triguttatum's hosts through trapping, sampling of carcasses, and opportunistic capture of vertebrates on Yorke Peninsula. A. triguttatum triguttatum was removed from black rats (Rattus rattus), wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus), Tammar wallabies (M. eugenii eugenii), domesticated cats and dogs, and humans. Before this study, A. triguttatum triguttatum had not been found on black rats or rabbits in the wild. This research has implications for the management of wildlife, livestock, and visitors on Yorke Peninsula. The potential for A. triguttatum triguttatum to spread to other areas of Yorke Peninsula and South Australia is considerable, as visitors (tourists) to southern Yorke Peninsula report the presence of ticks both on themselves and among camping equipment on arriving home. PMID:17611781

  15. Penguin eggshell membranes reflect homogeneity of mercury in the marine food web surrounding the Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Brasso, Rebecka L; Polito, Michael J; Lynch, Heather J; Naveen, R; Emslie, Steven D

    2012-11-15

    Remote regions such as the Antarctic have become increasingly important for investigations into far-reaching anthropogenic impacts on the environment, most recently in regard to the global mercury cycle. Spatial patterns of mercury availability in four regions of the Antarctic Peninsula were investigated using three species of sympatrically breeding Pygoscelis penguins as biomonitors. Eggshells with intact membranes from Adélie, Gentoo, and Chinstrap penguins were collected at 24 breeding colonies in the South Orkney Islands, South Shetland Islands, eastern Antarctic Peninsula, and western Antarctic Peninsula during the 2006/2007 austral summer. In addition, we compared eggshell membrane mercury concentrations with eggshell stable isotope values (δ(15)N and δ(13)C) to determine if species-specific trophic or foraging habitat preferences influenced female mercury exposure prior to breeding. With few exceptions, mercury concentrations were found to be fairly homogeneous throughout the Antarctic Peninsula suggesting little spatial variation in the risk of exposure to dietary mercury in this food web. Mercury concentrations in Gentoo and Adélie penguins were similar while Chinstrap penguins tended to have higher eggshell membrane mercury concentrations than their congeners. However, inter and intra-specific differences in eggshell membrane mercury concentration were not related to eggshell δ(15)N or δ(13)C values, a likely result of all three species foraging at similar trophic positions. The lack of regional-scale differences in mercury availability in this marine ecosystem may be a reflection of generally uniform atmospheric deposition and upwelling of regionally homogeneous deep water rather than from geographically distinct point sources. PMID:23069932

  16. The ant genus Carebara Westwood in the Arabian Peninsula (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf, Mostafa R.; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The ant genus Carebara of the Arabian Peninsula is revised. Carebara abuhurayri Sharaf & Aldawood, 2011 is synonymized under Carebara arabica Collingwood & van Harten, 2001. Carebara arabica is redescribed and a Neotype is fixed based on a specimen collected from southwestern Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A new species, C. fayrouzae sp. n. is described from Saudi Arabia based on queens, major and minor workers. Keys to major and minor workers of the two Arabian Carebara species are given. PMID:24363580

  17. Heat source for an amagmatic hydrothermal system, Noto Peninsula, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Koji; Ninomiya, Atusi; Negi, Tateyuki

    2009-01-01

    Although there is no evidence of volcanism in the Noto Peninsula since the late Miocene, the peninsula has long been known to be unusual and atypical of non-volcanic regions, as indicated by high-temperature hot springs and a geothermal gradient greater than 50 K/km. In order to provide geochemical constraints on the heat source for amagmatic hydrothermal activity, the chemical and isotopic compositions of 14 gas and water samples from hot springs were measured. The observed 3He/4He ratios of most hot spring gases range from 0.03 to 1.2 RA (RA denotes the atmospheric 3He/4He ratio of 1.4 × 10-6). In these samples, mantle helium composes less than 10% of the total helium, indicating an insignificant contribution of mantle-derived volatiles from, for example, newly ascending magma and/or aqueous fluid generated by dehydration of the subducting slab. The Noto Peninsula mainly consists of Neogene volcaniclastic and sedimentary rocks overlying Paleozoic to Mesozoic basement rocks associated with uranium-bearing granite pegmatite containing elevated concentrations of heat generating elements such as uranium, thorium, and potassium. A plausible heat source for the amagmatic hydrothermal activity can be attributed to this distinctive geological environment where high heat producing granitic rocks are buried under Neogene sedimentary rocks with low thermal conductivities that act as thermal blankets. Most Noto Peninsula hot springs are found in areas of active faulting, where stress concentrations since the late Miocene could open an existing fault pathway because the fluid pressure is close to the lithostatic pressure. Meteoric waters circulating through hot basement rock come to the surface along these permeable conduits with minimal mixing with shallow groundwater, resulting in emanation of high-temperature hot springs with low 3He/4He ratio gases along active fault zones.

  18. Geological and Petrological Characteristics of Oligocene Magmatic Rocks in The Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erenoglu, Oya

    2016-04-01

    Oligocene magmatic activity in the Biga Peninsula (NW-Anatolia) produced widespread volcano-plutonic complexes. The study region, where in north of the Evciler village in the middle of Biga Peninsula includes these igneous assemblages. In this study, the petrographic and geochemical characteristics of igneous rocks in the region were investigated as well as the geological locations. The magmatic rocks are classified as 6 different units using their lithostratigraphical properties. The volcanism in the region starts with basaltic andesite lava including basalt dykes in the Lower Oligocene. In the Upper Oligocene, the evolved magma by crustal contamination produced commonly dacitic and andesitic lavas. The volcanism continued with andesitic lavas which had significant alterations in the region during this period. Evciler pluton including granite and granodiorite composition with shallow intrusive, was located with the related volcanism at the same time. The volcanic products, i.e. andesitic and trachydacitic lavas, was completed in the interval between Upper Oligocene and Lower Miocene. The post-collisional Oligocene sequence is associated with calc-alkaline composition and it has middle, high-K. Trace and rare earth elements (REE) diagrams show the enrichment in both large-ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements (LREE) with respect to the high field strength elements (HFSE), and a significant increment in heavy rare earth element consumption (HREE). The features of major, trace and rare earth elements of plutonic and volcanic rocks and the compositional variations of Oligocene volcanic group indicate increasing amounts of partial melting, crustal contamination and/or assimilation. The Oligocene post-collisional volcanism in Biga Peninsula points out the lithospheric mantle source enriched by subduction which controlled by slab break-off and lithospheric delamination. Acknowledgement. This study was supported by Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University

  19. Holocene Southern Ocean surface temperature variability west of the Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Shevenell, A E; Ingalls, A E; Domack, E W; Kelly, C

    2011-02-10

    The disintegration of ice shelves, reduced sea-ice and glacier extent, and shifting ecological zones observed around Antarctica highlight the impact of recent atmospheric and oceanic warming on the cryosphere. Observations and models suggest that oceanic and atmospheric temperature variations at Antarctica's margins affect global cryosphere stability, ocean circulation, sea levels and carbon cycling. In particular, recent climate changes on the Antarctic Peninsula have been dramatic, yet the Holocene climate variability of this region is largely unknown, limiting our ability to evaluate ongoing changes within the context of historical variability and underlying forcing mechanisms. Here we show that surface ocean temperatures at the continental margin of the western Antarctic Peninsula cooled by 3-4 °C over the past 12,000 years, tracking the Holocene decline of local (65° S) spring insolation. Our results, based on TEX(86) sea surface temperature (SST) proxy evidence from a marine sediment core, indicate the importance of regional summer duration as a driver of Antarctic seasonal sea-ice fluctuations. On millennial timescales, abrupt SST fluctuations of 2-4 °C coincide with globally recognized climate variability. Similarities between our SSTs, Southern Hemisphere westerly wind reconstructions and El Niño/Southern Oscillation variability indicate that present climate teleconnections between the tropical Pacific Ocean and the western Antarctic Peninsula strengthened late in the Holocene epoch. We conclude that during the Holocene, Southern Ocean temperatures at the western Antarctic Peninsula margin were tied to changes in the position of the westerlies, which have a critical role in global carbon cycling. PMID:21307939

