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Sample records for skin test reactivity

  1. Reactivity of allergy skin test in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Supakthanasiri, Phisit; Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Chantaphakul, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Healthy individuals may be exposed and sensitised to allergens, and have a positive response to a skin prick test despite being asymptomatic. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of atopic sensitisation and identify the reactivity of healthy volunteers to common aeroallergens. METHODS Healthy volunteers with no known allergic symptoms were recruited in this study. All volunteers were scheduled to undergo a skin prick test with 16 common aeroallergens that were previously identified among atopic patients. RESULTS A total of 100 volunteers (mean age 28 years) were enrolled in this study. 42 volunteers had positive skin prick tests for at least one allergen. The median number of sensitised allergen was 2 (range 1–7). Volunteers with positive skin tests (n = 42) were younger than those with negative skin tests (n = 58) (mean age 25.5 vs. 29.2 years; p < 0.05). The group with positive skin tests also had a higher proportion of males (57.1% vs. 31.0%; p < 0.01) and first-degree relatives with a history of atopic diseases (31.0% vs. 10.3%; p < 0.05). The most common sensitised allergens in these healthy asymptomatic volunteers were mite (n = 33), house dust (n = 23) and American cockroach (n = 20). CONCLUSION In this study, up to 42% of healthy volunteers, particularly those with a family history of atopy, were sensitised to allergens. Reactivity of the skin test without allergic symptoms, however, does not indicate allergic disease. Therefore, the skin test should only be indicated in atopic symptomatic individuals. PMID:24452975

  2. Allergic skin test reactivity to marijuana in the Southwest.

    PubMed

    Freeman, G L

    1983-06-01

    In a general allergy consultation practice in Arizona and western New Mexico, 129 patients were tested for immediate hypersensitivity skin test reactivity to marijuana pollen and tobacco leaf, as well as to a battery of other antigens. In all, 90 patients were diagnosed as allergic (atopic) and, of these, 63 (70 percent) were found to be skin test reactive to marijuana pollen and 18 (20 percent) to tobacco leaf. The incidence of skin test reactivity to marijuana was not significantly different for persons living at low, middle or high elevations throughout the Southwest. Marijuana sensitivity occurred in patients who were, in general, also sensitive to a variety of other airborne plant pollens. There was no close correlation, however, between sensitivity to marijuana pollen and sensitivity to pollens from elm, mulberry, hop and stinging nettle, which are botanically related to marijuana. The data suggest that marijuana pollen may be a relatively common airborne pollen pollutant in the Southwest, allergic persons being sensitized through inhalation. If this is confirmed by further studies, then clinical investigation of marijuana hyposensitization (immunotherapy) may be warranted. This is in contrast to tobacco allergy for which simple avoidance is recommended. PMID:6613109

  3. Allergic Skin Test Reactivity to Marijuana in the Southwest

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Geraldine L.

    1983-01-01

    In a general allergy consultation practice in Arizona and western New Mexico, 129 patients were tested for immediate hypersensitivity skin test reactivity to marijuana pollen and tobacco leaf, as well as to a battery of other antigens. In all, 90 patients were diagnosed as allergic (atopic) and, of these, 63 (70 percent) were found to be skin test reactive to marijuana pollen and 18 (20 percent) to tobacco leaf. The incidence of skin test reactivity to marijuana was not significantly different for persons living at low, middle or high elevations throughout the Southwest. Marijuana sensitivity occurred in patients who were, in general, also sensitive to a variety of other airborne plant pollens. There was no close correlation, however, between sensitivity to marijuana pollen and sensitivity to pollens from elm, mulberry, hop and stinging nettle, which are botanically related to marijuana. The data suggest that marijuana pollen may be a relatively common airborne pollen pollutant in the Southwest, allergic persons being sensitized through inhalation. If this is confirmed by further studies, then clinical investigation of marijuana hyposensitization (immunotherapy) may be warranted. This is in contrast to tobacco allergy for which simple avoidance is recommended. PMID:6613109

  4. Allergen skin test reactivities among asthmatic Thai children.

    PubMed

    Kongpanichkul, A; Vichyanond, P; Tuchinda, M

    1997-02-01

    Skin prick tests with 14 selected local aeroallergens were performed on 100 asthmatic children aged 0-16 years attending the Pediatric Allergy Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital. The 14 allergens included Dermatophagoides farinae, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, American cockroach (Periplaneta americana), Johnson grass (Sorghum halopense), Cladosporium clarosporoides, Alternaria tenuis, Penicillium mix, Aspergillus mix, cat dander, dog dander, milk, egg white, soy and shrimp. Positive skin test reactivity was defined as a mean wheal diameter > or = 3 mm at the 20 minute reading. There were 68 males and 32 females. Their ages were between 0-2 years (n = 1), 2-5 years (n = 19), 5-10 years (n = 49) and 10-16 years (n = 31). Of all the subjects, 22 were classified as having mild asthma, 74 with moderate asthma and 4 with severe asthma. At least one skin prick test was positive in 74 subjects (74%) and two positive tests in 66 subjects (66%). The prevalence of sensitization to various allergens was as follows; Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus 67%, Dermatophagoides farinae 62%, American cockroach 44%, shrimp 14%, Johnson grass 14%, cat dander 10%, Alternaria 7%, Cladosporium 7%, dog dander 5%, soy 4%, Penicillium 3%, Aspergillus 2%, milk 2% and egg white 1%. The wheal size to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus did not correlate with age. In this group of asthmatic Thai children, house dust mites are the most important allergen causing sensitization. PMID:9078689

  5. PPD skin test

    MedlinePlus

    Purified protein derivative standard; TB skin test; Tuberculin skin test; Mantoux test ... Berger BJ. Mantoux skin test (PPD test, purified protein derivative test, Tb test, tuberculin skin test, TST, ...

  6. Allergy testing - skin

    MedlinePlus

    Patch tests - allergy; Scratch tests - allergy; Skin tests - allergy; RAST test ... There are three common methods of allergy skin testing. The skin prick test involves: Placing a small amount of substances that may be causing your symptoms on the skin, ...

  7. Tuberculin skin test reactivity is dependent on host genetic background in Colombian tuberculosis household contacts.

    PubMed

    Cobat, Aurélie; Barrera, Luis F; Henao, Hanna; Arbeláez, Patricia; Abel, Laurent; García, Luis F; Schurr, Erwin; Alcaïs, Alexandre

    2012-04-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) measures the intensity of antimycobacterial acquired immunity and is used to diagnose latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We report evidence for a codominant gene explaining ∼65% of the TST variability. Disregarding the host genetic background may lead to misclassifications of TST-based diagnosis of latent M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:22291100

  8. Skin testing of gallic acid-based hair dye in paraphenylenediamine/paratoluenediamine-reactive patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yunseok; Lee, Joon Ho; Kwon, Hyok Bu; An, Susun; Lee, Ai-Young

    2016-07-01

    Incidence of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to para-phenylenediamine (PPD)/paratoluenediamine (PTD) hair dyes is increasing. Hair dyes utilizing gallic acid (GA) may be a safe alternative. However, pretesting is recommended. We investigated the contact sensitivity to ingredients of a dye product; GA, monoethanolamine thioglycolate (MT), l-cystein and ferrous sulfate, and an appropriate pretest method in 31 patients reactive to PPD and/or PTD. An open test was performed with the test dye following the patch test. Subsequently, a use test was performed twice, with a 4-week interval. One subject showed a positive reaction to ferrous sulfate in the patch test. Another subject reacted to the first compound alone in the open test. Thirteen subjects manifesting cutaneous lesions from previous regular hair dyeing, showed reactions at the first use of the test dye; and six had reactions with reduced severity at the second test. GA and MT are safe for use in ACD patients reactive to PPD and/or PTD. For predicting contact allergy to hair dyes, the open test appeared to be a better pretest method than the patch test. PMID:26663148

  9. 5-HTTLPR Expression Outside the Skin: An Experimental Test of the Emotional Reactivity Hypothesis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Weeland, Joyce; Slagt, Meike; Brummelman, Eddie; Matthys, Walter; de Castro, Bram Orobio; Overbeek, Geertjan

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that variation in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 (i.e., the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism) moderates the impact of environmental stressors on child psychopathology. Emotional reactivity −the intensity of an individual’s response to other’s emotions− has been put forward as a possible mechanism underlying these gene-by-environment interactions (i.e., G×E). Compared to children homozygous for the L-allele (LL-genotypes), children carrying an S-allele (SS/SL-genotypes), specifically when they have been frequently exposed to negative emotions in the family environment, might be more emotionally reactive and therefore more susceptible to affective environmental stressors. However, the association between 5-HTTLPR and emotional reactivity in children has not yet been empirically tested. Therefore, the goal of this study was to test this association in a large-scale experiment. Methods Children (N = 521, 52.5% boys, Mage = 9.72 years) were genotyped and randomly assigned to happy, angry or neutral dynamic facial expressions and vocalizations. Motor and affective emotional reactivity were assessed through children’s self-reported negative and positive affect (n = 460) and facial electromyography activity (i.e., fEMG: the zygomaticus or “smile” muscle and the corrugator or “frown” muscle, n = 403). Parents reported on their negative and positive parenting behaviors. Results Children mimicked and experienced the emotion they were exposed to. However, neither motor reactivity nor affective reactivity to these emotions depended on children’s 5-HTTLPR genotype: SS/SL-genotypes did not manifest any stronger response to emotional stimuli than LL-genotypes. This finding remained the same when taking the broader family environment into account, controlling for kinship, age, gender and genetic ancestry, and when including a tri-allelic factor. Conclusions We found no evidence for an association

  10. Skin reactivity to metallic cobalt in patients with a positive patch test to cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    de Fine Olivarius, F; Menné, T

    1992-10-01

    458 consecutive patients were patch tested with a metallic cobalt disc as a supplement to the standard series. 23 patients had a positive reaction to CoCl2 1% pet. Of these, 19 were tested with the cobalt disc. 11 had a positive reaction and 5 a questionable reaction. There were no positive reactions to the cobalt disc in patients with a negative patch test to CoCl2 1% pet. Patch testing with CoCl2 1% pet. diagnoses all patients with allergy to metallic cobalt, but the test method is limited by a high number of irritant and questionable reactions. PMID:1451489

  11. CSD skin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003385.htm CSD skin test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The cat scratch disease (CSD) skin test was once used to help ...

  12. PPD skin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a method used to diagnose silent (latent) tuberculosis (TB) infection. PPD stands for purified protein derivative. ... derivative test, Tb test, tuberculin skin test, TST, tuberculosis test) - diagnostic. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. ...

  13. Sensitive skin and stratum corneum reactivity to household cleaning products.

    PubMed

    Goffin, V; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    1996-02-01

    Products intended for individuals with sensitive skin are being increasingly developed by formulators of household cleaning products. However, there is currently no consensus about the definition and recognition of the biological basis of sensitive skin. We sought to determine the relation between the nature of environmental threat perceived as aggressive by panelists, and the stratum corneum reactivity to household cleaning products as measured by the corneosurfametry test. Results indicate substantial differences in irritancy potential between proprietary products. Corneosurfametry data show significant differences in stratum corneum reactivity between, on the one hand, individuals with either non-sensitive skin or skin sensitive to climate/fabrics, and, on the other hand, individuals with detergent-sensitive skin. It is concluded that sensitive skin is not one single condition. Sound information in rating detergent-sensitive skin may be gained by corneosurfametry. PMID:8681562

  14. CSD skin test

    MedlinePlus

    The cat scratch disease (CSD) skin test was once used to help diagnose CSD. The test is no longer used today. ... LN, Welch DF, Koehler JE. Bartonella, including cat-scratch disease. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, ...

  15. [Positive skin test and age

    PubMed

    Forte, W C; Júnior, F F; Filho, W D; Shibata, E; Henriques, L S; Mastroti, R A; Guedes, M da S

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate positive responses to skin tests for immediate hypersensitivity to allergens in children with asthma and rhinitis at different ages. METHOD: We observed positive skin test reactivity in prick tests using fifteen allergens of same origin (total dust and Dermatophagoides sp.; Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus; Dermatophagoides farinae; Blomia tropicalis; Penicillium sp; Alternaria alternata; Cladosporium herbarium; Aspergillus fumigatus; Bermuda grass; forage grass; dog and cat epithelia; feathers; Blatella germanica and wool). We placed 713 selected patients into different age groups - Group I: 6 to 11 months; Group II: 1 to 3 years and 11 months; Group III: 4 to 8 years and 11 months; and Group IV: 9 to 15 years. We used the chi-square test for statistical analysis. RESULTS: The total significant differences between these groups were: I to II = 5; II to III = 5; II to IV = 5; III to IV = 6; I to III = 10; and I to IV = 10. CONCLUSION: Skin test reactivity is acquired progressively with age, and can be observed as early as at 12 months. Reactivity is significantly more positive from the age of 4 on. PMID:14647601

  16. Tuberculin Skin Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... perpendicular to the long axis). How Are TST Reactions Interpreted? Skin test interpretation depends on two factors: ... among high-risk groups. What Are False-Positive Reactions? Some persons may react to the TST even ...

  17. Bifidobacterium longum lysate, a new ingredient for reactive skin.

    PubMed

    Guéniche, Audrey; Bastien, Philippe; Ovigne, Jean Marc; Kermici, Michel; Courchay, Guy; Chevalier, Veronique; Breton, Lionel; Castiel-Higounenc, Isabelle

    2010-08-01

    Reactive skin is characterized by marked sensitivity to physical (heat, cold, wind) or chemical (topically applied products) stimuli and by the impairment of the skin barrier's ability to repair itself. Several lines of evidence suggest that beyond their capacity to positively influence the composition of intestinal microbiota, some probiotic bacteria can modulate the immune system both at local and systemic levels, thereby improving immune defense mechanisms and/or down-regulating immune disorders such as allergies and intestinal inflammation. Several recent human clinical trials clearly suggest that probiotic supplementation might be beneficial to the skin. Using a probiotic lysate, Bifidobacterium longum sp. extract (BL), we demonstrated first in vitro, and then in a clinical trial, that this non-replicating bacteria form applied to the skin was able to improve sensitive skin. The effect of BL were evaluated first on two different models. Using ex vivo human skin explant model we found a statistically significant improvement versus placebo in various parameters associated with inflammation such as a decrease in vasodilation, oedema, mast cell degranulation and TNF-alpha release. Moreover, using nerve cell cultures in vitro, we showed that after 6 h of incubation in culture medium (0.3-1%), the probiotic lysate significantly inhibited capsaicin-induced CGRP release by neurones. Then, a topical cream containing the active extract was tested in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Sixty-six female volunteers with reactive skin were randomly given either the cream with the bacterial extract at 10% (n = 33) or the control cream (n = 33). The volunteers applied the cream to the face, arms and legs twice a day for two months. Skin sensitivity was assessed by stinging test (lactic acid) and skin barrier recovery was evaluated by measuring trans-epidermal water loss following barrier disruption induced by repeated tape-stripping at D1, D29 and D57. The

  18. Skin, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Circadian Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Mary A.; Nihal, Minakshi; Wood, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Skin, a complex organ and the body's first line of defense against environmental insults, plays a critical role in maintaining homeostasis in an organism. This balance is maintained through a complex network of cellular machinery and signaling events, including those regulating oxidative stress and circadian rhythms. These regulatory mechanisms have developed integral systems to protect skin cells and to signal to the rest of the body in the event of internal and environmental stresses. Recent Advances: Interestingly, several signaling pathways and many bioactive molecules have been found to be involved and even important in the regulation of oxidative stress and circadian rhythms, especially in the skin. It is becoming increasingly evident that these two regulatory systems may, in fact, be interconnected in the regulation of homeostasis. Important examples of molecules that connect the two systems include serotonin, melatonin, vitamin D, and vitamin A. Critical Issues: Excessive reactive oxygen species and/or dysregulation of antioxidant system and circadian rhythms can cause critical errors in maintaining proper barrier function and skin health, as well as overall homeostasis. Unfortunately, the modern lifestyle seems to contribute to increasing alterations in redox balance and circadian rhythms, thereby posing a critical problem for normal functioning of the living system. Future Directions: Since the oxidative stress and circadian rhythm systems seem to have areas of overlap, future research needs to be focused on defining the interactions between these two important systems. This may be especially important in the skin where both systems play critical roles in protecting the whole body. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2982–2996. PMID:24111846

  19. Thermal provocation to evaluate microvascular reactivity in human skin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    With increased interest in predictive medicine, development of a relatively noninvasive technique that can improve prediction of major clinical outcomes has gained considerable attention. Current tests that are the target of critical evaluation, such as flow-mediated vasodilation of the brachial artery and pulse-wave velocity, are specific to the larger conduit vessels. However, evidence is mounting that functional changes in the microcirculation may be an early sign of globalized microvascular dysfunction. Thus development of a test of microvascular reactivity that could be used to evaluate cardiovascular risk or response to treatment is an exciting area of innovation. This mini-review is focused on tests of microvascular reactivity to thermal stimuli in the cutaneous circulation. The skin may prove to be an ideal site for evaluation of microvascular dysfunction due to its ease of access and growing evidence that changes in skin vascular reactivity may precede overt clinical signs of disease. Evaluation of the skin blood flow response to locally applied heat has already demonstrated prognostic utility, and the response to local cooling holds promise in patients in whom cutaneous disorders are present. Whether either of these tests can be used to predict cardiovascular morbidity or mortality in a clinical setting requires further evaluation. PMID:20507974

  20. Aspergillus antigen skin test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The aspergillus antigen skin test determines whether or not a person has been exposed to the mold aspergillus. It is performed by injecting an aspergillus antigen under the skin with a needle. After 48 ...

  1. Common aeroallergens in patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis living in southwestern part of Iran: based on skin prick test reactivity.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, Shokrollah; Gheybi, Mohammad Kazzem; Movahed, Ali; Tahmasebi, Rahim; Iranpour, Dariush; Fatemi, Atena; Etemadan, Razieh; Gooya, Mostafa; Zandi, Sahar; Ashourinejad, Hamid; Alavizadeh, Sara; Khoddami, Shaghayegh

    2015-04-01

    Aeroallergens continue to have a key role in the pathogenesis of asthma and allergic diseases and have recently received increased attention in medical research throughout the world. The prevalence of aeroallergens vary in different regions, depending on the type of climate. The aim of the present study was to determine prevalence of the sensitivity to aeroallergens among patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis (AR), based on skin prick test (SPT) reactivity in the province of Bushehr, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, 743 patients were enrolled. The participants had asthma and AR and reacted to at least one allergen with SPT. Skin prick test with standard extracts including house dust mites (HDMs), animal dander, molds and pollens were performed on patients according to the herbal geography of the area. The male to female ratio and mean age of the patients were 1.03 and 27.6± 15.4 year, respectively. Out of 567 patients with AR, the common aeroallergens were HDMs (88.5%), molds (82.9%), animal dander (79.5%), weeds (77.6%), trees (75.5%) and grass pollen (71.5%). Moreover, among 176 patients with asthma, the prevalence of aeroallergens were HDMs (90.5 %), molds (80.7%), animal dander (77.5%), weeds (73.3%), trees (73.3%) and grass pollen (67.9%). The sensitivity to animal dander, Chenopodium album and Russian thistle pollens were significantly associated with the severity of AR. Moreover, sensitivity to animal dander such as cat and feather of birds, cockroach, Bermuda grass and Chenopodium album pollens were significantly associated with the severity of asthma. The results of this study revealed that HDM was the most common sensitizing aeroallergen in patients with asthma and AR. Molds and animal dander as indoor allergens were also common aeroallergens. We suggest that the hot weather and ambient humidity in the region may be the main cause of the change in the pattern of SPT reactivity. PMID:25780879

  2. Allergy testing - skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you are allergic to bee venom or penicillin. Or it may be used if the skin ... sore, or swollen after contact with the substance Penicillin allergy Venom allergy Allergies to penicillin and closely ...

  3. Lepromin skin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... the skin up. The lump indicates that the antigen has been injected at the correct depth. The ... When the antigen is injected, there may be a slight stinging or burning. There may also be mild itching at the ...

  4. Histoplasma skin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Histoplasma capsulatum. The fungus causes an infection called histoplasmosis. How the Test is Performed The health care ... have been exposed to the fungus that causes histoplasmosis . Normal Results No reaction (inflammation) at the site ...

