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Sample records for situ reaction study

  1. In Situ Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies of Lithium-Oxygen Redox Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi-Chun; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Harding, Jonathon R.; Mutoro, Eva; Baggetto, Loïc; Dudney, Nancy J.; Liu, Zhi; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2012-10-01

    The lack of fundamental understanding of the oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution in nonaqueous electrolytes significantly hinders the development of rechargeable lithium-air batteries. Here we employ a solid-state Li4+xTi5O12/LiPON/LixV2O5 cell and examine in situ the chemistry of Li-O2 reaction products on LixV2O5 as a function of applied voltage under ultra high vacuum (UHV) and at 500 mtorr of oxygen pressure using ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS). Under UHV, lithium intercalated into LixV2O5 while molecular oxygen was reduced to form lithium peroxide on LixV2O5 in the presence of oxygen upon discharge. Interestingly, the oxidation of Li2O2 began at much lower overpotentials (~240 mV) than the charge overpotentials of conventional Li-O2 cells with aprotic electrolytes (~1000 mV). Our study provides the first evidence of reversible lithium peroxide formation and decomposition in situ on an oxide surface using a solid-state cell, and new insights into the reaction mechanism of Li-O2 chemistry.

  2. In Situ Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies of Lithium-Oxygen Redox Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Chun; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Harding, Jonathon R.; Mutoro, Eva; Baggetto, Loïc; Dudney, Nancy J.; Liu, Zhi; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2012-01-01

    The lack of fundamental understanding of the oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution in nonaqueous electrolytes significantly hinders the development of rechargeable lithium-air batteries. Here we employ a solid-state Li4+xTi5O12/LiPON/LixV2O5 cell and examine in situ the chemistry of Li-O2 reaction products on LixV2O5 as a function of applied voltage under ultra high vacuum (UHV) and at 500 mtorr of oxygen pressure using ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS). Under UHV, lithium intercalated into LixV2O5 while molecular oxygen was reduced to form lithium peroxide on LixV2O5 in the presence of oxygen upon discharge. Interestingly, the oxidation of Li2O2 began at much lower overpotentials (~240 mV) than the charge overpotentials of conventional Li-O2 cells with aprotic electrolytes (~1000 mV). Our study provides the first evidence of reversible lithium peroxide formation and decomposition in situ on an oxide surface using a solid-state cell, and new insights into the reaction mechanism of Li-O2 chemistry. PMID:23056907

  3. In situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of lithium-oxygen redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Chun; Crumlin, Ethan J; Veith, Gabriel M; Harding, Jonathon R; Mutoro, Eva; Baggetto, Loïc; Dudney, Nancy J; Liu, Zhi; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2012-01-01

    The lack of fundamental understanding of the oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution in nonaqueous electrolytes significantly hinders the development of rechargeable lithium-air batteries. Here we employ a solid-state Li(4+x)Ti(5)O(12)/LiPON/Li(x)V(2)O(5) cell and examine in situ the chemistry of Li-O(2) reaction products on Li(x)V(2)O(5) as a function of applied voltage under ultra high vacuum (UHV) and at 500 mtorr of oxygen pressure using ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS). Under UHV, lithium intercalated into Li(x)V(2)O(5) while molecular oxygen was reduced to form lithium peroxide on Li(x)V(2)O(5) in the presence of oxygen upon discharge. Interestingly, the oxidation of Li(2)O(2) began at much lower overpotentials (~240 mV) than the charge overpotentials of conventional Li-O(2) cells with aprotic electrolytes (~1000 mV). Our study provides the first evidence of reversible lithium peroxide formation and decomposition in situ on an oxide surface using a solid-state cell, and new insights into the reaction mechanism of Li-O(2) chemistry. PMID:23056907

  4. In Situ Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies of Lithium-Oxygen Redox Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yi-Chun; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Harding, Jonathon R.; Mutoro, Eva; Baggetto, Loïc; Dudney, Nancy J.; Liu, Zhi; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2012-10-08

    The lack of fundamental understanding of the oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution in nonaqueous electrolytes significantly hinders the development of rechargeable lithium-air batteries. Here we employ a solid-state Li4+xTi5O12/LiPON/LixV2O5 cell and examine in situ the chemistry of Li-O2 reaction products on LixV2O5 as a function of applied voltage under ultra high vacuum (UHV) and near ambient-pressure of oxygen using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS). Oxygen reduction and evolution reactions take place on the surface of the mixed electronic and Li+ ionic conductor, LixV2O5, which eliminate parasitic reactions between oxygen reduction/evolution reaction intermediates and aprotic electrolytes used in Li-O2 batteries reported to date. Under UHV, reversible lithium intercalation and de-intercalation from LixV2O5 was noted, where the changes in the vanadium valence state revealed from XPS in this study were comparable to that reported previously from Li/LixV2O5 thin film batteries. In presence of oxygen near ambient pressure, the LixV2O5 surface was covered gradually by the reaction product of oxygen reduction, namely lithium peroxide (Li2O2) (approximately 1-2 unit cells) upon discharge. Interestingly, the LixV2O5 surface became re-exposed upon charging, and the oxidation of Li2O2 began at much lower overpotentials (~240 mV) than the charge overpotentials of Li-O2 cells (~1000 mV) with aprotic electrolytes, which can be attributed to subnanometer-thick Li2O2 with surfaces free of contaminants such as carbonate species. Our study provides first evidence of reversible lithium peroxide formation and decomposition in situ on an oxide surface using a solid-state cell, and new insights into the reaction mechanism of Li-O2 chemistry.

  5. Development of wet environment TEM (wet-ETEM) for in situ studies of liquid-catalyst reactions on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Gai, Pratibha L

    2002-02-01

    We present the development of in situ wet environmental transmission electron microscopy (wet-ETEM) for direct probing of controlled liquid-catalyst reactions at operating temperatures on the nanoscale. The first nanoscale imaging and electron diffraction of dynamic liquid hydrogenation and polymerization reactions in the manufacture of polyamides reported here opens up new opportunities for high resolution studies of a wide range of solution-solid and solution-gas-solid reactions in the chemical and biological sciences. PMID:14710723

  6. An in situ photoemission study of the dehydrogenation reaction of methanol on Ni( 1 0 0 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, R.; Whelan, C. M.; Denecke, R.; Steinrück, H.-P.

    2002-06-01

    Making use of the high intensity and resolution of synchrotron radiation at MAX-II (Sweden) we studied the dehydrogenation reaction of methanol on Ni(1 0 0) as a function of temperature by core level photoelectron spectroscopy. The temperature was increased linearly from 105 to 425 K with a heating rate of 0.06 K s -1. Measurement times of 60 s per C 1s spectrum allowed the dehydrogenation reaction to be monitored in situ. The different binding energies of the core level characteristic of different adsorbed species are reported. After exposure at 105 K, the C 1s spectra exhibit two peaks, representing methanol in multilayer and monolayer states. Above 160 K the multilayer is completely desorbed and methanol from the monolayer starts to dehydrogenate to form a methoxy species which decomposes above 240 K to carbon monoxide adsorbed in the bridge site. The onset of the on-top site occupation is observed at 270 K. The data suggests conversion from bridge to on-top site CO around 290 K. Our results show good agreement with literature values from temperature programmed desorption and Fourier transform infra-red experiments and provide new information in the form of quantitative data on the decomposition pathway of methanol adsorbed on Ni(1 0 0).

  7. In situ high pressure and temperature carbon-13 nmr for the study of carbonation reactions of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surface, James Andrew

    The aqueous reactions of carbon dioxide with various Mg-containing minerals [MgO, Mg(OH)2, and Mg2SiO4] at several different pressures (1-200 bar) and temperatures (25-150C) have been studied using a novel, elevated pressure and temperature 13C NMR probe. Critical observations about reaction rates, chemical exchange, and pH measurements throughout these reactions and the implications of the in situ measurements made during these reactions are discussed. A new method is used to elucidate pH under high pressure and temperature conditions which utilizes a calculation scheme wherein experimental data and a computational model are combined. Additionally, a 1D pH imaging method is employed to observe pH gradient effects across mineral samples during their reaction with CO2. Finally, other experimental details are discussed including ex situ analysis on carbonate products using pXRD, Raman, and MAS NMR. Detailed discussion outlines how to use 13C NMR to study CO2 mineralization reactions.

  8. Development of a reaction cell for in-situ/operando studies of surface of a catalyst under a reaction condition and during catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2016-06-01

    Tracking surface chemistry of a catalyst during catalysis is significant for fundamental understanding of catalytic performance of the catalyst since it allows for establishing an intrinsic correlation between surface chemistry of a catalyst at its working status and its corresponding catalytic performance. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used for in-situ studies of surfaces of different materials or devices in a gas. To simulate the gaseous environment of a catalyst in a fixed-bed a flowing gaseous environment of reactants around the catalyst is necessary. Here, we report the development of a new flowing reaction cell for simulating in-situ study of a catalyst surface under a reaction condition in gas of one reactant or during catalysis in a mixture of reactants of a catalytic reaction. The homemade reaction cell is installed in a high vacuum (HV) or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment of a chamber. The flowing gas in the reaction cell is separated from the HV or UHV environment through well sealings at three interfaces between the reaction cell and X-ray window, sample door and aperture of front cone of an energy analyzer. Catalyst in the cell is heated through infrared laser beam introduced through a fiber optics interfaced with the reaction cell through a homemade feedthrough. The highly localized heating on the sample holder and Au-passivated internal surface of the reaction cell effectively minimizes any unwanted reactions potentially catalyzed by the reaction cell. The incorporated laser heating allows a fast heating and a high thermal stability of the sample at a high temperature. With this cell, a catalyst at 800 °C in a flowing gas can be tracked readily.

  9. Development of a reaction cell for in-situ/operando studies of surface of a catalyst under a reaction condition and during catalysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2016-06-01

    Tracking surface chemistry of a catalyst during catalysis is significant for fundamental understanding of catalytic performance of the catalyst since it allows for establishing an intrinsic correlation between surface chemistry of a catalyst at its working status and its corresponding catalytic performance. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used for in-situ studies of surfaces of different materials or devices in a gas. To simulate the gaseous environment of a catalyst in a fixed-bed a flowing gaseous environment of reactants around the catalyst is necessary. Here, we report the development of a new flowing reaction cell for simulating in-situ study of a catalyst surface under a reaction condition in gas of one reactant or during catalysis in a mixture of reactants of a catalytic reaction. The homemade reaction cell is installed in a high vacuum (HV) or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment of a chamber. The flowing gas in the reaction cell is separated from the HV or UHV environment through well sealings at three interfaces between the reaction cell and X-ray window, sample door and aperture of front cone of an energy analyzer. Catalyst in the cell is heated through infrared laser beam introduced through a fiber optics interfaced with the reaction cell through a homemade feedthrough. The highly localized heating on the sample holder and Au-passivated internal surface of the reaction cell effectively minimizes any unwanted reactions potentially catalyzed by the reaction cell. The incorporated laser heating allows a fast heating and a high thermal stability of the sample at a high temperature. With this cell, a catalyst at 800 °C in a flowing gas can be tracked readily. PMID:27370473

  10. An in situ electron microscopy technique for the study of thermally activated reactions in multilayered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, M.A.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Weihs, T.P.

    1995-04-14

    A novel in situ transmission electron microscopy technique for the observation of reaction processes in multilayered materials is reported. The technique involves constant heating rate experiments of multilayered materials in image and diffraction modes. Because the fine scale microstructure of multilayered materials is typically a small fraction of the TEM specimen thickness, realistic comparison of the microstructural evolution with that of similarly processed thick foil samples is possible. Such experiments, when well designed, can provide rapid characterization of phase transformations and stability of nano-structured materials. The results of these experiments can be recorded in both video and micrograph format. The results and limitations of this technique will be shown for the Al/Zr and Al/Monel multilayered systems.

  11. Reaction of Formic Acid over Amorphous Manganese Oxide Catalytic Systems: An In Situ Study

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, Jason; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Mullins, David R; Suib, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of formic acid with amorphous manganese oxide (AMO) is investigated using in situ photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy techniques. Soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and in situ FTIR illustrate two possible modes of formate bound species at the AMO surface. Two peaks in the IR region from 1340-1390 cm{sup -1} are indicative of formate species bound to the surface in a bidentate configuration. However, a 224 cm{sup -1} band gap between v{sub s}OCO and v{sub as}OCO suggests formate is bound in a bridging configuration. Temperature-programmed desorption studies confirm the formate bound species desorbs as carbon dioxide from the surface at multiple binding sites. At temperatures above 700 K, the presence of K{sup +} {hor_ellipsis} OC complex suggests the bound species interacts at vacant sites related to framework oxygen and cation mobility.

  12. Reaction of Formic Acid over Amorphous Manganese Oxide Catalytic Systems: An In Situ Study

    SciTech Connect

    J Durand; S Senanayake; S Suib; D Mullins

    2011-12-31

    The interaction of formic acid with amorphous manganese oxide (AMO) is investigated using in situ photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy techniques. Soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and in situ FTIR illustrate two possible modes of formate bound species at the AMO surface. Two peaks in the IR region from 1340-1390 cm{sup -1} are indicative of formate species bound to the surface in a bidentate configuration. However, a 224 cm{sup -1} band gap between v{sub s}OCO and v{sub as}OCO suggests formate is bound in a bridging configuration. Temperature-programmed desorption studies confirm the formate bound species desorbs as carbon dioxide from the surface at multiple binding sites. At temperatures above 700 K, the presence of K{sup +} {hor_ellipsis} OC complex suggests the bound species interacts at vacant sites related to framework oxygen and cation mobility.

  13. Utilizing in Situ Electrochemical SHINERS for Oxygen Reduction Reaction Studies in Aprotic Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Thomas A; Hardwick, Laurence J

    2016-06-01

    Spectroscopic detection of reaction intermediates upon a variety of electrode surfaces is of major interest within physical chemistry. A notable technique in the study of the electrochemical interface has been surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The drawback of SERS is that it is limited to roughened gold and silver substrates. Herein we report that shell-isolated nanoparticles for enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) can overcome the limitations of SERS and has followed the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), within a nonaqueous electrolyte, on glassy carbon, gold, palladium, and platinum disk electrodes. The work presented demonstrates SHINERS for spectroelectrochemical studies for applied and fundamental electrochemistry in aprotic electrolytes, especially for the understanding and development of future metal-oxygen battery applications. In particular, we highlight that with the addition of Li(+), both the electrode surface and solvent influence the ORR mechanism, which opens up the possibility of tailoring surfaces to produce desired reaction pathways. PMID:27195529

  14. Development of an FTIR in situ reactor for real time study of surface reactions in photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauchecorne, Birger

    For many years, photocatalysis has been proposed as one of the promising techniques to abate environmental pollutants. To improve the catalytic efficiency, it is vital to know the reaction mechanisms of the photocatalytic degradation. Different methods are therefore described in literature to study these mechanisms at the gaseous phase/photocatalyst interface with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as a commonly used method. The reactors described in literature and/or available on the market experience some technical and scientific difficulties. Generally, the catalyst can only be investigated after the reactions have occurred, or it is only possible to look at the changes in the gas phase concentrations while the reactions are taking place. It is thus a major challenge to develop a reactor which makes it possible to detect changes on the catalyst surface at the moment the reactions are happening. In this work, a new reactor is developed that makes it possible to study the catalytic surface at the moment the reactions occur, by means of transmission-absorption FTIR spectroscopy. Moreover, by using UV LEDs, it was possible to install the UV light inside the reactor area, so that no harmful UV light can leave the reactor, inherently making it a safer method. It was also opted to construct the reactor in a modular way, so that every part was interchangeable and could easily be replaced according to the needs of the researcher. A special screw cap is designed to hold the UV LEDs on a printed circuit board and to fit in every standard FTIR spectrometer. This study provides exciting new insights in the photocatalytic degradation mechanism of ethylene and acetaldehyde. It is for instance found that OH radicals are used as the oxidising agents to abate these pollutants. For ethylene it was proven that the molecular orbitals play an important role, resulting in the formation of both formaldehyde and formic acid as intermediates before complete mineralisation

  15. Reactions of graphene supported Co3O4 nanocubes with lithium and magnesium studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Li, Qianqian; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.; Rao, Qunli; Xu, Junming

    2016-02-01

    Reaction beyond intercalation and the utilization of metal ions beyond lithium-ions are two promising approaches for developing the next generation of high capacity and low cost energy storage materials. Here, we use graphene supported Co3O4 nanocubes and study their reaction with lithium, magnesium and aluminum using in situ transmission electron microscopy. On lithiation, the Co3O4 nanocubes decompose to Co metal nanoparticles (2 to 3 nm) and embed in as-formed Li2O matrix; conversely, the CoO nanoparticles form on the Co site accompanying the decomposition of Li2O in the delithiation process. The lithiation process is dominated by surface diffusion of Li+, and graphene sheets enhance the Li+ diffusion. However, upon charge with magnesium, the Mg2+ diffusion is sluggish, and there is no sign of conversion reaction between Mg and Co3O4 at room temperature. Instead, a thin film consisting of metal Mg nanoparticles is formed on the surface of graphene due to a process similar to metal plating. The Al3+ diffusion is even more sluggish and no reaction between Al and Co3O4 is observed. These findings provide insights to tackle the reaction mechanism of multivalent ions with electrode materials.

  16. Reactions of graphene supported Co3O4 nanocubes with lithium and magnesium studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Li, Qianqian; Dravid, Vinayak P; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R; Rao, Qunli; Xu, Junming

    2016-02-26

    Reaction beyond intercalation and the utilization of metal ions beyond lithium-ions are two promising approaches for developing the next generation of high capacity and low cost energy storage materials. Here, we use graphene supported Co3O4 nanocubes and study their reaction with lithium, magnesium and aluminum using in situ transmission electron microscopy. On lithiation, the Co3O4 nanocubes decompose to Co metal nanoparticles (2 to 3 nm) and embed in as-formed Li2O matrix; conversely, the CoO nanoparticles form on the Co site accompanying the decomposition of Li2O in the delithiation process. The lithiation process is dominated by surface diffusion of Li(+), and graphene sheets enhance the Li(+) diffusion. However, upon charge with magnesium, the Mg(2+) diffusion is sluggish, and there is no sign of conversion reaction between Mg and Co3O4 at room temperature. Instead, a thin film consisting of metal Mg nanoparticles is formed on the surface of graphene due to a process similar to metal plating. The Al(3+) diffusion is even more sluggish and no reaction between Al and Co3O4 is observed. These findings provide insights to tackle the reaction mechanism of multivalent ions with electrode materials. PMID:26808457

  17. In Situ Potentiodynamic Analysis of the Electrolyte/Silicon Electrodes Interface Reactions--A Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Han, Hui-Ling; Ross, Philip N; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2016-01-27

    The key factor in long-term use of batteries is the formation of an electrically insulating solid layer that allows lithium ion transport but stops further electrolyte redox reactions on the electrode surface, hence solid electrolyte interphase (SEI). We have studied a common electrolyte, 1.0 M LiPF6/ethylene carbonate (EC)/diethyl carbonate (DEC), reduction products on crystalline silicon (Si) electrodes in a lithium (Li) half-cell system under reaction conditions. We employed in situ sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) with interface sensitivity in order to probe the molecular composition of the SEI surface species under various applied potentials where electrolyte reduction is expected. We found that, with a Si(100)-hydrogen terminated wafer, a Si-ethoxy (Si-OC2H5) surface intermediate forms due to DEC decomposition. Our results suggest that the SEI surface composition varies depending on the termination of Si surface, i.e., the acidity of the Si surface. We provide the evidence of specific chemical composition of the SEI on the anode surface under reaction conditions. This supports an electrochemical electrolyte reduction mechanism in which the reduction of the DEC molecule to an ethoxy moiety plays a key role. These findings shed new light on the formation mechanism of SEI on Si anodes in particular and on SEI formation in general. PMID:26651259

  18. A study on the orientation inheritance in laminated NiAl produced by in situ reaction annealing.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan; Fan, Guohua; Geng, Lin

    2016-04-01

    In order to promote the performance of B2 NiAl by texture control of orientation during in situ processing, phase transformation in laminated NiAl with bimodal grain size distribution manufactured by reaction annealing of Ni and Al foils has been studied. It turned out that there existed a Kurdjumov-Sachs orientation relationship (K-S OR) between parent Ni and product NiAl by crystallography analysis according to the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) results. The parent Ni did not transform to the product NiAl directly but via the formation of Ni3Al firstly according to the transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of the interface. This led to a new K-S OR between Ni3Al and NiAl with a small atomic misfit, which made less residual stress generated through the formation of Ni3Al than directly from the parent Ni. PMID:26867210

  19. In Situ Study on Current Density Distribution and Its Effect on Interfacial Reaction in a Soldering Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Lin; Zhao, Ning; Ma, Haitao; Zhao, Huijing; Huang, Mingliang

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial reaction in Cu/Sn/Cu solder joint during liquid-solid eletromigration (EM) was in situ studied using synchrotron radiation real-time imaging technology. The current density distribution in the solder joint was analyzed with the finite element method (FEM). The relationships among solder shape, current density distribution, Cu dissolution, and the formation and dissolution of interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) were revealed. The current promoted dissolution of the cathode IMC and growth of the anode IMC and suppressed the dissolution of anode Cu. The change of interfacial IMC had little effect on the current density distribution; however, the dissolution of cathode Cu, which changed the solder shape, had a significant effect on the current density distribution. The dissolution of cathode Cu under forward current and cathode IMC under reverse current and the growth of anode IMC under forward current was faster where the current density was higher. The synchrotron radiation real-time imaging technology can not only in situ observe the change of solder shape, the dissolution and growth behavior of interfacial IMC and the dissolution behavior of substrate in a soldering process but also provide data needed for numerical simulation of current density distribution in a solder joint.

  20. A straightforward implementation of in situ solution electrochemical ¹³C NMR spectroscopy for studying reactions on commercial electrocatalysts: ethanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Sorte, E G; Sun, S-G; Tong, Y Y J

    2015-05-11

    Identifying and quantifying electrocatalytic-reaction-generated solution species, be they reaction intermediates or products, are highly desirable in terms of understanding the associated reaction mechanisms. We report herein a straightforward implementation of in situ solution electrochemical (13)C NMR spectroscopy for the first time that enables in situ studies of reactions on commercial fuel-cell electrocatalysts (Pt and PtRu blacks). Using ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) as a working example, we discovered that (1) the complete oxidation of ethanol to CO2 only took place dominantly at the very beginning of a potentiostatic chronoamperometric (CA) measurement and (2) the PtRu had a much higher activity in catalysing oxygen insertion reaction that leads to acetic acid. PMID:25868425

  1. In-situ time resolved synchrotron powder diffraction studies of synthesis and chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Norby, P.

    1995-09-01

    Equipment for time and temperature dependent powder diffraction has been developed, especially in order to be able to study hydrothermal syntheses of zeolites. The system is very versatile and has so far been used to study e.g. hydrothermal syntheses of zeolites and aluminophosphates, syntheses of layered phosphates, formation of Sorel cements, dehydration and phase transformations of zeolites, solid state synthesis of lanthanum manganites, ion exchange of zeolites using molten salt, and oxidation/reduction of lanthanum manganites at high temperatures. The sample is contained in quartz capillaries and is heated using a stream of hot air. External pressure can be applied allowing hydrothermal syntheses at temperatures up to 200 C to be performed. Controlled atmosphere is obtained by flowing gas or a mixture of gases through the capillary.

  2. Study on the Electrochemical Reaction Mechanism of ZnFe2O4 by In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qingmei; Wang, Shixin; Yao, Libing; Li, Haojie; Du, Gaohui; Ye, Huiqun; Fang, Yunzhang

    2016-06-01

    A family of mixed transition–metal oxides (MTMOs) has great potential for applications as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). However, the reaction mechanism of MTMOs anodes during lithiation/delithiation is remain unclear. Here, the lithiation/delithiation processes of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles are observed dynamically using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results suggest that during the first lithiation process the ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles undergo a conversion process and generate a composite structure of 1–3 nm Fe and Zn nanograins within Li2O matrix. During the delithiation process, volume contraction and the conversion of Zn and Fe take place with the disappearance of Li2O, followed by the complete conversion to Fe2O3 and ZnO not the original phase ZnFe2O4. The following cycles are dominated by the full reversible phase conversion between Zn, Fe and ZnO, Fe2O3. The Fe valence evolution during cycles evidenced by electron energy–loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques also exhibit the reversible conversion between Fe and Fe2O3 after the first lithiation, agreeing well with the in situ TEM results. Such in situ TEM observations provide valuable phenomenological insights into electrochemical reaction of MTMOs, which may help to optimize the composition of anode materials for further improved electrochemical performance.

  3. Study on the Electrochemical Reaction Mechanism of ZnFe2O4 by In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, Qingmei; Wang, Shixin; Yao, Libing; Li, Haojie; Du, Gaohui; Ye, Huiqun; Fang, Yunzhang

    2016-01-01

    A family of mixed transition-metal oxides (MTMOs) has great potential for applications as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). However, the reaction mechanism of MTMOs anodes during lithiation/delithiation is remain unclear. Here, the lithiation/delithiation processes of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles are observed dynamically using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results suggest that during the first lithiation process the ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles undergo a conversion process and generate a composite structure of 1-3 nm Fe and Zn nanograins within Li2O matrix. During the delithiation process, volume contraction and the conversion of Zn and Fe take place with the disappearance of Li2O, followed by the complete conversion to Fe2O3 and ZnO not the original phase ZnFe2O4. The following cycles are dominated by the full reversible phase conversion between Zn, Fe and ZnO, Fe2O3. The Fe valence evolution during cycles evidenced by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques also exhibit the reversible conversion between Fe and Fe2O3 after the first lithiation, agreeing well with the in situ TEM results. Such in situ TEM observations provide valuable phenomenological insights into electrochemical reaction of MTMOs, which may help to optimize the composition of anode materials for further improved electrochemical performance. PMID:27306189

  4. Study on the Electrochemical Reaction Mechanism of ZnFe2O4 by In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qingmei; Wang, Shixin; Yao, Libing; Li, Haojie; Du, Gaohui; Ye, Huiqun; Fang, Yunzhang

    2016-01-01

    A family of mixed transition–metal oxides (MTMOs) has great potential for applications as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). However, the reaction mechanism of MTMOs anodes during lithiation/delithiation is remain unclear. Here, the lithiation/delithiation processes of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles are observed dynamically using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results suggest that during the first lithiation process the ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles undergo a conversion process and generate a composite structure of 1–3 nm Fe and Zn nanograins within Li2O matrix. During the delithiation process, volume contraction and the conversion of Zn and Fe take place with the disappearance of Li2O, followed by the complete conversion to Fe2O3 and ZnO not the original phase ZnFe2O4. The following cycles are dominated by the full reversible phase conversion between Zn, Fe and ZnO, Fe2O3. The Fe valence evolution during cycles evidenced by electron energy–loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques also exhibit the reversible conversion between Fe and Fe2O3 after the first lithiation, agreeing well with the in situ TEM results. Such in situ TEM observations provide valuable phenomenological insights into electrochemical reaction of MTMOs, which may help to optimize the composition of anode materials for further improved electrochemical performance. PMID:27306189

  5. A flow-through reaction cell for in situ X-ray diffraction and absorption studies of heterogeneous powder-liquid reactions and phase transformations.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Pilar; da Silva, Iván; Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Alfonso, Belén F; Trobajo, Camino; Khainakov, Sergei; Garcia, Jose R; Garcia-Granda, Santiago; Castro, Germán R

    2012-01-01

    A portable powder-liquid high-corrosion-resistant reaction cell has been designed to follow in situ reactions by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques. The cell has been conceived to be mounted on the experimental stations for diffraction and absorption of the Spanish CRG SpLine-BM25 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Powder reactants and/or products are kept at a fixed position in a vertical geometry in the X-ray pathway by a porous membrane, under forced liquid reflux circulation. Owing to the short pathway of the X-ray beam through the cell, XRD and XAS measurements can be carried out in transmission configuration/mode. In the case of the diffraction technique, data can be collected with either a point detector or a two-dimensional CCD detector, depending on specific experimental requirements in terms of space or time resolution. Crystallization processes, heterogeneous catalytic processes and several varieties of experiments can be followed by these techniques with this cell. Two experiments were carried out to demonstrate the cell feasibility: the phase transformations of layered titanium phosphates in boiling aqueous solutions of phosphoric acid, and the reaction of copper carbonate and L-isoleucine amino acid powders in boiling aqueous solution. In this last case the shrinking of the solid reactants and the formation of Cu(isoleucine)(2) is observed. The crystallization processes and several phase transitions have been observed during the experiments, as well as an unexpected reaction pathway. PMID:22186649

  6. Oxygen storage properties of La1-xSrxFeO3- for chemical-looping reactions an in-situ neutron and synchrotron X-ray study

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Daniel; Schreiber, Nathaniel; Levitas, Benjamin; Xu, Wenqian; Rodriguez, Efrain E

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen storage materials (OSMs) provide lattice oxygen for a number of chemical-looping reactions including natural gas combustion and methane reforming. La1 xSrxFeO3 has shown promise for use as an OSM in methane reforming reactions due to its high product selectivity, fast oxide diffusion, and cycle stability. Here, we investigate the structural evolution of the series La1 xSrxFeO3 for x = 0, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, and 1, using in situ synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction, as it is cycled under the conditions of a chemical-looping reactor (methane and oxygen atmospheres). In the compositions x = 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, and 1, we discover an envelope , or temperature range, of oxygen storage capacity (OSC), where oxygen can easily and reversibly be inserted and removed from the OSM. Our in situ X-ray and neutron diffraction results reveal that while samples with higher Sr contents had a higher OSC, those same samples suffered from slower reaction kinetics and some, such as the x = 1/2 and x = 2/3 compositions, had local variations in Sr content, which led to inhomogeneous regions with varying reaction rates. Therefore, we highlight the importance of in situ diffraction studies, and we propose that these measurements are required for the thorough evaluation of future candidate OSMs. We recommend La2/3Sr1/3FeO3 as the optimal OSM in the series because its structure remains homogeneous throughout the reaction, and its OSC envelope is similar to that of the higher doped materials.

  7. Oxygen storage properties of La1-xSrxFeO3- for chemical-looping reactions an in-situ neutron and synchrotron X-ray study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Taylor, Daniel; Schreiber, Nathaniel; Levitas, Benjamin; Xu, Wenqian; Rodriguez, Efrain E

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen storage materials (OSMs) provide lattice oxygen for a number of chemical-looping reactions including natural gas combustion and methane reforming. La1 xSrxFeO3 has shown promise for use as an OSM in methane reforming reactions due to its high product selectivity, fast oxide diffusion, and cycle stability. Here, we investigate the structural evolution of the series La1 xSrxFeO3 for x = 0, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, and 1, using in situ synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction, as it is cycled under the conditions of a chemical-looping reactor (methane and oxygen atmospheres). In the compositions x = 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, and 1, wemore » discover an envelope , or temperature range, of oxygen storage capacity (OSC), where oxygen can easily and reversibly be inserted and removed from the OSM. Our in situ X-ray and neutron diffraction results reveal that while samples with higher Sr contents had a higher OSC, those same samples suffered from slower reaction kinetics and some, such as the x = 1/2 and x = 2/3 compositions, had local variations in Sr content, which led to inhomogeneous regions with varying reaction rates. Therefore, we highlight the importance of in situ diffraction studies, and we propose that these measurements are required for the thorough evaluation of future candidate OSMs. We recommend La2/3Sr1/3FeO3 as the optimal OSM in the series because its structure remains homogeneous throughout the reaction, and its OSC envelope is similar to that of the higher doped materials.« less

  8. A reaction cell with sample laser heating for in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies under environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Carlos; Jiang, Peng; Pach, Elzbieta; Borondics, Ferenc; West, Mark W; Tuxen, Anders; Chintapalli, Mahati; Carenco, Sophie; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel

    2013-05-01

    A miniature (1 ml volume) reaction cell with transparent X-ray windows and laser heating of the sample has been designed to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of materials in the presence of gases at atmospheric pressures. Heating by laser solves the problems associated with the presence of reactive gases interacting with hot filaments used in resistive heating methods. It also facilitates collection of a small total electron yield signal by eliminating interference with heating current leakage and ground loops. The excellent operation of the cell is demonstrated with examples of CO and H2 Fischer-Tropsch reactions on Co nanoparticles. PMID:23592631

  9. A portable powder-liquid high corrosion-resistant reaction cell for in situ X-ray diffraction and absorption studies of heterogeneous powder-liquid reactions and phase transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, P.; da Silva, I.; Heyman, C.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Castro, G. R.

    2013-03-01

    A portable powder-liquid high corrosion-resistant reaction cell has been designed to follow in situ reactions by X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques in transmission mode. The cell has been conceived to be mounted on the experimental stations for diffraction and absorption of the Spanish CRG SpLine-BM25 beamline at the ESRF. In the case of the diffraction technique, data can be collected with either a point detector or a two-dimensional CCD detector. Using the 2D-CCD camera, the cell can be used for time-resolved in situ studies of phase transitions and reactions. Powder reactants and/or products are kept at a fixed position in a vertical geometry in the X-ray pathway, which is minimized in order to reduce the X-ray absorption by the reaction bath. Sample is fixed by a porous membrane under forced liquid reflux circulation, assuring total powder-liquid contact, with an accurate temperature control in the range from 20 to 220°C.

  10. An in situ sample environment reaction cell for spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of powders and small structured reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chu; Gustafson, Johan; Merte, Lindsay R.; Evertsson, Jonas; Norén, Katarina; Carlson, Stefan; Svensson, Håkan; Carlsson, Per-Anders

    2015-03-15

    An easy-to-use sample environment reaction cell for X-ray based in situ studies of powders and small structured samples, e.g., powder, pellet, and monolith catalysts, is described. The design of the cell allows for flexible use of appropriate X-ray transparent windows, shielding the sample from ambient conditions, such that incident X-ray energies as low as 3 keV can be used. Thus, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements in either transmission or fluorescence mode are facilitated. Total gas flows up to about 500 ml{sub n}/min can be fed while the sample temperature is accurately controlled (at least) in the range of 25–500 °C. The gas feed is composed by a versatile gas-mixing system and the effluent gas flow composition is monitored with mass spectrometry (MS). These systems are described briefly. Results from simultaneous XAS/MS measurements during oxidation of carbon monoxide over a 4% Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder catalyst are used to illustrate the system performance in terms of transmission XAS. Also, 2.2% Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 2% Ag − Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder catalysts have been used to demonstrate X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy in fluorescence mode. Further, a 2% Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} monolith catalyst was used ex situ for transmission XANES. The reaction cell opens for facile studies of structure-function relationships for model as well as realistic catalysts both in the form of powders, small pellets, and coated or extruded monoliths at near realistic conditions. The applicability of the cell for X-ray diffraction measurements is discussed.

  11. An in situ sample environment reaction cell for spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of powders and small structured reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chu; Gustafson, Johan; Merte, Lindsay R.; Evertsson, Jonas; Norén, Katarina; Carlson, Stefan; Svensson, Hâkan; Carlsson, Per-Anders

    2015-03-01

    An easy-to-use sample environment reaction cell for X-ray based in situ studies of powders and small structured samples, e.g., powder, pellet, and monolith catalysts, is described. The design of the cell allows for flexible use of appropriate X-ray transparent windows, shielding the sample from ambient conditions, such that incident X-ray energies as low as 3 keV can be used. Thus, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements in either transmission or fluorescence mode are facilitated. Total gas flows up to about 500 mln/min can be fed while the sample temperature is accurately controlled (at least) in the range of 25-500 °C. The gas feed is composed by a versatile gas-mixing system and the effluent gas flow composition is monitored with mass spectrometry (MS). These systems are described briefly. Results from simultaneous XAS/MS measurements during oxidation of carbon monoxide over a 4% Pt/Al2O3 powder catalyst are used to illustrate the system performance in terms of transmission XAS. Also, 2.2% Pd/Al2O3 and 2% Ag - Al2O3 powder catalysts have been used to demonstrate X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy in fluorescence mode. Further, a 2% Pt/Al2O3 monolith catalyst was used ex situ for transmission XANES. The reaction cell opens for facile studies of structure-function relationships for model as well as realistic catalysts both in the form of powders, small pellets, and coated or extruded monoliths at near realistic conditions. The applicability of the cell for X-ray diffraction measurements is discussed.

  12. Study of Epstein-Barr virus expression in Burkitt's lymphoma by polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization: A study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Deyhimi, Parviz; Kalantari, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is variable in different geographic regions. In developing countries, the association of EBV with BL is regarded to be of an endemic-type in equatorial Africa (> 95%) and sporadic-type in the developed countries (15-30%). The purpose of this study is to assess the frequency of EBV infection in BL, in Iran. The study also aims to compare Ribonucleic acid (RNA) in situ hybridization (RISH), the standard diagnostic method, with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method for diagnosing BL. Materials and Methods: In this epidemiological study, the paraffinized specimens of 18 cases of BL were selected. Next, the ISH of EBV-encoded RNA (EBER-RISH) and PCR assays that were based on Epstein Barr Nuclear Antigen 2 (EBNA2) amplification were used. The EBV strain was determined by PCR. The data were analyzed using the SPSS10 software and by performing Pearson correlation coefficient formula at a significant level of 0.05. Results: EBV RNA was detected in 50% of the BL specimens. Type 1 and 2 accounted for 70 and 30% of the cases, respectively. Regarding RISH as the standard method for EBV diagnosis, the PCR assays showed a sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 88.9%, respectively. Conclusion: According to the obtained findings, the frequency of EBV in BL was 50% and PCR and RISH showed high concordance and sensitivity in EBV detection. Therefore, PCR can be used as a faster method for EBV detection in high-risk geographical regions. PMID:25097650

  13. Aberration corrected environmental STEM (AC ESTEM) for dynamic in-situ gas reaction studies of nanoparticle catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyes, E. D.; Gai, P. L.

    2014-06-01

    Environmental scanning transmission electron microscopy (ESTEM) with aberration correction (AC) has recently been added to the capabilities of the more established ETEM for analysis of heterogeneous nanoparticle based catalysts. It has helped to reveal the importance and potentially unique properties of individual atoms as active sites in their own right as well as pathways between established nanoparticles. A new capability is introduced for dynamic in-situ experiments under controlled conditions of specimen temperature and gas environment related to real world conditions pertinent to a range of industrial and societal priorities for new and improved chemical processes, materials, fuels, pharmaceutical products and processes, and in control or remediation of environmental emissions.

  14. A study of plasma reaction mechanisms and kinetics in glow discharges of methyl methacrylate and related precursors using in situ FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu-Chi Vickie

    In order to understand plasma deposition processes, it is important to have a knowledge of the plasma gas-phase reactions. In this project, in situ Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was utilized to study the plasma gas-phase chemistry in a capacitively coupled glow discharge. Gas-phase measurements of a number of organic plasmas were performed. The precursors include methyl methacrylate (MMA), methyl crotonate, methyl isobutyrate, ethyl methacrylate, vinyl acetate, isopropanol, methanol, tetramethyl cyclobutanedione and formaldehyde. However, MMA was studied most extensively. In addition to the gas-phase study, plasma polymerized films were also characterized. A number of dissociation products were detected by FTIR in the plasmas. Calibration curves of these products and some monomers were prepared to determine the species concentrations and gas-phase composition. Plasma reaction kinetics were studied in closed systems to determine parameters such as dissociation pathway efficiencies, monomer decomposition rate coefficients, and intermediate species decomposition rate coefficients. The study shows that there are two major electron-impact induced dissociation pathways in MMA plasmas: the C-O bond cleavage reaction and decarboxylations. The C-O bond cleavage reaction accounts for approximately half of the MMA dissociation, and neutral formaldehyde and dimethyl ketene (DMK) molecules are produced via intramolecular rearrangement. Decarboxylation reactions produce CO, COsb2 and a number of radicals that subsequently stabilize to form neutral molecules, such as propylene, allene and methanol. These intermediate species then further dissociate in the plasma to small hydrocarbons (methane, acetylene and ethylene), CO, COsb2 and Hsb2. The reaction mechanisms in the plasmas of other alpha ,beta-unsaturated esters and vinyl acetate were found to be similar to the MMA mechanisms. However, the saturated ester (methyl isobutyrate) and isopropanol plasmas were found

  15. In situ study on the effect of thermomigration on intermetallic compounds growth in liquid-solid interfacial reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Lin; Zhao, Ning; Ma, Haitao Zhao, Huijing; Huang, Mingliang

    2014-05-28

    Synchrotron radiation real-time imaging technology was carried out in situ to observe and characterize the effect of thermomigration on the growth behavior of interfacial intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in Cu/Sn/Cu solder joint during soldering. The thermomigration resulted in asymmetrical formation and growth of the interfacial IMCs. Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} and Cu{sub 3}Sn IMCs formed at the cold end and grew rapidly during the whole soldering process. However, only Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} IMC formed at the hot end and remained relatively thin until solidification. The IMCs at the cold end were nearly seven times thicker than that at the hot end after solidification. The Cu dissolution at the cold end was significantly restrained, while that at the hot end was promoted, which supplied Cu atoms to diffuse toward the cold end under thermomigration to feed the rapid IMC growth. Moreover, the thermomigration also caused asymmetrical morphology of the interfacial IMCs at the cooling stage, i.e., the Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} IMC at the cold end transformed into facet structure, while that at the hot end remained scallop-type. The asymmetrical growth behavior of the interfacial IMCs was analyzed from the view point of kinetics.

  16. The reaction of ceria coatings on mica with H{sub 2}S An in-situ X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Bertaux, S.; Reynders, P.; Schweda, E

    2004-05-05

    Thin layers of ceria were deposited on the surface of mica platelets in solution. The reaction of such particles with hydrogen sulfide yields a red colored special effect pigment. The ceria layer reacts with H{sub 2}S to produce a variety of sulfide and oxysulfide phases. The reaction path discovered in situ by time and temperature resolved X-ray diffraction is CeO{sub 2}{yields}CeS{sub 2}{yields}C-Ce{sub 2}S{sub 3}{yields}Ce{sub 10}S{sub 14}O. The reaction itself is extremely variable depending on gas flow, heating rates and decomposition atmospheres. Effects on the thin film are recorded by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and revealed a destruction of the layer once red Ce{sub 10}S{sub 14}O was formed. The product layer then reveals the typical nonwetting behaviour of a liquid on a surface.

  17. Monitoring enzymatic reactions with in situ sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Ian T.; Iordanov, V.; Kroon, Arthur; Dietrich, Heidi R. C.; Moerman, R.; van den Doel, L. R.; van Dedem, G. W. K.; Bossche, Andre; Gray, Bonnie L.; Sarro, Lina; Verbeek, Piet W.; van Vliet, Lucas J.

    2003-07-01

    In previous publications and presentations we have described our construction of a laboratory-on-a-chip based on nanoliter capacity wells etched in silicon. We have described methods for dispensing reagents as well as samples, for preventing evaporation, for embedding electronics in each well to measure fluid volume per well in real-time, and for monitoring the production or consumption of NADH in enzyme-catalyzed reactions such as those found in the glycolytic pathway of yeast. In this paper we describe the use of light sensors (photodiodes) in each well to measure both fluorescence (such as that evidenced in NADH) as well as bioluminescence (such as evidenced in ATP assays). We show that our detection limit for NADH fluorescence in 100 μM and for ATP/luciferase bioluminescence is 2.4 μM.

  18. In situ analysis of copper electrodeposition reaction using unilateral NMR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, B. F.; Nunes, L. M. S.; Lobo, C. M. S.; Carvalho, A. S.; Cabeça, L. F.; Colnago, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The uses of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) to study electrochemical reactions in situ have greatly increased in the last decade. However, most of these applications are limited to specialized NMR laboratories and not feasible for routine analysis. Recently we have shown that a bench top, time domain NMR spectrometer can be used to monitor in situ copper electrodeposition reaction and the effect of Lorentz force in the reaction rate. However these spectrometers limit the cell size to the magnet gap and cannot be used with standard electrochemical cells. In this paper we are demonstrating that unilateral NMR sensor (UNMR), which does not limit sample size/volume, can be used to monitor electrodeposition of paramagnetic ions in situ. The copper electrodeposition reaction was monitored remotely and in situ, placing the electrochemical cell on top of the UNMR sensor. The Cu2+ concentration was measured during three hours of the electrodeposition reactions, by using the transverse relaxation rate (R2) determined with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence. The reaction rate increased fourfold when the reaction was performed in the presence of a magnetic field (in situ), in comparison to the reactions in the absence of the magnetic field (ex situ). The increase of reaction rate, in the presence of the UNMR magnet, was related to the magneto hydrodynamic force (FB) and magnetic field gradient force (F∇B). F∇B was calculated to be one order of magnitude stronger than FB. The UNMR sensor has several advantages for in situ measurements when compared to standard NMR spectrometers. It is a low cost, portable, open system, which does not limit sample size/volume and can be easily be adapted to standard electrochemical cells or large industrial reactors.

  19. In situ analysis of copper electrodeposition reaction using unilateral NMR sensor.

    PubMed

    Gomes, B F; Nunes, L M S; Lobo, C M S; Carvalho, A S; Cabeça, L F; Colnago, L A

    2015-12-01

    The uses of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) to study electrochemical reactions in situ have greatly increased in the last decade. However, most of these applications are limited to specialized NMR laboratories and not feasible for routine analysis. Recently we have shown that a bench top, time domain NMR spectrometer can be used to monitor in situ copper electrodeposition reaction and the effect of Lorentz force in the reaction rate. However these spectrometers limit the cell size to the magnet gap and cannot be used with standard electrochemical cells. In this paper we are demonstrating that unilateral NMR sensor (UNMR), which does not limit sample size/volume, can be used to monitor electrodeposition of paramagnetic ions in situ. The copper electrodeposition reaction was monitored remotely and in situ, placing the electrochemical cell on top of the UNMR sensor. The Cu(2+) concentration was measured during three hours of the electrodeposition reactions, by using the transverse relaxation rate (R2) determined with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence. The reaction rate increased fourfold when the reaction was performed in the presence of a magnetic field (in situ), in comparison to the reactions in the absence of the magnetic field (ex situ). The increase of reaction rate, in the presence of the UNMR magnet, was related to the magneto hydrodynamic force (FB) and magnetic field gradient force (F∇B). F∇B was calculated to be one order of magnitude stronger than FB. The UNMR sensor has several advantages for in situ measurements when compared to standard NMR spectrometers. It is a low cost, portable, open system, which does not limit sample size/volume and can be easily be adapted to standard electrochemical cells or large industrial reactors. PMID:26540649

  20. In Situ Studies of the Active Sites for the Water Gas Shift Reaction over Cu-CeO2 Catalysts: Complex Interaction Between Metallic Copper and Oxygen Vacancies of Ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,X.; Rodriguez, J.; Hanson, J.; Gamarra, D.; Martinez-Arias, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.

    2006-01-01

    New information about the active sites for the water gas shift (WGS) reaction over Cu-CeO{sub 2} systems was obtained using in-situ, time-resolved X-ray diffraction (TR-XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TR-XAS, Cu K and Ce L3 edges), and infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Cu-CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared by a novel reversed microemulsion method (doped Ce1-xCuxO2 sample) and an impregnation method (impregnated CuO{sub x}/CeO{sub 2} sample) were studied. The results from all of the samples indicate that both metallic copper and oxygen vacancies in ceria were involved in the generation of active sites for the WGS reaction. Evidence was found for a synergistic Cu-O vacancy interaction. This interaction enhances the chemical activity of Cu, and the presence of Cu facilitates the formation of O vacancies in ceria under reaction conditions. Water dissociation occurred on the O vacancy sites or the Cu-O vacancy interface. No significant amounts of formate were formed on the catalysts during the WGS reaction. The presence of strongly bound carbonates is an important factor for the deactivation of the catalysts at high temperatures. This work identifies for the first time the active sites for the WGS reaction on Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalysts and illustrates the importance of in situ structural studies for heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

  1. In-situ Studies of the Reactions of Bifunctional and Heterocyclic Molecules over Noble Metal Single Crystal and Nanoparticle Catalysts Studied with Kinetics and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-06-30

    Sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in combination with gas chromatography (GC) was used in-situ to monitor surface bound reaction intermediates and reaction selectivities for the hydrogenation reactions of pyrrole, furan, pyridine, acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal over Pt(111), Pt(100), Rh(111), and platinum nanoparticles under Torr reactant pressures and temperatures of 300K to 450K. The focus of this work is the correlation between the SFG-VS observed surface bound reaction intermediates and adsorption modes with the reaction selectivity, and how this is affected by catalyst structure and temperature. Pyrrole hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Rh(111) single crystals at Torr pressures. It was found that pyrrole adsorbs to Pt(111) perpendicularly by cleaving the N-H bond and binding through the nitrogen. However, over Rh(111) pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry binding through the {pi}-aromatic orbitals. A surface-bound pyrroline reaction intermediate was detected over both surfaces with SFG-VS. It was found that the ring-cracking product butylamine is a reaction poison over both surfaces studied. Furan hydrogenation was studied over Pt(111), Pt(100), 10 nm cubic platinum nanoparticles and 1 nm platinum nanoparticles. The product distribution was observed to be highly structure sensitive and the acquired SFG-VS spectra reflected this sensitivity. Pt(100) exhibited more ring-cracking to form butanol than Pt(111), while the nanoparticles yielded higher selectivities for the partially saturated ring dihydrofuran. Pyridine hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Pt(100). The α-pyridyl surface adsorption mode was observed with SFG-VS over both surfaces. 1,4-dihydropyridine was seen as a surface intermediate over Pt(100) but not Pt(111). Upon heating the surfaces to 350K, the adsorbed pyridine changes to a flat-lying adsorption mode. No evidence was found for the pyridinium cation. The hydrogenation of the

  2. In–situ Spatiotemporal Chemical Reactions at Water-Solid Interfacial Processes using Microelectrode Techniques: from Biofilm to Metal Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent developments in microscale sensors allows the non-destructive and in–situ measurement of both the absolute and changes in chemical concentrations in engineered and natural aquatic systems. Microelectrodes represent a unique tool for studying in–situ chemical reactions in b...

  3. In situ XANES & XRD Study of interphasial reaction between uncharged Li2FeSiO4 cathode and LiPF6-based electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Z.; Chiu, H. C.; Lu, X.; Chen, N.; Emond, V.; Demopoulos, G. P.; Jiang, D. T.

    2016-05-01

    In situ synchrotron radiation XANES and XRD have been carried out on Li2FeSiO4 cathode material in a lithium-ion-battery (LIB) cell. The evolution of the long range lattice structure and the local iron oxidation state has been observed at a charging rate of C/20 for the formation cycle for one Lithium extraction; additional ex situ measurements of the pristine cathode material were taken for comparison. The observed spontaneous interaction between the cathode and the fluorinated electrolyte and the impact of subsequent cycling are discussed.

  4. In situ alkali-silica reaction observed by x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtis, K.E.; Monteiro, P.J.M.; Brown, J.T.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-04-01

    In concrete, alkali metal ions and hydroxyl ions contributed by the cement and reactive silicates present in aggregate can participate in a destructive alkali-silica reaction (ASR). This reaction of the alkalis with the silicates produces a gel that tends to imbibe water found in the concrete pores, leading to swelling of the gel and eventual cracking of the affected concrete member. Over 104 cases of alkali-aggregate reaction in dams and spillways have been reported around the world. At present, no method exists to arrest the expansive chemical reaction which generates significant distress in the affected structures. Most existing techniques available for the examination of concrete microstructure, including ASR products, demand that samples be dried and exposed to high pressure during the observation period. These sample preparation requirements present a major disadvantage for the study of alkali-silica reaction. Given the nature of the reaction and the affect of water on its products, it is likely that the removal of water will affect the morphology, creating artifacts in the sample. The purpose of this research is to observe and characterize the alkali-silica reaction, including each of the specific reactions identified previously, in situ without introducing sample artifacts. For observation of unconditioned samples, x-ray microscopy offers an opportunity for such an examination of the alkali-silica reaction. Currently, this investigation is focusing on the effect of calcium ions on the alkali-silica reaction.

  5. Cu(II)-Gd(III) cryogenic magnetic refrigerants and Cu8Dy9 single-molecule magnet generated by in situ reactions of picolinaldehyde and acetylpyridine: experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Liang; Lin, Wei-Quan; Chen, Yan-Cong; Gómez-Coca, Silvia; Aravena, Daniel; Ruiz, Eliseo; Leng, Ji-Dong; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2013-12-16

    A series of heterometallic [Ln(III)(x)Cu(II)(y)] complexes, [Gd2Cu2]n (1), [Gd4Cu8] (2), [Ln9Cu8] (Ln=Gd, 3·Gd; Ln=Dy, 3·Dy), were successfully synthesized by a one-pot route at room temperature with three kinds of in situ carbonyl-related reactions: Cannizzaro reaction, aldol reaction, and oxidation. This strategy led to dysprosium analogues that behaved as single-molecule magnets (SMMs) and gadolinium analogues that showed significant magnetocaloric effect (MCE). In this study a numerical DFT approach is proposed by using pseudopotentials to calculate the exchange coupling constants in three polynuclear [Gd(x)Cu(y)] complexes; with these values exact diagonalization or quantum Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to calculate the variation of the magnetic entropy involved in the MCE. For the [Dy9Cu8] complexes, local magnetic properties of the Dy(III) centers have been determined by using the CASSCF+RASSI method. PMID:24265054

  6. Laboratory support for in situ gasification: reaction kinetics. Annual report October 1977-September 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.E.; Wong, S.H.; Johnson, J.E.; Sikand, N.; Jonke, A.A.

    1980-02-01

    This work is directed toward support studies for the national program for the development and demonstration of in situ coal gasification processes. The objective of this work is to determine the reaction-controlling variables and reaction kinetics for the gasification of chars obtained by pyrolyzing coal in simulated underground gasification conditions. The reactions being studied and to be studied include steam-char, CO/sub 2/-char, H/sub 2/-char, the water-gas shift reaction, and the methanation reaction. In this report are presented data regarding the kinetics of the reaction of steam with chars prepared from Pittsburgh seam high-volatile bituminous coal. In addition, a reaction model is described correlating the steam-char reaction rates measured earlier for Hanna subbituminous coal with operating conditions including temperature, partial pressures of steam and hydrogen, and extent of carbon gasification. Partial results are presented and discussed for an investigation of structural parameters of Hanna char as a function of pyrolysis conditions and extent of carbon gasified.

  7. Studying Reaction Intermediates Formed at Graphenic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Depanjan; Sen Gupta, Soujit; Narayanan, Rahul; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2014-03-01

    We report in-situ production and detection of intermediates at graphenic surfaces, especially during alcohol oxidation. Alcohol oxidation to acid occurs on graphene oxide-coated paper surface, driven by an electrical potential, in a paper spray mass spectrometry experiment. As paper spray ionization is a fast process and the time scale matches with the reaction time scale, we were able to detect the intermediate, acetal. This is the first observation of acetal formed in surface oxidation. The process is not limited to alcohols and the reaction has been extended to aldehydes, amines, phosphenes, sugars, etc., where reaction products were detected instantaneously. By combining surface reactions with ambient ionization and mass spectrometry, we show that new insights into chemical reactions become feasible. We suggest that several other chemical transformations may be studied this way. This work opens up a new pathway for different industrially and energetically important reactions using different metal catalysts and modified substrate.

  8. In Situ Raman Monitoring of Silver(I)-Aided Laser-Driven Cleavage Reaction of Cyclobutane.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengtai; Han, Xijiang; Du, Yunchen; Wang, Hsing-Lin; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The cyclobutane cleavage reaction is an important process and has received continuous interest. Herein, we demonstrate the visible laser-driven cleavage reaction of cyclobutane in crystal form by using in situ Raman spectroscopy. Silver(I) coordination-induced strain and thermal effects from the laser irradiation are the two main driving forces for the cleavage of cyclobutane crystals. This work may open up a new avenue for studying cyclobutane cleavage reactions, as compared to the conventional routes using ex situ techniques. PMID:26510491

  9. In-situ investigation of Cu-In-Se reactions by thin film calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, D.; Mueller, G.

    1998-12-31

    Studies of the reaction path during annealing of Cu-In-Se thin films for solar cell absorbers have been limited up to now to ex-situ analyses of the phase composition by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) after processing by a specific temperature-time program. As an indirect method, the application of ex-situ XRD /is not sufficient for the determination of reaction temperatures and reaction times for setting up a general model of CIS-formation. The authors show in this paper that the use of a calorimetric method (Thin film Calorimetry, TFC) offers the advantage of a direct (in-situ) observation of thin film reactions. Special care is taken to use film thicknesses of practical interest for industrial application (1.5--3 {micro}m). In a first step the authors show results of binary reactions in the Cu-In, In-Se and Cu-Se systems. Their knowledge is necessary for understanding the processes involved in the ternary CIS-layers. It turned out that thin Cu-In and Cu-Se films react already at room temperature and behave as predicted by the bulk equilibrium phase diagrams during heating. In-Se thin films show prominent exothermic reactions starting with the melting of In. The first phase to be formed is generally In{sub 2}Se which is then converted to more Se-rich compounds. In ternary Cu-In-Se films (Cu/In = 1.00) the authors observe transitions of the Cu-Se-system which can be attributed to the decomposition of CuSe{sub 2} and CuSe. Consequences for the model of improved CIS-growth by a Cu-Se flux agent are discussed.

  10. In situ reaction kinetic analysis of dental restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younas, Basma; Samad Khan, Abdul; Muzaffar, Danish; Hussain, Ijaz; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in situ structural and thermal changes of dental restorative materials at periodical time intervals. The commercial materials included zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE), zinc phosphate type I (ZnPO4), glass ionomer cement type II (GIC) and resin-based nano-omposite (Filtek Z350 XT). These materials were processed according to manufacturer's instructions. For the structural analysis Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used at high resolution. TGA was used to evaluate thermal weight-loss. The FTIR spectra were collected at periodic time intervals. FTIR spectra showed that with time passing all materials exhibited an increase in peak intensities and a new appearance of shoulders and shifting of peaks for example, ZnPO4 (P-O), ZOE (C═O, C═N, C-O-C), GIC (COO-, C-H, Si-OH), composites (C═O, C═C, C═N, C-N-H). The peaks were replaced by bands and these bands became broader with time interval. Composites showed a degree of conversion and new peaks corresponded to the cross-linking of polymer composites. TGA analysis showed that significant changes in weight loss of set materials were observed after 24 h, where ZOE showed continuous changes in thermal degradation. The spectral changes and thermal degradation with time interval elucidated in situ setting behaviour and understanding of their bonding compatibility with tooth structure and change in relation to time.

  11. An in situ heating TEM analysis method for an interface reaction.

    PubMed

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Ito, Katsuji; Nagakubo, Yasuhira; Asakawa, Takayuki; Kanemura, Takashi

    2009-10-01

    In order to analyze the thermal property of nano-sized materials, an in situ observation technique that allows highly sensitive energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic (EDX) analyses and high-resolution in situ heating observation of precision specimens is required. A method for the in situ observation of the interface reaction using an analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a specimen-heating holder was developed. The specimen holder used in this study was a direct-heating type having a fine tungsten wire heater. For sensitive analyses including an EDX map of composition changes during the interface reaction, a space toward the EDX detector with a take-off angle of 20 degrees was made in the specimen holder. Samples were prepared by attaching a micro-sample directly to the heater using the focused ion beam (FIB) micro-sampling technique. It was confirmed that the sensitive EDX map and electron diffraction analyses were possible during the reaction, and that the resolution of this technique was of the order of 0.223 nm at 550 degrees C. PMID:19376815

  12. Following the Transient Reactions in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Using In an In Situ Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jie; Hu, Jian Z.; Chen, Honghao; Vijayakumar, M.; Zheng, Jianming; Pan, Huilin; Walter, Eric D.; Hu, Mary Y.; Deng, Xuchu; Feng, Ju; Liaw, Bor Yann; Gu, Meng; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Dongping; Xu, Suochang; Wang, Chong M.; Liu, Jun

    2015-05-13

    Li-S batteries hold great potential for next-generation, large-format power source applications; yet, the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical reaction pathways remains lacking to enable their functionality as promised. Here, in situ NMR technique employing a specially designed cylindrical micro battery was used to monitor the chemical environments around Li+ ions during repetitive charge-discharge process and track the transient electrochemical and chemical reactions occurring in the whole Li-S system. The in situ NMR provides real time, quantitative information related to the temporal concentration variations of the polysulfides with various chain lengths, providing important clues for the reaction pathways during both discharge and charge processes. The in-situ technique also reveals that redox reactions may involve transient species that are difficult to detect in ex-situ NMR study. Intermediate species such as charged free radicals may play an important role in the formation of the polysulfide products. Additionally, in situ NMR measurement simultaneously reveals vital information on the 7Li chemical environments in the electrochemical and parasitic reactions on the lithium anode that promotes the understanding of the failure mechanism in the Li-S system. These new insights could help design effective strategies to accelerate the development of Li-S battery technology.

  13. In situ liquid-cell electron microscopy of silver-palladium galvanic replacement reactions on silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sutter, E; Jungjohann, K; Bliznakov, S; Courty, A; Maisonhaute, E; Tenney, S; Sutter, P

    2014-01-01

    Galvanic replacement reactions provide an elegant way of transforming solid nanoparticles into complex hollow morphologies. Conventionally, galvanic replacement is studied by stopping the reaction at different stages and characterizing the products ex situ. In situ observations by liquid-cell electron microscopy can provide insight into mechanisms, rates and possible modifications of galvanic replacement reactions in the native solution environment. Here we use liquid-cell electron microscopy to investigate galvanic replacement reactions between silver nanoparticle templates and aqueous palladium salt solutions. Our in situ observations follow the transformation of the silver nanoparticles into hollow silver-palladium nanostructures. While the silver-palladium nanocages have morphologies similar to those obtained in ex situ control experiments the reaction rates are much higher, indicating that the electron beam strongly affects the galvanic-type process in the liquid-cell. By using scavengers added to the aqueous solution we identify the role of radicals generated via radiolysis by high-energy electrons in modifying galvanic reactions. PMID:25208691

  14. In situ liquid-cell electron microscopy of silver-palladium galvanic replacement reactions on silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, E.; Jungjohann, K.; Bliznakov, S.; Courty, A.; Maisonhaute, E.; Tenney, S.; Sutter, P.

    2014-09-01

    Galvanic replacement reactions provide an elegant way of transforming solid nanoparticles into complex hollow morphologies. Conventionally, galvanic replacement is studied by stopping the reaction at different stages and characterizing the products ex situ. In situ observations by liquid-cell electron microscopy can provide insight into mechanisms, rates and possible modifications of galvanic replacement reactions in the native solution environment. Here we use liquid-cell electron microscopy to investigate galvanic replacement reactions between silver nanoparticle templates and aqueous palladium salt solutions. Our in situ observations follow the transformation of the silver nanoparticles into hollow silver-palladium nanostructures. While the silver-palladium nanocages have morphologies similar to those obtained in ex situ control experiments the reaction rates are much higher, indicating that the electron beam strongly affects the galvanic-type process in the liquid-cell. By using scavengers added to the aqueous solution we identify the role of radicals generated via radiolysis by high-energy electrons in modifying galvanic reactions.

  15. Electrochemical in-situ reaction cell for X-ray scattering, diffraction and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Artur; Granlund, Eric; Cairns, Elton J.

    2003-01-27

    An electrochemical in-situ reaction cell for hard X-ray experiments with battery electrodes is described. Applications include the small angle scattering, diffraction, and near-edge spectroscopy of lithium manganese oxide electrodes.

  16. In-situ X-ray characterization of the reaction of lithium with InSe

    SciTech Connect

    Levy-Clement, C.; Dahn, J.R.; McKinnon, W.R.; Rioux, J.

    1984-12-01

    The reaction at room temperature of Li with InSe in Li/InSe electrochemical cells was studied using in-situ X-ray diffraction. Li reacts with InSe first to form Li/sub 2/Se and In, then reacts with the In to form InLi. An intermediate phase appears in each of these two steps. The first intermediate phase may be an intercalation compound Li /SUB x/ InSe, the second some In-Li alloy.

  17. Engineered injection and extraction to enhance reaction for improved in situ remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscopo, Amy N.; Neupauer, Roseanna M.; Mays, David C.

    2013-06-01

    During in situ remediation, a treatment solution is often injected into a contaminated aquifer to degrade the groundwater contaminant. Since contaminant degradation reactions occur only at locations where the treatment solution and groundwater contaminant overlap, mixing of the treatment solution and the contaminated groundwater is necessary for reaction to occur. Mixing results from molecular diffusion and pore-scale dispersion, which operate over small length scales; thus, mixing during in situ remediation can only occur where the separation distance between the treatment solution and contaminated groundwater is small. To promote mixing, advection can be used to spread the treatment solution into the contaminated groundwater to increase the extent of the region where the two solutions coexist. A certain degree of passive spreading is the natural consequence of aquifer heterogeneity, which is manifested as macrodispersion. An alternative mechanism is active spreading, in which unsteady flows lead to stretching and folding of plumes. Active spreading can be accomplished by engineered injection and extraction (EIE), in which clean water is injected and extracted at wells surrounding a contaminant plume to create unsteady flow fields that stretch and fold the treatment solution and contaminant plumes. For a model system in which nested plumes of two reactants undergo scalar transport and instantaneous reaction, the simulation results reported here indicate that EIE enhances degradation of groundwater contamination in homogeneous and heterogeneous aquifers compared to baseline models without EIE. Furthermore, this study shows that the amount of reaction provided by the spreading due to EIE is greater than the amount of reaction due to spreading from heterogeneity alone.

