Science.gov

Sample records for size distribution dependence

  1. Bayesian analysis of size-dependent overwinter mortality from size-frequency distributions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Stephanie M; Kottas, Athanasios; Mangel, Marc

    2010-04-01

    Understanding the relationship between body size and mortality is an important problem in ecology. We introduce a novel Bayesian method that can be used to quantify this relationship when the only data available are size-frequency distributions of unmarked individuals measured at two successive time periods. The inverse Gaussian distribution provides a parametric form for the statistical model development, and we use Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to evaluate posterior distributions. We illustrate the method using data on threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) collected before and after the winter season in an Alaskan lake. Our method allows us to compare the intensity of size-biased mortality in different years. We discuss generalizations that include more complicated relationships between size and survival as well as time-series modeling. PMID:20462116

  2. Nanoparticle distribution during systemic inflammation is size-dependent and organ-specific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.-H.; Lundy, D. J.; Toh, E. K.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Shih, C.; Chen, P.; Chang, H.-C.; Lai, J. J.; Stayton, P. S.; Hoffman, A. S.; Hsieh, P. C.-H.

    2015-09-01

    This study comprehensively investigates the changing biodistribution of fluorescent-labelled polystyrene latex bead nanoparticles in a mouse model of inflammation. Since inflammation alters systemic circulatory properties, increases vessel permeability and modulates the immune system, we theorised that systemic inflammation would alter nanoparticle distribution within the body. This has implications for prospective nanocarrier-based therapies targeting inflammatory diseases. Low dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial endotoxin, was used to induce an inflammatory response, and 20 nm, 100 nm or 500 nm polystyrene nanoparticles were administered after 16 hours. HPLC analysis was used to accurately quantify nanoparticle retention by each vital organ, and tissue sections revealed the precise locations of nanoparticle deposition within key tissues. During inflammation, nanoparticles of all sizes redistributed, particularly to the marginal zones of the spleen. We found that LPS-induced inflammation induces splenic macrophage polarisation and alters leukocyte uptake of nanoparticles, with size-dependent effects. In addition, spleen vasculature becomes significantly more permeable following LPS treatment. We conclude that systemic inflammation affects nanoparticle distribution by multiple mechanisms, in a size dependent manner.This study comprehensively investigates the changing biodistribution of fluorescent-labelled polystyrene latex bead nanoparticles in a mouse model of inflammation. Since inflammation alters systemic circulatory properties, increases vessel permeability and modulates the immune system, we theorised that systemic inflammation would alter nanoparticle distribution within the body. This has implications for prospective nanocarrier-based therapies targeting inflammatory diseases. Low dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial endotoxin, was used to induce an inflammatory response, and 20 nm, 100 nm or 500 nm polystyrene nanoparticles were administered

  3. Measuring agglomerate size distribution and dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance absorbance on gold nanoparticle agglomerate size using analytical ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Zook, Justin M; Rastogi, Vinayak; Maccuspie, Robert I; Keene, Athena M; Fagan, Jeffrey

    2011-10-25

    Agglomeration of nanoparticles during measurements in relevant biological and environmental media is a frequent problem in nanomaterial property characterization. The primary problem is typically that any changes to the size distribution can dramatically affect the potential nanotoxicity or other size-determined properties, such as the absorbance signal in a biosensor measurement. Herein we demonstrate analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) as a powerful method for measuring two critical characteristics of nanoparticle (NP) agglomerates in situ in biological media: the NP agglomerate size distribution, and the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorbance spectrum of precise sizes of gold NP agglomerates. To characterize the size distribution, we present a theoretical framework for calculating the hydrodynamic diameter distribution of NP agglomerates from their sedimentation coefficient distribution. We measure sedimentation rates for monomers, dimers, and trimers, as well as for larger agglomerates with up to 600 NPs. The AUC size distributions were found generally to be broader than the size distributions estimated from dynamic light scattering and diffusion-limited colloidal aggregation theory, an alternative bulk measurement method that relies on several assumptions. In addition, the measured sedimentation coefficients can be used in nanotoxicity studies to predict how quickly the agglomerates sediment out of solution under normal gravitational forces, such as in the environment. We also calculate the absorbance spectra for monomer, dimer, trimer, and larger gold NP agglomerates up to 600 NPs, to enable a better understanding of LSPR biosensors. Finally, we validate a new method that uses these spectra to deconvolute the net absorbance spectrum of an unknown bulk sample and approximate the proportions of monomers, dimers, and trimers in a polydisperse sample of small agglomerates, so that every sample does not need to be measured by AUC. These results

  4. Temperature Dependence of Particle Size Distribution in Transformer Oil-Based Ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Józefczak, Arkadiusz; Hornowski, Tomasz; Skumiel, Andrzej

    2011-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the particle size distribution (PSD) of a transformer oil-based ferrofluid was studied using an ultrasound method. The measurements of the ultrasound velocity and attenuation were carried out in the absence of an external magnetic field as a function of the volume concentration of magnetite particles at temperatures ranging from 10 °C to 80 °C. The experimental results of ultrasound measurements were analyzed within the framework of the Vinogradov-Isakovich theory which takes into account contributions to acoustical parameters due to friction and heat exchange between magnetic particles and the surrounding carrier liquid. From the best fit of the experimental results and theoretical predictions, the parameters characterizing the PSD at different temperatures were determined. In order to analyze ultrasonic data, the density and viscosity of ferrofluid samples and the transformer oil were also measured.

  5. Characterizing size dependence of ceramic-fiber strength using modified Weibull distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yuntian; Blumenthal, W.R.

    1995-05-01

    The strengths of ceramic fibers have been observed to increase with decreasing fiber diameter and length. The traditional single-modal Weibull distribution function can only take into account one type of flaw, which makes it inappropriate to characterize the strength dependence of both the diameter and the length since ceramic fibers usually have both volume and surface flaws which affect the strength dependence in different ways. Although the bi-modal Weibull distribution can be used to characterize both volume and surface flaws, the mathematical difficulty in its application makes it undesirable. In this paper, the factors affecting fiber strength are analyzed in terms of fracture mechanics and flaw formation. A modified Weibull distribution function is proposed to characterize both the diameter dependence and the length dependence of ceramic fibers.

  6. COLOR DEPENDENCE IN THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    August, Tyler M.; Wiegert, Paul A.

    2013-06-15

    The size distribution of the asteroid belt is examined with 16956 main belt asteroids detected in data taken from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey in two filters (g' and r'). The cumulative H (absolute magnitude) distribution is examined in both filters, and both match well to simple power laws down to H = 17, with slopes in rough agreement with those reported the literature. This implies that disruptive collisions between asteroids are gravitationally dominated down to at least this size, and probably sub-kilometer scales. The slopes of these distributions appear shallower in the outer belt than the inner belt, and the g' distributions appear slightly steeper than the r'. The slope shallowing in the outer belt may reflect a real compositional difference: the inner asteroid belt has been suggested to consist mostly of stony and/or metallic S-type asteroids, whereas carbonaceous C-types are thought to be more prevalent further from the Sun. No waves are seen in the size distribution above H = 15. Since waves are expected to be produced at the transition from gravitationally-dominated to internal strength-dominated collisions, their absence here may imply that the transition occurs at sub-kilometer scales, much smaller than the H = 17 (diameter {approx} 1.6 km) cutoff of this study.

  7. The evolution of biomass-burning aerosol size distributions due to coagulation: dependence on fire and meteorological details and parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kimiko M.; Laing, James R.; Stevens, Robin G.; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-06-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols have a significant effect on global and regional aerosol climate forcings. To model the magnitude of these effects accurately requires knowledge of the size distribution of the emitted and evolving aerosol particles. Current biomass-burning inventories do not include size distributions, and global and regional models generally assume a fixed size distribution from all biomass-burning emissions. However, biomass-burning size distributions evolve in the plume due to coagulation and net organic aerosol (OA) evaporation or formation, and the plume processes occur on spacial scales smaller than global/regional-model grid boxes. The extent of this size-distribution evolution is dependent on a variety of factors relating to the emission source and atmospheric conditions. Therefore, accurately accounting for biomass-burning aerosol size in global models requires an effective aerosol size distribution that accounts for this sub-grid evolution and can be derived from available emission-inventory and meteorological parameters. In this paper, we perform a detailed investigation of the effects of coagulation on the aerosol size distribution in biomass-burning plumes. We compare the effect of coagulation to that of OA evaporation and formation. We develop coagulation-only parameterizations for effective biomass-burning size distributions using the SAM-TOMAS large-eddy simulation plume model. For the most-sophisticated parameterization, we use the Gaussian Emulation Machine for Sensitivity Analysis (GEM-SA) to build a parameterization of the aged size distribution based on the SAM-TOMAS output and seven inputs: emission median dry diameter, emission distribution modal width, mass emissions flux, fire area, mean boundary-layer wind speed, plume mixing depth, and time/distance since emission. This parameterization was tested against an independent set of SAM-TOMAS simulations and yields R2 values of 0.83 and 0.89 for Dpm and modal width, respectively. The

  8. Assessment of size-dependent mercury distribution in King Mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, E.O.; Balthis, W.L. |

    1994-12-31

    The assessment of health risks from fish contamination and the issuance of advisories require accurate characterizations of the actual contaminant concentrations in fish of every relevant size. Such characterizations should not only contain statistical measures of location and variation, but provide a complete parameterization of the contaminant distribution for each given size class. This paper proposes two methods for determining such distributions from scatter diagrams of contaminant concentration versus fish length and illustrates them with an analysis of mercury contaminant in king mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla. The first method consists of fitting contamination data with a family of S-distributions. This family shows trends in its defining parameter values, and these trends provide a comprehensive characterization of the measured contaminant concentrations. Each S-distribution has a rather simple mathematical structure from which one readily obtains secondary characteristics like quantiles, which are necessary for advanced simulation purposes. The second method takes into account that contaminant accumulation is the outcome of a metabolic process. When this process is modeled as a system of differential equations, it can be reformulated in such a way that it describes how the contaminant distribution changes over a given period of time. The resulting distributions have a more complicated structure than those obtained with the first method, but they allow them to bridge the gap between individual metabolic accumulation processes and trends in populations.

  9. Business size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hulst, R.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2001-10-01

    In a recent work, we introduced two models for the dynamics of customers trying to find the business that best corresponds to their expectation for the price of a commodity. In agreement with the empirical data, a power-law distribution for the business sizes was obtained, taking the number of customers of a business as a proxy for its size. Here, we extend one of our previous models in two different ways. First, we introduce a business aggregation rate that is fitness dependent, which allows us to reproduce a spread in empirical data from one country to another. Second, we allow the bankruptcy rate to take a different functional form, to be able to obtain a log-normal distribution with power-law tails for the size of the businesses.

  10. Study of vesicle size distribution dependence on pH value based on nanopore resistive pulse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuqing; Rudzevich, Yauheni; Wearne, Adam; Lumpkin, Daniel; Morales, Joselyn; Nemec, Kathleen; Tatulian, Suren; Lupan, Oleg; Chow, Lee

    2013-03-01

    Vesicles are low-micron to sub-micron spheres formed by a lipid bilayer shell and serve as potential vehicles for drug delivery. The size of vesicle is proposed to be one of the instrumental variables affecting delivery efficiency since the size is correlated to factors like circulation and residence time in blood, the rate for cell endocytosis, and efficiency in cell targeting. In this work, we demonstrate accessible and reliable detection and size distribution measurement employing a glass nanopore device based on the resistive pulse method. This novel method enables us to investigate the size distribution dependence of pH difference across the membrane of vesicles with very small sample volume and rapid speed. This provides useful information for optimizing the efficiency of drug delivery in a pH sensitive environment.

  11. The Dependence of Properties of Alumina Zirconia Graphite Refractories on Particle Size Distribution by Furnas Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shan-Pu; Wang, Moo-Chin; Hon, Min-Hsiung

    1999-11-01

    The alumina zirconia graphite (AZG) refractories were obtained through baking techniques using fused Al2O3, partially stabilized ZrO2 and flake graphite as the starting materials with Al, Si, and SiC powders as additives. Furnas model are used to describe the particle size distribution for coarse Al2O3 (500 1000 µm)/medium Al2O3 (61 125 µm)/fine Al2O3 (<44 µm) in which the contents of coarse, medium and fine Al2O3 powders are variable on the basis of constancy of other fine particles in the matrix. Bulk density of AZG refractories determined by Furnas model is about 3.0 g/cm3. The lowest apparent porosity (5.1%) was obtained at a weight ratio for coarse Al2O3/medium Al2O3 of 2.14. The reheat linear change fraction is 0.1 0.2% for all samples, indicating that this material has acceptable volume stability. The number of air exposure cycles for the thermal shock resistance (Rst) were 11 16, and the relation of Rst with apparent porosity (Po) is correlated by Rst = 1.12 Po + 5.91. The relation of erosion fraction (Er) with Po is expressed as Er = 0.30 Po - 0.27. Therefore, the Rst increased and the Er decreased while the Po increased in this AZG system.

  12. Effect of magnetic anisotropy and particle size distribution on temperature dependent magnetic hyperthermia in Fe3O4 ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palihawadana Arachchige, Maheshika; Nemala, Humeshkar; Naik, Vaman; Naik, Ratna

    Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) has a great potential as a non-invasive cancer therapy technique. Specific absorption rate (SAR) which measures the efficiency of heat generation, mainly depends on magnetic properties of nanoparticles such as saturation magnetization (Ms) and magnetic anisotropy (K) which depend on the size and shape. Therefore, MHT applications of magnetic nanoparticles often require a controllable synthesis to achieve desirable magnetic properties. We have synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles using two different methods, co-precipitation (CP) and hydrothermal (HT) techniques to produce similar XRD crystallite size of 12 nm, and subsequently coated with dextran to prepare ferrofluids for MHT. However, TEM measurements show average particle sizes of 13.8 +/-3.6 nm and 14.6 +/-3.6 nm for HT and CP samples, implying the existence of an amorphous surface layer for both. The MHT data show the two samples have very different SAR values of 110 W/g (CP) and 40W/g (HT) at room temperature, although they have similar Ms of 70 +/-4 emu/g regardless of their different TEM sizes. We fitted the temperature dependent SAR using linear response theory to explain the observed results. CP sample shows a larger magnetic core with a narrow size distribution and a higher K value compared to that of HT sample.

  13. Determining the magnetic attempt time τ0, its temperature dependence, and the grain size distribution from magnetic viscosity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, Thomas; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Paterson, Greig A.

    2015-11-01

    A new method to determine the atomic attempt time τ0 of magnetic relaxation of fine particles, which is central to rock and soil magnetism and paleomagnetic recording theory, is presented, including the determination of its temperature dependence, and simultaneously the grain size distribution of a sample. It is based on measuring a series of zero-field magnetic viscous decay curves for saturation isothermal remanent magnetization at various different temperatures that are later joined together on a single grain size scale from which the grain size distribution and attempt time are determined. The attempt time was determined for three samples containing noninteracting, single-domain titanomagnetites of different grain sizes for temperatures between 27 K and 374 K. No clear temperature-dependent trend was found; however, values varied significantly from one sample to the other: from 10-11 to 10-8s; in particular, the sample containing multiple magnetic phases had an effective attempt time significantly lower than the more homogeneous samples, thereby questioning the applicability of the simple Néel-Arhennius equation for magnetic relaxation for composite materials.

  14. Distribution of Systemically Administered Nanoparticles Reveals a Size-Dependent Effect Immediately following Cardiac Ischaemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lundy, David J.; Chen, Kun-Hung; Toh, Elsie K.-W.; Hsieh, Patrick C.-H.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles represent an attractive option for systemic delivery of therapeutic compounds to the heart following myocardial infarction. However, it is well known that physicochemical properties of nanoparticles such as size, shape and surface modifications can vastly alter the distribution and uptake of injected nanoparticles. Therefore, we aimed to provide an examination of the rapid size-dependent uptake of fluorescent PEG-modified polystyrene nanoparticles administered immediately following cardiac ischaemia-reperfusion injury in mice. By assessing the biodistribution of nanoparticles with core diameters between 20 nm and 2 μm 30 minutes after their administration, we conclude that 20–200 nm diameter nanoparticles are optimal for passive targeting of the injured left ventricle. PMID:27161857

  15. Island-size distribution and capture numbers in three-dimensional [corrected] nucleation: dependence on island morphology.

    PubMed

    Royston, John; Amar, Jacques G

    2009-10-01

    The scaling of the monomer and island densities, island-size distribution (ISD), and capture-number distribution (CND) as a function of the fraction of occupied sites (coverage) and ratio D(h)/F of the monomer hopping rate D(h) to the (per site) monomer creation rate F are studied for the case of irreversible nucleation and growth of fractal islands in three dimensions (d=3) . We note that our model is a three-dimensional analog of submonolayer growth in the absence of island relaxation and may also be viewed as a simplified model of the early stages of vacancy cluster nucleation and growth under irradiation. In contrast to results previously obtained for point-islands in d=3 , for which mean-field behavior corresponding to a CND which is independent of island size was observed, our results indicate that for fractal islands the scaled CND increases approximately linearly with island size in the asymptotic limit of large D(h)/F . In addition, while the peak height of the scaled ISD for fractal islands appears to diverge with increasing D(h)/F , the dependence on D(h)/F is much weaker than for point-islands in d=3 . The results of a self-consistent rate-equation calculation for the coverage and D(h)/F dependence of the average island and monomer densities are also presented and good agreement with simulation results is obtained. For the case of point-islands, the value of the exponent chi describing the D(h)/F dependence of the island density at fixed coverage, e.g., N(sat) approximately (D(h)/F)-chi , is in good agreement with the value (chi=1/3) expected for irreversible growth. However, for both compact and fractal islands in d=3 , our results indicate that the value of chi (chi approximately 0.42) is significantly larger. In order to explain this behavior, an analytical expression [e.g., chi=d(f)/(3d(f)-2) ] for the dependence of chi on island fractal dimension d(f) in d=3 is derived and found to give reasonable agreement with our simulation and rate

  16. Particle-size dependence on metal(loid) distributions in mine wastes: Implications for water contamination and human exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, C.S.; Wilson, K.M.; Rytuba, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    The mining and processing of metal-bearing ores has resulted in contamination issues where waste materials from abandoned mines remain in piles of untreated and unconsolidated material, posing the potential for waterborne and airborne transport of toxic elements. This study presents a systematic method of particle size separation, mass distribution, and bulk chemical analysis for mine tailings and adjacent background soil samples from the Rand historic mining district, California, in order to assess particle size distribution and related trends in metal(loid) concentration as a function of particle size. Mine tailings produced through stamp milling and leaching processes were found to have both a narrower and finer particle size distribution than background samples, with significant fractions of particles available in a size range (???250 ??m) that could be incidentally ingested. In both tailings and background samples, the majority of trace metal(loid)s display an inverse relationship between concentration and particle size, resulting in higher proportions of As, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn in finer-sized fractions which are more susceptible to both water- and wind-borne transport as well as ingestion and/or inhalation. Established regulatory screening levels for such elements may, therefore, significantly underestimate potential exposure risk if relying solely on bulk sample concentrations to guide remediation decisions. Correlations in elemental concentration trends (such as between As and Fe) indicate relationships between elements that may be relevant to their chemical speciation. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Size-dependent distribution and feeding habits of Terebralia palustris in mangrove habitats of Gazi Bay, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, Ellen; Muthumbi, Agnes; Kamanu, Chomba Peter; Vanreusel, Ann

    2008-03-01

    The gastropod Terebralia palustris often dominates the surface of muddy to sandy substrates of intertidal mudflats and mangrove forests, where they clearly destabilize the sediment. In the present study, it was investigated whether and to what extent the behaviour of juvenile and adult snails differs among habitats (mudflat vs. mangrove stand) in a Sonneratia alba mangal at Gazi Bay, Kenya. For this purpose we: (1) examined their distribution along three land-sea transects; and (2) applied stable isotope analysis to determine the feeding patterns of different-sized snails from the mangrove and mudflat habitats. Additionally, we investigated if these gastropods exert an impact on microphytobenthic (diatom) biomass, and whether this is size-dependent. The latter objective was met by either enclosing or excluding different-sized snails from experimental cages on the intertidal mudflat and the subsequent assessment of a change in pigment concentration of the sediment surface. In agreement with several previous studies conducted in other mangroves and geographical locations, a spatial segregation was demonstrated between juveniles (more common on the mudflat) and adults (more common in the mangrove forest). On the intertidal mudflat juveniles avoided sediment patches characterized by highly saline water in intertidal pools and a high mud content, while adults tended to dwell on substrates covered by a high amount of leaf litter. Stable carbon isotope analysis of the foot tissue of snails sampled from the S. alba stand and the mudflat indicated a transition in food source when a shell length of 51 mm is reached. Considering the δ13C value of juveniles, it seems they might be selecting for microphytobenthos, which might explain their preference for the mudflat. The diet of size classes found in both habitats did not differ significantly, although juveniles inhabiting the mangrove forest were slightly more depleted in 13C compared to those residing on the mudflat

  18. Coupling scale-dependent slope stability and fractal analysis of topography for the investigation of landslide size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frattini, P.; Crosta, G. B.

    2009-04-01

    We investigate the physics laying behind landslide size distributions, by coupling slope stability analysis and scale-sensitive fractal analysis of topography within a probabilistic approach. Slope stability analyses have been performed under ideal conditions, in order to highlight the control of slope angle, friction angle, and cohesion on the size distribution of landslides. We demonstrate that, for a given slope angle, cohesion exerts a primary control on both the depth and the length of landslides: the larger the cohesion, the deeper and longer the landslide. As a consequence, the landslide size distribution in cohesive materials is limited toward the smaller size. Scale-sensitive fractal analysis of topography have been performed by using the patchwork method, by applying triangular patches to virtually tile the topographic surface. The fractal behaviour of the topography is modelled by decreasing triangle sizes (i.e., scale of measurement), thus replicating the surface more and more precisely. We apply the patchwork method to study the fractal behaviour of two topographic datasets from Avisio river Catchment, Trento Province (Italy): an interpolated 10x10 m DTM and a Lidar 2x2 m DTM. The interpolated DTM shows a fractal behaviour in a range of area scale between 10-4 and 10-6 sqm. For smaller scale, we observe a rollover that is caused by artificial smoothing of topographic data due to interpolation algorithms. The Lidar DTM shows a fractal behaviour between 10-2 and 10-6. For smaller scales, the rollover seems to be related to a transition from a landscape composed of ridges and valleys to one composed of relatively smooth hillslopes. Results of slope stability analyses over idealized cases and topographic analysis have been used to derive a synthetic landslide size distributions, by applying few simplifying assumptions and a probabilistic approach. As a result, we show that: (1) the landslide size distribution of non cohesive materials does not show a

  19. Multi-Scale Particle Size Distributions of Mars, Moon and Itokawa based on a time-maturation dependent fragmentation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambous, C. A.; Pike, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    We present the development of a soil evolution framework and multiscale modelling of the surface of Mars, Moon and Itokawa thus providing an atlas of extra-terrestrial Particle Size Distributions (PSD). These PSDs are profoundly based on a tailoring method which interconnects several datasets from different sites captured by the various missions. The final integrated product is then fully justified through a soil evolution analysis model mathematically constructed via fundamental physical principles (Charalambous, 2013). The construction of the PSD takes into account the macroscale fresh primary impacts and their products, the mesoscale distributions obtained by the in-situ data of surface missions (Golombek et al., 1997, 2012) and finally the microscopic scale distributions provided by Curiosity and Phoenix Lander (Pike, 2011). The distribution naturally extends at the magnitudinal scales at which current data does not exist due to the lack of scientific instruments capturing the populations at these data absent scales. The extension is based on the model distribution (Charalambous, 2013) which takes as parameters known values of material specific probabilities of fragmentation and grinding limits. Additionally, the establishment of a closed-form statistical distribution provides a quantitative description of the soil's structure. Consequently, reverse engineering of the model distribution allows the synthesis of soil that faithfully represents the particle population at the studied sites (Charalambous, 2011). Such representation essentially delivers a virtual soil environment to work with for numerous applications. A specific application demonstrated here will be the information that can directly be extracted for the successful drilling probability as a function of distance in an effort to aid the HP3 instrument of the 2016 Insight Mission to Mars. Pike, W. T., et al. "Quantification of the dry history of the Martian soil inferred from in situ microscopy

  20. Hail Size Distribution Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A 3-D weather radar visualization software program was developed and implemented as part of an experimental Launch Pad 39 Hail Monitor System. 3DRadPlot, a radar plotting program, is one of several software modules that form building blocks of the hail data processing and analysis system (the complete software processing system under development). The spatial and temporal mapping algorithms were originally developed through research at the University of Central Florida, funded by NASA s Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM), where the goal was to merge National Weather Service (NWS) Next-Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) volume reflectivity data with drop size distribution data acquired from a cluster of raindrop disdrometers. In this current work, we adapted these algorithms to process data from a cluster of hail disdrometers positioned around Launch Pads 39A or 39B, along with the corresponding NWS radar data. Radar data from all NWS NEXRAD sites is archived at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). That data can be readily accessed at . 3DRadPlot plots Level III reflectivity data at four scan elevations (this software is available at Open Channel Software, ). By using spatial and temporal interpolation/extrapolation based on hydrometeor fall dynamics, we can merge the hail disdrometer array data coupled with local Weather Surveillance Radar-1988, Doppler (WSR-88D) radial velocity and reflectivity data into a 4-D (3-D space and time) picture of hail size distributions. Hail flux maps can then be generated and used for damage prediction and assessment over specific surfaces corresponding to structures within the disdrometer array volume. Immediately following a hail storm, specific damage areas and degree of damage can be identified for inspection crews.

  1. Nanophase cobalt, nickel and zinc ferrites: synchrotron XAS study on the crystallite size dependence of metal distribution.

    PubMed

    Nordhei, Camilla; Ramstad, Astrid Lund; Nicholson, David G

    2008-02-21

    Nanophase cobalt, nickel and zinc ferrites, in which the crystallites are in the size range 4-25 nm, were synthesised by coprecipitation and subsequent annealing. X-Ray absorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation (supported by X-ray powder diffraction) was used to study the effects of particle size on the distributions of the metal atoms over the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the spinel structure. Deviations from the bulk structure were found which are attributed to the significant influence of the surface on very small particles. Like the bulk material, nickel ferrite is an inverse spinel in the nanoregime, although the population of metals on the octahedral sites increases with decreasing particle size. Cobalt ferrite and zinc ferrite take the inverse and normal forms of the spinel structure respectively, but within the nanoregime both systems show similar trends in being partially inverted. Further, in zinc ferrite, unlike the normal bulk structure, the nanophase system involves mixed coordinations of zinc(ii) and iron(iii) consistent with increasing partial inversion with size. PMID:18259645

  2. Dependence on Crystal Size of the Nanoscale Chemical Phase Distribution and Fracture in LixFePO₄.

    PubMed

    Yu, Young-Sang; Kim, Chunjoong; Shapiro, David A; Farmand, Maryam; Qian, Danna; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Kilcoyne, A L David; Celestre, Rich; Marchesini, Stefano; Joseph, John; Denes, Peter; Warwick, Tony; Strobridge, Fiona C; Grey, Clare P; Padmore, Howard; Meng, Ying Shirley; Kostecki, Robert; Cabana, Jordi

    2015-07-01

    The performance of battery electrode materials is strongly affected by inefficiencies in utilization kinetics and cycle life as well as size effects. Observations of phase transformations in these materials with high chemical and spatial resolution can elucidate the relationship between chemical processes and mechanical degradation. Soft X-ray ptychographic microscopy combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron microscopy creates a powerful suite of tools that we use to assess the chemical and morphological changes in lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) micro- and nanocrystals that occur upon delithiation. All sizes of partly delithiated crystals were found to contain two phases with a complex correlation between crystallographic orientation and phase distribution. However, the lattice mismatch between LiFePO4 and FePO4 led to severe fracturing on microcrystals, whereas no mechanical damage was observed in nanoplates, indicating that mechanics are a principal driver in the outstanding electrode performance of LiFePO4 nanoparticles. These results demonstrate the importance of engineering the active electrode material in next generation electrical energy storage systems, which will achieve theoretical limits of energy density and extended stability. This work establishes soft X-ray ptychographic chemical imaging as an essential tool to build comprehensive relationships between mechanics and chemistry that guide this engineering design. PMID:26061698

  3. Lunar soil grain size distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrier, W. D., III

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive review has been made of the currently available data for lunar grain size distributions. It has been concluded that there is little or no statistical difference among the large majority of the soil samples from the Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 missions. The grain size distribution for these soils has reached a steady state in which the comminution processes are balanced by the aggregation processes. The median particle size for the steady-state soil is 40 to 130 microns. The predictions of lunar grain size distributions based on the Surveyor television photographs have been found to be quantitatively in error and qualitatively misleading.

  4. Determination of size-dependent metal distribution in dissolved organic matter by SEC-UV/VIS-ICP-MS with special focus on changes in seawater.

    PubMed

    Rathgeb, Anna; Causon, Tim; Krachler, Regina; Hann, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for all marine organisms, but it is also a growth limiting factor as the iron concentrations in the open ocean are below 1 nmol/L in sea water iron is almost entirely bound to organic ligands of the dissolved organic matter fraction, which are mostly of unknown structure. The input from rivers was traditionally considered as less important due to estuarine sedimentation processes of the mainly colloidal iron particles. However, recent studies have shown that this removal is not complete and riverine input may represent an important iron source in the open ocean. In this context, iron transport by land-derived natural organic matter (NOM), and dissolved organic matter (DOM) have been identified as carrier mechanisms for riverine iron. The aim of this work is to characterize complexes containing iron and other metals in waters simulating estuarine conditions in order to help understand which role iron-DOM compounds play in the open ocean. A method based on size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) with sequential UV/VIS and ICP-MS detection was developed for investigation of DOM size distribution and for assessment of the size-dependent metal distribution in NOM-rich surface water. Furthermore, sample matrix experiments were also performed revealing a dependence of DOM size distribution upon seawater concentration and different compounds present in seawater. Finally, efforts toward determination of DOM size with standardization with typical SEC standards indicate that only relative comparisons are possible with this approach, and that the sample matrix composition strongly influences obtained results. PMID:26814136

  5. Temperature induced changes in size dependent distributions of two boreal and three Lusitanian flatfish species: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hal, Ralf; van Kooten, Tobias; Rijnsdorp, Adriaan D.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in spatial distribution in several fish species have been related to recent increase in global temperature. In the North Sea, both a poleward shift and a shift to deeper water have been observed. Here, we study the underlying mechanism of these shifts in a comparative study of the changes in distribution of two boreal flatfish species (plaice Pleuronectes platessa and dab Limanda limanda) and three Lusitanian flatfish species (sole Solea solea, solenette Buglossidium luteum, and scaldfish Arnoglossus laterna) as recorded in annual bottom trawl surveys carried out in the North Sea in late summer since 1985. The distribution is analysed in relation to the bottom temperature at the time of the survey as well as to the seasonal maximum bottom temperature earlier in the year. It is shown that the boreal species plaice and dab moved to deeper water and maintained the seasonal maximum temperature that they experienced in earlier periods, while the Lusitanian species sole, solenette, and scaldfish experienced an increase in the seasonal maximum temperature that they experienced while maintaining their depth distribution. This overall response varied between length classes, reflecting a preference for higher temperature of the smaller length classes. The results lend support to the hypothesis that the fish displayed a direct response to the maximum temperature that occurred during the growth season before the time of sampling.

  6. Experimental determination of size distributions: analyzing proper sample sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffo, A.; Alopaeus, V.

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of various particle size distributions is a crucial aspect for many applications in the process industry. Size distribution is often related to the final product quality, as in crystallization or polymerization. In other cases it is related to the correct evaluation of heat and mass transfer, as well as reaction rates, depending on the interfacial area between the different phases or to the assessment of yield stresses of polycrystalline metals/alloys samples. The experimental determination of such distributions often involves laborious sampling procedures and the statistical significance of the outcome is rarely investigated. In this work, we propose a novel rigorous tool, based on inferential statistics, to determine the number of samples needed to obtain reliable measurements of size distribution, according to specific requirements defined a priori. Such methodology can be adopted regardless of the measurement technique used.