  5. Seronegative reactive spondyloarthritis and the skin.

    PubMed

    Generali, Elena; Ceribelli, Angela; Massarotti, Marco; Cantarini, Luca; Selmi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Spondyloarthritidies represent a group of conditions affecting the axial and peripheral muscoloskeletal apparatus and are often associated with psoriasis, infections, and inflammatory bowel diseases. Other diseases included in this category are psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and enteropathic arthritis. Reactive arthritis is an elusive spondyloarthritis, commonly occurring 1 to 3 weeks after a digestive or a genitourinary tract infection, in which microorganisms do not infect the joint directly. Reactive arthritis is classically characterized by large-joint arthritis, urethritis in men and cervicitis in women, and eye inflammation (usually conjunctivitis or uveitis) but encompasses numerous other symptoms and signs, including manifestations of dermatologic interest such as keratoderma blenorrhagicum and circinate balanitis. The diagnosis of reactive arthritis is clinical, and the infectious agent cannot always be identified due to disease latency after the infection. Most cases are self-limiting, but reactive arthritis may become chronic in 30% of cases. Treatment options include anti-inflammatory drugs, steroids, and sulfasalazine; biologic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) blockers, have been recently used, but there are only a few randomized clinical trials on the treatment of reactive arthritis. The effectiveness of antimicrobials needs further evaluation. PMID:26321399

  6. Skin prick testing in patients using beta-blockers: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The use of beta-blockers is a relative contraindication in allergen skin testing yet there is a paucity of literature on adverse events in this circumstance. We examined a population of skin tested patients on beta-blockers to look for any adverse effects. Methods Charts from 2004-2008 in a single allergy clinic were reviewed for any patients taking a beta-blocker when skin tested. Data was examined for skin test reactivity, type of skin test, concomitant asthma diagnosis, allergens tested, and adverse events. Results One hundred and ninety-one patients were taking beta-blockers when skin testing occurred. Seventy-two patients had positive skin tests. No tests resulted in an adverse event. Conclusions This data demonstrates the relative safety of administrating of skin prick tests to patients on beta-blocker treatment. Larger prospective studies are needed to substantiate the findings of this study. PMID:20298514

  7. Peptide Reactivity of Isothiocyanates - Implications for Skin Allergy.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Isabella; Samuelsson, Kristin; Ponting, David J; Törnqvist, Margareta; Ilag, Leopold L; Nilsson, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Skin allergy is a chronic condition that affects about 20% of the population of the western world. This disease is caused by small reactive compounds, haptens, able to penetrate into the epidermis and modify endogenous proteins, thereby triggering an immunogenic reaction. Phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) and ethyl isothiocyanate (EITC) have been suggested to be responsible for allergic skin reactions to chloroprene rubber, the main constituent of wetsuits, orthopedic braces, and many types of sports gear. In the present work we have studied the reactivity of the isothiocyanates PITC, EITC, and tetramethylrhodamine-6-isothiocyanate (6-TRITC) toward peptides under aqueous conditions at physiological pH to gain information about the types of immunogenic complexes these compounds may form in the skin. We found that all three compounds reacted quickly with cysteine moieties. For PITC and 6-TRITC the cysteine adducts decomposed over time, while stable adducts with lysine were formed. These experimental findings were verified by DFT calculations. Our results may suggest that the latter are responsible for allergic reactions to isothiocyanates. The initial adduct formation with cysteine residues may still be of great importance as it prevents hydrolysis and facilitates the transport of isothiocyanates into epidermis where they can form stable immunogenic complexes with lysine-containing proteins. PMID:26883070

  8. Peptide Reactivity of Isothiocyanates – Implications for Skin Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Isabella; Samuelsson, Kristin; Ponting, David J.; Törnqvist, Margareta; Ilag, Leopold L.; Nilsson, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Skin allergy is a chronic condition that affects about 20% of the population of the western world. This disease is caused by small reactive compounds, haptens, able to penetrate into the epidermis and modify endogenous proteins, thereby triggering an immunogenic reaction. Phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) and ethyl isothiocyanate (EITC) have been suggested to be responsible for allergic skin reactions to chloroprene rubber, the main constituent of wetsuits, orthopedic braces, and many types of sports gear. In the present work we have studied the reactivity of the isothiocyanates PITC, EITC, and tetramethylrhodamine-6-isothiocyanate (6-TRITC) toward peptides under aqueous conditions at physiological pH to gain information about the types of immunogenic complexes these compounds may form in the skin. We found that all three compounds reacted quickly with cysteine moieties. For PITC and 6-TRITC the cysteine adducts decomposed over time, while stable adducts with lysine were formed. These experimental findings were verified by DFT calculations. Our results may suggest that the latter are responsible for allergic reactions to isothiocyanates. The initial adduct formation with cysteine residues may still be of great importance as it prevents hydrolysis and facilitates the transport of isothiocyanates into epidermis where they can form stable immunogenic complexes with lysine-containing proteins. PMID:26883070

  9. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? C-Reactive Protein Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: CRP Formal name: C-Reactive Protein Related tests: ESR , Complement , Procalcitonin , ANA , Rheumatoid Factor ...

  10. Reliability of skin testing as a measure of nutritional state

    SciTech Connect

    Forse, R.A.; Christou, N.; Meakins, J.L.; MacLean, L.D.; Shizgal, H.M.

    1981-10-01

    The reliability of skin testing to assess the nutritional state was evaluated in 257 patients who received total parenteral nutrition (TPN). The nutritional state was assessed by determining body composition, by multiple-isotope dilution. Immunocompetence was simultaneously evaluated by skin testing with five recall antigens. These measurements were carried out before and at two-week intervals during TPN. A statistically significant relationship existed between the response to skin testing and the nutritional state. A body composition consistent with malnutrition was present in the anergic patients, while body composition was normal in the patients who reacted normally to skin testing. However, a considerable overlap existed as 43% of the reactive patients were malnourished, and 21% of the anergic patients were normally nourished. Thirty-seven (43%) of the 86 anergic patients converted and became reactive during TPN, and their body composition improved significantly. The remaining 49 anergic patients (57%) did not convert, and their body composition did not change despite similar nutritional support. The principal difference between the two groups of anergic patients was the nature of the therapy administered. In the anergic patients who converted, therapy was aggressive and appropriate, and clinical improvement occurred in 23 (62.2%) of the patients, with a mortality of 5.4%. In the 49 patients who remained anergic, therapy was often inappropriate or unsuccessful, with clinical improvement in only three (6.1%) of the patients and a mortality of 42.8%. The data demonstrated a significant relationship between the response to skin testing and the nutritional state. However, because of the wide overlap, skin testing does not accurately assess a person's nutritional state. The persistence of the anergic state is indicative of a lack of response to therapy.

  11. Effect of reactive skin decontamination lotion on skin wound healing in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Walters, Thomas J; Kauvar, David S; Reeder, Joanna; Baer, David G

    2007-03-01

    Reactive skin decontamination lotion (RSDL) is a proposed replacement for the existing skin and equipment decontamination kit. Because RSDL may need to be used to decontaminate wounded personnel, we conducted an assessment of the effect of this agent on wound healing. A skin incision model using male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 19 rats/group) was used. A 7.0-cm incision was made through the skin, and RSDL was (experimental group) or was not (control group) applied to the open wound; the wound edges were then approximated with sutures. Seven days later, animals were euthanized and wound samples were taken. Healing was assessed by measuring mechanical strength, collagen content, and histological appearance. RSDL-treated wounds had 23% lower tensile strength (p < 0.05) and 11% lower collagen content (p < 0.05) than did the untreated control wounds. Histological assessments did not differ significantly between groups. The results of this investigation demonstrate that the application of RSDL directly to an open wound impairs wound strength and decreases collagen content in the early phases of wound healing. This may have clinical implications for the treatment and outcomes of chemical casualty combat trauma. PMID:17436779

  12. Prostanoids are not involved in postocclusive reactive hyperaemia in human skin.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Marcin; Gaillard-Bigot, Florence; Roustit, Matthieu; Cracowski, Jean-Luc

    2015-10-01

    Several mediators contribute to postocclusive reactive hyperaemia (PORH) in the skin, including sensory nerves and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors. The main objective of this study was to investigate the specific involvement of prostanoids in human skin PORH. We tested the effect of the inhibition of cyclo-oxygenases (COX) by 4 mm ketoprofen, infused through microdialysis fibers inserted into the healthy volunteers forearm skin, following 5 min brachial artery occlusion. Skin microvascular blood flux was recorded using two-dimensional Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging. Maximal cutaneous vascular conductance (CVCmax ) was obtained following the perfusion of 29 mm sodium nitroprusside. A systematic review of the effects of COX inhibitors on skin peak PORH was also performed. We observed no significant difference between ketoprofen and placebo for the PORH peak (78 ± 8 and 71 ± 19% CVCmax , respectively) and area under the curve (2951 ± 721 and 2490 ± 936% CVCmax .s). A meta-analysis showed a substantial heterogeneity between studies, with overall a neutral effect of COX inhibition on peak PORH. Cyclo-oxygenase inhibition does not alter skin PORH, suggesting no involvement of prostanoids in cutaneous postocclusive vasodilatation in healthy humans. PMID:26194355

  13. Randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study of the effect of Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 on skin reactivity.

    PubMed

    Gueniche, A; Philippe, D; Bastien, P; Reuteler, G; Blum, S; Castiel-Higounenc, I; Breton, L; Benyacoub, J

    2014-06-01

    In recent decades, the prevalence of subjects with reactive skin has considerably increased in industrialised countries. 50% of women and 30% of men report cutaneous discomfort classified under reactive/sensitive skin. Several topical approaches have been proposed, in particular through improvement of galenic forms or protection of epidermal surface. We propose to act differently, deeply from inside the body via an innovative nutritional approach. To this purpose, Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 (ST11) was selected because of its specific beneficial skin properties discovered in in vitro studies, i.e. diminution of neurogenic inflammation and promotion of the recovery of skin barrier function. We designed a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical study with a two-month supplementation in two female treatment groups (n=32 per group). A capsaicin test was performed to monitor the time course of skin sensitivity. Moreover, transepidermal water loss was assessed to analyse the rate of skin barrier function recovery; dryness of the leg and roughness of the cheeks was investigated by a dermatologist as well as by self-assessment. The results of the present clinical trial show that oral supplementation with the probiotic decreases skin sensitivity and increases the rate of barrier function recovery. Thus, the data provide evidence that daily intake of ST11 could improve reactive skin condition. PMID:24322879

  14. Skin Prick Test in Patients with Chronic Allergic Skin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Pooja; Dogra, Alka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic allergic skin disorders are the inflammatory and proliferative conditions in which both genetic and environmental factors play important roles. Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and atopic dermatitis (AD) are among the most common chronic allergic skin disorders. These can be provoked by various food and aeroallergens. Skin prick tests (SPTs) represent the cheapest and most effective method to diagnose type I hypersensitivity. Positive skin tests with a history suggestive of clinical sensitivity strongly incriminate the allergen as a contributor to the disease process. Aims and Objectives: To determine the incidence of positive SPT in patients with chronic allergic skin disorders and to identify the various allergens implicated in positive SPT. Methods: Fifty patients of chronic allergic disorders were recruited in this study. They were evaluated by SPT with both food and aeroallergens. Results: In our study, SPT positivity in patients of CIU was 63.41% and in AD was 77.78%. Out of the 41 patients of CIU, the most common allergen groups showing SPT positivity were dust and pollen, each comprising 26.83% patients. SPT reaction was positive with food items (21.6%), insects (17.07%), fungus (12.20%), and Dermatophagoides farinae, that is, house dust mite (HDM) (7.32%). The allergen which showed maximum positivity was grain dust wheat (19.51%). Among nine patients of AD, maximum SPT positivity was seen with Dermatophagoides farinae, pollen Amaranthus spinosus, grain dust wheat, and cotton mill dust; each comprising 22.22% of patients. Conclusion: Our study showed that a significant number of patients of CIU and AD showed sensitivity to dust, pollen, insects, Dermatophagoides farinae, and fungi on SPT. Thus, it is an important tool in the diagnosis of CIU and AD. PMID:25814704

  15. COAL SLAGGING AND REACTIVITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Donald P. McCollor; Kurt E. Eylands; Jason D. Laumb

    2003-10-01

    carbon as well as slagging. A second phase of the project involved advanced analysis of the baseline coal along with an Australian coal fired at the plant. These analysis results were used in equilibrium thermodynamic modeling along with a coal quality model developed by the EERC to assess slagging, fouling, and opacity for the coals. Bench-scale carbon conversion testing was performed in a drop-tube furnace to assess the reactivity of the coals. The Australian coal had a higher mineral content with significantly more clay minerals present than the baseline coal. The presence of these clay minerals, which tend to melt at relatively low temperatures, indicated a higher potential for problematic slagging than the baseline coal. However, the pyritic minerals, comprising over 25% of the baseline mineral content, may form sticky iron sulfides, leading to severe slagging in the burner region if local areas with reducing conditions exist. Modeling results indicated that neither would present significant fouling problems. The Australian coal was expected to show slagging behavior much more severe than the baseline coal except at very high furnace temperatures. However, the baseline coal was predicted to exhibit opacity problems, as well as have a higher potential for problematic calcium sulfate-based low-temperature fouling. The baseline coal had a somewhat higher reactivity than the Australian coal, which was consistent with both the lower average activation energy for the baseline coal and the greater carbon conversion at a given temperature and residence time. The activation energy of the baseline coal showed some effect of oxygen on the activation energy, with E{sub a} increasing at the lower oxygen concentration, but may be due to the scatter in the baseline coal kinetic values at the higher oxygen level tested.

  16. Test battery with the human cell line activation test, direct peptide reactivity assay and DEREK based on a 139 chemical data set for predicting skin sensitizing potential and potency of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Takenouchi, Osamu; Fukui, Shiho; Okamoto, Kenji; Kurotani, Satoru; Imai, Noriyasu; Fujishiro, Miyuki; Kyotani, Daiki; Kato, Yoshinao; Kasahara, Toshihiko; Fujita, Masaharu; Toyoda, Akemi; Sekiya, Daisuke; Watanabe, Shinichi; Seto, Hirokazu; Hirota, Morihiko; Ashikaga, Takao; Miyazawa, Masaaki

    2015-11-01

    To develop a testing strategy incorporating the human cell line activation test (h-CLAT), direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) and DEREK, we created an expanded data set of 139 chemicals (102 sensitizers and 37 non-sensitizers) by combining the existing data set of 101 chemicals through the collaborative projects of Japan Cosmetic Industry Association. Of the additional 38 chemicals, 15 chemicals with relatively low water solubility (log Kow > 3.5) were selected to clarify the limitation of testing strategies regarding the lipophilic chemicals. Predictivities of the h-CLAT, DPRA and DEREK, and the combinations thereof were evaluated by comparison to results of the local lymph node assay. When evaluating 139 chemicals using combinations of three methods based on integrated testing strategy (ITS) concept (ITS-based test battery) and a sequential testing strategy (STS) weighing the predictive performance of the h-CLAT and DPRA, overall similar predictivities were found as before on the 101 chemical data set. An analysis of false negative chemicals suggested a major limitation of our strategies was the testing of low water-soluble chemicals. When excluded the negative results for chemicals with log Kow > 3.5, the sensitivity and accuracy of ITS improved to 97% (91 of 94 chemicals) and 89% (114 of 128). Likewise, the sensitivity and accuracy of STS to 98% (92 of 94) and 85% (111 of 129). Moreover, the ITS and STS also showed good correlation with local lymph node assay on three potency classifications, yielding accuracies of 74% (ITS) and 73% (STS). Thus, the inclusion of log Kow in analysis could give both strategies a higher predictive performance. PMID:25820183

  17. Prereactivation propranolol fails to reduce skin conductance reactivity to prepared fear-conditioned stimuli.

    PubMed

    Spring, Justin D; Wood, Nellie E; Mueller-Pfeiffer, Christoph; Milad, Mohammed R; Pitman, Roger K; Orr, Scott P

    2015-03-01

    Pharmacologic blockade of memory reconsolidation has been demonstrated in fear-conditioned rodents and humans and may provide a means to reduce fearfulness in anxiety disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder. Studying the efficacy of potential interventions in clinical populations is challenging, creating a need for paradigms within which candidate reconsolidation-blocking interventions can be readily tested. We used videos of biologically prepared conditioned stimuli (tarantulas) to test the efficacy of propranolol in blocking reconsolidation of conditioned fear in healthy young adults. Strong differential conditioning, measured by skin conductance, was observed among a screened subset of participants during acquisition. However, subsequent propranolol failed to reduce reactivity to the reactivated conditioned stimulus. These results are consistent with other recent findings and point to a need for testing other candidate drugs. PMID:25224026

  18. Long-term periodic anthelmintic treatments are associated with increased allergen skin reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Endara, P; Vaca, M; Chico, M E; Erazo, S; Oviedo, G; Quinzo, I; Rodriguez, A; Lovato, R; Moncayo, A-L; Barreto, M L; Rodrigues, L C; Cooper, P J

    2010-01-01

    Background The low prevalence of allergic disease in the rural tropics has been attributed to the protective effects of chronic helminth infections. There is concern that treatment-based control programmes for these parasites may lead to an increase in the prevalence of allergic diseases. Objective We measured the impact of 15–17 years of anthelmintic treatment with ivermectin on the prevalence of allergen skin test reactivity and allergic symptoms in school-age children. Methods The prevalence of allergen skin test reactivity, exercise-induced bronchospasm and allergic symptoms was compared between school-age children living in communities that had received community-based treatments with ivermectin (for onchocerciasis control) for a period of 15–17 years with those living in geographically adjacent communities that had received no ivermectin. Results The prevalence of allergen skin test reactivity was double in children living in treated communities compared with those in untreated communities (16.7% vs. 8.7%, adjusted OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.50–2.94, P<0.0001), and the effect was mediated partly by a reduced prevalence of Trichuris trichiura among treated children. Ivermectin treatments were associated with an increased prevalence of recent eczema symptoms (adjusted OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.05–4.78, P=0.04) but not symptoms of asthma or rhino-conjunctivitis. The effect on eczema symptoms was not associated with reductions in geohelminth infections. Conclusion Long-term periodic treatments with ivermectin were associated with an increased prevalence of allergen skin test reactivity. There was some evidence that treatment was associated with an increased prevalence of recent eczema symptoms but not those of asthma or rhino-conjunctivitis. Cite this as: P. Endara, M. Vaca, M. E. Chico, S. Erazo, G. Oviedo, I. Quinzo, A. Rodriguez R. Lovato, A.-L. Moncayo, M. L. Barreto, L. C. Rodrigues and P. J. Cooper, Clinical & Experimental Allergy, 2010 (40) 1669–1677. PMID

  19. Montenegro skin test and age of skin lesion as predictors of treatment failure in cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Antonio, Liliane de Fátima; Fagundes, Aline; Oliveira, Raquel Vasconcellos Carvalhaes; Pinto, Priscila Garcia; Bedoya-Pacheco, Sandro Javier; Vasconcellos, Erica de Camargo Ferreira e; Valete-Rosalino, Maria Cláudia; Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; Passos, Sônia Regina Lambert; Pimentel, Maria Inês Fernandes; Schubach, Armando de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to examine the association among the Montenegro skin test (MST), age of skin lesion and therapeutic response in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) treated at Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases (INI), Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For each treatment failure (case), two controls showing skin lesion healing following treatment, paired by sex and age, were randomly selected. All patients were treated with 5 mg Sb(5+)/kg/day of intramuscular meglumine antimoniate (Sb(5+)) for 30 successive days. Patients with CL were approximately five times more likely to fail when lesions were less than two months old at the first appointment. Patients with treatment failure showed less intense MST reactions than patients progressing to clinical cure. For each 10 mm of increase in MST response, there was a 26% reduction in the chance of treatment failure. An early treatment - defined as a treatment applied for skin lesions, which starts when they are less than two months old at the first appointment -, as well as a poor cellular immune response, reflected by lower reactivity in MST, were associated with treatment failure in cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:25229216

  20. MONTENEGRO SKIN TEST AND AGE OF SKIN LESION AS PREDICTORS OF TREATMENT FAILURE IN CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Liliane de Fátima; Fagundes, Aline; Oliveira, Raquel Vasconcellos Carvalhaes; Pinto, Priscila Garcia; Bedoya-Pacheco, Sandro Javier; Vasconcellos, Érica de Camargo Ferreira e; Valete-Rosalino, Maria Cláudia; Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; Passos, Sônia Regina Lambert; Pimentel, Maria Inês Fernandes; Schubach, Armando de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to examine the association among the Montenegro skin test (MST), age of skin lesion and therapeutic response in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) treated at Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases (INI), Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For each treatment failure (case), two controls showing skin lesion healing following treatment, paired by sex and age, were randomly selected. All patients were treated with 5 mg Sb5+/kg/day of intramuscular meglumine antimoniate (Sb5+) for 30 successive days. Patients with CL were approximately five times more likely to fail when lesions were less than two months old at the first appointment. Patients with treatment failure showed less intense MST reactions than patients progressing to clinical cure. For each 10 mm of increase in MST response, there was a 26% reduction in the chance of treatment failure. An early treatment - defined as a treatment applied for skin lesions, which starts when they are less than two months old at the first appointment -, as well as a poor cellular immune response, reflected by lower reactivity in MST, were associated with treatment failure in cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:25229216

  1. A diagnostic skin test for Onchocerca volvulus infection.

    PubMed

    Ngu, J L; Ndumbe, P M; Titanji, V; Leke, R

    1981-09-01

    Onchocerca supernatant (OS) was prepared by a technique permitting live microfilariae to migrate from nodule tissue through agar gel into sterile Hanks balanced salt/Penicillin-Streptomycin solution where they metabolized. The OS, after dialysis, was passed through Seitz viral filter and either concentrated or lyophilized. Using rabbit antiserum in immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis tests, microfilariae proteins and also human protein were detected in out OS. No common antigens were found between this and somatic extracts of Loa loa, O. gutturosa, O. volvulus, L. carinii, D. immittis and A. lumbricoides. 125I labelled OS was purified by passage through protein A column and then through immunosorbent column of horse anti-human serum linked to CNB-activated sepharose 4B. Autoradiography, after sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacylamide slab gel eletrophoresis of purified OS, showed 10 protein bands in the molecular range 10,000 to 125,000. Skin prick tests with OS, shown not to be contaminated with Hepatitis B antigens, elicited immediate hypersensitivity reaction. Using our criteria, positive reactions were seen in 81% of proven onchocerca cases and only occasionally in Loasis 4.5%, ascaridiasis 13.5% or healthy controls 2.4%. The poor skin reactivity to OS in loasis was not due to immunosuppression as these patients, when also infested with ascaris, reacted just as well as onchocerca patients with ascaris to skin prick test using somatic extracts of ascaris. PMID:6808726

  2. Quiz: Test Your Skin Cancer IQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... of skin is usually the first step in skin cancer treatment and may have already occurred in the process ... Skin Cancer" Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma Early / NIH Research ...