  18. In situ high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy - Fundamental insights in surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Christian; Steinrück, Hans-Peter

    2013-11-01

    Since the advent of third generation synchrotron light sources optimized for providing soft X-rays up to 2 keV, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been developed to be an outstanding tool to study surface properties and surface reactions at an unprecedented level. The high resolution allows identifying various surface species, and for small molecules even the vibrational fine structure can be resolved in the XP spectra. The high photon flux reduces the required measuring time per spectrum to the domain of a few seconds or even less, which enables to follow surface processes in situ. Moreover, it also provides access to very small coverages down to below 0.1% of a monolayer, enabling the investigation of minority species or processes at defect sites. The photon energy can be adjusted according to the requirement of a particular experiment, i.e., to maximize or minimize the surface sensitivity or the photoionization cross-section of the substrate or the adsorbate. For a few instruments worldwide, a next step forward was taken by combining in situ high-resolution spectrometers with supersonic molecular beams. These beams allow to control and vary the kinetic and internal energies of the incident molecules and provide a local pressure of up to ~10-5 mbar, which can be switched on and off in a controllable way, thus offering a well-defined time structure to study adsorption or reaction processes.

  19. Next-Generation in Situ Hybridization Chain Reaction: Higher Gain, Lower Cost, Greater Durability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization chain reaction (HCR) provides multiplexed, isothermal, enzyme-free, molecular signal amplification in diverse settings. Within intact vertebrate embryos, where signal-to-background is at a premium, HCR in situ amplification enables simultaneous mapping of multiple target mRNAs, addressing a longstanding challenge in the biological sciences. With this approach, RNA probes complementary to mRNA targets trigger chain reactions in which metastable fluorophore-labeled RNA hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. The properties of HCR lead to straightforward multiplexing, deep sample penetration, high signal-to-background, and sharp subcellular signal localization within fixed whole-mount zebrafish embryos, a standard model system for the study of vertebrate development. However, RNA reagents are expensive and vulnerable to enzymatic degradation. Moreover, the stringent hybridization conditions used to destabilize nonspecific hairpin binding also reduce the energetic driving force for HCR polymerization, creating a trade-off between minimization of background and maximization of signal. Here, we eliminate this trade-off by demonstrating that low background levels can be achieved using permissive in situ amplification conditions (0% formamide, room temperature) and engineer next-generation DNA HCR amplifiers that maximize the free energy benefit per polymerization step while preserving the kinetic trapping property that underlies conditional polymerization, dramatically increasing signal gain, reducing reagent cost, and improving reagent durability. PMID:24712299

  20. In-situ observations of catalytic surface reactions with soft x-rays under working conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Ryo; Kondoh, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Catalytic chemical reactions proceeding on solid surfaces are an important topic in fundamental science and industrial technologies such as energy conversion, pollution control and chemical synthesis. Complete understanding of the heterogeneous catalysis and improving its efficiency to an ultimate level are the eventual goals for many surface scientists. Soft x-ray is one of the prime probes to observe electronic and structural information of the target materials. Most studies in surface science using soft x-rays have been performed under ultra-high vacuum conditions due to the technical limitation, though the practical catalytic reactions proceed under ambient pressure conditions. However, recent developments of soft x-ray based techniques operating under ambient pressure conditions have opened a door to the in-situ observation of materials under realistic environments. The near-ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) using synchrotron radiation enables us to observe the chemical states of surfaces of condensed matters under the presence of gas(es) at elevated pressures, which has been hardly conducted with the conventional XPS technique. Furthermore, not only the NAP-XPS but also ambient-pressure compatible soft x-ray core-level spectroscopies, such as near-edge absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), have been significantly contributing to the in-situ observations. In this review, first we introduce recent developments of in-situ observations using soft x-ray techniques and current status. Then we present recent new findings on catalytically active surfaces using soft x-ray techniques, particularly focusing on the NAP-XPS technique. Finally we give a perspective on the future direction of this emerging technique.

  1. In situ measurement of reaction volume and calculation of pH of weak acid buffer solutions under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Min, Stephen K; Samaranayake, Chaminda P; Sastry, Sudhir K

    2011-05-26

    Direct measurements of reaction volume, so far, have been limited to atmospheric pressure. This study describes a method for in situ reaction volume measurements under pressure using a variable volume piezometer. Reaction volumes for protonic ionization of weak acid buffering agents (MES, citric acid, sulfanilic acid, and phosphoric acid) were measured in situ under pressure up to 400 MPa at 25 °C. The methodology involved initial separation of buffering agents within the piezometer using gelatin capsules. Under pressure, the volume of the reactants was measured at 25 °C, and the contents were heated to 40 °C to dissolve the gelatin and allow the reaction to occur, and cooled to 25 °C, where the volume of products was measured. Reaction volumes were used to calculate pH of the buffer solutions as a function of pressure. The results show that the measured reaction volumes as well as the calculated pH values generally quite agree with their respective theoretically predicted values up to 100 MPa. The results of this study highlight the need for a comprehensive theory to describe the pressure behavior of ionization reactions in realistic systems especially at higher pressures. PMID:21542618

  2. In Situ Vitrification Treatability Study Work Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Charboneau, B.L.; Landon, J.L.

    1989-03-01

    The Buried Waste Program was established in October, 1987 to accelerate the studies needed to develop a recommended long-term management plan for the buried mixed waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The In Situ Vitrification Project is being conducted in a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Feasibility Study format to identify methods for the long-term management of the mixed waste buried. This In Situ Vitrification Treatability Study Work Plan gives a brief description of the site, work breakdown structure, and project organization: the in situ vitrification technology; the purpose of the tests and demonstrations; and the equipment and materials required for the tests and demonstration. 5 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Photocatalytic removal of soot: unravelling of the reaction mechanism by EPR and in situ FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Smits, Marianne; Ling, Yun; Lenaerts, Silvia; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2012-12-21

    Photocatalytic soot oxidation is studied on P25 TiO(2) as an important model reaction for self-cleaning processes by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Contacting of carbon black with P25 leads on the one hand to a reduction of the local dioxygen concentration in the powder. On the other hand, the weakly adsorbed radicals on the carbon particles are likely to act as alternative traps for the photogenerated conduction-band electrons. We find furthermore that the presence of dioxygen and oxygen-related radicals is vital for the photocatalytic soot degradation. The complete oxidation of soot to CO(2) is evidenced by in situ FTIR spectroscopy, no intermediate CO is detected during the photocatalytic process. PMID:23150192

  4. In Situ Catalyst Modification in Atom Transfer Radical Reactions with Ruthenium Benzylidene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juneyoung; Grandner, Jessica M; Engle, Keary M; Houk, K N; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Ruthenium benzylidene complexes are well-known as olefin metathesis catalysts. Several reports have demonstrated the ability of these catalysts to also facilitate atom transfer radical (ATR) reactions, such as atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). However, while the mechanism of olefin metathesis with ruthenium benzylidenes has been well-studied, the mechanism by which ruthenium benzylidenes promote ATR reactions remains unknown. To probe this question, we have analyzed seven different ruthenium benzylidene complexes for ATR reactivity. Kinetic studies by (1)H NMR revealed that ruthenium benzylidene complexes are rapidly converted into new ATRA-active, metathesis-inactive species under typical ATRA conditions. When ruthenium benzylidene complexes were activated prior to substrate addition, the resulting activated species exhibited enhanced kinetic reactivity in ATRA with no significant difference in overall product yield compared to the original complexes. Even at low temperature, where the original intact complexes did not catalyze the reaction, preactivated catalysts successfully reacted. Only the ruthenium benzylidene complexes that could be rapidly transformed into ATRA-active species could successfully catalyze ATRP, whereas other complexes preferred redox-initiated free radical polymerization. Kinetic measurements along with additional mechanistic and computational studies show that a metathesis-inactive ruthenium species, generated in situ from the ruthenium benzylidene complexes, is the active catalyst in ATR reactions. Based on data from (1) H, (13)C, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography, we suspect that this ATRA-active species is a RuxCly(PCy3)z complex. PMID:27186790

  5. Spectroscopic detection of aqueous contaminants using in situ corona reactions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M

    1997-04-01

    An apparently novel technique to aid the detection of a variety of inorganic and organic compounds in environmental and drinking water samples is described. Background absorbance due to optical scattering, cell fouling, and a variety of contaminants is suppressed by combining UV spectroscopy with chemical reactions initiated by reactive species generated in a high-voltage corona discharge. Injection of the reactive species takes place through a free water surface from the "corona wind". Initial measurements on aqueous chlorine in drinking water and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene) in unfiltered river water down to parts-per-million concentration are given which show, by comparison with a conventional UV absorption measurement, good background suppression. The experimental arrangement is simpler than that in typical fluorescence detection systems, and the geometrical flexibility means that corona "dosing" can be applied also to Raman and other spectroscopies, to electrochemical detection schemes, and to planar and windowless geometries. PMID:9105172

  6. The reaction product of hydrogen and electro-refined plutonium observed by in situ electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brierley, M.; Knowles, J. P.; Preuss, M.

    2016-02-01

    Electro-refined plutonium was reacted with hydrogen within the preparation chamber of a Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscope and in situ images were obtained. The plutonium hydride reaction product was observed to have precipitated at the oxide metal interface as angular particulates (ca 2 μm in length) and was also present within micro cracks intersecting the surface.

  7. Intermolecular enantioselective dearomatization reaction of β-naphthol using meso-aziridine: a bifunctional in situ generated magnesium catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongxu; Wang, Linqing; Han, Fengxia; Li, Dan; Zhao, Depeng; Wang, Rui

    2015-02-01

    A direct, facile, and highly diastereo- and enantioselective dearomatization reaction of β-naphthol derivatives with aziridines has been developed for the first time. A newly designed Box-OH ligand was employed for an in situ generated magnesium catalyst and proved to be efficient. The corresponding dearomatization product was transformed into a polycyclic scaffold and polyhydroxylated compound. (1) H NMR studies revealed the activation mode of the dearomatization process of β-naphthols, and a clear positive nonlinear effect was observed in the reaction, and provides insight into the coordination environment around the Mg(II) center and the possible active species. PMID:25589219

  8. A novel system for in-situ observations of early hydration reactions in wet conditions in conventional SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, A.; Bentur, A. . E-mail: bentur@tx.technion.ac.il; Kovler, K.

    2007-01-15

    A novel system enabling wet microscopy in conventional SEM is described and its performance for in-situ study of hydration reactions is demonstrated. The technology is based on a sealed specimen capsule, which is protected from the microscope vacuum by an electron-transparent partition membrane. Thus, the wet sample can be placed and observed in a 'conventional' SEM without the need for drying or employing environmental SEM. Early hydration reactions of gypsum and cement systems were followed during the first 24 h.

  9. In situ characterization of catalysts and membranes in a microchannel under high-temperature water gas shift reaction conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavusoglu, G.; Dallmann, F.; Lichtenberg, H.; Goldbach, A.; Dittmeyer, R.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    Microreactor technology with high heat transfer in combination with stable catalysts is a very attractive approach for reactions involving major heat effects such as methane steam reforming and to some extent, also the high temperature water gas shift (WGS) reaction. For this study Rh/ceria catalysts and an ultrathin hydrogen selective membrane were characterized in situ in a microreactor specially designed for x-ray absorption spectroscopic measurements under WGS conditions. The results of these experiments can serve as a basis for further development of the catalysts and membranes.

  10. Design and operation of an in situ high pressure reaction cell for x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Bare, S. R.; Yang, N.; Kelly, S. D.; Mickelson, G. E.; Modica, F. S.; UOP LLC; EXAFS Analysis

    2007-01-01

    The design and initial operation of an in situ catalysis reaction cell for x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at high pressure is described. The design is based on an x-ray transparent tube fabricated from beryllium. This forms a true plug flow reactor for catalysis studies. The reactor is coupled to a portable microprocessor-controlled versatile feed system, and incorporates on-line analysis of reaction products. XAFS data recorded during the reduction of a NiRe/carbon catalyst at 4 bar are used to illustrate the performance of the reactor.

  11. Observing Metal-Catalyzed Chemical Reactions in Situ Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on Pd–Au Nanoshells

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Kimberly N.; Janesko, Benjamin G.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2016-01-01

    Insight into the nature of transient reaction intermediates and mechanistic pathways involved in heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions is obtainable from a number of surface spectroscopic techniques. Carrying out these investigations under actual reaction conditions is preferred but remains challenging, especially for catalytic reactions that occur in water. Here, we report the direct spectroscopic study of the catalytic hydrodechlorination of 1,1-dichloroethene in H2O using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). With Pd islands grown on Au nanoshell films, this reaction can be followed in situ using SERS, exploiting the high enhancements and large active area of Au nanoshell SERS substrates, the transparency of Raman spectroscopy to aqueous solvents, and the catalytic activity enhancement of Pd by the underlying Au metal. The formation and subsequent transformation of several adsorbate species was observed. These results provide the first direct evidence of the room-temperature catalytic hydrodechlorination of a chlorinated solvent, a potentially important pathway for groundwater cleanup, as a sequence of dechlorination and hydrogenation steps. More broadly, the results highlight the exciting prospects of studying catalytic processes in water in situ, like those involved in biomass conversion and proton-exchange membrane fuel cells. PMID:19554693

  12. Reversible lability by in situ reaction of self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Héctor M; Thompson, Christopher M; Hohman, J Nathan; Crespi, Vincent H; Weiss, Paul S

    2009-02-18

    We describe a new methodology for the fabrication of controllably displaceable monolayers using a carboxyl-functionalized self-assembled monolayer and in situ Fischer esterification, a simple and reversible chemical reaction. Using an 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid monolayer as a model system, we show that in situ esterification results in the creation of subtle chemical and structural defects. These defects promote molecular exchange reactions with n-dodecanethiol molecules, leading to the complete and rapid displacement of the exposed areas. Displacement results in well-ordered crystalline n-dodecanethiolate monolayer films. We also show that the complementary hydrolysis reaction can be employed to quench the reacted monolayer, significantly hindering further displacement. The generality of reversible lability was tested by applying the in situ esterification reaction to the structurally distinct carboxyl-functionalized molecule 3-mercapto-1-adamantanecarboxylic acid. Beyond its applicability to create mixed-composition monolayers, this methodology could be combined with chemical patterning techniques, such as microdisplacement printing, to fabricate complex functional surfaces. PMID:19170497

  13. Study of char gasification reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ballal, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    A Texas lignite, an anthracite and two bituminous coals, Pittsburgh number8 and Illinois number6, were pyrolyzed in a nitrogen atmosphere to prepare chars. Optical microscopy, mercury porosimetry and gas adsorption techniques using nitrogen, CO/sub 2/ and CO, were employed for pore structure characterization. The lignite char exhibited the fastest rates of gaseous diffusion, followed in order of decreasing diffusivities by the Illinois number6, Pittsburgh number8 and anthracite chars. The changes in reactivities and pore structures of chars were measured experimentally during their reaction with oxygen (400-550C) and CO/sub 2/ (800-1000C). For a particular char-gas system, the normalized rate-conversion pattern was invariant with respect to temperature and gaseous concentration. In the case of lignite and Pittsburgh number8 chars, the rate-conversion pattern was similar during reaction with oxygen and CO/sub 2/. Adsorption experiments on partially reacted chars indicated that the micropores in the lignite char were accessible to both reactants. The micropores in the Illinois number6 char were, however, not accessible during its reaction with oxygen. The evolution of pore structure during reaction was modeled by using a probabilistic approach which accounts for overlapping pores with different shapes and sizes. The kinetics of gasification of the lignite and the Pittsburgh number8 chars was studied using a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type kinetic expression to correlate the experimental data. CO was found to inhibit the reaction substantially. The effect of a potassium carbonate catalyst on the reaction of these two chars was also investigated. Substantial increases in reaction rates were observed, and the enhancement was approximately proportional to the catalyst loading.

  14. Mechanistic studies of malonic acid-mediated in situ acylation.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Koushik; Naoum, Johnny N; Roy, Tapta Kanchan; Gilon, Chaim; Gerber, R Benny; Friedler, Assaf

    2015-09-01

    We have previously introduced an easy to perform, cost-effective and highly efficient acetylation technique for solid phase synthesis (SPPS). Malonic acid is used as a precursor and the reaction proceeds via a reactive ketene that acetylates the target amine. Here we present a detailed mechanistic study of the malonic acid-mediated acylation. The influence of reaction conditions, peptide sequence and reagents was systematically studied. Our results show that the methodology can be successfully applied to different types of peptides and nonpeptidic molecules irrespective of their structure, sequence, or conformation. Using alkyl, phenyl, and benzyl malonic acid, we synthesized various acyl peptides with almost quantitative yields. The ketenes obtained from the different malonic acid derived precursors were characterized by in situ (1) H-NMR. The reaction proceeded in short reaction times and resulted in excellent yields when using uronium-based coupling agents, DIPEA as a base, DMF/DMSO/NMP as solvents, Rink amide/Wang/Merrifield resins, temperature of 20°C, pH 8-12 and 5 min preactivation at inert atmosphere. The reaction was unaffected by Lewis acids, transition metal ions, surfactants, or salt. DFT studies support the kinetically favorable concerted mechanism for CO2 and ketene formation that leads to the thermodynamically stable acylated products. We conclude that the malonic acid-mediated acylation is a general method applicable to various target molecules. PMID:25846609

  15. Orientation relationship in WC-Co composite nanoparticles synthesized by in situ reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xilong; Song, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Xingwei; Wang, Haibin; Zhou, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Using the nanoscale violet tungsten oxide as the tungsten source, the WC-Co composite powder was synthesized by the in situ reactions. The particle size of the WC-Co composite powder has a narrow distribution with the mean particle size below 100 nm, and the single composite particle has a nanocrystalline structure with a mean grain size smaller than 10 nm. The detailed characterizations of the nanoparticle microstructure reveal that the orientation relationship and coherence at the interfaces can form during the in situ reactions and further inherit in the consolidated cemented carbide bulk material. The favorable crystallographic characteristics of the WC-Co composite nanoparticles play a significant role in the enhancement of the mechanical properties of the prepared cemented carbide bulk material.

  16. Quasi in situ scanning force microscope with an automatic operated reaction chamber.

    PubMed

    Hund, Markus; Olszowka, Violetta; Fischer, Franz; Krejtschi, Heinz

    2011-11-01

    We describe the design and performance of a quasi in situ scanning force microscope with an automatic operated reaction chamber. The design provides a repetitive hermetically sealed sample environment for successive processing. The reaction chamber is based on a combination of a flexure-guided cover, a piezo-positioning system and a force applicator system. An axial force seals the cover against the reactor enabling flow-through applications at low pressure, ambient pressure, or elevated pressure. The position stability of the sample relative to the probe is characterized and a full automated operation of the instrument is explored by the alignment of an ABC terblock copolymer thin film undergoing solvent vapor annealing in the presence of a high electric field. Due to the high electric field strength and the sharp scanning force microscope tip it is impossible to perform in situ scanning in the presence of the electric field. PMID:22128986

  17. Orientation relationship in WC-Co composite nanoparticles synthesized by in situ reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xilong; Song, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Xingwei; Wang, Haibin; Zhou, Cheng

    2015-04-10

    Using the nanoscale violet tungsten oxide as the tungsten source, the WC-Co composite powder was synthesized by the in situ reactions. The particle size of the WC-Co composite powder has a narrow distribution with the mean particle size below 100 nm, and the single composite particle has a nanocrystalline structure with a mean grain size smaller than 10 nm. The detailed characterizations of the nanoparticle microstructure reveal that the orientation relationship and coherence at the interfaces can form during the in situ reactions and further inherit in the consolidated cemented carbide bulk material. The favorable crystallographic characteristics of the WC-Co composite nanoparticles play a significant role in the enhancement of the mechanical properties of the prepared cemented carbide bulk material. PMID:25785577

  18. Addition of CFCl3 to Aromatic Aldehydes via in Situ Grignard Reaction.

    PubMed

    Barkakaty, Balaka; Talukdar, Bandana; Lokitz, Bradley S

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic modification of trichlorofluoromethane (CFCl3) to non-volatile and useful fluorinated precursors is a cost-effective and an environmentally benign strategy for the safe consumption/destruction of the ozone depleting potential of the reagent. In this report, we present a novel method for in situ Grignard reaction using magnesium powder and CFCl3 for synthesis of dichlorofluoromethyl aromatic alcohols. PMID:26295221

  19. Addition of CFCl3 to Aromatic Aldehydes via in Situ Grignard Reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barkakaty, Balaka; Talukdar, Bandana; Lokitz, Bradley

    2015-08-18

    In the case of synthetic modification of trichlorofluoromethane (CFCl3) to non-volatile and useful fluorinated precursors, we realized that it is a cost-effective and an environmentally benign strategy for the safe consumption/destruction of the ozone depleting potential of the reagent. In our report, we present a novel method for in situ Grignard reaction using magnesium powder and CFCl3 for synthesis of dichlorofluoromethyl aromatic alcohols.

  20. Addition of CFCl3 to Aromatic Aldehydes via in Situ Grignard Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Barkakaty, Balaka; Talukdar, Bandana; Lokitz, Bradley

    2015-08-18

    In the case of synthetic modification of trichlorofluoromethane (CFCl3) to non-volatile and useful fluorinated precursors, we realized that it is a cost-effective and an environmentally benign strategy for the safe consumption/destruction of the ozone depleting potential of the reagent. In our report, we present a novel method for in situ Grignard reaction using magnesium powder and CFCl3 for synthesis of dichlorofluoromethyl aromatic alcohols.

  1. In situ observation of surface species on iridium oxide nanoparticles during the oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Casalongue, Hernan G; Ng, May Ling; Kaya, Sarp; Friebel, Daniel; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Nilsson, Anders

    2014-07-01

    An iridium oxide nanoparticle electrocatalyst under oxygen evolution reaction conditions was probed in situ by ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Under OER conditions, iridium undergoes a change in oxidation state from Ir(IV) to Ir(V) that takes place predominantly at the surface of the catalyst. The chemical change in iridium is coupled to a decrease in surface hydroxide, providing experimental evidence which strongly suggests that the oxygen evolution reaction on iridium oxide occurs through an OOH-mediated deprotonation mechanism. PMID:24889896

  2. Four unexpected lanthanide coordination polymers involving in situ reaction of solvent N, N-Dimethylformamide

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jun-Cheng; Tong, Wen-Quan; Fu, Ai-Yun; Xie, Cheng-Gen; Chang, Wen-Gui; Wu, Ju; Xu, Guang-Nian; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Li, Jun; Li, Yong; Yang, Peng-Qi

    2015-05-15

    Four unexpected 2D lanthanide coordination polymers have been synthesized through in situ reactions of DMF solvent under solvothermal conditions. The isostructural complexes 1–3 contain four types of 2{sub 1} helical chains. While the Nd(III) ions are bridged through μ{sub 2}-HIDC{sup 2−} and oxalate to form a 2D sheet along the bc plane without helical character in 4. Therefore, complex 1 exhibits bright red solid-state phosphorescence upon exposure to UV radiation at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Four unexpected 2D lanthanide coordination polymers have been synthesized through in situ reactions of solvent DMF to formate acid or oxalic acid under solvothermal conditions. The isostructural complexes 1–3 contain four types of different 2{sub 1} helical chains in the 2D layer and 1 exhibits bright red solid-state phosphorescence upon UV radiation. - Highlights: • Four unexpected 2D lanthanide coordination compounds have been synthesized through in situ reactions under solvothermal conditions. • The complexes 1–3 contain four types of 2{sub 1} helical chains in the layer. • Complex 1 exhibits bright red solid-state phosphorescence upon exposure to UV radiation at room temperature.

  3. Interfacial Reaction Studies Using ONIOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2003-01-01

    In this report, we focus on the calculations of the energetics and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions for Organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). The work described in this report builds upon our own previous thermochemical and chemical kinetics studies. The first of these articles refers to the prediction of thermochemical properties, and the latter one deals with the prediction of rate constants for gaseous homolytic dissociation reactions. The calculations of this investigation are at the microscopic level. The systems chosen consisted of a gallium nitride (GaN) substrate, and molecular nitrogen (N2) and ammonia (NH3) as adsorbants. The energetics for the adsorption and the adsorbant dissociation processes were estimated, and reaction rate constants for the dissociation reactions of free and adsorbed molecules were predicted. The energetics for substrate decomposition was also computed. The ONIOM method, implemented in the Gaussian98 program, was used to perform the calculations. This approach has been selected since it allows dividing the system into two layers that can be treated at different levels of accuracy. The atoms of the substrate were modeled using molecular mechanics6 with universal force fields, whereas the adsorbed molecules were approximated using quantum mechanics, based on density functional theory methods with B3LYP functionals and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. Calculations for the substrate were performed in slabs of several unit cells in each direction. The N2 and NH3 adsorbates were attached to a central location at the Ga-lined surface.

  4. Mechanisms and reaction pathways for simultaneous oxidation of NOx and SO₂ by ozone determined by in situ IR measurements.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chenglang; Zhao, Nan; Zhuang, Zhuokai; Wang, Haiqiang; Liu, Yue; Weng, Xiaole; Wu, Zhongbiao

    2014-06-15

    Ozone (O3) oxidation combined with wet scrubbing is a promising method for the simultaneous removal of SO2 and NOx in flue gas. In this study, the O3 oxidation processes of NO and SO2, as well as their coexistence, were investigated using an in situ IR spectrometer. Experimental results showed that the O3 concentration and the reaction temperature played critical roles in the O3 oxidation process of NO. Around 80°C, when inlet molar ratio of O3/NO was less than 1, NO was mainly oxidized to NO2, while when the ratio was greater than 1, NO would be further oxidized to NO3, N2O5, and HNO3. NO3 was the key intermediate product for the formation of N2O5 and HNO3. However, the subsequent reactions of NO3 were temperature dependence. With the increase of reaction temperature above 100°C, the concentration of NO2 increased whereas the concentrations of N2O5 and HNO3 decreased. The oxidation of SO2 by O3 was negligible and SO2 had little influence on the oxidation of NO in the simultaneous oxidation of NO and SO2. Finally, based on the in situ IR results, the oxidation mechanism is discussed and the reaction pathways are proposed. PMID:24801895

  5. Resonance Raman spectroscopy as an in situ probe for monitoring catalytic events in a Ru-porphyrin mediated amination reaction.

    PubMed

    Zardi, Paolo; Gallo, Emma; Solan, Gregory A; Hudson, Andrew J

    2016-05-10

    Resonance Raman microspectroscopy has been widely used to study the structure and dynamics of porphyrins and metal complexes containing the porphyrin ligand. Here, we have demonstrated that the same technique can be adapted to examine the mechanism of a homogeneously-catalysed reaction mediated by a transition-metal-porphyrin complex. Previously it has been challenging to study this type of reaction using in situ spectroscopic monitoring due to the low stability of the reaction intermediates and elevated-temperature conditions. We have made a straightforward modification to the sample stage on a microscope for time-lapsed Raman microspectroscopy from reaction mixtures in these media. The allylic amination of unsaturated hydrocarbons by aryl azides, which can be catalysed by a ruthenium-porphyrin complex, has been used as an illustrative example of the methodology. The mechanism of this particular reaction has been studied previously using density-functional theory and kinetic approaches. The Raman measurements support the mechanism proposed in the earlier publications by providing the first experimental verification of a precursor reaction complex between the aryl azide and the ruthenium metal ion, and evidence for the formation of a mono-imido intermediate complex under conditions of high concentration of the reactant olefin. PMID:27070335

  6. (Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  7. Fundamental studies of high-temperature corrosion reactions. Fifth annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, R.A.

    1980-02-01

    The in-situ study of metal oxidation reactions and the mechanism of the sulfidation of molybdenum by sulfur gases were studied. Equipment including a SEM microscope, heater and power supply which were used is described. (FS)

  8. In Situ Imidazole Activation of Ribonucleotides for Abiotic RNA Oligomerization Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burcar, Bradley T.; Jawed, Mohsin; Shah, Hari; McGown, Linda B.

    2015-06-01

    The hypothesis that RNA played a significant role in the origin of life requires effective and efficient abiotic pathways to produce RNA oligomers. The most successful abiotic oligomerization reactions to date have utilized high-energy, modified, or pre-activated ribonucleotides to generate strands of RNA up to 50-mers in length. In spite of their success, these modifications and pre-activation reactions significantly alter the ribonucleotides in ways that are highly unlikely to have occurred on a prebiotic Earth. This research seeks to address this problem by exploring an aqueous based method for activating the canonical ribonucleotides in situ using 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and imidazole. The reactions were run with and without a montmorillonite clay catalyst and compared to reactions that used ribonucleotides that were pre-activated with imidazole. The effects of pH and ribonucleotide concentration were also investigated. The results demonstrate the ability of in situ activation of ribonucleotides to generate linear RNA oligomers in solution, providing an alternative route to produce RNA for use in prebiotic Earth scenarios.

  9. Hybrid Photopatterned Enzymatic Reaction (HyPER) for In situ Cell Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Donald R; Borrajo, Jacob; Soon, Allyson; Acosta-Vélez, Giovanny F.; Oshita, Victor; Darling, Nicole; Mack, Julia; Barker, Thomas; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; Segura, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    The ability to design artificial extracellular matrices as cell instructive scaffolds has opened the door to technologies capable of studying cell fate in vitro and to guide tissue repair in vivo. One main component of the design of artificial extracellular matrices is the incorporation of biochemical cues to guide cell phenotype and multicellular organization. The extracellular matrix is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of proteins that present a variety of spatially discrete signals to residing cell populations. In contrast, most engineered ECMs do not mimic this heterogeneity. In recent years the use of photodeprotection has been used to achieve spatial immobilization of signals. However, these approaches have been limited mostly to small peptides. Here we combine photodeprotection with enzymatic reaction to achieve spatially controlled immobilization of active bioactive signals that range from small molecules to large proteins. A peptide substrate for transglutaminase factor XIII (FXIIIa) is caged with a photodeprotectable group, which is then immobilized to the bulk of a cell compatible hydrogel. With the use of focused light the substrate can be deprotected and used to immobilize patterned bioactive signals. This approach offers an innovative strategy to immobilize delicate bioactive signals, such as growth factors, without loss of activity and enables In situ cell manipulation of encapsulated cells. PMID:24399784

  10. Monitoring of galvanic replacement reaction between silver nanowires and HAuCl4 by in situ transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yugang; Wang, Yuxin

    2011-10-12

    Galvanic replacement reaction between silver nanowires and an aqueous solution of HAuCl(4) has been successfully monitored in real time by using in situ transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) in combination with a flow cell reactor. The in situ observations clearly show the morphological evolution of the solid silver nanowires to hollow gold nanotubes in the course of the reaction. Careful analysis of the images reveals that the galvanic replacement reaction on the silver nanowires involves multiple steps: (i) local initiation of pitting process; (ii) anisotropic etching of the silver nanowires and uniform deposition of the resulting gold atoms on the surfaces of the nanowires; and (iii) reconstruction of the nanotube walls via an Ostwald ripening process. The in situ TXM represents a promising approach for studying dynamic processes involved in the growth and chemical transformation of nanomaterials in solutions, in particular for nanostructures with dimensions larger than 50 nm. PMID:21894944

  11. Uranyl triazolate formation via an in situ Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Knope, Karah E.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2010-08-27

    A two dimensional UO22+ coordination polymer, (UO2)3(C10H5N3O4)2(OH)2(H2O)2, has been synthesized under solvothermal conditions. The triazolate ligand, 1-(4-carboxyphenyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carboxylic acid (CPTAZ) has been generated via a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of 4-azidobenzoic acid and propiolic acid. Reactions of the UO22+ cation with both the in situ generated triazolate ligand and the presynthesized ligand have been explored. The structure, fluorescent and thermal behaviour of this material are presented, as is a discussion of the utility of in situ ligand formation versus direct assembly.

  12. In situ Regeneration of NADH via Lipoamide Dehydrogenase-catalyzed Electron Transfer Reaction Evidenced by Spectroelectrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, Tsz Kin; Chen, Baowei; Lei, Chenghong; Liu, Jun

    2012-08-01

    NAD/NADH is a coenzyme found in all living cells, carrying electrons from one reaction to another. We report on characterizations of in situ regeneration of NADH via lipoamide dehydrogenase (LD)-catalyzed electron transfer reaction to regenerate NADH using UV-vis spectroelectrochemistry. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) and maximum velocity (Vmax) of NADH regeneration were measured as 0.80 {+-} 0.15 mM and 1.91 {+-} 0.09 {micro}M s-1 in a 1-mm thin-layer spectroelectrochemical cell using gold gauze as the working electrode at the applied potential -0.75 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The electrocatalytic reduction of the NAD system was further coupled with the enzymatic conversion of pyruvate to lactate by lactate dehydrogenase to examine the coenzymatic activity of the regenerated NADH. Although the reproducible electrocatalytic reduction of NAD into NADH is known to be difficult compared to the electrocatalytic oxidation of NADH, our spectroelectrochemical results indicate that the in situ regeneration of NADH via LD-catalyzed electron transfer reaction is fast and sustainable and can be potentially applied to many NAD/NADH-dependent enzyme systems.

  13. Vaginal micropapillary lesions are not related to human papillomavirus infection: in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction detection techniques.

    PubMed

    Garzetti, G G; Ciavattini, A; Goteri, G; Menzo, S; De Nictolis, M; Clementi, M; Brugia, M; Romanini, C

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the human papillomavirus DNA presence in vaginal papillary lesions, with particular regard to micropapillomatosis to better define their clinical significance. Prospective study: the study population was composed of 62 women who were recruited consecutively from the Colposcopy Centre of the Ancona University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, on the grounds of vaginal papillomatosis or/and typical acuminata warts. Biopsies for routine histology, and for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA detection by means of in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were taken from the papillary lesions and from 24 healthy women, who were selected as controls. Macroscopically, vaginal micropapillomatosis was ascertained in 51 cases (82.3%), while in 11 cases (17.7%) the colposcopic diagnosis was condyloma acuminatum. During in situ hybridization, HPV DNA positivity was observed in 8 (9.4%) out of 85 samples of squamous papillae and in 11 (64.7%) out of 17 samples of condylomata; in control specimens, HPV DNA was detected in 2 (8.3%) out of 24 bioptic samples. The correspondence between in situ hybridization and PCR was 96.1%, with 17.4% more diagnosis obtained by PCR. Vaginal micropapillomatosis may be regarded as a variation in the normal anatomy of the lower genital tract without any significant relationship with HPV infection, and as a lesion easily distinguishable from condylomata acuminata by clinical examination alone. PMID:7959342

  14. Adsorption, Coadsorption and Reaction of Acetaldehyde and NO₂ on Na-Y,FAU: an in situ FTIR Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Szanyi, Janos; Kwak, Ja Hun; Moline, Ryan A.; Peden, Charles HF

    2004-11-04

    The adsorption of acetaldehyde and its co-adsorption and reaction with NO₂ were investigated on a Na-Y, FAU zeolite using in situ FTIR spectroscopy. Acetaldehyde adsorbs strongly over Na-Y and desorbs molecularly at around 400K with very limited extent of condensation or polymerization. Reaction between CH₃CHO and NO₂ takes place in co-adsorption experiments even at 300K. In the initial step, acetaldehyde is oxidized to acetic acid accompanied by the formation of NO, which can be observed as N2O₃ formed via a further reaction between NO and NO₂. The key intermediates in the overall NOx reduction in this process are nitro- and nitrosomethane, which form in the next step. Their decomposition and further reaction with adsorbed NOx species lead to the formation of HCN, HNCO, N₂O, CO₂ and organic nitrile species identified by their characteristic IR vibrational signatures. At 473K, the reaction between adsorbed CH₃CHO and NO₂ is very fast. The results seem to suggest a mechanism in which N-N bond formation takes place among ionic nitrogen containing species (NO⁺ and CN⁻ or NCO⁻). No evidence has been found to suggest the participation of NHx⁺NOy⁻ type species in the N⁻N bond formation under the experimental conditions of this study.

  15. New platform for cytochrome p450 reaction combining in situ immobilization on biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyung; Nam, Dong Heon; Lee, Sahng Ha; Park, Jong Hyun; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Chan Beum; Jeong, Ki Jun

    2014-12-17

    We describe an efficienct chemical conversion platform with in situ immobilization of P450-BM3 on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) granules. Through fusion with phasin, P450-BM3 is easily immobilized on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) granules in Escherichia coli. In our work, the immobilized P450 exhibited higher stability and catalytic activity compared to free P450 against changes of pH, temperature, and concentrations of urea and ions. Through quick recovery of immobilized enzyme, the P450-P(3HB) complex successfully catalyzed an O-dealkylation reaction several times with maintained activity. Using the robust P450-P(3HB) complex, we performed a P450-catalyzed reaction on a preparative reactor scale (100 mL) and high-level production (12.3 μM) of 7-hydroxycoumarine from 7-ethoxycoumarin could be achieved. PMID:25322062

  16. Transfer Reaction Studies with JENSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, P.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U.; Linhardt, L. E.; Kontos, A.; Kozub, R. L.; Matos, M.; Montes, F.; Pain, S. D.; Pittman, S. T.; Sachs, A.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Jensa Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target system was designed to provide a gas target that was pure, localized, and dense. Several commissioning experiments with the JENSA target, performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), were undertaken to demonstrate the unique capability of JENSA for transfer reaction studies. JENSA has since completed its move from ORNL to the ReA3 reaccelerated beam hall at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). An overview of the JENSA design and operation will be presented, as well as a brief discussion of the experiments performed at ORNL with JENSA, with a focus on preliminary results from the 20Ne(p,t)18Ne commissioning experiment.

  17. The in-situ characterization of a transesterification reaction using electrical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sungjin

    Impedance Spectroscopy has been used in the in-situ monitoring of a transesterfication reaction of soybean biodiesel. This paper describes the application of Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) to observe and characterize the transesterfication reaction and its interfacial behavior phenomena electrically. In particular, the dielectric properties of soybean biodiesel were measured at broad range frequencies from 10-2 to 106 Hz at different temperatures, methanol molar ratio to biodiesel, concentration of catalyst and reaction time. Measurement of dielectric property have provided an important approach to understanding the structure of matter. Measurements of the dielectric properties are a reliable and efficient method for evaluating the biodiesel production to determine their quality and yield for reducing the production cost. The dielectric constant (epsilon') and loss (epsilon") are the most convenient indicators for quality control in commercial biodiesel manufacturing. Dielectric properties were correlated with chemically measured changes in soybean oil such as free fatty acids, amount of catalyst and alcohols at different temperatures as well as reaction times. It was observed that there is a good correlation between the dielectric constant (epsilon') and loss (epsilon") in soybean biodiesel. The result indicated that the dielectric properties increased with the (1) increasing temperature (2) increasing methanol; (3) increasing catalyst; (4) increasing reaction time. Dielectric properties was a useful index for the rapid quality evaluation of soybean biodiesel. Dielectric properties were compared to conventional methods of analysis (Infrared Spectroscopy) for evaluating the quality of soybean biodiesel. The results indicated that dielectric constant and dielectric loss are essential measurement for predicting the best biodiesel yield. Moreover, the electrical impedance parameters such as bulk resistance (Rb), bulk capacitance (Cb) and time constant(tau b

  18. In situ visualization of metallurgical reactions in nanoscale Cu/Sn diffusion couples

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Qiyue; Stach, Eric A.; Gao, Fan; Zhou, Guangwen; Gu, Zhiyong

    2015-02-10

    The Cu–Sn metallurgical soldering reaction in two-segmented Cu–Sn nanowires is visualized by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. By varying the relative lengths of Cu and Sn segments, we show that the metallurgical reaction starts at ~ 200 ° with the formation of a Cu–Sn solid solution for the Sn/Cu length ratio smaller than 1:5 while the formation of Cu–Sn intermetallic compounds (IMCs) for larger Sn/Cu length ratios. Upon heating the nanowires up to ~ 500 °C, two phase transformation pathways occur, η-Cu₆Sn₅ → ε-Cu₃Sn → δ-Cu₄₁Sn₁₁ for nanowires with a long Cu segment and η-Cu₆Sn₅ → ε-Cu₃Sn → γ-Cu₃Sn with a short Cu segment. The dynamic in situ TEM visualization of the evolution of Kirkendall voids demonstrates that Cu diffuses faster both in Sn and IMCs than that of Sn in Cu₃ and IMCs, which is the underlying cause of the dependence of the IMC formation and associated phase evolution on the relative lengths of the Cu and Sn segments.

  19. In situ visualization of metallurgical reactions in nanoscale Cu/Sn diffusion couples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yin, Qiyue; Stach, Eric A.; Gao, Fan; Zhou, Guangwen; Gu, Zhiyong

    2015-02-10

    The Cu–Sn metallurgical soldering reaction in two-segmented Cu–Sn nanowires is visualized by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. By varying the relative lengths of Cu and Sn segments, we show that the metallurgical reaction starts at ~ 200 ° with the formation of a Cu–Sn solid solution for the Sn/Cu length ratio smaller than 1:5 while the formation of Cu–Sn intermetallic compounds (IMCs) for larger Sn/Cu length ratios. Upon heating the nanowires up to ~ 500 °C, two phase transformation pathways occur, η-Cu₆Sn₅ → ε-Cu₃Sn → δ-Cu₄₁Sn₁₁ for nanowires with a long Cu segment and η-Cu₆Sn₅ → ε-Cu₃Sn → γ-Cu₃Sn with amore » short Cu segment. The dynamic in situ TEM visualization of the evolution of Kirkendall voids demonstrates that Cu diffuses faster both in Sn and IMCs than that of Sn in Cu₃ and IMCs, which is the underlying cause of the dependence of the IMC formation and associated phase evolution on the relative lengths of the Cu and Sn segments.« less

  20. Structure and properties of composites synthesized in situ using solid state displacement reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, C.H. Jr.; Brimhall, J.L.

    1993-10-01

    Solid state displacement reactions can produce in situ intermetallic and ceramic matrix composites in a process where an intermetallic or ceramic phase(s) and a potential reinforcing phase(s) are grown together during a solid state reaction. Interpenetrating and dispersed microstructures, important for desirable composite properties, have been produced by means of displacement reaction processing techniques. Two such composites have been synthesized which exhibit two distinct microstructures: MoSi{sub 2} reinforced with SiC particles, which exhibits a dispersed-phase structure, and NiAl/Ni{sub 3}Al reinforced with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which exhibits an interpenetrating-phase structure. Strength in bending and chevron-notch fracture toughness have been determined as a function of temperature, and measured properties compare favorably with composites produced by other means. The measured properties are discussed with regard to the observed microstructures. The potential for displacement reaction processing is assessed, and it appears to be a cost-effective synthesis method compared to others.

  1. Nuclear Structure and Reaction Mechanism Studies with Multinucleon Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, P. H.; Jones, G. A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Abdullah, M.; Gelletly, W.; Langdown, S. D.; Wollel, G.; De Angelis, G.; Gadea, A.; Kroell, Th.; Marginean, N.; Martinez, T.; Napoli, D. R.; Rusu, C.; Tonev, D.; Zhang, Y. H.; Ur, C. A.; Axiotis, M.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.

    2006-08-14

    This contribution reports on the results of an experiment to study the near-yrast states in selenium- and osmium-like nuclei, following their population in thick-target, multinucleon transfer reactions between an 82Se beam and a 192Os target. The experimental results for the level scheme for 84Se are presented together with investigations into the use of multi-dimensional gamma-ray energy gating to investigate angular momentum population in such heavy-ion binary reactions.

  2. Experimental Study of Serpentinization Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.; Brearley, A. J.; Ganguly, J.; Liermann, H.-P.; Keil, K.

    2004-01-01

    Current carbonaceous chondrite parent-body thermal models [1-3] produce scenarios that are inconsistent with constraints on aqueous alteration conditions based on meteorite mineralogical evidence, such as phase stability relationships within the meteorite matrix minerals [4] and isotope equilibration arguments [5, 6]. This discrepancy arises principally because of the thermal runaway effect produced by silicate hydration reactions (here loosely called serpentinization, as the principal products are serpentine minerals), which are so exothermic as to produce more than enough heat to melt more ice and provide a self-sustaining chain reaction. One possible way to dissipate the heat of reaction is to use a very small parent body [e.g., 2] or possibly a rubble pile model. Another possibility is to release this heat more slowly, which depends on the alteration reaction path and kinetics.

  3. LONG TERM IN SITU DISPOSAL ENGINEERING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS; CARLSON; BROCKMAN

    2003-07-23

    Patent application pulled per Ken Norris (FH General Counsel). The objective of this study is to devise methods, produce conceptual designs, examine and select alternatives, and estimate costs for the demonstration of long-term (300-year) in situ disposal of an existing waste disposal site. The demonstration site selected is the 216-A-24 Crib near the 200 East Area. The site contains a fission product inventory and has experienced plant, animal, and inadvertent than intrusion. Of the potential intrusive events and transport pathways at the site, potential human intrusion has been given primary consideration in barrier design. Intrusion by wind, plants, and animals has been given secondary consideration. Groundwater modeling for a number of barrier configurations has been carried out to help select a barrier that will minimize water infiltration and waste/water contact time. The estimated effective lifetime and cost of 20 barrier schemes, using a variety of materials, have been evaluated. The schemes studied include single component surface barriers, multicomponent barriers, and massively injected grout barriers. Five barriers with high estimated effective lifetimes and relatively low costs have been selected for detailed evaluation. They are basalt riprap barriers, massive soil barriers, salt basin barriers, multi-component fine/coarse barriers, and cemented basalt barriers. A variety of materials and configurations for marking the site have also been considered. A decision analysis was completed to select a barrier scheme for demonstration. The analysis indicated that the basalt riprap alternative would be the preferred choice for a full-scale demonstration. The recommended approach is to demonstrate the basalt riprap barrier at the 216-A-24 Crib as soon as possible. Methods and costs of assessing effectiveness of the demonstration are also described. Preliminary design modifications and costs for applying the five selected barrier schemes to other site types are

  4. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  5. In situ surface characterization and oxygen reduction reaction on shape-controlled gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hernández, J; Solla-Gullón, J; Herrero, E; Feliu, J M; Aldaz, A

    2009-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles of different shapes/surface structures were synthesized and electrochemically characterized. An in-situ surface characterization of the Au nanoparticles, which was able to obtain qualitative information about the type and relative sizes of the different facets present in the surface of the Au nanoparticles, was carried out by using Pb Under Potential Deposition (UPD) in alkaline solutions as a surface sensitive tool. The results obtained show that the final atomic arrangement on the surface can be different from that expected from the bulk structure of the well-defined shape Au nanoparticles. In this way, the development of precise in-situ methods to measure the distribution of the different sites on the nanoparticle surface, as lead UPD on gold surfaces, is highlighted. Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) was performed on the different Au nanoparticles. In agreement with the particular sensitivity of the oxygen reduction to the presence of Au(100) surface domains, cubic Au nanoparticles show much better electrocatalytic activity for ORR than small spherical particles and long nanorods, in agreement with the presence of a great fraction of (100) terrace sites on the surface of cubic gold nanoparticles. PMID:19437963

  6. In situ generation of electron acceptor for photoelectrochemical biosensing via hemin-mediated catalytic reaction.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yang; Lei, Jianping; Zhang, Lei; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-12-16

    A novel photoelectrochemical sensing strategy is designed for DNA detection on the basis of in situ generation of an electron acceptor via the catalytic reaction of hemin toward H2O2. The photoelectrochemical platform was established by sequential assembly of near-infrared CdTe quantum dots, capture DNA, and a hemin-labeled DNA probe to form a triple-helix molecular beacon (THMB) structure on an indium tin oxide electrode. According to the highly catalytic capacity of hemin toward H2O2, a photoelectrochemical mechanism was then proposed, in which the electron acceptor of O2 was in situ-generated on the electrode surface, leading to the enhancement of the photocurrent response. The utilization of CdTe QDs can extend the absorption edge to the near-infrared band, resulting in an increase in the light-to-electricity efficiency. After introducing target DNA, the THMB structure is disassembled and releases hemin and, thus, quenches the photocurrent. Under optimized conditions, this biosensor shows high sensitivity with a linear range from 1 to 1000 pM and detection limit of 0.8 pM. Moreover, it exhibits good performance of excellent selectivity, high stability, and acceptable fabrication reproducibility. This present strategy opens an alternative avenue for photoelectrochemical signal transduction and expands the applications of hemin-based materials in photoelectrochemical biosensing and clinical diagnosis. PMID:25393151

  7. Investigation of CaO-CO₂ reaction kinetics by in-situ XRD using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Biasin, A.; Segre, C. U.; Salviulo, G.; Zorzi, F.; Strumendo, M.

    2015-02-05

    In this work, in-situ synchrotron radiation x-ray powder diffraction (SR-XRPD), performed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) facilities of the Argonne National Laboratory, was applied to investigate the CaO–CO2 reaction. A set of CO2 absorption experiments were conducted in a high temperature reaction capillary with a controlled atmosphere (CO2 partial pressure of 1 bar), in the temperature range between 450 °C and 750 °C using CaO based sorbents obtained by calcination of commercial calcium carbonate. The evolution of the crystalline phases during CO2 uptake by the CaO solid sorbents was monitored for a carbonation time of 20 min as a function of the carbonation temperature and of the calcination conditions. The Rietveld refinement method was applied to estimate the calcium oxide conversion during the reaction progress and the average size of the initial (at the beginning of carbonation) calcium oxide crystallites. The measured average initial carbonation rate (in terms of conversion time derivative) of 0.280 s-1 (±13.2% standard deviation) is significantly higher than the values obtained by thermo-gravimetric analysis and reported thus far in the literature. Additionally, a dependence of the conversion versus time curves on the initial calcium oxide crystallite size was observed and a linear relationship between the initial CaO crystallite size and the calcium oxide final conversion was identified.

  8. Detection of HTLV-1 by polymerase chain reaction in situ hybridization in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Setoyama, M; Kerdel, F A; Elgart, G; Kanzaki, T; Byrnes, J J

    1998-03-01

    A method for nonradioactive polymerase chain reaction in situ hybridization was developed and used to determine the distribution of human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) proviral DNA in paraffin-embedded surgical specimens of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). As controls, we used biopsy samples of five cases of mycosis fungoides, cells of an HTLV-I-infected cell line (MT2), as well as HTLV-1-negative cells (YAS). We successfully detected the amplicon of the HTLV-1 tax sequence in the nuclei of the cutaneous infiltrating lymphoid cells in 90% (9/10) of ATLL cases. Studies also revealed the existence of HTLV-1 provirus DNA in nuclei of sweat gland epithelial cells and vascular endothelial cells as well as lymphoid cells in ATLL patients. Mycosis fungoides and YAS cells were negative for the HTLV-I tax sequence, but MT2 cells were strongly positive. The results indicated that this technique was more sensitive in detecting intracellular amplicons than was the previous in situ hybridization method. Through its use, we were able to easily determine the distribution of HTLV-I-positive cells among the various cells and tissues of paraffin-embedded archival materials. PMID:9502410

  9. In-situ synchrotron x-ray spectroscopy of ruthenium nanoparticles modified with selenium for oxygen reduction reaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Inukai, J.; Cao, D.; Wieckowski, A.; Chang, K.-C.; Menzel, A.; Komanicky, V.; You, H.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Yamanashi

    2007-11-15

    We used in situ Se K-edge X-ray spectroscopy to characterize Ru nanoparticles chemically modified with submonolayers of selenium (Se/Ru) [Cao et al. J. Electrochem. Soc. 2006, 153, A869]. X-ray powder diffraction verified that the Se/Ru catalyst had metallic Ru cores. The in situ X-ray absorption near edge structure taken at the open circuit potential showed that there were both elemental and oxidized selenium on the as-prepared Se/Ru samples. All selenium oxide was reduced to the elemental form of selenium by applying negative potentials. By applying positive potentials, selenium was subsequently reoxidized. The analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure shows the appearance of selenium hydration (Se-OH{sub 2}) in a deaerated solution, which was not observed during the oxygen reduction reaction. We present evidence that Se-free Ru atoms play an important role in the ORR activity of the Se/Ru catalyst studied in this paper.

  10. In situ synchrotron x-ray spectroscopy of ruthenium nanoparticles modified with selenium for an oxygen reduction reaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Inukai, J.; Cao, D.; Wieckowski, A.; Chang, K.-C.; Menzel, A.; Komanicky, V.; You, H.; Univ. Illinois; Univ. Yamanashi

    2007-11-15

    We used in situ Se K-edge X-ray spectroscopy to characterize Ru nanoparticles chemically modified with submonolayers of selenium (Se/Ru) [Cao et al. J. Electrochem. Soc. 2006, 153, A869]. X-ray powder diffraction verified that the Se/Ru catalyst had metallic Ru cores. The in situ X-ray absorption near edge structure taken at the open circuit potential showed that there were both elemental and oxidized selenium on the as-prepared Se/Ru samples. All selenium oxide was reduced to the elemental form of selenium by applying negative potentials. By applying positive potentials, selenium was subsequently reoxidized. The analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure shows the appearance of selenium hydration (Se-OH{sub 2}) in a deaerated solution, which was not observed during the oxygen reduction reaction. We present evidence that Se-free Ru atoms play an important role in the ORR activity of the Se/Ru catalyst studied in this paper.

  11. Electrophilic activation of alkynes for enyne cycloisomerization reactions with in situ generated early/late heterobimetallic Pt-Ti catalysts.

    PubMed

    Talley, Michael R; Stokes, Ryjul W; Walker, Whitney K; Michaelis, David J

    2016-06-14

    In situ formation of heterobimetallic Pt-Ti catalysts enables rapid room temperature catalysis in enyne cycloisomerization reactions. The Lewis acidic titanium atom in the ligand framework is shown to be essential for fast catalysis. A range of enyne substrates are efficiently cyclized to carbocycles and heterocycles in high yield. PMID:27240482

  12. Uncovering the Role of Metal Catalysis in Tetrazole Formation by an In Situ Cycloaddition Reaction: An Experimental Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Di-Chang; Wen, Ya-Qiong; Deng, Ji-Hua; Luo, Xu-Zhong; Gong, Yun-Nan; Lu, Tong-Bu

    2015-09-28

    Using an experimental approach, the role of metal catalysis has been investigated in the in situ cycloaddition reaction of nitrile with azide to form tetrazoles. It has been shown that metal catalysis serves to activate the cyano group in the nitrile reagent by a coordinative interaction. PMID:26293313

  13. In situ monitoring of the Li-O2 electrochemical reaction on nanoporous gold using electrochemical AFM.

    PubMed

    Wen, Rui; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2014-03-11

    The lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) electrochemical reaction on nanoporous gold (NPG) is observed using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging coupled with potentiostatic measurement. Dense Li2O2 nanoparticles form a film at 2.5 V, which is decomposed at 3.8-4.0 V in an ether-based electrolyte. PMID:24469227

  14. Optimizing Metalloporphyrin-Catalyzed Reduction Reactions for In Situ Remediation of DOE Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Schlautman, Mark A.

    2013-07-14

    Past activities have resulted in a legacy of contaminated soil and groundwater at Department of Energy facilities nationwide. Uranium and chromium are among the most frequently encountered and highest-priority metal and radionuclide contaminants at DOE installations. Abiotic chemical reduction of uranium and chromium at contaminated DOE sites can be beneficial because the reduced metal species are less soluble in water, less mobile in the environment, and less toxic to humans and ecosystems. Although direct biological reduction has been reported for U(VI) and Cr(VI) in laboratory studies and at some field sites, the reactions can sometimes be slow or even inhibited due to unfavorable environmental conditions. One promising approach for the in-situ remediation of DOE contaminants is to develop electron shuttle catalysts that can be delivered precisely to the specific subsurface locations where contaminants reside. Previous research has shown that reduction of oxidized organic and inorganic contaminants often can be catalyzed by electron shuttle systems. Metalloporphyrins and their derivatives are well known electron shuttles for many biogeochemical systems, and thus were selected to study their catalytic capabilities for the reduction of chromium and uranium in the presence of reducing agents. Zero valent iron (ZVI) was chosen as the primary electron donor in most experimental systems. Research proceeded in three phases and the key findings of each phase are reported here. Phase I examined Cr(VI) reduction and utilized micro- and nano-sized ZVI as the electron donors. Electron shuttle catalysts tested were cobalt- and iron-containing metalloporphyrins and Vitamin B12. To aid in the recycle and reuse of the nano-sized ZVI and soluble catalysts, sol-gels and calcium-alginate gel beads were tested as immobilization/support matrices. Although the nano-sized ZVI could be incorporated within the alginate gel beads, preliminary attempts to trap it in sol-gels were not

  15. Microbial Studies Supporting Implementation of In Situ Bioremediation at TAN

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Joan Marie; Matthern, Gretchen Elise; Rae, Catherine; Ely, R. L.

    2000-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is evaluating in situ bioremediation of contaminated groundwater at its Test Area North Facility. To determine feasibility, microcosm and bioreactor studies were conducted to ascertain the ability of indigenous microbes to convert trichloroethene and dichloroethene to non-hazardous byproducts under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and to measure the kinetics of microbial reactions associated with the degradation process. Microcosms were established from core samples and groundwater obtained from within the contaminant plume. These microcosms were amended with nutrients, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, to identify electron donors capable of stimulating the degradation process. Results of the anaerobic microcosm studies showed that lactate, acetate and propionate amendments stimulated indigenous cell growth and functioned as effective substrates for reductive degradation of chloroethenes. Bioreactors inoculated with cultures from these anaerobic microcosms were operated under a batch mode for 42 days then converted to a fed-batch mode and operated at a 53-day hydraulic residence time. It was demonstrated that indigenous microbes capable of complete anaerobic reductive dechlorination are present in the subject well. It was also demonstrated that aerobic microbes capable of oxidizing chlorinated compounds produced by anaerobic reductive dechlorination are present. Kinetic data suggest that controlling the type and concentration of electron donors can increase trichlorethene conversion rates. In the event that complete mineralization of trichlorethene does not occur following stimulation, and anaerobic/aerobic treatment scheme is feasible.

  16. In Situ Real-time Environmental High Resolution Electron Microscopy of Nanometer Size Novel Xerogel Catalysts for Hydrogenation Reactions in Nylon 6,6.

    PubMed

    Gai; Kourtakis; Ziemecki

    2000-07-01

    In situ real-time environmental high resolution electron microscopy (EHREM) under controlled reaction environments permits direct atomic resolution imaging of dynamic surface and sub-surface microstructures of reacting catalysts. Using the EHREM and complementary microscopy methods, we have investigated selective hydrogenation reaction mechanisms over novel xerogel catalysts of ruthenium and Ru with Co and Au promoters on titania supports, and report an alternative heterogeneous catalytic process for the hydrogenation of adiponitrile (ADN) in the manufacture of Nylon 6,6. The direct EHREM observations are supported by ultra-high resolution low voltage scanning electron microscope (SEM) of spatial distributions of the highly dispersed nanometer-size catalyst particles and parallel chemical studies. The results demonstrate the important role of in situ EHREM in the design of heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation processes on the nanoscale. PMID:10898817

  17. N-Heterocyclic Carbene Catalyzed [4 + 2] Annulation Reactions with in Situ Generated Heterocyclic ortho-Quinodimethanes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianfeng; Yuan, Shiru; Miao, Maozhong

    2016-08-01

    An efficient strategy for the in situ generation of heterocyclic ortho-quinodimethanes (oQDMs) from 2-methyl-heteroarene-3-carboxylic esters by N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalysis is disclosed. These heterocyclic oQDMs undergo highly enantioselective [4 + 2] annulation reactions with isatin-derived ketimines to afford optically pure heteroarene-fused δ-lactams bearing a quaternary stereogenic center. The main features of this reaction include challenging direct C(sp(3))-H bond functionalizations, excellent enantioselectivities, readily available starting materials, mild reaction conditions, high efficiency, and operational simplicity. PMID:27391039

  18. Aryl formate as bifunctional reagent: applications in palladium-catalyzed carbonylative coupling reactions using in situ generated CO.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoquan; Neumann, Helfried; Beller, Matthias; Wu, Xiao-Feng

    2014-03-17

    After decades of development, carbonylation reactions have become one of the most powerful tools in modern organic synthesis. However, the requirement of CO gas limits the applications of such reactions. Reported herein is a versatile and practical protocol for carbonylative reactions which rely on the cooperation of phenyl formate and nonaflate, and the generation of CO in situ. This protocol has a high functionalgroup tolerance and could be applied in carbonylations with C, N, and, O nucleophiles. The corresponding amides, alkynones, furanones, and aryl benzoates were synthesized in good yields. PMID:24677435

  19. MEMS Lubrication by In-Situ Tribochemical Reactions From the Vapor Phase.

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael T.; Asay, David B.; Kim, Seong H.

    2008-01-01

    Vapor Phase Lubrication (VPL) of silicon surfaces with pentanol has been demonstrated. Two potential show stoppers with respect to application of this approach to real MEMS devices have been investigated. Water vapor was found to reduce the effectiveness of VPL with alcohol for a given alcohol concentration, but the basic reaction mechanism observed in water-free environments is still active, and devices operated much longer in mixed alcohol and water vapor environments than with chemisorbed monolayer lubricants alone. Complex MEMS gear trains were successfully lubricated with alcohol vapors, resulting in a factor of 104 improvement in operating life without failure. Complex devices could be made to fail if operated at much higher frequencies than previously used, and there is some evidence that the observed failure is due to accumulation of reaction products at deeply buried interfaces. However, if hypothetical reaction mechanisms involving heated surfaces are valid, then the failures observed at high frequency may not be relevant to operation at normal frequencies. Therefore, this work demonstrates that VPL is a viable approach for complex MEMS devices in conventional packages. Further study of the VPL reaction mechanisms are recommended so that the vapor composition may be optimized for low friction and for different substrate materials with potential application to conventionally fabricated, metal alloy parts in weapons systems. Reaction kinetics should be studied to define effective lubrication regimes as a function of the partial pressure of the vapor phase constituent, interfacial shear rate, substrate composition, and temperature.

  20. 2D NMR studies of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Use of relayed coherence transfer for /sub 1/H resonance assignment and in situ structure elucidation of amikacin derivatives in reaction mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, N.H.; Eaton, H.L.; Nguyen, K.T.; Hartzell, C.; Nelson, R.J.; Priest, J.H.

    1988-04-19

    Phase-sensitive 2D /sup 1/H//sup 1/H COSY spectra can be used to identify the structures of individual pure specimens of the aminoglycoside antibiotic amikacin and its N-hemisuccinyl derivatives. However, even at 500 MHz the 2D chemical shift dispersion does not allow for unambiguous assignment of all cross-peaks. By use of 2D relayed coherence transfer experiments (RELAY) optimized to detect two-step /sup 1/H//sup 1/H scalar interactions in which one of the J-values is small, sufficient additional correlations can be obtained from the frequency-isolated resonances to allow facile tracing of all scalar connectivities. Complete assignments of the /sup 1/H NMR spectra of amikacin, its 6'-N-hemisuccinamide, and a novel bis(acylate) (..gamma..-N-(p-vinylbenzoyl)amikacin 6'-N-hemisuccinamide) were obtained for aqueous media. The NMR spectrum of amikacin free base was also assigned in dimethyl sulfoxide solution. The RELAY experiment can be extended to the analysis of reaction mixtures, which allows for the identification and resonance assignment of regioisomeric amikacin haptens in the mixture state. All of the N-monohemisuccinyl isomers of amikacin have been identified in reaction mixtures through the RELAY experiment. The relative reactivities of the amino functions of amikacin toward acylating agents were found to be 6'-N > 3-N greater than or equal to 3''-N greater than or equal to ..gamma..-N. However, this reactivity order is altered after the initial acylation event.

  1. Controlling the Formation of Nanocavities in Kirkendall Nanoobjects through Sequential Thermal Ex Situ Oxidation and In Situ Reduction Reactions.

    PubMed

    Mel, Abdel-Aziz El; Tessier, Pierre-Yves; Buffiere, Marie; Gautron, Eric; Ding, JunJun; Du, Ke; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Snyders, Rony; Bittencourt, Carla; Molina-Luna, Leopoldo

    2016-06-01

    Controlling the porosity, the shape, and the morphology of Kirkendall hollow nanostructures is the key factor to tune the properties of these tailor-made nanomaterials which allow in turn broadening their applications. It is shown that by applying a continuous oxidation to copper nanowires following a temperature ramp protocol, one can synthesize cuprous oxide nanotubes containing periodic copper nanoparticles. A further oxidation of such nanoobjects allows obtaining cupric oxide nanotubes with a bamboo-like structure. On the other hand, by applying a sequential oxidation and reduction reactions to copper nanowires, one can synthesize hollow nanoobjects with complex shapes and morphologies that cannot be obtained using the Kirkendall effect alone, such as necklace-like cuprous oxide nanotubes, periodic solid copper nanoparticles or hollow cuprous oxide nanospheres interconnected with single crystal cuprous oxide nanorods, and aligned and periodic hollow nanospheres embedded in a cuprous oxide nanotube. The strategy demonstrated in this study opens new avenues for the engineering of hollow nanostructures with potential applications in gas sensing, catalysis, and energy storage. PMID:27061060

  2. In situ observation of reaction between metal and Si surface by low energy RBS/channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Masataka; Kobayashi, Naoto

    1997-02-01

    We have developed a low energy Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS)/ion channeling measurement system for the analysis of thin films and solid surfaces with the use of several tens keV hydrogen ions, and of a time-of-flight spectrometer which was originally developed by Mendenhall and Weller. The depth resolution of our system is better than that of conventional RBS system with MeV helium ions and silicon surface barrier detectors. This RBS/ion channeling system is small in size compared to the conventional RBS/ion channeling measurement system with the use of MeV He ions, because of the small ion accelerator for several tens keV ions. The analysis of crystalline thin films which utilizes ion channeling effect can be performed with this low energy RBS/ion channeling measurement system. The in situ observation of the thermal reaction between iron and silicon substrate with the use of this measurement system is demonstrated. The deposited Fe (3.3 ML) on Si(001) clean surface diffused into the substrate by 380 °C annealing, while on the hydrogen-terminated (dihydride) Si(001) the 480 °C annealing did not lead to the diffusion. Present results indicates that the hydrogen termination of Si(001) surface prevents the deposited Fe from diffusing into the substrate up to relatively high temperature compared to the clean surface.