  7. Centaur size distribution with DECam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, Cesar; Trilling, David E.; Schlichting, Hilke

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of the 2014 centaur search campaign on the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) in Tololo, Chile. This is the largest debiased Centaur survey to date, measuring for the first time the size distribution of small Centaurs (1-10km) and the first time the sizes of planetesimals from which the entire Solar System formed are directly detected.The theoretical model for the coagulation and collisional evolution of the outer solar system proposed in Schlichting et al. 2013 predicts a steep rise in the size distribution of TNOs smaller than 10km. These objects are below the detection limit of current TNO surveys but feasible for the Centaur population. By constraining the number of Centaurs and this feature in their size distribution we can confirm the collisional evolution of the Solar System and estimate the rate at which material is being transferred from the outer to the inner Solar System. If the shallow power law behavior from the TNO size distribution at ~40km can be extrapolated to 1km, the size of the Jupiter Family of Comets (JFC), there would not be enough small TNOs to supply the JFC population (Volk & Malhotra, 2008), debunking the link between TNOs and JFCs.We also obtain the colors of small Centaurs and TNOs, providing a signature of collisional evolution by measuring if there is in fact a relationship between color and size. If objects smaller than the break in the TNO size distribution are being ground down by collisions then their surfaces should be fresh, and then appear bluer in the optical than larger TNOs that are not experiencing collisions.

  8. Size-Dependent Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjesfandiari, Ali; Hajesfandiari, Arezoo; Dargush, Gary

    2013-11-01

    Classical fluid mechanics provides a reasonable basis for analyzing the behavior of fluid flow at the macro scale. However, experiments show that the behavior of fluid in small scales is different from their behavior at macro scales. An additional concern relates to the absence of a length scale in the governing Navier-Stokes equations, when the present description of turbulence seems to need the clear definition of a characteristic size. Consequently, there is need for a more complete fluid dynamics, which spans many scales and, of course, must reduce to classical fluid mechanics for flows with macro-scale size. Here we develop the consistent size-dependent fluid mechanics by discovering the skew-symmetric character of couple stress tensor. As a result, the skew-symmetric mean curvature rate vector as the consistent measure of deformation is introduced. It is demonstrated that this theory may provide a basis for fundamental studies of flows at the finest scales for which a continuum representation is valid and, perhaps, for gaining additional insight into the problem of turbulence.

  9. Size distribution of detached drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, V. V.; Stepanov, V. M.

    1989-10-01

    The law governing the size distribution of detached gas-liquid streams of drops has been determined analytically, and a comparison is carried out against experimental data existing in the literature. The derived theoretical relationships offer an excellent description of existing experimental results.

  10. Size distribution of ring polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medalion, Shlomi; Aghion, Erez; Meirovitch, Hagai; Barkai, Eli; Kessler, David A.

    2016-06-01

    We present an exact solution for the distribution of sample averaged monomer to monomer distance of ring polymers. For non-interacting and local-interaction models these distributions correspond to the distribution of the area under the reflected Bessel bridge and the Bessel excursion respectively, and are shown to be identical in dimension d ≥ 2, albeit with pronounced finite size effects at the critical dimension, d = 2. A symmetry of the problem reveals that dimension d and 4 ‑ d are equivalent, thus the celebrated Airy distribution describing the areal distribution of the d = 1 Brownian excursion describes also a polymer in three dimensions. For a self-avoiding polymer in dimension d we find numerically that the fluctuations of the scaled averaged distance are nearly identical in dimension d = 2, 3 and are well described to a first approximation by the non-interacting excursion model in dimension 5.

  11. Exponential Size Distribution of von Willebrand Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lippok, Svenja; Obser, Tobias; Müller, Jochen P.; Stierle, Valentin K.; Benoit, Martin; Budde, Ulrich; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2013-01-01

    Von Willebrand Factor (VWF) is a multimeric protein crucial for hemostasis. Under shear flow, it acts as a mechanosensor responding with a size-dependent globule-stretch transition to increasing shear rates. Here, we quantify for the first time, to our knowledge, the size distribution of recombinant VWF and VWF-eGFP using a multilateral approach that involves quantitative gel analysis, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We find an exponentially decaying size distribution of multimers for recombinant VWF as well as for VWF derived from blood samples in accordance with the notion of a step-growth polymerization process during VWF biosynthesis. The distribution is solely described by the extent of polymerization, which was found to be reduced in the case of the pathologically relevant mutant VWF-IIC. The VWF-specific protease ADAMTS13 systematically shifts the VWF size distribution toward smaller sizes. This dynamic evolution is monitored using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and compared to a computer simulation of a random cleavage process relating ADAMTS13 concentration to the degree of VWF breakdown. Quantitative assessment of VWF size distribution in terms of an exponential might prove to be useful both as a valuable biophysical characterization and as a possible disease indicator for clinical applications. PMID:24010664

  12. Size distribution of ring polymers

    PubMed Central

    Medalion, Shlomi; Aghion, Erez; Meirovitch, Hagai; Barkai, Eli; Kessler, David A.

    2016-01-01

    We present an exact solution for the distribution of sample averaged monomer to monomer distance of ring polymers. For non-interacting and local-interaction models these distributions correspond to the distribution of the area under the reflected Bessel bridge and the Bessel excursion respectively, and are shown to be identical in dimension d ≥ 2, albeit with pronounced finite size effects at the critical dimension, d = 2. A symmetry of the problem reveals that dimension d and 4 − d are equivalent, thus the celebrated Airy distribution describing the areal distribution of the d = 1 Brownian excursion describes also a polymer in three dimensions. For a self-avoiding polymer in dimension d we find numerically that the fluctuations of the scaled averaged distance are nearly identical in dimension d = 2, 3 and are well described to a first approximation by the non-interacting excursion model in dimension 5. PMID:27302596

  13. Size distribution of ring polymers.

    PubMed

    Medalion, Shlomi; Aghion, Erez; Meirovitch, Hagai; Barkai, Eli; Kessler, David A

    2016-01-01

    We present an exact solution for the distribution of sample averaged monomer to monomer distance of ring polymers. For non-interacting and local-interaction models these distributions correspond to the distribution of the area under the reflected Bessel bridge and the Bessel excursion respectively, and are shown to be identical in dimension d ≥ 2, albeit with pronounced finite size effects at the critical dimension, d = 2. A symmetry of the problem reveals that dimension d and 4 - d are equivalent, thus the celebrated Airy distribution describing the areal distribution of the d = 1 Brownian excursion describes also a polymer in three dimensions. For a self-avoiding polymer in dimension d we find numerically that the fluctuations of the scaled averaged distance are nearly identical in dimension d = 2, 3 and are well described to a first approximation by the non-interacting excursion model in dimension 5. PMID:27302596

  14. Power laws, discontinuities and regional city size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garmestani, A.S.; Allen, C.R.; Gallagher, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Urban systems are manifestations of human adaptation to the natural environment. City size distributions are the expression of hierarchical processes acting upon urban systems. In this paper, we test the entire city size distributions for the southeastern and southwestern United States (1990), as well as the size classes in these regions for power law behavior. We interpret the differences in the size of the regional city size distributions as the manifestation of variable growth dynamics dependent upon city size. Size classes in the city size distributions are snapshots of stable states within urban systems in flux. ?? 2008.

  15. Size-dependent distribution of radiocesium in riverbed sediments and its relevance to the migration of radiocesium in river systems after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuya; Iwatani, Hokuto; Sakaguchi, Aya; Fan, Qiaohui; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the particle size distribution of radiocesium in riverbed sediments after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Riverbed sediments were collected in the Abukuma River system in Fukushima and Miyagi Prefectures. The collected sediments were separated into 11 fractions, ranging from granular size (>2000 μm) to clay size (<2 μm) fractions. Cesium-137 concentrations were higher in the smaller particle size fractions, possibly reflecting specific surface areas and the mineralogy, in particular the clay mineral content. A gap in (137)Cs concentration was observed between the silt size and sand size fractions of riverbed sediments at downstream sites, whereas riverbed sediments at an upstream site did not show such a concentration gap. It is likely that selective transport of small particles in suspended state from upstream areas resulted in an accumulation of radiocesium in downstream areas. PMID:24874435

  16. Is the Morin Transition Size Dependent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, O.

    2007-12-01

    Morin transition temperatures Tm were measured for submicron (SD) synthetic hematites with grain sizes between 120 and 520 nm and on 0.5 and 6 mm (MD) natural single crystals. The Morin transition temperature is quite variable in both SD and MD hematites. Tm ranged from 250 to 260 K for natural crystals and even more widely, from 241 to 254 K, for the more heterogeneous synthetic hematites. The scatter must be due to different methods of preparation, crystal morphology, strain and crystal imperfections that are common for both synthetic and natural crystals. The present Tm data for SD and MD hematites are compatible with published data by other workers in the 100 nm - 10 mm range. In this interval, Tm decreases slightly with decreasing particle size but is almost size independent. However, in nanoparticles with grain sizes between 30 and 90 nm, the spin-flop transition is strongly dependent on particle size: Tm decreases sharply with decreasing size and the transition disappears below 20 nm. This phenomenon is due to surface effects that lead to spin directions deviating from the easy axis. The present SD and MD hematites exhibit a thermal hysteresis in the Morin transition: the values of Tm in cooling and in heating are different. For the same cooling/warming rate, the width of the Morin transition in the submicron crystals is broader than for the natural single crystals. This broadening in SD hematites is directly attributable to the wide distribution of particle sizes. In natural single crystals the entire width of the transition could be due to crystal imperfections and the internal stresses that result from these defects.

  17. Spatial Structure of Seagrass Suggests That Size-Dependent Plant Traits Have a Strong Influence on the Distribution and Maintenance of Tropical Multispecies Meadows

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Jillian L. S.; Van Niel, Kimberly P.; Kendrick, Gary A.; Holmes, Karen W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Seagrass species in the tropics occur in multispecies meadows. How these meadows are maintained through species co-existence and what their ecological drivers may be has been an overarching question in seagrass biogeography. In this study, we quantify the spatial structure of four co-existing species and infer potential ecological processes from these structures. Methods and Results Species presence/absence data were collected using underwater towed and dropped video cameras in Pulau Tinggi, Malaysia. The geostatistical method, utilizing semivariograms, was used to describe the spatial structure of Halophila spp, Halodule uninervis, Syringodium isoetifolium and Cymodocea serrulata. Species had spatial patterns that were oriented in the along-shore and across-shore directions, nested with larger species in meadow interiors, and consisted of multiple structures that indicate the influence of 2–3 underlying processes. The Linear Model of Coregionalization (LMC) was used to estimate the amount of variance contributing to the presence of a species at specific spatial scales. These distances were <2.5 m (micro-scale), 2.5–50 m (fine-scale) and >50 m (broad-scale) in the along-shore; and <2.5 m (micro-scale), 2.5–140 m (fine-scale) and >140 m (broad-scale) in the across-shore. The LMC suggests that smaller species (Halophila spp and H. uninervis) were most influenced by broad-scale processes such as hydrodynamics and water depth whereas large, localised species (S. isoetifolium and C. serrulata) were more influenced by finer-scale processes such as sediment burial, seagrass colonization and growth, and physical disturbance. Conclusion In this study, we provide evidence that spatial structure is distinct even when species occur in well-mixed multispecies meadows, and we suggest that size-dependent plant traits have a strong influence on the distribution and maintenance of tropical marine plant communities. This study offers a contrast from previous spatial

  18. The size distribution of interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, Adolf N.

    1987-01-01

    Three major areas involving interstellar grains were investigated. First, studies were performed of scattering in reflection nebulae with the goal of deriving scattering characteristics of dust grains such as the albedo and the phase function asymmetry throughout the visible and the ultraviolet. Secondly, studies were performed of the wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction designed to demonstrate the wide range of grain size distributions naturally occurring in individual clouds in different parts of the galaxy. And thirdly, studies were also performed of the ultraviolet powered emission of dust grains in the 0.5 to 1.0 micron wavelength range in reflection nebulae. Findings considered of major importance are highlighted.

  19. Determination of the cumulus size distribution from LANDSAT pictures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karg, E.; Mueller, H.; Quenzel, H.

    1983-01-01

    Varying insolation causes undesirable thermic stress to the receiver of a solar power plant. The rapid change of insolation depends on the size distribution of the clouds; in order to measure these changes, it is suitable to determine typical cumulus size distributions. For this purpose, LANDSAT-images are adequate. Several examples of cumulus size distributions will be presented and their effects on the operation of a solar power plant are discussed.

  20. Imaging widespread seismicity at midlower crustal depths beneath Long Beach, CA, with a dense seismic array: Evidence for a depth-dependent earthquake size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inbal, Asaf; Clayton, Robert W.; Ampuero, Jean-Paul

    2015-08-01

    We use a dense seismic array composed of 5200 vertical geophones to monitor microseismicity in Long Beach, California. Poor signal-to-noise ratio due to anthropogenic activity is mitigated via downward-continuation of the recorded wavefield. The downward-continued data are continuously back projected to search for coherent arrivals from sources beneath the array, which reveals numerous, previously undetected events. The spatial distribution of seismicity is uncorrelated with the mapped fault traces, or with activity in the nearby oil-fields. Many events are located at depths larger than 20 km, well below the commonly accepted seismogenic depth for that area. The seismicity exhibits temporal clustering consistent with Omori's law, and its size distribution obeys the Gutenberg-Richter relation above 20 km but falls off exponentially at larger depths. The dense array allows detection of earthquakes two magnitude units smaller than the permanent seismic network in the area. Because the event size distribution above 20 km depth obeys a power law whose exponent is near one, this improvement yields a hundred-fold decrease in the time needed for effective characterization of seismicity in Long Beach.

  1. Size dependent adsorption on nanocrystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. M.; Wen, Z.; Jiang, Q.

    2005-03-01

    A quantitative thermodynamic correlation method to describe the size dependent Langmuir adsorption isotherm is developed. According to the model, the equilibrium adsorption constant increases as material size decreases, which is in agreement with the literature data of acetic acid, valeric acid, oxalic acid, and adipic acid on anatase nanoparticles.

  2. Grain size dependence of wear in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.CM.; Rice, R.W.; Johnson, D.; Platt, B.A.

    1985-08-01

    Pin-on-disk (POD) microwear tests of Al2O3, MgO, MgAl2O4, and ZrO2 crystalline structures were conducted as a function of grain size and the results compared with data from single crystals of the same materials. Extrapolation to infinite grain size in the Hall-Petch type relationship for the structures resulted in lower intercepts than the single-crystal values. In addition, the macrowear grain-size dependence appears to decrease with increased wear. It is suggested that thermal expansion anisotropy (of Al2O3) significantly affects the grain size dependence of POD wear, giving a negative intercept, while elastic anisotropy is a factor in the grain-size dependence of the cubic (MgO, MgAl2O4, and ZrO2 materials. The reduced grain-size dependence is attributed to overlapping wear tracks, reducing the effects of enhanced wear damage. 9 references.

  3. Scaling in animal group-size distributions

    PubMed Central

    Bonabeau, Eric; Dagorn, Laurent; Fréon, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    An elementary model of animal aggregation is presented. The group-size distributions resulting from this model are truncated power laws. The predictions of the model are found to be consistent with data that describe the group-size distributions of tuna fish, sardinellas, and African buffaloes. PMID:10200286

  4. Body Size Distribution of the Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    O’Gorman, Eoin J.; Hone, David W. E.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of species body size is critically important for determining resource use within a group or clade. It is widely known that non-avian dinosaurs were the largest creatures to roam the Earth. There is, however, little understanding of how maximum species body size was distributed among the dinosaurs. Do they share a similar distribution to modern day vertebrate groups in spite of their large size, or did they exhibit fundamentally different distributions due to unique evolutionary pressures and adaptations? Here, we address this question by comparing the distribution of maximum species body size for dinosaurs to an extensive set of extant and extinct vertebrate groups. We also examine the body size distribution of dinosaurs by various sub-groups, time periods and formations. We find that dinosaurs exhibit a strong skew towards larger species, in direct contrast to modern day vertebrates. This pattern is not solely an artefact of bias in the fossil record, as demonstrated by contrasting distributions in two major extinct groups and supports the hypothesis that dinosaurs exhibited a fundamentally different life history strategy to other terrestrial vertebrates. A disparity in the size distribution of the herbivorous Ornithischia and Sauropodomorpha and the largely carnivorous Theropoda suggests that this pattern may have been a product of a divergence in evolutionary strategies: herbivorous dinosaurs rapidly evolved large size to escape predation by carnivores and maximise digestive efficiency; carnivores had sufficient resources among juvenile dinosaurs and non-dinosaurian prey to achieve optimal success at smaller body size. PMID:23284818

  5. Size-dependent mortality rate profiles.

    PubMed

    Roa-Ureta, Ruben H

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge of mortality rates is crucial to the understanding of population dynamics in populations of free-living fish and invertebrates in marine and freshwater environments, and consequently to sustainable resource management. There is a well developed theory of population dynamics based on age distributions that allow direct estimation of mortality rates. However, for most cases the aging of individuals is difficult or age distributions are not available for other reasons. The body size distribution is a widely available alternative although the theory underlying the formation of its shape is more complicated than in the case of age distributions. A solid theory of the time evolution of a population structured by any physiological variable has been developed in 1960s and 1970s by adapting the Hamilton-Jacobi formulation of classical mechanics, and equations to estimate the body size-distributed mortality profile have been derived for simple cases. Here I extend those results with regards to the size-distributed mortality profile to complex cases of non-stationary populations, individuals growing according to a generalised growth model and seasonally patterned recruitment pulses. I apply resulting methods to two cases in the marine environment, a benthic crustacean population that was growing during the period of observation and whose individuals grow with negative acceleration, and a sea urchin coastal population that is undergoing a stable cycle of two equilibrium points in population size whose individuals grow with varying acceleration that switches sign along the size range. The extension is very general and substantially widens the applicability of the theory. PMID:27164999

  6. Asteroid Size-Frequency Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    2001-01-01

    A total of six deep exposures (using AOT CAM01 with a 6 inch PFOV) through the ISOCAM LW10 filter (IRAS Band 1, i.e. 12 micron) were obtained on an approximately 15 arcminute square field centered on the ecliptic plane. Point sources were extracted using the technique described. Two known asteroids appear in these frames and 20 sources moving with velocities appropriate for main belt asteroids are present. Most of the asteroids detected have flux densities less than 1 mJy, i,e., between 150 and 350 times fainter than any of the asteroids observed by IRAS. These data provide the first direct measurement of the 12 pm sky-plane density for asteroids on the ecliptic equator. The median zodiacal foreground, as measured by ISOCAM during this survey, is found to be 22.1 +/- 1.5 mJy per pixel, i.e., 26.2 +/- 1.7 MJy/sr. The results presented here imply that the actual number of kilometer-sized asteroids is significantly greater than previously believed and in reasonable agreement with the Statistical Asteroid Model.

  7. Size distributions of solar energetic particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E.; Reames, D.; Kahler, S.; Cane, H.

    1991-01-01

    NASA particle detectors on the IMP-8 are employed to determine the size distributions of the peak fluxes of events related to solar-energetic particles including protons and electrons. The energetic proton events show a flatter size distribution which suggests that not all flares are proton flares. Both the electron and proton events are classified as either 'impulsive' or 'gradual', and the impulsive events tend to have a steeper power-law distribution.

  8. Analytic scaling function for island-size distributions.

    PubMed

    Dubrovskii, V G; Sibirev, N V

    2015-04-01

    We obtain an explicit solution for the island-size distribution described by the rate equations for irreversible growth with the simplified capture rates of the form σ(s)(Θ)∝Θ(p)(a+s-1) for all s≥1, where s is the size and Θ is the time-dependent coverage. The intrinsic property of this solution is its scaling form in the continuum limit. The analytic scaling function depends on the two parameters a and p and is capable of describing very dissimilar distribution shapes, both monomodal and monotonically decreasing. The obtained results suggest that the scaling features of the size distributions are closely related to the size linearity of the capture rates. A simple analytic scaling is obtained rigorously here and helps to gain a better theoretical understanding of possible origins of the scaling behavior of the island-size distributions. PMID:25974509

  9. High frequency variability of particle size distribution and its dependency on turbulence over the sea bottom during re-suspension processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renosh, P. R.; Schmitt, François G.; Loisel, Hubert; Sentchev, Alexei; Mériaux, Xavier

    2014-04-01

    The impact of tidal current, waves and turbulence on particles re-suspension over the sea bottom is studied through Eulerian high frequency measurements of velocity and particle size distribution (PSD) during 5 tidal cycles (65 h) in a coastal environment of the eastern English Channel. High frequency variability of PSD is observed along with the velocity fluctuations. Power spectral analysis shows that turbulent velocity and PSD parameters have similarities in their spectral behaviour over the whole range of examined temporal scales. The low frequency variability of particles is controlled by turbulence (β≃-5/3) and the high frequency is partly driven by dynamical processes impacted by the sea bottom interactions with turbulence (wall turbulence). Stokes number (St), rarely measured in situ, exhibits very low values, emphasizing that these particles can be considered as passive tracers. The effect of tide and waves on turbidity and PSD is highlighted. During slack tide, when the current reaches its minimum value, we observe a higher proportion of small particles compared to larger ones. To a lower extent, high significant wave heights are also associated with a greater concentration of suspended sediments and the presence of larger particles (larger Sauter's diameter DA, and lower PSD slope ξ).

  10. Size-Dependent Raman Shifts for nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yukun; Zhao, Xinmei; Yin, Penggang; Gao, Faming

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for probing semiconductor nanocrystals. The underlying mechanism behind the size-dependent Raman shifts is still quite controversial. Here we offer a new theoretical method for the quantum confinement effects on the Raman spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals. We propose that the shift of Raman spectra in nanocrystals can result from two overlapping effects: the quantum effect shift and surface effect shift. The quantum effect shift is extracted from an extended Kubo formula, the surface effect shift is determined via the first principles calculations. Fairly good prediction of Raman shifts can be obtained without the use of any adjustable parameter. Closer analysis shows that the size-dependent Raman shifts in Si nanocrystals mainly result from the quantum effect shifts. For nanodiamond, the proportion of surface effect shift in Raman shift is up to about 40%. Such model can also provide a good baseline for using Raman spectroscopy as a tool to measure size. PMID:27102066

  11. Particle size distribution instrument. Topical report 13

    SciTech Connect

    Okhuysen, W.; Gassaway, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    The development of an instrument to measure the concentration of particles in gas is described in this report. An in situ instrument was designed and constructed which sizes individual particles and counts the number of occurrences for several size classes. Although this instrument was designed to detect the size distribution of slag and seed particles generated at an experimental coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic power facility, it can be used as a nonintrusive diagnostic tool for other hostile industrial processes involving the formation and growth of particulates. Two of the techniques developed are extensions of the widely used crossed beam velocimeter, providing simultaneous measurement of the size distribution and velocity of articles.

  12. Domain Size Distribution in Segregating Binary Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Hiromitsu

    2016-05-01

    Domain size distribution in phase separating binary Bose-Einstein condensates is studied theoretically by numerically solving the Gross-Pitaevskii equations at zero temperature. We show that the size distribution in the domain patterns arising from the dynamic instability obeys a power law in a scaling regime according to the dynamic scaling analysis based on the percolation theory. The scaling behavior is kept during the relaxation dynamics until the characteristic domain size becomes comparable to the linear size of the system, consistent with the dynamic scaling hypothesis of the phase-ordering kinetics. Our numerical experiments indicate the existence of a different scaling regime in the size distribution function, which can be caused by the so-called coreless vortices.

  13. Size-dependent thermopower of nickel nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Jaiveer; Kaurav, N.; Okram, Gunadhor S.

    2014-04-24

    Nickel nanoparticles (Ni-NPs) were prepared by thermal decomposition method using Trioctylphosphine (TOP) and Oleylamine (OA). The average particle size (D) estimated from X-ray diffraction (XRD) using Scherrer equation, to be 1-10nm, systematically decreases with increasing concentration of TOP at constant OA concentration. The observed thermopower strongly depends on particle size particularly at low temperatures reaching a very high value of ∼ 10{sup 5} μV/K (at 20 K), and is attributed to the enhanced grain-boundary scattering combined with quantum confinement.

  14. Analytic modeling of aerosol size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepack, A.; Box, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical functions commonly used for representing aerosol size distributions are studied parametrically. Methods for obtaining best fit estimates of the parameters are described. A catalog of graphical plots depicting the parametric behavior of the functions is presented along with procedures for obtaining analytical representations of size distribution data by visual matching of the data with one of the plots. Examples of fitting the same data with equal accuracy by more than one analytic model are also given.

  15. Initial size distributions and hygroscopicity of indoor combustion aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Hopke, P.K.

    1993-10-01

    Cigarette smoke, incense smoke, natural gas flames, propane fuel flames, and candle flames are contributors of indoor aerosol particles. To provide a quantitative basis for the modeling of inhaled aerosol deposition pattern, the hygroscopic growth of particles from these five sources as well as the source size distributions were measured. Because the experiments were performed on the bases of particles of single size, it provided not only the averaged particle`s hygroscopic growth of each source, but also the detailed size change for particles of different sizes within the whole size spectrum. The source particle size distribution measurements found that cigarette smoke and incense smoke contained particles in the size range of 100-700 nm, while the natural gas, propane, and candle flames generated particles between 10 and 100 nm. The hygroscopic growth experiments showed that these combustion aerosol particles could grow 10% to 120%, depending on the particle sizes and origins. 18 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Size dependence of non-magnetic thickness in YIG nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyaifar, M.; Mohammadpour, H.; Dorafshani, M.; Hasanpour, A.

    2016-07-01

    This study is focused on particle size dependence of structural and magnetic properties in yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12) nanoparticles. A series of YIG samples with different particle size were produced by varying the annealing temperatures. The X-ray analysis revealed an inverse correlation between lattice parameter and the crystallite size. The normal distribution is used for fitting the particles size distribution which is extracted from scanning electron micrographs. Also, by using the results of vibrating sample magnetometer, the magnetic diameter was calculated based on Langevin model in order to investigate the variation of dead layer thickness. Furthermore, the observed line broadening in Mössbauer spectra confirmed the increase of non-magnetic thickness due to the reduction of particle size.

  17. Langevin granulometry of the particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kákay, Attila; Gutowski, M. W.; Takacs, L.; Franco, V.; Varga, L. K.

    2004-06-01

    The problem of deriving the particle size distribution directly from superparamagnetic magnetization curves is studied by three mathematical methods: (1) least-squares deviation with regularization procedure, (2) simulated annealing and (3) genetic algorithm. Software has been developed for the latest versions of all these methods and its performance compared for various models of underlying particle size distributions (Dirac dgr-like, lognormal- and Gaussian-shaped). For single peak distributions all three methods give reasonable and similar results, but for bimodal distributions the genetic algorithm is the only acceptable one. The genetic algorithm is able to recover with the same precision both the lognormal and Gaussian single and double (mixed) model distributions. The sensitivity of the genetic algorithm—the most promising method—to uncertainty of measurements was also tested; correct peak position and its half width were recovered for Gaussian distributions, when the analysed data were contaminated with noise of up to 5% of MS.

  18. Particle Size Distributions in Atmospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paoli, Roberto; Shariff, Karim

    2003-01-01

    In this note, we derive a transport equation for a spatially integrated distribution function of particles size that is suitable for sparse particle systems, such as in atmospheric clouds. This is done by integrating a Boltzmann equation for a (local) distribution function over an arbitrary but finite volume. A methodology for evolving the moments of the integrated distribution is presented. These moments can be either tracked for a finite number of discrete populations ('clusters') or treated as continuum variables.

  19. Intraspecific body size frequency distributions of insects.

    PubMed

    Gouws, E Jeanne; Gaston, Kevin J; Chown, Steven L

    2011-01-01

    Although interspecific body size frequency distributions are well documented for many taxa, including the insects, intraspecific body size frequency distributions (IaBSFDs) are more poorly known, and their variation among mass-based and linear estimates of size has not been widely explored. Here we provide IaBSFDs for 16 species of insects based on both mass and linear estimates and large sample sizes (n ≥ 100). In addition, we review the published IaBSFDs for insects, though doing so is complicated by their under-emphasis in the literature. The form of IaBSFDs can differ substantially between mass-based and linear measures. Nonetheless, in non-social insects they tend to be normally distributed (18 of 27 species) or in fewer instances positively skewed. Negatively skewed distributions are infrequently reported and log transformation readily removes the positive skew. Sexual size dimorphism does not generally cause bimodality in IaBSFDs. The available information on IaBSFDs in the social insects suggests that these distributions are usually positively skewed or bimodal (24 of 30 species). However, only c. 15% of ant genera are polymorphic, suggesting that normal distributions are probably more common, but less frequently investigated. Although only 57 species, representing seven of the 29 orders of insects, have been considered here, it appears that whilst IaBSFDs are usually normal, other distribution shapes can be found in several species, though most notably among the social insects. By contrast, the interspecific body size frequency distribution is typically right-skewed in insects and in most other taxa. PMID:21479214

  20. Intraspecific Body Size Frequency Distributions of Insects

    PubMed Central

    Gouws, E. Jeanne; Gaston, Kevin J.; Chown, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    Although interspecific body size frequency distributions are well documented for many taxa, including the insects, intraspecific body size frequency distributions (IaBSFDs) are more poorly known, and their variation among mass-based and linear estimates of size has not been widely explored. Here we provide IaBSFDs for 16 species of insects based on both mass and linear estimates and large sample sizes (n≥100). In addition, we review the published IaBSFDs for insects, though doing so is complicated by their under-emphasis in the literature. The form of IaBSFDs can differ substantially between mass-based and linear measures. Nonetheless, in non-social insects they tend to be normally distributed (18 of 27 species) or in fewer instances positively skewed. Negatively skewed distributions are infrequently reported and log transformation readily removes the positive skew. Sexual size dimorphism does not generally cause bimodality in IaBSFDs. The available information on IaBSFDs in the social insects suggests that these distributions are usually positively skewed or bimodal (24 of 30 species). However, only c. 15% of ant genera are polymorphic, suggesting that normal distributions are probably more common, but less frequently investigated. Although only 57 species, representing seven of the 29 orders of insects, have been considered here, it appears that whilst IaBSFDs are usually normal, other distribution shapes can be found in several species, though most notably among the social insects. By contrast, the interspecific body size frequency distribution is typically right-skewed in insects and in most other taxa. PMID:21479214

  1. Pore size distribution and accessible pore size distribution in bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurovs, Richard; He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell; Blach, Tomasz P

    2012-01-01

    The porosity and pore size distribution of coals determine many of their properties, from gas release to their behavior on carbonization, and yet most methods of determining pore size distribution can only examine a restricted size range. Even then, only accessible pores can be investigated with these methods. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) are increasingly used to characterize the size distribution of all of the pores non-destructively. Here we have used USANS/SANS to examine 24 well-characterized bituminous and subbituminous coals: three from the eastern US, two from Poland, one from New Zealand and the rest from the Sydney and Bowen Basins in Eastern Australia, and determined the relationships of the scattering intensity corresponding to different pore sizes with other coal properties. The range of pore radii examinable with these techniques is 2.5 nm to 7 {micro}m. We confirm that there is a wide range of pore sizes in coal. The pore size distribution was found to be strongly affected by both rank and type (expressed as either hydrogen or vitrinite content) in the size range 250 nm to 7 {micro}m and 5 to 10 nm, but weakly in intermediate regions. The results suggest that different mechanisms control coal porosity on different scales. Contrast-matching USANS and SANS were also used to determine the size distribution of the fraction of the pores in these coals that are inaccessible to deuterated methane, CD{sub 4}, at ambient temperature. In some coals most of the small ({approx} 10 nm) pores were found to be inaccessible to CD{sub 4} on the time scale of the measurement ({approx} 30 min - 16 h). This inaccessibility suggests that in these coals a considerable fraction of inherent methane may be trapped for extended periods of time, thus reducing the effectiveness of methane release from (or sorption by) these coals. Although the number of small pores was less in higher rank coals, the fraction of total

  2. Colloid particle size-dependent dispersivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, C. V.; Katzourakis, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that dispersion coefficients evaluated by fitting advection-dispersion transport models to nonreactive tracer breakthrough curves do not adequately describe colloid transport under the same flow field conditions. Here an extensive laboratory study was undertaken to assess whether the dispersivity, which traditionally has been considered to be a property of the porous medium, is dependent on colloid particle size and interstitial velocity. A total of 49 colloid transport experiments were performed in columns packed with glass beads under chemically unfavorable colloid attachment conditions. Nine different colloid diameters, and various flow velocities were examined. The breakthrough curves were successfully simulated with a mathematical model describing colloid transport in homogeneous, water saturated porous media. The results demonstrated that the dispersivity is positively correlated with colloid particle size, and increases with increasing velocity.