  20. Upper-crust Tomographic Structure of the Southern Korea Peninsula from Local Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Park, J. H.; Kang, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    We derived the three dimensional P wave velocity model for the uppermost 14 km of crust in the southern Korea peninsula using travel-time data from local earthquakes which are recorded by two nation-wide seismic networks operated by Korea Meteorological Administration and Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources. Earthquakes in the study occurred between 2001 and 2014. 19,935 P wave arrivals from 747 earthquakes observed by 184 seismic stations are selected for the 3-D tomographic inversion. In order to secure best possible data for tomography inversion, we applied a strict criteria during the selection of earthquakes and travel-times. The study area is parameterized by 10km×10km×4km grid for velocity inversion and 1km×1km×1km grid for travel time calculations. Checkerboard resolution test are used to demonstrate the ray coverage and the resolution for the given station-event configurations. The results indicate P-wave velocity model at shallow depths less than 2 km are not properly resolved mainly due to the insufficient ray coverage. The model at deeper depths greater than 14 km also suffered by lack of ray coverage. Thus, we limit our interpretations of the preliminary P wave velocity model to areas that are illuminated by enough rays. P wave velocity model indicates there are significant lateral velocity variations across the southern Korea peninsula. Most distinguished feature in the velocity model is the higher velocity anomaly beneath the southeastern Korea peninsula. The anomaly regions is distinguished by well-defined tectonic boundary. At 8 km depth, lower velocity anomaly is observed in Gyeonggi massif and high-mountain regions in the southern Korea peninsula. The 3-D velocity model is compared with geophysical and geological observations.

  1. [The ecology of Echinococcus multilocularis (Leuckart, 1863) and E. granulosus (Batsch, 1786) on the Kamchatka Peninsula].

    PubMed

    Tranbenkova, N A

    1992-01-01

    Some aspects of dwelling of Echinococcus multilocularis and E. granulosus populations in the Kamchatka Peninsula were considered. Transformation of their natural foci to natural synanthropic due to enrichment of mammalian fauna, increased human density and rural development was noticed. Main quantitative characteristics of infectivity of the worm definitive and intermediate hosts are presented using literature and the author's own data. A correlation was noted between host density and their infectivity with Echinococcus. PMID:1508075

  2. The Polyploid Series of the Achillea millefolium Aggregate in the Iberian Peninsula Investigated Using Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    López-Vinyallonga, Sara; Soriano, Ignasi; Susanna, Alfonso; Montserra, Josep Maria; Roquet, Cristina; Garcia-Jacas, Núria

    2015-01-01

    The Achillea millefolium aggregate is one of the most diverse polyploid complexes of the Northern hemisphere and has its western Eurasian boundary in the Iberian Peninsula. Four ploidy levels have been detected in A. millefolium, three of which have already been found in Iberia (diploid, hexaploid and octoploid), and a fourth (tetraploid) reported during the preparation of this paper. We collected a sample from 26 Iberian populations comprising all ploidy levels, and we used microsatellite markers analyzed as dominant in view of the high ploidy levels. Our goals were to quantify the genetic diversity of A. millefolium in the Iberian Peninsula, to elucidate its genetic structure, to investigate the differences in ploidy levels, and to analyse the dispersal of the species. The lack of spatial genetic structure recovered is linked to both high levels of gene flow between populations and to the fact that most genetic variability occurs within populations. This in turn suggests the existence of a huge panmictic yarrow population in the Iberian Peninsula. This is consistent with the assumption that recent colonization and rapid expansion occurred throughout this area. Likewise, the low levels of genetic variability recovered suggest that bottlenecks and/or founder events may have been involved in this process, and clonal reproduction may have played an important role in maintaining this genetic impoverishment. Indeed, the ecological and phenologic uniformity present in the A. millefolium agg. in Iberia compared to Eurasia and North America may be responsible for the low number of representatives of this complex of species present in the Iberian Peninsula. The low levels of genetic differentiation between ploidy levels recovered in our work suggest the absence of barriers between them. PMID:26091537

  3. An Anvilian (early pleistocene) marine fauna from western Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopkins, D.M.; Rowland, R.W.; Echols, R.E.; Valentine, P.C.

    1974-01-01

    Cover sediments of the York Terrace exposed near the California River, western Seward Peninsula, Alaska, yield mollusks, ostracodes, and foraminifera that lived during the Anvilian transgression of early Pleistocene age. The fossiliferous sediments lie at the inner edge of the York Terrace, a deformed wave-cut platform that extends eastward from Bering Strait along much of the southern coast of Seward Peninsula. The seaward margin is truncated by the little-deformed Lost River Terrace, carved during the Pelukian (Sangamonian) transgression. The early Pleistocene sediments seem to have been deposited between the first and second of four glaciations for which evidence can be found in the California River area. The California River fauna includes several extinct species and several species now confined to areas as remote as the northwestern Pacific and north Atlantic. The fauna probably lived in water temperatures much like those of the present time but deeper water on the Bering Shelf is suggested. The presence of an early Pleistocene fauna at the inner edge of the York Terrace at California River shows that the terrace was largely carved before and during early Pleistocene time. However, a marine fauna apparently of middle Pleistocene age is found on the York Terrace near Cassiterite Peak, and this seems to indicate that the terrace remained low until middle Pleistocene time. Uplift of the York Terrace probably was accompanied by uplift of Bering Strait. The strait may have been deeper, and there may have been no land bridge between the Seward Peninsula of Alaksa and the Chukotka Peninsula of Siberia during most of early and middle Pleistocene time. ?? 1974.

  4. Three-dimensional upper crustal velocity structure beneath San Francisco Peninsula, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Tom; Zoback, Mary Lou

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents new seismic data from, and crustal models of the San Francisco Peninsula. In much of central California the San Andreas fault juxtaposes the Cretaceous granitic Salinian terrane on its west and the Late Mesozoic/Early Tertiary Franciscan Complex on its east. On San Francisco Peninsula, however, the present-day San Andreas fault is completely within a Franciscan terrane, and the Pilarcitos fault, located southwest of the San Andreas, marks the Salinian-Franciscan boundary. This circumstance has evoked two different explanations: either the Pilarcitos is a thrust fault that has pushed Franciscan rocks over Salinian rocks or the Pilarcitos is a transform fault that has accommodated significant right-lateral slip. In an effort to better resolve the subsurface structure of the peninsula faults, we established a temporary network of 31 seismographs arrayed across the San Andreas fault and the subparallel Pilarcitos fault at ˜1-2 km spacings. These instruments were deployed during the first 6 months of 1995 and recorded local earthquakes, air gun sources set off in San Francisco Bay, and explosive sources. Travel times from these sources were used to augment earthquake arrival times recorded by the Northern California Seismic Network and were inverted for three-dimensional velocity structure. Results show lateral velocity changes at depth (˜0.5-7 km) that correlate with downward vertical projections of the surface traces of the San Andreas and Pilarcitos faults. We thus interpret the faults as high-angle to vertical features (constrained to a 70°-110° dip range). From this we conclude that the Pilarcitos fault is probably an important strike-slip fault that accommodated much of the right-lateral plate boundary strain on the peninsula prior to the initiation of the modern-day San Andreas fault in this region sometime after about 3.0 m.y. ago.

  5. Spatial Distribution of Dorylaimid and Mononchid Nematodes from Southeast Iberian Peninsula: Chorological Relationships among Species

    PubMed Central

    Liébanas, G.; Peña-Santiago, R.; Real, R.; Márquez, A. L.

