Science.gov

Sample records for skeletal myosin light

  1. Myosin regulatory light chain modulates the Ca2+ dependence of the kinetics of tension development in skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, J R; Diffee, G M; Moss, R L

    1996-01-01

    To determine the role of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) in modulating contraction in skeletal muscle, we examined the rate of tension development in bundles of skinned skeletal muscle fibers as a function of the level of Ca(2+) activation after UV flash-induced release of Ca(2+) from the photosensitive Ca(2+) chelator DM-nitrophen. In control fiber bundles, the rate of tension development was highly dependent on the concentration of activator Ca(2+) after the flash. There was a greater than twofold increase in the rate of tension development when the post-flash [Ca(2+)] was increased from the lowest level tested (which produced a steady tension that was 42% of maximum tension) to the highest level (producing 97% of maximum tension). However, when 40-70% of endogenous myosin RLC was extracted from the fiber bundles, tension developed at the maximum rate, regardless of the post-flash concentration of Ca(2+). Thus, the Ca(2+) dependence of the rate of tension development was eliminated by partial extraction of myosin RLC, an effect that was partially reversed by recombination of RLC back into the fiber bundles. The elimination of the Ca(2+) dependence of the kinetics of tension development was specific to the extraction of RLC rather than an artifact of the co-extraction of both RLC and Troponin C, because the rate of tension development was still Ca(2+) dependent, even when nearly 50% of endogenous Troponin C was extracted from fiber bundles fully replete with RLC. Thus, myosin RLC appears to be a key component in modulating Ca(2+) sensitive cross-bridge transitions that limit the rate of force development after photorelease of Ca(2+) in skeletal muscle fibers. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 PMID:9172757

  2. Altered kinetics of contraction in skeletal muscle fibers containing a mutant myosin regulatory light chain with reduced divalent cation binding.

    PubMed Central

    Diffee, G M; Patel, J R; Reinach, F C; Greaser, M L; Moss, R L

    1996-01-01

    We examined the kinetic properties of rabbit skinned skeletal muscle fibers in which the endogenous myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) was partially replaced with a mutant RLC (D47A) containing a point mutation within the Ca2+/Mg2+ binding site that severely reduced its affinity for divalent cations. We found that when approximately 50% of the endogenous RLC was replaced by the mutant, maximum tension declined to approximately 60% of control and the rate constant of active tension redevelopment (ktr) after mechanical disruption of cross-bridges was reduced to approximately 70% of control. This reduction in ktr was not an indirect effect on kinetics due to a reduced number of strongly bound myosin heads, because when the strongly binding cross-bridge analog N-ethylmaleimide-modified myosin subfragment1 (NEM-S1) was added to the fibers, there was no effect upon maximum ktr. Fiber stiffness declined after D47A exchange in a manner indicative of a decrease in the number of strongly bound cross-bridges, suggesting that the force per cross-bridge was not significantly affected by the presence of D47A RLC. In contrast to the effects on ktr, the rate of tension relaxation in steadily activated fibers after flash photolysis of the Ca2+ chelator diazo-2 increased by nearly twofold after D47A exchange. We conclude that the incorporation of the nondivalent cation-binding mutant of myosin RLC decreases the proportion of cycling cross-bridges in a force-generating state by decreasing the rate of formation of force-generating bridges and increasing the rate of detachment. These results suggest that divalent cation binding to myosin RLC plays an important role in modulating the kinetics of cross-bridge attachment and detachment. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8804617

  3. Phosphorylation of human skeletal muscle myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, M.E.; Lingley, M.D.; Stuart, D.S.; Hoffman-Goetz, L.

    1986-03-01

    Phosphorylation of the P-light chains (phosphorylatable light chains) in human skeletal muscle myosin was studied in vitro and in vivo under resting an d contracted conditions. biopsy samples from rested vastus lateralis muscle of male and female subjects were incubated in oxygenated physiological solution at 30/sup 0/C. Samples frozen following a quiescent period showed the presence of only unphosphorylated P-light chains designated LC2f (light chain two of fast myosin) CL2s and LC2s'(light chains two of slow myosin). Treatment with caffeine (10 mM) or direct electrical stimulation resulted in the appearance of three additional bands which were identified as the phosphorylated forms of the P-light chains i.e. LC2f-P, LC2s-P and LC2s'-P. The presence of phosphate was confirmed by prior incubation with (/sup 30/P) orthophosphate. Muscle samples rapidly frozen from resting vastus lateralis muscle revealed the presence of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P-light chains in approximately equal ratios. Muscle samples rapidly frozen following a maximal 10 second isometric contraction showed virtually only phosphorylated fast and slow P-light chains. These results reveal that the P-light chains in human fast and slow myosin may be rapidly phosphorylated, but the basal level of phosphorylation in rested human muscle considerably exceeds that observed in animal muscles studied in vitro or in situ.

  4. Pre-steady-state kinetics of the activation of rabbit skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase by Ca2+/calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Bowman, B F; Peterson, J A; Stull, J T

    1992-03-15

    Myosin light chain kinase is activated by Ca2+/calmodulin. Insights into the kinetic mechanism of this activation by Ca2+/calmodulin have now been obtained using extrinsically labeled fluorescent calmodulin, a fluorescent peptide substrate, and a stopped-flow spectrophotofluorimeter. We employed spinach calmodulin labeled with the sulfhydryl-selective probe, 2-(4-maleimidoanilino)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid, to measure changes in the fluorescence intensity of the 2-(4-maleimidoanilino)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid-calmodulin upon binding to rabbit skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase. The fluorescent peptide substrate KKRAARAC(sulfobenzo-furazan)SNVFS-amide was used to measure kinase activity. Our results showed that the binding interaction could be modeled as a two-step process: a bimolecular reaction with an association rate of 4.6 x 10(7) M-1 s-1 followed by an isomerization with a rate of 2.2 s-1. Phosphorylation of the peptide during stopped-flow experiments could be modeled by a two-step process with a catalytic association rate of 6.5 x 10(6) M-1 s-1 and a turnover rate of 10-20 s-1. Our results also indicated that kinase activity occurred too rapidly for the slower isomerization rate of 2.2 s-1 to be linked specifically to the activation process. PMID:1544916

  5. X-ray diffraction analysis of the effects of myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation and butanedione monoxime on skinned skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Maki; Kimura, Masako; Li, Zhao-Bo; Ohno, Tetsuo; Takemori, Shigeru; Hoh, Joseph F Y; Yagi, Naoto

    2016-04-15

    The phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) is an important modulator of skeletal muscle performance and plays a key role in posttetanic potentiation and staircase potentiation of twitch contractions. The structural basis for these phenomena within the filament lattice has not been thoroughly investigated. Using a synchrotron radiation source at SPring8, we obtained X-ray diffraction patterns from skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers before and after phosphorylation of myosin RLC in the presence of myosin light chain kinase, calmodulin, and calcium at a concentration below the threshold for tension development ([Ca(2+)] = 10(-6.8)M). After phosphorylation, the first myosin layer line slightly decreased in intensity at ∼0.05 nm(-1)along the equatorial axis, indicating a partial loss of the helical order of myosin heads along the thick filament. Concomitantly, the (1,1/1,0) intensity ratio of the equatorial reflections increased. These results provide a firm structural basis for the hypothesis that phosphorylation of myosin RLC caused the myosin heads to move away from the thick filaments towards the thin filaments, thereby enhancing the probability of interaction with actin. In contrast, 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), known to inhibit contraction by impeding phosphate release from myosin, had exactly the opposite effects on meridional and equatorial reflections to those of phosphorylation. We hypothesize that these antagonistic effects are due to the acceleration of phosphate release from myosin by phosphorylation and its inhibition by BDM, the consequent shifts in crossbridge equilibria leading to opposite changes in abundance of the myosin-ADP-inorganic phosphate complex state associated with helical order of thick filaments. PMID:26911280

  6. Differences in the transient response of fast and slow skeletal muscle fibers. Correlations between complex modulus and myosin light chains.

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, M; Schachat, F H

    1984-01-01

    Sinusoidal analysis of the mechanochemical properties of skinned muscle fibers under conditions of maximal activation was applied to fibers from several rabbit skeletal muscles (psoas, tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, diaphragm, soleus, semitendinosus). This investigation distinguished between two general classes of fibers, which on the basis of their myosin light chain complements could be classified as fast and slow. In fast fibers (e.g., psoas) we identified the presence of at least three exponential processes (A), (B), (C) of comparable magnitudes. In slow fibers (e.g., soleus) we identified the presence of at least four exponential processes (A)-(D) of very different magnitudes; magnitudes of processes (A) and (B) are very small compared with those of (C) and (D). The apparent rate constants are 8-29-fold slower in slow fibers. Because our sinusoidal characterization takes less than or equal to 22 s and does not involve chemical denaturation or other means of disruption of the myofilament lattice, it allows the different physiological classes of fibers to be characterized and then studied further by other techniques. The perfect correlation between physiological and molecular properties as assayed by gel electrophoresis after sinusoidal analysis demonstrates this and justifies its use in distinguishing between fiber types. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:6743745

  7. Myosin, Transgelin, and Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lguillette, Renaud; Laviolette, Michel; Bergeron, Celine; Zitouni, Nedjma; Kogut, Paul; Solway, Julian; Kachmar, Linda; Hamid, Qutayba; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Airway smooth muscle (SM) of patients with asthma exhibits a greater velocity of shortening (Vmax) than that of normal subjects, and this is thought to contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness. A greater Vmax can result from increased myosin activation. This has been reported in sensitized human airway SM and in models of asthma. A faster Vmax can also result from the expression of specific contractile proteins that promote faster cross-bridge cycling. This possibility has never been addressed in asthma. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that the expression of genes coding for SM contractile proteins is altered in asthmatic airways and contributes to their increased Vmax. Methods: We quantified the expression of several genes that code for SM contractile proteins in mild allergic asthmatic and control human airway endobronchial biopsies. The function of these contractile proteins was tested using the in vitro motility assay. Measurements and Main Results: We observed an increased expression of the fast myosin heavy chain isoform, transgelin, and myosin light chain kinase in patients with asthma. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the expression of these genes at the protein level. To address the functional significance of this overexpression, we purified tracheal myosin from the hyperresponsive Fisher rats, which also overexpress the fast myosin heavy chain isoform as compared with the normoresponsive Lewis rats, and found a faster rate of actin filament propulsion. Conversely, transgelin did not alter the rate of actin filament propulsion. Conclusions: Selective overexpression of airway smooth muscle genes in asthmatic airways leads to increased Vmax, thus contributing to the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in asthma. PMID:19011151

  8. Dynamics of myosin replacement in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Koichi; Ichimura, Emi; Yasukawa, Yuya; Wakamatsu, Jun-Ichi; Nishimura, Takanori

    2015-11-15

    Highly organized thick filaments in skeletal muscle cells are formed from ~300 myosin molecules. Each thick-filament-associated myosin molecule is thought to be constantly exchanged. However, the mechanism of myosin replacement remains unclear, as does the source of myosin for substitution. Here, we investigated the dynamics of myosin exchange in the myofibrils of cultured myotubes by fluorescent recovery after photobleaching and found that myofibrillar myosin is actively replaced with an exchange half-life of ~3 h. Myosin replacement was not disrupted by the absence of the microtubule system or by actomyosin interactions, suggesting that known cytoskeletal systems are dispensable for myosin substitution. Intriguingly, myosin replacement was independent of myosin binding protein C, which links myosin molecules together to form thick filaments. This implies that an individual myosin molecule rather than a thick filament functions as an exchange unit. Furthermore, the myosin substitution rate was decreased by the inhibition of protein synthesis, suggesting that newly synthesized myosin, as well as preexisting cytosolic myosin, contributes to myosin replacement in myofibrils. Notably, incorporation and release of myosin occurred simultaneously in myofibrils, but rapid myosin release from myofibrils was observed without protein synthesis. Collectively, our results indicate that myosin shuttles between myofibrils and the nonmyofibrillar cytosol to maintain a dynamic equilibrium in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:26377314

  9. The Conformation of Myosin Heads in Relaxed Skeletal Muscle: Implications for Myosin-Based Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fusi, Luca; Huang, Zhe; Irving, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    In isolated thick filaments from many types of muscle, the two head domains of each myosin molecule are folded back against the filament backbone in a conformation called the interacting heads motif (IHM) in which actin interaction is inhibited. This conformation is present in resting skeletal muscle, but it is not known how exit from the IHM state is achieved during muscle activation. Here, we investigated this by measuring the in situ conformation of the light chain domain of the myosin heads in relaxed demembranated fibers from rabbit psoas muscle using fluorescence polarization from bifunctional rhodamine probes at four sites on the C-terminal lobe of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC). The order parameter 〈P2〉 describing probe orientation with respect to the filament axis had a roughly sigmoidal dependence on temperature in relaxing conditions, with a half-maximal change at ∼19°C. Either lattice compression by 5% dextran T500 or addition of 25 μM blebbistatin decreased the transition temperature to ∼14°C. Maximum entropy analysis revealed three preferred orientations of the myosin RLC region at 25°C and above, two with its long axis roughly parallel to the filament axis and one roughly perpendicular. The parallel orientations are similar to those of the so-called blocked and free heads in the IHM and are stabilized by either lattice compression or blebbistatin. In relaxed skeletal muscle at near-physiological temperature and myofilament lattice spacing, the majority of the myosin heads have their light chain domains in IHM-like conformations, with a minority in a distinct conformation with their RLC regions roughly perpendicular to the filament axis. None of these three orientation populations were present during active contraction. These results are consistent with a regulatory transition of the thick filament in skeletal muscle associated with a conformational equilibrium of the myosin heads. PMID:26287630

  10. The myosin light chain enhancer and the skeletal actin promoter share a binding site for factors involved in muscle-specific gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, H; Walsh, K; Harrison, C A; Rosenthal, N

    1991-01-01

    The myosin light chain (MLC) 1/3 enhancer (MLC enhancer), identified at the 3' end of the skeletal MLC1/3 locus, contains a sequence motif that is homologous to a protein-binding site of the skeletal muscle alpha-actin promoter. Gel shift, competition, and footprint assays demonstrated that a CArG motif in the MLC enhancer binds the proteins MAPF1 and MAPF2, previously identified as factors interacting with the muscle regulatory element of the skeletal alpha-actin promoter. Transient transfection assays with constructs containing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene demonstrated that a 115-bp subfragment of the MLC enhancer is able to exert promoter activity when provided with a silent nonmuscle TATA box. A point mutation at the MAPF1/2-binding site interferes with factor binding and abolishes the promoter activity of the 115-bp fragment. The observation that an oligonucleotide encompassing the MAPF1/2 site of the MLC enhancer alone cannot serve as a promoter element suggests that additional factor-binding sites are necessary for this function. The finding that MAPF1 and MAPF2 recognize similar sequence motifs in two muscle genes, simultaneously activated during muscle differentiation, implies that these factors may have a role in coordinating the activation of contractile protein gene expression during myogenesis. Images PMID:2046675

  11. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase efficiently phosphorylates serine 15 of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, Matthew P.; Sikkink, Laura A.; Penheiter, Alan R.; Burghardt, Thomas P.; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) is phosphorylated at S15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is a widely believed that MYL2 is a poor substrate for smMLCK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In fact, smMLCK efficiently and rapidly phosphorylates S15 in MYL2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation kinetics measured by novel fluorescence method without radioactivity. -- Abstract: Specific phosphorylation of the human ventricular cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) modifies the protein at S15. This modification affects MYL2 secondary structure and modulates the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of contraction in cardiac tissue. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase prevalent in uterus and present in other contracting tissues including cardiac muscle. The recombinant 130 kDa (short) smMLCK phosphorylated S15 in MYL2 in vitro. Specific modification of S15 was verified using the direct detection of the phospho group on S15 with mass spectrometry. SmMLCK also specifically phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain S15 in porcine ventricular myosin and chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (S20 in smooth muscle) but failed to phosphorylate the myosin regulatory light chain in rabbit skeletal myosin. Phosphorylation kinetics, measured using a novel fluorescence method eliminating the use of radioactive isotopes, indicates similar Michaelis-Menten V{sub max} and K{sub M} for regulatory light chain S15 phosphorylation rates in MYL2, porcine ventricular myosin, and chicken gizzard myosin. These data demonstrate that smMLCK is a specific and efficient kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of MYL2, cardiac, and smooth muscle myosin. Whether smMLCK plays a role in cardiac muscle regulation or response to a disease causing stimulus is unclear but it should be considered a potentially significant kinase in cardiac tissue on the basis of its specificity, kinetics, and tissue expression.

  12. Skeletal muscle myosin is the autoantigen for experimental autoimmune myositis.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Hiroshi; Bhopale, Mahendra K; Constantinescu, Cris S; Schotland, Donald; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2003-06-01

    Experimental autoimmune myositis (EAM) is a rodent model for human inflammatory muscle disease (IMD). It can be induced by immunization of rodents with skeletal muscle homogenate and adjuvant. The specific myositogenic autoantigen has not been clearly identified although some evidence points to skeletal muscle myosin. In this report we strengthen this evidence, showing that Lewis rats immunized with purified skeletal muscle myosin develop EAM with the same pattern and severity as EAM induced by whole rabbit skeletal muscle homogenate (WRM). Multiple inflammatory lesions are detected histopathologically in the biceps, quadriceps, and gastrocnemius muscles. Myosin-reactive T cells from animals immunized either with myosin or with WRM have similar patterns of antigen-induced proliferation. The results show that myosin, a component of skeletal muscle, is at least one autoantigen in EAM. PMID:12782010

  13. Arginylation of myosin heavy chain regulates skeletal muscle strength

    PubMed Central

    Cornachione, Anabelle S.; Leite, Felipe S.; Wang, Junling; Leu, Nicolae A.; Kalganov, Albert; Volgin, Denys; Han, Xuemei; Xu, Tao; Cheng, Yu-Shu; Yates, John R. R.; Rassier, Dilson E.; Kashina, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Protein arginylation is a post-translational modification with an emerging global role in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. To test the role of arginylation in the skeletal muscle, we generated a mouse model with Ate1 knockout driven by skeletal muscle-specific creatine kinase (Ckmm) promoter. Such Ckmm-Ate1 mice were viable and outwardly normal, however their skeletal muscle strength was significantly reduced compared to the control. Mass spectrometry of the isolated skeletal myofibrils showed a limited set of proteins arginylated on specific sites, including myosin heavy chain. Atomic force microscopy measurements of the contractile strength in individual myofibrils and isolated myosin filaments from these mice showed a significant reduction of contractile forces, which, in the case of the myosin filaments could be fully rescued by re-arginylation with purified Ate1. Our results demonstrate that arginylation regulates force production in the muscle and exerts a direct effect on muscle strength through arginylation of myosin. PMID:25017061

  14. The expression of myosin genes in developing skeletal muscle in the mouse embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, G.E.; Ontell, M.; Cox, R.; Sassoon, D.; Buckingham, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Using in situ hybridization, we have investigated the temporal sequence of myosin gene expression in the developing skeletal muscle masses of mouse embryos. The probes used were isoform-specific, 35S-labeled antisense cRNAs to the known sarcomeric myosin heavy chain and myosin alkali light chain gene transcripts. Results showed that both cardiac and skeletal myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain mRNAs were first detected between 9 and 10 d post coitum (p.c.) in the myotomes of the most rostral somites. Myosin transcripts appeared in more caudal somites at later stages in a developmental gradient. The earliest myosin heavy chain transcripts detected code for the embryonic skeletal (MHCemb) and beta-cardiac (MHC beta) isoforms. Perinatal myosin heavy chain (MHCpn) transcripts begin to accumulate at 10.5 d p.c., which is much earlier than previously reported. At this stage, MHCemb is the major MHC transcript. By 12.5 d p.c., MHCpn and MHCemb mRNAs are present to an equal extent, and by 15.5 d p.c. the MHCpn transcript is the major MHC mRNA detected. Cardiac MHC beta transcripts are always present as a minor component. In contrast, the cardiac MLC1A mRNA is initially more abundant than that encoding the skeletal MLC1F isoform. By 12.5 d p.c. the two MLC mRNAs are present at similar levels, and by 15.5 d p.c., MLC1F is the predominant MLC transcript detected. Transcripts for the ventricular/slow (MLC1V) and another fast skeletal myosin light chain (MLC3F) are not detected in skeletal muscle before 15 d p.c., which marks the beginning of the fetal stage of muscle development. This is the first stage at which we can detect differences in expression of myosin genes between developing muscle fibers. We conclude that, during the development of the myotome and body wall muscles, different myosin genes follow independent patterns of activation and acculumation.

  15. Myosin-linked calcium regulation in squid mantle muscle. Light-chain components of squid myosin.

    PubMed

    Konno, K; Arai, K; Watanabe, S

    1979-12-01

    As reported by Kendrick-Jones et al. (1976), myosin from squid mantle muscle contains two types of light-chain components, different in size but similar in net charge. We were able to separate the two types of light chains by a five-step procedure, yielding LC-1 (17,000 daltons) and LC-2 (15,000 daltons). It was found that squid mantle LC-1 and LC-2 function exactly like SH-light chains and EDTA-light chains of scallop adductor myosin, respectively. In functional tests, we used "desensitized" myosin of scallop adductor muscle, simply because "EDTA washing" removed neither LC-1 nor LC-2 from squid mantle myosin. The removal and recombination of light chains were examined by gel electrophoresis, and Ca or Sr sensitivity was determined by measuring the Mg-ATPase activity of skeletal acto-scallop or squid myosin. It was found that EDTA washing readily released the EDTA-light chains of scallop myosin completely, and that the EDTA-washed scallop myosin was capable of regaining its full content of EDTA-LC as well as its full sensitivity to calcium. We also found that as regards combining with, and conferring calcium sensitivity on the EDTA-washed myosin of scallop adductor, squid mantle LC-2 could effectively replace scallop adductor EDTA-LC. In addition, calcium or strontium ions were found to induce changes in the UV absorption spectrum of scallop adductor EDTA-LC, although the apparent binding constants estimated from the difference spectrum were too low to account for the Ca or Sr sensitivity of scallop actomyosin-ATPase. The divalent cations also induced changes in the UV absorption spectrum of squid LC-2, and the apparent binding constants estimated from the difference spectrum were sufficiently high (1.5 X 10(5) M-1 for Ca binding, and 1.6 X 10(3) M-1 for Sr binding) to account for the Ca and Sr sensitivities of squid mantle myosin B-ATPase. The findings with scallop adductor myosin are in conflict with those reported by Kendrick-Jones et al., and must be accounted for in formulating the molecular mechanism of myosin-linked calcium regulation in molluscan muscles. PMID:160911

  16. In Vivo Orientation of Single Myosin Lever Arms in Zebrafish Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaojing; Ekker, Stephen C.; Shelden, Eric A.; Takubo, Naoko; Wang, Yihua; Burghardt, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac and skeletal myosin assembled in the muscle lattice power contraction by transducing ATP free energy into the mechanical work of moving actin. Myosin catalytic/lever-arm domains comprise the transduction/mechanical coupling machinery that move actin by lever-arm rotation. In vivo, myosin is crowded and constrained by the fiber lattice as side chains are mutated and otherwise modified under normal, diseased, or aging conditions that collectively define the native myosin environment. Single-myosin detection uniquely defines bottom-up characterization of myosin functionality. The marriage of in vivo and single-myosin detection to study zebrafish embryo models of human muscle disease is a multiscaled technology that allows one-to-one registration of a selected myosin molecular alteration with muscle filament-sarcomere-cell-fiber-tissue-organ- and organism level phenotypes. In vivo single-myosin lever-arm orientation was observed at superresolution using a photoactivatable-green-fluorescent-protein (PAGFP)-tagged myosin light chain expressed in zebrafish skeletal muscle. By simultaneous observation of multiphoton excitation fluorescence emission and second harmonic generation from myosin, we demonstrated tag specificity for the lever arm. Single-molecule detection used highly inclined parallel beam illumination and was verified by quantized photoactivation and photobleaching. Single-molecule emission patterns from relaxed muscle in vivo provided extensive superresolved dipole orientation constraints that were modeled using docking scenarios generated for the myosin (S1) and GFP crystal structures. The dipole orientation data provided sufficient constraints to estimate S1/GFP coordination. The S1/GFP coordination in vivo is rigid and the lever-arm orientation distribution is well-ordered in relaxed muscle. For comparison, single myosins in relaxed permeabilized porcine papillary muscle fibers indicated slightly differently oriented lever arms and rigid S1/GFP coordination. Lever arms in both muscles indicated one preferred spherical polar orientation and widely distributed azimuthal orientations relative to the fiber symmetry axis. Cardiac myosin is more radially displaced from the fiber axis. Probe rigidity implies the PAGFP tag reliably indicates cross-bridge orientation in situ and in vivo. PMID:25229148

  17. Random myosin loss along thick-filaments increases myosin attachment time and the proportion of bound myosin heads to mitigate force decline in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Bertrand C.W.; McNabb, Mark; Palmer, Bradley M.; Toth, Michael J.; Miller, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Diminished skeletal muscle performance with aging, disuse, and disease may be partially attributed to the loss of myofilament proteins. Several laboratories have found a disproportionate loss of myosin protein content relative to other myofilament proteins, but due to methodological limitations, the structural manifestation of this protein loss is unknown. To investigate how variations in myosin content affect ensemble cross-bridge behavior and force production we simulated muscle contraction in the half-sarcomere as myosin was removed either i) uniformly, from the Z-line end of thick-filaments, or ii) randomly, along the length of thick-filaments. Uniform myosin removal decreased force production, showing a slightly steeper force-to-myosin content relationship than the 1:1 relationship that would be expected from the loss of cross-bridges. Random myosin removal also decreased force production, but this decrease was less than observed with uniform myosin loss, largely due to increased myosin attachment time (ton) and fractional cross-bridge binding with random myosin loss. These findings support our prior observations that prolonged ton may augment force production in single fibers with randomly reduced myosin content from chronic heart failure patients. These simulation also illustrate that the pattern of myosin loss along thick-filaments influences ensemble cross-bridge behavior and maintenance of force throughout the sarcomere. PMID:24486373

  18. Distribution and properties of myosin isozymes in developing avian and mammalian skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, G F; Lowey, S; Benfield, P A; Hobbs, A W

    1982-02-01

    Isozymes of myosin have been localized with respect to individual fibers in differentiating skeletal muscles of the rat and chicken using immunocytochemistry. The myosin light chain pattern has been analyzed in the same muscles by two-dimensional PAGE. In the muscles of both species, the response to antibodies against fast and slow adult myosin is consistent with the speed of contraction of the muscle. During early development, when speed of contraction is slow in future fast and slow muscles, all the fibers react strongly with anti-slow as well as with anti-fast myosin. As adult contractile properties are acquired, the fibers react with antibodies specific for either fast or slow myosin, but few fibers react with both antibodies. The myosin light chain pattern slow shows a change with development: the initial light chains (LC) are principally of the fast type, LC1(f), and LC2(f), independent of whether the embryonic muscle is destined to become a fast or a slow muscle in the adult. The LC3(f), light chain does not appear in significant amounts until after birth, in agreement with earlier reports. The predominance of fast light chains during early stages of development is especially evident in the rat soleus and chicken ALD, both slow muscles, in which LC1(f), is gradually replaced by the slow light chain, LC1(s), as development proceeds. Other features of the light chain pattern include an "embryonic" light chain in fetal and neonatal muscles of the rat, as originally demonstrated by R.G. Whalen, G.S. Butler- Browne, and F. Gros. (1978. J. Mol. Biol. 126:415-431.); and the presence of approximately 10 percent slow light chains in embryonic pectoralis, a fast white muscle in the adult chicken. The response of differentiating muscle fibers to anti-slow myosin antibody cannot, however, be ascribed solely to the presence of slow light chains, since antibody specific for the slow heavy chain continues to react with all the fibers. We conclude that during early development, the myosin consists of a population of molecules in which the heavy chain can be associated with a fast, slow, or embryonic light chain. Biochemical analysis has shown that this embryonic heavy chain (or chains) is distinct from adult fast or slow myosin (R.G. Whalen, K. Schwartz, P. Bouveret, S.M. Sell, and F. Gros. 1979. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 76:5197-5201. J.I. Rushbrook, and A. Stracher. 1979. Proc Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 76:4331-4334. P.A. Benfield, S. Lowey, and D.D. LeBlanc. 1981. Biophys. J. 33(2, Pt. 2):243a[Abstr.]). Embryonic myosin, therefore, constitutes a unique class of molecules, whose synthesis ceases before the muscle differentiates into an adult pattern of fiber types. PMID:6174531

  19. A monoclonal antibody to the embryonic myosin heavy chain of rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gambke, B; Rubinstein, N A

    1984-10-10

    A monoclonal antibody, 2B6, has been prepared against the embryonic myosin heavy chain of rat skeletal muscle. On solid phase radioimmunoassay, 2B6 shows specificity to myosin isozymes known to contain the embryonic myosin heavy chain and on immunoblots of denatured contractile proteins and on competitive radioimmunoassay, it reacts only with the myosin heavy chain of embryonic myosin and not with the myosin heavy chain of neonatal or adult fast and slow myosin isozymes or with other contractile or noncontractile proteins. This specificity is maintained with cat, dog, guinea pig, and human myosins, but not with chicken myosins. 2B6 was used to define which isozymes in the developing animal contained the embryonic myosin heavy chain and to characterize the changes in embryonic myosin heavy chain in fast versus slow muscles during development. Finally, 2B6 was used to demonstrate that thyroid hormone hastens the disappearance of embryonic myosin heavy chain during development, while hypothyroidism retards its decrease. This confirmed our previous conclusion that thyroid hormones orchestrate changes in isozymes during development. PMID:6384219

  20. Smooth muscle and skeletal muscle myosins produce similar unitary forces and displacements in the laser trap.

    PubMed Central

    Guilford, W H; Dupuis, D E; Kennedy, G; Wu, J; Patlak, J B; Warshaw, D M

    1997-01-01

    Purified smooth muscle myosin in the in vitro motility assay propels actin filaments at 1/10 the velocity, yet produces 3-4 times more force than skeletal muscle myosin. At the level of a single myosin molecule, these differences in force and actin filament velocity may be reflected in the size and duration of single motion and force-generating events, or in the kinetics of the cross-bridge cycle. Specifically, an increase in either unitary force or duty cycle may explain the enhanced force-generating capacity of smooth muscle myosin. Similarly, an increase in attached time or decrease in unitary displacement may explain the reduced actin filament velocity of smooth muscle myosin. To discriminate between these possibilities, we used a laser trap to measure unitary forces and displacements from single smooth and skeletal muscle myosin molecules. We analyzed our data using mean-variance analysis, which does not rely on scoring individual events by eye, and emphasizes periods in the data with constant properties. Both myosins demonstrated multiple but similar event populations with discrete peaks at approximately +11 and -11 nm in displacement, and 1.5 and 3.5 pN in force. Mean attached times for smooth muscle myosin were longer than for skeletal-muscle myosin. These results explain much of the difference in actin filament velocity between these myosins, and suggest that an increased duty cycle is responsible for the enhanced force-generating capacity of smooth over skeletal-muscle myosin. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:9138552

  1. A comparison of rat myosin from fast and slow skeletal muscle and the effect of disuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unsworth, B. R.; Witzmann, F. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Certain enzymatic and structural features of myosin, purified from rat skeletal muscles representative of the fast twitch glycolytic (type IIb), the fast twitch oxidative (type IIa), and the slow twitch oxidative (type I) fiber, were determined and the results were compared with the measured contractile properties. Good correlation was found between the shortening velocities and Ca(2+)-activated ATPase activity for each fiber type. Short term hind limb immobilization caused prolongation of contraction time and one-half relaxation time in the fast twitch muscles and a reduction of these contractile properties in slow twitch soleus. Furthermore, the increased maximum shortening velocity in the immobilized soleus could be correlated with increased Ca(2+)-ATPase, but no change was observed in the enzymatic activity of the fast twitch muscles. No alteration in light chain distribution with disuse was observed in any of the fiber types. The myosin from slow twitch soleus could be distinguished from fast twitch myosins on the basis of the pattern of peptides generated by proteolysis of the heavy chains. Six weeks of hind limb immobilization resulted in both an increased ATPase activity and an altered heavy chain primary structure in the slow twitch soleus muscle.

  2. Improving human skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain fiber typing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Murach, Kevin A; Bagley, James R; McLeland, Kathryn A; Arevalo, Jose A; Ciccone, Anthony B; Malyszek, Kylie K; Wen, Yuan; Galpin, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Single muscle fiber sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) is a sensitive technique for determining skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of human biopsy samples. However, the number of fibers suitable to represent fiber type distribution via this method is undefined. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis (VL) of nine resistance-trained males (25 ± 1 year, height = 179 ± 5 cm, mass = 82 ± 8 kg). Single fiber MHC composition was determined via SDS-PAGE. VL fiber type distribution [percent MHC I, I/IIa, IIa, IIa/IIx, and total "hybrids" (i.e. I/IIa + IIa/IIx)] was evaluated according to number of fibers analyzed per person (25 vs. 125). VL fiber type distribution did not differ according to number of fibers analyzed (P > 0.05). VL biopsy fiber type distribution of nine subjects is represented by analyzing 25 fibers per person. These data may help minimize cost, personnel-time, and materials associated with this technique, thereby improving fiber typing efficiency in humans. PMID:26842420

  3. Increased expression of Myosin binding protein H in the skeletal muscle of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Conti, Antonio; Riva, Nilo; Pesca, Mariasabina; Iannaccone, Sandro; Cannistraci, Carlo V; Corbo, Massimo; Previtali, Stefano C; Quattrini, Angelo; Alessio, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe and fatal neurodegenerative disease of still unknown pathogenesis. Recent findings suggest that the skeletal muscle may play an active pathogenetic role. To investigate ALS's pathogenesis and to seek diagnostic markers, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies with the differential expression proteomic approach. We studied skeletal muscle biopsies from healthy controls (CN), sporadic ALS (sALS), motor neuropathies (MN) and myopathies (M). Pre-eminently among several differentially expressed proteins, Myosin binding protein H (MyBP-H) expression in ALS samples was anomalously high. MyBP-H is a component of the thick filaments of the skeletal muscle and has strong affinity for myosin, but its function is still unclear. High MyBP-H expression level was associated with abnormal expression of Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2), LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) and cofilin2, that might affect the actin-myosin interaction. We propose that MyBP-H expression level serves, as a putative biomarker in the skeletal muscle, to discriminate ALS from motor neuropathies, and that it signals the onset of dysregulation in actin-myosin interaction; this in turn might contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:24184715

  4. Functional diversity among a family of human skeletal muscle myosin motors

    PubMed Central

    Resnicow, Daniel I.; Deacon, John C.; Warrick, Hans M.; Spudich, James A.; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2010-01-01

    Human skeletal muscle fibers express five highly conserved type-II myosin heavy chain (MyHC) genes in distinct spatial and temporal patterns. In addition, the human genome contains an intact sixth gene, MyHC-IIb, which is thought under most circumstances not to be expressed. The physiological and biochemical properties of individual muscle fibers correlate with the predominantly expressed MyHC isoform, but a functional analysis of homogenous skeletal muscle myosin isoforms has not been possible. This is due to the difficulties of separating the multiple isoforms usually coexpressed in muscle fibers, as well as the lack of an expression system that produces active recombinant type II skeletal muscle myosin. In this study we describe a mammalian muscle cell expression system and the functional analysis of all six recombinant human type II skeletal muscle myosin isoforms. The diverse biochemical activities and actin-filament velocities of these myosins indicate that they likely have distinct functions in muscle. Our data also show that ATPase activity and motility are generally correlated for human skeletal muscle myosins. The exception, MyHC-IIb, encodes a protein that is high in ATPase activity but slow in motility; this is the first functional analysis of the protein from this gene. In addition, the developmental isoforms, hypothesized to have low ATPase activity, were indistinguishable from adult-fast MyHC-IIa and the specialized MyHC-Extraocular isoform, that was predicted to be the fastest of all six isoforms but was functionally similar to the slower isoforms. PMID:20080549

  5. Effect of spaceflight on skeletal muscle: Mechanical properties and myosin isoform content of a slow muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiozzo, Vincent J.; Baker, Michael J.; Herrick, Robert E.; Tao, Ming; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1994-01-01

    This study examined changes in contractile, biochemical, and histochemical properties of slow antigravity skeletal muscle after a 6-day spaceflight mission. Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: flight and ground-based control. Approximately 3 h after the landing, in situ contractile measurements were made on the soleus muscles of the flight animals. The control animals were studied 24 h later. The contractile measurements included force-velocity relationship, force-frequency relationship, and fatigability. Biochemical measurements focused on the myosin heavy chain (MHC) and myosin light chain profiles. Adenosinetriphosphatase histochemistry was performed to identify cross-sectional area of slow and fast muscle fibers and to determine the percent fiber type distribution. The force-velocity relationships of the flight muscles were altered such that maximal isometric tension P(sub o) was decreased by 24% and maximal shortening velocity was increased by 14% (P less than 0.05). The force-frequency relationship of the flight muscles was shifted to the right of the control muscles. At the end of the 2-min fatigue test, the flight muscles generated only 34% of P(sub o), whereas the control muscles generated 64% of P(sub o). The flight muscles exhibited de novo expression of the type IIx MHC isoform as well as a slight decrease in the slow type I and fast type IIa MHC isoforms. Histochemical analyses of flight muscles demonstrated a small increase in the percentage of fast type II fibers and a greater atrophy of the slow type I fibers. The results demonstrate that contractile properties of slow antigravity skeletal muscle are sensitive to the microgravity environment and that changes begin to occur within the 1st wk. These changes were at least, in part, associated with changes in the amount and type of contractile protein expressed.

  6. Effect of spaceflight on skeletal muscle: mechanical properties and myosin isoform content of a slow muscle.

    PubMed

    Caiozzo, V J; Baker, M J; Herrick, R E; Tao, M; Baldwin, K M

    1994-04-01

    This study examined changes in contractile, biochemical, and histochemical properties of slow antigravity skeletal muscle after a 6-day spaceflight mission. Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: flight and ground-based control. Approximately 3 h after the landing, in situ contractile measurements were made on the soleus muscles of the flight animals. The control animals were studied 24 h later. The contractile measurements included force-velocity relationship, force-frequency relationship, and fatigability. Biochemical measurements focused on the myosin heavy chain (MHC) and myosin light chain profiles. Adenosine-triphosphatase histochemistry was performed to identify cross-sectional area of slow and fast muscle fibers and to determine the percent fiber type distribution. The force-velocity relationships of the flight muscles were altered such that maximal isometric tension (Po) was decreased by 24% and maximal shortening velocity was increased by 14% (P < 0.05). The force-frequency relationship of the flight muscles was shifted to the right of the control muscles. At the end of the 2-min fatigue test, the flight muscles generated only 34% of Po, whereas the control muscles generated 64% of Po. The flight muscles exhibited de novo expression of the type IIx MHC isoform as well as a slight decrease in the slow type I and fast type IIa MHC isoforms. Histochemical analyses of flight muscles demonstrated a small increase in the percentage of fast type II fibers and a greater atrophy of the slow type I fibers. The results demonstrate that contractile properties of slow antigravity skeletal muscle are sensitive to the microgravity environment and that changes begin to occur within the 1st wk. These changes were at least, in part, associated with changes in the amount and type of contractile protein expressed. PMID:8045858

  7. Myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation enhances cardiac β-myosin in vitro motility under load

    PubMed Central

    Karabina, Anastasia; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Moore, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and myofibrillar disarray, and often results in sudden cardiac death. Two HCM mutations, N47K and R58Q, are located in the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC). The RLC mechanically stabilizes the myosin lever arm, which is crucial to myosin’s ability to transmit contractile force. The N47K and R58Q mutations have previously been shown to reduce actin filament velocity under load, stemming from a more compliant lever arm (Greenberg, 2010). In contrast, RLC phosphorylation was shown to impart stiffness to the myosin lever arm (Greenberg, 2009). We hypothesized that phosphorylation of the mutant HCM-RLC may mitigate distinct mutation-induced structural and functional abnormalities. In vitro motility assays were utilized to investigate the effects of RLC phosphorylation on the HCM-RLC mutant phenotype in the presence of an α-actinin frictional load. Porcine cardiac β-myosin was depleted of its native RLC and reconstituted with mutant or wild-type human RLC in phosphorylated or non-phosphorylated form. Consistent with previous findings, in the presence of load, myosin bearing the HCM mutations reduced actin sliding velocity compared to WT resulting in 31–41% reductions in force production. Myosin containing phosphorylated RLC (WT or mutant) increased sliding velocity and also restored mutant myosin force production to near WT unphosphorylated values. These results point to RLC phosphorylation as a general mechanism to increase force production of the individual myosin motor and as a potential target to ameliorate the HCM-induced phenotype at the molecular level. PMID:26116789

  8. Conformation of the myosin motor during force generation in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Irving, M; Piazzesi, G; Lucii, L; Sun, Y B; Harford, J J; Dobbie, I M; Ferenczi, M A; Reconditi, M; Lombardi, V

    2000-06-01

    Myosin motors drive muscle contraction, cytokinesis and cell locomotion, and members of the myosin superfamily have been implicated in an increasingly diverse range of cell functions. Myosin can displace a bound actin filament several nanometers in a single interaction. Crystallographic studies suggest that this 'working stroke' involves bending of the myosin head between its light chain and catalytic domains. Here we used X-ray fiber diffraction to test the crystallographic model and measure the interdomain bending during force generation in an intact single muscle fiber. The observed bending has two components: an elastic distortion and an active rotation that generates force. The average bend of the force-generating myosin heads in a muscle fiber is intermediate between those in crystal structures with different bound nucleotides, and the C-terminus of the head is displaced by 7 nm along the actin filament axis compared with the in vitro conformation seen in the absence of nucleotide. PMID:10881196

  9. The role of the N-terminus of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jones, Michelle; Guzman, Georgianna; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kerrick, W. Glenn L.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    Summary To study the regulation of cardiac muscle contraction by the myosin essential light chain (ELC) and the physiological significance of its N-terminal extension, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice partially replacing the endogenous mouse ventricular ELC with either the human ventricular ELC wild type (Tg-WT) or its 43 amino acid N-terminal truncation mutant (Tg-Δ43) in the murine hearts. The mutant protein is similar in sequence to the short ELC variant present in skeletal muscle and the ELC protein distribution in Tg-Δ43 ventricles resembles that of fast skeletal muscle. Cardiac muscle preparations from Tg-Δ43 mice demonstrate reduced force per cross-sectional area of muscle, which is likely caused by a reduced number of force generating myosin cross-bridges and/or by decreased force per cross-bridge. As the mice grow older, the contractile force per cross-sectional area further decreases in Tg-Δ43 mice and the mutant hearts develop a phenotype of non-pathologic hypertrophy while still maintaining normal cardiac performance. The myocardium of older Tg-Δ43 mice also exhibits reduced myosin content. Our results suggest that the role of the N-terminal ELC extension is to maintain the integrity of myosin and to modulate force generation by decreasing myosin neck region compliance and promoting strong cross-bridge formation and/or by enhancing myosin attachment to actin. PMID:19361417

  10. Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain controls myosin head conformation in cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kampourakis, Thomas; Irving, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    The effect of phosphorylation on the conformation of the regulatory light chain (cRLC) region of myosin in ventricular trabeculae from rat heart was determined by polarized fluorescence from thiophosphorylated cRLCs labelled with bifunctional sulforhodamine (BSR). Less than 5% of cRLCs were endogenously phosphorylated in this preparation, and similarly low values of basal cRLC phosphorylation were measured in fresh intact ventricle from both rat and mouse hearts. BSR-labelled cRLCs were thiophosphorylated by a recombinant fragment of human cardiac myosin light chain kinase, which was shown to phosphorylate cRLCs specifically at serine 15 in a calcium- and calmodulin-dependent manner, both in vitro and in situ. The BSR-cRLCs were exchanged into demembranated trabeculae, and polarized fluorescence intensities measured for each BSR-cRLC in relaxation, active isometric contraction and rigor were combined with RLC crystal structures to calculate the orientation distribution of the C-lobe of the cRLC in each state. Only two of the four C-lobe orientation populations seen during relaxation and active isometric contraction in the unphosphorylated state were present after cRLC phosphorylation. Thus cRLC phosphorylation alters the equilibrium between defined conformations of the cRLC regions of the myosin heads, rather than simply disordering the heads as assumed previously. cRLC phosphorylation also changes the orientation of the cRLC C-lobe in rigor conditions, showing that the orientation of this part of the myosin head is determined by its interaction with the thick filament even when the head is strongly bound to actin. These results suggest that cRLC phosphorylation controls the contractility of the heart by modulating the interaction of the cRLC region of the myosin heads with the thick filament backbone. PMID:26057075

  11. Sarcomere-length dependence of myosin filament structure in skeletal muscle fibres of the frog.

    PubMed

    Reconditi, Massimo; Brunello, Elisabetta; Fusi, Luca; Linari, Marco; Martinez, Manuel Fernandez; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Irving, Malcolm; Piazzesi, Gabriella

    2014-03-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns were recorded at beamline ID02 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility from small bundles of skeletal muscle fibres from Rana esculenta at sarcomere lengths between 2.1 and 3.5 μm at 4°C. The intensities of the X-ray reflections from resting fibres associated with the quasi-helical order of the myosin heads and myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C) decreased in the sarcomere length range 2.6-3.0 μm but were constant outside it, suggesting that an OFF conformation of the thick filament is maintained by an interaction between MyBP-C and the thin filaments. During active isometric contraction the intensity of the M3 reflection from the regular repeat of the myosin heads along the filaments decreased in proportion to the overlap between thick and thin filaments, with no change in its interference fine structure. Thus, myosin heads in the regions of the thick filaments that do not overlap with thin filaments are highly disordered during isometric contraction, in contrast to their quasi-helical order at rest. Heads in the overlap region that belong to two-headed myosin molecules that are fully detached from actin are also highly disordered, in contrast to the detached partners of actin-attached heads. These results provide strong support for the concept of a regulatory structural transition in the thick filament involving changes in both the organisation of the myosin heads on its surface and the axial periodicity of the myosin tails in its backbone, mediated by an interaction between MyBP-C and the thin filaments. PMID:24344169

  12. Role of myosin light chain and myosin light chain kinase in advanced glycation end product-induced endothelial hyperpermeability in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fan; Guo, Xiaohua; Xu, Jing; Wang, Weiju; Li, Bingling; Huang, Qiaobing; Su, Lei; Xu, Qiulin

    2016-03-01

    We have previously reported that advanced glycation end products activated Rho-associated protein kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, causing endothelial hyperpermeability. However, the mechanisms involved were not fully clarified. Here, we explored the role of myosin light chain kinase in advanced glycation end product-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. Myosin light chain phosphorylation significantly increased by advanced glycation end products in endothelial cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, indicating that myosin light chain phosphorylation is involved in the advanced glycation end product pathway. Advanced glycation end products also induced myosin phosphatase-targeting subunit 1 phosphorylation, and small interfering RNA knockdown of the receptor for advanced glycation end products, or blocking myosin light chain kinase with its inhibitor, ML-7, or small interfering RNA abated advanced glycation end product-induced myosin light chain phosphorylation. Advanced glycation end product-induced F-actin rearrangement and endothelial hyperpermeability were also diminished by inhibition of receptor for advanced glycation end product or myosin light chain kinase signalling. Moreover, inhibiting myosin light chain kinase with ML-7 or blocking receptor for advanced glycation end product with its neutralizing antibody attenuated advanced glycation end product-induced microvascular hyperpermeability. Our findings suggest a novel role for myosin light chain and myosin light chain kinase in advanced glycation end product-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. PMID:26607798

  13. Effect of a myosin regulatory light chain mutation K104E on actin-myosin interactions.

    PubMed

    Duggal, D; Nagwekar, J; Rich, R; Huang, W; Midde, K; Fudala, R; Das, H; Gryczynski, I; Szczesna-Cordary, D; Borejdo, J

    2015-05-15

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in young individuals. Molecular mechanisms underlying this disorder are largely unknown; this study aims at revealing how disruptions in actin-myosin interactions can play a role in this disorder. Cross-bridge (XB) kinetics and the degree of order were examined in contracting myofibrils from the ex vivo left ventricles of transgenic (Tg) mice expressing FHC regulatory light chain (RLC) mutation K104E. Because the degree of order and the kinetics are best studied when an individual XB makes a significant contribution to the overall signal, the number of observed XBs in an ex vivo ventricle was minimized to ∼20. Autofluorescence and photobleaching were minimized by labeling the myosin lever arm with a relatively long-lived red-emitting dye containing a chromophore system encapsulated in a cyclic macromolecule. Mutated XBs were significantly better ordered during steady-state contraction and during rigor, but the mutation had no effect on the degree of order in relaxed myofibrils. The K104E mutation increased the rate of XB binding to thin filaments and the rate of execution of the power stroke. The stopped-flow experiments revealed a significantly faster observed dissociation rate in Tg-K104E vs. Tg-wild-type (WT) myosin and a smaller second-order ATP-binding rate for the K104E compared with WT myosin. Collectively, our data indicate that the mutation-induced changes in the interaction of myosin with actin during the contraction-relaxation cycle may contribute to altered contractility and the development of FHC. PMID:25770245

  14. Detection of serum cardiac myosin light chains in acute experimental myocardial infarction: radioimmunoassay of cardiac myosin light chains.

    PubMed

    Khaw, B A; Gold, H K; Fallon, J T; Haber, E

    1978-12-01

    To develop a more specific plasma test for myocardial infarction, antibodies specific for cardiac myosin light chains (CM-LC) were elicited that showed less than 3% cross-reactivity with skeletal muscle light chains. These antibodies were used to develop a radioimmunoassay for CM-LC that had a sensitivity of 20 ng (+/- 4 SD; P less than 0.001). Normal dog plasma showed no measurable concentrations of CM-LC (n = 6). Plasma samples from 10 dogs with experimental myocardial infarction produced by persistent left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) occlusion were obtained at 0, 2, 4, 6, 24, 48 and 72 hours. CM-LC were first detectable in all 10 animals 6 hours after occlusion (97.98 +/- 14 ng/ml [mean +/- SEM]; P less than 0.001). Maximal CM-LC levels were usually obtained between 24 and 48 hours. Sham-operated open chest dogs (0--48 hours, n = 3) showed no measurable CM-LC in the plasma samples. Another group of 10 dogs were subjected to 5 hours of LAD occlusion, followed by reperfusion. In four dogs, CM-LC were detectable as early as 1 hour after reperfusion (81.88 +/- 37.75 ng/ml serum). Sera from all 10 dogs showed elevated levels of CM-LC (199.75 +/- 24.0 ng/ml) by 24 hours. Peak CM-LC concentrations were obtained in five dogs at 24 hours (247.0 +/- 35.28 ng/ml) and in another dog at 120 hours (245 ng/ml). Histochemical infarct size was determined to be 0.5--10% of the left ventricular mass at seven days by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. The specificity and sensitivity of this radioimmunoassay for detection of CM-LC, unique proteins to the heart, may be valuable in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. PMID:709768

  15. Force generation by skeletal muscle is controlled by mechanosensing in myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Linari, Marco; Brunello, Elisabetta; Reconditi, Massimo; Fusi, Luca; Caremani, Marco; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Irving, Malcolm

    2015-12-10

    Contraction of both skeletal muscle and the heart is thought to be controlled by a calcium-dependent structural change in the actin-containing thin filaments, which permits the binding of myosin motors from the neighbouring thick filaments to drive filament sliding. Here we show by synchrotron small-angle X-ray diffraction of frog (Rana temporaria) single skeletal muscle cells that, although the well-known thin-filament mechanism is sufficient for regulation of muscle shortening against low load, force generation against high load requires a second permissive step linked to a change in the structure of the thick filament. The resting (switched 'OFF') structure of the thick filament is characterized by helical tracks of myosin motors on the filament surface and a short backbone periodicity. This OFF structure is almost completely preserved during low-load shortening, which is driven by a small fraction of constitutively active (switched 'ON') myosin motors outside thick-filament control. At higher load, these motors generate sufficient thick-filament stress to trigger the transition to its long-periodicity ON structure, unlocking the major population of motors required for high-load contraction. This concept of the thick filament as a regulatory mechanosensor provides a novel explanation for the dynamic and energetic properties of skeletal muscle. A similar mechanism probably operates in the heart. PMID:26560032

  16. Function of the N terminus of the myosin essential light chain of vertebrate striated muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, H L

    1995-01-01

    All but one (LC3-f; a fast skeletal muscle isoform) of the essential light chain isoforms of myosin (ELC) that are expressed in vertebrate striated muscles have an extended N terminus that is found neither in invertebrate ELCs nor in the majority of vertebrate smooth and nonmuscle myosin ELCs. Studies with permeabilized skeletal muscle fibers and in vitro motility assays have demonstrated that the presence of the ELC isoform lacking the N-terminal extension (LC3-f) is correlated with an increased maximal velocity of filament sliding. To examine further this modulatory role of the ELCs, a procedure was developed for the exchange of ELCs that is based on a technique for the removal of regulatory light chains from permeabilized muscle fibers. Different isoforms of the ELCs and mutant ELCs were exchanged into permeabilized skeletal muscle fibers from rabbit psoas muscle. The role of the ELCs of myosin in altering the shortening Vmax of striated muscle was confirmed. Additionally, experiments with mutant ELCs in which lysines at the extreme N terminus were replaced with alanines, demonstrated an increased shortening Vmax that coincided with removal of the positive charges contributed by the lysines. This suggests that charge interactions (i.e., salt bridges) between the N terminus of the ELC and negatively charged amino acids on the surface of actin cause a slowing of filament sliding. Whether this role in altering shortening velocity is the primary function of the extended N terminus of the ELC or whether it is merely a consequence of providing a tether between the thick and thin filaments is discussed. PMID:7787052

  17. Constitutive phosphorylation of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chang, Audrey N; Battiprolu, Pavan K; Cowley, Patrick M; Chen, Guohua; Gerard, Robert D; Pinto, Jose R; Hill, Joseph A; Baker, Anthony J; Kamm, Kristine E; Stull, James T

    2015-04-24

    In beating hearts, phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) at a single site to 0.45 mol of phosphate/mol by cardiac myosin light chain kinase (cMLCK) increases Ca(2+) sensitivity of myofilament contraction necessary for normal cardiac performance. Reduction of RLC phosphorylation in conditional cMLCK knock-out mice caused cardiac dilation and loss of cardiac performance by 1 week, as shown by increased left ventricular internal diameter at end-diastole and decreased fractional shortening. Decreased RLC phosphorylation by conventional or conditional cMLCK gene ablation did not affect troponin-I or myosin-binding protein-C phosphorylation in vivo. The extent of RLC phosphorylation was not changed by prolonged infusion of dobutamine or treatment with a β-adrenergic antagonist, suggesting that RLC is constitutively phosphorylated to maintain cardiac performance. Biochemical studies with myofilaments showed that RLC phosphorylation up to 90% was a random process. RLC is slowly dephosphorylated in both noncontracting hearts and isolated cardiac myocytes from adult mice. Electrically paced ventricular trabeculae restored RLC phosphorylation, which was increased to 0.91 mol of phosphate/mol of RLC with inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP). The two RLCs in each myosin appear to be readily available for phosphorylation by a soluble cMLCK, but MLCP activity limits the amount of constitutive RLC phosphorylation. MLCP with its regulatory subunit MYPT2 bound tightly to myofilaments was constitutively phosphorylated in beating hearts at a site that inhibits MLCP activity. Thus, the constitutive RLC phosphorylation is limited physiologically by low cMLCK activity in balance with low MLCP activity. PMID:25733667

  18. Characteristics of light chains of Chara myosin revealed by immunological investigation

    PubMed Central

    KAKEI, Toshihito; SUMIYOSHI, Hiroki; HIGASHI-FUJIME, Sugie

    2012-01-01

    Chara myosin is plant myosin responsible for cytoplasmic streaming and moves actin filaments at 60 µm/s, which is the fastest of all myosins examined. The neck of the myosin molecule has usually mechanical and regulatory roles. The neck of Chara myosin is supposed to bind six light chains, but, at present, we have no knowledge about them. We found Ca++-calmodulin activated Chara myosin motility and its actin-activated ATPase, and actually bound with the Chara myosin heavy chain, indicating calmodulin might be one of candidates for Chara myosin light chains. Antibody against essential light chain from Physarum myosin, and antibodies against Chara calmodulin and chicken myosin light chain from lens membranes reacted with 20 kDa and 18 kDa polypeptides of Chara myosin preparation, respectively. Correspondingly, column purified Chara myosin had light chains of 20 kDa, and 18 kDa with the molar ratio of 0.7 and 2.5 to the heavy chain, respectively. PMID:22687741

  19. Interaction of ADP with skeletal and cardiac myosin and their active fragments observed by proton release.

    PubMed

    Kardami, E; De Bruin, S; Gratzer, W

    1979-07-01

    The technique of proton release measurement has been used to explore the binding of ADP to skeletal and cardiac myosins and their active fragments in a variety of conditions. It has proved possible to obtain binding profiles on intact myosin in the filamentous, undissolved form in physiological solvent conditions. Binding constants are given. At higher ionic strength (0.5 M potassium chloride) the binding profile of magnesium-ADP. is compatible with the presence of two types of site, differing from one another both in respect of affinity and the number of protons released per site. Studies with cardiac myosin reveal no such indications of heterogeneity, and are consistent with the presence of a single population of thermodynamically indistinguishable sites. In the absence of divalent cations, in solutions containing potassium ions and EDTA, ADP binds with absorption rather than liberation of protons. The pH profile of proton absorption at saturation can be fitted in terms of an ionising group with an unperturbed pK of 9.4, and at least one of lower pK(5.9). The dissociation constant (pH8 at 5 degrees C) is about 8 microM, and the affinity for uncomplexed ADP is thus only slightly weaker than that for magnesium-ADP PMID:38115

  20. Myosin heavy chain is stabilized by BCL-2 interacting cell death suppressor (BIS) in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin; Park, Jun-Sub; Lee, Hyun; Jeong, Jaemin; Hyeon Yun, Hye; Yun Kim, Hye; Ko, Young-Gyu; Lee, Jeong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    BCL-2 interacting cell death suppressor (BIS), which is ubiquitously expressed, has important roles in various cellular processes, such as apoptosis, the cellular stress response, migration and invasion and protein quality control. In particular, BIS is highly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles, and BIS gene mutations result in human myopathy. In this study, we show that mRNA and protein levels of BIS were markedly increased during skeletal myogenesis in C2C12 cells and mouse satellite cells. BIS knockdown did not prevent the early stage of skeletal myogenesis, but did induce muscle atrophy and a decrease in the diameter of myotubes. BIS knockdown significantly suppressed the expression level of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) without changing the expression levels of myogenic marker proteins, such as Mgn, Cav-3 and MG53. In addition, BIS endogenously interacted with MyHC, and BIS knockdown induced MyHC ubiquitination and degradation. From these data, we conclude that molecular association of MyHC and BIS is necessary for MyHC stabilization in skeletal muscle. PMID:27034027

  1. Thirteen is enough: the myosins of Dictyostelium discoideum and their light chains

    PubMed Central

    Kollmar, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Background Dictyostelium discoideum is one of the most famous model organisms for studying motile processes like cell movement, organelle transport, cytokinesis, and endocytosis. Members of the myosin superfamily, that move on actin filaments and power many of these tasks, are tripartite proteins consisting of a conserved catalytic domain followed by the neck region consisting of a different number of so-called IQ motifs for binding of light chains. The tails contain functional motifs that are responsible for the accomplishment of the different tasks in the cell. Unicellular organisms like yeasts contain three to five myosins while vertebrates express over 40 different myosin genes. Recently, the question has been raised how many myosins a simple multicellular organism like Dictyostelium would need to accomplish all the different motility-related tasks. Results The analysis of the Dictyostelium genome revealed thirteen myosins of which three have not been described before. The phylogenetic analysis of the motor domains of the new myosins placed Myo1F to the class-I myosins and Myo5A to the class-V myosins. The third new myosin, an orphan myosin, has been named MyoG. It contains an N-terminal extension of over 400 residues, and a tail consisting of four IQ motifs and two MyTH4/FERM (myosin tail homology 4/band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, and moesin) tandem domains that are separated by a long region containing an SH3 (src homology 3) domain. In contrast to previous analyses, an extensive comparison with 126 class-VII, class-X, class-XV, and class-XXII myosins now showed that MyoI does not group into any of these classes and should not be used as a model for class-VII myosins. The search for calmodulin related proteins revealed two further potential myosin light chains. One is a close homolog of the two EF-hand motifs containing MlcB, and the other, CBP14, phylogenetically groups to the ELC/RLC/calmodulin (essential light chain/regulatory light chain) branch of the tree. Conclusion Dictyostelium contains thirteen myosins together with 6–8 MLCs (myosin light chain) to assist in a variety of actin-based processes in the cell. Although they are homologous to myosins of higher eukaryotes, the myosins of Dictyostelium should be considered with care as models for specific functions of vertebrate myosins. PMID:16857047

  2. Indirect myosin immunocytochemistry for the identification of fibre types in equine skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, A. K.; Rose, R. J.; Pozgaj, I.; Hoh, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    The histochemical ATPase method for muscle fibre typing was first described by Brooke and Kaiser in 1970. However, problems have been found with the subdivision of type II fibres using this technique. To determine whether indirect myosin immunocytochemistry using anti-slow (5-4D), anti-fast (1A10) and anti-fast red (5-2B) monoclonal antibodies with cross reactivity for type I, II and IIa fibres, respectively, in a number of species, could identify three fibre types in equine skeletal muscle, data on fibre type composition and fibre size obtained using the two different techniques were compared. Results indicate that different myosin heavy chains can coexist in single equine muscle fibres. Type I and type II fibres were identified by immunocytochemistry, but subdivision of type II fibres was not possible. Although the percentage of type I and type II fibres was not significantly different for the two techniques, a few fibres reacted with both the 1A10 and 5-4D antibodies.

  3. Enhanced protein electrophoresis technique for separating human skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamman, M. M.; Clarke, M. S.; Talmadge, R. J.; Feeback, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Talmadge and Roy (J. Appl. Physiol. 1993, 75, 2337-2340) previously established a sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) protocol for separating all four rat skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms (MHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb); however, when applied to human muscle, the type II MHC isoforms (Ila, IIx) are not clearly distinguished. In this brief paper we describe a modification of the SDS-PAGE protocol which yields distinct and consistent separation of all three adult human MHC isoforms (MHC I, IIa, IIx) in a minigel system. MHC specificity of each band was confirmed by Western blot using three monoclonal IgG antibodies (mAbs) immunoreactive against MHCI (mAb MHCs, Novacastra Laboratories), MHCI+IIa (mAb BF-35), and MHCIIa+IIx (mAb SC-71). Results provide a valuable SDS-PAGE minigel technique for separating MHC isoforms in human muscle without the difficult task of casting gradient gels.

  4. Knockdown of fast skeletal myosin-binding protein C in zebrafish results in a severe skeletal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Andersson-Lendahl, Monika; Sejersen, Thomas; Arner, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Myosin-binding protein C (MyBPC) in the muscle sarcomere interacts with several contractile and structural proteins. Mutations in the cardiac isoform (MyBPC-3) in humans, or animal knockout, are associated with cardiomyopathy. Function of the fast skeletal isoform (MyBPC-2) in living muscles is less understood. This question was addressed using zebrafish models, combining gene expression data with functional analysis of contractility and small-angle x-ray diffraction measurements of filament structure. Fast skeletal MyBPC-2B, the major isoform, was knocked down by >50% using morpholino antisense nucleotides. These morphants exhibited a skeletal myopathy with elevated apoptosis and up-regulation of factors associated with muscle protein degradation. Morphant muscles had shorter sarcomeres with a broader length distribution, shorter actin filaments, and a wider interfilament spacing compared with controls, suggesting that fast skeletal MyBPC has a role in sarcomere assembly. Active force was reduced more than expected from the decrease in muscle size, suggesting that MyBPC-2 is required for optimal force generation at the cross-bridge level. The maximal shortening velocity was significantly increased in the MyBPC-2 morphants, but when related to the sarcomere length, the difference was smaller, reflecting that the decrease in MyBPC-2B content and the resulting myopathy were accompanied by only a minor influence on filament shortening kinetics. In the controls, equatorial patterns from small-angle x-ray scattering revealed that comparatively few cross-bridges are attached (as evaluated by the intensity ratio of the 11 and 10 equatorial reflections) during active contraction. X-ray scattering data from relaxed and contracting morphants were not significantly different from those in controls. However, the increase in the 11:10 intensity ratio in rigor was lower compared with that in controls, possibly reflecting effects of MyBPC on the cross-bridge interactions. In conclusion, lack of MyBPC-2 results in a severe skeletal myopathy with structural changes and muscle weakness. PMID:27022191

  5. Leucine induces myofibrillar protein accretion in cultured skeletal muscle through mTOR dependent and -independent control of myosin heavy chain mRNA levels.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Haegens A; Schols AM; van Essen AL; van Loon LJ; Langen RC

    2012-05-01

    SCOPE: Nutritional intervention during muscle wasting aims to attenuate net muscle protein loss. Branched chain amino acids, especially leucine, are able to stimulate the anabolic mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling cascade and protein synthesis. It has been suggested that muscle myofibrillar protein expression is more responsive to amino acid supplementation compared to cytoplasmic proteins, although accretion of myofibrillar proteins has not extensively been investigated. We hypothesized that leucine specifically increases myofibrillar protein synthesis in skeletal muscle.METHODS AND RESULTS: This hypothesis was investigated in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells using physiologically relevant culture conditions. Leucine supplementation specifically increased myofibrillar protein accretion, including myosin heavy chain-slow and -fast and myosin light chain 1 and -3 in C2C12 cells. Neither total protein content, nor de novo protein synthesis was affected, despite leucine-induced increased 4E-BP1 and S6K1 phosphorylation. Leucine supplementation did not affect myogenesis, measured by creatine kinase activity and myoblast fusion, either. Remarkably, leucine-induced increased myofibrillar protein accretion was accompanied by elevated MyHC mRNA levels, which involved mTOR-dependent and -independent regulation of MyHC-4 and MyHC-7 gene-expression, respectively.CONCLUSION: This study clearly demonstrates myofibrillar and not generic protein accretion in skeletal muscle following leucine supplementation, and suggests this involves pre-translational control of MyHC expression by leucine.

  6. Dictyostelium discoideum myosin: Isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding the essential light chain

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, R.L.; Rushforth, A.M.; Pollenz, R.S.; Kuczmarski, E.R.; Tafuri, S.R.

    1988-02-01

    The authors used an antibody specific for Dictyostelium discoideum myosin to screen a lambdagt11 cDNA expression library to obtain cDNA clones which encode the Dictyostelium essential myosin light chain (EMLC). The amino acid sequence predicted from the sequence of the cDNA clone showed 31.5% identity with the amino acid sequence of the chicken EMLC. Comparisons of the Dictyostelium EMLC, a nonmuscle cell type, with EMLC sequences from similar MLCs of skeletal- and smooth-muscle origin, showed distinct regions of homology. Much of the observed homology was localized to regions corresponding to consensus Ca/sup 2 +/-binding of E-F hand domains. Southern blot analysis suggested that the Dictyostelium genome contains a single gene encoding the EMLC. Examination of the pattern of EMLC mRNA expression showed that a significant increase in EMLC message levels occurred during the first few hours of development, coinciding with increased actin expression and immediately preceding the period of maximal chemotactic activity.

  7. Age dependence of myosin heavy chain transitions induced by creatine depletion in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that myosin heavy chain (MHC) plasticity resulting from creatine depletion is an age-dependent process. At weaning (age 28 days), rat pups were placed on either standard rat chow (normal diet juvenile group) or the same chow supplemented with 1% wt/wt of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (creatine depletion juvenile (CDJ) group). Two groups of adult rats (age approximately 8 wk) were placed on the same diet regimens (normal diet adult and creatine depletion adult (CDA) groups). After 40 days (CDJ and normal diet juvenile groups) and 60 days (CDA and normal diet adult groups), animals were killed and several skeletal muscles were removed for analysis of creatine content or MHC ditribution. In the CDJ group, creatine depletion (78%) was accompanied by significant shifts toward expression of slower MHC isoforms in two slow and three fast skeletal muscles. In contrast, creatine depletion in adult animals did not result in similar shifts toward slow MHC isoform expression in either muscle type. The results of this study indicate that there is a differential effect of creatine depletion on MHC tranitions that appears to be age dependent. These results strongly suggest that investigators contemplating experimental designs involving the use of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid should consider the age of the animals to be used.

  8. Inhibiting Myosin-ATPase Reveals Dynamic Range of Mitochondrial Respiratory Control in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Christopher G.R.; Kane, Daniel A.; Lin, Chien-Te; Kozy, Rachel; Cathey, Brook L.; Lark, Daniel S.; Kane, Constance L.; Brophy, Patricia M.; Gavin, Timothy P; Anderson, Ethan J.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiratory kinetics in permeabilized skeletal myofibres (PmFB) is increasingly used in clinical diagnostic and basic research settings. However, estimates of the Km for ADP vary considerably (?20-300 ?M) and tend to overestimate respiration at rest. Noting PmFBs spontaneously contract during respiration experiments, we systematically determined the impact of contraction, temperature and oxygenation on ADP-stimulated respiratory kinetics. Blebbistatin (BLEB), a myosin II ATPase inhibitor, blocked contraction under all conditions and yielded high Km values for ADP of >?250 and ?80 ?M in red and white rat PmFB, respectively. In the absence of BLEB, PmFB contracted and the Km for ADP decreased by ?2 to 10-fold in a temperature-dependent manner. PmFB were sensitive to hyperoxia (increased Km) in the absence of BLEB (contracted) at 30C but not 37C. In PmFB from humans, contraction elicited high sensitivity to ADP (m <100 ?M) whereas blocking contraction (+BLEB) and including PCr:Cr = 2 to mimic the resting energetic state yielded a Km for ADP = ?1560 ?M, consistent with estimates of in vivo resting respiratory rates of <1% maximum. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of muscle to ADP varies over a wide range in relation to contractile state and cellular energy charge, providing evidence that enzymatic coupling of energy transfer within skeletal muscle becomes more efficient in the working state. PMID:21554250

  9. Myosin Heavy Chain Plasticity in Aging Skeletal Muscle With Aerobic Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Adam R.; Trappe, Todd A.; Jemiolo, Bozena; Trappe, Scott W.

    2011-01-01

    To assess myosin heavy chain (MHC) plasticity in aging skeletal muscle with aerobic exercise training, MHC composition was measured at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level and protein level in mixed-muscle homogenates and single myofibers. Muscle samples were obtained from eight nonexercising women (70 ± 2 years) before and after 12 weeks of training (20–45 minutes of cycle exercise per session at 60%–80% heart rate reserve, three to four sessions per week). Training elevated MHC I mRNA (p < .10) and protein (p < .05) in mixed-muscle (54% ± 4% to 61% ± 2%) and single myofibers (42% ± 4% to 52% ± 3%). The increase in MHC I protein was positively correlated (p < .05) with improvements in whole muscle power. Training resulted in a general downregulation of MHC IIa and IIx at the mRNA and protein levels. The training-induced increase in MHC I protein and mRNA demonstrates the maintenance of skeletal muscle plasticity with aging. Furthermore, these data suggest that a shift toward an oxidative MHC phenotype may be beneficial for metabolic and functional health in older individuals. PMID:21659340

  10. Continued Expression of Neonatal Myosin Heavy Chain in Adult Dystrophic Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandman, Everett

    1985-02-01

    The expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms was examined in normal and dystrophic chicken muscle with a monoclonal antibody specific for neonatal myosin. Adult dystrophic muscle continued to contain neonatal myosin long after it disappeared from adult normal muscle. A new technique involving western blotting and peptide mapping demonstrated that the immunoreactive myosin in adult dystrophic muscle was identical to that found in neonatal normal muscle. Immunocytochemistry revealed that all fibers in the dystrophic muscle failed to repress neonatal myosin heavy chain. These studies suggest that muscular dystrophy inhibits the myosin gene switching that normally occurs during muscle maturation.

  11. Involvement of myosin light-chain kinase in endothelial cell retraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wysolmerski, R.B.; Lagunoff, D. )

    1990-01-01

    Permeabilized bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers were used to investigate the mechanism of endothelial cell retraction. Postconfluent endothelial cells permeabilized with saponin retracted upon exposure to ATP and Ca{sup 2+}. Retraction was accompanied by thiophosphorylation of 19,000-Da myosin light chains when adenosine 5'-(gamma-({sup 35}S)thio)triphosphate was included in the medium. Both retraction and thiophosphorylation of myosin light chains exhibited a graded quantitative dependence on Ca{sup 2+}. When permeabilized monolayers were extracted in buffer D containing 100 mM KCl and 30 mM MgCl2 for 30 min, the cells failed to retract upon exposure to ATP and Ca{sup 2+}, and no thiophosphorylation of myosin light chains occurred. The ability both to retract and to thiophosphorylate myosin light chains was restored by the addition to the permeabilized, extracted cells of myosin light-chain kinase and calmodulin together but not by either alone. These studies indicate that endothelial cell retraction, as does smooth muscle contraction, depends on myosin light-chain kinase phosphorylation of myosin light chains.