  3. Size-dependent word frequencies and translational invariance of books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardsson, Sebastian; da Rocha, Luis Enrique Correa; Minnhagen, Petter

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that a real novel shares many characteristic features with a null model in which the words are randomly distributed throughout the text. Such a common feature is a certain translational invariance of the text. Another is that the functional form of the word-frequency distribution of a novel depends on the length of the text in the same way as the null model. This means that an approximate power-law tail ascribed to the data will have an exponent which changes with the size of the text-section which is analyzed. A further consequence is that a novel cannot be described by text-evolution models such as the Simon model. The size-transformation of a novel is found to be well described by a specific Random Book Transformation. This size transformation in addition enables a more precise determination of the functional form of the word-frequency distribution. The implications of the results are discussed.

  4. Magnetite Particle Size Distribution and Pellet Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyeon Jeong; Tang, Ming; Pistorius, Petrus Christiaan

    2014-08-01

    Oxidation of magnetite pellets is commonly performed to prepare strong pellets for ironmaking. This article presents a contribution to quantitative understanding of fundamental pellet oxidation kinetics, based on measured oxidation kinetics of magnetite particles and pellets. The commonly observed "plateau" oxidation behavior is confirmed to be consistent with the effect of very large differences in magnetite particle sizes in the concentrate from which pellets are produced. The magnetite particles range in size from less than a micron to several tens of a microns; changing the size distribution by inert sintering of pellets decreases both the plateau level of oxidation and the specific surface area, in ways that are compatible with an assumed Rosin-Rammler magnetite particle size distribution.

  5. Correlating size and composition-dependent effects with magnetic, Mössbauer, and pair distribution function measurements in a family of catalytically active ferrite nanoparticles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wong, Stanislaus; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Lewis, Crystal S.; Han, Jinkyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiang; Shi, Chenyang; Abeykoon, A. M.Milinda; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Stach, Eric; et al

    2015-05-06

    The magnetic spinel ferrites, MFe₂O₄ (wherein 'M' = a divalent metal ion such as but not limited to Mn, Co, Zn, and Ni), represent a unique class of magnetic materials in which the rational introduction of different 'M's can yield correspondingly unique and interesting magnetic behaviors. Herein we present a generalized hydrothermal method for the synthesis of single-crystalline ferrite nanoparticles with 'M' = Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, respectively, which can be systematically and efficaciously produced simply by changing the metal precursor. Our protocol can moreover lead to reproducible size control by judicious selection of various surfactants. Asmore » such, we have probed the effects of both (i) size and (ii) chemical composition upon the magnetic properties of these nanomaterials using complementary magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. The structure of the samples was confirmed by atomic PDF analysis of X-ray and electron powder diffraction data as a function of particle size. These materials retain the bulk spinel structure to the smallest size (i.e., 3 nm). In addition, we have explored the catalytic potential of our ferrites as both (a) magnetically recoverable photocatalysts and (b) biological catalysts, and noted that many of our as-prepared ferrite systems evinced intrinsically higher activities as compared with their iron oxide analogues.« less

  6. Correlating size and composition-dependent effects with magnetic, Mössbauer, and pair distribution function measurements in a family of catalytically active ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stanislaus; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Lewis, Crystal S.; Han, Jinkyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiang; Shi, Chenyang; Abeykoon, A. M.Milinda; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Stach, Eric; Thomas, Justin; Guerrero, Kevin; Munayco, Pablo; Munayco, Jimmy; Scorzelli, Rosa B.; Burnham, Philip; Viescas, Arthur J; Tiano, Amanda L.

    2015-05-06

    The magnetic spinel ferrites, MFe₂O₄ (wherein 'M' = a divalent metal ion such as but not limited to Mn, Co, Zn, and Ni), represent a unique class of magnetic materials in which the rational introduction of different 'M's can yield correspondingly unique and interesting magnetic behaviors. Herein we present a generalized hydrothermal method for the synthesis of single-crystalline ferrite nanoparticles with 'M' = Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, respectively, which can be systematically and efficaciously produced simply by changing the metal precursor. Our protocol can moreover lead to reproducible size control by judicious selection of various surfactants. As such, we have probed the effects of both (i) size and (ii) chemical composition upon the magnetic properties of these nanomaterials using complementary magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. The structure of the samples was confirmed by atomic PDF analysis of X-ray and electron powder diffraction data as a function of particle size. These materials retain the bulk spinel structure to the smallest size (i.e., 3 nm). In addition, we have explored the catalytic potential of our ferrites as both (a) magnetically recoverable photocatalysts and (b) biological catalysts, and noted that many of our as-prepared ferrite systems evinced intrinsically higher activities as compared with their iron oxide analogues.

  7. Comparison of drop size distributions from two droplet sizing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldenburg, John R.; Ide, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison between the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and the combined measurements from Particle Measuring Systems' Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe and the Optical Array Probe was conducted in an icing wind tunnel using NASA Icing Research Tunnel spray nozzles to produce the supercooled water droplet cloud. Clouds having a range of volume median diameters from 10 to greater than 50 microns were used for the instrument comparisons. A volume median diameter was calculated from combining the droplet distributions of the Optical Array Probe and the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe. A comparison of the combined volume median diameters and the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer volume median diameters showed agreement from 10 microns up to 30 microns. Typical drop size distributions from the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer, the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe, and Optical Array Probe are presented for several median volume diameters. A comparison of the distributions illustrates regions of the distributions where there is good agreement and other regions where there are discrepancies between the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and the Particle Measuring Systems' droplet size instruments.

  8. Aerosol and air pollution size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shani, Gad; Haccoun, A.; Kushelevsky, A.

    The size distribution of aerosols was measured in a moderately industrial city, in a semi-arid zone on the Negev desert border. The aerosols in the city of Beer Sheva are from two sources: the dust coming from the desert and urban pollution. The size measurements were done with a cascade impactor. The elemental content of the aerosols was investigated by neutron activation analysis and X-ray fluorescence. The main elements of the dust are: Ca, Si, Fe, Na and the trace elements are: Sc, Se, La, Sm, Hf and others. The main elements of the urban pollution are S, Br, Pb, Cl, Hg and others. It was found that the elements belonging to each group can easily be classified by the size distribution. The analytical consideration of the aerosol size distribution of each group are discussed and two corresponding analytical expressions are suggested. It is shown that aerosols originating in the dust have a hump shape distribution around ~ 4μm, and those originating in urban pollution have a distribution decreasing with increasing aerosol diameter. Many examples are given to prove the conclusions.

  9. The size-distribution of Earth's lakes.

    PubMed

    Cael, B B; Seekell, D A

    2016-01-01

    Globally, there are millions of small lakes, but a small number of large lakes. Most key ecosystem patterns and processes scale with lake size, thus this asymmetry between area and abundance is a fundamental constraint on broad-scale patterns in lake ecology. Nonetheless, descriptions of lake size-distributions are scarce and empirical distributions are rarely evaluated relative to theoretical predictions. Here we develop expectations for Earth's lake area-distribution based on percolation theory and evaluate these expectations with data from a global lake census. Lake surface areas ≥8.5 km(2) are power-law distributed with a tail exponent (τ = 1.97) and fractal dimension (d = 1.38), similar to theoretical expectations (τ = 2.05; d = 4/3). Lakes <8.5 km(2) are not power-law distributed. An independently developed regional lake census exhibits a similar transition and consistency with theoretical predictions. Small lakes deviate from the power-law distribution because smaller lakes are more susceptible to dynamical change and topographic behavior at sub-kilometer scales is not self-similar. Our results provide a robust characterization and theoretical explanation for the lake size-abundance relationship, and form a fundamental basis for understanding and predicting patterns in lake ecology at broad scales. PMID:27388607

  10. Size distributions in two porous chondritic micrometeorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative size measurements of granular units (GUs), and nm-sized minerals in these units, in two porous chondritic micrometeorites are investigated. The matrix of these micrometeorites consist of loosely packed, 0.1 micron-sized, GUs. These objects were a major component of the solar nebula dust that accreted into protoplanets. The matrix in micrometeorite W7010*A2 has a fractal dimension with a small coefficient that supports efficient sticking of carbon-rich GUs during accretion. The fractal nature of the matrix provides a way to calculate the density using the aggregate size. The resulting very low density for porous chondritic micrometeorites is 0.08-0.14 g/cu cm, which supports the view that they are the solid debris from unconsolidated solar system bodies. Chondritic GUs contain ultrafine olivines, pyroxenes, and sulfides, embedded in hydrocarbons and amorphous carbons. Nanocrystals in the micrometeorites W7010*A2 and U2015*B show log normal size distributions. The high incidence of disk-shaped grains, a changeover from disk-shaped to euhedral grains, the unevolved nature of the size distributions, and multiple populations for grains less than 127 nm in size, are consistent with continuous postaccretion nucleation and growth in amorphous GUs, including coarsening via Ostwald ripening.

  11. THE COLLISIONAL DIVOT IN THE KUIPER BELT SIZE DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Wesley C.

    2009-11-20

    This paper presents the results of collisional evolution calculations for the Kuiper Belt starting from an initial size distribution similar to that produced by accretion simulations of that region-a steep power-law large object size distribution that breaks to a shallower slope at r approx 1-2 km, with collisional equilibrium achieved for objects r approx< 0.5 km. We find that the break from the steep large object power law causes a divot, or depletion of objects at r approx 10-20 km, which, in turn, greatly reduces the disruption rate of objects with r approx> 25-50 km, preserving the steep power-law behavior for objects at this size. Our calculations demonstrate that the roll-over observed in the Kuiper Belt size distribution is naturally explained as an edge of a divot in the size distribution; the radius at which the size distribution transitions away from the power law, and the shape of the divot from our simulations are consistent with the size of the observed roll-over, and size distribution for smaller bodies. Both the kink radius and the radius of the divot center depend on the strength scaling law in the gravity regime for Kuiper Belt objects. These simulations suggest that the sky density of r approx 1 km objects is approx10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} objects per square degree. A detection of the divot in the size distribution would provide a measure of the strength of large Kuiper Belt objects, and constrain the shape of the size distribution at the end of accretion in the Kuiper Belt.

  12. Acoustical concept for measuring particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, D.S.; Kaufman, M.

    1981-02-01

    A new concept is investigated for measuring particle size and distribution for air pollution control applications. This study illustrates that the proposed device--the Acoustic Particulate Monitor (APM)--can measure total mass loading, mean particle diameter, and width of particle size distributions on an in-situ basis. The concept for such an instrument is based upon experimental and theoretical observations that the presence of dust in air causes a reduction in the speed of sound as a function of the transmitted frequency. These percentage reductions in the speed of sound are small and the research results illustrate how the accompanying shift in the acoustical phase is a highly sensitive method for detecting such effects. The magnitudes of the phase shift are related to mass loading. The frequency associated with the maximum phase shift is defined as the acoustic frequency, fA. Experimentally determining fA provides a measure of the mean particle size of the distribution. The detailed shape of the phase shift as a function of frequency is a measure of the spread in the size distribution of the entrained particulate. Experiments were performed using several configurations. Results were verified using direct mass measurements and microphotographs.

  13. PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR AN OFFICE AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses an evaluation of the effect of percent outdoor air supplied and occupation level on the particle size distributions and mass concentrations for a typical office building. (NOTE: As attention has become focused on indoor air pollution control, it has become i...

  14. Raindrop Size Distribution Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, Ali; Bashor, Paul G.; Habib, Emad; Kasparis, Takis

    2008-01-01

    Characteristics of the raindrop size distribution in seven tropical cyclones have been studied through impact-type disdrometer measurements at three different sites during the 2004-06 Atlantic hurricane seasons. One of the cyclones has been observed at two different sites. High concentrations of small and/or midsize drops were observed in the presence or absence of large drops. Even in the presence of large drops, the maximum drop diameter rarely exceeded 4 mm. These characteristics of raindrop size distribution were observed in all stages of tropical cyclones, unless the storm was in the extratropical stage where the tropical cyclone and a midlatitude frontal system had merged. The presence of relatively high concentrations of large drops in extratropical cyclones resembled the size distribution in continental thunderstorms. The integral rain parameters of drop concentration, liquid water content, and rain rate at fixed reflectivity were therefore lower in extratropical cyclones than in tropical cyclones. In tropical cyclones, at a disdrometercalculated reflectivity of 40 dBZ, the number concentration was 700 plus or minus 100 drops m(sup -3), while the liquid water content and rain rate were 0.90 plus or minus 0.05 g m(sup -3) and 18.5 plus or minus 0.5 mm h(sup -1), respectively. The mean mass diameter, on the other hand, was 1.67 plus or minus 0.3 mm. The comparison of raindrop size distributions between Atlantic tropical cyclones and storms that occurred in the central tropical Pacific island of Roi-Namur revealed that the number density is slightly shifted toward smaller drops, resulting in higher-integral rain parameters and lower mean mass and maximum drop diameters at the latter site. Considering parameterization of the raindrop size distribution in tropical cyclones, characteristics of the normalized gamma distribution parameters were examined with respect to reflectivity. The mean mass diameter increased rapidly with reflectivity, while the normalized

  15. SELF-CONSISTENT SIZE AND VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS OF COLLISIONAL CASCADES

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Margaret; Schlichting, Hilke E. E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu

    2012-03-10

    The standard theoretical treatment of collisional cascades derives a steady-state size distribution assuming a single constant velocity dispersion for all bodies regardless of size. Here we relax this assumption and solve self-consistently for the bodies' steady-state size and size-dependent velocity distributions. Specifically, we account for viscous stirring, dynamical friction, and collisional damping of the bodies' random velocities in addition to the mass conservation requirement typically applied to find the size distribution in a steady-state cascade. The resulting size distributions are significantly steeper than those derived without velocity evolution. For example, accounting self-consistently for the velocities can change the standard q = 3.5 power-law index of the Dohnanyi differential size spectrum to an index as large as q = 4. Similarly, for bodies held together by their own gravity, the corresponding power-law index range 2.88 < q < 3.14 of Pan and Sari can steepen to values as large as q = 3.26. Our velocity results allow quantitative predictions of the bodies' scale heights as a function of size. Together with our predictions, observations of the scale heights for different-sized bodies for the Kuiper belt, the asteroid belt, and extrasolar debris disks may constrain the mass and number of large bodies stirring the cascade as well as the colliding bodies' internal strengths.

  16. Theory of Nanocluster Size Distributions from Ion Beam Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C.W.; Yi, D.O.; Sharp, I.D.; Shin, S.J.; Liao, C.Y.; Guzman, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Chrzan, D.C.

    2008-06-13

    Ion beam synthesis of nanoclusters is studied via both kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and the self-consistent mean-field solution to a set of coupled rate equations. Both approaches predict the existence of a steady state shape for the cluster size distribution that depends only on a characteristic length determined by the ratio of the effective diffusion coefficient to the ion flux. The average cluster size in the steady state regime is determined by the implanted species/matrix interface energy.

  17. Dependence of sandpile avalanche frequency-size distribution on coverage extent and compactness of embedded toppling threshold heterogeneity: implications for the variation of Gutenberg-Richter b value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiao, L.-Y.; Liu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of the spatiotemporal evolution of failure threshold heterogeneity on the dynamics of fault criticality, and thus on regional seismogenesis, have attracted strong interest in the field of regional seismotectonics. The heterogeneity might be a manifestation of the macroscopic distribution and multiscale strength variation of asperities, the distinct regional stress level, and (microscopically) heterogeneous fault surface roughness or friction regimes. In this study, rather than attempting to mimic the complex microscale slipping physics on a fault surface, sandpile cellular automata were implemented with a straightforward toppling rule. The objective is to examine the influence of distinct configurations of the embedded heterogeneous toppling threshold field on the global system avalanche event statistics. The examination results revealed that increasing the coverage extent and decreasing the compactness of the heterogeneous failure threshold, rather than the magnitude, range of contrast, diversity, or the geometric configuration of the threshold heterogeneity, leads to a systematic increase in the scaling exponent of the avalanche event power law statistics, implying the importance of mutual interaction among toppling sites with distinct thresholds. For tectonic provinces with differing stress regimes evolving spatio temporally, it is postulated that the distinct extent and compactness of the heterogeneous failure threshold are critical factors that manifest in the reported dynamic variations of seismicity scaling.

  18. Indoor aerosol size distributions in a gymnasium.

    PubMed

    Castro, Amaya; Calvo, Ana I; Alves, Célia; Alonso-Blanco, Elisabeth; Coz, Esther; Marques, Liliana; Nunes, Teresa; Fernández-Guisuraga, Jose Manuel; Fraile, Roberto

    2015-08-15

    In this study, an indoor/outdoor monitoring program was carried out in a gymnasium at the University of Leon, Spain. The main goal was a characterization of aerosol size distributions in a university gymnasium under different conditions and sports activities (with and without magnesia alba) and the study of the mass fraction deposited in each of the parts of the respiratory tract. The aerosol particles were measured in 31 discrete channels (size ranges) using a laser spectrometer probe. Aerosol size distributions were studied under different conditions: i) before sports activities, ii) activities without using magnesia alba, iii) activities using magnesia alba, iv) cleaning procedures, and v) outdoors. The aerosol refractive index and density indoors were estimated from the aerosol composition: 1.577-0.003i and 2.055 g cm(-3), respectively. Using the estimated density, the mass concentration was calculated, and the evolution of PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 for different activities was assessed. The quality of the air in the gymnasium was strongly influenced by the use of magnesia alba (MgCO3) and the number of gymnasts who were training. Due to the climbing chalk and the constant process of resuspension, average PM10 concentrations of over 440 μg m(-3) were reached. The maximum daily concentrations ranged from 500 to 900 μg m(-3). Particle size determines the place in the respiratory tract where the deposition occurs. For this reason, the inhalable, thoracic, tracheobronchial and respirable fractions were assessed for healthy adults and high risk people, according to international standards. The estimations show that, for healthy adults, up to 300 μg m(-3) can be retained by the trachea and bronchi, and 130 μg m(-3) may reach the alveolar region. The different physical activities and the attendance rates in the sports facility have a significant influence on the concentration and size distributions observed. PMID:25897726

  19. Genome Sizes and the Benford Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Friar, James L.; Goldman, Terrance; Pérez–Mercader, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Background Data on the number of Open Reading Frames (ORFs) coded by genomes from the 3 domains of Life show the presence of some notable general features. These include essential differences between the Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes, with the number of ORFs growing linearly with total genome size for the former, but only logarithmically for the latter. Results Simply by assuming that the (protein) coding and non-coding fractions of the genome must have different dynamics and that the non-coding fraction must be particularly versatile and therefore be controlled by a variety of (unspecified) probability distribution functions (pdf’s), we are able to predict that the number of ORFs for Eukaryotes follows a Benford distribution and must therefore have a specific logarithmic form. Using the data for the 1000+ genomes available to us in early 2010, we find that the Benford distribution provides excellent fits to the data over several orders of magnitude. Conclusions In its linear regime the Benford distribution produces excellent fits to the Prokaryote data, while the full non-linear form of the distribution similarly provides an excellent fit to the Eukaryote data. Furthermore, in their region of overlap the salient features are statistically congruent. This allows us to interpret the difference between Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes as the manifestation of the increased demand in the biological functions required for the larger Eukaryotes, to estimate some minimal genome sizes, and to predict a maximal Prokaryote genome size on the order of 8–12 megabasepairs.These results naturally allow a mathematical interpretation in terms of maximal entropy and, therefore, most efficient information transmission. PMID:22629319

  20. Determination of atmospheric particle size distribution from forward scattering data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    Description of an analytic method of reconstructing the particle size distribution of atmospheric aerosols when no a priori information is available regarding the refractive index of the particles, the analytic form of the distribution, the size range, and the size extremal values. The method applies in principle to angle-dependent scattering data at a fixed wave number, or to wave-number-dependent scattering data at a fixed angle, or to a combination of the two. Some results of an angular scan study of the aureole are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the method. In conclusion, an analysis is made of the efficiency and accuracy of the method, the uniqueness of the inverse solutions, and the stability of the method relative to experimental noise.

  1. Average size and size distribution of large droplets produced in a free-jet expansion of a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, E. L.; Henne, U.

    1999-02-01

    The experimental parameters and fluid properties affecting the average size N¯ and the size distribution P(N) of droplets formed by fragmentation of a liquid after expansion into a vacuum are investigated. The mean droplet size is found to be a function of the surface tension of the liquid, the nozzle diameter, and a characteristic flow speed. The size distribution is found to be a linear exponential distribution; measurements deviate from this distribution at small sizes if a factor which is a function of the cluster size is included in the measuring process. Good agreement with measured distributions of both positive and negative droplet ions formed from neutral 4He droplets by electron impact is found. The strong dependence of mean droplet size on source-orifice diameter found in the present analysis indicates that earlier correlations of droplet size with specific entropy in the source were useful at best only for a fixed nozzle size.

  2. Remote Laser Diffraction Particle Size Distribution Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Huestis, Gary Michael; Bolton, Steven Michael

    2001-03-01

    In support of a radioactive slurry sampling and physical characterization task, an “off-the-shelf” laser diffraction (classical light scattering) particle size analyzer was utilized for remote particle size distribution (PSD) analysis. Spent nuclear fuel was previously reprocessed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC—formerly recognized as the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) which is on DOE’s INEEL site. The acidic, radioactive aqueous raffinate streams from these processes were transferred to 300,000 gallon stainless steel storage vessels located in the INTEC Tank Farm area. Due to the transfer piping configuration in these vessels, complete removal of the liquid can not be achieved. Consequently, a “heel” slurry remains at the bottom of an “emptied” vessel. Particle size distribution characterization of the settled solids in this remaining heel slurry, as well as suspended solids in the tank liquid, is the goal of this remote PSD analyzer task. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model LA-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a “hot cell” (gamma radiation) environment. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not previously achievable—making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  3. Particle size distributions and the vertical distribution of suspended matter in the upwelling region off Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchen, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    Various methods of presenting and mathematically describing particle size distribution are explained and evaluated. The hyperbolic distribution is found to be the most practical but the more complex characteristic vector analysis is the most sensitive to changes in the shape of the particle size distributions. A method for determining onshore-offshore flow patterns from the distribution of particulates was presented. A numerical model of the vertical structure of two size classes of particles was developed. The results show a close similarity to the observed distributions but overestimate the particle concentration by forty percent. This was attributed to ignoring grazing by zooplankton. Sensivity analyses showed the size preference was most responsive to the maximum specific growth rates and nutrient half saturation constants. The verical structure was highly dependent on the eddy diffusivity followed closely by the growth terms.

  4. Measurement of aggregates' size distribution by angular light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caumont-Prim, Chloé; Yon, Jérôme; Coppalle, Alexis; Ouf, François-Xavier; Fang Ren, Kuan

    2013-09-01

    A novel method is introduced for in situ determination of the size distribution of submicronic fractal aggregate particles by unique measurement of angular scattering of light. This method relies on the dependence of a new defined function Rg⋆ on the polydispersity of the aggregates' size distribution. The function Rg⋆ is then interpreted by the use of iso-level charts to determine the parameters of the log-normal soot size distribution. The main advantage of this method is its independence of the particle optical properties and primary sphere diameter. Moreover, except for the knowledge of fractal dimension, this method does not require any additional measurement. It is validated on monodisperse particles selected by a differential mobility analyzer and polydisperse soot from ethylene diffusion flame whose size distribution is independently determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Finally, the size distribution of soot generated by a commercial apparatus is measured by the proposed method and the comparison to that given by a commercial granulometer shows a good agreement.

  5. Particle size distribution of indoor aerosol sources

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, K.B.

    1990-10-24

    As concern about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has grown in recent years, it has become necessary to determine the nature of particles produced by different indoor aerosol sources and the typical concentration that these sources tend to produce. These data are important in predicting the dose of particles to people exposed to these sources and it will also enable us to take effective mitigation procedures. Further, it will also help in designing appropriate air cleaners. A new state of the art technique, DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer) System is used to determine the particle size distributions of a number of sources. This system employs the electrical mobility characteristics of these particles and is very effective in the 0.01--1.0 {mu}m size range. A modified system that can measure particle sizes in the lower size range down to 3 nm was also used. Experimental results for various aerosol sources is presented in the ensuing chapters. 37 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Physical Causes of Drop Size Distribution Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, I.

    Drop size distributions are measured at ground by instruments (disdrometers) that mostly sample one drop at a time or at best, a small number of drops simultaneously. To obtain a representative sample a time window of the observations is required. This introduces a spurious variability due to the differential fall speed of drops coupled with a highly variable field of precipitation in rapid displacement respect to the dis- drometer. A filter has been studied to minimize this spurious variability as well as instrumental uncertainty. The use of filtered data allows to see case to case differences in DSDs that are hidden in the large scatter in the raw data. These differences can be associated to physical processes revealed by a vertically pointing radar such as the de- gree of aggregation, riming, etc. Numerical modeling of particle size evolution using the quasi-stochastic growth equation serves as guide for the understanding of these processes.

  7. Measurement of nonvolatile particle number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the nonvolatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a nonvolatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol (OA; 40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a nonvolatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type of OA

  8. Electronic cigarette aerosol particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Ingebrethsen, Bradley J; Cole, Stephen K; Alderman, Steven L

    2012-12-01

    The particle size distribution of aerosols produced by electronic cigarettes was measured in an undiluted state by a spectral transmission procedure and after high dilution with an electrical mobility analyzer. The undiluted e-cigarette aerosols were found to have particle diameters of average mass in the 250-450 nm range and particle number concentrations in the 10(9) particles/cm(3) range. These measurements are comparable to those observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke in prior studies and also measured in the current study with the spectral transmission method and with the electrical mobility procedure. Total particulate mass for the e-cigarettes calculated from the size distribution parameters measured by spectral transmission were in good agreement with replicate determinations of total particulate mass by gravimetric filter collection. In contrast, average particle diameters determined for e-cigarettes by the electrical mobility method are in the 50 nm range and total particulate masses calculated based on the suggested diameters are orders of magnitude smaller than those determined gravimetrically. This latter discrepancy, and the very small particle diameters observed, are believed to result from almost complete e-cigarette aerosol particle evaporation at the dilution levels and conditions of the electrical mobility analysis. A much smaller degree, ~20% by mass, of apparent particle evaporation was observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke. The spectral transmission method is validated in the current study against measurements on tobacco burning cigarette smoke, which has been well characterized in prior studies, and is supported as yielding an accurate characterization of the e-cigarette aerosol particle size distribution. PMID:23216158

  9. Particle Size Distribution in Aluminum Manufacturing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sa; Noth, Elizabeth M.; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Eisen, Ellen A.; Cullen, Mark R.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2015-01-01

    As part of exposure assessment for an ongoing epidemiologic study of heart disease and fine particle exposures in aluminum industry, area particle samples were collected in production facilities to assess instrument reliability and particle size distribution at different process areas. Personal modular impactors (PMI) and Minimicro-orifice uniform deposition impactors (MiniMOUDI) were used. The coefficient of variation (CV) of co-located samples was used to evaluate the reproducibility of the samplers. PM2.5 measured by PMI was compared to PM2.5 calculated from MiniMOUDI data. Mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and concentrations of sub-micrometer (PM1.0) and quasi-ultrafine (PM0.56) particles were evaluated to characterize particle size distribution. Most of CVs were less than 30%. The slope of the linear regression of PMI_PM2.5 versus MiniMOUDI_PM2.5 was 1.03 mg/m3 per mg/m3 (± 0.05), with correlation coefficient of 0.97 (± 0.01). Particle size distribution varied substantively in smelters, whereas it was less variable in fabrication units with significantly smaller MMADs (arithmetic mean of MMADs: 2.59 μm in smelters vs. 1.31 μm in fabrication units, p = 0.001). Although the total particle concentration was more than two times higher in the smelters than in the fabrication units, the fraction of PM10 which was PM1.0 or PM0.56 was significantly lower in the smelters than in the fabrication units (p < 0.001). Consequently, the concentrations of sub-micrometer and quasi-ultrafine particles were similar in these two types of facilities. It would appear, studies evaluating ultrafine particle exposure in aluminum industry should focus on not only the smelters, but also the fabrication facilities. PMID:26478760

  10. Soil signature simulation of complex mixtures and particle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Tyler; Bachmann, Charles M.; Salvaggio, Carl

    2015-09-01

    Soil reflectance signatures were modeled using the digital imaging and remote sensing image generation model and Blender three-dimensional (3-D) graphic design software. Using these tools, the geometry, radiometry, and chemistry of quartz and magnetite were exploited to model the presence of particle size and porosity effects in the visible and the shortwave infrared spectrum. Using the physics engines within the Blender 3-D graphic design software, physical representations of granular soil scenes were created. Each scene characterized a specific particle distribution and density. Chemical and optical properties of pure quartz and magnetite were assigned to particles in the scene based on particle size. This work presents a model to describe an observed phase-angle dependence of beach sand density. Bidirectional reflectance signatures were simulated for targets of varying size distribution and density. This model provides validation for a phenomenological trade space between density and particle size distribution in complex, heterogeneous soil mixtures. It also confirms the suggestion that directional reflectance signatures can be defined by intimate mixtures that depend on pore spacing. The study demonstrated that by combining realistic target geometry and spectral measurements of pure quartz and magnetite, effects of soil particle size and density could be modeled without functional data fitting or rigorous analysis of material dynamics. This research does not use traditional function-based models for simulation. The combination of realistic geometry, physically viable particle structure, and first-principles ray-tracing enables the ability to represent signature changes that have been observed in experimental observations.

  11. Size distribution and structure of Barchan dune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán, O.; Schwämmle, V.; Lind, P. G.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2011-07-01

    Barchans are isolated mobile dunes often organized in large dune fields. Dune fields seem to present a characteristic dune size and spacing, which suggests a cooperative behavior based on dune interaction. In Duran et al. (2009), we propose that the redistribution of sand by collisions between dunes is a key element for the stability and size selection of barchan dune fields. This approach was based on a mean-field model ignoring the spatial distribution of dune fields. Here, we present a simplified dune field model that includes the spatial evolution of individual dunes as well as their interaction through sand exchange and binary collisions. As a result, the dune field evolves towards a steady state that depends on the boundary conditions. Comparing our results with measurements of Moroccan dune fields, we find that the simulated fields have the same dune size distribution as in real fields but fail to reproduce their homogeneity along the wind direction.

  12. Dense medium radiative transfer theory for two scattering layers with a Rayleigh distribution of particle sizes

    SciTech Connect

    West, R.; Tsang, Leung; Winebrenner, D.P. )

    1993-03-01

    Dense medium radiative transfer theory is applied to a three-layer model consisting of two scattering layers overlying a homogeneous half space with a size distribution of particles in each layer. A model with a distribution of sizes gives quite different results than those obtained from a model with a single size. The size distribution is especially important in the low frequency limit when scattering is strongly dependent on particle size. The size distribution and absorption characteristics also affect the extinction behavior as a function of fractional volume. Theoretical results are also compared with experimental data. The sizes, permittivities, and densities used in the numerical illustrations are typical values for snow.

  13. Packing fraction of particles with a Weibull size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwers, H. J. H.

    2016-07-01

    This paper addresses the void fraction of polydisperse particles with a Weibull (or Rosin-Rammler) size distribution. It is demonstrated that the governing parameters of this distribution can be uniquely related to those of the lognormal distribution. Hence, an existing closed-form expression that predicts the void fraction of particles with a lognormal size distribution can be transformed into an expression for Weibull distributions. Both expressions contain the contraction coefficient β. Likewise the monosized void fraction φ1, it is a physical parameter which depends on the particles' shape and their state of compaction only. Based on a consideration of the scaled binary void contraction, a linear relation for (1 - φ1)β as function of φ1 is proposed, with proportionality constant B, depending on the state of compaction only. This is validated using computational and experimental packing data concerning random close and random loose packing arrangements. Finally, using this β, the closed-form analytical expression governing the void fraction of Weibull distributions is thoroughly compared with empirical data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found. Furthermore, the present analysis yields an algebraic equation relating the void fraction of monosized particles at different compaction states. This expression appears to be in good agreement with a broad collection of random close and random loose packing data.