    2002-01-01

    The spatial distribution of 138 Dorylaimid and Mononchid species collected in a natural area from the Southeast Iberian Peninsula was studied. A chorological classification was used to examine distribution patterns shared by groups of species. Eighty species were classified into 14 collective and 16 individual chorotypes. The geographical projections of several collective chorotypes are illustrated along with their corresponding distribution maps. The importance of this analysis to nematological study is briefly discussed. PMID:19265962

  6. Geochemistry of the Baie Charrier Basaltic Section, Courbet Peninsula, Kerguelen Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanano, D. W.; Weis, D.; Scoates, J. S.; Giret, A.

    2004-12-01

    The Kerguelen Archipelago, located in the Southern Indian Ocean, is the third largest oceanic island and represents the emergent part of the Northern Kerguelen Plateau. We present new petrographic and geochemical data from the Baie Charrier basaltic section on the northern Courbet Peninsula. This dataset complements the 1000 m Mont Crozier basaltic section located 16 km to the southwest in the central part of the peninsula. Isotopic compositions of the Crozier basalts are interpreted to be representative of the enriched component of the Kerguelen mantle plume. The Baie Charrier basalts are mildly alkalic and olivine-phyric, with a range of MgO contents (3.1-16.7 wt.%) significantly larger than that observed in the Crozier section. Mafic phenocrysts are normally zoned, with olivine core compositions of Fo86-70 and clinopyroxene core Mg#'s of 0.88 to 0.79. Mineral-melt equilibria constraints indicate a maximum MgO content for the Baie Charrier parental magmas of 8-10 wt.%. Major and trace element concentrations, as well as Sr, Nd, Pb, and Hf isotopic compositions, identify four distinct volcanic units within the Baie Charrier section, reflecting temporal changes in volcanism derived from a heterogeneous source region. A comparison of the Baie Charrier and Crozier sections shows similar Zr/Nb ratios of 6-7.5, enrichments in incompatible and light rare earth elements, and highly radiogenic Pb compositions (206Pb/204Pb = 18.35-18.64). This suggests that both sections are derived from the same source region and provides further evidence that the Courbet Peninsula is a single volcanic unit. However, the abundance of olivine-phyric basalts at Baie Charrier, and their absence at Crozier, suggests that the eruptive center of this volcano may not coincide with the present geographic center of the peninsula. The Baie Charrier basalts contain a strong signature of the enriched plume component and provide additional constraints on the composition of the Kerguelen mantle plume.

  7. Leishmanicidal evaluation of extracts from native plants of the Yucatan peninsula.

    PubMed

    Peraza-Sánchez, S R; Cen-Pacheco, F; Noh-Chimal, A; May-Pat, F; Simá-Polanco, P; Dumonteil, E; García-Miss, M R; Mut-Martín, M

    2007-06-01

    Methanol extracts were prepared from different parts of 18 plants collected in the Yucatan peninsula and evaluated in an in vitro bioassay for leishmanicidal activity against Leishmania mexicana promastigotes. The ten most potent plant extracts (IC(50)<50 microg/ml) were Aphelandra scabra leaves, Byrsonima bucidaefolia bark, Byrsonima crassifolia bark, Clusia flava leaves, Cupania dentata bark, Diphysa carthagenensis leaves, Dorstenia contrajerva whole plant, Milleria quinqueflora roots, Tridax procumbens whole plant, and Vitex gaumeri bark. PMID:17482379

  8. Arabian Peninsula and northeast Africa as seen from Gemini 11 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Arabian Peninsula (on left) and northeast Africa (on right) as seen from the Gemini 11 spacecraft at an altitude of 340 nautical miles during its 27th revolution of the earth, looking southeast. Saudia Arabia, South Arabia, Yemen and Aden Protectorate are at left. At bottom right is Ethiopia. French Somaliland is in center on right shore. Somali is at upper right. Body of water at bottom is Red Sea. Gulf of Aden is in center; and at top left is Indian Ocean.

  9. Fishery biology and management of Protonibea diacanthus (Sciaenidae) aggregations in far Northern Cape York Peninsula waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, M. J.; Gribble, N. A.; Garrett, R. N.

    2008-09-01

    The sciaenid Protonibea diacanthus is a large, long-lived predatory fish of inshore northern Australian waters, which forms annual aggregations that are fished extensively by traditional (subsistence) and recreational fishers. There are now widespread concerns that the resource is being overexploited. Indigenous fishers of the Cape York Northern Peninsula Area (NPA) relate that large adult fish (up to 1500 mm total length (TL)) made up the bulk of the catch from the sciaenid aggregations until about 1994. In contrast, sexually mature P. diacanthus comprised only a small component (12 fish out of 270=4.4%) examined in a 1999-2000 sampling programme that was biased towards the largest individuals available. At 790 mm TL, the minimum size at first maturity for female P. diacanthus in this study is much smaller than the 920 mm TL reported previously in Queensland waters. Developing ovaries were observed in specimens sampled from sciaenid aggregations which formed in NPA waters between May and September 2000. However, no fish with ripe or spent gonads were found in the study, so the current timing and location of the spawning season for P. diacanthus in the region remain unknown. Food items observed in the analysis of the diet of P. diacanthus from the NPA included a variety of teleosts and invertebrates. The range of animal taxa represented in the prey items support the description of an 'opportunistic predator' attributed to the species. In our sampling, the stomach contents of fish caught during the time of the aggregation events did not differ from those observed at other times of the year. A total of 114 P. diacanthus were tagged and released at aggregation sites during the study period, and 3 fish (2.6%) were subsequently recaptured. The low rate of tag returns from the wild stock tagging programme, both in this study (2.6%) and from recreational fisher tag/release programmes for the sciaenid elsewhere in Queensland (6.5%), were not explained by tag loss nor

  10. Geodetic implications on block formation and geodynamic domains in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrocoso, M.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Prates, G.; García, A.; Kraus, S.

    2016-01-01

    The South Shetland Islands archipelago is dynamically complex due to its tectonic surroundings. Most islands are part of a formerly active volcanic arc, although Deception, Penguin and Bridgeman Islands, as well as several submarine volcanoes, are characterized by active back-arc volcanism. Geodetic benchmarks were deployed and the movement of the lithosphere to which they were fixed measured to provide geodynamic insight for the South Shetland Islands, Bransfield Basin and Antarctic Peninsula area based on surface deformation. These benchmarks' data add spatial and temporal coverage to previous results. The results reveal two different geodynamic patterns, each confined to a distinct part of the South Shetland Islands archipelago. The inferred absolute horizontal velocity vectors for the benchmarks in the northeastern part of the archipelago are consistent with the opening of the Bransfield Basin, while benchmark vectors in the southwestern part of the archipelago are similar to those of the benchmarks on the Antarctic Peninsula. In between, Snow, Deception and Livingston Islands represent a transition zone. In this area, the horizontal velocity vectors relative to the Antarctic plate shift northeastwards from N to NW. Furthermore, the South Shetland Islands benchmarks, except for that at Gibbs (Elephant) Islands, indicate subsidence, which might be a consequence of the slab roll-back at the South Shetland Trench. In contrast, the uplift revealed by the Antarctic Peninsula benchmarks suggests glacial isostatic adjustment after the Larson B ice-shelf breakup.

  11. Remotely-Sensed Glacier Change Estimation: a Case Study at Lindblad Cove, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieber, K. D.; Mills, J. P.; Miller, P. E.; Fox, A. J.