  3. The skin prick test - European standards.

    PubMed

    Heinzerling, Lucie; Mari, Adriano; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Bresciani, Megon; Burbach, Guido; Darsow, Ulf; Durham, Stephen; Fokkens, Wytske; Gjomarkaj, Mark; Haahtela, Tari; Bom, Ana Todo; Wöhrl, Stefan; Maibach, Howard; Lockey, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Skin prick testing is an essential test procedure to confirm sensitization in IgE-mediated allergic disease in subjects with rhinoconjunctivitis, asthma, urticaria, anapylaxis, atopic eczema and food and drug allergy. This manuscript reviews the available evidence including Medline and Embase searches, abstracts of international allergy meetings and position papers from the world allergy literature. The recommended method of prick testing includes the appropriate use of specific allergen extracts, positive and negative controls, interpretation of the tests after 15 - 20 minutes of application, with a positive result defined as a wheal ≥3 mm diameter. A standard prick test panel for Europe for inhalants is proposed and includes hazel (Corylus avellana), alder (Alnus incana), birch (Betula alba), plane (Platanus vulgaris), cypress (Cupressus sempervirens), grass mix (Poa pratensis, Dactilis glomerata, Lolium perenne, Phleum pratense, Festuca pratensis, Helictotrichon pretense), Olive (Olea europaea), mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris), ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia), Alternaria alternata (tenuis), Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus fumigatus, Parietaria, cat, dog, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae, and cockroach (Blatella germanica). Standardization of the skin test procedures and standard panels for different geographic locations are encouraged worldwide to permit better comparisons for diagnostic, clinical and research purposes. PMID:23369181

  4. Use of thermography in testing skin creams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anttonen, Hannu; Kauppinen, Timo T.; Lehmuskallio, Eero; Rintamaki, Hannu

    1994-03-01

    The aim of the study was to test the effect of skin creams and their components in windy (3 m/s) and cold (-15 degree(s)C) conditions on face temperature and heat flux. The tests were carried out in a climatic chamber with 18 persons sitting in front of the opening of the wind tunnel, the wind directed against the face. Skin temperatures were measured from 4 points on both sides of the face with thermistors and the heat fluxes were measured using heat flux sensors on both cheeks. Also the ambient temperature and wind were registered. In addition to these measurements an IR thermal scanner was also used to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of temperature variation on the face during the exposure. The results were continuously recorded on VHS-video tape. Using still pictures from recorded material the area temperature of the cheek was measured, which described the mean temperature of the cheek. Test periods were 30 minutes and the same test subjects were not used until 48 h after the previous cold exposure. The test persons were young (20 - 30 years) healthy male persons. The total number of tests was 38.

  5. The skin prick test – European standards

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Skin prick testing is an essential test procedure to confirm sensitization in IgE-mediated allergic disease in subjects with rhinoconjunctivitis, asthma, urticaria, anapylaxis, atopic eczema and food and drug allergy. This manuscript reviews the available evidence including Medline and Embase searches, abstracts of international allergy meetings and position papers from the world allergy literature. The recommended method of prick testing includes the appropriate use of specific allergen extracts, positive and negative controls, interpretation of the tests after 15 – 20 minutes of application, with a positive result defined as a wheal ≥3 mm diameter. A standard prick test panel for Europe for inhalants is proposed and includes hazel (Corylus avellana), alder (Alnus incana), birch (Betula alba), plane (Platanus vulgaris), cypress (Cupressus sempervirens), grass mix (Poa pratensis, Dactilis glomerata, Lolium perenne, Phleum pratense, Festuca pratensis, Helictotrichon pretense), Olive (Olea europaea), mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris), ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia), Alternaria alternata (tenuis), Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus fumigatus, Parietaria, cat, dog, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae, and cockroach (Blatella germanica). Standardization of the skin test procedures and standard panels for different geographic locations are encouraged worldwide to permit better comparisons for diagnostic, clinical and research purposes. PMID:23369181

  6. Delayed extinction fails to reduce skin conductance reactivity to fear-conditioned stimuli.

    PubMed

    Fricchione, Jon; Greenberg, Mark S; Spring, Justin; Wood, Nellie; Mueller-Pfeiffer, Christoph; Milad, Mohammed R; Pitman, Roger K; Orr, Scott P

    2016-09-01

    A brief 10-min time delay between an initial and subsequent exposure to extinction trials has been found to impair memory reconsolidation in fear-conditioned rodents and humans, providing a potential means to reduce fearfulness in anxiety disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present study used videos of biologically prepared, conditioned stimuli (tarantulas) to test the efficacy of delayed extinction in blocking reconsolidation of conditioned fear in healthy young adults. Strong differential conditioning, measured by skin conductance, was observed among a screened subset of participants during acquisition. However, the delayed-extinction intervention failed to reduce reactivity to the conditioned stimulus paired with the extinction delay. These results are partially consistent with other recent, mixed findings and point to a need for testing other candidate interventions designed to interfere with the reconsolidation process. PMID:27314560

  7. Test Pile Reactivity Loss Due to Trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Plumlee, K.E.

    2001-03-09

    The presence of trichloroethylene in the test pile caused a continual decrease in pile reactivity. A system which removed, purified, and returned 12,000 cfh helium to the pile has held contamination to a negligible level and has permitted normal pile operation.

  8. Mental Reactivation and Pleasantness Judgment of Experience Related to Vision, Hearing, Skin Sensations, Taste and Olfaction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Language acquisition is based on our knowledge about the world and forms through multiple sensory-motor interactions with the environment. We link the properties of individual experience formed at different stages of ontogeny with the phased development of sensory modalities and with the acquisition of words describing the appropriate forms of sensitivity. To test whether early-formed experience related to skin sensations, olfaction and taste differs from later-formed experience related to vision and hearing, we asked Russian-speaking participants to categorize or to assess the pleasantness of experience mentally reactivated by sense-related adjectives found in common dictionaries. It was found that categorizing adjectives in relation to vision, hearing and skin sensations took longer than categorizing adjectives in relation to olfaction and taste. In addition, experience described by adjectives predominantly related to vision, hearing and skin sensations took more time for the pleasantness judgment and generated less intense emotions than that described by adjectives predominantly related to olfaction and taste. Interestingly the dynamics of skin resistance corresponded to the intensity and pleasantness of reported emotions. We also found that sense-related experience described by early-acquired adjectives took less time for the pleasantness judgment and generated more intense and more positive emotions than that described by later-acquired adjectives. Correlations were found between the time of the pleasantness judgment of experience, intensity and pleasantness of reported emotions, age of acquisition, frequency, imageability and length of sense-related adjectives. All in all these findings support the hypothesis that early-formed experience is less differentiated than later-formed experience. PMID:27400090

  9. Purification, partial characterization, and identification of a skin-reactive protein antigen of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    De Bruyn, J; Bosmans, R; Turneer, M; Weckx, M; Nyabenda, J; Van Vooren, J P; Falmagne, P; Wiker, H G; Harboe, M

    1987-01-01

    An immunogenic and skin-reactive protein called P64 was purified from Sauton zinc-deficient culture filtrate of Mycobacterium bovis BCG by using successively hydrophobic chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose, ion exchange on DEAE-Sephacel, and molecular sieving on Sephadex G-200. The final P64 preparation was found to be homogeneous based on several analyses. Protein P64 was a constituent of BCG cells since it was present in soluble cellular extract from normally grown BCG cells. It represented 8 to 9% of the soluble proteins of the extract and appeared as the major soluble protein antigen of BCG. This protein was found to have a molecular weight of 64,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but in molecular sieving it eluted at a volume corresponding to a molecular weight of 246,000. An abnormal UV spectrum was observed for this protein. Its amino acid composition showed an abundance of acidic amino acids (or their amides). Aromatic amino acids represented only 3% of the total amino acid residues. The NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of this protein (10 amino acids) was determined. Its sugar content measured with the phenol-sulfuric acid test was lower than 0.3% (wt/wt.) Isolated P64 was tested by various crossed-immunoelectrophoresis techniques and was shown to correspond to antigen 82 in the reference system for BCG antigens. The protein antigen P64 elicited a delayed cutaneous reaction in guinea pigs sensitized with either living or heat-killed BCG. Its potency in skin reaction was, respectively, two- and threefold that of the BCG purified protein derivative. The two types of sensitization used for skin test reactions promoted significant immunoglobulin G antibody production against the protein antigen P64 in guinea pigs 7 weeks after sensitization. PMID:3539805

  10. A fluorescence high throughput screening method for the detection of reactive electrophiles as potential skin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Avonto, Cristina; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Rua, Diego; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-12-01

    Skin sensitization is an important toxicological end-point in the risk assessment of chemical allergens. Because of the complexity of the biological mechanisms associated with skin sensitization, integrated approaches combining different chemical, biological and in silico methods are recommended to replace conventional animal tests. Chemical methods are intended to characterize the potential of a sensitizer to induce earlier molecular initiating events. The presence of an electrophilic mechanistic domain is considered one of the essential chemical features to covalently bind to the biological target and induce further haptenation processes. Current in chemico assays rely on the quantification of unreacted model nucleophiles after incubation with the candidate sensitizer. In the current study, a new fluorescence-based method, 'HTS-DCYA assay', is proposed. The assay aims at the identification of reactive electrophiles based on their chemical reactivity toward a model fluorescent thiol. The reaction workflow enabled the development of a High Throughput Screening (HTS) method to directly quantify the reaction adducts. The reaction conditions have been optimized to minimize solubility issues, oxidative side reactions and increase the throughput of the assay while minimizing the reaction time, which are common issues with existing methods. Thirty-six chemicals previously classified with LLNA, DPRA or KeratinoSens™ were tested as a proof of concept. Preliminary results gave an estimated 82% accuracy, 78% sensitivity, 90% specificity, comparable to other in chemico methods such as Cys-DPRA. In addition to validated chemicals, six natural products were analyzed and a prediction of their sensitization potential is presented for the first time. PMID:26455772

  11. Reactive skin decontamination lotion (RSDL) for the decontamination of chemical warfare agent (CWA) dermal exposure.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, M D; Hurst, C G; Kirk, M A; Reedy, S J D; Braue, E H

    2012-08-01

    Rapid decontamination of the skin is the single most important action to prevent dermal absorption of chemical contaminants in persons exposed to chemical warfare agents (CWA) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) as a result of accidental or intentional release. Chemicals on the skin may be removed by mechanical means through the use of dry sorbents or water. Recent interest in decontamination systems which both partition contaminants away from the skin and actively neutralize the chemical has led to the development of several reactive decontamination solutions. This article will review the recently FDA-approved Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) and will summarize the toxicity and efficacy studies conducted to date. Evidence of RSDL's superior performance against vesicant and organophosphorus chemical warfare agents compared to water, bleach, and dry sorbents, suggests that RSDL may have a role in mass human exposure chemical decontamination in both the military and civilian arenas. PMID:22352732

  12. Anaphylaxis to muscle relaxants: rational for skin tests.

    PubMed

    Moneret-Vautrin, D A; Kanny, G

    2002-09-01

    IgE-dependent allergy to muscle relaxants (MR) has an estimated prevalence of 1 out of 6500 General Anesthesias (GA). 62% of anaphylaxis during surgery are due to MR anaphylaxis. All the molecules are divalent, carrying two NH4+ epitopes (quaternary ammonium ions), either structurally or after rapid in vivo protonization (vecuronium). The excellent overall performance of skin test makes them the golden standard for the diagnosis of anaphylactoid reactions. Techniques include intradermal tests and prick-tests. The current localizations are the forearm and the back. Positivity criteria are 3 mm for prick-tests. For IDTs, the criterium is the doubling of the size of the injection papula, when 0.02 to 0.04 ml is injected: 8 mm. The recommended concentrations are not falsely negative. Commercial concentrations can be tested by prick tests, except for mivacurium and atracurium tested of 1:10 dilution. A scale of concentrations is advised for IDT starting with 1:10,000, up to a normally non reactive concentration that is: 100 micrograms/ml (succinylcholine), 200 micrograms/ml (gallamine), 10 micrograms/ml (atracurium), 2 micrograms/ml (mivacurium), 200 micrograms/ml (pancuronium), 400 micrograms/ml (vecuronium), 1,000 micrograms/ml (rocuronium), 200 micrograms/ml (cis atracurium). The specificity and sensitivity of the skin tests to MRs are greater than 95%. The reproducibility over years is 88%. The overall concordance of PT and IDR is 97%. Both types of tests can be used for the diagnosis. IDT have to be carried out for the search of the cross sensitization. 84% of patients do have cross sensitization to MRs but only 16% react to all MRs. The further use of MRs selected by negative IDTs has been proved to be safe. PMID:12389445

  13. Functional cloning of a gp100-reactive T-cell receptor from vitiligo patient skin.

    PubMed

    Klarquist, Jared; Eby, Jonathan M; Henning, Steven W; Li, Mingli; Wainwright, Derek A; Westerhof, Wiete; Luiten, Rosalie M; Nishimura, Michael I; Le Poole, I Caroline

    2016-05-01

    We isolated gp100-reactive T cells from perilesional skin of a patient with progressive vitiligo with superior reactivity toward melanoma cells compared with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes 1520, a melanoma-derived T-cell line reactive with the same cognate peptide. After dimer enrichment and limited dilution cloning, amplified cells were subjected to reverse transcription and 5' RACE to identify the variable TCRα and TCRβ subunit sequences. The full-length sequence was cloned into a retroviral vector separating both subunits by a P2A slippage sequence and introduced into Jurkat cells and primary T cells. Cytokine secreted by transduced cells in response to cognate peptide and gp100-expressing targets signifies that we have successfully cloned a gp100-reactive T-cell receptor from actively depigmenting skin. PMID:26824221

  14. [Precision and economy of skin prick tests].

    PubMed

    Kupczyk, Maciej; Kupryś, Izabela; Kuna, Piotr

    2002-03-01

    Due to a rise in the number of cases of allergic disease and a need to increase financial resources for the diagnosis of these conditions, the possibility of reducing costs of skin pricks tests (SPT) was very welcome. In an attempt to reduce costs some practitioners use one lancet for several pricks in one patient. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this way of performing SPT influences the results. 52 subjects with (39) and without (13) atopy were tested with histamine, codeine and standard allergen extracts. SPT were applied to the volar surface of a randomly assigned forearm using two methods: one lancet-one prick on one forearm (single test method) and one lancet-multiple pricks ("multiple test" method) on the other. The false positive tests at the placebo site following allergen were recorded only in multiple test method, in 41 out of 72 pricks (p < 0.00001) when all reactions above baseline were considered and in 26 out of 72 (p = 0.00001) when a 3 mm cut-off was considered. The size of the false positive reaction depends on the intensity of the reaction to the preceding allergen (rang Spearman factor R = 0.706, p < 0.000001) and decreases in the second consecutive placebo test. Our data show that one lancet for multiple test method cannot be used to diagnose factors responsible for allergy, particularly in patients qualified for immunotherapy and in scientific studies. For financial reasons multiple test method can be used in screening and epidemiological studies where atopy is studied and there is no need to identify the specific allergen. PMID:12053585

  15. Expanded Small-Scale Shock Reactivity Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granholm, Richard

    2005-07-01

    Explosives react from a strong shock, even in quantities too small for detonation. The potential for a new material to be an explosive can be evaluated from this shock reactivity. The recently developed small-scale shock reactivity test (SSRT)ootnotetextH. W. Sandusky, R. H. Granholm, D. G. Bohl, ``Small-Scale Shock Reactivity Test,'' NSWC Technical Report (in publication), Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head, MD 20640 uses very high confinement to allow prompt reactions to occur in less than half-gram samples well below critical diameter, with the reactions quantified by a dent in a soft aluminum witness block. This test has been expanded to simultaneously measure both early and late-time reactions from a single sample subjected to the output from an RP-80 detonator. The sample apparatus is further confined within a small chamber instrumented with a pressure gage for internal air blast. This provides a measure of late-time reactions, such as from fuel/air combustion. Results are shown from several simultaneous early- and late-reaction measurements.

  16. [Introduce a new vitro replacement method of skin irritation test].