  12. Regulatory Light Chain Mutations Associated with Cardiomyopathy Affect Myosin Mechanics and Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Michael J.; Watt, James D.; Jones, Michelle; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Moore, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    The myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) wraps around the alpha helical neck region of myosin. This neck region has been proposed to act as a lever arm, amplifying small conformational changes in the myosin head to generate motion. The RLC serves an important structural role, supporting the myosin neck region and a modulatory role, tuning the kinetics of the actin myosin interaction. Given the importance of the RLC, it is not surprising that mutations of the RLC can lead to familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC), the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in people under 30. Population studies identified two FHC mutations located near the cationic binding site of the RLC, R58Q and N47K. Although these mutations are close in sequence, they differ in clinical presentation and prognosis with R58Q showing a more severe phenotype. We examined the molecular based changes in myosin that are responsible for the disease phenotype by purifying myosin from transgenic mouse hearts expressing mutant myosins and examining actin filament sliding using the in vitro motility assay. We found that both R58Q and N47K showed reductions in force compared to the wild type that could result in compensatory hypertrophy. Furthermore, we observed a higher ATPase rate and an increased activation at submaximal calcium levels for the R58Q myosin that could lead to decreased efficiency and incomplete cardiac relaxation, potentially explaining the more severe phenotype for the R58Q mutation. PMID:18929571

  13. Dimerization of native myosin LC2(RLC)-free subfragment 1 from adult rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Morel, J E; Taouil, K; D'hahan, N; Aguilar, A; Merah, Z; Dalbiez, J P; Bayol, P; Guillo, N; Patard, L; Cabane, V; Ferrari, M; Figuera Picazo, G; Dam Hieu, H; Francin, M

    1998-10-27

    We reinvestigated whether the native myosin LC2-free-subfragment 1 (S1) dimer exists by using viscometry, capillary electrophoresis, and laser light scattering. We found that the intrinsic viscosity of the monomer is [eta]m = 6.7 cm3/g and its translation diffusion coefficient is (c = 0) = 4.43 x 10(-)7 cm2/s. For the dimer, [eta]d = 19.8 cm3/g and (c = 0) = 2.54 x 10(-)7 cm2/s. Using the Svedberg equation and introducing the values of the sedimentation coefficients (5.05 S for the monomer and 6.05 S for the dimer), we find the following molecular weights: Mr,m = 108 000 Da and Mr,d = 213 000 Da, which agree well with previous determinations. Capillary electrophoresis successfully separated S1(A1) and S1(A2), in a monomer buffer, and S1(A1) and S1(A2) and a heterodimer S1(A1)-S1(A2), in a dimer buffer. An interesting feature of the monomer-dimer equilibrium is the presence of temperature transitions, whose positions and widths depend upon the buffer conditions. At low temperatures, a pure dimer was observed, whereas at high temperatures only the monomer was present. The dimerization site on both myosin and S1 is extremely labile. PMID:9790676

  14. Myosin heavy chain expression in rodent skeletal muscle: effects of exposure to zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, F.; Herrick, R. E.; Adams, G. R.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    This study ascertained the effects of 9 days of zero gravity on the relative (percentage of total) and calculated absolute (mg/muscle) content of isomyosin expressed in both antigravity and locomotor skeletal muscle of ground control (CON) and flight-exposed (FL) rats. Results showed that although there were no differences in body weight between FL and CON animals, a significant reduction in muscle mass occurred in the vastus intermedius (VI) (P < 0.05) but not in the vastus lateralis (VL) or the tibialis anterior. Both total muscle protein and myofibril protein content were not different between the muscle regions examined in the FL and CON groups. In the VI, there were trends for reductions in the relative content of type I and IIa myosin heavy chains (MHCs) that were offset by increases in the relative content of both type IIb and possibly type IIx MHC protein (P > 0.05). mRNA levels were consistent with this pattern (P < 0.05). The same pattern held true for the red region of the VL as examined at both the protein and mRNA level (P < 0.05). When the atrophy process was examined, there were net reductions in the absolute content of both type I and IIa MHCs that were offset by calculated increases in type IIb MHC in both VI and red VL. Collectively, these findings suggest that there are both absolute and relative changes occurring in MHC expression in the "red" regions of antigravity skeletal muscle during exposure to zero gravity that could affect muscle function.

  15. Effect of Porcine Akirin2 on Skeletal Myosin Heavy Chain Isoform Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoling; Luo, Yanliu; Zhou, Bo; Huang, Zhiqing; Jia, Gang; Liu, Guangmang; Zhao, Hua; Yang, Zhouping; Zhang, Ruinan

    2015-01-01

    Akirin2 plays an important role in skeletal myogenesis. In this study, we found that porcine Akirin2 (pAkirin2) mRNA level was significantly higher in fast extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and longissimus lumborum (LL) muscles than in slow soleus (SOL) muscle of pigs. Overexpression of pAkirin2 increased the number of myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive cells, indicating that pAkirin2 promoted myoblast differentiation. We also found that overexpression of pAkirin2 increased the mRNA expressions of MHCI and MHCIIa and decreased the mRNA expression of MHCIIb. Myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) are the major downstream effectors of calcineurin. Here we also observed that the mRNA expressions of MEF2C and NFATc1 were notably elevated by pAkirin2 overexpression. Together, our data indicate that the role of pAkirin2 in modulating MHCI and MHCIIa expressions may be achieved through calcineurin/NFATc1 signaling pathway. PMID:25686036

  16. Interaction of thyroid state and denervation on skeletal myosin heavy chain expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, F.; Arnold, C.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of altered thyroid state and denervation (Den) on skeletal myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in the plantaris and soleus muscles. Rats were subjected to unilateral denervation (Den) and randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) euthyroid; (2) hyperthyroid; (3) and hypothyroid. Denervation caused severe muscle atrophy and muscle-type specific MHC transformation. Denervation transformed the soleus to a faster muscle, and its effects required the presence of circulating thyroid hormone. In contrast, denervation transformed the plantaris to a slower muscle independently of thyroid state. Furthermore, thyroid hormone effects did not depend upon innervation status in the soleus, while they required the presence of the nerve in the plantaris. Collectively, these findings suggest that both thyroid hormone and intact nerve (a) differentially affect MHC transformations in fast and slow muscle; and (b) are important factors in regulating the optimal expression of both type I and IIB MHC genes. This research suggests that for patients with nerve damage and/or paralysis, both muscle mass and biochemical properties can also be affected by the thyroid state.

  17. Myosin light chain kinase regulates synaptic plasticity and fear learning in the lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, R; Margulies, D S; Farb, C R; Hou, M; Johnson, L R; LeDoux, J E

    2006-01-01

    Learning and memory depend on signaling molecules that affect synaptic efficacy. The cytoskeleton has been implicated in regulating synaptic transmission but its role in learning and memory is poorly understood. Fear learning depends on plasticity in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala. We therefore examined whether the cytoskeletal-regulatory protein, myosin light chain kinase, might contribute to fear learning in the rat lateral amygdala. Microinjection of ML-7, a specific inhibitor of myosin light chain kinase, into the lateral nucleus of the amygdala before fear conditioning, but not immediately afterward, enhanced both short-term memory and long-term memory, suggesting that myosin light chain kinase is involved specifically in memory acquisition rather than in posttraining consolidation of memory. Myosin light chain kinase inhibitor had no effect on memory retrieval. Furthermore, ML-7 had no effect on behavior when the training stimuli were presented in a non-associative manner. Anatomical studies showed that myosin light chain kinase is present in cells throughout lateral nucleus of the amygdala and is localized to dendritic shafts and spines that are postsynaptic to the projections from the auditory thalamus to lateral nucleus of the amygdala, a pathway specifically implicated in fear learning. Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase enhanced long-term potentiation, a physiological model of learning, in the auditory thalamic pathway to the lateral nucleus of the amygdala. When ML-7 was applied without associative tetanic stimulation it had no effect on synaptic responses in lateral nucleus of the amygdala. Thus, myosin light chain kinase activity in lateral nucleus of the amygdala appears to normally suppress synaptic plasticity in the circuits underlying fear learning, suggesting that myosin light chain kinase may help prevent the acquisition of irrelevant fears. Impairment of this mechanism could contribute to pathological fear learning. PMID:16515842

  18. Drosophila UNC-45 prevents heat-induced aggregation of skeletal muscle myosin and facilitates refolding of citrate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Melkani, Girish C.; Lee, Chi F.; Cammarato, Anthony; Bernstein, Sanford I.

    2010-05-28

    UNC-45 belongs to the UCS (UNC-45, CRO1, She4p) domain protein family, whose members interact with various classes of myosin. Here we provide structural and biochemical evidence that Escherichia coli-expressed Drosophila UNC-45 (DUNC-45) maintains the integrity of several substrates during heat-induced stress in vitro. DUNC-45 displays chaperone function in suppressing aggregation of the muscle myosin heavy meromyosin fragment, the myosin S-1 motor domain, {alpha}-lactalbumin and citrate synthase. Biochemical evidence is supported by electron microscopy, which reveals the first structural evidence that DUNC-45 prevents inter- or intra-molecular aggregates of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin caused by elevated temperatures. We also demonstrate for the first time that UNC-45 is able to refold a denatured substrate, urea-unfolded citrate synthase. Overall, this in vitro study provides insight into the fate of muscle myosin under stress conditions and suggests that UNC-45 protects and maintains the contractile machinery during in vivo stress.

  19. Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Expression in Developing Neonatal Skeletal Muscle: Involvement of the Nerve, Gravity, and Thyroid State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Adams, G.; Haddad, F.; Zeng, M.; Qin, A.; Qin, L.; McCue, S.; Bodell, P.

    1999-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene family encodes at least six MHC proteins (herein designated as neonatal, embryonic, slow type I (beta), and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb) that are expressed in skeletal muscle in a muscle-specific and developmentally-regulated fashion. At birth, both antigravity (e.g. soleus) and locomotor (e.g., plantaris) skeletal muscles are undifferentiated relative to the adult MHC phenotype such that the neonatal and embryonic MHC isoforms account for 80 - 90% of the MHC pool in a fast locomotor muscle; whereas, the embryonic and slow, type I isoforms account for approx. 90% of the pool in a typical antigravity muscle. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of an intact nerve, gravity and thyroid hormone (T3), as well as certain interactions of these interventions, on MHC gene expression in developing neonatal skeletal muscles of rodents.

  20. A Global, Myosin Light Chain Kinase-dependent Increase in Myosin II Contractility Accompanies the Metaphase–Anaphase Transition in Sea Urchin Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Amy; Stack, Christianna; Bresnick, Anne R.

    2006-01-01

    Myosin II is the force-generating motor for cytokinesis, and although it is accepted that myosin contractility is greatest at the cell equator, the temporal and spatial cues that direct equatorial contractility are not known. Dividing sea urchin eggs were placed under compression to study myosin II-based contractile dynamics, and cells manipulated in this manner underwent an abrupt, global increase in cortical contractility concomitant with the metaphase–anaphase transition, followed by a brief relaxation and the onset of furrowing. Prefurrow cortical contractility both preceded and was independent of astral microtubule elongation, suggesting that the initial activation of myosin II preceded cleavage plane specification. The initial rise in contractility required myosin light chain kinase but not Rho-kinase, but both signaling pathways were required for successful cytokinesis. Last, mobilization of intracellular calcium during metaphase induced a contractile response, suggesting that calcium transients may be partially responsible for the timing of this initial contractile event. Together, these findings suggest that myosin II-based contractility is initiated at the metaphase–anaphase transition by Ca2+-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity and is maintained through cytokinesis by both MLCK- and Rho-dependent signaling. Moreover, the signals that initiate myosin II contractility respond to specific cell cycle transitions independently of the microtubule-dependent cleavage stimulus. PMID:16837551

  1. Molecular determinants of force production in human skeletal muscle fibers: effects of myosin isoform expression and cross-sectional area

    PubMed Central

    Bedrin, Nicholas G.; Ades, Philip A.; Palmer, Bradley M.; Toth, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contractile performance is governed by the properties of its constituent fibers, which are, in turn, determined by the molecular interactions of the myofilament proteins. To define the molecular determinants of contractile function in humans, we measured myofilament mechanics during maximal Ca2+-activated and passive isometric conditions in single muscle fibers with homogenous (I and IIA) and mixed (I/IIA and IIA/X) myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms from healthy, young adult male (n = 5) and female (n = 7) volunteers. Fibers containing only MHC II isoforms (IIA and IIA/X) produced higher maximal Ca2+-activated forces over the range of cross-sectional areas (CSAs) examined than MHC I fibers, resulting in higher (24–42%) specific forces. The number and/or stiffness of the strongly bound myosin-actin cross bridges increased in the higher force-producing MHC II isoforms and, in all isoforms, better predicted force than CSA. In men and women, cross-bridge kinetics, in terms of myosin attachment time and rate of myosin force production, were independent of CSA, although women had faster (7–15%) kinetics. The relative proportion of cross bridges and/or their stiffness was reduced as fiber size increased, causing a decline in specific force. Results from our examination of molecular mechanisms across the range of physiological CSAs explain the variation in specific force among the different fiber types in human skeletal muscle, which may have relevance to understanding how various physiological and pathophysiological conditions modulate single-fiber and whole muscle contractility. PMID:25567808

  2. Force-velocity properties of human skeletal muscle fibres: myosin heavy chain isoform and temperature dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Bottinelli, R; Canepari, M; Pellegrino, M A; Reggiani, C

    1996-01-01

    1. A large population (n = 151) of human skinned skeletal muscle fibres has been studied. Force-velocity curves of sixty-seven fibres were obtained by load-clamp manoeuvres at 12 degrees C. In each fibre maximum shortening velocity (Vmax), maximum power output (Wmax), optimal velocity (velocity at which Wmax is developed, Vopt), optimal force (force at which Wmax is developed, Popt), specific tension (Po/CSA, isometric tension/cross-sectional area) were assessed. Unloaded shortening velocity (Vo) was also determined at 12 degrees C in a different group (n = 57) of fibres by slack-test procedure. 2. All fibres used for mechanical experiments were characterized on the basis of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and divided into five types: type I (or slow), types IIA and IIB (or fast), and types I-IIA and IIA-IIB (or mixed types). 3. Vmax, Wmax, Vopt, Popt, Vopt/Vmax ratio, Po/CSA and Vo were found to depend on MHC isoform composition. All parameters were significantly lower in type I than in the fast (type IIA and IIB) fibres. Among fast fibres, Vmax, Wmax, Vopt and Vo were significantly lower in type IIA and than in IIB fibres, whereas Popt, Po/CSA and Vopt/Vmax were similar. 4. The temperature dependence of Vo and Po/CSA was assessed in a group of twenty-one fibres in the range 12-22 degrees C. In a set of six fibres temperature dependence of Vmax was also studied. The Q10 (5.88) and activation energy E (125 kJ mol-1) values for maximum shortening velocity calculated from Arrhenius plots pointed to a very high temperature sensitivity. Po/CSA was very temperature dependent in the 12-17 degrees C range, but less dependent between 17 and 22 degrees C. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:8887767

  3. The C-terminal helix in subdomain 4 of the regulatory light chain is essential for myosin regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, T; Kendrick-Jones, J

    1993-01-01

    In vertebrate smooth/non-muscle myosins, phosphorylation of the regulatory light chains by a specific calmodulin-activated kinase controls both myosin head interaction with actin and assembly of the myosin into filaments. Previous studies have shown that the C-terminal domain of the regulatory light chain is crucial for the regulation of these myosin functions. To further dissect the role of this region of the light chain in myosin regulation, a series of chicken smooth muscle myosin regulatory light chain mutants has been constructed with successive C-terminal deletions. These mutants were synthesized in Escherichia coli and analysed by their ability to restore Ca2+ regulation to scallop myosin that had been stripped of its native regulatory light chains ('desensitized'). The results show that regulatory light chain mutants with deletions in the C-terminal helix in subdomain 4 were able to reform the regulatory Ca2+ binding site on the scallop myosin head, but had lost the ability to suppress scallop myosin filament assembly and interaction with actin in the absence of Ca2+. Further deletions in the C-terminal domain led to a gradual loss of ability to restore the regulatory Ca2+ binding site. Thus, the regions in the C-terminal half of the regulatory light chain responsible for myosin regulation can be identified. Images PMID:8223496

  4. Cloning of skeletal myosin heavy chain gene family from adult pleopod muscle and whole larvae of shrimps.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Hiroki; Piyapattanakorn, Sanit; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-06-01

    The physiological and biological properties of skeletal muscle in crustacea have not been well understood compared with those of vertebrates. The present study focused on myosin, the major protein in skeletal muscle, from shrimps. In our previous study, two full-length genes encoding myosin heavy chain (MHC), a large subunit of the myosin molecule, were cloned from abdominal fast skeletal muscle of kuruma Marsupenaeus japonicus, black tiger Penaeus monodon and Pacific white Penaeus vannamei shrimps, and named as MHCa and MHCb. In this study, we renamed these as MHC1 and MHC2, respectively, due to the presence of various isoforms newly identified. Partial MHC sequences were identified from pleopod muscle of these shrimps. Two MHCs, named MHC3 and MHC4, were identified from pleopod muscle of kuruma shrimp, whereas two MHCs, named MHC4 and MHC5, were cloned from Pacific white shrimp pleopod. MHC3 was cloned only from black tiger shrimp pleopod. Partial MHC sequences from zoea, mysis, and postlarvae of black tiger and Pacific white shrimps were also determined. The phylogenetic tree demonstrated that most MHCs from pleopod muscle and larval MHCs formed clades with MHC1 and MHC2, respectively. These MHCs were considered to be of fast type, since MHC1 and MHC2 are fast-type MHCs according to our previous study. MHC5 obtained from pleopod muscle of Pacific white shrimp in this study was monophyletic with American lobster Homarus americanus S2 slow tonic MHC previously reported, indicating that MHC5 from Pacific white shrimp is of slow type. PMID:23526764

  5. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G.; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D.

    2016-01-01

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies. PMID:26888436

  6. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D

    2016-01-01

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies. PMID:26888436

  7. Amplitude of the actomyosin power stroke depends strongly on the isoform of the myosin essential light chain.

    PubMed

    Guhathakurta, Piyali; Prochniewicz, Ewa; Thomas, David D

    2015-04-14

    We have used time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) to determine the role of myosin essential light chains (ELCs) in structural transitions within the actomyosin complex. Skeletal muscle myosins have two ELC isoforms, A1 and A2, which differ by an additional 40-45 residues at the N terminus of A1, and subfragment 1 (S1) containing A1 (S1A1) has higher catalytic efficiency and higher affinity for actin than S1A2. ELC's location at the junction between the catalytic and light-chain domains gives it the potential to play a central role in the force-generating power stroke. Therefore, we measured site-directed TR-FRET between a donor on actin and an acceptor near the C terminus of ELC, detecting directly the rotation of the light-chain domain (lever arm) relative to actin (power stroke), induced by the interaction of ATP-bound myosin with actin. TR-FRET resolved the weakly bound (W) and strongly bound (S) states of actomyosin during the W-to-S transition (power stroke). We found that the W states are essentially the same for the two isoenzymes, but the S states are quite different, indicating a much larger movement of S1A1. FRET from actin to a probe on the N-terminal extension of A1 showed close proximity to actin. We conclude that the N-terminal extension of A1-ELC modulates the W-to-S structural transition of acto-S1, so that the light-chain domain undergoes a much larger power stroke in S1A1 than in S1A2. These results have profound implications for understanding the contractile function of actomyosin, as needed in therapeutic design for muscle disorders. PMID:25825773

  8. Amplitude of the actomyosin power stroke depends strongly on the isoform of the myosin essential light chain

    PubMed Central

    Guhathakurta, Piyali; Prochniewicz, Ewa; Thomas, David D.

    2015-01-01

    We have used time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) to determine the role of myosin essential light chains (ELCs) in structural transitions within the actomyosin complex. Skeletal muscle myosins have two ELC isoforms, A1 and A2, which differ by an additional 40–45 residues at the N terminus of A1, and subfragment 1 (S1) containing A1 (S1A1) has higher catalytic efficiency and higher affinity for actin than S1A2. ELC’s location at the junction between the catalytic and light-chain domains gives it the potential to play a central role in the force-generating power stroke. Therefore, we measured site-directed TR-FRET between a donor on actin and an acceptor near the C terminus of ELC, detecting directly the rotation of the light-chain domain (lever arm) relative to actin (power stroke), induced by the interaction of ATP-bound myosin with actin. TR-FRET resolved the weakly bound (W) and strongly bound (S) states of actomyosin during the W-to-S transition (power stroke). We found that the W states are essentially the same for the two isoenzymes, but the S states are quite different, indicating a much larger movement of S1A1. FRET from actin to a probe on the N-terminal extension of A1 showed close proximity to actin. We conclude that the N-terminal extension of A1-ELC modulates the W-to-S structural transition of acto-S1, so that the light-chain domain undergoes a much larger power stroke in S1A1 than in S1A2. These results have profound implications for understanding the contractile function of actomyosin, as needed in therapeutic design for muscle disorders. PMID:25825773

  9. Variations in contractile properties of rabbit single muscle fibres in relation to troponin T isoforms and myosin light chains.

    PubMed Central

    Greaser, M L; Moss, R L; Reiser, P J

    1988-01-01

    1. The maximal velocity of shortening (Vmax), tension-pCa relationships and the contractile and regulatory protein composition were determined in single, chemically skinned fibres from adult rabbit plantaris muscles. 2. Three groups of fibres were identified based on their protein compositions. One group had exclusively the slow-type myosin heavy chain (MHC) and myosin light chains (LC) and had low velocities. Another group of fibres had mixtures of fast-type and slow-type MHCs and LCs and had intermediate shortening velocities. The third group of fibres had fast-type myosin heavy and light chains and high velocities. 3. The low-velocity fibres had a mean velocity (+/- S.E.M.) of 0.86 +/- 0.03 muscle lengths/s (ML/s) at 15 degrees C. The remaining fibres formed a continuum with respect to Vmax from 1.37 to 3.94 ML/s. These results indicate that a much greater diversity exists among single fibres from adult mammalian skeletal muscle than previously recognized. The intermediate- and high-velocity fibres formed a continuum (from slow to fast) with respect to the amount of myosin light chain 3 (LC3). That is, Vmax increased with the relative LC3 content in single fibres in the intermediate- and high-velocity groups in a quantitative, statistically significant manner. 4. Three isoforms of fast-type troponin T were identified among the intermediate- and high-velocity fibres. These fibres also contained fast-type troponin C and troponin I. As was the case with the relative LC3 content, these fibres also formed a continuum with respect to the relative proportions of the three isoforms of fast-type troponin T. It appears that different isoforms of troponin T are responsible for a slightly higher Ca2+ sensitivity of tension development in the high-velocity fibres compared to the intermediate fibres. The continuum in troponin T isoform composition paralleled an increase in Vmax among these fibres. 5. The low-velocity fibres had the highest Ca2+ sensitivity of the three groups and had exclusively the slow-type isoforms of the regulatory proteins in the troponin complex. 6. The co-ordinated variations in troponin T and LC3 compositions among the intermediate- and high-velocity fibres are discussed as a possible means for the further differentiation of the contractile properties of the fibres in these two groups, beyond that provided by myosin heavy chain isoforms alone. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3254423

  10. Drosophila melanogaster has only one myosin alkali light-chain gene which encodes a protein with considerable amino acid sequence homology to chicken myosin alkali light chains.

    PubMed Central

    Falkenthal, S; Parker, V P; Mattox, W W; Davidson, N

    1984-01-01

    A chimeric lambda DNA molecule containing the myosin alkali light-chain gene of Drosophila melanogaster was isolated. The encoded amino acid sequence was determined from the nucleic acid sequence of a cDNA homologous to the genomic clone. The identity of the encoded protein was established by two criteria: (i) sequence homology with the chicken alkali light-chain proteins and (ii) comparison of the two-dimensional gel electrophoretic pattern of the peptides synthesized by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected RNA to that of myosin alkali light-chain peptides extracted from Drosophila myofibrils. There is only one myosin alkali light-chain in D. melanogaster; its chromosomal location is region 98B . This gene is abundantly expressed during the development of larval as well as adult muscles. The Drosophila protein appears to contain one putative divalent cation-binding domain (an EF hand) as compared with the three EF hands present in chicken alkali light chains. Images PMID:6328279

  11. The Relay/Converter Interface Influences Hydrolysis of ATP by Skeletal Muscle Myosin II.

    PubMed

    Bloemink, Marieke J; Melkani, Girish C; Bernstein, Sanford I; Geeves, Michael A

    2016-01-22

    The interface between relay and converter domain of muscle myosin is critical for optimal myosin performance. Using Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle S1, we performed a kinetic analysis of the effect of mutations in the converter and relay domain. Introduction of a mutation (R759E) in the converter domain inhibits the steady-state ATPase of myosin S1, whereas an additional mutation in the relay domain (N509K) is able to restore the ATPase toward wild-type values. The R759E S1 construct showed little effect on most steps of the actomyosin ATPase cycle. The exception was a 25-30% reduction in the rate constant of the hydrolysis step, the step coupled to the cross-bridge recovery stroke that involves a change in conformation at the relay/converter domain interface. Significantly, the double mutant restored the hydrolysis step to values similar to the wild-type myosin. Modeling the relay/converter interface suggests a possible interaction between converter residue 759 and relay residue 509 in the actin-detached conformation, which is lost in R759E but is restored in N509K/R759E. This detailed kinetic analysis of Drosophila myosin carrying the R759E mutation shows that the interface between the relay loop and converter domain is important for fine-tuning myosin kinetics, in particular ATP binding and hydrolysis. PMID:26586917

  12. The Relay/Converter Interface Influences Hydrolysis of ATP by Skeletal Muscle Myosin II*

    PubMed Central

    Bloemink, Marieke J.; Melkani, Girish C.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Geeves, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    The interface between relay and converter domain of muscle myosin is critical for optimal myosin performance. Using Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle S1, we performed a kinetic analysis of the effect of mutations in the converter and relay domain. Introduction of a mutation (R759E) in the converter domain inhibits the steady-state ATPase of myosin S1, whereas an additional mutation in the relay domain (N509K) is able to restore the ATPase toward wild-type values. The R759E S1 construct showed little effect on most steps of the actomyosin ATPase cycle. The exception was a 25–30% reduction in the rate constant of the hydrolysis step, the step coupled to the cross-bridge recovery stroke that involves a change in conformation at the relay/converter domain interface. Significantly, the double mutant restored the hydrolysis step to values similar to the wild-type myosin. Modeling the relay/converter interface suggests a possible interaction between converter residue 759 and relay residue 509 in the actin-detached conformation, which is lost in R759E but is restored in N509K/R759E. This detailed kinetic analysis of Drosophila myosin carrying the R759E mutation shows that the interface between the relay loop and converter domain is important for fine-tuning myosin kinetics, in particular ATP binding and hydrolysis. PMID:26586917

  13. Temporal embryonic transcription of chicken fast skeletal myosin heavy chain isoforms in the single comb white leghorn.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J; St-Pierre, N; Lilburn, M S; Wick, M

    2016-05-01

    There are numerous factors that can significantly influence embryonic development in poultry and thus make simple days of incubation (chronological age) a less than perfect metric for studying embryonic physiology. The developmental fast skeletal muscle myosin (MyHC), the predominant protein in thePectoralis major(PM), is temporally expressed as a cadre of highly specific developmental isoforms. In the study described herein, a novel molecular technology (NanoString) was used to characterize the myosin isoform transcriptional patterns in the PM of Single Comb White Leghorn (SCWL) embryos. NanoString technology is based on quantitative analysis of the transcriptome through digital detection and quantification of target mRNA transcripts. Total RNA was isolated and gene transcription quantified using NanoString in embryonic muscle samples collected daily from 6 through 19 days of incubation. Data were analyzed using the LOESS smoothing function at a 95% confidence level. The temporal transcription of MyHC isoforms obtained in this study was consistent with the literature at higher specificity and resolution, thus validating NanoString for use in gene transcription analyses. The results support a hypothesis that the transcription patterns of the embryonic MyHC isoforms may be used as molecular clocks to further investigate the developmental relationships underlying embryonic fast skeletal muscle growth and development. PMID:26908894

  14. Role of the Essential Light Chain in the Activation of Smooth Muscle Myosin by Regulatory Light Chain Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kenneth A.; Feig, Michael; Brooks, Charles L.; Fagnant, Patricia M.; Lowey, Susan; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    The activity of smooth and non-muscle myosin II is regulated by phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) at serine 19. The dephosphorylated state of full-length monomeric myosin is characterized by an asymmetric intramolecular head-head interaction that completely inhibits the ATPase activity, accompanied by a hairpin fold of the tail, which prevents filament assembly. Phosphorylation of serine 19 disrupts these head-head interactions by an unknown mechanism. Computational modeling suggested that formation of the inhibited state is characterized by both torsional and bending motions about the myosin heavy chain (HC) at a location between the RLC and the essential light chain (ELC). Therefore, altering relative motions between the ELC and the RLC at this locus might disrupt the inhibited state. Based on this hypothesis we have derived an atomic model for the phosphorylated state of the smooth muscle myosin light chain domain (LCD). This model predicts a set of specific interactions between the N-terminal residues of the RLC with both the myosin HC and the ELC. Site directed mutagenesis was used to show that interactions between the phosphorylated N-terminus of the RLC and helix-A of the ELC are required for phosphorylation to activate smooth muscle myosin. PMID:24361582

  15. Effects of Myosin “Essential” Light Chain A1 on the Aggregation Properties of the Myosin Head

    PubMed Central

    Markov, D.I.; Nikolaeva, O.P.

    2010-01-01

    We compared the thermal aggregation properties of two isoforms of the isolated myosin head (myosin subfragment 1, S1) containing different “essential” (or “alkali”) light chains, A1 or A2. Temperature dependencies for the aggregation of these two S1 isoforms, as measured by the increase in turbidity, were compared with the temperature dependencies of their thermal denaturation obtained from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments. At relatively high ionic strength (in the presence of 100 mM KCl) close to its physiological values in muscle fibers, we have found no appreciable difference between the two S1 isoforms in their thermally induced aggregation. Under these conditions, the aggregation of both S1 isoforms was independent of the protein concentration and resulted from their irreversible denaturation, which led to the cohesion of denatured S1 molecules. In contrast, a significant difference between these S1 isoforms was revealed in their aggregation measured at low ionic strength. Under these conditions, the aggregation of S1 containing a light chain A1 (but not A2) was strongly dependent on protein concentration, the increase of which (from 0.125 to 2.0 mg/ml) shifted the aggregation curve by ~10 degrees towards the lower temperatures. It has been concluded that the aggregation properties of this S1 isoform at low ionic strength is basically determined by intermolecular interactions of the N–terminal extension of the A1 light chain (which is absent in the A2 light chain) with other S1 molecules. These interactions seem to be independent of the S1 thermal denaturation, and they may take place even at low temperature. PMID:22649644

  16. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor of T. gondii Motility Induces the Posttranslational Modification of Myosin Light Chain-1 and Inhibits Myosin Motor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Heaslip, Aoife T.; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Carey, Kimberly L.; Catti, Federica; Warshaw, David M.; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Ward, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that enters cells by a process of active penetration. Host cell penetration and parasite motility are driven by a myosin motor complex consisting of four known proteins: TgMyoA, an unconventional Class XIV myosin; TgMLC1, a myosin light chain; and two membrane-associated proteins, TgGAP45 and TgGAP50. Little is known about how the activity of the myosin motor complex is regulated. Here, we show that treatment of parasites with a recently identified small-molecule inhibitor of invasion and motility results in a rapid and irreversible change in the electrophoretic mobility of TgMLC1. While the precise nature of the TgMLC1 modification has not yet been established, it was mapped to the peptide Val46-Arg59. To determine if the TgMLC1 modification is responsible for the motility defect observed in parasites after compound treatment, the activity of myosin motor complexes from control and compound-treated parasites was compared in an in vitro motility assay. TgMyoA motor complexes containing the modified TgMLC1 showed significantly decreased motor activity compared to control complexes. This change in motor activity likely accounts for the motility defects seen in the parasites after compound treatment and provides the first evidence, in any species, that the mechanical activity of Class XIV myosins can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to their associated light chains. PMID:20084115

  17. Crystal Structure of a Phosphorylated Light Chain Domain of Scallop Smooth-Muscle Myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.S.; Robinson, H.; O-Neall-Hennessey, E.; Reshetnikova, L.; Brown, J. H.; Szent-Gyorgyi, A. G.; Cohen, C.

    2011-11-02

    We have determined the crystal structure of a phosphorylated smooth-muscle myosin light chain domain (LCD). This reconstituted LCD is of a sea scallop catch muscle myosin with its phosphorylatable regulatory light chain (RLC SmoA). In the crystal structure, Arg{sup 16}, an arginine residue that is present in this isoform but not in vertebrate smooth-muscle RLC, stabilizes the phosphorylation site. This arginine interacts with the carbonyl group of the phosphorylation-site serine in the unphosphorylated LCD (determined previously), and with the phosphate group when the serine is phosphorylated. However, the overall conformation of the LCD is essentially unchanged upon phosphorylation. This result provides additional evidence that phosphorylation of the RLC is unlikely to act as an on-switch in regulation of scallop catch muscle myosin.

  18. Tissue specificity of 3'-untranslated sequence of myosin light chain gene: unexpected interspecies homology with repetitive DNA.

    PubMed

    Saidapet, C; Khandekar, P; Mendola, C; Siddiqui, M A

    1984-09-01

    Using the 3' noncoding and coding sequences of chick heart myosin light chain mRNA cloned into Escherichia coli as probes, it was observed that, while the coding sequence shared homology with myosin light-chain mRNAs from other sources, the 3' noncoding sequence was specific for chick heart muscle. This property was used to detect chick heart-specific myosin light-chain gene activity in chick blastoderms of very early developmental stages where cells of different muscle origins cannot be distinguished morphologically. However, in spite of the tissue-specific divergence of the 3' noncoding sequence of myosin light-chain gene, which is present in a single copy in the chick genome, a surprising homology with DNA from such a diverse source like Dictyostelium discoideum was noted. The sequence homologous to chick myosin light-chain DNA was apparently present in a high repetition frequency in the Dictyostelium genome. PMID:6385857

  19. The molecular origin of birefringence in skeletal muscle. Contribution of myosin subfragment S-1.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, H M; Baskin, R J; Yeh, Y

    1991-01-01

    The state of optical polarization of He-Ne laser light diffracted by single skinned frog skeletal muscle fibers has been determined after decoration of the thin filaments of rigor fibers with exogenous S-1. Light on the first diffraction order was analyzed using optical ellipsometry for changes occurring in total birefringence (delta nT) and total differential field ratio (rT) and the experimental results compared with theoretical predictions. Fibers were examined with SDS-gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy as independent assays of S-1 binding. The binding of S-1 to the thin filaments caused a significant increase in rT and a small but significant decrease in delta nT. Release of bound exogenous S-1 with magnesium pyrophosphate demonstrated that the effect of S-1 on the optical parameters was reversible and both electrophoresis and electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of S-1 specifically bound to the thin filaments. Model simulations based on the theory of Yeh, Y., and R. Baskin (1988. Biophys. J. 54:205-218) showed that the values of delta nT and rT were sensitive to the axial bonding angle of exogenous S-1 as well as to the volume fraction of added S-1. Analysis of the data in light of the model showed that an average axial S-1 binding angle of 68 degrees +/- 7 degrees best fit the data. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:1760508

  20. Differential regulation of actin and myosin isoenzyme synthesis in functionally overloaded skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, P; Gagnon, J; Essig, D A; Reid, S K; Prior, G; Zak, R

    1990-01-01

    Overload hypertrophy of the chicken anterior latissimus dorsi muscle is accompanied by a replacement of one myosin isoenzyme (slow myosin-1, SM1) by another (slow myosin-2, SM2). To investigate the molecular mechanisms by which these changes occur, we measured the fractional synthesis rates (ks) in vivo of individual myosin-heavy-chain isoenzymes, total actin and total protein during the first 72 h of muscle growth. Although the ks of total protein and actin were doubled at 24 h, the ks for SM1 and SM2 were depressed. However, the ks of both isomyosins were nearly tripled by 72 h. Despite the increase in muscle size observed at 72 h, the amount of SM1 was reduced by half, indicating increased degradation of SM1. Results of translation of polyribosomes in vitro paralleled the results obtained in vivo. The proportion of total polyadenylylated mRNA in total RNA was increased at 48 and 72 h, but unchanged at 24 h despite the increase in protein synthesis at 24 h. Nuclease-protection analyses indicate that the level of specific SM1 and SM2 mRNAs change in a reciprocal fashion during overload. We conclude that gene-specific and temporal differences exist in the regulatory mechanisms that control overload-induced muscle growth. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2302182

  1. Purification, Characterization and Analysis of the Allergenic Properties of Myosin Light Chain in Procambarus clarkia.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Myosin light chain (MLC) plays a vital role in cell and muscle functions and has been identified as an allergen in close species. In this study, MLC with the molecular mass of 18kDa was purified from crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) muscle fibrils. Its physicochemical characterization showed that the...

  2. A 170 kDa polypeptide from mung bean shares multiple epitopes with rabbit skeletal myosin and binds ADP-agarose.

    PubMed

    Qiao, L; Jablonsky, P P; Elliott, J; Williamson, R E

    1994-11-01

    A 170 kDa polypeptide that has been partially purified from mung beans is retained by ADP-agarose even in the absence of divalent cations when most non-myosin ATPases and kinases do not bind. Attempts to demonstrate a myosin-like ATPase activity were inconclusive, however, and the protein accounts at most for only a small part of the total K+ EDTA ATPase activity of mung bean extracts. All four monoclonal antibodies raised to the 170 kDa polypeptide react with rabbit skeletal muscle myosin and localize the 170 kDa polypeptide in mung bean root tip cells to the actin-containing phragmoplast and to sites dispersed throughout the cytoplasm which probably include some but not all actin cables. These 4 monoclonals and 3 commercially available antimyosin monoclonals all recognise rabbit skeletal myosin and 160-170 kDa proteins that are present in two other angiosperms tested. In addition, a 158 kDa protein of mung bean reacts with only one antibody and does not bind ADP-agarose. We conclude that strong but not yet conclusive evidence points to the 160-170 kDa proteins of angiosperms being a widely conserved form of myosin heavy chain. PMID:7534549

  3. Myosin Light Chain–activating Phosphorylation Sites Are Required for Oogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Pascale; Karess, Roger

    1997-01-01

    The Drosophila spaghetti squash (sqh) gene encodes the regulatory myosin light chain (RMLC) of nonmuscle myosin II. Biochemical analysis of vertebrate nonmuscle and smooth muscle myosin II has established that phosphorylation of certain amino acids of the RMLC greatly increases the actin-dependent myosin ATPase and motor activity of myosin in vitro. We have assessed the in vivo importance of these sites, which in Drosophila correspond to serine-21 and threonine-20, by creating a series of transgenes in which these specific amino acids were altered. The phenotypes of the transgenes were examined in an otherwise null mutant background during oocyte development in Drosophila females. Germ line cystoblasts entirely lacking a functional sqh gene show severe defects in proliferation and cytokinesis. The ring canals, cytoplasmic bridges linking the oocyte to the nurse cells in the egg chamber, are abnormal, suggesting a role of myosin II in their establishment or maintenance. In addition, numerous aggregates of myosin heavy chain accumulate in the sqh null cells. Mutant sqh transgene sqh-A20, A21 in which both serine-21 and threonine-20 have been replaced by alanines behaves in most respects identically to the null allele in this system, with the exception that no heavy chain aggregates are found. In contrast, expression of sqh-A21, in which only the primary phosphorylation target serine-21 site is altered, partially restores functionality to germ line myosin II, allowing cystoblast division and oocyte development, albeit with some cytokinesis failure, defects in the rapid cytoplasmic transport from nurse cells to cytoplasm characteristic of late stage oogenesis, and some damaged ring canals. Substituting a glutamate for the serine-21 (mutant sqh-E21) allows oogenesis to be completed with minimal defects, producing eggs that can develop normally to produce fertile adults. Flies expressing sqh-A20, in which only the secondary phosphorylation site is absent, appear to be entirely wild type. Taken together, this genetic evidence argues that phosphorylation at serine-21 is critical to RMLC function in activating myosin II in vivo, but that the function can be partially provided by phosphorylation at threonine-20. PMID:9412474

  4. Fluorescence intensity and UV absorption changes accompanying dissociation and association of regulatory light chain of scallop adductor myosin.

    PubMed

    Konno, K; Arai, K; Watanabe, S

    1983-10-01

    Dissociation and association of regulatory light chains of scallop myosin were found to be accompanied by changes in the fluorescence intensity and in the UV absorption spectrum. The changes in the two optical properties of scallop myosin and the dissociation and association of regulatory light chains were studied as a function of the magnesium and calcium concentrations. The results thus obtained suggested that there are two different types of attachment between regulatory light chains and "desensitized" myosin; one type is a calcium-specific attachment, and the other type of attachment can be mediated by either calcium or magnesium ions. These changes in the optical properties of scallop myosin were distinguishable from those induced by Mg-ATP; for example, with "desensitized" scallop myosin, the former changes were not observed but the latter were. PMID:6418724

  5. Purification and characterization of a sea urchin egg Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent kinase with myosin light chain phosphorylating activity.

    PubMed

    Chou, Y H; Rebhun, L I

    1986-04-25

    The crude actomyosin precipitate from sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) egg extracts contains Ca2+-sensitive myosin light chain kinase activity. Activity can be further increased by exogenous calmodulin (CaM). Egg myosin light chain kinase activity is purified from total egg extract by fractionating on three different chromatographic columns: DEAE ion exchange, gel filtration on Sephacryl-300, and Affi-Gel-CaM affinity. The purified egg kinase depends totally on Ca2+ and CaM for activity. Unphosphorylated egg myosin has very little actin-activated ATPase. After phosphorylation of the phosphorylable light chain by either egg kinase or gizzard myosin light chain kinase, the actin-activated ATPase of egg myosin is enhanced several fold. However, the egg kinase bears some unique characteristics which are very different from conventional myosin light chain kinases of differentiated tissues. The purified egg kinase has a native molecular mass of 405 kDa, while on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis it shows a single subunit of 56 kDa. The affinity of egg kinase for CaM (Ka = 0.4 microM) is relatively weaker than that of the gizzard myosin light chain kinase. The egg kinase autophosphorylates in the presence of Ca2+ and CaM and has a rather broad substrate specificity. The possible relationship between this egg Ca2+-CaM-dependent kinase and the Ca2+-CaM-dependent kinases from brain and liver is discussed. PMID:2937787

  6. Regulation of myosin light chain kinase and telokin expression in smooth muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Herring, B Paul; El-Mounayri, Omar; Gallagher, Patricia J; Yin, Feng; Zhou, Jiliang

    2006-11-01

    The mylk1 gene is a large gene spanning approximately 250 kb and comprising at least 31 exons. The mylk1 gene encodes at least four protein products: two isoforms of the 220-kDa myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), a 130-kDa MLCK, and telokin. Transcripts encoding these products are derived from four independent promoters within the mylk1 gene. The kinases expressed from the mylk1 gene have been extensively characterized and function to regulate the activity of nonmuscle and smooth muscle myosin II. Activation of these myosin motors by MLCK modulates a variety of contractile processes, including smooth muscle contraction, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Dysregulation of these processes contributes to a number of diseases. The noncatalytic gene product telokin also has been shown to modulate contraction in smooth muscle cells through its ability to inhibit myosin light chain phosphatase. Given the crucial role of the products of the mylk1 gene in regulating numerous contractile processes, it seems intuitive that alterations in the transcriptional activity of the mylk1 gene also will have a significant impact on many physiological and pathological processes. In this review we highlight some of the recent studies that have described the transcriptional regulation of mylk1 gene products in smooth muscle tissues and discuss the implications of these findings for regulation of expression of other smooth muscle-specific genes. PMID:16774989

  7. Myosin light chain kinase from vascular smooth muscle inhibits the ATP-dependent interaction between actin and myosin by binding to actin.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Ye, L H; Kohama, K

    1995-07-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) was prepared from smooth muscle of bovine aorta. MLCK inhibited the ATP-dependent movement of actin filaments on a glass surface coated with smooth muscle myosin that had been phosphorylated. The inhibitory effect was abolished by calmodulin in the presence of Ca2+ (Ca-CaM). The abolition was also observed when the concentration of actin filaments was increased. The inhibitory effect and its abolition were related to the actin-binding activity of MLCK, that is antagonized by Ca-CaM. PMID:8537296

  8. Flexible light-chain and helical structure of F-actin explain the movement and step size of myosin-VI.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ganhui; Sun, Sean X

    2006-12-01

    Myosin-VI is a dimeric isoform of unconventional myosins. Single molecule experiments indicate that myosin-VI and myosin-V are processive molecular motors, but travel toward opposite ends of filamentous actin. Structural studies show several differences between myosin-V and VI, including a significant difference in the light-chain domain connecting the motor domains. Combining the measured kinetics of myosin-VI with the elasticity of the light chains, and the helical structure of F-actin, we compare and contrast the motility of myosin-VI with myosin-V. We show that the elastic properties of the light-chain domain control the stepping behavior of these motors. Simple models incorporating the motor elastic energy can quantitatively capture most of the observed data. Implications of our result for other processive motors are discussed. PMID:16963511

  9. Myosin light chain kinase regulates cell polarization independently of membrane tension or Rho kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Sunny S.; Diz-Muñoz, Alba; Weiner, Orion D.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells polarize to a single front and rear to achieve rapid actin-based motility, but the mechanisms preventing the formation of multiple fronts are unclear. We developed embryonic zebrafish keratocytes as a model system for investigating establishment of a single axis. We observed that, although keratocytes from 2 d postfertilization (dpf) embryos resembled canonical fan-shaped keratocytes, keratocytes from 4 dpf embryos often formed multiple protrusions despite unchanged membrane tension. Using genomic, genetic, and pharmacological approaches, we determined that the multiple-protrusion phenotype was primarily due to increased myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression. MLCK activity influences cell polarity by increasing myosin accumulation in lamellipodia, which locally decreases protrusion lifetime, limiting lamellipodial size and allowing for multiple protrusions to coexist within the context of membrane tension limiting protrusion globally. In contrast, Rho kinase (ROCK) regulates myosin accumulation at the cell rear and does not determine protrusion size. These results suggest a novel MLCK-specific mechanism for controlling cell polarity via regulation of myosin activity in protrusions. PMID:25918227

  10. Interaction of protein-bound polysaccharide (PSK) with smooth muscle myosin regulatory light chain.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Kunimatsu, Mitoshi

    2003-06-01

    The interaction of a protein-bound polysaccharide (PSK) isolated from Basidiomycetes with smooth muscle myosin components was evaluated by limited digestion, urea/glycerol gel electrophoresis, affinity chromatography and overlay assay using a peptide array. PSK was bound to the regulatory light chain (RLC) of myosin, but not to the essential light chain. The binding to PSK was definitely observed for unphosphorylated RLC, compared to phosphorylated one. From the amino acid sequence of the RLC, 490 peptides were synthesized on a cellulose membrane. Overlay assays showed that the PSK-binding on the molecule of RLC were localized in the N- and C-terminal basic regions and these sites were conserved in RLC from the human smooth muscle and nonmuscle cells. PMID:12808284

  11. Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase reduces brain edema formation after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Luh, Clara; Kuhlmann, Christoph R; Ackermann, Bianca; Timaru-Kast, Ralph; Luhmann, Heiko J; Behl, Christian; Werner, Christian; Engelhard, Kristin; Thal, Serge C

    2010-02-01

    The role of the endothelial contractile apparatus in the process of brain edema formation after brain trauma is not characterized. Phosphorylation of myosin light chains by myosin light chain kinases (MLCK) activates endothelial contractile elements and results in a rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. This may enhance post-traumatic blood-brain barrier dysfunction. In order to investigate the role of the MLCK on brain edema formation and blood-brain barrier permeability after brain injury, mice were anesthetized and subjected to a controlled cortical impact (CCI). MLCK expression is significantly up-regulated after CCI with a maximum 12 h post-injury. Specific inhibition of MLCK by ML-7 resulted in a reduction of phosphorylation of myosin light chains and improved blood-brain-barrier integrity. Accordingly, ML-7 attenuated post-traumatic brain edema formation and intracranial hypertension 24 h after CCI. Prevention of brain edema formation did not translate into improved neurological outcome or reduced brain lesion. In conclusion, the results confirm that the endothelial contractile apparatus is activated by CCI and opens the endothelial barrier leading to vasogenic brain edema formation. Lack of neurological and histological improvement suggests that specific targeting of vasogenic brain edema at the endothelial level is not sufficient to limit secondary brain damage and has, therefore, to be combined with other potential neuroprotective strategies. PMID:19943851

  12. Molecular cloning and mRNA expression analysis of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) from fast skeletal muscle of grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wuying; Fu, Guihong; Bing, Shiyu; Meng, Tao; Zhou, Ruixue; Cheng, Jia; Zhao, Falan; Zhang, Hongfang; Zhang, Jianshe

    2010-03-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MyHC) is one of the major structural and contracting proteins of muscle. We have isolated the cDNA clone encoding MyHC of the grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella. The sequence comprises 5 934 bp, including a 5 814 bp open reading frame encoding an amino acid sequence of 1 937 residues. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 69% homology to rabbit fast skeletal MyHC and 73%-76% homology to the MyHCs from the mandarin fish, walleye pollack, white croaker, chum salmon, and carp. The putative sequences of subfragment-1 and the light meromyosin region showed 61.4%-80% homology to the corresponding regions of other fish MyHCs. The tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific expressions of the MyHC gene were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. The MyHC gene showed the highest expression in the muscles compared with the kidney, spleen and intestine. Developmentally, there was a gradual increase in MyHC mRNA expression from the neural formation stage to the tail bud stage. The highest expression was detected in hatching larva. Our work on the MyHC gene from the grass carp has provided useful information for fish molecular biology and fish genomics.

  13. Impact of resistance exercise during bed rest on skeletal muscle sarcopenia and myosin isoform distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamman, M. M.; Clarke, M. S.; Feeback, D. L.; Talmadge, R. J.; Stevens, B. R.; Lieberman, S. A.; Greenisen, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Because resistance exercise (REx) and bed-rest unloading (BRU) are associated with opposing adaptations, our purpose was to test the efficacy of REx against the effects of 14 days of BRU on the knee-extensor muscle group. Sixteen healthy men were randomly assigned to no exercise (NoEx; n = 8) or REx (n = 8). REx performed five sets of leg press exercise with 80-85% of one repetition maximum (1 RM) every other day during BRU. Muscle samples were removed from the vastus lateralis muscle by percutaneous needle biopsy. Myofiber distribution was determined immunohistochemically with three monoclonal antibodies against myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms (I, IIa, IIx). MHC distribution was further assessed by quantitative gel electrophoresis. Dynamic 1-RM leg press and unilateral maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) were determined. Maximal neural activation (root mean squared electromyogram) and rate of torque development (RTD) were measured during MVC. Reductions (P < 0.05) in type I (15%) and type II (17%) myofiber cross-sectional areas were found in NoEx but not in REx. Electrophoresis revealed no changes in MHC isoform distribution. The percentage of type IIx myofibers decreased (P < 0.05) in REx from 9 to 2% and did not change in NoEx. 1 RM was reduced (P < 0.05) by 9% in NoEx but was unchanged in REx. MVC fell by 15 and 13% in NoEx and REx, respectively. The agonist-to-antagonist root mean squared electromyogram ratio decreased (P < 0.05) 19% in REx. RTD slowed (P < 0.05) by 54% in NoEx only. Results indicate that REx prevented BRU-induced myofiber atrophy and also maintained training-specific strength. Unlike spaceflight, BRU did not induce shifts in myosin phenotype. The reported benefits of REx may prove useful in prescribing exercise for astronauts in microgravity.

  14. Thermal Denaturation and Aggregation of Myosin Subfragment 1 Isoforms with Different Essential Light Chains

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Denis I.; Zubov, Eugene O.; Nikolaeva, Olga P.; Kurganov, Boris I.; Levitsky, Dmitrii I.

    2010-01-01

    We compared thermally induced denaturation and aggregation of two isoforms of the isolated myosin head (myosin subfragment 1, S1) containing different “essential” (or “alkali”) light chains, A1 or A2. We applied differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate the domain structure of these two S1 isoforms. For this purpose, a special calorimetric approach was developed to analyze the DSC profiles of irreversibly denaturing multidomain proteins. Using this approach, we revealed two calorimetric domains in the S1 molecule, the more thermostable domain denaturing in two steps. Comparing the DSC data with temperature dependences of intrinsic fluorescence parameters and S1 ATPase inactivation, we have identified these two calorimetric domains as motor domain and regulatory domain of the myosin head, the motor domain being more thermostable. Some difference between the two S1 isoforms was only revealed by DSC in thermal denaturation of the regulatory domain. We also applied dynamic light scattering (DLS) to analyze the aggregation of S1 isoforms induced by their thermal denaturation. We have found no appreciable difference between these S1 isoforms in their aggregation properties under ionic strength conditions close to those in the muscle fiber (in the presence of 100 mM KCl). Under these conditions kinetics of this process was independent of protein concentration, and the aggregation rate was limited by irreversible denaturation of the S1 motor domain. PMID:21151434

  15. The Effects of Neuregulin on Cardiac Myosin Light Chain Kinase Gene-Ablated Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Audrey N.; Huang, Jian; Battiprolu, Pavan K.; Hill, Joseph A.; Kamm, Kristine E.; Stull, James T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Activation of ErbB2/4 receptor tyrosine kinases in cardiomyocytes by neuregulin treatment is associated with improvement in cardiac function, supporting its use in human patients with heart failure despite the lack of a specific mechanism. Neuregulin infusion in rodents increases cardiac myosin light chain kinase (cMLCK) expression and cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation which may improve actin-myosin interactions for contraction. We generated a cMLCK knockout mouse to test the hypothesis that cMLCK is necessary for neuregulin-induced improvement in cardiac function by increasing RLC phosphorylation. Principal Findings The cMLCK knockout mice have attenuated RLC phosphorylation and decreased cardiac performance measured as fractional shortening. Neuregulin infusion for seven days in wildtype mice increased cardiac cMLCK protein expression and RLC phosphorylation while increasing Akt phosphorylation and decreasing phospholamban phosphorylation. There was no change in fractional shortening. In contrast, neuregulin infusion in cMLCK knockout animals increased cardiac performance in the absence of cMLCK without increasing RLC phosphorylation. In addition, CaMKII signaling appeared to be enhanced in neuregulin-treated knockout mice. Conclusions Thus, Neuregulin may improve cardiac performance in the failing heart without increasing cMLCK and RLC phosphorylation by activating other signaling pathways. PMID:23776695

  16. Depolarization induces Rho-Rho kinase-mediated myosin light chain phosphorylation in kidney tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Szászi, Katalin; Sirokmány, Gábor; Di Ciano-Oliveira, Caterina; Rotstein, Ori D; Kapus, András

    2005-09-01

    Myosin-based contractility plays important roles in the regulation of epithelial functions, particularly paracellular permeability. However, the triggering factors and the signaling pathways that control epithelial myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation have not been elucidated. Herein we show that plasma membrane depolarization provoked by distinct means, including high extracellular K(+), the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium, or the ionophore nystatin, induced strong diphosphorylation of MLC in kidney epithelial cells. In sharp contrast to smooth muscle, depolarization of epithelial cells did not provoke a Ca(2+) signal, and removal of external Ca(2+) promoted rather than inhibited MLC phosphorylation. Moreover, elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) did not induce significant MLC phosphorylation, and the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 did not prevent the depolarization-induced MLC response, suggesting that MLCK is not a regulated element in this process. Instead, the Rho-Rho kinase (ROK) pathway is the key mediator because 1) depolarization stimulated Rho and induced its peripheral translocation, 2) inhibition of Rho by Clostridium difficile toxin B or C3 transferase abolished MLC phosphorylation, and 3) the ROK inhibitor Y-27632 suppressed the effect. Importantly, physiological depolarizing stimuli were able to activate the same pathway: L-alanine, the substrate of the electrogenic Na(+)-alanine cotransporter, stimulated Rho and induced Y-27632-sensitive MLC phosphorylation in a Na(+)-dependent manner. Together, our results define a novel mode of the regulation of MLC phosphorylation in epithelial cells, which is depolarization triggered and Rho-ROK-mediated but Ca(2+) signal independent. This pathway may be a central mechanism whereby electrogenic transmembrane transport processes control myosin phosphorylation and thereby regulate paracellular transport. PMID:15857905

  17. PKC-mediated cerebral vasoconstriction: Role of myosin light chain phosphorylation versus actin cytoskeleton reorganization.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Ahmed F; Abd-Elrahman, Khaled S; Moreno-Dominguez, Alejandro

    2015-06-15

    Defective protein kinase C (PKC) signaling has been suggested to contribute to abnormal vascular contraction in disease conditions including hypertension and diabetes. Our previous work on agonist and pressure-induced cerebral vasoconstriction implicated PKC as a major contributor to force production in a myosin light chain (LC20) phosphorylation-independent manner. Here, we used phorbol dibutyrate to selectively induce a PKC-dependent constriction in rat middle cerebral arteries and delineate the relative contribution of different contractile mechanisms involved. Specifically, we employed an ultra-sensitive 3-step western blotting approach to detect changes in the content of phosphoproteins that regulate myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity, thin filament activation, and actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Data indicate that PKC activation evoked a greater constriction at a similar level of LC20 phosphorylation achieved by 5-HT. PDBu-evoked constriction persisted in the presence of Gö6976, a selective inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent PKC, and in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Biochemical evidence indicates that either + or - extracellular Ca(2+), PDBu (i) inhibits MLCP activity via the phosphorylation of myosin targeting subunit of myosin phosphatase (MYPT1) and C-kinase potentiated protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor (CPI-17), (ii) increases the phosphorylation of paxillin and heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), and reduces G-actin content, and (iii) does not change the phospho-content of the thin filament proteins, calponin and caldesmon. PDBu-induced constriction was more sensitive to disruption of actin cytoskeleton compared to inhibition of cross-bridge cycling. In conclusion, this study provided evidence for the pivotal contribution of cytoskeletal actin polymerization in force generation following PKC activation in cerebral resistance arteries. PMID:25931148

  18. Erythrocyte Protein 4.1 Binds and Regulates Myosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternack, Gary R.; Racusen, Richard H.

    1989-12-01

    Myosin was recently identified in erythrocytes and was shown to partition both with membrane and cytosolic fractions, suggesting that it may be loosely bound to membranes [Fowler, V. M., Davis, J. Q. & Bennett, V. (1985) J. Cell Biol. 100, 47-55, and Wong, A. J., Kiehart, D. P. & Pollard, T. D. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 46-49]; however, the molecular basis for this binding was unclear. The present studies employed immobilized monomeric myosin to examine the interaction of myosin with erythrocyte protein 4.1. In human erythrocytes, protein 4.1 binds to integral membrane proteins and mediates spectrin-actin assembly. Protein 4.1 binds to rabbit skeletal muscle myosin with a Kd = 140 nM and a stoichiometry consistent with 1:1 binding. Heavy meromyosin competes for protein 4.1 binding with Ki = 36-54 nM; however, the S1 fragment (the myosin head) competes less efficiently. Affinity chromatography of partial chymotryptic digests of protein 4.1 on immobilized myosin identified a 10-kDa domain of protein 4.1 as the myosin-binding site. In functional studies, protein 4.1 partially inhibited the actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase activity of rabbit skeletal muscle myosin with Ki = 51 nM. Liver cytosolic and erythrocyte myosins preactivated with myosin light-chain kinase were similarly inhibited by protein 4.1. These studies show that protein 4.1 binds, modulates, and thus may regulate myosin. This interaction might serve to generate the contractile forces involved in Mg2+-ATP-dependent shape changes in erythrocytes and may additionally serve as a model for myosin organization and regulation in non-muscle cells.

  19. Analysis of Methionine Oxidation in Myosin Isoforms in Porcine Skeletal Muscle by LC-MS/MS Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin-Yeon; Jung, Eun-Young; Jeong, Tae-Chul; Yang, Han-Sul; Kim, Gap-Don

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze oxidized methionines in the myosin isoforms of porcine longissimus thoracis, psoas major, and semimembranosus muscles by liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS). A total of 836 queries matched to four myosin isoforms (myosin-1, -2, -4, and -7) were analyzed and each myosin isoform was identified by its unique peptides (7.3-13.3). Forty-four peptides were observed from all three muscles. Seventeen peptides were unique to the myosin isoform and the others were common peptides expressed in two or more myosin isoforms. Five were identified as oxidized peptides with one or two methionine sulfoxides with 16 amu of mass modification. Methionines on residues 215 (215), 438 (438), 853 (851), 856 (854), 1071 (1069), and 1106 (1104) of myosin-1 (myosin-4) were oxidized by the addition of oxygen. Myosin-2 had two oxidized methionines on residues 215 and 438. No queries matched to myosin-7 were observed as oxidized peptides. LC-MS/MS allows analysis of the oxidation of specific amino acids on specific residue sites, as well as in specific proteins in the food system. PMID:27194935

  20. Expression profiles of myostatin, myogenin, and Myosin heavy chain in skeletal muscles of two rabbit breeds differing in growth rate.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Liangde; Xie, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Lei, Min; Li, Congyan; Ren, Yongjun; Zheng, Jie; Guo, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Cuixia; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Yucai

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare mRNA levels of myostatin (MSTN), myogenin (MyoG), and fiber type compositions in terms of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) in skeletal muscles of two rabbit breeds with different body sizes and growth rates. Longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles of 16 Californian rabbits (CW) and 16 Germany great line of ZIKA rabbits (GZ) were collected at the ages of 35d and 84d (slaughter age). The results showed that the live weights of GZ rabbits of 35d and 84d old were approximately 36% and 26% greater than those of CW rabbits, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that at the age of 84d GZ rabbits contained significantly lower MSTN mRNA level and higher MyoG mRNA level in both longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles than CW rabbits, and mRNA levels of MSTN and MyoG exhibited opposite changes from the age of 35d to 84d, suggesting that GZ rabbits were subjected to less growth inhibition from MSTN at slaughter age, which occurred most possibly in skeletal muscles. Four types of fiber were identified by real-time PCR in rabbit muscles, with MyHC-1 and MyHC-2D, MyHC-2B were the major types in biceps femoris and longissimus dorsi muscles, respectively. At the age of 84d, GZ rabbits contained greater proportion of MyHC-1 and decreased proportion of MyHC-2D and decreased lactate dehydrogenase activity in biceps femoris than CW rabbits, and the results were exactly opposite in longissimus dorsi, suggesting that GZ rabbits show higher oxidative capacity in biceps femoris muscle than CW rabbits. In conclusion, the trends of mRNA levels of MSTN and fiber types in GZ rabbits' skeletal muscles might be consistent with the putative fast growth characteristic of GZ rabbits compared to CW rabbits. PMID:24813217

  1. Contraction due to microtubule disruption is associated with increased phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodney, M S; Elson, E L

    1995-01-01

    Microtubules have been proposed to function as rigid struts which oppose cellular contraction. Consistent with this hypothesis, microtubule disruption strengthens the contractile force exerted by many cell types. We have investigated alternative explanation for the mechanical effects of microtubule disruption: that microtubules modulate the mechanochemical activity of myosin by influencing phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (LC20). We measured the force produced by a population of fibroblasts within a collagen lattice attached to an isometric force transducer. Treatment of cells with nocodazole, an inhibitor of microtubule polymerization, stimulated an isometric contraction that reached its peak level within 30 min and was typically 30-45% of the force increase following maximal stimulation with 30% fetal bovine serum. The contraction following nocodazole treatment was associated with a 2- to 4-fold increase in LC20 phosphorylation. The increases in both force and LC20 phosphorylation, after addition of nocodazole, could be blocked or reversed by stabilizing the microtubules with paclitaxel (former generic name, taxol). Increasing force and LC20 phosphorylation by pretreatment with fetal bovine serum decreased the subsequent additional contraction upon microtubule disruption, a finding that appears inconsistent with a load-shifting mechanism. Our results suggest that phosphorylation of LC20 is a common mechanism for the contractions stimulated both by microtubule poisons and receptor-mediated agonists. The modulation of myosin activity by alterations in microtubule assembly may coordinate the physiological functions of these cytoskeletal components. PMID:7479762

  2. Conformational changes at the highly reactive cystein and lysine regions of skeletal muscle myosin induced by formation of transition state analogues.

    PubMed

    Maruta, S; Homma, K; Ohki, T

    1998-09-01

    Myosin forms stable ternary complexes with Mg2+-ADP and phosphate analogues of aluminum fluoride (AlF4-), beryllium fluoride (BeFn), and scandium fluoride (ScFn). These complexes are distinct from each other and may mimic different transient states in the ATPase cycle [Maruta et al. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 7093-7100]. Regions of skeletal muscle myosin containing the highly reactive residues Cys 707 (SH1), Cys 697 (SH2), and lysine 83 (RLR) dramatically alter their local conformation when myosin hydrolyzes ATP, and these changes may reflect formation of a series of transient intermediates during ATP hydrolysis. We used the fluorescent probes 4-fluoro-7-sulfamoylbezofurazan, 2-(4'-maleimidylanilino)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid, and trinitrobenzene-sulfonate, which bind to SH1, SH2, and RLR, respectively, to examine differences in local conformations within myosin.ADP.phosphate analogue (BeFn, Vi, AlF4-, and ScFn) complexes. It was observed that the ternary complexes had SH1 conformations similar to those seen on S-1 in the presence of ATP. In contrast, local conformations in the SH2 and RLR regions of S-1.ADP.BeFn were different from those in corresponding regions of S-1.ADP.AlF4- or ScFn. These results suggest that SH1 and SH2 move distinctly during ATP hydrolysis and that the local conformations of the SH2 and RLR regions more sensitively reflect different transient states. PMID:9722668

  3. The human myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) from hippocampus: Cloning, sequencing, expression, and localization to 3qcen-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Potier, M.C.; Rossier, J.; Turnell, W.G.; Pekarsky, Y.; Gardiner, K.

    1995-10-10

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), a key enzyme in muscle contraction, has been shown by immunohistology to be present in neurons and glia. We describe here the cloning of the cDNA for human MLCK from hippocampus, encoding a protein sequence 95% similar to smooth muscle MLCKs but less than 60% similar to skeletal muscle MLCKs. The cDNA clone detected two RNA transcripts in human frontal and entorhinal cortex, in hippocampus, and in jejunum, one corresponding to MLCK and the other probably to telokin, the carboxy-terminal 154 codons of MLCK expressed as an independent protein in smooth muscle. Levels of expression were lower in brain compared to smooth muscle. We show that within the protein sequence, a motif of 28 or 24 residues is repeated five times, the second repeat ending with the putative methionine start codon. These repeats overlap with a second previously reported module of 12 residues repeated five times in the human sequence. In addition, the acidic C-terminus of all MLCKs from both brain and smooth muscle resembles the C-terminus of tubulins. The chromosomal localization of the gene for human MLCK is shown to be at 3qcen-q21, as determined by PCR and Southern blotting using two somatic cell hybrid panels. 33 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Evidence for three fast myosin heavy chain isoforms in type II skeletal muscle fibers in the adult llama (Lama glama).