  3. In situ measurement of molecular diffusion during catalytic reaction by pulsed-field gradient NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Y.; Kaerger, J.; Hunger, B. ); Feoktistova, N.N.; Zhdanov, S.P. )

    1992-09-01

    Pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy is applied to study the intracrystalline diffusivity of the reactant and product molecules during the conversion of cyclopropane to propene in Zeolite X. The diffusivities are found to be large enough that any influence of intracrystalline diffusion on the overall reaction in flow reactors may be excluded.

  4. In Situ and Ex Situ TEM Study of Lithiation Behaviours of Porous Silicon Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenfei; Ge, Mingyuan; Luo, Langli; Fang, Xin; Liu, Yihang; Zhang, Anyi; Rong, Jiepeng; Wang, Chongmin; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the lithiation behaviours of both porous silicon (Si) nanoparticles and porous Si nanowires by in situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and compare them with solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires. The in situ TEM observation reveals that the critical fracture diameter of porous Si particles reaches up to 1.52 μm, which is much larger than the previously reported 150 nm for crystalline Si nanoparticles and 870 nm for amorphous Si nanoparticles. After full lithiation, solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to crystalline Li15Si4 phase while porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to amorphous LixSi phase, which is due to the effect of domain size on the stability of Li15Si4 as revealed by the first-principle molecular dynamic simulation. Ex situ TEM characterization is conducted to further investigate the structural evolution of porous and solid Si nanoparticles during the cycling process, which confirms that the porous Si nanoparticles exhibit better capability to suppress pore evolution than solid Si nanoparticles. The investigation of structural evolution and phase transition of porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires during the lithiation process reveal that they are more desirable as lithium-ion battery anode materials than solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires. PMID:27571919

  5. In Situ and Ex Situ TEM Study of Lithiation Behaviours of Porous Silicon Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chenfei; Ge, Mingyuan; Luo, Langli; Fang, Xin; Liu, Yihang; Zhang, Anyi; Rong, Jiepeng; Wang, Chongmin; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the lithiation behaviours of both porous silicon (Si) nanoparticles and porous Si nanowires by in situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and compare them with solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires. The in situ TEM observation reveals that the critical fracture diameter of porous Si particles reaches up to 1.52 μm, which is much larger than the previously reported 150 nm for crystalline Si nanoparticles and 870 nm for amorphous Si nanoparticles. After full lithiation, solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to crystalline Li15Si4 phase while porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to amorphous LixSi phase, which is due to the effect of domain size on the stability of Li15Si4 as revealed by the first-principle molecular dynamic simulation. Ex situ TEM characterization is conducted to further investigate the structural evolution of porous and solid Si nanoparticles during the cycling process, which confirms that the porous Si nanoparticles exhibit better capability to suppress pore evolution than solid Si nanoparticles. The investigation of structural evolution and phase transition of porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires during the lithiation process reveal that they are more desirable as lithium-ion battery anode materials than solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires. PMID:27571919

  6. Externally controlled pressure and temperature microreactor for in situ x-ray diffraction, visual and spectroscopic reaction investigations under supercritical and subcritial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Diefenbacher, J.; McKelvy, M.; Chizemeshya, A.V.; Wolf, G.H.

    2010-07-13

    A microreactor has been developed for in situ, spectroscopic investigations of materials and reaction processes with full external pressure and temperature control from ambient conditions to 400 C and 310 bar. The sample chamber is in direct contact with an external manifold, whereby gases, liquids or fluids can be injected and their activities controlled prior to and under investigation conditions. The microreactor employs high strength, single crystal moissanite windows which allow direct probe beam interaction with a sample to investigate in situ reaction processes and other materials properties. The relatively large volume of the cell, along with full optical accessibility and external temperature and pressure control, make this reaction cell well suited for experimental investigations involving any combination of gas, fluid, and solid interactions. The microreactor's capabilities are demonstrated through an in situ x-ray diffraction study of the conversion of a meta-serpentine sample to magnesite under high pressure and temperature. Serpentine is one of the mineral candidates for the implementation of mineral carbonation, an intriguing carbon sequestration candidate technology.

  7. Externally controlled pressure and temperature microreactor for in situ x-ray diffraction, visual and spectroscopic reaction investigations under supercritical and subcritical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Diefenbacher, Jason; McKelvy, Michael; Chizmeshya, Andrew V.G.; Wolf, George H.

    2005-01-01

    A microreactor has been developed for in situ, spectroscopic investigations of materials and reaction processes with full external pressure and temperature control from ambient conditions to 400 deg. C and 310 bar. The sample chamber is in direct contact with an external manifold, whereby gases, liquids or fluids can be injected and their activities controlled prior to and under investigation conditions. The microreactor employs high strength, single crystal moissanite windows which allow direct probe beam interaction with a sample to investigate in situ reaction processes and other materials properties. The relatively large volume of the cell, along with full optical accessibility and external temperature and pressure control, make this reaction cell well suited for experimental investigations involving any combination of gas, fluid, and solid interactions. The microreactor's capabilities are demonstrated through an in situ x-ray diffraction study of the conversion of a meta-serpentine sample to magnesite under high pressure and temperature. Serpentine is one of the mineral candidates for the implementation of mineral carbonation, an intriguing carbon sequestration candidate technology.

  8. Fluorescent metal-organic polymers of zinc and cadmium from hydrothermal in situ acylation reaction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Yang; Ye, Ling; Zhang, Xiao; Cui, Xiao-Bing; Zhang, Jian-Po; Xu, Ji-Qing; Hou, Qin; Wang, Tie-Gang

    2010-11-28

    A series of metal-organic complexes based on d(10) metals and the ligand H(4)bbh (H(4)bbh = benzene-1, 2, 4, 5-biformhydrazide), formed through hydrothermal in situ acylate reaction of H(4)bta (H(4)bta = benzene-1, 2, 4, 5-tetracarboxylic acid) with hydrazine hydrate (N(2)H(4)·H(2)O), have been prepared and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compounds [Zn(μ(2)-H(2)bbh)(phen)(H(2)O)](2) (1) (phen = 1, 10-phenanthroline) and [Zn(μ(2)-H(2)bbh)(2, 2'-bpy)](2) (2) (2, 2'-bpy = 2, 2'-bipyridine) are both dinuclear complexes in which bridging ligands H(2)bbh(2-) display different μ(2)- coordination modes. [Zn(μ(2)-H(2)bbh)(1/2)(μ(2)-H(2)bbh)(1/2)(H(2)O)](n) (3) exhibits a two-dimensional (2-D) layer structure containing simultaneously two kinds of different coordination modes of H(2)bbh(2-): μ(2)-bidentate and μ(4)-tetradentate. [Cd(μ(3)-H(2)bbh)(phen)](n) (4) consists of one-dimensional (1-D) double-metal chains. The crystal structures of these compounds are stabilized by hydrogen bonds and π···π interactions, forming three-dimensional supramolecular networks. All of the compounds were characterized by IR, UV-vis spectra and elemental analysis and they show good fluorescence properties in the solid state at room temperature. In order to understand the emission mechanism, we carried out TDDFT calculations on the excited electronic states of compound 2. PMID:20886135

  9. Intermediates in the cation reactions in solution probed by an in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering method

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Chen, Hung-Ying; Chen, Hsueh-Szu; Gwo, Shangjr; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2015-01-01

    For chemical reactions in liquid state, such as catalysis, understanding of dynamical changes is conducive to practical applications. Solvation of copper salts in aqueous solution has implications for life, the environment, and industry. In an ongoing research, the question arises that why the color of aqueous CuCl2 solution changes with solution concentration? In this work, we have developed a convenient and efficient in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering technique to probe the presence of many intermediates, some of them are responsible for color change, in crystallization of aqueous copper chloride solution. The versatility of the novel technique was confirmed in the identification of five intermediates states in the transition from CdS to MoS2 nanowires in solution. The facile in situ method is expected to be widely applicable in probing intermediate states in a variety of chemical reactions in solution. PMID:26333518

  10. Controlling stereoselectivity in the aminocatalytic enantioselective Mannich reaction of aldehydes with in situ generated N-carbamoyl imines.

    PubMed

    Galzerano, Patrizia; Agostino, Dario; Bencivenni, Giorgio; Sambri, Letizia; Bartoli, Giuseppe; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2010-05-25

    A simple and convenient method for the direct, aminocatalytic, and highly enantioselective Mannich reactions of aldehydes with in situ generated N-carbamoyl imines has been developed. Both alpha-imino esters and aromatic imines serve as suitable electrophilic components. Moreover, the judicious selection of commercially available secondary amine catalysts allows selective access to the desired stereoisomer of the N-tert-butoxycarbonyl (Boc) or N-carbobenzyloxy (Cbz) Mannich adducts, with high control over the syn or anti relative configuration and almost perfect enantioselectivity. Besides the possibility to fully control the stereochemistry of the Mannich reaction, the main advantage of this method lies in the operational simplicity; the highly reactive N-carbamate-protected imines are generated in situ from stable and easily handled alpha-amido sulfones. PMID:20397160

  11. Intermediates in the cation reactions in solution probed by an in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Chen, Hung-Ying; Chen, Hsueh-Szu; Gwo, Shangjr; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2015-09-01

    For chemical reactions in liquid state, such as catalysis, understanding of dynamical changes is conducive to practical applications. Solvation of copper salts in aqueous solution has implications for life, the environment, and industry. In an ongoing research, the question arises that why the color of aqueous CuCl2 solution changes with solution concentration? In this work, we have developed a convenient and efficient in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering technique to probe the presence of many intermediates, some of them are responsible for color change, in crystallization of aqueous copper chloride solution. The versatility of the novel technique was confirmed in the identification of five intermediates states in the transition from CdS to MoS2 nanowires in solution. The facile in situ method is expected to be widely applicable in probing intermediate states in a variety of chemical reactions in solution.

  12. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy And Spectroscopy Studies Of Rechargeable Batteries Under Dynamic Operating Conditions: A Retrospective And Perspective View

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chong M.

    2015-02-14

    Since the advent of the transmission electron microscope (TEM), continuing efforts have been made to image material under native and reaction environments that typically involve liquids, gases, and external stimuli. With the advances of aberration-corrected TEM for improving the imaging resolution, steady progress has been made on developing methodologies that allow imaging under dynamic operating conditions, or in situ TEM imaging. The success of in situ TEM imaging is closely associated with advances in microfabrication techniques that enable manipulation of nanoscale objects around the objective lens of the TEM. This paper summarizes and highlights recent progress involving in situ TEM studies of energy storage materials, especially rechargeable batteries. The paper is organized to cover both the in situ TEM techniques and the scientific discoveries made possible by in situ TEM imaging.

  13. Grain rotation and lattice deformation during photoinduced chemical reactions revealed by in situ X-ray nanodiffraction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhifeng; Bartels, Matthias; Xu, Rui; Osterhoff, Markus; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Sprung, Michael; Suzuki, Akihiro; Takahashi, Yukio; Blanton, Thomas N; Salditt, Tim; Miao, Jianwei

    2015-07-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used to investigate many physical science phenomena, ranging from phase transitions, chemical reactions and crystal growth to grain boundary dynamics. A major limitation of in situ XRD and TEM is a compromise that has to be made between spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we report the development of in situ X-ray nanodiffraction to measure high-resolution diffraction patterns from single grains with up to 5 ms temporal resolution. We observed, for the first time, grain rotation and lattice deformation in chemical reactions induced by X-ray photons: Br(-) + hv → Br + e(-) and e(-) + Ag(+) → Ag(0). The grain rotation and lattice deformation associated with the chemical reactions were quantified to be as fast as 3.25 rad s(-1) and as large as 0.5 Å, respectively. The ability to measure high-resolution diffraction patterns from individual grains with a temporal resolution of several milliseconds is expected to find broad applications in materials science, physics, chemistry and nanoscience. PMID:26053760

  14. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G.

    2014-05-01

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of 7Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the 7Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in 11C.

  15. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G.

    2014-05-02

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the {sup 7}Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in {sup 11}C.

  16. (Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions)

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following research projects; decay of excited nuclei formed in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV; mass and charge distributions in Cl-induced heavy ion reactions; and mass and charge distributions in {sup 56}Fe + {sup 165}Ho at E/A = 12 MeV.

  17. Theoretical studies of chemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, G.C.

    1993-12-01

    This collaborative program with the Theoretical Chemistry Group at Argonne involves theoretical studies of gas phase chemical reactions and related energy transfer and photodissociation processes. Many of the reactions studied are of direct relevance to combustion; others are selected they provide important examples of special dynamical processes, or are of relevance to experimental measurements. Both classical trajectory and quantum reactive scattering methods are used for these studies, and the types of information determined range from thermal rate constants to state to state differential cross sections.

  18. In situ and real-time monitoring of mechanochemical milling reactions using synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Halasz, Ivan; Kimber, Simon A J; Beldon, Patrick J; Belenguer, Ana M; Adams, Frank; Honkimäki, Veijo; Nightingale, Richard C; Dinnebier, Robert E; Friščić, Tomislav

    2013-09-01

    We describe the only currently available protocol for in situ, real-time monitoring of mechanochemical reactions and intermediates by X-ray powder diffraction. Although mechanochemical reactions (inducing transformations by mechanical forces such as grinding and milling) are normally performed in commercially available milling assemblies, such equipment does not permit direct reaction monitoring. We now describe the design and in-house modification of milling equipment that allows the reaction jars of the operating mill to be placed in the path of a high-energy (∼90 keV) synchrotron X-ray beam while the reaction is taking place. Resulting data are analyzed using conventional software, such as TOPAS. Reaction intermediates and products are identified using the Cambridge Structural Database or Inorganic Crystal Structure Database. Reactions are analyzed by fitting the time-resolved diffractograms using structureless Pawley refinement for crystalline phases that are not fully structurally characterized (such as porous frameworks with disordered guests), or the Rietveld method for solids with fully determined crystal structures (metal oxides, coordination polymers). PMID:23949378

  19. In situ electrochemical-electron spin resonance investigations of multi-electron redox reaction for organic radical cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qian; Walter, Eric D.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Choi, Daiwon; Lemmon, John P.

    2016-02-01

    The multi-electron redox reaction of an organic radical based composite cathode comprised of poly(2,2,6,6- tetramethylpiperidinyloxy-4-yl methacrylate) (PTMA)-Ketjenblack is investigated using an in situ electrochemical-electron spin resonance (ESR) methodology. The experiments allow each electrochemical state to be associated with the chemical state (or environment) of the radical species upon the cell cycling. In situ ESR spectra of the composite cathode demonstrate a two-electron redox reaction of PTMA that is from an aminoxy anion (n-type, at 2.5-2.6 V vs. Li/Li+) via a radical (at 3.2-3.5 V vs. Li/Li+) to an oxoammonium cation (p-type, at 3.7-4.0 V vs. Li/Li+). In particular, an adjustable n-type doping process of PTMA is first observed during the discharging process. Moreover, two different local environments of radical species are found in the PTMA-Ketjenblack composite electrode that includes both concentrated and isolated radicals. These two types of radical species, showing similarities during the redox reaction process while behaving quite different in the non-faradic reaction of ion sorption/desorption on the electrode surface, govern the electrochemical behavior of PTMA based composite electrode.

  20. Studying photonuclear reactions using the activation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyshev, S. S.; Ermakov, A. N.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Khankin, V. V.; Kurilik, A. S.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Stopani, K. A.

    2014-05-01

    The experimental setup that is used at the Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Moscow State University to study photonuclear reactions using the activation technique is described. The system is based on two modern compact race track microtrons with maximum energy of electrons of up to 55 and 67.7 MeV. A low-background HPGe detector is used to measure the induced gamma activity. The data acquisition and analysis system, used to process the measured spectra, is described. The described system is used to study multiparticle photonuclear reactions and production of nuclei far from the beta stability region.

  1. Time-resolved in situ Studies of Apatite Formation in Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Borkiewicz, O.; Rakovan, J; Cahill, C

    2010-01-01

    Formation of hydroxylapatite through the precipitation and evolution of calcium phosphate precursor phases under varying conditions of temperature (25-90 C), pH (6.5-9.0), and calcium to phosphorus ratio (1.0, 1.33, 1.5, and 1.67) comparable to those found in many sediments and soils were studied. The products of low-temperature precipitation were analyzed by ex situ X-ray diffraction and SEM, as well as time-resolved in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Rietveld refinement was used for quantitative evaluation of relative abundances during phase evolution. The results of ex situ investigations conducted at ambient temperature and near-neutral pH indicate formation of amorphous calcium phosphate, which over the course of experiments transforms to brushite and ultimately hydroxylapatite. The results of in situ X-ray diffraction experiments suggest a more complex pathway of phase development under the same conditions. Some of the initially formed amorphous calcium phosphate and/or crystalline brushite transformed to octacalcium phosphate. In the later stage of the reactions, octacalcium phosphate transforms quite rapidly to hydroxylapatite. This is accompanied or followed by the transformation of the remaining brushite to monetite. Hydroxylapatite and monetite coexist in the sample throughout the remainder of the experiments. In contrast to the near-neutral pH experiments, the results from ex situ and in situ diffraction investigations performed at higher pH yield similar results. The precipitate formed in the initial stages in both types of experiments was identified as amorphous calcium phosphate, which over the course of the reaction quite rapidly transformed to hydroxylapatite without any apparent intermediate phases. This is the first application of time-resolved in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction to precipitation reactions in the Ca(OH){sub 2}-H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O system. The results indicate that precursors are likely to occur during the natural or

  2. Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels Formed in Situ by Transglutaminase-Catalyzed Reaction.

    PubMed

    Ranga, Adrian; Lutolf, Matthias P; Hilborn, Jöns; Ossipov, Dmitri A

    2016-05-01

    Enzymatically cross-linked hydrogels can be formed in situ and permit highly versatile and selective tethering of bioactive molecules, thereby allowing for a wealth of applications in cell biology and tissue engineering. While a number of studies have reported the bioconjugation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and peptides into such matrices, the site-specific incorporation of biologically highly relevant polysaccharides such as hyaluronic acid (HA) has thus far not been reported, limiting our ability to reconstruct this key feature of the in vivo ECM. Here we demonstrate a novel strategy for transglutaminase-mediated covalent linking of HA moieties to a synthetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) macromer resulting in the formation of hybrid HA-PEG hydrogels. We characterize the ensuing matrix properties and demonstrate how these cytocompatible gels can serve to modulate the cellular phenotype of human mammary cancer epithelial cells as well as mouse myoblasts. The use of HA as a novel building block in the increasingly varied library of synthetic PEG-based artificial ECMs should have applications as a structural as well as a signaling component and offers significant potential as an injectable matrix for regenerative medicine. PMID:27014785

  3. In situ and ex situ XANES study of nanodispersed Mo species in zeolites used in fine chemistry catalysis.

    PubMed

    Rentería, M; Traverse, A; Anunziata, O A; Lede, E J; Pierella, L; Requejo, F G

    2001-03-01

    Mo K-edge XANES experiments on Mo-containing zeolites at low Mo loading (1 and 2 wt% of Mo on H-ZSM-11, H-BETA and H-ZSM-5 catalysts), active in fine chemistry reactions, were performed ex situ as function of sample calcination temperature in air (in the range 773-973 K) or in situ at 873 and 973K under N2 flow. The results showed a 4-fold oxygen coordination for the incorporated Mo species in the activated (dehydrated) state. Combining these results with additional data evidences an almost total Mo exchange inside the zeolite channels. PMID:11512876

  4. Redox Reaction in Silicate Melts Monitored by ''Static'' In-Situ Fe K-Edge XANES up to 1180 deg. C

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, Max; Partzsch, Georg M.; Welter, Edmund; Farges, Francois

    2007-02-02

    A new experimental setup to measure in-situ kinetics of redox reactions in silicate melts is presented. To study the progress of the Fe-redox reaction, the variation of the signal is recorded at an energy, where the difference between the spectra of the oxidized and reduced Fe in the melt is largest (''static XANES''). To control the redox conditions, the gas atmosphere could be changed between to types of gases using computer-controlled valves (N2:H2 and air, respectively). In this way, a number of reduction/oxidation cycles can be monitored in-situ and continuously. Applied at the Fe K-edge in molten silicates, we obtained a set of high quality data, which includes the very first steps of the redox reaction. An Avrami-type equation is used to investigate rate-controlling parameters for the iron oxidation/reduction kinetics for two melts (basaltic and Na trisilicate) for temperatures up to 1180 deg. C.

  5. Single-Tube Reaction Using Perfluorocarbons: A Prerequisite Step Leading to the Whole-Slide In Situ Technique on Histopathological Slides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chang; Teng, Tsung-Han; Tsai, Jane S-C; Huang, Hsien-Da; Chang, Yih-Leong; Liang, Cher-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Developing a robust, novel method for performing multiple reactions in a single tube is not only time- and cost-saving but also critical for future high-throughput whole-slide in situ techniques on diseased tissues. In this study, we introduce the use of perfluorocarbons and compound-coated magnetic particles to create pseudochambers in a single tube, allowing different reactions to be performed in different phases. Perfluorocarbons also serve as cell lysis buffer and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) buffer owing to their highly penetrating, repellent and emulsifiable properties. Using this method, nucleic acids can be isolated and purified from various sample types and sizes, followed by PCR, real-time PCR, or multiplex PCR in the same tube. No incubation or enzyme digesting time is needed and the risk of cross-contamination is reduced. Tests can be performed in microemulsions (water-in-oil droplets) containing sequence-specific captures and probes for further high-throughput detection. We present a simple, quick, and robust procedure as a prerequisite step to future high-throughput in situ techniques. PMID:27336363

  6. Single-Tube Reaction Using Perfluorocarbons: A Prerequisite Step Leading to the Whole-Slide In Situ Technique on Histopathological Slides

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Chang; Teng, Tsung-Han; Tsai, Jane S.-C.; Huang, Hsien-Da; Chang, Yih-Leong

    2016-01-01

    Developing a robust, novel method for performing multiple reactions in a single tube is not only time- and cost-saving but also critical for future high-throughput whole-slide in situ techniques on diseased tissues. In this study, we introduce the use of perfluorocarbons and compound-coated magnetic particles to create pseudochambers in a single tube, allowing different reactions to be performed in different phases. Perfluorocarbons also serve as cell lysis buffer and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) buffer owing to their highly penetrating, repellent and emulsifiable properties. Using this method, nucleic acids can be isolated and purified from various sample types and sizes, followed by PCR, real-time PCR, or multiplex PCR in the same tube. No incubation or enzyme digesting time is needed and the risk of cross-contamination is reduced. Tests can be performed in microemulsions (water-in-oil droplets) containing sequence-specific captures and probes for further high-throughput detection. We present a simple, quick, and robust procedure as a prerequisite step to future high-throughput in situ techniques. PMID:27336363

  7. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M.; Crooks, Richard M.; et al

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shownmore » to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.« less

  8. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M.; Crooks, Richard M.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Liu, Ping

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.

  9. In Situ Probing of the Active Site Geometry of Ultrathin Nanowires for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiqing; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M; Crooks, Richard M; Adzic, Radoslav R; Liu, Ping; Wong, Stanislaus S

    2015-10-01

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (∼2 nm) core-shell Pt∼Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu∼Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Hence, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general. PMID:26402364

  10. Metal cocatalyzed tandem alkynylative cyclization reaction of in situ formed N-iminoisoquinolinium ylides with bromoalkynes via C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Yang, Qin; Chen, Zhiyuan; Ding, Qiuping; Xu, Jingshi; Peng, Yiyuan

    2012-09-21

    Silver triflate and copper(I) iodide cocatalyzed direct alkynylation and cyclization reaction of in situ formed N-iminoisoquinolinium ylides with bromoalkynes is described. The reaction proceeds efficiently through a combination of C-H activation and subsequent tandem reaction in one pot, leading to diverse H-pyrazolo[5,1-a]isoquinolines in good yields under mild reaction conditions. PMID:22946742

  11. Design and Operation of a High Pressure Reaction Cell for in situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bare,S.; Yang, N.; Kelly, S.; Mickelson, G.; Modica, F.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of catalytic reactions have been instrumental in advancing the understanding of catalytic processes. These measurements require an in situ catalysis reaction cell with unique properties. Here we describe the design and initial operation of an in situ/operando catalysis reaction cell for transmission X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements. The cell is designed: to be an ideal catalytic reactor with no mass transfer effects; to give the same conversion and selectivity under similar space velocities as standard laboratory micro-reactors; to be operational temperatures up to 600 {sup o}C and pressures up to 14 bar; to be X-ray transparent allowing XAS measurement to be collected in transmission for all elements with Z {>=} 23 (vanadium K-edge at 5.5 keV); to measure the actual catalyst bed temperature; to not use o-ring seals, or water cooling; to be robust, compact, easy to assemble, and use, and relatively low cost to produce. The heart of the cell is fabricated from an X-ray transparent beryllium tube that forms a plug flow reactor. XAFS data recorded during the reduction of a Re/{gamma}-A{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as a function of hydrogen pressure from 0.05 to 8 bar, and from a Pt-Sn/{gamma}-A{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst during n-heptane reforming are given as initial examples of the versatility of the reactor.

  12. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e⁻aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e⁻aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e⁻aq]. In addition, by comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e⁻aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  13. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e⁻aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e⁻aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pdmore » deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e⁻aq]. In addition, by comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e⁻aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.« less

  14. In-Situ Cure Monitoring of the Immidization Reaction of PMR-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cossins, Sheryl; Kellar, Jon J.; Winter, Robb M.

    1997-01-01

    Glass fiber reinforced polymer composites are becoming widely used in industry. With this increase in production, an in-situ method of quality control for the curing of the polymer is desirable. This would allow for the production of high-quality parts having more uniform properties.' Recently, in-situ fiber optic monitoring of polymer curing has primarily focused on epoxy resins and has been performed by Raman or fluorescence methods. In addition, some infrared (IR) investigations have been performed using transmission or ATR cells. An alternate IR approach involves using optical fibers as a sensor by utilizing evanescent wave spectroscopy.

  15. Combining direct residence time measurements and biogeochemistry to calculate in-situ reaction rates in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittroff, Marco; Gilfedder, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    The hyporheic zone is an active interface between groundwater, riparian and surface water systems. Exchange and reaction of water, nutrients, and organic matter occur due to variations in surface and groundwater flow regimes, bed topography and active biogeochemistry fuelled by bioavailable carbon. There has been an increasing focus on coupling the residence time of surface water in the hyporheic zone with biogeochemical reactions. However, there are very few tracers that can be used to measure residence times in-situ, especially in complex groundwater-surface water settings. In this work we have used the natural radioisotope Radon (222Rn) as an in-situ tracer for river water residence time in a riffle-pool sequence (Rote Main River), and combined this information with biogeochemical parameters (DOC and C quality, O3, NO3, CO2). We can clearly observe a dependence of reaction progress on the water residence times, with oxygen and nitrate reduction following inverse logarithmic trends as a function of time. By comparing with initial concentrations (the river end member) with riverbed levels we have estimated first-order in-situ reduction rates for nitrate and oxygen. Nitrate reduction rates are at the higher end of published values, which is likely due to the continual supply of bioavailable carbon from the river system. This work helps to better understand the function and efficiency of the hyporheic zone as a natural filter for redox sensitive species such as nitrate at the groundwater - steam interface. It also provides a useful method for estimating residence times in complex, higher order river systems.

  16. Reactions Between Silicon and Graphite Substrates at High Temperature: In Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jesse F.; Ma, Luyao; Forwald, Karl; Sichen, Du

    2013-09-01

    Graphite as a refractory material has found wide application in many process steps to produce photovoltaic silicon. In the current study, the melting behavior of silicon in contact with different grades of graphite was investigated. The infiltration of silicon into graphite was found to be highly dependent on the internal structure of the graphite substrate. It was confirmed that the heating history of silicon in contact with a graphite substrate strongly influences the melting behavior, which is likely attributed to a gas-solid reaction that forms SiC at less than the liquidus temperature of silicon and alters the surface properties of the graphite. It was also observed that a concentration of CO greater than 5 pct in the inlet gas leads to SiC formation on the surface of the silicon and severely hinders melting.

  17. GEOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIAL REACTIONS AFFECTING THE LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF IN SITU 'IRON BARRIERS'

    EPA Science Inventory

    The in situ application of granular iron (Fe0) has become popular for the destruction of halogenated organic compounds for the immobilization of specific metals in groundwater. However, a knowledge gap exists concerning the long-term performance of the Fe0-barriers. The corrosi...

  18. Temperature-dependent size exclusion chromatography for the in situ investigation of dynamic bonding/debonding reactions.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Josef; Guimard, Nathalie K; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Schmidt, Friedrich G; Lederer, Albena

    2013-11-01

    Polymers capable of dynamic bonding/debonding reactions are of great interest in modern day research. Potential applications can be found in the fields of self-healing materials or printable networks. Since temperature is often used as a stimulus for triggering reversible bonding reactions, an analysis operating at elevated temperatures is very useful for the in situ investigation of the reaction mechanism, as unwanted side effects can be minimized when performing the analyses at the same temperature at which the reactions occur. A temperature-dependent size exclusion chromatographic system (TD SEC) has been optimized for investigating the kinetics of retro Diels-Alder-based depolymerization of Diels-Alder polymers. The changing molecular weight distribution of the analyzed polymers during depolymerization gives valuable quantitative information on the kinetics of the reactions. Adequate data interpretation methods were developed for the correct evaluation of the chromatograms. The results are confirmed by high-temperature dynamic light scattering, thermogravimetric analysis, and time-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at high temperatures. In addition, the SEC system and column material stability under application conditions were assessed using thermoanalysis methods, infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen physisorption, and scanning electron microscopy. The findings demonstrate that the system is stable and, thus, we can reliably characterize such dynamically bonding/debonding systems with TD SEC. PMID:23877179

  19. In-situ x-ray absorption study of copper films in ground watersolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kvashnina, K.O.; Butorin, S.M.; Modin, A.; Soroka, I.; Marcellini, M.; Nordgren, J.; Guo, J.-H.; Werme, L.

    2007-10-29

    This study illustrates how the damage from copper corrosion can be reduced by modifying the chemistry of the copper surface environment. The surface modification of oxidized copper films induced by chemical reaction with Cl{sup -} and HCO{sub 3}{sup -} in aqueous solutions was monitored by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that corrosion of copper can be significantly reduced by adding even a small amount of sodium bicarbonate. The studied copper films corroded quickly in chloride solutions, whereas the same solution containing 1.1 mM HCO{sub 3}{sup -} prevented or slowed down the corrosion processes.

  20. In situ X-ray absorption study of copper films in ground water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvashnina, K. O.; Butorin, S. M.; Modin, A.; Soroka, I.; Marcellini, M.; Nordgren, J.; Guo, J.-H.; Werme, L.

    2007-10-01

    This study illustrates how the damage from copper corrosion can be reduced by modifying the chemistry of the copper surface environment. The surface modification of oxidized copper films induced by chemical reaction with Cl - and HCO3- in aqueous solutions was monitored by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that corrosion of copper can be significantly reduced by adding even a small amount of sodium bicarbonate. The studied copper films corroded quickly in chloride solutions, whereas the same solution containing 1.1 mM HCO3- prevented or slowed down the corrosion processes.

  1. Underwater microscopy for in situ studies of benthic ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Andrew D.; Treibitz, Tali; Roberts, Paul L. D.; Kelly, Emily L. A.; Horwitz, Rael; Smith, Jennifer E.; Jaffe, Jules S.

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic-scale processes significantly influence benthic marine ecosystems such as coral reefs and kelp forests. Due to the ocean's complex and dynamic nature, it is most informative to study these processes in the natural environment yet it is inherently difficult. Here we present a system capable of non-invasively imaging seafloor environments and organisms in situ at nearly micrometre resolution. We overcome the challenges of underwater microscopy through the use of a long working distance microscopic objective, an electrically tunable lens and focused reflectance illumination. The diver-deployed instrument permits studies of both spatial and temporal processes such as the algal colonization and overgrowth of bleaching corals, as well as coral polyp behaviour and interspecific competition. By enabling in situ observations at previously unattainable scales, this instrument can provide important new insights into micro-scale processes in benthic ecosystems that shape observed patterns at much larger scales. PMID:27403715

  2. Underwater microscopy for in situ studies of benthic ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Andrew D.; Treibitz, Tali; Roberts, Paul L. D.; Kelly, Emily L. A.; Horwitz, Rael; Smith, Jennifer E.; Jaffe, Jules S.

    2016-07-01

    Microscopic-scale processes significantly influence benthic marine ecosystems such as coral reefs and kelp forests. Due to the ocean's complex and dynamic nature, it is most informative to study these processes in the natural environment yet it is inherently difficult. Here we present a system capable of non-invasively imaging seafloor environments and organisms in situ at nearly micrometre resolution. We overcome the challenges of underwater microscopy through the use of a long working distance microscopic objective, an electrically tunable lens and focused reflectance illumination. The diver-deployed instrument permits studies of both spatial and temporal processes such as the algal colonization and overgrowth of bleaching corals, as well as coral polyp behaviour and interspecific competition. By enabling in situ observations at previously unattainable scales, this instrument can provide important new insights into micro-scale processes in benthic ecosystems that shape observed patterns at much larger scales.

  3. Underwater microscopy for in situ studies of benthic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Andrew D; Treibitz, Tali; Roberts, Paul L D; Kelly, Emily L A; Horwitz, Rael; Smith, Jennifer E; Jaffe, Jules S

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic-scale processes significantly influence benthic marine ecosystems such as coral reefs and kelp forests. Due to the ocean's complex and dynamic nature, it is most informative to study these processes in the natural environment yet it is inherently difficult. Here we present a system capable of non-invasively imaging seafloor environments and organisms in situ at nearly micrometre resolution. We overcome the challenges of underwater microscopy through the use of a long working distance microscopic objective, an electrically tunable lens and focused reflectance illumination. The diver-deployed instrument permits studies of both spatial and temporal processes such as the algal colonization and overgrowth of bleaching corals, as well as coral polyp behaviour and interspecific competition. By enabling in situ observations at previously unattainable scales, this instrument can provide important new insights into micro-scale processes in benthic ecosystems that shape observed patterns at much larger scales. PMID:27403715

  4. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  5. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yuan T.

    1991-03-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  6. Indentation device for in situ Raman spectroscopic and optical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbig, Y. B.; Michaels, C. A.; Forster, A. M.; Hettenhouser, J. W.; Byrd, W. E.; Morris, D. J.; Cook, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    Instrumented indentation is a widely used technique to study the mechanical behavior of materials at small length scales. Mechanical tests of bulk materials, microscopic, and spectroscopic studies may be conducted to complement indentation and enable the determination of the kinetics and physics involved in the mechanical deformation of materials at the crystallographic and molecular level, e.g., strain build-up in crystal lattices, phase transformations, and changes in crystallinity or orientation. However, many of these phenomena occurring during indentation can only be observed in their entirety and analyzed in depth under in situ conditions. This paper describes the design, calibration, and operation of an indentation device that is coupled with a Raman microscope to conduct in situ spectroscopic and optical analysis of mechanically deformed regions of Raman-active, transparent bulk material, thin films or fibers under contact loading. The capabilities of the presented device are demonstrated by in situ studies of the indentation-induced phase transformations of Si thin films and modifications of molecular conformations in high density polyethylene films.

  7. [Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  8. Structure and growth of stearate monolayers on calcite: First results of an in situ X-ray reflectivity study

    SciTech Connect

    Fenter, P.; Sturchio, N.C.

    1999-10-01

    The adsorption of organic molecules at mineral-fluid interfaces has a profound influence upon geochemical reaction and transport processes, yet little is known about the in situ structures or properties of organic layers at mineral-fluid interfaces. The authors describe an X-ray reflectivity study of stearate monolayers adsorbed at the calcite surface from methanolic solutions. Using these measurements the authors are able to determine important aspects of the in situ structure, bonding, adsorption, and growth mechanisms of stearate monolayers. The experimental approach demonstrated here can be applied widely in studying the interaction of organic molecules with mineral surfaces in aqueous systems.

  9. XAFS characterization of industrial catalysts: in situ study of phase transformation of nickel sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Jia, Z.; Wang, Q.; Zhao, S.; Xu, Z.; Yang, W.; Frenkel, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    The online sulfiding process for nickel-contained catalyst often ends up with a nickel sulfide mixture in refinery plant. To elucidate the local environment of nickel and its corresponding sulfur species, a model catalyst (nickel sulfide) and model thermal process were employed to explore the possibilities for characterization of real catalysts in industrial conditions. The present investigation shows effectiveness of in situ XANES and EXAFS measurements for studying the phase stability and phase composition in these systems, which could be used to simulate real sulfiding process in industrial reactions, such as hydrodesulfurizations of oil.

  10. Studies of in-situ calcium-based sorbents in advanced pressurized coal conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Katta, S.; Shires, P.J.; O'Donnell, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the project is to obtain experimental data on the reactions of calcium-based sorbents in gasification systems and to evaluate or develop kinetic models applicable to the commercial design of such systems. Both air-blown coal gasification systems and second generation fluid bed combustion systems (partial gasification) will be investigated, as well as subsequent stabilization of the solid wastes (calcium sulfide/ash) produced. More specifically, the objectives are to: Develop data on kinetics of in-situ desulfurization reactions; study the effect of calcium on the kinetics of carbon conversion rate; study kinetics of oxidation of CaS to CaSO[sup 4]; Develop and identify viable techniques to stabilize CaS; and, carry out further development work on most promising method and determine its commercial economics.

  11. Studies of in-situ calcium-based sorbents in advanced pressurized coal conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Katta, S.; Shires, P.J.; O`Donnell, J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The overall objective of the project is to obtain experimental data on the reactions of calcium-based sorbents in gasification systems and to evaluate or develop kinetic models applicable to the commercial design of such systems. Both air-blown coal gasification systems and second generation fluid bed combustion systems (partial gasification) will be investigated, as well as subsequent stabilization of the solid wastes (calcium sulfide/ash) produced. More specifically, the objectives are to: Develop data on kinetics of in-situ desulfurization reactions; study the effect of calcium on the kinetics of carbon conversion rate; study kinetics of oxidation of CaS to CaSO{sup 4}; Develop and identify viable techniques to stabilize CaS; and, carry out further development work on most promising method and determine its commercial economics.

  12. Early age hydration and pozzolanic reaction in natural zeolite blended cements: Reaction kinetics and products by in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Snellings, R.; Mertens, G.; Cizer, O.; Elsen, J.

    2010-12-15

    The in situ early-age hydration and pozzolanic reaction in cements blended with natural zeolites were investigated by time-resolved synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction with Rietveld quantitative phase analysis. Chabazite and Na-, K-, and Ca-exchanged clinoptilolite materials were mixed with Portland cement in a 3:7 weight ratio and hydrated in situ at 40 {sup o}C. The evolution of phase contents showed that the addition of natural zeolites accelerates the onset of C{sub 3}S hydration and precipitation of CH and AFt. Kinetic analysis of the consumption of C{sub 3}S indicates that the enveloping C-S-H layer is thinner and/or less dense in the presence of alkali-exchanged clinoptilolite pozzolans. The zeolite pozzolanic activity is interpreted to depend on the zeolite exchangeable cation content and on the crystallinity. The addition of natural zeolites alters the structural evolution of the C-S-H product. Longer silicate chains and a lower C/S ratio are deduced from the evolution of the C-S-H b-cell parameter.

  13. Analysis and modeling of PEM fuel cell stack performance: Effect of in situ reverse water gas shift reaction and oxygen bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, G.; Li, Xianguo

    In this study the performance of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack is analyzed with a mathematical model when the stack operates on hydrocarbon reformate gas as the anode feed stream. It is shown that the effect of carbon dioxide dilution of the hydrogen dominated reformate gas has a minimal impact on the stack performance. However, the CO-poisoning effect due to the in situ reverse water gas shift reaction in the anode feed stream could have a very serious adverse impact on the stack performance, especially at high current densities. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the equilibrium concentrations of CO could be as high as 100 ppm, generated by the in situ reverse water gas shift reaction, under the typical conditions of PEM fuel cell operation; and are influenced by the stack operating temperature and water content of the reformate anode feed. This CO-poisoning of the stack performance is shown mitigated effectively by introducing about 0.5-1% oxygen to the anode feed.

  14. Small-volume, ultrahigh-vacuum-compatible high-pressure reaction cell for combined kinetic and in situ IR spectroscopic measurements on planar model catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Diemant, T.; Häring, T.; Rauscher, H.; Behm, R. J.

    2005-12-01

    We describe the design and performance of a high-pressure reaction cell for simultaneous kinetic and in situ infrared reflection (IR) spectroscopic measurements on model catalysts at elevated pressures, between 10-3 and 103mbars, which can be operated both as batch reactor and as flow reactor with defined gas flow. The cell is attached to an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) system, which is used for sample preparation and also contains facilities for sample characterization. Specific for this design is the combination of a small cell volume, which allows kinetic measurements with high sensitivity under batch or continuous flow conditions, the complete isolation of the cell from the UHV part during UHV measurements, continuous temperature control during both UHV and high-pressure operation, and rapid transfer between UHV and high-pressure stage. Gas dosing is performed by a designed gas-handling system, which allows operation as flow reactor with calibrated gas flows at adjustable pressures. To study the kinetics of reactions on the model catalysts, a quadrupole mass spectrometer is connected to the high-pressure cell. IR measurements are possible in situ by polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, which also allows measurements at elevated pressures. The performance of the setup is demonstrated by test measurements on the kinetics for CO oxidation and the CO adsorption on a Au /TiO2/Ru(0001) model catalyst film at 1-50 mbar total pressure.

  15. Adsorption and oxidation of formaldehyde on a polycrystalline Pt film electrode: An in situ IR spectroscopy search for adsorbed reaction intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Behm, R Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Summary As part of a mechanistic study of the electrooxidation of C1 molecules we have systematically investigated the dissociative adsorption/oxidation of formaldehyde on a polycrystalline Pt film electrode under experimental conditions optimizing the chance for detecting weakly adsorbed reaction intermediates. Employing in situ IR spectroscopy in an attenuated total reflection configuration (ATR-FTIRS) with p-polarized IR radiation to further improve the signal-to-noise ratio, and using low reaction temperatures (3 °C) and deuterium substitution to slow down the reaction kinetics and to stabilize weakly adsorbed reaction intermediates, we could detect an IR absorption band at 1660 cm−1 characteristic for adsorbed formyl intermediates. This assignment is supported by an isotope shift in wave number. Effects of temperature, potential and deuterium substitution on the formation and disappearance of different adsorbed species (COad, adsorbed formate, adsorbed formyl), are monitored and quantified. Consequences on the mechanism for dissociative adsorption and oxidation of formaldehyde are discussed. PMID:24991512

  16. Combined in situ XRD and in situ XANES studies on the reduction behavior of a rhenium promoted cobalt catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nitin; Payzant, E A; Jothimurugesan, K; Spivey, J J

    2011-08-28

    A 10% Co-4% Re/(2% Zr/SiO(2)) catalyst was prepared by co-impregnation using a silica support modified by 2% Zr. The catalyst was characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR), in situ XRD and in situ XANES analysis where it was simultaneously exposed to H(2) using a temperature programmed ramp. The results showed the two step reduction of large crystalline Co(3)O(4) with CoO as an intermediate. TPR results showed that the reduction of highly dispersed Co(3)O(4) was facilitated by reduced rhenium by a H(2)-spillover mechanism. In situ XRD results showed the presence of both, Co-hcp and Co-fcc phases in the reduced catalyst at 400 °C. However, the Co-hcp phase was more abundant, which is thought to be the more active phase as compared to the Co-fcc phase for CO hydrogenation. CO hydrogenation at 270 °C and 5 bar pressure produces no detectable change in the phases during the time of experiment. In situ XANES results showed a decrease in the metallic cobalt in the presence of H(2)/CO, which can be attributed due to oxidation of the catalyst by reaction under these conditions. PMID:21743918

  17. ALDOL- AND MANNICH-TYPE REACTIONS VIA IN SITU OLEFIN MIGRATION IN IONIC LIQUID

    EPA Science Inventory


    An aldol-type and a Mannich-type reaction via the cross-coupling of aldehydes and imines with allylic alcohols catalyzed by RuCl2(PPh3)3 was developed with ionic liquid as the solvent. The solvent/catalyst system could be reused for at least five times with no loss of reactiv...

  18. Liquid chromatography with amperometric reaction detection involving electrogenerated reagents: applications with in-situ generated bromine.

    PubMed

    King, W P; Kissinger, P T

    1980-09-01

    We describe the use of electrogenerated reactants for continuous on-line reaction detection with thin-layer hydrodynamic amperometry. The reagent is introduced into the liquid-chromatographic column effluent at a constant rate by using controlled-current electrochemistry. After the effluent passes through a short reaction coil, the reagent concentration is monitored at the detector. Reaction of eluted compounds with bromine is signalled by changes in the current detected. The direct electrochemical control of the reagent concentration allows changes to be made, even during the course of obtaining a chromatogram. Depending on the specific reagent or reaction, the reagent is supplied either by addition of a second stream or by direct generation in the mobile phase. The latter configuration provides sufficient baseline stability to permit detection of the uptake of as little as 10 pmol of reagent bromine. The technique has been used to detect nanograms of underivatized fatty acids, prostaglandins, and phenols after separation by reversed-phase liquid chromatography. PMID:7408178

  19. Viscous fingering with chemical reaction: effect of in-situ production of surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Juan; Homsy, G. M.

    2003-04-01

    Viscous fingering experiments are performed in a radial Hele-Shaw cell for a liquid liquid system in the presence of a well-characterized interfacial reaction capable of changing the surface tension on the time scale of the experiments. The reaction is a neutralization of a fatty acid by an alkaline material to form a surfactant, which exhibits first-order kinetics for the surface tension as a function of time. The experiments are carried out for capillary numbers, Ca, high enough for the fingering to always be in the fractal regime, and for a wide range of Damköhler numbers, Da. The fingers are typically wider in the presence of the chemical reaction than the non-reactive case. We observe two different-behaviours of the reactive fingering patterns. For intermediate values of Da, 0.5 < Da < 4, the fractal dimension d_{f} is higher than the classical value measured for the non-reactive fingering patterns and reaches a maximum of about 1.9. For both small (Da < 0.5) and high Da (Da > 4), the reactive fingering patterns are similar to the fingers with no reaction: the fractal dimension is found to be the same for both systems. These effects are consistent with the hypothesis that Marangoni stresses are present and produce wider fingers.

  20. In situ studies of grain growth in thin metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, C.S.; Mansuri, C.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Townsend, S.J. . Dept. of Physics); Smith, D.A. . T.J. Watson Research Center)

    1993-06-01

    Grain growth in thin films of aluminum has been studied using in situ transmission electron microscopy and a heating stage. Videotapes taken during grain growth were analyzed with the intent of searching for the predominant local rearrangement processes responsible for growth. Evolution of a soap froth can be decomposed into only two elementary local topology rearranging events. The authors have found numerous exceptions to prevailing theories that compare grain growth in thin films to the evolution of such froths. These observations suggest that a more complete picture of grain growth is necessary and that such a theory must include more complex local rearrangement processes.

  1. Calcite dissolution: an in situ study in the Panama Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Thunell, R.C.; Keir, R.S.; Honjo, S.

    1981-05-08

    The results of an in situ study of calcite dissolution in the Panama Basin indicate that the rate of dissolution in the water column increases suddenly below a water depth of about 2800 meters. This coincides with the depth at which the calcium carbonate content of surface sediments begins to decrease rapidly or the sedimentary lysocline. Since this level of increased dissolution both in the water column and on the sea floor does not appear to be related to the transition from supersaturation to undersaturation with respect to carbonate, there may be a kinetic origin for the lysocline in this region.

  2. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for electrochemical reactions in ordinary solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Takuya; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobata, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Noguchi, Hidenori; Kawasaki, Tadahiro; Uosaki, Kohei

    2013-09-09

    In situ electrochemical X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) apparatus, which allows XPS at solid/liquid interfaces under potential control, was constructed utilizing a microcell with an ultra-thin Si membrane, which separates vacuum and a solution. Hard X-rays from a synchrotron source penetrate into the Si membrane surface exposed to the solution. Electrons emitted at the Si/solution interface can pass through the membrane and be analyzed by an analyzer placed in vacuum. Its operation was demonstrated for potential-induced Si oxide growth in water. Effect of potential and time on the thickness of Si and Si oxide layers was quantitatively determined at sub-nanometer resolution.

  3. Quasi-in-situ single-grain photoelectron microspectroscopy of Co/PPy nanocomposites under oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Bocchetta, Patrizia; Amati, Matteo; Bozzini, Benedetto; Catalano, Massimo; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Gregoratti, Luca; Taurino, Antonietta; Kiskinova, Maya

    2014-11-26

    This paper reports an investigation into the aging of pyrolyzed cobalt/polypyrrole (Co/PPy) oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts, based on quasi-in-situ photoelectron microspectroscopy. The catalyst precursor was prepared by potentiostatic reverse-pulse coelectrodeposition from an acetonitrile solution on graphite. Accelerated aging was obtained by quasi-in-situ voltammetric cycling in an acidic electrolyte. Using photoelectron imaging and microspectroscopy of single Co/PPy grains at a resolution of 100 nm, we tracked the ORR-induced changes in the morphology and chemical state of the pristine material, consisting of uniformly distributed ∼20 nm nanoparticles, initially consisting of a mixture of Co(II) and Co(III) oxidation states in almost equal amounts. The evolution of the Co 2p, O 1s, and N 1s spectra revealed that the main effects of aging are a gradual loss of the Co present at the surface and the reduction of Co(III) to Co(II), accompanied by the emergence and growth of a N 1s signal, corresponding to electrocatalytically active C-N sites. PMID:25369153

  4. Fluorescent labelling of in situ hybridisation probes through the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Susann; Manetto, Antonio; Cassinelli, Valentina; Fuchs, Jörg; Ma, Lu; Raddaoui, Nada; Houben, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    In situ hybridisation is a powerful tool to investigate the genome and chromosome architecture. Nick translation (NT) is widely used to label DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). However, NT is limited to the use of long double-stranded DNA and does not allow the labelling of single-stranded and short DNA, e.g. oligonucleotides. An alternative technique is the copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), at which azide and alkyne functional groups react in a multistep process catalysed by copper(I) ions to give 1,4-distributed 1,2,3-triazoles at a high yield (also called 'click reaction'). We successfully applied this technique to label short single-stranded DNA probes as well as long PCR-derived double-stranded probes and tested them by FISH on plant chromosomes and nuclei. The hybridisation efficiency of differently labelled probes was compared to those obtained by conventional labelling techniques. We show that copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition-labelled probes are reliable tools to detect different types of repetitive sequences on chromosomes opening new promising routes for the detection of single copy gene. Moreover, a combination of FISH using such probes with other techniques, e.g. immunohistochemistry (IHC) and cell proliferation assays using 5-ethynyl-deoxyuridine, is herein shown to be easily feasible. PMID:27095480

  5. Synthesis of iron aluminide-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites by in-situ displacement reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, R.; McKamey, C.G.; Buck, L.R.; Schneibel, J.H.

    1997-09-01

    Composites consisting of an iron aluminide matrix with ceramic particle reinforcements, such as alumina, could improve the high temperature strength without compromising the oxidation resistance. In this paper, the feasibility of processing Fe-Al alloy/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites by an in-situ displacement reaction between Fe-40 at.% Al and iron oxide, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is investigated. Simple powder metallurgical processing was performed without resorting to an externally applied pressures or deformations during the high temperature processing step. The microstructural features of the composites are rationalized based on results from diffusion couples. Preliminary mechanical properties such as fracture toughness, yield strength and hardness are determined and compared with the values obtained for monolithic iron aluminide - Fe-28 at.% Al. Results suggest that a significant improvement in the properties is needed and further avenues for modifications, such as changes in the interface strength and externally applied forces during processing, are suggested.

  6. In situ generated highly active copper oxide catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction at low overpotential in alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Cui, Shengsheng; Qian, Manman; Sun, Zijun; Du, Pingwu

    2016-04-25

    Developing efficient water oxidation catalysts made up of earth-abundant elements has attracted much attention as a step toward for future clean energy production. Herein we report a simple one-step method to generate a low cost copper oxide catalyst film in situ from a copper(ii) ethylenediamine complex. The resulting catalyst has excellent activity toward the oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline solutions. A catalytic current density of 1.0 mA cm(-2) and 10 mA cm(-2) for the catalyst film requires the overpotentials of only ∼370 mV and ∼475 mV in 1.0 M KOH, respectively. This catalytic performance shows that the new catalyst is one of the best Cu-based heterogeneous OER catalysts to date. PMID:27020763

  7. Experimental studies of gas-aerosol reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anand

    1991-05-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 is believed to the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfate formation in cloud droplets. However, no studies in noncloud aerosol systems have been reported. The objective is to quantify the importance of the noncloud liquid phase reactions of SO2 by H2O2 in the atmosphere. Growth rates of submicron droplets exposed to SO2 and H2O2 were measured using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique (Rader and McMurry, 1986). The technique uses differential mobility analyzers (DMA's) to generate monodisperse particles and to measure particle size after the reaction. To facilitate submicron monodisperse droplet production with the DMA, a low-ion-concentration charter capable of generating singly charged particles up to 1.0 microns was developed and experimentally evaluated. The experiments were performed using dry and deliquesced (NH4)2SO4 particles with SO2 and H2O2 concentrations from 0-860 ppb and 0-150 ppb, respectively. No growth was observed for dry particles. For droplets greater than or equal to 0.3 microns, the fractional diameter growth was independent of particle size and for droplets less than or equal to 0.2 microns, it decreased as particle size decreased. The observed decrease is due to NH3 evaporation. As ammonia evaporates, droplet pH decreases causing the oxidation rate to decrease, leading to a lower growth rate. To predict the size-dependent growth rates, a theoretical model was developed using solution thermodynamics, gas/particle equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. The experimental and theoretical results are in reasonable agreement. For dry (NH4)2SO4 particles exposed to SO2, H2O2, NH3, and H2O vapor, surface reaction-controlled growth was observed. Particle growth was very sensitive to particle composition. No growth was observed for Polystyrene latex particles, whereas (NH4)2SO4 particles doped with catalysts (Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+) and Cu(2+)) in a molar ratio of 1:500 grew slower than

  8. Reaction rate kinetics for in situ combustion retorting of Michigan Antrim oil shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostam-Abadi, M.; Mickelson, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The intrinsic reaction rate kinetics for the pyrolysis of Michigan Antrim oil shale and the oxidation of the carbonaceous residue of this shale have been determined using a thermogravimetric analysis method. The kinetics of the pyrolysis reaction were evaluated from both isothermal and nonisothermal rate data. The reaction was found to be second-order with an activation energy of 252.2 kJ/mole, and with a frequency factor of 9.25 ?? 1015 sec-1. Pyrolysis kinetics were not affected by heating rates between 0.01 to 0.67??K/s. No evidence of any reactions among the oil shale mineral constituents was observed at temperatures below 1173??K. However, it was found that the presence of pyrite in oil shale reduces the primary devolatilization rate of kerogen and increases the amount of residual char in the spent shale. Carbonaceous residues which were prepared by heating the oil shale at a rate of 0.166??K/s to temperatures between 923??K and 1073??K, had the highest reactivities when oxidized at 0.166??K/s in a gas having 21 volume percent oxygen. Oxygen chemisorption was found to be the initial precursor to the oxidation process. The kinetics governing oxygen chemisorption is (Equation Presented) where X is the fractional coverage. The oxidation of the carbonaceous residue was found also to be second-order. The activation energy and the frequency factor determined from isothermal experiments were 147 kJ/mole and 9.18??107 sec-1 respectively, while the values of these parameters obtained from a nonisothermal experiment were 212 kJ/mole and 1.5??1013 sec-1. The variation in the rate constants is attributed to the fact that isothermal and nonisothermal analyses represent two different aspects of the combustion process.

  9. In situ TEM studies of carbon and gold nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casillas Garcia, Gilberto

    Properties of matter change as structures go down in size to the nanoscale, creating new possibilities for creating new functional materials with better properties than the bulk. In situ TEM techniques were used to probe the properties of two different materials: atomic carbon chains and gold nanoparticles. Carbon chains were synthesized by in situ TEM electron beam irradiation from few-layers-graphene (FLG) flakes. Several chains up to 5 nm long were observed. Aberration corrected TEM confirmed the dimerization of the linear chain as predicted by Peierls. Moreover, it was observed that two linear carbon chains can cross-bond every 9 atoms, and it was confirmed by DFT calculations. Five-fold nanoparticles are not supposed to be stable beyond 5 nm size. Here, decahedra with high index facets in the order of 300 nm were studied by TEM. It was found that the high index facets were only stable by adding a capping agent, otherwise, smooth edges were observed. In this case, a (5x1) hexagonal surface reconstruction was observed on the {001} surfaces, with the hexagonal strings along a [110] and a [410] direction. Additionally, mechanical properties of gold nanoparticles, with and without twin boundaries, under 100 nm were measured by in situ TEM compression experiments. All of the nanoparticles presented yield strengths in the order of GPa. Multi twinned nanoparticles were found to be more malleable, reaching real compressing strains of 100 %, while the single crystal nanoparticle presented less plastic flow. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the twin boundaries contribute to the malleability of the nanoparticles, at the same time it provides a mechanism to stop dislocations, hence, strain hardening the nanoparticle at later stages of compression. Finally, the behavior of a single grain boundary was studied by in situ TEM manipulation of nanoparticles. A liquid-like behavior of a grain boundary is observed after two 40 nm gold nanoparticles are brought to

  10. In situ measurements of heterogeneous reactions on ambient aerosol particles: Impacts on atmospheric chemistry and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, Timothy

    2015-02-11

    Aerosol particles play a critical role in the Earth’s energy budget through the absorption and scattering of radiation, and/or through their ability to form clouds and alter cloud lifetime. Heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions alter the climate-relevant properties of aerosol particles and catalyze reaction pathways that are energetically unfavorable in the gas phase. The chemical composition of aerosol particles dictates the kinetics of heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions. At present, the vast majority of the molecular level information on these processes has been determined in laboratory investigations on model aerosol systems. The work described here provides a comprehensive investigation into the reactivity of complex, ambient aerosol particles is proposed to determine: 1) how representative laboratory investigations of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes conducted on model, simple systems are of the real atmosphere, and 2) the impact of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes on ambient particle optical properties and their ability to nucleate clouds. This work has focused on the uptake kinetics for ammonia (NH3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5). The results of these investigations will be used to directly improve the representation of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes in global climate models, by identifying the key mechanistic drivers that control the variability in the observed kinetics.

  11. In situ loading of well-dispersed silver nanoparticles on nanocrystalline magnesium oxide for real-time monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaige; Li, Gongke; Hu, Yuling

    2015-10-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique is of great importance for insight into the transient reaction intermediates and mechanistic pathways involved in heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions under actual reaction conditions, especially in water. Herein, we demonstrate a facile method for in situ synthesis of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide-Ag(0) (nano MgO-Ag(0)) hybrid nanomaterials with dispersed Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on the surface of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide (nano MgO) via Sn2+ linkage and reduction. As a benefit from the synergy effect of nano MgO and Ag NPs, the nano MgO-Ag(0) exhibited both excellent SERS and catalytic activities for the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol in the presence of NaBH4. The nano MgO-Ag(0) was used for real-time monitoring of the catalytic reaction process of 4-nitrothiophenol to 4-aminothiophenol in an aqueous medium by observing the SERS signals of the reactant, intermediate and final products. The intrinsic reaction kinetics and reaction mechanism of this reaction were also investigated. This SERS-based synergy technique provides a novel approach for quantitative in situ monitoring of catalytic chemical reaction processes.The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique is of great importance for insight into the transient reaction intermediates and mechanistic pathways involved in heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions under actual reaction conditions, especially in water. Herein, we demonstrate a facile method for in situ synthesis of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide-Ag(0) (nano MgO-Ag(0)) hybrid nanomaterials with dispersed Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on the surface of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide (nano MgO) via Sn2+ linkage and reduction. As a benefit from the synergy effect of nano MgO and Ag NPs, the nano MgO-Ag(0) exhibited both excellent SERS and catalytic activities for the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol in the presence of NaBH4. The nano MgO-Ag(0) was used for real

  12. Adsorption, Coadsorption, and Reaction of Acetaldehyde and NO2 on Na-Y,FAU: An In Situ FTIR Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    János, Szanyi; Ja Hun, Kwak; Ryan A.,Moline; Charles H. F.,Peden

    2004-11-01

    The adsorption of acetaldehyde and its coadsorption and reaction with NO2 were investigated on a Na-Y,FAU zeolite using in situ FTIR spectroscopy. Acetaldehyde adsorbs strongly over Na-Y and desorbs molecularly at around 400 K with very limited extent of condensation or polymerization. Reaction between CH3CHO and NO2 takes place in coadsorption experiments even at 300 K. In the initial step, acetaldehyde is oxidized to acetic acid accompanied by the formation of NO, which can be observed as N2O3 formed via a further reaction between NO and NO2. The key intermediates in the overall NOx reduction in this process are nitromethane and, possibly, nitrosomethane, which form in the next step. Their decomposition and further reaction with adsorbed NOx species lead to the formation of HCN, HNCO, N2O, CO2, and organic nitrile species identified by their characteristic IR vibrational signatures. At 473 K, the reaction between adsorbed CH3CHO and NO2 is very fast. The results seem to suggest a mechanism in which N-N bond formation takes place among ionic nitrogen containing species (NO+ and CN- or NCO-). Finally, no evidence has been found to suggest the participation of NHx+NOy- type species in the N-N bond formation under the experimental conditions of this study, although their role in the overall N2 formation process cannot be ruled out under realistic catalytic conditions.

  13. Aniline-Promoted Cyclization-Replacement Cascade Reactions of 2-Hydroxycinnamaldehydes with Various Carbonic Nucleophiles through In Situ Formed N,O-Acetals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chenguang; Huang, He; Li, Xiangmin; Zhang, Yueteng; Li, Hao; Wang, Wei

    2016-06-27

    In this study, we report the harnessing of new reactivity of N,O-acetals in an aminocatalytic fashion for organic synthesis. Unlike widely used strategies requiring the use of acids and/or elevated temperatures, direct replacement of the amine component of the N,O-acetals by carbon-centered nucleophiles for C-C bond formation is realized under mild reaction conditions. Furthermore, without necessary preformation of the N,O-acetals, an amine-catalyzed in situ formation of N,O-acetals is developed. Coupling both reactions into a one-pot operation enables the achievement of a catalytic process. We demonstrate the employment of simple anilines as promoters for the cyclization-substitution cascade reactions of trans-2-hydroxycinnamaldehydes with various carbonic nucleophiles including indoles, pyrroles, naphthols, phenols, and silyl enol ethers. The process offers an alternative approach to structurally diverse, "privileged" 2-substituted 2H-chromenes. The synthetic power of the new process is furthermore shown by its application in a 2-step synthesis of the natural product candenatenin E and for the facile installation of 2-substituted 2H-chromene moieties into biologically active indoles. PMID:27230417

  14. In situ temperature measurements of reaction spaces under microwave irradiation using photoluminescent probes.

    PubMed

    Ano, Taishi; Kishimoto, Fuminao; Sasaki, Ryo; Tsubaki, Shuntaro; Maitani, Masato M; Suzuki, Eiichi; Wada, Yuji

    2016-05-11

    We demonstrate two novel methods for the measurement of the temperatures of reaction spaces locally heated by microwaves, which have been applied here to two example systems, i.e., BaTiO3 particles covered with a SiO2 shell (BaTiO3-SiO2) and layered tungstate particles. Photoluminescent (PL) probes showing the temperature-sensitivity in their PL lifetimes are located in the nanospaces of the above systems. In the case of BaTiO3-SiO2 core-shell particles, rhodamine B is loaded into the mesopores of the SiO2 shell covering the BaTiO3 core, which generates the heat through the dielectric loss of microwaves. The inner nanospace temperature of the SiO2 shell is determined to be 28 °C higher than the bulk temperature under microwave irradiation at 24 W. On the other hand, Eu(3+) is immobilized in the interlayer space of layered tungstate as the PL probe, showing that the nanospace temperature of the interlayer is only 4 °C higher than the bulk temperature. This method for temperature-measurement is powerful for controlling microwave heating and elucidates the ambiguous mechanisms of microwave special effects often observed in chemical reactions, contributing greatly to the practical application of microwaves in chemistry and materials sciences. PMID:27136754

  15. Comparative Reactivity Study of Forsterite and Antigorite in Wet Supercritical CO2 by In Situ Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Christopher J.; Loring, John S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Wang, Zheming

    2013-10-01

    The carbonation reactions of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) and antigorite [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4], representatives of olivine and serpentine minerals, in dry and wet supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) at conditions relevant to geologic carbon sequestration (35 °C and 100 bar) were studied by in-situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Our results confirm that water plays a critical role in the reactions between metal silicate minerals and scCO2. For neat scCO2, no reaction was observed in 24 hr for either mineral. When water was added to the scCO2, a thin water film formed on the minerals’ surfaces, and the reaction rates and extents increased as the water saturation level was raised from 54% to 116% (excess water). For the first time, the presence of bicarbonate, a key reaction intermediate for metal silicate reactions with scCO2, was observed in a heterogeneous system where mineral solids, an adsorbed water film, and bulk scCO2 co-exist. In excess-water experiments, approximately 4% of forsterite and less than 2% of antigorite transformed into hydrated Mg-carbonates. A precipitate similar to nesquehonite (MgCO3•3H2O) was observed for forsterite within 6 hr of reaction time, but no such precipitate was formed from antigorite until after water was removed from the scCO2 following a 24-hr reaction period. The reduced reactivity and carbonate-precipitation behavior of antigorite was attributed to slower, incongruent dissolution of the mineral and lower concentrations of Mg2+ and HCO3- in the water film. The in situ measurements employed in this work make it possible to quantify metal carbonate precipitates and key reaction intermediates such as bicarbonate for the investigation of carbonation reaction mechanisms relevant to geologic carbon sequestration.