    PubMed

    Sun, Likui; Hou, Li; Shi, Yanping

    2011-09-01

    A series of new replacement methods of skin irritation test such as EpiSkin, EpiDermSIT (updated) and SkinEthicRHE have been validated by ECVAM. Due to it, animals are protected to the full extent. These provide more methods for biological evaluation of medical devices. PMID:22242390

  17. In vitro and human testing strategies for skin irritation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M K; Osborne, R; Perkins, M A

    2000-01-01

    Prior to the manufacture, transport, and marketing of chemicals or products, it is critical to assess their potential for skin toxicity (corrosion or irritation), thereby protecting the worker and consumer from adverse skin effects due to intended or accidental skin exposure. Traditionally, animal testing procedures have provided the data needed to assess the more severe forms of skin toxicity, and current regulations may require animal test data before permission can be obtained to manufacture, transport, or market chemicals or the products that contain them. In recent years, the use of animals to assess skin safety has been opposed by some as inhumane and unnecessary. The conflicting needs of the industrial toxicologist to (1) protect human safety, (2) comply with regulations, and (3) reduce animal testing have led to major efforts to develop alternative, yet predictive, test methods. A variety of in vitro skin corrosion test methods have been developed and several have successfully passed initial international validation. These have included skin or epidermal equivalent assays that have been shown to distinguish corrosive from noncorrosive chemicals. These skin/epidermal equivalent assays have also been modified and used to assess skin irritation potential relative to existing human exposure test data. The data show a good correlation between in vitro assay data and different types of human skin irritation data for both chemicals and consumer products. The effort to eliminate animal tests has also led to the development of a novel human patch test for assessment of acute skin irritation potential. A case study shows the benefits of in vitro and human skin irritation tests compared to the animal tests they seek to replace, and strategies now exist to adequately assess human skin irritation potential without the need to rely on animal test methods. PMID:11083109

  18. Harsh Parenting and Child Externalizing Behavior: Skin Conductance Level Reactivity as a Moderator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erath, Stephen A.; El-Sheikh, Mona; Cummings, E. Mark

    2009-01-01

    Skin conductance level reactivity (SCLR) was examined as a moderator of the association between harsh parenting and child externalizing behavior. Participants were 251 boys and girls (8-9 years). Mothers and fathers provided reports of harsh parenting and their children's externalizing behavior; children also provided reports of harsh parenting.…

  19. Skin Conductance Level Reactivity Moderates the Association between Harsh Parenting and Growth in Child Externalizing Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erath, Stephen A.; El-Sheikh, Mona; Hinnant, J. Benjamin; Cummings, E. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Skin conductance level reactivity (SCLR) was examined as a moderator of the association between harsh parenting at age 8 years and growth in child externalizing behavior from age 8 to age 10 (N = 251). Mothers and fathers provided reports of harsh parenting and their children's externalizing behavior; children also provided reports of harsh…

  20. Children's Skin Conductance Reactivity as a Mechanism of Risk in the Context of Parental Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, E. Mark; El-Sheikh, Mona; Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Keller, Peggy S.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Children's physiological reactivity was examined as a moderator of relations between parental dysphoria and child adjustment problems, addressing gaps in the study of child characteristics as risk processes. Method: One hundred fifty-seven children (86 boys, 71 girls) were assessed twice over a two-year interval. Skin conductance level…

  1. Skin testing and incremental challenge in the evaluation of adverse reactions to local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Schatz, M

    1984-10-01

    True allergic reactions to local anesthetics (LAs) probably make up no more than 1% of all adverse LA reactions. A diagnosis of true potential allergic reactivity is made difficult because (1) the history of the prior reaction may be vague or equivocal and (2) the lack of identification of the actual specific LA hapten-carrier complex limits the potential usefulness of immunologic tests. Nonetheless, since avoidance of LAs may be associated with substantial increased pain or increased risk and because true allergic reactions are rare, investigators and clinicians have used skin testing, incremental challenge, or both as a means of identifying a safe LA for a patient with a history of a prior adverse reaction. Review of the literature dealing with LA skin testing and incremental challenge suggests the following: (1) Skin testing with LAs may correlate with a history of an adverse reaction but may produce systemic adverse reactions, especially with undiluted drug. (2) Although false positive skin tests have been reported, most skin-tested patients who subsequently tolerate an LA have a negative skin test to that drug, and false negative skin tests have not been clearly documented. (3) Incremental challenge beginning with diluted LA is a safe and effective means of identifying a drug that a patient with a history of a prior adverse reaction can tolerate. (4) Current concepts of non-cross-reacting LA groups may be useful in the choice of a drug for use in skin testing and incremental challenge. (5) Preservatives in LAs may account for some but probably not the majority of adverse reactions to LAs. On the basis of this literature review, a practical protocol including dilutional skin testing and incremental challenge is presented for use in evaluating patients with prior adverse reactions to LAs. PMID:6491108

  2. Point skin tests in allergology: estimation of point skin tests with histamine solutions of different concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, Janusz; Kruszewski, Jerzy; Klosowicz, Stanislaw J.; Zmija, Jozef

    1995-08-01

    The application of liquid crystal contact thermography for point skin tests used in allergology diagnostic has been studied. The effect of a concentration of histamine, adopted as the etalon substance, on observed temperature fields is presented. Obtained results have been confirmed by thermovision measurements. A correlation between studied method and visual estimation used until now is the best for temperature range observed as a blue color.

  3. UVB dependence of quantum dot reactive oxygen species generation in common skin cell models

    PubMed Central

    MORTENSEN, LUKE J.; FAULKNOR, RENEA; RAVICHANDRAN, SUPRIYA; ZHENG, HONG; DELOUISE, LISA A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that UVB can slightly increase the penetration of nanoparticles through skin and significantly alter skin cell biology, thus it is important to understand if and how UVB may impact subsequent nanoparticle skin cell interactions. The research presented herein evaluates the effect of UVB on quantum dot (QD) uptake and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in primary keratinocytes, primary melanocytes, and related cell lines. QD exposure induced cell type dependent ROS responses increased by pre-exposing cells to UVB and correlated with the level of QD uptake. Our results suggest that keratinocytes may be at greater risk for QD induced ROS generation than melanocytes, and raise awareness about the differential cellular effects that topically applied nanomaterials may have on UVB exposed skin. PMID:26485933

  4. UVB Dependence of Quantum Dot Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Common Skin Cell Models.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Luke J; Faulknor, Renea; Ravichandran, Supriya; Zheng, Hong; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2015-09-01

    Studies have shown that UVB can slightly increase the penetration of nanoparticles through skin and significantly alter skin cell biology, thus it is important to understand if and how UVB may impact subsequent nanoparticle skin cell interactions. The research presented herein evaluates the effect of UVB on quantum dot (QD) uptake and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in primary keratinocytes, primary melanocytes, and related cell lines. QD exposure induced cell type dependent ROS responses increased by pre-exposing cells to UVB and correlated with the level of QD uptake. Our results suggest that keratinocytes may be at greater risk for QD induced ROS generation than melanocytes, and raise awareness about the differential cellular effects that topically applied nanomaterials may have on UVB exposed skin. PMID:26485933

  5. Skin testing with food, codeine, and histamine in exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lin, R Y; Barnard, M

    1993-06-01

    A 33-year-old Chinese woman with exercise-induced anaphylaxis after ingesting Chinese seafood noodle soup, was studied for skin test reactivity to food, histamine, and codeine. Prick skin tests were negative for shrimp, wheat, and chicken soup base, but were positive at 5 to 6 mm (wheal diameter) to the whole broth after it had been combined with the other ingredients. No significant (> 3 mm) wheals were observed in eight controls who were simultaneously tested with the broth. To assess the role of exercise, three series of skin tests were performed with histamine, codeine, and whole broth before and after aerobic exercise on two occasions. Codeine elicited consistent increases in wheal size after exercise compared with pre-exercise skin tests. Histamine and whole broth wheal sizes did not increase significantly. Three control subjects also had codeine and histamine skin tests before and after exercise, No exercise-associated increases were noted for codeine. Potential insights into mast cell abnormalities in exercise-induced anaphylaxis may be gained by skin testing patterns with codeine and other mast cell degranulating agents. PMID:8507042

  6. Measurements of UV-generated free radicals/reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrling, Th.; Jung, K.; Fuchs, J.

    2006-03-01

    Free radicals/reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in skin by UV irradiation were measured by electron spin resonance (ESR). To increase the sensitivity of measurement the short life free radicals/ROS were scavenged and accumulated by using the nitroxyl probe 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetrametylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl (PCA). The spatial distribution of free radicals/ROS measured in pig skin biopsies with ESR imaging after UV irradiation corresponds to the intensity decay of irradiance in the depth of the skin. The main part of free radicals/ROS were generated by UVA (320-400 nm) so that the spatial distribution of free radicals reaches up to the lower side of the dermis. In vivo measurements on human skin were performed with a L-band ESR spectrometer and a surface coil integrating the signal intensities from all skin layers to get a sufficient signal amplitude. Using this experimental arrangement the protection of UVB and UVA/B filter against the generation of free radicals/ROS in skin were measured. The protection against ROS and the repair of damages caused by them can be realized with active antioxidants characterized by a high antioxidative power (AP). The effect of UV filter and antioxidants corresponding to their protection against free radicals/ROS in skin generated by UVAB irradiation can be quantified by the new radical sun protection factor (RSF). The RSF indicates the increase of time for staying in the sun to generate the same number of free radicals/ROS in the skin like for the unprotected skin. Regarding the amount of generated free radicals/ROS in skin as an biophysical endpoint the RSF characterizes both the protection against UVB and UVA radiation.

  7. Putting the parts together: combining in vitro methods to test for skin sensitizing potentials.

    PubMed

    Bauch, Caroline; Kolle, Susanne N; Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Eltze, Tobias; Fabian, Eric; Mehling, Annette; Teubner, Wera; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-08-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common skin disease and is elicited by repeated skin contact with an allergen. In the regulatory context, currently only data from animal experiments are acceptable to assess the skin sensitizing potential of substances. Animal welfare and EU Cosmetic Directive/Regulation call for the implementation of animal-free alternatives for safety assessments. The mechanisms that trigger skin sensitization are complex and various steps are involved. Therefore, a single in vitro method may not be able to accurately assess this endpoint. Non-animal methods are being developed and validated and can be used for testing strategies that ensure a reliable prediction of skin sensitization potentials. In this study, the predictivities of four in vitro assays, one in chemico and one in silico method addressing three different steps in the development of skin sensitization were assessed using 54 test substances of known sensitizing potential. The predictivity of single tests and combinations of these assays were compared. These data were used to develop an in vitro testing scheme and prediction model for the detection of skin sensitizers based on protein reactivity, activation of the Keap-1/Nrf2 signaling pathway and dendritic cell activation. PMID:22659254

  8. Development of a forensic skin colour predictive test.

    PubMed

    Maroñas, Olalla; Phillips, Chris; Söchtig, Jens; Gomez-Tato, Antonio; Cruz, Raquel; Alvarez-Dios, José; de Cal, María Casares; Ruiz, Yarimar; Fondevila, Manuel; Carracedo, Ángel; Lareu, María V

    2014-11-01

    There is growing interest in skin colour prediction in the forensic field. However, a lack of consensus approaches for recording skin colour phenotype plus the complicating factors of epistatic effects, environmental influences such as exposure to the sun and unidentified genetic variants, present difficulties for the development of a forensic skin colour predictive test centred on the most strongly associated SNPs. Previous studies have analysed skin colour variation in single unadmixed population groups, including South Asians (Stokowski et al., 2007, Am. J. Hum. Genet, 81: 1119-32) and Europeans (Jacobs et al., 2013, Hum Genet. 132: 147-58). Nevertheless, a major challenge lies in the analysis of skin colour in admixed individuals, where co-ancestry proportions do not necessarily dictate any one person's skin colour. Our study sought to analyse genetic differences between African, European and admixed African-European subjects where direct spectrometric measurements and photographs of skin colour were made in parallel. We identified strong associations to skin colour variation in the subjects studied from a pigmentation SNP discovery panel of 59 markers and developed a forensic online classifier based on naïve Bayes analysis of the SNP profiles made. A skin colour predictive test is described using the ten most strongly associated SNPs in 8 genes linked to skin pigmentation variation. PMID:25082135

  9. Skin Testing for Allergic Rhinitis: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is the most common type of allergy worldwide. The accuracy of skin testing for allergic rhinitis is still debated. This health technology assessment had two objectives: to determine the diagnostic accuracy of skin-prick and intradermal testing in patients with suspected allergic rhinitis and to estimate the costs to the Ontario health system of skin testing for allergic rhinitis. Methods We searched All Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, CRD Health Technology Assessment Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and NHS Economic Evaluation Database for studies that evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of skin-prick and intradermal testing for allergic rhinitis using nasal provocation as the reference standard. For the clinical evidence review, data extraction and quality assessment were performed using the QUADAS-2 tool. We used the bivariate random-effects model for meta-analysis. For the economic evidence review, we assessed studies using a modified checklist developed by the (United Kingdom) National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. We estimated the annual cost of skin testing for allergic rhinitis in Ontario for 2015 to 2017 using provincial data on testing volumes and costs. Results We meta-analyzed seven studies with a total of 430 patients that assessed the accuracy of skin-prick testing. The pooled pair of sensitivity and specificity for skin-prick testing was 85% and 77%, respectively. We did not perform a meta-analysis for the diagnostic accuracy of intradermal testing due to the small number of studies (n = 4). Of these, two evaluated the accuracy of intradermal testing in confirming negative skin-prick testing results, with sensitivity ranging from 27% to 50% and specificity ranging from 60% to 100%. The other two studies evaluated the accuracy of intradermal testing as a stand-alone tool for diagnosing allergic rhinitis, with

  10. An in vitro human skin test for assessing sensitization potential.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S S; Wang, X N; Fielding, M; Kerry, A; Dickinson, I; Munuswamy, R; Kimber, I; Dickinson, A M

    2016-05-01

    Sensitization to chemicals resulting in an allergy is an important health issue. The current gold-standard method for identification and characterization of skin-sensitizing chemicals was the mouse local lymph node assay (LLNA). However, for a number of reasons there has been an increasing imperative to develop alternative approaches to hazard identification that do not require the use of animals. Here we describe a human in-vitro skin explant test for identification of sensitization hazards and the assessment of relative skin sensitizing potency. This method measures histological damage in human skin as a readout of the immune response induced by the test material. Using this approach we have measured responses to 44 chemicals including skin sensitizers, pre/pro-haptens, respiratory sensitizers, non-sensitizing chemicals (including skin-irritants) and previously misclassified compounds. Based on comparisons with the LLNA, the skin explant test gave 95% specificity, 95% sensitivity, 95% concordance with a correlation coefficient of 0.9. The same specificity and sensitivity were achieved for comparison of results with published human sensitization data with a correlation coefficient of 0.91. The test also successfully identified nickel sulphate as a human skin sensitizer, which was misclassified as negative in the LLNA. In addition, sensitizers and non-sensitizers identified as positive or negative by the skin explant test have induced high/low T cell proliferation and IFNγ production, respectively. Collectively, the data suggests the human in-vitro skin explant test could provide the basis for a novel approach for characterization of the sensitizing activity as a first step in the risk assessment process. PMID:26251951

  11. High reactive oxygen species in fibrotic and nonfibrotic skin of patients with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bourji, Khalil; Meyer, Alain; Chatelus, Emmanuel; Pincemail, Joël; Pigatto, Erika; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Singh, François; Charlier, Corinne; Geny, Bernard; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Punzi, Leonardo; Cozzi, Franco; Sibilia, Jean

    2015-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic multisystemic connective tissue disease characterized by progressive fibrosis affecting skin and internal organs. Despite serious efforts to unveil the pathogenic mechanisms of SSc, they are still unclear. High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in affected patients have been shown, and ROS are suggested to play a role in fibrosis pathogenesis. In this study we evaluate ROS levels in nonfibrotic and fibrotic skin of patients with SSc and we compare them with those obtained from healthy controls. We enrolled nine SSc patients fulfilling the EULAR/ACR classification criteria and seven healthy controls. Patients included four men and five women with mean age of 46 ± 10 years. Controls were matched by sex and age. All patients were affected by the diffuse cutaneous form of SSc and the ANA pattern anti-Scl70. Mean disease duration was 7.5 ± 5 years. Skin involvement was evaluated by modified Rodnan skin score. Skin samples (4-mm punch biopsy) were taken from fibrotic skin and nonfibrotic skin of patients and from healthy controls as well. To detect ROS, specimens were analyzed immediately after sampling by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Blood samples were drawn from all patients and controls to assess oxidative stress biomarkers. ROS levels (expressed as median and range, in nmol/L/min/mg of dry weight) were 24.7 (10.9-47.0) in fibrotic skin, 18.7 (7.3-34.0) in nonfibrotic skin, and 7.7 (3.5-13.6) in healthy control skin. ROS levels in fibrotic and nonfibrotic skin of SSc patients were significantly higher than in healthy controls (p = 0.002 and p = 0.009, respectively). ROS levels in fibrotic skin were raised in comparison to nonfibrotic skin, when samples related to each patient were compared (p = 0.01). ROS levels in fibrotic skin were correlated with forced vital capacity (r = -0.75, p = 0.02) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r = 0.70, p = 0.04). All other clinical and lab parameters showed no

  12. Ultrasonic testing of reactive powder concrete.

    PubMed

    Washer, Glenn; Fuchs, Paul; Graybeal, Benjamin A; Hartmann, Joseph Lawrence

    2004-02-01

    Concrete is a critical material for the construction of infrastructure facilities throughout the world. Traditional concretes consist of cement paste and aggregates ranging in size from 6 to 25 mm that form a heterogeneous material with substantial compressive strength and a very low tensile strength. Steel reinforcement is used to provide tensile strength for reinforced concrete structures and as a composite the material is useful for structural applications. A new material known as reactive powder concrete (RPC) is becoming available. It differs significantly from traditional concrete; RPC has no large aggregates, and contains small steel fibers that provide additional strength and, in some cases, can replace traditional steel reinforcement. Due to its high density and lack of aggregates, ultrasonic inspections at frequencies 10 to 20 times that of traditional concrete inspections are possible. This paper reports on the initial findings of research conducted to determine the applicability of ultrasonic testing techniques for the condition assessment of RPC. Pulse velocities for shear and longitudinal waves and ultrasonic measurement of the modulus of elasticity for RPC are reported. Ultrasonic crack detection for RPC also is investigated. PMID:15055809

  13. Skin testing for allergic diseases: techniques, indications and interpretations.

    PubMed

    Villacorte, G V

    1978-01-01

    Despite significant strides in serologic methodologies, the skin test, when properly done, has remained the single most sensitive and practical assay for specific dermal-bound reaginic antibody. Its value could further be enhanced if and when characterization and standardization of the allergen extracts become a reality. While the technique is simple, the indications and interpretations of allergy skin tests required the expertise of well-trained allergists. A positive skin reaction is no more than a mere supportive laboratory aid in the diagnosis of allergic disease, which is arrived at through a carefully taken detailed history and a meticulously done physical examination. PMID:748833

  14. Reactivity initiated accident test series Test RIA 1-4

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, Z.R.; El-Genk, M.S.; Fukuda, S.K.; LaPointe, R.E.; Osetek, D.J.

    1980-05-01

    The Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Test RIA 1-4, the first 9-rod fuel rod bundle RIA Test to be performed at BWR hot startup conditions, was completed on April 16, 1980. The test was performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF). Objective for Test RIA 1-4 was to provide information regarding loss-of-coolable fuel rod geometry following a RIA event for a peak fuel enthalpy equivalent to the present licensing criteria of 280 cal/g. The most severe RIA is the postulated Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) control rod drop during reactor startup. Therefore the test was conducted at BWR hot startup coolant conditions (538 K, 6.45 MPa, 0.8 1/sec). The test sequence began with steady power operation to condition the fuel, establish a short-lived fission product inventory, and calibrate the calorimetric measurements and core power chambers, neutron flux and gamma flux detectors. The test train was removed from the in-pile tube (IPT) to replace one of the fuel rods with a nominally identical irradiated rod and twelve flux wire monitors. A 2.8 ms period power burst was then performed. Coolant flow measurements were made before and after the power burst to characterize the flow blockage that occurred as a result of fuel rod failure.