    PubMed

    Graziotti, G H; Ríos, C M; Rivero, J L

    2001-08-01

    Skeletal muscle fiber types classified on the basis of their content of different myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms were analyzed in samples from hindlimb muscles of adult sedentary llamas (Lama glama) by correlating immunohistochemistry with specific anti-MHC monoclonal antibodies, myofibrillar ATPase (mATPase) histochemistry, and quantitative histochemistry of fiber metabolic and size properties. The immunohistochemical technique allowed the separation of four pure (i.e., expressing a unique MHC isoform) muscle fiber types: one slow-twitch (Type I) and three fast-twitch (Type II) phenotypes. The same four major fiber types could be objectively discriminated with two serial sections stained for mATPase after acid (pH 4.5) and alkaline (pH 10.5) preincubations. The three fast-twitch fiber types were tentatively designated as IIA, IIX, and IIB on the basis of the homologies of their immunoreactivities, acid denaturation of their mATPase activity, size, and metabolic properties expressed at the cellular level with the corresponding isoforms of rat and horse muscles. Acid stability of their mATPase activity increased in the rank order IIA>IIX>IIB. The same was true for size and glycolytic capacity, whereas oxidative capacity decreased in the same rank order IIA>IIX>IIB. In addition to these four pure fibers (I, IIA, IIX, and IIB), four other fiber types with hybrid phenotypes containing two (I+IIA, IIAX, and IIXB) or three (IIAXB) MHCs were immunohistochemically delineated. These frequent phenotypes (40% of the semitendinosus muscle fiber composition) had overlapped mATPase staining intensities with their corresponding pure fiber types, so they could not be delineated by mATPase histochemistry. Expression of the three fast adult MHC isoforms was spatially regulated around islets of Type I fibers, with concentric circles of fibers expressing MHC-IIA, then MHC-IIX, and peripherally MHC-IIB. This study demonstrates that three adult fast Type II MHC isoproteins are expressed in skeletal muscle fibers of the llama. The general assumption that the very fast MHC-IIB isoform is expressed only in small mammals can be rejected. PMID:11457931

  5. Autoregulatory Control of Smooth Muscle Myosin Light Chain Kinase Promoter by Notch Signaling.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanchita; Proweller, Aaron

    2016-02-01

    Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (SM-MLCK) is the key enzyme responsible for phosphorylation of regulatory myosin light chain (MLC20), resulting in actin-myosin cross-bridging and force generation in vascular smooth muscle required for physiological vasoreactivity and blood pressure control. In this study, we investigated the combinatorial role of myocardin/serum response factor (SRF) and Notch signaling in the transcriptional regulation of MLCK gene expression. Promoter reporter analyses in rat A10 smooth muscle cells revealed a bimodal pattern of MLCK promoter activity and gene expression upon stimulation with constitutively active Notch1 in presence of myocardin or by Jagged1 ligand stimulation. An initial Notch1-induced increase in MLCK transcription was followed by loss in promoter sensitivity, which could be restored with further Notch1 dose escalation. Real-time PCR analyses revealed that endogenous levels of Hairy Related Transcription (HRT) factor 2 (HRT2) peaked concurrently with inhibitory concentrations of Notch1. Forced expression of HRT2 demonstrated simultaneous repression of both myocardin- and Notch1-induced MLCK promoter activity. HRT2-mediated repression was further confirmed by HRT2 truncations and siHRT2 treatments that rescued MLCK promoter activity and gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies revealed both Jagged1 ligand- and Notch1-enhanced myocardin/SRF complex formation at the promoter CArG element. In contrast, heightened levels of HRT2 concomitantly disrupted myocardin/SRF and Notch transcription complex formation at respective CArG and CSL binding elements. Taken together, SM-MLCK promoter activity appears highly sensitive to the relative levels of Notch1 signaling, HRT2, and myocardin. These findings identify a novel Notch-dependent HRT2 autoregulatory circuit coordinating transcriptional regulation of SM-MLCK. PMID:26703474

  6. Myosin Regulatory Light Chain (RLC) Phosphorylation Change as a Modulator of Cardiac Muscle Contraction in Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Toepfer, Christopher; Caorsi, Valentina; Kampourakis, Thomas; Sikkel, Markus B.; West, Timothy G.; Leung, Man-Ching; Al-Saud, Sara A.; MacLeod, Kenneth T.; Lyon, Alexander R.; Marston, Steven B.; Sellers, James R.; Ferenczi, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation alters cardiac muscle mechanics is important because it is often altered in cardiac disease. The effect this protein phosphorylation has on muscle mechanics during a physiological range of shortening velocities, during which the heart generates power and performs work, has not been addressed. We have expressed and phosphorylated recombinant Rattus norvegicus left ventricular RLC. In vitro we have phosphorylated these recombinant species with cardiac myosin light chain kinase and zipper-interacting protein kinase. We compare rat permeabilized cardiac trabeculae, which have undergone exchange with differently phosphorylated RLC species. We were able to enrich trabecular RLC phosphorylation by 40% compared with controls and, in a separate series, lower RLC phosphorylation to 60% of control values. Compared with the trabeculae with a low level of RLC phosphorylation, RLC phosphorylation enrichment increased isometric force by more than 3-fold and peak power output by more than 7-fold and approximately doubled both maximum shortening speed and the shortening velocity that generated peak power. We augmented these measurements by observing increased RLC phosphorylation of human and rat HF samples from endocardial left ventricular homogenate. These results demonstrate the importance of increased RLC phosphorylation in the up-regulation of myocardial performance and suggest that reduced RLC phosphorylation is a key aspect of impaired contractile function in the diseased myocardium. PMID:23530050

  7. Planarian myosin essential light chain is involved in the formation of brain lateral branches during regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuying; Chen, Xuhui; Yuan, Zuoqing; Zhou, Luming; Pang, Qiuxiang; Mao, Bingyu; Zhao, Bosheng

    2015-08-01

    The myosin essential light chain (ELC) is a structure component of the actomyosin cross-bridge, however, the functions in the central nervous system (CNS) development and regeneration remain poorly understood. Planarian Dugesia japonica has revealed fundamental mechanisms and unique aspects of neuroscience and neuroregeneration. In this study, the cDNA DjElc, encoding a planarian essential light chain of myosin, was identified from the planarian Dugesia japonica cDNA library. It encodes a deduced protein with highly conserved functionally domains EF-Hand and Ca(2+) binding sites that shares significant similarity with other members of ELC. Whole mount in situ hybridization studies show that DjElc expressed in CNS during embryonic development and regeneration of adult planarians. Loss of function of DjElc by RNA interference during planarian regeneration inhibits brain lateral branches regeneration completely. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that DjElc is required for maintenance of neurons and neurite outgrowth, particularly for involving the brain later branch regeneration. PMID:25585662

  8. Myosin light chain kinase plays an essential role in S. flexneri dissemination.

    PubMed

    Rathman, M; de Lanerolle, P; Ohayon, H; Gounon, P; Sansonetti, P

    2000-10-01

    Shigella flexneri, the causitive agent of bacillary dysentery, has been shown to disseminate in colonic epithelial cells via protrusions that extend from infected cells and are endocytosed by adjacent cells. This phenomenon occurs in the region of the eukaryotic cell's adherens junctions and is inhibited by pharmacological reagents or host cell mutations that completely disrupt the junctional complex. In this study, inhibitors of the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) were shown to dramatically decrease intercellular spread of S. flexneri but to have no inhibitory effect on bacterial entry, multiplication or actin-based motility within the host cell. Furthermore, cell-to-cell spread of Listeria monocytogenes, another bacterial pathogen that uses an actin-based mechanism to move within the eukaryotic cytoplasm and to spread from cell to cell, was not affected by the MLCK inhibitors, indicating that (1) the inhibition of S. flexneri cell-to-cell spread in treated cells is not due to a complete break down of cell-cell contacts, which was subsequently confirmed by confocal microscopy, and (2) MLCK plays a role in a S. flexneri-specific mechanism of dissemination. Myosin has been shown to play a role in a variety of membrane-based phenomena. The work presented here suggests that activation of this molecule via phosphorylation by MLCK, at the very least participates in the formation of the bacteria-containing protrusion, and could also contribute to the endocytosis of this structure by neighboring cells. PMID:10984429

  9. Essential myosin light chain as a target for caspase-3 in failing myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Alessandra; Weig, Hans-Jörg; Ott, Thomas; Seyfarth, Melchior; Holthoff, Hans-Peter; Grewe, Diana; Gillitzer, Angelika; Bott-Flügel, Lorenz; Schömig, Albert; Ungerer, Martin; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig

    2002-01-01

    Programmed cell death involves the activation of caspase proteases that can mediate the cleavage of vital cytoskeletal proteins. We have recently reported that, in failing cardiac myocytes, caspase-3 activation is associated with a reduction in contractile performance. In this study we used a modified yeast two-hybrid system to screen for caspase-3 interacting proteins of the cardiac cytoskeleton. We identified ventricular essential myosin light chain (vMLC1) as a target for caspase-3. By sequencing and site-directed mutagenesis, a noncanonical cleavage site for caspase-3 was mapped to the C-terminal DFVE135G motif. We demonstrated that vMLC1 cleavage in failing myocardium in vivo is associated with a morphological disruption of the organized vMLC1 staining of sarcomeres, and with a reduction in myocyte contractile performance. Adenoviral gene transfer of the caspase inhibitor p35 in vivo prevented caspase-3 activation and vMLC1 cleavage, with positive impact on contractility. These data suggest that direct cleavage of vMLC1 by activated caspase-3 may contribute to depression of myocyte function by altering cross-bridge interaction between myosin and actin molecules. Therefore, activation of apoptotic pathways in the heart may lead to contractile dysfunction before cell death. PMID:12186978

  10. Analysis of phosphorylation of the myosin-targeting subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase by Phos-tag SDS-PAGE.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Cindy; MacDonald, Justin A; Walsh, Michael P

    2016-04-15

    Phosphorylation of the myosin-targeting subunit 1 of myosin light chain phosphatase (MYPT1) plays an important role in the regulation of smooth muscle contraction, and several sites of phosphorylation by different protein Ser/Thr kinases have been identified. Furthermore, in some instances, phosphorylation at specific sites affects phosphorylation at neighboring sites, with functional consequences. Characterization of the complex phosphorylation of MYPT1 in tissue samples at rest and in response to contractile and relaxant stimuli is, therefore, challenging. We have exploited Phos-tag SDS-PAGE in combination with Western blotting using antibodies to MYPT1, including phosphospecific antibodies, to separate multiple phosphorylated MYPT1 species and quantify MYPT1 phosphorylation stoichiometry using purified, full-length recombinant MYPT1 phosphorylated by Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). This approach confirmed that phosphorylation of MYPT1 by ROCK occurs at Thr(697)and Thr(855), PKA phosphorylates these two sites and the neighboring Ser(696)and Ser(854), and prior phosphorylation at Thr(697)and Thr(855)by ROCK precludes phosphorylation at Ser(696)and Ser(854)by PKA. Furthermore, phosphorylation at Thr(697)and Thr(855)by ROCK exposes two other sites of phosphorylation by PKA. Treatment of Triton-skinned rat caudal arterial smooth muscle strips with the membrane-impermeant phosphatase inhibitor microcystin or treatment of intact tissue with the membrane-permeant phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A induced slow, sustained contractions that correlated with phosphorylation of MYPT1 at 7 to ≥10 sites. Phos-tag SDS-PAGE thus provides a suitable and convenient method for analysis of the complex, multisite MYPT1 phosphorylation events involved in the regulation of myosin light chain phosphatase activity and smooth muscle contraction. PMID:26864694

  11. Myosin light chain phosphorylation during the contraction cycle of frog muscle.

    PubMed

    Bárány, K; Bárány, M; Gillis, J M; Kushmerick, M J

    1980-04-01

    Changes in the [32P]phosphate content of proteins during contraction were investigated with sartorius and semitendinosus muscles dissected from live frogs injected with [32P]orthophosphate. During a single tetanus, the only significant change was the increase in the [32P]phosphate content of the 18,000-dalton light chain of myosin. The extent of light chain phosphorylation was a function of stimulus duration and it amounted maximally to 0.35 mol of [32P]phosphate transferred per mol of light chain. The extent of phosphorylation in stimulated and stretched semitendinosus muscles, which were unable to produce active tension, was nearly identical to that in muscles stimulated at standard rest length, when the time of stimulation was over a half-second. Maximal light chain phosphorylation was also observed in muscles treated with caffein. These results provide evidence for the activation of the light chain kinase in the intact muscle through a process involving Ca2+. The phosphorylation of the light chain associated with tetanic stimulation was reversible. After short tetanuses, dephosphorylation of light chain approximately followed relaxation and after longer tetanuses, dephosphorylation lagged behind relaxation. The role of light chain phosphorylation was investigated in caffeine-treated and untreated muscles by measuring the Ca content of actin and the [32P]phosphate content of light chain. Phosphorylation of light chain protected the actin-bound Ca against removal by EDTA stoichiometrically. It is postulated that the physiological role of light chain phosphorylation is to increase the rate of combination of the cross-bridges with the actin filaments in the contracting phase of the mechanical activity. PMID:7364050

  12. Phosphorylation of Nonmuscle myosin II-A regulatory light chain resists Sendai virus fusion with host cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Provas; Saha, Shekhar; Chandra, Sunandini; Das, Alakesh; Dey, Sumit K.; Das, Mahua R.; Sen, Shamik; Sarkar, Debi P.; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2015-01-01

    Enveloped viruses enter host cells through membrane fusion and the cells in turn alter their shape to accommodate components of the virus. However, the role of nonmuscle myosin II of the actomyosin complex of host cells in membrane fusion is yet to be understood. Herein, we show that both (−) blebbistatin, a specific inhibitor of nonmuscle myosin II (NMII) and small interfering RNA markedly augment fusion of Sendai virus (SeV), with chinese hamster ovary cells and human hepatocarcinoma cells. Inhibition of RLC phosphorylation using inhibitors against ROCK, but not PKC and MRCK, or overexpression of phospho-dead mutant of RLC enhances membrane fusion. SeV infection increases cellular stiffness and myosin light chain phosphorylation at two hour post infection. Taken together, the present investigation strongly indicates that Rho-ROCK-NMII contractility signaling pathway may provide a physical barrier to host cells against viral fusion. PMID:25993465

  13. Helicobacter pylori CagA Disrupts Epithelial Patterning by Activating Myosin Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Muyskens, Jonathan B.; Guillemin, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a leading cause of ulcers and gastric cancer. We show that expression of the H. pylori virulence factor CagA in a model Drosophila melanogaster epithelium induces morphological disruptions including ectopic furrowing. We find that CagA alters the distribution and increases the levels of activated myosin regulatory light chain (MLC), a key regulator of epithelial integrity. Reducing MLC activity suppresses CagA-induced disruptions. A CagA mutant lacking EPIYA motifs (CagAEPISA) induces less epithelial disruption and is not targeted to apical foci like wild-type CagA. In a cell culture model in which CagAEPISA and CagA have equivalent subcellular localization, CagAEPISA is equally potent in activating MLC. Therefore, in our transgenic system, CagA is targeted by EPIYA motifs to a specific apical region of the epithelium where it efficiently activates MLC to disrupt epithelial integrity. PMID:21445303

  14. Role of protein kinase C in the phosphorylation of cardiac myosin light chain 2.

    PubMed Central

    Venema, R C; Raynor, R L; Noland, T A; Kuo, J F

    1993-01-01

    The role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the phosphorylation of myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) in adult rat heart cells has been investigated. PKC-mediated phosphorylation of MLC2 in adult rat cardiac myofibrils in vitro occurs with a stoichiometry (0.7 mol of phosphate/mol of protein) similar to that mediated by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping of MLC2 following phosphorylation by PKC or MLCK in vitro yields the same major phosphopeptides for each protein kinase. These sites are also 32P-labelled in situ when isolated cardiomyocytes are incubated with [32P]P(i). 32P labelling of MLC2 in cardiomyocytes is increased by 5-fold in 10 min upon incubation with the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A, demonstrating the existence of a rapidly turning over component of MLC2 phosphorylation in these cells. 32P label is completely removed from MLC2 when myocytes are exposed to 2,3-butanedione monoxime, an inhibitor of cardiac contraction known to desensitize the myofilaments to activation by Ca2+. 32P labelling of MLC2 is also decreased by 50-100% following exposure to the PKC-selective inhibitors calphostin C and chelerythrine, suggesting that PKC, and not MLCK, is primarily responsible for incorporation of rapidly turning over phosphate into MLC2 in situ. Taken together, these data implicate PKC in the phosphorylation of MLC2 in heart cells and support the hypothesis that phosphorylation of cardiac MLC2 has a role in determining myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8396912

  15. Differential effects of docoosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid on fatty acid composition and myosin heavy chain-related genes of slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Michio; Inoue, Takayuki; Katakura, Masanori; Hossain, Shahdat; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Arai, Hiroyuki; Shido, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) mediates the metabolic and contractile responses of skeletal muscles. MHC displays different isoforms, each of which has different characteristics. To better understand the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids in skeletal muscles, rats were fed with control-, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-, and arachidonic acid (ARA)-oil, and the effects on plasma and muscular fatty acid profile, oxidative stress, mRNA levels of myosin heavy chain isoforms MHC1 of slow-twitch muscle (SO) and MHC2A, MHC2X, and MHCB isoforms of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of fast-twitch muscle were evaluated. Concomitantly, mRNA levels of anti-oxidative enzymes, such as, catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD were determined. The expressions of MHC1, MHC2A, MHC2X, and MHC2B were lower in the SO of the DHA-fed rats. In the EDL muscles of DHA-fed rats, the expressions of MHC1 and MHC2A increased; however, the expressions of MHC2X increased and that of the MHC2 were not altered. Oxidative stress, as indicated by the levels of LPO, was significantly higher in the plasma of the ARA-fed rats, when compared with that of the DHA-fed rats. The LPO levels were higher both in the SO and EDL muscles of ARA-fed rats. Compared with ARA oil intake, DHA oil showed higher mRNA levels of GPx and SOD. Catalase expression was higher only in the EDL but not in the SO-type muscles. Our studies finally indicate that DHA and ARA differentially affect the regulation of contractile and metabolic properties of slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscles. PMID:27021216

  16. Papaverine Prevents Vasospasm by Regulation of Myosin Light Chain Phosphorylation and Actin Polymerization in Human Saphenous Vein

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Kyle M.; Putumbaka, Gowthami; Wise, Eric S.; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce; Brophy, Colleen M.; Komalavilas, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    Objective Papaverine is used to prevent vasospasm in human saphenous veins (HSV) during vein graft preparation prior to implantation as a bypass conduit. Papaverine is a nonspecific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases, leading to increases in both intracellular cGMP and cAMP. We hypothesized that papaverine reduces force by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and myosin light chain phosphorylation, and increasing actin depolymerization via regulation of actin regulatory protein phosphorylation. Approach and Results HSV was equilibrated in a muscle bath, pre-treated with 1 mM papaverine followed by 5 μM norepinephrine, and force along with [Ca2+]i levels were concurrently measured. Filamentous actin (F-actin) level was measured by an in vitro actin assay. Tissue was snap frozen to measure myosin light chain and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation. Pre-treatment with papaverine completely inhibited norepinephrine-induced force generation, blocked increases in [Ca2+]i and led to a decrease in the phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Papaverine pre-treatment also led to increased phosphorylation of the heat shock-related protein 20 (HSPB6) and the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), as well as decreased filamentous actin (F-actin) levels suggesting depolymerization of actin. Conclusions These results suggest that papaverine-induced force inhibition of HSV involves [Ca2+]i-mediated inhibition of myosin light chain phosphorylation and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation-mediated actin depolymerization. Thus, papaverine induces sustained inhibition of contraction of HSV by the modulation of both myosin cross-bridge formation and actin cytoskeletal dynamics and is a pharmacological alternative to high pressure distention to prevent vasospasm. PMID:27136356

  17. Myosin content of individual human muscle fibers isolated by laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Charles A; Stone, William L; Howell, Mary E A; Brannon, Marianne F; Hall, H Kenton; Gibson, Andrew L; Stone, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    Muscle fiber composition correlates with insulin resistance, and exercise training can increase slow-twitch (type I) fibers and, thereby, mitigate diabetes risk. Human skeletal muscle is made up of three distinct fiber types, but muscle contains many more isoforms of myosin heavy and light chains, which are coded by 15 and 11 different genes, respectively. Laser capture microdissection techniques allow assessment of mRNA and protein content in individual fibers. We found that specific human fiber types contain different mixtures of myosin heavy and light chains. Fast-twitch (type IIx) fibers consistently contained myosin heavy chains 1, 2, and 4 and myosin light chain 1. Type I fibers always contained myosin heavy chains 6 and 7 (MYH6 and MYH7) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), whereas MYH6, MYH7, and MYL3 were nearly absent from type IIx fibers. In contrast to cardiomyocytes, where MYH6 (also known as α-myosin heavy chain) is seen solely in fast-twitch cells, only slow-twitch fibers of skeletal muscle contained MYH6. Classical fast myosin heavy chains (MHC1, MHC2, and MHC4) were present in variable proportions in all fiber types, but significant MYH6 and MYH7 expression indicated slow-twitch phenotype, and the absence of these two isoforms determined a fast-twitch phenotype. The mixed myosin heavy and light chain content of type IIa fibers was consistent with its role as a transition between fast and slow phenotypes. These new observations suggest that the presence or absence of MYH6 and MYH7 proteins dictates the slow- or fast-twitch phenotype in skeletal muscle. PMID:26676053

  18. Ragweed sensitization-induced increase of myosin light chain kinase content in canine airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H; Rao, K; Halayko, A J; Liu, X; Stephens, N L

    1992-12-01

    Previous studies have identified changes of mechanical properties of airway smooth muscle (ASM) from a canine model of atopic airway hyperreactivity. These changes, including increased maximum shortening capacity (delta Lmax) and early shortening velocity (Vo), may be responsible for the airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma. We have suggested that these changes may be due to increased actomyosin ATPase activity, controlled via phosphorylation of the 20 kD myosin light chain (MLC20) by MLC kinase (MLCK). Therefore, ATPase activity, MLC20 phosphorylation, and MLCK content and activity were assessed in tracheal and bronchial smooth muscles (TSM and BSM) of ragweed pollen-sensitized dogs (S) and their littermate controls (C). Specific ATPase activities from STSM and SBSM were significantly higher than their control counterparts (CTSM, CBSM). Phosphorylation of MLC20 in STSM was greater both at rest and during electrical stimulation due to the increased amount of MLCK in STSM and SBSM by 30 and 25%, respectively. MLCK activity was also increased significantly in STSM and SBSM (from 46.99 +/- 8.33 and 42.85 +/- 5.92 to 91.9 +/- 6.43 and 64.12 +/- 7.88 32P mmol/mg fresh tissue weight/min respectively [mean +/- SEM]). When normalized to the amount of MLCK in the tissue, however, specific MLCK activity in STSM and SBSM was similar to that in controls. It is unlikely that myosin phosphatase plays any role in the changes of MLC20 phosphorylation in sensitized animals. Peptide mapping showed no visible change in primary structure of MLCK in STSM and SBSM compared with those of controls. We report that ASM actomyosin ATPase activity is increased in STSM and SBSM. The increased ATPase activity is the result of increased MLC20 phosphorylation, the latter likely resulting from the increased MLCK content, which may account for the hyperresponsiveness found in ASM from these animals. PMID:1449804

  19. Lens fiber cell elongation and differentiation is associated with a robust increase in myosin light chain phosphorylation in the developing mouse.

    PubMed

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Skiba, Nikolai; Vasantha Rao, Ponugoti

    2007-10-01

    Myosin II, a molecular motor, plays a critical role in cell migration, cell shape changes, cell adhesion, and cytokinesis. To understand the role of myosin II in lens fiber cell elongation and differentiation, we determined the distribution pattern of nonmuscle myosin IIA, IIB, and phosphorylated regulatory myosin light chain-2 (phospho-MLC) in frozen sections of the developing mouse lens by immunofluorescence analysis. While myosin IIA was distributed uniformly throughout the differentiating lens, including the epithelium and fibers, myosin IIB was localized predominantly to the epithelium and the posterior tips of the lens fibers. In contrast, immunostaining with a di-phospho-MLC antibody localized intensely and precisely to the elongating and differentiating primary and secondary lens fibers, co-localizing with actin filaments. An in situ analysis of Rho GTPase activation revealed that Rho-GTP was distributed uniformly throughout the embryonic lens, including epithelium and fibers. Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity by ML-7 in organ cultured mouse lenses led to development of nuclear lens opacity in association with abnormal fiber cell organization. Taken together, these data reveal a distinct spatial distribution pattern of myosin II isoforms in the developing lens and a robust activation of MLC phosphorylation in the differentiating lens fibers. Moreover, the regulation of MLC phosphorylation by MLCK appears to be critical for crystallin organization and for maintenance of lens transparency and lens membrane function. PMID:17459090

  20. Identification and changes in the pattern of expression of slow-skeletal-muscle-like myosin heavy chains in a developing fast muscle.

    PubMed

    Dhoot, G K

    1988-01-01

    Immunochemical studies of chicken pectoralis major, a fast muscle, have demonstrated large amounts of myosin heavy chains (MHCs) of the slow-skeletal-muscle type during early stages of embryonic development. A large majority of the myotubes present in early embryonic muscle stained for this class of MHC. As development progressed, its synthesis was suppressed in most of the muscle, except in the deeper presumptive red-strip region. The level of this MHC in the embryonic muscle appeared to be reduced by its suppression in a proportion of the existing cells, by the addition of many presumptive fast cells that never expressed this MHC, and by atrophy or degeneration of a small proportion of the slow MHC-positive cells. Further suppression of this MHC in a proportion of the histochemically typed slow cells present in the red-strip region did not occur until quite late in the post-hatch period. PMID:3384226

  1. Changes in the structure of calmodulin induced by a peptide based on the calmodulin-binding domain of myosin light chain kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Heidorn, D.B.; Seeger, P.A.; Rokop, S.E.; Blumenthal, D.K.; Means, A.R.; Crespi, H.; Trewhella, J. )

    1989-08-08

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering data were used to study the solution structure of calmodulin complexed with a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 577-603 of rabbit skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase. The X-ray data indicate that, in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}, the calmodulin-peptide complex has a structure that is considerably more compact than uncomplexed calmodulin. The radius of gyration, R{sub g}, for the complex is approximately 20% smaller than that of uncomplexed Ca{sup 2+}{center dot}calmodulin, and the maximum dimension, d{sub max}, for the complex is also about 20% smaller. The peptide-induced conformational rearrangement of calmodulin is (Ca{sup 2+}) dependent. The length distribution function for the complex is more symmetric than that for uncomplexed Ca{sup 2+}{center dot}calmodulin, indicating that more of the mass is distributed toward the center of mass for the complex, compared with the dumbbell-shaped Ca{sup 2+}{center dot}calmodulin. The solvent contrast dependence of R{sub g} for neutron scattering indicates that the peptide is located more toward the center of the complex, while the calmodulin is located more peripherally, and that the centers of mass of the calmodulin and the peptide are not coincident. The scattering data support the hypothesis that the interconnecting helix region observed in the crystal structure for calmodulin is quite flexible in solution, allowing the two lobes of calmodulin to form close contacts on binding the peptide. This flexibility of the central helix may play a critical role in activating target enzymes such as myosin light chain kinase.

  2. Myosins 1 and 6, myosin light chain kinase, actin and microtubules cooperate during antibody-mediated internalisation and trafficking of membrane-expressed viral antigens in feline infectious peritonitis virus infected monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Monocytes infected with feline infectious peritonitis virus, a coronavirus, express viral proteins in their plasma membranes. Upon binding of antibodies, these proteins are quickly internalised through a new clathrin- and caveolae-independent internalisation pathway. By doing so, the infected monocytes can escape antibody-dependent cell lysis. In the present study, we investigated which kinases and cytoskeletal proteins are of importance during internalisation and subsequent intracellular transport. The experiments showed that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin 1 are crucial for the initiation of the internalisation. With co-localisation stainings, it was found that MLCK and myosin 1 co-localise with antigens even before internalisation started. Myosin 6 co-localised with the internalising complexes during passage through the cortical actin, were it might play a role in moving or disintegrating actin filaments, to overcome the actin barrier. One minute after internalisation started, vesicles had passed the cortical actin, co-localised with microtubules and association with myosin 6 was lost. The vesicles were further transported over the microtubules and accumulated at the microtubule organising centre after 10 to 30 min. Intracellular trafficking over microtubules was mediated by MLCK, myosin 1 and a small actin tail. Since inhibiting MLCK with ML-7 was so efficient in blocking the internalisation pathway, this target can be used for the development of a new treatment for FIPV. PMID:24517254

  3. Constitutive phosphorylation of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain prevents development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chen-Ching; Muthu, Priya; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Liang, Jingsheng; Huang, Wenrui; Irving, Thomas C.; Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M.; Hare, Joshua M.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-dependent phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) of cardiac myosin is known to play a beneficial role in heart disease, but the idea of a phosphorylation-mediated reversal of a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype is novel. Our previous studies on transgenic (Tg) HCM-RLC mice revealed that the D166V (Aspartate166 ?Valine) mutation-induced changes in heart morphology and function coincided with largely reduced RLC phosphorylation in situ. We hypothesized that the introduction of a constitutively phosphorylated Serine15 (S15D) into the hearts of D166V mice would prevent the development of a deleterious HCM phenotype. In support of this notion, MLCK-induced phosphorylation of D166V-mutated hearts was found to rescue some of their abnormal contractile properties. Tg-S15D-D166V mice were generated with the human cardiac RLC-S15D-D166V construct substituted for mouse cardiac RLC and were subjected to functional, structural, and morphological assessments. The results were compared with Tg-WT and Tg-D166V mice expressing the human ventricular RLC-WT or its D166V mutant, respectively. Echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic studies demonstrated significant improvements of intact heart function in S15D-D166V mice compared with D166V, with the systolic and diastolic indices reaching those monitored in WT mice. A largely reduced maximal tension and abnormally high myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity observed in D166V-mutated hearts were reversed in S15D-D166V mice. Low-angle X-ray diffraction study revealed that altered myofilament structures present in HCM-D166V mice were mitigated in S15D-D166V rescue mice. Our collective results suggest that expression of pseudophosphorylated RLC in the hearts of HCM mice is sufficient to prevent the development of the pathological HCM phenotype. PMID:26124132

  4. Ontogenesis of myosin light chain phosphorylation in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Chitano, Pasquale; Worthington, Charles L; Jenkin, Janet A; Stephens, Newman L; Gyapong, Sylvia; Wang, Lu; Murphy, Thomas M

    2005-02-01

    Increased airway responsiveness occurs in normal young individuals compared to adults. A maturation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contractility is likely a mechanism of this juvenile airway hyperresponsiveness. Indeed, we showed in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle (TSM) that maximum shortening velocity decreases dramatically after the first 3 weeks of life. Because the phosphorylation of the 20-kDa myosin light chain (MLC(20)) was shown to be a key event in ASM contractility, in the present work we sought to investigate it during ontogenesis. In three age groups (1-week-old, 3-week-old, and adult guinea pigs), we assessed the amount of MLC(20) phosphorylation achieved either in TSM crude protein homogenates exposed to Mg(2+) . ATP . CaCl(2) or in tracheal strips during electrical field stimulation (EFS). Phosphorylated and unphosphorylated MLC(20) were separated on nondenaturing 10% polyacrylamide gels, and the ratio of phosphorylation was obtained by densitometric analysis of chemiluminescent Western immunoblots. Maximum MLC(20) phosphorylation (% of total MLC(20)) in TSM tissue homogenate was, respectively, 32.6 +/- 5.7, 32.2 +/- 5.7, and 46.8 +/- 5.8 in 1-week, 3-week, and adult guinea pigs. Interestingly, in nonstimulated intact tracheal strips, we found a substantial degree of MLC(20) phosphorylation: respectively, 42.2 +/- 5.8, 36.5 +/- 7.8, and 46.4 +/- 4.7 in 1-week, 3-week, and adult guinea pigs. Maximal EFS-induced MLC(20) phosphorylation (% increase over baseline) in the 3-week age group was attained after 3 sec of EFS, and was 161.2 +/- 17.6, while in 1-week and adult guinea pigs, it was attained at 1.5 sec of EFS and was, respectively, 133.3 +/- 9.3 and 110.2 +/- 3.9 (P < 0.05). We conclude that MLC(20) phosphorylation in guinea pig intact tracheal strips correlates with ontogenetic changes in shortening velocity and changes in myosin light chain kinase content. These results further suggest that the maturation of ASM contractile properties plays a role in the greater airway responsiveness reported in children and young animals. PMID:15573396

  5. Cytokinesis is not controlled by calmodulin or myosin light chain kinase in the Caenorhabditis elegans early embryo

    PubMed Central

    Batchelder, Ellen L.; Thomas–Virnig, Christina L.; Hardin, Jeffery D.; White, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Furrow ingression in animal cell cytokinesis is controlled by phosphorylation of myosin II regulatory light chain (mRLC). In C. elegans embryos, Rho-dependent Kinase (RhoK) is involved in, but not absolutely required for, this phosphorylation. The calmodulin effector Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) can also phosphorylate mRLC and is widely regarded as a candidate for redundant function with RhoK. However, our results show that RNAi against C. elegans calmodulin and candidate MLCKs had no effect on cytokinesis in wild type or RhoK mutant embryos, ruling out the calmodulin/MLCK pathway as the missing regulator of cytokinesis in the C. elegans early embryo. PMID:17716666

  6. Myosin light chain phosphorylation in sup 32 P-labeled rabbit aorta stimulated by phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate and phenylephrine

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, H.A.; Oren, J.W.; Benscoter, H.A. )

    1989-12-15

    The mechanism(s) of force development in vascular smooth muscle following pharmacological activation of protein kinase C by phorbol esters are not known. In this study, we examined the myosin light chain phosphorylation response following stimulation by phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDB) or phenylephrine in rabbit aorta which had been incubated with 32PO4 in order to label ATP pools. Through tryptic phosphopeptide mapping of myosin light chain from intact tissue and comparison to controls using purified components, we inferred that Ca2+-dependent force stimulated by PDB was associated with small increases in serine-19 phosphorylation, consistent with a contractile mechanism involving indirect activation of myosin light chain kinase. Additional residues, consistent with the in vitro substrate specificity of protein kinase C, were also observed to be phosphorylated in response to PDB and represented proportionately a larger fraction of the total phosphorylated myosin light chain in Ca2+-depleted tissues. Stimulation by an alpha 1-adrenergic agonist (phenylephrine) resulted in phosphorylation of residues which were consistent with an activation mechanism involving myosin light chain kinase only. These results indicate that in rabbit aorta the contractile effects of PDB may be partially mediated by Ca2+-dependent activation of myosin light chain kinase. However, the data do not rule out a component of the PDB-stimulated contractile response which is independent of myosin light chain phosphorylation on the serine-19 residue. In addition, activation by a more physiological stimulus, phenylephrine, does not result in protein kinase C-mediated myosin light chain phosphorylation.

  7. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain from adrenomedullary chromaffin cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, L M; Hidalgo, M J; Palmero, M; Ballesta, J J; Reig, J A; Garcia, A G; Viniegra, S

    1989-01-01

    The myosin-light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation accompanying catecholamine release in chromaffin cells was investigated with the objective of assessing the possible role of this contractile protein in catecholamine secretion. The electrophoretic characteristics of adrenomedullary MLC were determined by immunochemical techniques using two different specific antibodies. The identified 22 kDa phosphoprotein was mainly present in the cytosol, as demonstrated by ultracentrifugation and immunocytochemical analysis. A part of this protein was located on, or close to, the plasma membrane. Cell stimulation by secretagogues resulted in a Ca2(+)-dependent 32P incorporation into MLC, the time course of this process being related to catecholamine release. These findings were supported by a two-dimensional gel-electrophoretic analysis by which means this protein was resolved into two acidic forms. A role for Ca2(+)-calmodulin and Ca2(+)-phospholipid kinases in adrenomedullary MLC phosphorylation is reported. The results obtained suggest a regulatory role for such a protein in the underlying exocytotic event. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:2481449

  8. Purification, Characterization, and Analysis of the Allergenic Properties of Myosin Light Chain in Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Xia; Chen, Heng-Li; Maleki, Soheila J; Cao, Min-Jie; Zhang, Ling-Jing; Su, Wen-Jin; Liu, Guang-Ming

    2015-07-15

    Myosin light chain (MLC) plays a vital role in cell and muscle functions and has been identified as an allergen in shrimp. In this study, MLC with a molecular mass of 18 kDa was purified from crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) muscle. Its physicochemical characterization showed that the purified MLC is a glycoprotein with 4.3% carbohydrate, highly stable to heat, acid-alkali, and digestion, and weakly retains IgE-binding activity when its secondary structure was altered. Serological assays suggested that conformational epitopes predominate over linear epitopes in the purified MLC. Two isoforms of the MLC gene (MLC1 and MLC2) were cloned, and the purified MLC was identified as MLC1. Analysis of the secondary and tertiary structures of the MLCs indicated that MLC1 has four conformational epitopes and three linear epitopes, whereas MLC2 had a major conformational epitope and three linear epitopes. These results are significant for understanding hypersensitization of humans to crayfish. PMID:26083097

  9. Olanzapine May Inhibit Colonic Motility Associated with the 5-HT Receptor and Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiarui; Qiao, Ying; Le, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study whether the effects of olanzapine on gastrointestinal motility is related to the serotonin antagonism and myosin light chain kinase. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. Olanzapine gavage was performed for each treatment group during the course of 30 continuous days, while the same volume of saline was given to the rats in the control group. Defecation of the rats was observed on days 7 and 30 after olanzapine gavage. The effects of olanzapine on contraction of colonic smooth muscles were observed in ex vivo experiments. A Western blot was used to evaluate expression levels of the serotonin transporter (SERT) and MLCK in colon segments of the rats. Results ResultsaaCompared to the control group, 5-160 µ M of olanzapine could inhibit dose-dependently the contraction of colonic smooth muscle ex vivo experiments. The maximum smooth muscle contraction effects of 5-HT and acetylcholine significantly decreased after treatment with 40-160 µ M of olanzapine. Constipation was found in the olanzapine-treated rats on day 7 and have sustained day 30 after gavage. Expression of MLCK in olanzapine-treated rats was significantly decreased, whereas the expression of SERT significantly increased on the day 7, then significantly decreased on the day 30 after olanzapine gavage. Conclusion SERT and MLCK may involve in the inhibition of colonic contraction induced by olanzapine. PMID:27081386

  10. [Innervation, activity rhythm and accumulation of myosin light chains in a fast muscle of chickens].

    PubMed

    Gardahaut, M F; Khaskiye, A; Rouaud, T; Renaud, D; Le Douarin, G

    1988-01-01

    The fast posterior latissimus dorsi muscle (PLD) of the chick ceases to accumulate slow myosin light chains (MLC) during neonatal development. On day 18 of embryonic life slow MLC represented only 2% of total MLC, and LC3F was first detected. In chick embryo, spinal cord stimulation at a slow rhythm modifies PLD differentiation toward the slow type: LC3F did not accumulate and slow MLC increased. In contrast, stimulation at a fast rhythm accelerated LC3F accumulation. PLD denervation on day 2 after hatching inhibited the synthesis of LC3F. Direct stimulation at a fast rhythm led to post-hatching development into normal fast type while a slow rhythm influenced the development of denervated PLD towards the slow type. In innervated PLD, the effect of stimulation at a slow rhythm was less important than in denervated PLD. These results suggest that the rhythm of the neural and/or contractile activity plays an important role in the MLC expression during embryonic and post-natal development of the chicken fast muscle. PMID:3187186

  11. Effects of a Fluorescent Myosin Light Chain Phosphatase Inhibitor on Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grindrod, Scott; Suy, Simeng; Fallen, Shannon; Eto, Masumi; Toretsky, Jeffrey; Brown, Milton L.

    2011-01-01

    Myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) is an enzyme important to regulation of cell cycle and motility that is shown to be upregulated in aggressive prostate cancer cells and tissue. We developed a fluorescent small molecule inhibitor of MLCP using structure based design in recombinant protein phosphatase 1C. Several best fit compounds were synthesized and evaluated by their inhibition of MLCP/32P-MLC dephosphorylation, which resulted in the identification of novel MLCP inhibitors. Androgen dependent (AD) and castration resistant prostate cancer cell (CRPC) lines were treated with the lead inhibitor resulting in decreased growth rate, reduced DNA synthesis, and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Moreover, CRPC cell lines showed an increased sensitivity to drug treatment having GI50 values four times lower than the AD prostate cancer cell line. This was reinforced by reduced BrdU DNA incorporation into CRPC cells compared to AD cells. β-actin disruption was also seen at much lower drug concentrations in CR cells which caused a dose dependent reduction in cellular chemotaxis of PC-3 cells. Since there are currently few clinical therapeutics targeting CR prostate cancer, MLCP represents a new target for preclinical and clinical development of new potential therapeutics which inhibit this disease phenotype. PMID:22655237

  12. G protein-mediated inhibition of myosin light-chain phosphatase in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, T; Masuo, M; Somlyo, A P

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of G protein-mediated sensitization of the contractile apparatus of smooth muscle to Ca2+ was studied in receptor-coupled alpha-toxin-permeabilized rabbit portal vein smooth muscle. To test the hypothesis that Ca2+ sensitization is due to inhibition of myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphatase activity, we measured the effect of guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate and phenylephrine on the rate of MLC dephosphorylation in muscles preactivated with Ca2+ and incubated in Ca(2+)- and ATP-free solution containing 1-(5-chloronaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexahydro-1,4-diazepine (ML-9) to block MLC kinase activity. Guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate alone (300 microM) or in combination (3 microM) with phenylephrine decreased the rates of relaxation and dephosphorylation of MLC to about half of control values; this inhibition is sufficient to account for maximal G protein-mediated Ca2+ sensitization of MLC phosphorylation. The rate of thiophosphorylation of MLC with adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]-triphosphate was not affected by guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate. We suggest that inhibition of protein phosphatase(s) by G protein(s) may have important regulatory functions. PMID:1656467

  13. Hold on tightly, let go lightly: myosin functions at adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Sandquist, Joshua C.; Bement, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Adherens junctions, the sites of cadherin-dependent cell–cell adhesion, are also important for dynamic tension sensing, force transduction and signalling. Different myosin motors contribute to adherens junction assembly and versatility in distinct ways. PMID:20596044

  14. Drosophila PATJ supports adherens junction stability by modulating Myosin light chain activity

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Arnab; Nagy-Zsvér-Vadas, Zsanett

    2012-01-01

    The assembly and consolidation of the adherens junctions (AJs) are key events in the establishment of an intact epithelium. However, AJs are further modified to obtain flexibility for cell migration and morphogenetic movements. Intact AJs in turn are a prerequisite for the establishment and maintenance of apical–basal polarity in epithelial cells. In this study, we report that the conserved PDZ (PSD95, Discs large, ZO-1) domain–containing protein PATJ (Pals1-associated tight junction protein) was not per se crucial for the maintenance of apical–basal polarity in Drosophila melanogaster epithelial cells but rather regulated Myosin localization and phosphorylation. PATJ directly bound to the Myosin-binding subunit of Myosin phosphatase and decreased Myosin dephosphorylation, resulting in activated Myosin. Thereby, PATJ supports the stability of the Zonula Adherens. Notably, weakening of AJ in a PATJ mutant epithelium led first to a loss of Myosin from the AJ, subsequently to a disassembly of the AJ, and finally, to a loss of apical–basal polarity and disruption of the tissue. PMID:23128243

  15. Loss of myostatin expression alters fiber-type distribution and expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in slow- and fast-type skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Girgenrath, Stefan; Song, Kening; Whittemore, Lisa-Anne

    2005-01-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta family that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Mstn knockout mice have greater skeletal muscle mass than wild-type littermates. We investigated the effect of Mstn on fiber type by comparing adult muscles from the murine Mstn knockout with wild-type controls. Based on myofibrillar ATPase staining, the soleus of Mstn knockout mice displays a larger proportion of fast type II fibers and a reduced proportion of slow type I fibers compared with wild-type animals. Based on staining for succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity, a larger proportion of glycolytic fibers and a reduced proportion of oxidative fibers occur in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of Mstn knockouts. These differences in distribution of fiber types are accompanied by differences in the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. In both Mstn knockout soleus and EDL, larger numbers of faster MHC isoforms are expressed at the expense of slower isoforms when compared with wild-type littermates. Thus, the absence of Mstn in the knockout mouse leads to an overall faster and more glycolytic muscle phenotype. This muscle phenotype is likely a consequence of developmental processes, and inhibition of Mstn in adults does not cause a transformation to a more fast and glycolytic phenotype. Our findings suggest that myostatin has a critical role in regulating the formation, proliferation, or differentiation of fetal myoblasts and postnatal fibers. PMID:15468312

  16. Myosin Binding Protein-C Slow Phosphorylation is Altered in Duchenne Dystrophy and Arthrogryposis Myopathy in Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Maegen A.; Ward, Christopher W.; Gurnett, Christina; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2015-01-01

    Myosin Binding Protein-C slow (sMyBP-C), encoded by MYBPC1, comprises a family of regulatory proteins of skeletal muscles that are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. MYBPC1 missense mutations are linked to the development of Distal Arthrogryposis-1 (DA-1). Although structure-function details for this myopathy are evolving, function is undoubtedly driven by sequence variations and post-translational modifications in sMyBP-C. Herein, we examined the phosphorylation profile of sMyBP-C in mouse and human fast-twitch skeletal muscles. We used Flexor Digitorum Brevis (FDB) isolated from young (~2-months old) and old (~14-months old) wild type and mdx mice, and human Abductor Hallucis (AH) and gastrocnemious muscles carrying the DA-1 mutations. Our results indicate both constitutive and differential phosphorylation of sMyBP-C in aged and diseased muscles. We report a 735% reduction in the phosphorylation levels of select sites in old wild type and young or old mdx FDB mouse muscles, compared to young wild type tissue. Similarly, we observe a 3070% decrease in the phosphorylation levels of all PKA and PKC phospho-sites in the DA-1 AH, but not gastrocnemius, muscle. Overall, our studies show that the phosphorylation pattern of sMyBP-C is differentially regulated in response to age and disease, suggesting that phosphorylation plays important roles in these processes. PMID:26287277

  17. Commensal bacterial endocytosis in epithelial cells is dependent on myosin light chain kinase-activated brush border fanning by interferon-?.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Ling; Peng, Wei-Hao; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Huang, Ching-Ying; Ni, Yen-Hsuan; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Turner, Jerrold R; Yu, Linda C H

    2014-08-01

    Abnormal bacterial adherence and internalization in enterocytes have been documented in Crohn disease, celiac disease, surgical stress, and intestinal obstruction and are associated with low-level interferon (IFN)-? production. How commensals gain access to epithelial soma through densely packed microvilli rooted on the terminal web (TW) remains unclear. We investigated molecular and ultrastructural mechanisms of bacterial endocytosis, focusing on regulatory roles of IFN-? and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in TW myosin phosphorylation and brush border fanning. Mouse intestines were sham operated on or obstructed for 6 hours by loop ligation with intraluminally administered ML-7 (a MLCK inhibitor) or Y27632 (a Rho-associated kinase inhibitor). After intestinal obstruction, epithelial endocytosis and extraintestinal translocation of bacteria were observed in the absence of tight junctional damage. Enhanced TW myosin light chain phosphorylation, arc formation, and brush border fanning coincided with intermicrovillous bacterial penetration, which were inhibited by ML-7 and neutralizing anti-IFN-? but not Y27632. The phenomena were not seen in mice genetically deficient for long MLCK-210 or IFN-?. Stimulation of human Caco-2BBe cells with IFN-? caused MLCK-dependent TW arc formation and brush border fanning, which preceded caveolin-mediated bacterial internalization through cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. In conclusion, epithelial MLCK-activated brush border fanning by IFN-? promotes adherence and internalization of normally noninvasive enteric bacteria. Transcytotic commensal penetration may contribute to initiation or relapse of chronic inflammation. PMID:24911373

  18. Preferential skeletal muscle myosin loss in response to mechanical silencing in a novel rat intensive care unit model: underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ochala, Julien; Gustafson, Ann-Marie; Diez, Monica Llano; Renaud, Guillaume; Li, Meishan; Aare, Sudhakar; Qaisar, Rizwan; Banduseela, Varuna C; Hedström, Yvette; Tang, Xiaorui; Dworkin, Barry; Ford, G Charles; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Perera, Sue; Gautel, Mathias; Larsson, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The muscle wasting and impaired muscle function in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients delay recovery from the primary disease, and have debilitating consequences that can persist for years after hospital discharge. It is likely that, in addition to pernicious effects of the primary disease, the basic life support procedures of long-term ICU treatment contribute directly to the progressive impairment of muscle function. This study aims at improving our understanding of the mechanisms underlying muscle wasting in ICU patients by using a unique experimental rat ICU model where animals are mechanically ventilated, sedated and pharmacologically paralysed for duration varying between 6 h and 14 days. Results show that the ICU intervention induces a phenotype resembling the severe muscle wasting and paralysis associated with the acute quadriplegic myopathy (AQM) observed in ICU patients, i.e. a preferential loss of myosin, transcriptional down-regulation of myosin synthesis, muscle atrophy and a dramatic decrease in muscle fibre force generation capacity. Detailed analyses of protein degradation pathways show that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway is highly involved in this process. A sequential change in localisation of muscle-specific RING finger proteins 1/2 (MuRF1/2) observed during the experimental period is suggested to play an instrumental role in both transcriptional regulation and protein degradation. We propose that, for those critically ill patients who develop AQM, complete mechanical silencing, due to pharmacological paralysis or sedation, is a critical factor underlying the preferential loss of the molecular motor protein myosin that leads to impaired muscle function or persisting paralysis. PMID:21320889

  19. Expression of the Myosin Heavy Chain IIB Gene in Porcine Skeletal Muscle: The Role of the CArG-Box Promoter Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David M.; Brameld, John M.; Parr, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Due to its similarity to humans, the pig is increasingly being considered as a good animal model for studying a range of human diseases. Despite their physiological similarities, differential expression of the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) IIB gene (MYH4) exists in the skeletal muscles of these species, which is associated with a different muscle phenotype. The expression of different MyHC isoforms is a critical determinant of the contractile and metabolic characteristics of the muscle fibre. We aimed to elucidate whether a genomic mechanism was responsible for the drastically different expression of MYH4 between pigs and humans, thus improving our understanding of the pig as a model for human skeletal muscle research. We utilized approximately 1 kb of the MYH4 promoter from a domestic pig and a human (which do and do not express MYH4, respectively) to elucidate the role of the promoter sequence in regulating the high expression of MYH4 in porcine skeletal muscle. We identified a 3 bp genomic difference within the proximal CArG and E-box region of the MYH4 promoter of pigs and humans that dictates the differential activity of these promoters during myogenesis. Subtle species-specific genomic differences within the CArG-box region caused differential protein-DNA interactions at this site and is likely accountable for the differential MYH4 promoter activity between pigs and humans. We propose that the genomic differences identified herein explain the differential activity of the MYH4 promoter of pigs and humans, which may contribute to the differential expression patterns displayed in these otherwise physiologically similar mammals. Further, we report that both the pig and human MYH4 promoters can be induced by MyoD over-expression, but the capacity to activate the MYH4 promoter is largely influenced by the 3 bp difference located within the CArG-box region of the proximal MYH4 promoter. PMID:25469802

  20. New Isoform of Cardiac Myosin Light Chain Kinase and the Role of Cardiac Myosin Phosphorylation in α1-Adrenoceptor Mediated Inotropic Response

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Masaya; Okamoto, Ryuji; Ito, Masaaki; Goto, Itaru; Fujita, Satoshi; Konishi, Katsuhisa; Mizutani, Hideo; Dohi, Kaoru; Hartshorne, David J.; Itoh, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Cardiac myosin light chain kinase (cMLCK) plays an obligatory role in maintaining the phosphorylation levels of regulatory myosin light chain (MLC2), which is thought to be crucial for regulation of cardiac function. To test this hypothesis, the role played by ventricular MLC2 (MLC2v) phosphorylation was investigated in the phenylephrine-induced increase in twitch tension using the naturally-occurring mouse strain, C57BL/6N, in which cMLCK is down regulated. Methods and Results By Western blot and nanoLC-MS/MS analysis, cMLCKs with molecular mass of 61-kDa (cMLCK-2) and/or 86-kDa were identified in mice heart. Among various mouse strains, C57BL/6N expressed cMLCK-2 alone and the closest relative strain C57BL/6J expressed both cMLCKs. The levels of MLC2v phosphorylation was significantly lower in C57BL/6N than in C57BL/6J. The papillary muscle twitch tension induced by electrical field stimulation was smaller in C57BL/6N than C57BL/6J. Phenylephrine had no effect on MLC2v phosphorylation in either strains but increased the twitch tension more potently in C57BL/6J than in C57BL/6N. Calyculin A increased papillary muscle MLC2v phosphorylation to a similar extent in both strains but increased the phenylephrine-induced inotropic response only in C57BL/6N. There was a significant positive correlation between the phenylephrine-induced inotropic response and the levels of MLC2v phosphorylation within ranges of 15–30%. Conclusions We identified a new isoform of cMLCK with a molecular mass of 61kDa(cMLCK-2) in mouse heart. In the C57BL/6N strain, only cMLCK-2 was expressed and the basal MLC2v phosphorylation levels and the phenylephrine-induced inotropic response were both smaller. We suggest that a lower phenylephrine-induced inotropic response may be caused by the lower basal MLC2v phosphorylation levels in this strain. PMID:26512720

  1. In Vitro Rescue Study of a Malignant Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Phenotype by Pseudo-Phosphorylation of Myosin Regulatory Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Muthu, Priya; Liang, Jingsheng; Schmidt, William; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Pseudo-phosphorylation of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) has never been examined as a rescue method to alleviate a cardiomyopathy phenotype brought about by a disease causing mutation in the myosin RLC. This study focuses on the aspartic acid to valine substitution (D166V) in the myosin RLC shown to be associated with a malignant phenotype of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). The mutation has also been demonstrated to cause severe functional abnormalities in transgenic mice expressing D166V in the heart. To explore this novel rescue strategy, pseudo-phosphorylation of D166V was used to determine whether the D166V-induced detrimental phenotype could be brought back to the level of wild-type (WT) RLC. The S15D substitution at the phosphorylation site of RLC was inserted into the recombinant WT and D166V mutant to mimic constitutively phosphorylated RLC proteins. Non-phosphorylatable (S15A) constructs were used as controls. A multi-faceted approach was taken to determine the effect of pseudo-phosphorylation on the ability of myosin to generate force and motion. Using mutant reconstituted porcine cardiac muscle preparations, we showed an S15D-induced rescue of both the enzymatic and binding properties of D166V-myosin to actin. A significant increase in force production capacity was noted in the in vitro motility assays for S15D-D166V vs. D166V reconstituted myosin. A similar pseudo-phosphorylation induced effect was observed on the D166V-elicited abnormal Ca2+ sensitivity of force in porcine papillary muscle strips reconstituted with phosphomimic recombinant RLCs. Results from this study demonstrate a novel in vitro rescue strategy that could be utilized in vivo to ameliorate a malignant cardiomyopathic phenotype. We show for the first time that pseudo-RLC phosphorylation can reverse the majority of the mutation-induced phenotypes highlighting the importance of RLC phosphorylation in combating cardiac disease. PMID:24374283

  2. The Plasmodium Class XIV Myosin, MyoB, Has a Distinct Subcellular Location in Invasive and Motile Stages of the Malaria Parasite and an Unusual Light Chain*

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Noor A.; Green, Judith L.; Wall, Richard J.; Knuepfer, Ellen; Moon, Robert W.; Schulte-Huxel, Christina; Stanway, Rebecca R.; Martin, Stephen R.; Howell, Steven A.; Douse, Christopher H.; Cota, Ernesto; Tate, Edward W.; Tewari, Rita; Holder, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    Myosin B (MyoB) is one of the two short class XIV myosins encoded in the Plasmodium genome. Class XIV myosins are characterized by a catalytic head, a modified neck, and the absence of a tail region. Myosin A (MyoA), the other class XIV myosin in Plasmodium, has been established as a component of the glideosome complex important in motility and cell invasion, but MyoB is not well characterized. We analyzed the properties of MyoB using three parasite species as follows: Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium berghei, and Plasmodium knowlesi. MyoB is expressed in all invasive stages (merozoites, ookinetes, and sporozoites) of the life cycle, and the protein is found in a discrete apical location in these polarized cells. In P. falciparum, MyoB is synthesized very late in schizogony/merogony, and its location in merozoites is distinct from, and anterior to, that of a range of known proteins present in the rhoptries, rhoptry neck or micronemes. Unlike MyoA, MyoB is not associated with glideosome complex proteins, including the MyoA light chain, myosin A tail domain-interacting protein (MTIP). A unique MyoB light chain (MLC-B) was identified that contains a calmodulin-like domain at the C terminus and an extended N-terminal region. MLC-B localizes to the same extreme apical pole in the cell as MyoB, and the two proteins form a complex. We propose that MLC-B is a MyoB-specific light chain, and for the short class XIV myosins that lack a tail region, the atypical myosin light chains may fulfill that role. PMID:25802338

  3. The Plasmodium Class XIV Myosin, MyoB, Has a Distinct Subcellular Location in Invasive and Motile Stages of the Malaria Parasite and an Unusual Light Chain.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Noor A; Green, Judith L; Wall, Richard J; Knuepfer, Ellen; Moon, Robert W; Schulte-Huxel, Christina; Stanway, Rebecca R; Martin, Stephen R; Howell, Steven A; Douse, Christopher H; Cota, Ernesto; Tate, Edward W; Tewari, Rita; Holder, Anthony A

    2015-05-01

    Myosin B (MyoB) is one of the two short class XIV myosins encoded in the Plasmodium genome. Class XIV myosins are characterized by a catalytic "head," a modified "neck," and the absence of a "tail" region. Myosin A (MyoA), the other class XIV myosin in Plasmodium, has been established as a component of the glideosome complex important in motility and cell invasion, but MyoB is not well characterized. We analyzed the properties of MyoB using three parasite species as follows: Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium berghei, and Plasmodium knowlesi. MyoB is expressed in all invasive stages (merozoites, ookinetes, and sporozoites) of the life cycle, and the protein is found in a discrete apical location in these polarized cells. In P. falciparum, MyoB is synthesized very late in schizogony/merogony, and its location in merozoites is distinct from, and anterior to, that of a range of known proteins present in the rhoptries, rhoptry neck or micronemes. Unlike MyoA, MyoB is not associated with glideosome complex proteins, including the MyoA light chain, myosin A tail domain-interacting protein (MTIP). A unique MyoB light chain (MLC-B) was identified that contains a calmodulin-like domain at the C terminus and an extended N-terminal region. MLC-B localizes to the same extreme apical pole in the cell as MyoB, and the two proteins form a complex. We propose that MLC-B is a MyoB-specific light chain, and for the short class XIV myosins that lack a tail region, the atypical myosin light chains may fulfill that role. PMID:25802338

  4. Vascular O-GlcNAcylation augments reactivity to constrictor stimuli by prolonging phosphorylated levels of the myosin light chain

    PubMed Central

    Lima, V.V.; Lobato, N.S.; Filgueira, F.P.; Webb, R.C.; Tostes, R.C.; Giachini, F.R.

    2014-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a modification that alters the function of numerous proteins. We hypothesized that augmented O-GlcNAcylation levels enhance myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and reduce myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity, leading to increased vascular contractile responsiveness. The vascular responses were measured by isometric force displacement. Thoracic aorta and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from rats were incubated with vehicle or with PugNAc, which increases O-GlcNAcylation. In addition, we determined whether proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation. PugNAc enhanced phenylephrine (PE) responses in rat aortas (maximal effect, 14.2±2 vs 7.9±1 mN for vehicle, n=7). Treatment with an MLCP inhibitor (calyculin A) augmented vascular responses to PE (13.4±2 mN) and abolished the differences in PE-response between the groups. The effect of PugNAc was not observed when vessels were preincubated with ML-9, an MLCK inhibitor (7.3±2 vs 7.5±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). Furthermore, our data showed that differences in the PE-induced contractile response between the groups were abolished by the activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AICAR; 6.1±2 vs 7.4±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). PugNAc increased phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT-1) and protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitor protein of 17 kDa (CPI-17), which are involved in RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated inhibition of myosin phosphatase activity. PugNAc incubation produced a time-dependent increase in vascular phosphorylation of myosin light chain and decreased phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase, which decreased the affinity of MLCK for Ca2+/calmodulin. Our data suggest that proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation, favoring vascular contraction. PMID:25140811

  5. Myosin light chain kinase controls voltage-dependent calcium channels in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Martinsen, A; Schakman, O; Yerna, X; Dessy, C; Morel, N

    2014-07-01

    The Ca(2+)-dependent kinase myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is the activator of smooth muscle contraction. In addition, it has been reported to be involved in Ca(2+) channel regulation in cultured cells, and we previously showed that the MLCK inhibitor ML-7 decreases arginine vasopressin (AVP)-induced Ca(2+) influx in rat aorta. This study was designed to investigate whether MLCK is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in resistance artery smooth muscle cell, which plays a major role in the control of blood pressure. As ML compounds were shown to have off-target effects, MLCK was downregulated by transfection with a small interfering RNA targeting MLCK (MLCK-siRNA) in rat small resistance mesenteric artery (RMA) and in the rat embryonic aortic cell line A7r5. Noradrenaline-induced contraction and Ca(2+) signal were significantly depressed in MLCK-siRNA compared to scramble-siRNA-transfected RMA. Contraction and Ca(2+) signal induced by high KCl and voltage-activated Ca(2+) current were also significantly decreased in MLCK-siRNA-transfected RMA, suggesting that MLCK depletion modifies voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. KCl- and AVP-induced Ca(2+) signals and voltage-activated Ca(2+) current were decreased in MLCK-depleted A7r5 cells. Eventually, real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that in A7r5, MLCK controlled mRNA expression of CaV1.2 (L-type) and CaV3.1 (T-type) voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Our results suggest that MLCK controls the transcription of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:24162233

  6. Structural and functional aspects of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    SciTech Connect

    Muthu, Priya; Wang, Li; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Huang, Wenrui; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kawai, Masataka; Irving, Thomas C.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2012-04-02

    The myosin essential light chain (ELC) is a structural component of the actomyosin cross-bridge, but its function is poorly understood, especially the role of the cardiac specific N-terminal extension in modulating actomyosin interaction. Here, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the A57G (alanine to glycine) mutation in the cardiac ELC known to cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). The function of the ELC N-terminal extension was investigated with the Tg-{Delta}43 mouse model, whose myocardium expresses a truncated ELC. Low-angle X-ray diffraction studies on papillary muscle fibers in rigor revealed a decreased interfilament spacing ({approx} 1.5 nm) and no alterations in cross-bridge mass distribution in Tg-A57G mice compared to Tg-WT, expressing the full-length nonmutated ELC. The truncation mutation showed a 1.3-fold increase in I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, indicating a shift of cross-bridge mass from the thick filament backbone toward the thin filaments. Mechanical studies demonstrated increased stiffness in Tg-A57G muscle fibers compared to Tg-WT or Tg-{Delta}43. The equilibrium constant for the cross-bridge force generation step was smallest in Tg-{Delta}43. These results support an important role for the N-terminal ELC extension in prepositioning the cross-bridge for optimal force production. Subtle changes in the ELC sequence were sufficient to alter cross-bridge properties and lead to pathological phenotypes.

  7. Myosin light chain phosphorylation in contraction of gastric antral smooth muscle from neonate and adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, J A; Paul, D A; Ryan, J P

    1996-01-01

    The decreased contractility of gastric antral smooth muscle in the neonate has been attributed to reduced levels of activator calcium. It is generally accepted that calcium-dependent myosin light chain phosphorylation (MLCP) is the key step in the initiation of force development in smooth muscle. In this study, we investigated the relationship between MLCP and force development in gastric antral smooth muscle from neonatal (4-6 d old) and adult rabbits. We tested the hypothesis that the reduced force development of circular smooth muscle from the neonate would be accompanied by decreased levels of MLCP, as compared with data from adult animals. Full thickness muscle strips oriented parallel to the circular muscle layer were examined for their contractile response to acetylcholine (ACh) (10(-8) M to 10(-3) M) or 10(-4) M ACh only. In the latter study, tissues were rapidly frozen in a dry ice-acetone slurry for subsequent MLCP determination. MLCP was determined at times corresponding to 5, 10, 15, 30, and 60 s of stimulation. For each age group, maximal active force developed at an ACh concentration of 10(-4) M and was significantly greater in tissues from adults (1.86 +/- 0.24 N/m2, adult; 0.95 +/- 0.05 N/m2, neonate; p < 0.05). In contrast, no significant differences were observed with respect to basal or agonist-stimulated levels of MLCP. The data suggest that factors other than levels of MLCP contribute to the reduced force-generating capacity of antral smooth muscle from the neonate. PMID:8825402

  8. Expression of calmodulin and myosin light chain kinase during larval settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhang-Fan; Wang, Hao; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM) and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus ( = Amphibalanus) amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM), encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite. PMID:22348072

  9. Constraints on intron evolution in the gene encoding the myosin alkali light chain in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Leicht, B.G.; Muse, S.V.; Hanczyc, M.

    1995-01-01

    Interspecific comparisons of intron sequences reveal conserved blocks of invariant nucleotides and several other departures from the strictly neutral model of molecular evolution. To distinguish the past action of evolutionary forces in introns known to have regulatory information, we examined nucleotide sequence variation at 991 sites in a random sample of 16 Drosophila melanogaster alleles of the gene encoding the myosin alkali light chain (Mlc1). The Mlc1 gene of D. melanogaster encodes two Mlc1 isoforms via developmentally regulated alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Analyses of these data reveal that introns 4 and 5, which flank the alternatively spliced exon 5, have reduced levels of both intraspecific polymorphism and interspecific divergence relative to intron 3. No polymorphism was observed in any of the exons examined in D. melanogaster. A genealogical analysis clearly demonstrates the occurrence of intragenic recombination in the ancestral history of Mlc1. Recombination events are estimated to be 13 times more likely than mutation events over the span of the sequenced region. Although there is little evidence for pairwise linkage disequilibrium in the Mlc1 region, higher order disequilibrium. does seem to be present in the 5{prime} half of the portion of the gene that was examined. Predictions of the folding free energy of the pre-mRNA reveal that sampled alleles have a significantly higher (less stable) free energy than do randomly permuted sequences. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that introns surrounding an alternatively spliced exon are subjected to additional constraints, perhaps due to specific aspects of secondary structure required for appropriate splicing of the pre-mRNA molecule. 48 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Expression of Calmodulin and Myosin Light Chain Kinase during Larval Settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhang-Fan; Wang, Hao; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM) and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus ( = Amphibalanus) amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM), encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca2+/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite. PMID:22348072

  11. Tarantula myosin free head regulatory light chain phosphorylation stiffens N-terminal extension, releasing it and blocking its docking back.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D; Lehman, William; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of smooth and striated muscle myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) showed that diphosphorylation induces a disorder-to-order transition. Our goal here was to further explore the effects of mono- and diphosphorylation on the straightening and rigidification of the tarantula myosin RLC NTE. For that we used MD simulations followed by persistence length analysis to explore the consequences of secondary and tertiary structure changes occurring on RLC NTE following phosphorylation. Static and dynamic persistence length analysis of tarantula RLC NTE peptides suggest that diphosphorylation produces an important 24-fold straightening and a 16-fold rigidification of the RLC NTE, while monophosphorylation has a less profound effect. This new information on myosin structural mechanics, not fully revealed by previous EM and MD studies, add support to a cooperative phosphorylation-dependent activation mechanism as proposed for the tarantula thick filament. Our results suggest that the RLC NTE straightening and rigidification after Ser45 phosphorylation leads to a release of the constitutively Ser35 monophosphorylated free head swaying away from the thick filament shaft. This is so because the stiffened diphosphorylated RLC NTE would hinder the docking back of the free head after swaying away, becoming released and mobile and unable to recover its original interacting position on activation. PMID:26038302

  12. Phosphorylation of myosin light chains in perfused rat heart. Effect of adrenaline and increased cytoplasmic calcium ions.

    PubMed Central

    Jeacocke, S A; England, P J

    1980-01-01

    1. A method was developed for the isolation of essentially pure myosin light chains from perfused rat heart. The phosphorylation of the P-light chains was estimated by hydrolysis and measurement of phosphate released, by electrophoresis in 8 M-urea and by 32P incorporation in perfusion with [32P]Pi. 2. In control perfusions there was 0.5-0.6 mol of phosphate/mol of P-light chain. This was not changed by perfusion with 5 microM-adrenaline for 10-40s. Perfusion for 1 min with medium containing 7.5 mM-CaCl2, or for 30s with medium containing 118 mM-KCl, also did not change the phosphorylation of P-light chains. 3. It is concluded that phosphorylation of P-light chains is not important in mediating the action of inotropic agents in the heart. Images Fig. 1. PMID:7470033

  13. Contraction parameters, myosin composition and metabolic enzymes of the skeletal muscles of the etruscan shrew Suncus etruscus and of the common European white-toothed shrew Crocidura russula (Insectivora: soricidae).

    PubMed

    Peters, T; Kubis, H P; Wetzel, P; Sender, S; Asmussen, G; Fons, R; Jürgens, K D

    1999-09-01

    In the Etruscan shrew, the isometric twitch contraction times of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles are shorter than in any other mammal, allowing these muscles to contract at outstandingly high contraction frequencies. This species has the highest mass-specific metabolic rate of all mammals and requires fast skeletal muscles not only for locomotion but also for effective heat production and for an extremely high ventilation rate. No differences could be detected in the fibre type pattern, the myosin heavy and light chain composition, or in the activity of the metabolic enzymes lactate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase of the two limb muscles, the EDL and the soleus, which in larger mammalian species exhibit distinct differences in contractile proteins and metabolic enzymes. All properties determined in EDL and soleus muscles of Suncus etruscus, as well as in the larger Crocidura russula, are typical for fast-oxidative fibres, and the same holds for several other skeletal muscles including the diaphragm muscle of S. etruscus. Nevertheless, the EDL and soleus muscles showed different mechanical properties in the two shrew species. Relaxation times and, in C. russula, time to peak force are shorter in the EDL than in the soleus muscle. This is in accordance with the time course of the Ca(2+) transients in these muscles. Such a result could be due to different parvalbumin concentrations, to a different volume fraction of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in the two muscles or to different Ca(2+)-ATPase activities. Alternatively, the lower content of cytosolic creatine kinase (CK) in the soleus compared with the EDL muscle could indicate that the observed difference in contraction times between these shrew muscles is due to the CK-controlled activity of their sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase. PMID:10460733

  14. 5'-flanking sequences of zebrafish fast myosin heavy chain genes regulate unique expression in the anterior, medial subsection and posterior tail somites of the skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Asaduzzaman, M; Shakur Ahammad, A K; Asakawa, S; Kinoshita, S; Watabe, S

    2016-01-01

    In zebrafish, fast muscle-specific myosin heavy chain genes have their unique expression patterns in a well-defined and restricted region of the skeletal muscle. However, the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms involved have remained unclear. Here, we examined the regulation of spatio-temporal expression patterns of myhz1 (myhz1.1, myhz1.2 and myhz1.3) and myhz2 during their development by using transient gene and stable transgenic techniques. Embryos microinjected with different length 5'-flanking sequences of myhz1 conjugated with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene showed EGFP expression in the anterior and medial subsections of somites, but not in the tail somite region. In contrast, embryos microinjected with different length 5'-flanking sequences of myhz2 showed EGFP expression exclusively at the posterior tail somite domain. Promoter deletion analyses demonstrated that reduced EGFP fluorescence typically is correlated with smaller 5'-flanking sequences. The immunohistochemical observation revealed that zebrafish larvae provided with the transient gene and those from stable transgenic lines consistently expressed EGFP in the fast muscle fibers. r-VISTA plot identified one common conserved region of about 140°bp among myhz1.1, myhz1.2 and myhz1.3. Deletion of this conserved region from the 5'-flanking sequence of each myhz1 markedly reduced EGFP expression in its unique spatial somite region. Deletion mutation analysis demonstrated that myhz2 expression in the tail somite region might be mediated by Tbx (family of transcription factors having a common DNA-binding sequence known as T-box) binding elements. In summary, 5'-flanking sequences of myhz1 and myhz2 regulate their unique expression patterns in a well-defined and restricted somite region of the skeletal muscle in zebrafish. PMID:26335505

  15. Skeletal Muscle Tissue Engineering: A Maturation Model Promoting Long Term Survival of Myotubes, Structural Development of the Excitation - Contraction Coupling Apparatus and Neonatal Myosin Heavy Chain Expression

    PubMed Central

    Das, Mainak; Rumsey, John W; Bhargava, Neelima; Stancescu, Maria; Hickman, James J

    2009-01-01

    The use of defined in vitro systems to study the developmental and physiological characteristics of a variety of cell types is increasing, due in large part to their ease of integration with tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and high-throughput screening applications. In this study, myotubes derived from fetal rat hind limbs were induced to develop several aspects of mature muscle including: sarcomere assembly, development of the excitation-contraction coupling apparatus and myosin heavy chain (MHC) class switching. Utilizing immunocytochemical analysis, anisotropic and isotropic band formation (striations) within the myotubes was established, indicative of sarcomere formation. In addition, clusters of ryanodine receptors were colocalized with dihydropyridine complex proteins which signaled development of the excitation-contraction coupling apparatus and transverse tubule biogenesis. The myotubes also exhibited MHC class switching from embryonic to neonatal MHC. Lastly, the myotubes survived significantly longer in culture (7090 days) than myotubes from our previously developed system (2025 days). These results were achieved by modifying the culture timeline as well as the development of a new medium formulation. This defined model system for skeletal muscle maturation supports the goal of developing physiologically relevant muscle constructs for use in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine as well as for high-throughput screening applications. PMID:19625080

  16. A Toxoplasma gondii class XIV myosin, expressed in Sf9 cells with a parasite co-chaperone, requires two light chains for fast motility.

    PubMed

    Bookwalter, Carol S; Kelsen, Anne; Leung, Jacqueline M; Ward, Gary E; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2014-10-31

    Many diverse myosin classes can be expressed using the baculovirus/Sf9 insect cell expression system, whereas others have been recalcitrant. We hypothesized that most myosins utilize Sf9 cell chaperones, but others require an organism-specific co-chaperone. TgMyoA, a class XIVa myosin from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, is required for the parasite to efficiently move and invade host cells. The T. gondii genome contains one UCS family myosin co-chaperone (TgUNC). TgMyoA expressed in Sf9 cells was soluble and functional only if the heavy and light chain(s) were co-expressed with TgUNC. The tetratricopeptide repeat domain of TgUNC was not essential to obtain functional myosin, implying that there are other mechanisms to recruit Hsp90. Purified TgMyoA heavy chain complexed with its regulatory light chain (TgMLC1) moved actin in a motility assay at a speed of ∼1.5 μm/s. When a putative essential light chain (TgELC1) was also bound, TgMyoA moved actin at more than twice that speed (∼3.4 μm/s). This result implies that two light chains bind to and stabilize the lever arm, the domain that amplifies small motions at the active site into the larger motions that propel actin at fast speeds. Our results show that the TgMyoA domain structure is more similar to other myosins than previously appreciated and provide a molecular explanation for how it moves actin at fast speeds. The ability to express milligram quantities of a class XIV myosin in a heterologous system paves the way for detailed structure-function analysis of TgMyoA and identification of small molecule inhibitors. PMID:25231988

  17. Mutations of the Drosophila Myosin Regulatory Light Chain Affect Courtship Song and Reduce Reproductive Success

    PubMed Central

    Chakravorty, Samya; Vu, Hien; Foelber, Veronica; Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila indirect flight muscles (IFM) rely on an enhanced stretch-activation response to generate high power output for flight. The IFM is neurally activated during the male courtship song, but its role, if any, in generating the small amplitude wing vibrations that produce the song is not known. Here, we examined the courtship song properties and mating behavior of three mutant strains of the myosin regulatory light chain (DMLC2) that are known to affect IFM contractile properties and impair flight: (i) Dmlc2Δ2–46 (Ext), an N-terminal extension truncation; (ii) Dmlc2S66A,S67A (Phos), a disruption of two MLC kinase phosphorylation sites; and (iii) Dmlc2Δ2–46;S66A,S67A (Dual), expressing both mutations. Our results show that the Dmlc2 gene is pleiotropic and that mutations that have a profound effect on flight mechanics (Phos and Dual) have minimal effects on courtship song. None of the mutations affect interpulse interval (IPI), a determinant of species-specific song, and intrapulse frequency (IPF) compared to Control (Dmlc2+ rescued null strain). However, abnormalities in the sine song (increased frequency) and the pulse song (increased cycles per pulse and pulse length) evident in Ext males are not apparent in Dual males suggesting that Ext and Phos interact differently in song and flight mechanics, given their known additive effect on the latter. All three mutant males produce a less vigorous pulse song and exhibit impaired mating behavior compared to Control males. As a result, females are less receptive to Ext, Phos, and Dual males when a Control male is present. These results open the possibility that DMLC2, and perhaps contractile protein genes in general, are partly under sexual selection. That mutations in DMLC2 manifest differently in song and flight suggest that this protein fulfills different roles in song and flight and that stretch activation plays a smaller role in song production than in flight. PMID:24587213

  18. Enhanced paracellular transport of insulin can be achieved via transient induction of myosin light chain phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Taverner, Alistair; Dondi, Ruggero; Almansour, Khaled; Laurent, Floriane; Owens, Siân-Eleri; Eggleston, Ian M.; Fotaki, Nikoletta; Mrsny, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium functions to effectively restrict the causal uptake of luminal contents but has been demonstrated to transiently increase paracellular permeability properties to provide an additional entry route for dietary macromolecules. We have examined a method to emulate this endogenous mechanism as a means of enhancing the oral uptake of insulin. Two sets of stable Permeant Inhibitor of Phosphatase (PIP) peptides were rationally designed to stimulate phosphorylation of intracellular epithelial myosin light chain (MLC) and screened using Caco-2 monolayers in vitro. Apical application of PIP peptide 640, designed to disrupt protein–protein interactions between protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and its regulator CPI-17, resulted in a reversible and non-toxic transient reduction in Caco-2 monolayer trans-epithelial electric resistance (TEER) and opening of the paracellular route to 4 kDa fluorescent dextran but not 70 kDa dextran in vitro. Apical application of PIP peptide 250, designed to impede MYPT1-mediated regulation of PP1, also decreased TEER in a reversible and non-toxic manner but transiently opened the paracellular route to both 4 and 70 kDa fluorescent dextrans. Direct injection of PIP peptides 640 or 250 with human insulin into the lumen of rat jejunum caused a decrease in blood glucose levels that was PIP peptide and insulin dose-dependent and correlated with increased pMLC levels. Systemic levels of insulin suggested approximately 3–4% of the dose injected into the intestinal lumen was absorbed, relative to a subcutaneous injection. Measurement of insulin levels in the portal vein showed a time window of absorption that was consistent with systemic concentration-time profiles and approximately 50% first-pass clearance by the liver. Monitoring the uptake of a fluorescent form of insulin suggested its uptake occurred via the paracellular route. Together, these studies add validation to the presence of an endogenous mechanism used by the intestinal epithelium to dynamically regulate its paracellular permeability properties and better define the potential to enhance the oral delivery of biopharmaceuticals via a transient regulation of an endogenous mechanism controlling the intestinal paracellular barrier. PMID:25980620

  19. Ca2+, caldesmon, and myosin light chain kinase exchange with calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Kasturi, R; Vasulka, C; Johnson, J D

    1993-04-15

    Wheat calmodulin (CaM) was labeled at Cys-27 with the sulfhydryl-specific fluorescent probe 2-(4'-maleimidoanilino)-naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid (MIANS), to form MIANS.CaM. In the presence of Ca2+, MIANS.CaM undergoes a large fluorescence increase when it binds myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and caldesmon (CaD), but little fluorescence change when it binds CaM antagonists or Ca2+. MLCK associates with MIANS.CaM at a rate of 2.8 x 10(7) M-1 s-1 and dissociates at 0.031 s-1 (Kd = 1.1 nM). Protein kinase A phosphorylation of MLCK (P-MLCK) produces a 3.5-fold decrease in its association rate with CaM and a 6-fold increase in its dissociation rate (Kd = 23 nM). CaD associates with MIANS.CaM with a rate of 5.3 x 10(8) M-1 s-1 and dissociates at 57 s-1 (Kd = 108 nM). EGTA disrupts the CaM.MLCK, CaM.P-MLCK, and the CaM.CaD complexes at rates of 3.5 s-1, 6.5 s-1, and 13.5 s-1, respectively. MLCK, therefore, dissociates from CaM more quickly by Ca2+ removal while the lower affinity CaD is dissociated more quickly by competition from higher affinity CaM target proteins than by Ca2+ removal. MLCK binding to CaM slowed Ca2+ dissociation from CaM's C-terminal Ca(2+)-binding sites from 30 s-1 to 6 s-1 while CaD had little effect on Ca2+ dissociation from these sites. During a Ca2+ transient, CaM could exchange with MLCK and CaD rapidly enough for these proteins to be directly involved in the contraction/relaxation cycle of smooth muscle. PMID:8463316

  20. Various Themes of Myosin Regulation.

    PubMed

    Heissler, Sarah M; Sellers, James R

    2016-05-01

    Members of the myosin superfamily are actin-based molecular motors that are indispensable for cellular homeostasis. The vast functional and structural diversity of myosins accounts for the variety and complexity of the underlying allosteric regulatory mechanisms that determine the activation or inhibition of myosin motor activity and enable precise timing and spatial aspects of myosin function at the cellular level. This review focuses on the molecular basis of posttranslational regulation of eukaryotic myosins from different classes across species by allosteric intrinsic and extrinsic effectors. First, we highlight the impact of heavy and light chain phosphorylation. Second, we outline intramolecular regulatory mechanisms such as autoinhibition and subsequent activation. Third, we discuss diverse extramolecular allosteric mechanisms ranging from actin-linked regulatory mechanisms to myosin:cargo interactions. At last, we briefly outline the allosteric regulation of myosins with synthetic compounds. PMID:26827725

  1. Effects of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy mutations on power output by human β-cardiac myosin.

    PubMed

    Spudich, James A; Aksel, Tural; Bartholomew, Sadie R; Nag, Suman; Kawana, Masataka; Yu, Elizabeth Choe; Sarkar, Saswata S; Sung, Jongmin; Sommese, Ruth F; Sutton, Shirley; Cho, Carol; Adhikari, Arjun S; Taylor, Rebecca; Liu, Chao; Trivedi, Darshan; Ruppel, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most frequently occurring inherited cardiovascular disease, with a prevalence of more than one in 500 individuals worldwide. Genetically acquired dilated cardiomyopathy is a related disease that is less prevalent. Both are caused by mutations in the genes encoding the fundamental force-generating protein machinery of the cardiac muscle sarcomere, including human β-cardiac myosin, the motor protein that powers ventricular contraction. Despite numerous studies, most performed with non-human or non-cardiac myosin, there is no clear consensus about the mechanism of action of these mutations on the function of human β-cardiac myosin. We are using a recombinantly expressed human β-cardiac myosin motor domain along with conventional and new methodologies to characterize the forces and velocities of the mutant myosins compared with wild type. Our studies are extending beyond myosin interactions with pure actin filaments to include the interaction of myosin with regulated actin filaments containing tropomyosin and troponin, the roles of regulatory light chain phosphorylation on the functions of the system, and the possible roles of myosin binding protein-C and titin, important regulatory components of both cardiac and skeletal muscles. PMID:26792326

  2. TNF causes changes in glomerular endothelial permeability and morphology through a Rho and myosin light chain kinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Wu, Xiaoyan; Hack, Bradley K; Bao, Lihua; Cunningham, Patrick N

    2015-12-01

    A key function of the endothelium is to serve as a regulated barrier between tissue compartments. We have previously shown that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a crucial role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury, in part by causing injury to the renal endothelium through its receptor TNFR1. Here, we report that TNF increased permeability to albumin in primary culture mouse renal endothelial cells, as well as human glomerular endothelial cells. This process occurred in association with changes in the actin cytoskeleton and was associated with gaps between previously confluent cells in culture and decreases in the tight junction protein occludin. This process was dependent on myosin light chain activation, as seen by its prevention with Rho-associated kinase and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitors. Surprisingly, permeability was not blocked by inhibition of apoptosis with caspase inhibitors. Additionally, we found that the renal glycocalyx, which plays an important role in barrier function, was also degraded by TNF in a Rho and MLCK dependent fashion. TNF treatment caused a decrease in the size of endothelial fenestrae, dependent on Rho and MLCK, although the relevance of this to changes in permeability is uncertain. In summary, TNF-induced barrier dysfunction in renal endothelial cells is crucially dependent upon the Rho/MLCK signaling pathway. PMID:26634902

  3. The carboxyl terminus of the smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase is expressed as an independent protein, telokin.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, P J; Herring, B P

    1991-12-15

    It has been proposed that the carboxyl terminus of the smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase is expressed as an independent protein. This protein has been purified from tissues and named telokin (Ito, M., Dabrowska, R., Guerriero, V., Jr., and Hartshorne, D. J. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 13971-13974). In this study we have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones encoding telokin. Analysis of a genomic DNA clone suggests that the mRNA encoding telokin arises from a promoter which appears to be located within an intron of the smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) gene. This intron interrupts exons encoding the calmodulin binding domain of the kinase. The amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA predicts that telokin is identical to the carboxyl-terminal 155 residues of the smooth muscle MLCK. Unlike the smooth muscle MLCK which is expressed in both smooth and non-muscle tissues, telokin is expressed in some smooth muscle tissues but has not been detected in aortic smooth muscle or in any non-muscle tissues. PMID:1748667

  4. Differential roles of regulatory light chain and myosin binding protein-C phosphorylations in the modulation of cardiac force development

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, Brett A.; Locher, Matthew R.; Bekyarova, Tanya; Patel, Jitandrakumar R.; Fitzsimons, Daniel P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Moss, Richard L.