  16. In situ AFM imaging of Li-O2 electrochemical reaction on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite with ether-based electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Wen, Rui; Hong, Misun; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2013-07-24

    Understanding the lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) electrochemical reaction is of importance to improve reaction kinetics, efficiency, and mitigate parasitic reactions, which links to the strategy of enhanced Li-O2 battery performance. Many in situ and ex situ analyses have been reported to address chemical species of reduction intermediate and products, whereas details of the dynamic Li-O2 reaction have not as yet been fully unraveled. For this purpose, visual imaging can provide straightforward evidence, formation and decomposition of products, during the Li-O2 electrochemical reaction. Here, we present real-time and in situ views of the Li-O2 reaction using electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM). Details of the reaction process can be observed at nano-/micrometer scale on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrode with lithium ion-containing tetraglyme, representative of the carbon cathode and ether-based electrolyte extensively employed in the Li-O2 battery. Upon oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), rapid growth of nanoplates, having axial diameter of hundreds of nanometers, length of micrometers, and ~5 nm thickness, at a step edge of HOPG can be observed, which eventually forms a lithium peroxide (Li2O2) film. This Li2O2 film is decomposed during the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), for which the decomposition potential is related to a thickness. There is no evidence of byproduct analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) after first reduction and oxidation reaction. However, further cycles provide unintended products such as lithium carbonate (Li2CO3), lithium acetate, and fluorine-related species with irregular morphology due to the degradation of HOPG electrode, tetraglyme, and lithium salt. These observations provide the first visualization of Li-O2 reaction process and morphological information of Li2O2, which can allow one to build strategies to prepare the optimum conditions for the Li-O2 battery. PMID:23808397

  17. Reversible Luminescence Modulation upon Photochromic Reactions in Rare-Earth Doped Ferroelectric Oxides by in Situ Photoluminescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiwei; Sun, Haiqin; Wang, Xusheng; Hao, Xihong; An, Shengli

    2015-11-18

    Reversible luminescence photoswitching upon photochromic reactions with excellent reproducibility is achieved in a new inorganic luminescence material: Na(0.5)Bi(2.5)Nb2O9: Pr(3+) (NBN:Pr) ferroelectric oxides. Upon blue light (452 nm) or sunlight irradiation, the material exhibits a reversible photochromism (PC) performance between dark gray and green color by alternating visible light and thermal stimulus without inducing any structure changes and is accompanied by a red emission at 613 nm. The coloration and decoloration process can be quantitatively evaluated by in situ photoluminescence spectroscopy. Meanwhile, the luminescence emission intensity based on PC reactions is effectively tuned by changing irradiation time and excitation wavelength, and the degree of luminescence modulation has no significant degradation after several periods, showing very excellent reproducibility. On the basis of the luminescence modulation behavior, a double-exponential relaxation model is proposed, and a combined equation is adopted to well describe the luminescence response to light irradiation, being in agreement with the experimental data. PMID:26496504

  18. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction as a diagnostic aid for synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Shipley, J.; Crew, J.; Birdsall, S.; Gill, S.; Clark, J.; Fisher, C.; Kelsey, A.; Nojima, T.; Sonobe, H.; Cooper, C.; Gusterson, B.

    1996-01-01

    Identification of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) that is associated with a high proportion of synovial sarcoma can be a useful diagnostic aid. The translocation results in fusion of the SYT gene on chromosome 18 to either the SSX1 or the SSX2 gene, two homologous genes within Xp11.2. Two-color interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were assessed as approaches to identify the rearrangement in well characterized cases. The presence of the translocation, and the specific chromosome X gene disrupted, were inferred from the configuration of signals from chromosome-specific centromere probes, paints, and markers flanking each gene in preparations of interphase nuclei. Rearrangement was found in two cell lines and eight of nine tumor samples, including analysis of five touch imprints. This was consistent with cytogenetic data in four cases and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis using primers known to amplify both SYT-SSX1 and SYT-SSX2 transcripts. The transcripts were distinguished by restriction with LspI and SmaI. Contrary to previous suggestions, there was no obvious correlation between histological subtype and involvement of the SSX1 or SSX2 gene. These approaches could also be applied to the identification of tumor-free margins and metastatic disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8579118

  19. Nickel-alumina composites: In situ synthesis by a displacement reaction, and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.; Burlitch, J.M.; Uestuendag, E.; Yoo, J.; Zehnder, A.T.

    1995-10-01

    Nickel-alumina composites have the potential to be high performance materials. Alumina, with its excellent oxidation resistance, combined with a ductile phase such as nickel may provide a tough material with a lower density and higher Young`s modulus, overall, a higher specific modulus than typical Superalloys. Dense, interpenetrating Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were synthesized using a displacement reaction between NiO and aluminum. The resulting composites were characterized in terms of their mechanical properties such as hardness, flexure strength, fracture toughness and elastic constants. The synthesis, characterization, and mechanical properties, as well as the effect of the interpenetrating microstructure on the toughening mechanisms and other properties will be discussed.

  20. Density functional studies of representative pericyclic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, John E.; Sosa, Carlos P.

    1994-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) has traditionally been shunned by computational chemists, but has long seen widespread use in the physics community. Recently, however, DFT has been adopted by the ab initio quantum chemistry community and much activity has been devoted to refining the methodology and exploring the range of its applicability. We investigate the use of DFT (both local (LDF) and non-local (NLDF) spin density approximations) to calculate transition and equilibrium structures for three representative pericyclic reactions: the electrocyclic ring opening reaction of cyclobutene, the [1,5] sigmatropic hydrogen shift reaction in (Z)-1,3-pentadiene, and the Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction between ethylene and butadiene. LDF theory tends to overemphasize the stability of the ringed structures in each of these reactions. For example, LDF predicts a very low (6 kcal mol -1) barrier to reaction for the Deils-Alder reaction. NLDF theory substantially improves the calculated reaction barrier (20 kcal mol -1), but it is still low with respect to experiment.

  1. Active phase of a Pd-Cu/ZSM-5 catalyst for benzene hydroxylation: In-situ XAFS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kye-Sung; Lee, Yong-Kul

    2012-07-01

    The gas-phase hydroxylation of benzene by using a mixture of oxygen and hydrogen has been carried out over Cu/ZSM-5 catalysts modified with palladium. In-situ X-ray absorption studies employed in the course of H2-tempereature programmed reduction (H2-TPR) followed by benzene hydroxylation confirmed that the oxidic phase of Cu2+ was transformed to Cu+ during the reaction. The addition of Pd to Cu/ZSM-5 noticeably improved the reducibility of the oxidic Cu phase, which resulted in an increase in the activity of the reaction.

  2. Detection of Newcastle disease virus RNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue and comparison with immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The usefulness of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues was examined and compared to the immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) assays for detection of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Spleen and lung tissues...

  3. Electrophilic Reaction of 2,2,2-Trifluorodiazoethane with the in Situ Generated N-Heterocyclic Carbenes: Access to N-Aminoguanidines.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ran; Zheng, Yan; Ma, Jun-An

    2016-09-01

    A facile and efficient electrophilic reaction of 2,2,2-trifluorodiazoethane (CF3CHN2) with the in situ generated N-heterocyclic carbenes is reported. Under basic conditions, a series of trifluoromethylated N-aminoguanidines were obtained in good to high yields. Furthermore, this protocol was applied in the synthesis of the agrochemical Imidacloprid analogue. PMID:27540867

  4. Intraductal Therapy of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: A Presurgery Study

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, M. Ellen; Gordon, Eva J.; Rao, Jian Yu; Jin, Yusheng; Hylton, Nola; Love, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Many women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) are treated with extensive surgery, radiation, and hormone therapy due to the inability to monitor the disease and to determine which cases will progress to invasive cancer. We assessed the safety and feasibility of administering chemotherapy directly into DCIS-containing ducts in 13 women before definitive surgery. The treatment was safe, feasible, and well tolerated, supporting further development of this strategy for management of DCIS. Introduction Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a noninvasive breast cancer wherein malignant cells are confined within a ductal lobular unit. Although less than half the cases of DCIS will progress to invasive disease, most women are treated aggressively with surgery, radiation, and/or hormone therapy due to the inability to clinically evaluate the extent and location of the disease. Intraductal therapy, in which a drug is administered directly into the mammary duct through the nipple, is a promising approach for treating DCIS, but the feasibility of instilling drug into a diseased duct has not been established. Patients and Methods Four to 6 weeks before their scheduled surgery, 13 women diagnosed with DCIS were subjected to cannulation of the affected duct. After both the absence of perforation and presence of dye in the duct were confirmed by ductogram, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin was instilled. Histopathologic assessment was performed after surgery to assess the treatment effects. Results Of the 13 women enrolled in the study, 6 had their DCIS duct successfully cannulated without perforation and instilled with the drug. The treatment was well tolerated, and no serious adverse events have been reported. Biomarker studies indicated a general decrease in Ki-67 levels but an increase in annexin-1 and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine in the lumen of DCIS-containing ducts, which suggests a local response to pegylated liposomal doxorubicin treatment. Conclusions Intraductal therapy offers

  5. Study of char gasification in a reaction/adsorption apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.; Crowley, J.A.

    1987-09-01

    The reaction of an activated carbon (coconut char) with CO/sub 2/ was studied in a reaction/adsorption apparatus which allows successive reactivity and physical adsorption measurements to be made on the same solid sample. Reaction and surface area evolution data were obtained in the temperature range from 800 to 900/sup 0/C. All reaction rate trajectories obtained in this study showed a maximum in the reaction rate, 2-3 times higher than the initial rate, at about 85% conversion. There was no correlation between these results and the evolution of the internal surface area although the reaction appeared to take place initially in the kinetically controlled regime.

  6. Remote and in situ sensing products in chemical reaction using a flexible terahertz pipe waveguide.

    PubMed

    You, Borwen; Lu, Ja-Yu

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of remote chemical detection is experimentally demonstrated by using a Teflon pipe as a scanning arm in a continuous-terahertz wave sensing and imaging system. Different tablets with distinct mixed ratios of aluminum and polyethylene powders are well distinguished by measuring the power reflectivities of 0.4 THz wave associated with their distinct terahertz refractive indices. Given its refractive index sensitivity and fast response, the reflective terahertz sensing system can be used to real-time trace and quantitatively analyze the ammonium-chloride aerosols produced by the chemical reaction between hydrochloric acid and ammonia vapors. With a tightly focusing terahertz beam spot, the spatial and concentration distributions of the generated chemical product are successfully mapped out by the 1D scan of the flexible pipe probe. In consideration of the responsitivity, power stability, and focused spot size of the system, its detection limit for the ammonium-chloride aerosol is estimated to be approximately 165 nmol/mm2. The reliable and compact terahertz pipe scan system is potentially suitable for practical applications, such as biomedical or industrial fiber endoscopy. PMID:27505768

  7. A theoretical guide for fabricating a conductive molecular wire on a silicon surface via an in situ surface polymerization reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xiaojing; Wang, Jinlan; Yuan, Shijun; Zhang, Xiuyun; Wu, Gang; Wang, Xiaobai; Yang, Shuo-Wang

    2015-09-01

    It has been a long-standing goal to make conductive molecular wires or linear polymer chains on traditional semiconductors or insulator substrates to satisfy the ongoing miniaturization in electronic devices. Here, we have proposed a surface in situ polymerization reaction for a pre-absorbed molecule, 4-hydrazinyl-3-(pyridin-4-ylmethyl)-benzaldehyde (HPyMB), to produce a conductive molecular wire on a silicon surface. Our first-principles calculations show that HPyMB molecules can absorb alternatively on the exposed Si atoms created via ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy on a hydrogen passivated H-Si(001)2 × 1 surface along the [110] direction. The adsorption is exothermic and its generated energy is sufficient for the following intermolecular dehydration polymerization reaction to overcome the activation energy barriers and thereafter form a molecular wire on the surface. This polymerized molecular wire is mechanically stable since it is chemically bonded onto the surface. After polymerization, the system becomes conductive due to the charge transfer from the molecule-surface bonds to their pyridine rings. More importantly, by removing 1.1 electrons from the system, the surface polymer chain is the sole conductive channel. Furthermore, its conducting nature remains robust even under a large external electric field. Our findings open a new window for the fabrication of conductive molecular wires or polymer chains on semiconductor surfaces, and provide insights into the mechanism behind the molecular wire conductivity.It has been a long-standing goal to make conductive molecular wires or linear polymer chains on traditional semiconductors or insulator substrates to satisfy the ongoing miniaturization in electronic devices. Here, we have proposed a surface in situ polymerization reaction for a pre-absorbed molecule, 4-hydrazinyl-3-(pyridin-4-ylmethyl)-benzaldehyde (HPyMB), to produce a conductive molecular wire on a silicon surface. Our first

  8. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1986-11-15

    Research has been continued on hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms. Progress in the period November 16, 1985 to November 15, 1986 is reviewed in the following areas: (1) Recoil atom reaction studies. (2) Reactions of thermally generated free atoms.

  9. Studies of photoredox reactions on nanosize semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcoxon, J.P.; Parsapour, F.; Kelley, D.F.

    1997-08-01

    Light induced electron transfer (ET) from nanosize semiconductors of MoS{sub 2} to organic electron acceptors such as 2,2{prime}-bipyridine (bpy) and methyl substituted 4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-tetramethyl-2,2{prime}-bipyridine (tmb) was studied by static and time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. The kinetics of ET were varied by changing the nanocluster size (the band gap), the electron acceptor, and the polarity of the solvent. MoS{sub 2} is an especially interesting semiconductor material as it is an indirect semiconductor in bulk form, and has a layered covalent bonding arrangement which is highly resistant to photocorrosion. Et occurs following photoexcitation of the direct band gap. Quantum confinement results in the smaller nanoclusters having higher conduction band energies, and therefore larger ET driving forces. The ET reaction energies may be varied by changing the electron acceptor, by varying the size of the MoS{sub 2} nanocluster or by varying the polarity of the solvent. In addition, varying the polarity of the solvent affects the reorganization energy and the barrier to electron transfer. TMB is harder to reduce, and thus has a smaller ET driving force than bpy. The solvent polarity is varied by varying the composition of acetonitrile/benzene mixed solvents.

  10. A large volume cell for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Fang; Qian, Gujie; Brugger, Joël; Studer, Andrew; Olsen, Scott; Pring, Allan

    2010-10-01

    A hydrothermal cell with 320 ml internal volume has been designed and constructed for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations. The cell design adopts a dumbbell configuration assembled with standard commercial stainless steel components and a zero-scattering Ti-Zr alloy sample compartment. The fluid movement and heat transfer are simply driven by natural convection due to the natural temperature gradient along the fluid path, so that the temperature at the sample compartment can be stably sustained by heating the fluid in the bottom fluid reservoir. The cell can operate at temperatures up to 300 °C and pressures up to 90 bars and is suitable for studying reactions requiring a large volume of hydrothermal fluid to damp out the negative effect from the change of fluid composition during the course of the reactions. The capability of the cell was demonstrated by a hydrothermal phase transformation investigation from leucite (KAlSi2O6) to analcime (NaAlSi2O6ṡH2O) at 210 °C on the high intensity powder diffractometer Wombat in ANSTO. The kinetics of the transformation has been resolved by collecting diffraction patterns every 10 min followed by Rietveld quantitative phase analysis. The classical Avrami/Arrhenius analysis gives an activation energy of 82.3±1.1 kJ mol-1. Estimations of the reaction rate under natural environments by extrapolations agree well with petrological observations.

  11. In-situ early-age hydration study of sulfobelite cements by synchrotron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez-Pinazo, G.; Cuesta, A.; García-Maté, M.; Santacruz, I.; Losilla, E.R.; Fauth, F.; Aranda, M.A.G.; De la Torre, A.G.

    2014-02-15

    Eco-friendly belite calcium sulfoaluminate (BCSA) cement hydration behavior is not yet well understood. Here, we report an in-situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study for the first hours of hydration of BCSA cements. Rietveld quantitative phase analysis has been used to establish the degree of reaction (α). The hydration of a mixture of ye'elimite and gypsum revealed that ettringite formation (α ∼ 70% at 50 h) is limited by ye'elimite dissolution. Two laboratory-prepared BCSA cements were also studied: non-active-BCSA and active-BCSA cements, with β- and α′{sub H}-belite as main phases, respectively. Ye'elimite, in the non-active-BCSA system, dissolves at higher pace (α ∼ 25% at 1 h) than in the active-BCSA one (α ∼ 10% at 1 h), with differences in the crystallization of ettringite (α ∼ 30% and α ∼ 5%, respectively). This behavior has strongly affected subsequent belite and ferrite reactivities, yielding stratlingite and other layered phases in non-active-BCSA. The dissolution and crystallization processes are reported and discussed in detail. -- Highlights: •Belite calcium sulfoaluminate cements early hydration mechanism has been determined. •Belite hydration strongly depends on availability of aluminum hydroxide. •Orthorhombic ye’elimite dissolved at a higher pace than cubic one. •Ye’elimite larger reaction degree yields stratlingite formation by belite reaction. •Rietveld method quantified gypsum, anhydrite and bassanite dissolution rates.

  12. Characteristics of vestibulosensory reactions studied by experimental caloric test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapranov, V. Z.

    1980-01-01

    Vestibulo-sensory reactions were studied in 135 workers who were in contact with nitroethers, by the method of an experimental caloric test. The response vestibulo-sensory reactions were recorded by means of an electroencephalograph. The changes in the sensory reaction depended on the duration of the workers' contact with toxic agents. A study of illusion reactions by the labyrinth calorization widens diagnostic possibilities in the examination of functional condition of the vestibular analyser considerably.

  13. Oxidation Induced Doping of Nanoparticles Revealed by in Situ X-ray Absorption Studies.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Gu; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Koo, Bonil; Dos Santos Claro, Paula Cecilia; Shibata, Tomohiro; Requejo, Félix G; Giovanetti, Lisandro J; Liu, Yuzi; Johnson, Christopher; Prakapenka, Vitali; Lee, Byeongdu; Shevchenko, Elena V

    2016-06-01

    Doping is a well-known approach to modulate the electronic and optical properties of nanoparticles (NPs). However, doping at nanoscale is still very challenging, and the reasons for that are not well understood. We studied the formation and doping process of iron and iron oxide NPs in real time by in situ synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study revealed that the mass flow of the iron triggered by oxidation is responsible for the internalization of the dopant (molybdenum) adsorbed at the surface of the host iron NPs. The oxidation induced doping allows controlling the doping levels by varying the amount of dopant precursor. Our in situ studies also revealed that the dopant precursor substantially changes the reaction kinetics of formation of iron and iron oxide NPs. Thus, in the presence of dopant precursor we observed significantly faster decomposition rate of iron precursors and substantially higher stability of iron NPs against oxidation. The same doping mechanism and higher stability of host metal NPs against oxidation was observed for cobalt-based systems. Since the internalization of the adsorbed dopant at the surface of the host NPs is driven by the mass transport of the host, this mechanism can be potentially applied to introduce dopants into different oxidized forms of metal and metal alloy NPs providing the extra degree of compositional control in material design. PMID:27152970

  14. SISGR - In situ characterization and modeling of formation reactions under extreme heating rates in nanostructured multilayer foils

    SciTech Connect

    Hufnagel, Todd C.

    2014-06-09

    Materials subjected to extreme conditions, such as very rapid heating, behave differently than materials under more ordinary conditions. In this program we examined the effect of rapid heating on solid-state chemical reactions in metallic materials. One primary goal was to develop experimental techniques capable of observing these reactions, which can occur at heating rates in excess of one million degrees Celsius per second. One approach that we used is x-ray diffraction performed using microfocused x-ray beams and very fast x-ray detectors. A second approach is the use of a pulsed electron source for dynamic transmission electron microscopy. With these techniques we were able to observe how the heating rate affects the chemical reaction, from which we were able to discern general principles about how these reactions proceed. A second thrust of this program was to develop computational tools to help us understand and predict the reactions. From atomic-scale simulations were learned about the interdiffusion between different metals at high heating rates, and about how new crystalline phases form. A second class of computational models allow us to predict the shape of the reaction front that occurs in these materials, and to connect our understanding of interdiffusion from the atomistic simulations to measurements made in the laboratory. Both the experimental and computational techniques developed in this program are expected to be broadly applicable to a wider range of scientific problems than the intermetallic solid-state reactions studied here. For example, we have already begun using the x-ray techniques to study how materials respond to mechanical deformation at very high rates.

  15. Cascade Reaction of Donor-Acceptor Cyclopropanes: Mechanistic Studies on Cycloadditions with Nitrosoarenes and cis-Diazenes.

    PubMed

    Chidley, Tristan; Vemula, Naresh; Carson, Cheryl A; Kerr, Michael A; Pagenkopf, Brian L

    2016-06-17

    Tandem ring opening, elimination, and cycloaddition of donor-acceptor cyclopropanes were observed in Yb(OTf)3-catalyzed cycloaddition with nitrosoarenes. The reaction results in formation of tetrahydro-1,2-oxazine instead of the normal cycloadduct isoxazolidine via in situ nitrone formation. A similar cascade sequence was observed with cis-diazines. Mechanistic studies on this unique transformation offer an entirely new approach for reaction design with donor-acceptor cyclopropanes. PMID:27267360

  16. Studying The Kinetics Of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation With In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mcdowell, Matthew T.; Ryu, Ill; Lee, Seokwoo; Wang, Chong M.; Nix, William D.; Cui, Yi

    2012-11-27

    Silicon is an attractive high-capacity anode material for Li-ion batteries, but a comprehensive understanding of the massive ~300% volume change and fracture during lithiation/delithiation is necessary to reliably employ Si anodes. Here, in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the lithiation of crystalline Si nanoparticles reveals that the reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior. Analysis suggests that this behavior is due to the influence of mechanical stress at the reaction front on the driving force for the reaction. These experiments give insight into the factors controlling the kinetics of this unique reaction.

  17. Kinetic Study of the Heck Reaction: An Interdisciplinary Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gozzi, Christel; Bouzidi, Naoual

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to study and calculate the kinetic constant of a Heck reaction: the arylation of but-3-en-2-ol by iodobenzene catalyzed by palladium acetate in presence of triethylamine in DMF. The reaction leads to a mixture of two ketones. Students use GC analysis to quantify reagents and products of reaction. They control the…

  18. Staff Reactions to Challenging Behaviour: An Observation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambrechts, Greet; Van Den Noortgate, Wim; Eeman, Lieve; Maes, Bea

    2010-01-01

    Staff reactions play an important role in the development and maintaining of clients' challenging behaviour. Because there is a paucity of research on staff reactions in naturalistic settings, this study examined sequential associations between challenging behaviour and staff reactions by means of a descriptive analysis. We analysed video…

  19. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1987-03-01

    Purpose of this research project is two-fold: (1) to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions which are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photo chemical processes which play an important role in many macroscopic processes and (2) to determine the energetics of polyatomic free radicals using microscopic experimental methods. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment translational energy and angular distributions using unique molecular beam apparati designed for these purposes.

  20. Soot Reaction Properties (Ground-Based Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Three major soot reaction processes are needed to predict soot properties in flame environments: soot growth, or the formation of soot on soot nuclei and soot particles; soot oxidation, or the reaction of soot with oxidizing species to yield the combustion products of soot oxidation; and soot nucleation, or the formation of soot nuclei from soot precursors having large molecular weights (generally thought to be large and particularly stable PAH molecules in flame environments, called stabilomers). These processes are addressed in the following, considering soot growth, oxidation and nucleation, in turn, by exploiting the soot and flame structure results for premixed and diffusion flames already discussed in Section 2.

  1. In situ identification of crystal facet-mediated chemical reactions on tetrahexahedral gold nanocrystals using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lang, Xiufeng; You, Tingting; Yin, Penggang; Tan, Enzhong; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Yifan; Zhu, Hongping; Ren, Bin; Guo, Lin

    2013-11-28

    Direct monitoring of a metal-catalyzed reaction by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is always a challenging issue as it needs bifunctional metal structures that have plasmonic properties and also act as catalysts. Here we demonstrate that the tetrahexahedral (THH) gold nanocrystals (Au NCs) with exposed {520} facets give highly enhanced Raman signals from molecules at the interface, permitting in situ observation of chemical transformation from para-aminothiophenol (PATP) to 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB). The origin of the intense SERS signals of DMAB is carefully investigated based on the comparison of the SERS spectra of PATP obtained with both the THH Au NCs and the Au nanospheres with the exposed {111} facets. It is elucidated that the high-index {520} facet rather than the localized surface plasmons of the THH Au NCs plays a key role in producing a high yield of the product DMAB which is accompanied by the selective enhancement of the characteristic Raman signals. PMID:24121935

  2. In situ Raman spectroscopy study of metal-enhanced hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of VO2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Fu, Qiang; Bao, Xinhe

    2016-11-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) has a phase transition from insulator to metal at 340 K, and this transition can be strongly modified by hydrogenation. In this work, two dimensional (2D) VO2 sheets have been grown on Si(1 1 1) surfaces through chemical vapor deposition, and metal (Au, Pt) thin films were deposited on VO2 surfaces by sputtering. The hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of VO2 and metal-decorated VO2 structures in H2 and in air were in situ studied by Raman. We found that hydrogenation and dehydrogenation temperatures have been significantly decreased with the VO2 surface decorated by Au and Pt. The enhanced hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions can be attributed to catalytic dissociation of H2 and O2 molecules on metal surfaces and subsequent spillover of dissociated H and O atoms to the oxide surfaces. PMID:27603090

  3. Single-Molecule Nanocatalysis Shows In Situ Deactivation of Pt/C Electrocatalysts during the Hydrogen-Oxidation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuwei; Chen, Tao; Alia, Shaun; Pivovar, Bryan S; Xu, Weilin

    2016-02-24

    By coupling a Pt-catalyzed fluorogenic reaction with the Pt-electrocatalyzed hydrogen-oxidation reaction (HOR), we combine single-molecule fluorescence microscopy with traditional electrochemical methods to study the real-time deactivation kinetics of a Pt/C electrocatalyst at single-particle level during electrocatalytic hydrogen-oxidation reaction. The decay of the catalytic performance of Pt/C could be mainly attributed to the electrocatalysis-induced etching or dissolution of Pt nanoparticles. Spontaneous regeneration of activity and incubation period of the Pt electrocatalyst were also observed at single-particle level. All these new insights are practically useful for the understanding and rational design of highly efficient electrocatalysts for application in fuel cells. PMID:26821777

  4. Versatile and Amplified Biosensing through Enzymatic Cascade Reaction by Coupling Alkaline Phosphatase in Situ Generation of Photoresponsive Nanozyme.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lu-Yi; Dong, Yu-Ming; Wu, Xiu-Ming; Cao, Gen-Xia; Wang, Guang-Li

    2015-10-20

    The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) biocatalysis followed by the in situ enzymatic generation of a visible light responsive nanozyme is coupled to elucidate a novel amplification strategy by enzymatic cascade reaction for versatile biosensing. The enzymatic hydrolysis of o-phosphonoxyphenol (OPP) to catechol (CA) by ALP is allowed to coordinate on the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) due to the specificity and high affinity of enediol ligands to Ti(IV). Upon the stimuli by CA generated from ALP, the inert TiO2 NPs is activated, which demonstrates highly efficient oxidase mimicking activity for catalyzing the oxidation of the typical substrate of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) under visible light (λ ≥ 400 nm) irradiation utilizing dissolved oxygen as an electron acceptor. On the basis of the cascade reaction of ALP and the nanozyme of CA coordinated TiO2 (TiO2-CA) NPs, we design exquisitely colorimetric biosensors for probing ALP activity and its inhibitor of 2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-DA). Quantitative probing of ALP activity in a wide linear range from 0.01 to 150 U/L with the detection limit of 0.002 U/L is realized, which endows the methodology with sufficiently high sensitivity for potentially practical applications in real samples of human serum (ALP level of 40-190 U/L for adults). In addition, a novel immunoassay protocol by taking mouse IgG as an example is validated using the ALP/nanozyme cascade amplification reaction as the signal transducer. A low detection limit of 2.0 pg/mL is attained for mouse IgG, which is 4500-fold lower than that of the standard enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Although only mouse IgG is used as a proof-of-concept in our experiment, we believe that this approach is generalizable to be readily extended to other ELISA systems. This methodology opens a new horizon for amplified and versatile biosensing including probing ALP activity and following ALP-based ELISA immunoassays. PMID:26419907

  5. In Situ Single-Nanoparticle Spectroscopy Study of Bimetallic Nanostructure Formation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremy G; Chakraborty, Indranath; Jain, Prashant K

    2016-08-16

    Bimetallic nanostructures (NSs), with utility in catalysis, are typically prepared using galvanic exchange (GE), but the final catalyst morphology is dictated by the dynamics of the process. In situ single nanoparticle (NP) optical scattering spectroscopy, coupled with ex situ electron microscopy, is used to capture the dynamic structural evolution of a bimetallic NS formed in a GE reaction between Ag and [PtCl6 ](2-) . We identify an early stage involving anisotropic oxidation of Ag to AgCl concomitant with reductive deposition of small Pt clusters on the NS surface. At later stages of GE, unreacted Ag inclusions phase segregate from the overcoated AgCl as a result of lattice strain between Ag and AgCl. The nature of the structural evolution elucidates why multi-domain Ag/AgCl/Pt NSs result from the GE process. The complex structural dynamics, determined from single-NP trajectories, would be masked in ensemble studies due to heterogeneity in the response of different NPs. PMID:27381891

  6. In situ studies of a platform for metastable inorganic crystal growth and materials discovery

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, Daniel P.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Chung, Duck Young; Halder, Gregory J.; Chupas, Peter J.; Soderholm, L.; Mitchell, J. F.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid shifts in the energy, technological, and environmental demands of materials science call for focused and efficient expansion of the library of functional inorganic compounds. To achieve the requisite efficiency, we need a materials discovery and optimization paradigm that can rapidly reveal all possible compounds for a given reaction and composition space. Here we provide such a paradigm via in situ X-ray diffraction measurements spanning solid, liquid flux, and recrystallization processes. We identify four new ternary sulfides from reactive salt fluxes in a matter of hours, simultaneously revealing routes for ex situ synthesis and crystal growth. Changing the flux chemistry, here accomplished by increasing sulfur content, permits comparison of the allowable crystalline building blocks in each reaction space. The speed and structural information inherent to this method of in situ synthesis provide an experimental complement to computational efforts to predict new compounds and uncover routes to targeted materials by design. PMID:25024201

  7. Circovirus-infected geese studied by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Joan; Soike, D; Moffett, Deborah; Weston, J H; Todd, D

    2005-06-01

    It has now been established that circovirus infection is common in farmed geese, but little is known about the clinicopathological significance of such infections. Ten clinically diseased geese suspected of being infected by circovirus were studied by in situ hybridization using a goose circovirus DNA probe. Circovirus DNA was demonstrated in the bursa of Fabricius (BF), spleen, thymus, bone marrow, liver, kidney, lung and heart, indicating that infection can be multisystemic. In some birds, virus DNA was present in very large quantities, most notably in the BF, liver and small intestine. With the exception of BF and thymus, there were no histological findings that would have suggested the presence of such quantities of circovirus DNA. In view of the very large quantities of virus DNA labelling present in some tissues, and by analogy to porcine circovirus type 2 infection and psittacine beak and feather virus infections, which are known to cause severe disease, and which have similar virus distribution to that found in our geese, it seems probable that the circovirus was important in the disease manifestations shown by the infected geese. PMID:16191706

  8. Experimental Study of Stellar Reactions at CNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Hayakawa, S.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Fukunishi, N.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, M. H.; Fuchi, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Kwon, K.; Lee, C. S.; Khiem, Le Hong; Chen, A.; Pearson, J.

    2006-11-01

    After a brief review on low-energy RI beam production technology, nuclear astrophysics programs at CNS are presented including a scope of the field in the Wako campus. The CRIB project involves a total development of the whole facility to maximize the low-energy RI beam intensities, including the ion source, the AVF cyclotron and the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, Some recent nuclear astrophysics experiments performed with the RI beams were discussed, including the measurement of the 14O(α,p)17F reaction, the key stellar reaction for the onset of the high-temperature rp-process. The first experiment performed with a newly installed high-resolution magnetic spectrograph PA of CNS was also presented. Collaboration possibilities for nuclear astrophysics in the RIKEN campus are also touched.

  9. Experimental Study of Stellar Reactions at CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Hayakawa, S.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Fukunishi, N.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, M. H.; Fuchi, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Kwon, K.; Lee, C. S.; Khiem, Le Hong; Chen, A.

    2006-11-02

    After a brief review on low-energy RI beam production technology, nuclear astrophysics programs at CNS are presented including a scope of the field in the Wako campus. The CRIB project involves a total development of the whole facility to maximize the low-energy RI beam intensities, including the ion source, the AVF cyclotron and the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, Some recent nuclear astrophysics experiments performed with the RI beams were discussed, including the measurement of the 14O({alpha},p)17F reaction, the key stellar reaction for the onset of the high-temperature rp-process. The first experiment performed with a newly installed high-resolution magnetic spectrograph PA of CNS was also presented. Collaboration possibilities for nuclear astrophysics in the RIKEN campus are also touched.

  10. A laser flash photolysis kinetics study of the reaction OH + H2O2 yields HO2 + H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, P. H.; Semmes, D. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction are reported as a function of temperature over the range 273-410 K. OH radicals are produced by 266 nm laser photolysis of H2O2 and detected by resonance fluorescence. H2O2 concentrations are determined in situ in the slow flow system by UV photometry. The results confirm the findings of two recent discharge flow-resonance fluorescence studies that the title reaction is considerably faster, particularly at temperatures below 300 K, than all earlier studies had indicated. A table giving kinetic data from the reaction is included.

  11. Theoretical study of chemical reactions in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Yokogawa, D.

    2015-12-31

    Quantum chemical calculations in solution are becoming more and more important in chemistry. Reference interaction site model self-consistent field (RISM-SCF) is one of the powerful approaches to perform quantum chemical calculations in solution. In this work, we developed a new generation of RISM-SCF, where a robust fitting method was newly introduced. We applied the new method to tautomerization reaction of cytosine in aqueous phase. Our calculation reproduced experimentally obtained relative stabilities and relative free energies correctly.

  12. In Situ Fabrication of PtCo Alloy Embedded in Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Nanopores as Synergistic Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Xing; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Hu; Qin, Yingying; Xu, Wenlei; Jiang, Yu; Sun, Youyi; Shi, Zheqi; Zhuang, Guilin; Li, Xiaonian; Mei, Donghai; Wang, Jian-guo

    2015-11-23

    A novel PtCo alloy in situ etched and embedded in graphene nanopores (PtCo/NPG) as a high-performance catalyst for ORR was reported. Graphene nanopores were fabricated in situ while forming PtCo nanoparticles that were uniformly embedded in the graphene nanopores. Given the synergistic effect between PtCo alloy and nanopores, PtCo/NPG exhibited 11.5 times higher mass activity than that of the commercial Pt/C cathode electrocatalyst. DFT calculations indicated that the nanopores in NPG cannot only stabilize PtCo nanoparticles but can also definitely change the electronic structures, thereby change its adsorption abilities. This enhancement can lead to a favorable reaction pathway on PtCo/NPG for ORR. This study showed that PtCo/NPG is a potential candidate for the next generation of Pt-based catalysts in fuel cells. This study also offered a promising alternative strategy and enabled the fabrication of various kinds of metal/graphene nanopore nanohybrids with potential applications in catalysts and potential use for other technological devices. The authors acknowledge the financial support from the National Basic Research Program (973 program, No. 2013CB733501), Zhejiang Provincial Education Department Research Program (Y201326554) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21306169, 21101137, 21136001, 21176221 and 91334013). D. Mei acknowledges the support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  13. Model studies on the first enzyme-catalyzed Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Kłossowski, Szymon; Wiraszka, Barbara; Berłożecki, Stanisław; Ostaszewski, Ryszard

    2013-02-01

    Multicomponent reactions are powerful tools for organic chemistry, and among them, the Ugi reaction provides remarkable improvement in many fields of organic chemistry such us combinatorial chemistry, medicinal chemistry, and peptide chemistry. A new, enzyme-catalyzed example of the Ugi three-component reaction is presented. The studies include the selection of an enzyme as well as determination of the scope and limitations of the newly described reaction. The presented method combines the enzyme promiscuity and multicomponent reaction advantages in the first one-pot formation of dipeptide 1. PMID:23343100

  14. Neutron-induced reaction studies using stored ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glorius, Jan; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Reifarth, René

    2015-11-01

    Storage rings provide unique possibilities for investigations of nuclear reactions. Radioactive ions can be stored if the ring is connected to an appropriate facility and reaction studies are feasible at low beam intensities because of the recycling of beam particles. Using gas jet or droplet targets, charged particle-induced reactions on short-lived isotopes can be studied in inverse kinematics. In such a system a high-flux reactor could serve as a neutron target extending the experimental spectrum to neutron-induced reactions. Those could be studied over a wide energy range covering the research fields of nuclear astrophysics and reactor safety, transmutation of nuclear waste and fusion.

  15. Study of reaction of sulfur halides with unsaturated compounds. reaction of sulfur monochloride with adamantylideneadamantane

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstikov, G.A.; Belogaeva, T.A.; Lerman, B.M.

    1986-09-20

    In a continuation of the study of the reaction of olefin (I) with sulfur halides, the authors investigate its reaction with sulfur monochloride. It is shown that the reaction of (I) with S/sub 2/C1/sub 2/ proceeds readily in CH/sub 2/C1/sub 2/, CHC1/sub 3/, CC1/sub 4/, leading to compounds of the same structure as in the reaction of (I) with SC1/sub 2/. The preferential formation of the epithio compound (II) and chloroepithio compound (III) takes place at near-to-equimolar ratio of the reagents and 100-fold excess of the solvent, while the reaction of chlorine-substituted adamantylideneadamantanes proceeds at an excess of the reagent. In contrast to SC1/sub 2/, sulfur monochloride does not react with (I) in hexane.

  16. Room temperature reaction of oxygen with gold: an in situ ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Peng; Porsgaard, Soeren; Borondics, Ferenc; Kober, Mariana; Caballero, Alfonso; Bluhm, Hendrik; Besenbacher, Flemming; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-02-01

    Gold is commonly regarded as the most inert element.1 However, the discovery of the exceptional catalytic properties of gold nanoparticles (NPs) for low temperature CO oxidation2 initiated great interest due to its promising applications and spawned a large number of studies devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism.3-6 Nevertheless, no consistent and conclusive picture has arisen.7-13

  17. Study of an anaphylactoid reaction to acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chien-Ming; Chen, Wu-Charng; Lin, Ching-Yuang

    2002-01-01

    Generalized itching, urticaria and anaphylactic shock developed in a 9-year-old girl on two separate occasions after she ingested acetaminophen. She was admitted to our hospital for observation during oral challenge. Total eosinophil counts, total serum IgE, IgA, IgG, IgM, C3, and C4, specific IgE antibodies to six common allergens, and skin prick tests to purified acetaminophen and acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) were unremarkable. No reaction occurred on open challenge with acetylsalicylic acid and mefenamic acid. However, urticaria and itching sensation occurred 45 min after ingesting 50 mg of purified acetaminophen. Dizziness, shivering, tachycardia and fainting also developed later. These symptoms resolved after treatment with a diphenhydramine injection and intravenous infusion of normal saline. There was a marked increase in the blood histamine level after challenge. In vitro histamine release before oral challenge was also abnormally as high as 50%. In summary, she had an immediate allergic reaction to acetaminophen but was tolerant to acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:12148965

  18. Behavior of Supported Palladium Oxide Nanoparticles under Reaction Conditions, Studied with near Ambient Pressure XPS.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Astrid; Heutz, Niels; Raschke, Hannes; Merz, Klaus; Hergenröder, Roland

    2015-08-01

    Near ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) is a promising method to close the "pressure gap", and thus, study the surface composition during heterogeneous reactions in situ. The specialized spectrometers necessary for this analytical technique have recently been adapted to operate with a conventional X-ray source, making it available for routine quantitative analysis in the laboratory. This is shown in the present in situ study of the partial oxidation of 2-propanol catalyzed with PdO nanoparticles supported on TiO2, which was investigated under reaction conditions as a function of gas composition (alcohol-to-oxygen ratio) and temperature. Exposure of the nanoparticles to 2-propanol at 30 °C leads to immediate partial reduction of the PdO, followed by a continuous reduction of the remaining PdO during heating. However, gaseous oxygen inhibits the reduction of PdO below 90 °C, and the oxidation of 2-propanol to carboxylates only occurs in the presence of oxygen above 90 °C. These results support the theory that metallic palladium is the active catalyst material, and they show that environmental conditions affect the nanoparticles and the reaction process significantly. The study also revealed challenges and limitations of this analytical method. Specifically, the intensity and fixed photon energy of a conventional X-ray source limit the spectral resolution and surface sensitivity of lab-based NAP-XPS, which affect precision and accuracy of the quantitative analysis. PMID:26144222

  19. Localization of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 DNA in Latently Infected BALB/c Mice Neurons Using in situ Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Khansarinejad, Behzad; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Ghaemi, Amir; Tiraihi, Taki; Pour Beiranvand, Shahram

    2010-01-01

    Background: Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) establishes a lifelong latent infection in neurons following primary infection. The existence of latent HSV-1 DNA in the trigeminal ganglia of infected BALB/c mice was examined using a direct in situ PCR technique, based on Digoxigenin-11-dUTP detection system with anti-digoxigenin-peroxidase and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) substrate. Methods: Eight-week-old male BALB/c mice were inoculated via the eye by 104 plaque forming unit of wild type Iranian isolates of HSV-1. After establishment of latency, trigeminal ganglia were removed and examined using in situ PCR to detect HSV-1 genome. Finally, the results of in situ PCR were verified by a two-round PCR method, using amplification cocktail of in situ reaction, as a template for a conventional gel base PCR. Results and Conclusion: The results suggest that a direct in situ PCR method using a peroxidase and DAB detection system is a useful means for detection of latent HSV-1 DNA in the latently infected ganglia. PMID:21079658

  20. Degradation of Bimetallic Model Electrocatalysts ___ an in situ XAS Study

    SciTech Connect

    Friebel, Daniel

    2011-06-22

    One of the major challenges in the development of clean energy fuel cells is the performance degradation of the electrocatalyst, which, apart from poisoning effects, can suffer from corrosion due to its exposure to a harsh environment under high potentials. In this communication, we demonstrate how interactions of Pt with a transition metal support affect not only, as commonly intended, the catalytic activity, but also the reactivity of Pt towards oxide formation or dissolution. We use two well-defined single-crystal model systems, Pt/Rh(111) and Pt/Au(111) and a unique x-ray spectroscopy technique with enhanced energy resolution to monitor the potential-dependent oxidation state of Pt, and find two markedly different oxidation mechanisms on the two different substrates. This information can be of great significance for future design of more active and more stable catalysts. We have studied the potential-induced degradation of Pt monolayer model electrocatalysts on Rh(111) and Au(111) single-crystal substrates. The anodic formation of Pt oxides was monitored using in situ high energy resolution fluorescence detection x-ray absorption spectroscopy (HERFD XAS). Although Pt was deposited on both substrates in a three-dimensional island growth mode, we observed remarkable differences during oxide formation that can only be understood in terms of strong Pt-substrate interactions throughout the Pt islands. Anodic polarization of Pt/Rh(111) up to +1.6 V vs. RHE (reversible hydrogen electrode) leads to formation an incompletely oxidized passive layer, whereas formation of PtO2 and partial Pt dissolution is observed for Pt/Au(111).

  1. Low temperature hydrogen plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of copper studied using in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chaukulkar, Rohan P.; Rai, Vikrant R.; Agarwal, Sumit; Thissen, Nick F. W.

    2014-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is an ideal technique to deposit ultrathin, conformal, and continuous metal thin films. However, compared to the ALD of binary materials such as metal oxides and metal nitrides, the surface reaction mechanisms during metal ALD are not well understood. In this study, the authors have designed and implemented an in situ reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (IRAS) setup to study the surface reactions during the ALD of Cu on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using Cu hexafluoroacetylacetonate [Cu(hfac){sub 2}] and a remote H{sub 2} plasma. Our infrared data show that complete ligand-exchange reactions occur at a substrate temperature of 80 °C in the absence of surface hydroxyl groups. Based on infrared data and previous studies, the authors propose that Cu(hfac){sub 2} dissociatively chemisorbs on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface, where the Al-O-Al bridge acts as the surface reactive site, leading to surface O-Cu-hfac and O-Al-hfac species. Surface saturation during the Cu(hfac){sub 2} half-cycle occurs through blocking of the available chemisorption sites. In the next half-reaction cycle, H radicals from an H{sub 2} plasma completely remove these surface hfac ligands. Through this study, the authors have demonstrated the capability of in situ IRAS as a tool to study surface reactions during ALD of metals. While transmission and internal reflection infrared spectroscopy are limited to the first few ALD cycles, IRAS can be used to probe all stages of metal ALD starting from initial nucleation to the formation of a continuous film.

  2. Remedition case studies: Thermal desorption, soil washing, and in situ vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide case studies of site cleanup projects utilizing thermal desorption, soil washing, and in situ vitrification. This volume contains reports on projects using thermal desorption, including six completed applications at sites contaminated with PCBs, pesticides, or chlorinated aliphatics. Two projects in this volume used soil washing and in situ vitrification technologies.

  3. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. Annual progress report, [January 1992--February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  4. In situ infrared study of adsorbed species during catalytic oxidation and carbon dioxide adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Rajesh A.

    2005-11-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be the fuel of the next century. Hydrogen can be produced by either water splitting using the solar or nuclear energy or by catalytic cracking and reforming of the fossil fuels. The water splitting process using solar energy and photovoltaics is a clean way to produce hydrogen, but it suffers from very low efficiency. A promising scheme to produce H 2 from natural gas involves following steps: (i) partial oxidation and reforming of natural gas to syngas, (ii) water-gas shift reaction to convert CO in the syngas to additional H2, (iii) separation of the H2 from CO2, and (iv) CO2 sequestration. The requirements for the above scheme are (i) a highly active coke resistant catalyst for generation of syngas by direct partial oxidation, (ii) a highly active sulfur tolerant catalyst for the water-gas shift reaction, and (iii) a low cost sorbent with high CO2 adsorption capacity for CO2 sequestration. This dissertation will address the mechanisms of partial oxidation, CO2 adsorption, and water-gas shift catalysis using in situ IR spectroscopy coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). The results from these studies will lead to a better understanding of the reaction mechanism and design of both the catalyst and sorbent for production of hydrogen with zero emissions. Partial oxidation of methane is studied over Rh/Al2O 3 catalyst to elucidate the reaction mechanism for synthesis gas formation. The product lead-lag relationship observed with in situ IR and MS results revealed that syngas is produced via a two-step reforming mechanism: the first step involving total oxidation of CH4 to CO2 and H 2O and the second step involving the reforming of unconverted methane with CO2 and H2O to form syngas. Furthermore, the Rh on the catalyst surface remains predominantly in the partially oxidized state (Rhdelta+ and Rh0). For the water-gas shift reaction, addition of Re to the Ni/CeO2 catalyst enhanced the water gas shift activity by a factor of three. The activity

  5. In situ Raman study of Electrochemically Intercalted Bisulfate Ions in Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumanasekera, G. U.; Allen, J. L.; Rao, A. M.; Fang, S. L.; Eklund, P. C.

    1998-03-01

    We have investigated the electrochemical intercalation of bisulfate ions in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) using in situ Raman spectroscopy. SWNTs pressed onto a Pt plate was used as the working electrode, a Pt wire and Ag/AgCl were used, respectively, as the counter electrode and reference electrode. Sulfuric acid (95%) was used as the electrolyte. Using Raman scattering we have observed an apparent rapid spontaneous reaction involving charge transfer between ionically bonded HSO_4^- anions and the nanotubes. This is evidenced by an instantaneous shift of the Raman-active tangential mode frequency from 1593 cm -1 to 1604 cm-1 (It was not possible to reverse this shift electrochemically to 1593 cm-1, even at the expense of large reverse bias). In forward bias, after this initial instantaneous reaction, the tangential mode frequency again upshifted from 1604 cm-1 to 1614 cm-1 linearly with external electrochemical charge Q. From the slope of ω(Q) we found in this regime, δω/δ f= 1220 cm-1 (f = holes/carbon). Upon further charging, a second regime with slope δω/δ f = 118 cm-1 was observed where the frequency upshifted from 1614 cm-1 to 1620 cm-1. The results are compared to similar studies in C_p^+HSO_4^-.xH_2SO4 graphite intercalation compounds.

  6. Matrix isolation as a tool for studying interstellar chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, David W.; Ortman, Bryan J.; Hauge, Robert H.; Margrave, John L.

    1989-01-01

    Since the identification of the OH radical as an interstellar species, over 50 molecular species were identified as interstellar denizens. While identification of new species appears straightforward, an explanation for their mechanisms of formation is not. Most astronomers concede that large bodies like interstellar dust grains are necessary for adsorption of molecules and their energies of reactions, but many of the mechanistic steps are unknown and speculative. It is proposed that data from matrix isolation experiments involving the reactions of refractory materials (especially C, Si, and Fe atoms and clusters) with small molecules (mainly H2, H2O, CO, CO2) are particularly applicable to explaining mechanistic details of likely interstellar chemical reactions. In many cases, matrix isolation techniques are the sole method of studying such reactions; also in many cases, complexations and bond rearrangements yield molecules never before observed. The study of these reactions thus provides a logical basis for the mechanisms of interstellar reactions. A list of reactions is presented that would simulate interstellar chemical reactions. These reactions were studied using FTIR-matrix isolation techniques.

  7. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Bassilakis, R.; Kroo, E.

    1989-01-01

    Most of the proposed processing schemes for improving liquefaction yields involve favoring bond-breaking and radical stabilization reactions over the retrograde reactions. The retrograde reactions are often encountered before liquefaction temperatures are reached. The objective of this program is to elucidate and model the retrograde reaction chemistry in direct coal liquefaction through the application of experimental techniques and theoretical models which have been successfully employed at Advanced Fuel Research (AFR) and SRI International (a subcontractor) to understand and predict coal reaction behavior. The study of retrograde reactions is being done using an integrated approach using extensive characterization of the liquefaction chemistry of three kinds of systems: (1) model polymers; (2) coal; and (3) modified coals.

  8. Transverse flow reactor studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, R.G.

    1993-12-01

    Radical reactions are in important in combustion chemistry; however, little state-specific information is available for these reactions. A new apparatus has been constructed to measure the dynamics of radical reactions. The unique feature of this apparatus is a transverse flow reactor in which an atom or radical of known concentration will be produced by pulsed laser photolysis of an appropriate precursor molecule. The time dependence of individual quantum states or products and/or reactants will be followed by rapid infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. The reaction H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O will be studied.

  9. In-situ spectroscopic studies of electrochromic tungsten oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Nilgun; Demirbas, Muharrem; Ozyurt, Secuk

    2001-11-01

    Tungsten oxide thin films were prepared using an ethanolic solution of tungsten hexachloride (WCl6) by sol-gel spin coating. The films were spin coated on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate at temperatures in the range of 100 to 450 degree(s)C. The films were characterized by x-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) UV- visible spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry (CV). XRD showed that they had a polycrystalline WO3 structure for heat treatment temperatures at above 350 degree(s)C. The SEM examinations showed that the surface texture was very uniform and homogeneous. In situ electrochemical reduction of WO3/ITO (2M HCl) produced a blue color in less than a second. Coloration efficiency (CE) was found to be 21 cm2/mC. In situ spectroscopic investigations showed that these films could be used as a working electrode in electrochromic devices.

  10. Towards microfluidic reactors for in situ synchrotron infrared studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverwood, I. P.; Al-Rifai, N.; Cao, E.; Nelson, D. J.; Chutia, A.; Wells, P. P.; Nolan, S. P.; Frogley, M. D.; Cinque, G.; Gavriilidis, A.; Catlow, C. R. A.

    2016-02-01

    Anodically bonded etched silicon microfluidic devices that allow infrared spectroscopic measurement of solutions are reported. These extend spatially well-resolved in situ infrared measurement to higher temperatures and pressures than previously reported, making them useful for effectively time-resolved measurement of realistic catalytic processes. A data processing technique necessary for the mitigation of interference fringes caused by multiple reflections of the probe beam is also described.

  11. Holographic microscopy for in situ studies of microorganism motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, J.; Hu, S.; Jericho, S.; Lindensmith, C.

    2011-12-01

    Robust technologies for the detection and identification of microorganisms at low concentrations in complex liquid media are needed for numerous applications: environmental and medical microbiology, food safety, and for the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System. The best current method for microbial enumeration is specific labeling with fluorescent dyes followed by high-resolution light microscopy. However, fluorescent techniques are difficult to use in situ in extreme environments (such as the Arctic and Antarctic or the open ocean) due to the fragility of the instruments and their high power demands. In addition, light microscopic techniques rarely provide insight into microbial motility behaviors. Tracking single cells would provide important insight into the physics of micron-scale motility as well as into key microbial phenomena such as surface attachment and invasiveness. An alternative to traditional light microscopy that is attracting increasing attention is holographic microscopy. Holographic microscopy works by illuminating the object of interest with coherent light from a laser. The light reflected from (or transmitted through) the object is then combined with a coherent reference beam to create an interference pattern that contains the phase and intensity information required to reconstruct a three dimensional image of the object. The interference pattern is recorded on a high resolution detector and can be used to computationally reconstruct a 3D image of the object. The lateral resolution of the image depends upon the wavelength of the light used, the laser power, camera quality, and external noise sources (vibration, stray light, and so forth). Although the principle is simple, technological barriers have prevented wider use of holographic microscopy. Laser sources and CCD cameras with the appropriate properties have only very recently become affordable. In addition, holographic microscopy leads to large data sets that are

  12. Dynamical observation of lithium insertion/extraction reaction during charge-discharge processes in Li-ion batteries by in situ spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shimoyamada, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Yoshida, Ryuji; Kato, Takehisa; Iriyama, Yasutoshi; Hirayama, Tsukasa

    2015-12-01

    All-solid-state Li-ion batteries (LIBs) with solid electrolytes are expected to be the next generation devices to overcome serious issues facing conventional LIBs with liquid electrolytes. However, the large Li-ion transfer resistance at the electrode/solid-electrolyte interfaces causes low power density and prevents practical use. In-situ-formed negative electrodes prepared by decomposing the solid electrolyte Li(1+x+3z)Alx(Ti,Ge)(2-x)Si(3z)P(3-z)O12 (LASGTP) with an excess Li-ion insertion reaction are effective electrodes providing low Li-ion transfer resistance at the interfaces. Prior to our work, however, it had still been unclear how the negative electrodes were formed in the parent solid electrolytes. Here, we succeeded in dynamically visualizing the formation by in situ spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope mode (SR-TEM-EELS). The Li-ions were gradually inserted into the solid electrolyte region around 400 nm from the negative current-collector/solid-electrolyte interface in the charge process. Some of the ions were then extracted in the discharge process, and the rest were diffused such that the distribution was almost flat, resulting in the negative electrodes. The redox reaction of Ti(4+)/Ti(3+) in the solid electrolyte was also observed in situ during the Li insertion/extraction processes. The in situ SR-TEM-EELS revealed the mechanism of the electrochemical reaction in solid-state batteries. PMID:26337787

  13. In situ construction of three anion-dependent cu(i) coordination networks as promising heterogeneous catalysts for azide-alkyne "click" reactions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenghu; Han, Lu Lu; Zhuang, Gui Lin; Bai, Jing; Sun, Di

    2015-05-18

    Three Cu(I) coordination networks, namely, {[Cu2(bpz)2(CN)X]·CH3CN}n, (X = Cl, 1; I, 3), {[Cu6(bpz)6(CH3CN)3(CN)3Br]·2OH·14CH3CN}n, (2, bpz = 3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole), were prepared by using solvothermal method. The cyanide ligands in these networks were generated in situ by cleavage of C-C bond of MeCN under solvothermal condition. The structures of these networks are dependent on halogen anions. Complex 1 is a ladderlike structure with μ2-CN(-) as rung and μ2-bpz as armrest. The Cl(-) in 1 is at terminal position but does not extend the one-dimensional (1D) ladder to higher dimensionalities. Complex 2 is a three-dimensional (3D) framework comprised of novel planar [Cu3Br] triangle and single Cu nodes, which are extended by μ2-bpz and μ2-CN(-) to form a novel (3,9)-connected gfy network. Density functional theory calculations showed that single-electron delocalization of Br atom induces the plane structure of [Cu3Br]. Complex 3 also possesses a similar ladderlike subunit as in 1, but the I(-) acts as bidentate bridge to extend the ladder to 3D framework with a four-connected sra topology. The three networks show notable catalytic activity on the click reaction. The compared catalytic results demonstrate that complex 2 possesses the best catalysis performance among three complexes, which is ascribed to the largest solvent-accessible void (porosity: 2 (29.4%) > 1 (25.7%) > 3 (17.6%)) and the more Cu(I) active sites in 2. The present combined structure-property studies provide not only a new synthetic route to obtain a new kind of catalyst for click reaction but also the new insights on catalyst structure-function relationships. PMID:25941881

  14. Evolving Technologies for In-Situ Studies of Mars Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carsey, F. D.; Hecht, M. H.

    2003-01-01

    Icy sites on Mars continue to be of high scientific importance. These sites include the polar caps, the southern mid-latitude subsurface permafrost, and the seasonal frost. These sites have interest due to their roles in climate processes, past climates, surface and near-surface water, astrobiology, geomorphology, and other topics. As is the case for many planetary features, remote sensing, while of great value, cannot answer all questions; in-situ examination is essential, and the motivation for in-situ observations generally leads to the subsurface, which, fortunately, is accessible on Mars. It is clear in fact that a Mars polar cap subsurface mission is both scientifically compelling and practical. Recent data from orbiting platforms has provided a remarkable level of information about the Mars ice caps; we know, for example, the size, shape and annual cycle of the cap topography as well as we know that of Earth, and we have more information on stratification that we have of, for example, the ice of East Antarctica. To understand the roles that the Mars polar caps play, it is necessary to gather information on the ice cap surface, strata, composition and bed. In this talk the status of in-situ operations and observations will be summarized, and, since we have conveniently at hand another planet with polar caps, permafrost and ice, the role of testing and validation of experimental procedures on Earth will be addressed.

  15. Design study for a magnetically supported reaction wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocking, G.; Dendy, J.; Sabnis, A.

    1974-01-01

    Results are described of a study program in which the characteristics of a magnetically supported reaction wheel are defined. Tradeoff analyses are presented for the principal components, which are then combined in several reaction wheel design concepts. A preliminary layout of the preferred configuration is presented along with calculated design and performance parameters. Recommendations are made for a prototype development program.

  16. Rheological study of in-situ crosslinkable hydrogels based on hyaluronanic acid, collagen and sericin.

    PubMed

    Vulpe, Raluca; Le Cerf, Didier; Dulong, Virginie; Popa, Marcel; Peptu, Catalina; Verestiuc, Liliana; Picton, Luc

    2016-12-01

    The elaboration of chemically crosslinked hydrogels based on collagen (C), hyaluronanic acid (HA) and sericin (S) with different polymer ratios was investigated by in-situ rheology. This reaction was performed via amide or ester bond reaction activated by carbodiimide, in pure water. Prior to molecule crosslinking, the rheological behaviour of the biopolymers (alone or in mixture) was characterized in a semi-dilute concentration regime. Both flow and dynamic measurements showed that uncrosslinked collagen alone appears to be rather elastic with yield stress properties, whereas uncrosslinked HA alone appears to be rather shear thinning and viscoelastic in agreement with entangled polymer behaviour. Sericin exhibited Newtonian low viscosity behaviour according to its very low molar mass. Before crosslinking, HA exhibited viscoelastic behaviour at concentrations above the critical entangled concentration (C*) in the mixtures, thus HA shows promise as a matrix for future crosslinked networks, whereas sericin did not significantly modify the rheology. During the reaction, followed by rheology, the kinetics were slower for pure HA systems compared with the mixtures (i.e., with added collagen and/or to a lesser extent sericin). At the same time, the final network of hydrogels (i.e., the elastic modulus) was more structured in the mixture based systems. This result is explained by ester bonds (the only possibility for pure HA systems), which are less favourable and reactive than amide bonds (possible with sericin and collagen). The presence of collagen in the HA matrix reinforced the hydrogel network. SEM studies confirmed the structure of the hydrogels, and in vitro degradability was globally consistent with the effect of the selected enzyme according to the hydrogel composition. All the elaborated hydrogels were non-cytotoxic in vitro. PMID:27612727

  17. A study to identify and compare airborne systems for in-situ measurements of launch vehicle effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, T. J.; Chace, A. S.

    1974-01-01

    An in-situ system for monitoring the concentration of HCl, CO, CO2, and Al2O3 in the cloud of reaction products that form as a result of a launch of solid propellant launch vehicle is studied. A wide array of instrumentation and platforms are reviewed to yield the recommended system. An airborne system suited to monitoring pollution concentrations over urban areas for the purpose of calibrating remote sensors is then selected using a similar methodology to yield the optimal configuration.

  18. The design and construction of a cell for the in situ monitoring of copolymerisation reactions using FT-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haigh, J.; Brookes, A.; Hendra, P. J.; Strawn, A.; Nicholas, C.; Purbrick, M.

    1997-01-01

    The copolymerisation of styrene and vinyl imidazole was studied online using a unique Raman cell. The copolymerisation parameters, r1 and r2, were obtained and compared with values obtained from NMR and elemental analysis. The problems associated with the technique and the data processing are discussed. Although there was poor correlation between techniques it was concluded that Raman has great potential as a much faster method therefore enabling much more data to be collected and giving information on the progress of copolymerisation reactions.

  19. Kinetic studies of the infrared-induced reaction between atomic chlorine and solid parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raston, Paul L.; Kettwich, Sharon C.; Anderson, David T.

    2015-04-01

    We present Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies of the IR-induced Cl + H2(v = 1) → HCl + H reaction in a parahydrogen (pH2) matrix aimed at distinguishing between two proposed reactions mechanisms; direct-IR and vibron-mediated. The Cl atom reactants are produced via 355 nm in situ photolysis of a Cl2 doped pH2 matrix. After photolysis is complete, a long-pass IR filter in the FTIR beam is removed and we measure the ensuing IR-induced reaction kinetics using rapid scan FTIR spectroscopy. We follow both the decay of the Cl atom reactant and growth of the HCl product using the Cl spin-orbit (SO) + Q1(0) and HCl R1(0) transitions, respectively. We show the IR-induced reaction mechanism depends on the spectral profile of the IR radiation; for IR spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities between 4000 and 5000 cm-1 we observe first-order kinetics that are assigned to a vibron-mediated mechanism and for spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities that include the Cl SO + Q1(0) transition near 5094 cm-1 we observe bi-exponential kinetics that are dominated by the direct-IR mechanism at early reaction times. We can distinguish between the two mechanisms using the observed kinetics. We investigate the reaction kinetics for different FTIR optical setups, for a range of sample conditions, and start and stop the IR-induced reaction to investigate the importance of secondary H atom reactions. We also study the IR-induced reaction in Br/Cl co-doped pH2 samples and show the presence of the Br atom quenches the vibron-mediated reaction kinetics presumably because the Br-atoms serve as efficient vibron traps. This paper indicates that in a highly enriched pH2 matrix the H atoms that are produced by the IR-induced Cl atom reaction likely do not play a significant role in the measured reaction kinetics which implies these secondary H atom reactions are highly selective.

  20. In situ dynamic study of hydrogen oxidation on rhodium.

    PubMed

    Visart de Bacarmé, T; Bär, T; Kruse, N

    2001-10-01

    The reaction of hydrogen/oxygen gas mixtures with rhodium single crystals was studied using video-FIM (Field Ion Microscopy) at temperatures between 350 and 550 K and up to 2 x 10(-2) Pa total pressure. Imaging at 500 K in a hydrogen rich gas mixture (H2:O2 = 9) revealed considerable morphological changes of the (0 0 1)-oriented field emitter tip, i.e. the growth of low-index at the expense of high-index planes and strong crystal coarsening. Decreasing the hydrogen partial pressure led to chemical and structural changes of the Rh sample. Starting on the [1 1 0] planes a surface oxide formed, which spread anisotropically across the surface until it finally covered the whole visible surface area. The transformation was reversible upon increasing the hydrogen pressure back to its initial value. However, a hysteresis behavior was observed, i.e. a larger hydrogen partial pressure was found to be necessary to re-establish the initial patterns of a reactive Oad/Had layer. By varying the temperature from 400 to 500 K a phase diagram was established for the Oad/Had system. Increasing the electric field proved to shift the phase diagram towards higher H2 pressures. At 550K self-sustained kinetic oscillations with a cycle time of approximately 40s could be observed. PMID:11770755

  1. A complex reaction time study (Sternberg) in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W.; Uri, John; Moore, Tom

    1993-01-01

    Simple and complex (Sternberg) reaction time studies were flown on three and seven day Shuttle flights in 1985. Three subjects did selftesting with an onboard handheld calculator without difficulty. There was little change in simple reaction time. One subject demonstrated a decrease in the processing rate during space motion sickness while a second exhibited an increase in complex reaction time without a change in processing rate during a period of high work load. The population was too small to demonstrate significant changes. This study demonstrates the ease and practicality of such measurements and indicates the potential value of such studies in space.