  15. Autonomic Nervous System Reactivity During Speech Repetition Tasks: Heart Rate Variability and Skin Conductance.

    PubMed

    Mackersie, Carol L; Calderon-Moultrie, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive and emotional challenges may elicit a physiological stress response that can include arousal of the sympathetic nervous system (fight or flight response) and withdrawal of the parasympathetic nervous system (responsible for recovery and rest). This article reviews studies that have used measures of electrodermal activity (skin conductance) and heart rate variability (HRV) to index sympathetic and parasympathetic activity during auditory tasks. In addition, the authors present results from a new study with normal-hearing listeners examining the effects of speaking rate on changes in skin conductance and high-frequency HRV (HF-HRV). Sentence repetition accuracy for normal and fast speaking rates was measured in noise using signal to noise ratios that were adjusted to approximate 80% accuracy (+3 dB fast rate; 0 dB normal rate) while monitoring skin conductance and HF-HRV activity. A significant increase in skin conductance level (reflecting sympathetic nervous system arousal) and a decrease in HF-HRV (reflecting parasympathetic nervous system withdrawal) were observed with an increase in speaking rate indicating sensitivity of both measures to increased task demand. Changes in psychophysiological reactivity with increased auditory task demand may reflect differences in listening effort, but other person-related factors such as motivation and stress may also play a role. Further research is needed to understand how psychophysiological activity during listening tasks is influenced by the acoustic characteristics of stimuli, task demands, and by the characteristics and emotional responses of the individual. PMID:27355761

  16. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase G894T gene polymorphism and response to skin reactive hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Aida Hanum Ghulam; Ghazali, Dzuzaini Mohd; Abdullah, Haswati; Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Wong, Abd Rahim

    2009-09-01

    Post occlusive skin reactive hyperemia (PORH) is a tool used to assess microcirculation. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediates nitric oxide (NO) production; polymorphism of the eNOS gene may affect response to the PORH process. This study aims to determine whether eNOS G894T gene polymorphism affects response to skin PORH. 230 normotensive male and females between 18 and 40 years participated in this cross-sectional study. 170 subjects were of the homozygous GG genotype, whereas 60 were of the GT genotype. Skin PORH was performed by occlusion of the upper arm at 200 mm Hg for 3 min. Skin perfusion and temperature were monitored before, during and after occlusion release using the laser Doppler fluximetry. There were no significant differences between genotypes in their baseline blood pressure, serum cholesterol, BMI and age. Maximum change in perfusion after occlusion release (PORHmax) for the GG and GT genotypes were not significantly different at 50.15+/-1.29 vs. 47.92+/-2.17 AU; ANCOVA, p=0.351. Peak perfusion (PORHpeak) were also not significantly different between the two genotypes (61.23+/-1.36 vs. 57.72+/-2.32 AU; p=0.169). Minimum baseline perfusion were however higher in the GG compared to the GT genotype (10.83+/-0.29 vs. 9.61+/-0.50, p=0.029). We conclude that microvascular reactivity, assessed by change in perfusion after temporary ischemia was not significantly different between the GG and GT genotypes of the eNOS G894T gene. eNOS 894T allele carriers however, have lower baseline perfusion compared to the homozygous G894 allele carrier. PMID:19481100

  17. Early skin and challenge testing after rocuronium anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Schulberg, E M; Webb, A R; Kolawole, H

    2016-05-01

    We present a case of early skin and challenge testing in a patient following severe anaphylaxis to rocuronium. The patient presented for semi-elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy and developed anaphylaxis with severe cardiovascular collapse after induction of anaesthesia. Surgery was cancelled but was considered necessary before the recommended four to six weeks for formal allergy testing. Limited skin and challenge testing was performed to rocuronium and cisatracurium while the patient was in the intensive care unit to identify a safe neuromuscular blocking drug for subsequent early surgery. The subsequent surgery, 48 hours after the initial reaction, was uneventful. The case highlights the difficulties when anaesthetising patients with recent anaphylaxis who have not yet had formal allergy testing and presents a potential management strategy involving early skin testing. PMID:27246945

  18. Evaluation of a High-Throughput Peptide Reactivity Format Assay for Assessment of the Skin Sensitization Potential of Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chin Lin; Lam, Ai-Leen; Smith, Maree T.; Ghassabian, Sussan

    2016-01-01

    The direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) is a validated method for in vitro assessment of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals. In the present work, we describe a peptide reactivity assay using 96-well plate format and systematically identified the optimal assay conditions for accurate and reproducible classification of chemicals with known sensitizing capacity. The aim of the research is to ensure that the analytical component of the peptide reactivity assay is robust, accurate, and reproducible in accordance with criteria that are used for the validation of bioanalytical methods. Analytical performance was evaluated using quality control samples (QCs; heptapeptides at low, medium, and high concentrations) and incubation of control chemicals (chemicals with known sensitization capacity, weak, moderate, strong, extreme, and non-sensitizers) with each of three synthetic heptapeptides, viz Cor1-C420 (Ac-NKKCDLF), cysteine- (Ac-RFAACAA), and lysine- (Ac-RFAAKAA) containing heptapeptides. The optimal incubation temperature for all three heptapeptides was 25°C. Apparent heptapeptide depletion was affected by vial material composition. Incubation of test chemicals with Cor1-C420, showed that peptide depletion was unchanged in polypropylene vials over 3-days storage in an autosampler but this was not the case for borosilicate glass vials. For cysteine-containing heptapeptide, the concentration was not stable by day 3 post-incubation in borosilicate glass vials. Although the lysine-containing heptapeptide concentration was unchanged in both polypropylene and borosilicate glass vials, the apparent extent of lysine-containing heptapeptide depletion by ethyl acrylate, differed between polypropylene (24.7%) and glass (47.3%) vials. Additionally, the peptide-chemical complexes for Cor1-C420-cinnamaldehyde and cysteine-containing heptapeptide-2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene were partially reversible during 3-days of autosampler storage. These observations further highlight

  19. Estimating Skin Cancer Risk: Evaluating Mobile Computer-Adaptive Testing

    PubMed Central

    Djaja, Ngadiman; Janda, Monika; Olsen, Catherine M; Whiteman, David C

    2016-01-01

    Background Response burden is a major detriment to questionnaire completion rates. Computer adaptive testing may offer advantages over non-adaptive testing, including reduction of numbers of items required for precise measurement. Objective Our aim was to compare the efficiency of non-adaptive (NAT) and computer adaptive testing (CAT) facilitated by Partial Credit Model (PCM)-derived calibration to estimate skin cancer risk. Methods We used a random sample from a population-based Australian cohort study of skin cancer risk (N=43,794). All 30 items of the skin cancer risk scale were calibrated with the Rasch PCM. A total of 1000 cases generated following a normal distribution (mean [SD] 0 [1]) were simulated using three Rasch models with three fixed-item (dichotomous, rating scale, and partial credit) scenarios, respectively. We calculated the comparative efficiency and precision of CAT and NAT (shortening of questionnaire length and the count difference number ratio less than 5% using independent t tests). Results We found that use of CAT led to smaller person standard error of the estimated measure than NAT, with substantially higher efficiency but no loss of precision, reducing response burden by 48%, 66%, and 66% for dichotomous, Rating Scale Model, and PCM models, respectively. Conclusions CAT-based administrations of the skin cancer risk scale could substantially reduce participant burden without compromising measurement precision. A mobile computer adaptive test was developed to help people efficiently assess their skin cancer risk. PMID:26800642

  20. Artificial microfluidic skin for in vitro perspiration simulation and testing.

    PubMed

    Hou, Linlin; Hagen, Joshua; Wang, Xiao; Papautsky, Ian; Naik, Rajesh; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy; Heikenfeld, Jason

    2013-05-21

    To expedite development of any skin wearable material, product, or device, an artificial perspiration (sweat) simulator can provide improved ease, cost, control, flexibility, and reproducibility in comparison to human or animal tests. Reported here is a human perspiration mimicking device including microreplicated skin-texture. A bottom 0.2 μm track etched polycarbonate membrane layer provides flow-rate control while a top photo-curable layer provides skin-like features such as sweat pore density, hydrophobicity, and wetting hysteresis. Key capabilities of this sweat simulator include: constant 'sweat' rate density without bubble-point variation even down to ~1 L h(-1) m(-2); replication of the 2 pores mm(-2) pore-density and the ~50 μm texture of human skin; simple gravity-fed flow control; low-cost and disposable construction. PMID:23576120

  1. Chemical reactivity indices and mechanism-based read-across for non-animal based assessment of skin sensitisation potential.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David W; Aptula, Aynur O; Patlewicz, Grace; Pease, Camilla

    2008-05-01

    The skin sensitisation potential of chemicals is currently assessed using in vivo methods where the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) is typically the method of first choice. Current regulatory initiatives are driving the impetus for the use of in vitro/in silico alternative approaches to provide the relevant information needed for the effective assessment of skin sensitisation, for both hazard characterisation and risk assessment purposes. A chemical must undergo a number of steps for it to induce skin sensitisation but the main determining step is formation of a stable covalent association with carrier protein. The ability of a chemical to react covalently with carrier protein nucleophiles relates to both its electrophilic reactivity and its hydrophobicity. This paper focuses on quantitative indices of electrophilic reactivity with nucleophiles, in a chemical mechanism-of-action context, and compares and contrasts the experimental approaches available to generate reactivity data that are suitable for mathematical modelling and making predictions of skin sensitisation potential, using new chemistry data correlated against existing in vivo bioassay data. As such, the paper goes on to describe an illustrative example of how quantitative kinetic measures of reactivity can be usefully and simply applied to perform mechanism-based read-across that enables hazard characterisation of skin sensitisation potential. An illustration of the types of quantitative mechanistic models that could be built using databases of kinetic measures of reactivity, hydrophobicity and existing in vivo bioassay data is also given. PMID:17703503

  2. Comparison between sensitivity of autologous skin serum test and autologous plasma skin test in patients with Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria for detection of antibody against IgE or IgE receptor (FcεRIα).

    PubMed

    Sajedi, Vahid; Movahedi, Masoud; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Aghamohamadi, Asghar; Gharagozlou, Mohammad; Ghareguzlou, Mohammad; Shafiei, Alireza; Soheili, Habib; Sanajian, Nahal

    2011-06-01

    Intradermal injection of autologous serum and plasma elicit a cutaneous reactivity in almost 45-60% of patients with Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria (CIU). This reactivity is associated with the presence of auto antibodies against IgE or IgE receptors. This study was carried out to compare the cutaneous reactivity of autologous serum and plasma skin tests in a series of patients with CIU for diagnosis of auto antibodies against IgE or IgE receptor. Fifty eight patients with CIU were injected intradermally with autologous serum and plasma (anticoagulated by citrate). Histamine was used as positive control and normal saline as negative control. The study group was checked by routine laboratory tests (CBC, U/A etc), allergens with skin prick tests, and serum IgE level, and auto antibodies against thyroid as well. Duration of urticaria was another factor which was assessed.There was no significant difference between positive ASST and positive APST patients for the above mentioned tests. 77.6% of the patients were Positive for APST and 65.5% were ASST positive. Duration of urticaria was longer in patients with positive ASST and APST than ASST and APST negative patients, although the difference was not statistically significant.Autologus serum skin test (ASST) and autologous plasma skin test (APST) could be used for estimation of duration and severity of urticaria and planning for the treatment. PMID:21625019

  3. Improved wheal detection from skin prick test images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulan, Orhan

    2014-03-01

    Skin prick test is a commonly used method for diagnosis of allergic diseases (e.g., pollen allergy, food allergy, etc.) in allergy clinics. The results of this test are erythema and wheal provoked on the skin where the test is applied. The sensitivity of the patient against a specific allergen is determined by the physical size of the wheal, which can be estimated from images captured by digital cameras. Accurate wheal detection from these images is an important step for precise estimation of wheal size. In this paper, we propose a method for improved wheal detection on prick test images captured by digital cameras. Our method operates by first localizing the test region by detecting calibration marks drawn on the skin. The luminance variation across the localized region is eliminated by applying a color transformation from RGB to YCbCr and discarding the luminance channel. We enhance the contrast of the captured images for the purpose of wheal detection by performing principal component analysis on the blue-difference (Cb) and red-difference (Cr) color channels. We finally, perform morphological operations on the contrast enhanced image to detect the wheal on the image plane. Our experiments performed on images acquired from 36 different patients show the efficiency of the proposed method for wheal detection from skin prick test images captured in an uncontrolled environment.

  4. Harsh Parenting and Child Externalizing Behavior: Skin Conductance Level Reactivity as a Moderator

    PubMed Central

    Erath, Stephen A.; El-Sheikh, Mona; Cummings, E. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Skin conductance level reactivity (SCLR) was examined as a moderator of the association between harsh parenting and child externalizing behavior. Participants were 251 boys and girls (8–9 years). Mothers and fathers provided reports of harsh parenting and their children’s externalizing behavior; children also provided reports of harsh parenting. SCLR was assessed in response to a socioemotional stress task and a problem-solving challenge task. Regression analyses revealed that the association between harsh parenting and externalizing behavior was stronger among children with lower SCLR, as compared to children with higher SCLR. SCLR may be a more robust moderator among boys compared to girls. Results are discussed with regard to theories on antisocial behavior and multiple-domain models of child development. PMID:19467012

  5. Non-animal test methods for predicting skin sensitization potentials.

    PubMed

    Mehling, Annette; Eriksson, Tove; Eltze, Tobias; Kolle, Susanne; Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Teubner, Wera; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-08-01

    Contact allergies are complex diseases, and it is estimated that 15-20 % of the general population suffers from contact allergy, with increasing prevalence. Evaluation of the sensitization potential of a substance is usually carried out in animal models. Nowadays, there is much interest in reducing and ultimately replacing current animal tests. Furthermore, as of 2013, the EU has posed a ban on animal testing of cosmetic ingredients that includes skin sensitization. Therefore, predictive and robust in vitro tests are urgently needed. In order to establish alternatives to animal testing, the in vitro tests must mimic the very complex interactions between the sensitizing chemical and the different parts of the immune system. This review article summarizes recent efforts to develop in vitro tests for predicting skin sensitizers. Cell-based assays, in chemico methods and, to a lesser extent, in silico methods are presented together with a discussion of their current status. With considerable progress having been achieved during the last years, the rationale today is that data from different non-animal test methods will have to be combined in order to obtain reliable hazard and potency information on potential skin sensitizers. PMID:22707154

  6. Antioxidant inhibition of skin inflammation induced by reactive oxidants: evaluation of the redox couple dihydrolipoate/lipoate.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, J; Milbradt, R

    1994-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species play an important role in mediating skin inflammation, and antioxidants may provide protection. We investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of natural antioxidants, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, trolox (a water-soluble tocopherol analog) and the redox couple dihydrolipoate/lipoate in skin. Furthermore we compared the anti-inflammatory potency of natural R and racemic dihydrolipoate, as well as R and S lipoate. Skin inflammation in hairless mice was induced by intradermal injection of the hydrogen peroxide producing enzyme glucose oxidase (GOD) or by topical application of the prooxidant drug anthralin. Intradermal injection of the antioxidants inhibited skin inflammation caused by GOD (catalase, dihydrolipoate) and anthralin (trolox, superoxide dismutase, dihydrolipoate). There was no statistically significant difference between the anti-inflammatory activity of the natural R and racemic dihydrolipoate. R or S lipoate did not inhibit skin inflammation when injected intradermally. In feeding experiments, however, R lipoate significantly inhibited GOD-mediated skin inflammation, while S lipoate was only marginally protective. We conclude that (1) several natural antioxidants such as catalase, superoxide dismutase and dihydrolipoate have anti-inflammatory properties in dermatitis induced by reactive oxidants, (2) lipoate (oxidized dihydrolipoate) has skin anti-inflammatory activity when administered orally and (3) naturally occurring R lipoate is a more potent anti-inflammatory agent than the non-physiological S lipoate. PMID:8054210

  7. Functional testing of topical skin formulations using an optimised ex vivo skin organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Sidgwick, G P; McGeorge, D; Bayat, A

    2016-07-01

    A number of equivalent-skin models are available for investigation of the ex vivo effect of topical application of drugs and cosmaceuticals onto skin, however many have their drawbacks. With the March 2013 ban on animal models for cosmetic testing of products or ingredients for sale in the EU, their utility for testing toxicity and effect on skin becomes more relevant. The aim of this study was to demonstrate proof of principle that altered expression of key gene and protein markers could be quantified in an optimised whole tissue biopsy culture model. Topical formulations containing green tea catechins (GTC) were investigated in a skin biopsy culture model (n = 11). Punch biopsies were harvested at 3, 7 and 10 days, and analysed using qRT-PCR, histology and HPLC to determine gene and protein expression, and transdermal delivery of compounds of interest. Reduced gene expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, mast cell tryptase, mast cell chymase, TGF-β1, CTGF and PAI-1 was observed after 7 and 10 days compared with treated controls (p < 0.05). Histological analysis indicated a reduction in mast cell tryptase and chymase positive cell numbers in treated biopsies compared with untreated controls at day 7 and day 10 (p < 0.05). Determination of transdermal uptake indicated that GTCs were detected in the biopsies. This model could be adapted to study a range of different topical formulations in both normal and diseased skin, negating the requirement for animal models in this context, prior to study in a clinical trial environment. PMID:27086034

  8. Pumpless microfluidic platform for drug testing on human skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Gledhill, Karl; Guo, Zongyou; Christiano, Angela M; Shuler, Michael L

    2015-02-01

    Advances in bio-mimetic in vitro human skin models increase the efficiency of drug screening studies. In this study, we designed and developed a microfluidic platform that allows for long-term maintenance of full thickness human skin equivalents (HSE) which are comprised of both the epidermal and dermal compartments. The design is based on the physiologically relevant blood residence times in human skin tissue and allows for the establishment of an air-epidermal interface which is crucial for maturation and terminal differentiation of HSEs. The small scale of the design reduces the amount of culture medium and the number of cells required by 36 fold compared to conventional transwell cultures. Our HSE-on-a-chip platform has the capability to recirculate the medium at desired flow rates without the need for pump or external tube connections. We demonstrate that the platform can be used to maintain HSEs for three weeks with proliferating keratinocytes similar to conventional HSE cultures. Immunohistochemistry analyses show that the differentiation and localization of keratinocytes was successfully achieved, establishing all sub-layers of the epidermis after one week. Basal keratinocytes located at the epidermal-dermal interface remain in a proliferative state for three weeks. We use a transdermal transport model to show that the skin barrier function is maintained for three weeks. We also validate the capability of the HSE-on-a-chip platform to be used for drug testing purposes by examining the toxic effects of doxorubucin on skin cells and structure. Overall, the HSE-on-a-chip is a user-friendly and cost-effective in vitro platform for drug testing of candidate molecules for skin disorders. PMID:25490891

  9. Validation of artificial skin equivalents as in vitro testing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Robert; Marx, Ulrich; Walles, Heike; Schober, Lena

    2011-03-01

    With the increasing complexity of the chemical composition of pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and everyday substances, the awareness of potential health issues and long term damages for humanoid organs is shifting into focus. Artificial in vitro testing systems play an important role in providing reliable test conditions and replacing precarious animal testing. Especially artificial skin equivalents ASEs are used for a broad spectrum of studies like penetration, irritation and corrosion of substances. One major challenge in tissue engineering is the qualification of each individual ASE as in vitro testing system. Due to biological fluctuations, the stratum corneum hornified layer of some ASEs may not fully develop or other defects might occur. For monitoring these effects we developed an fully automated Optical Coherence Tomography device. Here, we present different methods to characterize and evaluate the quality of the ASEs based on image and data processing of OCT B-scans. By analysing the surface structure, defects, like cuts or tears, are detectable. A further indicator for the quality of the ASE is the morphology of the tissue. This allows to determine if the skin model has reached the final growth state. We found, that OCT is a well suited technology for automatically characterizing artificial skin equivalents and validating the application as testing system.

  10. Marital Conflict and Risk for Child Maladjustment over Time: Skin Conductance Level Reactivity as a Vulnerability Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Keller, Peggy S.; Erath, Stephen A.

    2007-01-01

    Skin conductance level reactivity (SCLR) was examined as a longitudinal mediator and moderator of relations between parental marital conflict and psychopathology among children and young adolescents. Participants were 157 boys and girls (M age at T1 = 9.31 years; SD = 1.97); there was a 2-year lag between T1 and T2 assessments. At T1,…

  11. Allergy to aminophylline: lack of predictability by skin testing.

    PubMed

    Kradjan, W A; Lakshminarayan, S

    1981-07-01

    Problems with determining hypersensitivity to aminophylline, ethylenediamine, and theophylline with intradermal skin tests and patch tests are reported in three patients. Three patients were tested with intradermal injections of 0.9% sodium chloride, 1% aminophylline, 1% ethylenediamine, and 0.5% theophylline following apparent allergic reactions to aminophylline. Patch testing using hydrophilic ointment base, 1% aminophylline, 1% ethylenediamine, and 0.5% theophylline was also done. All three patients had no reaction to intradermal sodium chloride or theophylline; all patch tests were negative. The first patient reacted to ethylenediamine strongly and to aminophylline more weakly; punch biopsy of the ethylenediamine reaction site showed a direct toxic effect with no allergic component. Punch biopsy of the aminophylline site showed a typical hypersensitivity reaction. Two concentrations (0.5% and 1.0%) of ethylenediamine injection were used to test the second patient, and he reacted to both concentrations but not to any other injections. His positive reactions contained blisters rather than the typical wheal-and-flare reaction of hypersensitivity. The third patient had similar responses including reactions to 0.5% and 0.1% ethylenediamine (he was not tested with 1% ethylenediamine). Skin testing may be of value in predicting aminophylline or ethylenediamine allergy, but the nonspecific toxic effect of ethylenediamine makes interpretation difficult. PMID:7258203

  12. Diagnostic performance of the "MESACUP anti-Skin profile TEST".

    PubMed

    Horváth, Orsolya N; Varga, Rita; Kaneda, Makoto; Schmidt, Enno; Ruzicka, Thomas; Sárdy, Miklós

    2016-02-01

    The "MESACUP anti-Skin profile TEST" is a new, commercially available ELISA kit to detect circulating IgG autoantibodies against desmoglein 1, desmoglein 3, BP180, BP230, and type VII collagen, both simultaneously and more rapidly than previous assays. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of this kit for the diagnosis of pemphigus foliaceus, pemphigus vulgaris, bullous pemphigoid and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. Dual-centre retrospective study in which 138 patients with autoimmune blistering diseases were compared to 40 controls Using the MESACUP anti-Skin profile TEST, both sensitivities and specificities for desmoglein 1, desmoglein 3, BP180, BP230, and type VII collagen autoantibodies were similar to those obtained using previous, specific ELISA systems and 88% of the results were concordant without any significant difference. The MESACUP anti-Skin profile TEST had a similar performance to previously produced ELISA systems. The novel kit can be used for rapid diagnosis of most common autoimmune blistering diseases and is especially suitable for identifying overlapping disorders. PMID:26771500

  13. Reactivity test between beryllium and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, H.; Kato, M.

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium has been expected for using as plasma facing material on ITER. And, copper alloy has been proposed as heat sink material behind plasma facing components. Therefore, both materials must be joined. However, the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper alloy does not clear in detail. For example, other authors reported that beryllium reacted with copper at high temperature, but it was not obvious about the generation of reaction products and increasing of the reaction layer. In the present work, from this point, for clarifying the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper, the out-of-pile compatibility tests were conducted with diffusion couples of beryllium and copper which were inserted in the capsule filled with high purity helium gas (6N). Annealing temperatures were 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700{degrees}C, and annealing periods were 100, 300 and 1000h. Beryllium specimens were hot pressed beryllium, and copper specimens were OFC (Oxygen Free Copper).