    2010-05-25

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) by protein kinase A (PKA) independently accelerate the kinetics of force development in ventricular myocardium. However, while MLCK treatment has been shown to increase the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of force (pCa{sub 50}), PKA treatment has been shown to decrease pCa{sub 50}, presumably due to cardiac troponin I phosphorylation. Further, MLCK treatment increases Ca{sup 2+}-independent force and maximum Ca{sup 2+}-activated force, whereas PKA treatment has no effect on either force. To investigate the structural basis underlying the kinase-specific differential effects on steady-state force, we used synchrotron low-angle X-ray diffraction to compare equatorial intensity ratios (I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}) to assess the proximity of myosin cross-bridge mass relative to actin and to compare lattice spacings (d{sub 1,0}) to assess the inter-thick filament spacing in skinned myocardium following treatment with either MLCK or PKA. As we showed previously, PKA phosphorylation of cMyBP-C increases I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0} and, as hypothesized, treatment with MLCK also increased I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, which can explain the accelerated rates of force development during activation. Importantly, interfilament spacing was reduced by {approx}2 nm ({Delta} 3.5%) with MLCK treatment, but did not change with PKA treatment. Thus, RLC or cMyBP-C phosphorylation increases the proximity of cross-bridges to actin, but only RLC phosphorylation affects lattice spacing, which suggests that RLC and cMyBP-C modulate the kinetics of force development by similar structural mechanisms; however, the effect of RLC phosphorylation to increase the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of force is mediated by a distinct mechanism, most probably involving changes in interfilament spacing.

  5. Force-velocity relations and myosin heavy chain isoform compositions of skinned fibres from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Bottinelli, R; Schiaffino, S; Reggiani, C

    1991-01-01

    1. This study was performed to assess whether muscle contractile properties are related to the presence of specific myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. 2. Force-velocity relations and MHC isoform composition were determined in seventy-four single skinned muscle fibres from rat soleus, extensor digitorum longus and plantaris muscles. 3. Four groups of fibres were identified according to their MHC isoform composition determined by monoclonal antibodies: type 1 (slow), and types 2A, 2B and 2X (fast). 4. With respect to maximum velocity of shortening (V0), the fibres formed a continuum between 0.35 and 2.84 L/s (muscle lengths per second) at 12 degrees C. V0 in type 1 fibres (slow fibres) was between 0.35 and 0.95 L/s (0.639 +/- 0.038 L/s; mean +/- S.E. of mean). V0 in type 2 fibres (fast fibres) was consistently higher than 0.91 L/s. Ranges of V0 in the three fast fibre types mostly overlapped. Type 2A and 2X fibres had similar mean V0 values (1.396 +/- 0.084 and 1.451 +/- 0.066 L/s respectively); type 2B fibres showed a higher mean V0 value (1.800 +/- 0.109 L/s) than type 2A and 2X fibres. 5. Mean values of a/P0, an index of the curvature of force-velocity relations, allowed us to identify two groups of fibres: a high curvature group comprised of type 1 (mean a/P0, 0.066 +/- 0.007) and 2A (0.066 +/- 0.024) fibres and a low curvature group comprised of type 2B (0.113 +/- 0.013) and 2X (0.132 +/- 0.008) fibres. 6. Maximal power output was lower in slow fibres than in fast fibres, and among fast fibres it was lower in type 2A fibres than in type 2X and 2B. 7. Force per unit cross-sectional area was less in slow fibres than in fast fibres. There was no relation between fibre type and cross-sectional area. 8. The results suggest that MHC composition is just one of the determinants of shortening velocity and of other muscle contractile properties. Images Fig. 3 PMID:1890654

  6. Mammalian myosin-18A, a highly divergent myosin.

    PubMed

    Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Heissler, Sarah M; Billington, Neil; Takagi, Yasuharu; Yang, Yi; Knight, Peter J; Homsher, Earl; Sellers, James R

    2013-03-29

    The Mus musculus myosin-18A gene is expressed as two alternatively spliced isoforms, α and β, with reported roles in Golgi localization, in maintenance of cytoskeleton, and as receptors for immunological surfactant proteins. Both myosin-18A isoforms feature a myosin motor domain, a single predicted IQ motif, and a long coiled-coil reminiscent of myosin-2. The myosin-18Aα isoform, additionally, has an N-terminal PDZ domain. Recombinant heavy meromyosin- and subfragment-1 (S1)-like constructs for both myosin-18Aα and -18β species were purified from the baculovirus/Sf9 cell expression system. These constructs bound both essential and regulatory light chains, indicating an additional noncanonical light chain binding site in the neck. Myosin-18Aα-S1 and -18Aβ-S1 molecules bound actin weakly with Kd values of 4.9 and 54 μm, respectively. The actin binding data could be modeled by assuming an equilibrium between two myosin conformations, a competent and an incompetent form to bind actin. Actin binding was unchanged by presence of nucleotide. Both myosin-18A isoforms bound N-methylanthraniloyl-nucleotides, but the rate of ATP hydrolysis was very slow (<0.002 s(-1)) and not significantly enhanced by actin. Phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain had no effect on ATP hydrolysis, and neither did the addition of tropomyosin or of GOLPH3, a myosin-18A binding partner. Electron microscopy of myosin-18A-S1 showed that the lever is strongly angled with respect to the long axis of the motor domain, suggesting a pre-power stroke conformation regardless of the presence of ATP. These data lead us to conclude that myosin-18A does not operate as a traditional molecular motor in cells. PMID:23382379

  7. The expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) genes in human skeletal muscle is related to metabolic characteristics involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Anders H; Rönn, Tina; Elgzyri, Tarq; Hansson, Ola; Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Vaag, Allan; Poulsen, Pernille; Ling, Charlotte

    2011-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes patients exhibit a reduction in oxidative muscle fibres and an increase in glycolytic muscle fibres. In this study, we investigated whether both genetic and non-genetic factors influence the mRNA expression levels of three myosin heavy chain (MHC) genes represented in different fibre types. Specifically, we examined the MHC7 (slow-twitch oxidative fibre), MHCIIa (fast-twitch oxidative fibre) and MHCIIx/d (fast-twitch glycolytic fibre) genes in human skeletal muscle. We further investigated the use of MHC mRNA expression as a proxy to determine fibre-type composition, as measured by traditional ATP staining. Two cohorts of age-matched Swedish men were studied to determine the relationship of muscle mRNA expression of MHC7, MHCIIa, and MHCIIx/d with muscle fibre composition. A classical twin approach, including young and elderly Danish twin pairs, was utilised to examine if differences in expression levels were due to genetic or environmental factors. Although MHCIIx/d mRNA expression correlated positively with the level of type IIx/d muscle fibres in the two cohorts (P<0.05), a relatively low magnitude of correlation suggests that mRNA does not fully correlate with fibre-type composition. Heritability estimates and genetic analysis suggest that the levels of MHC7, MHCIIa and MHCIIx/d expression are primarily under non-genetic influence, and MHCIIa indicated an age-related decline. PGC-1α exhibited a positive relationship with the expression of all three MHC genes (P<0.05); meanwhile, PGC-1β related positively with MHCIIa expression and negatively with MHCIIx/d expression (P<0.05). While MHCIIa expression related positively with insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (P<0.01), MHCIIx/d expression related negatively with insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (P<0.05). Our findings suggest that the expression levels of the MHC genes are associated with age and both PGC-1α and PGC-1β and indicate that the MHC genes may to some extent be used to determine fibre-type composition in human skeletal muscle. PMID:21470888

  8. Phosphorylation and the N-terminal extension of the regulatory light chain help orient and align the myosin heads in Drosophila flight muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, Gerrie P.; Miller, Mark S.; Reedy, Mary C.; Soto-Adames, Felipe N.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.; Maughan, David W.; Irving, Thomas C.

    2010-02-02

    X-ray diffraction of the indirect flight muscle (IFM) in living Drosophila at rest and electron microscopy of intact and glycerinated IFM was used to compare the effects of mutations in the regulatory light chain (RLC) on sarcomeric structure. Truncation of the RLC N-terminal extension (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46}) or disruption of the phosphorylation sites by substituting alanines (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}) decreased the equatorial intensity ratio (I{sub 20}/I{sub 10}), indicating decreased myosin mass associated with the thin filaments. Phosphorylation site disruption (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}), but not N-terminal extension truncation (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46}), decreased the 14.5 nm reflection intensity, indicating a spread of the axial distribution of the myosin heads. The arrangement of thick filaments and myosin heads in electron micrographs of the phosphorylation mutant (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}) appeared normal in the relaxed and rigor states, but when calcium activated, fewer myosin heads formed cross-bridges. In transgenic flies with both alterations to the RLC (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46; S66A, S67A}), the effects of the dual mutation were additive. The results suggest that the RLC N-terminal extension serves as a 'tether' to help pre-position the myosin heads for attachment to actin, while phosphorylation of the RLC promotes head orientations that allow optimal interactions with the thin filament.

  9. Regulation of calcium channels in smooth muscle: New insights into the role of myosin light chain kinase

    PubMed Central

    Martinsen, A; Dessy, C; Morel, N

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) plays a crucial role in artery contraction, which regulates blood pressure and blood flow distribution. In addition to this role, MLCK contributes to Ca2+ flux regulation in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and in non-muscle cells, where cytoskeleton has been suggested to help Ca2+ channels trafficking. This conclusion is based on the use of pharmacological inhibitors of MLCK and molecular and cellular techniques developed to down-regulate the enzyme. Dissimilarities have been observed between cells and whole tissues, as well as between large conductance and small resistance arteries. A differential expression in MLCK and ion channels (either voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels or non-selective cationic channels) could account for these observations, and is in line with the functional properties of the arteries. A potential involvement of MLCK in the pathways modulating Ca2+ entry in VSM is described in the present review. PMID:25483583

  10. SLOW MYOSIN ATP TURNOVER IN THE SUPER-RELAXED STATE IN TARANTULA MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Naber, Nariman; Cooke, Roger

    2011-01-01

    We measured the nucleotide turnover rate of myosin in tarantula leg-muscle fibers by observing single turnovers of the fluorescent nucleotide analog, mantATP, as monitored by the decrease in fluorescence when mantATP is replaced by ATP in a chase experiment. We find a multi-exponential process, with approximately two-thirds of the myosin showing a very slow nucleotide turnover time constant, ~30 minutes. This slow-turnover state is termed the super-relaxed state (SRX). If fibers are incubated in mantADP and chased with ADP, the SRX is not seen, indicating that trinucleotide-relaxed myosins are responsible for the SRX. Phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain eliminates the fraction of myosin with the very long lifetime. The data imply that the very long-lived SRX in tarantula fibers is a highly novel adaptation for energy conservation in an animal that spends extremely long periods of time in a quiescent state employing a lie-in-wait hunting strategy. The presence of the SRX measured here correlates well with the binding of myosin heads to the core of the thick filament in a structure known as the “interacting-heads motif” observed previously by electron microscopy. Both the structural array and the long-lived SRX require relaxed filaments or relaxed fibers, both are lost upon myosin phosphorylation, and both appear to be more stable in tarantula than in vertebrate skeletal or vertebrate cardiac preparations. PMID:21763701

  11. Involvement of NADPH oxidases and non-muscle myosin light chain in senescence of endothelial progenitor cells in hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting-Bo; Zhang, Jie-Jie; Liu, Bin; Liu, Wei-Qi; Wu, Yan; Xiong, Xiao-Ming; Luo, Xiu-Ju; Ma, Qi-Lin; Peng, Jun

    2016-03-01

    NADPH oxidase (NOX)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) is involved in endothelial dysfunction of hyperlipidemia, and non-muscle myosin regulatory light chain (nmMLC20) is reported to have a transcriptional function in regulation of gene expression. The purposes of this study are to determine whether NOX-derived ROS can promote endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) senescence and whether nmMLC20 can regulate NOX expression through a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The rats were subjected to 8weeks of high-fat diet feeding to establish a hyperlipidemic model, which showed an increase in plasma lipids and the accelerated senescence and reduced number of circulating EPCs, accompanied by an increase in myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and NOX activities, p-nmMLC20 level, NOX (NOX2, NOX4) expression, and H2O2 content. Next, EPCs isolated from normal rats were incubated with ox-LDL (100?g/mL) for 24h to establish a senescent model in vitro. Consistent with our in vivo findings, ox-LDL treatment increased the senescence of EPCs concomitant with an increase in MLCK and NOX activities, p-nmMLC20 level (in total or nuclear proteins), NOX expression, and H2O2 content; these phenomena were reversed by MLCK inhibitor. NOX inhibitor achieved similar results to that of MLCK inhibitor except that there is no effect on MLCK activity and p-nmMLC20 level. Furthermore, knockdown of nmMLC20, NOX2, or NOX4 led to a down-regulation in NOX and a reduction in ox-LDL-induced EPC senescence. These results suggest that NOX-derived ROS promotes the senescence of circulating EPCs in hyperlipidemia and nmMLC20 may play a transcriptional role in the upregulation of NOX through a phosphorylation-dependent manner. PMID:26685858

  12. Time dependent effects on contractile properties, fibre population, myosin light chains and enzymes of energy metabolism in intermittently and continuously stimulated fast twitch muscles of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Pette, D; Müller, W; Leisner, E; Vrbová, G

    1976-07-30

    Fast-twitch tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus rabbit muscles were subjected to long-term intermittent (8 h daily) or continuous (24 h daily) indirect stimulation with a frequency pattern resembling that of a slow motoneuron. Increases in time to peak of isometric twitch contraction were observed without parallel changes in the pattern of myosin light chains or alterations in the distribution of slow and fast fibres as discernible by the histochemical ATPase reaction. However, changes in the fibre population and in the myosin light chain pattern were observed after intermittent stimulation periods exceeding 40 days or continuous stimulation periods longer than 20 days. Under these conditions even higher increases were found in contraction time. In one animal a complete change in fbire population was observed. In this case myosin light chains of the slow (LCS1, LCS2) and of the fast type (LCf1) were obviously synthetized simultaneously within the same fibre. Early changes in the enzyme activity pattern of energy metabolism indicated a conversion of the fibres including their mitochondrial population. These changes and the earlier reported changes in the sarcoplasmic reticulum are probably responsible for the early changes in contractile properties which occur before the transformation of the myosin. PMID:134352

  13. The effects of slow skeletal troponin I expression in the murine myocardium are influenced by development-related shifts in myosin heavy chain isoform

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Steven J; Chandra, Murali

    2012-01-01

    Troponin I (TnI) and myosin heavy chain (MHC) are two contractile regulatory proteins that undergo major shifts in isoform expression as cardiac myocytes mature from embryonic to adult stages. To date, many studies have investigated individual effects of embryonic vs. cardiac isoforms of either TnI or MHC on cardiac muscle function and contractile dynamics. Thus, we sought to determine whether concomitant expression of the embryonic isoforms of both TnI and MHC had functional effects that were not previously observed. Adult transgenic (TG) mice that express the embryonic isoform of TnI, slow skeletal TnI (ssTnI), were treated with propylthiouracil (PTU) to revert MHC expression from adult (α-MHC) to embryonic (β-MHC) isoforms. Cardiac muscle fibres from these mice contained ∼80%β-MHC and ∼34% ssTnI of total MHC or TnI, respectively, allowing us to test the functional effects of ssTnI in the presence of β-MHC. Detergent-skinned cardiac muscle fibre bundles were used to study how the interplay between MHC and TnI modulate muscle length-mediated effect on crossbridge (XB) recruitment dynamics, Ca2+-activated tension, and ATPase activity. One major finding was that the model-predicted XB recruitment rate (b) was enhanced significantly by ssTnI, and this speeding effect of ssTnI on XB recruitment rate was much greater (3.8-fold) when β-MHC was present. Another major finding was that the previously documented ssTnI-mediated increase in myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity (pCa50) was blunted when β-MHC was present. ssTnI expression increased pCa50 by 0.33 in α-MHC fibres, whereas ssTnI increased pCa50 by only 0.05 in β-MHC fibres. Our study provides new evidence for significant interplay between MHC and TnI isoforms that is essential for tuning cardiac contractile function. Thus, MHC–TnI interplay may provide a developmentally dependent mechanism to enhance XB recruitment dynamics at a time when Ca2+-handling mechanisms are underdeveloped, and to prevent excessive ssTnI-dependent inotropy (increased Ca2+ sensitivity) in the embryonic myocardium. PMID:22966157

  14. Heterogeneity of myofibrillar proteins in lobster fast and slow muscles: variants of troponin, paramyosin, and myosin light chains comprise four distinct protein assemblages

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Fast and slow muscles from the claws and abdomen of the American lobster Homarus americanus were examined for adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity and for differences in myofibrillar proteins. Both myosin and actomyosin ATPase were correlated with fiber composition and contractile speed. Four distinct patterns of myofibrilla proteins observed in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels were distinguished by different assemblages of regulatory and contractile protein variants. A total of three species of troponin-T, five species of troponin-I, and three species of troponin-C were observed. Lobster myosins contained two groups of light chains (LC), termed alpha and beta. There were three ..cap alpha..-LC variants and two ..beta..-LC variants. There were no apparent differences in myosin heavy chain, actin, and tropomyosin. Only paramyosin showed a pattern completely consistent with muscle fiber type: slow fibers contained a species (105 kD) slightly smaller than the principle variant (110 kD) in fast fibers. It is proposed that the type of paramyosin present could provide a biochemical marker to identify the fiber composition of muscles that have not been fully characterized. The diversity of troponin and myosin LC variants suggests that subtle differences in physiological performance exist within the broader categories of fast- and slow-twitch muscles. 31 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Characterization of the myosin light chain kinase from smooth muscle as an actin-binding protein that assembles actin filaments in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, K; Okagaki, T; Ye, L H; Samizo, K; Higashi-Fujime, S; Takagi, T; Kohama, K

    1999-05-01

    In addition to its kinase activity, myosin light chain kinase has an actin-binding activity, which results in bundling of actin filaments [Hayakawa et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 199, 786-791, 1994]. There are two actin-binding sites on the kinase: calcium- and calmodulin-sensitive and insensitive sites [Ye et al., J. Biol. Chem. 272, 32182-32189, 1997]. The calcium/calmodulin-sensitive, actin-binding site is located at Asp2-Pro41 and the insensitive site is at Ser138-Met213. The cyanogen bromide fragment, consisting of Asp2-Met213, is furnished with both sites and is the actin-binding core of myosin light chain kinase. Cross-linking between the two sites assembles actin filaments into bundles. Breaking of actin-binding at the calcium/calmodulin-sensitive site by calcium/calmodulin disassembles the bundles. PMID:10231551

  16. Functional adaptation between yeast actin and its cognate myosin motors.

    PubMed

    Stark, Benjamin C; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; Allingham, John S; Rubenstein, Peter A; Lord, Matthew

    2011-09-01

    We employed budding yeast and skeletal muscle actin to examine the contribution of the actin isoform to myosin motor function. While yeast and muscle actin are highly homologous, they exhibit different charge density at their N termini (a proposed myosin-binding interface). Muscle myosin-II actin-activated ATPase activity is significantly higher with muscle versus yeast actin. Whether this reflects inefficiency in the ability of yeast actin to activate myosin is not known. Here we optimized the isolation of two yeast myosins to assess actin function in a homogenous system. Yeast myosin-II (Myo1p) and myosin-V (Myo2p) accommodate the reduced N-terminal charge density of yeast actin, showing greater activity with yeast over muscle actin. Increasing the number of negative charges at the N terminus of yeast actin from two to four (as in muscle) had little effect on yeast myosin activity, while other substitutions of charged residues at the myosin interface of yeast actin reduced activity. Thus, yeast actin functions most effectively with its native myosins, which in part relies on associations mediated by its outer domain. Compared with yeast myosin-II and myosin-V, muscle myosin-II activity was very sensitive to salt. Collectively, our findings suggest differing degrees of reliance on electrostatic interactions during weak actomyosin binding in yeast versus muscle. Our study also highlights the importance of native actin isoforms when considering the function of myosins. PMID:21757693

  17. Structure transition in myosin association with the change of concentration: solubility equilibrium under specified KCl and pH condition.

    PubMed

    Tsunashima, Yoshisuke; Akutagawa, Tohru

    2004-10-15

    We observed, for the first time, the elementary process for the ordered self-assembly formation of myosin in solution. It was realized exclusively under the specific condition of 200 mM KCl, 5 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.08, at 15-20 degrees C, which is called the transition-generating condition (TGC). Described more in detail: pure myosin extracted from rabbit skeletal muscle exhibited the structural transition in its association form only when the myosin concentration c was changed under TGC. The myosin solubility was saturated in both edges of the total myosin concentration c > 10.0 mg/mL (solubility region II) and c < or = 0.25 mg/mL (solubility region I). In the intermediate region, the association structure of myosin changed stepwise with decreasing c. The steps were classified into four regions: region I (c < or = 0.25 mg/mL), II (0.25 < or = c < or = 0.50 mg/mL), III (0.50 < or = c < or = 5.0 mg/mL), and IV (c > 5.0 mg/mL). In each region except II, the plot of the relative soluble myosin concentration c(aq)/c against c(-1) gave a straight line of different slopes, certifying that myosin constructs self-assemblies by the closed association mechanism and that the self-assembly takes dual structures in each region. In region II, a drastic transition occurred in the self-assembled dual structures. Here, a highly associated (insoluble) giant assembly would break into soluble assemblies composed of several myosin molecules. The solubility region I originates a driving force for this structural transition. The basic binding unit of the self-assembly would be a parallel myosin-dimer constructed by the intermolecular axial staggers of 14.3 and 43 nm, as is observed by X-ray diffraction for the thick filament assembly or light meromyosin paracrystals. Myosin could take a single rod-like chain form only in an extremely low concentration region of c < or = c(aq,0) (= 0.053 mg/mL). The association behavior revealed in the present study suggests strongly that the complementary charge cluster and its electrostatic interaction between parallel myosin rods play a crucial role for the ordered self-assembly formation and that the specific electrostatic atmosphere of the solution under TGC is essential to the association mechanism in skeletal muscle myosin, or the thick filament formation of the mammals. PMID:15378484

  18. Proteomics analysis of serum protein profiling in pancreatic cancer patients by DIGE: up-regulation of mannose-binding lectin 2 and myosin light chain kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer has significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Good prognosis relies on an early diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to develop techniques for identifying cancer biomarkers in the serum of patients with pancreatic cancer. Methods Serum samples from five individuals with pancreatic cancer and five individuals without cancer were compared. Highly abundant serum proteins were depleted by immuno-affinity column. Differential protein analysis was performed using 2-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Results Among these protein spots, we found that 16 protein spots were differently expressed between the two mixtures; 8 of these were up-regulated and 8 were down-regulated in cancer. Mass spectrometry and database searching allowed the identification of the proteins corresponding to the gel spots. Up-regulation of mannose-binding lectin 2 and myosin light chain kinase 2, which have not previously been implicated in pancreatic cancer, were observed. In an independent series of serum samples from 16 patients with pancreatic cancer and 16 non-cancer-bearing controls, increased levels of mannose-binding lectin 2 and myosin light chain kinase 2 were confirmed by western blot. Conclusions These results suggest that affinity column enrichment and DIGE can be used to identify proteins differentially expressed in serum from pancreatic cancer patients. These two proteins 'mannose-binding lectin 2 and myosin light chain kinase 2' might be potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of the pancreatic cancer. PMID:20587030

  19. Structure of the smooth muscle myosin light-chain kinase calmodulin-binding domain peptide bound to calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, S.M.; Schneider, D.M.; Wand, A.J. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana ); Strobel, L.A. ); VanBerkum, M.F.A.; Means, A.R. )

    1991-10-22

    The interaction between the peptide corresponding to the calmodulin-binding domain of smooth muscle myosin light-chain kinase and (Ca{sup 2+}){sub 4}-calmodulin has been studied by multinuclear and multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The study was facilitated by the use of {sup 15}N-labeled peptide in conjunction with {sup 15}N-edited and {sup 15}N-correlated {sup 1}H spectroscopy. The peptide forms a 1:1 complex with calcium-saturated calmodulin which is in slow exchange with free peptide. The {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances of the bound have been assigned. An extensive set of structural constraints for the bound peptide has been assembled from the analysis of nuclear Overhauser effects and three-bond coupling constants. The backbone conformation of the bound peptide has been determined using these constraints by use of distance geometry and related computational methods. The backbone conformation of the peptide has been determined to high precision and is generally indicative of helical secondary structure. Nonhelical backbone conformations are seen in the middle and at the C-terminal end of the bound peptide. These studies provide the first direct confirmation of the amphiphilic helix model for the structure of peptides bound to calcium-saturated calmodulin.

  20. MyoD and myogenin act on the chicken myosin light-chain 1 gene as distinct transcriptional factors.

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, A; Fujisawa-Sehara, A; Komiya, T; Nabeshima, Y; Nabeshima, Y

    1993-01-01

    Expression of MyoD, myogenin, MRF4, and Myf-5 converts nonmuscle cells to muscle cells. In an attempt to analyze the roles of these factors, we have investigated their effects on transcription driven by the promoter of the chicken myosin alkaline light-chain (MLC1) gene. The activation by CMD1 or c-myogenin (chicken MyoD or myogenin, respectively) was dependent on the existence of a muscle-specific regulatory region located from positions -2096 to -1743. Its distal half, containing a pair of E boxes (CANNTG), had been previously characterized as an enhancer responsive to CMD1 but not to c-myogenin. In this study, we report the identification of another enhancer in the muscle-specific regulatory region which is preferentially responsive to c-myogenin. Deletion and mutation analyses indicated that this enhancer requires a single E box and its flanking sequences. Furthermore, analysis of chimeric proteins of CMD1 and c-myogenin indicated that regions outside the basic helix-loop-helix domain of c-myogenin are involved in the specificity of the enhancer. These results show that CMD1 and c-myogenin act on the MLC1 gene by recognizing different upstream DNA sequences and that direct or indirect interactions between the regions outside the basic helix-loop-helix domain and flanking sequences of E boxes are involved in the target sequence specificity. Images PMID:8413304

  1. A mutation in the atrial-specific myosin light chain gene (MYL4) causes familial atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Orr, Nathan; Arnaout, Rima; Gula, Lorne J; Spears, Danna A; Leong-Sit, Peter; Li, Qiuju; Tarhuni, Wadea; Reischauer, Sven; Chauhan, Vijay S; Borkovich, Matthew; Uppal, Shaheen; Adler, Arnon; Coughlin, Shaun R; Stainier, Didier Y R; Gollob, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common arrhythmia, is a growing epidemic with substantial morbidity and economic burden. Mechanisms underlying vulnerability to AF remain poorly understood, which contributes to the current lack of highly effective therapies. Recognizing mechanistic subtypes of AF may guide an individualized approach to patient management. Here, we describe a family with a previously unreported syndrome characterized by early-onset AF (age <35 years), conduction disease and signs of a primary atrial myopathy. Phenotypic penetrance was complete in all mutation carriers, although complete disease expressivity appears to be age-dependent. We show that this syndrome is caused by a novel, heterozygous p.Glu11Lys mutation in the atrial-specific myosin light chain gene MYL4. In zebrafish, mutant MYL4 leads to disruption of sarcomeric structure, atrial enlargement and electrical abnormalities associated with human AF. These findings describe the cause of a rare subtype of AF due to a primary, atrial-specific sarcomeric defect. PMID:27066836

  2. Myosin light chain phosphatase activation is involved in the hydrogen sulfide-induced relaxation in mouse gastric fundus.

    PubMed

    Dhaese, Ingeborg; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2009-03-15

    The relaxant effect of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) in the vascular tree is well established but its influence and mechanism of action in gastrointestinal smooth muscle was hardly investigated. The influence of H(2)S on contractility in mouse gastric fundus was therefore examined. Sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS; H(2)S donor) was administered to prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha))-contracted circular muscle strips of mouse gastric fundus, before and after incubation with interfering drugs. NaHS caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of the pre-contracted mouse gastric fundus strips. The K(+) channels blockers glibenclamide, apamin, charybdotoxin, 4-aminopyridin and barium chloride had no influence on the NaHS-induced relaxation. The relaxation by NaHS was also not influenced by L-NAME, ODQ and SQ 22536, inhibitors of the cGMP and cAMP pathway, by nerve blockers capsazepine, omega-conotoxin and tetrodotoxin or by several channel and receptor blockers (ouabain, nifedipine, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate, ryanodine and thapsigargin). The myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) inhibitor calyculin-A reduced the NaHS-induced relaxation, but the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 had no influence. We show that NaHS is able to relax PGF(2alpha)-contracted mouse gastric fundus strips. The results suggest that in the mouse gastric fundus, H(2)S causes relaxation at least partially via activation of MLCP. PMID:19374871

  3. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Amol; Cotton, James A.; Dixon, Brent R.; Gedamu, Lashitew; Yates, Robin M.; Buret, Andre G.

    2015-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates) trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate) trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections. PMID:26334299

  4. A mutation in the atrial-specific myosin light chain gene (MYL4) causes familial atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Nathan; Arnaout, Rima; Gula, Lorne J.; Spears, Danna A.; Leong-Sit, Peter; Li, Qiuju; Tarhuni, Wadea; Reischauer, Sven; Chauhan, Vijay S.; Borkovich, Matthew; Uppal, Shaheen; Adler, Arnon; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Stainier, Didier Y. R.; Gollob, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common arrhythmia, is a growing epidemic with substantial morbidity and economic burden. Mechanisms underlying vulnerability to AF remain poorly understood, which contributes to the current lack of highly effective therapies. Recognizing mechanistic subtypes of AF may guide an individualized approach to patient management. Here, we describe a family with a previously unreported syndrome characterized by early-onset AF (age <35 years), conduction disease and signs of a primary atrial myopathy. Phenotypic penetrance was complete in all mutation carriers, although complete disease expressivity appears to be age-dependent. We show that this syndrome is caused by a novel, heterozygous p.Glu11Lys mutation in the atrial-specific myosin light chain gene MYL4. In zebrafish, mutant MYL4 leads to disruption of sarcomeric structure, atrial enlargement and electrical abnormalities associated with human AF. These findings describe the cause of a rare subtype of AF due to a primary, atrial-specific sarcomeric defect. PMID:27066836

  5. Commensal Bacterial Endocytosis in Epithelial Cells Is Dependent on Myosin Light Chain Kinase–Activated Brush Border Fanning by Interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Ling; Peng, Wei-Hao; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Huang, Ching-Ying; Ni, Yen-Hsuan; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Turner, Jerrold R.; Yu, Linda C.H.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal bacterial adherence and internalization in enterocytes have been documented in Crohn disease, celiac disease, surgical stress, and intestinal obstruction and are associated with low-level interferon (IFN)-γ production. How commensals gain access to epithelial soma through densely packed microvilli rooted on the terminal web (TW) remains unclear. We investigated molecular and ultrastructural mechanisms of bacterial endocytosis, focusing on regulatory roles of IFN-γ and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in TW myosin phosphorylation and brush border fanning. Mouse intestines were sham operated on or obstructed for 6 hours by loop ligation with intraluminally administered ML-7 (a MLCK inhibitor) or Y27632 (a Rho-associated kinase inhibitor). After intestinal obstruction, epithelial endocytosis and extraintestinal translocation of bacteria were observed in the absence of tight junctional damage. Enhanced TW myosin light chain phosphorylation, arc formation, and brush border fanning coincided with intermicrovillous bacterial penetration, which were inhibited by ML-7 and neutralizing anti–IFN-γ but not Y27632. The phenomena were not seen in mice genetically deficient for long MLCK-210 or IFN-γ. Stimulation of human Caco-2BBe cells with IFN-γ caused MLCK-dependent TW arc formation and brush border fanning, which preceded caveolin-mediated bacterial internalization through cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. In conclusion, epithelial MLCK-activated brush border fanning by IFN-γ promotes adherence and internalization of normally noninvasive enteric bacteria. Transcytotic commensal penetration may contribute to initiation or relapse of chronic inflammation. PMID:24911373

  6. Remote control of myosin and kinesin motors using light-activated gearshifting.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Muneaki; Chen, Lu; Howes, Stuart C; Schindler, Tony D; Nogales, Eva; Bryant, Zev

    2014-09-01

    Cytoskeletal motors perform critical force generation and transport functions in eukaryotic cells. Engineered modifications of motor function provide direct tests of protein structure-function relationships and potential tools for controlling cellular processes or for harnessing molecular transport in artificial systems. Here, we report the design and characterization of a panel of cytoskeletal motors that reversibly change gears--speed up, slow down or switch directions--when exposed to blue light. Our genetically encoded structural designs incorporate a photoactive protein domain to enable light-dependent conformational changes in an engineered lever arm. Using in vitro motility assays, we demonstrate robust spatiotemporal control over motor function and characterize the kinetics of the optical gearshifting mechanism. We have used a modular approach to create optical gearshifting motors for both actin-based and microtubule-based transport. PMID:25086603

  7. Remote control of myosin and kinesin motors using light-activated gearshifting

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Muneaki; Chen, Lu; Howes, Stuart C.; Schindler, Tony D.; Nogales, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Cytoskeletal motors perform critical force generation and transport functions in eukaryotic cells1,2. Engineered modifications of motor function provide direct tests of protein structure-function relationships and potential tools for controlling cellular processes or for harnessing molecular transport in artificial systems3,4. Here, we report the design and characterization of a panel of cytoskeletal motors that reversibly change gears—speed up, slow down or switch directions—when exposed to blue light. Our genetically encoded structural designs incorporate a photoactive protein domain to enable light-dependent conformational changes in an engineered lever arm. Using in vitro motility assays, we demonstrate robust spatiotemporal control over motor function and characterize the kinetics of the optical gearshifting mechanism. We have used a modular approach to create optical gearshifting motors for both actin-based and microtubule-based transport. PMID:25086603

  8. Remote control of myosin and kinesin motors using light-activated gearshifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Muneaki; Chen, Lu; Howes, Stuart C.; Schindler, Tony D.; Nogales, Eva; Bryant, Zev

    2014-09-01

    Cytoskeletal motors perform critical force generation and transport functions in eukaryotic cells. Engineered modifications of motor function provide direct tests of protein structure-function relationships and potential tools for controlling cellular processes or for harnessing molecular transport in artificial systems. Here, we report the design and characterization of a panel of cytoskeletal motors that reversibly change gears—speed up, slow down or switch directions—when exposed to blue light. Our genetically encoded structural designs incorporate a photoactive protein domain to enable light-dependent conformational changes in an engineered lever arm. Using in vitro motility assays, we demonstrate robust spatiotemporal control over motor function and characterize the kinetics of the optical gearshifting mechanism. We have used a modular approach to create optical gearshifting motors for both actin-based and microtubule-based transport.

  9. Flexibility of myosin attachment to surfaces influences F-actin motion.

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, D A; Bourdieu, L; Ott, A; Kinose, F; Libchaber, A

    1995-01-01

    We have analyzed the dependence of actin filament sliding movement on the mode of myosin attachment to surfaces. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to three distinct sites were used to tether myosin to nitrocellulose-coated glass. One antibody reacts with an epitope on the regulatory light chain (LC2) located at the head-rod junction. The other two react with sites in the rod domain, one in the S2 region near the S2-LMM hinge, and the other at the C terminus of the myosin rod. This method of attachment provides a means of controlling the flexibility and density of myosin on the surface. Fast skeletal muscle myosin monomers were bound to the surfaces through the specific interaction with these mAbs, and the sliding movement of fluorescently labeled actin filaments was analyzed by video microscopy. Each of these antibodies produced stable myosin-coated surfaces that supported uniform motion of actin over the course of several hours. Attachment of myosin through the anti-S2 and anti-LMM mAbs yielded significantly higher velocities (10 microns/s at 30 degrees C) than attachment through anti-LC2 (4-5 microns/s at 30 degrees C). For each antibody, we observed a characteristic value of the myosin density for the onset of F-actin motion and a second critical density for velocity saturation. The specific mode of attachment influences the velocity of actin filaments and the characteristic surface density needed to support movement. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 8 PMID:7544167

  10. Biphasic Regulation of Myosin Light Chain Phosphorylation by p21-activated Kinase Modulates Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contractility*

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ji; Pham, Ngoc T.; Olate, Nicole; Kislitsyna, Karina; Day, Mary-Clare; LeTourneau, Phillip A.; Kots, Alexander; Stewart, Randolph H.; Laine, Glen A.; Cox, Charles S.; Uray, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Supraphysiological mechanical stretching in smooth muscle results in decreased contractile activity. However, the mechanism is unclear. Previous studies indicated that intestinal motility dysfunction after edema development is associated with increased smooth muscle stress and decreased myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation in vivo, providing an ideal model for studying mechanical stress-mediated decrease in smooth muscle contraction. Primary human intestinal smooth muscle cells (hISMCs) were subjected to either control cyclical stretch (CCS) or edema (increasing) cyclical stretch (ECS), mimicking the biophysical forces in non-edematous and edematous intestinal smooth muscle in vivo. ECS induced significant decreases in phosphorylation of MLC and MLC phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and a significant increase in p21-activated kinase (PAK) activity compared with CCS. PAK regulated MLC phosphorylation in an activity-dependent biphasic manner. PAK activation increased MLC and MYPT1 phosphorylation in CCS but decreased MLC and MYPT1 phosphorylation in hISMCs subjected to ECS. PAK inhibition had the opposite results. siRNA studies showed that PAK1 plays a critical role in regulating MLC phosphorylation in hISMCs. PAK1 enhanced MLC phosphorylation via phosphorylating MYPT1 on Thr-696, whereas PAK1 inhibited MLC phosphorylation via decreasing MYPT1 on both Thr-696 and Thr-853. Importantly, in vivo data indicated that PAK activity increased in edematous tissue, and inhibition of PAK in edematous intestine improved intestinal motility. We conclude that PAK1 positively regulates MLC phosphorylation in intestinal smooth muscle through increasing inhibitory phosphorylation of MYPT1 under physiologic conditions, whereas PAK1 negatively regulates MLC phosphorylation via inhibiting MYPT1 phosphorylation when PAK activity is increased under pathologic conditions. PMID:23161543

  11. Effect of metabolic inhibition on intracellular Ca2+, phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain and force in rat smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, M J; Menice, C B; Morgan, K G; Wray, S

    1997-01-01

    1. The effect of the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), phosphorylation of the 20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin (MLC20) and contractility was investigated in isolated longitudinal smooth muscle from rat uteri. 2. Cyanide (2 mM) application to normally polarized preparations resulted in an elevation of basal [Ca2+]i but an inhibition of [Ca2+]i transients and the accompanying contractions. 3. Depolarization with high-K+ solution (40 mM KCI) resulted in elevation of [Ca2+]i and maintained force production. Phosphorylation of MLC20 was transiently increased followed by a steady-state augmentation above resting levels. 4. Carbachol (100 microM) produced a transient elevation of [Ca2+]i and force of depolarized tissues followed by a steady-state augmentation of both parameters. PGF2 alpha (1 microM) did not significantly potentiate [Ca2+]i or force in depolarized preparations. Both carbachol and PGF2 alpha potentiated phosphorylation of MLC20 in depolarized tissues. 5. Addition of cyanide to depolarized preparations, in the presence or absence of carbachol or PGF2 alpha, resulted in significant attenuation of force under each condition. The magnitude and normalized rates of force inhibition by cyanide were not significantly different for each stimulus condition. MLC20 phosphorylation levels were unaltered by cyanide treatment. However, cyanide increased the maintained level of [Ca2+]i under each experimental protocol. 6. It is concluded that the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation with cyanide results in dissociation of both the [Ca2+]i-force and MLC20 phosphorylation-force relationships in rat uterine smooth muscle. PMID:9080376

  12. Discrete effects of A57G-myosin essential light chain mutation associated with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Paulino, Ellena C.; Huang, Wenrui; Muthu, Priya; Liang, Jingsheng; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Rojas, Ana I.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    The functional consequences of the familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy A57G (alanine-to-glycine) mutation in the myosin ventricular essential light chain (ELC) were assessed in vitro and in vivo using previously generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing A57G-ELC mutant vs. wild-type (WT) of human cardiac ELC and in recombinant A57G- or WT-protein-exchanged porcine cardiac muscle strips. Compared with the Tg-WT, there was a significant increase in the Ca2+ sensitivity of force (ΔpCa50 ≅ 0.1) and an ∼1.3-fold decrease in maximal force per cross section of muscle observed in the mutant preparations. In addition, a significant increase in passive tension in response to stretch was monitored in Tg-A57G vs. Tg-WT strips indicating a mutation-induced myocardial stiffness. Consistently, the hearts of Tg-A57G mice demonstrated a high level of fibrosis and hypertrophy manifested by increased heart weight-to-body weight ratios and a decreased number of nuclei indicating an increase in the two-dimensional size of Tg-A57G vs. Tg-WT myocytes. Echocardiography examination showed a phenotype of eccentric hypertrophy in Tg-A57G mice, enhanced left ventricular (LV) cavity dimension without changes in LV posterior/anterior wall thickness. Invasive hemodynamics data revealed significantly increased end-systolic elastance, defined by the slope of the pressure-volume relationship, indicating a mutation-induced increase in cardiac contractility. Our results suggest that the A57G allele causes disease by means of a discrete modulation of myofilament function, increased Ca2+ sensitivity, and decreased maximal tension followed by compensatory hypertrophy and enhanced contractility. These and other contributing factors such as increased myocardial stiffness and fibrosis most likely activate cardiomyopathic signaling pathways leading to pathologic cardiac remodeling. PMID:23748425

  13. Molecular cloning, characterisation and mRNA expression analysis of the sheep myosin light chain 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunlan; Wang, Guizhi; Ji, Zhibin; Liu, Zhaohua; Hou, Lei; Liu, Guanqing; Wang, Jianmin

    2015-09-10

    The complete cDNA sequence of the sheep MYL1 (Myosin light chain 1) gene was cloned using RT-PCR, 5' RACE and 3' RACE. We obtained two alternatively spliced isoforms of the MYL1 gene, MYL1a and MYL1b, which are 849 and 1046bp in length and encode proteins composed of 150 and 192 amino acid residues, respectively. And the GenBank accession numbers of MYL1a and MYL1b full-length cDNA sequences that we cloned are KJ700419 and KJ710701, respectively. Neither protein was predicted to have a signal peptide, but both were predicted to have several N-glycosylation and phosphorylation sites. More than half of the secondary structure of these proteins was predicted to be α-helical. The human MYL2 protein (1m8q.1.C) is the most similar in tertiary structure. Sequence alignment showed that the sheep MYL1a protein shares more than 92% amino acid sequence similar with Mus musculus, Homo sapiens, Rattus norvegicus, Sus scrofa and Gallus gallus and that the MYL1b protein shares more than 93% amino acid sequence similar with M. musculus, H. sapiens, R. norvegicus, Bos taurus and Oryctolagus cuniculus. Transcription profile analyses of various tissues indicated that the sheep MYL1a and MYL1b mRNAs were highly but differentially expressed in the longissimus dorsi. Moreover, the expression levels of these genes in the longissimus dorsi differed between Dorper and Small-tailed Han sheep. These results serve as a foundation for further investigations of the function of the sheep MYL1 gene. PMID:25911560

  14. Non–Muscle Myosin Light Chain Kinase Isoform Is a Viable Molecular Target in Acute Inflammatory Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Moitra, Jaideep; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Sammani, Saad; Turner, Jerry R.; Chiang, Eddie T.; Evenoski, Carrie; Wang, Ting; Singleton, Patrick A.; Huang, Yong; Lussier, Yves A.; Watterson, D. Martin; Dudek, Steven M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and mechanical ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), major causes of acute respiratory failure with elevated morbidity and mortality, are characterized by significant pulmonary inflammation and alveolar/vascular barrier dysfunction. Previous studies highlighted the role of the non–muscle myosin light chain kinase isoform (nmMLCK) as an essential element of the inflammatory response, with variants in the MYLK gene that contribute to ALI susceptibility. To define nmMLCK involvement further in acute inflammatory syndromes, we used two murine models of inflammatory lung injury, induced by either an intratracheal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS model) or mechanical ventilation with increased tidal volumes (the VILI model). Intravenous delivery of the membrane-permeant MLC kinase peptide inhibitor, PIK, produced a dose-dependent attenuation of both LPS-induced lung inflammation and VILI (∼50% reductions in alveolar/vascular permeability and leukocyte influx). Intravenous injections of nmMLCK silencing RNA, either directly or as cargo within angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) antibody–conjugated liposomes (to target the pulmonary vasculature selectively), decreased nmMLCK lung expression (∼70% reduction) and significantly attenuated LPS-induced and VILI-induced lung inflammation (∼40% reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage protein). Compared with wild-type mice, nmMLCK knockout mice were significantly protected from VILI, with significant reductions in VILI-induced gene expression in biological pathways such as nrf2-mediated oxidative stress, coagulation, p53-signaling, leukocyte extravasation, and IL-6–signaling. These studies validate nmMLCK as an attractive target for ameliorating the adverse effects of dysregulated lung inflammation. PMID:20139351

  15. Proline-rich region of non-muscle myosin light chain kinase modulates kinase activity and endothelial cytoskeletal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Belvitch, Patrick; Adyshev, Djanybek; Elangovan, Venkateswaran R; Brown, Mary E; Naureckas, Caitlin; Rizzo, Alicia N; Siegler, Jessica H; Garcia, Joe G N; Dudek, Steven M

    2014-09-01

    Disruption of the pulmonary endothelial barrier and subsequent vascular leak is a hallmark of acute lung injury. Dynamic rearrangements in the endothelial cell (EC) peripheral membrane and underlying cytoskeleton are critical determinants of barrier function. The cytoskeletal effector protein non-muscle myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK) and the actin-binding regulatory protein cortactin are important regulators of the endothelial barrier. In the present study we functionally characterize a proline-rich region of nmMLCK previously identified as the possible site of interaction between nmMLCK and cortactin. A mutant nmMLCK construct deficient in proline residues at the putative sites of cortactin binding (amino acids 973, 976, 1019, 1022) was generated. Co-immunoprecipitation studies in human lung EC transfected with wild-type or mutant nmMLCK demonstrated similar levels of cortactin interaction at baseline and after stimulation with the barrier-enhancing agonist, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). In contrast, binding studies utilizing recombinant nmMLCK fragments containing the wild-type or proline-deficient sequence demonstrated a two-fold increase in cortactin binding (p<0.01) to the mutant construct. Immunofluorescent microscopy revealed an increased stress fiber density in ECs expressing GFP-labeled mutant nmMLCK at baseline (p=0.02) and after thrombin (p=0.01) or S1P (p=0.02) when compared to wild-type. Mutant nmMLCK demonstrated an increase in kinase activity in response to thrombin (p<0.01). Kymographic analysis demonstrated an increased EC membrane retraction distance and velocity (p<0.01) in response to the barrier disrupting agent thrombin in cells expressing the mutant vs. the wild-type nmMLCK construct. These results provide evidence that critical prolines within nmMLCK (amino acids 973, 976, 1019, 1022) regulate cytoskeletal and membrane events associated with pulmonary endothelial barrier function. PMID:25072537

  16. Proteomic analysis of physiological versus pathological cardiac remodeling in animal models expressing mutations in myosin essential light chains.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Aldrin V; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Cheah, Jenice X; Gilda, Jennifer E; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Zhou, Zhiqun; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-12-01

    In this study we aimed to provide an in-depth proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in the hearts of transgenic mouse models of pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy using tandem mass tag labeling and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The Δ43 mouse model, expressing the 43-amino-acid N-terminally truncated myosin essential light chain (ELC) served as a tool to study the mechanisms of physiological cardiac remodeling, while the pathological hypertrophy was investigated in A57G (Alanine 57 → Glycine) ELC mice. The results showed that 30 proteins were differentially expressed in Δ43 versus A57G hearts as determined by multiple pair comparisons of the mutant versus wild-type (WT) samples with P < 0.05. The A57G hearts showed differential expression of nine mitochondrial proteins involved in metabolic processes compared to four proteins for ∆43 hearts when both mutants were compared to WT hearts. Comparisons between ∆43 and A57G hearts showed an upregulation of three metabolically important mitochondrial proteins but downregulation of nine proteins in ∆43 hearts. The physiological model of cardiac hypertrophy (∆43) showed no changes in the levels of Ca(2+)-binding proteins relative to WT, while the pathologic model (A57G) showed the upregulation of three Ca(2+)-binding proteins, including sarcalumenin. Unique differences in chaperone and fatty acid metabolism proteins were also observed in Δ43 versus A57G hearts. The proteomics data support the results from functional studies performed previously on both animal models of cardiac hypertrophy and suggest that the A57G- and not ∆43- mediated alterations in fatty acid metabolism and Ca(2+) homeostasis may contribute to pathological cardiac remodeling in A57G hearts. PMID:26668058

  17. Inhibition of long myosin light-chain kinase activation alleviates intestinal damage after binge ethanol exposure and burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Zahs, Anita; Bird, Melanie D.; Ramirez, Luis; Turner, Jerrold R.; Choudhry, Mashkoor A.

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory evidence suggests that intestinal permeability is elevated following either binge ethanol exposure or burn injury alone, and this barrier dysfunction is further perturbed when these insults are combined. We and others have previously reported a rise in both systemic and local proinflammatory cytokine production in mice after the combined insult. Knowing that long myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) is important for epithelial barrier maintenance and can be activated by proinflammatory cytokines, we examined whether inhibition of MLCK alleviated detrimental intestinal responses seen after ethanol exposure and burn injury. To accomplish this, mice were given vehicle or a single binge ethanol exposure followed by a sham or dorsal scald burn injury. Following injury, one group of mice received membrane permeant inhibitor of MLCK (PIK). At 6 and 24 h postinjury, bacterial translocation and intestinal levels of proinflammatory cytokines were measured, and changes in tight junction protein localization and total intestinal morphology were analyzed. Elevated morphological damage, ileal IL-1β and IL-6 levels, and bacterial translocation were seen in mice exposed to ethanol and burn injury relative to either insult alone. This increase was not seen in mice receiving PIK after injury. Ethanol-exposed and burn-injured mice had reduced zonula occludens protein-1 and occludin localization to the tight junction relative to sham-injured mice. However, the observed changes in junctional complexes were not seen in our PIK-treated mice following the combined insult. These data suggest that MLCK activity may promote morphological and inflammatory responses in the ileum following ethanol exposure and burn injury. PMID:22790598

  18. Neonatal asphyxia induces the nitration of cardiac myosin light chain 2 that is associated with cardiac systolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Doroszko, Adrian; Polewicz, Dorota; Cadete, Virgilio J J; Sawicka, Jolanta; Jones, Michelle; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Cheung, Po-Yin; Sawicki, Grzegorz

    2010-12-01

    Hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (H-R) observed during perinatal asphyxia is a serious complication with high mortality and morbidity rates that may cause adverse cardiovascular effects in neonates. Our aim was to determine if oxidative stress related to H-R induces peroxynitrite-dependent modifications of the cardiac contractile protein, myosin regulatory light chain 2 (MLC2), and whether this is associated with development of cardiac systolic dysfunction. Twelve newborn piglets were acutely instrumented for hemodynamic monitoring and randomized to a control group ventilated with only atmospheric air or to the H-R study group exposed to alveolar normocapnic hypoxia followed by reoxygenation. Afterward, animals were euthanized, and the hearts were harvested for biochemical analyses. Systolic function as well as cardiac MLC2 levels decreased in H-R animals, whereas nitrates and nitrotyrosine levels increased. Negative correlations between nitrates, nitrotyrosine, and MLC2 levels were observed. Moreover, H-R induced nitration of two tyrosine residues within the MLC2 protein. Similarly, in vitro exposure of MLC2 to peroxynitrite resulted in the nitration of tyrosine, which increased the susceptibility of MLC2 to subsequent degradation by matrix metalloproteinase 2. Substitution of this tyrosine with phenylalanine prevented the matrix metalloproteinase 2-dependent degradation of MLC2. In addition, a large decrease in MLC2 phosphorylation caused by H-R was observed. Oxidative stress related to asphyxia induces nitration of cardiac MLC2 protein and thus increases its degradation. This and a large decrease in MLC2 phosphorylation contribute to the development of systolic dysfunction. Inhibition of MLC2 nitration and/or direct inhibition of its degradation by MMP-2 could be potential therapeutic targets aiming at reduction of myocardial damage during resuscitation of asphyxiated newborns. PMID:20386496

  19. Compressive Stress Induces Dephosphorylation of the Myosin Regulatory Light Chain via RhoA Phosphorylation by the Adenylyl Cyclase/Protein Kinase A Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Kenji; Ishihara, Seiichiro; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige; Haga, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress that arises due to deformation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) either stretches or compresses cells. The cellular response to stretching has been actively studied. For example, stretching induces phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) via the RhoA/RhoA-associated protein kinase (ROCK) pathway, resulting in increased cellular tension. In contrast, the effects of compressive stress on cellular functions are not fully resolved. The mechanisms for sensing and differentially responding to stretching and compressive stress are not known. To address these questions, we investigated whether phosphorylation levels of MRLC were affected by compressive stress. Contrary to the response in stretching cells, MRLC was dephosphorylated 5 min after cells were subjected to compressive stress. Compressive loading induced activation of myosin phosphatase mediated via the dephosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (Thr853). Because myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (Thr853) is phosphorylated only by ROCK, compressive loading may have induced inactivation of ROCK. However, GTP-bound RhoA (active form) increased in response to compressive stress. The compression-induced activation of RhoA and inactivation of its effector ROCK are contradictory. This inconsistency was due to phosphorylation of RhoA (Ser188) that reduced affinity of RhoA to ROCK. Treatment with the inhibitor of protein kinase A that phosphorylates RhoA (Ser188) induced suppression of compression-stimulated MRLC dephosphorylation. Incidentally, stretching induced phosphorylation of MRLC, but did not affect phosphorylation levels of RhoA (Ser188). Together, our results suggest that RhoA phosphorylation is an important process for MRLC dephosphorylation by compressive loading, and for distinguishing between stretching and compressing cells. PMID:25734240

  20. Clearing skeletal muscle with CLARITY for light microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Milgroom, Andrew; Ralston, Evelyn

    2016-04-01

    Viewing subcellular details over large tissue volumes is becoming an essential condition of the success of large-scale projects aimed at visualizing cell connections in whole organs or tissues. However, tissue opacity remains an obstacle to deep tissue imaging. This situation has brought renewed interest for techniques of tissue clearing; new protocols, such as CLARITY (Clear Lipid-exchanged Acrylamide-hybridized Rigid Imaging/Immunostaining/In situ hybridization-compatible Tissue-hYdrogel), have recently been developed. So far, most of the tests of these techniques have been applied to brain or other soft tissues. Here we show that CLARITY clears mouse hindlimb skeletal muscles and maintains the basic structural features of muscle and its fibers. However, tagging with fluorescent markers was not successful. PMID:26732743

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced activation of RhoA in airway smooth muscle cells: role in the Ca2+ sensitization of myosin light chain20 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Irene; Cobban, Hannah J; Vandenabeele, Peter; MacEwan, David J; Nixon, Graeme F

    2003-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), an inflammatory cytokine, has a potentially important role in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma and may contribute to airway hyper-responsiveness. Recent evidence has revealed that TNF can increase the Ca(2+) sensitivity of agonist-stimulated myosin light chain(20) (MLC(20)) phosphorylation and contractility in guinea pig airway smooth muscle (ASM). In the present study, the potential intracellular pathways responsible for this TNF-induced Ca(2+) sensitization were investigated. In permeabilized cultured guinea pig ASM cells, recombinant human TNF stimulated an increase in Ca(2+)-activated MLC(20) phosphorylation under Ca(2+) "clamp" conditions. This increased MLC(20) phosphorylation was inhibited by preincubation with the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632. TNF also increased the proportion of GTP-bound RhoA, as measured using rhotekin Rho-binding domain, in a time course compatible with a role in the TNF-induced Ca(2+) sensitization. In cultured human ASM cells, recombinant human TNF also activated RhoA with a similar time course. In addition, TNF stimulated phosphorylation of the regulatory subunit of the myosin phosphatase, which was inhibited by Y27632. Although human ASM cells expressed both receptor subtypes, TNF-R1 and TNF-R2, the activation of RhoA was predominantly via stimulation of the TNF-R1, although RhoA did not immunoprecipitate with the TNF-R1. In conclusion, the TNF-induced increase in the Ca(2+) sensitivity of MLC(20) phosphorylation is through stimulation of the TNF-R1 receptor and via a RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway leading to inhibition of the myosin light chain phosphatase. This intracellular mechanism may contribute to TNF-induced airway hyper-responsiveness. PMID:12606782

  2. A composite approach towards a complete model of the myosin rod.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, E Nihal; Taylor, Keenan C; Andreas, Michael P; Ajay, Guatam; Heinze, Nathan T; Cui, Qiang; Rayment, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Sarcomeric myosins have the remarkable ability to form regular bipolar thick filaments that, together with actin thin filaments, constitute the fundamental contractile unit of skeletal and cardiac muscle. This has been established for over 50?years and yet a molecular model for the thick filament has not been attained. In part this is due to the lack of a detailed molecular model for the coiled-coil that constitutes the myosin rod. The ability to self-assemble resides in the C-terminal section of myosin known as light meromyosin (LMM) which exhibits strong salt-dependent aggregation that has inhibited structural studies. Here we evaluate the feasibility of generating a complete model for the myosin rod by combining overlapping structures of five sections of coiled-coil covering 164 amino acid residues which constitute 20% of LMM. Each section contains ?7-9 heptads of myosin. The problem of aggregation was overcome by incorporating the globular folding domains, Gp7 and Xrcc4 which enhance crystallization. The effect of these domains on the stability and conformation of the myosin rod was examined through biophysical studies and overlapping structures. In addition, a computational approach was developed to combine the sections into a contiguous model. The structures were aligned, trimmed to form a contiguous model, and simulated for >700 ns to remove the discontinuities and achieve an equilibrated conformation that represents the native state. This experimental and computational strategy lays the foundation for building a model for the entire myosin rod. Proteins 2016; 84:172-189. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26573747

  3. Carbachol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal epithelial tight junction damage by down-regulating NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Jianguo

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol ameliorated the lipopolysaccharide-induced ileal tight junction damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol prevented the LPS-induced NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol exerted its beneficial effects in an {alpha}7 nicotinic receptor-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Carbachol is a cholinergic agonist that protects the intestines after trauma or burn injury. The present study determines the beneficial effects of carbachol and the mechanisms by which it ameliorates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 mg/kg LPS. Results showed that the gut barrier permeability was reduced, the ultrastructural disruption of tight junctions (TJs) was prevented, the redistribution of zonula occludens-1 and claudin-2 proteins was partially reversed, and the nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-{kappa}{beta}) and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) activation in the intestinal epithelium were suppressed after carbachol administration in LPS-exposed rats. Pretreatment with the {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7nAchR) antagonist {alpha}-bungarotoxin blocked the protective action of carbachol. These results suggested that carbachol treatment can protect LPS-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Carbachol exerts its beneficial effect on the amelioration of the TJ damage by inhibiting the NF-{kappa}{beta} and MLCK pathways in an {alpha}7nAchR-dependent manner.

  4. The basic helix-loop-helix protein upstream stimulating factor regulates the cardiac ventricular myosin light-chain 2 gene via independent cis regulatory elements.

    PubMed Central

    Navankasattusas, S; Sawadogo, M; van Bilsen, M; Dang, C V; Chien, K R

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have documented that 250 bp of the rat cardiac ventricular myosin light-chain 2 (MLC-2v) promoter is sufficient to confer cardiac muscle-specific expression on a luciferase reporter gene in both transgenic mice and primary cultured neonatal rat myocardial cells. Utilizing ligation-mediated PCR to perform in vivo dimethyl sulfate footprinting, the present study has identified protein-DNA interaction within the position from -176 to -165. This region, identified as MLE1, contains a core sequence, CACGTG, which conforms to the consensus E-box site and is identical to the upstream stimulating factor (USF)-binding site of the adenovirus major late promoter. Transient assays of luciferase reporter genes containing point mutations of the site demonstrate the importance of this cis regulatory element in the transcriptional activation of this cardiac muscle gene in ventricular muscle cells. The protein complex that occupies this site is capable of binding to HF-1a and PRE B sites which are known to be required for cardiac muscle-specific expression of rat MLC-2v and alpha-myosin heavy-chain genes, respectively. This study provides direct evidence that USF, a member of the basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper family, binds to MLE1, HF-1a, and PRE B sites and suggests that it is a component of protein complexes that may coordinately control the expression of MLC-2v and alpha-myosin heavy-chain genes. The current study also provides evidence that USF can positively and negatively regulate the MLC-2v gene via independent cis regulatory elements. Images PMID:7935447

  5. Cross-bridge Kinetics in Myofibrils Containing Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy R58Q Mutation in the Regulatory Light Chain of Myosin

    PubMed Central

    Mettikolla, P.; Calander, N.; Luchowski, R.; Gryczynski, I.; Gryczynski, Z.; Zhao, J.; Szczesna-Cordary, D.; Borejdo, J.

    2011-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a heritable form of cardiac hypertrophy caused by single-point mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins including ventricular myosin regulatory light chain (RLC). FHC often leads to malignant outcomes and sudden cardiac death. The FHC mutations are believed to alter the kinetics of the interaction between actin and myosin resulting in inefficient energy utilization and compromised function of the heart. We studied the effect of the FHC-linked R58Q-RLC mutation on the kinetics of transgenic (Tg)-R58Q cardiac myofibrils. Kinetics was determined from the rate of change of orientation of actin monomers during muscle contraction. Actin monomers change orientation because myosin cross-bridges deliver to it periodic force impulses. An individual impulse (but not time average of impulses) carries the information about the kinetics of actomyosin interaction. To observe individual impulses it was necessary to scale down the experiments to the level of a few molecules. A small population (~4 molecules) was selected by using (deliberately) inefficient fluorescence labeling and observing fluorescent molecules by a confocal microscope. We show that the kinetic rates are significantly smaller in the contracting cardiac myofibrils from Tg-R58Q mice then in control Tg-wild type (WT). We also demonstrate a lower force per cross-section of muscle fiber in Tg-R58Q versus Tg-WT mice. We conclude that the R58Q mutation-induced decrease in cross-bridge kinetics underlines the mechanism by which Tg-R58Q fibers develop low force and thus compromise the ability of the mutated heart to efficiently pump blood. PMID:21723297

  6. Identification of T. gondii Myosin Light Chain-1 as a Direct Target of TachypleginA-2, a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Parasite Motility and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jacqueline M.; Tran, Fanny; Pathak, Ravindra B.; Poupart, Séverine; Heaslip, Aoife T.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Ward, Gary E.

    2014-01-01

    Motility of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii plays an important role in the parasite’s life cycle and virulence within animal and human hosts. Motility is driven by a myosin motor complex that is highly conserved across the Phylum Apicomplexa. Two key components of this complex are the class XIV unconventional myosin, TgMyoA, and its associated light chain, TgMLC1. We previously showed that treatment of parasites with a small-molecule inhibitor of T. gondii invasion and motility, tachypleginA, induces an electrophoretic mobility shift of TgMLC1 that is associated with decreased myosin motor activity. However, the direct target(s) of tachypleginA and the molecular basis of the compound-induced TgMLC1 modification were unknown. We show here by “click” chemistry labelling that TgMLC1 is a direct and covalent target of an alkyne-derivatized analogue of tachypleginA. We also show that this analogue can covalently bind to model thiol substrates. The electrophoretic mobility shift induced by another structural analogue, tachypleginA-2, was associated with the formation of a 225.118 Da adduct on S57 and/or C58, and treatment with deuterated tachypleginA-2 confirmed that the adduct was derived from the compound itself. Recombinant TgMLC1 containing a C58S mutation (but not S57A) was refractory to click labelling and no longer exhibited a mobility shift in response to compound treatment, identifying C58 as the site of compound binding on TgMLC1. Finally, a knock-in parasite line expressing the C58S mutation showed decreased sensitivity to compound treatment in a quantitative 3D motility assay. These data strongly support a model in which tachypleginA and its analogues inhibit the motility of T. gondii by binding directly and covalently to C58 of TgMLC1, thereby causing a decrease in the activity of the parasite’s myosin motor. PMID:24892871

  7. Rho-kinase/myosin light chain kinase pathway plays a key role in the impairment of bile canaliculi dynamics induced by cholestatic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sharanek, Ahmad; Burban, Audrey; Burbank, Matthew; Le Guevel, Rémy; Li, Ruoya; Guillouzo, André; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis represents a frequent manifestation of drug-induced liver injury; however, the mechanisms underlying such injuries are poorly understood. In this study of human HepaRG and primary hepatocytes, we found that bile canaliculi (BC) underwent spontaneous contractions, which are essential for bile acid (BA) efflux and require alternations in myosin light chain (MLC2) phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. Short exposure to 6 cholestatic compounds revealed that BC constriction and dilation were associated with disruptions in the ROCK/MLCK/myosin pathway. At the studied concentrations, cyclosporine A and chlorpromazine induced early ROCK activity, resulting in permanent MLC2 phosphorylation and BC constriction. However, fasudil reduced ROCK activity and caused rapid, substantial and permanent MLC2 dephosphorylation, leading to BC dilation. The remaining compounds (1-naphthyl isothiocyanate, deoxycholic acid and bosentan) caused BC dilation without modulating ROCK activity, although they were associated with a steady decrease in MLC2 phosphorylation via MLCK. These changes were associated with a common loss of BC contractions and failure of BA clearance. These results provide the first demonstration that cholestatic drugs alter BC dynamics by targeting the ROCK/MLCK pathway; in addition, they highlight new insights into the mechanisms underlying bile flow failure and can be used to identify new predictive biomarkers of drug-induced cholestasis. PMID:27169750

  8. Differential localization of myosin and myosin phosphatase subunits in smooth muscle cells and migrating fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Murata, K; Hirano, K; Villa-Moruzzi, E; Hartshorne, D J; Brautigan, D L

    1997-01-01

    Myosin II light chains (MLC20) are phosphorylated by a Ca2+/calmodulin-activated kinase and dephosphorylated by a phosphatase that has been purified as a trimer containing the delta isoform of type 1 catalytic subunit (PP1C delta), a myosin-binding 130-kDa subunit (M130) and a 20-kDa subunit. The distribution of M130 and PP1C as well as myosin II was examined in smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblotting after differential extraction. Myosin and M130 colocalized with actin stress fibers in permeabilized cells. However, in nonpermeabilized cells the staining for myosin and M130 was different, with myosin mostly at the periphery of the cell and the M130 appearing diffusely throughout the cytoplasm. Accordingly, most M130 was recovered in a soluble fraction during permeabilization of cells, but the conditions used affected the solubility of both M130 and myosin. The PP1C alpha isoform colocalized with M130 and also was in the nucleus, whereas the PP1C delta isoform was localized prominently in the nucleus and in focal adhesions. In migrating cells, M130 concentrated in the tailing edge and was depleted from the leading half of the cell, where double staining showed myosin II was present. Because the tailing edge of migrating cells is known to contain phosphorylated myosin, inhibition of myosin LC20 phosphatase, probably by phosphorylation of the M130 subunit, may be required for cell migration. Images PMID:9247646

  9. Myosin from striated adductor muscle of Chlamys nipponensis akazara.

    PubMed

    Nishita, K; Ojima, T; Watanabe, S

    1979-09-01

    Myosin was isolated from striated adductor muscle of Akazara shell-fish, and purified on DEAE-Sephadex A50. The sedimentation constant (s 20,2 0 W) and the intrinsic viscosity, [eta] of Akazara myosin thus purified were estimated to be 6.6 S and 2.10 dl/g, respectively. In many respects, Akazara myosin was similar to scallop myosin. (1) Only one size of light-chain component (17,000 daltons) was detectable in SDS-gel electrophoresis of Akazara myosin, but two types of light-chain component were seen in urea-gel electrophoresis; these were equivalent to EDTA-light chain and SH-light chain of scallop myosin. The molar ratio of heavy chain (206,000 daltons), EDTA-light chain, and SH-light chain in Akazara myosin was estimated, from the staining densities of gel-electrophoretic bands, to be approximately 1 : 1 : 1. (2) EDTA-washing procedure removed EDTA-light chain only, causing desensitization of Akazara myosin. EDTA-light chain isolated from Akazara myofibrils was able to resensitize EDTA-washed Akazara myosin. Akazara myosin, however, was found to be different from scallop myosin in two important properties: (1) complete removal of EDTA-light chains was required to achieve a complete loss of calcium sensitivity, and full resensitization was attained on recombination of EDTA-light chains with desensitized myosin prepared essentially free from EDTA-light chains. (2) EDTA-light chains isolated from Akazara myofibrils show a calcium-induced UV absorption difference spectrum. PMID:159903

  10. Structure of the Small Dictyostelium discoideum Myosin Light Chain MlcB Provides Insights into MyoB IQ Motif Recognition*

    PubMed Central

    Liburd, Janine; Chitayat, Seth; Crawley, Scott W.; Munro, Kim; Miller, Emily; Denis, Chris M.; Spencer, Holly L.; Ct, Graham P.; Smith, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum MyoB is a class I myosin involved in the formation and retraction of membrane projections, cortical tension generation, membrane recycling, and phagosome maturation. The MyoB-specific, single-lobe EF-hand light chain MlcB binds the sole IQ motif of MyoB with submicromolar affinity in the absence and presence of Ca2+. However, the structural features of this novel myosin light chain and its interaction with its cognate IQ motif remain uncharacterized. Here, we describe the NMR-derived solution structure of apoMlcB, which displays a globular four-helix bundle. Helix 1 adopts a unique orientation when compared with the apo states of the EF-hand calcium-binding proteins calmodulin, S100B, and calbindin D9k. NMR-based chemical shift perturbation mapping identified a hydrophobic MyoB IQ binding surface that involves amino acid residues in helices I and IV and the functional N-terminal Ca2+ binding loop, a site that appears to be maintained when MlcB adopts the holo state. Complementary mutagenesis and binding studies indicated that residues Ile-701, Phe-705, and Trp-708 of the MyoB IQ motif are critical for recognition of MlcB, which together allowed the generation of a structural model of the apoMlcB-MyoB IQ complex. We conclude that the mode of IQ motif recognition by the novel single-lobe MlcB differs considerably from that of stereotypical bilobal light chains such as calmodulin. PMID:24790102

  11. Structure of the small Dictyostelium discoideum myosin light chain MlcB provides insights into MyoB IQ motif recognition.

    PubMed

    Liburd, Janine; Chitayat, Seth; Crawley, Scott W; Munro, Kim; Miller, Emily; Denis, Chris M; Spencer, Holly L; Ct, Graham P; Smith, Steven P

    2014-06-13

    Dictyostelium discoideum MyoB is a class I myosin involved in the formation and retraction of membrane projections, cortical tension generation, membrane recycling, and phagosome maturation. The MyoB-specific, single-lobe EF-hand light chain MlcB binds the sole IQ motif of MyoB with submicromolar affinity in the absence and presence of Ca(2+). However, the structural features of this novel myosin light chain and its interaction with its cognate IQ motif remain uncharacterized. Here, we describe the NMR-derived solution structure of apoMlcB, which displays a globular four-helix bundle. Helix 1 adopts a unique orientation when compared with the apo states of the EF-hand calcium-binding proteins calmodulin, S100B, and calbindin D9k. NMR-based chemical shift perturbation mapping identified a hydrophobic MyoB IQ binding surface that involves amino acid residues in helices I and IV and the functional N-terminal Ca(2+) binding loop, a site that appears to be maintained when MlcB adopts the holo state. Complementary mutagenesis and binding studies indicated that residues Ile-701, Phe-705, and Trp-708 of the MyoB IQ motif are critical for recognition of MlcB, which together allowed the generation of a structural model of the apoMlcB-MyoB IQ complex. We conclude that the mode of IQ motif recognition by the novel single-lobe MlcB differs considerably from that of stereotypical bilobal light chains such as calmodulin. PMID:24790102

  12. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Analysis of the Human Long Myosin Light-Chain Kinase 1-Specific Domain IgCAM3

    SciTech Connect

    W Vallen Graham; A Magis; K Bailey; J Turner; D Ostrov

    2011-12-31

    Myosin light-chain kinase-dependent tight junction regulation is a critical event in inflammatory cytokine-induced increases in epithelial paracellular permeability. MLCK is expressed in human intestinal epithelium as two isoforms, long MLCK1 and long MLCK2, and MLCK1 is specifically localized to the tight junction, where it regulates paracellular permeability. The sole difference between these long MLCK splice variants is the presence of an immunoglobulin-like cell-adhesion molecule domain, IgCAM3, in MLCK1. To gain insight into the structure of the IgCAM3 domain, the IgCAM3 domain of MLCK1 has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Preliminary X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution and were consistent with the primitive trigonal space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}.