  14. Packing fraction of particles with a Weibull size distribution.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, H J H

    2016-07-01

    This paper addresses the void fraction of polydisperse particles with a Weibull (or Rosin-Rammler) size distribution. It is demonstrated that the governing parameters of this distribution can be uniquely related to those of the lognormal distribution. Hence, an existing closed-form expression that predicts the void fraction of particles with a lognormal size distribution can be transformed into an expression for Weibull distributions. Both expressions contain the contraction coefficient β. Likewise the monosized void fraction φ_{1}, it is a physical parameter which depends on the particles' shape and their state of compaction only. Based on a consideration of the scaled binary void contraction, a linear relation for (1-φ_{1})β as function of φ_{1} is proposed, with proportionality constant B, depending on the state of compaction only. This is validated using computational and experimental packing data concerning random close and random loose packing arrangements. Finally, using this β, the closed-form analytical expression governing the void fraction of Weibull distributions is thoroughly compared with empirical data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found. Furthermore, the present analysis yields an algebraic equation relating the void fraction of monosized particles at different compaction states. This expression appears to be in good agreement with a broad collection of random close and random loose packing data. PMID:27575204

  15. Size dependent cytotoxicity of fly ash particles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.K.; Tam, J.S.K.; Wong, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    Fly ash samples were collected from the electrostatic precipitator of a coal-fired power plant in Hong Kong. The particles of the respirable range (smaller than 10 {mu}m) were divided into 4 groups according to their particle size (mass median aerodynamic diameters). The surface morphology and the metal contents (Fe, Mn, Al and Zn) of fly ash particles were examined by a scanning electron microscopy and an inductively coupled plasma spectrophotometer, respectively. The particles were very heterogeneous in size and shape as well as the concentration of metals. The cytotoxicity of these four groups of fly ash particles were evaluated using an in vitro rat alveolar macrophages culture assay. The viability of alveolar macrophages was lower when incubated with smaller size particles. This relationship was also reflected by the damage of the surface morphology of the cells and the release of cytoplasmic (lactate dehydrogenase) and lysosomal (acid phosphatase and {beta}-glucuronidase) marker enzymes into the culture media.

  16. Nanocatalysis: size- and shape-dependent chemisorption and catalytic reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Behafarid, Farzad

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, the field of catalysis has experienced an astonishing transformation, driven in part by more demanding environmental standards and critical societal and industrial needs such as the search for alternative energy sources. Thanks to the advent of nanotechnology, major steps have been made towards the rational design of novel catalysts. Striking new catalytic properties, including greatly enhanced reactivities and selectivities, have been reported for nanoparticle (NP) catalysts as compared to their bulk counterparts. However, in order to harness the power of these nanocatalysts, a detailed understanding of the origin of their enhanced performance is needed. The present review focuses on the role of the NP size and shape on chemisorption and catalytic performance. Since homogeneity in NP size and shape is a prerequisite for the understanding of structure-reactivity correlations, we first review different synthesis methods that result in narrow NP size distributions and shape controlled NPs. Next, size-dependent phenomena which influence the chemical reactivity of NPs, including quantum size-effects and the presence of under-coordinated surface atoms are examined. The effect of the NP shape on catalytic performance is discussed and explained based on the existence of different atomic structures on the NP surface with distinct chemisorption properties. The influence of additional factors, such as the oxidation state of the NPs and NP-support interactions, is also considered in the frame of the size- and shape-dependency that these phenomena present. Ultimately, our review highlights the importance of achieving a systematic understanding of the factors that control the activity and selectivity of a catalyst in order to avoid trial and error methods in the rational design of the new generation of nanocatalysts with properties tunable at the atomic level.

  17. Aggregate size distribution of the soil loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Judit Alexandra; Jakab, Gergely; Szabó, Boglárka; Józsa, Sándor; Szalai, Zoltán; Centeri, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    aggregate size distribution which is led to nutrient and organic matter redistribution is one of a key questions to improve erosion estimation. G. Jakab was supported by the János Bolyai fellowship of the HAS.

  18. Particle Size Distribution in Saturn’s Ring C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, Essam A.; Wong, K.; French, R.; Rappaport, N.

    2012-10-01

    Information about particle sizes in Saturn’s rings is provided by two complementary types of Cassini radio occultation measurements. The first is differential extinction of three coherent sinusoidal signals transmitted by Cassini through the rings back to Earth (wavelength = 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm, respectively). The differential measurements strongly constraint three parameters of an assumed power-law size distribution n(a) = n0 (a/a0)q, amin ≤ a ≤ amax: namely, the power law index q, the minimum radius amin, and reference abundance n0 at reference radius a0. The differential measurements are particularly sensitive to radii in the range 0.1 mm < a < 1 m. Complementing this capability, is a second type of measurements that is particularly sensitive to the larger radii 1 m < a < 20 m and their abundance. Signature of the collective near-forward scattering by these particles is captured in power spectrum measurements as broadened component of width, shape, and strength that depend on ring particle sizes, their spatial distribution, and observation geometry. Contributions of ring features of width as small several hundred kilometers can be identified and isolated in the measured spectra for a small subset of Cassini orbits of favorable geometry. We use three inverse scattering algorithms (Bayes, constrained linear inversion, generalized singular-value-decomposition) to recover the size distribution of particles of resolved ring features over the size range 1 m < a < 20 m without assuming an explicit size distribution model. We also investigate consistency of the results with a single power-law model extending over 0.1 mm < a < 20 m and implications to the spatial distribution of ring particles normal to the ring plane (vertical ring thickness). We present example results for selected features across Saturn’s Ring C where little evidence for gravitational wakes is present, hence the approaches above are applicable.

  19. Pore-size distributions of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Walther, D.H.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M. |

    1993-11-01

    Pore-size distributions have been measured for N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) hydrogels at 25 and 32{degrees}C with swelling capacities 11.3 and 6.0 g swollen gel per g dry gel. The mixed-solute-exclusion method (introduced by Kuga) was used to obtain the experimental solute-exclusion curve which represents the amount of imbibed liquid inside the gel inaccessible for a solute of radius r. The pore-size distributions were obtained by using Casassa`s Brownian-motion model and numerically solving the Fredholm integral equation. The pore-size distributions of temperature-sensitive NIPA hydrogels are strongly dependent on temperature which determines swelling capacity. With increasing swelling capacity (from 6.0 to 11.3), the pore-size distribution shifts to higher mode values (27.3 to 50.6 {angstrom}) and to higher variance (1.07{center_dot}10{sup 3} to 3.58{center_dot}10{sup 3} {angstrom}{sup 2}).

  20. Asymmetric competition causes multimodal size distributions in spatially structured populations.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Jorge; Allen, Robert B; Coomes, David A; Eichhorn, Markus P

    2016-01-27

    Plant sizes within populations often exhibit multimodal distributions, even when all individuals are the same age and have experienced identical conditions. To establish the causes of this, we created an individual-based model simulating the growth of trees in a spatially explicit framework, which was parametrized using data from a long-term study of forest stands in New Zealand. First, we demonstrate that asymmetric resource competition is a necessary condition for the formation of multimodal size distributions within cohorts. By contrast, the legacy of small-scale clustering during recruitment is transient and quickly overwhelmed by density-dependent mortality. Complex multi-layered size distributions are generated when established individuals are restricted in the spatial domain within which they can capture resources. The number of modes reveals the effective number of direct competitors, while the separation and spread of modes are influenced by distances among established individuals. Asymmetric competition within local neighbourhoods can therefore generate a range of complex size distributions within even-aged cohorts. PMID:26817778

  1. Capturing tensile size-dependency in polymer nanofiber elasticity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; Wang, Jun; Han, Ray P S

    2015-02-01

    As the name implies, tensile size-dependency refers to the size-dependent response under uniaxial tension. It defers markedly from bending size-dependency in terms of onset and magnitude of the size-dependent response; the former begins earlier but rises to a smaller value than the latter. Experimentally, tensile size-dependent behavior is much harder to capture than its bending counterpart. This is also true in the computational effort; bending size-dependency models are more prevalent and well-developed. Indeed, many have questioned the existence of tensile size-dependency. However, recent experiments seem to support the existence of this phenomenon. Current strain gradient elasticity theories can accurately predict bending size-dependency but are unable to track tensile size-dependency. To rectify this deficiency a higher-order strain gradient elasticity model is constructed by including the second gradient of the strain into the deformation energy. Tensile experiments involving 10 wt% polycaprolactone nanofibers are performed to calibrate and verify our model. The results reveal that for the selected nanofibers, their size-dependency begins when their diameters reduce to 600 nm and below. Further, their characteristic length-scale parameter is found to be 1095.8 nm. PMID:25460923

  2. Size-dependent diffusion in cycloalkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowert, Bruce. A.; Jones, Jared B.; Zahm, Jacob A.; Turner, Robert M., II

    The translational diffusion constants, D, of biphenyl, trans-stilbene, 1,4-diphenyl-1,3-butadiene, 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, tetraphenylethylene, 9,10-diphenylanthracene, bibenzyl, triptycene, perylene and 2,3-benzanthracene (tetracene) have been measured in combinations of the cycloalkanes cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, n-butylcyclohexane, cis-decalin and trans-decalin using capillary flow techniques. Tetracene and chrycene have been studied in a series of n-alkanes. Deviations from the Stokes-Einstein (SE) relation (D = kBT/6πηr) were found. For a given solute, the hydrodynamic radius r decreases as both the viscosity η and the solvent/solute size ratio increase; the data were fitted to D/T = A/η p with p<1 (p = 1 for the SE relation). The p values in the cycloalkanes increase as the solute size increases, are compared to the values in the n-alkanes and are discussed in terms of the properties of the two types of solvent. The experimental D values also are compared to the predictions of the Wilke-Chang equation and a free volume model which includes both the masses and sizes of the solution components.

  3. Size dependent polaronic conduction in hematite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Monika; Banday, Azeem; Murugavel, Sevi

    2016-05-01

    Lithium Ion Batteries have been attracted as the major renewable energy source for all portable electronic devices because of its advantages like superior energy density, high theoretical capacity, high specific energy, stable cycling and less memory effects. Recently, α-Fe2O3 has been considered as a potential anode material due to high specific capacity, low cost, high abundance and environmental benignity. We have synthesized α-Fe2O3 with various sizes by using the ball milling and sol-gel procedure. Here, we report the dc conductivity measurement for the crystallite size ranging from 15 nm to 50nm. It has been observed that the enhancement in the polaronic conductivity nearly two orders in magnitude while reducing the crystallite size from bulk into nano scale level. The enhancement in the conductivity is due to the augmented to compressive strain developed in the material which leads to pronounced decrease in the hopping length of polarons. Thus, nanocrystaline α-Fe2O3 may be a better alternative anode material for lithium ion batteries than earlier reported systems.

  4. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice

  5. Disparate maturation adaptations to size-dependent mortality

    PubMed Central

    Gårdmark, Anna; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    Body size is an important determinant of resource use, fecundity and mortality risk. Evolution of maturation size in response to size-dependent selection is thus a fundamental part of life-history theory. Increased mortality among small individuals has previously been predicted to cause larger maturation size, whereas increased mortality among large individuals is expected to have the opposite effect. Here we use a continuously size-structured model to demonstrate that, contrary to these widespread expectations, increased mortality among small individuals can have three alternative effects: maturation size may increase, decrease or become evolutionarily bistable. We show that such complex responses must be reckoned with whenever mortality is size-dependent, growth is indeterminate, reproduction impairs growth and fecundity increases with size. Predicting adaptive responses to altered size-dependent mortality is thus inherently difficult, since, as demonstrated here, such mortality cannot only reverse the direction of adaptation, but also cause abrupt shifts in evolutionarily stable maturation sizes. PMID:16901838

  6. Grain-size Distributions from Deconvolved Broadband Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, K.

    2014-12-01

    A magnetic susceptibility meter with several-decade frequency band has recently made it possible to obtain superparamagnetic grain-size distributions only by room-temperature measurement. A rigorous deconvolution scheme of frequency dependence of susceptibility is already available. I have made some corrections on the deconvolution scheme and present its applications to broadband susceptibility data on loess and volcanic rocks. Deconvolution of frequency dependence of susceptibility was originally developed by Shchervakov and Fabian [2005]. Suppose an ensemble of grains distributed for two independent variables of volume (grain-size) and energy barrier. Applying alternating magnetic field with varying frequency results in differentiating grains by energy barrier - not directly by volume. Since the response function for frequency is known, deconvolution of frequency dependence of susceptibility provide a rigorous solution for the second moment of volume on the volume-energy barrier distribution. Based on a common assumption of a linear relation between volume and energy barrier, we can obtain analytical volume or grain-size distributions of superparamagnetic grains. A ZH broadband susceptibility meter comprises of two separated devices for lower (SM-100, 65 - 16kHz) and higher (SM-105, 16k - 512kHz) frequency ranges. At every frequency susceptibility calibration was conducted using three kinds of paramagnetic rare earth oxides [Fukuma and Torii, 2011]. Almost all samples exhibited seemingly linear dependences of in-phase susceptibility on logarithmic frequency. This indicates that the measured data do not suffer serious noise, and that the second moment of volume is relatively constant against energy barrier. Nonetheless, third-order polynomial fittings revealed slight deflections from the quasi-linear susceptibility - logarithmic frequency relations. Deconvolving the polynomials showed that such slight defections come from peaks or troughs in varying second moment

  7. SUPERFISH accuracy dependence on mesh size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merson, J. L.; Boicourt, G. P.

    1989-02-01

    The RF cavity code SUPERFISH is extensively used for the design of drift-tube linac (DTL), radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and coupled-cavity linac (CCL) structures. It has been known for some time that considerably finer meshes are required near the nose of a drift tube to ensure accurate calculation of the resonant frequency and related secondary quantities. This paper discusses the results of numerical experiments designed to provide rules to set proper mesh sizes for DTL, RFQ, and CCL problems. During this work, SUPERFISH problems involving more than 100,000 mesh points were solved.

  8. Size Dependent Antioxidant Activity of Polypyrrole Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Banerjee, Somik

    2011-07-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers have been synthesized employing surfactant assisted miceller polymerization by varying the surfactant concentration. The synthesized nanofibers have been characterized using TEM, XRD, FTIR and UV-Visible spectroscopy. TEM reveals that the diameter of the PPy nanowires decreases with the increase in surfactant concentration. X-ray spectra shows an amorphous peak centered around 2θ = 24.6° which is attributed to the π-π interaction of the partial PPy chains similar to that of aromatic groups. The domain length of the samples determined using the single-line approximation technique, decreases with decreasing diameter whereas the strain in the material increases, which have been attributed to the reduction of size with increase in the surfactant concentration as revealed by TEM. The vibrational bands observed from the FTIR spectra confirm the formation of surfactant free PPy nanowires. UV-Visible spectra shows a blue-shift in the π-π* absorption peak. Antioxidant activity of the samples has been determined using the DPPH free radical method. It has been observed that enhancement in free radical scavenging coincides with the decreasing diameter of the PPy nanofibers which has been associated with the increase in the surface reaction sites with the reduction of size.

  9. Size-dependent structure of silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, Kristie Jo

    2008-12-31

    Silver noble metal nanoparticles that are<10 nm often possess multiply twinned grains allowing them to adopt shapes and atomic structures not observed in bulk materials. The properties exhibited by particles with multiply twinned polycrystalline structures are often far different from those of single-crystalline particles and from the bulk. I will present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles<10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. Results for nanoparticles in the intermediate size range of 5 to 10 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. I propose a mechanism for this transitiion that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. Results for nanoparticles of 3.9 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent orthorhombic distortion. This distortion is interpreted in the context of idealized decahedral particles. In addition, given these size-dependent measurements of silver nanoparticle compression with pressure, we have constructed a pressure calibration curve. Encapsulating these silver nanoparticles in hollow metal oxide nanospheres then allows us to measure the pressure inside a nanoshell using x-ray diffraction. We demonstrate the measurement of pressure gradients across nanoshells and show that these nanoshells have maximum resolved shear strengths on the order of 500 MPa to IGPa.

  10. A New Method to Generate Micron-Sized AerosolS With Narrow Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gañón-Calvo, Alfonso; Barrero, Antonio

    1996-11-01

    Aerosols in the micron-size range with a remarkable monodisperse size distribution can be generated from the breaking up process of a capillary microjet. The size of the main droplets and satellites depend on the jet diameter, d_j, as well as the flow rate, Q, and liquid properties which eventually determine the jet`s breaking up. Therefore, the generation and control of capillary microjets is essential to produce sprays of small droplets with narrow size histograms. Electrosprays has been up to now one of the most successful techniques to produce monodisperse micron-size aerosols. As an alternative, we report here a new method, aerospray, to generate capillary micro jets which can compete against the electrospray for the production of aerosols of small droplets with very narrow size distribution. The method is outlined in the following. Liquid coming out from the exit of a capillary needle is sucked by means of a high speed gas stream (usually air) which flows throughout a hole separating two chambers at different pressures. Under certain parametric conditions of liquid properties, liquid and air flow rates, and geometric characteristics (needle and hole diameters, distance from the needle to the hole, etc), the liquid forms a steady capillary microjet of very small diameter which is speeded up an stabilized by the action of the viscous stresses at the gas liquid interface. The jet passes through the hole and goes out the outside chamber where eventually breaks up into microdroplets by varicose instabilities. Measurements from Laser-Doppler PDA Analizer of these aerosprays show that both the droplet size and its standard deviation are comparable to those obtained by electrospray techniques. On the other hand, using the aerospray, the standard deviation of the resulting droplet size distribution is of the order of those that can be obtained by ultrasonic atomization but the mean diameters can be more than one order of magnitude smaller.

  11. Characterization of Nanocrystal Size Distribution using Raman Spectroscopy with a Multi-particle Phonon Confinement Model.

    PubMed

    Doğan, İlker; van de Sanden, Mauritius C M

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of the size distribution of nanocrystals is a critical requirement for the processing and optimization of their size-dependent properties. The common techniques used for the size analysis are transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). These techniques, however, are not suitable for analyzing the nanocrystal size distribution in a fast, non-destructive and a reliable manner at the same time. Our aim in this work is to demonstrate that size distribution of semiconductor nanocrystals that are subject to size-dependent phonon confinement effects, can be quantitatively estimated in a non-destructive, fast and reliable manner using Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, mixed size distributions can be separately probed, and their respective volumetric ratios can be estimated using this technique. In order to analyze the size distribution, we have formulized an analytical expression of one-particle PCM and projected it onto a generic distribution function that will represent the size distribution of analyzed nanocrystal. As a model experiment, we have analyzed the size distribution of free-standing silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) with multi-modal size distributions. The estimated size distributions are in excellent agreement with TEM and PL results, revealing the reliability of our model. PMID:26327524

  12. Aged Boreal Biomass Burning Size Distributions from Bortas 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, J. R.; Sakamoto, K.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Taylor, J.; Duck, T.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols contribute to aerosol radiative forcing on the climate system. The magnitude of this effect is partially determined by aerosol size distributions, which are strong functions of source fire characteristics (e.g. fuel type, MCE) and in-plume microphysical processing. The uncertainties in biomass-burning emission number size-distributions in climate model inventories lead to uncertainties in the CCN concentrations and forcing estimates derived from these models. The BORTAS-B measurement campaign was designed to sample boreal biomass-burning outflow over Eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Using these BORTAS-B data, we implement plume criteria to isolate the characteristic size-distribution of aged biomass-burning emissions (aged ~ 1.5 - 2 days) from boreal wildfires in Northwestern Ontario. The composite median size-distribution yields a single dominant accumulation mode with Dpm = 232 nm, σ = 1.7, which are comparable to literature values of other aged plumes of a similar type. The organic aerosol enhancement ratios (ΔOA/ΔCO) along the path of Flight b622 show values of 0.08-0.18 μg m-3 ppbv-1 with no significant trend with distance from the source. This lack of enhancement ratio increase/decrease with distance suggests no detectable net OA production/evaporation within the aged plume over the sampling period. A Lagrangian microphysical model was used to determine an estimate of the freshly emitted size distribution and flux corresponding to the BORTAS-B aged size-distributions. The model was restricted to coagulation and dilution processes only based on the insignificant net OA production/evaporation derived from the ΔOA/ΔCO enhancement ratios. Depending on the, we estimate that the fresh-plume median diameter was in the range of 59-94 nm with modal widths in the range of 1.7-2.8. Thus, the size of the freshly emitted particles is somewhat unconstrained due to the uncertainties in the plume dilution rates.

  13. Evolution of Particle Size Distributions in Fragmentation Over Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambous, C. A.; Pike, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new model of fragmentation based on a probabilistic calculation of the repeated fracture of a particle population. The resulting continuous solution, which is in closed form, gives the evolution of fragmentation products from an initial block, through a scale-invariant power-law relationship to a final comminuted powder. Models for the fragmentation of particles have been developed separately in mainly two different disciplines: the continuous integro-differential equations of batch mineral grinding (Reid, 1965) and the fractal analysis of geophysics (Turcotte, 1986) based on a discrete model with a single probability of fracture. The first gives a time-dependent development of the particle-size distribution, but has resisted a closed-form solution, while the latter leads to the scale-invariant power laws, but with no time dependence. Bird (2009) recently introduced a bridge between these two approaches with a step-wise iterative calculation of the fragmentation products. The development of the particle-size distribution occurs with discrete steps: during each fragmentation event, the particles will repeatedly fracture probabilistically, cascading down the length scales to a final size distribution reached after all particles have failed to further fragment. We have identified this process as the equivalent to a sequence of trials for each particle with a fixed probability of fragmentation. Although the resulting distribution is discrete, it can be reformulated as a continuous distribution in maturity over time and particle size. In our model, Turcotte's power-law distribution emerges at a unique maturation index that defines a regime boundary. Up to this index, the fragmentation is in an erosional regime with the initial particle size setting the scaling. Fragmentation beyond this index is in a regime of comminution with rebreakage of the particles down to the size limit of fracture. The maturation index can increment continuously, for example under

  14. Emulsification in turbulent flow: 3. Daughter drop-size distribution.

    PubMed

    Tcholakova, Slavka; Vankova, Nina; Denkov, Nikolai D; Danner, Thomas

    2007-06-15

    Systematic set of experiments is performed to clarify the effects of several factors on the size distribution of the daughter drops, which are formed as a result of drop breakage during emulsification in turbulent flow. The effects of oil viscosity, etaD, interfacial tension, sigma, and rate of energy dissipation in the turbulent flow, epsilon, are studied. As starting oil-water premixes we use emulsions containing monodisperse oil drops, which have been generated by membrane emulsification. By passing these premixes through a narrow-gap homogenizer, working in turbulent regime of emulsification, we monitor the changes in the drop-size distribution with the emulsification time. The experimental data are analyzed by using a new numerical procedure, which is based on the assumption (supported by the experimental data) that the probability for formation of daughter drops with diameter smaller than the maximum diameter of the stable drops, dsize distribution of these daughter drops depend strongly on the viscosity of the dispersed phase. Different scaling laws are found to describe the experimental results for the oils of low and high viscosity. The obtained results for the daughter drop-size distribution are in a reasonably good agreement with the experimental results reported by other authors. In contrast, the comparison with several basic model functions, proposed in the literature, does not show good agreement and the possible reasons are discussed. The proposed numerical procedure allows us to describe accurately the evolution of all main characteristics of the drop-size distribution during emulsification, such as the number and volume averaged diameters, and the distributive and cumulative functions by

  15. Reversing the size-dependence of surface plasmon resonances

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Sheng; McMahon, Jeffrey M.; Schatz, George C.; Gray, Stephen K.; Sun, Yugang

    2010-01-01

    The size-dependence of surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) is poorly understood in the small particle limit due to complex physical/chemical effects and uncertainties in experimental samples. In this article, we report an approach for synthesizing an ideal class of colloidal Ag nanoparticles with highly uniform morphologies and narrow size distributions. Optical measurements and theoretical analyses for particle diameters in the d ≈ 2–20 nm range are presented. The SPR absorption band exhibits an exceptional behavior: As size decreases from d ≈ 20 nm it blue-shifts but then turns over near d ≈ 12 nm and strongly red-shifts. A multilayer Mie theory model agrees well with the observations, indicating that lowered electron conductivity in the outermost atomic layer, due to chemical interactions, is the cause of the red-shift. We corroborate this picture by experimentally demonstrating precise chemical control of the SPR peak positions via ligand exchange. PMID:20671201

  16. Temperature and size-dependent Hamaker constants for metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, K; Pinchuk, P

    2016-08-26

    Theoretical values of the Hamaker constant have been calculated for metal nanoparticles using Lifshitz theory. The theory describes the Hamaker constant in terms of the permittivity of the interacting bodies. Metal nanoparticles exhibit an internal size effect that alters the dielectric permittivity of the particle when its size falls below the mean free path of the conducting electrons. This size dependence of the permittivity leads to size-dependence of the Hamaker constant for metal nanoparticles. Additionally, the electron damping and the plasma frequency used to model the permittivity of the particle exhibit temperature-dependence, which lead to temperature dependence of the Hamaker constant. In this work, both the size and temperature dependence for gold, silver, copper, and aluminum nanoparticles is demonstrated. The results of this study might be of interest for studying the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution. PMID:27454147

  17. Temperature and size-dependent Hamaker constants for metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, K.; Pinchuk, P.

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical values of the Hamaker constant have been calculated for metal nanoparticles using Lifshitz theory. The theory describes the Hamaker constant in terms of the permittivity of the interacting bodies. Metal nanoparticles exhibit an internal size effect that alters the dielectric permittivity of the particle when its size falls below the mean free path of the conducting electrons. This size dependence of the permittivity leads to size-dependence of the Hamaker constant for metal nanoparticles. Additionally, the electron damping and the plasma frequency used to model the permittivity of the particle exhibit temperature-dependence, which lead to temperature dependence of the Hamaker constant. In this work, both the size and temperature dependence for gold, silver, copper, and aluminum nanoparticles is demonstrated. The results of this study might be of interest for studying the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution.

  18. Determination of size distribution of elliptical microvessels from size distribution measurement of their section profiles.

    PubMed

    Krasnoperov, R A; Gerasimov, A N

    2003-01-01

    In transmission electron microscopy, microvessels (MVs) are studied as profiles on ultrathin sections. To determine MV sizes from measurements made on MV profiles, an assumption must be made about MV shape, a circular cylinder being used to approximate the latter on limited lengths. However, this model is irrelevant in case MVs have some flatness. The elliptical cylinder model is preferable, although relationships between the cylinder profile (two-dimensional; 2D) and its true (three-dimensional; 3D) sizes are not yet known. We have obtained the 2D/3D functions that express the relationships between such profile sizes as the minor radius (Y), major radius (X), axial ratio (X/Y), area (S), and perimeter (P) on the one hand, and the corresponding MV sizes (Y(0), X(0), X(0)/Y(0), S(0), and P(0)) on the other. The 2D/3D functions make it possible to derive elliptical MV sizes from section profile size distributions, probability density functions (PDFs) for the latter being determined. We have applied the 2D/3D functions in studying axial ratios of thyroid hemocapillaries. A factual X/Y frequency histogram has been constructed and fitted by theoretical X/Y PDFs plotted for different sets of capillary sizes. The thyroid capillaries have been revealed to be clustered, 72.7% of them having X(0)/Y(0) approximately 1.6, 17.6%, X(0)/Y(0) approximately 1.0, and 9.7%, X(0)/Y(0) approximately 3.2. The proposed technique is instrumental in precise modeling of microcirculatory network geometry. PMID:12524478

  19. Particle size distribution dynamics during precipitative softening: declining solution composition.

    PubMed

    Nason, Jeffrey A; Lawler, Desmond F

    2009-02-01

    Particle removal is a critical step in the treatment of surface water for potable use, and the majority of drinking water treatment plants employ precipitative coagulation processes such as alum and iron "sweep-floc" coagulation or lime softening for particle pre-treatment. Unfortunately, little is quantitatively known about how particle size distributions are shaped by simultaneous precipitation and flocculation. In an earlier paper, we demonstrated the effects of the saturation ratio, the mixing intensity and the seed concentration on the rates of homogeneous nucleation, precipitative growth and flocculation during precipitation of calcium carbonate at constant solution composition using electronic particle counting techniques. In this work, we extend those findings to systems more closely emulating the conditions in actual softening processes (i.e., declining solution composition). Key findings include the strong dependence of the rate of flocculation on the initial saturation ratio and demonstration of the benefits of seeding precipitative softening from the perspective of optimizing the effluent particle size distribution. The mixing intensity during precipitation was also shown to strongly influence the final particle size distribution. Implications of the findings with respect to softening practice are discussed. PMID:18976791

  20. Effects of particle size distribution in thick film conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of particle size distribution in thick film conductors are discussed. The distribution of particle sizes does have an effect on fired film density but the effect is not always positive. A proper distribution of sizes is necessary, and while the theoretical models can serve as guides to selecting this proper distribution, improved densities can be achieved by empirical variations from the predictions of the models.

  1. The dependence of cirrus gamma size distributions expressed as volumes in N0-λ-μ phase space and bulk cloud properties on environmental conditions: Results from the Small Ice Particles in Cirrus Experiment (SPARTICUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel

    2015-10-01

    The variability of cirrus ice microphysical properties is investigated using observations obtained during the Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) campaign. An existing approach that represents a size distribution (SD) as a single gamma function using an ellipsoid of equally realizable solutions in (N0, λ, μ) phase space is modified to automatically identify multiple modes in SDs and characterize each mode by such an ellipsoid. The modified approach is applied to ice crystals with maximum dimension D > 15 µm collected by the 2-D stereo and 2-D precipitation probes on the Stratton Park Engineering Company Learjet. The dependencies of N0, μ, and λ from each mode, total number concentration, bulk extinction, ice water content (IWC), and mass median maximum dimension Dmm as a function of temperature T and cirrus type are then analyzed. The changes in the observed codependencies between N0, μ, and λ, bulk extinction, IWC, and Dmm with environmental conditions indicate that particles were larger at higher T during SPARTICUS. At most two modes were observed in any SD during SPARTICUS, with the average boundary between them at 115 µm, similar to past studies not using probes with shatter mitigating tips and artifact removal algorithms. The bimodality of the SDs increased with T. This and the differences in N0, μ, and λ between the modes suggest that particles with smaller D nucleated more recently than particles with larger D, which grew via vapor deposition and aggregation. Because smaller crystals, whose concentrations are uncertain, make marginal contributions to higher order moments, the use of higher moments for evaluating model fields is suggested.

  2. The Dependence of Cirrus Gamma Size Distributions Expressed as Volumes in N(sub 0)-Lambda-Mu Phase Space and Bulk Cloud Properties on Environmental Conditions: Results from the Small Ice Particles in Cirrus Experiment (SPARTICUS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The variability of cirrus ice microphysical properties is investigated using observations obtained during the Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) campaign. An existing approach that represents a size distribution (SD) as a single gamma function using an ellipsoid of equally realizable solutions in (N(sub 0), lambda, mu) phase space is modified to automatically identify multiple modes in SDs and characterize each mode by such an ellipsoid. The modified approach is applied to ice crystals with maximum dimension D greater than15 micrometers collected by the 2-D stereo and 2-D precipitation probes on the Stratton Park Engineering Company Learjet. The dependencies of N(sub 0), mu, and lambda from each mode, total number concentration, bulk extinction, ice water content (IWC), and mass median maximum dimension D(sub mm) as a function of temperature T and cirrus type are then analyzed. The changes in the observed codependencies between N(sub 0), mu, and lambda, bulk extinction, IWC, and D(sub mm) with environmental conditions indicate that particles were larger at higher T during SPARTICUS. At most two modes were observed in any SD during SPARTICUS, with the average boundary between them at 115 micrometers, similar to past studies not using probes with shatter mitigating tips and artifact removal algorithms. The bimodality of the SDs increased with T. This and the differences in N(sub 0), mu, and lambda between the modes suggest that particles with smaller D nucleated more recently than particles with larger D, which grew via vapor deposition and aggregation. Because smaller crystals, whose concentrations are uncertain, make marginal contributions to higher order moments, the use of higher moments for evaluating model fields is suggested.

  3. Establishing different size distributions in the asteroid belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    While gas is present in the protoplanetary disk, aerodynamic drag circularizes, equatorializes and shrinks planetesimal orbits. The strength of this effect is size-dependent effecting smaller planetesimals more severely. During planet formation debris from giant impacts amongst the growing terrestrial embryos can be transported to the asteroid belt via scattering events and secular resonances. The effectiveness of this transport is strongly size dependent due to the aforementioned gas drag. Thus transported debris in the asteroid belt can have a strong size sorting. Further processing due to collisions and YORP-induced rotational fission during the lifetime of the solar system must be taken into account before a model population of debris can be compared to suspected planetary debris in the asteroid belt, such as the A-type asteroids. Furthermore, scenarios such as the Grand Tack may establish size distributions since they predict that S-type asteroids are transported from an inner planetesimal disk while C-type asteroids are transporeted from an outer planetesimal disk.