  14. Structural modification of the skin barrier by OH radicals: a reactive molecular dynamics study for plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Paal, J.; Verlackt, C. C.; Yusupov, M.; Neyts, E. C.; Bogaerts, A.

    2015-04-01

    While plasma treatment of skin diseases and wound healing has been proven highly effective, the underlying mechanisms, and more generally the effect of plasma radicals on skin tissue, are not yet completely understood. In this paper, we perform ReaxFF-based reactive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interaction of plasma generated OH radicals with a model system composed of free fatty acids, ceramides, and cholesterol molecules. This model system is an approximation of the upper layer of the skin (stratum corneum). All interaction mechanisms observed in our simulations are initiated by H-abstraction from one of the ceramides. This reaction, in turn, often starts a cascade of other reactions, which eventually lead to the formation of aldehydes, the dissociation of ceramides or the elimination of formaldehyde, and thus eventually to the degradation of the skin barrier function.

  15. Oral Toxicity Study and Skin Sensitization Test of a Cricket.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyeon Yeol; Lee, Somin; Ahn, Kyu Sup; Kim, Hye Jin; Lee, Sang Sik; Ko, Hyuk Ju; Lee, Jin Kyu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Ahn, Mi Young; Kim, Eun Mi; Lim, Jeong Ho; Song, Kyung Seuk

    2016-04-01

    Crickets have been attracting considerable interest in the field of nutrition and toxicology due to the global exhaustion of food resulting from a growing population. The cricket is normally eaten in several countries after roasting, similar to the grasshopper; however, safety evaluation data on cricket powder is limited. Here, we performed general toxicity studies of cricket powder including a single, 2-week repeated dose range evaluation test, a 13-week repeated oral dose toxicity test in Sprague-Dawley rats, a single oral dose toxicity test in Beagle dogs, and a skin sensitization test in guinea pigs following the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development test guidelines 406 and 408 in addition to Good Laboratory Practice. To investigate the NOAEL and target organs of cricket powder, Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to 4 groups: vehicle control, 1,250 mg/kg, 2,500 mg/kg, 5,000 mg/kg dose test groups and cricket powder was administered over 13 weeks after single dose and dose range finding studies in rats based on the results of the single oral administration toxicity study in rats and Beagle dogs. The results of the study showed that the NOAEL of cricket powder was over 5,000 mg/kg for both sexes of rats without adverse effects in a 13-week repeated oral toxicity study and there was no skin hypersensitivity reaction. Therefore, our results reveal that crickets can be widely used as a new substitute food or nutrient resource. PMID:27123167

  16. Oral Toxicity Study and Skin Sensitization Test of a Cricket

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyeon Yeol; Lee, Somin; Ahn, Kyu Sup; Kim, Hye Jin; Lee, Sang Sik; Ko, Hyuk Ju; Lee, Jin Kyu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Ahn, Mi Young; Kim, Eun Mi; Lim, Jeong Ho; Song, Kyung Seuk

    2016-01-01

    Crickets have been attracting considerable interest in the field of nutrition and toxicology due to the global exhaustion of food resulting from a growing population. The cricket is normally eaten in several countries after roasting, similar to the grasshopper; however, safety evaluation data on cricket powder is limited. Here, we performed general toxicity studies of cricket powder including a single, 2-week repeated dose range evaluation test, a 13-week repeated oral dose toxicity test in Sprague-Dawley rats, a single oral dose toxicity test in Beagle dogs, and a skin sensitization test in guinea pigs following the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development test guidelines 406 and 408 in addition to Good Laboratory Practice. To investigate the NOAEL and target organs of cricket powder, Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to 4 groups: vehicle control, 1,250 mg/kg, 2,500 mg/kg, 5,000 mg/kg dose test groups and cricket powder was administered over 13 weeks after single dose and dose range finding studies in rats based on the results of the single oral administration toxicity study in rats and Beagle dogs. The results of the study showed that the NOAEL of cricket powder was over 5,000 mg/kg for both sexes of rats without adverse effects in a 13-week repeated oral toxicity study and there was no skin hypersensitivity reaction. Therefore, our results reveal that crickets can be widely used as a new substitute food or nutrient resource. PMID:27123167

  17. Apparatus for testing skin samples or the like

    DOEpatents

    Holland, J.M.

    1982-08-31

    An apparatus for testing the permeability of living skin samples has a flat base with a plurality of sample-holding cavities formed in its upper surface, the samples being placed in counterbores in the cavities with the epidermis uppermost. O-rings of Teflon washers are respectively placed on the samples and a flat cover is connected to the base to press the rings against the upper surfaces of the samples. Media to maintain tissue viability and recovery of metabolites is introduced into the lower portion of the sample-holding cavities through passages in the base. Test materials are introduced through holes in the cover plate after assembly of the chamber.

  18. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. 866....5270 C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A C-reactive protein... the C-reactive protein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of C-reactive protein aids...

  19. Skin Conductance Level Reactivity Moderates the Association Between Harsh Parenting and Growth in Child Externalizing Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Erath, Stephen A.; El-Sheikh, Mona; Hinnant, J. Benjamin; Cummings, E. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Skin conductance level reactivity (SCLR) was examined as a moderator of the association between harsh parenting at age 8 years and growth in child externalizing behavior from age 8 to age 10 (N = 251). Mothers and fathers provided reports of harsh parenting and their children’s externalizing behavior; children also provided reports of harsh parenting. SCLR was assessed in response to a socioemotional stress task and a problem-solving challenge task. Latent growth modeling revealed that boys with higher harsh parenting in conjunction with lower SCLR exhibited relatively high and stable levels of externalizing behavior during late childhood. Boys with higher harsh parenting and higher SCLR exhibited relatively low to moderate levels of externalizing behavior at age 8, but some results suggested that their externalizing behavior increased over time, approaching the same levels as boys with higher harsh parenting and lower SCLR by age 10. For the most part, girls and boys with lower harsh parenting were given relatively low and stable ratings of externalizing behavior throughout late childhood. Results are discussed from a developmental psychopathology perspective with reference to models of antisocial behavior in childhood. PMID:21142369

  20. Peptide reactivity associated with skin sensitization: The QSAR Toolbox and TIMES compared to the DPRA.

    PubMed

    Urbisch, D; Honarvar, N; Kolle, S N; Mehling, A; Ramirez, T; Teubner, W; Landsiedel, R

    2016-08-01

    The molecular initiating event (MIE) of skin sensitization is the binding of a hapten to dermal proteins. This can be assessed using the in chemico direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) or in silico tools such as the QSAR Toolbox and TIMES SS. In this study, the suitability of these methods was analyzed by comparing their results to in vivo sensitization data of LLNA and human studies. Compared to human data, 84% of non-sensitizers and sensitizers yielded consistent results in the DPRA. In silico tools resulted in 'no alert' for 83%-100% of the non-sensitizers, but alerted only 55%-61% of the sensitizers. The inclusion of biotic and abiotic transformation simulations yielded more alerts for sensitizers, but simultaneously dropped the number of non-alerted non-sensitizers. In contrast to the DPRA, in silico tools were more consistent with results of the LLNA than human data. Interestingly, the new "DPRA profilers" (QSAR Toolbox) provided unsatisfactory results. Additionally, the results were combined in the '2 out of 3' prediction model with in vitro data derived from LuSens and h-CLAT. Using DPRA results, the model identified 90% of human sensitizers and non-sensitizers; using in silico results (including abiotic and biotic activations) instead of DPRA results led to a comparable high predictivity. PMID:27090964

  1. Skin Conductance Level Reactivity Moderates the Association Between Parental Psychological Control and Relational Aggression in Emerging Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Caitlin R; Abaied, Jamie L

    2016-04-01

    When studying factors that may heighten risk for relational aggression in youth, it is important to consider characteristics of both the individual and their environment. This research examined the associations between parental psychological control and reactive and proactive relational aggression in emerging adults in college. Given that sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation may underlie differences between reactive and proactive aggression and has been shown to moderate the effects of parenting on youth development, the moderating role of SNS reactivity [indexed by skin conductance level reactivity (SCLR)] was also examined. Emerging adults (N = 180; 77.2 % female) self-reported on perceptions of parental psychological control and reactive and proactive relational aggression. SCLR was assessed in response to an interpersonal laboratory challenge task. Parental psychological control was positively associated with reactive relational aggression only for emerging adults who exhibited high SCLR. Parental psychological control was positively associated with proactive relational aggression only among emerging adults who showed low SCLR. This study extends previous research on parenting and aggression and suggests that parental psychological control is differentially associated with reactive versus proactive relational aggression, depending on emerging adults' SCLR to interpersonal stress. PMID:26762376

  2. Pharmacy-based skin-testing program in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Clyne, K E; Ternes, R L

    1996-09-01

    The establishment of a pharmacy-based skin-testing program at a community hospital is described. Problems with existing skin testing were brought to the attention of the pharmacy and therapeutics committee, which decided that one group of caregivers within the hospital should be chosen and trained to perform skin testing. A problem-solving team identified specific problems and developed solutions. The top four causes of the skin-testing problems were failure to follow procedure, inaccurate reading of tests, failure to report positive results, and failure to document results. Groups within the hospital who might perform skin testing were assessed according to several criteria; the pharmacy staff was selected because of ease of notification, availability, and ability to conduct follow-through (reading, documenting, and reporting results). Other improvements were step-by-step instructions for all phases of skin testing, a portable skin-test supply kit, and a skin-test record form to be placed in the physician progress notes. Pharmacists were trained by the employee health nurse. Pharmacist skin testing began in March 1995. Pharmacists administered tests to 93 inpatients and about 250 employees during the first 13 months of the program, and no problems were reported. Establishment of a pharmacy-based skin-testing program improved the quality of inpatient skin testing and enabled pharmacists to increase their role in patient care. PMID:8870893

  3. A dataset on 145 chemicals tested in alternative assays for skin sensitization undergoing prevalidation.

    PubMed

    Natsch, Andreas; Ryan, Cindy A; Foertsch, Leslie; Emter, Roger; Jaworska, Joanna; Gerberick, Frank; Kern, Petra

    2013-11-01

    Skin sensitization is a key endpoint for cosmetic ingredients, with a forthcoming ban for animal testing in Europe. Four alternative tests have so far been submitted to ECVAM prevalidation: (i) MUSST and (ii) h-Clat assess surface markers on dendritic cell lines, (iii) the direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) measures reactivity with model peptides and (iv) the KeratinoSens(TM) assay which is based on detection of Nrf2-induced luciferase. It is anticipated that only an integrated testing strategy (ITS) based on a battery of tests might give a full replacement providing also a sensitization potency assessment, but this concept should be tested with a data-driven analysis. Here we report a database on 145 chemicals reporting the quantitative endpoints measured in a U937- test, the DPRA and KeratinoSens(TM) . It can serve to develop data-driven ITS approaches as we show in a parallel paper and provides a view as to the current ability to predict with in vitro tests as we are entering 2013. It may also serve as reference database when benchmarking new molecules with in vitro based read-across and find use as a reference database when evaluating new tests. The tests and combinations thereof were evaluated for predictivity, and overall a similar predictivity was found as before on three-fold smaller datasets. Analysis of the dose-response parameters of the individual tests indicates a correlation to sensitization potency. Detailed analysis of chemicals false-negative and false-positive in two tests helped to define limitations in the tests but also in the database derived from animal studies. PMID:23576290

  4. Sleep Deprived and Sweating It Out: The Effects of Total Sleep Deprivation on Skin Conductance Reactivity to Psychosocial Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jean C.J.; Verhulst, Silvan; Massar, Stijn A.A.; Chee, Michael W.L.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: We examined how sleep deprivation alters physiological responses to psychosocial stress by evaluating changes in skin conductance. Design: Between-subjects design with one group allocated to 24 h of total sleep deprivation and the other to rested wakefulness. Setting: The study took place in a research laboratory. Participants: Participants were 40 healthy young adults recruited from a university. Interventions: Sleep deprivation and feedback. Measurements and Results: Electrodermal activity was monitored while participants completed a difficult perceptual task with false feedback. All participants showed increased skin conductance levels following stress. However, compared to well-rested participants, sleep deprived participants showed higher skin conductance reactivity with increasing stress levels. Conclusions: Our results suggest that sleep deprivation augments allostatic responses to increasing psychosocial stress. Consequentially, we propose sleep loss as a risk factor that can influence the pathogenic effects of stress. Citation: Liu JC, Verhulst S, Massar SA, Chee MW. Sleep deprived and sweating it out: the effects of total sleep deprivation on skin conductance reactivity to psychosocial stress. SLEEP 2015;38(1):155–159. PMID:25325448

  5. Assessment of Pre- and Pro-haptens Using Nonanimal Test Methods for Skin Sensitization.

    PubMed

    Urbisch, Daniel; Becker, Matthias; Honarvar, Naveed; Kolle, Susanne Noreen; Mehling, Annette; Teubner, Wera; Wareing, Britta; Landsiedel, Robert

    2016-05-16

    Because of ethical and regulatory reasons, several nonanimal test methods to assess the skin sensitization potential of chemicals have been developed and validated. In contrast to in vivo methods, they lack or provide limited metabolic capacity. For this reason, identification of pro-haptens but also pre-haptens, which require molecular transformations to gain peptide reactivity, is a challenge for these methods. In this study, 27 pre- and pro-haptens were tested using nonanimal test methods. Of these, 18 provided true positive results in the direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA; sensitivity of 67%), although lacking structural alerts for direct peptide reactivity. The reaction mechanisms leading to peptide depletion in the DPRA were therefore elucidated using mass spectrometry. Hapten-peptide adducts were identified for 13 of the 18 chemicals indicating that these pre-haptens were activated and that peptide binding occurred. Positive results for five of the 18 chemicals can be explained by dipeptide formations or the oxidation of the sulfhydryl group of the peptide. Nine of the 27 chemicals were tested negative in the DPRA. Of these, four yielded true positive results in the keratinocyte and dendritic cell based assays. Likewise, 16 of the 18 chemicals tested positive in the DPRA were also positive in either one or both of the cell-based assays. A combination of DPRA, KeratinoSens, and h-CLAT used in a 2 out of 3 weight of evidence (WoE) approach identified 22 of the 27 pre- and pro-haptens correctly (sensitivity of 81%), exhibiting a similar sensitivity as for directly acting haptens. This analysis shows that the combination of in chemico and in vitro test methods is suitable to identify pre-haptens and the majority of pro-haptens. PMID:27070937

  6. Decreased Serum Epinephrine in Children With Positive Skin Prick Test

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seok-Chan; Suh, Jeffrey D.; Chung, Sochung; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Choi, Ji Ho; Oh, Jeong In; Kim, In-Tae; Kim, Jin Kook

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the association between catecholamine levels and skin prick test results among children. Methods Two hundred eight first grade children from one elementary school were invited to participate in this study. Skin prick test (SPT) for six allergens (2 house dust mites, cat, dog, mugwort, and pollen mixture) was performed, and patient demographic information was recorded. The parents were surveyed using questionnaires about rhinitis-related symptoms. Finally, venous blood sampling was done to measure catecholamine levels (epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine) by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results Out of 208 children, 174 (106 boys and 68 girls) enrolled in this study. Ninety-six of the children (55%) had negative SPT (nonsensitization group), while 78 (45%) had a positive SPT to at least one of six allergens (sensitization group). The diagnosis of chronic rhinitis was more prevalent in the sensitization group (35.9%) than nonsensitization group (26.0%), however the finding was not significant (P=0.186). Epinephrine levels were decreased between the sensitization group compared to the nonsensitization group (P=0.004). There was no difference in norepinephrine and dopamine levels (P>0.05). Conclusion Epinephrine levels are lower in children with positive SPT compared to controls, however, the level of the catecholamine was not associated with the presence or absence of rhinitis symptoms. PMID:26622958

  7. 78 FR 68076 - Request for Information on Alternative Skin Sensitization Test Methods and Testing Strategies and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ...The Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) is developing a U.S. plan for the evaluation of alternative skin sensitization test methods and testing strategies. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM) requests information that ICCVAM might use to develop this plan and......

  8. CHEMICAL REACTIVITY TEST: Assessing Thermal Stability and Chemical Compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Koerner, J; Tran, T; Gagliardi, F; Fontes, A

    2005-04-21

    The thermal stability of high explosive (HE) and its compatibility with other materials are of critical importance in storage and handling practices. These properties are measured at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using the chemical reactivity test (CRT). The CRT measures the total amount of gas evolved from a material or combination of materials after being heat treated for a designated period of time. When the test result is compared to a threshold value, the relative thermal stability of an HE or the compatibility of an HE with other materials is determined. We describe the CRT testing apparatus, the experimental procedure, and the comparison methodology and provide examples and discussion of results.

  9. Freeze-drying as a preserving preparation technique for in vitro testing of human skin.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Lutz; Vidlářová, Lucie; Kostka, Karl-Heinz; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Windbergs, Maike

    2013-01-01

    In vitro testing of drugs with excised human skin is a valuable prerequisite for clinical studies. However, the analysis of excised human skin presents several obstacles. Ongoing drug diffusion, microbial growth and changes in hydration state influence the results of drug penetration studies. In this work, we evaluate freeze-drying as a preserving preparation method for skin samples to overcome these obstacles. We analyse excised human skin before and after freeze-drying and compare these results with human skin in vivo. Based on comprehensive thermal and spectroscopic analysis, we demonstrate comparability to in vivo conditions and exclude significant changes within the skin samples due to freeze-drying. Furthermore, we show that freeze-drying after skin incubation with drugs prevents growth of drug crystals on the skin surface due to drying effects. In conclusion, we introduce freeze-drying as a preserving preparation technique for in vitro testing of human skin. PMID:23278895

  10. A fluorescence high throughput screening method for the detection of reactive electrophiles as potential skin sensitizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skin sensitization is an important toxicological end-point in the risk assessment of chemical allergens. Because of the complexity of the biological mechanisms associated with skin sensitization integrated approaches combining different chemical, biological and in silico methods are recommended to r...

  11. Evaluation of leishmanin skin test in Indian visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Gidwani, Kamlesh; Rai, Madhukar; Chakravarty, Jaya; Boelaert, Marleen; Sundar, Shyam

    2009-04-01

    We evaluated the performance of the leishmanin skin test (LST) in 50 patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL), 124 cured VL patients at different time intervals, 125 healthy controls from an endemic region (HEC), and 14 healthy controls from a non-endemic region (NEHC). The leishmanin antigen used was based on Leishmania major and was obtained from the Pasteur Institute (Iran). A positive LST was found in 14.0% of patients with active VL, 40.3% of cured patients, 21.6% of HECs, and 0% in NEHCs. The 14% positivity in patients with active VL conflicts with the widely held opinion that such patients should be negative because of anergy. Also, a lack of sensitivity of the LST was observed in cured VL patients. An LST antigen produced from L. donovani strains from India should be explored. PMID:19346376

  12. Small-Scale Shock Reactivity and Internal Blast Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granholm, R. H.; Sandusky, H. W.

    2006-07-01

    Explosives react from a strong shock, even in quantities too small for detonation. The potential for a new material to be an explosive can be evaluated from this shock reactivity. The recently developed small-scale shock reactivity test (SSRT) uses very high confinement to allow prompt reactions to occur in less than half-gram samples well below critical diameter. Early and late-time reactions are simultaneously measured from a single sample subjected to the output from an RP-80 detonator. Prompt reactions are quantified by a dent in a soft aluminum witness block, while later reactions, such as from fuel/air combustion, are measured by recording blast pressure. Internal blast quasi-static pressure is obtained by confining the sample apparatus within a three-liter chamber. Late-time reaction effects of plastics, and results from HMX, HMX/Aluminum, and a plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) are reported.

  13. An integrated testing strategy for in vitro skin corrosion and irritation assessment using SkinEthic™ Reconstructed Human Epidermis.