    2016-06-01

    This study builds on existing literature of glacier change estimation in polar regions and is a continuation of efforts aimed at unlocking the information encapsulated in archival aerial photography of Antarctic Peninsula glaciers. Historical aerial imagery acquired in 1957 over three marine-terminating glaciers at Lindblad Cove on the West Coast of Trinity Peninsula is processed to extract digital elevation models (DEMs) which are subsequently compared to DEMs generated from present day (2014) WorldView-2 satellite stereo-imagery. The new WorldView-2 images offer unprecedented sub-metre resolution of the Antarctic Peninsula and are explored here to facilitate improved registration and higher accuracy analysis of glacier changes. Unlike many studies, which focus on glacier fronts or only restricted regions of glaciers, this paper presents a complete coverage of elevation changes across the glacier surfaces for two of the studied glaciers. The study utilises a robust least squares matching technique to ensure precise registration of the archival and modern DEMs, which is applied due to lack of existing ground control in this remote region. This case study reveals that, while many glaciers in polar regions are reported as experiencing significant mass loss, some glaciers are stable or even demonstrate mass gain. All three glaciers reported here demonstrated overall mean increases in surface elevation, indicative of positive mass balance ranging from 0.6 to 5.8 metre water equivalent between 1957 and 2014.

  12. Tectonically controlled sedimentation in the Mesozoic basins of the Antarctic Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, D.I.M.; Butterworth, P.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The Antarctica Peninsula (AP) lies on a medium-size block of continental crust and is one of a mosaic of west Antarctica coastal block that underwent a complex tectonic evolution during Gondwana breakup. The peninsula represents the eroded roots of a microcontinental volcanic arc; this arc lay above the easterly subducting proto-Pacific plate, and was active throughout the Mesozoic. The exposed Mesozoic basins display a complex stratigraphy, reflecting local tectonic and volcanic events. There are a few general trends. Almost all basins are post-late Oxfordian, their fill is entirely clastic, and is largely derived from the Antarctica peninsula volcanic arc. Most basins were affected by a period of arc expansion in the latest Jurassic or earliest Cretaceous, which manifests itself as inputs of lava or coarse volcaniclastic sediment overlying mudstones with an open marine fauna. Barriasian and older mudstones are generally finer grained and darker than mudstones from post-Berriasian strata. However, it must be emphasized that these are only general trends. Deformation is variable, commonly progressive. No lithostratigraphic units can be correlated between any two basins, nor are there any interregional unconformities. No matching is possible with basins of equivalent age in formerly contiguous areas of Gondwana. There is evidence that some global eustatic events are recorded in the sedimentary records of at least two of the AP Mesozoic basins, but these have effect only in periods of local tectonic quiescence. The dominant control on sedimentation in this large segment of the Pacific rim was arc tectonics.

  13. Chestnut cultivar diversification process in the Iberian Peninsula, Canary Islands, and Azores.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Lorenzo, Santiago; Costa, Rita Maria Lourenço; Ramos-Cabrer, Ana María; Ciordia-Ara, Marta; Ribeiro, Carla Alexandra Marques; Borges, Olga; Barreneche, Teresa

    2011-04-01

    This is a large-scale molecular study based on simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci of the diversification process in chestnut cultivars from Portugal and Spain, from the northern Iberian Peninsula to the Canary Islands and the Azores. A total of 593 grafted chestnut trees (Castanea sativa Mill.) were analysed with 10 SSRs: 292 from Portugal and 301 from Spain. Some of the trees studied were more than 300 years old. Accessions were analysed using a model-based Bayesian procedure to assess the geographical structure and to assign individuals to reconstructed populations based on the SSR genotypes. We found 356 different genotypes with a mean value of clonality of 33% owing to grafting. Mutations accounted for 6%, with hybridization being the main diversification process that can explain the great diversity found. Ten main cultivar groups were detected: four in northern Spain, five in the centre of the Iberian Peninsula, and one in southern Spain related to the centre of the Iberian Peninsula. This work demonstrated that cultivar origin and the diversification process was a combination of clonal propagation of selected seedlings, hybridization, and mutations, which allowed high levels of diversity to be maintained with respect to selected clones for fruit production. Furthermore, seedlings and graft sticks facilitated the transport to new destinations in the colonization process, transporting sometimes more than 3000 km if we consider the Azores and the Canary Islands. PMID:21491973

  14. Permafrost distribution in marine terraces and glacier margins in the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, António; Oliva, Marc; Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical surveying has been proven to be an effective method to unveil the distribution of permafrost conditions in polar environments. In the South Shetland Islands permafrost is considered to be marginal to discontinuous until elevations of 20-40 m asl changing to continuous at higher altitudes. However, there is no specific data about the distribution of permafrost in the recently deglaciated areas in the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Antarctica), the largest ice-free area in the South Shetland Islands. With the purpose of better understanding the existence or inexistence of permanent frozen conditions in this area, we have conducted a field season focusing on the geophysical surveying along two transects: from the coast to the highest marine terraces and from the glacier to the central plateau. The snowy conditions during the cold season in 2014 in the Byers Peninsula have conditioned a late melting of snow, which must be taken into account when interpreting the data related to frozen conditions inferred from the geophysical surveying. The results provide insights about the time required for permafrost to form in the lowest areas of the peninsula, as well as the possible existence of permafrost near the glacier front which may be indicative of the thermal properties of the base of the glacier (cold-warm). This research was financially supported by the HOLOANTAR project (Portuguese Science Foundation) and the AXA Research Fund.

  15. Inter-annual variation of NDVI over Korea Peninsula using harmonic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In-hwan; Han, Kyung-Soo; Pi, Kyoung-Jin; Park, Soo-Jae; Kim, Sang-Il

    2010-10-01

    Global warming and climatic changes due to human activities impact on marine and terrestrial ecosystems, which feedbacks to climate system. These negative feedbacks amplify or accelerate again global climate change. In particular, life cycle of vegetation sensitively vary according to global climate change. This study attempts to analyze quantitatively vegetation change in Korea peninsula using harmonic analysis. Satellite data was extracted from SPOT/VEGETATION S10 MVC (Maximum Value Composite) NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) products during 10 years (1999 to 2008) around Korea peninsula. This NDVI data set was pre-processed to correct noise pixels cause by cloud and ground wetness. Variation of vegetation life cycle was analyzed through amplitudes and phases of annual harmonic components (first harmonic components) per year for two land cover types (cropland and forest). The results clearly show that the peak of vegetation life cycle in Korea peninsula is brought forward to early. Especially, it represents that the phases over low latitudes area between 32.8°N and 38°N steadily decrease every year both forest and cropland. The study estimated that phase values moved up approximately 0.5 day per year in cropland and 0.8 day per year in forest.

  16. Impacts of the north and tropical Atlantic Ocean on the Antarctic Peninsula and sea ice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xichen; Holland, David M; Gerber, Edwin P; Yoo, Changhyun

    2014-01-23

    In recent decades, Antarctica has experienced pronounced climate changes. The Antarctic Peninsula exhibited the strongest warming of any region on the planet, causing rapid changes in land ice. Additionally, in contrast to the sea-ice decline over the Arctic, Antarctic sea ice has not declined, but has instead undergone a perplexing redistribution. Antarctic climate is influenced by, among other factors, changes in radiative forcing and remote Pacific climate variability, but none explains the observed Antarctic Peninsula warming or the sea-ice redistribution in austral winter. However, in the north and tropical Atlantic Ocean, the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (a leading mode of sea surface temperature variability) has been overlooked in this context. Here we show that sea surface warming related to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation reduces the surface pressure in the Amundsen Sea and contributes to the observed dipole-like sea-ice redistribution between the Ross and Amundsen-Bellingshausen-Weddell seas and to the Antarctic Peninsula warming. Support for these findings comes from analysis of observational and reanalysis data, and independently from both comprehensive and idealized atmospheric model simulations. We suggest that the north and tropical Atlantic is important for projections of future climate change in Antarctica, and has the potential to affect the global thermohaline circulation and sea-level change. PMID:24451542

  17. Modelled glacier response to centennial temperature and precipitation trends on the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Bethan J.; Golledge, Nicholas R.; Glasser, Neil F.; Carrivick, Jonathan L.; Ligtenberg, Stefan R. M.; Barrand, Nicholas E.; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Hambrey, Michael J.; Smellie, John L.