  13. L-Type Calcium Channels Play a Critical Role in Maintaining Lens Transparency by Regulating Phosphorylation of Aquaporin-0 and Myosin Light Chain and Expression of Connexins

    PubMed Central

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Nagendran, Tharkika; de Ridder, Gustaaf G.; Schey, Kevin L.; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Homeostasis of intracellular calcium is crucial for lens cytoarchitecture and transparency, however, the identity of specific channel proteins regulating calcium influx within the lens is not completely understood. Here we examined the expression and distribution profiles of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and explored their role in morphological integrity and transparency of the mouse lens, using cDNA microarray, RT-PCR, immunoblot, pharmacological inhibitors and immunofluorescence analyses. The results revealed that Ca (V) 1.2 and 1.3 channels are expressed and distributed in both the epithelium and cortical fiber cells in mouse lens. Inhibition of LTCCs with felodipine or nifedipine induces progressive cortical cataract formation with time, in association with decreased lens weight in ex-vivo mouse lenses. Histological analyses of felodipine treated lenses revealed extensive disorganization and swelling of cortical fiber cells resembling the phenotype reported for altered aquaporin-0 activity without detectable cytotoxic effects. Analysis of both soluble and membrane rich fractions from felodipine treated lenses by SDS-PAGE in conjunction with mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses revealed decreases in β-B1-crystallin, Hsp-90, spectrin and filensin. Significantly, loss of transparency in the felodipine treated lenses was preceded by an increase in aquaporin-0 serine-235 phosphorylation and levels of connexin-50, together with decreases in myosin light chain phosphorylation and the levels of 14-3-3ε, a phosphoprotein-binding regulatory protein. Felodipine treatment led to a significant increase in gene expression of connexin-50 and 46 in the mouse lens. Additionally, felodipine inhibition of LTCCs in primary cultures of mouse lens epithelial cells resulted in decreased intracellular calcium, and decreased actin stress fibers and myosin light chain phosphorylation, without detectable cytotoxic response. Taken together, these observations reveal a crucial role for LTCCs in regulation of expression, activity and stability of aquaporin-0, connexins, cytoskeletal proteins, and the mechanical properties of lens, all of which have a vital role in maintaining lens function and cytoarchitecture. PMID:23734214

  14. L-type calcium channels play a critical role in maintaining lens transparency by regulating phosphorylation of aquaporin-0 and myosin light chain and expression of connexins.

    PubMed

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Nagendran, Tharkika; de Ridder, Gustaaf G; Schey, Kevin L; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Homeostasis of intracellular calcium is crucial for lens cytoarchitecture and transparency, however, the identity of specific channel proteins regulating calcium influx within the lens is not completely understood. Here we examined the expression and distribution profiles of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and explored their role in morphological integrity and transparency of the mouse lens, using cDNA microarray, RT-PCR, immunoblot, pharmacological inhibitors and immunofluorescence analyses. The results revealed that Ca (V) 1.2 and 1.3 channels are expressed and distributed in both the epithelium and cortical fiber cells in mouse lens. Inhibition of LTCCs with felodipine or nifedipine induces progressive cortical cataract formation with time, in association with decreased lens weight in ex-vivo mouse lenses. Histological analyses of felodipine treated lenses revealed extensive disorganization and swelling of cortical fiber cells resembling the phenotype reported for altered aquaporin-0 activity without detectable cytotoxic effects. Analysis of both soluble and membrane rich fractions from felodipine treated lenses by SDS-PAGE in conjunction with mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses revealed decreases in β-B1-crystallin, Hsp-90, spectrin and filensin. Significantly, loss of transparency in the felodipine treated lenses was preceded by an increase in aquaporin-0 serine-235 phosphorylation and levels of connexin-50, together with decreases in myosin light chain phosphorylation and the levels of 14-3-3ε, a phosphoprotein-binding regulatory protein. Felodipine treatment led to a significant increase in gene expression of connexin-50 and 46 in the mouse lens. Additionally, felodipine inhibition of LTCCs in primary cultures of mouse lens epithelial cells resulted in decreased intracellular calcium, and decreased actin stress fibers and myosin light chain phosphorylation, without detectable cytotoxic response. Taken together, these observations reveal a crucial role for LTCCs in regulation of expression, activity and stability of aquaporin-0, connexins, cytoskeletal proteins, and the mechanical properties of lens, all of which have a vital role in maintaining lens function and cytoarchitecture. PMID:23734214

  15. Myosin filament 3D structure in mammalian cardiac muscle?

    PubMed Central

    AL-Khayat, Hind A.; Morris, Edward P.; Kensler, Robert W.; Squire, John M.

    2008-01-01

    A number of cardiac myopathies (e.g. familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy) are linked to mutations in cardiac muscle myosin filament proteins, including myosin and myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C). To understand the myopathies it is necessary to know the normal 3D structure of these filaments. We have carried out 3D single particle analysis of electron micrograph images of negatively stained isolated myosin filaments from rabbit cardiac muscle. Single filament images were aligned and divided into segments about 2נ430 long, each of which was treated as an independent particle. The resulting 40 resolution 3D reconstruction showed both axial and azimuthal (no radial) myosin head perturbations within the 430 repeat, with successive crown rotations of approximately 60, 60 and 0, rather than the regular 40 for an unperturbed helix. However, it is shown that the projecting density peaks appear to start at low radius from origins closer to those expected for an unperturbed helical filament, and that the azimuthal perturbation especially increases with radius. The head arrangements in rabbit cardiac myosin filaments are very similar to those in fish skeletal muscle myosin filaments, suggesting a possible general structural theme for myosin filaments in all vertebrate striated muscles (skeletal and cardiac). PMID:18472277

  16. Effect of Serum from Chickens Treated with Clenbuterol on Myosin Accumulation, Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population, and Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Embryonic Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Wuethrich, Andrew J.; Hancock, Deana L.

    2002-01-01

    Broiler chickens at 35 d of age were fed 1 ppm clenbuterol for 14 d. This level of dietary clenbuterol led to 5-7% increases in the weights of leg and breast muscle tissue. At the end of the 14-d period, serum was prepared from both control and clenbuterol-treated chickens, and was then employed as a component of cell culture media at a final concentration of 20% (v/v). Muscle cell cultures were prepared from both the leg and the breast muscle groups of 12-d chick embryos. Treatment groups included control chicken serum to which 10 nM, 50 nM, and 1 uM clenbuterol had been added, as well as cells grown in media containing 10% horse serum. Cultures were subjected to each treatment for 3 d, beginning on the seventh d in culture. Neither the percent fusion nor the number of nuclei in myotubes was significantly affected by any of the treatments. The quantity of myosin heavy chains (MHCs) was not increased by serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens in either breast or leg muscle cultures; however, the MHC quantity was 50-150% higher in cultures grown in control chicken serum to which 10 and 50 nM clenbuterol had also been added. The B-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) population was 4000-7000 betaARs per cell in cultures grown in chicken serum with leg muscle cultures having approximately 25-30% more receptors than breast muscle Culture. Receptor population was not significantly affected by the presence of clenbuterol or by the presence of serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens. In contrast, the betaAR Population in leg and breast muscle cultures grown in the presence of 10% horse serum was 16,000-18,000 betaARs per cell. Basal concentration of cyclic adenosine 3':5'monophosphate (cAMP) was not significantly affected by the treatments. When cultures grown in chicken serum were stimulated for 10 min with 1 uM isoproterenol, limited increases of 12-20% in cAMP Concentration above the. basal levels were observed. However, when cultures grown in the presence of horse serum were stimulated with 1 uM isoproterenol, cAMP concentration was stimulated 5- to 9-fold above the basal levels. Thus, not only did cells, grown in horse serum have a higher PAR population, but also each receptor had a higher capacity for cAMP synthesis following isoproterenol stimulation. Finally, the hypothesis that clenbuterol exerts its action on muscle protein content by changes in cAMP concentration was tested. No correlation was apparent between basal cAMP concentration and MHC content.

  17. Loss of Prox1 in striated muscle causes slow to fast skeletal muscle fiber conversion and dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Petchey, Louisa K.; Risebro, Catherine A.; Vieira, Joaquim M.; Roberts, Tom; Bryson, John B.; Greensmith, Linda; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Riley, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Correct regulation of troponin and myosin contractile protein gene isoforms is a critical determinant of cardiac and skeletal striated muscle development and function, with misexpression frequently associated with impaired contractility or disease. Here we reveal a novel requirement for Prospero-related homeobox factor 1 (Prox1) during mouse heart development in the direct transcriptional repression of the fast-twitch skeletal muscle genes troponin T3, troponin I2, and myosin light chain 1. A proportion of cardiac-specific Prox1 knockout mice survive beyond birth with hearts characterized by marked overexpression of fast-twitch genes and postnatal development of a fatal dilated cardiomyopathy. Through conditional knockout of Prox1 from skeletal muscle, we demonstrate a conserved requirement for Prox1 in the repression of troponin T3, troponin I2, and myosin light chain 1 between cardiac and slow-twitch skeletal muscle and establish Prox1 ablation as sufficient to cause a switch from a slow- to fast-twitch muscle phenotype. Our study identifies conserved roles for Prox1 between cardiac and skeletal muscle, specifically implicated in slow-twitch fiber-type specification, function, and cardiomyopathic disease. PMID:24938781

  18. Physical and enzymatic properties of myosin from porcine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, D S; Frederiksen, D W

    1980-01-01

    Porcine brain myosin is a cytoplasmic protein similar to, but distinct from, its muscle counterpart. It has a high K+-ATPase activity at high ionic strength in EDTA and a low Mg+2-ATPase activity that is activated fivefold by either porcine brain or rabbit skeletal muscle actin. The molecule consists of three classes of subunits, with molecular weights of approximately 195,000 , 19,000, and 16,000. Brain myosin contains less glutamic acid, less lysine, and more threonine, serine, proline, and tyrosine than skeletal muscle myosin. The brain myosin extinction coefficient at 278 nm is 0.810 cm2/mg. Hydrodynamic studies yield an S020,w of 4.95S, a D020,w of 1.07 x 10(-7) cm2/s for brain myosin, and indicate that the molecules aggregate at high ionic strength. The molecular weight of the molecule, as calculated from extrapolation of D020,w/S20,w to zero concentration, is 444,000. The intrinsic viscosity of brain myosin is 0.191 ml/mg. These data are consistent with a highly asymmetric molecular species. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicates that brain myosin is 58-60% alpha-helical in the presence of Ca+2 ions, and that removal of Ca+2 causes a small change in the spectrum. PMID:6114756

  19. Differential signalling by muscarinic receptors in smooth muscle: m2-mediated inactivation of myosin light chain kinase via Gi3, Cdc42/Rac1 and p21-activated kinase 1 pathway, and m3-mediated MLC20 (20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II) phosphorylation via Rho-associated kinase/myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 and protein kinase C/CPI-17 pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Karnam S; Zhou, Huiping; Grider, John R; Brautigan, David L; Eto, Masumi; Makhlouf, Gabriel M

    2003-01-01

    Signalling via m3 and m2 receptors in smooth muscles involved activation of two G-protein-dependent pathways by each receptor. m2 receptors were coupled via Gbetagammai3 with activation of phospholipase C-beta3, phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Cdc42/Rac1 (where Cdc stands for cell division cycle) and p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Each step was inhibited by methoctramine and pertussis toxin. PAK1 activity was abolished in cells expressing both Cdc42-DN (where DN stands for dominant negative) and Rac1-DN. MLCK phosphorylation was inhibited by PAK1 antibody, and in cells expressing Cdc42-DN and Rac1-DN. m3 receptors were coupled via Galpha(q/11) with activation of phospholipase C-beta1 and via RhoA with activation of Rho-associated kinase (Rho kinase), phospholipase D and protein kinase C (PKC). Rho kinase and phospholipase D activities were inhibited by C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. PKC activity was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide, and in cells expressing RhoA-DN; PKC activity was also inhibited partly by Y27632 (44+/-5%). PKC-induced phosphorylation of PKC-activated 17 kDa inhibitor protein of type 1 phosphatase (CPI-17) at Thr38 was abolished by bisindolylmaleimide and inhibited partly by Y27632 (28+/-3%). Rho-kinase-induced phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and was abolished by Y27632. Sustained phosphorylation of 20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II (MLC20) and contraction were abolished by bisindolylmaleimide Y27632 and C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. The results suggest that Rho-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and PKC-dependent phosphorylation and enhancement of CPI-17 binding to the catalytic subunit of MLC phosphatase (MLCP) act co-operatively to inhibit MLCP activity, leading to sustained stimulation of MLC20 phosphorylation and contraction. Because Y27632 inhibited both Rho kinase and PKC activities, it could not be used to ascertain the contribution of MYPT1 to inhibition of MLCP activity. m2-dependent phosphorylation and inactivation of MLCK precluded its involvement in sustained MLC20 phosphorylation and contraction. PMID:12733988

  20. Effects of light-emitting diode (LED) therapy on skeletal muscle ischemia reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Shahzamani, Mehran; Takhtfooladi, Hamed Ashrafzadeh; Moayer, Fariborz; Allahverdi, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy has been shown to decrease ischemia-reperfusion injuries in the skeletal muscle by induction of synthesis of antioxidants and other cytoprotective proteins. Recently, the light-emitting diode (LED) has been used instead of laser for the treatment of various diseases because of its low operational cost compared to the use of a laser. The objective of this work was to analyze the effects of LED therapy at 904 nm on skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats. Thirty healthy male Wistar rats were allocated into three groups of ten rats each as follows: normal (N), ischemia-reperfusion (IR), and ischemia-reperfusion + LED (IR + LED) therapy. Ischemia was induced by right femoral artery clipping for 2 h followed by 2 h of reperfusion. The IR + LED group received LED irradiation on the right gastrocnemius muscle (4 J/cm(2)) immediately and 1 h following blood supply occlusion for 10 min. At the end of trial, the animals were euthanized and the right gastrocnemius muscles were submitted to histological and histochemical analysis. The extent of muscle damage in the IR + LED group was significantly lower than that in the IR group (P < 0.05). In comparison with other groups, tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the IR group were significantly increased (P < 0.05). The muscle tissue glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutases (SOD), and catalase (CAT) levels in the IR group were significantly lower than those in the subjects in other groups. From the histological and histochemical perspective, the LED therapy has alleviated the metabolic injuries in the skeletal muscle ischemia reperfusion in this experimental model. PMID:25274196

  1. Myosin superfamily evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Reid F; Langford, George M

    2002-11-01

    The superfamily of myosin proteins found in eukaryotic cells is known to contain at least 18 different classes. Members are classified based on the phylogenetic analysis of the head domains located at the amino terminus of the polypeptide. While phylogenetic relationships provide insights into the functional relatedness of myosins within and between families, the evolutionary history of the myosin superfamily is not revealed by such studies. In order to establish the evolutionary history of the superfamily, we analyzed the representation of myosin gene families in a range of organisms covering the taxonomic spectrum. The amino acid sequences of 232 myosin heavy chains, as well as 65 organisms representing the protist, plant, and animal kingdoms, were included in this study. A phylogenetic tree of organisms was constructed based on several complementary taxonomic classification schemes. The results of the analysis support an evolutionary hypothesis in which myosins II and I evolved the earliest of all the myosin groups. Myosins V and XI evolved from a common myosin II-like ancestor, but the two families diverged to either the plant (XI) or animal (V) lineage. Class VII myosin appeared fourth among the families, and classes VI and IX appeared later during the early period of metazoan radiation. Myosins III, XV, and XVIII appeared after this group, and X appeared during the formative phases of vertebrate evolution. The remaining members of the myosin superfamily (IV, VI, XII, XIII, XIV, XVI, and XVII) are limited in distribution to one or more groups of organisms. The evolutionary data permits one to predict the likelihood that myosin genes absent from a given species are either missing (not found yet because of insufficient data) or lost due to a mutation that removed the gene from an organism's lineage. In conclusion, an analysis of the evolutionary history of the myosin superfamily suggests that early-appearing myosin families function as generalists, carrying out a number of functions in a variety of cell types, while more recently evolved myosin families function as specialists and are limited to a few organisms or a few cell types within organisms. PMID:12382324

  2. Unconventional myosins acting unconventionally

    PubMed Central

    Woolner, Sarah; Bement, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Unconventional myosins are proteins that bind actin filaments in an ATP-regulated manner. Because of their association with membranes, they have traditionally been viewed as motors that function primarily to transport membranous organelles along actin filaments. Recently, however, a wealth of roles for myosins that are not obviously related to organelle transport have been uncovered, including organization of F-actin, mitotic spindle regulation and gene transcription. Furthermore, it has also become apparent that the motor domains of different myosins vary strikingly in their biophysical attributes. We suggest that the assumption that most unconventional myosins function primarily as organelle transporters might be misguided. PMID:19406643

  3. Analysis of tarantula skeletal muscle protein sequences and identification of transcriptional isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jingui; Sun, Yongqiao; Zhao, Fa-Qing; Yu, Jun; Craig, Roger; Hu, Songnian

    2009-01-01

    Background Tarantula has been used as a model system for studying skeletal muscle structure and function, yet data on the genes expressed in tarantula muscle are lacking. Results We constructed a cDNA library from Aphonopelma sp. (Tarantula) skeletal muscle and got 2507 high-quality 5'ESTs (expressed sequence tags) from randomly picked clones. EST analysis showed 305 unigenes, among which 81 had more than 2 ESTs. Twenty abundant unigenes had matches to skeletal muscle-related genes including actin, myosin, tropomyosin, troponin-I, T and C, paramyosin, muscle LIM protein, muscle protein 20, a-actinin and tandem Ig/Fn motifs (found in giant sarcomere-related proteins). Matches to myosin light chain kinase and calponin were also identified. These results support the existence of both actin-linked and myosin-linked regulation in tarantula skeletal muscle. We have predicted full-length as well as partial cDNA sequences both experimentally and computationally for myosin heavy and light chains, actin, tropomyosin, and troponin-I, T and C, and have deduced the putative peptides. A preliminary analysis of the structural and functional properties was also carried out. Sequence similarities suggested multiple isoforms of most myofibrillar proteins, supporting the generality of multiple isoforms known from previous muscle sequence studies. This may be related to a mix of muscle fiber types. Conclusion The present study serves as a basis for defining the transcriptome of tarantula skeletal muscle, for future in vitro expression of tarantula proteins, and for interpreting structural and functional observations in this model species. PMID:19298669

  4. Myosin expression and specialization among the earliest muscle fibers of the developing avian limb.

    PubMed

    Crow, M T; Stockdale, F E

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies specific to the light- and heavy-chain subunits of chicken skeletal muscle myosin have been used to identify fast and slow myosin-containing fibers in the thigh muscles of embryonic and adult chickens and to determine when in development diversification of muscle fiber types first occurs. Primary generation fibers which expressed different MLC and MHC types were evident within the dorsal and ventral premuscle masses and in the first muscles to form in the limb. These early embryonic muscle fiber types became distributed among and within the individual muscles of the thigh in a characteristic spatial pattern which served as a "blueprint" for guiding future muscle development and predicting the future fiber composition of the muscle. Despite the continuous addition of muscle fibers to the limb throughout development, the pattern remained unchanged. Neither the time of appearance, initial specialization, nor characteristic distribution of these primary fiber types within the limb was altered during the early embryonic period by chronic neuromuscular paralysis induced by D-tubocurarine. In contrast, muscles at later stages of embryonic development were markedly affected by such treatments and underwent atrophy and loss of differential staining characteristics. These results demonstrate that diversification of fibers in terms of myosin content is one of the earliest events in the formation of these muscles and suggest that the development of avian muscles be divided into two phases: an embryonic phase during which fibers of differing myosin content appear independently of innervation to become distributed in a specific topographic pattern within each muscle as it forms, followed by a fetal phase during which innervation becomes essential for maintaining this pattern and modulating the myosin content of its fibers. PMID:3943663

  5. The Rho-GTPase effector ROCK regulates meiotic maturation of the bovine oocyte via myosin light chain phosphorylation and cofilin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Rim; Xu, Yong-Nan; Jo, Yu-Jin; Namgoong, Suk; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2015-11-01

    Oocyte meiosis involves a unique asymmetric division involving spindle movement from the central cytoplasm to the cortex, followed by polar body extrusion. ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector involved in various cellular functions in somatic cells as well as oocyte meiosis. ROCK was previously shown to promote actin organization by phosphorylating several downstream targets, including LIM domain kinase (LIMK), phosphorylated cofilin (p-cofilin), and myosin light chain (MLC). In this study, we investigated the roles of ROCK and MLC during bovine oocyte meiosis. We found that ROCK was localized around the nucleus at the oocyte's germinal-vesicle (GV) stage, but spreads to the rest of the cytoplasm in later developmental stages. On the other hand, phosphorylated MLC (p-MLC) localized at the cortex, and its abundance decreased by the metaphase-II stage. Disrupting ROCK activity, via RNAi or the chemical inhibitor Y-27632, blocked both cell cycle progression and polar body extrusion. ROCK inhibition also resulted in decreased cortical actin, p-cofilin, and p-MLC levels. Similar to the phenotype associated with inhibition of ROCK activity, inhibition of MLC kinase by the chemical inhibitor ML-7 caused defects in polar body extrusion. Collectively, our results suggest that the ROCK/MLC/actomyosin as well as ROCK/LIMK/cofilin pathways regulate meiotic spindle migration and cytokinesis during bovine oocyte maturation. PMID:26175189

  6. Vasoactivity of Rucaparib, a PARP-1 Inhibitor, is a Complex Process that Involves Myosin Light Chain Kinase, P2 Receptors, and PARP Itself

    PubMed Central

    McCrudden, Cian M.; O’Rourke, Martin G.; Cherry, Kim E.; Yuen, Hiu-Fung; O’Rourke, Declan; Babur, Muhammad; Telfer, Brian A.; Thomas, Huw D.; Keane, Patrick; Nambirajan, Thiagarajan; Hagan, Chris; O’Sullivan, Joe M.; Shaw, Chris; Williams, Kaye J.; Curtin, Nicola J.; Hirst, David G.; Robson, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), as monotherapy or to supplement the potencies of other agents, is a promising strategy in cancer treatment. We previously reported that the first PARP inhibitor to enter clinical trial, rucaparib (AG014699), induced vasodilation in vivo in xenografts, potentiating response to temozolomide. We now report that rucaparib inhibits the activity of the muscle contraction mediator myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) 10-fold more potently than its commercially available inhibitor ML-9. Moreover, rucaparib produces additive relaxation above the maximal degree achievable with ML-9, suggesting that MLCK inhibition is not solely responsible for dilation. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis using L-NMMA also failed to impact rucaparib’s activity. Rucaparib contains the nicotinamide pharmacophore, suggesting it may inhibit other NAD+-dependent processes. NAD+ exerts P2 purinergic receptor-dependent inhibition of smooth muscle contraction. Indiscriminate blockade of the P2 purinergic receptors with suramin abrogated rucaparib-induced vasodilation in rat arterial tissue without affecting ML-9-evoked dilation, although the specific receptor subtypes responsible have not been unequivocally identified. Furthermore, dorsal window chamber and real time tumor vessel perfusion analyses in PARP-1-/- mice indicate a potential role for PARP in dilation of tumor-recruited vessels. Finally, rucaparib provoked relaxation in 70% of patient-derived tumor-associated vessels. These data provide tantalising evidence of the complexity of the mechanism underlying rucaparib-mediated vasodilation. PMID:25689628

  7. Non-muscle myosin light chain promotes endothelial progenitor cells senescence and dysfunction in pulmonary hypertensive rats through up-regulation of NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Li, Tao; Peng, Jing-Jie; Zhang, Jie-Jie; Liu, Wei-Qi; Luo, Xiu-Ju; Ma, Qi-Lin; Gong, Zhi-Cheng; Peng, Jun

    2016-03-15

    Non-muscle myosin regulatory light chain (nmMLC20) is reported to exert transcriptional function in regulation of gene expression, and NADPH oxidase (NOX)-derived reactive oxygen species contribute to vascular remodeling of pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). This study aims to determine if nmMLC20 can promote endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) senescence and dysfunction through up-regulation of NOX in PAH rats. The rats were exposed to10% hypoxia for 3 weeks to establish a PAH model, which showed an increase in right ventricle systolic pressure, right ventricular and pulmonary vascular remodeling, and the accelerated senescence and impaired functions in EPCs, accompanied by an increase in Rho-kinase (ROCK) and NOX activities, p-nmMLC20 level, NOX expression and H2O2 content; these phenomena were reversed by fasudil, a selective inhibitor of ROCK. Next, normal EPCs were cultured under hypoxia to induce senescence in vitro. Consistent with the in vivo findings, hypoxia increased the senescence and dysfunction of EPCs concomitant with an increase in ROCK and NOX activities, p-nmMLC20 level, NOX expression and H2O2 content; these phenomena were reversed by fasudil. Knockdown of nmMLC20 showed similar results to that of fasudil except no effect on ROCK activity. Based on these observations, we conclude that nmMLC20 could promote the senescence and dysfunctions of EPCs in PAH through up-regulation of NOX in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. PMID:26872992

  8. Loading of nuclear autoantigens prototypically recognized by systemic lupus erythematosus sera into late apoptotic vesicles requires intact microtubules and myosin light chain kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Zirngibl, M; Frnrohr, B G; Janko, C; Munoz, L E; Voll, R E; Gregory, C D; Schett, G; Herrmann, M

    2015-01-01

    Most cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are characterized by an impaired clearance of apoptotic cells in various tissues. Non-cleared apoptotic waste is considered an immunogen driving the autoimmune response in patients with SLE. During the execution of apoptosis, membrane blebs are formed and filled with cellular components. Here, we evaluate the cytoskeletal pathway(s) responsible for the loading of SLE prototypic nuclear autoantigens into the apoptotic cell-derived membranous vesicles (ACMV) generated during late phases of apoptosis. HeLa cells expressing a fusion protein of histone H2B with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were irradiated with ultraviolet (UV)-B to induce apoptosis. The appearance and trafficking of chromatin-derived material was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Specific inhibitors of cytoskeletal pathways were employed to identify the motile elements involved in translocation and trafficking of the nuclear components. We observed that immediately after their appearance the ACMV did not contain histone H2BGFP; in this phase the fluorescence was contained in the nuclear remnants and the cytoplasm. Within consecutive minutes the ACMV were loaded with chromatin-derived material, whereas the loading of simultaneously created ACMV with histone H2BGFP was not uniform. Some ACMV were preferentially filled and, consequently, showed a remarkably higher histone H2BGFP accumulation. Inhibitors of the cytoskeleton revealed that functional microtubules and myosin light chain kinase are required for nuclear shrinkage and loading of nuclear material into the ACMV, respectively. PMID:24673456

  9. Structure–Function Analysis of the Non-Muscle Myosin Light Chain Kinase (nmMLCK) Isoform by NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling: Influence of MYLK Variants

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Kui; Ramirez, Benjamin; Mapes, Brandon; Shen, Grace R.; Gokhale, Vijay; Brown, Mary E.; Santarsiero, Bernard; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Dudek, Steven M.; Wang, Ting; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2015-01-01

    The MYLK gene encodes the multifunctional enzyme, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), involved in isoform-specific non-muscle and smooth muscle contraction and regulation of vascular permeability during inflammation. Three MYLK SNPs (P21H, S147P, V261A) alter the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the non-muscle isoform of MLCK (nmMLCK) and are highly associated with susceptibility to acute lung injury (ALI) and asthma, especially in individuals of African descent. To understand the functional effects of SNP associations, we examined the N-terminal segments of nmMLCK by 1H-15N heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) spectroscopy, a 2-D NMR technique, and by in silico molecular modeling. Both NMR analysis and molecular modeling indicated SNP localization to loops that connect the immunoglobulin-like domains of nmMLCK, consistent with minimal structural changes evoked by these SNPs. Molecular modeling analysis identified protein-protein interaction motifs adversely affected by these MYLK SNPs including binding by the scaffold protein 14-3-3, results confirmed by immunoprecipitation and western blot studies. These structure-function studies suggest novel mechanisms for nmMLCK regulation, which may confirm MYLK as a candidate gene in inflammatory lung disease and advance knowledge of the genetic underpinning of lung-related health disparities. PMID:26111161

  10. Direct Modeling of X-Ray Diffraction Pattern from Contracting Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Koubassova, Natalia A.; Bershitsky, Sergey Y.; Ferenczi, Michael A.; Tsaturyan, Andrey K.

    2008-01-01

    A direct modeling approach was used to quantitatively interpret the two-dimensional x-ray diffraction patterns obtained from contracting mammalian skeletal muscle. The dependence of the calculated layer line intensities on the number of myosin heads bound to the thin filaments, on the conformation of these heads and on their mode of attachment to actin, was studied systematically. Results of modeling are compared to experimental data collected from permeabilized fibers from rabbit skeletal muscle contracting at 5°C and 30°C and developing low and high isometric tension, respectively. The results of the modeling show that: i), the intensity of the first actin layer line is independent of the tilt of the light chain domains of myosin heads and can be used as a measure of the fraction of myosin heads stereospecifically attached to actin; ii), during isometric contraction at near physiological temperature, the fraction of these heads is ∼40% and the light chain domains of the majority of them are more perpendicular to the filament axis than in rigor; and iii), at low temperature, when isometric tension is low, a majority of the attached myosin heads are bound to actin nonstereospecifically whereas at high temperature and tension they are bound stereospecifically. PMID:18539638

  11. Effect of light and brine shrimp on skeletal δ 13C in the Hawaiian coral Porites compressa: a tank experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottoli, Andréa G.

    2002-06-01

    Previous experimental fieldwork showed that coral skeletal δ 13C values decreased when solar intensity was reduced, and increased in the absence of zooplankton. However, actual seasonal changes in solar irradiance levels are typically less pronounced than those used in the previous experiment and the effect of increases in the consumption of zooplankton in the coral diet on skeletal δ 13C remains relatively unknown. In the present study, the effects of four different light and heterotrophy regimes on coral skeletal δ 13C values were measured. Porites compressa corals were grown in outdoor flow-through tanks under 112%, 100%, 75%, and 50% light conditions at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, Hawaii. In addition, corals were fed either zero, low, medium, or high concentrations of brine shrimp. Decreases in light from 100% resulted in significant decreases in δ 13C that is most likely due to a corresponding decrease in photosynthesis. Increases in light to 112% also resulted in a decrease in δ 13C values. This latter response may be a consequence of photoinhibition. The overall curved response in δ 13C values was described by a significant quadratic function. Increases in brine shrimp concentrations resulted in increased skeletal δ 13C levels. This unexpected outcome appears to be attributable to enhanced nitrogen supply associated with the brine shrimp diet which led to increased zooxanthellae concentrations, increased photosynthesis rates, and thus increased δ 13C values. This result highlights the potential influence of nutrients from heterotrophically acquired carbon in maintaining the zooxanthellae-host symbiosis in balance. In addition, evidence is presented that suggests that coral skeletal growth and δ 13C are decoupled. These results increase our knowledge of how light and heterotrophy affects the δ 13C of coral skeletons.

  12. Alternative S2 Hinge Regions of the Myosin Rod Affect Myofibrillar Structure and Myosin Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Mark S.; Dambacher, Corey M.; Knowles, Aileen F.; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Swank, Douglas M.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Maughan, David W.

    2009-07-01

    The subfragment 2/light meromyosin 'hinge' region has been proposed to significantly contribute to muscle contraction force and/or speed. Transgenic replacement of the endogenous fast muscle isovariant hinge A (exon 15a) in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle with the slow muscle hinge B (exon 15b) allows examination of the structural and functional changes when only this region of the myosin molecule is different. Hinge B was previously shown to increase myosin rod length, increase A-band and sarcomere length, and decrease flight performance compared to hinge A. We applied additional measures to these transgenic lines to further evaluate the consequences of modifying this hinge region. Structurally, the longer A-band and sarcomere lengths found in the hinge B myofibrils appear to be due to the longitudinal addition of myosin heads. Functionally, hinge B, although a significant distance from the myosin catalytic domain, alters myosin kinetics in a manner consistent with this region increasing myosin rod length. These structural and functional changes combine to decrease whole fly wing-beat frequency and flight performance. Our results indicate that this hinge region plays an important role in determining myosin kinetics and in regulating thick and thin filament lengths as well as sarcomere length.

  13. Thyroid Hormone Signaling in Male Mouse Skeletal Muscle Is Largely Independent of D2 in Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Werneck-de-Castro, Joao P; Fonseca, Tatiana L; Ignacio, Daniele L; Fernandes, Gustavo W; Andrade-Feraud, Cristina M; Lartey, Lattoya J; Ribeiro, Marcelo B; Ribeiro, Miriam O; Gereben, Balazs; Bianco, Antonio C

    2015-10-01

    The type 2 deiodinase (D2) activates the prohormone T4 to T3. D2 is expressed in skeletal muscle (SKM), and its global inactivation (GLOB-D2KO mice) reportedly leads to skeletal muscle hypothyroidism and impaired differentiation. Here floxed Dio2 mice were crossed with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the myosin light chain 1f (cre-MLC) to disrupt D2 expression in the late developmental stages of skeletal myocytes (SKM-D2KO). This led to a loss of approximately 50% in D2 activity in neonatal and adult SKM-D2KO skeletal muscle and about 75% in isolated SKM-D2KO myocytes. To test the impact of Dio2 disruption, we measured soleus T3 content and found it to be normal. We also looked at the expression of T3-responsive genes in skeletal muscle, ie, myosin heavy chain I, α-actin, myosin light chain, tropomyosin, and serca 1 and 2, which was preserved in neonatal SKM-D2KO hindlimb muscles, at a time that coincides with a peak of D2 activity in control animals. In adult soleus the baseline level of D2 activity was about 6-fold lower, and in the SKM-D2KO soleus, the expression of only one of five T3-responsive genes was reduced. Despite this, adult SKM-D2KO animals performed indistinguishably from controls on a treadmill test, running for approximately 16 minutes and reached a speed of about 23 m/min; muscle strength was about 0.3 mN/m·g body weight in SKM-D2KO and control ankle muscles. In conclusion, there are multiple sources of D2 in the mouse SKM, and its role is limited in postnatal skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:26214036

  14. Reciprocal regulation controlling the expression of CPI-17, a specific inhibitor protein for the myosin light chain phosphatase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee In; Urban, Mark; Young, Garbo D; Eto, Masumi

    2012-07-01

    Cellular activity of the myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) determines agonist-induced force development of smooth muscle (SM). CPI-17 is an endogenous inhibitor protein for MLCP, responsible for mediating G-protein signaling into SM contraction. Fluctuations in CPI-17 expression occur in response to pathological stresses, altering excitation-contraction coupling in SM. Here, we determined the signaling pathways regulating CPI-17 expression in rat aorta tissues and the cell culture using a pharmacological approach. CPI-17 transcription was suppressed in response to the proliferative stimulus with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) through the ERK1/2 pathway, whereas it was elevated in response to inflammatory, stress-induced and excitatory stimuli with transforming growth factor-β, IL-1β, TNFα, sorbitol, and serotonin. CPI-17 transcription was repressed by inhibition of JNK, p38, PKC, and Rho-kinase (ROCK). The mouse and human CPI-17 gene promoters were governed by the proximal GC-boxes at the 5'-flanking region, where Sp1/Sp3 transcription factors bound. Sp1 binding to the region was more prominent in intact aorta tissues, compared with the SM cell culture, where the CPI-17 gene is repressed. The 173-bp proximal promoter activity was negatively and positively regulated through PDGF-induced ERK1/2 and sorbitol-induced p38/JNK pathways, respectively. By contrast, PKC and ROCK inhibitors failed to repress the 173-bp promoter activity, suggesting distal enhancer elements. CPI-17 transcription was insensitive to knockdown of myocardin/Kruppel-like factor 4 small interfering RNA or histone deacetylase inhibition. The reciprocal regulation of Sp1/Sp3-driven CPI-17 expression through multiple kinases may be responsible for the adaptation of MLCP signal and SM tone to environmental changes. PMID:22538237

  15. Sp1-mediated nonmuscle myosin light chain kinase expression and enhanced activity in vascular endothelial growth factor–induced vascular permeability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite the important role played by the nonmuscle isoform of myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK) in vascular barrier regulation and the implication of both nmMLCK and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the role played by nmMLCK in VEGF-induced vascular permeability is poorly understood. In this study, the role played by nmMLCK in VEGF-induced vascular hyperpermeability was investigated. Human lung endothelial cell barrier integrity in response to VEGF is examined in both the absence and the presence of nmMLCK small interfering RNAs. Levels of nmMLCK messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, and promoter activity expression were monitored after VEGF stimulation in lung endothelial cells. nmMYLK promoter activity was assessed using nmMYLK promoter luciferase reporter constructs with a series of nested deletions. nmMYLK transcriptional regulation was further characterized by examination of a key transcriptional factor. nmMLCK plays an important role in VEGF-induced permeability. We found that activation of the VEGF signaling pathway in lung endothelial cells increases MYLK gene product at both mRNA and protein levels. Increased nmMLCK mRNA and protein expression is a result of increased nmMYLK promoter activity, regulated in part by binding of the Sp1 transcription factor on triggering by the VEGF signaling pathway. Taken together, these findings suggest that MYLK is an important ARDS candidate gene and a therapeutic target that is highly influenced by excessive VEGF concentrations in the inflamed lung. PMID:26697178

  16. EFIA/YB-1 is a component of cardiac HF-1A binding activity and positively regulates transcription of the myosin light-chain 2v gene.

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Y; Chien, K R

    1995-01-01

    Transient assays in cultured ventricular muscle cells and studies in transgenic mice have identified two adjacent regulatory elements (HF-1a and HF-1b/MEF-2) as required to maintain ventricular chamber-specific expression of the myosin light-chain 2v (MLC-2v) gene. A rat neonatal heart cDNA library was screened with an HF-1a binding site, resulting in the isolation of EFIA, the rat homolog of human YB-1. Purified recombinant EFIA/YB-1 protein binds to the HF-1a site in a sequence-specific manner and contacts a subset of the HF-1a contact points made by the cardiac nuclear factor(s). The HF-1a sequence contains AGTGG, which is highly homologous to the inverted CCAAT core of the EFIA/YB-1 binding sites and is found to be essential for binding of the recombinant EFIA/YB-1. Antiserum against Xenopus YB-3 (100% identical in the DNA binding domain and 89% identical in overall amino acid sequence to rat EFIA) can specifically abolish a component of the endogenous HF-1a complex in the rat cardiac myocyte nuclear extracts. In cotransfection assays, EFIA/YB-1 increased 250-bp MLC-2v promoter activity by 3.4-fold specifically in the cardiac cell context and in an HF-1a site-dependent manner. EFIA/YB-1 complexes with an unknown protein in cardiac myocyte nuclear extracts to form the endogenous HF-1a binding activity. Immunocoprecipitation revealed that EFIA/YB-1 has a major associated protein of approximately 30 kDa (p30) in cardiac muscle cells. This study suggests that EFIA/YB-1, together with the partner p30, binds to the HF-1a site and, in conjunction with HF-1b/MEF-2, mediates ventricular chamber-specific expression of the MLC-2v gene. PMID:7760795

  17. Ocular Inflammation and Corneal Permeability Alteration by Benzalkonium Chloride in Rats: A Protective Effect of a Myosin Light Chain Kinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Droy-Lefaix, Marie Thérèse; Bueno, Lionel; Caron, Philippe; Belot, Eric; Roche, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interest of an ophthalmic eyedrop preparation containing a myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor, ML-7, in the treatment of ocular surface. The local protective effect on the inflammation and the increase of corneal permeability induced by benzalkonium (BAK) was evaluated. Methods. An ocular instillation of 10 μL BAK at a concentration of 0.1% in PBS was performed on rats. The eyes were rinsed with sterilized water, 10 minutes after BAK preceded by instillation at T −24, −12, and −0.5 hours of 10 μL of ML-7: 100 μg (10 μL) into a gel form vehicle. All animals were sacrificed 6 hours after BAK instillation. The eyes were isolated for study in a masked manner. The ocular surface inflammation was assessed by measuring the inflammatory cell infiltration by a histologic quantitative analysis and for total ocular myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. The tight junction permeability was tested. Results. Instillation of 0.1% BAK increased the inflammation of the eye. The quantitative analysis showed an increase in the number of eosinophil and neutrophil polynuclears, and MPO activity. Pretreatment with ML-7 reduced inflammation (P < 0.05). The vehicle alone produced no notable effects. BAK instillation also thickened the fluorescent corneal front on frozen sections, indicating an increase of tight junction permeability. Pretreatment with ML-7 suppressed BAK-induced alterations of paracellular permeability while the vehicle had no visible effects. Conclusions. Our study indicates that the inhibition of corneal cytoskeleton contraction by an MLCK inhibitor prevents BAK-induced ocular inflammatory response, and that ML-7 may be a new and original preparation in the treatment of ocular surface pathologies. PMID:23518768

  18. Transgenic expression and purification of myosin isoforms using the Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle system

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, James T.; Melkani, Girish C.; Huxford, Tom; Bernstein, Sanford I.

    2011-01-01

    Biophysical and structural studies on muscle myosin rely upon milligram quantities of extremely pure material. However, many biologically interesting myosin isoforms are expressed at levels that are too low for direct purification from primary tissues. Efforts aimed at recombinant expression of functional striated muscle myosin isoforms in bacterial or insect cell culture have largely met with failure, although high level expression in muscle cell culture has recently been achieved at significant expense. We report a novel method for the use of strains of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster genetically engineered to produce histidine-tagged recombinant muscle myosin isoforms. This method takes advantage of the single muscle myosin heavy chain gene within the Drosophila genome, the high level of expression of accessible myosin in the thoracic indirect flight muscles, the ability to knock out endogenous expression of myosin in this tissue and the relatively low cost of fruit fly colony production and maintenance. We illustrate this method by expressing and purifying a recombinant histidine-tagged variant of embryonic body wall skeletal muscle myosin II from an engineered fly strain. The recombinant protein shows the expected ATPase activity and is of sufficient purity and homogeneity for crystallization. This system may prove useful for the expression and isolation of mutant myosins associated with skeletal muscle diseases and cardiomyopathies for their biochemical and structural characterization. PMID:22178692

  19. Effects of proteolysis on the adenosinetriphosphatase activities of thymus myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, N.D.; Wagner, P.D.

    1987-07-28

    Limited proteolysis was used to identify regions on the heavy chains of calf thymus myosin which may be involved in ATP and actin binding. Assignments of the various proteolytic fragments to different parts of the myosin heavy chain were based on solubility, gel filtration, electron microscopy, and binding of /sup 32/P-labeled regulatory light chains. Chymotrypsin rapidly cleaved within the head of thymus myosin to give a 70,000-dalton N-terminal fragment and a 140,000-dalton C-terminal fragment. These two fragments did not dissociate under nondenaturing conditions. Cleavage within the myosin tail to give heavy meromyosin occurred more slowly. Cleavage at the site 70,000 daltons from the N-terminus of the heavy chain caused about a 30-fold decrease in the actin concentration required to achieve half-maximal stimulation of the magnesium-adenosinetriphosphatase (Mg-ATPase) activity of unphosphorylated thymus myosin. The actin-activated ATPase activity of this digested myosin was only slightly affected by light chain phosphorylation. Actin inhibited the cleavage at this site by chymotrypsin. In the presence of ATP, chymotrypsin rapidly cleaved the thymus myosin heavy chain at an additional site about 4000 daltons from the N-terminus. Cleavage at this site caused a 2-fold increase in the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-ATPase activity and 3-fold decreases in the Ca/sup 2 +/- and Mg-ATPase activities of thymus myosin. Thus, cleavage at the N-terminus of thymus myosin was affected by ATP, and this cleavage altered ATPase activity. Papain cleaved the thymus myosin heavy chain about 94,000 daltons from the N-terminus to give subfragment 1. Although this subfragment 1 contained intact light chains, its actin-activated ATPase activity was not affected by light chain phosphorylation.

  20. Myosin-I nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, P G; Albanesi, J P; Bahler, M; Bement, W M; Berg, J S; Burgess, D R; Burnside, B; Cheney, R E; Corey, D P; Coudrier, E; de Lanerolle, P; Hammer, J A; Hasson, T; Holt, J R; Hudspeth, A J; Ikebe, M; Kendrick-Jones, J; Korn, E D; Li, R; Mercer, J A; Milligan, R A; Mooseker, M S; Ostap, E M; Petit, C; Pollard, T D; Sellers, J R; Soldati, T; Titus, M A

    2001-11-26

    We suggest that the vertebrate myosin-I field adopt a common nomenclature system based on the names adopted by the Human Genome Organization (HUGO). At present, the myosin-I nomenclature is very confusing; not only are several systems in use, but several different genes have been given the same name. Despite their faults, we believe that the names adopted by the HUGO nomenclature group for genome annotation are the best compromise, and we recommend universal adoption. PMID:11724811

  1. Light olefin production, skeletal olefin isomerization and etherification for oxygenated fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    ARCO`s newly developed SUPERFLEX{sup SM} process offers opportunities to product high yields of light olefins, from a variety of readily available refinery and petrochemical feedstocks. The process is unique in that it employs a catalytic reactor system which is lower in capital and operating costs than conventional steam cracking reactors. The SUPERFLEX process is also more selective for production of propylene and butylenes (including isobutylene) than conventional steam cracking operations. The C{sub 4} product stream from the SUPERFLEX process contains about 20 to 30 percent isobutylene. The SUPERFLEX C{sub 4} product is, therefore, an excellent feedstock for producing MTBE via reaction of the contained isobutylene with methanol. After MTBE production, the isobutylene depleted C{sub 4} stream may be recycled to the SUPERFLEX process to produce additional isobutylene and propylene. This paper will focus on the chemistry and mechanism of catalytic cracking and skeletal olefin isomerization. In addition, there will be some discussion on catalyst activation, life and characterization.

  2. Myosin motor isoforms direct specification of actomyosin function by tropomyosins

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Joseph E.; Pollard, Luther W.; Murray, George G.; Lord, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Myosins and tropomyosins represent two cytoskeletal proteins that often work together with actin filaments in contractile and motile cellular processes. While the specialized role of tropomyosin in striated muscle myosin-II regulation is well characterized, its role in non-muscle myosin regulation is poorly understood. We previously showed that fission yeast tropomyosin (Cdc8p) positively regulates myosin-II (Myo2p) and myosin-V (Myo52p) motors. To understand the broader implications of this regulation we examined the role of two mammalian tropomyosins (Tpm3.1cy/Tm5NM1 and Tpm4.2cy/Tm4) recently implicated in cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Like Cdc8p, the Tpm3.1cy and Tpm4.2cy isoforms significantly enhance Myo2p and Myo52p motor activity, converting non-processive Myo52p molecules into processive motors that can walk along actin tracks as single molecules. In contrast to the positive regulation of Myo2p and Myo52p, Cdc8p and the mammalian tropomyosins potently inhibited skeletal muscle myosin-II, while having negligible effects on the highly processive mammalian myosin-Va. In support of a conserved role for certain tropomyosins in regulating non-muscle actomyosin structures, Tpm3.1cy supported normal contractile ring function in fission yeast. Our work reveals that actomyosin regulation by tropomyosin is dependent on the myosin isoform, highlighting a general role for specific isoforms of tropomyosin in sorting myosin motor outputs. PMID:25712463

  3. Phosphate and ADP Differently Inhibit Coordinated Smooth Muscle Myosin Groups

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, Lennart; Balassy, Zsombor; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Mackey, Michael C.; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Actin filaments propelled in vitro by groups of skeletal muscle myosin motors exhibit distinct phases of active sliding or arrest, whose occurrence depends on actin length (L) within a range of up to 1.0 μm. Smooth muscle myosin filaments are exponentially distributed with ≈150 nm average length in vivo—suggesting relevance of the L-dependence of myosin group kinetics. Here, we found L-dependent actin arrest and sliding in in vitro motility assays of smooth muscle myosin. We perturbed individual myosin kinetics with varying, physiological concentrations of phosphate (Pi, release associated with main power stroke) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP, release associated with minor mechanical step). Adenosine triphosphate was kept constant at physiological concentration. Increasing [Pi] lowered the fraction of time for which actin was actively sliding, reflected in reduced average sliding velocity (ν) and motile fraction (fmot, fraction of time that filaments are moving); increasing [ADP] increased the fraction of time actively sliding and reduced the velocity while sliding, reflected in reduced ν and increased fmot. We introduced specific Pi and ADP effects on individual myosin kinetics into our recently developed mathematical model of actin propulsion by myosin groups. Simulations matched our experimental observations and described the inhibition of myosin group kinetics. At low [Pi] and [ADP], actin arrest and sliding were reflected by two distinct chemical states of the myosin group. Upon [Pi] increase, the probability of the active state decreased; upon [ADP] increase, the probability of the active state increased, but the active state became increasingly similar to the arrested state. PMID:25650929

  4. Light-emitting diode therapy increases collagen deposition during the repair process of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Claudia Aparecida Viana; Alves, Agnelo Neves; Terena, Stella Maris Lins; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Nunes, Fábio Daumas; da Silva, Daniela de Fátima Teixeira; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli

    2016-04-01

    This study analyzed the effects of light-emitting diode (LED) therapy on the morphology of muscle tissue as well as collagen remodeling and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activity in the skeletal muscle of rats following acute injury. Wistar rats were divided into four groups: (1) control, (2) sham, (3) untreated cryoinjury, and (4) cryoinjury treated with LED. Cryoinjury was induced by two applications of a metal probe cooled in liquid nitrogen directly onto the belly of the tibialis anterior muscle. For treatment, the LED equipment (wavelength 850 nm, output power 30 mW, and total energy 3.2 J) was used daily. The study periods were 1, 3, and 7 days after cryoinjury. Morphological aspects were evaluated through hematoxylin-eosin staining. The amount of collagen fibers was evaluated using Picro Sirius Red staining under polarized light. The gelatinase activity of MMP-2 was evaluated using zymography. The results showed significant reductions in inflammatory infiltrate after 3 days and an increased number of immature muscle fibers after 7 days. Furthermore, treatment induced a reduction in the gelatinolytic activity of MMP-2 after 1, 3, and 7 days in comparison to the untreated injury groups and increased the collagen deposition after 3 and 7 days in the treated groups. LED therapy at 850 nm induced a significant reduction in inflammation, decreased MMP-2 activity, and increased the amount of immature muscle and collagen fibers during the muscle repair process following acute injury. PMID:26873500

  5. Light and X-ray diffraction studies on chick skeletal muscle under controlled physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Ichiro

    1974-01-01

    1. The sarcomere length (s) of ehick slow and fast muscles (anterior and posterior latissimus dorsi (ant. lat. dorsi and post. lat. dorsi)) was measured by the method of light diffraction. In resting ant. lat. dorsi, s changed from 176 to 230 ?m during stretch from minimum to maximum muscle lengths in situ, and in resting post. lat. dorsi from 218 to 263 ?m. 2. Resting tension started to rise in ant. lat. dorsi when s exceeded 17-18 ?m, but in post. lat. dorsi not until s exceeded 26-27 ?m. 3. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that ant. lat. dorsi contains collagen filaments; collagen reflexions were not seen in patterns obtained from post. lat. dorsi with the same exposure time. 4. The relation between active tension and sarcomere length was similar for ant. and post. lat. dorsi. The maximum active tension was observed when s = 205-215 ?m in ant. lat. dorsi, and when s = 210-225 ?m in post. lat. dorsi. 5. X-ray diffraction patterns from both muscles showed that the periodic structures of the thick and thin filaments are similar to those in frog and rabbit skeletal muscles. 6. The volume of the myofilament lattice in resting ant. lat. dorsi was 306 ( 014) 109 3, in resting post. lat. dorsi 298 ( 009) 109 3. These values are close to that of frog skeletal muscle. The lattice volume remained constant in ant. lat. dorsi and post. lat. dorsi over the range of sarcomere lengths found in situ. 7. The equatorial diffraction patterns from the ant. lat. dorsi in rigor (glycerol extracted) were different from that of the resting muscle, and suggested that a large number of cross-bridges were attached to the thin filaments during rigor. During potassium contracture, however, the diffraction pattern remained similar to that from the resting ant. lat. dorsi. ImagesPlate 1Plate 2 PMID:4852995

  6. Cargo recognition and cargo-mediated regulation of unconventional myosins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Li, Jianchao; Zhang, Mingjie

    2014-10-21

    Organized motions are hallmarks of living organisms. Such motions range from collective cell movements during development and muscle contractions at the macroscopic scale all the way down to cellular cargo (e.g., various biomolecules and organelles) transportation and mechanoforce sensing at more microscopic scales. Energy required for these biological motions is almost invariably provided by cellular chemical fuels in the form of nucleotide triphosphate. Biological systems have designed a group of nanoscale engines, known as molecular motors, to convert cellular chemical fuels into mechanical energy. Molecular motors come in various forms including cytoskeleton motors (myosin, kinesin, and dynein), nucleic-acid-based motors, cellular membrane-based rotary motors, and so on. The main focus of this Account is one subfamily of actin filament-based motors called unconventional myosins (other than muscle myosin II, the remaining myosins are collectively referred to as unconventional myosins). In general, myosins can use ATP to fuel two types of mechanomotions: dynamic tethering actin filaments with various cellular compartments or structures and actin filament-based intracellular transport. In contrast to rich knowledge accumulated over many decades on ATP hydrolyzing motor heads and their interactions with actin filaments, how various myosins recognize their specific cargoes and whether and how cargoes can in return regulate functions of motors are less understood. Nonetheless, a series of biochemical and structural investigations in the past few years, including works from our own laboratory, begin to shed lights on these latter questions. Some myosins (e.g., myosin-VI) can function both as cellular transporters and as mechanical tethers. To function as a processive transporter, myosins need to form dimers or multimers. To be a mechanical tether, a monomeric myosin is sufficient. It has been shown for myosin-VI that its cellular cargo proteins can play critical roles in determining the motor properties. Dab2, an adaptor protein linking endocytic vesicles with actin-filament-bound myosin-VI, can induce the motor to form a transport competent dimer. Such a cargo-mediated dimerization mechanism has also been observed in other myosins including myosin-V and myosin-VIIa. The tail domains of myosins are very diverse both in their lengths and protein domain compositions and thus enable motors to engage a broad range of different cellular cargoes. Remarkably, the cargo binding tail of one myosin alone often can bind to multiple distinct target proteins. A series of atomic structures of myosin-V/cargo complexes solved recently reveals that the globular cargo binding tail of the motor contains a number of nonoverlapping target recognition sites for binding to its cargoes including melanophilin, vesicle adaptors RILPL2, and vesicle-bound GTPase Rab11. The structures of the MyTH4-FERM tandems from myosin-VIIa and myosin-X in complex with their respective targets reveal that MyTH4 and FERM domains extensively interact with each other forming structural and functional supramodules in both motors and demonstrate that the structurally similar MyTH4-FERM tandems of the two motors display totally different target binding modes. These structural studies have also shed light on why numerous mutations found in these myosins can cause devastating human diseases such as deafness and blindness, intellectual disabilities, immune disorders, and diabetes. PMID:25230296

  7. Distinct regulatory elements control muscle-specific, fiber-type-selective, and axially graded expression of a myosin light-chain gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, M V; Donoghue, M J; Merlie, J P; Sanes, J R

    1996-01-01

    The fast alkali myosin light chain 1f/3f (MLC1f/3f) gene is developmentally regulated, muscle specific, and preferentially expressed in fast-twitch fibers. A transgene containing an MLC1f promoter plus a downstream enhancer replicates this pattern of expression in transgenic mice. Unexpectedly, this transgene is also expressed in a striking (approximately 100-fold) rostrocaudal gradient in axial muscles (reviewed by J. R. Sanes, M. J. Donoghue, M. C. Wallace, and J. P. Merlie, Cold Spring Harbor Symp. Quant. Biol. 57:451-460, 1992). Here, we analyzed the expression of mutated transgenes to map sites necessary for muscle-specific, fiber-type-selective, and axially graded expression. We show that two E boxes (myogenic factor binding sites), a homeodomain (hox) protein binding site, and an MEF2 site, which are clustered in an approximately 170-bp core enhancer, are all necessary for maximal transgene activity in muscle but not for fiber-type- or position-dependent expression. A distinct region within the core enhancer promotes selective expression of the transgene in fast-twitch muscles. Sequences that flank the core enhancer are also necessary for high-level activity in transgenic mice but have little influence on activity in transfected cells, suggesting the presence of regions resembling matrix attachment sites. Truncations of the MLC1f promoter affected position-dependent expression of the transgene, revealing distinct regions that repress transgene activity in neck muscles and promote differential expression among intercostal muscles. Thus, the whole-body gradient of expression displayed by the complete transgene may reflect the integrated activities of discrete elements that regulate expression in subsets of muscles. Finally, we show that transgene activity is not significantly affected by deletion or overexpression of the myoD gene, suggesting that intermuscular differences in myogenic factor levels do not affect patterns of transgene expression. Together, our results provide evidence for at least nine distinct sites that exert major effects on the levels and patterns of MLC1f expression in adult muscles. PMID:8668209

  8. Calcium-dependent regulation of the motor activity of recombinant full-length Physarum myosin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Kawamichi, Hozumi; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Yoshiyama, Shinji; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Akio

    2012-08-01

    We successfully synthesized full-length and the mutant Physarum myosin and heavy meromyosin (HMM) constructs associated with Physarum regulatory light chain and essential light chain (PhELC) using Physarum myosin heavy chain in Sf-9 cells, and examined their Ca(2+)-mediated regulation. Ca(2+) inhibited the motility and ATPase activities of Physarum myosin and HMM. The Ca(2+) effect is also reversible at the in vitro motility of Physarum myosin. We demonstrated that full-length myosin increases the Ca(2+) inhibition more effectively than HMM. Furthermore, Ca(2+) did not affect the motility and ATPase activities of the mutant Physarum myosin with PhELC that lost Ca(2+)-binding ability. Therefore, we conclude that PhELC plays a critical role in Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of Physarum myosin. PMID:22648562

  9. The Role of Structural Dynamics of Actin in Class-Specific Myosin Motility

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Taro Q. P.; Morimatsu, Masatoshi; Iwane, Atsuko H.; Yanagida, Toshio; Uyeda, Taro Q. P.

    2015-01-01

    The structural dynamics of actin, including the tilting motion between the small and large domains, are essential for proper interactions with actin-binding proteins. Gly146 is situated at the hinge between the two domains, and we previously showed that a G146V mutation leads to severe motility defects in skeletal myosin but has no effect on motility of myosin V. The present study tested the hypothesis that G146V mutation impaired rotation between the two domains, leading to such functional defects. First, our study showed that depolymerization of G146V filaments was slower than that of wild-type filaments. This result is consistent with the distinction of structural states of G146V filaments from those of the wild type, considering the recent report that stabilization of actin filaments involves rotation of the two domains. Next, we measured intramolecular FRET efficiencies between two fluorophores in the two domains with or without skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin or the heavy meromyosin equivalent of myosin V in the presence of ATP. Single-molecule FRET measurements showed that the conformations of actin subunits of control and G146V actin filaments were different in the presence of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin. This altered conformation of G146V subunits may lead to motility defects in myosin II. In contrast, distributions of FRET efficiencies of control and G146V subunits were similar in the presence of myosin V, consistent with the lack of motility defects in G146V actin with myosin V. The distribution of FRET efficiencies in the presence of myosin V was different from that in the presence of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin, implying that the roles of actin conformation in myosin motility depend on the type of myosin. PMID:25945499

  10. Cooperative actions between myosin heads bring effective functions.

    PubMed

    Esaki, Seiji; Ishii, Yoshiharu; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Yanagida, Toshio

    2007-04-01

    A recent study with single molecule measurements has reported that muscle myosin, a molecular motor, stochastically generates multiple steps along an actin filament associated with the hydrolysis of a single ATP molecule [Kitamura, K., Tokunaga, M., Esaki, S., Iwane, A.H., Yanagida, T., 2005. Mechanism of muscle contraction based on stochastic properties of single actomyosin motors observed in vitro. Biophysics 1, 1-19]. We have built a model reproducing such a stochastic movement of a myosin molecule incorporated with ATPase reaction cycles and demonstrated that the thermal fluctuation was a key for the function of myosin molecules [Esaki, S., Ishii, Y., Yanagida, T., 2003. Model describing the biased Brownian movement of myosin. Proc. Jpn. Acad. 79 (Ser B), 9-14]. The size of the displacement generated during the hydrolysis of single ATP molecules was limited within a half pitch of an actin filament when a single myosin molecules work separately. However, in muscle the size of the displacement has been reported to be greater than 60 nm [Yanagida, T., Arata, T., Oosawa, F., 1985. Sliding distance of actin filament induced by a myosin crossbridge during one ATP hydrolysis cycle. Nature 316, 366-369; Higuchi et al., 1991]. The difference suggests cooperative action between myosin heads in muscle. Here we extended the model built for an isolated myosin head to a system in which myosin heads are aligned in muscle arrangement to understand the cooperativity between heads. The simulation showed that the rotation of the actin filament [Takezawa, Y., Sugimoto, Y., Wakabayashi, K., 1998. Extensibility of the actin and myosin filaments in various states of skeletal muscles as studied by X-ray diffraction. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 453, 309-317; Wakabayashi, K., Ueno, Y., Takezawa, Y., Sugimoto, Y., 2001. Muscle contraction mechanism: use of X-ray synchrotron radiation. Nat. Enc. Life Sci. 1-11] associated with the release of ATPase products and binding of ATP as well as interaction between myosin heads allowed the myosin filament to move greater than a half pitch of the actin filament while a single ATP molecule is hydrolyzed. Our model demonstrated that the movement is loosely coupled to the ATPase cycle as observed in muscle. PMID:17187925

  11. Myosin IIB and F-actin control apical vacuolar morphology and histamine-induced trafficking of H-K-ATPase-containing tubulovesicles in gastric parietal cells

    PubMed Central

    Crothers, James M.; Rosen, Jared E.; Nakada, Stephanie L.; Rakholia, Milap; Okamoto, Curtis T.; Forte, John G.; Machen, Terry E.

    2014-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of myosin or actin function and confocal microscopy were used to test the role of an actomyosin complex in controlling morphology, trafficking, and fusion of tubulovesicles (TV) containing H-K-ATPase with the apical secretory canaliculus (ASC) of primary-cultured rabbit gastric parietal cells. In resting cells, myosin IIB and IIC, ezrin, and F-actin were associated with ASC, whereas H-K-ATPase localized to intracellular TV. Histamine caused fusion of TV with ASC and subsequent expansion resulting from HCl and water secretion; F-actin and ezrin remained associated with ASC whereas myosin IIB and IIC appeared to dissociate from ASC and relocalize to the cytoplasm. ML-7 (inhibits myosin light chain kinase) caused ASC of resting cells to collapse and most myosin IIB, F-actin, and ezrin to dissociate from ASC. TV were unaffected by ML-7. Jasplakinolide (stabilizes F-actin) caused ASC to develop large blebs to which actin, myosin II, and ezrin, as well as tubulin, were prominently localized. When added prior to stimulation, ML-7 and jasplakinolide prevented normal histamine-stimulated transformations of ASC/TV and the cytoskeleton, but they did not affect cells that had been previously stimulated with histamine. These results indicate that dynamic pools of actomyosin are required for maintenance of ASC structure in resting cells and for trafficking of TV to ASC during histamine stimulation. However, the dynamic pools of actomyosin are not required once the histamine-stimulated transformation of TV/ASC and cytoskeleton has occurred. These results also show that vesicle trafficking in parietal cells shares mechanisms with similar processes in renal collecting duct cells, neuronal synapses, and skeletal muscle. PMID:24578340

  12. The working stroke of the myosin II motor in muscle is not tightly coupled to release of orthophosphate from its active site

    PubMed Central

    Caremani, Marco; Melli, Luca; Dolfi, Mario; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle shortens faster against a lower load. This force–velocity relationship is the fundamental determinant of muscle performance in vivo and is due to ATP-driven working strokes of myosin II motors, during their cyclic interactions with the actin filament in each half-sarcomere. Crystallographic studies suggest that the working stroke is associated with the release of phosphate (Pi) and consists of 70 deg tilting of a light-chain domain that connects the catalytic domain of the myosin motor to the myosin tail and filament. However, the coupling of the working stroke with Pi release is still an unsolved question. Using nanometre–microsecond mechanics on skinned muscle fibres, we impose stepwise drops in force on an otherwise isometric contraction and record the isotonic velocity transient, to measure the mechanical manifestation of the working stroke of myosin motors and the rate of its regeneration in relation to the half-sarcomere load and [Pi]. We show that the rate constant of the working stroke is unaffected by [Pi], while the subsequent transition to steady velocity shortening is accelerated. We propose a new chemo-mechanical model that reproduces the transient and steady state responses by assuming that: (i) the release of Pi from the catalytic site of a myosin motor can occur at any stage of the working stroke, and (ii) a myosin motor, in an intermediate state of the working stroke, can slip to the next actin monomer during filament sliding. This model explains the efficient action of muscle molecular motors working as an ensemble in the half-sarcomere. PMID:23878374

  13. Structural and molecular conformation of myosin in intact muscle fibers by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucciotti, V.; Stringari, C.; Sacconi, L.; Vanzi, F.; Linari, M.; Piazzesi, G.; Lombardi, V.; Pavone, F. S.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, the use of Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) for imaging biological samples has been explored with regard to intrinsic SHG in highly ordered biological samples. As shown by fractional extraction of proteins, myosin is the source of SHG signal in skeletal muscle. SHG is highly dependent on symmetries and provides selective information on the structural order and orientation of the emitting proteins and the dynamics of myosin molecules responsible for the mechano-chemical transduction during contraction. We characterise the polarization-dependence of SHG intensity in three different physiological states: resting, rigor and isometric tetanic contraction in a sarcomere length range between 2.0 μm and 4.0 μm. The orientation of motor domains of the myosin molecules is dependent on their physiological states and modulate the SHG signal. We can discriminate the orientation of the emitting dipoles in four different molecular conformations of myosin heads in intact fibers during isometric contraction, in resting and rigor. We estimate the contribution of the myosin motor domain to the total second order bulk susceptibility from its molecular structure and its functional conformation. We demonstrate that SHG is sensitive to the fraction of ordered myosin heads by disrupting the order of myosin heads in rigor with an ATP analog. We estimate the fraction of myosin motors generating the isometric force in the active muscle fiber from the dependence of the SHG modulation on the degree of overlap between actin and myosin filaments during an isometric contraction.

  14. The role of myosin phosphorylation in anaphase chromosome movement.

    PubMed

    Sheykhani, Rozhan; Shirodkar, Purnata V; Forer, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the role of myosin phosphorylation in anaphase chromosome movement. Y27632 and ML7 block two different pathways for phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC). Both stopped or slowed chromosome movement when added to anaphase crane-fly spermatocytes. To confirm that the effects of the pharmacological agents were on the presumed targets, we studied cells stained with antibodies against mono- or bi-phosphorylated myosin. For all chromosomes whose movements were affected by a drug, the corresponding spindle fibres of the affected chromosomes had reduced levels of 1P- and 2P-myosin. Thus the drugs acted on the presumed target and myosin phosphorylation is involved in anaphase force production. Calyculin A, an inhibitor of MRLC dephosphorylation, reversed and accelerated the altered movements caused by Y27632 and ML-7, suggesting that another phosphorylation pathway is involved in phosphorylation of spindle myosin. Staurosporine, a more general phosphorylation inhibitor, also reduced the levels of MRLC phosphorylation and caused anaphase chromosomes to stop or slow. The effects of staurosporine on chromosome movements were not reversed by Calyculin A, confirming that another phosphorylation pathway is involved in phosphorylation of spindle myosin. PMID:23566798

  15. Biomarker evaluation of skeletal muscle toxicity following clofibrate administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Bodié, Karen; Buck, Wayne R; Pieh, Julia; Liguori, Michael J; Popp, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The use of sensitive biomarkers to monitor skeletal muscle toxicity in preclinical toxicity studies is important for the risk assessment in humans during the development of a novel compound. Skeletal muscle toxicity in Sprague Dawley Rats was induced with clofibrate at different dose levels for 7 days to compare standard clinical pathology assays with novel skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle biomarkers, gene expression and histopathological changes. The standard clinical pathology assays aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and creatine kinase (CK) enzyme activity were compared to novel biomarkers fatty acid binding protein 3 (Fabp3), myosin light chain 3 (Myl3), muscular isoform of CK immunoreactivity (three isoforms CKBB, CKMM, CKMB), parvalbumin (Prv), skeletal troponin I (sTnI), cardiac troponin T (cTnT), cardiac troponin I (cTnI), CKMM, and myoglobin (Myo). The biomarker elevations were correlated to histopathological findings detected in several muscles and gene expression changes. Clofibrate predominantly induced skeletal muscle toxicity of type I fibers of low magnitude. Useful biomarkers for skeletal muscle toxicity were AST, Fabp3, Myl3, (CKMB) and sTnI. Measurements of CK enzyme activity by a standard clinical assay were not useful for monitoring clofibrate-induced skeletal muscle toxicity in the rat at the doses used in this study. PMID:27020044

  16. Actin age orchestrates myosin-5 and myosin-6 run lengths.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Dennis; Santos, Alicja; Kovar, David R; Rock, Ronald S

    2015-08-01

    Unlike a static and immobile skeleton, the actin cytoskeleton is a highly dynamic network of filamentous actin (F-actin) polymers that continuously turn over. In addition to generating mechanical forces and sensing mechanical deformation, dynamic F-actin networks serve as cellular tracks for myosin motor traffic. However, much of our mechanistic understanding of processive myosins comes from in vitro studies in which motility was studied on pre-assembled and artificially stabilized, static F-actin tracks. In this work, we examine the role of actin dynamics in single-molecule myosin motility using assembling F-actin and two highly processive motors, myosin-5 and myosin-6. These two myosins have distinct functions in the cell and travel in opposite directions along actin filaments [1-3]. Myosin-5 walks toward the barbed ends of F-actin, traveling to sites of actin polymerization at the cell periphery [4]. Myosin-6 walks toward the pointed end of F-actin [5], traveling toward the cell center along older segments of the actin filament. We find that myosin-5 takes 1.3- to 1.5-fold longer runs on ADP•Pi (young) F-actin, whereas myosin-6 takes 1.7- to 3.6-fold longer runs along ADP (old) F-actin. These results suggest that conformational differences between ADP•Pi and ADP F-actin tailor these myosins to walk farther toward their preferred actin filament end. Taken together, these experiments define a new mechanism by which myosin traffic may sort to different F-actin networks depending on filament age. PMID:26190073

  17. Actin-myosin contractility is responsible for the reduced viability of dissociated human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guokai; Hou, Zhonggang; Gulbranson, Daniel; Thomson, James A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Human ES cells are the pluripotent precursor of the three embryonic germ layers. Human ES cells exhibit basal-apical polarity, junctional complexes, integrin-dependent matrix adhesion, and E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion, all characteristics shared by the epiblast epithelium of the intact mammalian embryo. After disruption of epithelial structures, programmed cell death is commonly observed. If individualized human ES cells are prevented from reattaching and forming colonies, their viability is significantly reduced. Here we show that actin-myosin contraction is a critical effector of the cell death response to human ES cell dissociation. Inhibition of myosin heavy chain ATPase, downregulation of myosin heavy chain, and downregulation of myosin light chain all increase survival and cloning efficiency of individualized human ES cells. ROCK inhibition decreases phosphorylation of myosin light chain, suggesting that inhibition of actin-myosin contraction is also the mechanism through which ROCK inhibitors increase cloning efficiency of human ES cells. PMID:20682449

  18. Nerve-dependent changes in skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain after experimental denervation, cross-reinnervation and in a demyelinating mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A

    PubMed Central

    Maggs, Alison M.; Huxley, Clare; Hughes, Simon M.

    2010-01-01

    Innervation regulates the contractile properties of vertebrate muscle fibers, in part through the effect of electrical activity on expression of distinct myosins. Here we analyse the role of innervation in regulating the accumulation of the general, maturational and adult forms of rodent slow myosin heavy chain (MyHC) that are defined by the presence of distinct antigenic epitopes. Denervation increases the number of fibers that express general slow MyHC, but it decreases the adult slow MyHC epitope. Cross-reinnervation of slow muscle by a fast nerve leads to an increase in the number of fibers that express fast MyHC. In both cases, there is an increase in fibers that express slow and fast IIA MyHCs but without the adult slow MyHC epitope. The data suggest that innervation is required for maturation and maintenance of diversity of both slow and fast fibers. The sequence of slow MyHC epitope transitions is a useful biomarker, and it may play a significant role during nerve-dependent changes in muscle fiber function. We applied this detailed muscle analysis to a transgenic mouse model of Human Motor and Sensory Neuropathy IA, also known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 1A (CMT1A), in which electrical conduction in some motor neurons is poor due to demyelination. The mice display atrophy of some muscle fibers and changes in slow and fast MyHC epitope expression suggestive of a progressive increase in innervation of muscle fibers by fast motor neurons, even at early stages. The potential role of these early changes in disease pathogenesis is discussed. PMID:19016545

  19. Chaperone-enhanced purification of unconventional myosin 15, a molecular motor specialized for stereocilia protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Bird, Jonathan E; Takagi, Yasuharu; Billington, Neil; Strub, Marie-Paule; Sellers, James R; Friedman, Thomas B

    2014-08-26

    Unconventional myosin 15 is a molecular motor expressed in inner ear hair cells that transports protein cargos within developing mechanosensory stereocilia. Mutations of myosin 15 cause profound hearing loss in humans and mice; however, the properties of this motor and its regulation within the stereocilia organelle are unknown. To address these questions, we expressed a subfragment 1-like (S1) truncation of mouse myosin 15, comprising the predicted motor domain plus three light-chain binding sites. Following unsuccessful attempts to express functional myosin 15-S1 using the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9)-baculovirus system, we discovered that coexpression of the muscle-myosin-specific chaperone UNC45B, in addition to the chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) significantly increased the yield of functional protein. Surprisingly, myosin 15-S1 did not bind calmodulin with high affinity. Instead, the IQ domains bound essential and regulatory light chains that are normally associated with class II myosins. We show that myosin 15-S1 is a barbed-end-directed motor that moves actin filaments in a gliding assay (∼ 430 nm · s(-1) at 30 °C), using a power stroke of 7.9 nm. The maximum ATPase rate (k(cat) ∼ 6 s(-1)) was similar to the actin-detachment rate (k(det) = 6.2 s(-1)) determined in single molecule optical trapping experiments, indicating that myosin 15-S1 was rate limited by transit through strongly actin-bound states, similar to other processive myosin motors. Our data further indicate that in addition to folding muscle myosin, UNC45B facilitates maturation of an unconventional myosin. We speculate that chaperone coexpression may be a simple method to optimize the purification of other myosin motors from Sf9 insect cells. PMID:25114250

  20. Electron microscopic evidence for the myosin head lever arm mechanism in hydrated myosin filaments using the gas environmental chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Minoda, Hiroki; CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 ; Okabe, Tatsuhiro; Inayoshi, Yuhri; Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru; Katayama, Eisaku; Wakabayashi, Takeyuki; Akimoto, Tsuyoshi; Sugi, Haruo

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We succeeded in recording structural changes of hydrated myosin cross-bridges. {yields} We succeeded in position-marking the cross-bridges with site-directed antibodies. {yields} We recorded cross-bridge movement at different regions in individual cross-bridge. {yields} The movement was smallest at the cross-bridge-subfragment two boundary. {yields} The results provide evidence for the cross-bridge lever arm mechanism. -- Abstract: Muscle contraction results from an attachment-detachment cycle between the myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and the sites on actin filaments. The myosin head first attaches to actin together with the products of ATP hydrolysis, performs a power stroke associated with release of hydrolysis products, and detaches from actin upon binding with new ATP. The detached myosin head then hydrolyses ATP, and performs a recovery stroke to restore its initial position. The strokes have been suggested to result from rotation of the lever arm domain around the converter domain, while the catalytic domain remains rigid. To ascertain the validity of the lever arm hypothesis in muscle, we recorded ATP-induced movement at different regions within individual myosin heads in hydrated myosin filaments, using the gas environmental chamber attached to the electron microscope. The myosin head were position-marked with gold particles using three different site-directed antibodies. The amplitude of ATP-induced movement at the actin binding site in the catalytic domain was similar to that at the boundary between the catalytic and converter domains, but was definitely larger than that at the regulatory light chain in the lever arm domain. These results are consistent with the myosin head lever arm mechanism in muscle contraction if some assumptions are made.