  2. High-temperature dehydration of talc: a kinetics study using in situ X-ray powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Duojun; Yi, Li; Huang, Bojin; Liu, Chuanjiang

    2015-06-01

    High-temperature in situ X-ray powder diffraction patterns were used to study the dehydration kinetics of natural talc with a size of 10-15 µm. The talc was annealed from 1073 to 1223 K, and the variations in the characteristic peaks corresponding to talc with the time were recorded to determine the reaction progress. The decomposition of talc occurred, and peaks corresponding to talc and peaks corresponding to enstatite and quartz were observed. The enstatite and talc exhibited a topotactic relationship. The dehydration kinetics of talc was studied as a function of temperature between 1073 and 1223 K. The kinetics data could be modeled using an Avrami equation that considers nucleation and growth processes ? where n varies from 0.4 to 0.8. The rate constant (k) equation for the natural talc is ? The reaction mechanism for the dehydration of talc is a heterogeneous nucleation and growth mechanism.

  3. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-12-17

    The overall objective of the program was to improve the understanding of retrograde reactions and their dependencies on coal rank and structure, and/or coal modifications and reaction conditions. Because retrograde reactions are competitive with bond breaking reactions, an understanding of both is required to shift the competition in favor of the latter. Related objectives were to clarify the conflicting observations reported in literature on such major topics as the role of oxygen groups in retrograde reactions and to provide a bridge from very fundamental studies on pure compounds to phenomenological studies on actual coal. This information was integrated into the FG-DVC model, which was improved and extended to the liquefaction context.

  4. Ultrahigh-vacuum chamber equipped with a reaction cell for studying liquid-phase catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardin, Denis E.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1993-05-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a liquid-phase reaction cell designed in our laboratory that is attached to an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) chamber equipped with the traditional surface science techniques for structure and composition analysis. The sample surface can be prepared and characterized in the UHV chamber prior to transfer in the liquid-phase reaction cell. The transfer has been designed so that there is no loss of the UHV chamber vacuum integrity, as few parts as possible come into contact with the liquid, the surface stays clean during the transfer. The liquid-phase reaction cell itself is designed to study liquid-phase hydrogenation reactions at pressures up to 2 atm and temperatures up to 70 °C. A 1-mm-diam liquid jet with a velocity up to 6 m/s is produced by a gear pump that is incident on the sample surface to allow good mass transfer at the liquid-solid interface. The progress of the reaction is followed by gas chromatography. We report the reaction rate data for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene on a platinum foil.

  5. Ultrahigh-vacuum chamber equipped with a reaction cell for studying liquid-phase catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gardin, D.E.; Somorjai, G.A. )

    1993-05-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a liquid-phase reaction cell designed in our laboratory that is attached to an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) chamber equipped with the traditional surface science techniques for structure and composition analysis. The sample surface can be prepared and characterized in the UHV chamber prior to transfer in the liquid-phase reaction cell. The transfer has been designed so that there is no loss of the UHV chamber vacuum integrity, as few parts as possible come into contact with the liquid, the surface stays clean during the transfer. The liquid-phase reaction cell itself is designed to study liquid-phase hydrogenation reactions at pressures up to 2 atm and temperatures up to 70 [degree]C. A 1-mm-diam liquid jet with a velocity up to 6 m/s is produced by a gear pump that is incident on the sample surface to allow good mass transfer at the liquid-solid interface. The progress of the reaction is followed by gas chromatography. We report the reaction rate data for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene on a platinum foil.

  6. In-situ scanning electron microscopy observations of Li plating and stripping reactions at the lithium phosphorus oxynitride glass electrolyte/Cu interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagane, Fumihiro; Shimokawa, Ryosuke; Sano, Hikaru; Sakaebe, Hikari; Iriyama, Yasutoshi

    2013-03-01

    Morphology variations during electrochemical lithium plating-stripping reactions at the lithium phosphorus oxynitride glass electrolyte (LiPON)/copper current collector (Cu) interface are observed in-situ by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This in-situ SEM observation shows dynamically that the plating reactions at 50 μA cm-2 distribute initial lithium growth sites sparsely at the LiPON/Cu interface, later, local lithium growth occurs from the pre-plated sites through the Cu film, and finally, most of the precipitated lithium grows to be needle-shape with the height of micron order. This local growth rate attains to be 6.8 mA cm-2, about 100 times higher value than applied one. When those precipitated lithium are stripped at 50 μA cm-2, core region of each precipitate is mostly stripped but its degree depends on the length of the precipitate. This dependency will arise from the diffusivity of Li. When this stripping current density is increased to 500 μA cm-2, the coulomb efficiency is further decreased. In-situ SEM observation shows that plated lithium around the interface becomes thin preferentially while that far away from the interface (upper side of plated lithium) remains unchanged. This will isolate most of precipitate lithium from LiPON film electrically, leading to further decreasing of the coulomb efficiency.

  7. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin

    2004-05-15

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum nanoparticles. The

  8. IN SITU INFRARED STUDY OF CATALYTIC DECOMPOSITION OF NO

    SciTech Connect

    KHALID ALMUSAITEER; RAM KRISHNAMURTHY; STEVEN S.C. CHUANG

    1998-08-18

    The growing concerns for the environment and increasingly stringent standards for NO emission have presented a major challenge to control NO emissions from electric utility plants and automobiles. Catalytic decomposition of NO is the most attractive approach for the control of NO emission for its simplicity. Successful development of an effective catalyst for NO decomposition will greatly decrease the equipment and operation cost of NO control. Due to lack of understanding of the mechanism of NO decomposition, efforts on the search of an effective catalyst have been unsuccessful. Scientific development of an effective catalyst requires fundamental understanding of the nature of active site, the rate-limiting step, and an approach to prolong the life of the catalyst. Research is proposed to study the reactivity of adsorbates for the direct NO decomposition and to investigate the feasibility of two novel approaches for improving catalyst activity and resistance to sintering. The first approach is the use of silanation to stabilize metal crystallites and supports for Cu-ZSM-5 and promoted Pt catalysts; the second is utilization of oxygen spillover and desorption to enhance NO decomposition activity. An innovative infrared reactor system will be used to observe and determine the dynamic behavior and the reactivity of adsorbates during NO decomposition, oxygen spillover, and silanation. A series of experiments including X-ray diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, temperature programmed reaction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy will be used to characterized the catalysts. The information obtained from this study will provide a scientific basis for developing an effective catalyst for the NO decomposition under practical flue gas conditions.

  9. In Situ Infrared Study of Catalytic Decomposition of NO

    SciTech Connect

    Cher-Dip Tan; Steven S.C. Chuang

    1997-07-17

    The growing concerns for the environment and increasingly stringent standards for NO emission have presented a major challenge to control NO emmissions from electric utility plants and automobiles. Catalytic decomposition of NO is the most attractive approach for the control of NO emission for its simplicity. Successful development of an effective catalyst for NO decomposition will greatly decrease the equipment and operation cost of NO control. Due to lack of understanding of the mechanism of NO decomposition, efforts on the search of an effective catalyst have been unsuccesful. Scientific development of an effective catalyst requires fundamental understanding of the nature of active site, the rate-limiting step, and an approach to prolong the life of the catalyst. Research is proposed to study the reactivity of adsorbates for the direct NO decomposition and to investigate the feasibility of two novel approaches for improving catalyst activity and resistance to sintering. The first approach is the use of silanation to stabilize metal crystallites and supports for Cu-ZSM-5 and promoted Pt catalysts; the second is utilization of oxygen spillover and desorption to enhance NO decomposition activity. An innovative infrared reactor system will be used to observe and determine the dynamic behavior and the reactivity of adsorbates during NO decomposition, oxygen spillover, and silanation. A series of experiments including X-ray diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, temperature programmed reaction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy will be used to characterized the catalysts. The information obtained from this study will provide a scientific basis for developing an effective catalyst for the NO decomposition under practical flue gas conditions.

  10. In situ XPS study of methanol reforming on PdGa near-surface intermetallic phases

    PubMed Central

    Rameshan, Christoph; Stadlmayr, Werner; Penner, Simon; Lorenz, Harald; Mayr, Lukas; Hävecker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Rocha, Tulio; Teschner, Detre; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Memmel, Norbert; Klötzer, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy ion scattering were used to study the preparation, (thermo)chemical and catalytic properties of 1:1 PdGa intermetallic near-surface phases. Deposition of several multilayers of Ga metal and subsequent annealing to 503–523 K led to the formation of a multi-layered 1:1 PdGa near-surface state without desorption of excess Ga to the gas phase. In general, the composition of the PdGa model system is much more variable than that of its PdZn counterpart, which results in gradual changes of the near-surface composition with increasing annealing or reaction temperature. In contrast to near-surface PdZn, in methanol steam reforming, no temperature region with pronounced CO2 selectivity was observed, which is due to the inability of purely intermetallic PdGa to efficiently activate water. This allows to pinpoint the water-activating role of the intermetallic/support interface and/or of the oxide support in the related supported PdxGa/Ga2O3 systems, which exhibit high CO2 selectivity in a broad temperature range. In contrast, corresponding experiments starting on the purely bimetallic model surface in oxidative methanol reforming yielded high CO2 selectivity already at low temperatures (∼460 K), which is due to efficient O2 activation on PdGa. In situ detected partial and reversible oxidative Ga segregation on intermetallic PdGa is associated with total oxidation of intermediate C1 oxygenates to CO2. PMID:22875996

  11. Semiconductor nanorod self-assembly at the liquid/air interface studied by in situ GISAXS and ex situ TEM.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Francesca; Rabouw, Freddy T; Evers, Wiel H; Byelov, Dima V; Petukhov, Andrei V; de Mello Donegá, Celso; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël

    2012-11-14

    We study the self-assembly of colloidal CdSe/CdS nanorods (NRs) at the liquid/air interface combining time-resolved in situ grazing-incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our study shows that NR superstructure formation occurs at the liquid/air interface. Short NRs self-assemble into micrometers long tracks of NRs lying side by side flat on the surface. In contrast, longer NRs align vertically into ordered superstructures. Systematic variation of the NR length and initial concentration of the NR dispersion allowed us to tune the orientation of the NRs in the final superstructure. With GISAXS, we were able to follow the dynamics of the self-assembly. We propose a model of hierarchical self-organization that provides a basis for the understanding of the length-dependent self-organization of NRs at the liquid/air interface. This opens the way to new materials based on NR membranes and anisotropic thin films. PMID:23038984

  12. Assessing denitrification in groundwater using natural gradient tracer tests with 15N: In situ measurement of a sequential multistep reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; Garabedian, S.P.; Revesz, K.M.; Yoshinari, T.

    2004-01-01

    Denitrification was measured within a nitrate-contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, using natural gradient tracer tests with 15N nitrate. The aquifer contained zones of relatively high concentrations of nitrite (up to 77 ??M) and nitrous oxide (up to 143 ??M) and has been the site of previous studies examining ground water denitrification using the acetylene block technique. Small-scale (15-24 m travel distance) tracer tests were conducted by injecting 15N nitrate and bromide as tracers into a depth interval that contained nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, and excess nitrogen gas. The timing of the bromide breakthrough curves at down-gradient wells matched peaks in 15N abundance above background for nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen gas after more than 40 days of travel. Results were simulated with a one-dimensional transport model using linked reaction kinetics for the individual steps of the denitrification reaction pathway. It was necessary to include within the model spatial variations in background concentrations of all nitrogen oxide species. The model indicated that nitrite production (0.036-0.047 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d -1) was faster than the subsequent denitrification steps (0.013-0.016 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d-1 for nitrous oxide and 0.013-0.020 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d-1 for nitrogen gas) and that the total rate of reaction was slower than indicated by both acetylene block tracer tests and laboratory incubations. The rate of nitrate removal by denitrification was much slower than the rate of transport, indicating that nitrate would migrate several kilometers down-gradient before being completely consumed.

  13. Remediation case studies: In situ soil treatment technologies (soil vapor extraction, thermal processes). Volume 8

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The case studies present available cost and performance information for full-scale remediation efforts. The studies contain varying levels of detail, reflecting the differences in the availability of data and information. The case studies in this volume describe 14 applications of soil vapor extraction (SVE) and in situ thermal processes. These include 10 full-scale and one pilot-scale SVE applications used to treat soil contaminated with chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons. Three of these applications involved treatment or containment of both contaminated soil and groundwater through a combination of SVE, air sparging, groundwater extraction, and/or in situ bioremediation technologies. One case study describes a photolytic technology demonstrated for treatment of contaminated vapors from an SVE system. In addition, this volume describes two in situ thermal treatment applications, one used to recover free and residual coal tar, and one that was a demonstration of an in situ process to desorb PCBs from soil.

  14. Jet-A reaction mechanism study for combustion application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Kundu, Krishna; Acosta, Waldo

    1991-01-01

    Simplified chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for the combustion of Jet A fuel was studied. Initially, 40 reacting species and 118 elementary chemical reactions were chosen based on a literature review. Through a sensitivity analysis with the use of LSENS General Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, 16 species and 21 elementary chemical reactions were determined from this study. This mechanism is first justified by comparison of calculated ignition delay time with the available shock tube data, then it is validated by comparison of calculated emissions from the plug flow reactor code with in-house flame tube data.

  15. Fission Study Using Multi-Nucleon Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, K.; Hirose, K.; Lėguillon, R.; Makii, H.; Nishinaka, I.; Orlandi, R.; Smallcombe, J.; Ishii, T.; Tsukada, K.; Asai, M.; Chiba, S.; Ohtsuki, T.; Tatsuzawa, R.; Takaki, N.

    2015-06-01

    Fission study using multi-nucleon transfer reaction will be discussed. This approach has an advantage that we can study fission of neutron-rich nuclei which cannot be accessed by particle or charged-particle capture reactions. Unique feature in our setup is that we can produce fission data for many nuclei using many transfer-channels. Also wide excitation energy range can be covered in this set up, allowing us to measure the excitation energy dependence of the fission properties. Preliminary data obtained in the 18O + 238U reaction will be presented..

  16. Jet-A reaction mechanism study for combustion application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Kundu, Krishna; Acosta, Waldo

    1991-01-01

    Simplified chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for the combustion of Jet A fuel are studied. Initially 40 reacting species and 118 elementary chemical reactions were chosen based on the literature review of previous works. Through a sensitivity analysis with the use of LSENS General Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, 16 species and 21 elementary chemical reactions were determined from this study. This mechanism is first justified by comparison of calculated ignition delay time with available shock tube data, then it is validated by comparison of calculated emissions from plug flow reactor code with in-house flame tube data.

  17. Theoretical Studies of Elementary Hydrocarbon Species and Their Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Wesley D.; Schaefer, III, Henry F.

    2015-11-14

    This is the final report of the theoretical studies of elementary hydrocarbon species and their reactions. Part A has a bibliography of publications supported by DOE from 2010 to 2016 and Part B goes into recent research highlights.

  18. Theoretical Study of Sodium-Water Surface Reaction Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using the ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule on the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. It was found that the estimated rate constant of the former was much larger than the latter. The results are the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR).

  19. In situ x-ray photoemission studies of the oxidation of Y-Ba-Cu films

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.J.; Jackman, R.B.; Foord, J.S.

    1988-12-15

    X-ray photoemission has been used to investigate the formation of Y-Ba-Cu films on Si(100) and as an in situ probe of their subsequent oxidation to yield the associated oxide ceramic. The layers are prepared by coevaporation of the metallic components under ultrahigh vacuum, and pure alloy phases can be deposited at 300 K; reaction with the underlying substrate resulting in loss of Cu and incorporation by Si in the film takes place, however, at higher temperatures. Room-temperature oxidation stabilizes the film against this interaction and results in the preferential oxidation and surface segregation of barium at the expense of Cu. This segregation process becomes even more apparent during higher temperature (approx.600 K) oxidation reactions. Chemical shifts and associated effects in x-ray photoelectron spectra are used to infer information on the chemical changes that occur in the film as oxidation proceeds. The thin-film phases prepared in situ in this work reveal a very similar surface composition to bulk superconducting samples prepared ex situ. This suggests that the surface segregation in bulk samples does not simply result from reaction with species such as water vapor, but instead may represent an equilibrium state of the oxide-oxygen interface.

  20. Short-range plasmonic nanofocusing within submicron regimes facilitates in situ probing and promoting of interfacial reactions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chen-Chieh; Lin, Keng-Te; Su, Pao-Yun; Wang, En-Yun; Yen, Yu-Ting; Chen, Hsuen-Li

    2016-02-14

    In this study, a simple configuration, based on high-index dielectric nanoparticles (NPs) and plasmonic nanostructures, is employed for the nanofocusing of submicron-short-range surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). The excited SPPs are locally bound and focused at the interface between the dielectric NPs and the underlying metallic nanostructures, thereby greatly enhancing the local electromagnetic field. Taking advantage of the surface properties of the dielectric NPs, this system performs various functions. For example, the nanofocusing of submicron-short-range SPPs is used to enhance the Raman signals of gas molecules adsorbed on the dielectric NPs. In addition, the presence of the local strong electromagnetic field accelerates the rates of interfacial reactions on the surfaces of the dielectric NPs. Therefore, the proposed nanofocusing configuration can both promote and probe interfacial reactions simultaneously. Herein, the promotion and probing of the desorption of EtOH vapor are described, as well as the photodegradation of methylene blue. Moreover, the nanofocusing of SPPs is demonstrated on an aluminum surface in both the visible and UV regimes, a process that has not been achieved using conventional tapered waveguide nanofocusing structures. Therefore, the nanofocusing of submicron-short-range SPPs by dielectric NPs on plasmonic nanostructures is not limited to low-loss noble metals. Accordingly, this system has potential for use in light management and on-chip green devices and sensors. PMID:26809318

  1. Studies of alpha-induced astrophysical reactions at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.

    2010-08-01

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator ) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Using the RI beams at CRIB, many measurements on proton alpha resonance scatterings, (α,p) reactions, and others were performed in recent years mainly for studying astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among them, the results on the 7Li+α resonance scatterings are presented.

  2. Studies of alpha-induced astrophysical reactions at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.

    2010-08-12

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Using the RI beams at CRIB, many measurements on proton alpha resonance scatterings, ({alpha},p) reactions, and others were performed in recent years mainly for studying astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among them, the results on the {sup 7}Li+{alpha} resonance scatterings are presented.

  3. Studies of photoredox reactions on nanosize semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcoxon, J.P.; Parsapour, F.; Kelly, D.F.

    1997-02-01

    Light induced electron transfer (ET) from nanosize semiconductors Of MoS{sub 2} to organic electron acceptors such as 2,2`-bipyridine (bpy) and methyl substituted 4,4`,5,5`-tetramethyl- 2,2`-bipyridine (tmb) was studied by static and time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. The kinetics of ET were varied by changing the nanocluster size (the band gap), the electron acceptor, and the polarity of the solvent. MoS{sub 2} is an especially interesting semiconductor material as it is an indirect semiconductor in bulk form, and has a layered covalent bonding arrangement which is highly resistant to photocorrosion.

  4. Leprosy Reaction in Thai Population: A 20-Year Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Suchonwanit, Poonkiat; Triamchaisri, Siripich; Wittayakornrerk, Sanchawan; Rattanakaemakorn, Ploysyne

    2015-01-01

    Background. Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that presents with varying dermatological and neurological symptoms. The leprosy reactions occur over the chronic course of the disease and lead to extensive disability and morbidity. Objective. To analyze and identify the risk factors which contribute to leprosy reactions. Methods. In a retrospective study, we reviewed the medical records of leprosy patients registered at the leprosy clinic, Ramathibodi Hospital, Thailand, between March 1995 and April 2015. One hundred and eight patients were included; descriptive analysis was used for baseline characteristics and a binary logistic regression model was applied for identifying risk factors correlated with leprosy reactions. Results. Of the 108 cases analyzed, 51 were male and 57 were female. The mean age of presentation was 45 years. The borderline tuberculoid type was the most common clinical form. Leprosy reactions were documented in 61 cases (56.5%). The average time to reaction was 8.9 months. From multivariate analysis, risk factors for leprosy reactions were being female, positive bacillary index status, and MB treatment regimen. Conclusions. Leprosy reactions are common complications in leprosy patients. Being female, positive bacillary index status, and multibacillary treatment regimen are significantly associated with the reactions. Early detection in cases with risk factors followed by appropriate treatment could prevent the morbidity of leprosy patients. PMID:26508912

  5. In situ infrared spectroscopic study of forsterite carbonation in wet supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Loring, John S; Thompson, Christopher J; Wang, Zheming; Joly, Alan G; Sklarew, Deborah S; Schaef, H Todd; Ilton, Eugene S; Rosso, Kevin M; Felmy, Andrew R

    2011-07-15

    Carbonation reactions are central to the prospect of CO(2) trapping by mineralization in geologic reservoirs. In contrast to the relevant aqueous-mediated reactions, little is known about the propensity for carbonation in the key partner fluid: supercritical carbon dioxide containing dissolved water ("wet" scCO(2)). We employed in situ mid-infrared spectroscopy to follow the reaction of a model silicate mineral (forsterite, Mg(2)SiO(4)) for 24 h with wet scCO(2) at 50 °C and 180 atm. The results show a dramatic dependence of reactivity on water concentration and the presence of liquid water on the forsterite particles. Exposure to neat scCO(2) showed no detectable carbonation reaction. At 47% and 81% water saturation, an Ångstrom-thick liquid-like water film was detected on the forsterite particles and less than 1% of the forsterite transformed. Most of the reaction occurred within the first 3 h of exposure to the fluid. In experiments at 95% saturation and with an excess of water (36% above water saturation), a nanometer-thick water film was detected, and the carbonation reaction proceeded continuously with approximately 2% and 10% conversion, respectively. Our collective results suggest constitutive links between water concentration, water film formation, reaction rate and extent, and reaction products in wet scCO(2). PMID:21699182

  6. Crossed molecular beam studies of atmospheric chemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingsong

    1993-04-01

    The dynamics of several elementary chemical reactions that are important in atmospheric chemistry are investigated. The reactive scattering of ground state chlorine or bromine atoms with ozone molecules and ground state chlorine atoms with nitrogen dioxide molecules is studied using a crossed molecular beams apparatus with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. The Cl + O{sub 3} {yields} ClO + O{sub 2} reaction has been studied at four collision energies ranging from 6 kcal/mole to 32 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions show that the reaction has a direct reaction mechanism and that there is a strong repulsion on the exit channel. The ClO product is sideways and forward scattered with respect to the Cl atom, and the translational energy release is large. The Cl atom is most likely to attack the terminal oxygen atom of the ozone molecule. The Br + O{sub 3} {yields} ClO + O{sub 2} reaction has been studied at five collision energies ranging from 5 kcal/mole to 26 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions are quite similar to those in the Cl + O{sub 3} reaction. The Br + O{sub 3} reaction has a direct reaction mechanism similar to that of the Cl + O{sub 3} reaction. The electronic structure of the ozone molecule seems to play the central role in determining the reaction mechanism in atomic radical reactions with the ozone molecule. The Cl + NO{sub 2} {yields} ClO + NO reaction has been studied at three collision energies ranging from 10.6 kcal/mole to 22.4 kcal/mole. The center-of-mass angular distribution has some forward-backward symmetry, and the product translational energy release is quite large. The reaction proceeds through a short-lived complex whose lifetime is less than one rotational period. The experimental results seem to show that the Cl atom mainly attacks the oxygen atom instead of the nitrogen atom of the NO{sub 2} molecule.

  7. Atmospheric chemistry: Laboratory studies of kinetics of important reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.

    Experiments to measure the rate constants for some reactions of the atmospherically important nitrate radical (NO3) are described using the discharge-flow technique. The nitrate radical was monitored by optical absorption at lambda = 662 nm. The reactions of NO3 with some stable organic and inorganic substrates are reported. The temperature dependences of some of the rate constants were also determined (298 less than T less than 523 K). In most cases, computer simulation was used to extract the rate constant for the primary process because the time-dependent behavior of (NO3) was affected by secondary reactions of NO3 with products of the primary interaction. The Arrhenius parameter for the reactions of NO3 with CH3CH3, CH2CH2, CH3OH, CHCl3, and HCl were determined. The activation energies for the reactions studied between NO3 and some alkynes are presented along with the corresponding pre-exponential factors. Some reactions were studied at room temperature (298 plus or minus 2 K) only and the rate constants found (in units of cubic cm/molecule sec) are: buta-1,3-diene (1.8 x 10 (exp -13), isobutene (2.8 x 10 (exp -13), HBr (1.3 x 10 (exp -15) and hex-2-yne (3.0 x 10 (exp -14). Non-Arrhenius behavior was found in the reactions of NO3 with n-butane, isobutane and propene. The empirical variation of these rate constants with temperature is presented. The curvature of the Arrhenius plots is discussed in terms of (1) a temperature-dependent pre-exponential factor, and (2) the possibility that two competing channels, possessing differing activation energies, exist for each reaction. The atmospheric implications of these reactions are discussed with reference to the nighttime production of nitric acid and the importance of the these reactions as loss processes for NO3.

  8. Design and application of a high-temperature microfurnace for an in situ X-ray diffraction study of phase transformation.

    PubMed

    Eu, W S; Cheung, W H; Valix, M

    2009-11-01

    Thermal treatment of mineral ores such as ilmenite can initiate phase transformations that could affect their activation or deactivation, subsequently influencing their ability to dissolve in a leaching agent. Most laboratory-based X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out ex situ in which realistic diffraction patterns could not be obtained simultaneously with occurring reactions and were time-consuming. The availability of synchrotron-radiation-based XRD not only allows in situ analysis, but significantly shortens the data recording time. The present study details the design of a robust high-temperature microfurnace which allows thermal processing of mineral ore samples and the simultaneous collection of high-resolution synchrotron XRD data. In addition, the application of the manufactured microfurnace for in situ study of phase transformations of ilmenite ore under reducing conditions is demonstrated. PMID:19844022

  9. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, F. Evertsson, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Lundgren, E.; Zhang, F.; Pan, J.; Carlà, F.; Nilsson, J.-O.

    2014-07-21

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  10. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, F.; Zhang, F.; Evertsson, J.; Carlà, F.; Pan, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Nilsson, J.-O.; Lundgren, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  11. MOLAB, a Mobile Laboratory for In Situ Non-Invasive Studies in Arts and Archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, B. G.; Matteini, Mauro; Miliani, C.; Pezzati, L.; Pinna, D.

    Mobile laboratory (MOLAB) is a unique joint collection of portable equipment for non-destructive in situ measurements. MOLAB activities are carried out within the frame of the Eu-ARTECH Integrated Infrastructure Initiative of the sixth F.P. In situ measurement is quite useful because it eliminates any risk connected to moving artworks or other precious objects to a laboratory. MOLAB instruments are accessible to European researchers through a peer-review selection of proposals. Starting from July 2004, MOLAB enabled non-destructive in situ studies of many precious artworks, such as paintings by Perugino, Raphael and Leonardo.

  12. Numerical Modeling of In-situ Reaction Barrier by Injection of Ca(OH)2 Solution for CO2 Geological Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, T.; Ito, T.

    2008-12-01

    Containment of CO2 in the storage reservoir is a very important issue. We present here an in-situ reaction barrier method to reduce the medium permeability along potential leakage paths of a deep CO2 storage reservoir in a saline formation. An aqueous solution will be injected into the fractures and rocks through injection wells. The solution will have a low viscosity and will not impact formation permeability as long as the solution is left as it is, but when the solution encounters dissolved CO2, precipitation will occur due to chemical reaction. As a result, the permeability will be reduced by filling the pores and fractures in the rocks with the precipitates. This concept has been successfully demonstrated previously through a laboratory experiment using Ca(OH)2 solution. The reduction of permeability in the laboratory experiment has been reproduced by reactive transport modeling using TOUGHREACT. The concept of the in-situ reaction barrier has been applied to a 2-D caprock-aquifer system under field physical and chemical conditions using the modeling tool. Calcite precipitation, permeability reduction, and CO2 leakage mitigation was achieved in the numerical experiment. This concept may be also applicable to prevent the leakage through abandoned wells, to mitigate well cement degradation, and to enhance CO2 mineral trapping.

  13. In-situ photo-polymerization study of Si-(bis-GMA)/TEGDMA by correlations of PA signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, F.; Navarrete, M.; Vera-Graziano, R.; Sobral, H.

    2005-06-01

    The photo-polymerization reaction of Si-(bis-GMA)/TEGDMA (a bis-GMA modified with silyl groups and mixed with TEDGMA) has been studied by pulsed photoacoustic (PA) and FTIR techniques. The light from a pulsed laser is focused on the surface of the sample for both to activate the chemical reaction and generate PA signals. The in-situ acquisition of the PA signals, during photo-polymerization (PP), in consecutive way, permits to follow changes in its physical properties. The structural changes during polymer formation are recovered by a numerical procedure based on correlation coefficients r_i. This numerical procedure, applied to digitally recorded PA signals, allows the construction of a PP profile dri /dT_i, and permits to detect the phase transitions during the whole process including the gel region. The obtained results are in agreement with those obtained from the FTIR analysis, under similar conditions.

  14. Palladium(0)/NHC-Catalyzed Reductive Heck Reaction of Enones: A Detailed Mechanistic Study.

    PubMed

    Raoufmoghaddam, Saeed; Mannathan, Subramaniyan; Minnaard, Adriaan J; de Vries, Johannes G; Reek, Joost N H

    2015-12-14

    We have studied the mechanism of the palladium-catalyzed reductive Heck reaction of para-substituted enones with 4-iodoanisole by using N,N-diisopropylethylamine (DIPEA) as the reductant. Kinetic studies and in situ spectroscopic analysis have provided a detailed insight into the reaction. Progress kinetic analysis demonstrated that neither catalyst decomposition nor product inhibition occurred during the catalysis. The reaction is first order in the palladium and aryl iodide, and zero order in the activated alkene, N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand, and DIPEA. The experiments with deuterated solvent ([D7]DMF) and deuterated base ([D15]Et3N) supported the role of the amine as a reductant in the reaction. The palladium complex [Pd(0)(NHC)(1)] has been identified as the resting state. The kinetic experiments by stopped-flow UV/Vis also revealed that the presence of the second substrate, benzylideneacetone 1, slows down the oxidative addition of 4-iodoanisole through its competing coordination to the palladium center. The kinetic and mechanistic studies indicated that the oxidative addition of the aryl iodide is the rate-determining step. Various scenarios for the oxidative addition step have been analyzed by using DFT calculations (bp86/def2-TZVP) that supported the inhibiting effect of substrate 1 by formation of resting state [Pd(0)(NHC)(1)] species at the cost of further increase in the energy barrier of the oxidative addition step. PMID:26561034

  15. Advanced sample environments for in situ neutron diffraction studies of nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, Helmut Matthias

    Generation IV nuclear reactor concepts, such as the supercritical-water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR), are actively researched internationally. Operating conditions above the critical point of water (374°C, 22.1 MPa) and fuel core temperature that potentially exceed 1850°C put a high demand on the surrounding materials. For their safe application, it is essential to characterize and understand the material properties on an atomic scale such as crystal structure and grain orientation (texture) changes as a function of temperature and stress. This permits the refinement of models predicting the macroscopic behavior of the material. Neutron diffraction is a powerful tool in characterizing such crystallographic properties due to their deep penetration depth into condensed matter. This leads to the ability to study bulk material properties, as opposed to surface effects, and allows for complex sample environments to study e.g. the individual contributions of thermo-mechanical processing steps during manufacturing, operating or accident scenarios. I present three sample environments for in situ neutron diffraction studies that provide such crystallographic information and have been successfully commissioned and integrated into the user program of the High Pressure -- Preferred Orientation (HIPPO) diffractometer at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) user facility. I adapted a sample changer for reliable and fast automated texture measurements of multiple specimens. I built a creep furnace combining a 2700 N load frame with a resistive vanadium furnace, capable of temperatures up to 1000°C, and manipulated by a pair of synchronized rotation stages. This combination allows following deformation and temperature dependent texture and strain evolutions in situ. Utilizing the presented sample changer and creep furnace we studied pressure tubes made of Zr-2.5wt%Nb currently employed in CANDURTM nuclear reactors and proposed for future SCWRs, acting as the primary

  16. In situ studies of microbial inactivation during high pressure processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Jose Antonio; Schaffner, Donald W.; Cuitiño, Alberto M.; Karwe, Mukund V.

    2016-01-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) has been shown to reduce microbial concentration in foods. The mechanisms of microbial inactivation by HPP have been associated with damage to cell membranes. The real-time response of bacteria to HPP was measured to elucidate the mechanisms of inactivation, which can aid in designing more effective processes. Different pressure cycling conditions were used to expose Enterobacter aerogenes cells to HPP. Propidium iodide (PI) was used as a probe, which fluoresces after penetrating cells with damaged membranes and binding with nucleic acids. A HPP vessel with sapphire windows was used for measuring fluorescence in situ. Membrane damage was detected during pressurization and hold time, but not during depressurization. The drop in fluorescence was larger than expected after pressure cycles at higher pressure and longer times. This indicated possible reversible disassociation of ribosomes resulting in additional binding of PI to exposed RNA under pressure and its release after depressurization.

  17. Experimental studies of reactions relevant for γ-process nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, P.; Endres, J.; Hennig, A.; Mayer, J.; Netterdon, L.; Zilges, A.; Sauerwein, A.

    2014-05-09

    We report on our recent experimental studies of reactions relevant for the γ process nucleosynthesis. Applying the activation method using the Cologne Clover Counting Setup total cross sections of the reactions {sup 168}Yb(α,γ), {sup 168}Yb(α,n), and {sup 187}Re(α,n) could be obtained. Furthermore, the reaction {sup 89}Y(p,γ) was investigated via the in-beam technique with HPGe detectors at the high-efficiency g-ray spectrometer HORUS in Cologne in order to determine partial and total cross sections.

  18. Chemical Accelerator Studies of Ion-Molecule Reaction Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingfeng

    1995-01-01

    A chemical accelerator instrument has been used to study the dynamics of ion-molecule reaction processes in the gas phase. Specifically, the following reactions are investigated: eqalign{rm CO^+ + H_2&longrightarrowrm HCO ^+ + Hcrrm CO^+ + D_2& longrightarrowrm DCO^+ + Dcrrm CO^+ + HDlongrightarrow &rm HCO ^+ (DCO^+) + D (H)cr} . Both angular and velocity distributions of reactively scattered product ions are measured, as well as reaction cross sections as a function of reactant relative translational energy. Formation of HCO^+ ion from rm CO^+ + H_2 over the collision energy range from 0.35 to 3.02 eV (c.m.) follows closely the predictions of the spectator stripping model, and results in highly excited HCO^+ product ions. This reaction is found to proceed via a direct impulsive mechanism, without any long-lived intermediate complexes involved. The reaction cross section is proportional to E_{T} ^{-1/2}, where E_ {rm T} is the reactant ion relative translational energy. Deuterium atom transfer from D_2 to CO^+ over the collision energy range from 0.41 to 5.14 eV (c.m.) occurs also in a direct process. Reaction cross section is proportional to rm E_{T}^{ -1/2}. The results are very similar to those of the reaction rm CO^+ + H_2. The reaction CO^+ + HD has two product channels, leading to the formation of HCO ^+ and DCO^+, respectively. The reaction is studied over the energy range from 0.88 to 5.00 eV (c.m.). It is found that the production of HCO^+ is consistently the slightly favored reaction channel, which is attributed to the orientation isotope effect. The translational exoergicity for both reaction channels follows closely the prediction of spectator stripping model. Product DCO^+ ions are in higher excited states than HCO ^+ ions. Product velocity distribution contour maps indicate that, at the lowest energies, the DCO ^+ production channel has a longer reaction duration than the HCO^+ production channel, but both reaction channels are dominated by direct

  19. In situ-generated metal oxide catalyst during CO oxidation reaction transformed from redox-active metal-organic framework-supported palladium nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The preparation of redox-active metal-organic framework (ra-MOF)-supported Pd nanoparticles (NPs) via the redox couple-driven method is reported, which can yield unprotected metallic NPs at room temperature within 10 min without the use of reducing agents. The Pd@ra-MOF has been exploited as a precursor of an active catalyst for CO oxidation. Under the CO oxidation reaction condition, Pd@ra-MOF is transformed into a PdOx-NiOy/C nanocomposite to generate catalytically active species in situ, and the resultant nanocatalyst shows sustainable activity through synergistic stabilization. PMID:22898143

  20. Study of chemical reactions under the influence of ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kien-Yin.

    1993-01-01

    At Los Alamos the author is interested in sonochemistry because there is potential for accelerating reactions involving the synthesis of certain nitro compounds and for reducing the possibility of decomposition under milder reaction conditions. The author has initiated the study of the nitration of 2,4-dihydro-3H-1,2,4-triazol-3-one with concentrated nitric acid under sonication. The preparation of 3,6-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-1,2-dihydro-1,2,4,5-tetrazine, and oxidation of 3,6-diamino-1,2,4,5-tetrazine were also studied. Sonication reaction conditions and results of these reactions under ultrasound are discussed in detail.

  1. Study of chemical reactions under the influence of ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kien-Yin

    1993-07-01

    At Los Alamos the author is interested in sonochemistry because there is potential for accelerating reactions involving the synthesis of certain nitro compounds and for reducing the possibility of decomposition under milder reaction conditions. The author has initiated the study of the nitration of 2,4-dihydro-3H-1,2,4-triazol-3-one with concentrated nitric acid under sonication. The preparation of 3,6-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-1,2-dihydro-1,2,4,5-tetrazine, and oxidation of 3,6-diamino-1,2,4,5-tetrazine were also studied. Sonication reaction conditions and results of these reactions under ultrasound are discussed in detail.

  2. Study of multi-nucleon transfer reactions with light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Benzoni, G.; Montanari, D.; Bracco, A.; Blasi, N.; Camera, F.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Corsi, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Nicolini, R.; Wieland, O.; Zalite, A.; Zocca, F.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Stefan, I.; Ibrahim, F.; Verney, D.; Battacharyya, S.; De France, G.

    2008-05-12

    Multi-nucleon transfer reactions are useful tools to populate exotic nuclei, particularly the neutron-rich ones. In this view, two different experiments have been performed employing a stable ({sup 22}Ne) and a radioactive ({sup 24}Ne) beam, both impinging on a {sup 208}Pb target. The first reaction has been studied using the CLARA-PRISMA-DANTE set-up at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Legnaro-Italy), while the second reaction was performed at Ganil (Caen-France) employing a SPIRAL radioactive beam of {sup 24}Ne. In this case recoils and coincident {gamma} rays were detected with the VAMOS-EXOGAM set-up.The data show that MNT reactions can selectively populate states of different nature and, therefore, are a good tool to study nuclear structure further away from stability.

  3. Short-range plasmonic nanofocusing within submicron regimes facilitates in situ probing and promoting of interfacial reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chen-Chieh; Lin, Keng-Te; Su, Pao-Yun; Wang, En-Yun; Yen, Yu-Ting; Chen, Hsuen-Li

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a simple configuration, based on high-index dielectric nanoparticles (NPs) and plasmonic nanostructures, is employed for the nanofocusing of submicron-short-range surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). The excited SPPs are locally bound and focused at the interface between the dielectric NPs and the underlying metallic nanostructures, thereby greatly enhancing the local electromagnetic field. Taking advantage of the surface properties of the dielectric NPs, this system performs various functions. For example, the nanofocusing of submicron-short-range SPPs is used to enhance the Raman signals of gas molecules adsorbed on the dielectric NPs. In addition, the presence of the local strong electromagnetic field accelerates the rates of interfacial reactions on the surfaces of the dielectric NPs. Therefore, the proposed nanofocusing configuration can both promote and probe interfacial reactions simultaneously. Herein, the promotion and probing of the desorption of EtOH vapor are described, as well as the photodegradation of methylene blue. Moreover, the nanofocusing of SPPs is demonstrated on an aluminum surface in both the visible and UV regimes, a process that has not been achieved using conventional tapered waveguide nanofocusing structures. Therefore, the nanofocusing of submicron-short-range SPPs by dielectric NPs on plasmonic nanostructures is not limited to low-loss noble metals. Accordingly, this system has potential for use in light management and on-chip green devices and sensors.In this study, a simple configuration, based on high-index dielectric nanoparticles (NPs) and plasmonic nanostructures, is employed for the nanofocusing of submicron-short-range surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). The excited SPPs are locally bound and focused at the interface between the dielectric NPs and the underlying metallic nanostructures, thereby greatly enhancing the local electromagnetic field. Taking advantage of the surface properties of the dielectric NPs, this

  4. In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Loring, John S.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Wang, Zheming; Joly, Alan G.; Sklarew, Deborah S.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2011-07-19

    Carbonation reactions are central to the prospect of CO2 trapping by mineralization in geologic reservoirs. In contrast to the relevant aqueous-mediated reactions, little is known about the propensity for carbonation in the long-term partner fluid: water-containing supercritical carbon dioxide (‘wet’ scCO2). We employed in situ mid-infrared spectroscopy to follow the reaction of a model silicate mineral (forsterite, Mg2SiO4) for 24 hr with wet scCO2 at 50°C and 180 atm, using water concentrations corresponding to 0%, 55%, 95%, and 136% saturation. Results show a dramatic dependence of reactivity on water concentration and the presence of liquid water on the forsterite particles. Exposure to neat scCO2 showed no detectable carbonation reaction. At 55% and 95% water saturation, a liquid-like thin water film was detected on the forsterite particles; less than 1% of the forsterite transformed, mostly within the first 3 hours of exposure to the fluid. At 136% saturation, where an (excess) liquid water film approximately several nanometers thick was intentionally condensed on the forsterite, the carbonation reaction proceeded continuously for 24 hr with 10% to 15% transformation. Our collective results suggest constitutive links between water concentration, water film formation, reaction rate and extent, and reaction products in wet scCO2.

  5. In situ monitoring of brain tissue reaction of chronically implanted electrodes with an optical coherence tomography fiber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yijing; Hassler, Christina; Stieglitz, Thomas; Seifert, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2014-03-01

    Neural microelectrodes are well established tools for delivering therapeutic electrical pulses, and recording neural electrophysiological signals. However, long term implanted neural probes often become functionally impaired by tissue encapsulation. At present, analyzing this immune reaction is only feasible with post-mortem histology; currently no means for specific in vivo monitoring exist and most applicable imaging modalities provide no sufficient resolution for a cellular measurement in deep brain regions. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a well developed imaging modality, providing cellular resolution and up to 1.2 mm imaging depth in brain tissue. Further more, a fiber based spectral domain OCT was shown to be capable of minimally invasive brain intervention. In the present study, we propose to use a fiber based spectral domain OCT to monitor the the progression of the tissue's immune response and scar encapsulation of microprobes in a rat animal model. We developed an integrated OCT fiber catheter consisting of an implantable ferrule based fiber cannula and a fiber patch cable. The fiber cannula was 18.5 mm long, including a 10.5 mm ceramic ferrule and a 8.0 mm long, 125 μm single mode fiber. A mating sleeve was used to fix and connect the fiber cannula to the OCT fiber cable. Light attenuation between the OCT fiber cable and the fiber cannula through the mating sleeve was measured and minimized. The fiber cannula was implanted in rat brain together with a microelectrode in sight used as a foreign body to induce the brain tissue immune reaction. Preliminary data showed a significant enhancement of the OCT backscattering signal during the brain tissue scarring process, while the OCT signal of the flexible microelectrode was getting weaker consequentially.

  6. Kinetics of methane hydrate decomposition studied via in situ low temperature X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Everett, S Michelle; Rawn, Claudia J; Keffer, David J; Mull, Derek L; Payzant, E Andrew; Phelps, Tommy J

    2013-05-01

    Gas hydrate is known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Based on results from the decomposition of three nominally similar methane hydrate samples, the kinetics of two regions, 180-200 and 230-260 K, within the overall decomposition range 140-260 K, were studied by in situ low temperature X-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic rate constants, k(a), and the reaction mechanisms, n, for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region, and activation energies, E(a), were determined by the Arrhenius plot. E(a) determined from the data for 180-200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230-260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher E(a) in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions. PMID:23557375

  7. Initial interaction of sulfur dioxide with water covered metal surfaces: An in situ IRAS study

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, D.; Leygraf, C.

    1995-05-01

    Sulfur dioxide is considered to be one of the most important stimulators of atmospheric corrosion in outdoor environments and numerous investigations have been made to understand its role. Despite clear evidence of the corrosion accelerating effect of SO{sub 2} there is still a lack in detailed knowledge on a molecular level of how SO{sub 2} interacts with metal surfaces during conditions of atmospheric corrosion. In situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) has been used to study the initial interaction of sulfur dioxide with water adlayer covered copper, nickel, and zinc surfaces. Each metal was exposed to 0.21 ppm SO{sub 2} in flowing air at 80% relative humidity and the formation of sulfite was followed from submonolayer thickness to layers of corrosion products of a few manometers thickness. From the positions of sulfite bonds in the experimentally obtained IRAS spectra and from considerations of optically induced band shifts in calculated IRAS spectra, it is suggested that the sulfite ions are coordinated with sulfur or sulfur and oxygen to the copper surface and with oxygen to the nickel and zinc surfaces. A fast initial growth rate was observed for the sulfite layer, which was followed by a slower growth rate after a few hours of exposure. A reaction sequence is suggested where bisulfite ions, formed by hydrolysis of sulfur dioxide in the water adlayer, generate surface metal-sulfite complexes at the oxide covered metal surface which subsequently detach from the surface and precipitate as thin layers of corrosion products.

  8. Recent Direct Reaction Experimental Studies with Radioactive Tin Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L.; Ahn, S.; Allmond, J. M.; Ayres, A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J. S.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C.; Cartegni, L.; Cerizza, G.; Chae, K. Y.; Cizewski, J. A.; Gade, A.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Garcia-Ruiz, R. F.; Grzywacz, R.; Howard, M. E.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J. F.; Manning, B.; Matoš, M.; McDaniel, S.; Miller, D.; Nesaraja, C. D.; O'Malley, P. D.; Padgett, S.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Pain, S. D.; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, D. C.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Schmitt, K. T.; Shore, A.; Smith, M. S.; Stracener, D. W.; Stroberg, S. R.; Tostevin, J.; Varner, R. L.; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.; Winkler, R.

    2015-01-01

    Direct reaction techniques are powerful tools to study the single-particle nature of nuclei. Performing direct reactions on short-lived nuclei requires radioactive ion beams produced either via fragmentation or the Isotope Separation OnLine (ISOL) method. Some of the most interesting regions to study with direct reactions are close to the magic numbers where changes in shell structure can be tracked. These changes can impact the final abundances of explosive nucleosynthesis. The structure of the chain of tin isotopes is strongly influenced by the Z = 50 proton shell closure, as well as the neutron shell closures lying in the neutron-rich, N = 82, and neutron-deficient, N = 50, regions. Here, we present two examples of direct reactions on exotic tin isotopes. The first uses a one-neutron transfer reaction and a low-energy reaccelerated ISOL beam to study states in Sn-131 from across the N = 82 shell closure. The second example utilizes a one-neutron knockout reaction on fragmentation beams of neutron-deficient Sn-106,108Sn. In conclusion, In both cases, measurements of γ rays in coincidence with charged particles proved to be invaluable.

  9. Recent Direct Reaction Experimental Studies with Radioactive Tin Beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jones, K. L.; Ahn, S.; Allmond, J. M.; Ayres, A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J. S.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C.; et al

    2015-01-01

    Direct reaction techniques are powerful tools to study the single-particle nature of nuclei. Performing direct reactions on short-lived nuclei requires radioactive ion beams produced either via fragmentation or the Isotope Separation OnLine (ISOL) method. Some of the most interesting regions to study with direct reactions are close to the magic numbers where changes in shell structure can be tracked. These changes can impact the final abundances of explosive nucleosynthesis. The structure of the chain of tin isotopes is strongly influenced by the Z = 50 proton shell closure, as well as the neutron shell closures lying in the neutron-rich, Nmore » = 82, and neutron-deficient, N = 50, regions. Here, we present two examples of direct reactions on exotic tin isotopes. The first uses a one-neutron transfer reaction and a low-energy reaccelerated ISOL beam to study states in Sn-131 from across the N = 82 shell closure. The second example utilizes a one-neutron knockout reaction on fragmentation beams of neutron-deficient Sn-106,108Sn. In conclusion, In both cases, measurements of γ rays in coincidence with charged particles proved to be invaluable.« less

  10. Indium hydroxide to oxide decomposition observed in one nanocrystal during in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miehe, Gerhard; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander

    2013-02-15

    The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to study, in situ, spatially resolved decomposition in individual nanocrystals of metal hydroxides and oxyhydroxides. This case study reports on the decomposition of indium hydroxide (c-In(OH){sub 3}) to bixbyite-type indium oxide (c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The electron beam is focused onto a single cube-shaped In(OH){sub 3} crystal of {l_brace}100{r_brace} morphology with ca. 35 nm edge length and a sequence of HR-TEM images was recorded during electron beam irradiation. The frame-by-frame analysis of video sequences allows for the in situ, time-resolved observation of the shape and orientation of the transformed crystals, which in turn enables the evaluation of the kinetics of c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystallization. Supplementary material (video of the transformation) related to this article can be found online at (10.1016/j.jssc.2012.09.022). After irradiation the shape of the parent cube-shaped crystal is preserved, however, its linear dimension (edge) is reduced by the factor 1.20. The corresponding spotted selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern representing zone [001] of c-In(OH){sub 3} is transformed to a diffuse strongly textured ring-like pattern of c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} that indicates the transformed cube is no longer a single crystal but is disintegrated into individual c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} domains with the size of about 5-10 nm. The induction time of approximately 15 s is estimated from the time-resolved Fourier transforms. The volume fraction of the transformed phase (c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3}), calculated from the shrinkage of the parent c-In(OH){sub 3} crystal in the recorded HR-TEM images, is used as a measure of the kinetics of c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystallization within the framework of Avrami-Erofeev formalism. The Avrami exponent of {approx}3 is characteristic for a reaction mechanism with fast nucleation at the beginning of the reaction and subsequent three-dimensional growth of

  11. Setup for in situ x-ray diffraction study of swift heavy ion irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kulriya, P. K.; Singh, F.; Tripathi, A.; Ahuja, R.; Kothari, A.; Dutt, R. N.; Mishra, Y. K.; Kumar, Amit; Avasthi, D. K.

    2007-11-15

    An in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of the Pelletron accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre for in situ studies of phase change in swift heavy ion irradiated materials. A high vacuum chamber with suitable windows for incident and diffracted X-rays is integrated with the goniometer and the beamline. Indigenously made liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) temperature sample cooling unit is installed. The snapshots of growth of particles with fluence of 90 MeV Ni ions were recorded using in situ XRD experiment, illustrating the potential of this in situ facility. A thin film of C{sub 60} was used to test the sample cooling unit. It shows that the phase of the C{sub 60} film transforms from a cubic lattice (at room temperature) to a fcc lattice at around T=255 K.

  12. Effects of methanol-to-oil ratio, catalyst amount and reaction time on the FAME yield by in situ transesterification of rubber seeds (Hevea brasiliensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulkadir, Bashir Abubakar; Uemura, Yoshimitsu; Ramli, Anita; Osman, Noridah B.; Kusakabe, Katsuki; Kai, Takami

    2014-10-01

    In this research, biodiesel is produced by in situ transesterification (direct transesterification) method from the rubber seeds using KOH as a catalyst. The influence of methanol to seeds mass ratio, duration of reaction, and catalyst loading was investigated. The result shows that, the best ratio of seeds to methanol is 1:6 (10 g seeds with 60 g methanol), 120 minutes reaction time and catalyst loading of 3.0 g. The maximum FAME yield obtain was 70 %. This findings support FAME production from the seeds of rubber tree using direct transesterifcation method from the seeds of rubber tree as an alternative to diesel fuel. Also, significant properties of biodiesel such as cloud point, density, pour point, specific gravity, and viscosity were investigated.

  13. Alterations in juvenile flatfish gill epithelia induced by sediment-bound toxicants: A comparative in situ and ex situ study.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carla; Alves de Matos, António P; Costa, Maria H; Costa, Pedro M

    2015-12-01

    Juvenile Solea senegalensis were exposed in the laboratory (ex situ) and field (in situ) to different sediments of a moderately impacted estuary (the Sado, Portugal) for 28 days. A qualitative histopathological screening yielded scant lesions to gills, albeit alterations such as epithelial hyperplasia being evident and more frequent in fish exposed ex situ. Fully quantitative traits, namely chloride and goblet cell count and size revealed differences between the two bioassay approaches, with ex situ experiments likely enhancing bioavailability of toxicants. Chloride cells endured autolytic processes that could, at least in part, relate to contamination by mixed metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Goblet cells did not reveal changes in the chemistry of mucous. Still, their number and size was reduced in fish exposed ex situ to the sediments most contaminated by PAHs, with evidence for adaptation. Also, copper histochemistry revealed the potential role of mucocytes in the regulation of metals. PMID:26518455

  14. Revealing Stepwise Mechanisms in Dipolar Cycloaddition Reactions: Computational Study of the Reaction between Nitrones and Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Darù, Andrea; Roca-López, David; Tejero, Tomás; Merino, Pedro

    2016-01-15

    The mechanism of cycloaddition reactions of nitrones with isocyanates has been studied using density functional theory (DFT) methods at the M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The exploration of the potential energy surfaces associated with two reactive channels leading to 1,2,4-oxadiazolidin-5-ones and 1,4,2-dioxazolidines revealed that the cycloaddition reaction takes place through a concerted mechanism in gas phase and in apolar solvents but a stepwise mechanism in polar solvents. In stepwise mechanisms, the first step of the reaction is a rare case in which the nitrone oxygen acts as a nucleophile by attacking the central carbon atom of the isocyanate (interacting with the π-system of the C═O bond) to give an intermediate. The corresponding transition structure is stabilized by an attractive electrostatic interaction favored in a polar medium. The second step of the reaction is the rate-limiting one in which the formation of 1,2,4-oxadiazolidin-5-ones or 1,4,2-dioxazolidines is decided. Calculations indicate that formation of 1,2,4-oxadiazolidin-5-ones is favored both kinetically and thermodynamically independently of the solvent, in agreement with experimental observations. Noncovalent interactions (NCI) and topological analysis of the gradient field of electron localization function (ELF) bonding confirmed the observed interactions. PMID:26682934

  15. Study of transfer and breakup reactions with the plastic box

    SciTech Connect

    Stokstad, R.G.; Albiston, C.R.; Bantel, M.; Chan, Y.; Countryman, P.J.; Gazes, S.; Harvey, B.G.; Homeyer, H.; Murphy, M.J.; Tserruya, I.

    1984-12-01

    The study of transfer reactions with heavy-ion projectiles is complicated by the frequent presence of three or more nuclei in the final state. One prolific source of three-body reactions is the production of a primary ejectile in an excited state above a particle threshold. A subset of transfer reactions, viz., those producing ejectiles in bound states, can be identified experimentally. This has been accomplished with a 4..pi.. detector constructed of one-millimeter-thick scintillator paddles of dimension 20 cm x 20 cm. The paddles are arranged in the form of a cube centered around the target with small entrance and exit apertures for the beam and the projectile-like fragments, (PLF). The detection of a light particle (e.g., a proton or an alpha particle) in coincidence with a PLF indicates a breakup reaction. The absence of any such coincidence indicates a reaction in which all the charge lost by the projectile was transferred to the target. With this technique we have studied the transfer and breakup reactions induced by 220 and 341 MeV /sup 20/Ne ions on a gold target. Ejectiles from Li to Ne have been measured at several scattering angles. The absolute cross sections, angular distributions and energy spectra for the transfer and breakup reactions are presented. Relatively large cross sections are observed for the complete transfer of up to seven units of charge (i.e., a nitrogen nucleus). The relatively large probabilities for ejectiles to be produced in particle-bound states suggest that on the average, most of the excitation energy in a collision resides in the heavy fragment when mass is transferred from the lighter to the heavier fragment. The gross features and trends in the energy spectra for transfer and breakup reactions are similar. 20 references.

  16. In situ X-ray diffraction monitoring of a mechanochemical reaction reveals a unique topology metal-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsenis, Athanassios D.; Puškarić, Andreas; Štrukil, Vjekoslav; Mottillo, Cristina; Julien, Patrick A.; Užarević, Krunoslav; Pham, Minh-Hao; Do, Trong-On; Kimber, Simon A. J.; Lazić, Predrag; Magdysyuk, Oxana; Dinnebier, Robert E.; Halasz, Ivan; Friščić, Tomislav

    2015-03-01

    Chemical and physical transformations by milling are attracting enormous interest for their ability to access new materials and clean reactivity, and are central to a number of core industries, from mineral processing to pharmaceutical manufacturing. While continuous mechanical stress during milling is thought to create an environment supporting nonconventional reactivity and exotic intermediates, such speculations have remained without proof. Here we use in situ, real-time powder X-ray diffraction monitoring to discover and capture a metastable, novel-topology intermediate of a mechanochemical transformation. Monitoring the mechanochemical synthesis of an archetypal metal-organic framework ZIF-8 by in situ powder X-ray diffraction reveals unexpected amorphization, and on further milling recrystallization into a non-porous material via a metastable intermediate based on a previously unreported topology, herein named katsenite (kat). The discovery of this phase and topology provides direct evidence that milling transformations can involve short-lived, structurally unusual phases not yet accessed by conventional chemistry.

  17. Time-resolved infrared absorption studies of the dynamics of radical reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, R. G.

    2008-01-01

    There is very little information available about the dynamics of radical+radical interactions. These processes are important in combustion being chain termination steps as well as generating new molecular species. To study these processes, a new experimental apparatus has been constructed to investigate radical-radical dynamics. The first radical or atomic species is produced with a known concentration in a microwave discharge flow system. The second is produced by pulsed laser photolysis of a suitable photolyte. The time dependence of individual rovibrational states of the product is followed by absorption of a continuous infrared laser. This approach will allow the reaction of interest to be differentiated from other radical reactions occurring simultaneously. The experimental approach is highly versatile, being able to detect a number of molecular species of particular interest to combustion processes such as water, methane, acetylene etc. at the state specific level. State specific infrared absorption coefficients of radicals can be measured in situ allowing for the determination of the absolute concentrations and hence branching ratios for reactions having multiple reaction pathways.

  18. Study of solid/gas phase photocatalytic reactions by electron ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nuño, Manuel; Ball, Richard J; Bowen, Chris R

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes a novel methodology for the real-time study of solid-gas phase photocatalytic reactions in situ. A novel reaction chamber has been designed and developed to facilitate the investigation of photoactive materials under different gas compositions. UV irradiation in the wavelength of ranges 376-387 and 381-392 nm was provided using specially designed high efficiency light emitting diode arrays. The experiments used air containing 190 ppm NO2 in a moist environment with a relative humidity of 0.1%. Photocatalytic samples consisting of pressed pellets of rutile and anatase crystalline forms of TiO2 were monitored over a period of 150 min. An ultra-high vacuum right angled bleed valve allowed a controlled flow of gas from the main reaction chamber at atmospheric pressure to a residual gas analyser operating at a vacuum of 10(-5)  mbar. The apparatus and methodology have been demonstrated to provide high sensitivity (ppb). The rate of degradation of NO2 attributed to reaction at the TiO2 surface was sensitive to both crystal structures (anatase or rutile) and wavelength of irradiation. PMID:25044899

  19. Studies of complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    Our work involves the study of intermediate energy heavy-ion nuclear reactions. This work has two foci. On the one hand, we desire to learn about the properties of nuclear matter under abnormal conditions, in this energy domain, predominately low densities. This purpose runs abreast of the second, which is the study of the relevant reaction mechanisms. The two objectives are inexorably linked because our experimental laboratory for studying nuclear matter properties is a dynamic one. We are forced to ask how nuclear matter properties, such as phase transitions, are reflected in the dynamics of the reactions. It may be that irrefutable information about nuclear matter will not be extracted from the reaction work. Nevertheless, we are compelled to undertake this effort not only because it is the only game in town and as yet we do not know that information cannot be extracted, but also because of our second objective. The process leads to an understanding of the reaction mechanism themselves and therefore to the response characteristics of finite, perhaps non-equilibrium, strongly interacting systems. Our program has been: To study energy, mass, and angular momentum deposition by studying incomplete fusion reactions. To gain confidence that we understand how highly excited systems decompose by studying all emissions from the highly excited systems. To push these kinds of studies into the intermediate energy domain, with excitation function studies. And attempt to learn about the dynamics of the decays using particle-particle correlations. In the last effort, we have decided to focus on simple systems, where we believe, definitive statements are possible. These avenues of research share a common theme, large complex fragment production.

  20. In situ SEM observation of the Si negative electrode reaction in an ionic-liquid-based lithium-ion secondary battery.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Tetsuya; Kanetsuku, Tsukasa; Sano, Teruki; Oshima, Yoshifumi; Ui, Koichi; Yamagata, Masaki; Ishikawa, Masashi; Kuwabata, Susumu

    2015-06-01

    By exploiting characteristics such as negligible vapour pressure and ion-conductive nature of an ionic liquid (IL), we established an in situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) method to observe the electrode reaction in the IL-based Li-ion secondary battery (LIB). When 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide ([C2mim][FSA]) with lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (Li[TFSA]) was used as the electrolyte, the Si negative electrode exhibited a clear morphology change during the charge process, without any solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer formation, while in the discharge process, the appearance was slightly changed, suggesting that a morphology change is irreversible in the charge-discharge process. On the other hand, the use of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([C2mim][TFSA]) with Li[TFSA] did not induce a change in the Si negative electrode. It is interesting to note this distinct contrast, which could be attributed to SEI layer formation from the electrochemical breakdown of [C2mim](+) at the Si negative electrode|separator interface in the [C2mim][TFSA]-based LIB. This in situ SEM observation technique could reveal the effect of the IL species electron-microscopically on the Si negative electrode reaction. PMID:25688094

  1. Molybdenum carbide nanocatalysts at work in the in situ environment: a density functional tight-binding and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingchen; Salahub, Dennis R

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous reactions catalyzed by transition-metal-containing nanoparticles represent a crucial type of reaction in chemical industry. Because of the existing gap in understanding heterogeneous catalysis between a cluster of a few atoms and a bulk model of periodic slabs, reactions catalyzed by transition-metal-containing nanoparticles are still not well understood. Herein, we provide a multiscale modeling approach to study the benzene hydrogenation reactions on molybdenum carbide nanoparticles (MCNPs) in the process of in situ heavy oil upgrading. By coupling the quantum mechanical (QM) density functional tight-binding (DFTB) method with a molecular mechanical (MM) force field, a QM/MM model was built to describe the reactants, the nanoparticles and the surroundings. Umbrella sampling (US) was used to calculate the free energy profiles of the benzene hydrogenation reactions in a model aromatic solvent in the in situ heavy oil upgrading conditions. By comparing with the traditional method in computational heterogeneous catalysis, the results reveal new features of the metallic MCNPs. Rather than being rigid, they are very flexible under working condition due to the entropic contributions of the MCNPs and the solvent, which greatly affect the free energy profiles of these nanoscale heterogeneous reactions. PMID:25774905

  2. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1990-11-01

    The goal of this project was to increase the authors understanding of the interplay between the kinetic and electronic energy of free atoms and their chemical reactivity by answering the following questions: (1) what is the chemistry of high-energy carbon silicon and germanium atoms recoiling from nuclear transformations; (2) how do the reactions of recoiling carbon, silicon and germanium atoms take place - what are the operative reaction mechanisms; (3) how does the reactivity of free carbon, silicon and germanium atoms vary with energy and electronic state, and what are the differences in the chemistry of these three isoelectronic atoms This research program consisted of a coordinated set of experiments capable of achieving these goals by defining the structures, the kinetic and internal energy, and the charge states of the intermediates formed in the gas-phase reactions of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms with silane, germane, and unsaturated organic molecules, and of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules. The reactions of high energy silicon, germanium, and carbon atoms created by nuclear recoil were studied with substrates chosen so that their products illuminated the mechanism of the recoil reactions. Information about the energy and electronic state of the recoiling atoms at reaction was obtained from the variation in end product yields and the extent of decomposition and rearrangement of primary products (usually reactive intermediates) as a function of total pressure and the concentration of inert moderator molecules that remove kinetic energy from the recoiling atoms and can induce transitions between electronic spin states. 29 refs.

  3. Secondary Teachers' Reactions to the New Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Lynn R.; Drake, Frederick D.

    1994-01-01

    Reports on 29 veteran secondary social studies teachers' reactions and responses to the New Social Studies movement of the 1960s and 1970s. Results indicate the magnitude of the gulf that exists between the concerns of theorists and the issues that are important to teachers. (CFR)

  4. Reaction dynamics studies for the system 7Be+58Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresi, D.; Mazzocco, M.; Acosta, L.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Fierro, N.; Glodariu, T.; Grilj, L.; Guglielmetti, A.; Keeley, N.; La Commara, M.; Martel, I.; Mazzocchi, C.; Molini, P.; Pakou, A.; Parascandolo, C.; Parkar, V. V.; Patronis, N.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Romoli, M.; Rusek, K.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Sandoli, M.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Strano, E.; Stroe, L.; Zerva, K.

    2015-04-01

    The study of reactions induced by exotic weakly bound nuclei at energies around the Coulomb barrier had attracted a large interest in the last decade, since the features of these nuclei can deeply affect the reaction dynamics. The discrimination between different reaction mechanisms is, in general, a rather difficult task. It can be achieved by using detector arrays covering high solid angle and with high granularity that allow to measure the reaction products and, possibly, coincidences between them, as, for example, recently done for stable weakly bound nuclei [1, 2]. We investigated the collision of the weakly bound nucleus 7Be on a 58Ni target at the beam energy of 1.1 times the Coulomb barrier, measuring the elastic scattering angular distribution and the energy and angular distributions of 3He and 4He. The 7Be radioactive ion beam was produced by the facility EXOTIC at INFN-LNL with an energy of 22 MeV and an intensity of ~3×105 pps. Results showed that the 4He yeld is about 4 times larger than 3He yield, suggesting that reaction mechanisms other than the break-up mostly produce the He isotopes. Theoretical calculations for transfer channels and compound nucleus reactions suggest that complete fusion accounts for (41±5%) of the total reaction cross section extracted from optical model analysis of the elastic scattering data, and that 3He and 4He stripping are the most populated reaction channels among direct processes. Eventually estimation of incomplete fusion contributions to the 3,4He production cross sections was performed through semi-classical calculations with the code PLATYPUS [3].