    2014-11-01

    The northern Antarctic Peninsula is currently undergoing rapid atmospheric warming. Increased glacier-surface melt during the twentieth century has contributed to ice-shelf collapse and the widespread acceleration, thinning and recession of glaciers. Therefore, glaciers peripheral to the Antarctic Ice Sheet currently make a large contribution to eustatic sea-level rise, but future melting may be offset by increased precipitation. Here we assess glacier-climate relationships both during the past and into the future, using ice-core and geological data and glacier and climate numerical model simulations. Focusing on Glacier IJR45 on James Ross Island, northeast Antarctic Peninsula, our modelling experiments show that this representative glacier is most sensitive to temperature change, not precipitation change. We determine that its most recent expansion occurred during the late Holocene `Little Ice Age' and not during the warmer mid-Holocene, as previously proposed. Simulations using a range of future Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change climate scenarios indicate that future increases in precipitation are unlikely to offset atmospheric-warming-induced melt of peripheral Antarctic Peninsula glaciers.

  18. Salmon Futures: Stakeholder-driven salmon management scenarios under changing environmental conditions on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trammell, E. J.; Krupa, M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the adaptive capacity of individuals within natural resource management agencies is a key component of assessing the vulnerability of salmon to future environmental change. We seek to explore the adaptive capacity of natural resource agencies on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula by exploring the drivers and implications of different salmon allocation scenarios through participatory workshops with managers. We present here the initial results from the first workshop, which explores the various drivers responsible for changes in salmon allocation. Ranging from global to local, and biophysical to socioeconomic, these drivers are also linked to specific actors in the region. These complex interactions comprise the Kenai Peninsula's social-ecological system and determine its ability to react to change. Using a stakeholder-driven scenario framework, we aim to: 1) explore the adaptive capacity of natural resource agencies in the region by exploring and exposing managers to different but logically coherent salmon allocation scenarios; 2) build stakeholder confidence in the science of environmental change on the Kenai Peninsula; and 3) develop a decision support tool that helps regional resource managers better understand their changing environment. We utilize and present the scenario framework as a platform for integrating hydrologic, landscape, and cultural change information into actionable decisions, crafted by the stakeholders, so that landscape change on the Kenai becomes more coordinated.

  19. Precipitation variability in September over the Korean Peninsula during ENSO developing phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Hye-Young; Park, Jong-Yeon; Kug, Jong-Seong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the relationship between the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and precipitation variability over the Korean Peninsula is investigated. In contrast to the previously-known positive correlation between them during an El Niño developing summer and winter, we found a considerably significant negative correlation in September between Niño3 Sea Surface Temperature and Korean precipitation during ENSO developing phase. The northerly wind is only seen during El Nino developing phase and is part of the cyclonic flow over the subtropical North Pacific. The cyclonic flow over the subtropical North Pacific is induced by the subtropical diabatic heating, which is a peculiar feature during El Niño developing phase. In addition, it is demonstrated that the negative correlation is partly attributed to the tropical cyclone (TC), particularly during La Niña phase. That is, TC tends to pass through Korean Peninsula more frequently during La Niña years, which leads to more precipitation over the Korean Peninsula.

  20. Natural Genetic Variation of Arabidopsis thaliana Is Geographically Structured in the Iberian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Picó, F. Xavier; Méndez-Vigo, Belén; Martínez-Zapater, José M.; Alonso-Blanco, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    To understand the demographic history of Arabidopsis thaliana within its native geographical range, we have studied its genetic structure in the Iberian Peninsula region. We have analyzed the amount and spatial distribution of A. thaliana genetic variation by genotyping 268 individuals sampled in 100 natural populations from the Iberian Peninsula. Analyses of 175 individuals from 7 of these populations, with 20 chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite loci and 109 common single nucleotide polymorphisms, show significant population differentiation and isolation by distance. In addition, analyses of one genotype from 100 populations detected significant isolation by distance over the entire Iberian Peninsula, as well as among six Iberian subregions. Analyses of these 100 genotypes with different model-based clustering algorithms inferred four genetic clusters, which show a clear-cut geographical differentiation pattern. On the other hand, clustering analysis of a worldwide sample showed a west–east Eurasian longitudinal spatial gradient of the commonest Iberian genetic cluster. These results indicate that A. thaliana genetic variation displays significant regional structure and consistently support the hypothesis that Iberia has been a glacial refugium for A. thaliana. Furthermore, the Iberian geographical structure indicates a complex regional population dynamics, suggesting that this region contained multiple Pleistocene refugia with a different contribution to the postglacial colonization of Europe. PMID:18716334

  1. Peninsulas of the neutron stability of nuclei in the vicinity of neutron magic numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, V. N.; Gridnev, K. A.; Greiner, W.; Gridnev, D. K.; Kuprikov, V. I.; Tarasov, D. V.; Vinas, X.

    2012-01-15

    On the basis of the Hartree-Fock method as implemented with Skyrme forces (Ska, SkM*, Sly4, and SkI2) and with allowance for an axial deformation and nucleon pairing in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer approximation, the properties of extremely neutron-rich even-even nuclei were calculated beyond the neutron drip line known earlier from theoretical calculations. It was shown that the chains of isotopes beyond the neutron drip line that contain N = 32, 58, 82, 126, and 184 neutrons form peninsulas of nuclei stable against the emission of one neutron and, in some cases, peninsulas of nuclei stable against the emission of two neutrons. The neutron- and proton-density distributions in nuclei forming stability peninsulas were found to be spherically symmetric. A mechanism via which the stability of nuclei might be restored beyond the neutron drip line was discussed. A comparison with the results of calculations by the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov method was performed for long chains of sulfur and gadolinium isotopes up to the neutron drip line.

  2. Pre-monsoon rain and its relationship with monsoon onset over the Indochina Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, Masashi; Matsumoto, Jun; kanae, Shinjiro; Oki, Taikan

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed rainfall during the pre-monsoon season from 1979 to 2002 over the Indochina Peninsula. Our multi-year analysis confirmed that the passage of the upper trough and moisture convergence in the lower troposphere produce intermittent rainfall events during the pre-monsoon season. From this result, three questions are raised. First, what are the characteristics of the upper trough? Second, what is the cause of the significant amount of moisture during the pre-monsoon season over inland Indochina? Third, what is the relationship between the intermittent pre-monsoon rainfall and monsoon onset? Our study suggests the following answers to these questions: 1) The upper trough is associated with the cyclone over the Yangtze River basin. This cyclone is baroclinic, so the upper trough over the study area is produced by the mid-latitude regime. 2) A significant amount of moisture over the Indochina Peninsula is produced by both intermittent rainfall associated with the passage of the upper trough and continuous rainfall occurred over a wide region associated with the equatorial southwesterly. 3) We found no clear relationship between rainfall amount during the pre-monsoon period and timing of monsoon onset over the Indochina Peninsula.

  3. Structural characterization and composition of Y-rich hainite from Sakharjok nepheline syenite pegmatite (Kola Peninsula, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyalina, L.; Zolotarev, A.; Selivanova, E.; Savchenko, Ye.; Zozulya, D.; Krivovichev, S.; Mikhailova, Yu.