  1. Conserved Intramolecular Interactions Maintain Myosin Interacting-Heads Motifs Explaining Tarantula Muscle Super-Relaxed State Structural Basis.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Qi, Dan; Wriggers, Willy; Pinto, Antonio; Zhu, Jingui; Bilbao, Aivett; Gillilan, Richard E; Hu, Songnian; Padrón, Raúl

    2016-03-27

    Tarantula striated muscle is an outstanding system for understanding the molecular organization of myosin filaments. Three-dimensional reconstruction based on cryo-electron microscopy images and single-particle image processing revealed that, in a relaxed state, myosin molecules undergo intramolecular head-head interactions, explaining why head activity switches off. The filament model obtained by rigidly docking a chicken smooth muscle myosin structure to the reconstruction was improved by flexibly fitting an atomic model built by mixing structures from different species to a tilt-corrected 2-nm three-dimensional map of frozen-hydrated tarantula thick filament. We used heavy and light chain sequences from tarantula myosin to build a single-species homology model of two heavy meromyosin interacting-heads motifs (IHMs). The flexibly fitted model includes previously missing loops and shows five intramolecular and five intermolecular interactions that keep the IHM in a compact off structure, forming four helical tracks of IHMs around the backbone. The residues involved in these interactions are oppositely charged, and their sequence conservation suggests that IHM is present across animal species. The new model, PDB 3JBH, explains the structural origin of the ATP turnover rates detected in relaxed tarantula muscle by ascribing the very slow rate to docked unphosphorylated heads, the slow rate to phosphorylated docked heads, and the fast rate to phosphorylated undocked heads. The conservation of intramolecular interactions across animal species and the presence of IHM in bilaterians suggest that a super-relaxed state should be maintained, as it plays a role in saving ATP in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscles. PMID:26851071

  2. Myosin VI: an innovative motor that challenged the swinging lever arm hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2010-01-01

    The swinging crossbridge hypothesis states that energy from ATP hydrolysis is transduced to mechanical movement of the myosin head while bound to actin. The light chain-binding region of myosin is thought to act as a lever arm that amplifies movements near the catalytic site. This model has been challenged by findings that myosin VI takes larger steps along actin filaments than early interpretations of its structure seem to allow. We now know that myosin VI does indeed operate by an unusual ~ 180° lever arm swing and achieves its large step size using special structural features in its tail domain. PMID:20094053

  3. Myosin-II-mediated cell shape changes and cell intercalation contribute to primitive streak formation.

    PubMed

    Rozbicki, Emil; Chuai, Manli; Karjalainen, Antti I; Song, Feifei; Sang, Helen M; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; MacDonald, Michael P; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2015-04-01

    Primitive streak formation in the chick embryo involves large-scale highly coordinated flows of more than 100,000 cells in the epiblast. These large-scale tissue flows and deformations can be correlated with specific anisotropic cell behaviours in the forming mesendoderm through a combination of light-sheet microscopy and computational analysis. Relevant behaviours include apical contraction, elongation along the apical-basal axis followed by ingression, and asynchronous directional cell intercalation of small groups of mesendoderm cells. Cell intercalation is associated with sequential, directional contraction of apical junctions, the onset, localization and direction of which correlate strongly with the appearance of active myosin II cables in aligned apical junctions in neighbouring cells. Use of class specific myosin inhibitors and gene-specific knockdown shows that apical contraction and intercalation are myosin II dependent and also reveal critical roles for myosin I and myosin V family members in the assembly of junctional myosin II cables. PMID:25812521

  4. Myosin II-mediated cell shape changes and cell intercalation contribute to primitive streak formation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Feifei; Sang, Helen M.; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; MacDonald, Michael P; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2016-01-01

    Primitive streak formation in the chick embryo involves large scale highly coordinated flows of over 100.000 cells in the epiblast. These large scale tissue flows and deformations can be correlated with specific anisotropic cell behaviours in the forming mesendoderm through a combined light-sheet microscopy and computational analysis. Relevant behaviours include apical contraction, elongation along the apical-basal axis followed by ingression as well as asynchronous directional cell intercalation of small groups of mesendoderm cells. Cell intercalation is associated with sequential, directional contraction of apical junctions, the onset, localisation and direction of which correlate strongly with the appearance of active Myosin II cables in aligned apical junctions in neighbouring cells. Use of a class specific Myosin inhibitors and gene specific knockdowns show that apical contraction and intercalation are Myosin II dependent and also reveal critical roles for Myosin I and Myosin V family members in the assembly of junctional Myosin II cables. PMID:25812521

  5. Control of myosin-I force sensing by alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Joseph M; Lewis, John H; Shuman, Henry; Ostap, E Michael

    2010-01-12

    Myosin-Is are molecular motors that link cellular membranes to the actin cytoskeleton, where they play roles in mechano-signal transduction and membrane trafficking. Some myosin-Is are proposed to act as force sensors, dynamically modulating their motile properties in response to changes in tension. In this study, we examined force sensing by the widely expressed myosin-I isoform, myo1b, which is alternatively spliced in its light chain binding domain (LCBD), yielding proteins with lever arms of different lengths. We found the actin-detachment kinetics of the splice isoforms to be extraordinarily tension-sensitive, with the magnitude of tension sensitivity to be related to LCBD splicing. Thus, in addition to regulating step-size, motility rates, and myosin activation, the LCBD is a key regulator of force sensing. We also found that myo1b is substantially more tension-sensitive than other myosins with similar length lever arms, indicating that different myosins have different tension-sensitive transitions. PMID:20080738

  6. Myosin-II Negatively Regulates Minor Process Extension and the Temporal Development of Neuronal Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Kollins, K.M.; Hu, J.; Bridgman, P.C.; Huang, Yue-Quiao; Gallo, G.

    2009-01-01

    The earliest stage in the development of neuronal polarity is characterized by extension of undifferentiated “minor processes” (MPs), which subsequently differentiate into the axon and dendrites. We investigated the role of the myosin II motor protein in MP extension using forebrain and hippocampal neuron cultures. Chronic treatment of neurons with the myosin II ATPase inhibitor blebbistatin increased MP length, which was also seen in myosin IIB knockouts. Through live-cell imaging we demonstrate that myosin II inhibition triggers rapid minor process extension to a maximum length range. Myosin II activity is determined by phosphorylation of its regulatory light chains (rMLC), mediated by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) or RhoA-kinase (ROCK). Pharmacological inhibition of MLCK or ROCK increased MP length moderately, with combined inhibition of these kinases resulting in an additive increase in MP length similar to the effect of direct inhibition of myosin II. Selective inhibition of RhoA signaling upstream of ROCK, with cell-permeable C3 transferase, increased both the length and number of MPs. To determine whether myosin II affected development of neuronal polarity, MP differentiation was examined in cultures treated with direct or indirect myosin II inhibitors. Significantly, inhibition of myosin II, MLCK, or ROCK accelerated the development of neuronal polarity. Increased myosin II activity, through constitutively active MLCK or RhoA, decreased both the length and number of MPs and, consequently, delayed or abolished the development of neuronal polarity. Together, these data indicate that myosin II negatively regulates MP extension, and the developmental time course for axonogenesis. PMID:19224562

  7. Conformational flexibility of loops of myosin enhances the global bias in the actin-myosin interaction landscape.

    PubMed

    Nie, Qing-Miao; Sasai, Masaki; Terada, Tomoki P

    2014-04-14

    A long-standing controversy on the mechanism of an actomyosin motor is the role of the Brownian motion of the myosin head in force generation. In order to shed light on this problem, we calculate free-energy landscapes of interaction between an actin filament and the head (S1) of myosin II by using a coarse-grained model of actomyosin. The results show that the free-energy landscape has a global gradient toward the strong-binding site on actin filament, which explains the biased Brownian motion of myosin S1 observed in a single-molecule experiment [Kitamura et al., Nature, 1999, 397, 129 and Biophysics, 2005, 1, 1]. The distinct global gradient in the landscape is brought about only when the conformation of loop 2 at the actin interface of myosin S1 is flexible. The conformational flexibility of loop 3 also contributes to the gradient in the landscape by compensating the role of loop 2. Though the structure of loop 2 is expanded in the weak-binding state, loop 2 shows the larger fluctuation of compaction and expansion due to the actin-myosin interactions as myosin S1 moves toward the strong-binding site on actin filament. Hence, the increase in the compaction-expansion fluctuation of loop 2, the stronger binding of myosin to actin, and the biased Brownian motion of myosin S1 are coupled with each other and should take place in a concurrent way. This predicted coupling should provide opportunities to further test the hypothesis of the biased Brownian motion in actomyosin. PMID:24513657

  8. The Energetics of Allosteric Regulation of ADP Release From Myosin Heads

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Del R.; Baker, Josh E.

    2009-01-01

    Myosin molecules are involved in a wide range of transport and contractile activities in cells. A single myosin head functions through its ATPase reaction as a force generator and as mechanosensor, and when two or more myosin heads work together in moving along an actin filament, the interplay between these mechanisms contributes to collective myosin behaviors. For example, the interplay between force generating and force sensing mechanisms coordinates the two heads of a myosin V molecule in its hand-over-hand processive stepping along an actin filament. In muscle, it contributes to the Fenn effect and smooth muscle latch. In both examples, a key force sensing mechanism is the regulation of ADP release via interhead forces that are generated upon actin myosin binding. Here we present a model describing the mechanism of allosteric regulation of ADP release from myosin heads as a change, ΔΔG-D, in the standard free energy for ADP release that results from the work, Δμmech, performed by that myosin head upon ADP release, or ΔΔG-D = Δμmech. We show that this model is consistent with previous measurements for strain-dependent kinetics of ADP release in both myosin V and muscle myosin II. The model makes explicit the energetic cost of accelerating ADP release, showing that acceleration of ADP release during myosin V processivity requires ∼ kT of energy whereas the energetic cost for accelerating ADP release in a myosin II-based actin motility assay is only ∼0.4 kT. The model also predicts that the acceleration of ADP release involves a dissipation of interhead forces. To test this prediction, we use an in vitro motility assay to show that the acceleration of ADP release from both smooth and skeletal muscle myosin II correlates with a decrease in interhead force. Our analyses provide clear energetic constraints for models of the allosteric regulation of ADP release and provide novel, testable insights into muscle and myosin V function. PMID:19506755

  9. The radius of gyration of native and reductively methylated myosin subfragment-1 from neutron scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, D B; Schneider, D K; Huang, Z; Mendelson, R A

    1995-01-01

    Reductive methylation of nearly all lysine groups of myosin subfragment-1 (S1) was required for crystallization and solution of its structure at atomic resolution. Possible effects of such methylation on the radius of gyration of chicken skeletal muscle myosin S1 have been investigated by using small-angle neutron scattering. In addition, we have investigated the effect of MgADP.Vi, which is thought to produce an analog of the S1.ADP.Pi state, on the S1 radius of gyration. We find that although methylation of S1, with or without SO42- ion addition, does not significantly alter the structure, addition of ADP plus vanadate does decrease the radius of gyration significantly. The S1 crystal structure predicts a radius of gyration close to that measured here by neutron scattering. These results suggest that the overall shape by crystallography resembles nucleotide-free S1 in solution. In order to estimate the effect of residues missing from the crystal structure, the structure of missing loops was estimated by secondary-structure prediction methods. Calculations using the complete crystal structure show that a simple closure of the nucleotide cleft by a rigid-body torsional rotation of residues (172-180 to 670) around an axis running along the base of the cleft alone does not produce changes as large as seen here and in x-ray scattering results. On the other hand, a rigid body rotation of either the light-chain binding domain (767 to 843 plus light chains) or of a portion of 20-kDa peptide plus this domain (706 to 843 plus light chains) is more readily capable of producing such changes. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 PMID:8519977

  10. Light effects on the isotopic fractionation of skeletal oxygen and carbon in the cultured zooxanthellate coral, Acropora: implications for coral-growth rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillet-Leclerc, A.; Reynaud, S.

    2009-11-01

    Skeletal isotopic and metabolic measurements of the branching coral Acropora cultured in constant conditions and subjected to two light intensities were revisited. We individually compared the data recorded at low light (LL) and high light (HL) for 24 colonies, all derived from the same parent colony. Metabolic and isotopic responses to the different light levels were highly variable. High light led to productivity enhancement, reduction of surface extension, doubling of aragonite deposited weight and increased ?18O levels in all nubbins; responses in respiration and ?13C were not clear. The partitioning of the colonies into two groups, one showing a ?13C increase and the other a ?13C decrease with increased light, revealed common behaviors. Samples showing an increase in ?13C were associated with the co-variation of low surface extension and high productivity while samples showing a decrease in ?13C were associated with the co-variation of higher surface extension and limited productivity. This experiment, which allowed for the separation of temperature and light effects on the coral, highlighted the significant light influences on both skeletal ?18O and ?13C. The high scattering of inter-colony ?18O observed at one site could be due to the differing photosynthetic responses of symbiotic algal assemblages. The ?13C responses could also be related to differing algal distributions in different skeletal portions. Our results were compared to observations by Gladfelter on Acropora cervicornis (1982). Both set of results highlight the relationships between coral-growth rates, micro-structures and photosynthetic activity. It appears that extension growth and accretion are two separate growth modes, and accretion is light-enhanced while extension is light-repressed. There are multiple consequences of these findings for paleoclimatic reconstructions involving corals.

  11. Diversity and Similarity of Motor Function and Cross-Bridge Kinetics in Papillary Muscles of Transgenic Mice Carrying Myosin Regulatory Light Chain Mutations D166V and R58Q

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Muthu, Priya; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Kawai, Masataka

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical properties of skinned papillary muscle fibers from transgenic mice expressing familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated mutations D166V and R58Q in myosin regulatory light chain were investigated. Elementary steps and the apparent rate constants of the cross-bridge cycle were characterized from the tension transients induced by sinusoidal length changes during maximal Ca2+ activation, together with ATP, ADP, and Pi studies. The tension-pCa relation was also tested in two sets of solutions with differing Pi and ionic strength. Our results showed that in both mutants, the fast apparent rate constant 2πc and the rate constants of the cross-bridge detachment step (k2) were smaller than those of wild type (WT), demonstrating the slower cross-bridge kinetics. D166V showed significantly smaller ATP (K1) and ADP (K0) association constants than WT, displaying weaker ATP binding and easier ADP release, whereas those of R58Q were not significantly different from WT. In tension-pCa study, both D166V and R58Q mutations exhibited increased Ca2+ sensitivity and less cooperativity. We conclude that, while the two FHC mutations have similar clinical manifestations and prognosis, some of the mechanical parameters of cross-bridges (K0, K1) are differently modified, whereas some others (Ca2+-sensitivity, cooperativity, k2) are similarly modified by these two FHC associated mutations. PMID:23727233

  12. Earning stripes: myosin binding protein-C interactions with actin.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Sabine J; Bezold, Kristina L; Harris, Samantha P

    2014-03-01

    Myosin binding protein-C (MyBP-C) was first discovered as an impurity during the purification of myosin from skeletal muscle. However, soon after its discovery, MyBP-C was also shown to bind actin. While the unique functional implications for a protein that could cross-link thick and thin filaments together were immediately recognized, most early research nonetheless focused on interactions of MyBP-C with the thick filament. This was in part because interactions of MyBP-C with the thick filament could adequately explain most (but not all) effects of MyBP-C on actomyosin interactions and in part because the specificity of actin binding was uncertain. However, numerous recent studies have now established that MyBP-C can indeed bind to actin through multiple binding sites, some of which are highly specific. Many of these interactions involve critical regulatory domains of MyBP-C that are also reported to interact with myosin. Here we review current evidence supporting MyBP-C interactions with actin and discuss these findings in terms of their ability to account for the functional effects of MyBP-C. We conclude that the influence of MyBP-C on muscle contraction can be explained equally well by interactions with actin as by interactions with myosin. However, because data showing that MyBP-C binds to either myosin or actin has come almost exclusively from in vitro biochemical studies, the challenge for future studies is to define which binding partner(s) MyBP-C interacts with in vivo. PMID:24442149

  13. The neck region of the myosin motor domain acts as a lever arm to generate movement.

    PubMed Central

    Uyeda, T Q; Abramson, P D; Spudich, J A

    1996-01-01

    The myosin head consists of a globular catalytic domain that binds actin and hydrolyzes ATP and a neck domain that consists of essential and regulatory light chains bound to a long alpha-helical portion of the heavy chain. The swinging neck-level model assumes that a swinging motion of the neck relative to the catalytic domain is the origin of movement. This model predicts that the step size, and consequently the sliding velocity, are linearly related to the length of the neck. We have tested this point by characterizing a series of mutant Dictyostelium myosins that have different neck lengths. The 2xELCBS mutant has an extra binding site for essential light chain. The delta RLCBS mutant myosin has an internal deletion that removes the regulatory light chain binding site. The delta BLCBS mutant lacks both light chain binding sites. Wild-type myosin and these mutant myosins were subjected to the sliding filament in vitro motility assay. As expected, mutants with shorter necks move slower than wild-type myosin in vitro. Most significantly, a mutant with a longer neck moves faster than the wild type, and the sliding velocities of these myosins are linearly related to the neck length, as predicted by the swinging neck-lever model. A simple extrapolation to zero speed predicts that the fulcrum point is in the vicinity of the SH1-SH2 region in the catalytic domain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8633089

  14. A myosin isoform repressed in hypertrophied ALD muscle of the chicken reappears during regeneration following cold injury.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A F; Kennedy, J M; Bandman, E; Zak, R

    1989-10-01

    A library of monoclonal antibodies specific for myosin heavy chain (HC) was used to study myosin expression in regenerating fibers. The response to cold injury of slow skeletal ALD muscle previously induced to eliminate SM1 myosin by weight overload was compared to that of its contralateral control. Native gel electrophoresis combined with immunoblotting demonstrated that slow SM1 myosin HC eliminated from hypertrophic muscle reappeared both at the site of active regeneration and unexpectedly, also distal to the site of injury. The regeneration response of hypertrophied muscles was similar to that of the controls. In addition to SM1 myosin HC, ventricular-like and embryonic/fast isoforms were also expressed in both muscles during the early stages of regeneration and disappeared as the muscle fibers matured. These observations demonstrate that regenerating slow muscle fibers reexpress myosins' characteristic of developing muscle irrespective of the myosin phenotype prior to injury. The reappearance of repressed myosin HC in the hypertrophied ALD muscle is consistent with the presence of newly differentiated myonuclei. PMID:2776974

  15. Actomyosin content of Physarum plasmodia and detection of immunological cross-reactions with myosins from related species.

    PubMed

    Kessler, D; Nachmias, V T; Loewy, A G

    1976-05-01

    The content of myosin in plasmodia of the myxomycete Physarum polycephalum was measured by an immunological technique, quantitative microcomplement (C') fixation. Migrating plasmodia (starved after growth on rolled oats) contained 0.60 +/- 0.08 (SD) mg myosin per g fresh plasmodia. Myosin comprised 0.77% +/- 0.05 (SD) of the total plasmodial protein. When total plasmodial proteins were separated by electrophoresis on SDS-polyacrylamide gels, a large amount of protein appeared in a band comigrating with muscle actin. Densitometry performed after Coomassie blue staining indicated that as much as 15-25% of the total protein in the plasmodium could be actin. This gives an actin/myosin ratio by weight in the myxomycete plasmodium as high as 19-33, a very "actin-rich" actomyosin compared with rabbit skeletal muscle actomyosin with an actin/myosin ratio of 0.6. Starvation stimulates rapid migration and is correlated with a higher percent of both myosin and actin in the total protein of the plasmodium compared with normally growing cultures. Immunological cross-reaction of myosins from a variety of species was measured by C' fixation using an antiserum produced against purified native myosin from P. polycephalum. Although myxomycete and vertebrate striated muscle myosins have very similar morphological and biochemical properties, and apparently possess similar binding properties to F-actin, only myosins from myxomycetes in the order Physarales, rather closely related to P. polycephalum, gave detectable cross-reactions. This finding suggests that many amino acid sequences in myosin have been variable during evolution. PMID:944188

  16. Functional conservation between rodents and chicken of regulatory sequences driving skeletal muscle gene expression in transgenic chickens

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Regulatory elements that control expression of specific genes during development have been shown in many cases to contain functionally-conserved modules that can be transferred between species and direct gene expression in a comparable developmental pattern. An example of such a module has been identified at the rat myosin light chain (MLC) 1/3 locus, which has been well characterised in transgenic mouse studies. This locus contains two promoters encoding two alternatively spliced isoforms of alkali myosin light chain. These promoters are differentially regulated during development through the activity of two enhancer elements. The MLC3 promoter alone has been shown to confer expression of a reporter gene in skeletal and cardiac muscle in transgenic mice and the addition of the downstream MLC enhancer increased expression levels in skeletal muscle. We asked whether this regulatory module, sufficient for striated muscle gene expression in the mouse, would drive expression in similar domains in the chicken. Results We have observed that a conserved downstream MLC enhancer is present in the chicken MLC locus. We found that the rat MLC1/3 regulatory elements were transcriptionally active in chick skeletal muscle primary cultures. We observed that a single copy lentiviral insert containing this regulatory cassette was able to drive expression of a lacZ reporter gene in the fast-fibres of skeletal muscle in chicken in three independent transgenic chicken lines in a pattern similar to the endogenous MLC locus. Reporter gene expression in cardiac muscle tissues was not observed for any of these lines. Conclusions From these results we conclude that skeletal expression from this regulatory module is conserved in a genomic context between rodents and chickens. This transgenic module will be useful in future investigations of muscle development in avian species. PMID:20184756

  17. Quasi-elastic light-scattering studies of single skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Haskell, R C; Carlson, F D

    1981-01-01

    Measurements were made of the intensity autocorrelation function, g(2)[tau], of light scattered from intact frog muscle fibers. During the tension plateau of an isometric tenanus, scattered field statistics were approximately Gaussian and intensity fluctuations were quasi-stationary. The half time, tau 1/2, for the decay of g(2)[tau] was typically 70 ms at a scattering angle of 30 degrees. The decay rate, 1/tau 1/2, of g(2)[tau] varied roughly linearly with the projection of the scattering vector on the fiber axis. 1/tau 1/2 was greater during the tension creep phase of tetani of highly stretched fibers, but was roughly independent of sarcomere length during the tension plateau. g(2)[tau] measured during rest or on diffraction pattern maxima during isometric contraction were flat with low amplitudes. These results are consistent with a model of a 200-mu m segment of an isometrically contracting fiber in which scattering material possesses relative axial velocities of 1-2 mu m/s accompanied by relative axial displacements greater than 0.1 mu m. The slow (1-2 mu m/s) motion of one portion of the fiber relative to another observed under the microscope (500X) during isometric contraction is consistent with the light-scattering results. Structural fluctuations on the scale of the myofibrillar sarcomere which may arise from asynchronous cycling of cross-bridges must involve relative axial velocities less than 3 mu m/s or relative axial displacements less than 0.05 mu m. PMID:6974014

  18. Muscle-specific regulation of a transfected rabbit myosin heavy chain beta gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Cribbs, L L; Shimizu, N; Yockey, C E; Levin, J E; Jakovcic, S; Zak, R; Umeda, P K

    1989-06-25

    We have examined the transcriptional regulation of the rabbit myosin heavy chain (HC) beta gene by using DNA-mediated transfection experiments. To analyze the activity of the myosin HC beta promoter in a myogenic background, cultured myoblasts from 12-day-old chick embryonic breast muscle were transfected with a chimeric gene containing 781 base pairs of the promoter region fused to the gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). As indicated by the transient expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, the activity of the promoter in myoblast cultures increased at least 32-fold following differentiation and was selectively inhibited when myogenesis was blocked with 5-bromodeoxyuridine. Furthermore, RNase protection experiments showed that the in vivo myosin HC beta transcriptional initiation (or cap) site was utilized in the transfected skeletal muscle cells and also that the regulation of the exogenous promoter was similar to the induction of the endogenous skeletal alpha-actin gene. The results indicated that the exogenous promoter is regulated in a tissue- and stage-specific manner. By creating progressive 5' deletions of the promoter, we showed that only the region extending -294 base pairs upstream from the cap site is necessary for the muscle-specific expression. Linker-scanner mutagenesis of this region indicated that the positive regulation in differentiated skeletal muscle is mediated by at least two distinct elements within the 5'-flanking region of the myosin HC beta gene. PMID:2567293

  19. Two distinct myosin II populations coordinate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath in the Caenorhabditis elegans somatic gonad.

    PubMed

    Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-04-01

    The myoepithelial sheath in the somatic gonad of the nematodeCaenorhabditis eleganshas nonstriated contractile actomyosin networks that produce highly coordinated contractility for ovulation of mature oocytes. Two myosin heavy chains are expressed in the myoepithelial sheath, which are also expressed in the body-wall striated muscle. The troponin/tropomyosin system is also present and essential for ovulation. Therefore, although the myoepithelial sheath has smooth muscle-like contractile apparatuses, it has a striated muscle-like regulatory mechanism through troponin/tropomyosin. Here we report that the myoepithelial sheath has a distinct myosin population containing nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which is regulated by phosphorylation and essential for ovulation. MLC-4, a nonmuscle myosin regulatory light chain, localizes to small punctate structures and does not colocalize with large, needle-like myosin filaments containing MYO-3, a striated-muscle myosin isoform. RNA interference of MLC-4, as well as of its upstream regulators, LET-502 (Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase) and MEL-11 (a myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), impairs ovulation. Expression of a phosphomimetic MLC-4 mutant mimicking a constitutively active state also impairs ovulation. A striated-muscle myosin (UNC-54) appears to provide partially compensatory contractility. Thus the results indicate that the two spatially distinct myosin II populations coordinately regulate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath. PMID:26864628

  20. The role of myosin in vesicle transport during bovine chromaffin cell secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Neco, Patricia; Gil, Anabel; Del Mar Francés, María; Viniegra, Salvador; Gutiérrez, Luis M

    2002-01-01

    Bovine adrenomedullary cells in culture have been used to study the role of myosin in vesicle transport during exocytosis. Amperometric determination of calcium-dependent catecholamine release from individual digitonin-permeabilized cells treated with 3 microM wortmannin or 20 mM 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM) and stimulated by continuous as well as repetitive calcium pulses showed alteration of slow phases of secretion when compared with control untreated cells. The specificity of these drugs for myosin inhibition was further supported by the use of peptide-18, a potent peptide affecting myosin light-chain kinase activity. These results were supported also by studying the impact of these myosin inhibitors on chromaffin granule mobility using direct visualization by dynamic confocal microscopy. Wortmannin and BDM affect drastically vesicle transport throughout the cell cytoplasm, including the region beneath the plasma membrane. Immunocytochemical studies demonstrate the presence of myosin types II and V in the cell periphery. The capability of antibodies to myosin II in abrogating the secretory response from populations of digitonin-permeabilized cells compared with the modest effect caused by anti-myosin V suggests that myosin II plays a fundamental role in the active transport of vesicles occurring in the sub-plasmalemmal area during chromaffin cell secretory activity. PMID:12225290

  1. Protein Phosphatase 1 β Paralogs Encode the Zebrafish Myosin Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Jayashankar, Vaishali; Nguyen, Michael J.; Carr, Brandon W.; Zheng, Dale C.; Rosales, Joseph B.; Rosales, Joshua B.; Weiser, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The myosin phosphatase is a highly conserved regulator of actomyosin contractility. Zebrafish has emerged as an ideal model system to study the in vivo role of myosin phosphatase in controlling cell contractility, cell movement and epithelial biology. Most work in zebrafish has focused on the regulatory subunit of the myosin phosphatase called Mypt1. In this work, we examined the critical role of Protein Phosphatase 1, PP1, the catalytic subunit of the myosin phosphatase. Methodology/Principal Findings We observed that in zebrafish two paralogous genes encoding PP1β, called ppp1cba and ppp1cbb, are both broadly expressed during early development. Furthermore, we found that both gene products interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase complex. In addition, expression of this complex results in dephosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain and large scale rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Morpholino knock-down of ppp1cba and ppp1cbb results in severe defects in morphogenetic cell movements during gastrulation through loss of myosin phosphatase function. Conclusions/Significance Our work demonstrates that zebrafish have two genes encoding PP1β, both of which can interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase. In addition, both genes are required for convergence and extension during gastrulation and correct dosage of the protein products is required. PMID:24040418

  2. Metal cation controls myosin and actomyosin kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Tkachev, Yaroslav V; Ge, Jinghua; Negrashov, Igor V; Nesmelov, Yuri E

    2013-01-01

    We have perturbed myosin nucleotide binding site with magnesium-, manganese-, or calcium-nucleotide complexes, using metal cation as a probe to examine the pathways of myosin ATPase in the presence of actin. We have used transient time-resolved FRET, myosin intrinsic fluorescence, fluorescence of pyrene labeled actin, combined with the steady state myosin ATPase activity measurements of previously characterized D.discoideum myosin construct A639C:K498C. We found that actin activation of myosin ATPase does not depend on metal cation, regardless of the cation-specific kinetics of nucleotide binding and dissociation. The rate limiting step of myosin ATPase depends on the metal cation. The rate of the recovery stroke and the reverse recovery stroke is directly proportional to the ionic radius of the cation. The rate of nucleotide release from myosin and actomyosin, and ATP binding to actomyosin depends on the cation coordination number. PMID:24115140

  3. Changes of intracellular milieu with fatigue or hypoxia depress contraction of skinned rabbit skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Godt, R E; Nosek, T M

    1989-01-01

    1. Maximal calcium-activated force (Fmax) and calcium sensitivity were markedly decreased in detergent-skinned fibres from skeletal and cardiac muscle by solutions that mimicked the total milieu changes associated with fatigue and hypoxia. Further experiments determined the relative contribution of each of the individual changes in milieu. 2. Both Ca2+ sensitivity and Fmax of skeletal and cardiac fibres were decreased with increased [H+] or inorganic phosphate (Pi). These effects were greater in cardiac muscle. 3. Decreasing MgATP over the range observed with fatigue and hypoxia (6.8-4.7 mM) had no effect on Fmax or Ca2+ sensitivity of either muscle type. 4. Decreasing phosphocreatine (PCr: 15-1 mM) increased Fmax but had little effect on Ca2+ sensitivity in both muscle types. In cardiac fibres, the effect on Fmax could be mimicked by inhibition of endogenous creatine kinase. 5. ADP (0.7 mM) increased Fmax and Ca2+ sensitivity, while AMP (0.06 mM) slightly increased Fmax but had no effect on Ca2+ sensitivity of either skeletal or cardiac fibres. 6. Creatine (25 mM) had no significant effect on either Ca2+ sensitivity or Fmax of skeletal and cardiac muscle fibres. At higher levels (50 mM), however, creatine depressed Fmax and slightly altered Ca2+ sensitivity. 7. Thiophosphorylation of myosin P light chains (phosphorylatable light chains of myosin) in rabbit psoas fibres had no effect on Ca2+ sensitivity, yet slightly but significantly increased Fmax under fatigue conditions. 8. Reducing the affinity for ATP hydrolysis (by adding ADP, AMP and creatine) over the range calculated for fatigue/hypoxia (60-45 kJ/mol) produced the enhancement in Fmax expected from added ADP and AMP in cardiac but not skeletal muscle, indicating that changes in affinity influence Fmax of skeletal muscle. Reducing affinity produced little change in Ca2+ sensitivity of skeletal muscle. In contrast, the change produced in cardiac muscle was greater than that expected from addition of ADP and AMP; i.e. decreasing affinity increases calcium sensitivity of the heart. 9. Simple summation of all significant changes expected from each constituent altered by fatigue/hypoxia adequately predicted the observed changes in Fmax and Ca2+ sensitivity in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres with but one exception (the change in Ca2+ sensitivity of skeletal muscle at pH 7 was slightly overestimated). PMID:2600830

  4. Light effects on the isotopic fractionation of skeletal oxygen and carbon in the cultured zooxanthellate coral, Acropora: implications for coral-growth rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillet-Leclerc, A.; Reynaud, S.

    2010-03-01

    Skeletal isotopic and metabolic measurements of the branching coral Acropora cultured in constant conditions and subjected to two light intensities were revisited. We individually compared the data recorded at low light (LL) and high light (HL) for 24 colonies, all derived from the same parent colony. Metabolic and isotopic responses to the different light levels were highly variable. High light led to productivity enhancement, reduction of surface extension, doubling of aragonite deposited weight and increased ?18O levels in all nubbins; responses in respiration and ?13C were not clear. The partitioning of the colonies cultured at HL into two groups, one showing a ?13C enrichment and the other a ?13C decrease revealed common behaviors. Samples showing an increase in ?13C were associated with the co-variation of low surface extension and high productivity while samples showing a decrease in ?13C were associated with the co-variation of higher surface extension and limited productivity. This experiment, which allowed for the separation of temperature and light effects on the coral, highlighted the significant light influences on both skeletal ?18O and ?13C. The high scattering of inter-colony ?18O observed at one site could be due to the differing photosynthetic responses of symbiotic algal assemblages. We compared our results with observations by Gladfelter on Acropora cervicornis (1982). Both set of results highlight the relationships between coral-growth rates, micro-structures and photosynthetic activity. It appears that extension growth and skeleton thickening are two separate growth modes, and thickening is light-enhanced while extension is light-suppressed. There are multiple consequences of these findings for paleoclimatic reconstructions involving corals.

  5. Higher plant myosin XI moves processively on actin with 35 nm steps at high velocity.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Motoki; Kojima, Hiroaki; Yokota, Etsuo; Orii, Hidefumi; Nakamori, Rinna; Katayama, Eisaku; Anson, Michael; Shimmen, Teruo; Oiwa, Kazuhiro

    2003-03-17

    High velocity cytoplasmic streaming is found in various plant cells from algae to angiosperms. We characterized mechanical and enzymatic properties of a higher plant myosin purified from tobacco bright yellow-2 cells, responsible for cytoplasmic streaming, having a 175 kDa heavy chain and calmodulin light chains. Sequence analysis shows it to be a class XI myosin and a dimer with six IQ motifs in the light chain-binding domains of each heavy chain. Electron microscopy confirmed these predictions. We measured its ATPase characteristics, in vitro motility and, using optical trap nanometry, forces and movement developed by individual myosin XI molecules. Single myosin XI molecules move processively along actin with 35 nm steps at 7 micro m/s, the fastest known processive motion. Processivity was confirmed by actin landing rate assays. Mean maximal force was approximately 0.5 pN, smaller than for myosin IIs. Dwell time analysis of beads carrying single myosin XI molecules fitted the ATPase kinetics, with ADP release being rate limiting. These results indicate that myosin XI is highly specialized for generation of fast processive movement with concomitantly low forces. PMID:12628919

  6. Myosin II Motors and F-Actin Dynamics Drive the Coordinated Movement of the Centrosome and Soma during CNS Glial-Guided Neuronal Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Solecki, Dr. David; Trivedi, Dr. Niraj; Govek, Eve-Ellen; Kerekes, Ryan A; Gleason, Shaun Scott; Hatten, Mary E

    2009-01-01

    Lamination of cortical regions of the vertebrate brain depends on glial-guided neuronal migration. The conserved polarity protein Par6{alpha} localizes to the centrosome and coordinates forward movement of the centrosome and soma in migrating neurons. The cytoskeletal components that produce this unique form of cell polarity and their relationship to polarity signaling cascades are unknown. We show that F-actin and Myosin II motors are enriched in the neuronal leading process and that Myosin II activity is necessary for leading process actin dynamics. Inhibition of Myosin II decreased the speed of centrosome and somal movement, whereas Myosin II activation increased coordinated movement. Ectopic expression or silencing of Par6{alpha} inhibited Myosin II motors by decreasing Myosin light-chain phosphorylation. These findings suggest leading-process Myosin II may function to 'pull' the centrosome and soma forward during glial-guided migration by a mechanism involving the conserved polarity protein Par6{alpha}.

  7. Myosin II motors and F-actin dynamics drive the coordinated movement of the centrosome and soma during CNS glial-guided neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Solecki, David J; Trivedi, Niraj; Govek, Eve-Ellen; Kerekes, Ryan A; Gleason, Shaun S; Hatten, Mary E

    2009-07-16

    Lamination of cortical regions of the vertebrate brain depends on glial-guided neuronal migration. The conserved polarity protein Par6alpha localizes to the centrosome and coordinates forward movement of the centrosome and soma in migrating neurons. The cytoskeletal components that produce this unique form of cell polarity and their relationship to polarity signaling cascades are unknown. We show that F-actin and Myosin II motors are enriched in the neuronal leading process and that Myosin II activity is necessary for leading process actin dynamics. Inhibition of Myosin II decreased the speed of centrosome and somal movement, whereas Myosin II activation increased coordinated movement. Ectopic expression or silencing of Par6alpha inhibited Myosin II motors by decreasing Myosin light-chain phosphorylation. These findings suggest leading-process Myosin II may function to "pull" the centrosome and soma forward during glial-guided migration by a mechanism involving the conserved polarity protein Par6alpha. PMID:19607793

  8. Small-molecule inhibitors of myosin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Tumbarello, David A; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2014-01-01

    Advances in screening and computational methods have enhanced recent efforts to discover/design small-molecule protein inhibitors. One attractive target for inhibition is the myosin family of motor proteins. Myosins function in a wide variety of cellular processes, from intracellular trafficking to cell motility, and are implicated in several human diseases (e.g., cancer, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, deafness and many neurological disorders). Potent and selective myosin inhibitors are, therefore, not only a tool for understanding myosin function, but are also a resource for developing treatments for diseases involving myosin dysfunction or overactivity. This review will provide a brief overview of the characteristics and scientific/therapeutic applications of the presently identified small-molecule myosin inhibitors before discussing the future of myosin inhibitor and activator design. PMID:23256812

  9. Myosin‑II heavy chain and formin mediate the targeting of myosin essential light chain to the division site before and during cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhonghui; Okada, Satoshi; Cai, Guoping; Zhou, Bing; Bi, Erfei

    2015-04-01

    MLC1 is a haploinsufficient gene encoding the essential light chain for Myo1, the sole myosin‑II heavy chain in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mlc1 defines an essential hub that coordinates actomyosin ring function, membrane trafficking, and septum formation during cytokinesis by binding to IQGAP, myosin‑II, and myosin‑V. However, the mechanism of how Mlc1 is targeted to the division site during the cell cycle remains unsolved. By constructing a GFP‑tagged MLC1 under its own promoter control and using quantitative live‑cell imaging coupled with yeast mutants, we found that septin ring and actin filaments mediate the targeting of Mlc1 to the division site before and during cytokinesis, respectively. Both mechanisms contribute to and are collectively required for the accumulation of Mlc1 at the division site during cytokinesis. We also found that Myo1 plays a major role in the septin‑dependent Mlc1 localization before cytokinesis, whereas the formin Bni1 plays a major role in the actin filament-dependent Mlc1 localization during cytokinesis. Such a two‑tiered mechanism for Mlc1 localization is presumably required for the ordered assembly and robustness of cytokinesis machinery and is likely conserved across species. PMID:25631819

  10. Stabilization of Helivcal Order in the Thick Filaments by Blebbistatin: Further Evidence of Coexisting Multiple Conformations of Myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.; White, H; Offer, G; Yu, L

    2009-01-01

    The degree of helical order of the thick filament of mammalian skeletal muscle is highly dependent on temperature and the nature of the ligand. Previously, we showed that there was a close correlation between the conformation of the myosin heads on the surface of the thick filaments and the extent of their helical order. Helical order required the heads to be in the closed conformation. In addition, we showed that, with the same ligand bound at the active site, three conformations of myosin coexisted in equilibrium. Hitherto, however, there was no detectable helical order as measured by x-ray diffraction under the temperatures studied for myosin with MgADP and the nucleotide-free myosin, raising the possibility that the concept of multiple conformations has limited validity. In this study, blebbistatin was used to stabilize the closed conformation of myosin. The degree of helical order is substantially improved with MgATP at low temperature or with MgADP or in the absence of nucleotide. The thermodynamic parameters of the disorder?order transition and the characteristics of the ordered array were not significantly altered by binding blebbistatin. The simplest explanation is that the binding of blebbistatin increases the proportion of myosin in the closed conformation from being negligible to substantial. These results provide further evidence for the coexistence of multiple conformations of myosin under a wide range of conditions and for the closed conformation being directly coupled to helical order.

  11. Expression of the inclusion body myopathy 3 mutation in Drosophila depresses myosin function and stability and recapitulates muscle inclusions and weakness.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Melkani, Girish C; Suggs, Jennifer A; Melkani, Anju; Kronert, William A; Cammarato, Anthony; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2012-06-01

    Hereditary myosin myopathies are characterized by variable clinical features. Inclusion body myopathy 3 (IBM-3) is an autosomal dominant disease associated with a missense mutation (E706K) in the myosin heavy chain IIa gene. Adult patients experience progressive muscle weakness. Biopsies reveal dystrophic changes, rimmed vacuoles with cytoplasmic inclusions, and focal disorganization of myofilaments. We constructed a transgene encoding E706K myosin and expressed it in Drosophila (E701K) indirect flight and jump muscles to establish a novel homozygous organism with homogeneous populations of fast IBM-3 myosin and muscle fibers. Flight and jump abilities were severely reduced in homozygotes. ATPase and actin sliding velocity of the mutant myosin were depressed >80% compared with wild-type myosin. Light scattering experiments and electron microscopy revealed that mutant myosin heads bear a dramatic propensity to collapse and aggregate. Thus E706K (E701K) myosin appears far more labile than wild-type myosin. Furthermore, mutant fly fibers exhibit ultrastructural hallmarks seen in patients, including cytoplasmic inclusions containing aberrant proteinaceous structures and disorganized muscle filaments. Our Drosophila model reveals the unambiguous consequences of the IBM-3 lesion on fast muscle myosin and fibers. The abnormalities observed in myosin function and muscle ultrastructure likely contribute to muscle weakness observed in our flies and patients. PMID:22496423

  12. Identification and localization of myosin phosphatase in human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Murányi, A; Erdodi, F; Ito, M; Gergely, P; Hartshorne, D J

    1998-01-01

    Type 1 (PP1) and type 2A (PP2A) phosphatase activity was measured in three subcellular fractions of human platelets. About 80% of the activity was in the high-speed supernatant. Western blots showed that the catalytic subunit of PP1 (PP1c), including alpha- and delta-isoforms, was present in each fraction, but the level of the catalytic subunit of PP2A was very low in the low-speed pellet (cytoskeletal fraction). Various antibodies detected a subunit similar to the 130 kDa subunit (M130) of myosin phosphatase (MP) of smooth muscle in the low- and the high-speed pellets of human platelets. PP1c and associated proteins were isolated by microcystin-Sepharose. Many proteins were separated from each fraction, including myosin, actin and PP1c. M130 was separated only from the low-speed and the high-speed pellets. Kinase activities were detected in the unbound fractions, and fractions from the low- and high-speed pellets phosphorylated M130 and myosin respectively. Treatment of platelets with calyculin A increased the phosphorylation level of many proteins, including myosin heavy- and light-chains, and caused association of cytoskeletal proteins with the low-speed pellet. No marked change in the distribution of PP1c and M130 was detected. These results suggest that the MP in human platelets is composed of PP1c plus a subunit similar to M130 of the smooth muscle phosphatase. PMID:9461514

  13. Calcium and cargoes as regulators of myosin 5a activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, James R. Thirumurugan, Kavitha; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Hammer, John A.; Knight, Peter J.

    2008-04-25

    Myosin 5a is a two-headed actin-dependent motor that transports various cargoes in cells. Its enzymology and mechanochemistry have been extensively studied in vitro. It is a processive motor that takes multiple 36 nm steps on actin. The enzymatic activity of myosin 5 is regulated by an intramolecular folding mechanism whereby its lever arms fold back against the coiled-coil tail such that the motor domains directly bind the globular tail domains. We show that the structure seen in individual folded molecules is consistent with electron density map of two-dimensional crystals of the molecule. In this compact state, the actin-activated MgATPase activity of the molecule is markedly inhibited and the molecule cannot move processively on surface bound actin filaments. The actin-activated MgATPase activity of myosin 5a is activated by increasing the calcium concentration or by binding of a cargo-receptor molecule, melanophilin, in vitro. However, calcium binding to the calmodulin light chains results in dissociation of some of the calmodulin which disrupts the ability of myosin 5a to move on actin filaments in vitro. Thus we propose that the physiologically relevant activation pathway in vivo involves binding of cargo-receptor proteins.

  14. Dynamics of myosin II organization into cortical contractile networks and fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Wei; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Ou-Yang, Daniel; Jedlicka, Sabrina; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2014-03-01

    The morphology of adhered cells critically depends on the formation of a contractile meshwork of parallel and cross-linked stress fibers along the contacting surface. The motor activity and mini-filament assembly of non-muscle myosin II is an important component of cell-level cytoskeletal remodeling during mechanosensing. To monitor the dynamics of myosin II, we used confocal microscopy to image cultured HeLa cells that stably express myosin regulatory light chain tagged with GFP (MRLC-GFP). MRLC-GFP was monitored in time-lapse movies at steady state and during the response of cells to varying concentrations of blebbistatin which disrupts actomyosin stress fibers. Using image correlation spectroscopy analysis, we quantified the kinetics of disassembly and reassembly of actomyosin networks and compared them to studies by other groups. This analysis suggested that the following processes contribute to the assembly of cortical actomyosin into fibers: random myosin mini-filament assembly and disassembly along the cortex; myosin mini-filament aligning and contraction; stabilization of cortical myosin upon increasing contractile tension. We developed simple numerical simulations that include those processes. The results of simulations of cells at steady state and in response to blebbistatin capture some of the main features observed in the experiments. This study provides a framework to help interpret how different cortical myosin remodeling kinetics may contribute to different cell shape and rigidity depending on substrate stiffness.

  15. Dynamics of myosin II organization into contractile networks and fibers at the medial cell cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Wei

    The cellular morphology of adhered cells depends crucially on the formation of a contractile meshwork of parallel and cross-linked stress fibers along the contacting surface. The motor activity and mini-filament assembly of non-muscle myosin II is an important component of cell-level cytoskeletal remodeling during mechanosensing. To monitor the dynamics of non-muscle myosin II, we used confocal microscopy to image cultured HeLa cells that stably express myosin regulatory light chain tagged with GFP (MRLC-GFP). MRLC-GFP was monitored in time-lapse movies at steady state and during the response of cells to varying concentrations of blebbistatin (which disrupts actomyosin stress fibers). Using image correlation spectroscopy analysis, we quantified the kinetics of disassembly and reassembly of actomyosin networks and compared to studies by other groups. This analysis suggested the following processes: myosin minifilament assembly and disassembly; aligning and contraction; myosin filament stabilization upon increasing contractile tension. Numerical simulations that include those processes capture some of the main features observed in the experiments. This study provides a framework to help interpret how different cortical myosin remodeling kinetics may contribute to different cell shape and rigidity depending on substrate stiffness. We discuss methods to monitor myosin reorganization using non-linear imaging methods.

  16. Myosin VI: cellular functions and motor properties.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rhys; Lister, Ida; Schmitz, Stephan; Walker, Matthew; Veigel, Claudia; Trinick, John; Buss, Folma; Kendrick-Jones, John

    2004-12-29

    Myosin VI has been localized in membrane ruffles at the leading edge of cells, at the trans-Golgi network compartment of the Golgi complex and in clathrin-coated pits or vesicles, indicating that it functions in a wide variety of intracellular processes. Myosin VI moves along actin filaments towards their minus end, which is the opposite direction to all of the other myosins so far studied (to our knowledge), and is therefore thought to have unique properties and functions. To investigate the cellular roles of myosin VI, we identified various myosin VI binding partners and are currently characterizing their interactions within the cell. As an alternative approach, we have expressed and purified full-length myosin VI and studied its in vitro properties. Previous studies assumed that myosin VI was a dimer, but our biochemical, biophysical and electron microscopic studies reveal that myosin VI can exist as a stable monomer. We observed, using an optical tweezers force transducer, that monomeric myosin VI is a non-processive motor which, despite a relatively short lever arm, generates a large working stroke of 18 nm. Whether monomer and/or dimer forms of myosin VI exist in cells and their possible functions will be discussed. PMID:15647169

  17. Electron microscopic recording of myosin head power stroke in hydrated myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Sugi, Haruo; Chaen, Shigeru; Akimoto, Tsuyoshi; Minoda, Hiroki; Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contraction results from cyclic attachment and detachment between myosin heads and actin filaments, coupled with ATP hydrolysis. Despite extensive studies, however, the amplitude of myosin head power stroke still remains to be a mystery. Using the gas environmental chamber, we have succeeded in recording the power stroke of position-marked myosin heads in hydrated mixture of actin and myosin filaments in a nearly isometric condition, in which myosin heads do not produce gross myofilament sliding, but only stretch adjacent elastic structures. On application of ATP, individual myosin heads move by ~3.3 nm at the distal region, and by ~2.5 nm at the proximal region of myosin head catalytic domain. After exhaustion of applied ATP, individual myosin heads return towards their initial position. At low ionic strength, the amplitude of myosin head power stroke increases to >4 nm at both distal and proximal regions of myosin heads catalytic domain, being consistent with the report that the force generated by individual myosin heads in muscle fibers is enhanced at low ionic strength. The advantages of the present study over other in vitro motility assay systems, using myosin heads detached from myosin filaments, are discussed. PMID:26498981

  18. Electron microscopic recording of myosin head power stroke in hydrated myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sugi, Haruo; Chaen, Shigeru; Akimoto, Tsuyoshi; Minoda, Hiroki; Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contraction results from cyclic attachment and detachment between myosin heads and actin filaments, coupled with ATP hydrolysis. Despite extensive studies, however, the amplitude of myosin head power stroke still remains to be a mystery. Using the gas environmental chamber, we have succeeded in recording the power stroke of position-marked myosin heads in hydrated mixture of actin and myosin filaments in a nearly isometric condition, in which myosin heads do not produce gross myofilament sliding, but only stretch adjacent elastic structures. On application of ATP, individual myosin heads move by ~3.3 nm at the distal region, and by ~2.5 nm at the proximal region of myosin head catalytic domain. After exhaustion of applied ATP, individual myosin heads return towards their initial position. At low ionic strength, the amplitude of myosin head power stroke increases to >4 nm at both distal and proximal regions of myosin heads catalytic domain, being consistent with the report that the force generated by individual myosin heads in muscle fibers is enhanced at low ionic strength. The advantages of the present study over other in vitro motility assay systems, using myosin heads detached from myosin filaments, are discussed. PMID:26498981

  19. Response of slow and fast muscle to hypothyroidism: maximal shortening velocity and myosin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Herrick, R. E.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined both the shortening velocity and myosin isoform distribution of slow- (soleus) and fast-twitch (plantaris) skeletal muscles under hypothyroid conditions. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control (n = 7) or hypothyroid (n = 7). In both muscles, the relative contents of native slow myosin (SM) and type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) increased in response to the hypothyroid treatment. The effects were such that the hypothyroid soleus muscle expressed only the native SM and type I MHC isoforms while repressing native intermediate myosin and type IIA MHC. In the plantaris, the relative content of native SM and type I MHC isoforms increased from 5 to 13% and from 4 to 10% of the total myosin pool, respectively. Maximal shortening velocity of the soleus and plantaris as measured by the slack test decreased by 32 and 19%, respectively, in response to hypothyroidism. In contrast, maximal shortening velocity as estimated by force-velocity data decreased only in the soleus (-19%). No significant change was observed for the plantaris.

  20. Skip residues modulate the structural properties of the myosin rod and guide thick filament assembly

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Keenan C.; Buvoli, Massimo; Korkmaz, Elif Nihal; Buvoli, Ada; Zheng, Yuqing; Heinze, Nathan T.; Cui, Qiang; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Rayment, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The rod of sarcomeric myosins directs thick filament assembly and is characterized by the insertion of four skip residues that introduce discontinuities in the coiled-coil heptad repeats. We report here that the regions surrounding the first three skip residues share high structural similarity despite their low sequence homology. Near each of these skip residues, the coiled-coil transitions to a nonclose-packed structure inducing local relaxation of the superhelical pitch. Moreover, molecular dynamics suggest that these distorted regions can assume different conformationally stable states. In contrast, the last skip residue region constitutes a true molecular hinge, providing C-terminal rod flexibility. Assembly of myosin with mutated skip residues in cardiomyocytes shows that the functional importance of each skip residue is associated with rod position and reveals the unique role of the molecular hinge in promoting myosin antiparallel packing. By defining the biophysical properties of the rod, the structures and molecular dynamic calculations presented here provide insight into thick filament formation, and highlight the structural differences occurring between the coiled-coils of myosin and the stereotypical tropomyosin. In addition to extending our knowledge into the conformational and biological properties of coiled-coil discontinuities, the molecular characterization of the four myosin skip residues also provides a guide to modeling the effects of rod mutations causing cardiac and skeletal myopathies. PMID:26150528

  1. Arf guanine nucleotide-exchange factors BIG1 and BIG2 regulate nonmuscle myosin IIA activity by anchoring myosin phosphatase complex

    PubMed Central

    Le, Kang; Li, Chun-Chun; Ye, Guan; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange factors BIG1 and BIG2 activate, through their Sec7 domains, ADP ribosylation factors (Arfs) by accelerating the replacement of Arf-bound GDP with GTP for initiation of vesicular transport or activation of specific enzymes that modify important phospholipids. They are also implicated in regulation of cell polarization and actin dynamics for directed migration. Reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation of endogenous HeLa cell BIG1 and BIG2 with myosin IIA was demonstrably independent of Arf guanine nucleotide-exchange factor activity, because effects of BIG1 and BIG2 depletion were reversed by overexpression of the cognate BIG molecule C-terminal sequence that follows the Arf activation site. Selective depletion of BIG1 or BIG2 enhanced specific phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (T18/S19) and F-actin content, which impaired cell migration in Transwell assays. Our data are clear evidence of these newly recognized functions for BIG1 and BIG2 in transduction or integration of mechanical signals from integrin adhesions and myosin IIA-dependent actin dynamics. Thus, by anchoring or scaffolding the assembly, organization, and efficient operation of multimolecular myosin phosphatase complexes that include myosin IIA, protein phosphatase 1δ, and myosin phosphatase-targeting subunit 1, BIG1 and BIG2 serve to integrate diverse biophysical and biochemical events in cells. PMID:23918382

  2. Myosin V from Drosophila reveals diversity of motor mechanisms within the myosin V family.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Judit; Kovács, Mihály; Wang, Fei; Nyitray, László; Sellers, James R

    2005-08-26

    Myosin V is the best characterized vesicle transporter in vertebrates, but it has been unknown as to whether all members of the myosin V family share a common, evolutionarily conserved mechanism of action. Here we show that myosin V from Drosophila has a strikingly different motor mechanism from that of vertebrate myosin Va, and it is a nonprocessive, ensemble motor. Our steady-state and transient kinetic measurements on single-headed constructs reveal that a single Drosophila myosin V molecule spends most of its mechanochemical cycle time detached from actin, therefore it has to function in processive units that comprise several molecules. Accordingly, in in vitro motility assays, double-headed Drosophila myosin V requires high surface concentrations to exhibit a continuous translocation of actin filaments. Our comparison between vertebrate and fly myosin V demonstrates that the well preserved function of myosin V motors in cytoplasmic transport can be accomplished by markedly different underlying mechanisms. PMID:15980429

  3. Immunochemical analysis of C-protein isoform transitions during the development of chicken skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Obinata, T; Reinach, F C; Bader, D M; Masaki, T; Kitani, S; Fischman, D A

    1984-01-01

    Isoforms of C-protein in adult chickens which differ in fast (pectoralis major, PM) and slow (anterior latissimus dorsi, ALD) skeletal muscles can be distinguished immunochemically with monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) specific for the respective fast (MF-1) and slow (ALD-66) protein variants (Reinach et al., 1982 and 1983). The expression of these C-proteins during chick muscle development in vivo has been analyzed by immunoblot and immunofluorescence procedures. Neither MF-1 nor ALD-66 reacted with whole-cell lysates or myofibrils from PM of 12-day-old embryos. However, both McAbs bound to peptides of 145 kDa in PM from late embryonic and young posthatched chickens. All of the myofibers in these muscles reacted with both antibodies, but the binding of the anti-slow McAb (ALD-66) diminished progressively with age and was completely negative with PM by 2 weeks after hatching. In contrast, the ALD muscle from 17 days in ovo thru adulthood only reacted with ALD-66; no binding of MF-1 could be detected at these stages. Since both fast and slow myosin light chains (LC) coexist within embryonic pectoralis and ALD muscles (e.g., G. F. Gauthier, S. Lowey, P. A. Benfield, and A. W. Hobbs, 1982, J. Cell Biol. 92, 471-484) yet segregate to specific fast and slow muscle fibers at different stages of development, the temporal transitions of C-protein and myosin LC were compared during myogenesis. "Slow-type" C-protein appeared after the disappearance of slow myosin light chains, whereas the accumulation of the "fast-type" light chains occurred before the expression of "fast-type" C-protein. The pattern of isoform transitions appears to be far more complex than previously suspected. PMID:6141116

  4. Myosin lever arm directs collective motion on cellular actin network

    PubMed Central

    Hariadi, Rizal F.; Cale, Mario; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2014-01-01

    The molecular motor myosin teams up to drive muscle contraction, membrane traffic, and cell division in biological cells. Myosin function in cells emerges from the interaction of multiple motors tethered to a scaffold, with surrounding actin filaments organized into 3D networks. Despite the importance of myosin function, the influence of intermotor interactions on collective motion remains poorly understood. In this study, we used precisely engineered myosin assemblies to examine emergence in collective myosin movement. We report that tethering multiple myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, modifies their movement trajectories on keratocyte actin networks. Single myosin V and VI dimers display similar skewed trajectories, albeit in opposite directions, when traversing the keratocyte actin network. In contrast, tethering myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, progressively straightens the trajectories with increasing myosin number. Trajectory shape of multimotor scaffolds positively correlates with the stiffness of the myosin lever arm. Swapping the flexible myosin VI lever arm for the relatively rigid myosin V lever increases trajectory skewness, and vice versa. A simplified model of coupled motor movement demonstrates that the differences in flexural rigidity of the two myosin lever arms is sufficient to account for the differences in observed behavior of groups of myosin V and VI motors. In accordance with this model trajectory, shapes for scaffolds containing both myosin V and VI are dominated by the myosin with a stiffer lever arm. Our findings suggest that structural features unique to each myosin type may confer selective advantages in cellular functions. PMID:24591646

  5. Evaluation of Acanthamoeba Myosin-IC as a Potential Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Reyes-Batlle, María; Piñero, José E.; Valladares, Basilio; Maciver, Sutherland K.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are facultative pathogens of humans, causing a sight-threatening keratitis and a fatal encephalitis. We have targeted myosin-IC by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing as a therapeutic approach, since it is known that the function of this protein is vital for the amoeba. In this work, specific siRNAs against the Acanthamoeba myosin-IC gene were developed. Treated and control amoebae were cultured in growth and encystment media to evaluate the induced effects after myosin-IC gene knockdown, as we have anticipated that cyst formation may be impaired. The effects of myosin-IC gene silencing were inhibition of cyst formation, inhibition of completion of cytokinesis, inhibition of osmoregulation under osmotic stress conditions, and death of the amoebae. The finding that myosin-IC silencing caused incompletion of cytokinesis is in agreement with earlier suggestions that the protein plays a role in cell locomotion, which is necessary to pull daughter cells apart after mitosis in a process known as “traction-mediated cytokinesis”. We conclude that myosin-IC is a very promising potential drug target for the development of much-needed antiamoebal drugs and that it should be further exploited for Acanthamoeba therapy. PMID:24468784

  6. Myosin II transport, organization, and phosphorylation: evidence for cortical flow/solation-contraction coupling during cytokinesis and cell locomotion.

    PubMed Central

    DeBiasio, R L; LaRocca, G M; Post, P L; Taylor, D L

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of cytokinesis has been difficult to define because of the short duration and the temporal-spatial dynamics involved in the formation, activation, force production, and disappearance of the cleavage furrow. We have investigated the structural and chemical dynamics of myosin II in living Swiss 3T3 cells from prometaphase through the separation and migration of daughter cells. The structural and chemical dynamics of myosin II have been defined using the semiautomated, multimode light microscope, together with a fluorescent analogue of myosin II and a fluorescent biosensor of myosin II regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation at serine 19. The correlation of image data from live cells using different modes of light microscopy allowed interpretations not possible from single-mode investigations. Myosin II transported toward the equatorial plane from adjacent regions, forming three-dimensional fibers that spanned the volume of the equator during anaphase and telophase. A global phosphorylation of myosin II at serine 19 of the RLC was initiated at anaphase when cortical myosin II transport started. The phosphorylation of myosin II remained high near the equatorial plane through telophase and into cytokinesis, whereas the phosphorylation of myosin II at serine 19 of the RLC decreased at the poles. The timing and pattern of phosphorylation was the same as the shortening of myosin II-based fibers in the cleavage furrow. Myosin II-based fibers shortened and transported out of the cleavage furrow into the tails of the two daughter cells late in cytokinesis. The patterns of myosin II transport, phosphorylation, and shortening of fibers in the migrating daughter cells were similar to that previously defined for cells migrating in a wound in vitro. The temporal-spatial patterns and dynamics of myosin II transport, phosphorylation at serine 19 of the RLC, and the shortening and disappearance of myosin II-based fibers support the proposal that a combination of the cortical flow hypothesis and the solation-contraction coupling hypothesis explain key aspects of cytokinesis and polarized cell locomotion. Images PMID:8856669

  7. Temperature effect on the chemomechanical regulation of substeps within the power stroke of a single Myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chenling; Chen, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Myosin IIs in the skeletal muscle are highly efficient nanoscale machines evolved in nature. Understanding how they function can not only bring insights into various biological processes but also provide guidelines to engineer synthetic nanoscale motors working in the vicinity of thermal noise. Though it was clearly demonstrated that the behavior of a skeletal muscle fiber, or that of a single myosin was strongly affected by the temperature, how exactly the temperature affects the kinetics of a single myosin is not fully understood. By adapting the newly developed transitional state model, which successfully explained the intriguing motor force regulation during skeletal muscle contraction, here we systematically explain how exactly the power stroke of a single myosin proceeds, with the consideration of the chemomechanical regulation of sub-steps within the stroke. The adapted theory is then utilized to investigate the temperature effect on various aspects of the power stroke. Our analysis suggests that, though swing rates, the isometric force, and the maximal stroke size all strongly vary with the temperature, the temperature can have a very small effect on the releasable elastic energy within the power stroke. PMID:26786569

  8. Coupled expression of troponin T and troponin I isoforms in single skeletal muscle fibers correlates with contractility

    PubMed Central

    BROTTO, MARCO A.; BIESIADECKI, BRANDON J.; BROTTO, LETICIA S.; NOSEK, THOMAS M; JIN, J.-P.

    2005-01-01

    (Summary) Brotto, Marco A., Brandon J. Biesiadecki, Leticia S. Brotto, Thomas M. Nosek, and J.-P. Jin. Striated muscle contraction is powered by actin-activated myosin ATPase. This process is regulated by Ca2+ via the troponin complex. Slow and fast twitch fibers of vertebrate skeletal muscle express type I and type II myosin, respectively, and these myosin isoenzymes confer different ATPase activities, contractile velocities and force. Skeletal muscle troponin has also diverged into fast and slow isoforms, but their functional significance is not fully understood. To investigate the expression of troponin isoforms in mammalian skeletal muscle and their functional relationship to that of the myosin isoforms, we concomitantly studied myosin and troponin T (TnT) and troponin I (TnI) isoform contents and isometric contractile properties in single fibers of rat skeletal muscle. We characterized a large number of Triton skinned single fibers from soleus, diaphragm, gastrocnemius and extensor digitorum longus muscles and selected fibers with combinations of a single myosin isoform and a single class (slow or fast) of TnT and TnI isoform to investigate their role in determining contractility. Type IIa, IIx and IIb myosin fibers produced higher isometric force than that of type I fibers. Despite the polyploidy of adult skeletal muscle fibers, the expression of fast or slow isoforms of TnT and TnI is tightly coupled. Fibers containing slow troponin had higher Ca2+ sensitivity than that of the fast troponin fibers, while fibers containing fast troponin showed a higher cooperativity of Ca2+ activation than that of the slow troponin fibers. The results demonstrate distinctive, but coordinated, regulation of troponin and myosin isoform expression in skeletal muscle and their contribution to the contractile properties. PMID:16192301

  9. Myosin II Dynamics during Embryo Morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasza, Karen

    2013-03-01

    During embryonic morphogenesis, the myosin II motor protein generates forces that help to shape tissues, organs, and the overall body form. In one dramatic example in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, the epithelial tissue that will give rise to the body of the adult animal elongates more than two-fold along the head-to-tail axis in less than an hour. This elongation is accomplished primarily through directional rearrangements of cells within the plane of the tissue. Just prior to elongation, polarized assemblies of myosin II accumulate perpendicular to the elongation axis. The contractile forces generated by myosin activity orient cell movements along a common axis, promoting local cell rearrangements that contribute to global tissue elongation. The molecular and mechanical mechanisms by which myosin drives this massive change in embryo shape are poorly understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we generated a collection of transgenic flies expressing variants of myosin II with altered motor function and regulation. We found that variants that are predicted to have increased myosin activity cause defects in tissue elongation. Using biophysical approaches, we found that these myosin variants also have decreased turnover dynamics within cells. To explore the mechanisms by which molecular-level myosin dynamics are translated into tissue-level elongation, we are using time-lapse confocal imaging to observe cell movements in embryos with altered myosin activity. We are utilizing computational approaches to quantify the dynamics and directionality of myosin localization and cell rearrangements. These studies will help elucidate how myosin-generated forces control cell movements within tissues. This work is in collaboration with J. Zallen at the Sloan-Kettering Institute.

  10. Structural basis of the relaxed state of a Ca2+-regulated myosin filament and its evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Woodhead, John L.; Zhao, Fa-Qing; Craig, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Myosin filaments of muscle are regulated either by phosphorylation of their regulatory light chains or Ca2+ binding to the essential light chains, contributing to onoff switching or modulation of contraction. Phosphorylation-regulated filaments in the relaxed state are characterized by an asymmetric interaction between the two myosin heads, inhibiting their actin binding or ATPase activity. Here, we have tested whether a similar interaction switches off activity in myosin filaments regulated by Ca2+ binding. Cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle image reconstruction of Ca2+-regulated (scallop) filaments reveals a helical array of myosin head-pair motifs above the filament surface. Docking of atomic models of scallop myosin head domains into the motifs reveals that the heads interact in a similar way to those in phosphorylation-regulated filaments. The results imply that the two major evolutionary branches of myosin regulationinvolving phosphorylation or Ca2+ bindingshare a common structural mechanism for switching off thick-filament activity in relaxed muscle. We suggest that the Ca2+-binding mechanism evolved from the more ancient phosphorylation-based system to enable rapid response of myosin-regulated muscles to activation. Although the motifs are similar in both systems, the scallop structure is more tilted and higher above the filament backbone, leading to different intermolecular interactions. The reconstruction reveals how the myosin tail emerges from the motif, connecting the heads to the filament backbone, and shows that the backbone is built from supramolecular assemblies of myosin tails. The reconstruction provides a native structural context for understanding past biochemical and biophysical studies of this model Ca2+-regulated myosin. PMID:23650385

  11. Nuclear actin and myosins in adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Fuchsova, Beata; Serebryannyy, Leonid A; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2015-11-01

    Adenovirus serotypes have been shown to cause drastic changes in nuclear organization, including the transcription machinery, during infection. This ability of adenovirus to subvert transcription in the host cell facilitates viral replication. Because nuclear actin and nuclear myosin I, myosin V and myosin VI have been implicated as direct regulators of transcription and important factors in the replication of other viruses, we sought to determine how nuclear actin and myosins are involved in adenovirus infection. We first confirmed reorganization of the host's transcription machinery to viral replication centers. We found that nuclear actin also reorganizes to sites of transcription through the intermediate but not the advanced late phase of viral infection. Furthermore, nuclear myosin I localized with nuclear actin and sites of transcription in viral replication centers. Intriguingly, nuclear myosins V and VI, which also reorganized to viral replication centers, exhibited different localization patterns, suggesting specialized roles for these nuclear myosins. Finally, we assessed the role of actin in adenovirus infection and found both cytoplasmic and nuclear actin likely play roles in adenovirus infection and replication. Together our data suggest the involvement of actin and multiple myosins in the nuclear replication and late viral gene expression of adenovirus. PMID:26226218

  12. Skeletal radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Bowerman, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The main emphasis of the chapter on skeletal radiology is CAT scanning and its use in the diagnosis of neoplasms. Other topics that are discussed include infections, arthritis, trauma, and metabolic and endocrine diseases as they relate to skeletal radiology. (KRM)

  13. Supervillin binding to myosin II and synergism with anillin are required for cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tara C.; Fridy, Peter C.; Li, Yinyin; Basil, Shruti; Arjun, Sneha; Friesen, Ryan M.; Leszyk, John; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Luna, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokinesis, the process by which cytoplasm is apportioned between dividing daughter cells, requires coordination of myosin II function, membrane trafficking, and central spindle organization. Most known regulators act during late cytokinesis; a few, including the myosin II–binding proteins anillin and supervillin, act earlier. Anillin's role in scaffolding the membrane cortex with the central spindle is well established, but the mechanism of supervillin action is relatively uncharacterized. We show here that two regions within supervillin affect cell division: residues 831–1281, which bind central spindle proteins, and residues 1–170, which bind the myosin II heavy chain (MHC) and the long form of myosin light-chain kinase. MHC binding is required to rescue supervillin deficiency, and mutagenesis of this site creates a dominant-negative phenotype. Supervillin concentrates activated and total myosin II at the furrow, and simultaneous knockdown of supervillin and anillin additively increases cell division failure. Knockdown of either protein causes mislocalization of the other, and endogenous anillin increases upon supervillin knockdown. Proteomic identification of interaction partners recovered using a high-affinity green fluorescent protein nanobody suggests that supervillin and anillin regulate the myosin II and actin cortical cytoskeletons through separate pathways. We conclude that supervillin and anillin play complementary roles during vertebrate cytokinesis. PMID:24088567

  14. Catch-slip bonds can be dispensable for motor force regulation during skeletal muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chenling; Chen, Bin

    2015-07-01

    It is intriguing how multiple molecular motors can perform coordinated and synchronous functions, which is essential in various cellular processes. Recent studies on skeletal muscle might have shed light on this issue, where rather precise motor force regulation was partly attributed to the specific stochastic features of a single attached myosin motor. Though attached motors can randomly detach from actin filaments either through an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis cycle or through "catch-slip bond" breaking, their respective contribution in motor force regulation has not been clarified. Here, through simulating a mechanical model of sarcomere with a coupled Monte Carlo method and finite element method, we find that the stochastic features of an ATP hydrolysis cycle can be sufficient while those of catch-slip bonds can be dispensable for motor force regulation. PMID:26274218

  15. Catch-slip bonds can be dispensable for motor force regulation during skeletal muscle contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chenling; Chen, Bin

    2015-07-01

    It is intriguing how multiple molecular motors can perform coordinated and synchronous functions, which is essential in various cellular processes. Recent studies on skeletal muscle might have shed light on this issue, where rather precise motor force regulation was partly attributed to the specific stochastic features of a single attached myosin motor. Though attached motors can randomly detach from actin filaments either through an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis cycle or through "catch-slip bond" breaking, their respective contribution in motor force regulation has not been clarified. Here, through simulating a mechanical model of sarcomere with a coupled Monte Carlo method and finite element method, we find that the stochastic features of an ATP hydrolysis cycle can be sufficient while those of catch-slip bonds can be dispensable for motor force regulation.

  16. Three-dimensional structural dynamics of myosin V by single-molecule fluorescence polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkey, Joseph N.; Quinlan, Margot E.; Alexander Shaw, M.; Corrie, John E. T.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2003-03-01

    The structural change that generates force and motion in actomyosin motility has been proposed to be tilting of the myosin light chain domain, which serves as a lever arm. Several experimental approaches have provided support for the lever arm hypothesis; however, the extent and timing of tilting motions are not well defined in the motor protein complex of functioning actomyosin. Here we report three-dimensional measurements of the structural dynamics of the light chain domain of brain myosin V using a single-molecule fluorescence polarization technique that determines the orientation of individual protein domains with 20-40-ms time resolution. Single fluorescent calmodulin light chains tilted back and forth between two well-defined angles as the myosin molecule processively translocated along actin. The results provide evidence for lever arm rotation of the calmodulin-binding domain in myosin V, and support a `hand-over-hand' mechanism for the translocation of double-headed myosin V molecules along actin filaments. The technique is applicable to the study of real-time structural changes in other biological systems.

  17. Cross-reactivity of termite myosin; a potential allergen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Myosin and myosin isoforms are common food allergens in crustaceans; such as, shrimp, lobster, and crab. Allergy to Shellfish is a prevalent and potentially long lasting disorder that can severely affect health and quality of life. Myosin and myosin isoforms of dust mites and cockroaches are simil...

  18. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chii J; Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-04-21

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  19. Heterogeneous activation of a slow myosin gene in proliferating myoblasts and differentiated single myofibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Hua; Wang, Qiao-Jing; Wang, Chao; Reinholt, Brad; Grant, Alan L; Gerrard, David E; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-06-01

    Each skeletal muscle contains a fixed ratio of fast and slow myofibers that are distributed in a stereotyped pattern to achieve a specific motor function. How myofibers are specified during development and regeneration is poorly understood. Here we address this question using transgenic reporter mice that indelibly mark the myofiber lineages based on activation of fast or slow myosin. Lineage tracing indicates that during development all muscles have activated the fast myosin gene Myl1, but not the slow myosin gene Myh7, which is activated in all slow but a subset of fast myofibers. Similarly, most nascent myofibers do not activate Myh7 during fast muscle regeneration, but the ratio and pattern of fast and slow myofibers are restored at the completion of regeneration. At the single myofiber level, most mature fast myofibers are heterogeneous in nuclear composition, manifested by mosaic activation of Myh7. Strikingly, Myh7 is activated in a subpopulation of proliferating myoblasts that co-express the myogenic progenitor marker Pax7. When induced to differentiate, the Myh7-activated myoblasts differentiate more readily than the non-activated myoblasts, and have a higher tendency, but not restricted, to become slow myotubes. Together, our data reveal significant nuclear heterogeneity within a single myofiber, and challenge the conventional view that myosin genes are only expressed after myogenic differentiation. These results provide novel insights into the regulation of muscle fiber type specification. PMID:25794679

  20. [X-ray interferometry of the axial movement of myosin heads during muscle force generation initiated by T-jump].