    PubMed

    Alépée, Nathalie; Grandidier, Marie-Hélène; Tornier, Carine; Cotovio, José

    2015-10-01

    The SkinEthic™ Reconstructed Human Epidermis (RHE) method has been formally adopted for the regulatory assessment of skin irritation (OECD TG 439) and corrosion (OECD TG 431). Recently, the OECD adopted an Integrated Approach on Testing and Assessment (IATA) for skin corrosion and skin irritation (OECD GD 203), which provides guidance on the integration of existing and new information in a modular approach for classification and labelling. The present study aimed to evaluate the use of the SkinEthic™ RHE model within the proposed OECD IATA. Data on 86 substances were integrated in a bottom-up and top-down testing strategy to assess their capacity for EU CLP and UN GHS classifications. For EU CLP, strategies showed an accuracy of 84.8% to discriminate non-classified from classified substances, 94.4% to discriminate corrosive from non-corrosive substances, and 68.5% to discriminate the four (sub)-categories. For UN GHS, strategies showed an accuracy of 89.5% to discriminate non-classified from classified substances, 93.4% to discriminate corrosive from non-corrosive substances, and 74.2% to discriminate four GHS (sub)-categories (excluding Category 3). In conclusion, the integration of SkinEthic™ RHE irritation and corrosion data in a bottom-up and top-down testing strategy allows the classification of substances according to EU CLP and UN GHS. PMID:26187475

  14. EVALUATION OF DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF THE COMPARATIVE TUBERCULIN SKIN TEST IN REHABILITANT BORNEAN ORANGUTANS (PONGO PYGMAEUS).

    PubMed

    Dench, Rosalie; Sulistyo, Fransiska; Fahroni, Agus; Philippa, Joost

    2015-12-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) has been the mainstay of tuberculosis (TB) testing in primates for decades, but its interpretation in orangutans (Pongo spp.) is challenging, because many animals react strongly, without evidence of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. One explanation is cross-reactivity with environmental nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). The use of a comparative TST (CTST), comparing reactivity to avian (representing NTM) and bovine (representing tuberculous mycobacteria) tuberculins aids in distinguishing cross-reactivity due to sensitization by NTM from shared antigens. The specificity of the TST can be increased with the use of CTST. We considered three interpretations of the TST in rehabilitant Bornean orangutans ( Pongo pygmaeus ) using avian purified protein derivative (APPD; 25,000 IU/ml) and two concentrations of bovine purified protein derivative (BPPD; 100,000 and 32,500 IU/ml). The tests were evaluated for their ability to identify accurately seven orangutans previously diagnosed with and treated for TB from a group of presumed negative individuals (n = 288 and n = 161 for the two respective BPPD concentrations). BPPD at 32,500 IU/ml had poor diagnostic capacity, whereas BPPD at 100,000 IU/ml performed better. The BPPD-only interpretation had moderate sensitivity (57%) and poor specificity (40%) and accuracy (41%). The comparative interpretation at 72 hr had similar sensitivity (57%) but improved specificity (95%) and accuracy (94%). However, best results were obtained by a comparative interpretation incorporating the 48- and 72-hr scores, which had good sensitivity (86%), specificity (95%) and accuracy (95%). These data reinforce recommendations that a CTST be used in orangutans and support the use of APPD at 25,000 IU/ml and BPPD at 100,000 IU/ml. The highest score at each site from the 48- and 72-hr checks should be considered the result for that tuberculin. If the bovine result is greater than the avian result, the

  15. Prospective multicentre study of the U-SENS test method for skin sensitization testing.

    PubMed

    Alépée, N; Piroird, C; Aujoulat, M; Dreyfuss, S; Hoffmann, S; Hohenstein, A; Meloni, M; Nardelli, L; Gerbeix, C; Cotovio, J

    2015-12-25

    The U-SENS™ is a test method based on the human myeloid U937 cell line to assess the skin sensitisation potential of substances. To demonstrate its robustness, a multicentre validation study with four laboratories testing 24 coded substances has been conducted according to internationally agreed principles. The primary objective of the study was to enlarge the U-SENS™'s reproducibility database. Secondary objectives were to provide additional evidence on its transferability and its predictive capability. Reproducibility within laboratories was approximately 92%, while the reproducibility between laboratories was 87.5%. Predictivity for the 24 validation substances was high, with sensitivity, specificity and accuracy being on average at least 93.8%. Similar performances are obtained for 38 substances when combining the study results with those of an earlier multicentre study, as well as with an automated version of the U-SENS™. With reliability and relevance similar to comparable non-animal skin sensitisation test methods, which have achieved regulatory acceptance, it is concluded that the U-SENS™ is a well reproducible and predictive test method. This profiles the U-SENS™ as a valuable addition to the suite of non-animal testing methods for skin sensitisation with the potential to significantly contribute to the development of integrated testing strategies. PMID:26439184

  16. Grape seed proanthocyanidins reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes in human skin cancer cells by targeting epigenetic regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Jones, Virginia; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2012-08-15

    Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been shown to have anti-skin carcinogenic effects in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise epigenetic molecular mechanisms remain unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether GSPs reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes following epigenetic modifications in skin cancer cells. For this purpose, A431 and SCC13 human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were used as in vitro models. The effects of GSPs on DNA methylation, histone modifications and tumor suppressor gene expressions were studied in these cell lines using enzyme activity assays, western blotting, dot-blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that treatment of A431 and SCC13 cells with GSPs decreased the levels of: (i) global DNA methylation, (ii) 5-methylcytosine, (iii) DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and (iv) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b in these cells. Similar effects were noted when these cancer cells were treated identically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. GSPs decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased levels of acetylated lysines 9 and 14 on histone H3 (H3-Lys 9 and 14) and acetylated lysines 5, 12 and 16 on histone H4, and reduced the levels of methylated H3-Lys 9. Further, GSP treatment resulted in re-expression of the mRNA and proteins of silenced tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1A, p16{sup INK4a} and Cip1/p21. Together, this study provides a new insight into the epigenetic mechanisms of GSPs and may have significant implications for epigenetic therapy in the treatment/prevention of skin cancers in humans. -- Highlights: ►Epigenetic modulations have been shown to have a role in cancer risk. ►Proanthocyanidins decrease the levels of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. ►Proanthocyanidins inhibit histone deacetylase activity in skin cancer cells. ►Proanthocyanidins reactivate tumor suppressor genes in skin

  17. Absence of induction of enhanced reactivation of herpes simplex virus in cells from xeroderma pigmentosum patients without skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahams, P.J.; van der Kleij, A.A.; Schouten, R.; van der Eb, A.J.

    1988-11-01

    The time course of appearance of enhanced reactivation (ER) and enhanced mutagenesis (EM) of herpes simplex virus type 1 were studied in UV-irradiated stationary cultures of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts. In some of the XP cells EM followed similar kinetics of appearance as ER. Maximal activities occurred when infection was delayed 1 or 2 days after cell treatment. However, in certain XP cells only induction of the EM response was observed, whereas ER was absent. Interestingly, the latter XP cells had been obtained from patients who had not yet developed skin cancer at the time they were described in the literature, whereas the former XP patients had already developed skin tumors. This suggests that the ER response may somehow be involved in the process of oncogenic transformation. Dose-response studies of ER in XP cells from tumor-bearing patients showed that ER is maximally induced with a UV dose of 40 Jm-2 given to the virus. Normal levels of ER were observed in 14 different normal human skin fibroblasts, indicating that the ER- phenotype does not occur in normal cells or at least more rarely than in XP cells.

  18. Sensitivity of BWR (boiling-water reactor) shutdown margin tests to local reactivity anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Cokinos, D.M.; Carew, J.F.

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of the work summarized in this paper has been to investigate and quantify the sensitivity of both the adjacent-rod and in-sequence Successful Shutdown Margin (SDM) tests to local reactivity anomalies. This was accomplished by introducing reactivity perturbations at selected four-bundle cell locations, and by evaluating their effect on core reactivity in each of the two tests.

  19. Seroepidemiological and leishmanin skin test surveys of visceral leishmaniasis in south and southwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Hailu, A; Berhe, N; Sisay, Z; Abraham, I; Medhin, G

    1996-01-01

    Sero-epidemiological and leishmanin skin test surveys of visceral leishmaniasis were carried out in eight localities of South and Southwest Ethiopia between the July 1989 and June 1992. A total number of 4870 subjects comprising semi-pastoral nomads, peasants and farm labourers were included in the study. Areas of high and low leishmanin skin test positivity were identified, with rates varying from 1.0-80.5%. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine prevalence of antileishmanial antibodies. The rates varied from 1.8% to 27.8%. Age and sex related serological and leishmanin skin test profiles are described. Correlation analysis of serological and leishmanin skin test was made for data in each locality. The relationships between seroprevalence, leishmanin skin test rates and prevalence of active visceral leishmaniasis and the implications on degrees of endemicity and patterns of transmission are discussed. PMID:8674496

  20. Male infertility testing: reactive oxygen species and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Ko, Edmund Y; Sabanegh, Edmund S; Agarwal, Ashok

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are an integral component of sperm developmental physiology, capacitation, and function. Elevated ROS levels, from processes such as infection or inflammation, can be associated with aberrations of sperm development, function, and fertilizing capacity. We review the impact of ROS on sperm physiology, its place in infertility evaluation, the implications for reproductive outcomes, and antioxidant therapy. Our systematic review of PubMed literature from the last 3 decades focuses on the physiology and etiology of ROS and oxidative stress (OS), evaluation of ROS, and antioxidants. ROS is normally produced physiologically and is used to maintain cellular processes such as sperm maturation, capacitation, and sperm-oocyte interaction. When ROS production exceeds the buffering capacity of antioxidants, OS occurs and can have a negative impact on sperm and fertility. ROS and antioxidant capacity testing can potentially add additional prognostic information to standard laboratory testing for the infertile male, although its role as standard part of an evaluation has yet to be determined. Elevated ROS levels have been implicated with abnormal semen parameters and male infertility, but the impact of ROS on fertilization rates and pregnancy is controversial. This is partly because of the lack of consensus on what type of patients may be suitable for ROS testing and assay standardization. Routine ROS testing for the infertile male is not currently recommended. PMID:25458618

  1. Skin testing and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in women undergoing breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Lane, R; Ungerer, J; Bernene, J; Askenase, P

    The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of skin testing and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) as measures of immune function in a population undergoing stress. Eight women were tested one week prior to breast biopsy and six were retested at least four weeks later. All biopsies were negative for malignancy. Control subjects were also tested four weeks apart. ESR values were elevated with stress but the magnitude of this effect was small. There were no differences between groups in skin test responses. Skin testing and ESR may have limited usefulness in the study of immune function in populations under stress. PMID:6885263

  2. The usefulness of the validated SkinEthic™ RHE test method to identify skin corrosive UN GHS subcategories.

    PubMed

    Alépée, Nathalie; Robert, Clément; Tornier, Carine; Cotovio, José

    2014-06-01

    The SkinEthic™ Reconstructed Human Epidermis (RHE) test method has been adopted within the context of OECD TG 431 for distinguishing corrosive and non-corrosive chemicals. The EU CLP classification system requires subcategorising of corrosive chemicals into the three UN GHS subcategories 1A, 1B and 1C. Since the SkinEthic™ RHE method was originally validated to discriminate corrosives from non-corrosives, the present study was undertaken to investigate its usefulness to discriminate skin corrosive UN GHS subcategories. In total 84 substances were tested in three independent runs and two prediction models (PM) were assessed, representing a pre-defined validated prediction model (PM-A) and an alternative one defined post-hoc (PM-B). The results obtained with both PM were reproducible, as shown by the ⩾92.9% concordance of classification between runs for discriminating corrosives versus non-corrosives, and the ⩾85% concordance for discriminating the GHS subcategories versus non-corrosives. Moreover results confirmed a high sensitivity of the SkinEthic™ RHE method to predict corrosives (94.9%) and good specificity (⩾73.7%) independent of the PM applied. Regarding the identification of UN GHS corrosive subcategories, PM-A resulted in 86.1% correct classifications of the GHS subcategory 1A. When using the PM-B, the identification of GHS subcategory 1B-and-1C substances improved, with 63.4% correct sub-categorisation. If considering the 30 reference chemicals as recommended in the recently revised OECD TG 431 (2013), PM-A and PM-B achieved 78.9% and 83.3% accuracy respectively for the identification of GHS subcategories and non-corrosives. They correctly predicted 90% of GHS subcategory 1A and 80% of GHS non-corrosive substances independent of the PM used. In conclusion, the SkinEthic™ RHE test method is highly reproducible and sensitive for discriminating corrosive from non-corrosive substances. Furthermore it allows reliable identification of skin

  3. An analysis of skin prick test reactions in 656 asthmatic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hendrick, D J; Davies, R J; D'Souza, M F; Pepys, J

    1975-01-01

    Of 656 asthmatic patients referred specifically for allergy assessments, 544 (84 percent) gave positive immediate skin prick tests to at least one of 22 common allergens used routinely. Comparison of these skin test positive patients with the 102 (16 percent) who were skin test negative showed a number of significant differences. The majority of the skin test positive patients (52 percent) were less than 10 years old at the time of onset of the asthma, whereas, of the skin test negative patients, 56 percent were aged over 30 years at the time of onset. Seventy per cent report rhinitis compared with 48 per cent of the skin test negative patients, and 29 per cent reported infantile eczema compared with 9 per cent. Symptoms attributed to house dust, pollens, and animals were noted two to three times more frequently by the skin test positive patients, while corticosteroid drugs had been used more commonly by the skin test negative patients (45 percent compared with 35 percent). No significant differences were observed with the other factors studied, namely, history of urticaria or angio-oedema, family history of "allergic" disease, and awareness of sensitivity to foods, aspirin or penicillin. Prick test reactions in the skin test positive patients were most commonly seen to house dust or the acarine mite, Dermatophagoides farinae (82 percent), followed by pollens (66 percent), animal danders (38 percent), foods (16 percent), Aspergillus fumigatus (16 percent), and other moulds (21 percent). There was a highly significant association of positive history with positive prick test for all allergens studied. Images PMID:1168378

  4. An analysis of skin prick test reactions in 656 asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, D J; Davies, R J; D'Souza, M F; Pepys, J

    1975-02-01

    Of 656 asthmatic patients referred specifically for allergy assessments, 544 (84 percent) gave positive immediate skin prick tests to at least one of 22 common allergens used routinely. Comparison of these skin test positive patients with the 102 (16 percent) who were skin test negative showed a number of significant differences. The majority of the skin test positive patients (52 percent) were less than 10 years old at the time of onset of the asthma, whereas, of the skin test negative patients, 56 percent were aged over 30 years at the time of onset. Seventy per cent report rhinitis compared with 48 per cent of the skin test negative patients, and 29 per cent reported infantile eczema compared with 9 per cent. Symptoms attributed to house dust, pollens, and animals were noted two to three times more frequently by the skin test positive patients, while corticosteroid drugs had been used more commonly by the skin test negative patients (45 percent compared with 35 percent). No significant differences were observed with the other factors studied, namely, history of urticaria or angio-oedema, family history of "allergic" disease, and awareness of sensitivity to foods, aspirin or penicillin. Prick test reactions in the skin test positive patients were most commonly seen to house dust or the acarine mite, Dermatophagoides farinae (82 percent), followed by pollens (66 percent), animal danders (38 percent), foods (16 percent), Aspergillus fumigatus (16 percent), and other moulds (21 percent). There was a highly significant association of positive history with positive prick test for all allergens studied. PMID:1168378

  5. Development of action levels for MED/MPD skin-testing units in ultraviolet phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Una M.; O'Hare, Neil J.

    2003-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) Phototherapy is commonly used for treatment of skin diseases such as psoriasis and eczema. Treatment is carried out using UV phototherapy units, exposing all or part of the body for a certain exposure time. Prior to exposure in treatment units, an unaffected area of skin may be tested using UV skin-testing units in order to determine a suitable treatment regime. The exposure time at which barely perceptible erythema has developed is known as the Minimal Erythemal Dose (MED) for UVB therapy and Minimal Phototoxic Dose (MPD) for UVA therapy. This is used to determine the starting dose in the treatment regime. The presence of 'hotspots' and 'coldspots' in UV skin-testing units can result in inaccurate determination of MED/MPD. This could give rise to severe burns during treatment, or in a sub-optimal dose regime being used. Quality assurance protocols for UV phototherapy equipment have recently been developed and these protocols have highlighted the need for action levels for skin-testing units. An action level is a reference value, which is used to determine whether the difference in irradiance output level across a UV unit is acceptable. Current methodologies for skin-testing in Ireland have been characterised and errors introduced during testing have been estimated. Action levels have been developed based on analysis of errors and requirements of skin-testing.

  6. Enhanced reactivation of ultraviolet-damaged herpes virus in ultraviolet pretreated skin fibroblasts of cancer prone donors

    SciTech Connect

    Coppey, J.; Menezes, S.

    1981-01-01

    An enhanced reactivation of ultraviolet-damaged (u.v. at 254 nm) unclear replicating double-stranded DNA viruses occurs when corresponding host cells are treated with radiation or carcinogens prior to infection. This phenomenon seems to be due to an induced DNA repair activity the nature of which is yet unknown. The u.v.-induced enhanced reactivation (ER) of u.v.-damaged herpes simplex virus (u.v. - HSV) was compared in dividing skin fibroblasts of 30 donors either normal or afflicted by genetic disorders, some of which confer a high risk for sunlight induced skin cancers. Cultures were exposed to a single dose of 1.0-25 J.m-2 from 0-60 h before infection with u.v.-HSV (at about 10-3 survival) and the rate of viral production was determined. ER was maximal for a 36 h time interval in all lines. The u.v. dose eliciting maximal ER was 15 J.m-2 in fibroblasts from normal donors, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) heterozygotes, Mibelli's porokeratosis, diffused naevomatosis, Down's syndrome, xerodermoids, XP variants and epidermodysplasia verruciformis. However, in the latter 3 cases, ER was almost 10 times more pronounced than in the normal cases. The u.v. dose eliciting maximal ER was 0.1, 0.3 and 2 J.m-2 in excision deficient XP fibroblasts from groups A, D and C, respectively, 2.5 J.m-2 in 11961 fibroblasts and 5 J.m-2 in fibroblast lines from cockayne s syndrome.