    2015-08-01

    Y-rich hainite occurs in nepheline syenite pegmatite of the Sakharjok massif (Kola Peninsula, Russia). It forms euhedral prismatic crystals up to 2 mm in length as well as rims around an unidentified mineral phase (silicate of Ca, Y, Zr and Ti). The mineral is triclinic, space group P-1, a 9.6054(10), b 5.6928(6), c 7.3344(7) Å, α 89.903(2), β 101.082(2), γ 100.830(2)°, V 386.32(7) Å3, Z = 1. The calculated density is 3.39 g/cm3. Chemical composition of Sakharjok hainite is different from the previously published data by much higher Y and Nb contents up to 0.72 and 0.20 atoms per formula unit, respectively, by the two- to five-fold depletion in the LREEs and by the strong enrichment of the HREEs. From the single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, there is a significant amount of Y in the M1 site associated with the absence of Zr in it. Nb and Zr are concentrated in the M5 site substituting Ti. Combination of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data and electron microprobe data give the empirical formula (Ca1.04Y0.63REE0.24Mn0.02)∑1.93(Na0.92Ca0.77)∑1.69Ca2.00(Na0.65Ca0.10)∑0.75(Ti0.60Zr0.21Nb0.15Fe0.03)∑0.99((Si4.00Al0.02)∑4.02O14) (F2.61O1.39)∑4.00.

  4. [Mercury in edible mushrooms from the area of Kościersk forests and from the Vistula peninsula].

    PubMed

    Falandysz, J; Marcinowicz, A; Chwir, A

    1996-01-01

    The total mercury concentrations were determined in caps and stalks or a whole fruiting bodies of 13 species of edible mushrooms collected at the area of Kościerzyna forests (District of Gdańsk) and the Vistula Peninsula (District of Elblag) in 1993/94. The method of measurement was cold-vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) after wet digestion of the samples with concentrated nitric acid. Macrolepiota procera showed highest mercury concentration among species investigated and contained, respectively, 1100 micrograms/kg dry wt in caps and 580 micrograms/kg in stalks, while Lycoperdon perlatum showed 1100 micrograms/kg in a whole fruiting body. Suillus granulatus, Xerocomus subtomentosus, Leccinum scabrum, Oudemansiella platyphylla and Lactarius delicious contained mercury in concentration from 150 to 370 micrograms/kg dry wt in caps and from 70 to 180 micrograms/kg in stalks. Suillus bovinus, Chroogomphus rutilus and Armillariella mellea showed smallest concentrations of mercury between species examined, i.e. in caps from 29 to 65 micrograms/kg and in stalks from 23 to 49 micrograms/kg, on a average. Leccinum scabrum and Xerocomus badius were collected from the both distant in space sampling sites. In the case of L. scabrum the concentrations of mercury were very similar for the both sites investigated, i.e. between 290 +/- 100 and 370 +/- 330 in caps, and 180 +/- 60 and 220 +/- 160 micrograms/kg dry wt in stalks, while for X. badius differed and were between 73 +/- 20 and 220 +/- 60 in caps, and 49 +/- 13 and 130 +/- 40 in stalks (p < 0.001). PMID:9064742

  5. Late Cretaceous-early Eocene counterclockwise rotation of the Fueguian Andes and evolution of the Patagonia-Antarctic Peninsula system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poblete, F.; Roperch, P.; Arriagada, C.; Ruffet, G.; Ramírez de Arellano, C.; Hervé, F.; Poujol, M.

    2016-02-01

    The southernmost Andes of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego present a prominent arc-shaped structure: the Patagonian Bend. Whether the bending is a primary curvature or an orocline is still matter of controversy. New paleomagnetic data have been obtained south of the Beagle Channel in 39 out of 61 sites. They have been drilled in Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous sediments and interbedded volcanics and in mid-Cretaceous to Eocene intrusives of the Fuegian Batholith. The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility was measured at each site and the influence of magnetic fabric on the characteristic remanent magnetizations (ChRM) in plutonic rocks was corrected using inverse tensors of anisotropy of remanent magnetizations. Normal polarity secondary magnetizations with west-directed declination were obtained in the sediments and they did not pass the fold test. These characteristic directions are similar to those recorded by mid Cretaceous intrusives suggesting a remagnetization event during the normal Cretaceous superchron and describe a large (> 90°) counterclockwise rotation. Late Cretaceous to Eocene rocks of the Fueguian Batholith, record decreasing counterclockwise rotations of 45° to 30°. These paleomagnetic results are interpreted as evidence of a large counterclockwise rotation of the Fueguian Andes related to the closure of the Rocas Verdes Basin and the formation of the Darwin Cordillera during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene. The tectonic evolution of the Patagonian Bend can thus be described as the formation of a progressive arc from an oroclinal stage during the closure of the Rocas Verdes basin to a mainly primary arc during the final stages of deformation of the Magallanes fold and thrust belt. Plate reconstructions show that the Antarctic Peninsula would have formed a continuous margin with Patagonia between the Early Cretaceous and the Eocene, and acted as a non-rotational rigid block facilitating the development of the Patagonian Bend.

  6. Surveillance of Viruses in Wild Fish Populations in Areas around the Gulf of Cadiz (South Atlantic Iberian Peninsula)

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Patricia; Olveira, José G.; Labella, Alejandro; Cutrín, Juan Manuel; Baro, Jorge C.; Borrego, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a viral epidemiological study of wild fish around the Gulf of Cadiz (southwestern Iberian Peninsula) and is focused on infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), and viral nervous necrosis virus (VNNV). One fish species (Chelon labrosus) was sampled inside the gulf, at the mouth of the San Pedro River. Another 29 were sampled, in three oceanographic campaigns, at sites around the Bay of Cadiz. The fish were processed individually and subjected to isolation in cell culture and molecular diagnosis. VHSV was not isolated from any species. Thirteen IPNV-type isolates were obtained from barracuda (Sphyraena sphyraena), axillary seabream (Pagellus acarne), common two-banded seabream (Diplodus vulgaris), common pandora (P. erythrinus), Senegal seabream (D. bellottii), and surmullet (Mullus surmuletus). Six VNNV isolates were obtained from axillary seabream, common pandora, black seabream (Spondyliosoma cantharus), red mullet (Mullet barbatus), Lusitanian toadfish (Halobatrachus didactylus), and tub gurnard (Chelidonichtys lucerna). In the river mouth, viruses were detected only after reamplification, obtaining prevalence percentages of IPNV and VNNV (44.4 and 63.0%, respectively) much higher than those observed in the oceanographic campaigns (25.7 and 19.6%, respectively). The opposite results were obtained in the case of VHSV after reamplification: 11.1% in the river mouth and 43.6% in the oceanic locations. Analyzing the results with respect to the proximity of the sampling sites to the coast, an anthropogenic influence on wild fish is suggested and discussed. The type of viruses and the presence of natural reassortants are also discussed. PMID:25128341

  7. Seasonal variability in whale encounters in the Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Deborah; Chester, Edwin T.; Moore, Sue E.; Širovic, Ana; Hildebrand, John A.; Friedlaender, Ari S.

    2004-08-01

    Cetacean sighting surveys were conducted as part of nine multidisciplinary research cruises over late summer, autumn and winter of 2 years (2001-2003) during the Southern Ocean Global Ocean Ecosystems (SO GLOBEC) program. Sea-ice cover differed markedly between years, with apparent effects on cetacean distribution. No ice was present until late June in 2001, while the previous winter sea ice never fully retreated (>30% cover) during the 2002 or 2003 summer, thus increasing the proportion of thicker and more complex ice, including multi-year floes. Humpback (237 sightings; 537 individuals) and minke (103 sightings: 267 individuals) whales were the most commonly detected species. Data from seven comparable cruises were used to identify habitat for minke and humpback whales over five geographically distinct spatial divisions in the study area. In all years, both species were predominantly found in near coastal habitat, particularly in the fjords where complex habitat likely concentrated prey. In 2002 and 2003 the presence of sea ice provided additional feeding habitat, and the numbers of minkes (in winter) and humpbacks (late summer and autumn) in the area doubled compared with 2001. Humpbacks in particular were concentrated at the ice boundaries during late summer and autumn, while minke numbers increased in the winter that followed and occupied ice-covered areas along the entire shelf edge. Important resource sites for these species are mainly located in near-coastal areas and are used in all years, but when ice margins exist and intersect with resource sites they attract much larger numbers of animals due to the dynamics between sea ice and prey.