    PubMed

    Kubasova, N A; Bershitskiĭ, S Iu; Ferenczi, M A; Panine, P; Narayanan, T; Tsaturian, A K

    2009-01-01

    The interference fine structure of the M3 reflection on the low-angle x-ray diffraction patterns of muscle fibres is used for the measurements of axial movements of myosin heads with a precision of 0.1-0.2 nm. We have measured changes in the M3 interference profile during tension rise induced by a 5 to 30 degrees C temperature jump in thin bundles of contracting fibers from rabbit skeletal muscle. Interpreting the data with a point diffractor model gives an estimate for the axial movement of the myosin heads during force rise of less than 0.6 nm. Modifications of the point diffractor model are discussed. We show that our experimental data can be explained by a model where myosin heads bind actin in a number of structurally different states. PMID:19807033

  1. Genetic Variation in Myosin 1H Contributes to Mandibular Prognathism

    PubMed Central

    Tassopoulou-Fishell, Maria; Deeley, Kathleen; Harvey, Erika M.; Sciote, James; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Several candidate loci have been suggested as influencing mandibular prognathism (1p22.1, 1p22.2, 1p36, 3q26.2, 5p13-p12, 6q25, 11q22.2-q22.3, 12q23, 12q13.13, and 19p13.2). The goal of this study was to replicate these results in a well-characterized homogeneous sample set. Methods Thirty-three single nucleotide polymorphisms spanning all candidate regions were studied in 44 prognathic and 35 Class I subjects from the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine Dental Registry and DNA Repository. The 44 mandibular prognathism subjects had an average age of 18.4 years, 31 were females and 13 males, and 24 were White, 15 African American, two Hispanic, and three Asian. The 35 Class I subjects had an average age of 17.6 years, 27 were females and 9 males, and 27 were White, six African Americans, one Hispanic, and two Asian. Skeletal mandibular prognathism diagnosis included cephalometric values indicative of Class III such as ANB smaller than two degrees, negative Witts appraisal, and positive A–B plane. Additional mandibular prognathism criteria included negative OJ and visually prognathic (concave) profile as determined by the subject's clinical evaluation. Orthognathic subjects without jaw deformations were used as a comparison group. Mandibular prognathism and orthognathic subjects were matched based on race, sex and age. Genetic markers were tested by polymerase chain reaction using TaqMan chemistry. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to determine overrepresentation of marker allele with alpha of 0.05. Results An association was unveiled between a marker in MYO1H (rs10850110) and the mandibular prognathism phenotype (p=0.03). MYO1H is a Class-I myosin that is in a different protein group than the myosin isoforms of muscle sarcomeres, which are the basis of skeletal muscle fiber typing. Class I myosins are necessary for cell motility, phagocytosis and vesicle transport. Conclusions More strict clinical definitions may increase homogeneity and aid the studies of genetic susceptibility to malocclusions. We provide evidence that MYO1H may contribute to mandibular prognathism. PMID:22196185

  2. Functional studies of individual myosin molecules.

    PubMed

    Dantzig, Jody A; Liu, Tim Y; Goldman, Yale E

    2006-10-01

    The "conventional" isoform of myosin that polymerizes into filaments (myosin II) is the molecular motor powering contraction in all three types of muscle. Considerable attention has been paid to the developmental progression, isoform distribution, and mutations that affect myocardial development, function, and adaptation. Optical trap (laser tweezer) experiments and various types of high-resolution fluorescence microscopy, capable of interrogating individual protein motors, are revealing novel and detailed information about their functionally relevant nanometer motions and pico-Newton forces. Single-molecule laser tweezer studies of cardiac myosin isoforms and their mutants have helped to elucidate the pathogenesis of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. Surprisingly, some disease mutations seem to enhance myosin function. More broadly, the myosin superfamily includes more than 20 nonfilamentous members with myriad cellular functions, including targeted organelle transport, endocytosis, chemotaxis, cytokinesis, modulation of sensory systems, and signal transduction. Widely varying genetic, developmental and functional disorders of the nervous, pigmentation, and immune systems have been described in accordance with these many roles. Compared to the collective nature of myosin II, some myosin family members operate with only a few partners or even alone. Individual myosin V and VI molecules can carry cellular vesicular cargoes much farther distances than their own size. Laser tweezer mechanics, single-molecule fluorescence polarization, and imaging with nanometer precision have elucidated the very different mechano-chemical properties of these isoforms. Critical contributions of nonsarcomeric myosins to myocardial development and adaptation are likely to be discovered in future studies, so these techniques and concepts may become important in cardiovascular research. PMID:17132771

  3. Cold-sensitive mutations of Dictyostelium myosin heavy chain highlight functional domains of the myosin motor

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, B.; Spudich, J.A.

    1996-06-01

    Dictyostelium provides a powerful environment for characterization of myosin II function. It provides well-established biochemical methods for in vitro analysis of myosin`s properties as well as an array of molecular genetic tools. The absence of myosin function results in an array of phenotypes that can be used to genetically manipulate myosin function. We have previously reported methods for the isolation and identification of rapid-effect cold-sensitive myosin II mutations in Dictyostelium. Here, we report the development and utilization of a rapid method for localizing these point mutations. We have also sequenced 19 mutants. The mutations show distinct clustering with respect to three-dimensional location and biochemically characterized functional domains of the protein. We conclude that these mutants represent powerful tools for understanding the mechanisms driving this protein motor. 36 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Maintenance of slow type I myosin protein and mRNA expression in overwintering prairie dogs (Cynomys leucurus and ludovicianus) and black bears (Ursus americanus).

    PubMed

    Rourke, Bryan C; Cotton, Clark J; Harlow, Henry J; Caiozzo, Vincent J

    2006-09-01

    Hibernating mammals have the remarkable ability to withstand long periods of fasting and reduced activity with dramatic maintenance of skeletal muscle function and protein composition. We investigated several hindlimb muscles of white-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys leucurus) and black bears (Ursus americanus), two very different hibernators who are dormant and fasting during winter. The black-tailed prairie dog (C. ludovicianus) remains active during winter, but suffers minor skeletal muscle atrophy; nevertheless, they also demonstrate apparent skeletal muscle adaptations. Using SDS-PAGE, we measured myosin protein isoform profiles before and after the hibernation season. All species maintained or increased levels of slow myosin, despite the collective physiological challenges of hypophagia and reduced activity. This contrasts markedly with standard mammalian models of skeletal muscle inactivity and atrophy predicting significant loss of slow myosin. A mechanism for changes in myosin isoforms was investigated using reverse-transcription PCR, following partial sequencing of the adult MHC isoforms in C. leucurus and U. americanus. However, mRNA expression was not well correlated with changes in MHC protein isoforms, and other synthesis and degradation pathways may be involved besides transcriptional control. The muscles of hibernating mammals demonstrate surprising and varied physiological responses to inactivity and atrophy with respect to slow MHC expression. PMID:16758215

  5. A mechanochemical model for myosin VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehver, Riina; Jack, Amanda; Lowe, Ian

    Myosin VI is a motor protein that transports cellular cargo along actin filaments. This transport takes place as a result of a coordinated mechano-chemical cycle that is controlled by external variables including imposed force and nucleotide concentrations. We present a model that captures the different dynamic pathways that myosin VI can take in response to these variables. The results of our model for experimentally observable quantities, such as the motor velocity or run length, agree with available experimental data, and we can also make predictions beyond the tested regimes. Using the model, we study how myosin VI reacts to its environment and test its operational efficiency.

  6. Myosin IIC: A Third Molecular Motor Driving Neuronal Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal dynamics result from the integration of forces developed by molecular motors, especially conventional myosins. Myosin IIC is a recently discovered nonsarcomeric conventional myosin motor, the function of which is poorly understood, particularly in relation to the separate but coupled activities of its close homologues, myosins IIA and IIB, which participate in neuronal adhesion, outgrowth and retraction. To determine myosin IIC function, we have applied a comparative functional knockdown approach by using isoform-specific antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides to deplete expression within neuronally derived cells. Myosin IIC was found to be critical for driving neuronal process outgrowth, a function that it shares with myosin IIB. Additionally, myosin IIC modulates neuronal cell adhesion, a function that it shares with myosin IIA but not myosin IIB. Consistent with this role, myosin IIC knockdown caused a concomitant decrease in paxillin-phospho-Tyr118 immunofluorescence, similar to knockdown of myosin IIA but not myosin IIB. Myosin IIC depletion also created a distinctive phenotype with increased cell body diameter, increased vacuolization, and impaired responsiveness to triggered neurite collapse by lysophosphatidic acid. This novel combination of properties suggests that myosin IIC must participate in distinctive cellular roles and reinforces our view that closely related motor isoforms drive diverse functions within neuronal cells. PMID:18614800

  7. Differential localization of unconventional myosin I and nonmuscle myosin II during B cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Sumoza-Toledo, Adriana; Gillespie, Peter G; Romero-Ramirez, Hector; Ferreira-Ishikawa, Hellen C; Larson, Roy E; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo

    2006-10-15

    Cross-linking of CD44 in vitro promotes chemokinesis and actin-based dendrite formation in T and B cells. However, the mechanisms by which the adhesion molecule CD44 induces cytoskeleton activation in lymphocytes are still poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated whether myosin isoforms are involved in CD44-dependent dendrite formation in activated B cells. Pharmacological inhibition of myosin with 2,3-butanedione monoxime strongly affected spreading and dendrite formation, suggesting that these cellular motors may participate in these phenomena. Furthermore, immunofluorescence analysis showed differences in subcellular localization of class I and class II myosin during B cell spreading. In response to CD44 cross-linking, myosin-1c was polarized to lamellipodia, where F-actin was high. In contrast, the distribution of cytosplasmic nonmuscle class II myosin was not altered. Expressions of myosin-1c and II were also demonstrated in B cells by Western blot. Although the inhibition of PLCgamma, PI3K and MEK-1 activation affected the spreading and dendrite formation in activated B cells, only PLCgamma and MEK-1 inhibition correlated with absence of myosin-1c polarization. Additionally, myosin-1c polarization was observed upon cross-linking of other surface molecules, suggesting a common mechanism for B cell spreading. This work shows that class I and class II myosin are expressed in B cells, are differentially distributed, and may participate in the morphological changes of these cells. PMID:16919270

  8. Flexibility within the Heads of Muscle Myosin-2 Molecules☆

    PubMed Central

    Billington, Neil; Revill, Derek J.; Burgess, Stan A.; Chantler, Peter D.; Knight, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    We show that negative-stain electron microscopy and image processing of nucleotide-free (apo) striated muscle myosin-2 subfragment-1 (S1), possessing one light chain or both light chains, is capable of resolving significant amounts of structural detail. The overall appearance of the motor and the lever is similar in rabbit, scallop and chicken S1. Projection matching of class averages of the different S1 types to projection views of two different crystal structures of apo S1 shows that all types most commonly closely resemble the appearance of the scallop S1 structure rather than the methylated chicken S1 structure. Methylation of chicken S1 has no effect on the structure of the molecule at this resolution: it too resembles the scallop S1 crystal structure. The lever is found to vary in its angle of attachment to the motor domain, with a hinge point located in the so-called pliant region between the converter and the essential light chain. The chicken S1 crystal structure lies near one end of the range of flexion observed. The Gaussian spread of angles of flexion suggests that flexibility is driven thermally, from which a torsional spring constant of ~ 23 pN·nm/rad2 is estimated on average for all S1 types, similar to myosin-5. This translates to apparent cantilever-type stiffness at the tip of the lever of 0.37 pN/nm. Because this stiffness is lower than recent estimates from myosin-2 heads attached to actin, we suggest that binding to actin leads to an allosteric stiffening of the motor–lever junction. PMID:24333017

  9. Knockdown of embryonic myosin heavy chain reveals an essential role in the morphology and function of the developing heart

    PubMed Central

    Rutland, Catrin Sian; Polo-Parada, Luis; Ehler, Elisabeth; Alibhai, Aziza; Thorpe, Aaran; Suren, Suganthi; Emes, Richard D.; Patel, Bhakti; Loughna, Siobhan

    2011-01-01

    The expression and function of embryonic myosin heavy chain (eMYH) has not been investigated within the early developing heart. This is despite the knowledge that other structural proteins, such as alpha and beta myosin heavy chains and cardiac alpha actin, play crucial roles in atrial septal development and cardiac function. Most cases of atrial septal defects and cardiomyopathy are not associated with a known causative gene, suggesting that further analysis into candidate genes is required. Expression studies localised eMYH in the developing chick heart. eMYH knockdown was achieved using morpholinos in a temporal manner and functional studies were carried out using electrical and calcium signalling methodologies. Knockdown in the early embryo led to abnormal atrial septal development and heart enlargement. Intriguingly, action potentials of the eMYH knockdown hearts were abnormal in comparison with the alpha and beta myosin heavy chain knockdowns and controls. Although myofibrillogenesis appeared normal, in knockdown hearts the tissue integrity was affected owing to apparent focal points of myocyte loss and an increase in cell death. An expression profile of human skeletal myosin heavy chain genes suggests that human myosin heavy chain 3 is the functional homologue of the chick eMYH gene. These data provide compelling evidence that eMYH plays a crucial role in important processes in the early developing heart and, hence, is a candidate causative gene for atrial septal defects and cardiomyopathy. PMID:21862559

  10. Myosin V movement: lessons from molecular dynamics studies of IQ peptides in the lever arm.

    PubMed

    Ganoth, Assaf; Nachliel, Esther; Friedman, Ran; Gutman, Menachem

    2007-12-18

    Myosin V moves along actin filaments by an arm-over-arm motion, known as the lever mechanism. Each of its arms is composed of six consecutive IQ peptides that bind light chain proteins, such as calmodulin or calmodulin-like proteins. We have employed a multistage approach in order to investigate the mechanochemical structural basis of the movement of myosin V from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For that purpose, we previously carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the Mlc1p-IQ2 and the Mlc1p-IQ4 protein-peptide complexes, and the present study deals with the structures of the IQ peptides when stripped from the Mlc1p protein. We have found that the crystalline structure of the IQ2 peptide retains a stable rodlike configuration in solution, whereas that of the IQ4 peptide grossly deviates from its X-ray conformation exhibiting an intrinsic tendency to curve and bend. The refolding process of the IQ4 peptide is initially driven by electrostatic interactions followed by nonpolar stabilization. Its bending appears to be affected by the ionic strength, when ionic strength higher than approximately 300 mM suppresses it from flexing. Considering that a poly-IQ sequence is the lever arm of myosin V, we suggest that the arm may harbor a joint, localized within the IQ4 sequence, enabling the elasticity of the neck of myosin V. Given that a poly-IQ sequence is present at the entire class of myosin V and the possibility that the yeast's myosin V molecule can exist either as a nonprocessive monomer or as a processive dimer depending on conditions (Krementsova, E. B., Hodges, A. R., Lu, H., and Trybus, K. M. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 6079-6086), our observations may account for a general structural feature for the myosins' arm embedded flexibility. PMID:18020453

  11. Direct observation of the myosin Va recovery stroke that contributes to unidirectional stepping along actin.

    PubMed

    Shiroguchi, Katsuyuki; Chin, Harvey F; Hannemann, Diane E; Muneyuki, Eiro; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2011-04-01

    Myosins are ATP-driven linear molecular motors that work as cellular force generators, transporters, and force sensors. These functions are driven by large-scale nucleotide-dependent conformational changes, termed "strokes"; the "power stroke" is the force-generating swinging of the myosin light chain-binding "neck" domain relative to the motor domain "head" while bound to actin; the "recovery stroke" is the necessary initial motion that primes, or "cocks," myosin while detached from actin. Myosin Va is a processive dimer that steps unidirectionally along actin following a "hand over hand" mechanism in which the trailing head detaches and steps forward ∼72 nm. Despite large rotational Brownian motion of the detached head about a free joint adjoining the two necks, unidirectional stepping is achieved, in part by the power stroke of the attached head that moves the joint forward. However, the power stroke alone cannot fully account for preferential forward site binding since the orientation and angle stability of the detached head, which is determined by the properties of the recovery stroke, dictate actin binding site accessibility. Here, we directly observe the recovery stroke dynamics and fluctuations of myosin Va using a novel, transient caged ATP-controlling system that maintains constant ATP levels through stepwise UV-pulse sequences of varying intensity. We immobilized the neck of monomeric myosin Va on a surface and observed real time motions of bead(s) attached site-specifically to the head. ATP induces a transient swing of the neck to the post-recovery stroke conformation, where it remains for ∼40 s, until ATP hydrolysis products are released. Angle distributions indicate that the post-recovery stroke conformation is stabilized by ≥ 5 k(B)T of energy. The high kinetic and energetic stability of the post-recovery stroke conformation favors preferential binding of the detached head to a forward site 72 nm away. Thus, the recovery stroke contributes to unidirectional stepping of myosin Va. PMID:21532738

  12. Polychlorobiphenyls inhibit skeletal muscle differentiation in culture.

    PubMed

    Coletti, D; Palleschi, S; Silvestroni, L; Cannavò, A; Vivarelli, E; Tomei, F; Molinaro, M; Adamo, S

    2001-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous and persistent pollutants whose role in developmental toxicity is of great concern. The observation that the offspring of PCB-exposed mothers (both in humans and rodents) display reduced body mass prompted us to investigate the effects of commercial mixtures of PCB congeners (Aroclor 1232, 1254, and 1262) on differentiation of both a myogenic cell line and primary myogenic cell cultures. The fusion of L6 myoblasts into multinucleated myotubes and the increase of creatine kinase (CK) activity were dose-dependently inhibited by Aroclor 1254 at concentrations (0.1-4 microg/ml) that caused no effect on cell density. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that Aroclor 1254 also prevented the accumulation of contractile filaments while inducing hypertrophy of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and appearance of membrane-filled autophagosomes. Half-maximal inhibition (IC50) of CK activity accumulation occurred at 0.01 microg/ml for Aroclor 1262, 2 microg/ml for Aroclor 1254, and 8 microg/ml for Aroclor 1232. Aroclor-dependent inhibition of myogenic differentiation was also shown by the reduced expression and nuclear accumulation of beta-galactosidase in primary cultures of fetal myoblasts from transgenic mice expressing this reporter gene under the control of the myosin light chain promoter. These data show that skeletal muscle differentiation is specifically impaired by PCBs and may explain the reported depression of body mass growth in PCB-exposed offspring at birth. Furthermore, myogenic cell cultures are highly sensitive to PCBs and allow the detection of biological effects of environmental levels of these pollutants. PMID:11559021

  13. Molecular characterization of two myosin heavy chain genes expressed in the adult heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, V.; Periasamy, M.; Nadal-Ginard, B.

    1982-06-01

    Four cDNA clones containing cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) inserts have been characterized. Hybridization and nucleotide sequence analysis identify two different MHC genes coding for proteins of different length that are both specifically expressed in the adult heart. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences reveal a highly conserved structure in the light meromyosin portion of MHC from striated muscle tissues.

  14. Size and speed of the working stroke of cardiac myosin in situ.

    PubMed

    Caremani, Marco; Pinzauti, Francesca; Reconditi, Massimo; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Stienen, Ger J M; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2016-03-29

    The power in the myocardium sarcomere is generated by two bipolar arrays of the motor protein cardiac myosin II extending from the thick filament and pulling the thin, actin-containing filaments from the opposite sides of the sarcomere. Despite the interest in the definition of myosin-based cardiomyopathies, no study has yet been able to determine the mechanokinetic properties of this motor protein in situ. Sarcomere-level mechanics recorded by a striation follower is used in electrically stimulated intact ventricular trabeculae from the rat heart to determine the isotonic velocity transient following a stepwise reduction in force from the isometric peak forceTPto a valueT(0.8-0.2TP). The size and the speed of the early rapid shortening (the isotonic working stroke) increase by reducingTfrom ∼3 nm per half-sarcomere (hs) and 1,000 s(-1)at high load to ∼8 nm⋅hs(-1)and 6,000 s(-1)at low load. Increases in sarcomere length (1.9-2.2 μm) and external[Formula: see text](1-2.5 mM), which produce an increase ofTP, do not affect the dependence onT, normalized forTP, of the size and speed of the working stroke. Thus, length- and Ca(2+)-dependent increase ofTPand power in the heart can solely be explained by modulation of the number of myosin motors, an emergent property of their array arrangement. The motor working stroke is similar to that of skeletal muscle myosin, whereas its speed is about three times slower. A new powerful tool for investigations and therapies of myosin-based cardiomyopathies is now within our reach. PMID:26984499

  15. Ca2+ sensitivity of regulated cardiac thin filament sliding does not depend on myosin isoform

    PubMed Central

    Schoffstall, Brenda; Brunet, Nicolas M; Williams, Shanedah; Miller, Victor F; Barnes, Alyson T; Wang, Fang; Compton, Lisa A; McFadden, Lori A; Taylor, Dianne W; Seavy, Margaret; Dhanarajan, Rani; Chase, P Bryant

    2006-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms in vertebrate striated muscles are distinguished functionally by differences in chemomechanical kinetics. These kinetic differences may influence the cross-bridge-dependent co-operativity of thin filament Ca2+ activation. To determine whether Ca2+ sensitivity of unloaded thin filament sliding depends upon MHC isoform kinetics, we performed in vitro motility assays with rabbit skeletal heavy meromyosin (rsHMM) or porcine cardiac myosin (pcMyosin). Regulated thin filaments were reconstituted with recombinant human cardiac troponin (rhcTn) and α-tropomyosin (rhcTm) expressed in Escherichia coli. All three subunits of rhcTn were coexpressed as a functional complex using a novel construct with a glutathione S-transferase (GST) affinity tag at the N-terminus of human cardiac troponin T (hcTnT) and an intervening tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease site that allows purification of rhcTn without denaturation, and removal of the GST tag without proteolysis of rhcTn subunits. Use of this highly purified rhcTn in our motility studies resulted in a clear definition of the regulated motility profile for both fast and slow MHC isoforms. Maximum sliding speed (pCa 5) of regulated thin filaments was roughly fivefold faster with rsHMM compared with pcMyosin, although speed was increased by 1.6- to 1.9-fold for regulated over unregulated actin with both MHC isoforms. The Ca2+ sensitivity of regulated thin filament sliding speed was unaffected by MHC isoform. Our motility results suggest that the cellular changes in isoform expression that result in regulation of myosin kinetics can occur independently of changes that influence thin filament Ca2+ sensitivity. PMID:17008370

  16. The role of myosin 1c and myosin 1b in surfactant exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kittelberger, Nadine; Breunig, Markus; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Miklavc, Pika

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Actin and actin-associated proteins have a pivotal effect on regulated exocytosis in secretory cells and influence pre-fusion as well as post-fusion stages of exocytosis. Actin polymerization on secretory granules during the post-fusion phase (formation of an actin coat) is especially important in cells with large secretory vesicles or poorly soluble secretions. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells secrete hydrophobic lipo-protein surfactant, which does not easily diffuse from fused vesicles. Previous work showed that compression of actin coat is necessary for surfactant extrusion. Here, we investigate the role of class 1 myosins as possible linkers between actin and membranes during exocytosis. Live-cell microscopy showed translocation of fluorescently labeled myosin 1b and myosin 1c to the secretory vesicle membrane after fusion. Myosin 1c translocation was dependent on its pleckstrin homology domain. Expression of myosin 1b and myosin 1c constructs influenced vesicle compression rate, whereas only the inhibition of myosin 1c reduced exocytosis. These findings suggest that class 1 myosins participate in several stages of ATII cell exocytosis and link actin coats to the secretory vesicle membrane to influence vesicle compression. PMID:26940917

  17. The role of myosin 1c and myosin 1b in surfactant exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kittelberger, Nadine; Breunig, Markus; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Miklavc, Pika

    2016-04-15

    Actin and actin-associated proteins have a pivotal effect on regulated exocytosis in secretory cells and influence pre-fusion as well as post-fusion stages of exocytosis. Actin polymerization on secretory granules during the post-fusion phase (formation of an actin coat) is especially important in cells with large secretory vesicles or poorly soluble secretions. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells secrete hydrophobic lipo-protein surfactant, which does not easily diffuse from fused vesicles. Previous work showed that compression of actin coat is necessary for surfactant extrusion. Here, we investigate the role of class 1 myosins as possible linkers between actin and membranes during exocytosis. Live-cell microscopy showed translocation of fluorescently labeled myosin 1b and myosin 1c to the secretory vesicle membrane after fusion. Myosin 1c translocation was dependent on its pleckstrin homology domain. Expression of myosin 1b and myosin 1c constructs influenced vesicle compression rate, whereas only the inhibition of myosin 1c reduced exocytosis. These findings suggest that class 1 myosins participate in several stages of ATII cell exocytosis and link actin coats to the secretory vesicle membrane to influence vesicle compression. PMID:26940917

  18. Characterization of human cardiac myosin heavy chain genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi-Takihara, K.; Sole, M.J.; Liew, J.; Ing, D.; Liew, C.C. )

    1989-05-01

    The authors have isolated and analyzed the structure of the genes coding for the {alpha} and {beta} forms of the human cardiac myosin heavy chain (MYHC). Detailed analysis of four overlapping MYHC genomic clones shows that the {alpha}-MYHC and {beta}-MYHC genes constitute a total length of 51 kilobases and are tandemly linked. The {beta}-MYHC-encoding gene, predominantly expressed in the normal human ventricle and also in slow-twitch skeletal muscle, is located 4.5 kilobases upstream of the {alpha}-MYHC-encoding gene, which is predominantly expressed in normal human atrium. The authors have determined the nucleotide sequences of the {beta} form of the MYHC gene, which is 100% homologous to the cardiac MYHC cDNA clone (pHMC3). It is unlikely that the divergence of a few nucleotide sequences from the cardiac {beta}-MYHC cDNA clone (pHMC3) reported in a MYHC cDNA clone (PSMHCZ) from skeletal muscle is due to a splicing mechanism. This finding suggests that the same {beta} form of the cardiac MYHC gene is expressed in both ventricular and slow-twitch skeletal muscle. The promoter regions of both {alpha}- and {beta}-MYHC genes, as well as the first four coding regions in the respective genes, have also been sequenced. The sequences in the 5{prime}-flanking region of the {alpha}- and {beta}-MYHC-encoding genes diverge extensively from one another, suggesting that expression of the {alpha}- and {beta}-MYHC genes is independently regulated.

  19. Skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Krakow, Deborah

    2015-06-01

    The skeletal dysplasias are a group of more than 450 heritable disorders of bone. They frequently present in the newborn period with disproportion, radiographic abnormalities, and occasionally other organ system abnormalities. For improved clinical care, it is important to determine a precise diagnosis to aid in management, familial recurrence, and identify those disorders highly associated with mortality. Long-term management of these disorders is predicated on an understanding of the associated skeletal system abnormalities, and these children are best served by a team approach to health care surveillance. PMID:26042906

  20. Contractility and kinetics of human fetal and human adult skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Racca, Alice W; Beck, Anita E; Rao, Vijay S; Flint, Galina V; Lundy, Scott D; Born, Donald E; Bamshad, Michael J; Regnier, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the contraction and relaxation properties of fetal skeletal muscle, and measurements thus far have been made with non-human mammalian muscle. Data on human fetal skeletal muscle contraction are lacking, and there are no published reports on the kinetics of either fetal or adult human skeletal muscle myofibrils. Understanding the contractile properties of human fetal muscle would be valuable in understanding muscle development and a variety of muscle diseases that are associated with mutations in fetal muscle sarcomere proteins. Therefore, we characterised the contractile properties of developing human fetal skeletal muscle and compared them to adult human skeletal muscle and rabbit psoas muscle. Electron micrographs showed human fetal muscle sarcomeres are not fully formed but myofibril formation is visible. Isolated myofibril mechanical measurements revealed much lower specific force, and slower rates of isometric force development, slow phase relaxation, and fast phase relaxation in human fetal when compared to human adult skeletal muscle. The duration of slow phase relaxation was also significantly longer compared to both adult groups, but was similarly affected by elevated ADP. F-actin sliding on human fetal skeletal myosin coated surfaces in in vitro motility (IVM) assays was much slower compared with adult rabbit skeletal myosin, though the Km(app) (apparent (fitted) Michaelis–Menten constant) of F-actin speed with ATP titration suggests a greater affinity of human fetal myosin for nucleotide binding. Replacing ATP with 2 deoxy-ATP (dATP) increased F-actin speed for both groups by a similar amount. Titrations of ADP into IVM assays produced a similar inhibitory affect for both groups, suggesting ADP binding may be similar, at least under low load. Together, our results suggest slower but similar mechanisms of myosin chemomechanical transduction for human fetal muscle that may also be limited by immature myofilament structure. PMID:23629510

  1. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  2. Transgene integration into the human AAVS1 locus enhances myosin II-dependent contractile force by reducing expression of myosin binding subunit 85.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Takeomi; Li, Rui; Haga, Hisashi; Kawabata, Kazushige

    2015-09-18

    The adeno-associated virus site 1 (AAVS1) locus in the human genome is a strong candidate for gene therapy by insertion of an exogenous gene into the locus. The AAVS1 locus includes the coding region for myosin binding subunit 85 (MBS85). Although the function of MBS85 is not well understood, myosin II-dependent contractile force may be affected by altered expression of MBS85. The effect of altered expression of MBS85 on cellular contractile force should be examined prior to the application of gene therapy. In this study, we show that transgene integration into AAVS1 and consequent reduction of MBS85 expression changes myosin II-dependent cellular contractile force. We established a human fibroblast cell line with exogenous DNA knocked-in to AAVS1 (KI cells) using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system. Western blotting analysis showed that KI cells had significantly reduced MBS85 expression. KI cells also showed greater cellular contractile force than control cells. The increased contractile force was associated with phosphorylation of the myosin II regulatory light chain (MRLC). Transfection of KI cells with an MBS85 expression plasmid restored cellular contractile force and phosphorylation of MRLC to the levels in control cells. These data suggest that transgene integration into the human AAVS1 locus induces an increase in cellular contractile force and thus should be considered as a gene therapy to effect changes in cellular contractile force. PMID:26260320

  3. Myofibrillogenesis in Skeletal Muscle Cells in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Joseph W.; Wang, Jushuo; Holloway, Beth; Du, Aiping; Sanger, Jean M.

    2009-01-01

    The “premyofibril” model of myofibrillogenesis, based on observations in cultured avian muscle cells, proposes that mature myofibrils are preceded by two intermediary structures: premyofibrils and nascent myofibrils. To determine if this model applies to zebrafish skeletal muscle development, we stained developing embryos with antibodies to sarcomeric alpha-actinin and myosin II. In the youngest muscle cells, sarcomeric alpha-actinin and non-muscle myosin II were each localized in linear arrays of small bands that resembled the premyofibrils in avian myocytes. The distribution of muscle–specific myosin II began as scattered short filaments followed in time by overlapping bundles of filaments and organized A-bands in the older somites. Alpha-actinin organization changed from small z-bodies to beaded Z-bands and ordered Z-bands in myofibrils that extended the length of the elongating somites. In older somites with mature myofibrils, premyofibrils were also present at the ends of the mature myofibrils, suggesting that as the cells and somites grew longer, premyofibrils were involved in the elongation of existing mature myofibrils. Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching showed that the exchange of proteins (actin, alpha-actinin, FATZ, myotilin and telethonin) between sarcoplasm and the Z-bands of mature myofibrils in zebrafish resembled that seen for the same proteins in cultured avian myotubes, suggesting that myofibril assembly and maintenance in zebrafish share common properties with avian muscle. PMID:19382198

  4. Regulation and recycling of myosin V.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kenneth A

    2007-02-01

    Recently there has been considerable progress in our understanding of regulation for unconventional myosin-V through elucidation of the structure of its inactive conformation and the factors that affect stability of this conformation. The inactive conformation is a folded compact structure characterized by interactions between the myosin head and the C-terminal cargo binding domain. Concentrations of Ca2+ greater than 10 microM disrupt folding. The 3-D structure determined by cryoelectron tomography of 2-D arrays in one study and electron micrographs of isolated molecules reported in another reveal similar features, but suggest different F-actin affinities for the inactive conformation. This has raised the question of how inactive myosin-V is recycled to other sites for additional rounds of cargo transport. PMID:17208425

  5. Evaluation of the Relative Performance of Drug-Induced Skeletal Muscle Injury Biomarkers in Rats.

    PubMed

    Burch, Peter M; Greg Hall, David; Walker, Elizabeth G; Bracken, William; Giovanelli, Richard; Goldstein, Richard; Higgs, Richard E; King, Nicholas M P; Lane, Pamela; Sauer, John-Michael; Michna, Laura; Muniappa, Nagaraja; Pritt, Michael L; Vlasakova, Katerina; Watson, David E; Wescott, Debra; Zabka, Tanja S; Glaab, Warren E

    2016-03-01

    Novel skeletal muscle (SKM) injury biomarkers that have recently been identified may outperform or add value to the conventional SKM injury biomarkers aspartate transaminase (AST) and creatine kinase (CK). The relative performance of these novel biomarkers of SKM injury including skeletal troponin I (sTnI), myosin light chain 3 (Myl3), CK M Isoform (Ckm), and fatty acid binding protein 3 (Fabp3) was assessed in 34 rat studies including both SKM toxicants and compounds with toxicities in tissues other than SKM. sTnI, Myl3, Ckm, and Fabp3 all outperformed CK or AST and/or added value for the diagnosis of drug-induced SKM injury (ie, myocyte degeneration/necrosis). In addition, when used in conjunction with CK and AST, sTnI, Myl3, CKm, and Fabp3 individually and collectively improved diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, as well as diagnostic certainty, for SKM injury and responded in a sensitive manner to low levels of SKM degeneration/necrosis in rats. These findings support the proposal that sTnI, Myl3, Ckm, and Fabp3 are suitable for voluntary use, in conjunction with CK and AST, in regulatory safety studies in rats to monitor drug-induced SKM injury and the potential translational use of these exploratory biomarkers in early clinical trials to ensure patient safety. PMID:26721300

  6. Phosphorylated peptides occur in a non-helical portion of the tail of a catch muscle myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Castellani, L.; Elliott, B.W. Jr.; Cohen, C.

    1987-05-01

    Myosin from a molluscan catch muscle (the Anterior Byssus Retractor (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis) is unusual in being phosphorylated in the rod by an endogenous heavy-chain kinase. This phosphorylation enhances myosin solubility at low ionic strength and induces molecular folding of the myosin tail. Papain and chymotryptic cleavage of this myosin, phosphorylated with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP, indicates that the phosphorylated residues are associated with the carboxy-terminal end of the light meromyosin. Ion-exchange and reverse-phase HPLC of radiolabeled chymotryptic peptides allow the isolation of two different peptides with high specific activity. One of these peptides is rich in lysine and arginine residues, a finding consistent with the observation that basic residues often determine the substrate specificity of protein kinases. The second peptide contains proline residues. Taken together, these results suggest that, as in the case of Acanthamoeba myosin, phosphorylation occurs in a nonhelical portion of the rod that may also control solubility. Identification of the residues that are phosphorylated and their location in the rod may reveal how the phosphorylation-dependent changes observed in the myosin in vitro are related to changes in intermolecular interactions in the thick filaments in vivo.

  7. Mouse and computational models link Mlc2v dephosphorylation to altered myosin kinetics in early cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Farah; Ouyang, Kunfu; Campbell, Stuart G.; Lyon, Robert C.; Chuang, Joyce; Fitzsimons, Dan; Tangney, Jared; Hidalgo, Carlos G.; Chung, Charles S.; Cheng, Hongqiang; Dalton, Nancy D.; Gu, Yusu; Kasahara, Hideko; Ghassemian, Majid; Omens, Jeffrey H.; Peterson, Kirk L.; Granzier, Henk L.; Moss, Richard L.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Chen, Ju

    2012-01-01

    Actin-myosin interactions provide the driving force underlying each heartbeat. The current view is that actin-bound regulatory proteins play a dominant role in the activation of calcium-dependent cardiac muscle contraction. In contrast, the relevance and nature of regulation by myosin regulatory proteins (for example, myosin light chain-2 [MLC2]) in cardiac muscle remain poorly understood. By integrating gene-targeted mouse and computational models, we have identified an indispensable role for ventricular Mlc2 (Mlc2v) phosphorylation in regulating cardiac muscle contraction. Cardiac myosin cycling kinetics, which directly control actin-myosin interactions, were directly affected, but surprisingly, Mlc2v phosphorylation also fed back to cooperatively influence calcium-dependent activation of the thin filament. Loss of these mechanisms produced early defects in the rate of cardiac muscle twitch relaxation and ventricular torsion. Strikingly, these defects preceded the left ventricular dysfunction of heart disease and failure in a mouse model with nonphosphorylatable Mlc2v. Thus, there is a direct and early role for Mlc2 phosphorylation in regulating actin-myosin interactions in striated muscle contraction, and dephosphorylation of Mlc2 or loss of these mechanisms can play a critical role in heart failure. PMID:22426213

  8. Single Myosin Cross-Bridge Orientation in Cardiac Papillary Muscle Detects Lever-Arm Shear Strain in Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Thomas P.; Josephson, Matthew P.; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    Myosin motors transduce ATP free energy into mechanical work. Transduction models allocate specific functions to motor structural domains beginning with ATP hydrolysis in the active site and ending in a lever-arm rotating power-stroke. Myosin light chains, regulatory (RLC) and essential (ELC), bind IQ-domains on the lever-arm and track its movement. Strong evidence exists that light chains stabilize the lever-arm and that light chain mutation undermines stability. Human ventricular RLC tagged with photoactivatable GFP (HCRLC-PAGFP) replaces native RLC in porcine papillary muscle fibers, restores native contractility, and situates PAGFP for single molecule orientation tracking within the crowded fiber lattice. The spatial emission pattern from single photoactivated PAGFP tagged myosins was observed in z-stacks fitted simultaneously to maximize accuracy in estimated dipole orientation. Emitter dipole polar and azimuthal angle pair scatter plots identified an area where steric and molecular crowding constraints depopulated orientations unfavorable for actin interaction. Transitions between pre- and post-power-stroke states represent the lever-arm trajectory sampled by the data and quantify lever-arm shear strain in transduction at three tension levels. These data identify forces acting on myosin in the in situ fiber system due to crowding, steric hindrance, and actomyosin interaction. They induce lever-arm shear strain observed with single molecule orientation detection. A single myosin work histogram reveals discretized power-stroke substates reminiscent of the Huxley–Simmons model for myosin based contraction [Huxley and Simmons (1971) Nature 233, 533]. RLC or ELC mutation, should it impact lever-arm shear strain, will be detected as changes in single myosin shear strain or power-stroke substate distribution. PMID:21819137

  9. Visualizing Key Hinges and a Potential Major Source of Compliance in the Lever Arm of Myosin

    SciTech Connect

    J Brown; V Senthil Kumar; E ONeall-Hennessey; L Reshetnikova; H Robinson; M Nguyen-McCarty; A Szent-Gyorgyi; C Cohen

    2011-12-31

    We have determined the 2.3-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of a myosin light chain domain, corresponding to one type found in sea scallop catch ('smooth') muscle. This structure reveals hinges that may function in the 'on' and 'off' states of myosin. The molecule adopts two different conformations about the heavy chain 'hook' and regulatory light chain (RLC) helix D. This conformational change results in extended and compressed forms of the lever arm whose lengths differ by 10 {angstrom}. The heavy chain hook and RLC helix D hinges could thus serve as a potential major and localized source of cross-bridge compliance during the contractile cycle. In addition, in one of the molecules of the crystal, part of the RLC N-terminal extension is seen in atomic detail and forms a one-turn alpha-helix that interacts with RLC helix D. This extension, whose sequence is highly variable in different myosins, may thus modulate the flexibility of the lever arm. Moreover, the relative proximity of the phosphorylation site to the helix D hinge suggests a potential role for conformational changes about this hinge in the transition between the on and off states of regulated myosins.

  10. Visualizing key hinges and a potential major source of compliance in the lever arm of myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.H.; Robinson, H.; Senthil Kumar, V. S.; O'Neall-Hennessey, E.; Reshetnikova, L.; Nguyen-McCarty, M.; Szent-Gyorgyi, A. G.; Cohen, C.

    2011-01-04

    We have determined the 2.3-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of a myosin light chain domain, corresponding to one type found in sea scallop catch ('smooth') muscle. This structure reveals hinges that may function in the 'on' and 'off' states of myosin. The molecule adopts two different conformations about the heavy chain 'hook' and regulatory light chain (RLC) helix D. This conformational change results in extended and compressed forms of the lever arm whose lengths differ by 10 {angstrom}. The heavy chain hook and RLC helix D hinges could thus serve as a potential major and localized source of cross-bridge compliance during the contractile cycle. In addition, in one of the molecules of the crystal, part of the RLC N-terminal extension is seen in atomic detail and forms a one-turn alpha-helix that interacts with RLC helix D. This extension, whose sequence is highly variable in different myosins, may thus modulate the flexibility of the lever arm. Moreover, the relative proximity of the phosphorylation site to the helix D hinge suggests a potential role for conformational changes about this hinge in the transition between the on and off states of regulated myosins.

  11. Alternative S2 hinge regions of the myosin rod differentially affect muscle function, myofibril dimensions and myosin tail length

    PubMed Central

    Suggs, Jennifer A.; Cammarato, Anthony; Kronert, William A.; Nikkhoy, Massoud; Dambacher, Corey M.; Megighian, Aram; Bernstein, Sanford I.

    2007-01-01

    Muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) rod domains intertwine to form alpha-helical coiled-coil dimers; these subsequently multimerize into thick filaments via electrostatic interactions. The subfragment 2/light meromyosin “hinge” region of the MHC rod, located in the C-terminal third of heavy meromyosin, may form a less stable coiled-coil than flanking regions. Partial “melting” of this region has been proposed to result in a helix to random-coil transition. A portion of the Drosophila melanogaster MHC hinge is encoded by mutually exclusive alternative exons 15a and 15b, the use of which correlates with fast (hinge A) or slow (hinge B) muscle physiological properties. To test the functional significance of alternative hinge regions, we constructed transgenic fly lines in which fast muscle isovariant hinge A was switched for slow muscle hinge B in the MHC isoforms of indirect flight and jump muscles. Substitution of the slow muscle hinge B impaired flight ability, increased sarcomere lengths by approximately 13% and resulted in minor disruption to indirect flight muscle sarcomeric structure compared with a transgenic control. With age, residual flight ability decreased rapidly and myofibrils developed peripheral defects. Computational analysis indicates that hinge B has a greater coiled-coil propensity and thus reduced flexibility compared to hinge A. Intriguingly, the MHC rod with hinge B was ~5 nm longer than myosin with hinge A, consistent with the more rigid coiled-coil conformation predicted for hinge B. Our study demonstrates that hinge B cannot functionally substitute for hinge A in fast muscle types, likely as a result of differences in the molecular structure of the rod, subtle changes in myofibril structure and decreased ability to maintain sarcomere structure in indirect flight muscle myofibrils. Thus alternative hinges are important in dictating the distinct functional properties of myosin isoforms and the muscles in which they are expressed. PMID:17316684

  12. The apparently negatively cooperative phosphorylation of smooth muscle myosin at low ionic strength is related to its filamentous state.

    PubMed

    Sellers, J R; Chock, P B; Adelstein, R S

    1983-12-10

    The correlation curve between phosphorylation and MgATPase activity suggests that the 20,000-dalton light chain of both heads of a smooth muscle myosin or heavy meromyosin (HMM) molecule must be phosphorylated before the MgATPase activity of either head can be activated by actin. The two heads of HMM appear to be phosphorylated randomly at equal rates, while those of myosin are phosphorylated in a negatively cooperative manner (Persechini, A., and Hartshorne, D.J. (1981) Science, 213, 1383-1385; Ikebe, M., Ogihara, S., and Tonomura, Y. (1982) J. Biochem. 91, 1809-1812). We have investigated the cause of this difference between HMM and myosin. We find that if myosin is first phosphorylated at high ionic strength (0.6 M KCl), where it is monomeric, and then assayed for MgATPase activity (in 0.05 M KCl), the data support a model where the two heads are phosphorylated randomly with equal rates (i.e. similarly to HMM). The correlation curves between MgATPase activity and dephosphorylation of fully phosphorylated myosin, both in a filamentous and monomeric state, are also best explained by a model where dephosphorylation of one head is sufficient to deactivate the entire molecule. With monomeric myosin, the dephosphorylation appears to occur randomly with equal rates, whereas with filamentous myosin the dephosphorylation appears to be negatively cooperative. The correlation between dephosphorylation of HMM and its MgATPase activity is more complex and is consistent with a positively cooperative dephosphorylation. Direct analyses of the time courses of phosphorylation of HMM and monomeric myosin show that a single exponential is sufficient to fit the data through greater than 90% of the reaction. However, when phosphorylation is carried out at low ionic strength (0.02 M KCl), where myosin is present as filaments, the time course consists of two exponential functions where the rate constant for the phosphorylation of one myosin head is 6-10 times greater than that for the other head which is located on the same molecule. This suggests that when myosin is polymerized into filaments the two previously indistinguishable heads either become nonequivalent or are subject to head-head interactions leading to a negatively cooperative phosphorylation reaction. PMID:6139378

  13. The contributions of filaments and cross-bridges to sarcomere compliance in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Brunello, Elisabetta; Caremani, Marco; Melli, Luca; Linari, Marco; Fernandez-Martinez, Manuel; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Irving, Malcolm; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Reconditi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Force generation in the muscle sarcomere is driven by the head domain of the myosin molecule extending from the thick filament to form cross-bridges with the actin-containing thin filament. Following attachment, a structural working stroke in the head pulls the thin filament towards the centre of the sarcomere, producing, under unloaded conditions, a filament sliding of ∼11 nm. The mechanism of force generation by the myosin head depends on the relationship between cross-bridge force and movement, which is determined by compliances of the cross-bridge (Ccb) and filaments. By measuring the force dependence of the spacing of the high-order myosin- and actin-based X-ray reflections from sartorius muscles of Rana esculenta we find a combined filament compliance (Cf) of 13.1 ± 1.2 nm MPa−1, close to recent estimates from single fibre mechanics (12.8 ± 0.5 nm MPa−1). Ccb calculated using these estimates is 0.37 ± 0.12 nm pN−1, a value fully accounted for by the compliance of the myosin head domain, 0.38 ± 0.06 nm pN−1, obtained from the intensity changes of the 14.5 nm myosin-based X-ray reflection in response to 3 kHz oscillations imposed on single muscle fibres in rigor. Thus, a significant contribution to Ccb from the myosin tail that joins the head to the thick filament is excluded. The low Ccb value indicates that the myosin head generates isometric force by a small sub-step of the 11 nm stroke that drives filament sliding at low load. The implications of these results for the mechanism of force generation by myosins have general relevance for cardiac and non-muscle myosins as well as for skeletal muscle. PMID:25015916

  14. Par-4: A New Activator of Myosin Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Vetterkind, Susanne; Lee, Eunhee; Sundberg, Eric; Poythress, Ransom H.; Tao, Terence C.; Preuss, Ute

    2010-01-01

    Myosin phosphatase (MP) is a key regulator of myosin light chain (LC20) phosphorylation, a process essential for motility, apoptosis, and smooth muscle contractility. Although MP inhibition is well studied, little is known about MP activation. We have recently demonstrated that prostate apoptosis response (Par)-4 modulates vascular smooth muscle contractility. Here, we test the hypothesis that Par-4 regulates MP activity directly. We show, by proximity ligation assays, surface plasmon resonance and coimmunoprecipitation, that Par-4 interacts with the targeting subunit of MP, MYPT1. Binding is mediated by the leucine zippers of MYPT1 and Par-4 and reduced by Par-4 phosphorylation. Overexpression of Par-4 leads to increased phosphatase activity of immunoprecipitated MP, whereas small interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous Par-4 significantly decreases MP activity and increases MYPT1 phosphorylation. LC20 phosphorylation assays demonstrate that overexpression of Par-4 reduces LC20 phosphorylation. In contrast, a phosphorylation site mutant, but not wild-type Par-4, interferes with zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK)-mediated MP inhibition. We conclude from our results Par-4 operates through a “padlock” model in which binding of Par-4 to MYPT1 activates MP by blocking access to the inhibitory phosphorylation sites, and inhibitory phosphorylation of MYPT1 by ZIPK requires “unlocking” of Par-4 by phosphorylation and displacement of Par-4 from the MP complex. PMID:20130087

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Myosin Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Elizabeth; Eftink, Maurice R.

    1985-01-01

    Students complete five experimental projects at the end of a senior-level biochemistry course which involves the isolation and characterization of myosin and its water-soluble subfragments. Procedures used and results obtained are provided for such projects as viscosity and ATPase measurements and gel electrophoresis experiments. (JN)

  16. Left-right asymmetry: class I myosins show the direction.

    PubMed

    Spéder, Pauline; Noselli, Stéphane

    2007-02-01

    Myosins are actin-based molecular motors that are found in almost all eukaryotes. Phylogenetic analysis allows the discrimination of 37 different types of myosins, most with unknown functions. Recent work in Drosophila has revealed a crucial role for type ID unconventional myosin in left-right asymmetry. Mutations in Myosin ID completely reverse the left-right axis (situs inversus), a phenotype that is dependent on an intact actin cytoskeleton. How this myosin might orient the left-right axis has began to be elucidated by showing that it interacts directly with beta-catenin, suggesting that myosin ID interacts with the adherens junction to control the direction of organ looping. This is the first demonstration of a role of a myosin in body patterning. PMID:17174542

  17. The fraction of myosin motors that participate in isometric contraction of rabbit muscle fibers at near-physiological temperature.

    PubMed

    Tsaturyan, Andrey K; Bershitsky, Sergey Y; Koubassova, Natalia A; Fernandez, Manuel; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Ferenczi, Michael A

    2011-07-20

    The duty ratio, or the part of the working cycle in which a myosin molecule is strongly attached to actin, determines motor processivity and is required to evaluate the force generated by each molecule. In muscle, it is equal to the fraction of myosin heads that are strongly, or stereospecifically, bound to the thin filaments. Estimates of this fraction during isometric contraction based on stiffness measurements or the intensities of the equatorial or meridional x-ray reflections vary significantly. Here, we determined this value using the intensity of the first actin layer line, A1, in the low-angle x-ray diffraction patterns of permeable fibers from rabbit skeletal muscle. We calibrated the A1 intensity by considering that the intensity in the relaxed and rigor states corresponds to 0% and 100% of myosin heads bound to actin, respectively. The fibers maximally activated with Ca(2+) at 4°C were heated to 31-34°C with a Joule temperature jump (T-jump). Rigor and relaxed-state measurements were obtained on the same fibers. The intensity of the inner part of A1 during isometric contraction compared with that in rigor corresponds to 41-43% stereospecifically bound myosin heads at near-physiological temperature, or an average force produced by a head of ~6.3 pN. PMID:21767493

  18. The Fraction of Myosin Motors That Participate in Isometric Contraction ofRabbit Muscle Fibers at Near-Physiological Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Tsaturyan, AndreyK.; Bershitsky, SergeyY.; Koubassova, NataliaA.; Fernandez, Manuel; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Ferenczi, MichaelA.

    2011-01-01

    The duty ratio, or the part of the working cycle in which a myosin molecule is strongly attached to actin, determines motor processivity and is required to evaluate the force generated by each molecule. In muscle, it is equal to the fraction of myosin heads that are strongly, or stereospecifically, bound to the thin filaments. Estimates of this fraction during isometric contraction based on stiffness measurements or the intensities of the equatorial or meridional x-ray reflections vary significantly. Here, we determined this value using the intensity of the first actin layer line, A1, in the low-angle x-ray diffraction patterns of permeable fibers from rabbit skeletal muscle. We calibrated the A1 intensity by considering that the intensity in the relaxed and rigor states corresponds to 0% and 100% of myosin heads bound to actin, respectively. The fibers maximally activated with Ca2+ at 4C were heated to 3134C with a Joule temperature jump (T-jump). Rigor and relaxed-state measurements were obtained on the same fibers. The intensity of the inner part of A1 during isometric contraction compared with that in rigor corresponds to 4143% stereospecifically bound myosin heads at near-physiological temperature, or an average force produced by a head of ?6.3 pN. PMID:21767493

  19. Muscle protein analysis. II. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of normal and diseased human skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Barany, M.; Danon, M.J.; Anderson, N.G.

    1980-07-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to analyze the major proteins of normal and pathological human-muscle samples. The normal human-muscle pattern contains four myosin light chains: three that co-migrate with the myosin light chains from rabbit fast muscle (extensor digitorum longus), and one that co-migrates with the light chain 2 from rabbit slow muscle (soleus). Of seven Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples, four yielded patterns with decreased amounts of actin and myosin relative to normal muscle, while three samples gave patterns comparable to that for normal muscle. Six samples from patients with myotonic dystrophy also gave normal patterns. In nemaline rod myopathy, in contrast, the pattern was deficient in two of the fast-type myosin light chains.

  20. Mechanics of the power stroke in myosin II.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, L; Truskinovsky, L

    2010-05-01

    Power stroke in skeletal muscles is a result of a conformational change in the globular portion of the molecular motor myosin II. In this paper we show that the fast tension recovery data reflecting the inner working of the power stroke mechanism can be quantitatively reproduced by a Langevin dynamics of a simple mechanical system with only two structural states. The proposed model is a generalization of the two state model of Huxley and Simmons. The main idea is to replace the rigid bistable device of Huxley and Simmons with an elastic bistable snap spring. In this setting the attached configuration of a cross bridge is represented not only by the discrete energy minima but also by a continuum of intermediate states where the fluctuation induced dynamics of the system takes place. We show that such soft-spin approach explains the load dependence of the power stroke amplitude and removes the well-known contradiction inside the conventional two state model regarding the time scale of the power stroke. PMID:20866269

  1. New roles for the LKB1-NUAK pathway in controlling myosin phosphatase complexes and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zagórska, Anna; Deak, Maria; Campbell, David G; Banerjee, Sourav; Hirano, Mariko; Aizawa, Shinichi; Prescott, Alan R; Alessi, Dario R

    2010-01-01

    The AMPK-related kinases NUAK1 and NUAK2 are activated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. We found that NUAK1 interacts with several myosin phosphatases, including the myosin phosphatase targeting-1 (MYPT1)-protein phosphatase-1beta (PP1beta) complex, through conserved Gly-Ile-Leu-Lys motifs that are direct binding sites for PP1beta. Phosphorylation of Ser(445), Ser(472), and Ser(910) of MYPT1 by NUAK1 promoted the interaction of MYPT1 with 14-3-3 adaptor proteins, thereby suppressing phosphatase activity. Cell detachment induced phosphorylation of endogenous MYPT1 by NUAK1, resulting in 14-3-3 binding to MYPT1 and enhanced phosphorylation of myosin light chain-2. Inhibition of the LKB1-NUAK1 pathway impaired cell detachment. Our data indicate that NUAK1 controls cell adhesion and functions as a regulator of myosin phosphatase complexes. Thus, LKB1 can influence the phosphorylation of targets not only through the AMPK family of kinases but also by controlling phosphatase complexes. PMID:20354225

  2. Myosin 18A coassembles with nonmuscle myosin 2 to form mixed bipolar filaments.

    PubMed

    Billington, Neil; Beach, Jordan R; Heissler, Sarah M; Remmert, Kirsten; Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Nagy, Attila; Takagi, Yasuharu; Shao, Lin; Li, Dong; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Yingfan; Barzik, Melanie; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A; Sellers, James R

    2015-03-30

    Class-18 myosins are most closely related to conventional class-2 nonmuscle myosins (NM2). Surprisingly, the purified head domains of Drosophila, mouse, and human myosin 18A (M18A) lack actin-activated ATPase activity and the ability to translocate actin filaments, suggesting that the functions of M18A in vivo do not depend on intrinsic motor activity. M18A has the longest coiled coil of any myosin outside of the class-2 myosins, suggesting that it might form bipolar filaments similar to conventional myosins. To address this possibility, we expressed and purified full-length mouse M18A using the baculovirus/Sf9 system. M18A did not form large bipolar filaments under any of the conditions tested. Instead, M18A formed an ∼ 65-nm-long bipolar structure with two heads at each end. Importantly, when NM2 was polymerized in the presence of M18A, the two myosins formed mixed bipolar filaments, as evidenced by cosedimentation, electron microscopy, and single-molecule imaging. Moreover, super-resolution imaging of NM2 and M18A using fluorescently tagged proteins and immunostaining of endogenous proteins showed that NM2 and M18A are present together within individual filaments inside living cells. Together, our in vitro and live-cell imaging data argue strongly that M18A coassembles with NM2 into mixed bipolar filaments. M18A could regulate the biophysical properties of these filaments and, by virtue of its extra N- and C-terminal domains, determine the localization and/or molecular interactions of the filaments. Given the numerous, fundamental cellular and developmental roles attributed to NM2, our results have far-reaching biological implications. PMID:25754640

  3. Distinct gene expression patterns in skeletal and cardiac muscle are dependent on common regulatory sequences in the MLC1/3 locus.

    PubMed Central

    McGrew, M J; Bogdanova, N; Hasegawa, K; Hughes, S H; Kitsis, R N; Rosenthal, N

    1996-01-01

    The myosin light-chain 1/3 locus (MLC1/3) is regulated by two promoters and a downstream enhancer element which produce two protein isoforms in fast skeletal muscle at distinct stages of mouse embryogenesis. We have analyzed the expression of transcripts from the internal MLC3 promoter and determined that it is also expressed in the atria of the heart. Expression from the MLC3 promoter in these striated muscle lineages is differentially regulated during development. In transgenic mice, the MLC3 promoter is responsible for cardiac-specific reporter gene expression while the downstream enhancer augments expression in skeletal muscle. Examination of the methylation status of endogenous and transgenic promoter and enhancer elements indicates that the internal promoter is not regulated in a manner similar to that of the MLC1 promoter or the downstream enhancer. A GATA protein consensus sequence in the proximal MLC3 promoter but not the MLC1 promoter binds with high affinity to GATA-4, a cardiac muscle- and gut-specific transcription factor. Mutation of either the MEF2 or GATA motifs in the MLC3 promoter attenuates its activity in both heart and skeletal muscles, demonstrating that MLC3 expression in these two diverse muscle types is dependent on common regulatory elements. PMID:8754853

  4. Myosin VI Stabilizes an Actin Network during Drosophila Spermatid Individualization

    PubMed Central

    Lenartowska, Marta; Miller, Kathryn G.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate a new function of myosin VI using observations of Drosophila spermatid individualization in vivo. We find that myosin VI stabilizes a branched actin network in actin structures (cones) that mediate the separation of the syncytial spermatids. In a myosin VI mutant, the cones do not accumulate F-actin during cone movement, whereas overexpression of myosin VI leads to bigger cones with more F-actin. Myosin subfragment 1-fragment decoration demonstrated that the actin cone is made up of two regions: a dense meshwork at the front and parallel bundles at the rear. The majority of the actin filaments were oriented with their pointed ends facing in the direction of cone movement. Our data also demonstrate that myosin VI binds to the cone front using its motor domain. Fluorescence recovery after photobleach experiments using green fluorescent protein-myosin VI revealed that myosin VI remains bound to F-actin for minutes, suggesting its role is tethering, rather than transporting cargo. We hypothesize that myosin VI protects the actin cone structure either by cross-linking actin filaments or anchoring regulatory molecules at the cone front. These observations uncover a novel mechanism mediated by myosin VI for stabilizing long-lived actin structures in cells. PMID:16571671

  5. Does Interaction between the Motor and Regulatory Domains of the Myosin Head Occur during ATPase Cycle? Evidence from Thermal Unfolding Studies on Myosin Subfragment 1

    PubMed Central

    Logvinova, Daria S.; Markov, Denis I.; Nikolaeva, Olga P.; Sluchanko, Nikolai N.; Ushakov, Dmitry S.; Levitsky, Dmitrii I.

    2015-01-01

    Myosin head (myosin subfragment 1, S1) consists of two major structural domains, the motor (or catalytic) domain and the regulatory domain. Functioning of the myosin head as a molecular motor is believed to involve a rotation of the regulatory domain (lever arm) relative to the motor domain during the ATPase cycle. According to predictions, this rotation can be accompanied by an interaction between the motor domain and the C-terminus of the essential light chain (ELC) associated with the regulatory domain. To check this assumption, we applied differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) combined with temperature dependences of fluorescence to study changes in thermal unfolding and the domain structure of S1, which occur upon formation of the ternary complexes S1-ADP-AlF4- and S1-ADP-BeFx that mimic S1 ATPase intermediate states S1**-ADP-Pi and S1*-ATP, respectively. To identify the thermal transitions on the DSC profiles (i.e. to assign them to the structural domains of S1), we compared the DSC data with temperature-induced changes in fluorescence of either tryptophan residues, located only in the motor domain, or recombinant ELC mutants (light chain 1 isoform), which were first fluorescently labeled at different positions in their C-terminal half and then introduced into the S1 regulatory domain. We show that formation of the ternary complexes S1-ADP-AlF4- and S1-ADP-BeFx significantly stabilizes not only the motor domain, but also the regulatory domain of the S1 molecule implying interdomain interaction via ELC. This is consistent with the previously proposed concepts and also adds some new interesting details to the molecular mechanism of the myosin ATPase cycle. PMID:26356744

  6. Does Interaction between the Motor and Regulatory Domains of the Myosin Head Occur during ATPase Cycle? Evidence from Thermal Unfolding Studies on Myosin Subfragment 1.

    PubMed

    Logvinova, Daria S; Markov, Denis I; Nikolaeva, Olga P; Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Ushakov, Dmitry S; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2015-01-01

    Myosin head (myosin subfragment 1, S1) consists of two major structural domains, the motor (or catalytic) domain and the regulatory domain. Functioning of the myosin head as a molecular motor is believed to involve a rotation of the regulatory domain (lever arm) relative to the motor domain during the ATPase cycle. According to predictions, this rotation can be accompanied by an interaction between the motor domain and the C-terminus of the essential light chain (ELC) associated with the regulatory domain. To check this assumption, we applied differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) combined with temperature dependences of fluorescence to study changes in thermal unfolding and the domain structure of S1, which occur upon formation of the ternary complexes S1-ADP-AlF4- and S1-ADP-BeFx that mimic S1 ATPase intermediate states S1**-ADP-Pi and S1*-ATP, respectively. To identify the thermal transitions on the DSC profiles (i.e. to assign them to the structural domains of S1), we compared the DSC data with temperature-induced changes in fluorescence of either tryptophan residues, located only in the motor domain, or recombinant ELC mutants (light chain 1 isoform), which were first fluorescently labeled at different positions in their C-terminal half and then introduced into the S1 regulatory domain. We show that formation of the ternary complexes S1-ADP-AlF4- and S1-ADP-BeFx significantly stabilizes not only the motor domain, but also the regulatory domain of the S1 molecule implying interdomain interaction via ELC. This is consistent with the previously proposed concepts and also adds some new interesting details to the molecular mechanism of the myosin ATPase cycle. PMID:26356744

  7. A Novel Three-Filament Model of Force Generation in Eccentric Contraction of Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Schappacher-Tilp, Gudrun; Leonard, Timothy; Desch, Gertrud; Herzog, Walter

    2015-01-01

    We propose and examine a three filament model of skeletal muscle force generation, thereby extending classical cross-bridge models by involving titin-actin interaction upon active force production. In regions with optimal actin-myosin overlap, the model does not alter energy and force predictions of cross-bridge models for isometric contractions. However, in contrast to cross-bridge models, the three filament model accurately predicts history-dependent force generation in half sarcomeres for eccentric and concentric contractions, and predicts the activation-dependent forces for stretches beyond actin-myosin filament overlap. PMID:25816319

  8. Direct real-time detection of the actin-activated power stroke within the myosin catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Muretta, Joseph M; Petersen, Karl J; Thomas, David D

    2013-04-30

    We have used transient kinetics, nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and kinetics simulations to resolve a structural transition in the Dictyostelium myosin II relay helix during the actin-activated power stroke. The relay helix plays a critical role in force generation in myosin, coupling biochemical changes in the ATPase site with the force-transducing rotation of the myosin light-chain domain. Previous research in the absence of actin showed that ATP binding to myosin induces a dynamic equilibrium between a bent prepower stroke state of the relay helix and a straight postpower stroke state, which dominates in the absence of ATP or when ADP is bound. We now ask whether actin binding reverses this transition and if so, how this reversal is coordinated with actin-activated phosphate release. We labeled a Cys-lite Dictyostelium myosin II motor domain with donor and acceptor probes at two engineered Cys residues designed to detect relay helix bending. We then performed transient time-resolved FRET following stopped-flow mixing of actin with labeled myosin, preincubated with ATP. We determined the kinetics of actin-activated phosphate release, using fluorescent phosphate-binding protein. The results show that actin binding to the myosin.ADP.P complex straightens the relay helix before phosphate dissociation. This actin-activated relay helix straightening is reversible, but phosphate irreversibly dissociates from the postpower stroke state, preventing reversal of the power stroke. Thus, relay helix straightening gates phosphate dissociation, whereas phosphate dissociation provides the thermodynamic driving force underlying force production. PMID:23589853

  9. Mechanical output of myosin II motors is regulated by myosin filament size and actin network mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Samantha; Alberts, Jonathan; Gardel, Margaret; Munro, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    The interactions of bipolar myosin II filaments with actin arrays are a predominate means of generating forces in numerous physiological processes including muscle contraction and cell migration. However, how the spatiotemporal regulation of these forces depends on motor mechanochemistry, bipolar filament size, and local actin mechanics is unknown. Here, we simulate myosin II motors with an agent-based model in which the motors have been benchmarked against experimental measurements. Force generation occurs in two distinct regimes characterized either by stable tension maintenance or by stochastic buildup and release; transitions between these regimes occur by changes to duty ratio and myosin filament size. The time required for building force to stall scales inversely with the stiffness of a network and the actin gliding speed of a motor. Finally, myosin motors are predicted to contract a network toward stiffer regions, which is consistent with experimental observations. Our representation of myosin motors can be used to understand how their mechanical and biochemical properties influence their observed behavior in a variety of in vitro and in vivo contexts.

  10. The Role of Myosin II Motor Activity in Distributing Myosin Asymmetrically and Coupling Protrusive Activity to Cell Translocation

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Nonmuscle myosin IIA and IIB distribute preferentially toward opposite ends of migrating endothelial cells. To understand the mechanism and function of this behavior, myosin II was examined in cells treated with the motor inhibitor, blebbistatin. Blebbistatin at ≥30 μM inhibited anterior redistribution of myosin IIA, with 100 μM blebbistatin causing posterior accumulation. Posterior accumulation of myosin IIB was unaffected. Time-lapse cinemicrography showed myosin IIA entering lamellipodia shortly after their formation, but failing to move into lamellipodia in blebbistatin. Thus, myosin II requires motor activity to move forward onto F-actin in protrusions. However, this movement is inhibited by myosin filament assembly, because whole myosin was delayed relative to a tailless fragment. Inhibiting myosin's forward movement reduced coupling between protrusive activity and translocation of the cell body: In untreated cells, body movement followed advancing lamellipodia, whereas blebbistatin-treated cells extended protrusions without displacement of the body or with a longer delay before movement. Anterior cytoplasm of blebbistatin-treated cells contained disorganized bundles of parallel microfilaments, but anterior F-actin bundles in untreated cells were mostly oriented perpendicular to movement. Myosin II may ordinarily move anteriorly on actin filaments and pull crossed filaments into antiparallel bundles, with the resulting realignment pulling the cell body forward. PMID:16855019

  11. Single Molecule Stepping and Structural Dynamics of Myosin X

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yujie; Sato, Osamu; Ruhnow, Felix; Arsenault, Mark E.; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Goldman, Yale E.

    2010-01-01

    Myosin X is an unconventional myosin with puzzling motility properties. We studied the motility of dimerized myosin X using single molecule fluorescence techniques – polTIRF, FIONA, and Parallax to measure rotation angles and 3-dimensional position of the molecule during its walk. It was found that Myosin X steps processively in a hand-over-hand manner following a left-handed helical path along both single actin filaments and bundles. Its step size and velocity are smaller on actin bundles than individual filaments, suggesting myosin X often steps onto neighboring filaments in a bundle. The data suggest that a previously postulated single α-helical domain mechanically extends the 3-IQ motif lever arm and either the neck-tail hinge or the tail is flexible. These structural features, in conjunction with the membrane and microtubule binding domains, enable myosin X to perform multiple functions on varied actin structures in cells. PMID:20364131

  12. Antiparallel coiled-coil–mediated dimerization of myosin X

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing; Ye, Fei; Wei, Zhiyi; Wen, Zilong; Zhang, Mingjie

    2012-01-01

    Processive movements of unconventional myosins on actin filaments generally require motor dimerization. A commonly accepted myosin dimerization mechanism is via formation of a parallel coiled-coil dimer by a stretch of amino acid residues immediately carboxyl-terminal to the motor’s lever-arm domain. Here, we discover that the predicted coiled-coil region of myosin X forms a highly stable, antiparallel coiled-coil dimer (anti-CC). Disruption of the anti-CC either by single-point mutations or by replacement of the anti-CC with a parallel coiled coil with a similar length compromised the filopodial induction activity of myosin X. We further show that the anti-CC and the single α-helical domain of myosin X are connected by a semirigid helical linker. The anti-CC–mediated dimerization may enable myosin X to walk on both single and bundled actin filaments. PMID:23012428

  13. Myosin IIA regulates cell motility and actomyosin-microtubule crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Even-Ram, Sharona; Doyle, Andrew D; Conti, Mary Anne; Matsumoto, Kazue; Adelstein, Robert S; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2007-03-01

    Non-muscle myosin II has diverse functions in cell contractility, cytokinesis and locomotion, but the specific contributions of its different isoforms have yet to be clarified. Here, we report that ablation of the myosin IIA isoform results in pronounced defects in cellular contractility, focal adhesions, actin stress fibre organization and tail retraction. Nevertheless, myosin IIA-deficient cells display substantially increased cell migration and exaggerated membrane ruffling, which was dependent on the small G-protein Rac1, its activator Tiam1 and the microtubule moter kinesin Eg5. Myosin IIA deficiency stabilized microtubules, shifting the balance between actomyosin and microtubules with increased microtubules in active membrane ruffles. When microtubule polymerization was suppressed, myosin IIB could partially compensate for the absence of the IIA isoform in cellular contractility, but not in cell migration. We conclude that myosin IIA negatively regulates cell migration and suggest that it maintains a balance between the actomyosin and microtubule systems by regulating microtubule dynamics. PMID:17310241

  14. Antiparallel coiled-coil-mediated dimerization of myosin X.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Ye, Fei; Wei, Zhiyi; Wen, Zilong; Zhang, Mingjie

    2012-10-23

    Processive movements of unconventional myosins on actin filaments generally require motor dimerization. A commonly accepted myosin dimerization mechanism is via formation of a parallel coiled-coil dimer by a stretch of amino acid residues immediately carboxyl-terminal to the motor's lever-arm domain. Here, we discover that the predicted coiled-coil region of myosin X forms a highly stable, antiparallel coiled-coil dimer (anti-CC). Disruption of the anti-CC either by single-point mutations or by replacement of the anti-CC with a parallel coiled coil with a similar length compromised the filopodial induction activity of myosin X. We further show that the anti-CC and the single α-helical domain of myosin X are connected by a semirigid helical linker. The anti-CC-mediated dimerization may enable myosin X to walk on both single and bundled actin filaments. PMID:23012428

  15. Ca2+- activated myosin- ATPases, creatine and adenylate kinases regulate mitochondrial function according to myofibre type in rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Gueguen, N; Lefaucheur, L; Ecolan, P; Fillaut, M; Herpin, P

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration rates and their regulation by ADP, AMP and creatine, were studied at different free Ca2+ concentrations (0.1 versus 0.4 μm) on permeabilized fibre bundles of rabbit skeletal muscles differing in their myosin heavy chain profiles. Four fibre bundle types were obtained: pure types I and IIx, and mixed types IIax (approximately 50% IIa and 50% IIx fibres) and IIb+ (60% IIb fibres, plus IIx and IIa). At rest, pure type I fibres displayed a much higher apparent Km for ADP (212 μm) than IIx fibres (8 μm). Within the IIax and IIb+ mixed fibre bundle types, two KADPm values were observed (70 μm and 5 μm). Comparison between pure IIx and mixed types indicates that the intermediate Km of 70 μm most probably corresponds to the mitochondrial affinity for ADP in IIa fibres, the lowest Km for ADP (5 μm) corresponding to IIx and IIb types. Activation of mitochondrial creatine and adenylate kinase reactions stimulated mitochondrial respiration only in type I and IIax fibre bundles, indicating an efficient coupling between both kinases and ADP rephosphorylation in type I and, likely, IIa fibres, since no effect was observed in pure IIx fibres. Following Ca2+-induced activation of myosin-ATPase, an increase in mitochondrial sensitivity to ADP of 45% and 250% was observed in type IIax and I bundles, respectively, an effect mostly prevented by addition of vanadate, an inhibitor of myosin-ATPase. Ca2+-induced activation of myosin-ATPase also prevented the stimulation of respiration rates by creatine and AMP in I and IIax bundles. In addition to differential regulation of mitochondrial respiration and energy transfer systems at rest in I and IIa versus IIx and IIb muscle fibres, our results indicate a regulation of phosphotransfer systems by Ca2+ via the stimulation of myosin-ATPases in type I and IIa fibres of rabbit muscles. PMID:15731190

  16. Prdm1 (Blimp-1) and the Expression of Fast and Slow Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms during Avian Myogenesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Girgenrath, Mahasweta; Miller, Jeffrey Boone

    2010-01-01

    Background Multiple types of fast and slow skeletal muscle fibers form during early embryogenesis in vertebrates. In zebrafish, formation of the earliest slow myofibers in fin muscles requires expression of the zinc-finger transcriptional repressor Prdm1 (also known as Blimp1). To further understand how the role of Prdm1 in early myogenesis may vary through evolution and during development, we have now analyzed Prdm1 expression in the diverse types of myotubes that form in culture from somitic, embryonic, and fetal chicken myoblasts. Principal Findings In cultures of somitic, embryonic limb, and fetal limb chicken cells, we found that Prdm1 was expressed in all of the differentiated muscle cells that formed, including those that expressed only fast myosin heavy chain isoforms, as well as those that co-expressed both fast and slow myosin heavy chain isoforms. Prdm1 was also expressed in Pax7-positive myoblasts, as well as in non-myogenic cells in the cultures. Furthermore, though all differentiated cells in control somite cultures co-expressed fast and slow myosin heavy chains, antisense knockdown of Prdm1 expression inhibited the formation of these co-expressing cells in somite cultures. Conclusions In chicken myogenic cell cultures, Prdm1 was expressed in most Pax7-positive myoblasts and in all differentiated muscle cells, irrespective of the developmental stage of cell donor or the pattern of fast and slow myosin heavy chains expressed in the differentiated cells that were formed. Thus, Prdm1 was expressed in myogenic cells prior to terminal differentiation; and, after differentiation, Prdm1 expression was not limited to cells that expressed slow myosin heavy chain isoforms. In addition, Prdm1 appeared to be required for differentiation of the somitic myocytes, which are the earliest myocytes to form in the avian embryo. PMID:20376350

  17. Phosphorylation of the myosin phosphatase target subunit by integrin-linked kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Murányi, Andrea; MacDonald, Justin A; Deng, Jing Ti; Wilson, David P; Haystead, Timothy A J; Walsh, Michael P; Erdodi, Ferenc; Kiss, Eniko; Wu, Yue; Hartshorne, David J

    2002-01-01

    A mechanism proposed for regulation of myosin phosphatase (MP) activity is phosphorylation of the myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1). Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is associated with the contractile machinery and can phosphorylate myosin at the myosin light-chain kinase sites. The possibility that ILK may also phosphorylate and regulate MP was investigated. ILK was associated with the MP holoenzyme, shown by Western blots and in-gel kinase assays. MYPT1 was phosphorylated by ILK and phosphorylation sites in the N- and C-terminal fragments of MYPT1 were detected. From sequence analyses, three sites were identified: a primary site at Thr(709), and two other sites at Thr(695) and Thr(495). One of the sites for cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was Ser(694). Assays with the catalytic subunit of type 1 phosphatase indicated that only the C-terminal fragment of MYPT1 phosphorylated by zipper-interacting protein kinase, and ILK inhibited activity. The phosphorylated N-terminal fragment activated phosphatase activity and phosphorylation by PKA was without effect. Using full-length MYPT1 constructs phosphorylated by various kinases it was shown that Rho kinase gave marked inhibition; ILK produced an intermediate level of inhibition, which was considerably reduced for the Thr(695)-->Ala mutant; and PKA had no effect. In summary, phosphorylation of the various sites indicated that Thr(695) was the major inhibitory site, Thr(709) had only a slight inhibitory effect and Ser(694) had no effect. The findings that ILK phosphorylated both MYPT1 and myosin and the association of ILK with MP suggest that ILK may influence cytoskeletal structure or function. PMID:12030846

  18. The On-off Switch in Regulated Myosins: Different Triggers but Related Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel, D.; Mui, S; O' Neall-Hennessey, E; Szent-Györgyi, A; Cohen, C

    2009-01-01

    In regulated myosin, motor and enzymatic activities are toggled between the on-state and off-state by a switch located on its lever arm domain, here called the regulatory domain (RD). This region consists of a long {alpha}-helical 'heavy chain' stabilized by a 'regulatory' light chain (RLC) and an 'essential' light chain (ELC). The on-state is activated by phosphorylation of the RLC of vertebrate smooth muscle RD or by direct binding of Ca{sup 2+} to the ELC of molluscan RD. Crystal structures are available only for the molluscan RD. To understand in more detail the pathway between the on-state and the off-state, we have now also determined the crystal structure of a molluscan (scallop) RD in the absence of Ca{sup 2+}. Our results indicate that loss of Ca{sup 2+} abolishes most of the interactions between the light chains and may increase the flexibility of the RD heavy chain. We propose that disruption of critical links with the C-lobe of the RLC is the key event initiating the off-state in both smooth muscle myosins and molluscan myosins.