  4. Accounting for dust aerosol size distribution in radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangnan; Min, Qilong; Peng, Yiran; Sun, Zhian; Zhao, Jian-Qi

    2015-07-01

    The impact of size distribution of mineral dust aerosol on radiative transfer was investigated using the Aerosol Robotic Network-retrieved aerosol size distributions. Three methods for determining the aerosol optical properties using size distributions were discussed. The first is referred to as a bin method in which the aerosol optical properties are determined for each bin of the size distribution. The second is named as an assembly mean method in which the aerosol optical properties are determined with an integration of the aerosol optical parameters over the observed size distribution. The third is a normal parameterization method based on an assumed size distribution. The bin method was used to generate the benchmark results in the radiation calculations against the methods of the assembly mean, and parameterizations based on two size distribution functions, namely, lognormal and gamma were examined. It is seen that the assembly mean method can produce aerosol radiative forcing with accuracy of better than 1%. The accuracies of the parameterizations based on lognormal and gamma size distributions are about 25% and 5%, respectively. Both the lognormal and gamma size distributions can be determined by two parameters, the effective radius and effective variance. The better results from the gamma size distribution can be explained by a third parameter of skewness which is found to be useful for judging how close the assumed distribution is to the observation result. The parameterizations based on the two assumed size distributions are also evaluated in a climate model. The results show that the reflected solar fluxes over the desert areas determined by the scheme based on the gamma size distribution are about 1 W m-2 less than those from the scheme based on the lognormal size distribution, bringing the model results closer to the observations.

  5. New acquisition techniques and statistical analysis of bubble size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proussevitch, A.; Sahagian, D.

    2005-12-01

    Various approaches have been taken to solve the long-standing problem of determining size distributions of objects embedded in an opaque medium. In the case of vesicles in volcanic rocks, the most reliable technique is 3-D imagery by computed X-Ray tomography. However, this method is expensive, requires intensive computational resources and thus limited and not always available for an investigator. As a cheaper alternative, 2-D cross-sectional data is commonly available, but requires stereological analysis for 3-D conversion. A stereology technique for spherical bubbles is quite robust but elongated non-spherical bubbles require complicated conversion approaches and large observed populations. We have revised computational schemes of applying non-spherical stereology for practical analysis of bubble size distributions. The basic idea of this new approach is to exclude from the conversion those classes (bins) of non-spherical bubbles that provide a larger cross-section probability distribution than a maximum value which depends on mean aspect ratio. Thus, in contrast to traditional stereological techniques, larger bubbles are "predicted" from the rest of the population. As a proof of principle, we have compared distributions so obtained with direct 3-D imagery (X-Ray tomography) for non-spherical bubbles from the same samples of vesicular basalts collected from the Colorado Plateau. The results of the comparison demonstrate that in cases where x-ray tomography is impractical, stereology can be used with reasonable reliability, even for non-spherical vesicles.

  6. Size and Age Dependence of Koronis Family Colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, L. A.

    2011-10-01

    The ancient and massive Koronis family now has four identified subfamilies (asteroid families made by the breakup of fragments of the ancient collision), with ages running from 5.7 to 290 My. This presents unique opportunities to explore space weathering processes, along with dynamical processes such as collisions and binary formation and destruction. Analysis of family members with accurate SDSS measurements shows a correlation of average subfamily color with age that for the first time is highly statistically significant. Yet Thomas et al. (2011) report a size dependence of the colors of the ancient family that demands caution when comparing subfamilies with differing size distributions. Reanalyis of the Thomas et al. data show the reported break near asteroid diameter 5 km is not significant. However, analysis of the much more extensive SDSS data set show a significant break past diameter 2.5 km, with smaller objects systematically bluer. The break is not present in the Karin subfamily (the youngest at 5.7 My), but is already fully developed in the Eriphyla subfamily (only 220 My). The reddening trend with age remains even when comparing only asteroids of similar size, confirming the presence of space weathering phenomena. The meaning of the trend with size is not immediately clear. We consider briefly the strengths and weaknesses of several interpretations of the bluer colors for small objects: 1) those objects receive more jolts from random collisions capable of shaking the regolith and exposing fresh material beneath; 2) those objects receive more jolts from the cycle of fission and recombination driven by YORP; and 3) the lower gravity on those objects retains regolith less well.

  7. The determination and optimization of (rutile) pigment particle size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    A light scattering particle size test which can be used with materials having a broad particle size distribution is described. This test is useful for pigments. The relation between the particle size distribution of a rutile pigment and its optical performance in a gray tint test at low pigment concentration is calculated and compared with experimental data.

  8. Size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient of thin films.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Ye; Huang, Bao-Ling; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-08-21

    Nanomaterials possess a high surface/volume ratio and surfaces play an essential role in size-dependent material properties. In the present study, nanometer-thick thin films were taken as an ideal system to investigate the surface-induced size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient. The surface eigenstress model was further developed with the consideration of thermal expansion, leading to analytic formulas of size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus, and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient of thin films. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on face-centered cubic (fcc) Ag, Cu, and Ni(001) thin films were conducted at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 600 K. The MD simulation results are perfectly consistent with the theoretical predictions, thereby verifying the theoretical approach. The newly developed surface eigenstress model will be able to attack similar problems in other types of nanomaterials. PMID:27426852

  9. Morphology, size distribution and elemental composition of several dental debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Shigeaki; Iwadera, Nobuki; Esaki, Mitsue; Aoyama, Ken-Ichi; Akasaka, Tsukasa; Uo, Motohiro; Morita, Manabu; Yawaka, Yasutaka; Watari, Fumio

    2012-12-01

    We investigated morphologies, size distributions and elemental compositions of dental debris formed by cutting/grinding teeth or dental alloys. The average size of debris formed by cutting/grinding dental alloy was around 100 μm and that of teeth was 20 μm. The debris formed by grinding with diamond or carborundum point had isotropic irregular shape, while the debris formed by cutting with carbide bar had characteristic lathe-cut shape. The elemental analysis indicated that the debris formed by grinding dental alloy with carborundum point consisted of not only the particles of the alloy but also the particles of Si compounds with the size of around 10 μm. The particles of Si compounds would be formed by abrasion of the grinding instrument (carborundum, SiC). Similarly, the debris formed by grinding with diamond point also contained submicro-sized particles consisting of C compounds. The results indicate that the morphology and composition of dental debris are varied depending on the combination between the workpiece and the cutting/grinding materials and that the dental debris consist of both the workpiece and the cutting/grinding materials in some combination. In addition, some of the debris of tooth had the size less than 2 μm, which has a potential to induce inflammation. Though the inflammation can be expected at low level, it is required to investigate the details in future.

  10. Time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyang

    1999-09-01

    I show that the angular distribution of electrons photoionized from gas phase targets by short light pulses is time-dependent, when the orbital momentum composition of the photocurrent changes with excitation energy so evolves with the time of detection. A theory of time- dependent photoionization is outlined and general formulas of time-dependent photoelectron flux and angular distribution are given. Two general propagator methods suitable to describe the time-dependent photoionization and scattering processes are developed. The photoionization process is viewed as a local excitation followed by a half scattering. The local excitation process is solved theoretically in a small region around the target core. This approach has been generalized to describe the evolution of a wavepacket in an unbound system. An asymptotic propagator theorem is discovered and used to derive analytic expressions for asymptotic propagators. The origin of the time dependence is explored by parameterizing the time delay and orbital momentum coupling in a two channel model. K-shell photoionization of N2 and CO are calculated with this time- dependent photoionization theory, implemented using a multiple scattering model. Numerical results demonstrate that the time dependence of photoelectron angular distributions is a realistic effect.

  11. Monte Carlo predictions of DNA fragment-size distributions for large sizes after HZE particle irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Sachs, R. K.; Brenner, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    DSBs (double-strand breaks) produced by densely ionizing space radiation are not located randomly in the genome: recent data indicate DSB clustering along chromosomes. DSB clustering at large scales, from >100 Mbp down to approximately 2 kbp, is modeled using a Monte-Carlo algorithm. A random-walk model of chromatin is combined with a track model, that predicts the radial distribution of energy from an ion, and the RLC (randomly-located-clusters) formalism, in software called DNAbreak. This model generalizes the random-breakage model, whose broken-stick fragment-size distribution is applicable to low-LET radiation. DSB induction due to track interaction with the DNA volume depends on the radiation quality parameter Q. This dose-independent parameter depends only weakly on LET. Multi-track, high-dose effects depend on the cluster intensity parameter lambda, proportional to fluence as defined by the RLC formalism. After lambda is determined by a numerical experiment, the model reduces to one adjustable parameter Q. The best numerical fits to the experimental data, determining Q, are obtained. The knowledge of lambda and Q allows us to give biophysically based extrapolations of high-dose DNA fragment-size data to low doses or to high LETs.

  12. Approximate sample sizes required to estimate length distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, L.E.

    2007-01-01

    The sample sizes required to estimate fish length were determined by bootstrapping from reference length distributions. Depending on population characteristics and species-specific maximum lengths, 1-cm length-frequency histograms required 375-1,200 fish to estimate within 10% with 80% confidence, 2.5-cm histograms required 150-425 fish, proportional stock density required 75-140 fish, and mean length required 75-160 fish. In general, smaller species, smaller populations, populations with higher mortality, and simpler length statistics required fewer samples. Indices that require low sample sizes may be suitable for monitoring population status, and when large changes in length are evident, additional sampling effort may be allocated to more precisely define length status with more informative estimators. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  13. Size-dependent dielectrophoretic crossover frequency of spherical particles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ping-You; Chen, I-An; Yeh, Che-Kai; Chen, Pin-Yi; Juang, Jia-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been extensively used in lab-on-a-chip systems for trapping, separating, and manipulating of micro particles suspended in a liquid medium. The most widely used analytic model, the dipole model, provides an accurate prediction on the crossover frequency of submicron particles, but cannot explain the significant drop in crossover frequency of larger particles. Here, we present numerical simulations using the Maxwell stress tensor (MST) and finite element method to study the size effect of the DEP crossover frequency of spherical polystyrene particles suspended in de-ionized water. Our results show that the surface conductance due to the electrical double layer plays a key role, and the size dependency of crossover frequency obtained by the MST method agrees reasonably well with published experimental data. The exponents of the power law are approximately -1.0 and -4.3 for smaller (diameter < 4.6 μm) and larger particles (diameter  > 4.6 μm), respectively. The free surface charge distribution reveals that the charge begins accumulating on the particle equator for particle diameters larger than a critical diameter of 4.6 μm, a result not captured by the dipolar approximation. This method may be extended to analyze bioparticles with complex shapes and composition, and provides new insights into the interpretation of dielectrophoresis applications using lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:26909121

  14. Binary nucleation kinetics. I. Self-consistent size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Wilemski, G.; Wyslouzil, B.E. ||

    1995-07-15

    Using the principle of detailed balance, we derive a new self-consistency requirement, termed the kinetic product rule, relating the evaporation coefficients and equilibrium cluster distribution for a binary system. We use this result to demonstrate and resolve an inconsistency for an idealized Kelvin model of nucleation in a simple binary mixture. We next examine several common forms for the equilibrium distribution of binary clusters based on the capillarity approximation and ideal vapor behavior. We point out fundamental deficiencies for each expression. We also show that each distribution yields evaporation coefficients that formally satisfy the new kinetic product rule but are physically unsatisfactory because they depend on the monomer vapor concentrations. We then propose a new form of the binary distribution function that is free of the deficiencies of the previous functions except for its reliance on the capillarity approximation. This new self-consistent classical (SCC) size distribution for binary clusters has the following properties: It satisfies the law of mass action; it reduces to an SCC unary distribution for clusters of a single component; and it produces physically acceptable evaporation rate coefficients that also satisfy the new kinetic product rule. Since it is possible to construct other examples of similarly well-behaved distributions, our result is not unique in this respect, but it does give reasonable predictions. As an illustration, we calculate binary nucleation rates and vapor activities for the ethanol--hexanol system at 260 K using the new SCC distribution and compare them to experimental results. The theoretical rates are uniformly higher than the experimental values over the entire vapor composition range. Although the predicted activities are lower, we find good agreement between the measured and theoretical slope of the critical vapor activity curve at a constant nucleation rate of 10{sup 7} cm{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}2}.

  15. Size-dependent concentrations of thermal vacancies in solid films.

    PubMed

    Gao, Panpan; Wu, Quan; Li, Xi; Ma, Hongxin; Zhang, Hao; Volinsky, Alex A; Qiao, Lijie; Su, Yanjing

    2016-08-10

    Solid films are considered as typical model systems to study size effects on thermal vacancy concentration in nanomaterials. By combining the generalized Young-Laplace equation with the chemical potential of vacancies, a strict size-dependent thermodynamic model of vacancies, which includes the surface intrinsic elastic parameters of the eigenstress, Young's modulus and the geometric size of the solid films, was established. The vacancy concentration changes in the film with respect to the bulk value, depending on the geometric size and surface stress sign of the solid films. Atomistic simulations of Au and Pt films verified the developed thermodynamic model. These results provide physical insights into the size-dependent thermal vacancy concentration in nanomaterials. PMID:27476928

  16. The size frequency distribution of dormant Jupiter family comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Kathryn; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Jedicke, Robert

    2006-07-01

    We estimate the total number and the slope of the size-frequency distribution (SFD) of dormant Jupiter family comets (JFCs) by fitting a one-parameter model to the known population. We first select 61 near-Earth objects (NEOs) that are likely to be dormant JFCs because their orbits are dynamically coupled to Jupiter [Bottke, W.F., Morbidelli, A., Jedicke, R., Petit, J., Levison, H.F., Michel, P., Metcalfe, T.S., 2002a. Icarus 156, 399-433]. Then, from the numerical simulations of Levison and Duncan [1997. Icarus 127, 13-32], we construct an orbit distribution model for JFCs in the NEO orbital element space. We assume an orbit-independent SFD for all JFCs, the slope of which is our unique free parameter. Finally, we compute observational biases for dormant JFCs using a calibrated NEO survey simulator [Jedicke, R., Morbidelli, A., Spahr, T., Petit, J., Bottke, W.F., 2003. Icarus 161, 17-33]. By fitting the biased model to the data, we estimate that there are ˜75 dormant JFCs with H<18 in the NEO region and that the slope of their cumulative SFD is -1.5±0.3. Our slope for the SFD of dormant JFCs is very close to that of active JFCs as determined by Weissman and Lowry [2003. Lunar Planet. Sci. 34. Abstract 2003]. Thus, we argue that when JFCs fade they are likely to become dormant rather than to disrupt and that the fate of faded comets is size-independent. Our results imply that the size distribution of the JFC progenitors—the scattered disk trans-neptunian population—either (i) has a similar and shallow SFD or ( i) is slightly steeper and physical processes acting on the comets in a size-dependent manner creates the shallower active comet SFD. Our measured slope, typical of collisionally evolved populations with a size-dependent impact strength [Benz, W., Asphaug, E., 1999. Icarus 142, 5-20], suggests that scattered disk bodies reached collisional equilibrium inside the protoplanetary disk prior to their removal from the planetary region.

  17. The distribution of bubble sizes during reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yin; Oh, S. Peng; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Sutter, P. M.

    2016-09-01

    A key physical quantity during reionization is the size of H II regions. Previous studies found a characteristic bubble size which increases rapidly during reionization, with apparent agreement between simulations and analytic excursion set theory. Using four different methods, we critically examine this claim. In particular, we introduce the use of the watershed algorithm - widely used for void finding in galaxy surveys - which we show to be an unbiased method with the lowest dispersion and best performance on Monte Carlo realizations of a known bubble size probability density function (PDF). We find that a friends-of-friends algorithm declares most of the ionized volume to be occupied by a network of volume-filling regions connected by narrow tunnels. For methods tuned to detect the volume-filling regions, previous apparent agreement between simulations and theory is spurious, and due to a failure to correctly account for the window function of measurement schemes. The discrepancy is already obvious from visual inspection. Instead, H II regions in simulations are significantly larger (by factors of 10-1000 in volume) than analytic predictions. The size PDF is narrower, and evolves more slowly with time, than predicted. It becomes more sharply peaked as reionization progresses. These effects are likely caused by bubble mergers, which are inadequately modelled by analytic theory. Our results have important consequences for high-redshift 21 cm observations, the mean free path of ionizing photons, and the visibility of Lyα emitters, and point to a fundamental failure in our understanding of the characteristic scales of the reionization process.

  18. Lunar soil: Size distribution and mineralogical constituents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duke, M.B.; Woo, C.C.; Bird, M.L.; Sellers, G.A.; Finkelman, R.B.

    1970-01-01

    The lunar soil collected by Apollo 11 consists primarily of submillimeter material and is finer in grain size than soil previously recorded photographically by Surveyor experiments. The main constituents are fine-grained to glassy rocks of basaltic affinity and coherent breccia of undetermined origin. Dark glass, containing abundant nickel-iron spheres, coats many rocks, mineral, and breccia fragments. Several types of homogeneous glass occur as fragments and spheres. Colorless spheres, probably an exotic component, are abundant in the fraction finer than 20 microns.

  19. Universal relation for size dependent thermodynamic properties of metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shiyun; Qi, Weihong; Cheng, Yajuan; Huang, Baiyun; Wang, Mingpu; Li, Yejun

    2011-06-14

    The previous model on surface free energy has been extended to calculate size dependent thermodynamic properties (i.e., melting temperature, melting enthalpy, melting entropy, evaporation temperature, Curie temperature, Debye temperature and specific heat capacity) of nanoparticles. According to the quantitative calculation of size effects on the calculated thermodynamic properties, it is found that most thermodynamic properties of nanoparticles vary linearly with 1/D as a first approximation. In other words, the size dependent thermodynamic properties P(n) have the form of P(n) = P(b)(1 -K/D), in which P(b) is the corresponding bulk value and K is the material constant. This may be regarded as a scaling law for most of the size dependent thermodynamic properties for different materials. The present predictions are consistent literature values. PMID:21523307

  20. The size distribution of inhabited planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Fergus

    2016-02-01

    Earth-like planets are expected to provide the greatest opportunity for the detection of life beyond the Solar system. However, our planet cannot be considered a fair sample, especially if intelligent life exists elsewhere. Just as a person's country of origin is a biased sample among countries, so too their planet of origin may be a biased sample among planets. The magnitude of this effect can be substantial: over 98 per cent of the world's population live in a country larger than the median. In the context of a simple model where the mean population density is invariant to planet size, we infer that a given inhabited planet (such as our nearest neighbour) has a radius r < 1.2r⊕ (95 per cent confidence bound). We show that this result is likely to hold not only for planets hosting advanced life, but also for those which harbour primitive life forms. Further, inferences may be drawn for any variable which influences population size. For example, since population density is widely observed to decline with increasing body mass, we conclude that most intelligent species are expected to exceed 300 kg.

  1. Size-dependent decoherence of excitonic states in semiconductor microcrystallites

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yuxi; Miranowicz, Adam; Oezdemir, Sahin K.; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2003-03-01

    The size-dependent decoherence of the exciton states, resulting from the spontaneous emission, is investigated in a semiconductor spherical microcrystallite under the condition a{sub B}<size of the microcrystallite corresponds to the shorter coherence time. If the initial state is a superposition of two different excitonic coherent states, the coherence time depends on both the overlap of two excitonic coherent states and the size of the microcrystallite. When the system with fixed size is initially in the even or odd coherent state, the larger average number of the excitons corresponds to the faster decoherence. When the average number of the excitons is given, the bigger size of the microcrystallite corresponds to the faster decoherence. The decoherence of the exciton states for the materials GaAs and CdS is numerically studied by our theoretical analysis.

  2. Knife mill operating factors effect on switchgrass particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bitra, V.S.P.; Womac, A.R.; Yang, Y.T.; Igathinathane, C.; Miu, P.I; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-06-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) particle size distributions created by a knife mill were determined for integral classifying screen sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates from 2 to 11 kg/min. Particle distributions were classified with standardized sieves for forage analysis that included horizontal sieving motion with machined-aluminum sieves of thickness proportional to sieve opening dimensions. Then, a wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Correlation coefficient of geometric mean length with knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.872, 0.349, and 0.037, respectively. Hence, knife mill screen size largely determined particle size of switchgrass chop. Feed rate had an unexpected influence on particle size, though to a lesser degree than screen size. The Rosin Rammler function fit the chopped switchgrass size distribution data with an R2 > 0.982. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Uniformity coefficient was more than 4.0, which indicated a large assortment of particles and also represented a well-graded particle size distribution. Knife mill chopping of switchgrass produced strongly fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 12.7 25.4 mm screens and fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 50.8 mm screen. Results of this extensive analysis of particle sizes can be applied to selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of switchgrass chop, and will serve as a guide for relations among the various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

  3. Investigating the Size Dependent Material Properties of Nanoceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Bushra B.

    Nanoceria is widely being investigated for applications as support materials for fuel cell catalysts, free radical scavengers, and as chemical and mechanical abrasives due to its high antioxidant capacity and its oxygen buffering capacity. This antioxidant or oxygen buffering capacity has been reported to be highly size dependent and related to its redox properties. However, the quantification of this antioxidant capacity has not been well defined or understood and has been often been carried out using colorimetric assays which do not directly correlate to ceria nanoparticle properties. Fabrication rules for developing materials with optimal antioxidant/oxygen buffering capacities are not yet defined and one of the limitations has been the challenge of obtaining quantitative measurements of the antioxidant properties. In this work, we create our own library of ceria nanoparticles of various size distributions by two synthesis methods: sol-gel peroxo and thermal decomposition/calcination and annealing in open atmosphere at three different temperatures. The synthesis methods and conditions produce characteristic sizes and morphologies of ceria nanoparticles. Qualitative and quantitative approaches are used for characterization and to predict reactivity. Qualitative approaches include Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements and Raman analysis while quantitative approaches include a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) Rietveld analysis, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to measure crystallite sizes, lattice parameters, oxygen site occupancies, and the relative abundance of Ce(III) ions in a nanoceria sample. These methods are discussed in detail in addition to their limitations and challenges. These methods are used to predict nanocrystalline or bulk-like behavior of ceria nanoparticles. The investigation of the material properties is also extended to test the redox properties of ceria

  4. Distributions of region size and GDP and their relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Hu; Chunxia, Yang; Xueshuai, Zhu; Zhilai, Zheng; Ya, Cao

    2015-07-01

    We first analyze the distribution of metropolitan (city) size, the distribution of metropolitan (city) GDP and the relation of both distributions. It is found that (1) the tails of distributions of size and GDP both obey Pareto Law with the Pareto exponent 1; (2) compared with Pareto exponent in GDP, Pareto exponent in size is bigger. Then an agent model is built to study the underlying formation mechanism of distributions of region size and GDP. Our model presents the mechanism how economic factors flow between regions to reproduce the tail behavior and the difference between the Pareto exponents of size and those of GDP. At last, the simulated results agree with the real empirical well.

  5. The Italian primary school-size distribution and the city-size: a complex nexus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, Alessandro; di Clemente, Riccardo; Buldyrev, Sergey V.

    2014-06-01

    We characterize the statistical law according to which Italian primary school-size distributes. We find that the school-size can be approximated by a log-normal distribution, with a fat lower tail that collects a large number of very small schools. The upper tail of the school-size distribution decreases exponentially and the growth rates are distributed with a Laplace PDF. These distributions are similar to those observed for firms and are consistent with a Bose-Einstein preferential attachment process. The body of the distribution features a bimodal shape suggesting some source of heterogeneity in the school organization that we uncover by an in-depth analysis of the relation between schools-size and city-size. We propose a novel cluster methodology and a new spatial interaction approach among schools which outline the variety of policies implemented in Italy. Different regional policies are also discussed shedding lights on the relation between policy and geographical features.

  6. Size-dependent pyroelectric properties of gallium nitride nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Wang, Chengyuan

    2016-04-01

    The size scale effect on the pyroelectric properties is studied for gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) based on molecular dynamics simulations and the theoretical analysis. Due to the significant influence of the surface thermoelasticity and piezoelectricity at the nanoscale, the pyroelectric coefficient of GaN NWs is found to depend on the cross-sectional size. This size-dependent pyroelectric coefficient of GaN NWs together with the size-dependent dielectric constant reported in our previous study is employed to study the pyroelectric potential of GaN NWs subjected to heating. The results show that the size scale effect is significant for thin NWs (cross-sectional size in nanometers) and may raise the pyroelectric potential of GaN NWs by over 10 times. Such a size scale effect on the pyroelectric properties of NWs originates from the influence of thermoelasticity, piezoelectricity, and dielectricity at the nanoscale and decreases with increasing cross-section of GaN NWs. It is expected that the present study may have strong implication in the field of energy harvesting at the nanoscale, as pyroelectricity offers a new avenue to the design of novel nanogenerators.

  7. Size distribution of Amazon River bed sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordin, C.F.; Meade, R.H.; Curtis, W.F.; Bosio, N.J.; Landim, P.M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The first recorded observations of bed material of the Amazon River were made in 1843 by Lt William Lewis Herndon of the US Navy, when he travelled the river from its headwaters to its mouth, sounding its depths, and noting the nature of particles caught in a heavy grease smeared to the bottom of his sounding weight1. He reported the bed material of the river to be mostly sand and fine gravel. Oltman and Ames took samples at a few locations in 1963 and 1964, and reported the bed material at O??bidos, Brazil, to be fine sands, with median diameters ranging from 0.15 to 0.25 mm (ref. 2). We present here a summary of particle-size analyses of samples of streambed material collected from the Amazon River and its major tributaries along a reach of the river from Iquitos in Peru, ???3,500 km above Macapa?? Brazil, to a point 220 km above Macapa??3. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  8. Size-dependent magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsula, Vitalii; Moskvin, Maksym; Dutz, Silvio; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Uniform iron oxide nanoparticles in the size range from 10 to 24 nm and polydisperse 14 nm iron oxide particles were prepared by thermal decomposition of Fe(III) carboxylates in the presence of oleic acid and co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides by ammonium hydroxide followed by oxidation, respectively. While the first method produced hydrophobic oleic acid coated particles, the second one formed hydrophilic, but uncoated, nanoparticles. To make the iron oxide particles water dispersible and colloidally stable, their surface was modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and sucrose, respectively. Size and size distribution of the nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and X-ray diffraction. Surface of the PEG-functionalized and sucrose-modified iron oxide particles was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Magnetic properties were measured by means of vibration sample magnetometry and specific absorption rate in alternating magnetic fields was determined calorimetrically. It was found, that larger ferrimagnetic particles showed higher heating performance than smaller superparamagnetic ones. In the transition range between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism, samples with a broader size distribution provided higher heating power than narrow size distributed particles of comparable mean size. Here presented particles showed promising properties for a possible application in magnetic hyperthermia.

  9. Determination of particle size distributions from acoustic wave propagation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.D.; Norato, M.A.; Sangani, A.S.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1999-05-01

    The wave equations for the interior and exterior of the particles are ensemble averaged and combined with an analysis by Allegra and Hawley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. {bold 51}, 1545 (1972)] for the interaction of a single particle with the incident wave to determine the phase speed and attenuation of sound waves propagating through dilute slurries. The theory is shown to compare very well with the measured attenuation. The inverse problem, i.e., the problem of determining the particle size distribution given the attenuation as a function of frequency, is examined using regularization techniques that have been successful for bubbly liquids. It is shown that, unlike the bubbly liquids, the success of solving the inverse problem is limited since it depends strongly on the nature of particles and the frequency range used in inverse calculations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Cluster-size dependent randomization traffic flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kun; Wang, Bing-Hong; Fu, Chuan-Ji; Lu, Yu-Feng

    2007-11-01

    In order to exhibit the meta-stable states, several slow-to-start rules have been investigated as modification to Nagel-Schreckenberg (NS) model. These models can reproduce some realistic phenomena which are absent in the original NS model. But in these models, the size of cluster is still not considered as a useful parameter. In real traffic, the slow-to-start motion of a standing vehicle often depends on the degree of congestion which can be measured by the clusters' size. According to this idea, we propose a cluster-size dependent slow-to-start model based on the speed-dependent slow-to-start rule (VDR) model. It gives expected results through simulations. Comparing with the VDR model, our new model has a better traffic efficiency and shows richer complex characters.

  11. The Angstrom Exponent and Bimodal Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent H.

    2005-01-01

    Powerlaws have long been used to describe the spectral dependence of aerosol extinction, and the wavelength exponent of the aerosol extinction powerlaw is commonly referred to as the Angstrom exponent. The Angstrom exponent is often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size, with values greater than two indicating small particles associated with combustion byproducts, and values less than one indicating large particles like sea salt and dust. In this study, we investigate the relationship between the Angstrom exponent and the mode parameters of bimodal aerosol size distributions using Mie theory calculations and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals. We find that Angstrom exponents based upon seven wavelengths (0.34, 0.38, 0.44, 0.5, 0.67, 0.87, and 1.02 micrometers) are sensitive to the volume fraction of aerosols with radii less then 0.6 micrometers, but not to the fine mode effective radius. The Angstrom exponent is also known to vary with wavelength, which is commonly referred to as curvature; we show how the spectral curvature can provide additional information about aerosol size distributions for intermediate values of the Angstrom exponent. Curvature also has a significant effect on the conclusions that can be drawn about two-wavelength Angstrom exponents; long wavelengths (0.67, 0.87 micrometers) are sensitive to fine mode volume fraction of aerosols but not fine mode effective radius, while short wavelengths (0.38, 0.44 micrometers) are sensitive to the fine mode effective radius but not the fine mode volume fraction.

  12. Intercomparison of 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS 3321): uncertainties in particle sizing and number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Sascha; Müller, Thomas; Weinhold, Kay; Zikova, Nadezda; Martins dos Santos, Sebastiao; Marinoni, Angela; Bischof, Oliver F.; Kykal, Carsten; Ries, Ludwig; Meinhardt, Frank; Aalto, Pasi; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic particle size spectrometers are a well-established method to measure number size distributions of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere. Quality assurance is essential for atmospheric observational aerosol networks to obtain comparable results with known uncertainties. In a laboratory study within the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network), 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS model 3321, TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) were compared with a focus on flow rates, particle sizing, and the unit-to-unit variability of the particle number size distribution. Flow rate deviations were relatively small (within a few percent), while the sizing accuracy was found to be within 10 % compared to polystyrene latex (PSL) reference particles. The unit-to-unit variability in terms of the particle number size distribution during this study was within 10 % to 20 % for particles in the range of 0.9 up to 3 µm, which is acceptable for atmospheric measurements. For particles smaller than that, the variability increased up to 60 %, probably caused by differences in the counting efficiencies of individual units. Number size distribution data for particles smaller than 0.9 µm in aerodynamic diameter should only be used with caution. For particles larger than 3 µm, the unit-to-unit variability increased as well. A possible reason is an insufficient sizing accuracy in combination with a steeply sloping particle number size distribution and the increasing uncertainty due to decreasing counting. Particularly this uncertainty of the particle number size distribution must be considered if higher moments of the size distribution such as the particle volume or mass are calculated, which require the conversion of the aerodynamic diameter measured to a volume equivalent diameter. In order to perform a quantitative quality assurance, a traceable reference method for the particle number concentration in the size range 0.5-3 µm

  13. Electron structure: Shape, size, and generalized parton distributions in QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Gerald A.

    2014-12-01

    The shape of the electron is studied using lowest-order perturbation theory. Quantities used to probe the structure of the proton—form factors, generalized parton distributions, transverse densities, Wigner distributions and the angular momentum content—are computed for the electron-photon component of the electron wave function. The influence of longitudinally polarized photons, demanded by the need for infrared regularization via a nonzero photon mass, is included. The appropriate value of the photon mass depends on experimental conditions, and consequently the size of the electron (as defined by the slope of its Dirac form factor) bound in a hydrogen atom is found to be about four times larger than when the electron is in a continuum scattering state. The shape of the electron, as determined from the transverse density and generalized parton distributions, is shown not to be round, and the continuum electron is shown to be far less round than the bound electron. An electron distribution function (analogous to the quark distribution function) is defined, and that of the bound electron is shown to be suppressed compared to that of the continuum electron. If the relative transverse momentum of the virtual electron and photon is large compared with the electron mass, the virtual electron and photon each carry nearly the total angular momentum of the physical electron (1 /2 ), with the orbital angular momentum being nearly (-1 /2 ). Including the nonzero photon mass leads to the suppression of end-point contributions to form factors. Implications for proton structure and color transparency are discussed.