  8. Lower Miocene Stratigraphy along the Panama Canal and Its Bearing on the Central American Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Michael Xavier; Jones, Douglas S.; MacFadden, Bruce J.

    2008-01-01

    Before the formation of the Central American Isthmus, there was a Central American Peninsula. Here we show that southern Central America existed as a peninsula as early as 19 Ma, based on new lithostratigraphic, biostratigraphic and strontium chemostratigraphic analyses of the formations exposed along the Gaillard Cut of the Panama Canal. Land mammals found in the Miocene Cucaracha Formation have similar body sizes to conspecific taxa in North America, indicating that there existed a terrestrial connection with North America that allowed gene flow between populations during this time. How long did this peninsula last? The answer hinges on the outcome of a stratigraphic dispute: To wit, is the terrestrial Cucaracha Formation older or younger than the marine La Boca Formation? Previous stratigraphic studies of the Panama Canal Basin have suggested that the Cucaracha Formation lies stratigraphically between the shallow-marine Culebra Formation and the shallow-to-upper-bathyal La Boca Formation, the latter containing the Emperador Limestone. If the La Boca Formation is younger than the Cucaracha Formation, as many think, then the peninsula was short-lived (1–2 m.y.), having been submerged in part by the transgression represented by the overlying La Boca Formation. On the other hand, our data support the view that the La Boca Formation is older than the Cucaracha Formation. Strontium dating shows that the La Boca Formation is older (23.07 to 20.62 Ma) than both the Culebra (19.83–19.12 Ma) and Cucaracha (Hemingfordian to Barstovian North American Land Mammal Ages; 19–14 Ma) formations. The Emperador Limestone is also older (21.24–20.99 Ma) than the Culebra and Cucaracha formations. What has been called the “La Boca Formation” (with the Emperador Limestone), is re-interpreted here as being the lower part of the Culebra Formation. Our new data sets demonstrate that the main axis of the volcanic arc in southern Central America more than likely existed as a

  9. Abrupt along-strike change in tectonic style: San Andreas fault zone, San Francisco Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zoback, M.L.; Jachens, R.C.; Olson, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Seismicity and high-resolution aeromagnetic data are used to define an abrupt change from compressional to extensional tectonism within a 10- to 15-km-wide zone along the San Andreas fault on the San Francisco Peninsula and offshore from the Golden Gate. This 100-km-long section of the San Andreas fault includes the hypocenter of the Mw = 7.8 1906 San Francisco earthquake as well as the highest level of persistent microseismicity along that ???470-km-long rupture. We define two distinct zones of deformation along this stretch of the fault using well-constrained relocations of all post-1969 earthquakes based a joint one-dimensional velocity/hypocenter inversion and a redetermination of focal mechanisms. The southern zone is characterized by thrust- and reverse-faulting focal mechanisms with NE trending P axes that indicate "fault-normal" compression in 7- to 10-km-wide zones of deformation on both sides of the San Andreas fault. A 1- to 2-km-wide vertical zone beneath the surface trace of the San Andreas is characterized by its almost complete lack of seismicity. The compressional deformation is consistent with the young, high topography of the Santa Cruz Mountains/Coast Ranges as the San Andreas fault makes a broad restraining left bend (???10??) through the southernmost peninsula. A zone of seismic quiescence ???15 km long separates this compressional zone to the south from a zone of combined normal-faulting and strike-slip-faulting focal mechanisms (including a ML = 5.3 earthquake in 1957) on the northernmost peninsula and offshore on the Golden Gate platform. Both linear pseudo-gravity gradients, calculated from the aeromagnetic data, and seismic reflection data indicate that the San Andreas fault makes an abrupt ???3-km right step less than 5 km offshore in this northern zone. A similar right-stepping (dilatational) geometry is also observed for the subparallel San Gregorio fault offshore. Persistent seismicity and extensional tectonism occur within the San

  10. Kinematic Model of the Izu Peninsula in the Northern Margin of the Philippine Sea Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, K.; Tabei, T.

    2008-12-01

    The Izu Peninsula in the northern margin of the Philippine Sea plate (PH) is the end of the Izu-Bonin arc that is colliding with the central Japan (CJ). Nationwide continuous GPS array has shown that the motion of the peninsula is significantly deviated compared with the stationary motion of the main part of PH. We propose a new kinematic model to explain a convergence process of the northern margin of PH. We consider the Izu Peninsula and its surrounding form a crustal block that has been detached from PH. At the same time we assume the Izu block suffers from significant internal deformation between PH and CJ. At first we determine a rigid rotation (the Euler pole and rotation rate) of the Izu block relative to PH and CJ. Then rigid motions predicted from the above rotation pole and rate are subtracted from the observed GPS velocities. The residuals show systematic strain patterns that are characterized by no remarkable deformation near the collision boundary with CJ and clear NW-SE contraction inside the block. Next we combine a collision at the root of the peninsula (Ishibashi and Itani, 2004) and a horizontal detachment beneath the peninsula (Seno, 2005) to explain the internal deformation. Thus the surface deformation can be expressed by a summation of two effects, collision and detachment, which can be evaluated by tensile and shear faults in an elastic half-space, respectively. However, relative magnitudes of these effects are unknown. Therefore we search an optimum model that reproduces the observed deformation field varying relative magnitudes of two effects. One possible model is that about 60% of the relative motion between PH and CJ is absorbed by the collision and the rest by the slip on the detachment. The remaining problems are exact location and configuration of the boundary between the Izu block and PH, strength of interaction at that boundary, and a horizontal extent of the detachment. We will refine a model using GPS data obtained at islands and

  11. Spatial variation of Lg-wave attenuation in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, Raquel; Ugalde, Arantza; Villaseñor, Antonio; José Jurado, María

    2014-05-01

    Within a global context, the Iberian Peninsula is a region where low to moderate (Mw < 5.5) earthquakes occur, most of them at shallow depths (h < 40 km). Seismicity concentrates mainly around the Pyrenean Range, the northwestern part of the peninsula, and the southern deformation zone that includes the Betics, the Alborán Sea and the Gulf of Cádiz. In recent years, considerable improvements in seismic data quality and geographic coverage have been made by the deployment of new permanent and portable broadband seismic stations in the Iberian Peninsula. The dense accumulation of seismic data has allowed us to investigate lateral variation of crustal seismic attenuation to develop the first regional 2D Lg-wave attenuation model for the entire Iberian Peninsula and its frequency dependence. Seismic data used consist of 71 events with magnitudes 3 ≤ mbLg ≤ 5.4 focal depths less than 30 km and epicentral distances from 100 to 1000 km which were recorded by 343 seismic stations between January 2008 and October 2013. To avoid confusion with fundamental-mode Love-wave energy on the transverse components, we only analyzed vertical component recordings. Among all the methods proposed to measure Lg attenuation, we considered the reliable Two-Station Method that allows removing the common source term by taking the ratio of Lg amplitudes recorded at two different stations along the same great-circle path from the same event. It requires, however, strict source-station configuration and dense event and station coverage. The spectral ratios collected over high-quality interstation paths were used to determine 1 Hz Lg Q (Q0) and its frequency dependence η. Then, the lateral variations of the attenuation parameters were mapped using inversion. Lg-wave propagation was found to be inefficient or blocked for most of the paths crossing the Mediterranean Sea, the western Alborán Sea and the Strait of Gibraltar. Our results reflect large variations in Q0 values across the Iberian

  12. Estimation of seismic source parameters for earthquakes in the southern Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, H.; Sheen, D.