  19. Ca2+-Dependent Regulations and Signaling in Skeletal Muscle: From Electro-Mechanical Coupling to Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Gehlert, Sebastian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Suhr, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) plays a pivotal role in almost all cellular processes and ensures the functionality of an organism. In skeletal muscle fibers, Ca2+ is critically involved in the innervation of skeletal muscle fibers that results in the exertion of an action potential along the muscle fiber membrane, the prerequisite for skeletal muscle contraction. Furthermore and among others, Ca2+ regulates also intracellular processes, such as myosin-actin cross bridging, protein synthesis, protein degradation and fiber type shifting by the control of Ca2+-sensitive proteases and transcription factors, as well as mitochondrial adaptations, plasticity and respiration. These data highlight the overwhelming significance of Ca2+ ions for the integrity of skeletal muscle tissue. In this review, we address the major functions of Ca2+ ions in adult muscle but also highlight recent findings of critical Ca2+-dependent mechanisms essential for skeletal muscle-regulation and maintenance. PMID:25569087

  20. Structural dynamics of troponin during activation of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fusi, Luca; Brunello, Elisabetta; Sevrieva, Ivanka R.; Sun, Yin-Biao; Irving, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved changes in the conformation of troponin in the thin filaments of skeletal muscle were followed during activation in situ by photolysis of caged calcium using bifunctional fluorescent probes in the regulatory and the coiled-coil (IT arm) domains of troponin. Three sequential steps in the activation mechanism were identified. The fastest step (1,100 s?1) matches the rate of Ca2+ binding to the regulatory domain but also dominates the motion of the IT arm. The second step (120 s?1) coincides with the azimuthal motion of tropomyosin around the thin filament. The third step (15 s?1) was shown by three independent approaches to track myosin head binding to the thin filament, but is absent in the regulatory head. The results lead to a four-state structural kinetic model that describes the molecular mechanism of muscle activation in the thin filamentmyosin head complex under physiological conditions. PMID:24616505

  1. Gene Regions Responding to Skeletal Muscle Atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Frank W.

    1997-01-01

    Our stated specific aims for this project were: 1) Identify the region(s) of the mouse IIb myosin heavy chain (MHC) promoter necessary for in vivo expression in mouse fast-twitch muscle, and 2) Identify the region(s) of the mouse IIb MHC promoter responsive to immobilization in mouse slow-twitch muscle in vivo. We sought to address these specific aims by introducing various MHC IIb promoter/reporter gene constructs directly into the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles of living mice. Although the method of somatic gene transfer into skeletal muscle by direct injection has been successfully used in our laboratory to study the regulation of the skeletal alpha actin gene in chicken skeletal muscle, we had many difficulties utilizing this procedure in the mouse. Because of the small size of the mouse soleus and the difficulty in obtaining consistent results, we elected not to study this muscle as first proposed. Rather, our MHC IIb promoter deletion experiments were performed in the gastrocnemius. Further, we decided to use hindlimb unloading via tail suspension to induce an upregulation of the MHC IIb gene, rather than immobilization of the hindlimbs via plaster casts. This change was made because tail suspension more closely mimics spaceflight, and this procedure in our lab results in a smaller loss of overall body mass than the mouse hindlimb immobilization procedure. This suggests that the stress level during tail suspension is less than during immobilization. This research has provided an important beginning point towards understanding the molecular regulation of the MHC lIb gene in response to unweighting of skeletal muscle Future work will focus on the regulation of MHC IIb mRNA stability in response to altered loading of skeletal muscle

  2. Germinal Center Specific Protein HGAL Directly Interacts with Both Myosin and Actin and Increases the Binding of Myosin to Actin

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Jones, Michelle; Watt, James; Helfman, David M.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Lossos, Izidore S.

    2011-01-01

    HGAL is a germinal center (GC)-specific gene whose expression correlates with a favorable prognosis in patients with diffuse large B-cell and classicHodgkin lymphomas. HGAL is involved in negative regulation of lymphocyte motility. The movement of lymphocytes is directly driven by actin polymerization and actin-myosin interactions. We demonstrate that HGAL interacts directly and independently with both actin and myosin and delineate the HGAL and myosin domains responsible for the interaction. Furthermore, we show that HGAL increases the binding of myosin to F-actin and inhibits the ability of myosin to translocate actin by reducing the maximal velocity of myosin head/actin movement. No effects of HGAL on the actomyosin ATPase activity and on the rate of actin polymerization from G-actin to F-actin were observed. These findings reveal a new mechanism underlying the inhibitory effects of GC-specific HGAL protein on lymphocyte and lymphoma cell motility. PMID:21447067

  3. Regulation of nonmuscle myosin II during 3-methylcholanthrene induced dedifferentiation of C2C12 myotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Sumit K.; Saha, Shekhar; Das, Provas; Das, Mahua R.; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2014-08-01

    3-Methylcholanthrene (3MC) induces tumor formation at the site of injection in the hind leg of mice within 110 days. Recent reports reveal that the transformation of normal muscle cells to atypical cells is one of the causes for tumor formation, however the molecular mechanism behind this process is not well understood. Here, we show in an in vitro study that 3MC induces fragmentation of multinucleate myotubes into viable mononucleates. These mononucleates form colonies when they are seeded into soft agar, indicative of cellular transformation. Immunoblot analysis reveals that phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC{sub 20}) is 5.6±0.5 fold reduced in 3MC treated myotubes in comparison to vehicle treated myotubes during the fragmentation of myotubes. In contrast, levels of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myogenin and cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D, Cyclin E1 remain unchanged as assessed by real-time PCR array and reverse transcriptase PCR analysis, respectively. Interestingly, addition of the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7, enhances the fragmentation, whereas phosphatase inhibitor perturbs the 3MC induced fragmentation of myotubes. These results suggest that decrease in RLC{sub 20} phosphorylation may be associated with the fragmentation step of dedifferentiation. - Highlights: • 3-Methylcholanthrene induces fragmentation of C2C12-myotubes. • Dedifferentiation can be divided into two steps – fragmentation and proliferation. • Fragmentation is associated with rearrangement of nonmuscle myosin II. • Genes associated with differentiation and proliferation are not altered during fragmentation. • Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain is reduced during fragmentation.

  4. Abnormal skeletal muscle bioenergetics in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, C. H.; Kemp, G. J.; Taylor, D. J.; Conway, M.; Rajagopalan, B.; O'Donoghue, A.; Styles, P.; McKenna, W. J.; Radda, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the skeletal muscle metabolic manifestations of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. DESIGN: A case-control study. SETTING: 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the calf muscle was performed on volunteers from a centre specialising in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PATIENTS: Five patients with abnormal beta myosin heavy chain protein in cardiac and skeletal muscle and five patients with a troponin T abnormality in cardiac muscle were compared with healthy controls. RESULTS: High energy phosphate metabolism in vivo was examined in a non-invasive manner. In resting muscle, the beta myosin heavy chain group had a higher ratio of phosphocreatine to ATP concentration (4.51 (SD 0.17)) than either the troponin T group (3.88 (0.42)) or controls (n = 16; 4.04 (0.40)). Exercise duration was reduced compared to controls, and during the fourth minute of exercise phosphocreatine depletion and muscle acidification were greater in both patient groups. After exercise, the recovery of phosphocreatine-an index of oxidative metabolic capacity of the muscle-was slower in the beta myosin heavy chain group (mean half time 0.65 (0.08) minutes) than in the troponin T group (0.60 (0.17) minutes) or controls (0.48 (0.14) minutes). CONCLUSIONS: Exercise metabolism was abnormal in both groups of subjects, and the affected contractile protein determined the metabolic changes in muscle at rest and during recovery. In patients with abnormal beta myosin heavy chain protein, there was a decrease in oxidative capacity consistent with the reduction in mitochondria reported in muscle biopsy studies of similar patients. PMID:9326994

  5. Aging of Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Miljkovic, Natasa; Lim, Jae-Young; Miljkovic, Iva

    2015-01-01

    Aging has become an important topic for scientific research because life expectancy and the number of men and women in older age groups have increased dramatically in the last century. This is true in most countries of the world including the Republic of Korea and the United States. From a rehabilitation perspective, the most important associated issue is a progressive decline in functional capacity and independence. Sarcopenia is partly responsible for this decline. Many changes underlying the loss of muscle mass and force-generating capacity of skeletal muscle can be understood at the cellular and molecular levels. Muscle size and architecture are both altered with advanced adult age. Further, changes in myofibers include impairments in several physiological domains including muscle fiber activation, excitation-contraction coupling, actin-myosin cross-bridge interaction, energy production, and repair and regeneration. A thorough understanding of these alterations can lead to the design of improved preventative and rehabilitative interventions, such as personalized exercise training programs. PMID:25932410

  6. Biochemical and histochemical adaptations of skeletal muscle to rat suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G. H.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of rat suspension on soleus disuse and atrophy was investigated to measure changes in fiber area and number and to determine if suspension elicited changes in lysosomal protease activity and rate of calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The infuence of rat suspension on myosin light chain phosphorylation and succinate dehydrogenase activity are determined.

  7. Skeletal muscle plasticity: cellular and molecular responses to altered physical activity paradigms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth M.; Haddad, Fadia

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine our current understanding of the chain of events known to be involved in the adaptive process whereby specific genes and their protein products undergo altered expression; specifically, skeletal muscle adaptation in response to altered loading states will be discussed, with a special focus on the regulation of the contractile protein, myosin heavy chain gene expression. This protein, which is both an important structural and regulatory protein comprising the contractile apparatus, can be expressed as different isoforms, thereby having an impact on the functional diversity of the muscle. Because the regulation of the myosin gene family is under the control of a complex set of processes including, but not limited to, activity, hormonal, and metabolic factors, this protein will serve as a cellular "marker" for studies of muscle plasticity in response to various mechanical perturbations in which the quantity and type of myosin isoform, along with other important cellular proteins, are altered in expression.

  8. Stability and melting kinetics of structural domains in the myosin rod.

    PubMed

    Tsong, T Y; Himmelfarb, S; Harrington, W F

    1983-03-01

    The thermal stability and melting kinetics of the alpha-helical conformation within several regions of the rabbit myosin rod have been investigated. Cyanogen bromide cleavage of long myosin subfragment-2 produced one coiled-coil alpha-helical fragment corresponding to short subfragment-2 with molecular weight 90,000 (Mr = 45,000) and two fragments from the hinge region with molecular weights of 32,000 to 34,000 (Mr = 16,000 to 17,000) and 24,000 to 26,000 (Mr = 12,000 to 13,000). Optical rotation melting experiments and temperature-jump kinetic studies of long subfragment-2 and its cyanogen bromide fragments show that the hinge and the short subfragment-2 domains melt as quasi-independent co-operative units. The alpha-helical structure within the hinge has an appreciably lower thermal stability than the flanking short subfragment-2 and light meromyosin regions of the myosin rod. Two relaxation processes for helix-melting, one in the submillisecond range (tau f) and the other in the millisecond range (tau s), are observed in the light meromyosin and short subfragment-2 regions of the rod, but melting in the hinge domain is dominated by the fast (tau f) process. Results suggest that the hinge domain of the subfragment-2 link may be the locus of force generation in a cycling cross-bridge. PMID:6341604

  9. Electron cryomicroscopy of acto-myosin-S1 during steady-state ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M; White, H; Belknap, B; Trinick, J

    1994-01-01

    The structure of the complex of actin and myosin subfragment-1 (S1) during steady-state ATP hydrolysis has been examined by electron microscopy. This complex is normally dissociated by ATP in vitro but was stabilized here by low ionic strength. Optimal conditions for attachment were established by light-scattering experiments that showed that approximately 70% of S1 could be bound in the presence of ATP. Micrographs of the unstained complex in vitreous water suggest that S1 attaches to actin in a variety of configurations in ATP; this contrasts with the single attached configuration seen in the presence of ADP. The data are therefore compatible with the idea that a change in attached configuration of the myosin cross-bridge is the origin of muscle force. In control experiments where ATP was allowed to hydrolyze completely the binding of the S1 seemed cooperative. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8061205

  10. Myosin-X: a MyTH-FERM myosin at the tips of filopodia

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, Michael L.; Cheney, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Myosin-X (Myo10) is an unconventional myosin with MyTH4-FERM domains that is best known for its striking localization to the tips of filopodia and its ability to induce filopodia. Although the head domain of Myo10 enables it to function as an actin-based motor, its tail contains binding sites for several molecules with central roles in cell biology, including phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate, microtubules and integrins. Myo10 also undergoes fascinating long-range movements within filopodia, which appear to represent a newly recognized system of transport. Myo10 is also unusual in that it is a myosin with important roles in the spindle, a microtubule-based structure. Exciting new studies have begun to reveal the structure and single-molecule properties of this intriguing myosin, as well as its mechanisms of regulation and induction of filopodia. At the cellular and organismal level, growing evidence demonstrates that Myo10 has crucial functions in numerous processes ranging from invadopodia formation to cell migration. PMID:22124140

  11. A Restrictive Cardiomyopathy Mutation in an Invariant Proline at the Myosin Head/Rod Junction Enhances Head Flexibility and Function, Yielding Muscle Defects in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Achal, Madhulika; Trujillo, Adriana S; Melkani, Girish C; Farman, Gerrie P; Ocorr, Karen; Viswanathan, Meera C; Kaushik, Gaurav; Newhard, Christopher S; Glasheen, Bernadette M; Melkani, Anju; Suggs, Jennifer A; Moore, Jeffrey R; Swank, Douglas M; Bodmer, Rolf; Cammarato, Anthony; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2016-06-01

    An "invariant proline" separates the myosin S1 head from its S2 tail and is proposed to be critical for orienting S1 during its interaction with actin, a process that leads to muscle contraction. Mutation of the invariant proline to leucine (P838L) caused dominant restrictive cardiomyopathy in a pediatric patient (Karam et al., Congenit. Heart Dis. 3:138-43, 2008). Here, we use Drosophila melanogaster to model this mutation and dissect its effects on the biochemical and biophysical properties of myosin, as well as on the structure and physiology of skeletal and cardiac muscles. P838L mutant myosin isolated from indirect flight muscles of transgenic Drosophila showed elevated ATPase and actin sliding velocity in vitro. Furthermore, the mutant heads exhibited increased rotational flexibility, and there was an increase in the average angle between the two heads. Indirect flight muscle myofibril assembly was minimally affected in mutant homozygotes, and isolated fibers displayed normal mechanical properties. However, myofibrils degraded during aging, correlating with reduced flight abilities. In contrast, hearts from homozygotes and heterozygotes showed normal morphology, myofibrillar arrays, and contractile parameters. When P838L was placed in trans to Mhc(5), an allele known to cause cardiac restriction in flies, it did not yield the constricted phenotype. Overall, our studies suggest that increased rotational flexibility of myosin S1 enhances myosin ATPase and actin sliding. Moreover, instability of P838L myofibrils leads to decreased function during aging of Drosophila skeletal muscle, but not cardiac muscle, despite the strong evolutionary conservation of the P838 residue. PMID:27107639

  12. Regulation of myosin II activity by actin architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, Kimberly; Stam, Samantha; McCall, Patrick; Munro, Edwin; Gardel, Margaret

    2015-03-01

    Networks of actin filaments containing myosin II motors generate forces and motions that promote biological processes such as cell division, motility, and cargo transport. In cells, actin filaments are arranged in various structures from disordered meshworks to tight bundles. Clusters of myosin II motors, known as myosin filaments, crosslink and generate force on neighboring actin filaments. We hypothesized that the local actin architecture controls the magnitude and duration of force generated by myosin II motors. We used fluorescence imaging to directly measure the mobility of myosin II filaments on actin networks and bundles with varying actin filament polarity, orientation, spacing, and length. On unipolar bundles, myosin exhibits fast, unidirectional motion consistent with their unloaded gliding speed. On mixed polarity bundles, myosin speed is reduced by one order of magnitude and marked by direction switching and trapping. Increasing filament spacing and bundle flexibility reduces the duration of trapping and enhances the mobility of motors. Simulations indicate that stable trapping is a signature of large generated forces while increased mobility indicates force release. Our data underscore that the efficiency of force generation by myosin motors in an actin network depends sensitively on its architecture and suggests actin crosslinking proteins are tuned to optimize actomyosin contractility.

  13. Unconventional myosin traffic in cells reveals a selective actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Brawley, Crista M.; Rock, Ronald S.

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have a self-organizing cytoskeleton where motors transport cargoes along cytoskeletal tracks. To understand the sorting process, we developed a system to observe single-molecule motility in a cellular context. We followed myosin classes V, VI, and X on triton-extracted actin cytoskeletons from Drosophila S2, mammalian COS-7, and mammalian U2OS cells. We find that these cells vary considerably in their global traffic patterns. The S2 and U2OS cells have regions of actin that either enhance or inhibit specific myosin classes. U2OS cells allow for 1 motor class, myosin VI, to move along stress fiber bundles, while motility of myosin V and X are suppressed. Myosin X motors are recruited to filopodia and the lamellar edge in S2 cells, whereas myosin VI motility is excluded from the same regions. Furthermore, we also see different velocities of myosin V motors in central regions of S2 cells, suggesting regional control of motor motility by the actin cytoskeleton. We also find unexpected features of the actin cytoskeletal network, including a population of reversed filaments with the barbed-end toward the cell center. This myosin motor regulation demonstrates that native actin cytoskeletons are more than just a collection of filaments. PMID:19478066

  14. Nonmuscle myosin dependent synthesis of type I collagen

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Le; Fritz, Dillon; Stefanovic, Lela; Stefanovic, Branko

    2010-01-01

    Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in human body synthesized in all tissues as the heterotrimer of two α1(I) and one α2(I) polypeptides. Here we show that intact nonmuscle myosin filaments are required for synthesis of heterotrimeric type I collagen. Conserved 5′ stem-loop in collagen α1(I) and α2(I) mRNAs binds RNA binding protein LARP6. LARP6 interacts with nonmuscle myosin through its C-terminal domain and associates collagen mRNAs with the filaments. Dissociation of nonmuscle myosin filaments results in secretion collagen α1(I) homotrimer, in diminished intracellular colocalization of collagen α1(I) and α2(I) polypeptides, which is required for folding of the heterotrimer, and in their increased intracellular degradation. Inhibition of the motor function of myosin has similar collagen specific effects, while disruption of actin filaments has a general effect on protein secretion. Nonmuscle myosin copurifies with polysomes and there is a subset of polysomes involved in myosin dependent translation of collagen mRNAs. These results indicate that association of collagen mRNAs with nonmuscle myosin filaments is necessary to coordinately synthesize collagen α1(I) and α2(I) polypeptides. We postulate that LARP6/myosin dependent mechanism regulates the synthesis of heterotrimeric type I collagen by coordinating translation of collagen mRNAs. PMID:20603131

  15. Developmental Changes is Expression of Beta-Adrenergic Receptors in Cultures of C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Vaughn, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    beta-Adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists have been reported to modulate growth in several mammalian and avian species, and bAR agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through this receptor. Because of the importance of bAR regulation on muscle protein metabolism in muscle cells, the objectives of this study were to determine the developmental expression pattern of the bAR population in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells, and to analyze changes in both the quantity and isoform expression of the major muscle protein, myosin. The number of bAR in mononucleated C2C12 cells was approximately 8,000 bAR per cell, which is comparable with the population reported in several other nonmuscle cell types. However, the bar population increased after myoblast fusion to greater than 50,000 bAR per muscle cell equivalent. The reasons for this apparent over-expression of bAR in C2C12 cells is not known. The quantity of myosin also increased after C2C12 myoblast fusion, but the quantity of myosin was less than that reported in primary muscle cell cultures. Finally, at least five different isoforms of myosin heavy chain could be resolved in C2C12 cells, and three of these exhibited either increased or decreased developmental regulation relative to the others. Thus, C2C12 myoblasts undergo developmental regulation of bAR population and myosin heavy chain isoform expression.

  16. On the kinetics that moves Myosin V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christian; O'Kelly de Galway, Winny

    2015-10-01

    Molecular motor proteins such as Myosin V, Dynein or Kinesin are no ratchets, at least not with a flashing asymmetric potential; the crucial asymmetry is in the dynamical activity. We make that explicit in terms of a simple Markov model, emphasizing the kinetic (and non-thermodynamic) aspects of stochastic transport. The analysis shows the presence of a fluctuation symmetry in that part of the dynamical activity which is antisymmetric under reversal of trailing and leading head of the motor. The direction of the motor motion is determined by it.

  17. Neuromuscular Development and Regulation of Myosin Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodine, Sue

    1997-01-01

    The proposed experiments were designed to determine whether the absence of gravity during embryogenesis influences the postnatal development of the neuromuscular system. Further, we examined the effects of reduced gravity on hindlimb muscles of the pregnant rats. Microgravity may have short and long-term effects on the development of muscle fiber type differentiation and force producing capabilities. Microgravity will reduce muscle fiber size and cause a shift in myosin heavy chain expression from slow to fast in hindlimb muscles of the adult pregnant rats.

  18. Analysis of the myosins encoded in the recently completed Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Day, I. S.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three types of molecular motors play an important role in the organization, dynamics and transport processes associated with the cytoskeleton. The myosin family of molecular motors move cargo on actin filaments, whereas kinesin and dynein motors move cargo along microtubules. These motors have been highly characterized in non-plant systems and information is becoming available about plant motors. The actin cytoskeleton in plants has been shown to be involved in processes such as transportation, signaling, cell division, cytoplasmic streaming and morphogenesis. The role of myosin in these processes has been established in a few cases but many questions remain to be answered about the number, types and roles of myosins in plants. RESULTS: Using the motor domain of an Arabidopsis myosin we identified 17 myosin sequences in the Arabidopsis genome. Phylogenetic analysis of the Arabidopsis myosins with non-plant and plant myosins revealed that all the Arabidopsis myosins and other plant myosins fall into two groups - class VIII and class XI. These groups contain exclusively plant or algal myosins with no animal or fungal myosins. Exon/intron data suggest that the myosins are highly conserved and that some may be a result of gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS: Plant myosins are unlike myosins from any other organisms except algae. As a percentage of the total gene number, the number of myosins is small overall in Arabidopsis compared with the other sequenced eukaryotic genomes. There are, however, a large number of class XI myosins. The function of each myosin has yet to be determined.

  19. Tuning myosin-driven sorting on cellular actin networks.

    PubMed

    Hariadi, Rizal F; Sommese, Ruth F; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2015-01-01

    Myosin V and VI are antagonistic motors that cohabit membrane vesicles in cells. A systematic study of their collective function, however, is lacking and forms the focus of this study. We functionally reconstitute a two-dimensional actin-myosin interface using myosin V and VI precisely patterned on DNA nanostructures, in combination with a model keratocyte actin meshwork. While scaffolds display solely unidirectional movement, their directional flux is modulated by both actin architecture and the structural properties of the myosin lever arm. This directional flux can be finely-tuned by the relative number of myosin V and VI motors on each scaffold. Pairing computation with experimental observations suggests that the ratio of motor stall forces is a key determinant of the observed competitive outcomes. Overall, our study demonstrates an elegant mechanism for sorting of membrane cargo using equally matched antagonistic motors, simply by modulating the relative number of engagement sites for each motor type. PMID:25738229

  20. The Nonmuscle Myosin Phosphatase PP1β (flapwing) Negatively Regulates Jun N-Terminal Kinase in Wing Imaginal Discs of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Jasmin; Gross, Sascha; Bennett, Daimark; Alphey, Luke

    2007-01-01

    Drosophila flapwing (flw) codes for serine/threonine protein phosphatase type 1β (PP1β). Regulation of nonmuscle myosin activity is the single essential flw function that is nonredundant with the three closely related PP1α genes. Flw is thought to dephosphorylate the nonmuscle myosin regulatory light chain, Spaghetti Squash (Sqh); this inactivates the nonmuscle myosin heavy chain, Zipper (Zip). Thus, strong flw mutants lead to hyperphosphorylation of Sqh and hyperactivation of nonmuscle myosin activity. Here, we show genetically that a Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) mutant suppresses the semilethality of a strong flw allele. Alleles of the JNK phosphatase puckered (puc) genetically enhance the weak allele flw1, leading to severe wing defects. Introducing a mutant of the nonmuscle myosin-binding subunit (Mbs) further enhances this genetic interaction to lethality. We show that puc expression is upregulated in wing imaginal discs mutant for flw1 and pucA251 and that this upregulation is modified by JNK and Zip. The level of phosphorylated (active) JNK is elevated in flw1 enhanced by puc. Together, we show that disruption of nonmuscle myosin activates JNK and puc expression in wing imaginal discs. PMID:17277363

  1. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems in the arms or legs (limbs). ... The term skeletal limb abnormalities is most often used to describe defects in the legs or arms that are due to ...

  2. Differentiation of the anterior latissimus dorsi muscle of the chicken examined by anti-myosin monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y T; Shafiq, S A

    1987-07-01

    Two new monoclonal antibodies (McAbs), ALD-180 and ALD-88, produced against the myosin of the slow anterior latissimus dorsi (ALD) muscle of the chicken are described. Their specificity for myosin heavy chain (MHC) was established by radioimmunoassay, immunoautoradiography, and immunofluorescence. They were used in conjunction with McAbs MF-14 and MF-30 (which have been characterized previously to be directed against MHC of the fast skeletal muscle) to examine the developmental changes of the chicken ALD muscle. At the 16-day embryonic, early posthatch, and adult stages the ALD muscle fibers differed in their reaction pattern with the McAbs; at the embryonic stage all fibers reacted strongly with ALD-180 and weakly with ALD-88 and MF-30; at the early posthatch stage there was a checkerboard pattern with many fibers not reacting with any of these three McAbs; and at the adult stage all fibers reacted strongly with ALD-180 and ALD-88 and weakly with MF-30. The MF-14 antibody did not react with ALD muscle at any developmental stage. The mature pattern of immunoreactivity of the ALD muscle fibers with the antibodies was established only after 9 weeks posthatch, and during this 9-week period the immunofluorescence changes were nonsynchronous. Based on immunocytochemical evidence of changes in myosin isoform expression, this study clearly demonstrates a distinctive neonatal (early posthatch) stage in the development of the chicken slow muscle. PMID:3302095

  3. Genetic suppression of a phosphomimic myosin II identifies system-level factors that promote myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yixin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Surcel, Alexandra; Miller, Christopher; Robinson, Douglas N

    2014-12-15

    How myosin II localizes to the cleavage furrow in Dictyostelium and metazoan cells remains largely unknown despite significant advances in understanding its regulation. We designed a genetic selection using cDNA library suppression of 3xAsp myosin II to identify factors involved in myosin cleavage furrow accumulation. The 3xAsp mutant is deficient in bipolar thick filament assembly, fails to accumulate at the cleavage furrow, cannot rescue myoII-null cytokinesis, and has impaired mechanosensitive accumulation. Eleven genes suppressed this dominant cytokinesis deficiency when 3xAsp was expressed in wild-type cells. 3xAsp myosin II's localization to the cleavage furrow was rescued by constructs encoding rcdBB, mmsdh, RMD1, actin, one novel protein, and a 14-3-3 hairpin. Further characterization showed that RMD1 is required for myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation, acting in parallel with mechanical stress. Analysis of several mutant strains revealed that different thresholds of myosin II activity are required for daughter cell symmetry than for furrow ingression dynamics. Finally, an engineered myosin II with a longer lever arm (2xELC), producing a highly mechanosensitive motor, could also partially suppress the intragenic 3xAsp. Overall, myosin II accumulation is the result of multiple parallel and partially redundant pathways that comprise a cellular contractility control system. PMID:25318674

  4. Genetic suppression of a phosphomimic myosin II identifies system-level factors that promote myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yixin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Surcel, Alexandra; Miller, Christopher; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2014-01-01

    How myosin II localizes to the cleavage furrow in Dictyostelium and metazoan cells remains largely unknown despite significant advances in understanding its regulation. We designed a genetic selection using cDNA library suppression of 3xAsp myosin II to identify factors involved in myosin cleavage furrow accumulation. The 3xAsp mutant is deficient in bipolar thick filament assembly, fails to accumulate at the cleavage furrow, cannot rescue myoII-null cytokinesis, and has impaired mechanosensitive accumulation. Eleven genes suppressed this dominant cytokinesis deficiency when 3xAsp was expressed in wild-type cells. 3xAsp myosin II's localization to the cleavage furrow was rescued by constructs encoding rcdBB, mmsdh, RMD1, actin, one novel protein, and a 14-3-3 hairpin. Further characterization showed that RMD1 is required for myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation, acting in parallel with mechanical stress. Analysis of several mutant strains revealed that different thresholds of myosin II activity are required for daughter cell symmetry than for furrow ingression dynamics. Finally, an engineered myosin II with a longer lever arm (2xELC), producing a highly mechanosensitive motor, could also partially suppress the intragenic 3xAsp. Overall, myosin II accumulation is the result of multiple parallel and partially redundant pathways that comprise a cellular contractility control system. PMID:25318674

  5. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  6. Skeletal muscle molecular alterations precede whole-muscle dysfunction in NYHA Class II heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Godard, Michael P; Whitman, Samantha A; Song, Yao-Hua; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF), a debilitating disease in a growing number of adults, exerts structural and neurohormonal changes in both cardiac and skeletal muscles. However, these alterations and their affected molecular pathways remain uncharacterized. Disease progression is known to transform skeletal muscle fiber composition by unknown mechanisms. In addition, perturbation of specific hormonal pathways, including those involving skeletal muscle insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 (IGFB-5) appears to occur, likely affecting muscle metabolism and regeneration. We hypothesized that changes in IGF-1 and IGFB-5 mRNA levels correlate with the transformation of single–skeletal muscle fiber myosin heavy chain isoforms early in disease progression, making these molecules valuable markers of skeletal muscle changes in heart failure. Materials and methods To investigate these molecules during “early” events in HF patients, we obtained skeletal muscle biopsies from New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class II HF patients and controls for molecular analyses of single fibers, and we also quantified isometric strength and muscle size. Results There were more (P < 0.05) single muscle fibers coexpressing two or more myosin heavy chains in the HF patients (30% ± 7%) compared to the control subjects (13% ± 2%). IGF-1 and IGFBP-5 expression was fivefold and 15-fold lower in patients with in HF compared to control subjects (P < 0.05), respectively. Strikingly, there was a correlation in IGF-1 expression and muscle cross-sectional area (P < 0.05) resulting in a decrease in whole-muscle quality (P < 0.05) in the HF patients, despite no significant decrease in isometric strength or whole-muscle size. Conclusion These data indicate that molecular alterations in myosin heavy chain isoforms, IGF-1, and IGFB-5 levels precede the gross morphological and functional deficits that have previously been associated with HF, and may be used as a predictor of functional outcome in patients. PMID:23204842

  7. Calponin-calmodulin interaction: properties and effects on smooth and skeletal muscle actin binding and actomyosin ATPases.

    PubMed

    Winder, S J; Walsh, M P; Vasulka, C; Johnson, J D

    1993-12-01

    Smooth muscle calponin bound to the biologically active fluorescent calmodulin [2-(4'-maleimidoanilino)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid-calmodulin] (MIANS.CaM) with a Kd of 80 nM and produced a 3.4-fold fluorescence enhancement. PKC-phosphorylated calponin (1.3 mol of Pi/mol) bound to CaM with approximately 15-fold lower affinity. Calponin inhibited CaM (10 nM) activation of the Ca(2+)-/CaM-activated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) with an IC50 of 138 nM. The calponin-CaM interaction was Ca(2+)-dependent: half-maximal binding of calponin to MIANS.CaM occurred at pCa 6.6 with a Hill coefficient of 2.4. Stopped-flow fluorescence kinetic analysis demonstrated that EGTA chelation of Ca2+ from CaM disrupted the MIANS.CaM-calponin complex at a rate of 1 s-1. Calponin bound MIANS.CaM at a rate of (6.0 +/- 1.8) x 10(6) M-1s-1, and melittin and unlabeled brain CaM both disrupted the MIANS.CaM-calponin complex at a rate of 0.3 +/- 0.1 s-1. These studies suggest that calponin binds CaM with 80-fold lower affinity than myosin light-chain kinase and that calponin associates with CaM much slower than it associates with caldesmon or myosin light-chain kinase. The physiological relevance of the CaM-calponin interaction was evaluated by analysis of the effects of Ca(2+)-CaM on (i) the interaction of calponin with actin and (ii) calponin-mediated inhibition of actin-activated myosin MgATPase activity. Ca(2+)-CaM half-maximally inhibited calponin (2 microM) binding to smooth and skeletal muscle actins (9 microM) at 5.4 and 11 microM CaM, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8241189

  8. The On-off Switch in Regulated Myosins: Different Triggers but Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Himmel, Daniel M.; Mui, Suet; O'Neall-Hennessey, Elizabeth; Szent-Györgyi, Andrew G.; Cohen, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    In regulated myosins, motor and enzymatic activity are toggled between on- and off-states by a switch located on its lever arm, or regulatory domain (RD). This region consists of a long alpha-helical "heavy chain" stabilized by a "regulatory" and an "essential" light chain. The on-state is activated by phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain of smooth muscle RD, or by direct binding of Ca2+ to the essential light chain of molluscan RD. Crystal structures are available only for the molluscan RD. To understand the pathway between the on and off states in more detail, we have now also determined the crystal structure of a molluscan (scallop) RD in the absence of Ca2+. Our results indicate that loss of Ca2+ abolishes most of the interactions between the light chains and may increase flexibility of the RD heavy chain. We propose that disruption of critical links with the C-lobe of the regulatory light chain is the key event initiating the off-state in both smooth muscle and molluscan myosins. PMID:19769984

  9. INSIGHTS INTO THE ROLES OF NON-MUSCLE MYOSIN IIA IN HUMAN KERATINOCYTE MIGRATION

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Saheli; Egelhoff, Thomas; Baskaran, Harihara

    2010-01-01

    Epidermal cell migration is a key factor in wound healing responses, regulated by the F-actin-myosin II systems. Previous reports have established the importance of non-muscle myosin II (NMII) in regulating cell migration. However, the role of NMII in primary human keratinocytes has not been investigated. In this study we used a microfabrication-based two-dimensional migration assay to examine the role of NMII in keratinocyte migration. We developed confluent cell islands of various sizes (0.025 – 0.25 mm2) and quantified migration as Fold Increase in island area over time. We report here that NMII was expressed and activated in migrating keratinocytes. Inhibition of NMIIA motor activity with blebbistatin increased migration significantly in all cell island sizes in six hours compared to control. Inhibition of Rho-kinase by Y-27632 did not alter migration while inhibition of myosin light chain kinase by ML-7 suppressed migration significantly in six hours. Both blebbistatin and Y-27632 induced formation of large membrane ruffles and elongated tails. In contrast, ML-7 blocked cell spreading, resulting in a rounded morphology. Taken together, these data suggest that NMIIA decreases migration in keratinocytes, but the mechanism may be differentially regulated by upstream kinases. PMID:20548965

  10. Making Skeletal Muscle from Progenitor and Stem Cells: Development versus Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lydia; Rozo, Michelle E.; Lepper, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    For locomotion, vertebrate animals use the force generated by contractile skeletal muscles. These muscles form an actin/myosin-based bio-machinery that is attached to skeletal elements to effect body movement and maintain posture. The mechanics, physiology, and homeostasis of skeletal muscles in normal and disease states are of significant clinical interest. How muscles originate from progenitors during embryogenesis has attracted considerable attention from developmental biologists. How skeletal muscles regenerate and repair themselves after injury by the use of stem cells is an important process to maintain muscle homeostasis throughout lifetime. In recent years, much progress has been made towards uncovering the origins of myogenic progenitors and stem cells as well as the regulation of these cells during development and regeneration. PMID:22737183

  11. Skeletal muscle changes after hemiparetic stroke and potential beneficial effects of exercise intervention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hafer-Macko, Charlene E.; Ryan, Alice S.; Ivey, Frederick M.; Macko, Richard F.

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States. New evidence reveals significant structural and metabolic changes in skeletal muscle after stroke. Muscle alterations include gross atrophy and shift to fast myosin heavy chain in the hemiparetic (contralateral) leg muscle; both are related to gait deficit severity. The underlying molecular mechanisms of this atrophy and muscle phenotype shift are not known. Inflammatory markers are also present in contralateral leg muscle after stroke. Individuals with stroke have a high prevalence of insulin resistance and diabetes. Skeletal muscle is a major site for insulin-glucose metabolism. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory pathway activation and oxidative injury could lead to wasting, altered function, and impaired insulin action in skeletal muscle. The health benefits of exercise in disabled populations have now been recognized. Aerobic exercise improves fitness, strength, and ambulatory performance in subjects with chronic stroke. Therapeutic exercise may modify or reverse skeletal muscle abnormalities. PMID:18566944

  12. Force-producing ADP state of myosin bound to actin

    PubMed Central

    Wulf, Sarah F.; Ropars, Virginie; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Oster, Marco; Hofhaus, Goetz; Trabuco, Leonardo G.; Pylypenko, Olena; Sweeney, H. Lee; Houdusse, Anne M.; Schröder, Rasmus R.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular motors produce force when they interact with their cellular tracks. For myosin motors, the primary force-generating state has MgADP tightly bound, whereas myosin is strongly bound to actin. We have generated an 8-Å cryoEM reconstruction of this state for myosin V and used molecular dynamics flexed fitting for model building. We compare this state to the subsequent state on actin (Rigor). The ADP-bound structure reveals that the actin-binding cleft is closed, even though MgADP is tightly bound. This state is accomplished by a previously unseen conformation of the β-sheet underlying the nucleotide pocket. The transition from the force-generating ADP state to Rigor requires a 9.5° rotation of the myosin lever arm, coupled to a β-sheet rearrangement. Thus, the structure reveals the detailed rearrangements underlying myosin force generation as well as the basis of strain-dependent ADP release that is essential for processive myosins, such as myosin V. PMID:26976594

  13. Phenolic antioxidant scavenging of myosin radicals generated by hypervalent myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Jongberg, Sisse; Lund, Marianne N; Østdal, Henrik; Skibsted, Leif H

    2012-12-01

    The scavenging activity of extracts of green tea (GTE), white grape (WGE), and rosemary (RE), all plant material with high phenolic content, and of the phenolic compounds 4-methylcatechol (4-MC), (+)-catechin, and carnosic acid toward long-lived myosin radicals generated by reaction with H2O2-activated myoglobin at room temperature (pH 7.5, I=1.0) was investigated by freeze-quench ESR spectroscopy. Myosin radicals were generated by incubating 16 μM myosin, 800 μM metmyoglobin, and 800 μM H2O2 for 10 min, and the phenolic extracts were subsequently added (1% (w/w) phenolic compounds relative to myosin). GTE was able to scavenge myosin radicals and reduce the radical intensity by 65%. Furthermore, a low concentration of 4-MC (33 μM) was found to increase the radical concentration when added to the myosin radicals, whereas a higher concentration of 4-MC and catechin (330 μM) was found to scavenge myosin radicals and reduce the overall radical concentration by ∼65%. PMID:23163579

  14. Force-producing ADP state of myosin bound to actin.

    PubMed

    Wulf, Sarah F; Ropars, Virginie; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Oster, Marco; Hofhaus, Goetz; Trabuco, Leonardo G; Pylypenko, Olena; Sweeney, H Lee; Houdusse, Anne M; Schröder, Rasmus R

    2016-03-29

    Molecular motors produce force when they interact with their cellular tracks. For myosin motors, the primary force-generating state has MgADP tightly bound, whereas myosin is strongly bound to actin. We have generated an 8-Å cryoEM reconstruction of this state for myosin V and used molecular dynamics flexed fitting for model building. We compare this state to the subsequent state on actin (Rigor). The ADP-bound structure reveals that the actin-binding cleft is closed, even though MgADP is tightly bound. This state is accomplished by a previously unseen conformation of the β-sheet underlying the nucleotide pocket. The transition from the force-generating ADP state to Rigor requires a 9.5° rotation of the myosin lever arm, coupled to a β-sheet rearrangement. Thus, the structure reveals the detailed rearrangements underlying myosin force generation as well as the basis of strain-dependent ADP release that is essential for processive myosins, such as myosin V. PMID:26976594

  15. Stochastic dynamics and mechanosensitivity of myosin II minifilaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Philipp J.; Erdmann, Thorsten; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2014-09-01

    Tissue cells are in a state of permanent mechanical tension that is maintained mainly by myosin II minifilaments, which are bipolar assemblies of tens of myosin II molecular motors contracting actin networks and bundles. Here we introduce a stochastic model for myosin II minifilaments as two small myosin II motor ensembles engaging in a stochastic tug-of-war. Each of the two ensembles is described by the parallel cluster model that allows us to use exact stochastic simulations and at the same time to keep important molecular details of the myosin II cross-bridge cycle. Our simulation and analytical results reveal a strong dependence of myosin II minifilament dynamics on environmental stiffness that is reminiscent of the cellular response to substrate stiffness. For small stiffness, minifilaments form transient crosslinks exerting short spikes of force with negligible mean. For large stiffness, minifilaments form near permanent crosslinks exerting a mean force which hardly depends on environmental elasticity. This functional switch arises because dissociation after the power stroke is suppressed by force (catch bonding) and because ensembles can no longer perform the power stroke at large forces. Symmetric myosin II minifilaments perform a random walk with an effective diffusion constant which decreases with increasing ensemble size, as demonstrated for rigid substrates with an analytical treatment.

  16. Neural-Thyroid Interaction on Skeletal Isomyosin in Zero Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal of the project was to develop a ground based model to first study the role of the nerve and of thyroid hormone (T3) in the regulation of body growth and skeletal muscle growth and differentiation in rodents. A primary objective was to test the hypothesis that normal weight bearing activity is essential for the development of antigravity, slow twitch skeletal muscle and the corresponding slow myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene; whereas, T3 was obligatory for general body and muscle growth and the establishment of fast MHC phenotype in typically fast locomoter muscles. These ground based experiments would provide both the efficacy and background for a spaceflight experiment (referred to as the Neurolab Mission) jointly sponsored by the NIH and NASA.

  17. Myosin I Overexpression Impairs Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Kristine D.; Titus, Margaret A.

    1997-01-01

    Dictyostelium myoB, a member of the myosin I family of motor proteins, is important for controlling the formation and retraction of membrane projections by the cell's actin cortex (Novak, K.D., M.D. Peterson, M.C. Reedy, and M.A. Titus. 1995. J. Cell Biol. 131:1205–1221). Mutants that express a three- to sevenfold excess of myoB (myoB+ cells) were generated to further analyze the role of myosin I in these processes. The myoB+ cells move with an instantaneous velocity that is 35% of the wild-type rate and exhibit a 6–8-h delay in initiation of aggregation when placed under starvation conditions. The myoB+ cells complete the developmental cycle after an extended period of time, but they form fewer fruiting bodies that appear to be small and abnormal. The myoB+ cells are also deficient in their ability both to form distinct F-actin filled projections such as crowns and to become elongate and polarized. This defect can be attributed to the presence of at least threefold more myoB at the cortex of the myoB+ cells. In contrast, threefold overexpression of a truncated myoB that lacks the src homology 3 (SH3) domain (myoB/SH3− cells) or myoB in which the consensus heavy chain phosphorylation site was mutated to an alanine (S332A-myoB) does not disturb normal cellular function. However, there is an increased concentration of myoB in the cortex of the myoB/SH3− and S332A-myoB cells comparable to that found in the myoB+ cells. These results suggest that excess full-length cortical myoB prevents the formation of the actin-filled extensions required for locomotion by increasing the tension of the F-actin cytoskeleton and/ or retracting projections before they can fully extend. They also demonstrate a role for the phosphorylation site and SH3 domain in mediating the in vivo activity of myosin I. PMID:9024693

  18. Single-molecule studies of unconventional motor protein myosin VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, HyeongJun

    Myosin VI is one of the myosin superfamily members that are actin-based molecular motors. It has received special attention due to its distinct features as compared to other myosins, such as its opposite directionality and a much larger step size than expected given the length of its "leg". This dissertation presents the author.s graduate work of several single-molecule studies on myosin VI. Special attention was paid to some of myosin VI.s tail domains that consist of proximal tail (PT), medial tail (MT), distal tail (DT) domains and cargo-binding domain (CBD). The functional form of myosin VI in cells is still under debate. Although full length myosin VI proteins in cytosolic extracts of cells were monomers from earlier studies, there are several reasons why it is now believed that myosin VI could exist as a dimer. If this is true and dimerization occurs, the next logical question would be which parts of myosin VI are dimerization regions? One model claimed that the CBD is the sole dimerization region. A competing model claimed that there must be another region that could be involved in dimerization, based on their observation that a construct without the CBD could still dimerize. Our single-molecule experiment with progressively truncated myosin VI constructs showed that the MT domain is a dimerization region, supporting the latter model. Additional single-molecule experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation done with our collaborators suggest that electrostatic salt bridges formed between positive and negative amino acid residues are mainly responsible for the MT domain dimerization. After resolving this, we are left with another important question which is how myosin VI can take such a large step. Recent crystal structure showed that one of the tail domains preceding the MT domain, called the PT domain, is a three-helix bundle. The most easily conceivable way might be an unfolding of the three-helix bundle upon dimerization, allowing the protein to stretch and reach a larger distance. The single-molecule stepping data with mutant full-length construct that lacks two helices out of three in the PT domain tell that it is indeed the case. In this dissertation, more details of myosin VI PT/MT domain experiments will be explored along with background information on the single-molecule experiment methods used in these studies.

  19. Wave biomechanics of the skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2006-12-01

    Results of acoustic measurements in skeletal muscle are generalized. It is shown that assessment of the pathologies and functional condition of the muscular system is possible with the use of shear waves. The velocity of these waves in muscles is much smaller than the velocity of sound; therefore, a higher symmetry type is formed for them. In the presence of a preferential direction (along muscle fibers), it is characterized by only two rather than five (as in usual media with the same anisotropy) moduli of elasticity. A covariant form of the corresponding wave equation is presented. It is shown that dissipation properties of skeletal muscles can be controlled by contracting them isometrically. Pulsed loads (shocks) and vibrations are damped differently, depending on their frequency spectrum. Characteristic frequencies on the order of tens and hundreds of hertz are attenuated due to actin-myosin bridges association/dissociation dynamics in the contracted muscle. At higher (kilohertz) frequencies, when the muscle is tensed, viscosity of the tissue increases by a factor of several tens because of the increase in friction experienced by fibrillar structures as they move relative to the surrounding liquid; the tension of the fibers changes the hydrodynamic conditions of the flow around them. Finally, at higher frequencies, the attenuation is associated with the rheological properties of biological molecules, in particular, with their conformational dynamics in the wave field. Models that describe the controlled shock dissipation mechanisms are proposed. Corresponding solutions are found, including those that allow for nonlinear effects.

  20. Shark skeletal muscle tropomyosin is a phosphoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hayley, Michael; Chevaldina, Tatiana; Mudalige, Wasana A K A; Jackman, Donna M; Dobbin, Alvin D; Heeley, David H

    2008-01-01

    Shark skeletal muscle tropomyosin is classified as an alpha-type isoform. The chemical structure is characterised by the absence of cysteine and the presence of a sub-stoichiometric amount of covalently bound phosphate. The protein migrates as a single component on a SDS polyacrylamide gel but is resolved into two components by chromatography and electrophoresis both in the presence of urea at mild alkaline pH. The only detectable difference between these components is the presence of phosphoserine in the tropomyosin form of greater net negative charge. Low ionic strength (pH 7) solutions of phosphorylated shark tropomyosin display significantly higher specific viscosity than unphosphorylated, consistent with the presence of a phosphorylation site within the overlap region, serine 283, as well as conservation of the positively charged amino terminal region. Similar observations were made with tropomyosin prepared from the trunk muscle of Atlantic cod. In a steady-state MgATPase assay, thin filaments (Ca2+) reconstituted with shark phosphorylated tropomyosin activate myosin to a greater extent than those composed of unphosphorylated. The difference is attributable chiefly to a change in Vmax. Skeletal muscle tropomyosin is concluded to be phosphorylated in cartilaginous fishes as well as some teleosts. PMID:18763042

  1. Nonmuscle myosin-2: mix and match.

    PubMed

    Heissler, Sarah M; Manstein, Dietmar J

    2013-01-01

    Members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 (NM-2) family of actin-based molecular motors catalyze the conversion of chemical energy into directed movement and force thereby acting as central regulatory components of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. By cyclically interacting with adenosine triphosphate and F-actin, NM-2 isoforms promote cytoskeletal force generation in established cellular processes like cell migration, shape changes, adhesion dynamics, endo- and exo-cytosis, and cytokinesis. Novel functions of the NM-2 family members in autophagy and viral infection are emerging, making NM-2 isoforms regulators of nearly all cellular processes that require the spatiotemporal organization of cytoskeletal scaffolding. Here, we assess current views about the role of NM-2 isoforms in these activities including the tight regulation of NM-2 assembly and activation through phosphorylation and how NM-2-mediated changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and mechanics affect cell physiological functions in health and disease. PMID:22565821

  2. Principles of Unconventional Myosin Function and Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, M. Amanda; Finan, Dina; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Spudich, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Unconventional myosins are a superfamily of actin-based motors implicated in diverse cellular processes. In recent years, much progress has been made in describing their biophysical properties, and headway has been made into analyzing their cellular functions. Here, we focus on the principles that guide in vivo motor function and targeting to specific cellular locations. Rather than describe each motor comprehensively, we outline the major themes that emerge from research across the superfamily and use specific examples to illustrate each. In presenting the data in this format, we seek to identify open questions in each field as well as to point out commonalities between them. To advance our understanding of myosins’ roles in vivo, clearly we must identify their cellular cargoes and the protein complexes that regulate motor attachment to fully appreciate their functions on the cellular and developmental levels. PMID:21639800

  3. A birefringence study of changes in myosin orientation during relaxation of skinned muscle fibers induced by photolytic ATP release.

    PubMed Central

    Peckham, M; Ferenczi, M A; Irving, M

    1994-01-01

    The birefringence of isolated skinned fibers from rabbit psoas muscle was measured continuously during relaxation from rigor produced by photolysis of caged ATP at sarcomere length 2.8-2.9 microns, ionic strength 0.1 M, 15 degrees C. Birefringence, the difference in refractive index between light components polarized parallel and perpendicular to the fiber axis, depends on the average degree of alignment of the myosin head domain with the fiber axis. After ATP release birefringence increased by 5.8 +/- 0.7% (mean +/- SE, n = 6) with two temporal components. A small fast component had an amplitude of 0.9 +/- 0.2% and rate constant of 63 s-1. By the completion of this component, the instantaneous stiffness had decreased to about half the rigor value, and the force response to a step stretch showed a rapid (approximately 1000 s-1) recovery phase. Subsequently a large slow birefringence component with rate constant 5.1 s-1 accompanied isometric force relaxation. Inorganic phosphate (10 mM) did not affect the fast birefringence component but accelerated the slow component and force relaxation. The fast birefringence component was probably caused by formation of myosin.ATP or myosin.ADP.Pi states that are weakly bound to actin. The average myosin head orientation at the end of this component is slightly more parallel to the fiber axis than in rigor. PMID:7811926

  4. Constitutive phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit-1 in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Ho; Chang, Audrey N; Huang, Jian; He, Weiqi; Sweeney, H Lee; Zhu, Minsheng; Kamm, Kristine E; Stull, James T

    2014-07-15

    Smooth muscle contraction initiated by myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation is dependent on the relative activities of Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP). We have investigated the physiological role of the MLCP regulatory subunit MYPT1 in bladder smooth muscle containing a smooth muscle-specific deletion of MYPT1 in adult mice. Deep-sequencing analyses of mRNA and immunoblotting revealed that MYPT1 depletion reduced the amount of PP1cδ with no compensatory changes in expression of other MYPT1 family members. Phosphatase activity towards phosphorylated smooth muscle heavy meromyosin was proportional to the amount of PP1cδ in total homogenates from wild-type or MYPT1-deficient tissues. Isolated MYPT1-deficient tissues from MYPT1(SM-/-) mice contracted with moderate differences in response to KCl and carbachol treatments, and relaxed rapidly with comparable rates after carbachol removal and only 1.5-fold slower after KCl removal. Measurements of phosphorylated proteins in the RLC signalling and actin polymerization modules during contractions revealed moderate changes. Using a novel procedure to quantify total phosphorylation of MYPT1 at Thr696 and Thr853, we found substantial phosphorylation in wild-type tissues under resting conditions, predicting attenuation of MLCP activity. Reduced PP1cδ activity in MYPT1-deficient tissues may be similar to the attenuated MLCP activity in wild-type tissues resulting from constitutively phosphorylated MYPT1. Constitutive phosphorylation of MYPT1 Thr696 and Thr853 may thus represent a physiological mechanism acting in concert with agonist-induced MYPT1 phosphorylation to inhibit MLCP activity. In summary, MYPT1 deficiency may not cause significant derangement of smooth muscle contractility because the effective MLCP activity is not changed. PMID:24835173

  5. Constitutive phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit-1 in smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Ho; Chang, Audrey N; Huang, Jian; He, Weiqi; Sweeney, H Lee; Zhu, Minsheng; Kamm, Kristine E; Stull, James T

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscle contraction initiated by myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation is dependent on the relative activities of Ca2+–calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP). We have investigated the physiological role of the MLCP regulatory subunit MYPT1 in bladder smooth muscle containing a smooth muscle-specific deletion of MYPT1 in adult mice. Deep-sequencing analyses of mRNA and immunoblotting revealed that MYPT1 depletion reduced the amount of PP1cδ with no compensatory changes in expression of other MYPT1 family members. Phosphatase activity towards phosphorylated smooth muscle heavy meromyosin was proportional to the amount of PP1cδ in total homogenates from wild-type or MYPT1-deficient tissues. Isolated MYPT1-deficient tissues from MYPT1SM−/− mice contracted with moderate differences in response to KCl and carbachol treatments, and relaxed rapidly with comparable rates after carbachol removal and only 1.5-fold slower after KCl removal. Measurements of phosphorylated proteins in the RLC signalling and actin polymerization modules during contractions revealed moderate changes. Using a novel procedure to quantify total phosphorylation of MYPT1 at Thr696 and Thr853, we found substantial phosphorylation in wild-type tissues under resting conditions, predicting attenuation of MLCP activity. Reduced PP1cδ activity in MYPT1-deficient tissues may be similar to the attenuated MLCP activity in wild-type tissues resulting from constitutively phosphorylated MYPT1. Constitutive phosphorylation of MYPT1 Thr696 and Thr853 may thus represent a physiological mechanism acting in concert with agonist-induced MYPT1 phosphorylation to inhibit MLCP activity. In summary, MYPT1 deficiency may not cause significant derangement of smooth muscle contractility because the effective MLCP activity is not changed. PMID:24835173

  6. Emergent Systems Energy Laws for Predicting Myosin Ensemble Processivity

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Paul; Moore, Jeffrey; Schunn, Christian; Cagan, Jonathan; LeDuc, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In complex systems with stochastic components, systems laws often emerge that describe higher level behavior regardless of lower level component configurations. In this paper, emergent laws for describing mechanochemical systems are investigated for processive myosin-actin motility systems. On the basis of prior experimental evidence that longer processive lifetimes are enabled by larger myosin ensembles, it is hypothesized that emergent scaling laws could coincide with myosin-actin contact probability or system energy consumption. Because processivity is difficult to predict analytically and measure experimentally, agent-based computational techniques are developed to simulate processive myosin ensembles and produce novel processive lifetime measurements. It is demonstrated that only systems energy relationships hold regardless of isoform configurations or ensemble size, and a unified expression for predicting processive lifetime is revealed. The finding of such laws provides insight for how patterns emerge in stochastic mechanochemical systems, while also informing understanding and engineering of complex biological systems. PMID:25885169

  7. Walking mechanism of the intracellular cargo transporter myosin V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Stephan; Smith-Palmer, Jayne; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Sellers, James R.; Veigel, Claudia

    2006-08-01

    Motor proteins of the myosin, kinesin and dynein families transport vesicles and other cargo along tracks of actin filaments or microtubules through the cytoplasm of cells. The mechanism by which myosin V, a motor involved in several types of intracellular transport, moves processively along actin filaments, has recently been the subject of many single molecule biophysical studies. Details of the molecular mechanisms by which this molecular motor operates are starting to emerge.

  8. Contribution of myosin II activity to cell spreading dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nisenholz, Noam; Paknikar, Aishwarya; Köster, Sarah; Zemel, Assaf

    2016-01-14

    Myosin II activity and actin polymerization at the leading edge of the cell are known to be essential sources of cellular stress. However, a quantitative account of their separate contributions is still lacking; so is the influence of the coupling between the two phenomena on cell spreading dynamics. We present a simple analytic elastic theory of cell spreading dynamics that quantitatively demonstrates how actin polymerization and myosin activity cooperate in the generation of cellular stress during spreading. Consistent with experiments, myosin activity is assumed to polarize in response to the stresses generated during spreading. The characteristic response time and the overall spreading time are predicted to determine different evolution profiles of cell spreading dynamics. These include, a (regular) monotonic increase of cell projected area with time, a non-monotonic (overshooting) profile with a maximum, and damped oscillatory modes. In addition, two populations of myosin II motors are distinguished based on their location in the lamella; those located above the major adhesion zone at the cell periphery are shown to facilitate spreading whereas those in deeper regions of the lamella are shown to oppose spreading. We demonstrate that the attenuation of myosin activity in the two regions may result in reciprocal effects on spreading. These findings provide important new insight into the function of myosin II motors in the course of spreading. PMID:26481613

  9. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  10. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-10-20

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  11. Skeletal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Paolo; Robey, Pamela G.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal stem cells (SSCs) reside in the postnatal bone marrow and give rise to cartilage, bone, hematopoiesis-supportive stroma and marrow adipocytes in defined in vivo assays. These lineages emerge in a specific sequence during embryonic development and post natal growth, and together comprise a continuous anatomical system, the bone-bone marrow organ. SSCs conjoin skeletal and hematopoietic physiology, and are a tool for understanding and ameliorating skeletal and hematopoietic disorders. Here and in the accompanying poster, we concisely discuss the biology of SSCs in the context of the development and postnatal physiology of skeletal lineages, to which their use in medicine must remain anchored. PMID:25758217

  12. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy and structure and function of skeletal muscle fibres in male body builders

    PubMed Central

    D'Antona, Giuseppe; Lanfranconi, Francesca; Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta; Brocca, Lorenza; Adami, Raffaella; Rossi, Rosetta; Moro, Giorgio; Miotti, Danilo; Canepari, Monica; Bottinelli, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Needle biopsy samples were taken from vastus lateralis muscle (VL) of five male body builders (BB, age 27.4 ± 0.93 years; mean ±s.e.m.), who had being performing hypertrophic heavy resistance exercise (HHRE) for at least 2 years, and from five male active, but untrained control subjects (CTRL, age 29.9 ± 2.01 years). The following determinations were performed: anatomical cross-sectional area and volume of the quadriceps and VL muscles in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); myosin heavy chain isoform (MHC) distribution of the whole biopsy samples by SDS-PAGE; cross-sectional area (CSA), force (Po), specific force (Po/CSA) and maximum shortening velocity (Vo) of a large population (n= 524) of single skinned muscle fibres classified on the basis of MHC isoform composition by SDS-PAGE; actin sliding velocity (Vf) on pure myosin isoforms by in vitro motility assays. In BB a preferential hypertrophy of fast and especially type 2X fibres was observed. The very large hypertrophy of VL in vivo could not be fully accounted for by single muscle fibre hypertrophy. CSA of VL in vivo was, in fact, 54% larger in BB than in CTRL, whereas mean fibre area was only 14% larger in BB than in CTRL. MHC isoform distribution was shifted towards 2X fibres in BB. Po/CSA was significantly lower in type 1 fibres from BB than in type 1 fibres from CTRL whereas both type 2A and type 2X fibres were significantly stronger in BB than in CTRL. Vo of type 1 fibres and Vf of myosin 1 were significantly lower in BB than in CTRL, whereas no difference was observed among fast fibres and myosin 2A. The findings indicate that skeletal muscle of BB was markedly adapted to HHRE through extreme hypertrophy, a shift towards the stronger and more powerful fibre types and an increase in specific force of muscle fibres. Such adaptations could not be fully accounted for by well known mechanisms of muscle plasticity, i.e. by the hypertrophy of single muscle fibre (quantitative mechanism) and by a regulation of contractile properties of muscle fibres based on MHC isoform content (qualitative mechanism). Two BB subjects took anabolic steroids and three BB subjects did not. The former BB differed from the latter BB mostly for the size of their muscles and muscle fibres. PMID:16339176

  13. IgG subclass reactivity to human cardiac myosin in cardiomyopathy patients is indicative of a Th1-like autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Skyllouriotis, P; Skyllouriotis-Lazarou, M; Natter, S; Steiner, R; Spitzauer, S; Kapiotis, S; Valent, P; Hirschl, A M; Guber, S E; Laufer, G; Wollenek, G; Wolner, E; Wimmer, M; Valenta, R

    1999-01-01

    Studies performed in mice together with the demonstration of increased levels of heart-specific autoantibodies, cytokines and cytokine receptors in sera from cardiomyopathy (CMP) patients argued for a pathogenic role of autoimmune mechanisms in CMP. This study was designed to analyse the presence of IgG anti-heart antibodies in sera from patients suffering from hypertrophic and dilatative forms of CMP as well as from patients with ischaemic heart disease and healthy individuals. Patients' sera were analysed for IgG reactivity to Western-blotted extracts prepared from human epithelial and endothelial cells, heart and skeletal muscle specimens as well as from Streptococcus pyogenes. The IgG subclass (IgG1–4) reactivity to purified human cardiac myosin was analysed by ELISA. While sera from CMP patients and healthy individuals displayed comparable IgG reactivity to a variety of human proteins, cardiac myosin represented the prominent antigen detected strongly and preferentially by sera from CMP patients. Pronounced IgG anti-cardiac myosin reactivity was frequently found in sera from patients with dilatative CMP and reduced ventricular function. ELISA analyses revealed a prominent IgG2/IgG3 anti-cardiac myosin reactivity in CMP sera, indicating a preferential Th1-like immune response. Elevated anti-cytomegalovirus, anti-enterovirus IgG titres as well as IgG reactivity to nitrocellulose-blotted S. pyogenes proteins were also frequently observed in the group of CMP patients. If further work can support the hypothesis that autoreactivity to cardiac myosin represents a pathogenic factor in CMP, specific immunomodulation of this Th1- towards a Th2-like immune response may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for CMP. PMID:9933448

  14. IgG subclass reactivity to human cardiac myosin in cardiomyopathy patients is indicative of a Th1-like autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Skyllouriotis, P; Skyllouriotis-Lazarou, M; Natter, S; Steiner, R; Spitzauer, S; Kapiotis, S; Valent, P; Hirschl, A M; Guber, S E; Laufer, G; Wollenek, G; Wolner, E; Wimmer, M; Valenta, R

    1999-02-01

    Studies performed in mice together with the demonstration of increased levels of heart-specific autoantibodies, cytokines and cytokine receptors in sera from cardiomyopathy (CMP) patients argued for a pathogenic role of autoimmune mechanisms in CMP. This study was designed to analyse the presence of IgG anti-heart antibodies in sera from patients suffering from hypertrophic and dilatative forms of CMP as well as from patients with ischaemic heart disease and healthy individuals. Patients' sera were analysed for IgG reactivity to Western-blotted extracts prepared from human epithelial and endothelial cells, heart and skeletal muscle specimens as well as from Streptococcus pyogenes. The IgG subclass (IgG1-4) reactivity to purified human cardiac myosin was analysed by ELISA. While sera from CMP patients and healthy individuals displayed comparable IgG reactivity to a variety of human proteins, cardiac myosin represented the prominent antigen detected strongly and preferentially by sera from CMP patients. Pronounced IgG anti-cardiac myosin reactivity was frequently found in sera from patients with dilatative CMP and reduced ventricular function. ELISA analyses revealed a prominent IgG2/IgG3 anti-cardiac myosin reactivity in CMP sera, indicating a preferential Th1-like immune response. Elevated anti-cytomegalovirus, anti-enterovirus IgG titres as well as IgG reactivity to nitrocellulose-blotted S. pyogenes proteins were also frequently observed in the group of CMP patients. If further work can support the hypothesis that autoreactivity to cardiac myosin represents a pathogenic factor in CMP, specific immunomodulation of this Th1- towards a Th2-like immune response may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for CMP. PMID:9933448

  15. Parathyroid hormone promotes the disassembly of cytoskeletal actin and myosin in cultured osteoblastic cells: Mediation by cyclic AMP

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, J.J.; Gronowicz, G.; Rodan, G.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) alters the shape of osteoblastic cells both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we examined the effect of PTH on cytoskeletal actin and myosin, estimated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of Triton X-100 (1%) nonextractable proteins. After 2-5 minutes, PTH caused a rapid and transient decrease of 50-60% in polymerized actin and myosin associated with the Triton X-100 nonextractable cytoskeleton. Polymerized actin returned to control levels by 30 min. The PTH effect was dose-dependent with an IC50 of about 1 nM, and was partially inhibited by the (3-34) PTH antagonist. PTH caused a rapid transient rise in cyclic AMP (cAMP) in these cells that peaked at 4 min, while the nadir in cytoskeletal actin and myosin was recorded around 5 min. The intracellular calcium chelator Quin-2/AM (10 microM) also decreased cytoskeletal actin and myosin, to the same extent as did PTH (100 nM). To distinguish between cAMP elevation and Ca++ reduction as mediators of PTH action, we measured the phosphorylation of the 20 kD (PI 4.9) myosin light chain in cells preincubated with (32P)-orthophosphate. The phosphorylation of this protein decreased within 2-3 min after PTH addition and returned to control levels after 5 min. The calcium ionophore A-23187 did not antagonize this PTH effect. Visualization of microfilaments with rhodamine-conjugated phalloidin showed that PTH altered the cytoskeleton by decreasing the number of stress fibers. These changes in the cytoskeleton paralleled changes in the shape of the cells from a spread configuration to a stellate form with retracting processes. The above findings indicate that the alteration in osteoblast shape produced by PTH involve relatively rapid and transient changes in cytoskeletal organization that appear to be mediated by cAMP.

  16. Regenerating tail muscles in lizard contain Fast but not Slow Myosin indicating that most myofibers belong to the fast twitch type for rapid contraction.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, L

    2015-10-01

    During tail regeneration in lizards a large mass of muscle tissue is formed in form of segmental myomeres of similar size located under the dermis of the new tail. These muscles accumulate glycogen and a fast form of myosin typical for twitch myofibers as it is shown by light and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry using an antibody directed against a Fast Myosin Heavy Chain. High resolution immunogold labeling shows that an intense labeling for fast myosin is localized over the thick filaments of the numerous myofibrils in about 70% of the regenerated myofibers while the labeling becomes less intense in the remaining muscle fibers. The present observations indicate that at least two subtypes of Fast Myosin containing muscle fibers are regenerated, the prevalent type was of the fast twitch containing few mitochondria, sparse glycogen, numerous smooth endoplasmic reticulum vesicles. The second, and less frequent type was a Fast-Oxidative-Glycolitic twitch fiber containing more mitochondria, a denser cytoplasm and myofibrils. Since their initial differentiation, myoblasts, myotubes and especially the regenerated myofibers do not accumulate any immuno-detectable Slow Myosin Heavy Chain. The study indicates that most of the segmental muscles of the regenerated tail serve for the limited bending of the tail during locomotion and trashing after amputation of the regenerated tail, a phenomenon that facilitates predator escape. PMID:26164738

  17. Skeletal muscle relaxants.

    PubMed

    See, Sharon; Ginzburg, Regina

    2008-02-01

    Health care providers prescribe skeletal muscle relaxants for a variety of indications. However, the comparative efficacy of these drugs is not well known. Skeletal muscle relaxants consist of both antispasticity and antispasmodic agents, a distinction prescribers often overlook. The antispasticity agents-baclofen, tizanidine, dantrolene, and diazepam-aid in improving muscle hypertonicity and involuntary jerks. Antispasmodic agents, such as cyclobenzaprine, are primarily used to treat musculoskeletal conditions. Much of the evidence from clinical trials regarding skeletal muscle relaxants is limited because of poor methodologic design, insensitive assessment methods, and small numbers of patients. Although trial results seem to support the use of these agents for their respective indications, efficacy data from comparator trials did not particularly favor one skeletal muscle relaxant over another. Therefore, the choice of a skeletal muscle relaxant should be based on its adverse-effect profile, tolerability, and cost. PMID:18225966

  18. An Unusual Transduction Pathway in Human Tonic Smooth Muscle Myosin

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Miriam F.; Ajtai, Katalin; Penheiter, Alan R.; Spencer, Joshua D.; Zheng, Ye; Morrison, Emma A.; Burghardt, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    The motor protein myosin binds actin and ATP, producing work by causing relative translation of the proteins while transducing ATP free energy. Smooth muscle myosin has one of four heavy chains encoded by the MYH11 gene that differ at the C-terminus and in the active site for ATPase due to alternate splicing. A seven-amino-acid active site insert in phasic muscle myosin is absent from the tonic isoform. Fluorescence increase in the nucleotide sensitive tryptophan (NST) accompanies nucleotide binding and hydrolysis in several myosin isoforms implying it results from a common origin within the motor. A wild-type tonic myosin (smA) construct of the enzymatic head domain (subfragment 1 or S1) has seven tryptophan residues and nucleotide-induced fluorescence enhancement like other myosins. Three smA mutants probe the molecular basis for the fluorescence enhancement. W506+ contains one tryptophan at position 506 homologous to the NST in other myosins. W506F has the native tryptophans except phenylalanine replaces W506, and W506+(Y499F) is W506+ with phenylalanine replacing Y499. W506+ lacks nucleotide-induced fluorescence enhancement probably eliminating W506 as the NST. W506F has impaired ATPase activity but retains nucleotide-induced fluorescence enhancement. Y499F replacement in W506+ partially rescues nucleotide sensitivity demonstrating the role of Y499 as an NST facilitator. The exceptional response of W506 to active site conformation opens the possibility that phasic and tonic isoforms differ in how influences from active site ATPase propagate through the protein network. PMID:17704147

  19. Identification of the gene for fly non-muscle myosin heavy chain: Drosophila myosin heavy chains are encoded by a gene family.

    PubMed

    Kiehart, D P; Lutz, M S; Chan, D; Ketchum, A S; Laymon, R A; Nguyen, B; Goldstein, L S

    1989-03-01

    In contrast to vertebrate species Drosophila has a single myosin heavy chain gene that apparently encodes all sarcomeric heavy chain polypeptides. Flies also contain a cytoplasmic myosin heavy chain polypeptide that by immunological and peptide mapping criteria is clearly different from the major thoracic muscle isoform. Here, we identify the gene that encodes this cytoplasmic isoform and demonstrate that it is distinct from the muscle myosin heavy chain gene. Thus, fly myosin heavy chains are the products of a gene family. Our data suggest that the contractile function required to power myosin based movement in non-muscle cells requires myosin diversity beyond that available in a single heavy chain gene. In addition, we show, that accumulation of cytoplasmic myosin transcripts is regulated in a developmental stage specific fashion, consistent with a key role for this protein in the movements of early embryogenesis. PMID:2498088

  20. Protective Effects of Clenbuterol against Dexamethasone-Induced Masseter Muscle Atrophy and Myosin Heavy Chain Transition

    PubMed Central

    Umeki, Daisuke; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Suita, Kenji; Fujita, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiki; Saeki, Yasutake; Okumura, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoid has a direct catabolic effect on skeletal muscle, leading to muscle atrophy, but no effective pharmacotherapy is available. We reported that clenbuterol (CB) induced masseter muscle hypertrophy and slow-to-fast myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform transition through direct muscle β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus, we hypothesized that CB would antagonize glucocorticoid (dexamethasone; DEX)-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition. Methodology We examined the effect of CB on DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy by measuring masseter muscle weight, fiber diameter, cross-sectional area, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we used immunoblotting to study the effects of CB on muscle hypertrophic signaling (insulin growth factor 1 (IGF1) expression, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and calcineurin pathway) and atrophic signaling (Akt/Forkhead box-O (FOXO) pathway and myostatin expression) in masseter muscle of rats treated with DEX and/or CB. Results and Conclusion Masseter muscle weight in the DEX-treated group was significantly lower than that in the Control group, as expected, but co-treatment with CB suppressed the DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy, concomitantly with inhibition of fast-to-slow MHC isoforms transition. Activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway in masseter muscle of the DEX-treated group was significantly inhibited compared to that of the Control group, and CB suppressed this inhibition. DEX also suppressed expression of IGF1 (positive regulator of muscle growth), and CB attenuated this inhibition. Myostatin protein expression was unchanged. CB had no effect on activation of the Akt/FOXO pathway. These results indicate that CB antagonizes DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition via modulation of Akt/mTOR activity and IGF1 expression. CB might be a useful pharmacological agent for treatment of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy. PMID:26053620