  5. Studies of the generation and reactions of gaseous HOCl

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    A new laboratory source of gaseous hypochlorous acid (HOCl) has been developed and applied to studies of several reactions which have potential importance in the chemistry of the stratosphere. The new source is dynamic, whereby HOCl is formed by reaction of Cl/sub 2/ with aqueous CaCO/sub 3/ and used before it equilibrates to form Cl/sub 2/O and H/sub 2/O. Compared to the conventional static preparation of HOCl by Cl/sub 2/O-H/sub 2/O-HOCl equilibration, the dynamic HOCl source has a substantially lower Cl/sub 2/O impurity level and is useful for studies which are otherwise complicated by large interference from Cl/sub 2/O. In two kinetic studies, the room temperature bimolecular rate constants of the reactions of OH + HOCl and H + HOCl were found to be (2.4 +/- 1.2) x 10/sup -13/ and (5.0 +/- 1.4) x 10/sup -12/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, respectively. The product distribution in the reaction of Cl + HOCl has been determined in a third investigation; the major reaction channel gives the products Cl/sub 2/ and OH, with a yield of 91% +/- 6% at 298 K. In a fourth investigation, the equilibrium constant (K/sub eq/) of the reaction Cl/sub 2/O + H/sub 2/O = 2 HOCl was determined to be 0.092 +/- 0.011 at 298 K. The results imply that the reactions of OH, H, and Cl with HOCL are not competitive with direct photolysis in the removal of HOCl from the stratosphere.

  6. Miniaturized Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope for In Situ Planetary Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Abbott, Terry; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Thaisen, Kevin; Taylor , Lawrence; Ramsey, Brian; Jerman, Gregory; Sampson, Allen; Harvey, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of remote planetary surfaces calls for the advancement of low power, highly-miniaturized instrumentation. Instruments of this nature that are capable of multiple types of analyses will prove to be particularly useful as we prepare for human return to the moon, and as we continue to explore increasingly remote locations in our Solar System. To this end, our group has been developing a miniaturized Environmental-Scanning Electron Microscope (mESEM) capable of remote investigations of mineralogical samples through in-situ topographical and chemical analysis on a fine scale. The functioning of an SEM is well known: an electron beam is focused to nanometer-scale onto a given sample where resulting emissions such as backscattered and secondary electrons, X-rays, and visible light are registered. Raster scanning the primary electron beam across the sample then gives a fine-scale image of the surface topography (texture), crystalline structure and orientation, with accompanying elemental composition. The flexibility in the types of measurements the mESEM is capable of, makes it ideally suited for a variety of applications. The mESEM is appropriate for use on multiple planetary surfaces, and for a variety of mission goals (from science to non-destructive analysis to ISRU). We will identify potential applications and range of potential uses related to planetary exploration. Over the past few of years we have initiated fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept assembly, consisting of a cold-field-emission electron gun and custom high-voltage power supply, electrostatic electron-beam focusing column, and scanning-imaging electronics plus backscatter detector. Current project status will be discussed. This effort is funded through the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences - Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program.

  7. Experimental study on neptunium migration under in situ geochemical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumata, M.; Vandergraaf, T. T.

    1998-12-01

    Results are reported for migration experiments performed with Np under in situ geochemical conditions over a range of groundwater flow rates in columns of crushed rock in a specially designed facility at the 240-level of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Pinawa, Manitoba, Canada. This laboratory is situated in an intrusive granitic rock formation, the Lac du Bonnet batholith. Highly altered granitic rock and groundwater were obtained from a major subhorizontal fracture zone at a depth of 250 m in the URL. The granite was wet-crushed and wet-sieved with groundwater from this fracture zone. The 180-850-μm size fraction was selected and packed in 20-cm long, 2.54-cm in diameter Teflon™-lined stainless steel columns. Approximately 30-ml vols of groundwater containing 3HHO and 237Np were injected into the columns at flow rates of 0.3, 1, and 3 ml/h, followed by elution with groundwater, obtained from the subhorizontal fracture, at the same flow rates, for a period of 95 days. Elution profiles for 3HHO were obtained, but no 237Np was detected in the eluted groundwater. After terminating the migration experiments, the columns were frozen, the column material was removed and cut into twenty 1-cm thick sections and each section was analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Profiles of 237Np were obtained for the three columns. A one-dimensional transport model was fitted to the 3HHO breakthrough curves to obtain flow parameters for this experiment. These flow parameters were in turn applied to the 237Np concentration profiles in the columns to produce sorption and dispersion coefficients for Np. The results show a strong dependence of retardation factors ( Rf) on flow rate. The decrease in the retarded velocity of the neptunium ( Vn) varied over one order of magnitude under the geochemical conditions for these experiments.

  8. Synthesis and structural characterization of three copper coordination polymers with pyridine derivatives from hydro(solvo)thermal in situ decarboxylation reactions of 2,5-dicarboxylpyridine

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Qin; Xu Jianing; Yu Jiehui; Wang Tiegang; Yang Qingfeng; Xu Jiqing

    2010-07-15

    The hydro(solvo)thermal self-assembles of CuI, KI and 2,5-dicarboxylpyridine [2,5-(COOH){sub 2}py] in different molar ratios in H{sub 2}O/alcohol solutions produced three Cu coordination polymers as 2-D [N-C{sub 2}H{sub 5}py][Cu{sub 3}I{sub 4}] 1, 1-D [N-CH{sub 3}py][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 3}] 2 as well as 1-D [Cu(2-COOpy){sub 2}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O 3 (N-C{sub 2}H{sub 5}py=N-ethylpyridine, N-CH{sub 3}py=N-methylpyridine, 2-COOpy=2-carboxylpyridine). N-C{sub 2}H{sub 5}py in 1 and N-CH{sub 3}py in 2 derived from the solvothermal in situ simultaneous decarboxylation and N-alkylation reactions of 2,5-(COOH){sub 2}py. The semi-decarboxylation reaction of 2,5-(COOH){sub 2}py into 2-COOpy occurred in the preparation of 3. X-ray single-crystal analysis revealed that CuI is transformed into a 2-D [Cu{sub 3}I{sub 4}]{sup -} layer in compound 1 and a 1-D chain in compound 2, templated by [N-C{sub 2}H{sub 5}py]{sup +} and [N-CH{sub 3}py]{sup +}, respectively. Compound 3 is a divalent Cu compound. The Cu(II) centers with a 4+2 geometry are coordinated by {mu}{sub 3}-mode 2-COOpy ligands. All of the title compounds were characterized by CHN analysis, IR spectrum analysis and TG analysis. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibit fluorescence properties with the maximum emissions at 581 nm for 1 and 537 nm for 2. - Graphical abstract: Three compounds were obtained via in situ metal-ligand hydro(solvo)thermal reactions of 2,5-(cooh){sub 2}py with cui. Three types of in situ reactions occurred for 2,5-(cooh){sub 2}py: decarboxylation n-ethylated in 1, n-methylated in 2 and semi-decarboxylation in 3.

  9. In situ NRA study of hydrogen isotope exchange in self-ion damaged tungsten exposed to neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markelj, S.; Založnik, A.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Vavpetič, P.; Pelicon, P.; Čadež, I.

    2016-02-01

    Isotope exchange was studied in-situ by Nuclear Reaction Analysis in the bulk of self-ion damaged tungsten at 600 K. Both variations of isotope exchange of H by D and of D by H were measured. The deuterium isothermal desorption was also studied and evaluated in order to be able to resolve the self-desorption from the isotope exchange at 600 K. The isotope exchange was also studied on the surface by Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis at 480 K and 380 K. The exchange mechanism was effective both on the surface and in the bulk of damaged tungsten. A simple model was introduced to describe the exchange efficiency on the surface and in the bulk obtaining the exchange cross sections on the surface and in bulk. In both cases an isotope effect was observed, where the exchange of H atoms by D atoms was more efficient than for the reverse sequence.

  10. Platinum-cobalt catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells - Long term behavior under ex-situ and in-situ conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Alexander; Grimmer, Christoph; Perchthaler, Markus; Weinberger, Stephan; Pichler, Birgit; Heinzl, Christoph; Scheu, Christina; Mautner, Franz-Andreas; Bitschnau, Brigitte; Hacker, Viktor

    2014-11-01

    Platinum cobalt catalysts (Pt-Co) have attracted much interest as cathode catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) due to their high activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Many of the reported catalysts show outstanding performance in ex-situ experiments. However, the laborious synthesis protocols of these Pt-Co catalysts disable an efficient and economic production of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). We present an economic, flexible and continuous Pt-M/C catalyst preparation method as part of a large scale membrane electrode assembly manufacturing. In comparison, the as-prepared Pt-Co/C based high temperature (HT)-PEM MEA showed an equal performance to a commercially available HT-PEM MEA during 600 h of operation under constant load, although the commercial one had a significantly higher Pt loading at the cathode.

  11. Mechanism study on the influence of in situ SOx removal on N2O emission in CFB boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lingnan; Qin, Wu; Hu, Xiaoying; Dong, Changqing; Yang, Yongping

    2015-04-01

    The influence of in situ deSOx process on N2O emission in CFB boiler was studied using density functional theory calculations. The competitive adsorption of SO2 and N2O on pure CaO (1 0 0) surface was first studied and the reaction priority was determined. Results showed that SO2 was more likely to adsorb on CaO (1 0 0) surface O anion site, which hindered the catalytic decomposition of N2O on CaO (1 0 0) surface and sulfurized the CaO (1 0 0) surface under reducing atmosphere. Then a partially sulfurized CaO (1 0 0) surface was established to study the catalytic activity of deSOx reaction intermediate on N2O decomposition. The O atom transfer process and the surface recovery process were two key steps for N2O decomposition and the rate-determining step was the latter one. The sulfurization of the surface could deactivate its catalytic activity on N2O decomposition compared with pure CaO (1 0 0) surface but it was still better than that of pure CaS (1 0 0) surface. The free Gibbs energy was calculated to incorporate the temperature dependence of respective reactions. When temperature was higher than 373 K, the surface recovery was more likely to proceed via the LH route.

  12. Predicting gold-mediated catalytic oxidative-coupling reactions from single crystal studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2014-03-18

    that the nucleophilic reaction should be independent of the origin of the aldehydes, whether formed in situ or introduced externally. As a further example, adsorbed amides, formed from deprotonation of amines by atomic oxygen, can also attack aldehydes nucleophilically to yield the corresponding amides. Our mechanistic framework can also explain more elaborate gold-mediated chemistry, such as a unique carbonylation reaction via two subsequent nucleophilic attacks. These model studies on well-defined Au(111) at low pressure predict steady-state catalytic behavior on nanoporous gold under practical conditions. The fundamental principles of this research can also explain many other oxygen-assisted gold-mediated reactions observed under ambient conditions. PMID:24387694

  13. Unified studies of structure and reactions in light unstable nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    The generalized two-center cluster model (GTCM), which can treat covalent, ionic and atomic configurations in general systems with two inert cores plus valence nucleons, is formulated in the basis of the microscopic cluster model. In this model, the covalent configurations constructed by the molecular orbital (MO) method and the atomic (or ionic) configuration obtained by the valence bonding (VB) method can be described in a consistent manner. GTCM is applied to the light neutron-rich system, 10,12Be = α + α + XN (X = 2,4), and the unified studies of the structural changes and the reaction problem are performed. In the structure study, the calculated energy levels are characterized in terms of the chemical bonding like structures, such as the covalent MO or ionic VB structures. The chemical bonding structures changes from level to level within a small energy interval. In the unbound region, the structure problem with the total system of α + α + XN and the reaction problem, induced by the collision of an asymptotic VB state of α+6,8He, are combined by GTCM. The properties of unbound resonant states are discussed in a close connection to the reaction mechanism, and some enhancement factors originated from the properties of the intrinsic states are predicted in the reaction observables. The unified calculation of the structures and the reactions is applied to the Coulomb shift problem in the mirror system, such the 10Be and 10C nuclei. The Coulomb displacement energy of the mirror systems are discussed.

  14. Structural characterizaiton and gas reactions of small metal particles by high-resolution, in-situ TEM and TED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The existing in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) facility was improved by adding a separately pumped mini-specimen chamber. The chamber contains wire-evaporation sources for three metals and a specimen heater for moderate substrate temperatures. A sample introduction device was constructed, installed, and tested, facilitating rapid introduction of a specimen into the mini-chamber while maintaining the background pressure in that chamber in the 10(-9) millibar range. Small particles and clusters of Pd, grown by deposition from the vapor phase in an in-situ TEM facility on amorphous and crystalline support films of alumina and on ultra-thin carbon films, were analyzed by conventional high-resolution TEM and image analysis in terms of detectability, number density, and size distribution. The smallest particles that could be detected and counted contained no more than 6 atoms; size determinations could be made for particles 1 nm in diameter. The influence of various oxygen plasma treatments, annealing treatments, and of increasing the substrate temperature during deposition was investigated. The TEM technique was employed to demonstrate that under otherwise identica l conditions the lattice parameter of Pd particles in the 1 to 2 nm size range and supported in random orientation on ex-situ prepared mica films is expanded by some 3% when compared to 5 nm size particles. It is believed that this expansion is neither a small-particle diffraction effect nor due to pseudomorphism, but that it is due to a annealing-induced transformation of the small as-deposited particles with predominantly composite crystal structures into larger particles with true f.c.c. structure and thus inherently smaller lattice parameter.

  15. Computational Studies on Cinchona Alkaloid-Catalyzed Asymmetric Organic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tanriver, Gamze; Dedeoglu, Burcu; Catak, Saron; Aviyente, Viktorya

    2016-06-21

    Remarkable progress in the area of asymmetric organocatalysis has been achieved in the last decades. Cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives have emerged as powerful organocatalysts owing to their reactivities leading to high enantioselectivities. The widespread usage of cinchona alkaloids has been attributed to their nontoxicity, ease of use, stability, cost effectiveness, recyclability, and practical utilization in industry. The presence of tunable functional groups enables cinchona alkaloids to catalyze a broad range of reactions. Excellent experimental studies have extensively contributed to this field, and highly selective reactions were catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives. Computational modeling has helped elucidate the mechanistic aspects of cinchona alkaloid catalyzed reactions as well as the origins of the selectivity they induce. These studies have complemented experimental work for the design of more efficient catalysts. This Account presents recent computational studies on cinchona alkaloid catalyzed organic reactions and the theoretical rationalizations behind their effectiveness and ability to induce selectivity. Valuable efforts to investigate the mechanisms of reactions catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and the key aspects of the catalytic activity of cinchona alkaloids in reactions ranging from pharmaceutical to industrial applications are summarized. Quantum mechanics, particularly density functional theory (DFT), and molecular mechanics, including ONIOM, were used to rationalize experimental findings by providing mechanistic insights into reaction mechanisms. B3LYP with modest basis sets has been used in most of the studies; nonetheless, the energetics have been corrected with higher basis sets as well as functionals parametrized to include dispersion M05-2X, M06-2X, and M06-L and functionals with dispersion corrections. Since cinchona alkaloids catalyze reactions by forming complexes with substrates via hydrogen bonds and long

  16. In situ microliter-droplet anodic stripping voltammetry of copper stained on the gold label after galvanic replacement reaction enlargement for ultrasensitive immunoassay of proteins.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaoli; Xu, Aigui; Wang, Linchun; Liu, Ling; Chao, Long; He, Fang; Tan, Yueming; Chen, Chao; Xie, Qingji

    2016-05-15

    We report a new protocol for ultrasensitive electrochemical sandwich-type immunosensing, on the basis of signal amplification by gold-label/copper-staining, galvanic replacement reactions (GRRs), and in situ microliter-droplet anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) after an enhanced cathodic preconcentration of copper. First, a sandwich-type immuno-structure is appropriately assembled at a glassy carbon electrode. Second, copper is selectively stained on the catalytic surfaces of second antibody-conjugated Au nanoparticles through CuSO4-ascorbic acid redox reaction, and the GRRs between HAuCl4 and the stained copper are used to amplify the quantity of copper. Finally, the corresponding antigen is determined based on simultaneous chemical-dissolution/cathodic-preconcentration of copper for in-situ ASV analysis directly at the immunoelectrode. Cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance and scanning electron microscopy are used for film characterization and/or process monitoring. Under optimized conditions, ultrasensitive analyses of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) and human carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) are achieved. The limits of detection are 0.3 fg mL(-1) (equivalent to 7 IgG molecules in the 6 μL sample employed) for IgG (S/N=3) and 1.3 nU mL(-1) for CA125 (S/N=3), respectively, which are amongst the best reported to date for the two proteins. The theoretical feasibility of such a single-molecule-level amperometric immunoassay is also discussed based on the immunological reaction thermodynamics. PMID:26802573

  17. Combined In-Situ XRD and In-Situ XANES Studies on the Reduction Behavior of a Rhenium Promoted Cobalt Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Nitin; Payzant, E Andrew; Jothimurugesan, K; Spivey, James J

    2011-01-01

    A 10% Co 4% Re/(2% Zr/SiO2) catalyst was prepared by co-impregnation using a silica support modified by 2% Zr. The catalyst was characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR), in situ XRD and in situ XANES analysis where it was simultaneously exposed to H2 using a temperature programmed ramp. The results showed the two step reduction of large crystalline Co3O4 with CoO as an intermediate. TPR results showed that the reduction of highly dispersed Co3O4 was facilitated by reduced rhenium by a H2-spillover mechanism. In situ XRD results showed the presence of both, Co-hcp and Co-fcc phases in the reduced catalyst at 400 C. However, the Co-hcp phase was more abundant, which is thought to be the more active phase as compared to the Co-fcc phase for CO hydrogenation. CO hydrogenation at 270 C and 5 bar pressure produces no detectable change in the phases during the time of experiment. In situ XANES results showed a decrease in the metallic cobalt in the presence of H2/CO, which can be attributed due to oxidation of the catalyst by reaction under these conditions.

  18. Nitrile-functionalized pyrrolidinium ionic liquids as solvents for cross-coupling reactions involving in situ generated nanoparticle catalyst reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yugang; Biondi, Ilaria; Chaubey, Manish; Yang, Xue; Fei, Zhaofu; Scopelliti, Rosario; Hartinger, Christian G; Li, Yongdan; Chiappe, Cinzia; Dyson, Paul J

    2010-02-28

    A series of nitrile-functionalized pyrrolidinium-based ionic liquids have been prepared and characterized by spectroscopic methods and X-ray crystallography. The application of these new ionic liquids as reaction media for Suzuki and Stille C-C cross-coupling reactions has been investigated and compared with related imidazolium and pyridinium systems (including those with and without nitrile functionalities). The nature of the ionic liquid strongly influences the catalyzed reaction and it would appear that, in addition to the nitrile group, the strength of anion-cation pairing in the ionic liquid and the viscosity of the ionic liquid play critical roles. Nanoparticles are also detected following catalysis and their role, and the influence of the ionic liquid on them, is assessed. The ability to use the nitrile-functionalized pyrrolidinium-based ionic liquids diluted in other (non-functionalized) ionic liquids is also described. PMID:20145850

  19. Anion exchange in Zn-Al layered double hydroxides: In situ X-ray diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salak, Andrei N.; Tedim, João; Kuznetsova, Alena I.; Zheludkevich, Mikhail L.; Ferreira, Mário G. S.

    2010-07-01

    Anion exchange capacity is a key factor for the application of Zn-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as nano-containers in active corrosion protection. In this work, the nitrate-pyrovanadate anion exchange/re-exchange processes in these LDHs were investigated in situ. We demonstrate that the exchange reactions lead to a decrease of the average crystallite size of LDHs as a result of mechanical fragmentation of the crystallites rather than dissolution/recrystallization. The fragmentation occurs due to fast anion exchange in the initial stage, and can be controlled by changing the ratio of the available substituent anions to the replacement anions and application of a mechanical activation.

  20. In situ/operando studies for the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift on metal oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, José A; Hanson, Jonathan C; Stacchiola, Dario; Senanayake, Sanjaya D

    2013-08-01

    In this perspective article, we show how a series of in situ techniques {X-ray diffraction (XRD), pair-distribution-function analysis (PDF), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS)} can be combined to perform detailed studies of the structural, electronic and chemical properties of metal oxide catalysts used for the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift reaction (WGS, CO + H2O → H2 + CO2). Under reaction conditions most WGS catalysts undergo chemical transformations that drastically modify their composition with respect to that obtained during the synthesis process. Experiments of time-resolved in situ XRD, XAFS, and PDF indicate that the active phase of catalysts which combine Cu, Au or Pt with oxides such as ZnO, CeO2, TiO2, CeOx/TiO2 and Fe2O3 essentially involves nanoparticles of the reduced noble metals. The oxide support undergoes partial reduction and is not a simple spectator, facilitating the dissociation of water and in some cases modifying the chemical properties of the supported metal. Therefore, to optimize the performance of these catalysts one must take into consideration the properties of the metal and oxide phases. IR and AP-XPS have been used to study the reaction mechanism for the WGS on metal oxide catalysts. Data of IR spectroscopy indicate that formate species are not necessarily involved in the main reaction path for the water-gas shift on Cu-, Au- and Pt-based catalysts. Thus, a pure redox mechanism or associative mechanisms that involve either carbonate-like (CO3, HCO3) or carboxyl (HOCO) species should be considered. In the last two decades, there have been tremendous advances in our ability to study catalytic materials under reaction conditions and we are moving towards the major goal of fully understanding how the active sites for the production of hydrogen through the WGS actually

  1. A Study of Illinois Employer Reactions to Training Credentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Frank G.; And Others

    A study was conducted in summer 1982 by Project REA to provide employment skill training operators and educators in Illinois with information about the reactions, attitudes, and beliefs of employers toward various forms of accreditation of training, i.e., academic credit, nonacademic credit, certificates, degrees, diplomas, and licenses. The study…

  2. Theoretical studies of the dynamics of chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, A.F.

    1993-12-01

    Recent research effort has focussed on several reactions pertinent to combustion. The formation of the formyl radical from atomic hydrogen and carbon monoxide, recombination of alkyl radicals and halo-alkyl radicals with halogen atoms, and the thermal dissociation of hydrogen cyanide and acetylene have been studied by modeling. In addition, the inelastic collisions of NCO with helium have been investigated.

  3. Study of Cold Potassium Atom - Calcium Ion Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egodapitiya, Kisra; Gang, Shu; Clark, Robert; Brown, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    We report on our progress towards constructing a hybrid system for studying reactions between cold Potassium (K) atoms and cold Calcium (Ca+) ions. Ca+ ions will be trapped and Doppler-cooled inside a linear quadrupole ion trap. Cold K atoms will be created inside a magneto optical trap, such that the ion and the atoms are in an overlapping volume. Trapping and re-pumping beams for the Potassium MOT are derived from the same laser with wavelength 766 nm using two acousto optic modulators. The reaction products will be detected using a time-of- flight mass spectrometer that is designed to detect radially ejected ions. The main objective of this experiment is to study the rate coefficients, and identification of reaction channels between cold K atoms and Ca+ ions. Subsequently this setup will be used to study reactions between cold K atoms and sympathetically cooled molecular ions such as CaO+, and to study internal state quenching of molecular ions.

  4. Emotional Reactions of Students in Field Education: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litvack, Andrea; Mishna, Faye; Bogo, Marion

    2010-01-01

    An exploratory study using qualitative methodology was undertaken with recent MSW graduates (N=12) from 2 graduate social work programs to identify and describe the students' emotional reactions to experiences in field education. Significant and interrelated themes emerged including the subjective and unique definitions of emotionally charged…

  5. Study of Daedalus Interstellar Spacecraft Reaction Chamber and Thrust Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. K.; Benaroya, H.

    Project Daedalus was the 1978 trade study that proved the feasibility of space travel utilizing fusion-based propulsion (Inertial Confinement Fusion). This paper analyzes some of the key structural aspects of the Daedalus spacecraft, in particular, the reaction chamber and thrust structure that is integral to the Daedalus spacecraft, which supports the loads resulting from the fusion reactions. First, the reaction chamber is studied computationally in terms of static loading and vibrational characteristics utilizing the finite element method. Next, a proposed bracing system is integrated into the reaction chamber and the effects are studied. Lastly, the field coils with their supporting truss structure are added to the assembly. Concepts are introduced for actuators and course-correction mechanisms that ensure the spacecraft maintains the required trajectory to rendezvous with the target system. Present-day materials and manufacturing considerations are explored based on the assumptions made in the Daedalus study. Testing, qualification, and assembly of the spacecraft are also discussed. This paper is a summary of the first author's Master's Thesis at Rutgers University.

  6. Histopathological study of corneal flap striae following laser in situ keratomileusis in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LI; SONG, FANG-ZHOU; BAO, LIAN-YUN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the histopathological changes and wound healing process of rabbit corneas following conventional laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) with and without the complication of flap macrostriae. The right eyes of 14 rabbits underwent LASIK with the formation of flap striae (macrostriae group) and the left underwent LASIK alone (control group). Two rabbits were selected at random for sacrifice on days 1, 3, 7 and 14, and at 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. The histopathological characters of the corneas were compared by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and Masson staining. In the control group, the epithelial basement membrane of the cornea exhibited microstriae and the arrangement of stromal collagen fibers was regular. The width of the microstriae in the flap was 20–40 μm one week after surgery and the microstriae were no longer visible two weeks postoperatively. In the macrostriae group, infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells occurred around the incision and irregular hyperplasia of the epithelium was observed due to undulation of the epithelial basement membrane on the first postoperative day. The collagen fibers and striae of the corneal stroma exhibited irregular undulation one month postoperatively. The area between the corneal flap and stromal bed was distinctly stained by PAS and Masson stains. Macrostriae with a width of 80–120 μm affecting two-thirds of the entire cornea remained visible six months postoperatively. In conclusion, the inflammatory reactions and clinical impact of flap macrostriae were severe. Macrostriae involving two-thirds of the entire cornea remained visible six months postoperatively. Longer-term studies are required to further elucidate the issues associated with corneal flap striae. PMID:25667649

  7. In situ powder diffraction study of belite sulfoaluminate clinkering.

    PubMed

    De la Torre, Angeles G; Cuberos, Antonio J M; Alvarez-Pinazo, Gema; Cuesta, Ana; Aranda, Miguel A G

    2011-05-01

    Belite sulfoaluminate (BSA) cements have been proposed as environmentally friendly building materials, as their production may release up to 35% less CO(2) into the atmosphere when compared with ordinary Portland cement fabrication. However, their formation mechanism has not been studied in detail so far. Here, an in situ high-temperature high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study is reported. Two types of BSA clinkers have been characterized, both containing 50-60 wt% C(2)S and 20-30 wt% C(4)A(3)\\underline{\\rm S} as main phases. One type is iron-rich and a second type (with different phase assemblage) is aluminium-rich. Furthermore, the C(2)S phase reacts slowly with water, thus activation of this compound is desirable in order to enhance the mechanical strength development of the resulting cements. To do so, iron-rich BSA clinkers have been doped with minor amounts of B(2)O(3) and Na(2)O to promote stabilization of α-forms of C(2)S, which are more reactive with water. The decarbonated raw materials were loaded into Pt tubes and heated to between 973 K and 1673 K, and patterns were collected using a high-energy synchrotron beam of wavelength λ = 0.30 Å. The thermal stability of Klein's salt in these clinkers has been clarified. Several reactions have been followed: formation and decomposition of Klein's salt, melting of aluminates and ferrite, and polymorphic transformations of dicalcium silicate: alpha'H-C2S → α-C(2)S. Changes in mineralogical phase assemblages at a given temperature owing to the addition of minor amounts of selected elements have also been determined. PMID:21525661

  8. Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, W. U.

    1993-08-01

    Papers on the following topics are included: The Cold-Fusion Saga; Decay Patterns of Dysprosium Nuclei Produced in S-32 + Sn-118,124 Fusion Reactions; Unexpected Features of Reactions Between Very Heavy Ions at Intermediate Bombarding Energies; Correlations Between Neutrons and Charged Products from the Dissipative Reaction Au-197 + Pb-208 at E/A = 29 MeV; Dissipative Dynamics of Projectile-Like Fragment Production in the Reaction Bi-209 + Xe-136 at E/A = 28.2 MeV; Dynamical Production of Intermediate-Mass Fragments in Peripheral Bi-209 + Xe-136 Collisions at E(sub lab)/A = 28.2 MeV; The Rochester 960-Liter Neutron Multiplicity Meter; A Simple Pulse Processing Concept for a Low-Cost Pulse-Shape-Based Particle Identification; A One-Transistor Preamplifier for PMT Anode Signals; A Five-Channel Multistop TDC/Event Handler for the SuperBall Neutron Multiplicity Meter; Construction of the SuperBall - a 16,000-Liter Neutron Detector for Calorimetric Studies of Intermediate-Energy Heavy-Ion Reactions; A Computer Code for Light Detection Efficiency Calculations for Photo-multipliers of a Neutron Detector; Evaluation of Gd-Loaded Liquid Scintillators for the SuperBall Neutron Calorimeter; and Measurement of the Interaction of Cosmic-Ray mu(-) with a Muon Telescope.

  9. Kinetic studies of cascade reactions in high-throughput systems.

    PubMed

    Iron, David; Boelens, Hans F M; Westerhuis, Johan A; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2003-12-01

    The application of robotic systems to the study of complex reaction kinetics is considered, using the cascade reaction A --> B --> C as a working example. Practical problems in calculating the rate constants k1 and k2 for the reactions A --> B and B --> C from concentration measurements of CA, CB, or CC are discussed in the light of the symmetry and invertability of the rate equations. A D-optimal analysis is used to determine the points in time and the species that will give the best (i.e., most accurate) results. When exact data are used, the most robust solution results from measuring the pair of concentrations (CA, CC). The system's information function is computed using numeric methods. This function is then used to estimate the amount of information obtainable from a given cascade reaction at any given time. The theoretical findings are compared with experimental results from a set of two-stage cascade experiments monitored using UV-visible spectroscopy. Finally, the pros and cons of using a single reaction sample to estimate both k1 and k2 are discussed. PMID:16465720

  10. Toluene pyrolysis studies and high temperature reactions of propargyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, R.D.; Chen, H.; Qin, Z.

    1993-12-01

    The main focus of this program is to investigate the thermal decompositions of fuels that play an important role in the pre-particle soot formation process. It has been demonstrated that the condition of maximum soot yield is established when the reaction conditions of temperature and pressure are sufficient to establish a radical pool to support the production of polyaromatic hydrocarbon species and the subsequent formation of soot particles. However, elevated temperatures result in lower soot yields which are attributed to thermolyses of aromatic ring structures and result in the bell-shaped dependence of soot yield on temperature. The authors have selected several acyclic hydrocarbons to evaluate the chemical thermodynamic and kinetic effects attendant to benzene formation. To assess the thermal stability of the aromatic ring, the authors have studied the pyrolyses of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, chlorobenzene and pyridine. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF) is employed to analyze the reaction zone behind reflected shock waves. Reaction time histories of the reactants, products, and intermediates are constructed and mechanisms are formulated to model the experimental data. The TOF work is often performed with use of laser schlieren densitometry (LS) to measure density gradients resulting from the heats of various reactions involved in a particular pyrolytic system. The two techniques, TOF and LS, provide independent and complementary information about ring formation and ring rupture reactions.

  11. A model study of sequential enzyme reactions and electrostatic channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, Changsun; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.; Metzger, Vincent T.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2014-03-01

    We study models of two sequential enzyme-catalyzed reactions as a basic functional building block for coupled biochemical networks. We investigate the influence of enzyme distributions and long-range molecular interactions on reaction kinetics, which have been exploited in biological systems to maximize metabolic efficiency and signaling effects. Specifically, we examine how the maximal rate of product generation in a series of sequential reactions is dependent on the enzyme distribution and the electrostatic composition of its participant enzymes and substrates. We find that close proximity between enzymes does not guarantee optimal reaction rates, as the benefit of decreasing enzyme separation is countered by the volume excluded by adjacent enzymes. We further quantify the extent to which the electrostatic potential increases the efficiency of transferring substrate between enzymes, which supports the existence of electrostatic channeling in nature. Here, a major finding is that the role of attractive electrostatic interactions in confining intermediate substrates in the vicinity of the enzymes can contribute more to net reactive throughput than the directional properties of the electrostatic fields. These findings shed light on the interplay of long-range interactions and enzyme distributions in coupled enzyme-catalyzed reactions, and their influence on signaling in biological systems.

  12. In Situ TEM Nanoindentation Studies on Stress-Induced Phase Transformations in Metallic Materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-11-30

    Though abundant phase transformations are in general thermally driven processes, there are many examples wherein stresses can induce phase transformations. We applied numerous in situ techniques, such as in situ x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction in order to reveal phase transformations. Recently, an in situ nanoindentation technique coupled with transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the capability to directly correlating stresses with phase transformations and microstructural evolutions at a submicron length scale. We briefly review in situ studies on stress-induced diffusional and diffusionless phase transformations in amorphous CuZrAl alloy and NiFeGa shape memory alloy. Moreover, in the amorphous CuZrAl, in situ nanoindentationmore » studies show that the nucleation of nanocrystals (a diffusional process) occurs at ultra-low stresses manifested by a prominent stress drop. In the NiFeGa shape memory alloy, two distinctive types of martensitic (diffusionless) phase transformations accompanied by stress plateaus are observed, including a reversible gradual phase transformation at low stress levels, and an irreversible abrupt phase transition at higher stress levels.« less

  13. In Situ TEM Nanoindentation Studies on Stress-Induced Phase Transformations in Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Although abundant phase transformations are in general thermally driven processes, there are many examples wherein stresses can induce phase transformations. Numerous in situ techniques, such as in situ x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction, have been applied to reveal phase transformations. Recently, an in situ nanoindentation technique coupled with transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the capability to directly correlating stresses with phase transformations and microstructural evolutions at a submicron length scale. Here we briefly review in situ studies on stress-induced diffusional and diffusionless phase transformations in amorphous CuZrAl alloy and NiFeGa shape memory alloy. In the amorphous CuZrAl, in situ nanoindentation studies show that the nucleation of nanocrystals (a diffusional process) occurs at ultra-low stresses manifested by a prominent stress drop. In the NiFeGa shape memory alloy, two distinctive types of martensitic (diffusionless) phase transformations accompanied by stress plateaus are observed, including a reversible gradual phase transformation at low stress levels, and an irreversible abrupt phase transition at higher stress levels.

  14. In Situ TEM Nanoindentation Studies on Stress-Induced Phase Transformations in Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-11-30

    Though abundant phase transformations are in general thermally driven processes, there are many examples wherein stresses can induce phase transformations. We applied numerous in situ techniques, such as in situ x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction in order to reveal phase transformations. Recently, an in situ nanoindentation technique coupled with transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the capability to directly correlating stresses with phase transformations and microstructural evolutions at a submicron length scale. We briefly review in situ studies on stress-induced diffusional and diffusionless phase transformations in amorphous CuZrAl alloy and NiFeGa shape memory alloy. Moreover, in the amorphous CuZrAl, in situ nanoindentation studies show that the nucleation of nanocrystals (a diffusional process) occurs at ultra-low stresses manifested by a prominent stress drop. In the NiFeGa shape memory alloy, two distinctive types of martensitic (diffusionless) phase transformations accompanied by stress plateaus are observed, including a reversible gradual phase transformation at low stress levels, and an irreversible abrupt phase transition at higher stress levels.

  15. Microcosm and in situ field studies of enhanced biotransformation of trichloroethylene by phenol-utilizing microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, G D; Semprini, L; McCarty, P L

    1993-01-01

    The ability of different aerobic groundwater microorganisms to cometabolically degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,2-cis-dichloroethylene (c-DCE), and 1,2-trans-dichloroethylene (t-DCE) was evaluated both in groundwater-fed microcosms and in situ in a shallow aquifer. Microcosms amended with phenol or toulene were equally effective in removing c-DCE (> 90%) followed by TCE (60 to 70%), while the microcosm fed methane was most effective in removing t-DCE (> 90%). The microcosm fed ammonia was the least effective. None of the microcosms effectively degraded 1,1,1-trichloroethane. At the Moffett Field groundwater test site, in situ removal of c-DCE and TCE coincided with biostimulation through phenol and oxygen injection and utilization, with c-DCE removed more rapidly than TCE. Greater TCE and c-DCE removal was observed when the phenol concentration was increased. Over 90% removal of c-DCE and TCE was observed in the 2-m biostimulated zone. This compares with 40 to 50% removal of c-DCE and 15 to 25% removal of TCE achieved by methane-grown microorganisms previously evaluated in an adjacent in situ test zone. The in situ removal with phenol-grown microorganisms agrees qualitatively with the microcosm studies, with the rates and extents of removal ranked as follows: c-DCE > TCE > t-DCE. These studies demonstrate the potential for in situ TCE bioremediation using microorganisms grown on phenol. PMID:8357259

  16. Studies of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction on Co(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerlings, J. J. C.; Zonnevylle, M. C.; de Groot, C. P. M.

    1991-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch reaction has been studied over Co(0001) in the temperature range between 220 and 300 °C at 1 bar total pressure and an H 2 : CO ratio of 2 : 1. It was found that the activation energies for methane, ethane and propane formation are equ which suggests similar rate determining steps. We propose that α-hydrogenation of a C nH 2 n+1 surface species is rate limiting. Olefins are formed via β-dehydrogenation of the same species. The olefins take part in a consecutive reaction and are finally converted to paraffins. The product distribution was found to follow Schulz-Flory kinetics with a chain growth probability of 0.2 at 250 °C. Post-reaction spectroscopy with EELS and Auger indicated the presence of CO and CH x ( x = 1, 2, 3) fragments on the surface.

  17. Theoretical studies on shaking processes in nuclear transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prashant; Nandi, Tapan

    2015-09-01

    The probabilities of shaking processes during nuclear transfer reactions have been studied using the Mukoyama formalism after the re-examination of formalism for β-decay processes. Electron shakeoff probabilities have been calculated for the α-transfer reaction in the range of Z = 10- 50. The Z-dependence on the shakeoff probabilities so obtained has been represented by an analytical equation with two parameters. The formalism has been applied on a typical nuclear transfer reaction Fe5626 +C126 →Ni6028 +Be84 and it is found that electron shakeup, shakedown and shakeoff probabilities dominate for low l quantum number of the respective shells of the projectile-like fragment ion. However, for a particular value of l these processes show high probabilities for low values of n quantum number.

  18. Theoretical Chemical Dynamics Studies of Elementary Combustion Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Donald L. Thompson

    2006-04-27

    The purpose of this research was the development and application of theoretical/computational methods for accurate predictions of the rates of reactions in many-atom systems. The specific aim was to improve computational methods for studying the chemical dynamics of large, complex systems and to obtain a better understanding of the chemical reactions involving large polyatomic molecules and radicals. The focus was on the development an automatic potential energy surface generation algorithm that takes advantage of high-performance computing environments; e.g., software for rate calculations that direct quantum chemistry codes to produce ab initio predictions of reaction rates and related dynamics quantities. Specifically, we developed interpolative moving least-squares (IMLS) methods for accurately fitting ab initio energies to provide global PESs and for use in direct dynamics simulations.

  19. Sum Frequency Generation Studies of Hydrogenation Reactions on Platinum Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Krier, James M.

    2013-08-31

    Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is used to characterize intermediate species of hydrogenation reactions on the surface of platinum nanoparticle catalysts. In contrast to other spectroscopy techniques which operate in ultra-high vacuum or probe surface species after reaction, SFG collects information under normal conditions as the reaction is taking place. Several systems have been studied previously using SFG on single crystals, notably alkene hydrogenation on Pt(111). In this thesis, many aspects of SFG experiments on colloidal nanoparticles are explored for the first time. To address spectral interference by the capping agent (PVP), three procedures are proposed: UV cleaning, H2 induced disordering and calcination (core-shell nanoparticles). UV cleaning and calcination physically destroy organic capping while disordering reduces SFG signal through a reversible structural change by PVP.

  20. Nanolithographic Fabrication and Heterogeneous Reaction Studies ofTwo-Dimensional Platinum Model Catalyst Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, A.M.

    2006-05-20

    In order to better understand the fundamental components that govern catalytic activity, two-dimensional model platinum nanocatalyst arrays have been designed and fabricated. These catalysts arrays are meant to model the interplay of the metal and support important to industrial heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Photolithography and sub-lithographic techniques such as electron beam lithography, size reduction lithography and nanoimprint lithography have been employed to create these platinum nanoarrays. Both in-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques and catalytic reaction measurements were used to correlate the structural parameters of the system to catalytic activity.

  1. In situ studies of mass transport in liquid alloys by means of neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Kargl, F; Engelhardt, M; Yang, F; Weis, H; Schmakat, P; Schillinger, B; Griesche, A; Meyer, A

    2011-06-29

    When in situ techniques became available in recent years this led to a breakthrough in accurately determining diffusion coefficients for liquid alloys. Here we discuss how neutron radiography can be used to measure chemical diffusion in a ternary AlCuAg alloy. Neutron radiography hereby gives complementary information to x-ray radiography used for measuring chemical diffusion and to quasielastic neutron scattering used mainly for determining self-diffusion. A novel Al(2)O(3) based furnace that enables one to study diffusion processes by means of neutron radiography is discussed. A chemical diffusion coefficient of Ag against Al around the eutectic composition Al(68.6)Cu(13.8)Ag(17.6) at.% was obtained. It is demonstrated that the in situ technique of neutron radiography is a powerful means to study mass transport properties in situ in binary and ternary alloys that show poor x-ray contrast. PMID:21654050

  2. Cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions to freshwater cyanobacteria – human volunteer studies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ian; Robertson, Ivan M; Webb, Penelope M; Schluter, Philip J; Shaw, Glen R

    2006-01-01

    Background Pruritic skin rashes associated with exposure to freshwater cyanobacteria are infrequently reported in the medical and scientific literature, mostly as anecdotal and case reports. Diagnostic dermatological investigations in humans are also infrequently described. We sought to conduct a pilot volunteer study to explore the potential for cyanobacteria to elicit hypersensitivity reactions. Methods A consecutive series of adult patients presenting for diagnostic skin patch testing at a hospital outpatient clinic were invited to participate. A convenience sample of volunteers matched for age and sex was also enrolled. Patches containing aqueous suspensions of various cyanobacteria at three concentrations were applied for 48 hours; dermatological assessment was made 48 hours and 96 hours after application. Results 20 outpatients and 19 reference subjects were recruited into the study. A single outpatient produced unequivocal reactions to several cyanobacteria suspensions; this subject was also the only one of the outpatient group with a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. No subjects in the reference group developed clinically detectable skin reactions to cyanobacteria. Conclusion This preliminary clinical study demonstrates that hypersensitivity reactions to cyanobacteria appear to be infrequent in both the general and dermatological outpatient populations. As cyanobacteria are widely distributed in aquatic environments, a better appreciation of risk factors, particularly with respect to allergic predisposition, may help to refine health advice given to people engaging in recreational activities where nuisance cyanobacteria are a problem. PMID:16584576

  3. (Studies of heavy-ion induced reactions): Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1986-10-01

    An experiment was performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac, extending previous studies using inverse reactions to 50 MeV/u /sup 139/La incident on targets of C and Al. Studies of excitation energy division in lower energy division in lower energy heavy-ion reactions were furthered using kinematic coincidences to measure the excitation energies of primary products in the Fe + Ho reaction at 12 MeV/u. These results will provide important systematics for comparisons with previous measurements at 9 MeV/u on the same system and at 15 MeV/u on the Fe + Fe and Fe + U systems. Also studied were different aspects of 15 MeV/u Fe-induced reactions, with experiments performed at the Oak Ridge HHIRF. The first three contributions of this report constitute a major portion of the results from this research. Finally, at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac a large detector array for coincident detection of fragmentation products in heavy-ion collisions below 100 MeV/u is being built. A list of publications, personnel, and activities is provided.

  4. Bridging the pressure gap: In situ atomic-level investigations of model platinum catalyst surfaces under reaction conditions by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, B.J.

    1994-05-01

    Results of this thesis show that STM measurements can provide information about the surfaces and their adsorbates. Stability of Pt(110) under high pressures of H2, O2, and CO was studied (Chap. 4). In situ UHV and high vacuum experiments were carried out for sulfur on Pt(111) (Chap.5). STM studies of CO/S/Pt(111) in high CO pressures showed that the Pt substrate undergoes a stacking-fault-domain reconstruction involving periodic transitions from fcc to hcp stacking of top-layer atoms (Chap.6). In Chap.7, the stability of propylene on Pt(111) and the decomposition products were studied in situ with the HPSTM. Finally, in Chap.8, results are presented which show how the Pt tip of the HPSTM was used to locally rehydrogenate and oxidize carbonaceous clusters deposited on the Pt(111) surface; the Pt tip acted as a catalyst after activation by short voltage pulses.

  5. Antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine digluconate in dentin: In vitro and in situ study

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Fátima Maria Cavalcante; de Melo, Mary Anne Sampaio; Lima, Juliana Paiva Marques; Zanin, Iriana Carla Junqueria; Rodrigues, Lidiany Karla Azevedo

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate a very short-term in vitro and in situ effect of 2% chlorhexidine-digluconate-based (CHX) cavity cleanser on the disinfection of dentin demineralized by cariogenic bacteria. Materials and Methods: Human dentin slabs were randomly allocated and used in 2 distinct phases, in vitro and in situ, for obtaining demineralized dentin. In vitro, the slabs (n=15) were immersed for 5 days in BHI broth inoculated with Streptococcus mutans CTT 3440. In situ, a double-blind design was conducted in one phase of 14 days, during which 20 volunteers wore palatal devices containing two human dental dentin slabs. On 5th day in vitro and 14th day in situ, the slabs were allocated to the two groups: Control group (5 μl of 0.9% NaCl solution) and CHX group (5 μl of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution, Cavity Cleanser™ BISCO, Schaumburg, IL, EUA), for 5 minutes. The microbiological analyses were performed immediately before and after the treatments. Results: The log reductions means found for CHX treatment on tested micro organisms were higher when compared to Control group either in vitro or in situ conditions. Conclusions: Our results showed that CHX was effective in reducing the cultivable microbiota in contaminated dentin. Furthermore, although the use of chlorhexidine-digluconate-based cavity disinfectant did not completely eliminate the viable microorganisms, it served as a suitable agent to disinfect tooth preparations. PMID:22368330

  6. How to design in situ studies: an evaluation of experimental protocols

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Young-Hye; Kim, Hae-Young; Son, Ho-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Designing in situ models for caries research is a demanding procedure, as both clinical and laboratory parameters need to be incorporated in a single study. This study aimed to construct an informative guideline for planning in situ models relevant to preexisting caries studies. Materials and Methods An electronic literature search of the PubMed database was performed. A total 191 of full articles written in English were included and data were extracted from materials and methods. Multiple variables were analyzed in relation to the publication types, participant characteristics, specimen and appliance factors, and other conditions. Frequencies and percentages were displayed to summarize the data and the Pearson's chi-square test was used to assess a statistical significance (p < 0.05). Results There were many parameters commonly included in the majority of in situ models such as inclusion criteria, sample sizes, sample allocation methods, tooth types, intraoral appliance types, sterilization methods, study periods, outcome measures, experimental interventions, etc. Interrelationships existed between the main research topics and some parameters (outcome measures and sample allocation methods) among the evaluated articles. Conclusions It will be possible to establish standardized in situ protocols according to the research topics. Furthermore, data collaboration from comparable studies would be enhanced by homogeneous study designs. PMID:25110639

  7. Real-time studies of battery electrochemical reactions inside a transmission electron microscope.

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kevin; Hudak, Nicholas S.; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xiaohua H.; Fan, Hongyou; Subramanian, Arunkumar; Shaw, Michael J.; Sullivan, John Patrick; Huang, Jian Yu

    2012-01-01

    We report the development of new experimental capabilities and ab initio modeling for real-time studies of Li-ion battery electrochemical reactions. We developed three capabilities for in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies: a capability that uses a nanomanipulator inside the TEM to assemble electrochemical cells with ionic liquid or solid state electrolytes, a capability that uses on-chip assembly of battery components on to TEM-compatible multi-electrode arrays, and a capability that uses a TEM-compatible sealed electrochemical cell that we developed for performing in-situ TEM using volatile battery electrolytes. These capabilities were used to understand lithiation mechanisms in nanoscale battery materials, including SnO{sub 2}, Si, Ge, Al, ZnO, and MnO{sub 2}. The modeling approaches used ab initio molecular dynamics to understand early stages of ethylene carbonate reduction on lithiated-graphite and lithium surfaces and constrained density functional theory to understand ethylene carbonate reduction on passivated electrode surfaces.

  8. [Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions]. Progress summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The experimental goals are focused on developing an understanding of strong interactions and the structure of hadronic systems by determination of the electromagnetic response; these goals will be accomplished through coincidence detection of final states. Nuclear modeling objectives are to organize and interpret the data through a consistent description of a broad spectrum of reaction observables; calculations are performed in a nonrelativistic diagrammatic framework as well as a relativistic QHD approach. Work is described according to the following arrangement: direct knockout reactions (completion of {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p), {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}pp) progress, large acceptance detector physics simulations), giant resonance studies (intermediate-energy experiments with solid-state detectors, the third response function in {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}p{sub 0}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 0}), comparison of the {sup 12}C(e, e{prime}p{sub 0}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 3}) reactions, quadrupole strength in the {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}{alpha}{sub 0}) reaction, quadrupole strength in the {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}{alpha}) reaction, analysis of the {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}p{sub 1}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 3}) angular distributions, analysis of the {sup 40}Ca(e,e{prime}x) reaction at low q, analysis of the higher-q {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}x) data from Bates), models of nuclear structure (experimental work, Hartree-Fock calculations, phonon excitations in spherical nuclei, shell model calculations, variational methods for relativistic fields), and instrumentation development efforts (developments at CEBAF, CLAS contracts, BLAST developments).

  9. Cerium oxide as a promoter for the electro-oxidation reaction of ethanol: in situ XAFS characterization of the Pt nanoparticles supported on CeO2 nanoparticles and nanorods.

    PubMed

    Corchado-García, Juan; Betancourt, Luis E; Vélez, Carlos A; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Stacchiola, Dario; Sasaki, Kotaro; Guinel, Maxime J-F; Zhou, Yunyun; Cheung, Chin Li; Cabrera, Carlos R

    2015-12-28

    In this study we probe the electrocatalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles supported on ceria nanoparticles (NPs) and nanorods (NRs) in the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) in alkaline media. The goal of this study was to relate morphology, support structure and composition to the EOR catalytic activity by using in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies. Cyclic voltammetry experiments showed that both ceria supported catalysts (NP vs. NR) had similar peak current densities at fast scan rates, however at slow scan rates, the ceria NR catalyst showed superior catalytic activity. In situ XAFS studies in KOH showed that both ceria supported catalysts had more electron density in their d-band (with the ceria NR having more electron density overall) than ceria - free Pt/Vulcan standard. However, in an ethanol solution the ceria NR catalyst had the least electron density. We propose that this change is due to the increased charge transfer efficiency between the ceria nanorod support and platinum. In the KOH solution, the increased electron density makes the platinum less electrophilic and hinders Pt-OH bond formation. In the EtOH solution, platinum's increased nucleophilicity facilitates the bond formation between Pt and the electron deficient carbon in ethanol which in turn withdraws the electron density from platinum and increases the white line intensity as observed in the XAS measurements. PMID:26580293

  10. Light Nuclei Studied with Nucleon Transfer Reactions Using Exotic Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A. H.; Rehm, K. E.; Greene, J. P.; Henderson, D. J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Jiang, C. L.; Moore, E. F.; Pardo, R. C.; Peterson, D.; Pieper, S. C.; Savard, G.; Schiffer, J. P.; Sinha, S.; Tang, X.; Wiringa, R. B.; Jisonna, L.; Segel, R. E.; Paul, M.

    2006-04-26

    Single-neutron transfer with the (d,p) reaction in inverse kinematics has been used to study the properties of the light nuclei 9Li and 7He. The results for 9Li and 7He are compared to the predictions of ab-initio models of nuclear structure. Different possibilities for excited states in 7He are discussed in the context of other recent experimental studies of 7He.

  11. In situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons: Three case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bost, R.C.; Perry, R.G.; Barber, T.

    1997-06-01

    In situ biodegradation of organic contaminants is one of the most cost-effective means of site remediation. This method has proven successful in soils, ground water, and slurries. Bacteria capable of degrading organic contaminants within an aquifer include many species from a wide spectrum of genera, e.g. Pseudomonas, Corynebacterium, Bacillus, etc. In most cases, a mixture of bacterial strains is required to completely oxidize a complex organic contaminant. Each strain of an organism may target a specific compound, working together with other organisms to ultimately degrade each intermediate until complete degradation, also known as mineralization, occurs. One or more of the following mechanisms are utilized by bacteria for organic chemical degradation: (1) aerobic, (2) anaerobic, and (3) co-metabolic. During aerobic oxidation of organic chemicals, bacteria utilize the pollutant as an electron and hydrogen source and oxygen acts as the electron and hydrogen acceptor, resulting in water. As the bacterial enzymes cleave the compound, oxidized products are produced along with energy for the reaction to proceed. This is the most rapid and widely utilized mechanism. Dehalogenation occurs under aerobic, or perhaps more often, under anoxic conditions. This process occurs in the presence of alternate electron acceptors and replaces chlorine with hydrogen. The mechanism of co-metabolism can be aerobic or anaerobic, but is more often aerobic. This process requires a separate energy source for the bacterial cell because the pollutant is not utilized as an energy source. The role of bioremediation in site remediation is demonstrated below by three case studies: (1) a refinery, (2) a municipal landfill and (3) a pesticide formulation plant.

  12. Thermo-Raman spectroscopy in situ monitoring study of solid-state synthesis of NiO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles and its characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ghule, Anil Vithal; Ghule, Kalyani; Tzing, S.-H.; Punde, Tushar H.; Chang Hua; Ling, Y.C.

    2009-12-15

    Hyphenation of thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and thermo-Raman spectrophotometer for in situ monitoring of solid-state reaction in oxygen atmosphere forming NiO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst nanoparticles is investigated. In situ thermo-Raman spectra in the range from 200 to 1400 cm{sup -1} were recorded at every degree interval from 25 to 800 deg. C. Thermo-Raman spectroscopic studies reveal that, although the onset of formation is around 600 deg. C, the bulk NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} forms at temperatures above 800 deg. C. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the reaction mixtures were recorded at regular temperature intervals of 100 deg. C, in the temperature range from 400 to 1000 deg. C, which could provide information on structural and morphological evolution of NiO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Slow controlled heating of the sample enabled better control over morphology and particle size distribution ({approx}20-30 nm diameter). The observed results were supported by complementary characterizations using TGA, XRD, SEM, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. - Graphical abstract: Hyphenation of thermogravimetric analyzer and thermo-Raman spectrophotometer for in situ monitoring of solid-state reaction at controlled heating rate and in oxygen atmosphere forming NiO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst nanoparticles is investigated.

  13. Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1981-07-01

    The research summarized in this report was performed during the period August 1, 1980 to June 30, 1981. The experimental emphasis in the heavy-ion-induced reaction studies continues to be discrete charge and mass resolution of all projectile-like fragments measured. In an experiment performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Superconducting LINAC, the /sup 37/Cl beam was used to bombard targets of /sup 40/Ca and /sup 209/Bi. This experiment is compared to results of our previous /sup 56/Fe-induced experiments. Attempts were made to extend the /sup 56/Fe reactions to lower energies at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory SuperHILAC. In a desire to improve the mass and charge resolution of previous experiments we tried a time-of-flight telescope employing both a channel-plate start and stop signal. This was backed by an ion chamber ..delta..E and silicon E detector. The operational difficulties encountered are being corrected and we hope to have a reliable system ready this fall. Studies of target fragmentation in /sup 4/He-induced reactions are continuing via experiments and model calculations. The program which began at the University of Maryland Cyclotron has been continued at the Indiana University Cyclotron with 120 and 200 MeV /sup 4/He incident on /sup 12/C and /sup 27/Al targets. While the Indiana data are currently being analyzed and no results are yet available, a summary of the Maryland work is given. Also presented in this section are the model calculations used to describe the data. 28 refs.

  14. Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers and isotope fractionation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Smith, R.L.; Miller, D.N.

    2006-01-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) is a major constituent of many contaminated groundwaters, but its movement through aquifers is complex and poorly documented. In this study, processes affecting NH4+ movement in a treated wastewater plume were studied by a combination of techniques including large-scale monitoring of NH4+ distribution; isotopic analyses of coexisting aqueous NH4+, NO3-, N2, and sorbed NH 4+; and in situ natural gradient 15NH 4+ tracer tests with numerical simulations of 15NH4+, 15NO3-, and 15N2 breakthrough data. Combined results indicate that the main mass of NH4+ was moving downgradient at a rate about 0.25 times the groundwater velocity. Retardation factors and groundwater ages indicate that much of the NH4+ in the plume was recharged early in the history of the wastewater disposal. NO3- and excess N2 gas, which were related to each other by denitrification near the plume source, were moving downgradient more rapidly and were largely unrelated to coexisting NH 4+. The ??15N data indicate areas of the plume affected by nitrification (substantial isotope fractionation) and sorption (no isotope fractionation). There was no conclusive evidence for NH 4+-consuming reactions (nitrification or anammox) in the anoxic core of the plume. Nitrification occurred along the upper boundary of the plume but was limited by a low rate of transverse dispersive mixing of wastewater NH4+ and O2 from overlying uncontaminated groundwater. Without induced vertical mixing or displacement of plume water with oxic groundwater from upgradient sources, the main mass of NH4+ could reach a discharge area without substantial reaction long after the more mobile wastewater constituents are gone. Multiple approaches including in situ isotopic tracers and fractionation studies provided critical information about processes affecting NH4+ movement and N speciation.

  15. Comparative studies on the tolerance to photoinduced cutaneous inflammatory reactions by psoralen and rose bengal.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J R; Haberman, H F; Ranadive, N S

    1997-02-01

    The photochemotherapeutic value of topical 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) plus UVA irradiation has been well recognized. The phototoxicity associated with psoralen plus UVA (PUVA) therapy is hallmarked by an increase in vascular permeability (iVP), the accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (aPMN) and erythema formation in situ. Rose bengal (RB) plus UVA-VIS light (320-700 nm) produces a similar acute inflammatory response, but without immediate or delayed erythema and perceptible edema. This study describes some of the parameters involved in inflammatory reactions evoked by PUVA and the results are compared with RB-induced phototoxic reactions. The rates of iVP and aPMN with a 3 h pulse were quantified using 125I-albumin and 51Cr-labelled PMNs respectively. The erythemal response was graded visually. 8-MOP cream was applied topically, while RB was injected intradermally in rabbit skin before UVA-VIS (9.4 J cm-2) irradiation. The data show that there is no significant difference in the rates of iVP, aPMN and erythema formation between normal skin sites and mast cell-depleted skin sites when challenged with 8-MOP plus light. These results suggest that in situ mast cells do not play a significant role in 8-MOP-photoinduced acute cutaneous inflammatory reactions, in contrast with RB-photoinduced reactions. The iVP and aPMN responses are minimal or absent in sites subjected to repeated exposure to 8-MOP plus light for three or more consecutive days, suggesting the establishment of a desensitized/unresponsive state. Moreover, 8-MOP-photo-desensitized sites do not produce iVP and aPMN of the same magnitude as the normal (naive) skin sites when challenged with RB plus light. Similarly, RB-photo-desensitized sites do not produce iVP and aPMN of the same magnitude as the native skin sites when challenged with 8-MOP plus light. The desensitization and cross-desensitization of skin sites to 8-MOP- or RB-photoinduced reactions suggest that there is either direct attack on the

  16. In-situ study of interconnect failures by electromigration inside a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzig, Klaus; Wendrock, Horst; Buerke, Axel; Kötter, Thomas

    1999-11-01

    The influence of microstructure on electromigration damage of Al and Cu interconnects with different width and morphology was studied. At first, grain boundaries and local grain orientations before electromigration were registered and correlated with defect places. The investigations focussed on in-situ electromigration tests inside a SEM under accelerated loading conditions, on the in-situ observation of defect formation, and on orientation measurements at the interconnect grains. The position of individual grain boundaries and the misorientation of their neighbored grains seem to be decisive factors for the interconnect failure because of different diffusivities. Whereas the failure behavior of polycrystalline interconnects is sufficiently understood, bamboo structures require further investigations.

  17. Preparation of multilayered materials in cross-section for in situ TEM tensile deformation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, M. A., LLNL

    1997-05-13

    The success of in-situ transmission electron microscopy experimentation is often dictated by proper specimen preparation. We report here a novel technique permitting the production of cross-sectioned tensile specimens of multilayered films for in-situ deformation studies. Of primary importance in the development of this technique is the production of an electron transparent micro-gauge section using focused ion beam technology. This microgauge section predetermines the position at which plastic deformation is initiated; crack nucleation, growth and failure are then subsequently observed.

  18. Study of in-situ degradation of thermal control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, J. E.; Zerlaut, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental technique used in study of damage mechanism to semiconductor pigments exposed to ultraviolet radiation can be adapted for investigations of surface chemistry and may be used analytically to determine contamination.

  19. Detection of rare RNA sequences by single-enzyme in situ reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. High-resolution analyses of interleukin-6 mRNA in paraffin sections of lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, J.; Krams, M.; Wacker, H. H.; Carstens, A.; Weisner, D.; Hamann, K.; Menke, M.; Harms, D.; Parwaresch, R.

    1997-01-01

    To study the distribution pattern of interleukin-6 (IL-6)-producing cells in normal human lymph nodes, we applied the in situ reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technique. We describe a new modification of this technique for monitoring small amounts of specific nucleotide sequences in conventional paraffin sections. This technique differs in at least two respects from those described earlier. The two decisive steps are: 1) the reverse transcription of mRNA and the subsequent amplification of cDNA by polymerase chain reaction are performed by a new single enzyme capable of both reaction types in one and the same medium without buffer exchange; and 2) for the specific detection of the amplified cDNA, a modified version of the primed in situ labeling technique was used. The technique, carried out on normal human lymph nodes, traces a low load of IL-6 mRNA in fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and a minor population of T lymphocytes in the pulp region. High levels of expression were encountered in about 20% of perisinusoidal pulp macrophages. In addition, moderate activity was detectable in sinus lining cells. Because no major activity was found in the germinal centers of the lymphoid B follicles and in the T zone, it is suggested that the plasma cell differentiation ensuing from primary and secondary B-cell immunization is mainly effected by the sinus lining cells as well as perifollicular and perisinusoidal pulp macrophages capable of producing high amounts of IL-6. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9033263

  20. Detection of human papillomavirus infection in squamous tumours of the conjunctiva and lacrimal sac by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridisation, and polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Y.; Mashima, Y.; Kameyama, K.; Mukai, M.; Oguchi, Y.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Squamous tumours of the ocular surface, including the lacrimal pathway, range from benign lesions to invasive carcinomas. Some of these tumours are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, with the types of HPV differing among papillomas and dysplastic or malignant lesions.
METHODS—The relation between squamous tumours of the conjunctiva and lacrimal sac and HPV infection was investigated in 17 individuals with such tumours. Nine of the 17 tumours were benign, four were dysplastic lesions, and four were carcinomas.
RESULTS—Eight specimens showed positive immunohistochemical staining with antibodies to HPV; four of these eight were papillomas, three were dysplastic lesions, and one was a carcinoma. Koilocytosis was detected in seven of these eight tumours. Five of the eight specimens positive for immunohistochemical staining were also positive for HPV DNA by in situ hybridisation, and all eight were positive for HPV DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method.
CONCLUSION—Approximately 50% of squamous tumours of the ocular surface and lacrimal sac were associated with HPV infection. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of the detection of HPV in the field of ophthalmology by a combination of immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridisation, and PCR.

 PMID:9215061

  1. Use of Hybridization Chain Reaction-Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization To Track Gene Expression by Both Partners during Initiation of Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Nikolakakis, K.; Lehnert, E.

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of a productive symbiosis between Euprymna scolopes, the Hawaiian bobtail squid, and its luminous bacterial symbiont, Vibrio fischeri, is mediated by transcriptional changes in both partners. A key challenge to unraveling the steps required to successfully initiate this and many other symbiotic associations is characterization of the timing and location of these changes. We report on the adaptation of hybridization chain reaction-fluorescent in situ hybridization (HCR-FISH) to simultaneously probe the spatiotemporal regulation of targeted genes in both E. scolopes and V. fischeri. This method revealed localized, transcriptionally coregulated epithelial cells within the light organ that responded directly to the presence of bacterial cells while, at the same time, provided a sensitive means to directly show regulated gene expression within the symbiont population. Thus, HCR-FISH provides a new approach for characterizing habitat transition in bacteria and for discovering host tissue responses to colonization. PMID:25956763

  2. Photosensitized degradation kinetics of trace halogenated contaminants in natural waters using membrane introduction mass spectrometry as an in situ reaction monitor.

    PubMed

    Letourneau, Dane R; Gill, Chris G; Krogh, Erik T

    2015-11-01

    The photochemically mediated dechlorination of polyhalogenated compounds represents a potential decontamination strategy and a relevant environmental process in chemically reducing media. We report the UV irradiation of natural and artificial waters containing natural dissolved organic matter to effect the photo-sensitized degradation of chlorinated organic compounds, including tetrachloromethane, 1,1,1-tricloroethane, perchloroethene, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane and chlorobenzene at trace (ppb) levels in aqueous solution. The degradation kinetics are followed in situ using membrane introduction mass spectrometry. By re-circulating the reaction mixture in a closed loop configuration over a semi-permeable hollow fiber polydimethylsiloxane membrane in a flow cell interface, volatile and semi-volatile compounds are continuously monitored using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The time resolved quantitative information provides useful mechanistic insights, including kinetic data. Pseudo first-order rate constants for the degradation of contaminant mixtures in natural waters are reported. PMID:26439106

  3. Thermal decomposition of t-butylamine borane studied by in situ solid state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Feigerle, J.; Smyrl, N. R.; Morrell, J. S.; Stowe, A. C.