  14. Microfluidic-Enabled Liposomes Elucidate Size-Dependent Transdermal Transport

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, Mariana; Vreeland, Wyatt N.; Quezado, Zenaide; Finkel, Julia C.; DeVoe, Don L.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic synthesis of small and nearly-monodisperse liposomes is used to investigate the size-dependent passive transdermal transport of nanoscale lipid vesicles. While large liposomes with diameters above 105 nm are found to be excluded from deeper skin layers past the stratum corneum, the primary barrier to nanoparticle transport, liposomes with mean diameters between 31–41 nm exhibit significantly enhanced penetration. Furthermore, multicolor fluorescence imaging reveals that the smaller liposomes pass rapidly through the stratum corneum without vesicle rupture. These findings reveal that nanoscale liposomes with well-controlled size and minimal size variance are excellent vehicles for transdermal delivery of functional nanoparticle drugs. PMID:24658111

  15. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga`s mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  16. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga's mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  17. The Size Distribution of Jupiter-Family Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Lowry, Stephen C.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: We are continuing our program to determine the size distribution of cometary nuclei. We have compiled a catalog of 105 measurements of 57 cometary nuclei, drawn from the general literature, from our own program of CCD photometry of distant cometary nuclei (Lowry and Weissman), and from unpublished observations by colleagues. We model the cumulative size distribution of the nuclei as a power law. Previous determinations of the size distribution slope do not agree. Fernandez et al. found a slope of alpha = 2.65+/-0.25 whereas Lowry et al. and Weissman and Lowry each found a slope of alpha = 1.60+/-0.10.

  18. Oligogermanes as molecular precursors for germanium(0) nanoparticles: Size control and size-dependent fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Schrick, Aaron C.; Weinert, Charles S.

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Catenated germanium compounds are employed as molecular precursors for germanium(0) nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles, and their fluorescence spectra, depend on the number of catenated germanium atoms present in the precursor. - Highlights: • We have used oligogermanes for the size-specific synthesis of germanium(0) nanoparticles. • The size of the nanomaterials obtained depends directly on the degree of catenation present in the oligogermane precursor. • The nanoparticles are shown to exhibit size-dependent fluorescence. • Oligogermanes will function as useful precursors for the synthesis of a variety of nanomaterials. - Abstract: Germanium nanoparticles were synthesized in solution from novel oligogermane molecular precursors. The size of the nanoparticles obtained is directly related to the number of catenated germanium atoms present in the oligogermane precursor and the nanoparticles exhibit size-dependent fluorescence. The germanium nanoparticles were also characterized by TEM, powder XRD, FTIR, EDS and XPS methods. This method appears to be a promising new route for the synthesis of germanium nanoparticles since the size of the materials obtained can be controlled by the choice of the oligogermane used as the precursor.

  19. The distribution of species range size: a stochastic process.

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Kevin J; He, Fangliang

    2002-01-01

    The major role played by environmental factors in determining the geographical range sizes of species raises the possibility of describing their long-term dynamics in relatively simple terms, a goal which has hitherto proved elusive. Here we develop a stochastic differential equation to describe the dynamics of the range size of an individual species based on the relationship between abundance and range size, derive a limiting stationary probability model to quantify the stochastic nature of the range size for that species at steady state, and then generalize this model to the species-range size distribution for an assemblage. The model fits well to several empirical datasets of the geographical range sizes of species in taxonomic assemblages, and provides the simplest explanation of species-range size distributions to date. PMID:12028767

  20. Size distributions of micro-bubbles generated by a pressurized dissolution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taya, C.; Maeda, Y.; Hosokawa, S.; Tomiyama, A.; Ito, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Size of micro-bubbles is widely distributed in the range of one to several hundreds micrometers and depends on generation methods, flow conditions and elapsed times after the bubble generation. Although a size distribution of micro-bubbles should be taken into account to improve accuracy in numerical simulations of flows with micro-bubbles, a variety of the size distribution makes it difficult to introduce the size distribution in the simulations. On the other hand, several models such as the Rosin-Rammler equation and the Nukiyama-Tanazawa equation have been proposed to represent the size distribution of particles or droplets. Applicability of these models to the size distribution of micro-bubbles has not been examined yet. In this study, we therefore measure size distribution of micro-bubbles generated by a pressurized dissolution method by using a phase Doppler anemometry (PDA), and investigate the applicability of the available models to the size distributions of micro-bubbles. Experimental apparatus consists of a pressurized tank in which air is dissolved in liquid under high pressure condition, a decompression nozzle in which micro-bubbles are generated due to pressure reduction, a rectangular duct and an upper tank. Experiments are conducted for several liquid volumetric fluxes in the decompression nozzle. Measurements are carried out at the downstream region of the decompression nozzle and in the upper tank. The experimental results indicate that (1) the Nukiyama-Tanasawa equation well represents the size distribution of micro-bubbles generated by the pressurized dissolution method, whereas the Rosin-Rammler equation fails in the representation, (2) the bubble size distribution of micro-bubbles can be evaluated by using the Nukiyama-Tanasawa equation without individual bubble diameters, when mean bubble diameter and skewness of the bubble distribution are given, and (3) an evaluation method of visibility based on the bubble size distribution and bubble

  1. First size-dependent growth rate measurements of 1 to 5 nm freshly formed atmospheric nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, C.; Chen, M.; Zhao, J.; Smith, J.; McMurry, P. H.; Wang, J.

    2011-09-01

    This study presents the first measurements of size-dependent particle diameter growth rates for freshly nucleated particles down to 1 nm geometric diameter. Data analysis methods were developed, de-coupling the size and time-dependence of particle growth rates by fitting the aerosol general dynamic equation to size distributions obtained at an instant in time. Size distributions of freshly nucleated particles were measured during two intensive measurement campaigns in different environments (Atlanta, GA and Boulder, CO) using a recently developed electrical mobility spectrometer with a diethylene glycol-based ultrafine condensation particle counter as the detector. Size and time-dependent growth rates were obtained directly from measured size distributions and were found to increase approximately linearly with size from ~1 to 3 nm geometric diameter, ranging, for example, from 5.6 ± 2.0 to 27 ± 5.3 nm h-1 in Boulder (13:00) and from 5.5 ± 0.82 to 7.6 ± 0.56 nm h-1 in Atlanta (13:00). The resulting growth rate enhancement Γ, defined as the ratio of the observed growth rate to the growth rate due to the condensation of sulfuric acid only, was found to increase approximately linearly with size from ~1 to 3 nm geometric diameter, having lower limit values that approached ~1 at 1.2 nm geometric diameter in Atlanta and ~3 at 0.8 nm geometric diameter in Boulder, and having upper limit values that reached 8.3 at 4.1 nm geometric diameter in Atlanta and 25 at 2.7 nm geometric diameter in Boulder. Survival probability calculations comparing constant and size-dependent growth indicate that neglecting the strong growth rate size dependence from 1 to 3 nm observed in this study could lead to a significant overestimation of CCN survival probability.

  2. INITIAL PLANETESIMAL SIZES AND THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichting, Hilke E.; Fuentes, Cesar I.; Trilling, David E.

    2013-08-01

    The Kuiper Belt is a remnant from the early solar system and its size distribution contains many important constraints that can be used to test models of planet formation and collisional evolution. We show, by comparing observations with theoretical models, that the observed Kuiper Belt size distribution is well matched by coagulation models, which start with an initial planetesimal population with radii of about 1 km, and subsequent collisional evolution. We find that the observed size distribution above R {approx} 30 km is primordial, i.e., it has not been modified by collisional evolution over the age of the solar system, and that the size distribution below R {approx} 30 km has been modified by collisions and that its slope is well matched by collisional evolution models that use published strength laws. We investigate in detail the resulting size distribution of bodies ranging from 0.01 km to 30 km and find that its slope changes several times as a function of radius before approaching the expected value for an equilibrium collisional cascade of material strength dominated bodies for R {approx}< 0.1 km. Compared to a single power-law size distribution that would span the whole range from 0.01 km to 30 km, we find in general a strong deficit of bodies around R {approx} 10 km and a strong excess of bodies around 2 km in radius. This deficit and excess of bodies are caused by the planetesimal size distribution left over from the runaway growth phase, which left most of the initial mass in small planetesimals while only a small fraction of the total mass is converted into large protoplanets. This excess mass in small planetesimals leaves a permanent signature in the size distribution of small bodies that is not erased after 4.5 Gyr of collisional evolution. Observations of the small Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) size distribution can therefore test if large KBOs grew as a result of runaway growth and constrained the initial planetesimal sizes. We find that results from

  3. Size-dependent Strain in Epitaxial (001)Gadolinium-doped Ceria Nanoislands

    SciTech Connect

    V Solovyov; M Gibert; T Puig; X Obradors

    2011-12-31

    We report size-dependent strain in epitaxial gadolinium doped ceria nanoislands, which was determined by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Reciprocal space sections of symmetric, (004) and asymmetric, (224) reflections are approximated by a model assuming size-dependent strain of the islands using real-space size distribution obtained by atomic force microscopy. We show that the islands smaller than 40 nm are subjected to a high level of lateral tensile strain and normal compression. The lateral to normal strain ratio determined from the reciprocal map analysis suggests that lateral tension is the primary stress generator, possibly due to oxygen vacancy ordering on the island-substrate interface.

  4. Liquid crystal size selection of large-size graphene oxide for size-dependent N-doping and oxygen reduction catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Ji Eun; Maiti, Uday Narayan; Lim, Joonwon; Hwang, Jin Ok; Shim, Jongwon; Oh, Jung Jae; Yun, Taeyeong; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2014-09-23

    Graphene oxide (GO) is aqueous-dispersible oxygenated graphene, which shows colloidal discotic liquid crystallinity. Many properties of GO-based materials, including electrical conductivity and mechanical properties, are limited by the small flake size of GO. Unfortunately, typical sonochemical exfoliation of GO from graphite generally leads to a broad size and shape distribution. Here, we introduce a facile size selection of large-size GO exploiting liquid crystallinity and investigate the size-dependent N-doping and oxygen reduction catalysis. In the biphasic GO dispersion where both isotropic and liquid crystalline phases are equilibrated, large-size GO flakes (>20 μm) are spontaneously concentrated within the liquid crystalline phase. N-Doping and reduction of the size-selected GO exhibit that N-dopant type is highly dependent on GO flake size. Large-size GO demonstrates quaternary dominant N-doping and the lowest onset potential (-0.08 V) for oxygen reduction catalysis, signifying that quaternary N-dopants serve as principal catalytic sites in N-doped graphene. PMID:25145457

  5. Mechanical vulnerability explains size-dependent mortality of reef corals

    PubMed Central

    Madin, Joshua S; Baird, Andrew H; Dornelas, Maria; Connolly, Sean R

    2014-01-01

    Understanding life history and demographic variation among species within communities is a central ecological goal. Mortality schedules are especially important in ecosystems where disturbance plays a major role in structuring communities, such as coral reefs. Here, we test whether a trait-based, mechanistic model of mechanical vulnerability in corals can explain mortality schedules. Specifically, we ask whether species that become increasingly vulnerable to hydrodynamic dislodgment as they grow have bathtub-shaped mortality curves, whereas species that remain mechanically stable have decreasing mortality rates with size, as predicted by classical life history theory for reef corals. We find that size-dependent mortality is highly consistent between species with the same growth form and that the shape of size-dependent mortality for each growth form can be explained by mechanical vulnerability. Our findings highlight the feasibility of predicting assemblage-scale mortality patterns on coral reefs with trait-based approaches. PMID:24894390

  6. INTEGRATING NEPHELOMETER RESPONSE CORRECTIONS FOR BIMODAL SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Correction factors are calculated for obtaining true scattering extinction coefficients from integrating nephelometer measurements. The corrections are based on the bimodal representation of ambient aerosol size distributions, and take account of the effects of angular truncation...

  7. The best nanoparticle size distribution for minimum thermal conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hang; Minnich, Austin J.

    2015-01-01

    Which sizes of nanoparticles embedded in a crystalline solid yield the lowest thermal conductivity? Nanoparticles have long been demonstrated to reduce the thermal conductivity of crystals by scattering phonons, but most previous works assumed the nanoparticles to have a single size. Here, we use optimization methods to show that the best nanoparticle size distribution to scatter the broad thermal phonon spectrum is not a similarly broad distribution but rather several discrete peaks at well-chosen nanoparticle radii. For SiGe, the best size distribution yields a thermal conductivity below that of amorphous silicon. Further, we demonstrate that a simplified distribution yields nearly the same low thermal conductivity and can be readily fabricated. Our work provides important insights into how to manipulate the full spectrum of phonons and will guide the design of more efficient thermoelectric materials. PMID:25757414

  8. ON THE PROPORTIONALITY OF FINE MASS CONCENTRATION AND EXTINCTION COEFFICIENT FOR BIMODAL SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For a bimodal size distribution of ambient aerosol, an upper limit in particle size can be chosen for the fine aerosol fraction so that the extinction coefficient for light scattering and absorption is directly proportional to the fine mass concentration, with no dependence on th...

  9. A statistical approach to estimate the 3D size distribution of spheres from 2D size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kong, M.; Bhattacharya, R.N.; James, C.; Basu, A.

    2005-01-01

    Size distribution of rigidly embedded spheres in a groundmass is usually determined from measurements of the radii of the two-dimensional (2D) circular cross sections of the spheres in random flat planes of a sample, such as in thin sections or polished slabs. Several methods have been devised to find a simple factor to convert the mean of such 2D size distributions to the actual 3D mean size of the spheres without a consensus. We derive an entirely theoretical solution based on well-established probability laws and not constrained by limitations of absolute size, which indicates that the ratio of the means of measured 2D and estimated 3D grain size distribution should be r/4 (=.785). Actual 2D size distribution of the radii of submicron sized, pure Fe0 globules in lunar agglutinitic glass, determined from backscattered electron images, is tested to fit the gamma size distribution model better than the log-normal model. Numerical analysis of 2D size distributions of Fe0 globules in 9 lunar soils shows that the average mean of 2D/3D ratio is 0.84, which is very close to the theoretical value. These results converge with the ratio 0.8 that Hughes (1978) determined for millimeter-sized chondrules from empirical measurements. We recommend that a factor of 1.273 (reciprocal of 0.785) be used to convert the determined 2D mean size (radius or diameter) of a population of spheres to estimate their actual 3D size. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  10. THE EFFECT OF THE DUST SIZE DISTRIBUTION ON ASTEROID POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Masiero, Joseph; Hartzell, Christine; Scheeres, Daniel J. E-mail: christine.hartzell@colorado.edu

    2009-12-15

    We have developed a theoretical description of how of an asteroid's polarization-phase curve will be affected by the removal of the dust from the surface due to a size-dependent phenomenon such as radiation pressure-driven escape of levitated particles. We test our calculations against new observations of four small (D {approx} 1 km) near-Earth asteroids (NEAs; (85236), (142348), (162900), and 2006 SZ{sub 217}) obtained with the Dual Beam Imaging Polarimeter on the University of Hawaii's 2.2 m telescope, as well as previous observations of (25143) Itokawa and (433) Eros. We find that the polarization of the light reflected from an asteroid is controlled by the mineralogical and chemical composition of the surface and is independent of dust particle. The relation between the slope of the polarization-phase curve beyond the inversion angle and the albedo of an asteroid is thus independent of the surface regolith size distribution and is valid for both Main Belt and NEAs.

  11. Laser induced mechanisms controlling the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeming; Vitrant, Guy; Lefkir, Yaya; Bakhti, Said; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-09-21

    This paper describes a model to simulate changes in the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) in TiO2 films upon continuous wave light excitation. Interrelated laser induced physical and chemical processes initiated directly by photon absorption or by plasmon induced thermal heating are considered. Namely the model takes into account the NP coalescence, Ostwald ripening, the reduction of silver ions and the oxidation of metallic NPs, competitive mechanisms that can lead to counter-intuitive behaviors depending on the exposure conditions. Theoretical predictions are compared successfully to the experimental results deduced from a thorough analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) pictures of Ag:TiO2 films processed with a scanning visible laser beam at different speeds. Ag:TiO2 systems are considered for many applications in solar energy conversion, photocatalysis or secured data printing. Numerical investigations of such a system provide a better understanding of light induced growth and shrinking processes and open up prospects for designing more efficient photocatalytic devices based on metal NP doped TiO2 or for improving the size homogeneity in self-organized metallic NP patterns, for instance. PMID:27539293

  12. Application-dependent Probability Distributions for Offshore Wind Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, E. C.; Lackner, M.; Vogel, R. M.; Baise, L. G.

    2010-12-01

    The higher wind speeds of the offshore environment make it an attractive setting for future wind farms. With sparser field measurements, the theoretical probability distribution of short-term wind speeds becomes more important in estimating values such as average power output and fatigue load. While previous studies typically compare the accuracy of probability distributions using R2, we show that validation based on this metric is not consistent with validation based on engineering parameters of interest, namely turbine power output and extreme wind speed. Thus, in order to make the most accurate estimates possible, the probability distribution that an engineer picks to characterize wind speeds should depend on the design parameter of interest. We introduce the Kappa and Wakeby probability distribution functions to wind speed modeling, and show that these two distributions, along with the Biweibull distribution, fit wind speed samples better than the more widely accepted Weibull and Rayleigh distributions based on R2. Additionally, out of the 14 probability distributions we examine, the Kappa and Wakeby give the most accurate and least biased estimates of turbine power output. The fact that the 2-parameter Lognormal distribution estimates extreme wind speeds (i.e. fits the upper tail of wind speed distributions) with least error indicates that not one single distribution performs satisfactorily for all applications. Our use of a large dataset composed of 178 buoys (totaling ~72 million 10-minute wind speed observations) makes these findings highly significant, both in terms of large sample size and broad geographical distribution across various wind regimes. Boxplots of R2 from the fit of each of the 14 distributions to the 178 boy wind speed samples. Distributions are ranked from left to right by ascending median R2, with the Biweibull having the closest median to 1.

  13. Remote sensing of floe size distribution and surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, D. A.; Thorndike, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    Floe size can be measured by several properties p- for instance, area or mean caliper diameter. Two definitions of floe size distribution seem particularly useful. F(p), the fraction of area covered by floes no smaller than p; and N(p), the number of floes per unit area no smaller than p. Several summertime distributions measured are a graph, their slopes range from -1.7 to -2.5. The variance of an estimate is also calculated.

  14. Size Dependent Heat Conduction in One-Dimensional Diatomic Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejal, N. Shah; P. N., Gajjar

    2016-04-01

    We study the size dependency of heat conduction in one-dimensional diatomic FPU-β lattices and establish that for low dimensional material, contribution from optical phonons is found more effective to the thermal conductivity and enhance heat transport in the thermodynamic limit N → ∞. For the finite size, thermal conductivity of 1D diatomic lattice is found to be lower than 1D monoatomic chain of the same size made up of the constituent particle of the diatomic chain. For the present 1D diatomic chain, obtained value of power divergent exponent of thermal conductivity 0.428±0.001 and diffusion exponent 1.2723 lead to the conclusions that increase in the system size, increases the thermal conductivity and existence of anomalous energy diffusion. Existing numerical data supports our findings.

  15. Size-dependent catalytic activity of supported metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Xiao, F.-S.; Purnell, S. K.; Alexeev, O.; Kawi, S.; Deutsch, S. E.; Gates, B. C.

    1994-11-01

    BECAUSE catalysis by metals is a surface phenomenon, many technological catalysts contain small (typically nanometre-sized) supported metal particles with a large fraction of the atoms exposed1. Many reactions, such as hydrocarbon hydrogenations, are structure-insensitive, proceeding at approximately the same rate on metal particles of various sizes provided that they are larger than about 1 nm and show bulk-like metallic behaviour1. But it is not known whether the catalytic properties of metal particles become size-dependent as the particles become so small that they are no longer metallic in character. Here we investigate the catalytic behaviour of precisely defined clusters of just four and six iridium atoms on solid supports. We find that the Ir4 and Ir6 clusters differ in catalytic activity both from each other and from metallic Ir particles. This raises the possibility of tailoring the catalytic behaviour of metal clusters by controlling the cluster size.

  16. Nanocrystal size distribution analysis from transmission electron microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sebille, Martijn; van der Maaten, Laurens J. P.; Xie, Ling; Jarolimek, Karol; Santbergen, Rudi; van Swaaij, René A. C. M. M.; Leifer, Klaus; Zeman, Miro

    2015-12-01

    We propose a method, with minimal bias caused by user input, to quickly detect and measure the nanocrystal size distribution from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images using a combination of Laplacian of Gaussian filters and non-maximum suppression. We demonstrate the proposed method on bright-field TEM images of an a-SiC:H sample containing embedded silicon nanocrystals with varying magnifications and we compare the accuracy and speed with size distributions obtained by manual measurements, a thresholding method and PEBBLES. Finally, we analytically consider the error induced by slicing nanocrystals during TEM sample preparation on the measured nanocrystal size distribution and formulate an equation to correct this effect.We propose a method, with minimal bias caused by user input, to quickly detect and measure the nanocrystal size distribution from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images using a combination of Laplacian of Gaussian filters and non-maximum suppression. We demonstrate the proposed method on bright-field TEM images of an a-SiC:H sample containing embedded silicon nanocrystals with varying magnifications and we compare the accuracy and speed with size distributions obtained by manual measurements, a thresholding method and PEBBLES. Finally, we analytically consider the error induced by slicing nanocrystals during TEM sample preparation on the measured nanocrystal size distribution and formulate an equation to correct this effect. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06292f

  17. A multiscale gradient-dependent plasticity model for size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Hao; Taheri-Nassaj, Nasrin; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical behaviour of polycrystalline material is closely correlated to grain size. In this study, we investigate the size-dependent phenomenon in multi-phase steels using a continuum dislocation dynamic model coupled with viscoplastic self-consistent model. We developed a dislocation-based strain gradient plasticity model and a stress gradient plasticity model, as well as a combined model, resulting in a theory that can predict size effect over a wide range of length scales. Results show that strain gradient plasticity and stress gradient plasticity are complementary rather than competing theories. The stress gradient model is dominant at the initial strain stage, and is much more effective for predicting yield strength than the strain gradient model. For larger deformations, the strain gradient model is dominant and more effective for predicting size-dependent hardening. The numerical results are compared with experimental data and it is found that they have the same trend for the yield stress. Furthermore, the effect of dislocation density at different strain stages is investigated, and the findings show that the Hall-Petch relation holds for the initial strain stage and breaks down for higher strain levels. Finally, a power law to describe the size effect and the transition zone between the strain gradient and stress gradient dominated regions is developed.

  18. Fusing Censored Dependent Data for Distributed Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hao; Varshney, Pramod K.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we consider a distributed detection problem for a censoring sensor network where each sensor's communication rate is significantly reduced by transmitting only "informative" observations to the Fusion Center (FC), and censoring those deemed "uninformative". While the independence of data from censoring sensors is often assumed in previous research, we explore spatial dependence among observations. Our focus is on designing the fusion rule under the Neyman-Pearson (NP) framework that takes into account the spatial dependence among observations. Two transmission scenarios are considered, one where uncensored observations are transmitted directly to the FC and second where they are first quantized and then transmitted to further improve transmission efficiency. Copula-based Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test (GLRT) for censored data is proposed with both continuous and discrete messages received at the FC corresponding to different transmission strategies. We address the computational issues of the copula-based GLRTs involving multidimensional integrals by presenting more efficient fusion rules, based on the key idea of injecting controlled noise at the FC before fusion. Although, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is reduced by introducing controlled noise at the receiver, simulation results demonstrate that the resulting noise-aided fusion approach based on adding artificial noise performs very closely to the exact copula-based GLRTs. Copula-based GLRTs and their noise-aided counterparts by exploiting the spatial dependence greatly improve detection performance compared with the fusion rule under independence assumption.

  19. Does Nanoparticle Activity Depend upon Size and Crystal Phase?

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jingkun; Oberdörster, Günter; Elder, Alison; Gelein, Robert; Mercer, Pamela; Biswas, Pratim

    2010-01-01

    A method to investigate the dependence of the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (e.g. size, surface area and crystal phase) on their oxidant generating capacity is proposed and demonstrated for TiO2 nanoparticles. Gas phase synthesis methods that allow for strict control of size and crystal phase were used to prepare TiO2 nanoparticles. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating capacity of these particles was then measured. The size dependent ROS activity was established using TiO2 nanoparticles of 9 different sizes (4 – 195 nm) but the same crystal phase. For a fixed total surface area, an S-shaped curve for ROS generation per unit surface area was observed as a function of particle size. The highest ROS activity per unit area was observed for 30 nm particles, and observed to be constant above 30 nm. There was a decrease in activity per unit area as size decreased from 30 nm to 10 nm; and again constant for particles smaller than 10 nm. The correlation between crystal phase and oxidant capacity was established using TiO2 nanoparticles of 11 different crystal phase combinations but similar size. The ability of different crystal phases of TiO2 nanoparticles to generate ROS was highest for amorphous, followed by anatase, and then anatase/rutile mixtures, and lowest for rutile samples. Based on evaluation of the entire dataset, important dose metrics for ROS generation are established. Their implications of these ROS studies on biological and toxicological studies using nanomaterials are discussed. PMID:20827377

  20. Influence of particle size distributions on magnetorheological fluid performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, H.; Stoian, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence that size distributions of the magnetic particles might have on the magnetorheological fluid performances. In our study, several size distributions have been tailored first by sieving a micrometric Fe powder in order to obtain narrow distribution powders and then by recomposing the new size distributions (different from Gaussian). We used spherical Fe particles (mesh -325) commercially available. The powder was sieved by means of a sieve shaker using a series of sieves with the following mesh size: 20, 32, 40, 50, 63, 80 micrometers. All magnetic powders were characterized through Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) measurements, particle size analysis and also Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images were taken. Magnetorheological (MR) fluids based on the resulted magnetic powders were prepared and studied by means of a rheometer with a magnetorheological module. The MR fluids were measured in magnetic field and in zero magnetic field as well. As we noticed in our previous experiments particles size distribution can also influence the MR fluids performances.

  1. Particle size and shape distributions of hammer milled pine

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, Tyler Lott; Matthews, Austin Colter; Williams, Christopher Luke; Ryan, John Chadron Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Particle size and shape distributions impact particle heating rates and diffusion of volatized gases out of particles during fast pyrolysis conversion, and consequently must be modeled accurately in order for computational pyrolysis models to produce reliable results for bulk solid materials. For this milestone, lodge pole pine chips were ground using a Thomas-Wiley #4 mill using two screen sizes in order to produce two representative materials that are suitable for fast pyrolysis. For the first material, a 6 mm screen was employed in the mill and for the second material, a 3 mm screen was employed in the mill. Both materials were subjected to RoTap sieve analysis, and the distributions of the particle sizes and shapes were determined using digital image analysis. The results of the physical analysis will be fed into computational pyrolysis simulations to create models of materials with realistic particle size and shape distributions. This milestone was met on schedule.

  2. Airborne Particle Size Distribution Measurements at USDOE Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.; Chittaporn, P.; Heikkinen, M.; Medora, R.; Merrill, R.

    2003-03-27

    There are no long term measurements of the particle size distribution and concentration of airborne radionuclides at any USDOE facility except Fernald. Yet the determinant of lung dose is the particle size, determining the airway and lower lung deposition. Beginning in 2000, continuous (6 to 8 weeks) measurements of the aerosol particle size distribution have been made with a miniature sampler developed under EMSP. Radon gas decays to a chain of four short lived solid radionuclides that attach immediately to the resident atmospheric aerosol. These in turn decay to long lived polonium 210. Alpha emitting polonium is a tracer for any atmospheric aerosol. Six samplers at Fernald and four at QC sites in New Jersey show a difference in both polonium concentration and size distribution with the winter measurements being higher/larger than summer by almost a factor of two at all locations. EMSP USDOE Contract DE FG07 97ER62522.

  3. Johnson SB as general functional form for raindrop size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugerone, Katia; De Michele, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    Drop size distribution represents the statistical synthesis of rainfall dynamics at particle size scale. Gamma and Lognormal distributions have been widely used in the literature to approximate the drop diameter variability, contrarily to the natural upper boundary of the variable, with almost always site-specific studies and without the support of statistical goodness-of-fit tests. In this work, we present an extensive statistical investigation of raindrop size distribution based on eight data sets, well distributed on the Earth's surface, which have been analyzed by using skewness-kurtosis plane, AIC and BIC indices and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Here for the first time, the Johnson SB is proposed as general functional form to describe the drop diameter variability specifically at 1 min time scale. Additional analyses demonstrate that the model is well suitable even for larger time intervals (≥1 min).

  4. Size dependent complexity of sequences in protein families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, W.

    2005-10-01

    The size dependent complexity of protein sequences in various families in the FSSP database is characterized by sequence entropy, sequence similarity and sequence identity. As the average length Lf of sequences in the family increases, an increasing trend of the sequence entropy and a decreasing trend of the sequence similarity and sequence identity are found. As Lf increases beyond 250, a saturation of the sequence entropy, the sequence similarity and the sequence identity is observed. Such a saturated behavior of complexity is attributed to the saturation of the probability Pg of global (long-range) interactions in protein structures when Lf >250. It is also found that the alphabet size of residue types describing the sequence diversity depends on the value of Lf, and becomes saturated at 12.

  5. Charge distribution over dust particles configured with size distribution in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, Sanjay K.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical kinetic model describing the distribution of charge on the dust particles configured with generalized Kappa size distribution in a complex plasma has been developed. The formulation is based on the manifestation of uniform potential theory with an analytical solution of the master differential equation for the probability density function of dust charge; the number and energy balance of the plasma constituents are utilized in writing the kinetic equations. A parametric study to determine the steady state plasma parameters and the charge distribution corresponding to a size distribution of dust grains in the complex plasma has been made; the numerical results are presented graphically. The charge distribution is seen sensitive to the population of small grains in the particle size distribution and thus in contrast to symmetrical distribution of charge around a mean value for uniform sized grains, the charge distribution in the present case peaks around lower charge.

  6. Size-dependent diffusion promotes the emergence of spatiotemporal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lai; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Banerjee, Malay

    2014-07-01

    Spatiotemporal patterns, indicating the spatiotemporal variability of individual abundance, are a pronounced scenario in ecological interactions. Most of the existing models for spatiotemporal patterns treat species as homogeneous groups of individuals with average characteristics by ignoring intraspecific physiological variations at the individual level. Here we explore the impacts of size variation within species resulting from individual ontogeny, on the emergence of spatiotemporal patterns in a fully size-structured population model. We found that size dependency of animal's diffusivity greatly promotes the formation of spatiotemporal patterns, by creating regular spatiotemporal patterns out of temporal chaos. We also found that size-dependent diffusion can substitute large-amplitude base harmonics with spatiotemporal patterns with lower amplitude oscillations but with enriched harmonics. Finally, we found that the single-generation cycle is more likely to drive spatiotemporal patterns compared to predator-prey cycles, meaning that the mechanism of Hopf bifurcation might be more common than hitherto appreciated since the former cycle is more widespread than the latter in case of interacting populations. Due to the ubiquity of individual ontogeny in natural ecosystems we conclude that diffusion variability within populations is a significant driving force for the emergence of spatiotemporal patterns. Our results offer a perspective on self-organized phenomena, and pave a way to understand such phenomena in systems organized as complex ecological networks.

  7. Nanomaterial cytotoxicity is composition, size, and cell type dependent

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite intensive research efforts, reports of cellular responses to nanomaterials are often inconsistent and even contradictory. Additionally, relationships between the responding cell type and nanomaterial properties are not well understood. Using three model cell lines representing different physiological compartments and nanomaterials of different compositions and sizes, we have systematically investigated the influence of nanomaterial properties on the degrees and pathways of cytotoxicity. In this study, we selected nanomaterials of different compositions (TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes [MWCNTs]) with differing size (MWCNTs of different diameters < 8 nm, 20-30 nm, > 50 nm; but same length 0.5-2 μm) to analyze the effects of composition and size on toxicity to 3T3 fibroblasts, RAW 264.7 macrophages, and telomerase-immortalized (hT) bronchiolar epithelial cells. Results Following characterization of nanomaterial properties in PBS and serum containing solutions, cells were exposed to nanomaterials of differing compositions and sizes, with cytotoxicity monitored through reduction in mitochondrial activity. In addition to cytotoxicity, the cellular response to nanomaterials was characterized by quantifying generation of reactive oxygen species, lysosomal membrane destabilization and mitochondrial permeability. The effect of these responses on cellular fate - apoptosis or necrosis - was then analyzed. Nanomaterial toxicity was variable based on exposed cell type and dependent on nanomaterial composition and size. In addition, nanomaterial exposure led to cell type dependent intracellular responses resulting in unique breakdown of cellular functions for each nanomaterial: cell combination. Conclusions Nanomaterials induce cell specific responses resulting in variable toxicity and subsequent cell fate based on the type of exposed cell. Our results indicate that the composition and size of nanomaterials as well as the target

  8. Crater size distributions on Ganymede and Callisto: fundamental issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Roland; Schmedemann, Nico; Werner, Stefanie; Ivanov, Boris; Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Crater size distributions on the two largest Jovian satellites Ganymede and Callisto and the origin of impactors are subject of intense and controversial debates. In this paper, we reinvestigate crater size distributions measured in surface units derived from a recently published global geologic map, based on Voyager and Galileo SSI images at a scale of 1 km/pxl (Collins G. C. et al. (2013), U. S. Geol. Surv., Sci. Inv. Map 3237). These units are used as a context to units mapped in more detail at higher resolution in Galileo SSI images. We focus on the following fundamental issues: (1) Similarity between shapes of crater distributions on the Galilean satellites and on inner solar system bodies; (2) production versus equilibrium distributions; (3) apex/antapex variations in crater distributions. First, our results show a strong similarity in shape between the crater distributions on the most densely cratered regions on Ganymede and Callisto with those in the lunar highlands. We conclude that the shape of the crater distributions on these two Jovian satellites implies the craters were preferentially formed from members of a collisionally evolved projectile family, derived either from Main Belt asteroids as candidates of impactors on the Jovian satellites, or from projectiles stemming from the outer solar system which have undergone collisional evolution, resulting in a size distribution similar to those of Main Belt asteroids. Second, the complex shape of the crater distributions on Ganymede and Callisto indicates they are mostly production distributions and can be used to infer the underlying shape of the projectile size distribution. Locally, equilibrium distributions occur, especially at smaller sub-kilometer diameters. Third, the most densely cratered regions on both satellites do not show apex-antapex variations in crater frequency, as inferred for bodies from heliocentric orbits (e.g., Zahnle K. et al. (2003), Icarus 163, 263-289). This indicates that these

  9. On the origin of size-dependent and size-independent crystal growth: Influence of advection and diffusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Eberl, D.D.