    2013-12-01

    Recent seismicity in the Korean Peninsula is shown to be low but there is the potential for more severe seismic activity. Historical records show that there were many damaging earthquakes around the Peninsula. Absence of instrumental records of damaging earthquakes hinders our efforts to understand seismotectonic characteristics in the Peninsula and predict seismic hazards. Therefore it is important to analyze instrumental records precisely to help improve our knowledge of seismicity in this region. Several studies on seismic source parameters in the Korean Peninsula were performed to find source parameters for a single event (Kim, 2001; Jo and Baag, 2007; Choi, 2009; Choi and Shim, 2009; Choi, 2010; Choi and Noh, 2010; Kim et al., 2010), to find relationships between source parameters (Kim and Kim, 2008; Shin and Kang, 2008) or to determine the input parameters for the stochastic strong ground motion simulation (Jo and Baag, 2001; Junn et al., 2002). In all previous studies, however, the source parameters were estimated only from small numbers of large earthquakes in this region. To understand the seismotectonic environment in low seismicity region, it will be better that a study on the source parameters is performed by using as many data as we can. In this study, therefore, we estimated seismic source parameters, such as the corner frequency, Brune stress drop and moment magnitude, from 503 events with ML≥1.6 that occurred in the southern part of the Korean Peninsula from 2001 to 2012. The data set consist of 2,834 S-wave trains on three-component seismograms recorded at broadband seismograph stations which have been operating by the Korea Meteorological Administration and the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources. To calculate the seismic source parameters, we used the iterative method of Jo and Baag (2001) based on the methods of Snoke (1987) and Andrews (1986). In this method, the source parameters are estimated by using the integration of

  13. Lower Miocene stratigraphy along the Panama Canal and its bearing on the Central American Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Michael Xavier; Jones, Douglas S; MacFadden, Bruce J

    2008-01-01

    Before the formation of the Central American Isthmus, there was a Central American Peninsula. Here we show that southern Central America existed as a peninsula as early as 19 Ma, based on new lithostratigraphic, biostratigraphic and strontium chemostratigraphic analyses of the formations exposed along the Gaillard Cut of the Panama Canal. Land mammals found in the Miocene Cucaracha Formation have similar body sizes to conspecific taxa in North America, indicating that there existed a terrestrial connection with North America that allowed gene flow between populations during this time. How long did this peninsula last? The answer hinges on the outcome of a stratigraphic dispute: To wit, is the terrestrial Cucaracha Formation older or younger than the marine La Boca Formation? Previous stratigraphic studies of the Panama Canal Basin have suggested that the Cucaracha Formation lies stratigraphically between the shallow-marine Culebra Formation and the shallow-to-upper-bathyal La Boca Formation, the latter containing the Emperador Limestone. If the La Boca Formation is younger than the Cucaracha Formation, as many think, then the peninsula was short-lived (1-2 m.y.), having been submerged in part by the transgression represented by the overlying La Boca Formation. On the other hand, our data support the view that the La Boca Formation is older than the Cucaracha Formation. Strontium dating shows that the La Boca Formation is older (23.07 to 20.62 Ma) than both the Culebra (19.83-19.12 Ma) and Cucaracha (Hemingfordian to Barstovian North American Land Mammal Ages; 19-14 Ma) formations. The Emperador Limestone is also older (21.24-20.99 Ma) than the Culebra and Cucaracha formations. What has been called the "La Boca Formation" (with the Emperador Limestone), is re-interpreted here as being the lower part of the Culebra Formation. Our new data sets demonstrate that the main axis of the volcanic arc in southern Central America more than likely existed as a peninsula

  14. Mass Balance of the Northern Antarctic Peninsula and its Ongoing Response to Ice Shelf Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scambos, T. A.; Berthier, E.; Haran, T. M.; Shuman, C. A.; Cook, A. J.; Bohlander, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    An assessment of the most rapidly changing areas of the Antarctic Peninsula (north of 66°S) shows that ice mass loss for the region is dominated by areas affected by eastern-Peninsula ice shelf losses in the past 20 years. Little if any of the mass loss is compensated by increased snowfall in the northwestern or far northern areas. We combined satellite stereo-image DEM differencing and ICESat-derived along-track elevation changes to measure ice mass loss for the Antarctic Peninsula north of 66°S between 2001-2010, focusing on the ICESat-1 period of operation (2003-2009). This mapping includes all ice drainages affected by recent ice shelf loss in the northeastern Peninsula (Prince Gustav, Larsen Inlet, Larsen A, and Larsen B) as well as James Ross Island, Vega Island, Anvers Island, Brabant Island and the adjacent west-flowing glaciers. Polaris Glacier (feeding the Larsen Inlet, which collapsed in 1986) is an exception, and may have stabilized. Our method uses ASTER and SPOT-5 stereo-image DEMs to determine dh/dt for elevations below 800 m; at higher elevations ICESat along-track elevation differencing is used. To adjust along-track path offsets between its 2003-2009 campaigns, we use a recent DEM of the Peninsula to establish and correct for cross-track slope (Cook et al., 2012, doi:10.5194/essdd-5-365-2012; http://nsidc.org/data/nsidc-0516.html) . We reduce the effect of possible seasonal variations in elevation by using only integer-year repeats of the ICESat tracks for comparison. Mass losses are dominated by the major glaciers that had flowed into the Prince Gustav (Boydell, Sjorgren, Röhss), Larsen A (Edgeworth, Bombardier, Dinsmoor, Drygalski), and Larsen B (Hektoria, Jorum, and Crane) embayments. The pattern of mass loss emphasizes the significant and multi-decadal response to ice shelf loss. Areas with shelf losses occurring 30 to 100s of years ago seem to be relatively stable or losing mass only slowly (western glaciers, northernmost areas). The

  15. Detailed predictions of climate induced changes in the thermal and flow regimes in mountain streams of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, José M.; Muñoz-Mas, Rafael; García de Jalón, Diego; Solana, Joaquín; Alonso, Carlos; Martínez-Capel, Francisco; Ribalaygua, Jaime; Pórtoles, Javier; Monjo, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Streamflow and temperature regimes are well-known to influence on the availability of suitable physical habitat for instream biological communities. General Circulation Models (GCMs) have predicted significant changes in timing and geographic distribution of precipitation and atmospheric temperature for the ongoing century. However, differences in these predictions may arise when focusing on different spatial and temporal scales. Therefore, to perform substantiated mitigation and management actions detailed scales are necessary to adequately forecast the consequent thermal and flow regimes. Regional predictions are relatively abundant but detailed ones, both spatially and temporally, are still scarce. The present study aimed at predicting the effects of climate change on the thermal and flow regime in the Iberian Peninsula, refining the resolution of previous studies. For this purpose, the study encompassed 28 sites at eight different mountain rivers and streams in the central part of the Iberian Peninsula (Spain). The daily flow was modelled using different daily, monthly and quarterly lags of the historical precipitation and temperature time series. These precipitation-runoff models were developed by means of M5 model trees. On the other hand water temperature was modelled at similar time scale by means of nonlinear regression from dedicated site-specific data. The developed models were used to simulate the temperature and flow regime under two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCPs) climate change scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) until the end of the present century by considering nine different GCMs, which were pertinently downscaled. The precipitation-runoff models achieved high accuracy (NSE>0.7), especially in regards of the low flows of the historical series. Results concomitantly forecasted flow reductions between 7 and 17 % (RCP4.5) and between 8 and 49% (RCP8.5) of the annual average in the most cases, being variable the magnitude and timing at each

  16. Daily precipitation extreme events for the Iberian Penins