    2010-03-18

    of the amine borane fuel more feasible [22]. In the present study, tert-butylamine borane is investigated by heteronuclear in situ solid state NMR to understand hydrogen release from a hydrocarbon containing amine borane. tbutylamine borane has similar physical properties to amine borane with a melting point of 96 C. A single proton has been replaced with a t-butylamine group resulting in a weakening of the dihydrogen bonding framework. t-butylamine borane has a theoretical gravimetric hydrogen density of 15.1%; however, isobutane can also be evolved rather than hydrogen. If decomposition yields one mole isobutane and two moles hydrogen, 4.5 wt% H2 gas will be evolved. More importantly for the present work, the resulting spent fuel should be comprised of both (BNH)n and (CBNH)n polyimidoboranes.

  4. In situ ATR-FTIR study of the early stages of fly ash geopolymer gel formation.

    PubMed

    Rees, Catherine A; Provis, John L; Lukey, Grant C; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2007-08-14

    The kinetics of geopolymer formation are monitored using a novel in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic technique. Reaction rates are determined from the intensity variation of the bands related to the geopolymer gel network and the unreacted fly ash particles. Comparison with deuterated geopolymer samples provides critical information regarding peak assignments. An initial induction (lag) period is observed to occur for hydroxide-activated geopolymers, followed by gel evolution according to an approximately linear reaction profile. The length of the lag period is reduced by increasing the concentration of NaOH. An increase in the rate of network formation also occurs with increasing NaOH concentration up to a maximum point, beyond which an increased NaOH concentration leads to a reduced rate of network formation. This trend is attributed to the competing effects of increased alkalinity and stronger ion pairing with an increase in NaOH concentration. In situ analysis also shows that the rate of fly ash dissolution is similar for all moderate- to high-alkali geopolymer slurries, which is attributed to the very highly water-deficient nature of these systems and is contrary to predictions from classical glass dissolution chemistry. This provides for the first time detailed kinetic information describing fly ash geopolymer formation kinetics. PMID:17658864

  5. Development of in situ respirometers for ocean acidification studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risi, M. A.; Barry, J. P.; Buck, K. R.; Okuda, C. M.; Reisenbichler, K. R.; Robison, B. H.

    2009-12-01

    Studies of metabolic rates of deep-sea organisms are important components of research addressing the biological impacts of ocean acidification. These studies contribute to our understanding of the ocean carbon cycle by identifying the pathways and rates of organic carbon fluxes in ocean ecosystems. Oxygen consumption is expected to decrease in most animals in response to hypercapnic (high-CO2) stress, due to disruption of internal acid/base balance. To perform these field and laboratory studies, a respirometry system utilizing a controller with a distributed architecture was developed. The architecture has allowed the system to be adapted to midwater and benthic respirometers. The distributed nature of the architecture allows the easy expansion of the respirometers as well as the integration of new sensors. An overview of the system and field results to date will be presented.

  6. Oxygen Reduction Reaction on Graphene in an Electro-Fenton System: In Situ Generation of H2 O2 for the Oxidation of Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Yu; Tang, Cheng; Wang, Hao-Fan; Chen, Cheng-Meng; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Xia; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-05-23

    Fenton oxidation using an aqueous mixture of Fe(2+) and H2 O2 is a promising environmental remediation strategy. However, the difficulty of storage and shipment of concentrated H2 O2 and the generation of iron sludge limit its broad application. Therefore, highly efficient and cost-effective electrocatalysts are in great need. Herein, a graphene catalyst is proposed for the electro-Fenton process, in which H2 O2 is generated in situ by the two-electron reduction of the dissolved O2 on the cathode and then decomposes to generate (.) OH in acidic solution with Fe(2+) . The π bond of the oxygen is broken whereas the σ bond is generally preserved on the metal-free reduced graphene oxide owing to the high free energy change. Consequently, the oxygen is reduced to H2 O2 through a two-electron pathway. The thermally reduced graphene with a high specific surface area (308.8 m(2)  g(-1) ) and a large oxygen content (10.3 at %) exhibits excellent reactivity for the two-electron oxygen reduction reaction to H2 O2 . A highly efficient peroxide yield (64.2 %) and a remarkable decolorization of methylene blue (12 mg L(-1) ) of over 97 % in 160 min are obtained. The degradation of methylene blue with hydroxyl radicals generated in situ is described by a pseudo first-order kinetics model. This provides a proof-of-concept of an environmentally friendly electro-Fenton process using graphene for the oxygen reduction reaction in an acidic solution to generate H2 O2 . PMID:27098063

  7. Transport with Bimolecular Reactions: Applications to In-Situ Chemical Oxidation of DNAPLs by Permanganate in Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshadi, Masoud

    Chemical oxidation of dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) by permanganate has emerged as an effective remediation strategy in fractured rock. Our objectives in this research were to carry out a sequence of experimental, computational and theoretical tasks aimed at improving current understanding of permanganate oxidation in fractured rock systems, and also develop modeling tools that can be used for preliminary design of oxidation schemes at field sites. Our research focused on both free-phase entrapped DNAPL in variable-aperture fractures and dissolved DNAPL in the rock matrix. In the first section of our research, we present high-resolution experimental investigations in transparent analog variable-aperture fractures to improve understanding of chemical oxidation of residual entrapped trichloroethylene (TCE) in fractures. Four experiments were performed with different permanganate concentrations, flow rates, and initial TCE phase geometry. The initial aperture field and evolving entrapped-phase geometry were measured quantitatively. We present results on the time-evolution of fracture-scale TCE consumption and DNAPL removal rates for all the experiments. In the next part of this work, we developed theoretical understanding of the reaction front dynamics in the case of chemical oxidation of aqueous-phase DNAPL within fracture-matrix system, backed up by numerical simulations. We also consider the influence of NOD consumption and contaminant sorption to solid aquifer materials in our models. Based on the results from this task we are able to propose simple strategies for remediation design (e.g. the time needed to degrade DNAPL inside the fracture-matrix system and the permanganate injection pattern) for a given set of conditions. Our numerical simulations of diffusion with bimolecular reaction in the rock matrix demonstrated a transition in the spatially integrated reaction rate - increasing with time initially, and transitioning to a decrease with time. We

  8. In situ fixation of lead in soil: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, M.; Robinson, W.W.

    1995-12-31

    Excavation and treatment of lead contaminated soil is routine today. Much less typical is the case where the soil is remediated and placed back into immediate use through the application of insitue techniques. A case study will be presented that will highlight the problem and the unique problem solving approach that allowed the site owner to promptly return his property to productive use.

  9. In-Situ Chemical Reduction and Oxidation of VOCs in Groundwater: Groundwater Treatability Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Amy; Glasgow, Jason; McCaleh, Rececca C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's treatability studies for volatile organic compounds in groundwater. In-Situ groundwater treatment technologies include: 1) Chemical Reduction(Ferox); 2) Chemical Oxidation (Fenton Reagents, Permanganate, and Persulfate); and 3) Thermal (Dynamic Underground Stripping, Six-Phase Heating). This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  10. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Heating Studies of Particle Coalescence and Microstructure Evolution in Nanosized Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    2006-06-02

    Final report on in-situ transmission microscopy heating studies of particle coalescence and microstructure evolution in nanosized ceramics. Report includes summary of work on particle shape changes and stress effects, and novel infiltration techniques in the processing of alumina based ceramics.

  11. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study

    SciTech Connect

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Battaglia, J.M.; Buksa, J.J.; Creedson, R.L.; Erlandson, O.D.; Levine, H.E.; Roelant, D.F.; Sanchez, H.W.; Schrader, S.A.

    1984-09-01

    GA Technologies has developed a conceptual ICF reactor system based on the Cascade rotating-bed reaction chamber concept. Unique features of the system design include the use of low activation SiC in a reaction chamber constructed of box-shaped tiles held together in compression by prestressing tendons to the vacuum chamber. Circulating Li/sub 2/O granules serve as the tritium breeding and energy transport material, cascading down the sides of the reaction chamber to the power conversion system. The total tritium inventory of the system is 6 kg; tritium recovery is accomplished directly from the granules via the vacuum system. A system for centrifugal throw transport of the hot Li/sub 2/O granules from the reaction chamber to the power conversion system has been developed. A number of issues were evaluated during the course of this study. These include the response of first-layer granules to the intense microexplosion surface heat flux, cost effective fabrication of Li/sub 2/O granules, tritium inventory and recovery issues, the thermodynamics of solids-flow options, vacuum versus helium-medium heat transfer, and the tradeoffs of capital cost versus efficiency for alternate heat exchange and power conversion system option. The resultant design options appear to be economically competitive, safe, and environmentally attractive.

  12. Iron oxide mineral-water interface reactions studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.E.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1994-07-01

    Natural iron mineral surfaces have been examined in air by atomic force (AFM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopies. A number of different surface features were found to be characteristic of the native surface. Even surfaces freshly exposed by crushing larger crystals were found to have a pebbly surface texture caused by the presence of thin coatings of what might be surface precipitates. This finding is interpreted as evidence for previous exposure to water, probably through an extensive network of microfractures. Surface reactions on the goethite crystals were studied by AFM at size resolutions ranging from microns to atomic resolution before, during, and after reaction with distilled water and 0.lN HCl. Immediate and extensive surface reconfiguration occurred on contact with water. In one case, after equilibration with water for 3 days, surface reprecipitation, etching and pitting were observed. Atomic resolution images taken under water were found to be disordered. The result of surface reaction was generally to increase the surface area substantially through the extension of surface platelet arrays, present prior to reaction. This work is being done in support of the site characterization project at Yucca Mountain.

  13. Molecular-dynamics study of detonation. II. The reaction mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Betsy M.; Mattson, William; Grosh, John; Trevino, S. F.

    1996-01-01

    In this work, we investigate mechanisms of chemical reactions that sustain an unsupported detonation. The chemical model of an energetic crystal used in this study consists of heteronuclear diatomic molecules that, at ambient pressure, dissociate endothermically. Subsequent association of the products to form homonuclear diatomic molecules provides the energy release that sustains the detonation. A many-body interaction is used to simulate changes in the electronic bonding as a function of local atomic environment. The consequence of the many-body interaction in this model is that the intramolecular bond is weakened with increasing density. The mechanism of the reaction for this model was extracted by investigating the details of the molecular properties in the reaction zone with two-dimensional molecular dynamics. The mechanism for the initiation of the reaction in this model is pressure-induced atomization. There was no evidence of excitation of vibrational modes to dissociative states. This particular result is directly attributable to the functional form and choice of parameters for this model, but might also have more general applicability.

  14. Shape-selected nanocrystals for in situ spectro-electrochemistry studies on structurally well defined surfaces under controlled electrolyte transport: A combined in situ ATR-FTIR/online DEMS investigation of CO electrooxidation on Pt

    PubMed Central

    Jusys, Zenonas; Behm, R Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Summary The suitability and potential of shape selected nanocrystals for in situ spectro-electrochemical and in particular spectro-electrocatalytic studies on structurally well defined electrodes under enforced and controlled electrolyte mass transport will be demonstrated, using Pt nanocrystals prepared by colloidal synthesis procedures and a flow cell set-up allowing simultaneous measurements of the Faradaic current, FTIR spectroscopy of adsorbed reaction intermediates and side products in an attenuated total reflection configuration (ATR-FTIRS) and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) measurements of volatile reaction products. Batches of shape-selected Pt nanocrystals with different shapes and hence different surface structures were prepared and structurally characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electrochemical methods. The potential for in situ spectro-electrocatalytic studies is illustrated for COad oxidation on Pt nanocrystal surfaces, where we could separate contributions from two processes occurring simultaneously, oxidative COad removal and re-adsorption of (bi)sulfate anions, and reveal a distinct structure sensitivity in these processes and also in the structural implications of (bi)sulfate re-adsorption on the CO adlayer. PMID:24991511

  15. Study on astrophysical reactions using low-energy RI beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, low-energy RI beams can be produced in a good intensity and they have been used for studying many astrophysical reactions. One of the facilities producing low-energy RI beams is CRIB (CNS Radio-Isotope Beam separator) [1,2], an RI-beam separator of Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. Taking CRIB as an example, recent improvements on the RI-beam production and experimental results on astrophysical studies are presented. Several experimental approaches have been taken for the studies on astrophysical reactions.The feature of each method are discussed based on real measurements performed at CRIB. One is the direct method, applied for measurements of reactions such as (α,p) [3]. Another is the measurement of proton/alpha resonance scattering using the thick target method in inverse kinematics, by which we can obtain information on the resonances relevant in astrophysical reactions [4,5]. A recent fruitful result was from a measurement of proton resonance scattering using a ^7Be beam [5]. The energy level structure of ^8B, revealed by the experiment, is especially of interest as it is related with the ^7Be(p,γ) ^8B reaction, responsible for the production of ^8B neutrinos in the sun. We successfully determined parameters of resonances in ^8B below 6.7 MeV, which may affect the ^7Be(p,γ)^8B reaction rate at the solar temparature. Indirect methods, such as ANC and the Trojan Horse Method, were also used in some of the measurements.[4pt] [1] S. Kubono et al., Eur. Phys. J. A13 (2002) 217.[0pt] [2] Y. Yanagisawa et al., Nucl. Instrum. Meth. Phys. Res., Sect. A 539 (2005) 74.[0pt] [3] M. Notani et al., Nucl. Phys. A 764 (2004) 113c.[0pt] [4] T. Teranishi et al., Phys. Lett. B 650 (2007) 129.[0pt] [5] H. Yamaguchi et al., Phys. Lett. B 672 (2009) 230.

  16. Electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of fuel cell reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Minhua

    Fuel cells, especially proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are expected soon to become a major source of clean energy. However, the sluggish kinetics of the fuel cell reactions, i.e., the fuel oxidation and oxygen reduction, hinders the wide-spread application of PEMFCs. These problems prompted our studies to focus on elucidating the nature of the reaction intermediates during the oxidation of fuels and the reduction of oxygen on electrocatalysts, and understanding the mechanisms of these reactions. The results from these studies will provide basic information for designing new electrocatalysts. In this dissertation, the oxidation reactions of ethanol and dimethyl ether (DME) on Pt were investigated by the surface enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy with an attenuated total reflection configuration (ATR-SEIRAS). Various reaction intermediates were detected and their electrochemical behaviors were studied. We also benefited from advantages of the ATR-SEIRAS technique and observed superoxide anion (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide anion (H2-) as the intermediates in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on Pt and Au electrodes for the first time. The other main goal of this study is design of new electrocatalysts for ORR with low cost and high activity. Two novel electrocatalysts were developed. One is Pt monolayer electrocatalysts consisting of a Pt monolayer formed by a red-ox replacement of the Cu monolayer by Pt atoms on non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell nanoparticles. In such catalyst, the total noble mass activity of the catalyst was 2--6 times larger that of commercial Pt catalyst. Another way of lowering the cost of catalysts and enhancing the ORR activity involves alloying less expensive noble metals with other non-noble elements. In this dissertation, the nano-structured Pd based alloy electrocatalysts have been explored. The results showed that their ORR activities surpass that of commercial Pt. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations

  17. Computational studies of polysiloxanes : oxidation potentials and decomposition reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A.; Redfern, P. C.; Zhang, Z.; Amine, K.

    2011-06-23

    Silicon-containing solvents have tremendous potential for application as electrolytes for electrical energy storage devices such as lithium-ion (air) batteries and supercapacitors. Quantum chemical methods were employed to investigate trends in oxidation potentials and decomposition reactions of a series of polysiloxanes. Various electron-donating and -withdrawing substituents can be used to tune the oxidation potential in shorter chain siloxanes but not in longer ones. Decomposition reactions of siloxanes in their oxidized states were investigated and compared against their carbon analogues. These studies suggest that the Si-O group provides added stability for siloxanes over their carbon analogues. Computational studies have also been performed for various disiloxanes and siloxanes with spacer groups to understand their thermochemical stability and oxidation potentials.

  18. Crossed-beam studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this program is to characterize the detailed dynamics of elementary radical reactions and to provide a better understanding of radical reactivity in general. The radical beam is typically generated by a laser photolysis method. After colliding with the reacting molecule in a crossed-beam apparatus, the reaction product state distribution is interrogated by laser spectroscopic techniques. Several radicals of combustion significance, such as O, CH, OH, CN and NCO have been successfully generated and their collisional behavior at the state-to-state integral cross section level of detail has been studied in this manner. During the past year, the detection system has been converted from LIF to REMPI schemes, and the emphasis of this program shifted to investigate the product angular distributions. Both inelastic and reactive processes have been studied.

  19. A Nuclear Reaction Analysis study of fluorine uptake in flint

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jian-Yue; Weathers, D. L.; Picton, F.; Hughes, B. F.; Duggan, J. L.; McDaniel, F. D.; Matteson, S.

    1999-06-10

    Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) using the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}O resonance reaction is a powerful method of fluorine depth profiling. We have used this method to study the fluorine uptake phenomenon in mineral flint, which could potentially develop into a method of dating archeological flint artifacts. Flint samples cut with a rock saw were immersed in aqueous fluoride solutions for different times for the uptake study. The results suggest that fluorine uptake is not a simple phenomenon, but rather a combination of several simultaneous processes. Fluorine surface adsorption appears to play an important role in developing the fluorine profiles. The surface adsorption was affected by several parameters such as pH value and fluorine concentration in the solution, among others. The problem of surface charging for the insulator materials during ion bombardment is also reported.

  20. Atmospheric Chemistry: Laboratory Studies of Kinetics of Important Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis describes the experiments to measure the rate constants for some reactions of the atmospherically important nitrate radical (NO_3) using the discharge-flow technique. The nitrate radical was monitored by optical absorption at lambda = 662 nm. The reactions of NO_3 with some stable organic and inorganic substrates are reported. The temperature dependences of some of the rate constants have also been determined (298 < T < 523 K). In most cases, computer simulation was used to extract the rate constant for the primary process because the time-dependent behaviour of (NO_3) was affected by secondary reactions of NO_3 with products of the primary interaction. The Arrhenius parameter in parentheses (E _{rm a}/kJ mol^ {-1}, A/cm^3 molecule ^{-1}s^ {-1} respectively) for the following reactions have been determined: ethane (37, 6.7 times 10^{-12}), ethylene (25.8, 6.3 times 10^ {-12}), CH_3OH (21.3, 1.2 times 10^ {-12}), CHCiota_3 (23.4, 8.6 times 10 ^{-13}) and HCl (27.7, 4 times 10^{-12}). The activation energies for the reactions studied between NO_3 and some alkynes are represented well by the value 25 +/- 3 kJ mol^{-1} and the corresponding pre-exponential factors (expressed as ln(10 ^{13}A/cm^3 molecule^{-1}s ^{-1}) are as follows: C_2H_2 (1.6 +/- 1.4), C_3H _4 (5.0 +/- 1.4), 1-C_4H_6 (5.8 +/- 1.0), 1-C_5 H_8 (5.7 +/- 0.6) and 1-C_6H _{10} (4.5 +/- 0.4). Some reactions were studied at room temperature _3(298 +/- 2 K) only and the rate constants found (in units of cm ^3 molecule^{ -1}s^{-1}) are: buta-1,3-diene (1.8 times 10 ^{-13}), isobutene (2.8 times 10^{-13 }), HBr (1.3 times 10 ^{-15}) and hex-2-yne (3.0 times 10^{-14 }). Non-Arrhenius behaviour was found in the reactions of NO_3 with n-butane, isobutane and propene. The empirical variation of these rate constants with temperature is well represented by the three parameter expressions:. k(T) = 1.2 times 10 ^{-46}T^{11

  1. Ultrafast optical studies of surface reaction processes at semiconductor interfaces. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.J.D.

    1994-10-01

    The DOE funded research has focused on the development of novel non-linear optical methods for the in situ study of surface reaction dynamics. In particular, the work has concentrated on interfacial charge transfer processes as this is the simplest of all surface reactions, i.e., no bonds are broken and the reaction is derived from nuclear repolarization. Interfacial charge transfer forms the basis for a number of important solar energy conversion strategies. In these studies, semiconductor liquid junctions provide a convenient system in which the interfacial charge transfer can be optically initiated. The all-optical approach necessitates that the dynamics of the charge transfer event itself be put in the proper context of the operating photophysical processes at the surface. There are at least four dynamical processes that are coupled in determining the overall rate of electron flux across the interface. In the limit that interfacial charge transfer approaches strong coupling, the time scale for transport of even field accelerated carriers within the space charge region becomes comparable to the charge transfer dynamics. The transport component needs to be convolved to probes of the carrier population at the surface. The other two dynamical processes, carrier thermalization and surface state trapping, determine the states which ultimately serve as the donor levels to the solution acceptor distribution. In terms of the hot carrier model, these latter two processes compete with direct unthermalized charge transfer. There is a fifth dynamical process which also needs consideration: the solvent modes that are coupled to the reaction coordinate. Ultimately, the dynamics of solvent relaxation determine the upper limit to the charge transfer process. Different optical techniques have been developed to follow all the above dynamical processes in which a real time view of charge transfer dynamics at semiconductor surfaces is emerging. These results are discussed here.

  2. Highly Stretchable and Conductive Silver Nanoparticle Embedded Graphene Flake Electrode Prepared by In situ Dual Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yeoheung; Samanta, Khokan; Lee, Hanleem; Lee, Keunsik; Tiwari, Anand P; Lee, JiHun; Yang, Junghee; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of stretchable devices that combine with conductive properties offers new exciting opportunities for wearable applications. Here, a novel, convenient and inexpensive solution process was demonstrated to prepare in situ silver (Ag) or platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs)-embedded rGO hybrid materials using formic acid duality in the presence of AgNO3 or H2PtCl6 at low temperature. The reduction duality of the formic acid can convert graphene oxide (GO) to rGO and simultaneously deposit the positively charged metal ion to metal NP on rGO while the formic acid itself is converted to a CO2 evolving gas that is eco-friendly. The AgNP-embedded rGO hybrid electrode on an elastomeric substrate exhibited superior stretchable properties including a maximum conductivity of 3012 S cm(-1) (at 0 % strain) and 322.8 S cm(-1) (at 35 % strain). Its fabrication process using a printing method is scalable. Surprisingly, the electrode can survive even in continuous stretching cycles. PMID:26383845

  3. Highly Stretchable and Conductive Silver Nanoparticle Embedded Graphene Flake Electrode Prepared by In situ Dual Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yeoheung; Samanta, Khokan; Lee, Hanleem; Lee, Keunsik; Tiwari, Anand P.; Lee, JiHun; Yang, Junghee; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of stretchable devices that combine with conductive properties offers new exciting opportunities for wearable applications. Here, a novel, convenient and inexpensive solution process was demonstrated to prepare in situ silver (Ag) or platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs)-embedded rGO hybrid materials using formic acid duality in the presence of AgNO3 or H2PtCl6 at low temperature. The reduction duality of the formic acid can convert graphene oxide (GO) to rGO and simultaneously deposit the positively charged metal ion to metal NP on rGO while the formic acid itself is converted to a CO2 evolving gas that is eco-friendly. The AgNP-embedded rGO hybrid electrode on an elastomeric substrate exhibited superior stretchable properties including a maximum conductivity of 3012 S cm-1 (at 0 % strain) and 322.8 S cm-1 (at 35 % strain). Its fabrication process using a printing method is scalable. Surprisingly, the electrode can survive even in continuous stretching cycles. PMID:26383845

  4. Highly Stretchable and Conductive Silver Nanoparticle Embedded Graphene Flake Electrode Prepared by In situ Dual Reduction Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Yeoheung; Samanta, Khokan; Lee, Hanleem; Lee, Keunsik; Tiwari, Anand P.; Lee, Jihun; Yang, Junghee; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2015-09-01

    The emergence of stretchable devices that combine with conductive properties offers new exciting opportunities for wearable applications. Here, a novel, convenient and inexpensive solution process was demonstrated to prepare in situ silver (Ag) or platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs)-embedded rGO hybrid materials using formic acid duality in the presence of AgNO3 or H2PtCl6 at low temperature. The reduction duality of the formic acid can convert graphene oxide (GO) to rGO and simultaneously deposit the positively charged metal ion to metal NP on rGO while the formic acid itself is converted to a CO2 evolving gas that is eco-friendly. The AgNP-embedded rGO hybrid electrode on an elastomeric substrate exhibited superior stretchable properties including a maximum conductivity of 3012 S cm-1 (at 0 % strain) and 322.8 S cm-1 (at 35 % strain). Its fabrication process using a printing method is scalable. Surprisingly, the electrode can survive even in continuous stretching cycles.

  5. In Situ Study of the Influence of Nickel on the Phase Transformation Kinetics in Austempered Ductile Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saal, Patrick; Meier, Leopold; Li, Xiaohu; Hofmann, Michael; Hoelzel, Markus; Wagner, Julia N.; Volk, Wolfram

    2016-02-01

    Phase fractions and austenite carbon contents in austempered ductile iron samples with three different nickel contents were determined by in situ neutron diffraction. The samples were austenitized at 1178 K (905 °C) for 30 minutes and austempered for 3.5 hours at temperatures between 523 K and 723 K (250 °C and 450 °C) using a mirror furnace. Based on the in situ neutron diffraction studies, plateau times were derived, which determine the end of stage I reaction. The austenite contents increase for higher austempering temperatures when the austempering times are selected properly, considering the accelerated phase transformation at higher temperature. Appropriate austempering times were derived for austempering temperatures between 523 K and 723 K (250 °C and 450 °C). Increased nickel contents lead to higher austenite phase fractions. Moreover the retarding effect of nickel on the phase transformation was quantified. The plateau values of phase fraction and the according austempering times were converted to TTT diagrams. The evolution of the austenite carbon content shows a maximum at 623 K (350 °C) austempering temperature. This can be explained by temperature-dependent carbide precipitation and carbon diffusion into lattice defects. Fine carbides within the ferrite could be found by preliminary APT analysis.

  6. In situ X-ray Diffraction Study of Ni–Yb Interlayer and Alloy Systems on Si„100

    SciTech Connect

    Knaepen, W.; Demeulemeester, J; Jordan-Sweet, J; Vantomme, A; Detavernier, C; Van Meirhaeghe, R; Lavoie, C

    2010-01-01

    The phase formation in the ternary Ni/Yb/Si system was studied for Ni-Yb alloy and interlayer structures on Si(100) substrates using in situ x-ray diffraction measurements. Yb was treated as an alloying element in the Ni-Si system with Yb concentrations varying between 0 and 40 at. % of the Ni concentration. Independent of the initial structure of the sample, a Ni-Si or Ni-Yb compound was detected first which suggests that Ni is the dominant diffusing species during the solid state reactions. No pure Yb silicides were identified but a ternary phase (YbNi{sub 2}Si{sub 2}) formed in all samples after the Si atoms became mobile. Information about the distribution of the phases throughout the thin silicide film was obtained using ex situ Rutherford backscattering analysis. Independent of the Yb concentration, the NiSi phase formed at the substrate interface. As a result, the immobile Yb atoms shifted toward the sample surface and no detectable amount of Yb atoms was left at the Ni-silicide/Si interface after annealing.

  7. Acute contrast reaction management by radiologists: a local audit study.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Murray J; Bynevelt, Michael

    2003-12-01

    Consultant radiologists and trainees must possess knowledge of optimal acute management of anaphylactic/anaphylactoid contrast reactions because patient survival depends upon prompt initial management. The aim of the present study is to assess the knowledge of first-line management of these reactions among radiologists. Within one working day, and without prior knowledge, radiology consultants and trainees within four teaching hospitals in a major Australian capital city were asked to complete a confidential questionnaire regarding acute resuscitation management. Scenarios were presented of an adult who developed life-threatening symptoms of anaphylaxis immediately after intravenous contrast administration, ventricular fibrillation and profound bradycardia. Questions were asked with regards to adrenaline, corticosteroid, antihistamines, intravenous volume expansion, cardio-pulmonary rescuscitation and knowledge of the emergency telephone number. Sites were assessed for presence of an anaphylaxis management chart and also when each participant last completed a resuscitation course. Forty-two participants were recruited. Overall, 53% of questions were answered correctly. Only 43% knew the adrenaline dose and if an incorrect dose was administered it was more likely to be an overdose. Notable inadequacies were also discovered with corticosteroid, atropine, antihistamine doses and intravenous fluid use. Only 26% had completed a resuscitation course in the past 2 years. Forty-five percent knew the emergency telephone number and 55% of rooms using intravenous contrast contained an immediately visible chart for contrast reaction management. Radiologist and trainee knowledge of immediate life-threatening contrast reaction management is deficient. Severe contrast reactions are uncommon with today's use of non-ionic contrast, but they still occur. Experience in the management of anaphylaxis can only come from regular, compulsory training. PMID:14641186

  8. Computational Study on Chemical Reaction Mechanisms of Octafluorocarbon Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Heechol; Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Plasma Fundamental Technology Research Team

    2015-09-01

    Saturated or unsaturated octafluorocarbons(OFCs) have been used extensively in dry etching processes due to their relatively low global warming potential and their high CF2 radical levels in commercial plasma treatments. Many experimental and theoretical studies of these species have been performed for useful information about physical and chemical properties of OFCs. However, direct experimental studies of these chemicals are difficult because of their high reactivity in plasma state and high-level theoretical approaches such as G3(MP2) and CCSD(T)/CBS need huge computational cost. Recently, it has been shown that the ωB97X-D/aVTZ method is strongly recommended as the best practical density functional theory(DFT) for rigorous and extensive studies of OFCs because of its high performance and reliability for van der Waals interactions. All the feasible isomerization and dissociation paths of OFCs were investigated at ωB97X-D/aVTZ and rate constants of their chemical reactions were computed by using variational transition-state theory(VTST) for a deep insight into OFCs' reaction mechanisms. Fates and roles of OFCs and their fragments in plasma phases could be clearly explained based on the obtained reaction mechanisms. This work was supported by R&D Program of ``Plasma Convergence & Fundamental Research'' through NFRI of Korea funded by the Government funds.

  9. Condensed Matter Deuterium Cluster Target for Study of Pycnonuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoling; George, Miley

    2009-11-01

    Fusion reactions have two main classes: thermonuclear and the pycnonuclear. Thermonuclear fusion occurs in low density high temperature plasmas, and is very sensitive to the ion temperature due to Columbic repulsion effects. As the density increases, the Columbic potential barrier is depressed by increased electron screening, allowing fusion at lower temperatures. This type of nuclear reaction is termed a pycnonuclear fusion and is the basis for astrophysical fusion. Ichimarua [1] proposed a laboratory study of this process using explosive mechanical compression of H/D to metallic densities, which would be extremely difficult to implement. Instead, our recent research suggests that metallic-like H/D ``clusters'' can be formed in dislocation loops of thin Palladium foils through electrochemical processes. [2] If this technique is used as a laser compression target, the compressed cluster density would allow study of pycnonuclear reactions. This provides a means of studying astrophysical fusion process, and could also lead to an important non-cryogenic ICF target. [2] [4pt] [1] S. Ichimaru, H. Kitamura. Phys. Plasmas, 6, 2649 (1999) [0pt] [2] G. Miley and X. Yang, Deuterium Cluster Target for Ultra-High Density, 18TH TOFE, San Francisco, CA Sep. 28 -- Oct. 2, 2008

  10. Kinetic study of hydrated lime reaction with HCl.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rong; Chin, Terence; Liang, David Tee; Laursen, Karin; Ong, Wan Yean; Yao, Kaiwen; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2003-06-01

    Hydrochloride (HCl) is an acidic pollutant present in the flue gas of most municipal or hazardous waste incinerators. Hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2) is often used as a dry sorbent for injection in a spray reactor to remove HCI. However, due to the short residence time encountered, this control method has generally been found to have low conversion efficiencies which results in the high lime usage and generates large amount of fly ash as solid wastes. A fundamental study was carried outto investigate the kinetics of HCl-lime reaction under simulated flue gas conditions in order to better understand the process thereby providing a basis for an optimized lime usage and reduced fly ash production. The initial reaction rate and conversion of three limes were studied using a thermogravimetric analyzer by varying the gas flow rate, temperature (170-400 degrees C), and HCI concentrations (600-1200 mg/m3) as well as the associated particle size and surface area of the limes. The initial lime conversions were found to rely mostly on the residence time, while the ultimate lime conversions were strongly influenced by temperature and the reaction products. CaOHCI was found to be the primary product in most cases, while for one specific lime, CaCl2 was the ultimate conversion product after an extended time period. The true utilization of lime in flue gas cleanup is thus higher when CaOHCl is considered as the final product than those based on CaCl2 as the final product, which has been commonly used in previous studies. The initial reaction was controlled by diffusion of HCl in gas phase and the subsequent reaction by gaseous diffusion through the developing product layer. Increasing the HCI concentration raised the initial rate as well as conversion. However, overloading the lime with excessive HCI caused clogging at its surface and a drop in the ultimate conversion. Limes with smaller particle diameters and higher surface areas were found to be more reactive. The effect of gas

  11. Simulation Studies of Protein and Small Molecule Interactions and Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Zhang, J; Che, X; Gao, Y Q

    2016-01-01

    Computational studies of protein and small molecule (protein-ligand/enzyme-substrate) interactions become more and more important in biological science and drug discovery. Computer modeling can provide molecular details of the processes such as conformational change, binding, and transportation of small molecules/proteins, which are not easily to be captured in experiments. In this chapter, we discussed simulation studies of both protein and small molecules from three aspects: conformation sampling, transportations of small molecules in enzymes, and enzymatic reactions involving small molecules. Both methodology developments and examples of simulation studies in this field were presented. PMID:27497167

  12. Cost studies of thermally enhanced in situ soil remediation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bremser, J.; Booth, S.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes five thermally enhanced technologies that may be used to remediate contaminated soil and water resources. The standard methods of treating these contaminated areas are Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE), Excavate & Treat (E&T), and Pump & Treat (P&T). Depending on the conditions at a given site, one or more of these conventional alternatives may be employed; however, several new thermally enhanced technologies for soil decontamination are emerging. These technologies are still in demonstration programs which generally are showing great success at achieving the expected remediation results. The cost savings reported in this work assume that the technologies will ultimately perform as anticipated by their developers in a normal environmental restoration work environment. The five technologies analyzed in this report are Low Frequency Heating (LF or Ohmic, both 3 and 6 phase AC), Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS), Radio Frequency Heating (RF), Radio Frequency Heating using Dipole Antennae (RFD), and Thermally Enhanced Vapor Extraction System (TEVES). In all of these technologies the introduction of heat to the formation raises vapor pressures accelerating contaminant evaporation rates and increases soil permeability raising diffusion rates of contaminants. The physical process enhancements resulting from temperature elevations permit a greater percentage of volatile organic compound (VOC) or semi- volatile organic compound (SVOC) contaminants to be driven out of the soils for treatment or capture in a much shorter time period. This report presents the results of cost-comparative studies between these new thermally enhanced technologies and the conventional technologies, as applied to five specific scenarios.

  13. Chemical reaction and dust formation studies in laboratory hydrocarbon plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippler, Rainer; Majumdar, Abhijit; Thejaswini, H. C.

    Plasma chemical reaction studies with relevance to, e.g., Titan's atmosphere have been per-formed in various laboratory plasmas [1,2]. Chemical reactions in a dielectric barrier discharge at medium pressure of 250-300 mbar have been studied in CH4 /N2 and CH4 /Ar gas mixtures by means of mass spectrometry. The main reaction scheme is production of H2 by fragmenta-tion of CH4 , but also production of larger hydrocarbons like Cn Hm with n up to 10 including formation of different functional CN groups is observed. [1] A. Majumdar and R. Hippler, Development of dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing apparatus for mass spectrometry and thin film deposition, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 075103 (2007) [2] H.T. Do, G. Thieme, M. Frühlich, H. Kersten, and R. Hippler, Ion Molecule and Dust Particle Formation in Ar/CH4 , Ar/C2 H2 and Ar/C3 H6 Radio-frequency Plasmas, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 45, No. 5-6, 378-384 (2005)

  14. Direct Reaction Experimental Studies with Beams of Radioactive Tin Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L.; Ahn, S.H.; Allmond, James M; Ayres, A.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Beene, James R; Berryman, J. S.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C. R.; Cartegni, L.; Chae, K. Y.; Gade, A.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Garcia-Ruiz, R.F.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Howard, Meredith E; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J Felix; Manning, Brett M; Matos, M.; McDaniel, S.; Miller, D.; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Padgett, S; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth; Pain, Steven D; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, David C; Ratkiewicz, Andrew J; Schmitt, Kyle; Smith, Michael Scott; Stracener, Daniel W; Stroberg, S.; Tostevin, Jeffrey A; Varner Jr, Robert L; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.

    2015-01-01

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at Sn-100, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at Sn-132 out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich Sn-130. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of gamma rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  15. Direct reaction experimental studies with beams of radioactive tin ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L. Ayres, A.; Bey, A.; Burcher, S.; Cartegni, L.; Cerizza, G.; Ahn, S.; Allmond, J. M.; Beene, J. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Liang, J. F.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D.; Radford, D. C.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Stracener, D. W.; Varner, R. L.; Bardayan, D. W.; Baugher, T.; and others

    2015-10-15

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at {sup 100}Sn, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at {sup 132}Sn out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich {sup 130}Sn. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of γ rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  16. Community reactions to helicopter noise - Results from an experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, James M.; Powell, Clemans A.

    1987-01-01

    Community reactions to low numbers of helicopter noise events (less than 50 per day) are investigated using a new type of study design. Although the effect of maximum noise level and number of noise events on helicopter noise annoyance was found to be similar to that represented by the energy summation principle contained in L(eq)-based noise indices, it is noted that the possibility that the number of noise events has only a small effect on annoyance cannot be rejected at the conventional p of less than 0.05 level. The effect of the duration of noise events was also shown to be consistent with L(eq)-based indices. After removing the effects of differences in duration and noise levels, little difference is found between reactions to impulsive and nonimpulsive types of helicopters.

  17. Nitric oxide dioxygenation reaction by oxy-coboglobin models: in-situ low-temperature FTIR characterization of coordinated peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Kurtikyan, Tigran S; Eksuzyan, Shahane R; Hayrapetyan, Vardan A; Martirosyan, Garik G; Hovhannisyan, Gohar S; Goodwin, John A

    2012-08-22

    The oxy-cobolglobin models of the general formula (NH(3))Co(Por)(O(2)) (Por = meso-tetra-phenyl and meso-tetra-p-tolylporphyrinato dianions) were constructed by sequential low temperature interaction of NH(3) and dioxygen with microporous layers of Co-porphyrins. At cryogenic temperatures small increments of NO were introduced into the cryostat and the following reactions were monitored by the FTIR and UV-visible spectroscopy during slow warming. Upon warming the layers from 80 to 120 K a set of new IR bands grows with correlating intensities along with the consumption of the ν(O(2)) band. Isotope labeling experiments with (18)O(2), (15)NO and N(18)O along with DFT calculations provides a basis for assigning them to the six-coordinate peroxynitrite complexes (NH(3))Co(Por)(OONO). Over the course of warming the layers from 140 to 170 K these complexes decompose and there are spectral features suggesting the formation of nitrogen dioxide NO(2). Upon keeping the layers at 180-210 K the bands of NO(2) gradually decrease in intensity and the set of new bands grows in the range of 1480, 1270, and 980 cm(-1). These bands have their isotopic counterparts when (15)NO, (18)O(2) and N(18)O are used in the experiments and certainly belong to the 6-coordinate nitrato complexes (NH(3))Co(Por)(η(1)-ONO(2)) demonstrating the ability of oxy coboglobin models to promote the nitric oxide dioxygenation (NOD) reaction similar to oxy-hemes. As in the case of Hb, Mb and model iron-porphyrins, the six-coordinate nitrato complexes are not stable at room temperature and dissociate to give nitrate anion and oxidized cationic complex Co(III)(Por)(NH(3))(1,2). PMID:22881578

  18. Tuning the properties of copper-based catalysts based on molecular in situ studies of model systems.

    PubMed

    Stacchiola, Darío J

    2015-07-21

    and morphology can be followed during a reaction by a combination of in situ microscopy and spectroscopy. In addition to determining the active phase of a catalyst by in situ methods, the presence of weakly adsorbed surface species or intermediates generated only in the presence of reactants can be detected, allowing in turn the comparison of experimental results with first principle modeling of specific reaction mechanisms. Three reactions are used to exemplify the approach: CO oxidation (CO + 1/2O2 → CO2), water gas shift reaction (WGSR) (CO + H2O → CO2 + H2), and methanol synthesis (CO2 + 3H2 → CH3OH + H2O). During CO oxidation, the full conversion of Cu(0) to Cu(2+) deactivates an initially outstanding catalyst. This can be remedied by the formation of a TiCuOx mixed-oxide that protects the presence of active partially oxidized Cu(+) cations. It is also shown that for the WGSR a switch occurs in the reaction mechanism, going from a redox process on Cu(111) to a more efficient associative pathway at the interface of ceria nanoparticles deposited on Cu(111). Similarly, the activation of CO2 at the ceria/Cu(111) interface allows its facile hydrogenation to methanol. Our combined studies emphasize the need of searching for optimal metal/oxide interfaces, where multifunctional sites can lead to new efficient catalytic reaction pathways. PMID:26103058

  19. Wear Mechanisms of Carbon-Based Refractory Materials in SiMn Tap-Holes—Part II: In Situ Observation of Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenkamp, J. D.; Pistorius, P. Chris; Tangstad, M.

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the study presented here is to determine to what extent chemical reactions between carbon-based refractory and slag or metal in the tap-hole of a SiMn furnace can contribute to wear of tap-hole refractory. The results of the study are reported in two parts. In Part I, thermodynamic calculations suggested that reaction between silicomanganese slag and carbon-based tap-hole refractory is possible, and experiments with nominally pure materials support this. However, practical refractory materials are by no means pure materials and contain secondary phases and porosity which can be expected to affect reaction with slag. In Part II, such reactions are examined experimentally, in cup and wettability tests, using commercially available carbon block and cold-ramming paste refractory materials and mainly industrial SiMn slag. Clear evidence was found of chemical reaction at approximately 1870 K (approximately 1600 °C), forming SiC and, it appears, metal droplets. Both carbon block and ramming paste refractory reacted with slag, with preferential attack on and penetration into the binder phase rather than aggregate particles. The two types of carbon-based refractory materials showed similar extents of chemical reaction observed as wetting and penetration in the laboratory tests. The differences in refractory life observed practically in industrial furnaces should therefore be attributed to wear mechanisms other than pure chemical wear as studied in this work.

  20. Density Functional Theory and Reaction Kinetics Studies of the Water–Gas Shift Reaction on Pt–Re Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasquillo-Flores, Ronald; Gallo, Jean Marcel R.; Hahn, Konstanze; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2013-11-05

    Periodic, self-consistent density functional theory calculations (DFT-GGA-PW91) on Pt(111) and Pt3Re(111) surfaces, reaction kinetics measurements, and microkinetic modeling are employed to study the mechanism of the water–gas shift (WGS) reaction over Pt and Pt–Re catalysts. The values of the reaction rates and reaction orders predicted by the model are in agreement with the ones experimentally determined; the calculated apparent activation energies are matched to within 6% of the experimental values. The primary reaction pathway is predicted to take place through adsorbed carboxyl (COOH) species, whereas formate (HCOO) is predicted to be a spectator species. We conclude that the clean Pt(111) is a good representation of the active site for the WGS reaction on Pt catalysts, whereas the active sites on the Pt–Re alloy catalyst likely contain partially oxidized metal ensembles.

  1. Acetone reactions over the surfaces of polycrystalline UO2: a kinetic and spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    King, Richard; Idriss, Hicham

    2009-04-21

    The reaction of acetone is studied on the surfaces of polycrystalline UO2, prepared by hydrogen reduction of U3O8 at 770 K. The study is conducted by in situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Acetone adsorption does not fit the simple Langmuir model, and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions are found to be significant. Acetone adsorbs molecularly on UO2 as evidenced by the nuCO of the eta1(O) mode at 1686 cm(-1). Part of acetone is reduced to the isopropoxide species ((CH3)2HC-O-U4+) upon heating (nu(CC), rho(CH3) at 1167 cm(-1) and nu(CO), rho(CH3) at 980 cm(-1)), and upon further heating, acetates (CH3COO(a), (a) for adsorbed) are observed. Detailed TPD studies indicated that the main reaction of acetone on UO2 is the deoxygenation to propene, driven by the oxophilic nature of UO2. Other reactions were also observed to a lesser extent, and these included reductive coupling to 2,3-dimethylbutene and condensation to mesityl oxide. An attempt to extract kinetic parameters from TPD data was conducted. Three models were studied: variation of heating rate, leading edge analysis (Habenschaden-Kuppers method), and complete analysis. The complete analysis provided the most plausible results, in particular, at low coverage. With this method, at nearly zero coverage the activation energy, Ed, for desorption was found to be close to 140 kJ/mol with a prefactor of 10(13) s(-1). Ed dropped sharply with increasing coverage, theta, to ca. 35 kJ/mol at theta=0.15 with a prefactor of 10(11) s(-1). The activation energy for the desorption of acetone on UO2(111) single crystals, at saturation coverage, was previously found to be equal to 65 kJ/mol using the leading edge analysis. PMID:19366223

  2. In-situ Study of Dynamic Phenomena at Metal Nanosolder Interfaces Using Aberration Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microcopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Controlling metallic nanoparticle (NP) interactions plays a vital role in the development of new joining techniques (nanosolder) that bond at lower processing temperatures but remain viable at higher temperatures. The pr imary objective of this project is t o develop a fundamental understanding of the actual reaction processes, associated atomic mechanisms, and the resulting microstructure that occur during thermally - driven bond formation concerning metal - metal nano - scale (%3C50nm) interfaces. In this LDRD pr oject, we have studied metallic NPs interaction at the elevated temperatures by combining in - situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM ) using an aberration - corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (AC - STEM) and atomic - scale modeling such as m olecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Various metallic NPs such as Ag, Cu and Au are synthesized by chemical routines. Numerous in - situ e xperiments were carried out with focus of the research on study of Ag - Cu system. For the first time, using in - situ STEM he ating experiments , we directly observed t he formation of a 3 - dimensional (3 - D) epitaxial Cu - Ag core - shell nanoparticle during the thermal interaction of Cu and Ag NPs at elevated temperatures (150 - 300 o C). The reaction takes place at temperatures as low as 150 o C and was only observed when care was taken to circumvent the effects of electron beam irradiation during STEM imaging. Atomic - scale modeling verified that the Cu - Ag core - shell structure is energetically favored, and indicated that this phenomenon is a nano - scale effect related to the large surface - to - volume ratio of the NPs. The observation potentially can be used for developing new nanosolder technology that uses Ag shell as the "glue" that stic ks the particles of Cu together. The LDRD has led to several journal publications and numerous conference presentations, and a TA. In addition, we have developed new TEM characterization techniques and phase

  3. In-situ HRTEM study of the reactive carbide phase of Co/MoS2 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Manuel; Ferrer, Domingo; Martinez-Soto, Eduan; Lopez-Lippmann, Hugo; Torres, Brenda; Berhault, Gilles; Chianelli, Russell R

    2013-04-01

    Hydrotreatment catalytic operations are commonly performed industrially by layered molybdenum sulfide promoted by cobalt or nickel in order to remove heteroelements (S, N, O) from fossil fuels and biofuels. Indeed, these heteroelements are responsible of the emission of pollutants when these fuels are used in vehicles. In this respect, previous studies made by our research group have shown that the active phase under steady state conditions is partially carbided while strong bending effects of MoS2 slabs were also observed. However, up to now, the morphology of the resulting Co/MoSxCy carbided catalyst has not been fully characterized. In the present study, for the first time, a chemical reaction between the carbon content of a TEM Cu/C grid and a freshly sulfide Co/MoS2 catalyst was in situ observed at 300 °C and 450 °C by HRTEM experimental techniques at ~10 nm of resolution. Results indicate that bending of MoS2 layers occurred due to carbon addition on MoS2 edge sites, as observed in stabilized catalysts after HDS reaction. Using a silicon grid, only cracks of MoS2 slabs were observed without bending effect confirming the role of structural-carbon in this change of morphology. PMID:22925737

  4. A Case Study in Chemical Kinetics: The OH + CO Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Ralph E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews some important properties of the bimolecular reaction between the hydroxyl radical and carbon monoxide. Investigates the kinetics of the reaction, the temperature and pressure dependence of the rate constant, the state-to-state dynamics of the reaction, and the reverse reaction. (MVL)

  5. A Reactive Oxide Overlayer on Rh Nanoparticles during CO Oxidation and Its Size Dependence Studied by in Situ Ambient Pressure XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Grass, Michael E.; Zhang, Yawen; Butcher, Derek R.; Park, Jeong Y.; Li, Yimin; Bluhm, Hendrik; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Zhang, Tianfu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-09-15

    CO oxidation is one of the most studied heterogeneous reactions, being scientifically and industrially important, particularly for removal of CO from exhaust streams and preferential oxidation for hydrogen purification in fuel cell applications. The precious metals Ru, Rh, Pd, Pt, and Au are most commonly used for this reaction because of their high activity and stability. Despite the wealth of experimental and theoretical data, it remains unclear what is the active surface for CO oxidation under catalytic conditions for these metals. In this communication, we utilize in situ synchrotron ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) to monitor the oxidation state at the surface of Rh nanoparticles during CO oxidation and demonstrate that the active catalyst is a surface oxide, the formation of which is dependent on particle size. The amount of oxide formed and the reaction rate both increase with decreasing particle size.

  6. Reaction cell for in situ soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of heterogeneous catalysis up to 1 atm and 250 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Kristiansen, P. T.; Rocha, T. C. R.; Knop-Gericke, A.; Guo, J. H.; Duda, L. C.

    2013-11-15

    We present a novel in situ reaction cell for heterogeneous catalysis monitored in situ by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). The reaction can be carried out at a total pressure up to 1 atm, a regime that has not been accessible to comparable in situ techniques and thus closes the pressure gap to many industrial standard conditions. Two alternate catalyst geometries were tested: (A) a thin film evaporated directly onto an x-ray transparent membrane with a flowing reaction gas mixture behind it or (B) a powder placed behind both the membrane and a gap of flowing reaction gas mixture. To illustrate the working principle and feasibility of our reaction cell setup we have chosen ethylene epoxidation over a silver catalyst as a test case. The evolution of incorporated oxygen species was monitored by total electron/fluorescence yield O K-XAS as well as O K-RIXS, which is a powerful method to separate contributions from inequivalent sites. We find that our method can reliably detect transient species that exist during catalytic reaction conditions that are hardly accessible using other spectroscopic methods.

  7. Neutrino-nucleus reactions based on recent structure studies

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio

    2015-05-15

    Neutrino-nucleus reactions are studied with the use of new shell model Hamiltonians, which have proper tensor components in the interactions and prove to be successful in the description of Gamow-Teller (GT) strengths in nuclei. The new Hamiltonians are applied to obtain new neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections in {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 56}Fe and {sup 56}Ni induced by solar and supernova neutrinos. The element synthesis by neutrino processes in supernova explosions is discussed with the new cross sections. The enhancement of the production yields of {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B and {sup 55}Mn is obtained while fragmented GT strength in {sup 56}Ni with two-peak structure is found to result in smaller e-capture rates at stellar environments. The monopole-based universal interaction with tensor force of π+ρ meson exchanges is used to evaluate GT strength in {sup 40}Ar and ν-induced reactions on {sup 40}Ar. It is found to reproduce well the experimental GT strength in {sup 40}Ar.

  8. In-situ Studies of Structures and Processes at Model Battery Electrode/Electrolyte Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenter, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The ability to understand and control materials properties within electrochemical energy storage systems is a significant scientific and technical challenge. This is due, at least in part, to the extreme conditions present within these systems, and the significant structural and chemical changes that take place as lithium ions are incorporated in the active electrode material. In particular, the behavior of interfaces in such systems is poorly understood, notably the solid-liquid interface that separates the electrode and the liquid electrolyte. I will review our recent work in which we seek to isolate and understand the role of interfacial reactivity in these systems through in-situ, real-time, observations of electrochemically driven lithiation/delithation reactions. This is achieved by observing well-defined model electrode-electrolyte interfaces using X-ray reflectivity. These results reveal novel understandings of interfacial reactivity in conversion reactions (e.g., Si, SixCr, Ge, NiO) that can be used to control the complex reaction lithiation pathway through the use of thin-film and multilayer electrode structures. This work was supported by the Center for Electrochemical Energy Science, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, in collaboration with T. Fister, A. Gewirth, M.J. Bedzyk and others.

  9. Materials testing for in situ stabilization treatability study of INEEL mixed wastes soils

    SciTech Connect

    Heiser, J.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the contaminant-specific materials testing phase of the In Situ Stabilization Comprehensive Environment Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study (TS). The purpose of materials testing is to measure the effectiveness of grouting agents to stabilize Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Acid Pit soils and select a grout material for use in the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Treatability Study within the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Test results will assist the selecting a grout material for the follow-on demonstrations described in Test Plan for the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Phases of the In Situ Stabilization Treatability Study at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex.

  10. In situ metathesis reaction combined with liquid-phase microextraction based on the solidification of sedimentary ionic liquids for the determination of pyrethroid insecticides in water samples.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lu; Zhang, Panjie; Shan, Wanyu; Wang, Xuan; Li, Songqing; Zhou, Wenfeng; Gao, Haixiang

    2015-11-01

    A novel dispersion liquid-liquid microextraction method based on the solidification of sedimentary ionic liquids (SSIL-DLLME), in which an in situ metathesis reaction forms an ionic liquid (IL) extraction phase, was developed to determine four pyrethroid insecticides (i.e., permethrin, cyhalothrin, fenpropathrin, and transfluthrin) in water followed by separation using high-performance liquid chromatography. In the developed method, in situ DLLME was used to enhance the extraction efficiency and yield. After centrifugation, the extraction solvent, tributyldodecylphosphonium hexafluorophosphate ([P44412][PF6]), was easily collected by solidification in the bottom of the tube. The effects of various experimental parameters, the quantity of tributyldodecylphosphonium bromide ([P44412]Br), the molar ratio of [P44412]Br to potassium hexafluorophosphate (KPF6), the ionic strength, the temperature of the sample solution, and the centrifugation time, were optimized using a Plackett-Burman design to identify the significant factors that affected the extraction efficiency. These significant factors were then optimized using a central composite design. Under the optimized conditions, the recoveries of the four pyrethroid insecticides at four spiked levels ranged from 87.1% to 101.7%, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 0.1% to 5.5%. At concentration levels between 1 and 500 µg/L, good linearity was obtained, with coefficients of determination greater than 0.9995. The limits of detection (LODs) for the four pyrethroid insecticides were in the range of 0.71-1.54 µg/L. The developed method was then successfully used for the determination of pyrethroid insecticides in environmental samples. PMID:26452797

  11. Application and comparison of silver intensification methods for the diaminobenzidine and diaminobenzidine-nickel endproduct of the peroxidation reaction in immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mullink, H; Vos, W; Jiwa, M; Horstman, A; van der Valk, P; Walboomers, J M; Meijer, C J

    1992-04-01

    Silver-intensification methods described in the literature for the diaminobenzidine (DAB) and diaminobenzidine-nickel (DAB/Ni) endproduct of the peroxidase reaction were compared in model systems after immunoperoxidase and in situ hybridization. First, these methods were compared in immunohistochemical model systems, using the demonstration of glial fibrillar acidic protein (GFAP) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in paraffin sections of human brain and prostate tissue, respectively. When DAB without Ni was used as substrate, tissue argyrophilia caused considerable background staining. Only when this tissue reactivity was quenched with, e.g., CuSO4 with H2O2 or thioglycolic acid, were the results acceptable. A considerable improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio could be obtained when nickel was included in the substrate mixture. The methods that proved to be best for demonstration of GFAP and PSA made use of acid developer solutions. Subsequently, these methods were compared with other sensitive immunostaining methods for demonstration of the gamma-delta T-cell receptor in frozen lymphoid tissue. In this model a considerable increase in the number of positive cells could be obtained using silver intensification. The different methods using DAB/Ni were also compared for use in DNA in situ hybridization (DISH). In this case two model systems were used: human papilloma virus type 11 (HPV-11) DNA in condyloma tissue (abundant target model) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in a mononucleosis lymph node (low target model). For demonstration of HPV-11, all methods gave more or less satisfactory results, which were best with the acid developer solutions. Moreover, for demonstration of EBV DNA, a signal could be obtained only with these developer solutions. Such a method also proved suitable in double immuno-hybrido stainings for the demonstration of EBV DNA in specific antigen-positive Reed-Sternberg cells in paraffin sections of Hodgkin lymph nodes. PMID:1532404

  12. In situ DNA hybridized chain reaction (FISH-HCR) as a better method for quantification of bacteria and archaea within marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buongiorno, J.; Lloyd, K. G.; Shumaker, A.; Schippers, A.; Webster, G.; Weightman, A.; Turner, S.

    2015-12-01

    Nearly 75% of the Earth's surface is covered by marine sediment that is home to an estimated 2.9 x 1029 microbial cells. A substantial impediment to understanding the abundance and distribution of cells within marine sediment is the lack of a consistent and reliable method for their taxon-specific quantification. Catalyzed reporter fluorescent in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) provides taxon-specific enumeration, but this process requires passing a large enzyme through cell membranes, decreasing its precision relative to general cell counts using a small DNA stain. In 2015, Yamaguchi et al. developed FISH hybridization chain reaction (FISH-HCR) as an in situ whole cell detection method for environmental microorganisms. FISH-HCR amplifies the fluorescent signal, as does CARD-FISH, but it allows for milder cell permeation methods that might prevent yield loss. To compare FISH-HCR to CARD-FISH, we examined bacteria and archaea cell counts within two sediment cores, Lille Belt (~78 meters deep) and Landsort Deep (90 meters deep), which were retrieved from the Baltic Sea Basin during IODP Expedition 347. Preliminary analysis shows that CARD-FISH counts are below the quantification limit for most depths across both cores. By contrast, quantification of cells was possible with FISH-HCR in all examined depths. When quantification with CARD-FISH was above the limit of detection, counts with FISH-HCR were up to 11 fold higher for Bacteria and 3 fold higher for Archaea from the same sediment sample. Further, FISH-HCR counts follow the trends of on board counts nicely, indicating that FISH-HCR may better reflect the cellular abundance within marine sediment than other quantification methods, including qPCR. Using FISH-HCR, we found that archaeal cell counts were on average greater than bacterial cell counts, but within the same order of magnitude.

  13. In-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry study of copper selective-area atomic layer deposition on palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Han; Qi, Jie; Willis, Brian G.

    2014-07-01

    Selective area copper atomic layer deposition on palladium seed layers has been investigated with in-situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry to probe the adsorption/desorption and reaction characteristics of individual deposition cycles. The reactants are copper bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate) vapor and hydrogen gas. Self-limiting atomic layer deposition was observed in the temperature range of 135–230 °C in a low pressure reactor. Under optimal conditions, growth occurs selectively on palladium and not on silicon dioxide or silicon nitride layers. Based on in-situ ellipsometry data and supporting experiments, a new mechanism for growth is proposed. In the proposed mechanism, precursor adsorption is reversible, and dissociatively adsorbed hydrogen are the stable surface intermediates between growth cycles. The mechanism is enabled by continuous diffusion of palladium from the seed layer into the deposited copper film and strong H* binding to palladium sites. Less intermixing can be obtained at low growth temperatures and short cycle times by minimizing Cu/Pd inter-diffusion.

  14. In Situ XAS Studies on the Structure of the Active Site of Supported Gold Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Weiher, Norbert; Beesley, Angela M.; Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos; Louis, Catherine; Delannoy, Laurent; Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van; Schroeder, Sven L. M.

    2007-02-02

    Gold clusters supported on Al2O3 and TiO2 have been exposed to different mixtures of CO and O2. Their structure has been probed in situ using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Au L3-edge. In all materials, the dominant phase during catalysis is Au0. Both samples show variations of the electronic structure of the gold clusters with changing reaction conditions as evidenced by changes in the X-ray absorption near-edge (XANES) region. These variations are caused by interaction between the gold clusters and the carbon monoxide present in the gas phase. The gold atoms remain zerovalent throughout all experiments confirming the importance of Au0 for catalytic activity.

  15. Study of all Reaction Channels in Deuteron-Deuteron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazani-Moghaddam-Arani, A.; Amir-Ahmadi, H. R.; Bacher, A. D.; Bailey, C. D.; Biegun, A.; Eslami-Kalantari, M.; Gašparić, I.; Joulaeizadeh, L.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kistryn, St.; Kozela, A.; Mardanpour, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Moeini, H.; Shende, S. V.; Stephan, E.; Stephenson, E. J.; Sworst, R.

    Few-nucleon systems can be used as fundamental laboratories for studying details of the nuclear force effects. We performed a series of deuteron-deuteron scattering experiments at intermediate energies. The experiments exploited BINA and BBS experimental setups and polarized deuteron beams with kinetic energies of 65 and 90 MeV/nucleon. These experiments aim to measure differential cross sections, vector and tensor analyzing powers of all available reaction channels in deuteron-deuteron scattering. With these data we will provide a systematic database, which will be used to test present theoretical approximations and upcoming ab-initio calculations in four-nucleon system.

  16. Quantum chemical study of penicillin: Reactions after acylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Feng, Dacheng; Zhu, Feng

    The density functional theory methods were used on the model molecules of penicillin to determine the possible reactions after their acylation on ?-lactamase, and the results were compared with sulbactam we have studied. The results show that, the acylated-enzyme tetrahedral intermediate can evolves with opening of ?-lactam ring as well as the thiazole ring; the thiazole ring-open products may be formed via ?-lactam ring-open product or from tetrahedral intermediate directly. Those products, in imine or enamine form, can tautomerize via hydrogen migration. In virtue of the water-assisted, their energy barriers are obviously reduced.

  17. Chemical reactions of As complexation by glutathione: an XAFS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, M. W.; Vasconcelos, I. F.; Modolo, L. V.; Barbosa, F. A. R.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the chemical reactions between As(III) and As(V) with glutathione, which is a target compound in As biochemistry due to its primordial role in As immobilization and intracellular reduction, in various molar ratios were investigated using As K-edge XAFS spectroscopy. Results showed a gradual substitution of As-O bonds in the coordination of aqueous As(III) and As(V) for three As-S bonds in the As+GSH complex. Moreover, the data showed reduction of As(V) to As(III) prior or concomitant to the As+GSH complex formation.

  18. In situ transmission electron microscopy study of electrochemical lithiation and delithiation cycling of the conversion anode RuO2.

    PubMed

    Gregorczyk, Keith E; Liu, Yang; Sullivan, John P; Rubloff, Gary W

    2013-07-23

    Conversion-type electrodes represent a broad class of materials with a new Li(+) reactivity concept. Of these materials, RuO2 can be considered a model material due to its metallic-like conductivity and its high theoretical capacity of 806 mAh/g. In this paper, we use in situ transmission electron microscopy to study the reaction between single-crystal RuO2 nanowires and Li(+). We show that a large volume expansion of 95% occurs after lithiation, 26% of which is irreversible after delithiation. Significant surface roughening and lithium embrittlement are also present. Furthermore, we show that the initial reaction from crystalline RuO2 to the fully lithiated mixed phase of Ru/Li2O is not fully reversible, passing through an intermediate phase of LixRuO2. In subsequent cycles, the phase transitions are between amorphous RuO2 in the delithiated state and a nanostructured network of Ru/Li2O in the fully lithiated phase. PMID:23782274

  19. In situ electrochemical studies of lithium-ion battery cathodes using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramdon, Sanjay; Bhushan, Bharat; Nagpure, Shrikant C.

    2014-03-01

    Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries have been implemented for numerous applications, including plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and pure electric vehicles (EV). In an effort to prolong battery life, it is important to understand the mechanisms that cause reduced battery capacity with aging. Past studies have shown that morphological changes occur in aged cathodes. In situ electrochemical studies using atomic force microscopy allow for the direct observation of the morphology of the Li-ion battery cathode, at a nanometer scale resolution, during the cycling of an electrochemical cell. A simple electrochemical cell designed for in situ characterization is introduced. Charge/discharge curves and morphology data obtained during charging and discharging of cells are presented, and relevant mechanisms are discussed.

  20. In situ STM studies of Sb(111) electrodes in aqueous electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozovski, V.; Kallip, S.; Lust, E.

    2013-07-01

    The in situ STM studies of Sb(111), which was cleaved at the temperature of liquid nitrogen inside the glove box, and of Sb(111), which was electrochemically polished in the KI + HCl aqueous solution, have been performed under negative polarizations from - 0.8 to - 0.15 V (versus Ag|AgCl in sat. KCl aqueous solution) in the 0.5 M Na2SO4 + 0.0003 M H2SO4 aqueous solution. The atomic resolution has been achieved. The in situ STM data show that there are no quick surface reconstruction processes and the surface structure of cleaved and electrochemically polished Sb(111) is stable within the potential region investigated, similarly for Bi(111) single crystal electrode, previously studied [S. Kallip, E. Lust, Electrochem. Comm. 7 (2005) 863].