    2003-01-01

    Crystal growth experiments were conducted using potassium alum and calcite crystals in aqueous solution under both non-stirred and stirred conditions to elucidate the mechanism for size-dependent (proportionate) and size-independent (constant) crystal growth. Growth by these two laws can be distinguished from each other because the relative size difference among crystals is maintained during proportionate growth, leading to a constant crystal size variance (??2) for a crystal size distribution (CSD) as the mean size increases. The absolute size difference among crystals is maintained during constant growth, resulting in a decrease in size variance. Results of these experiments show that for centimeter-sized alum crystals, proportionate growth occurs in stirred systems, whereas constant growth occurs in non-stirred systems. Accordingly, the mechanism for proportionate growth is hypothesized to be related to the supply of reactants to the crystal surface by advection, whereas constant growth is related to supply by diffusion. Paradoxically, micrometer-sized calcite crystals showed proportionate growth both in stirred and in non-stirred systems. Such growth presumably results from the effects of convection and Brownian motion, which promote an advective environment and hence proportionate growth for minute crystals in non-stirred systems, thereby indicating the importance of solution velocity relative to crystal size. Calcite crystals grown in gels, where fluid motion was minimized, showed evidence for constant, diffusion-controlled growth. Additional investigations of CSDs of naturally occurring crystals indicate that proportionate growth is by far the most common growth law, thereby suggesting that advection, rather than diffusion, is the dominant process for supplying reactants to crystal surfaces.

  10. Templated formation of giant polymer vesicles with controlled size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howse, Jonathan R.; Jones, Richard A. L.; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Ducker, Robert E.; Leggett, Graham J.; Ryan, Anthony J.

    2009-06-01

    Unilamellar polymer vesicles are formed when a block copolymer self-assembles to form a single bilayer structure, with a hydrophobic core and hydrophilic surfaces, and the resulting membrane folds over and rearranges by connecting its edges to enclose a space. The physics of self-assembly tightly specifies the wall thickness of the resulting vesicle, but, both for polymer vesicles and phospholipids, no mechanism strongly selects for the overall size, so the size distribution of vesicles tends to be very polydisperse. We report a method for the production of controlled size distributions of micrometre-sized (that is, giant) vesicles combining the `top-down' control of micrometre-sized features (vesicle diameter) by photolithography and dewetting with the `bottom-up' control of nanometre-sized features (membrane thickness) by molecular self-assembly. It enables the spontaneous creation of unilamellar vesicles with a narrow size distribution that could find applications in drug and gene delivery, nano- and micro-reactors, substrates for macromolecular crystallography and model systems for studies of membrane function.

  11. Verifying the Dependence of Fractal Coefficients on Different Spatial Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Gospodinov, Dragomir; Marekova, Elisaveta; Marinov, Alexander

    2010-01-21

    A fractal distribution requires that the number of objects larger than a specific size r has a power-law dependence on the size N(r) = C/r{sup D}propor tor{sup -D} where D is the fractal dimension. Usually the correlation integral is calculated to estimate the correlation fractal dimension of epicentres. A 'box-counting' procedure could also be applied giving the 'capacity' fractal dimension. The fractal dimension can be an integer and then it is equivalent to a Euclidean dimension (it is zero of a point, one of a segment, of a square is two and of a cube is three). In general the fractal dimension is not an integer but a fractional dimension and there comes the origin of the term 'fractal'. The use of a power-law to statistically describe a set of events or phenomena reveals the lack of a characteristic length scale, that is fractal objects are scale invariant. Scaling invariance and chaotic behavior constitute the base of a lot of natural hazards phenomena. Many studies of earthquakes reveal that their occurrence exhibits scale-invariant properties, so the fractal dimension can characterize them. It has first been confirmed that both aftershock rate decay in time and earthquake size distribution follow a power law. Recently many other earthquake distributions have been found to be scale-invariant. The spatial distribution of both regional seismicity and aftershocks show some fractal features. Earthquake spatial distributions are considered fractal, but indirectly. There are two possible models, which result in fractal earthquake distributions. The first model considers that a fractal distribution of faults leads to a fractal distribution of earthquakes, because each earthquake is characteristic of the fault on which it occurs. The second assumes that each fault has a fractal distribution of earthquakes. Observations strongly favour the first hypothesis.The fractal coefficients analysis provides some important advantages in examining earthquake spatial

  12. Thresholded Power law Size Distributions of Instabilities in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2015-11-01

    Power-law-like size distributions are ubiquitous in astrophysical instabilities. There are at least four natural effects that cause deviations from ideal power law size distributions, which we model here in a generalized way: (1) a physical threshold of an instability; (2) incomplete sampling of the smallest events below a threshold x0; (3) contamination by an event-unrelated background xb; and (4) truncation effects at the largest events due to a finite system size. These effects can be modeled in the simplest terms with a “thresholded power law” distribution function (also called generalized Pareto [type II] or Lomax distribution), N(x){dx}\\propto {(x+{x}0)}-a{dx}, where x0 > 0 is positive for a threshold effect, while x0 < 0 is negative for background contamination. We analytically derive the functional shape of this thresholded power law distribution function from an exponential growth evolution model, which produces avalanches only when a disturbance exceeds a critical threshold x0. We apply the thresholded power law distribution function to terrestrial, solar (HXRBS, BATSE, RHESSI), and stellar flare (Kepler) data sets. We find that the thresholded power law model provides an adequate fit to most of the observed data. Major advantages of this model are the automated choice of the power law fitting range, diagnostics of background contamination, physical instability thresholds, instrumental detection thresholds, and finite system size limits. When testing self-organized criticality models that predict ideal power laws, we suggest including these natural truncation effects.

  13. Body size distributions of the pale grass blue butterfly in Japan: Size rules and the status of the Fukushima population

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Wataru; Iwasaki, Mayo; Otaki, Joji M.

    2015-01-01

    The body size of the pale grass blue butterfly, Zizeeria maha, has been used as an environmental indicator of radioactive pollution caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident. However, geographical and temporal size distributions in Japan and temperature effects on size have not been established in this species. Here, we examined the geographical, temporal, and temperature-dependent changes of the forewing size of Z. maha argia in Japan. Butterflies collected in 2012 and 2013 from multiple prefectures throughout Japan demonstrated an inverse relationship of latitude and forewing size, which is the reverse of Bergmann’s cline. The Fukushima population was significantly larger than the Aomori and Miyagi populations and exhibited no difference from most of the other prefectural populations. When monitored at a single geographic locality every other month, forewing sizes were the largest in April and the smallest in August. Rearing larvae at a constant temperature demonstrated that forewing size followed the temperature-size rule. Therefore, the converse Bergmann’s rule and the temperature-size rule coexist in this multivoltine species. Our study establishes this species as a useful environmental indicator and supports the idea that the size reduction observed only in Fukushima Prefecture in 2011 was caused by the environmental stress of radioactive pollution. PMID:26197998

  14. Body size distributions of the pale grass blue butterfly in Japan: Size rules and the status of the Fukushima population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Wataru; Iwasaki, Mayo; Otaki, Joji M.

    2015-07-01

    The body size of the pale grass blue butterfly, Zizeeria maha, has been used as an environmental indicator of radioactive pollution caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident. However, geographical and temporal size distributions in Japan and temperature effects on size have not been established in this species. Here, we examined the geographical, temporal, and temperature-dependent changes of the forewing size of Z. maha argia in Japan. Butterflies collected in 2012 and 2013 from multiple prefectures throughout Japan demonstrated an inverse relationship of latitude and forewing size, which is the reverse of Bergmann’s cline. The Fukushima population was significantly larger than the Aomori and Miyagi populations and exhibited no difference from most of the other prefectural populations. When monitored at a single geographic locality every other month, forewing sizes were the largest in April and the smallest in August. Rearing larvae at a constant temperature demonstrated that forewing size followed the temperature-size rule. Therefore, the converse Bergmann’s rule and the temperature-size rule coexist in this multivoltine species. Our study establishes this species as a useful environmental indicator and supports the idea that the size reduction observed only in Fukushima Prefecture in 2011 was caused by the environmental stress of radioactive pollution.

  15. Size dependent strengthening mechanisms in sputtered Fe/W multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Yu, K. Y.; Lee, J.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2010-05-01

    We investigate size dependent strengthening mechanisms in sputtered Fe/W multilayers with individual layer thickness, h, varying from 1 to 200 nm. Microstructure analyses reveal that Fe/W has incoherent bcc/bcc interface when h is greater than 5 nm. When h decreases to 1-2.5 nm, the interface becomes semicoherent, and Fe and W show significant lattice distortions comparing to their bulk counterpart due to interface constraint. The layer thickness dependent drastic variations in x-ray diffraction profiles are simulated well by using an analytical model. Film hardness increases with decreasing h, and approaches a maximum value of 12.5 GPa when h is 1 nm. The layer thickness dependent film hardnesses are compared with analytical models. Koehler's image force plays a major role in determining the maximum strength of composites at smaller h.

  16. The Italian primary school-size distribution and the city-size: a complex nexus.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, Alessandro; Di Clemente, Riccardo; Buldyrev, Sergey V

    2014-01-01

    We characterize the statistical law according to which Italian primary school-size distributes. We find that the school-size can be approximated by a log-normal distribution, with a fat lower tail that collects a large number of very small schools. The upper tail of the school-size distribution decreases exponentially and the growth rates are distributed with a Laplace PDF. These distributions are similar to those observed for firms and are consistent with a Bose-Einstein preferential attachment process. The body of the distribution features a bimodal shape suggesting some source of heterogeneity in the school organization that we uncover by an in-depth analysis of the relation between schools-size and city-size. We propose a novel cluster methodology and a new spatial interaction approach among schools which outline the variety of policies implemented in Italy. Different regional policies are also discussed shedding lights on the relation between policy and geographical features. PMID:24954714

  17. Production, depreciation and the size distribution of firms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qi; Chen, Yongwang; Tong, Hui; Di, Zengru

    2008-05-01

    Many empirical researches indicate that firm size distributions in different industries or countries exhibit some similar characters. Among them the fact that many firm size distributions obey power-law especially for the upper end has been mostly discussed. Here we present an agent-based model to describe the evolution of manufacturing firms. Some basic economic behaviors are taken into account, which are production with decreasing marginal returns, preferential allocation of investments, and stochastic depreciation. The model gives a steady size distribution of firms which obey power-law. The effect of parameters on the power exponent is analyzed. The theoretical results are given based on both the Fokker-Planck equation and the Kesten process. They are well consistent with the numerical results.

  18. The Size Frequency Distribution of Small Main-Belt Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Brian J.; Trilling, David E.; Hines, Dean C.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Fuentes, Cesar I.; Hulsebus, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The asteroid size distribution informs us about the formation and composition of the Solar System. We build on our previous work in which we harvest serendipitously observed data of the Taurus region and measure the brightness and size distributions of Main-belt asteroids. This is accomplished with the highly sensitive MIPS 24 micron channel. We expect to catalog 104 asteroids, giving us a statistically significant data set. Results from this investigation will allow us to characterize the total population of small, Main-belt asteroids. Here we will present new results on the completeness of our study; on the presence of size distribution variations with inclination and radial distance in the belt; and early result on other archival fields.

  19. Endogenic craters on basaltic lava flows - Size frequency distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Gault, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Circular crater forms, termed collapse depressions, which occur on many basalt flows on the earth have also been detected on the moon and Mars and possibly on Mercury and Io. The admixture of collapse craters with impact craters would affect age determinations of planetary surface units based on impact crater statistics by making them appear anomalously old. In the work described in the present paper, the techniques conventionally used in planetary crater counting were applied to the determination of the size range and size frequency distribution of collapse craters on lava flows in Idaho, California, and New Mexico. Collapse depressions range in size from 3 to 80 m in diameter; their cumulative size distributions are similar to those of small impact craters on the moon.

  20. Porosity, pore size distribution and in situ strength of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bhattacharjee, B

    2003-01-01

    In this study, in situ strength of concrete was determined through compression test of cores drilled out from laboratory cast beams. The apparent porosity and pore size distribution of the same concrete were determined through mercury intrusion porosimetry, performed on small-drilled cores. The normal-strength concrete mixes used in the experimental investigation were designed to exhibit a wide variation in their strengths. To ensure further variation in porosity, pore size distribution and strength, two modes of compaction, two varieties of coarse aggregates, different levels of age, curing period and exposure condition of concrete were also introduced in experimental scheme. With the data so generated, an appraisal of the most frequently referred relationships involving strength, porosity and pore size of cement-based materials was carried out. Finally, a new empirical model relating the in situ strength of concrete with porosity, pore size characteristics, cement content, aggregate type, exposure conditions, etc., is presented.

  1. Aerosol size distribution seasonal characteristics measured in Tiksi, Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, E.; Kondratyev, V.; Brus, D.; Laurila, T.; Lihavainen, H.; Backman, J.; Vakkari, V.; Aurela, M.; Hatakka, J.; Viisanen, Y.; Uttal, T.; Ivakhov, V.; Makshtas, A.

    2015-07-01

    Four years of continuous aerosol number size distribution measurements from an Arctic Climate Observatory in Tiksi Russia are analyzed. Source region effects on particle modal features, and number and mass concentrations are presented for different seasons. The monthly median total aerosol number concentration in Tiksi ranges from 184 cm-3 in November to 724 cm-3 in July with a local maximum in March of 481 cm-3. The total mass concentration has a distinct maximum in February-March of 1.72-2.38 μg m-3 and two minimums in June of 0.42 μg m-3 and in September-October of 0.36-0.57 μg m-3. These seasonal cycles in number and mass concentrations are related to isolated aerosol sources such as Arctic haze in early spring which increases accumulation and coarse mode numbers, and biogenic emissions in summer which affects the smaller, nucleation and Aitken mode particles. The impact of temperature dependent natural emissions on aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei numbers was significant. Therefore, in addition to the precursor emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds, the frequent Siberian forest fires, although far are suggested to play a role in Arctic aerosol composition during the warmest months. During calm and cold months aerosol concentrations were occasionally increased by nearby aerosol sources in trapping inversions. These results provide valuable information on inter-annual cycles and sources of Arctic aerosols.

  2. Extrahypophysial distribution of corticotropin as a function of brain size.

    PubMed Central

    Moldow, R; Yalow, R S

    1978-01-01

    Determination by radioimmunoassay of corticotropin in the brains of rats, rabbits, dogs, monkeys, and human beings reveals that the dimensions within which the hormone is found is about the same for each of these species but that the anatomical regions in which the hormone is found depends on brain size. Corticotropin is widely distributed in the brain of rats but is found only in the hypothalamic region of the primate brain. The patterns of immunoreactivity observed after Sephadex gel filtration confirm that the molecular forms of corticotropin found in extrahypophysial regions are similar to those in the pituitary of each species. These findings suggest that the mammalian pituitary is the sole site of synthesis of the hormone. The observation of persistence of corticotropin in the brains of commerically hypophysectomized rats has been interpreted by others as suggesting diencephalic as well as pituitary origin for this peptide. However, our studies demonstrate that 8 weeks after hypophysectomy the rats we have received from commerical sources manifest stress-stimulated plasma corticotropin concentrations about 80% of that found in intact rats in spite of the fact that residual pituitary tissue was not found by visual inspection of the sella. Scrapings from the sella revealed a corticotropin content up to 5% that of the average rat pituitary. Images PMID:204943

  3. Rank-Size Distribution of Notes in Harmonic Music: Hierarchic Shuffling of Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Río, Manuel Beltrán; Cocho, Germinal

    We trace the rank size distribution of notes in harmonic music, which on previous works we suggested was much better represented by the Two-parameter, first class Beta distribution than the customary power law, to the ranked mixing of distributions dictated by the harmonic and instrumental nature of the piece. The same representation is shown to arise in other fields by the same type of ranked shuffling of distributions. We include the codon content of intergenic DNA sequences and the ranked distribution of sizes of trees in a determined area as examples. We show that the fittings proposed increase their accuracy with the number of distributions that are mixed and ranked.

  4. Size-dependent complex dielectric function of Ni, Mo, W, Pb, Zn and Na nanoparticles. Application to sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñetón Arboleda, David; Santillán, Jesica M. J.; Mendoza Herrera, Luis J.; Muraca, Diego; Schinca, Daniel C.; Scaffardi, Lucía B.

    2016-02-01

    This work determines the size dependent metal nanoparticle (NP) dielectric function from a ‘top-down’ approach using the bulk experimental refractive index as a starting point. Free-electron damping constant ({γ\\text{free}} ) and plasma frequency ({ω\\text{p}} ) parameters in the Drude model are calculated for nickel (Ni), molybdenum (Mo), tungsten (W), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn) and sodium (Na) using a method developed in our group. Determined {γ\\text{free}} and {ω\\text{p}} parameters allow to develop an expression that improves the precision in reproducing the discrete metal bulk dielectric function in a wide wavelength range (UV-FIR). The bulk dielectric function is modified for describing the nanometric case by adding size corrective terms for free and bound electrons contributions. As an application of this study we characterize Ni spherical NPs synthesized by ultrafast laser ablation of a solid target in water. Using Mie theory together with the size-dependent dielectric function, we theoretically reproduce its experimental extinction spectrum. From this fitting, composition and size distribution of the particles in the colloidal suspension may be derived. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results agree with the sizes and structure derived from optical extinction spectroscopy (OES).

  5. Influence of multidroplet size distribution on icing collection efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H.-P.; Kimble, K. R.; Frost, W.; Shaw, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Calculation of collection efficiencies of two-dimensional airfoils for a monodispersed droplet icing cloud and a multidispersed droplet is carried out. Comparison is made with the experimental results reported in the NACA Technical Note series. The results of the study show considerably improved agreement with experiment when multidroplet size distributions are employed. The study then investigates the effect of collection efficiency on airborne particle droplet size sampling instruments. The biased effect introduced due to sampling from different collection volumes is predicted.

  6. Demographic properties shape tree size distribution in a Malaysian rain forest.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Takashi S; Potts, Matthew D; Kohyama, Tetsuo I; Kassim, Abd Rahman; Ashton, Peter S

    2015-03-01

    Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain how vertical and horizontal heterogeneity in light conditions enhances tree species coexistence in forest ecosystems. The foliage partitioning theory proposes that differentiation in vertical foliage distribution, caused by an interspecific variation in mortality-to-growth ratio, promotes stable coexistence. In contrast, successional niche theory posits that horizontal light heterogeneity, caused by gap dynamics, enhances species coexistence through an interspecific trade-off between growth rate and survival. To distinguish between these theories of species coexistence, we analyzed tree inventory data for 370 species from the 50-ha plot in Pasoh Forest Reserve, Malaysia. We used community-wide Bayesian models to quantify size-dependent growth rate and mortality of every species. We compared the observed size distributions and the projected distributions from size-dependent demographic rates. We found that the observed size distributions were not simply correlated with the rate of population increase but were related to demographic properties such as size growth rate and mortality. Species with low relative abundance of juveniles in size distribution showed high growth rate and low mortality at small tree sizes and low per-capita recruitment rate. Overall, our findings were in accordance with those predicted by foliage partitioning theory. PMID:25674691

  7. Comparison of aerosol size distribution in coastal and oceanic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta; van Eijk, Alexander M.

    2006-08-01

    The results of applying the empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) method to decomposition and approximation of aerosol size distributions are presented. A comparison was made for two aerosol data sets, representing coastal and oceanic environments. The first data set includes measurements collected at the Irish Atlantic coast in 1994 and 1995, the second one data collected during the Rough Evaporation Duct (RED) experiment that took place off Oahu, Hawaii in 2001. The main finding is that aerosol size distributions can be represented by a superposition of the mean size distribution and the first eigenvector multiplied by an amplitude function. For the two aerosol data sets the mean size distribution is very similar in the range of small particles sizes (radius < 1μm) but the main difference appears for larger aerosols (radius > 1μm). It is also reflected by the spectral shape of the eigenvector. The differences can be related to the type of aerosols present at both locations, and the amplitude function can be associated to meteorological conditions. The amplitude function also indicates the episodes with the maximum/minimum continental influence. The results of this analysis will be used in upgrades of the ANAM model.

  8. On the upper tail of Italian firms’ size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirillo, Pasquale; Hüsler, Jürg

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we analyze the upper tail of the size distribution of Italian companies with limited liability belonging to the CEBI database. Size is defined in terms of net worth. In particular, we show that the largest firms follow a power law distribution, according to the well-known Pareto law, for which we give estimates of the shape parameter. Such a behavior seems to be quite persistent over time, view that for almost 20 years of observations, the shape parameter is always in the vicinity of 1.8. The power law hypothesis is also positively tested using graphical and analytical methods.

  9. Three optical methods for remotely measuring aerosol size distributions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, J. A.; Herman, B. M.

    1971-01-01

    Three optical probing methods for remotely measuring atmospheric aerosol size distributions are discussed and contrasted. The particular detection methods which are considered make use of monostatic lidar (laser radar), bistatic lidar, and solar radiometer sensing techniques. The theory of each of these measurement techniques is discussed briefly, and the necessary constraints which must be applied to obtain aerosol size distribution information from such measurements are pointed out. Theoretical and/or experimental results are also presented which demonstrate the utility of the three proposed probing methods.

  10. Saturn's rings - Particle size distributions for thin layer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, H. A.; Marouf, E. A.; Tyler, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    A model incorporating limited interaction between the incident energy and particles in the ring is considered which appears to be consistent with the multiple scattering process in Saturn's rings. The model allows for the small physical thickness of the rings and can be used to relate Voyager 1 observations of 3.6- and 13-cm wavelength microwave scatter from the rings to the ring particle size distribution function for particles with radii ranging from 0.001 to 20 m. This limited-scatter model yields solutions for particle size distribution functions for eight regions in the rings, which exhibit approximately inverse-cubic power-law behavior.

  11. Size distribution of Portuguese firms between 2006 and 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoal, Rui; Augusto, Mário; Monteiro, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to describe the size distribution of Portuguese firms, as measured by annual sales and total assets, between 2006 and 2012, giving an economic interpretation for the evolution of the distribution along the time. Three distributions are fitted to data: the lognormal, the Pareto (and as a particular case Zipf) and the Simplified Canonical Law (SCL). We present the main arguments found in literature to justify the use of distributions and emphasize the interpretation of SCL coefficients. Methods of estimation include Maximum Likelihood, modified Ordinary Least Squares in log-log scale and Nonlinear Least Squares considering the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. When applying these approaches to Portuguese's firms data, we analyze if the evolution of estimated parameters in both lognormal power and SCL is in accordance with the known existence of a recession period after 2008. This is confirmed for sales but not for assets, leading to the conclusion that the first variable is a best proxy for firm size.

  12. Particle size distributions of several commonly used seeding aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswy, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    During the course of experimentation, no solid particle powder could be found which produced an aerosol with a narrow particle size distribution when fluidization was the only flow process used in producing the aerosol. The complication of adding particle size fractionation processes to the aerosol generation effort appears to be avoidable. In this regard, a simple sonic orifice is found to be effective in reducing the percentage of agglomerates in the several metal oxide powders tested. Marginally beneficial results are obtained for a 0.5/99.5 percent by weight mixture of the flow agent and metal oxide powder. However, agglomeration is observed to be enhanced when the flow agent percentage is increased to 5 percent. Liquid atomization using the Collison nebulizer as well as a version of the Laskin nozzle resulted in polydispersed aerosols with particle size distributions heavily weighted by the small particle end of the size spectrum. The aerosol particle size distributions produced by the vaporization/condensation seeder are closer to the ideal monodispersed aerosol than any of the other aerosols tested. In addition, this seeding approach affords a measure of control over particle size and particle production rate.

  13. Size Evolution and Stochastic Models: Explaining Ostracod Size through Probabilistic Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, M.; Decker, S.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2014-12-01

    The biovolume of animals has functioned as an important benchmark for measuring evolution throughout geologic time. In our project, we examined the observed average body size of ostracods over time in order to understand the mechanism of size evolution in these marine organisms. The body size of ostracods has varied since the beginning of the Ordovician, where the first true ostracods appeared. We created a stochastic branching model to create possible evolutionary trees of ostracod size. Using stratigraphic ranges for ostracods compiled from over 750 genera in the Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, we calculated overall speciation and extinction rates for our model. At each timestep in our model, new lineages can evolve or existing lineages can become extinct. Newly evolved lineages are assigned sizes based on their parent genera. We parameterized our model to generate neutral and directional changes in ostracod size to compare with the observed data. New sizes were chosen via a normal distribution, and the neutral model selected new sizes differentials centered on zero, allowing for an equal chance of larger or smaller ostracods at each speciation. Conversely, the directional model centered the distribution on a negative value, giving a larger chance of smaller ostracods. Our data strongly suggests that the overall direction of ostracod evolution has been following a model that directionally pushes mean ostracod size down, shying away from a neutral model. Our model was able to match the magnitude of size decrease. Our models had a constant linear decrease while the actual data had a much more rapid initial rate followed by a constant size. The nuance of the observed trends ultimately suggests a more complex method of size evolution. In conclusion, probabilistic methods can provide valuable insight into possible evolutionary mechanisms determining size evolution in ostracods.

  14. Size-dependent antimicrobial effects of novel palladium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Adams, Clara P; Walker, Katherine A; Obare, Sherine O; Docherty, Kathryn M

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the interactions between nanoscale materials and microorganisms is crucial to provide a comprehensive, proactive understanding of nanomaterial toxicity and explore the potential for novel applications. It is well known that nanomaterial behavior is governed by the size and composition of the particles, though the effects of small differences in size toward biological cells have not been well investigated. Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) have gained significant interest as catalysts for important carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom reactions and are increasingly used in the chemical industry, however, few other applications of Pd NPs have been investigated. In the present study, we examined the antimicrobial capacity of Pd NPs, which provides both an indication of their usefulness as target antimicrobial compounds, as well as their potency as potential environmental pollutants. We synthesized Pd NPs of three different well-constrained sizes, 2.0 ± 0.1 nm, 2.5 ± 0.2 nm and 3.1 ± 0.2 nm. We examined the inhibitory effects of the Pd NPs and Pd(2+) ions toward gram negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacterial cultures throughout a 24 hour period. Inhibitory growth effects of six concentrations of Pd NPs and Pd(2+) ions (2.5 × 10(-4), 10(-5), 10(-6), 10(-7), 10(-8), and 10(-9) M) were examined. Our results indicate that Pd NPs are generally much more inhibitory toward S. aureus than toward E. coli, though all sizes are toxic at ≥ 10(-5) M to both organisms. We observed a significant difference in size-dependence of antimicrobial activity, which differed based on the microorganism tested. Our work shows that Pd NPs are highly antimicrobial, and that fine-scale (<1 nm) differences in size can alter antimicrobial activity. PMID:24465824

  15. Size-Dependent Antimicrobial Effects of Novel Palladium Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Clara P.; Walker, Katherine A.; Obare, Sherine O.; Docherty, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the interactions between nanoscale materials and microorganisms is crucial to provide a comprehensive, proactive understanding of nanomaterial toxicity and explore the potential for novel applications. It is well known that nanomaterial behavior is governed by the size and composition of the particles, though the effects of small differences in size toward biological cells have not been well investigated. Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) have gained significant interest as catalysts for important carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom reactions and are increasingly used in the chemical industry, however, few other applications of Pd NPs have been investigated. In the present study, we examined the antimicrobial capacity of Pd NPs, which provides both an indication of their usefulness as target antimicrobial compounds, as well as their potency as potential environmental pollutants. We synthesized Pd NPs of three different well-constrained sizes, 2.0±0.1 nm, 2.5±0.2 nm and 3.1±0.2 nm. We examined the inhibitory effects of the Pd NPs and Pd2+ ions toward gram negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacterial cultures throughout a 24 hour period. Inhibitory growth effects of six concentrations of Pd NPs and Pd2+ ions (2.5×10−4, 10−5, 10−6, 10−7, 10−8, and 10−9 M) were examined. Our results indicate that Pd NPs are generally much more inhibitory toward S. aureus than toward E. coli, though all sizes are toxic at ≥10−5 M to both organisms. We observed a significant difference in size-dependence of antimicrobial activity, which differed based on the microorganism tested. Our work shows that Pd NPs are highly antimicrobial, and that fine-scale (<1 nm) differences in size can alter antimicrobial activity. PMID:24465824

  16. Ductility of metal alloys with grain size distribution in a wide range of strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Skripnyak, Nataliya V.; Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.

    Ductility of ultrafine grained (UFG) metal alloys with a distribution of grain size was investigated in wide loading conditions by numerical simulation. The multiscale models with a unimodal and a bimodal grain size distributions were developed using the data of structure research of hexagonal close packed and face center cubic UFG alloys. Macroscopic fracture is considered as a result of the formation of percolation clusters of damage at the mesoscopic level. The critical fracture strain of UFG alloys on the mesoscale level depends on the relative volumes of coarse grains. The nucleation of damages at quasi-static and dynamic loading is associated with strain localization in UFG partial volumes with bimodal grain size distribution. The concentration of damages arise in the vicinity of the boundaries of coarse and ultrafine grains. The occurrence of a bimodal grain size distributions causes the increase of UFG alloys' ductility, but decrease of their tensile strength. Linkoping University, Sweden.

  17. Aerosol size distribution seasonal characteristics measured in Tiksi, Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, E.; Kondratyev, V.; Brus, D.; Laurila, T.; Lihavainen, H.; Backman, J.; Vakkari, V.; Aurela, M.; Hatakka, J.; Viisanen, Y.; Uttal, T.; Ivakhov, V.; Makshtas, A.

    2016-02-01

    Four years of continuous aerosol number size distribution measurements from the Arctic Climate Observatory in Tiksi, Russia, are analyzed. Tiksi is located in a region where in situ information on aerosol particle properties has not been previously available. Particle size distributions were measured with a differential mobility particle sizer (in the diameter range of 7-500 nm) and with an aerodynamic particle sizer (in the diameter range of 0.5-10 μm). Source region effects on particle modal features and number, and mass concentrations are presented for different seasons. The monthly median total aerosol number concentration in Tiksi ranges from 184 cm-3 in November to 724 cm-3 in July, with a local maximum in March of 481 cm-3. The total mass concentration has a distinct maximum in February-March of 1.72-2.38 μg m-3 and two minimums in June (0.42 μg m-3) and in September-October (0.36-0.57 μg m-3). These seasonal cycles in number and mass concentrations are related to isolated processes and phenomena such as Arctic haze in early spring, which increases accumulation and coarse-mode numbers, and secondary particle formation in spring and summer, which affects the nucleation and Aitken mode particle concentrations. Secondary particle formation was frequently observed in Tiksi and was shown to be slightly more common in marine, in comparison to continental, air flows. Particle formation rates were the highest in spring, while the particle growth rates peaked in summer. These results suggest two different origins for secondary particles, anthropogenic pollution being the important source in spring and biogenic emissions being significant in summer. The impact of temperature-dependent natural emissions on aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei numbers was significant: the increase in both the particle mass and the CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) number with temperature was found to be higher than in any previous study done over the boreal forest region. In addition

  18. Size distributions of gold nanoclusters studied by liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    WILCOXON,JESS P.; MARTIN,JAMES E.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.