  1. Four Zn(II)/Cd(II)-3-amino-1,2,4-triazolate frameworks constructed by in situ metal/ligand reactions: Structures and fluorescent properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zilu; Li Xiaoling; Liang Fupei

    2008-08-15

    Four Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes with the in situ-generated ligand of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazolate (AmTAZ{sup -}) were isolated from the solvothermal reactions of the corresponding Cd(II) or Zn(II) salts with 5-amino-1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxylic acid (AmTAZAc). Their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. [Zn(AmTAZ)(CH{sub 3}COO)] (1) presents a two-dimensional framework constructed from Zn(II) ions and {mu}{sub 3}-AmTAZ{sup -} ligands. A remarkable feature of [Zn{sub 4}(AmTAZ){sub 4}(SO{sub 4})(OH)(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 0.5}].2H{sub 2}O (2) is the construction of the building units of octagonal cylinders which interact with each other by sharing one face or overlapping, resulting in the formation of a three-dimensional framework with three kinds of 1D channels. [Cd(AmTAZ)Br] (3) crystallizes in a chiral space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, giving a homochiral three-dimensional framework with two types of helical channels (left- and right-handed). Different from the others, the 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole molecules in [Cd(AmTAZH)SO{sub 4}] (4) behave as neutral {mu}{sub 2}-2,4-bridges to connect the two-dimensional CdSO{sub 4} sheets into a three-dimensional framework. Of all, 2 and 3 display different fluorescent properties probably due to different metal ions, coordination environments and structural topologies. - Graphical abstract: The solvothermal reactions of Cd(II) and Zn(II) salts bearing different anions with 5-amino-1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxylic acid (AmTAZAc) produced four Cd(II) and Zn(II) MOFs with the in situ-generated 3-amino-1,2,4-triazolate (AmTAZ{sup -}) ion as ligand, which display different structural topologies and fluorescent properties. Display Omitted.

  2. In-situ Studies of Highly Charged Ions at the LLNL EBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P

    2001-08-16

    The properties of highly charged ions and their interaction with electrons and atoms is being studied in-situ at the LLNL electron beam ion traps, EBIT-II and SuperEBIT. Spectroscopic measurements provide data on electron-ion and ion-atom interactions as well as accurate transition energies of lines relevant for understanding QED, nuclear magnetization, and the effects of relativity on complex, state-of-the-art atomic calculations.

  3. Feasibility studies of in-situ coal gasification in the Warrior coal field. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas G.W.; McKinley, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    Studies in support of in-situ gasification involved experiments in bench-scale combustors where three parameters were varied independently: initial fuel bed temperature, applied air flow and water vapor influx rate. Methods for measuring the thermal conductivity of solids at high temperatures were evaluated and measurements of the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity were made over a temperature range for several samples of coke. (LTN)

  4. Automated data extraction from in situ protein-stable isotope probing studies.

    PubMed

    Slysz, Gordon W; Steinke, Laurey; Ward, David M; Klatt, Christian G; Clauss, Therese R W; Purvine, Samuel O; Payne, Samuel H; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S

    2014-03-01

    Protein-stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) has strong potential for revealing key metabolizing taxa in complex microbial communities. While most protein-SIP work to date has been performed under controlled laboratory conditions to allow extensive isotope labeling of the target organism(s), a key application will be in situ studies of microbial communities for short periods of time under natural conditions that result in small degrees of partial labeling. One hurdle restricting large-scale in situ protein-SIP studies is the lack of algorithms and software for automated data processing of the massive data sets resulting from such studies. In response, we developed Stable Isotope Probing Protein Extraction Resources software (SIPPER) and applied it for large-scale extraction and visualization of data from short-term (3 h) protein-SIP experiments performed in situ on phototrophic bacterial mats isolated from Yellowstone National Park. Several metrics incorporated into the software allow it to support exhaustive analysis of the complex composite isotopic envelope observed as a result of low amounts of partial label incorporation. SIPPER also enables the detection of labeled molecular species without the need for any prior identification. PMID:24467184

  5. Automated data extraction from in situ protein stable isotope probing studies

    SciTech Connect

    Slysz, Gordon W.; Steinke, Laurey A.; Ward, David M.; Klatt, Christian G.; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Payne, Samuel H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2014-01-27

    Protein stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) has strong potential for revealing key metabolizing taxa in complex microbial communities. While most protein-SIP work to date has been performed under controlled laboratory conditions to allow extensive isotope labeling of the target organism, a key application will be in situ studies of microbial communities under conditions that result in small degrees of partial labeling. One hurdle restricting large scale in situ protein-SIP studies is the lack of algorithms and software for automated data processing of the massive data sets resulting from such studies. In response, we developed Stable Isotope Probing Protein Extraction Resources software (SIPPER) and applied it for large scale extraction and visualization of data from short term (3 h) protein-SIP experiments performed in situ on Yellowstone phototrophic bacterial mats. Several metrics incorporated into the software allow it to support exhaustive analysis of the complex composite isotopic envelope observed as a result of low amounts of partial label incorporation. SIPPER also enables the detection of labeled molecular species without the need for any prior identification.

  6. Photosynthetic reaction center of green sulfur bacteria studied by EPR

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, W.; Rutherford, A.W. ); Fieler, U. )

    1990-04-24

    Membrane preparations of two species of the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium have been studied be EPR. Three signals were detected which were attributed to iron-sulfur centers acting as electron acceptors in the photosynthetic reaction center. (1) A signal from a center designated F{sub B}, was photoinduced at 4K. (2) A similar signal, F{sub A}, was photoinduced in addition to the F{sub B} signal upon a short period of illumination at 200 K. (3) Further illumination at 200 K resulted in the appearance of a broad feature at g=1.78. This is attributed to the g{sub x} component of an iron-sulfur center designated F{sub X}. The designations of these signals as F{sub B}, F{sub A}, and F{sub X} are based on their spectroscopic similarities to signals in photosystem I (PS I). The orientation dependence of these EPR signals in ordered Chlorobium membrane multilayers is remarkably similar to that of their PS I homologues. A magnetic interaction between the reduced forms of F{sub B} and F{sub A} occurs, which is also very similar to that seen in PS I. The triplet state of P{sub 840}, the primary electron donor, could be photoinduced at 4 K in samples which had been preincubated with sodium dithionite and methyl viologen and then preilluminated at 200 K. The preillumination reduces the iron-sulfur centers while the preincubation is thought to result in the inactivation of an earlier electron acceptor. Orientation studies of the triplet signal in ordered multilayers indicate that the bacteriochlorophylls which act as the primary electron donor in Chlorobium are arranged with a structural geometry almost identical with that of the special pair in purple bacteria. The Chlorobium reaction center appears to be similar in some respects to both PS I and to the purple bacterial reaction center. This is discussed with regard to the evolution of the different types of reaction centers from a common ancestor.

  7. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sresty, G.C.

    1994-07-07

    A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. The EM heating process for soil decontamination is based on volumetric heating technologies developed during the `70s for the recovery of fuels from shale and tar sands by IIT Research Institute (IITRI) under a co-operative program with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Additional modifications of the technology developed during the mid `80s are currently used for the production of heavy oil and waste treatment. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 to 95 C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern.

  8. Studies of a photochromic model system using NMR with ex-situ and in-situ irradiation devices.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Christiane; Kind, Jonas; Schenderlein, Helge; Bartling, Hanna; Feldmeier, Christian; Gschwind, Ruth M; Biesalski, Markus; Thiele, Christina M

    2016-06-01

    The switching behavior of a photochromic model system was investigated in detail via NMR spectroscopy in order to improve understanding of the compound itself and to provide ways to obtain insights into composition trends of a photo switchable (polymeric) material containing spiropyran/merocyanine units. In addition to the classical irradiation performed outside the magnet (ex-situ), a device for irradiation inside the NMR spectrometer (in-situ) was tested. Both setups are introduced, their advantages and disadvantages as well as their limits are described and the setup for future investigations of photochromic materials is suggested. The influence of different sample concentrations, irradiation procedures, and light intensities on the model system was examined as well as the dependence on solvent, temperature, and irradiation wavelengths. Using the recently published LED illumination device, it was even possible to record two-dimensional spectra on this model system with rather short half-life (7 min in DMSO). This way (13) C chemical shifts of the merocyanine form were obtained, which were unknown before. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26891085

  9. Nitrogen-doped graphene/carbon nanotube hybrids: in situ formation on bifunctional catalysts and their superior electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution/reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Tian, Gui-Li; Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Yu, Dingshan; Kong, Xiang-Yi; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Qiang; Wei, Fei

    2014-06-12

    There is a growing interest in oxygen electrode catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER), as they play a key role in a wide range of renewable energy technologies such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries, and water splitting. Nevertheless, the development of highly-active bifunctional catalysts at low cost for both ORR and OER still remains a huge challenge. Herein, we report a new N-doped graphene/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) hybrid (NGSH) material as an efficient noble-metal-free bifunctional electrocatalyst for both ORR and OER. NGSHs were fabricated by in situ doping during chemical vapor deposition growth on layered double hydroxide derived bifunctional catalysts. Our one-step approach not only provides simultaneous growth of graphene and SWCNTs, leading to the formation of three dimensional interconnected network, but also brings the intrinsic dispersion of graphene and carbon nanotubes and the dispersion of N-containing functional groups within a highly conductive scaffold. Thus, the NGSHs possess a large specific surface area of 812.9 m(2) g(-1) and high electrical conductivity of 53.8 S cm(-1) . Despite of relatively low nitrogen content (0.53 at%), the NGSHs demonstrate a high ORR activity, much superior to two constituent components and even comparable to the commercial 20 wt% Pt/C catalysts with much better durability and resistance to crossover effect. The same hybrid material also presents high catalytic activity towards OER, rendering them high-performance cheap catalysts for both ORR and OER. Our result opens up new avenues for energy conversion technologies based on earth-abundant, scalable, noble-metal-free catalysts. PMID:24574006

  10. Phthalic acid complexation and the dissolution of forsteritic glass studied via in situ FTIR and X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Peter M.; Wogelius, Roy A.

    2008-04-01

    Multiple Internal Reflection Fourier Transform Infra-Red (MIR-FTIR) spectroscopy was developed and used for in situ flow-through experiments designed to study the process of organic acid promoted silicate dissolution. In tandem with the FTIR analysis, ex situ X-ray scattering was used to perform detailed analyses of the changes in the surface structure and chemistry resulting from the dissolution process. Phthalic acid and forsteritic glass that had been Chemically Vapour Deposited (CVD) onto an internal reflection element were used as reactants, and the MIR-FTIR results showed that phthalic acid may promote dissolution by directly binding to exposed Mg metal ion centers on the solid surface. Integrated infrared absorption intensity as a function of time shows that phthalic acid attachment apparently follows a t1/2 dependence, indicating that attachment is a diffusive process. The diffusion coefficient of phthalic acid was estimated to be approximately 7 × 10 -6 cm 2 s -1 in the solution near the interface with the glass. Shifts in the infrared absorption structure of the phthalate complexed with the surface compared to the solute species indicate that phthalate forms a seven-membered ring chelate complex. This bidentate complex efficiently depletes Mg from the glass surface, such that after reaction as much as 95% of the Mg may be removed. Surface depletion in Mg causes adsorbate density to fall after an initial attachment stage for the organic ligand. In addition, the infrared analysis shows that silica in the near surface polymerizes after Mg removal, presumably to maintain charge balance. X-ray reflectivity shows that the dissolution rate of forsteritic glass at pH 4 based on Mg removal in such flow-through experiments was equal to 4 × 10 -12 mol cm -2 s -1 (geometric surface area normalized). Reflectivity also shows how the surface mass density decreases during reaction from 2.64 g cm -3 to 2.2 g cm -3, consistent with preferential loss of Mg from the

  11. In Situ Potentiometry and Ellipsometry: A Promising Tool to Study Biofouling of Potentiometric Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lisak, Grzegorz; Arnebrant, Thomas; Lewenstam, Andrzej; Bobacka, Johan; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas

    2016-03-15

    In situ potentiometry and null ellipsometry was combined and used as a tool to follow the kinetics of biofouling of ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). The study was performed using custom-made solid-contact K(+)-ISEs consisting of a gold surface with immobilized 6-(ferrocenyl)hexanethiol as ion-to-electron transducer that was coated with a potassium-selective plasticized polymer membrane. The electrode potential and the ellipsometric signal (corresponding to the amount of adsorbed protein) were recorded simultaneously during adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) at the surface of the K(+)-ISEs. This in situ method may become useful in developing sensors with minimized biofouling. PMID:26864883

  12. Study of dislocations in copper by weak beam, stereo, and in situ straining TEM

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, R. J.; Misra, A.; Mitchell, T. E.

    2002-01-01

    Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been an invaluable tool for verifjhg and developing dislocation theories since the first direct observations of dislocations were made using a TEM in the 1950s. Several useful techniques and technological advancements have been made since, helping fbrther the advancement of dislocation knowledge. The present paper concerns two studies of dislocations in copper made by coupling several of these techniques, specifically weak beam, in situ straining, and stereo TEM. Stereo-TEM coupled with in situ straining TEM was used for tracking 3D dislocation motion and interactions in low dislocation density copper foils. A mechanism by which dislocations in a pileup bypass a dislocation node is observed and discussed. Weak beam TEM is used in conjunction with stereo-TEM to analyze the dislocation content of a dense dislocation wall (DDW).

  13. In situ activity recovery of aging biofilm in biological aerated filter: Surfactants treatment and mechanisms study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qisheng; Huang, Hui; Ren, Hongqiang; Ding, Lili; Geng, Jinju

    2016-11-01

    In situ activity recovery of aging biofilm in the biological aerated filter (BAF) is an important but underappreciated problem. Lab-scaled BAFs were established in this study and three kinds of surfactants containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) and rhamnolipid were employed. Multiple indicators including effluent qualities, dissolved organic matters, biofilm physiology and morphology characteristics were investigated to explore the mechanisms. Results showed that removal rates of effluent COD in test groups significantly recovered to the level before aging. Compared with the control, effluent in SDBS and rhamnolipid-treated groups obtained more protein-like and humic-like substances, respectively. Furthermore, great live cell ratio, smooth surface and low adhesion force of biofilm were observed after rhamnolipid treatment, which was in consistent with good effluent qualities in the same group. This is the first report of applying rhamnolipid for in situ activity recovery of aging biofilm in bioreactors. PMID:27513646

  14. In situ study of heavy ion irradiation response of immiscible Cu/Fe multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Li, N.; Bufford, D. C.; Li, J.; Hattar, K.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies show that immiscible metallic multilayers with incoherent interfaces can effectively reduce defect density in ion irradiated metals by providing active defect sinks that capture and annihilate radiation induced defect clusters. Although it is anticipated that defect density within the layers should vary as a function of distance to the layer interface, there is, to date, little in situ TEM evidence to validate this hypothesis. In this study monolithic Cu films and Cu/Fe multilayers with individual layer thickness, h, of 100 and 5 nm were subjected to in situ Cu ion irradiation at room temperature to nominally 1 displacement-per-atom inside a transmission electron microscope. Rapid formation and propagation of defect clusters were observed in monolithic Cu, whereas fewer defects with smaller dimensions were generated in Cu/Fe multilayers with smaller h. Furthermore in situ video shows that the cumulative defect density in Cu/Fe 100 nm multilayers indeed varies, as a function of distance to the layer interfaces, supporting a long postulated hypothesis.

  15. Development of an in Situ NMR Photoreactor To Study Environmental Photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Bliumkin, Liora; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Soong, Ronald; Adamo, Antonio; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Zhao, Ran; Reiner, Eric; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Photochemistry is a key environmental process directly linked to the fate, source, and toxicity of pollutants in the environment. This study explores two approaches for integrating light sources with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy: sample irradiation using a "sunlight simulator" outside the magnet versus direct irradiation of the sample inside the magnet. To assess their applicability, the in situ NMR photoreactors were applied to a series of environmental systems: an atmospheric pollutant (p-nitrophenol), crude oil extracts, and groundwater. The study successfully illustrates that environmentally relevant aqueous photochemical processes can be monitored in situ and in real time using NMR spectroscopy. A range of intermediates and degradation products were identified and matched to the literature. Preliminary measurements of half-lives were also obtained from kinetic curves. The sunlight simulator was shown to be the most suitable model to explore environmental photolytic processes in situ. Other light sources with more intense UV output hold potential for evaluating UV as a remediation alternative in areas such as wastewater treatment plants or oil spills. Finally, the ability to analyze the photolytic fate of trace chemicals at natural abundance in groundwater, using a cryogenic probe, demonstrates the viability of NMR spectroscopy as a powerful and complementary technique for environmental applications in general. PMID:27172272

  16. Surface studies of lithium-oxygen redox reactions over HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchini, Florencia; Herrera, Santiago E.; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Williams, Federico J.

    2016-04-01

    The O2/Li2O2 electrode reaction has been studied on low surface area HOPG electrodes in 0.1 M LiPF6 in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) electrolyte. Studies were performed using electrochemical cells coupled to a XPS spectrometer and to an AFM microscope. AFM images after electrochemical treatment at cathodic potentials exhibited 20 to 100 nm in height features, whereas anodic treatment showed a thin film of about 1 nm thickness deposited over the HOPG electrode. XPS spectra after electrochemical treatment showed surface species due to DMSO and LiPF6 decomposition. These findings indicate the high reactivity of oxygen reduction products towards the electrolyte and the solvent. The unwanted deposits formed under electrochemical operation cannot be completely eliminated from the surface even after applying high anodic potentials. This highlights the known loss of capacity of Li-air batteries, issue that must be overcome for successful applications.

  17. [Peroneal reaction time: study of a normal sample].

    PubMed

    Lipke, K; Tannheimer, M; Benesch, S; Gerngross, H; Becker, H P; Schmidt, R

    2001-12-01

    Chronic functional instability is a residual problem after acute ankle sprain. Reasons may be weak ligaments and/or a deficit in the proprioceptive system. Studies have shown that peroneal reaction time (PRT) can be used to quantify proprioceptive performance. To test the influence of anthropometric data on PRT, an experimental study with 120 healthy volunteers was performed. Surface electrodes recorded the activity of the peroneal muscles after a sudden inversion on a tilting platform. It was found that PRT is not influenced by extrinsic or anthropometric data. Furthermore, the results prove a significant slackening in PRT with increasing age. Therefore, the patient's age must to be considered in judging the PRT. PMID:11803722

  18. Three dimensional nickel oxides/nickel structure by in situ electro-oxidation of nickel foam as robust electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guan-Qun; Liu, Yan-Ru; Hu, Wen-Hui; Dong, Bin; Li, Xiao; Shang, Xiao; Chai, Yong-Ming; Liu, Yun-Qi; Liu, Chen-Guang

    2015-12-01

    Three dimensional (3D) nickel oxide/nickel (NiOx/Ni) structure has been synthesized through a facile in situ electro-oxidation method. The formation of NiOx through the electro-oxidation process has been proved by SEM and EDX, with some dense black dots appearing on the surface of Ni foam and the molar ratio of O/Ni increasing, which is nearly 7 times larger than the pure Ni foam. The increase in O content indicates the formatted black particles on the surface of Ni foam are composed of NiOx. The electrocatalytic property of the obtained 3D NiOx/Ni structure has been measured and it can be used as a highly active electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The overpotential to reach j = 10 mA cm-2 is 0.39 V. And after the long-term I-t measurement, extremely high electrochemical and physical stability are exhibited in the 3D structure, keeping electrochemical activity and morphology the same. The excellent OER properties may be attributed to the 3D structure and the interface effect of NiOx/Ni.

  19. Photo-redox reactions of dicarboxylates and α-hydroxydicarboxylates at the surface of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides followed with in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Borer, Paul; Hug, Stephan J

    2014-02-15

    Colloidal mineral-phases play an important role in the adsorption, transport and transformation of organic and inorganic compounds in the atmosphere and in aqueous environments. Artificial UV-light and sunlight can induce electron transfer reactions between metal ions of the solid phases and adsorbed compounds, leading to their transformation and degradation. To investigate different possible photo-induced oxidation pathways of dicarboxylates adsorbed on iron(III)(hydr)oxide surfaces, we followed UV-A induced photoreactions of oxalate, malonate, succinate and their corresponding α-hydroxy analogues tartronate and malate with in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy in immersed particle layers of lepidocrocite, goethite, maghemite and hematite at pH 4. UV-A light (365 ± 5 nm) lead to fast degradation of oxalate, tartronate and malate, while malonate and succinate were photo-degraded at much slower rates. Efficient generation of OH-radicals can be excluded, as this would lead to fast and indiscriminate degradation of all tested compounds. Rapid photo-degradation of adsorbed oxalate and the α-hydroxydicarboxylates must be induced by direct ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) or by selectively oxidizing valence band holes, both processes requiring inner-sphere coordination with direct ligand-to-metal bonds to enable efficient electron-transfer. The slow photo-degradation of malonate and succinate can be explained by low-yield production of OH-radicals at the surface of the iron(III)(hydr)oxides. PMID:24370400

  20. In situ growth of NixSy controlled by surface treatment of nickel foam as efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiao; Li, Xiao; Hu, Wen-Hui; Dong, Bin; Liu, Yan-Ru; Han, Guan-Qun; Chai, Yong-Ming; Liu, Yun-Qi; Liu, Chen-Guang

    2016-08-01

    In situ growth of NixSy with different crystal phases supported on different surface-treated (acidification or oxidation) nickel foam (NF) has been successfully achieved by a facile solvothermal process. XRD and SEM results show that crystal phase and morphology of NixSy have been greatly affected by the surface treatment of NF. XRD results show that the mixture crystal phases of NixSy have been obtained on both acid-treated NF (NF(a)) and oxidant treated NF (NF(o)). NixSy/NF(a) contains Ni3S2 and NiS, whereas NixSy/NF(o) has Ni3S2 and NiS2, implying different crystal phases derived from different surface treatment of NF. SEM images also reveal the different morphology of two samples based on pre-treatment support. NixSy/NF(a) displays unique conical agglomeration surrounded by porous structure. NixSy/NF(o) has the disorder stacking structure of nanosheets. Electrochemical measurements for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) show the enhanced performances of NixSy/NF(a) than NixSy/NF(o) and pure Ni3S2/NF as contrast samples, implying that NiS outperforms other types of NixSy. The mechanisms of sulfurization path of different surface-treated NF have been discussed. The facile surface treatment of NF may provide a new strategy to prepare excellent electrocatalysts for OER.

  1. Highly active carbon supported palladium catalysts decorated by a trace amount of platinum by an in-situ galvanic displacement reaction for formic acid oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuopeng; Li, Muwu; Han, Mingjia; Wu, Xin; Guo, Yong; Zeng, Jianhuang; Li, Yuexia; Liao, Shijun

    2015-03-01

    Aimed at reducing platinum usage and improved catalytic activity for formic acid oxidation, a series of Pt decorated Pd/C catalysts are prepared by an in-situ galvanic displacement reaction between freshly prepared Pd/C ink and H2PtCl6 in an aqueous solution. The catalysts with 4 nm particle sizes and 20 wt.% loadings have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical evaluations by cyclic voltammetry are conducted to test out the CO tolerance and catalytic activities. In addition to XPS analysis, a theoretical calculation has been attempted the first time to find out the surface Pd/Pt molar ratios. The decay rate of the catalysts has been evaluated by the percentage of the forward/backward peak current retained using the value at the 20th cycle divided by that in the first cycle. Compared with a Pd/C benchmark, all Pt decorated Pd/C register enhanced activity while the cost remains virtually unchanged. The optimized catalyst is found to have a Pd/Pt molar ratio of 75:1 but with 2.5 times activity relative to that of Pd/C.

  2. Cationic Pd(II)-catalyzed C–H activation/cross-coupling reactions at room temperature: synthetic and mechanistic studies

    PubMed Central

    Nishikata, Takashi; Abela, Alexander R; Huang, Shenlin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cationic palladium(II) complexes have been found to be highly reactive towards aromatic C–H activation of arylureas at room temperature. A commercially available catalyst [Pd(MeCN)4](BF4)2 or a nitrile-free cationic palladium(II) complex generated in situ from the reaction of Pd(OAc)2 and HBF4, effectively catalyzes C–H activation/cross-coupling reactions between aryl iodides, arylboronic acids and acrylates under milder conditions than those previously reported. The nature of the directing group was found to be critical for achieving room temperature conditions, with the urea moiety the most effective in promoting facile coupling reactions at an ortho C–H position. This methodology has been utilized in a streamlined and efficient synthesis of boscalid, an agent produced on the kiloton scale annually and used to control a range of plant pathogens in broadacre and horticultural crops. Mechanistic investigations led to a proposed catalytic cycle involving three steps: (1) C–H activation to generate a cationic palladacycle; (2) reaction of the cationic palladacycle with an aryl iodide, arylboronic acid or acrylate, and (3) regeneration of the active cationic palladium catalyst. The reaction between a cationic palladium(II) complex and arylurea allowed the formation and isolation of the corresponding palladacycle intermediate, characterized by X-ray analysis. Roles of various additives in the stepwise process have also been studied. PMID:27340491

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanocrystalline ZnSe: An in situ synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, J.-E. Jensen, T.R.; Hanson, J.C.

    2008-08-15

    The hydrothermal synthesis of nanocrystalline ZnSe has been studied by in situ X-ray powder diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The formation of ZnSe was studied using the following starting mixtures: Zn+Se+H{sub 2}O (route A) and ZnCl{sub 2}+Se+H{sub 2}O+Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3} (route B). The route A experiment showed that Zn powder starts reacting with water at 134 deg. C giving ZnO and H{sub 2} followed by the formation of ZnSe which takes place in temperature range from 167 to 195 deg. C. The route B experiment shows a considerably more complex reaction path with several intermediate phases and in this case the formation of ZnSe starts at 141 deg. C and ZnSe and Se were the only crystalline phases observed at the end of the experiment where the temperature was 195 deg. C. The sizes of the nanocrystalline particles were determined to 18 and 9 nm in the route A and B experiments, respectively. Nanocrystalline ZnSe was also synthesized ex situ using the route A and B methods and characterized by conventional X-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. An average crystalline domain size of ca. 8 nm was determined by X-ray powder diffraction in fair agreement with TEM images, which showed larger aggregates of nanoparticles having approximate diameters of 10 nm. Furthermore, a method for purification of the ZnSe nanoparticles was developed and the prepared particles showed signs of anisotropic size broadening of the diffraction peaks. - Graphical abstract: Stack of powder diagrams showing the formation of nanocrystalline ZnSe under hydrothermal conditions.

  4. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Nanocrystalline ZnSe: An in situ Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Powder Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect

    Joergensen,J.; Jensen, T.; Hanson, J.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrothermal synthesis of nanocrystalline ZnSe has been studied by in situ X-ray powder diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The formation of ZnSe was studied using the following starting mixtures: Zn+Se+H2O (route A) and ZnCl2+Se+H2O+Na2SO3 (route B). The route A experiment showed that Zn powder starts reacting with water at 134 C giving ZnO and H2 followed by the formation of ZnSe which takes place in temperature range from 167 to 195 C. The route B experiment shows a considerably more complex reaction path with several intermediate phases and in this case the formation of ZnSe starts at 141 C and ZnSe and Se were the only crystalline phases observed at the end of the experiment where the temperature was 195 C. The sizes of the nanocrystalline particles were determined to 18 and 9 nm in the route A and B experiments, respectively. Nanocrystalline ZnSe was also synthesized ex situ using the route A and B methods and characterized by conventional X-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. An average crystalline domain size of ca. 8 nm was determined by X-ray powder diffraction in fair agreement with TEM images, which showed larger aggregates of nanoparticles having approximate diameters of 10 nm. Furthermore, a method for purification of the ZnSe nanoparticles was developed and the prepared particles showed signs of anisotropic size broadening of the diffraction peaks.

  5. In situ X-ray diffraction study of Na+ saturated montmorillonite exposed to variably wet super critical CO2.

    PubMed

    Ilton, Eugene S; Schaef, H Todd; Qafoku, Odeta; Rosso, Kevin M; Felmy, Andrew R

    2012-04-01

    Reactions involving variably hydrated super critical CO(2) (scCO(2)) and a Na saturated dioctahedral smectite (Na-STX-1) were examined by in situ high-pressure X-ray diffraction at 50 °C and 90 bar, conditions that are relevant to long-term geologic storage of CO(2). Both hydration and dehydration reactions were rapid with appreciable reaction occurring in minutes and near steady state occurring within an hour. Hydration occurred stepwise as a function of increasing H(2)O in the system; 1W, 2W-3W, and >3W clay hydration states were stable from ~2-30%, ~31-55 < 64%, and ≥ ~71% H(2)O saturation in scCO(2), respectively. Exposure of sub 1W clay to anhydrous scCO(2) caused interlayer expansion, not contraction as expected for dehydration, suggesting that CO(2) intercalated the interlayer region of the sub 1W clay, which might provide a secondary trapping mechanism for CO(2). In contrast, control experiments using pressurized N(2) and similar initial conditions as in the scCO(2) study, showed little to no change in the d(001) spacing, or hydration states, of the clay. A salient implication for cap rock integrity is that clays can dehydrate when exposed to wet scCO(2). For example, a clay in the ~3W hydration state could collapse by ~3 Å in the c* direction, or ~15%, if exposed to scCO(2) at less than or equal to about 64% H(2)O saturation. PMID:22404533

  6. The human sunburn reaction: histologic and biochemical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchrest, B.A.; Soter, N.A.; Stoff, J.S.; Mihm, M.C. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet-induced erythema reaction was investigated histologically and biochemically in four subjects, utilizing suction blister aspirates, analyzed for histamine and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and Epon-embedded 1-mu skin biopsy sections from control skin and from irradiated skin at intervals for 72 hours after exposure to a Hanovia lamp. Major histologic alterations in the epidermis included dyskeratotic and vacuolated keratinocytes (sunburn cells), and disappearance of Langerhans cells. In the dermis the major changes were vascular, involving both the superficial and deep venular plexuses. Endothelial cell enlargement was first apparent within 30 minutes of irradiation, peaked at 24 hours, and persisted throughout the 72-hour study period. Mast cell degranulation and associated perivenular edema were first apparent at 1 hour and striking at the onset of erythema, 3 to 4 hours postirradiation; edema was absent and mast cells were again normal in number and granule content at 24 hours. Histamine levels rose approximately fourfold above control values immediately after the onset of erythema and returned to baseline within 24 hours. PGE2 levels were statistically elevated even before the onset of erythema and reached approximately 150% of the control value at 24 hours. These data provide the first evidence that histamine may mediate the early phase of the human sunburn reaction and increase our understanding of its complex histologic and biochemical sequelae.

  7. A Discrete Model to Study Reaction-Diffusion-Mechanics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Louis D.; Nash, Martyn P.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD) processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material). Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects. PMID:21804911

  8. Space shuttle orbiter reaction control system jet interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The space shuttle orbiter has forward mounted and rear mounted Reaction Control Systems (RCS) which are used for orbital maneuvering and also provide control during entry and abort maneuvers in the atmosphere. The effects of interaction between the RCS jets and the flow over the vehicle in the atmosphere are studied. Test data obtained in the NASA Langley Research Center 31 inch continuous flow hypersonic tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 10.3 is analyzed. The data were obtained with a 0.01 scale force model with aft mounted RCS nozzles mounted on the sting off of the force model balance. The plume simulations were accomplished primarily using air in a cold gas simulation through scaled nozzles, however, various cold gas mixtures of Helium and Argon were also tested. The effect of number of nozzles was tested as were limited tests of combined controls. The data show that RCS nozzle exit momentum ratio is the primary correlating parameter for effects where the plume impinges on an adjacent surface and mass flow ratio is the parameter where the plume interaction is primarily with the external stream. An analytic model of aft mounted RCS units was developed in which the total reaction control moments are the sum of thrust, impingement, interaction, and cross-coupling terms.

  9. Chemistry at high pressures and temperatures: in-situ synthesis and characterization of {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} by DAC X-ray/laser-heating studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.-S.; Akella, J.; Nicol, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed in-situ XRD technique at high pressures and temperatures by integrating the angle-resolved synchrotron XRD method, laser-heating system, and diamond anvil cell together. Using this technique, we have studied the direct elementary reactions of nitrogen with Si, yielding technologically important {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. These reactions do not occur at ambient temperatures at high pressures up to 50 GPa, but proceed exothermically at high temperatures at moderate pressures. It implies that the reaction is kinetically limited by a large activation barrier.

  10. IN SITU MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING NMR FOR STUDYING GEOLOGICAL CO(2) SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2011-03-27

    Geological carbon sequestration (GCS) is one of the most promising ways of mitigating atmospheric greenhouse gases (1-3). Mineral carbonation reactions are potentially important to the long-term sealing effectiveness of caprock but remain poorly predictable, particularly in low-water supercritical CO2 (scCO2)-dominated environments where the chemistry has not been adequately explored. In situ probes that provide molecular-level information is desirable for investigating mechanisms and rates of GCS mineral carbonation reactions. MAS-NMR is a powerful tool for obtaining detailed molecular structure and dynamics information of a system regardless whether the system is in a solid, a liquid, a gaseous, or a supercritical state, or a mixture thereof (4,5). However, MAS NMR under scCO2 conditions has never been realized due to the tremendous technical difficulties of achieving and maintaining high pressure within a fast spinning MAS rotor (6,7), where non-metal materials must be used. In this work, we report development of a unique high pressure MAS NMR capability, and its application to mineral carbonation chemistry in scCO2 under geologically relevant temperatures and pressures.

  11. A study of the Sabatier-methanation reaction kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verostko, C. E.; Forsythe, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    The kinetics of the Sabatier methanation reaction, the reduction of carbon dioxide with hydrogen to methane and water, was investigated for 58 percent nickel on kieselguhr catalyst and 20 percent ruthenium on alumina catalyst. Differential rate data from an experimental program were correlated with a power function rate equation both for forward and reverse reactions. The kinetic parameters of activation energy, frequency rate constant and reaction order were determined for the rate equation. The values of these parameters were obtained from an Arrhenius plot of the experimental differential rate data. Also the carbon monoxide side reaction effect was measured and included in the correlation of parameters. The reaction was found to fit the rate equation experimentally within the temperature range 421 K, where the reaction effectively begins, the 800 K where the reaction rate drops and departs from the rate equation form.

  12. A kinetic study of the CH2OO Criegee intermediate self-reaction, reaction with SO2 and unimolecular reaction using cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chhantyal-Pun, Rabi; Davey, Anthony; Shallcross, Dudley E; Percival, Carl J; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2015-02-01

    Criegee intermediates are important species formed during the ozonolysis of alkenes. Reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates with various species like SO2 and NO2 may contribute significantly to tropospheric chemistry. In the laboratory, self-reaction can be an important loss pathway for Criegee intermediates and thus needs to be characterized to obtain accurate bimolecular reaction rate coefficients. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy was used to perform kinetic measurements for various reactions of CH2OO at 293 K and under low pressure (7 to 30 Torr) conditions. For the reaction CH2OO + CH2OO (8), a rate coefficient k8 = (7.35 ± 0.63) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was derived from the measured CH2OO decay rates, using an absorption cross section value reported previously. A rate coefficient of k4 = (3.80 ± 0.04) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained for the CH2OO + SO2 (4) reaction. An upper limit for the unimolecular CH2OO loss rate coefficient of 11.6 ± 8.0 s(-1) was deduced from studies of reaction (4). SO2 catalysed CH2OO isomerization or intersystem crossing is proposed to occur with a rate coefficient of (3.53 ± 0.32) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). PMID:25553776

  13. A near-ambient-pressure XPS study on catalytic CO oxidation reaction over a Ru(101¯0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Ryo; Shimura, Masahiro; Yoshida, Masaaki; Monya, Yuji; Suzuki, Kazuma; Amemiya, Kenta; Mase, Kazuhiko; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Kondoh, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the interactions of CO and O2 with Ru(101¯0) single crystal surfaces, and studied the in-situ catalytic oxidation reaction of CO on the surface under near realistic pressure conditions by using a combination of near-ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and differential pumping mass spectroscopy. At lower temperatures (T < 190 °C), most of the surface keeps metallic and is covered by both chemisorbed atomic oxygen and CO, and the CO2 formation rate is relatively slow. At higher temperatures, the reaction rate significantly increases and reaches the saturation, where the Ru surface is dominated by a bulk oxide (i.e. RuO2).

  14. A plant chamber system with downstream reaction chamber to study the effects of pollution on biogenic emissions.

    PubMed

    Timkovsky, J; Gankema, P; Pierik, R; Holzinger, R

    2014-01-01

    A system of two plant chambers and a downstream reaction chamber has been set up to investigate the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and possible effects of pollutants such as ozone. The system can be used to compare BVOC emissions from two sets of differently treated plants, or to study the photochemistry of real plant emissions under polluted conditions without exposing the plants to pollutants. The main analytical tool is a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) which allows online monitoring of biogenic emissions and chemical degradation products. The identification of BVOCs and their oxidation products is aided by cryogenic trapping and subsequent in situ gas chromatographic analysis. PMID:25068256

  15. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. [Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  16. An in situ approach to study trace element partitioning in the laser heated diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Petitgirard, S.; Mezouar, M.; Borchert, M.; Appel, K.; Liermann, H.-P.; Andrault, D.

    2012-01-15

    Data on partitioning behavior of elements between different phases at in situ conditions are crucial for the understanding of element mobility especially for geochemical studies. Here, we present results of in situ partitioning of trace elements (Zr, Pd, and Ru) between silicate and iron melts, up to 50 GPa and 4200 K, using a modified laser heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). This new experimental set up allows simultaneous collection of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) data as a function of time using the high pressure beamline ID27 (ESRF, France). The technique enables the simultaneous detection of sample melting based to the appearance of diffuse scattering in the XRD pattern, characteristic of the structure factor of liquids, and measurements of elemental partitioning of the sample using XRF, before, during and after laser heating in the DAC. We were able to detect elements concentrations as low as a few ppm level (2-5 ppm) on standard solutions. In situ measurements are complimented by mapping of the chemical partitions of the trace elements after laser heating on the quenched samples to constrain the partitioning data. Our first results indicate a strong partitioning of Pd and Ru into the metallic phase, while Zr remains clearly incompatible with iron. This novel approach extends the pressure and temperature range of partitioning experiments derived from quenched samples from the large volume presses and could bring new insight to the early history of Earth.

  17. In situ SEM Study of Lithium Intercalation in individual V2O5 Nanowires

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Cothren, Joshua E.; Leonard, Donovan N.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2015-01-08

    Progress in rational engineering of Li-ion batteries requires better understanding of the electrochemical processes and accompanying transformations in the electrode materials on multiple length scales. In spite of recent progress in utilizing transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to analyze these materials, in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was mostly overlooked as a powerful tool that allows probing these phenomena on the nano and mesoscale. In this paper, we report on in situ SEM study of lithiation in a V2O5-based single-nanobelt battery with ionic liquid electrolyte. Coupled with cyclic voltammetry measurements, in situ SEM revealed the peculiarities of subsurface intercalation, formation ofmore » solid-electrolyte interface (SEI) and electromigration of liquid. We observed that single-crystalline vanadia nanobelts do not undergo large-scale amorphization or fracture during electrochemical cycling, but rather transform topochemically with only a slight shape distortion. Lastly, the SEI layer seems to have significant influence on the lithium ion diffusion and overall capacity of the single-nanobelt battery.« less

  18. An in situ approach to study trace element partitioning in the laser heated diamond anvil cell.

    PubMed

    Petitgirard, S; Borchert, M; Andrault, D; Appel, K; Mezouar, M; Liermann, H-P

    2012-01-01

    Data on partitioning behavior of elements between different phases at in situ conditions are crucial for the understanding of element mobility especially for geochemical studies. Here, we present results of in situ partitioning of trace elements (Zr, Pd, and Ru) between silicate and iron melts, up to 50 GPa and 4200 K, using a modified laser heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). This new experimental set up allows simultaneous collection of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) data as a function of time using the high pressure beamline ID27 (ESRF, France). The technique enables the simultaneous detection of sample melting based to the appearance of diffuse scattering in the XRD pattern, characteristic of the structure factor of liquids, and measurements of elemental partitioning of the sample using XRF, before, during and after laser heating in the DAC. We were able to detect elements concentrations as low as a few ppm level (2-5 ppm) on standard solutions. In situ measurements are complimented by mapping of the chemical partitions of the trace elements after laser heating on the quenched samples to constrain the partitioning data. Our first results indicate a strong partitioning of Pd and Ru into the metallic phase, while Zr remains clearly incompatible with iron. This novel approach extends the pressure and temperature range of partitioning experiments derived from quenched samples from the large volume presses and could bring new insight to the early history of Earth. PMID:22299967

  19. Computational Chemistry in the Undergraduate Laboratory: A Mechanistic Study of the Wittig Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    The Wittig reaction is one of the most useful reactions in organic chemistry. Despite its prominence early in the organic chemistry curriculum, the exact mechanism of this reaction is still under debate, and this controversy is often neglected in the classroom. Introducing a simple computational study of the Wittig reaction illustrates the…

  20. Laboratory studies of the kinetics of tropospheric and stratospheric atom and radical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golde, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    Direct measurements of reaction rate constants and branching fractions for elementary reactions necessary in the modeling of the troposphere or stratosphere are provided. Details of reaction mechanisms are elucidated by studying pressure and temperature dependences of reactions, as well as by use of isotopic labels. Measurement techniques are improved for radical species in the laboratory. Progress and results in each area are given.

  1. Reaction studies of hot silicon and germanium radicals. Progress report, September 1, 1979-August 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1980-08-31

    The experimental approach to attaining the goals of this research program is briefly outlined and the progress made in the last year is reviewed in sections entitled: (a) primary steps in the reaction of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms and the identification of reactive intermediates in the recoil reactions; (b) thermally induced silylene and germylene reactions; (c) ion-molecule reaction studies.

  2. Pulsed supercritical synthesis of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles in a water-isopropanol mixture studied by in situ powder X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltzholtz, Jakob Rostgaard; Tyrsted, Christoffer; Jensen, Kirsten Marie Ørnsbjerg; Bremholm, Martin; Christensen, Mogens; Becker-Christensen, Jacob; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2013-02-01

    A new step in supercritical nanoparticle synthesis, the pulsed supercritical synthesis reactor, is investigated in situ using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) to understand the formation of nanoparticles in real time. This eliminates the common problem of transferring information gained during in situ studies to subsequent laboratory reactor conditions. As a proof of principle, anatase titania nanoparticles were synthesized in a 50/50 mixture of water and isopropanol near and above the critical point of water (P = 250 bar, T = 300, 350, 400, 450, 500 and 550 °C). The evolution of the reaction product was followed by sequentially recording PXRD patterns with a time resolution of less than two seconds. The crystallite size of titania is found to depend on both temperature and residence time, and increasing either parameter leads to larger crystallites. A simple adjustment of either temperature or residence time provides a direct method for gram scale production of anatase nanoparticles of average crystallite sizes between 7 and 35 nm, thus giving the option of synthesizing tailor-made nanoparticles. Modeling of the in situ growth curves using an Avrami growth model gave an activation energy of 66(19) kJ mol-1 for the initial crystallization. The in situ PXRD data also provide direct information about the size dependent macrostrain in the nanoparticles and with decreasing crystallite size the unit cell contracts, especially along the c-direction. This agrees well with previous ex situ results obtained for hydrothermal synthesis of titania nanoparticles.A new step in supercritical nanoparticle synthesis, the pulsed supercritical synthesis reactor, is investigated in situ using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) to understand the formation of nanoparticles in real time. This eliminates the common problem of transferring information gained during in situ studies to subsequent laboratory reactor conditions. As a proof of principle, anatase titania

  3. CO(2)-selective methanol steam reforming on In-doped Pd studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rameshan, Christoph; Lorenz, Harald; Mayr, Lukas; Penner, Simon; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Arrigo, Rosa; Haevecker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert; Klötzer, Bernhard

    2012-11-01

    In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (in situ XPS) was used to study the structural and catalytic properties of Pd-In near-surface intermetallic phases in correlation with previously studied PdZn and PdGa.Room temperature deposition of ∼4 monolayer equivalents (MLEs) of In metal on Pd foil and subsequent annealing to 453 K in vacuum yields a ∼1:1 Pd/In near-surface multilayer intermetallic phase. This Pd(1)In(1) phase exhibits a similar "Cu-like" electronic structure and indium depth distribution as its methanol steam reforming (MSR)-selective multilayer Pd(1)Zn(1) counterpart.Catalytic characterization of the multilayer Pd(1)In(1) phase in MSR yielded a CO(2)-selectivity of almost 100% between 493 and 550 K. In contrast to previously studied In(2)O(3)-supported PdIn nanoparticles and pure In(2)O(3), intermediate formaldehyde is only partially converted to CO(2) using this Pd(1)In(1) phase. Strongly correlated with PdZn, on an In-diluted PdIn intermetallic phase with "Pd-like" electronic structure, prepared by thermal annealing at 623 K, methanol steam reforming is suppressed and enhanced CO formation via full methanol dehydrogenation is observed.To achieve CO(2)-TOF values on the isolated Pd(1)In(1) intermetallic phase as high as on supported PdIn/In(2)O(3), at least 593 K reaction temperature is required. A bimetal-oxide synergism, with both bimetallic and oxide synergistically contributing to the observed catalytic activity and selectivity, manifests itself by accelerated formaldehyde-to-CO(2) conversion at markedly lowered temperatures as compared to separate oxide and bimetal. Combination of suppression of full methanol dehydrogenation to CO on Pd(1)In(1) inhibited inverse water-gas-shift reaction on In(2)O(3) and fast water activation/conversion of formaldehyde is the key to the low-temperature activity and high CO(2)-selectivity of the supported catalyst. PMID:23226689

  4. CO2-selective methanol steam reforming on In-doped Pd studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rameshan, Christoph; Lorenz, Harald; Mayr, Lukas; Penner, Simon; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Arrigo, Rosa; Haevecker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert; Klötzer, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (in situ XPS) was used to study the structural and catalytic properties of Pd–In near-surface intermetallic phases in correlation with previously studied PdZn and PdGa. Room temperature deposition of ∼4 monolayer equivalents (MLEs) of In metal on Pd foil and subsequent annealing to 453 K in vacuum yields a ∼1:1 Pd/In near-surface multilayer intermetallic phase. This Pd1In1 phase exhibits a similar “Cu-like” electronic structure and indium depth distribution as its methanol steam reforming (MSR)-selective multilayer Pd1Zn1 counterpart. Catalytic characterization of the multilayer Pd1In1 phase in MSR yielded a CO2-selectivity of almost 100% between 493 and 550 K. In contrast to previously studied In2O3-supported PdIn nanoparticles and pure In2O3, intermediate formaldehyde is only partially converted to CO2 using this Pd1In1 phase. Strongly correlated with PdZn, on an In-diluted PdIn intermetallic phase with “Pd-like” electronic structure, prepared by thermal annealing at 623 K, methanol steam reforming is suppressed and enhanced CO formation via full methanol dehydrogenation is observed. To achieve CO2-TOF values on the isolated Pd1In1 intermetallic phase as high as on supported PdIn/In2O3, at least 593 K reaction temperature is required. A bimetal-oxide synergism, with both bimetallic and oxide synergistically contributing to the observed catalytic activity and selectivity, manifests itself by accelerated formaldehyde-to-CO2 conversion at markedly lowered temperatures as compared to separate oxide and bimetal. Combination of suppression of full methanol dehydrogenation to CO on Pd1In1 inhibited inverse water–gas-shift reaction on In2O3 and fast water activation/conversion of formaldehyde is the key to the low-temperature activity and high CO2-selectivity of the supported catalyst. PMID:23226689

  5. Theoretical study of reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface

    SciTech Connect

    Halley, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Electron transfer rates are predicted by numerical methods, in a collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory . Emphasis is on electron transfer involving ions known to be important in enhancing stress corrosion cracking in light water reactors and on electron transfer at oxide surfaces. We have produced a new theory for description of the Jahn Teller effect in the solvation shell of the cuprous ion in aqueous solution, have implemented it in a molecular dynamics simulation and compared the results with experimental neutron scattering measurements on solutions containing the cuprous ion. A large amount of numerical data has been collected on the transition state of the ferrous ferric electron transfer reaction at an electrode. Work was completed on a polarizable and dissociable model of water for use in the electron transfer studies. New calculations of the conductivity in models of oxides have shown the existence of impurity conduction bands in such models for the first time.

  6. Study of molybdenum electrodes for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilha, Janine Carvalho; Martini, Emilse Maria Agostini; Brum, Cauã; de Souza, Michèle Oberson; de Souza, Roberto Fernando

    The molybdenum electrode, Mo, has been investigated for hydrogen production via water electrolysis in 10 vol.% aqueous solutions of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMI·BF 4) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The EIS measurements show that the Mo system has much higher interfacial capacitance, and correspondently the electrical double layer formed on this electrode is thicker than those formed on nickel or platinum. The positive displacement of potential of zero charge (PZC) values indicates the specific adsorption of the imidazolium cation on the Mo surface. This study provides an elegant explanation for the better performance of Mo electrodes in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER): the BMI cation acts as an intermediate for the proton transfer from water to the electrode surface, thereby decreasing the overpotential of HER. This model explains the synergism between Mo and the BMI cation in the HER process.

  7. Reaction between Chromium(III) and EDTA Ions: an Overlooked Mechanism of Case Study Reaction of Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cerar, Janez

    2015-01-01

    Widely cited and accepted explanation of reaction mechanism of the case study reaction of chemical kinetics between Cr(III) ions and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) contradicts modern chromium(III) coordination chemistry data. Absorption UV and visible light spectra were recorded during the reaction between aqueous solution of Cr(NO(3))(3) and EDTA in order to obtain new information about this reaction. Analysis of the spectra showed that only very small fraction of intermediates may be present in solution during the course of the reaction. The reaction scheme was established and according to it calculations based on a simplified model were carried out. Literature data for constants were used if known, otherwise, adjusted values of their sound estimates were applied. Reasonable agreement of the model calculations with the experimental data was obtained for pH values 3.8 and 4.5 but the model failed to reproduce measured rate of reaction at pH 5.5, probably due to the use of the oversimplified model. PMID:26454587

  8. In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Techniques for the Study of Lithium Battery Materials

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.; Mukerjee, S.; Yang, X. Q.; Sun, X., Ein-Eli, Y.

    1998-11-01

    The combination of in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a very powerful technique in the study of lithium battery cathode materials. XRD identifies the phase changes that occur during cycling and XAS gives information on the redox charge compensation processes that occur on the transition metal oxides. Because of its element specific nature XAS can identify the occurrence of redox processes on the various cations in doped oxide cathode materials. Since XAS probes short range order and is particularly useful in the study of amorphous tin based composite oxide anode materials.

  9. In situ vitrification and the effects of soil additives; A mixture experiment case study

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, G.F.; Shade, J.W. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a case study involving in situ vitrification (ISV), a process for immobilizing chemical or nuclear wastes in soil by melting-dissolving the contaminated soil into a glass block. One goal of the study was to investigate how viscosity and electrical conductivity were affected by mixing CaO and Na{sub 2}O with soil. A three-component constrained-region mixture experiment design was generated and the viscosity and electrical conductivity data collected. Several second-order mixture models were considered, and the Box-Cox transformation technique was applied to select property transformations. The fitted models were used to produce contour and component effects plots.

  10. Kinetic studies of the hydroxyl radical reaction with PAHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthula, Rajeshwar

    An existing quartz optical reactor heating system was designed to permit higher temperature kinetic measurements more closely associated with post-combuston conditions (up to 1200 K). A pulsed laser photolysis/pulsed laser-induced fluorescence (PLP/PLIF) technique was then applied with this modified reactor to study the OH radical kinetics with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The kinetics of the reaction of a surrogate three-ring PAH, anthracene (and its deuterated form) with hydroxyl (OH) radicals was investigated over the temperature range of 373 to 1200 K. This study represents the first examination of the OH kinetics for this class of reactions at elevated temperatures (>470 K). The results indicate a complex temperature dependence similar to that observed for simpler aromatic compounds, e.g., benzene. At low temperatures (373-498 K), the rate measurements exhibited Arrhenius behavior (1.82 x 10-11 exp(542.35/T) in units of cm3 molecule -1 s-1) and kinetic isotope effect (KIE) measurements were consistent with an OH addition mechanism. The low temperature results are extrapolated to atmospheric temperatures and compared with previous measurements. Rate measurements between 673 and 923 K exhibited a sharp decrease in the magnitude of the rate coefficients (a factor of 9). KIE measurements under these conditions were still consistent with an OH addition mechanism. The following modified Arrhenius equation is the best fit to our anthracene measurements between 373 and 923 K, 8.17 x 1014 T-8.3 exp(-3171.71/T) (in units of cm3 molecule-1 s-1). For a limited temperature range between 1000 and 1200 K, the rate measurements exhibited an apparent positive temperature dependence with the following Arrhenius equation the best fit to the data, 2.18 x 10-11*exp(-1734.11/T) (in units of cm3molecule-1s -1). KIE measurements above 999 K were slightly larger than unity, but inclusive regarding the mechanism of the reaction. Theoretical calculations of the KIE indicate

  11. An exploratory study of zoo visitors' exhibit experiences and reactions.

    PubMed

    Luebke, Jerry F; Matiasek, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Visiting a zoo or aquarium is not only fun, but can also have a positive impact on visitors' knowledge and attitudes regarding animals and the environment. The biggest challenge, however, is for these institutions to strategically provide opportunities for cognitive and affective learning while simultaneously facilitating enjoyment and fun. Recent studies in zoos and aquaria have examined various factors that can influence learning such as engaging visitors' emotions or connecting with visitors' prior knowledge and interests. The intent of the current study was to further this line of investigation and explore the relationship between visitors' predispositions and their cognitive and affective experiences and reactions as they walked through an animal exhibit. We selected three indoor immersion exhibits and one outdoor naturalistic exhibit for the study to obtain a wide range of different animals and exhibit settings. Research assistants randomly intercepted visitors leaving the exhibits and asked, among other things, the extent they experienced certain thoughts and feelings while they were walking through the exhibits. Results revealed that visitors' emotional responses to viewing animals were key experiences along with opportunities for introspection and reflection during their time in the exhibits. Implications of the study are discussed in reference to providing both fun and meaningful learning experiences for visitors. PMID:23740472

  12. A study of Mediterranean Eddies by in situ and remote sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ienna, Federico Salvatore

    Subsurface coherent vortices in the North Atlantic, whose saline water originates from the Mediterranean Sea and which are known as Mediterranean Eddies ("meddies"), have been of particular interest to physical oceanographers since their discovery, especially for their salt and heat transport properties into the North Atlantic Ocean. Many studies in the past have been successful in observing and studying the typical properties of meddies by probing them with in-situ techniques. The use of remote sensing techniques would offer a much cheaper and easier alternative for studying these phenomena, but only a few past studies have been able to study meddies by remote sensing, and a reliable method for observing them remotely remains elusive. This research presents a new way of locating and tracking meddies in the North Atlantic Ocean using satellite altimeter data. The method presented in this research makes use of Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) as a mean to isolate the surface expressions of meddies on the ocean surface and separate them from any other surface constituents, allowing robust meddies to be consistently tracked by satellite. One such meddy is successfully tracked over a 6 month time period (2 November 2005 - 17 May 2006). Results of the satellite tracking method are verified using Expendable Bathythermographs (XBT). Furthermore, three other meddies are also studied by in-situ observations using Argo float data, and an analysis of the buoyancy frequency properties of meddies is made.

  13. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of in situ generation of ammonia from urea in a batch reactor for flue gas conditioning of thermal power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, J.N.; Patwardhan, A.V.; Meikap, B.C.

    2009-03-15

    Ammonia has long been known to be useful in the treatment of flue/tail/stack gases from industrial furnaces, incinerators, and electric power generation industries. In this study, urea hydrolysis for production of ammonia, in different application areas that require safe use of ammonia at in situ condition, was investigated in a batch reactor. The equilibrium and kinetic study of urea hydrolysis was done in a batch reactor at reaction pressure to investigate the effect of reaction temperature, initial feed concentration, and time on ammonia production. This study reveals that conversion increases exponentially with an increase in temperature but with increases in initial feed concentration of urea the conversion decreases marginally. Further, the effect of time on conversion has also been studied; it was found that conversion increases with increase in time. Using collision theory, the temperature dependency of forward rate constant developed from which activation energy of the reaction and the frequency factor has been calculated. The activation energy and frequency factor of urea hydrolysis reaction at atmospheric pressure was found to be 73.6 kJ/mol and 2.89 x 10{sup 7} min{sup -1}, respectively.

  14. Comparative Reactivity Study of Natural Silicate Minerals in Wet Supercritical CO2 By In Situ Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C.; Schaef, T.; Miller, Q. R.; Loring, J. S.; Wang, Z.; Johnson, K. T.; McGrail, P.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term storage of CO2 in deep geologic reservoirs is one of the strategies being developed and implemented for reducing anthropogenic emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere. Reservoirs containing basalt or peridotite have the potential to permanently entrap the CO2 as silicate minerals react with the CO2 and formation waters to form stable carbonate minerals. Although the relevant reactions have been well studied in the aqueous phase, comparatively little work has focused on silicate mineral reactivity in the CO2-rich fluid containing dissolved water at conditions relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. In this study, we used in situ infrared spectroscopy to investigate the carbonation of naturally occurring samples of San Carlos olivine (Mg2SiO4), Bramble enstatite (MgSiO3), and a Hawaiian picritic basalt rich in olivine. To enhance reactivity, subsamples were micronized to obtain higher surface area materials, in the range of 14 to 23 m2g-1. Experiments were carried out at 50 °C and 91 bar by circulating a stream of dry or wet supercritical CO2 (scCO2) past a sample overlayer deposited on the window of a high-pressure infrared flow cell. Water concentrations ranged from 0% to 135% relative to saturation, and transmission-mode absorbance spectra were recorded as a function of time for 24 hours. In experiments with excess water, a controlled temperature gradient was used to intentionally condense a film of liquid water on the overlayers' surfaces. No discernible reaction was detected when the samples were exposed to dry scCO2. When water was added to the scCO2, a thin film of liquid-like water formed on the surfaces of each sample, followed by spectral evidence of carbonation. The extents of reaction were dependent on both the thickness of the water films and the materials being tested. The thinnest water film was associated with the Bramble enstatite, which also appeared minimally reactive. The Hawaiian picritic basalt was slightly more reactive but contained

  15. Silicate Carbonation in Supercritical CO2 Containing Dissolved H2O: An in situ High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Miller, Quin RS; Thompson, Christopher J.; Loring, John S.; Bowden, Mark E.; Arey, Bruce W.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Technological advances have been significant in recent years for managing environmentally harmful emissions (mostly CO2) resulting from combustion of fossil fuels. Deep underground geologic formations are emerging as reasonable options for long term storage of CO2 but mechanisms controlling rock and mineral stability in contact with injected supercritical fluids containing water are relatively unknown. In this paper, we discuss mineral transformation reactions occurring between supercritical CO2 containing water and the silicate minerals forsterite (Mg2SiO4), wollastonite (CaSiO3), and enstatite (MgSiO3). This study utilizes newly developed in situ high pressure x-ray diffraction (HXRD) and in situ infra red (IR) to examine mineral transformation reactions. Forsterite and enstatite were selected as they are important minerals present in igneous and mafic rocks and have been the subject of a large number of aqueous dissolution studies that can be compared with non-aqueous fluid tests in this study. Wollastonite, classified as a pyroxenoid (similar to a pyroxene), was chosen as a suitably fast reacting proxy for examining silicate carbonation processes associated with a wet scCO2 fluid as related to geologic carbon sequestration. The experiments were conducted under modest pressures (90 to 160 bar), temperatures between 35° to 70° C, and varying concentrations of dissolved water. Under these conditions scCO2 contains up to 3,500 ppm dissolved water.

  16. Studies of the Atmospheric Chemsitry of Energy-Related Volatile Organic Compounds and of their Atmospheric Reaction Products

    SciTech Connect

    Roger Atkinson; Janet Arey

    2007-04-14

    The focus of this contract was to investigate selected aspects of the atmospheric chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted into the atmosphere from energy-related sources as well as from biogenic sources. The classes of VOCs studied were polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitro-PAHs, the biogenic VOCs isoprene, 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol and cis-3-hexen-1-ol, alkenes (including alkenes emitted from vegetation) and their oxygenated atmospheric reaction products, and a series of oxygenated carbonyl and hydroxycarbonyl compounds formed as atmospheric reaction products of aromatic hydrocarbons and other VOCs. Large volume reaction chambers were used to investigate the kinetics and/or products of photolysis and of the gas-phase reactions of these organic compounds with hydroxyl (OH) radicals, nitrate (NO3) radicals, and ozone (O3), using an array of analytical instrumentation to analyze the reactants and products (including gas chromatography, in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and direct air sampling atmospheric pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry). The following studies were carried out. The photolysis rates of 1- and 2-nitronaphthalene and of eleven isomeric methylnitronaphthalenes were measured indoors using blacklamp irradiation and outdoors using natural sunlight. Rate constants were measured for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals, Cl atoms and NO3 radicals with naphthalene, 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene, 1- and 2-ethylnaphthalene and the ten dimethylnaphthalene isomers. Rate constants were measured for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with four unsaturated carbonyls and with a series of hydroxyaldehydes formed as atmospheric reaction products of other VOCs, and for the gas-phase reactions of O3 with a series of cycloalkenes. Products of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and O3 with a series of biogenically emitted VOCs were identified and quantified. Ambient atmospheric measurements of the concentrations of a

  17. Quantum dynamics study for D{sub 2} + OH reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Zhang, D.; Li, W.; Zhang, Q.; Wang, D.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, J.Z.H.

    1995-11-16

    A PA5D (potential averaged 5D) TD (time-dependent) quantum wave-packet calculation is reported for the reaction D{sub 2} + OH {yields} D + DOH on the Schatz-Elgersma potential energy surface. The dynamics calculation is carried out on a workstation with a modest memory, which is made possible by using a normalized angular quadrature scheme to minimize the requirement for computer memory during wave-packet propagation. Reaction probabilities, cross sections, and rate constants are presented for the title reaction, and the comparison of the present result with those of the isotopic reactions, H{sub 2} + OH and HD + OH, is given. Consistent with its isotopic reactions, the rotational orientation of D{sub 2} has a stronger effect than that of OH and, in particular, the D{sub 2} (j=1) reactant produces the largest reaction probability, which is attributed to a general steric effect. The comparison of all three isotopic reactions shows that the reactivity (reaction probability and cross section) of the HH(D) + OH system is in the order of P{sub H(2)} > P{sub HD} > P{sub D(2)}. This trend is in good agreement with reduced dimensionality calculations. 27 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Thermal degradation reaction mechanism of xylose: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinbao; He, Chao; Wu, Longqin; Tong, Hong

    2016-08-01

    The thermal degradation reaction mechanism of xylose as hemicellulose model compound was investigated by using density functional theory methods M062X with the 6-31++G(d,p) basis set. Eight possible pyrolytic reaction pathways were proposed and the standard kinetic and thermodynamic parameters in all reaction pathways were calculated at different temperatures. In reaction pathway (1), xylose is first transformed into acyclic containing-carbonyl isomer, and then the isomer further decomposes through four possible pyrolysis pathways (1-1)-(1-4). Pathways (2) and (3) depict an immediate ring-opening process through the simultaneous breaking of C-O and C-C bonds. Pathways (4)-(7) describe the pyrolysis processes of various anhydro-xyloses through a direct ring-opening process. Pathway (8) gives the evolutionary process of pyranones. The calculation results show that reaction pathways (1), (2) and (5) are the major reaction channels and reaction pathways (3), (4), and (6)-(8) are the competitive reaction channels in pyrolysis of xylose. The major products of xylose pyrolysis are low molecular products such as 2-furaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal and acetone, and the main competitive products are formaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid, CO2, CH4, acetol, pyranone, and so on.

  19. In situ microscopy as a tool for the monitoring of filamentous bacteria: a case study in an industrial activated sludge system dominated by M. parvicella.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Thiemo; Dias, Philipe Ambrozio; de León Gallegos, Erika Lizette; Tacke, Viola; Schielke, Andreas; Hesse, Tobias; Fajado, Diego Andrés Sierra; Suhr, Hajo; Wiedemann, Philipp; Denecke, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the application of in situ microscopy for monitoring the growth of filamentous bacteria which can induce disturbances in an industrial activated sludge process. An in situ microscope (ISM) is immersed directly into samples of activated sludge with Microthrix parvicella as dominating species. Without needing further preparatory steps, the automatic evaluation of the ISM-images generates two signals: the number of individual filaments per image (ISM-filament counting) and the total extended filament length (TEFL) per image (ISM-online TEFL). In this first version of the image-processing algorithm, closely spaced crossing filament-segments or filaments within bulk material are not detected. The signals show highly linear correlation both with the standard filament index and the TEFL. Correlations were further substantiated by comparison with real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) measurements of M. parvicella and of the diluted sludge volume index. In this case study, in situ microscopy proved to be a suitable tool for straightforward online-monitoring of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge systems. With future adaptation of the system to different filament morphologies, including cross-linking filaments, bundles, and attached growth, the system will be applicable to other wastewater treatment plants. PMID:27003073

  20. In situ study through electrical resistance of growth rate of trifluoroacetate-based solution-derived YBa2Cu3O7 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Valdés, C. F.; Puig, T.; Obradors, X.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we have studied by means of in situ electrical measurements the nucleation, growth and sintering stages of epitaxial YBa2Cu3O6+δ (YBCO) superconducting thin films prepared using a chemical solution deposition approach based on metal-organic trifluoroacetate-based (TFA) precursors. Single crystal substrates (LaAlO3 and CeO2/YSZ) were used in this study. Analysis of isothermal time dependences, at different temperatures, of in situ electrical resistance of films allowed to evidence that the growth rate G is strongly temperature dependent, i.e. G is enhanced by a factor ˜15 when going from 700 to 810 °C. Additionally, we demonstrate that adding Ag-TFA in the solution may enhance the growth rate by as much as 50%, as compared to pure YBCO, thus confirming previous assessments of the strong influence of Ag doping on YBCO film growth and microstructure. In situ electrical resistance measurements show as well that an incubation time exists and we infer the origin of its temperature dependence. Finally, a thermodynamic analysis allows proposing a single equation for the growth rate of YBCO films integrating all the relevant processing parameters. Our analysis has validated the solid-gas reaction-diffusion model describing the growth of YBCO films from TFA precursors and thus enlarges the knowledge required to enhance the control of the microstructure and superconducting properties of solution-derived YBCO films.