    2000-05-23

    The authors report high pressure liquid chromatography, (HPLC), and transmission electron microscopy, (TEM), studies of the size distributions of nanosize gold clusters dispersed in organic solvents. These metal clusters are synthesized in inverse micelles at room temperature and those investigated range in diameter from 1--10 nm. HPLC is sensitive enough to discern changes in hydrodynamic volume corresponding to only 2 carbon atoms of the passivating agent or metal core size changes of less than 4 {angstrom}. The authors have determined for the first time how the total cluster volume (metal core + passivating organic shell) changes with the size of the passivating agent.

  19. Size dependent reduction-oxidation-reduction behaviour of cobalt oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Sadasivan, Sajanikumari; Bellabarba, Ronan M; Tooze, Robert P

    2013-11-21

    Morphologically similar cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4) of four different sizes (3 nm, 6 nm, 11 nm and 29 nm) with narrow size distribution were prepared by subtle variation of synthesis conditions. These nanoparticles were used as model materials to understand the structural and morphological changes that occur to cobalt oxide during sequential reduction, oxidation and further re-reduction process as a function of the initial size of cobalt oxide. On reduction, spherical cobalt nanoparticles were obtained independent of the original size of cobalt oxide. In contrast, subsequent oxidation of the metal particles led to solid spheres, hollow spheres or core-shell structures depending on the size of the initial metal particle. Further re-reduction of the oxidized structures was also observed to be size dependent. The hollow oxide shells formed by the large particles (29 nm) fragmented into smaller particles on reduction, while the hollow shells of the medium sized particles (11 nm) did not re-disperse on further reduction. Similarly, no re-dispersion was observed in the case of the small particles (6 nm). This model study provides useful insights into the size dependent behavior of metal/metal oxide particles during oxidation/reduction. This has important implications in petrochemical industry where cobalt is used as a catalyst in the Fischer-Tropsch process. PMID:24065040

  20. Enhanced size-dependent trapping of particles using microvortices

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Kasper, Susan; Papautsky, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Inertial microfluidics has been attracting considerable interest for size-based separation of particles and cells. The inertial forces can be manipulated by expanding the microchannel geometry, leading to formation of microvortices which selectively isolate and trap particles or cells from a mixture. In this work, we aim to enhance our understanding of particle trapping in such microvortices by developing a model of selective particle trapping. Design and operational parameters including flow conditions, size of the trapping region, and target particle concentration are explored to elucidate their influence on trapping behavior. Our results show that the size dependence of trapping is characterized by a threshold Reynolds number, which governs the selective entry of particles into microvortices from the main flow. We show that concentration enhancement on the order of 100,000× and isolation of targets at concentrations in the 1/mL is possible. Ultimately, the insights gained from our systematic investigation suggest optimization solutions that enhance device performance (efficiency, size selectivity, and yield) and are applicable to selective isolation and trapping of large rare cells as well as other applications. PMID:24187531

  1. New image processing software for analyzing object size-frequency distributions, geometry, orientation, and spatial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggan, Ciarán; Hamilton, Christopher W.

    2010-04-01

    Geological Image Analysis Software (GIAS) combines basic tools for calculating object area, abundance, radius, perimeter, eccentricity, orientation, and centroid location, with the first automated method for characterizing the aerial distribution of objects using sample-size-dependent nearest neighbor (NN) statistics. The NN analyses include tests for (1) Poisson, (2) Normalized Poisson, (3) Scavenged k=1, and (4) Scavenged k=2 NN distributions. GIAS is implemented in MATLAB with a Graphical User Interface (GUI) that is available as pre-parsed pseudocode for use with MATLAB, or as a stand-alone application that runs on Windows and Unix systems. GIAS can process raster data (e.g., satellite imagery, photomicrographs, etc.) and tables of object coordinates to characterize the size, geometry, orientation, and spatial organization of a wide range of geological features. This information expedites quantitative measurements of 2D object properties, provides criteria for validating the use of stereology to transform 2D object sections into 3D models, and establishes a standardized NN methodology that can be used to compare the results of different geospatial studies and identify objects using non-morphological parameters.

  2. The size-distribution of Earth’s lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cael, B. B.; Seekell, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    Globally, there are millions of small lakes, but a small number of large lakes. Most key ecosystem patterns and processes scale with lake size, thus this asymmetry between area and abundance is a fundamental constraint on broad-scale patterns in lake ecology. Nonetheless, descriptions of lake size-distributions are scarce and empirical distributions are rarely evaluated relative to theoretical predictions. Here we develop expectations for Earth’s lake area-distribution based on percolation theory and evaluate these expectations with data from a global lake census. Lake surface areas ≥8.5 km2 are power-law distributed with a tail exponent (τ = 1.97) and fractal dimension (d = 1.38), similar to theoretical expectations (τ = 2.05 d = 4/3). Lakes <8.5 km2 are not power-law distributed. An independently developed regional lake census exhibits a similar transition and consistency with theoretical predictions. Small lakes deviate from the power-law distribution because smaller lakes are more susceptible to dynamical change and topographic behavior at sub-kilometer scales is not self-similar. Our results provide a robust characterization and theoretical explanation for the lake size-abundance relationship, and form a fundamental basis for understanding and predicting patterns in lake ecology at broad scales.

  3. Aggregation dynamics explain vegetation patch-size distributions.

    PubMed

    Irvine, M A; Bull, J C; Keeling, M J

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation patch-size distributions have been an intense area of study for theoreticians and applied ecologists alike in recent years. Of particular interest is the seemingly ubiquitous nature of power-law patch-size distributions emerging in a number of diverse ecosystems. The leading explanation of the emergence of these power-laws is due to local facilitative mechanisms. There is also a common transition from power law to exponential distribution when a system is under global pressure, such as grazing or lack of rainfall. These phenomena require a simple mechanistic explanation. Here, we study vegetation patches from a spatially implicit, patch dynamic viewpoint. We show that under minimal assumptions a power-law patch-size distribution appears as a natural consequence of aggregation. A linear death term also leads to an exponential term in the distribution for any non-zero death rate. This work shows the origin of the breakdown of the power-law under increasing pressure and shows that in general, we expect to observe a power law with an exponential cutoff (rather than pure power laws). The estimated parameters of this distribution also provide insight into the underlying ecological mechanisms of aggregation and death. PMID:26742959

  4. The size-distribution of Earth’s lakes

    PubMed Central

    Cael, B. B.; Seekell, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, there are millions of small lakes, but a small number of large lakes. Most key ecosystem patterns and processes scale with lake size, thus this asymmetry between area and abundance is a fundamental constraint on broad-scale patterns in lake ecology. Nonetheless, descriptions of lake size-distributions are scarce and empirical distributions are rarely evaluated relative to theoretical predictions. Here we develop expectations for Earth’s lake area-distribution based on percolation theory and evaluate these expectations with data from a global lake census. Lake surface areas ≥8.5 km2 are power-law distributed with a tail exponent (τ = 1.97) and fractal dimension (d = 1.38), similar to theoretical expectations (τ = 2.05; d = 4/3). Lakes <8.5 km2 are not power-law distributed. An independently developed regional lake census exhibits a similar transition and consistency with theoretical predictions. Small lakes deviate from the power-law distribution because smaller lakes are more susceptible to dynamical change and topographic behavior at sub-kilometer scales is not self-similar. Our results provide a robust characterization and theoretical explanation for the lake size-abundance relationship, and form a fundamental basis for understanding and predicting patterns in lake ecology at broad scales. PMID:27388607

  5. Aerosol mobility imaging for rapid size distribution measurements

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Hering, Susanne Vera; Spielman, Steven Russel; Kuang, Chongai

    2016-07-19

    A parallel plate dimensional electrical mobility separator and laminar flow water condensation provide rapid, mobility-based particle sizing at concentrations typical of the remote atmosphere. Particles are separated spatially within the electrical mobility separator, enlarged through water condensation, and imaged onto a CCD array. The mobility separation distributes particles in accordance with their size. The condensation enlarges size-separated particles by water condensation while they are still within the gap of the mobility drift tube. Once enlarged the particles are illuminated by a laser. At a pre-selected frequency, typically 10 Hz, the position of all of the individual particles illuminated by the laser are captured by CCD camera. This instantly records the particle number concentration at each position. Because the position is directly related to the particle size (or mobility), the particle size spectra is derived from the images recorded by the CCD.

  6. Size-dependent dissociation of carbon monoxide on cobalt nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tuxen, Anders; Carenco, Sophie; Chintapalli, Mahati; Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Escudero, Carlos; Pach, Elzbieta; Jiang, Peng; Borondics, Ferenc; Beberwyck, Brandon; Alivisatos, A Paul; Thornton, Geoff; Pong, Way-Faung; Guo, Jinghua; Perez, Ruben; Besenbacher, Flemming; Salmeron, Miquel

    2013-02-13

    In situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was employed to study the adsorption and dissociation of carbon monoxide molecules on cobalt nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 4 to 15 nm. The majority of CO molecules adsorb molecularly on the surface of the nanoparticles, but some undergo dissociative adsorption, leading to oxide species on the surface of the nanoparticles. We found that the tendency of CO to undergo dissociation depends critically on the size of the Co nanoparticles. Indeed, CO molecules dissociate much more efficiently on the larger nanoparticles (15 nm) than on the smaller particles (4 nm). We further observed a strong increase in the dissociation rate of adsorbed CO upon exposure to hydrogen, clearly demonstrating that the CO dissociation on cobalt nanoparticles is assisted by hydrogen. Our results suggest that the ability of cobalt nanoparticles to dissociate hydrogen is the main parameter determining the reactivity of cobalt nanoparticles in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. PMID:23339635

  7. Mining airborne particulate size distribution data by positive matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liming; Kim, Eugene; Hopke, Philip K.; Stanier, Charles; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2005-04-01

    Airborne particulate size distribution data acquired in Pittsburgh from July 2001 to June 2002 were analyzed as a bilinear receptor model solved by positive matrix factorization (PMF). The data were obtained from two scanning mobility particle spectrometers and an aerodynamic particle sampler with a temporal resolution of 15 min. Each sample contained 165 size bins from 0.003 to 2.5 μm. Particle growth periods in nucleation events were identified, and the data in these intervals were excluded from this study so that the size distribution profiles associated with the factors could be regarded as sufficiently constant to satisfy the assumptions of the receptor model. The values for each set of five consecutive size bins were averaged to produce 33 new size intervals. Analyses were made on monthly data sets to ensure that the changes in the size distributions from the source to the receptor site could be regarded as constant. The factors from PMF could be assigned to particle sources by examination of the number size distributions associated with the factors, the time frequency properties of the contribution of each source (Fourier analysis of source contribution values), and the correlations of the contribution values with simultaneous gas phase measurements (O3, NO, NO2, SO2, CO) and particle composition data (sulfate, nitrate, organic carbon/elemental carbon). Seasonal trends and weekday/weekend effects were investigated. Conditional probability function analyses were performed for each source to ascertain the likely directions in which the sources were located. Five factors were separated. Two factors, local traffic and nucleation, are clear sources, but each of the other factors appears to be a mixture of several sources that cannot be further separated.

  8. Distributional shifts in size structure of phytoplankton community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waga, H.; Hirawake, T.; Fujiwara, A.; Nishino, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Suzuki, K.; Takao, S.

    2015-12-01

    Increased understanding on how marine species shift their distribution is required for effective conservation of fishery resources under climate change. Previous studies have often predicted distributional shifts of fish using satellite derived sea surface temperature (SST). However, SST may not fully represent the changes in species distribution through food web structure and as such this remains an open issue due to lack of ecological perspective on energy transfer process in the earlier studies. One of the most important factors in ecosystem is composition of phytoplankton community, and its size structure determines energy flow efficiency from base to higher trophic levels. To elucidate spatiotemporal variation in phytoplankton size structure, chlorophyll-a size distribution (CSD) algorithm was developed using spectral variance of phytoplankton absorption coefficient through principal component analysis. Slope of CSD (CSD slope) indicates size structure of phytoplankton community where, strong and weak magnitudes of CSD slope indicate smaller and larger phytoplankton structure, respectively. Shifts in CSD slope and SST were derived as the ratio of temporal trend over the 12-year period (2003-2014) to 2-dimensional spatial gradient and the resulting global median velocity of CSD slope and SST were 0.361 and 0.733 km year-1, respectively. In addition, the velocity of CSD slope monotonically increases with increasing latitude, while relatively complex latitudinal pattern for SST emerged. Moreover, angle of shifts suggest that species are required to shift their distribution toward not limited to simple pole-ward migration, and some regions exhibit opposite direction between the velocity of CSD slope and SST. These findings further imply that combined phytoplankton size structure and SST may contribute for more accurate prediction of species distribution shifts relative to existing studies which only considering variations in thermal niches.

  9. The magnetized sheath of a dusty plasma with grains size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Jing Gan, Chunyun; Lin, Binbin; Yang, Jinhong

    2015-05-15

    The structure of a plasma sheath in the presence of dust grains size distribution (DGSD) is investigated in the multi-fluid framework. It is shown that effect of the dust grains with different sizes on the sheath structure is a collective behavior. The spatial distributions of electric potential, the electron and ion densities and velocities, and the dust grains surface potential are strongly affected by DGSD. The dynamics of dust grains with different sizes in the sheath depend on not only DGSD but also their radius. By comparison of the sheath structure, it is found that under the same expected value of DGSD condition, the sheath length is longer in the case of lognormal distribution than that in the case of uniform distribution. In two cases of normal and lognormal distributions, the sheath length is almost equal for the small variance of DGSD, and then the difference of sheath length increases gradually with increase in the variance.

  10. Size and voltage dependence of effective anisotropy in sub-100-nm perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Stephan K.; Bapna, Mukund; Oberdick, Samuel D.; Majetich, Sara A.; Li, Mingen; Chien, C. L.; Ahmed, Rizvi; Victora, R. H.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are investigated using a conductive atomic force microscope. The 1.23 -nm Co40Fe40B20 recording layer coercivity exhibits a size dependence which suggests single-domain behavior for diameters ≤100 nm. Focusing on devices with diameters smaller than 100 nm, we determine the effect of voltage and size on the effective device anisotropy Keff using two different techniques. Keff is extracted both from distributions of the switching fields of the recording and reference layers and from measurement of thermal fluctuations of the recording layer magnetization when a field close to the switching field is applied. The results from both sets of measurements reveal that Keff increases monotonically with decreasing junction diameter, consistent with the size dependence of the demagnetization energy density. We demonstrate that Keff can be controlled with a voltage down to the smallest size measured, 64 nm.

  11. System size dependence of particle production at the SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Blume, C.

    2012-05-15

    Recent results on the system size dependence of net-baryon and hyperon production as measured at the CERN SPS are discussed. The observed N{sub part} dependences of yields, but also of dynamical properties, such as average transverse momenta, can be described in the context of the core corona approach. Other observables, such as antiproton yields and net-protons at forward rapidities, do not follow the predictions of this model. Possible implications for a search for a critical point in the QCD phase diagram are discussed. Event-by-event fluctuations of the relative core to corona source contributions might influence fluctuation observables (e.g., multiplicity fluctuations). The magnitude of this effect is investigated.

  12. Elemental composition and size distribution of particulates in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Neustadter, H. E.; Leibecki, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made of the elemental particle size distribution at five contrasting urban environments with different source-type distributions in Cleveland, Ohio. Air quality conditions ranged from normal to air pollution alert levels. A parallel network of high-volume cascade impactors (5-state) were used for simultaneous sampling on glass fiber surfaces for mass determinations and on Whatman-41 surfaces for elemental analysis by neutron activation for 25 elements. The elemental data are assessed in terms of distribution functions and interrelationships and are compared between locations as a function of resultant wind direction in an attempt to relate the findings to sources.

  13. Elemental composition and size distribution of particulates in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.; King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Neustadter, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the elemental particle size distribution at five contrasting urban environments with different source-type distributions in Cleveland, Ohio. Air quality conditions ranged from normal to air pollution alert levels. A parallel network of high-volume cascade impactors (5-stage) were used for simultaneous sampling on glass fiber surfaces for mass determinations and on Whatman-41 surfaces for elemental analysis by neutron activation for 25 elements. The elemental data are assessed in terms of distribution functions and interrelationships and are compared between locations as a function of resultant wind direction in an attempt to relate the findings to sources.

  14. Sample Size Tables, "t" Test, and a Prevalent Psychometric Distribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawilowsky, Shlomo S.; Hillman, Stephen B.

    Psychology studies often have low statistical power. Sample size tables, as given by J. Cohen (1988), may be used to increase power, but they are based on Monte Carlo studies of relatively "tame" mathematical distributions, as compared to psychology data sets. In this study, Monte Carlo methods were used to investigate Type I and Type II error…

  15. APPARATUS AND PROCEDURE FOR DETERMINING OIL DROPLET SIZE DISTRIBUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This program was initiated to develop a method and apparatus for determining the oil drop size distribution in flowing oily brine during brine cleanup treatment. An automated photomicrographic apparatus for taking time-lapse photographs of oily brine that was briefly at rest is d...

  16. DROPLET SIZE DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENTS OF ISO NOZZLES BY SHADOWGRAPHY METHOD.

    PubMed

    De Cock, N; Massinon, M; Salah, S Ouled Taleb; Mercatoris, B C; Lebeau, F

    2015-01-01

    The droplet size distribution of agricultural sprays is a key parameter during the plant protection product applications. Therefore, measurement of the drop size distribution is an important concern for spray users as well as nozzle manufacturers. The present work assessed the capability of a shadowgraphy technique to distinguish correctly the 6 spray class boundaries defined in the ISO draft standard (ISO 25358). The measurement set-up is composed by a high speed camera synchronized with a LED backlighting. The tested spray is positioned between the camera and the light. The droplets appear on the images as shadows on a brighter background. For each acquisition, two frames are recorded within a small time laps (38 μI. The droplet diameter and velocity are retrieved by using advanced image analysis algorithm on each pair of frames. Then, the drop size distribution is obtained by gathering the data retrieved from all the images. The global results showed that the 6 drop size distributions were correctly separated highlighting the ability of the method to measure small as well as large droplets using the same set-up configuration. The spatial analysis showed that the spray scanning should be extended in the minor axis direction in order to catch the whole spray. PMID:27141727

  17. Tracing Particle Size Distribution Curves Using an Analogue Circuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisschop, F. De; Segaert, O.

    1986-01-01

    Proposes an analog circuit for use in sedimentation analysis of finely divided solid materials. Discusses a method of particle size distribution analysis and provides schematics of the circuit with list of components as well as a discussion about the operation of the circuit. (JM)

  18. Size and moisture distribution characteristics of walnuts and their components

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the size characteristics and moisture content (MC) distributions of individual walnuts and their components, including hulls, shells and kernels under different harvest conditions. Measurements were carried out for three walnut varieties, Tulare, Howard a...

  19. Factors influencing the effect size distribution of adaptive substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Christopher G.; Gould, Billie A.; Schemske, Douglas W.

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of effect sizes of adaptive substitutions has been central to evolutionary biology since the modern synthesis. Early theory proposed that because large-effect mutations have negative pleiotropic consequences, only small-effect mutations contribute to adaptation. More recent theory suggested instead that large-effect mutations could be favoured when populations are far from their adaptive peak. Here we suggest that the distributions of effect sizes are expected to differ among study systems, reflecting the wide variation in evolutionary forces and ecological conditions experienced in nature. These include selection, mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and other factors such as the degree of pleiotropy, the distance to the phenotypic optimum, whether the optimum is stable or moving, and whether new mutation or standing genetic variation provides the source of adaptive alleles. Our goal is to review how these factors might affect the distribution of effect sizes and to identify new research directions. Until more theory and empirical work is available, we feel that it is premature to make broad generalizations about the effect size distribution of adaptive substitutions important in nature. PMID:27053750

  20. Airborne particulate size distributions in underground mines and their relationship to size-selective sampling criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Rubow, K.L.; Marple, V.A.; Cantrell, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    Researchers are becoming increasingly concerned with airborne particulate matter, not only in the respirable size range, but also in larger size ranges. International Standards Organization (ISO) and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienist (ACGIH) have developed standards for {open_quotes}inhalable{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}thoracic{close_quotes} particulate matter. These require sampling particles up to approximately 100 {mu}m in diameter. The size distribution and mass concentration of airborne particulate matter have been measured in air quality studies of the working sections of more than 20 underground mines by University of Minnesota and U.S. Bureau of Mines personnel. Measurements have been made in more than 15 coal mines and five metal/nonmetal mines over the past eight years. Although mines using diesel-powered equipment were emphasized, mines using all-electric powered equipment were also included. Particle sampling was conducted at fixed locations, i.e., mine portal, ventilation intake entry, haulageways, ventilation return entry, and near raincars, bolters and load-haul-dump equipment. The primary sampling device used was the MSP Model 100 micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). The MOUDI samples at a flow rate of 30 LPM and. provides particle size distribution information for particles primarily in the 0.1 to 18 {mu}m size range. Up to five MOUDI samplers were simultaneously deployed at the fixed locations. Sampling times were typically 4 to 6 hrs/shift. Results from these field studies have been summarized to determine the average size distributions and mass concentrations at various locations in the mine section sampled. From these average size distributions, predictions are made regarding the expected levels of respirable and thoracic mass concentrations as defined by various health-based size-selective aerosol-sampling criteria.

  1. Particle size, size distribution and morphological evaluation of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GRP) industrial by-product.

    PubMed

    Mazzoli, Alida; Moriconi, Giacomo

    2014-12-01

    The waste management of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GRP) materials, in particular those made with thermosetting resins, is a critical issue for the composites industry because these materials cannot be reprocessed. Therefore, most thermosetting GRP waste is presently sent to landfill, in spite of the significant environmental impact caused by their disposal in this way. The limited GRP waste recycling worldwide is mostly due to its intrinsic thermosetting properties, lack of characterization data and unavailability of viable recycling and recovery routes. One of the possibility for re-using GRP industrial by-product is in form of powder as a partial aggregate replacement or filler addition in cement based composites for applications in sustainable construction materials and technologies. However, the feasibility of this kind of reutilization strongly depends on the morphology and particle size distribution of a powder made up of polymer granules and glass fibers. In the present study, the use of image analysis method, based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ImageJ processing program, is proposed in order to evaluate the morphology of the particles and measure the particle size and size distribution of fine GRP waste powder. The obtained results show a great potential of such a method in order to be considered as a standardized method of measurement and analysis in order to characterize the grain size and size distribution of GRP particles before exploiting any compatibility issue for its recycling management. PMID:25195092

  2. Turbulent Concentration of Chondrules: Size Distribution and Multifractal Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Hogan, Robert C.; Paque, Julie M.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    Size-selective concentration of particles in 3D turbulence may be related to collection of chondrules and other constituents into primitive bodies in a weakly turbulent protoplanetary nebula. In the terrestrial planet region, both the characteristic size and narrow size distribution of chondrules are explained, whereas "fluffier" particles would be concentrated in lower density, or more intensely turbulent, regions of the nebula. The spatial distribution of concentrated particle density obeys multifractal scaling, suggesting a dose tie to the turbulent cascade process. This scaling behavior allows predictions of the concentration probabilities to be made in the protoplanetary nebula, which are so large (> 10(exp 3) - 10(exp 4)) that further studies must be made of the role of mass loading.

  3. Effect of disjunct size distributions on foraminiferal species abundance determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.E.; Liddell, W.D.

    1988-02-01

    Studies of foraminiferal distribution and abundance have typically employed a procedure (standard method) that entails counting approximately 300 specimens from a size range greater than some specified minimum (commonly 63 or 125 ..mu..m). This method fails to take into account that foraminifera may be found only within certain size fractions, either because of species specific size ranges or taphonomic processes (sorting, transport, abrasion). Use of a modified counting procedure (sieve method) takes into account foraminiferal size distributions. The sieve method uses counts of up to 300 specimens in each sand-size fraction (0.125-0.25, 0.25-0.5, 0.5-1, 1-2 mm) of each sample. Counts are then totaled for each sample (up to 1200 specimens per site) and used in determination of species abundances for each site. The sieve method has been of considerable utility in recognition of a foraminiferal bathymetric zonation preserved in sediment assemblages from fringing reef environments at Discovery Bay, north Jamaica. Well-documented reef zones (based on corals and physiography) are clearly defined in Q-mode cluster analysis (UPGMA) of species abundances determined using the sieve method. In contrast, individual fore reef zones are not recognized in cluster analysis of foraminiferal species abundances based on the standard method, nor by cluster analysis of species abundances within individual size fractions.

  4. A new stochastic algorithm for inversion of dust aerosol size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Li, Feng; Yang, Ma-ying

    2015-08-01

    Dust aerosol size distribution is an important source of information about atmospheric aerosols, and it can be determined from multiwavelength extinction measurements. This paper describes a stochastic inverse technique based on artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm to invert the dust aerosol size distribution by light extinction method. The direct problems for the size distribution of water drop and dust particle, which are the main elements of atmospheric aerosols, are solved by the Mie theory and the Lambert-Beer Law in multispectral region. And then, the parameters of three widely used functions, i.e. the log normal distribution (L-N), the Junge distribution (J-J), and the normal distribution (N-N), which can provide the most useful representation of aerosol size distributions, are inversed by the ABC algorithm in the dependent model. Numerical results show that the ABC algorithm can be successfully applied to recover the aerosol size distribution with high feasibility and reliability even in the presence of random noise.

  5. Particle-Size-Distribution of Nevada Test Site Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, G; Ray-Maitra, A

    2007-09-17

    The amount of each size particle in a given soil is called the particle-size distribution (PSD), and the way it feels to the touch is called the soil texture. Sand, silt, and clay are the three particle sizes of mineral material found in soils. Sand is the largest sized particle and it feels gritty; silt is medium sized and it feels floury; and clay is the smallest and if feels sticky. Knowing the particle-size distribution of a soil sample helps to understand many soil properties such as how much water, heat, and nutrients the soil will hold, how fast water and heat will move through the soil, and what kind of structure, bulk density and consistence the soil will have. Furthermore, the native particle-size distribution of the soil in the vicinity of ground zero of a nuclear detonation plays a major role in nuclear fallout. For soils that have a high-sand content, the near-range fallout will be relatively high and the far-range fallout will be relatively light. Whereas, for soils that have a high-silt and high-clay content, the near-range fallout will be significantly lower and the far-range fallout will be significantly higher. As part of a program funded by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has recently measured the PSDs from the various major areas at the Nevada Test Site where atmospheric detonations and/or nuclear weapon safety tests were performed back in the 50s and 60s. The purpose of this report is to document those results.

  6. Size- and structure-dependent toxicity of silica particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Sanshiro; Miyaoi, Kenichi; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Inasawa, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2011-03-01

    Nano- and micro-particulates firmly attach with the surface of various biological systems. In some chronic pulmonary disease such as asbestosis and silicosis, causative particulates will induce chronic inflammatory disorder, followed by poor prognosis diseases. However, nano- and micro-scale specific toxicity of silica particulates is not well examined enough to recognize the risk of nano- and micro-particulates from the clinical aspect. To clarify the effect of the size and structure of silica particulates on the cellular damage and the biological response, we assessed the cytotoxicity of the various kinds of silica particles including amorphous and crystalline silica, in mouse alveolar macrophage culture, focusing on the fibrotic and inflammatory response. Our study showed that the cytotoxicity, which depends on the particle size and surface area, is correlated with their inflammatory response. By contrast, production of TGF-β, which is one of the fibrotic agents in lung, by addition of crystal silica was much higher than that of amorphous silica. We conclude that fibrosis and inflammation are induced at different phases and that the size- and structure-differences of silica particulates affect the both biological responses, caused by surface activity, radical species, and so on.

  7. Size-dependent toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Glyptotendipes tokunagai

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seona; Kim, Soyoun; Bae, Yeon-Jae; Park, June-Woo; Jung, Jinho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to evaluate the size-dependent toxicity of spherical silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) to an endemic benthic organism, Glyptotendipes tokunagai. Methods Ag nanoparticles of three nominal sizes (50, 100, and 150 nm) capped with polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP-Ag NPs) were used. Their physicochemical properties, acute toxicity (48 hours), and bioaccumulation were measured using third instar larvae of G. tokunagai. Results The aggregation and dissolution of PVP-Ag NPs increased with exposure time and concentration, respectively, particularly for 50 nm PVP-Ag NPs. However, the dissolved concentration of Ag ions was not significant compared with the median lethal concentration value for AgNO3 (3.51 mg/L). The acute toxicity of PVP-Ag NPs was highest for the smallest particles (50 nm), whereas bioaccumulation was greatest for the largest particles (150 nm). However, larger PVP-Ag NPs were absorbed and excreted rapidly, resulting in shorter stays in G. tokunagai than the smaller ones. Conclusions The size of PVP-Ag NPs significantly affects their acute toxicity to G. tokunagai. In particular, smaller PVP-Ag NPs have a higher solubility and stay longer in the body of G. tokunagai, resulting in higher toxicity than larger PVP-Ag NPs. PMID:26184045

  8. Size and dimensionality dependent phonon conductivity in nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Otaibi, Jawaher; Srivastava, G. P.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied size and dimensionality dependent phonon conductivity of PbTe-PbSe nanocomposites by considering three configurations: superlattice, embedded nanowire and embedded nanodot. Calculations have been performed in the framework of an effective medium theory. The required bulk thermal conductivities of PbTe and PbSe are evaluated by using Callaway’s effective relaxation-time theory, and by accounting for relevant scattering mechanism including three-phonon Normal and Umklapp interactions involving acoustic as well as optical branches. The thermal interface resistance is computed using the diffuse mismatch theory. It is found that the size (thickness) and volume fraction of PbSe are the two main factors that control the effective thermal conductivity in these nanocomposites. In particular, for PbSe size d  =  10 nm and volume fraction {{V}\\text{f}}=0.1 , our results predict significant reductions over the weighted average of room-temperature bulk results of 9%, 17% and 15% in the conductivity across the interfaces for the superlattice, embedded nanowire, and nanosphere structures, respectively. For a given {{V}\\text{f}} , an increase in d reduces the interface density Φ and the effective conductivity varies approximately as 1/\\sqrtΦ . It is shown that nanocompositing in any of the three configurations can beat the alloy limit for lattice thermal conductivity.

  9. Size and DNA distributions of electrophoretically separated cultured human kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Plank, L. D.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Electrophoretic purification of purifying cultured cells according to function presumes that the size of cycle phase of a cell is not an overriding determinant of its electrophoretic velocity in an electrophoretic separator. The size distributions and DNA distributions of fractions of cells purified by density gradient electrophoresis were determined. No systematic dependence of electrophoretic migration upward in a density gradient column upon either size or DNA content were found. It was found that human leukemia cell populations, which are more uniform function and found in all phases of the cell cycle during exponential growth, separated on a vertical sensity gradient electrophoresis column according to their size, which is shown to be strictly cell cycle dependent.

  10. Aged boreal biomass burning aerosol size distributions from BORTAS 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, K. M.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Taylor, J. W.; Duck, T. J.; Pierce, J. R.

    2014-09-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols contribute to aerosol radiative forcing on the climate system. The magnitude of this effect is partially determined by aerosol size distributions, which are functions of source fire characteristics (e.g. fuel type, MCE) and in-plume microphysical processing. The uncertainties in biomass-burning emission number size-distributions in climate model inventories lead to uncertainties in the CCN concentrations and forcing estimates derived from these models. The BORTAS-B measurement campaign was designed to sample boreal biomass-burning outflow over Eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Using these BORTAS-B data, we implement plume criteria to isolate the characteristic size-distribution of aged biomass-burning emissions (aged ∼1-2 days) from boreal wildfires in Northwestern Ontario. The composite median size-distribution yields a single dominant accumulation mode with Dpm = 230 nm (number-median diameter), σ = 1.7, which are comparable to literature values of other aged plumes of a similar type. The organic aerosol enhancement ratios (ΔOA / ΔCO) along the path of Flight b622 show values of 0.05-0.18 μg m-3 ppbv-1 with no significant trend with distance from the source. This lack of enhancement ratio increase/decrease with distance suggests no detectable net OA production/evaporation within the aged plume over the sampling period. A Lagrangian microphysical model was used to determine an estimate of the freshly emitted size distribution corresponding to the BORTAS-B aged size-distributions. The model was restricted to coagulation and dilution processes based on the insignificant net OA production/evaporation derived from the ΔOA / ΔCO enhancement ratios. We estimate that the fresh-plume median diameter was in the range of 59-94 nm with modal widths in the range of 1.7-2.8 (the ranges are due to uncertainty in the entrainment rate). Thus, the size of the freshly emitted particles is relatively unconstrained due to the uncertainties in