  7. Reconstructed human epidermis for skin absorption testing: results of the German prevalidation study.

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Bock, Udo; Gamer, Armin; Haberland, Annekathrin; Haltner-Ukomadu, Eleonore; Kaca, Monika; Kamp, Hennicke; Kietzmann, Manfred; Korting, Hans Christian; Krächter, Hans-Udo; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Liebsch, Manfred; Mehling, Annette; Netzlaff, Frank; Niedorf, Frank; Rübbelke, Maria K; Schäfer, Ulrich; Schmidt, Elisabeth; Schreiber, Sylvia; Schröder, Klaus-Rudolf; Spielmann, Horst; Vuia, Alexander

    2006-06-01

    Exposure to chemicals absorbed by the skin can threaten human health. In order to standardise the predictive testing of percutaneous absorption for regulatory purposes, the OECD adopted guideline 428, which describes methods for assessing absorption by using human and animal skin. In this study, a protocol based on the OECD principles was developed and prevalidated by using reconstructed human epidermis (RHE). The permeation of the OECD standard compounds, caffeine and testosterone, through commercially available RHE models was compared to that of human epidermis and animal skin. In comparison to human epidermis, the permeation of the chemicals was overestimated when using RHE. The following ranking of the permeation coefficients for testosterone was obtained: SkinEthic > EpiDerm, EPISKIN > human epidermis, bovine udder skin, pig skin. The ranking for caffeine was: SkinEthic, EPISKIN > bovine udder skin, EpiDerm, pig skin, human epidermis. The inter-laboratory and intra-laboratory reproducibility was good. Long and variable lag times, which are a matter of concern when using human and pig skin, did not occur with RHE. Due to the successful transfer of the protocol, it is now in the validation process. PMID:16831060

  8. Resveratrol Prevents High Fluence Red Light-Emitting Diode Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Photoinhibition of Human Skin Fibroblast Migration

    PubMed Central

    Mamalis, Andrew; Koo, Eugene; Isseroff, R. Rivkah; Murphy, William; Jagdeo, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Background Skin fibrosis is a significant medical problem that leads to a functional, aesthetic, and psychosocial impact on quality-of-life. Light-emitting diode-generated 633-nm red light (LED-RL) is part of the visible light spectrum that is not known to cause DNA damage and is considered a safe, non-invasive, inexpensive, and portable potential alternative to ultraviolet phototherapy that may change the treatment paradigm of fibrotic skin disease. Objective The goal of our study was to investigate the how reactive oxygen species (ROS) free radicals generated by high fluence LED-RL inhibit the migration of skin fibroblasts, the main cell type involved in skin fibrosis. Fibroblast migration speed is increased in skin fibrosis, and we studied cellular migration speed of cultured human skin fibroblasts as a surrogate measure of high fluence LED-RL effect on fibroblast function. To ascertain the inhibitory role of LED-RL generated ROS on migration speed, we hypothesized that resveratrol, a potent antioxidant, could prevent the photoinhibitory effects of high fluence LED-RL on fibroblast migration speed. Methods High fluence LED-RL generated ROS were measured by flow cytometry analysis using dihydrorhodamine (DHR). For purposes of comparison, we assessed the effects of ROS generated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on fibroblast migration speed and the ability of resveratrol, a well known antioxidant, to prevent LED-RL and H2O2 generated ROS-associated changes in fibroblast migration speed. To determine whether resveratrol could prevent the high fluence LED-RL ROS-mediated photoinhibition of human skin fibroblast migration, treated cells were incubated with resveratrol at concentrations of 0.0001% and 0.001% for 24 hours, irradiated with high fluences LED-RL of 480, 640, and 800 J/cm2. Results High fluence LED-RL increases intracellular fibroblast ROS and decreases fibroblast migration speed. LED-RL at 480, 640 and 800 J/cm2 increased ROS levels to 132.8%, 151.0%, and 158

  9. A tuberculin skin test survey among Ghanaian school children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ghana has not conducted a national tuberculin survey or tuberculosis prevalence survey since the establishment of the National Tuberculosis Control Programme. The primary objective of this study was therefore to determine the prevalence of tuberculin skin sensitivity in Ghanaian school children aged 6-10 years in 8 out of 10 regions of Ghana between 2004 and 2006. Methods Tuberculin survey was conducted in 179 primary schools from 21 districts in 8 regions. Schools were purposively selected so as to reflect the proportion of affluent private and free tuition public schools as well as the proportion of small and large schools. Results Of the 24,778 children registered for the survey, 23,600 (95.2%) were tested of which 21,861 (92.6%) were available for reading. The age distribution showed an increase in numbers of children towards older age: 11% of the children were 6 years and 25%, 10 years. Females were 52.5% and males 47.5%. The proportion of girls was higher in all age groups (range 51.4% to 54.0%, p < 0.001). BCG scar was visible in 89.3% of the children. The percentage of children with a BCG scar differed by district and by age. The percentage of children with a BCG scar decreased with increasing age in all districts, reflecting increasing BCG vaccination coverage in Ghana in the last ten years. The risk of tuberculosis infection was low in the northern savannah zones compared to the southern coastal zones. Using a cut-off of 15 mm, the prevalence of infection ranged from 0.0% to 5.4% and the Annual Risks of Tuberculosis Infection 0.0% to 0.6%. There was an increase in the proportion of infected children after the age of 7 years. Children attending low and middle-class schools had a higher risk of infection than children attending upper-class schools. Conclusion Tuberculosis infection is still a public health problem in Ghana and to monitor the trend, the survey needs to be repeated at 5 years interval. PMID:20102620

  10. Self-Antigen Presentation by Keratinocytes in the Inflamed Adult Skin Modulates T-Cell Auto-Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Meister, Michael; Tounsi, Amel; Gaffal, Evelyn; Bald, Tobias; Papatriantafyllou, Maria; Ludwig, Julia; Pougialis, Georg; Bestvater, Felix; Klotz, Luisa; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Tüting, Thomas; Hämmerling, Günter J; Arnold, Bernd; Oelert, Thilo

    2015-08-01

    Keratinocytes have a pivotal role in the regulation of immune responses, but the impact of antigen presentation by these cells is still poorly understood, particularly in a situation where the antigen will be presented only in adult life. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse model in which keratinocytes exclusively present a myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide covalently linked to the major histocompatibility complex class II β-chain, solely under inflammatory conditions. In these mice, inflammation caused by epicutaneous contact sensitizer treatment resulted in keratinocyte-mediated expansion of MBP-specific CD4(+) T cells in the skin. Moreover, repeated contact sensitizer application preceding a systemic MBP immunization reduced the reactivity of the respective CD4(+) T cells and lowered the symptoms of the resulting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. This downregulation was CD4(+) T-cell-mediated and dependent on the presence of the immune modulator Dickkopf-3. Thus, presentation of a neo self-antigen by keratinocytes in the inflamed, adult skin can modulate CD4(+) T-cell auto-aggression at a distal organ. PMID:25835957

  11. The use of reconstructed human epidermis for skin absorption testing: Results of the validation study.

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Bock, Udo; Diembeck, Walter; Düsing, Hans-Jürgen; Gamer, Armin; Haltner-Ukomadu, Eleonore; Hoffmann, Christine; Kaca, Monika; Kamp, Hennicke; Kersen, Silke; Kietzmann, Manfred; Korting, Hans Christian; Krächter, Hans-Udo; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Liebsch, Manfred; Mehling, Annette; Müller-Goymann, Christel; Netzlaff, Frank; Niedorf, Frank; Rübbelke, Maria K; Schäfer, Ulrich; Schmidt, Elisabeth; Schreiber, Sylvia; Spielmann, Horst; Vuia, Alexander; Weimer, Michaela

    2008-05-01

    A formal validation study was performed, in order to investigate whether the commercially-available reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) models, EPISKIN, EpiDerm and SkinEthic, are suitable for in vitro skin absorption testing. The skin types currently recommended in the OECD Test Guideline 428, namely, ex vivo human epidermis and pig skin, were used as references. Based on the promising outcome of the prevalidation study, the panel of test substances was enlarged to nine substances, covering a wider spectrum of physicochemical properties. The substances were tested under both infinite-dose and finite-dose conditions, in ten laboratories, under strictly controlled conditions. The data were subjected to independent statistical analyses. Intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory variability contributed almost equally to the total variability, which was in the same range as that in preceding studies. In general, permeation of the RHE models exceeded that of human epidermis and pig skin (the SkinEthic RHE was found to be the most permeable), yet the ranking of substance permeation through the three tested RHE models and the pig skin reflected the permeation through human epidermis. In addition, both infinite-dose and finite-dose experiments are feasible with RHE models. The RHE models did not show the expected significantly better reproducibility, as compared to excised skin, despite a tendency toward lower variability of the data. Importantly, however, the permeation data showed a sufficient correlation between all the preparations examined. Thus, the RHE models, EPISKIN, EpiDerm and SkinEthic, are appropriate alternatives to human and pig skin, for the in vitro assessment of the permeation and penetration of substances when applied as aqueous solutions. PMID:18522484

  12. Advanced tests for skin and respiratory sensitization assessment.

    PubMed

    Rovida, Costanza; Martin, Stefan F; Vivier, Manon; Weltzien, Hans Ulrich; Roggen, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Sens-it-iv is an FP6 Integrated Project that finished in March 2011 after 66 months of activity, thanks to 12 million € of funding. The ultimate goal of the Sens-it-iv project was the development of a set of in vitro methods for the assessment of the skin and respiratory sensitization potential of chemicals and proteins. The level of development was intended to be at the point to enter the pre-validation phase. At the end of the project it can be concluded that the goal has been largely accomplished. Several advanced methods were evaluated extensively, and for some of them a detailed Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) was established. Other, less advanced methods also contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms driving sensitization. The present contribution, which has been prepared with the support of CAAT-Europe, represents a short summary of what was discussed during the 3-day end congress of the Sens-it-iv project in Brussels. It presents a list of methods that are ready for skin sensitization hazard assessment. Potency evaluation and the possibility of distinguishing skin from respiratory sensitizers are also well advanced. PMID:23665811

  13. Reactive Secondary Sequence Oxidative Pathology Polymer Model and Antioxidant Tests

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To provide common Organic Chemistry/Polymer Science thermoset free-radical crosslinking Sciences for Medical understanding and also present research findings for several common vitamins/antioxidants with a new class of drugs known as free-radical inhibitors. Study Design Peroxide/Fenton transition-metal redox couples that generate free radicals were combined with unsaturated lipid oils to demonstrate thermoset-polymer chain growth by crosslinking with the α-β-unsaturated aldehyde acrolein into rubbery/adhesive solids. Further, Vitamin A and beta carotene were similarly studied for crosslink pathological potential. Also, free-radical inhibitor hydroquinone was compared for antioxidant capability with Vitamin E. Place and Duration of Study Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Biomaterials, University of Alabama at Birmingham, between June 2005 and August 2012. Methodology Observations were recorded for Fenton free-radical crosslinking of unsaturated lipids and vitamin A/beta carotene by photography further with weight measurements and percent-shrinkage testing directly related to covalent crosslinking of unsaturated lipids recorded over time with different concentrations of acrolein. Also, hydroquinone and vitamin E were compared at concentrations from 0.0–7.3wt% as antioxidants for reductions in percent-shrinkage measurements, n = 5. Results Unsaturated lipid oils responded to Fenton thermoset-polymer reactive secondary sequence reactions only by acrolein with crosslinking into rubbery-type solids and different non-solid gluey products. Further, molecular oxygen crosslinking was demonstrated with lipid peroxidation and acrolein at specially identified margins. By peroxide/Fenton free-radical testing, both vitamin A and beta-carotene demonstrated possible pathology chemistry for chain-growth crosslinking. During lipid/acrolein testing over a 50 hour time period at 7.3wt% antioxidants, hydroquinone significantly reduced percent

  14. Reactivity enhancement of oxide skins in reversible Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Delmelle, Renaud; Borgschulte, Andreas; Gehrig, Jeffrey C.; Züttel, Andreas

    2014-12-15

    The reversibility of hydrogen sorption in complex hydrides has only been shown unambiguously for NaAlH{sub 4} doped with transition metal compounds. Despite a multitude of investigations of the effect of the added catalyst on the hydrogen sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, the mechanism of catalysis remains elusive so far. Following the decomposition of TiCl{sub 3}-doped NaAlH{sub 4} by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we link the chemical state of the dopant with those of the hydride and decomposition products. Titanium and aluminium change their oxidation states during cycling. The change of the formal oxidation state of Al from III to zero is partly due to the chemical reaction from NaAlH{sub 4} to Al. Furthermore, aluminium oxide is formed (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which coexists with titanium oxide (Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The interplay of metallic and oxidized Ti with the oxide skin might explain the effectiveness of Ti and similar dopants (Ce, Zr…)

  15. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  16. Contribution to the Determination of In Vivo Mechanical Characteristics of Human Skin by Indentation Test

    PubMed Central

    Zahouani, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a triphasic model of intact skin in vivo based on a general phenomenological thermohydromechanical and physicochemical (THMPC) approach of heterogeneous media. The skin is seen here as a deforming stratified medium composed of four layers and made out of different fluid-saturated materials which contain also an ionic component. All the layers are treated as linear, isotropic materials described by their own behaviour law. The numerical simulations of in vivo indentation test performed on human skin are given. The numerical results correlate reasonably well with the typical observations of indented human skin. The discussion shows the versatility of this approach to obtain a better understanding on the mechanical behaviour of human skin layers separately. PMID:24324525

  17. Skin2--an in vitro human skin model: the correlation between in vivo and in vitro testing of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Demetrulias, J; Donnelly, T; Morhenn, V; Jessee, B; Hainsworth, S; Casterton, P; Bernhofer, L; Martin, K; Decker, D

    1998-02-01

    The availability of an in vitro test system to replace animal testing of potential irritants is becoming more and more urgent especially in Europe as a consequence of the European Community Cosmetics Directive. To evaluate the ability of Advanced Tissue Sciences' (ATS) ZK1301 skin model to predict the skin irritation potential of surfactants, we performed a pilot validation study utilizing four different laboratories. The in vitro protocol was designed as a quantitative pre-screen for the clinical patch studies. Sixteen substances, representing various surfactant categories and ranges of irritation potential, were tested. The 3-[4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to quantitate viability in vitro. We documented the viability of tissues exposed to unknown substances for specific periods. The in vitro results were calculated as percent distilled water controls (DWC). The time required to reduce the viability of each tissue to 50% of the distilled water controls (T50) was compared to mean erythema and edema scores from the clinical studies by Pearson's correlation. The individual laboratories demonstrated coefficients of 0.72. The results indicated that the 30 min percent untreated control values best predicted the 24 h clinical patch scores. No statistically significant interlab variability was found. Only one false negative was seen when non/mild and moderate/severe irritant categories were assigned according to the in vitro scores. These results demonstrate that the skin2 in vitro test system may serve as a good screening method prior to clinical patch studies. PMID:9517918

  18. Systematic evaluation of non-animal test methods for skin sensitisation safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Kerstin; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Alépée, Nathalie; Ashikaga, Takao; Barroso, Joao; Elcombe, Cliff; Gellatly, Nicola; Galbiati, Valentina; Gibbs, Susan; Groux, Hervé; Hibatallah, Jalila; Keller, Donald; Kern, Petra; Klaric, Martina; Kolle, Susanne; Kuehnl, Jochen; Lambrechts, Nathalie; Lindstedt, Malin; Millet, Marion; Martinozzi-Teissier, Silvia; Natsch, Andreas; Petersohn, Dirk; Pike, Ian; Sakaguchi, Hitoshi; Schepky, Andreas; Tailhardat, Magalie; Templier, Marie; van Vliet, Erwin; Maxwell, Gavin

    2015-02-01

    The need for non-animal data to assess skin sensitisation properties of substances, especially cosmetics ingredients, has spawned the development of many in vitro methods. As it is widely believed that no single method can provide a solution, the Cosmetics Europe Skin Tolerance Task Force has defined a three-phase framework for the development of a non-animal testing strategy for skin sensitization potency prediction. The results of the first phase – systematic evaluation of 16 test methods – are presented here. This evaluation involved generation of data on a common set of ten substances in all methods and systematic collation of information including the level of standardisation, existing test data,potential for throughput, transferability and accessibility in cooperation with the test method developers.A workshop was held with the test method developers to review the outcome of this evaluation and to discuss the results. The evaluation informed the prioritisation of test methods for the next phase of the non-animal testing strategy development framework. Ultimately, the testing strategy – combined with bioavailability and skin metabolism data and exposure consideration – is envisaged to allow establishment of a data integration approach for skin sensitisation safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients. PMID:25448812

  19. Construction of Tests in the Cognitive and Psychomotor Domains for Skin and Scuba Diving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Jean

    The fundamental purposes of this study were to develop mastery tests in the cognitive and psychomotor domains for skin and scuba diving and to establish validity and reliability for the tests. A table of specifications was developed for each domain, and a pilot study refined the initial test batteries into their final form. In the main study,…

  20. Evaluation of status of tuberculin skin sensitivity test among medical students.

    PubMed

    Chander, J; Gupta, R; Subrahmanyan, S

    1997-02-01

    The status of tuberculin skin sensitivity tests was evaluated in 87 medical students. It was found that Mantoux test has less significant role to play in the vaccinated individuals and in the population at high risk of exposure. Hence this test is to be supplemented with clinical manifestations and other investigations to establish the final diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:9355707

  1. Bovine Tuberculosis: Effect of the Tuberculin Skin Test on In vitro Interferon gamma Responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a disease of zoonotic and economic importance. In many countries, control is based on test and slaughter policies and/or abattoir surveillance. For testing, cell mediated immune- (CMI-) based assays (i.e., Tuberculin skin test (TST) supplemented by the interferon gamma (...

  2. Thermographic assessment of skin prick tests in comparison with the routine evaluation methods

    PubMed Central

    Rokita, Eugeniusz; Tatoń, Grzegorz; Guzik, Tomasz; Śliwa, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The skin prick test is still the first and basic procedure in the diagnosis of allergic diseases. The possibility of using a sensitive thermographic method supported by the mathematical model for the assessment of skin test results will be highlighted in the studies. Aim To compare the proposed approach with routine planimetric and thermographic methods. Material and methods A mathematical model of allergic reaction was developed. Simplifying assumptions of the IgE-mediated skin reaction is the essence of the model. Investigations were performed in a group of 40 patients. Results Using the spatio-temporal evolution of temperature distributions, the ratios of the histamine released from mast cells to the control histamine were determined. The obtained values very well correlate with the standard evaluation of skin prick tests (correlation coefficient = 0.98). Conclusions The proposed method of skin test evaluation presents several advantages. The continuous acquisition of data provides the monitoring of time course of the allergic response. The transport of mediator and its concentration were distinctly discriminated, which may be diagnostically useful, especially for abnormal cases. The high sensitivity of the method enables studying patients regardless of age and skin sensitivity. PMID:27512354

  3. Humoral immunity in tuberculin skin test anergy and its role in high-risk persons exposed to active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Encinales, Liliana; Zuñiga, Joaquin; Yunis, Maria; Granados-Montiel, Julio; Granados, Julio; Almeciga, Ingrid; Clavijo, Olga; Awad, Carlos; Collazos, Vilma; Vargas-Rojas, María Inés; Bañales-Mendez, José Luis; Vazquez-Castañeda, Lilia; Stern, Joel N.; Romero, Viviana; Frindkis-Hareli, Masha; Terreros, Daniel; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Yunis, Edmond J.

    2009-01-01

    The most common test to identify latent tuberculosis is the Tuberculin skin test that detects T cell responses of delayed type hypersensitivity type IV. Since it produces false negative reactions in active tuberculosis or in high-risk persons exposed to tuberculosis patients as shown in this report, we studied antibody profiles to explain the anergy of such responses in high-risk individuals without active infection. Our results showed that humoral immunity against Tuberculin, regardless of the result of the Tuberculin skin test is important for protection from active tuberculosis and that the presence of high antibody titers is a more reliable indicator of infection latency suggesting that latency can be based on the levels of antibodies together with in vitro proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of the purified protein derivative. Importantly, anti-Tuberculin IgG antibody levels mediate the anergy described herein, which could also prevent reactivation of disease in high-risk individuals with high antibody titers. Such IgG Tuberculin antibodies were also found associated with blocking and/or stimulation of in vitro cultures of PBMC with Tuberculin. In this regard, future studies need to establish if immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis can generate a broad spectrum of reactions either toward Th1 responses favoring stimulation by cytokines or by antibodies and those toward diminished responses by Th2 cytokines or blocking by antibodies; possibly involving mechanisms of antibody dependent protection from Mtb by different subclasses of IgG. PMID:20004475

  4. Humoral immunity in tuberculin skin test anergy and its role in high-risk persons exposed to active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Encinales, Liliana; Zuñiga, Joaquin; Granados-Montiel, Julio; Yunis, Maria; Granados, Julio; Almeciga, Ingrid; Clavijo, Olga; Awad, Carlos; Collazos, Vilma; Vargas-Rojas, María Inés; Bañales-Mendez, José Luis; Vazquez-Castañeda, Lilia; Stern, Joel N; Romero, Viviana; Fridkis-Hareli, Masha; Frindkis-Hareli, Masha; Terreros, Daniel; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Yunis, Edmond J

    2010-02-01

    The most common test to identify latent tuberculosis is the tuberculin skin test that detects T cell responses of delayed type hypersensitivity type IV. Since it produces false negative reactions in active tuberculosis or in high-risk persons exposed to tuberculosis patients as shown in this report, we studied antibody profiles to explain the anergy of such responses in high-risk individuals without active infection. Our results showed that humoral immunity against tuberculin, regardless of the result of the tuberculin skin test is important for protection from active tuberculosis and that the presence of high antibody titers is a more reliable indicator of infection latency suggesting that latency can be based on the levels of antibodies together with in vitro proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of the purified protein derivative. Importantly, anti-tuberculin IgG antibody levels mediate the anergy described herein, which could also prevent reactivation of disease in high-risk individuals with high antibody titers. Such anti-tuberculin IgG antibodies were also found associated with blocking and/or stimulation of in vitro cultures of PBMC with tuberculin. In this regard, future studies need to establish if immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis can generate a broad spectrum of reactions either toward Th1 responses favoring stimulation by cytokines or by antibodies and those toward diminished responses by Th2 cytokines or blocking by antibodies; possibly involving mechanisms of antibody dependent protection from Mtb by different subclasses of IgG. PMID:20004475

  5. The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Reus, Astrid A.; Usta, Mustafa; Krul, Cyrille A.M.

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air–liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin. -- Highlights: ► We use human skin obtained from surgery for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals. ► We use the comet assay as parameter for genotoxicity in ex vivo human skin. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to predict in vivo genotoxins are determined. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy are 89%, 90% and 90%, respectively. ► The method

  6. An in vitro method for detecting chemical sensitization using human reconstructed skin models and its applicability to cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and medical device safety testing.

    PubMed

    McKim, James M; Keller, Donald J; Gorski, Joel R

    2012-12-01

    Chemical sensitization is a serious condition caused by small reactive molecules and is characterized by a delayed type hypersensitivity known as allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Contact with these molecules via dermal exposure represent a significant concern for chemical manufacturers. Recent legislation in the EU has created the need to develop non-animal alternative methods for many routine safety studies including sensitization. Although most of the alternative research has focused on pure chemicals that possess reasonable solubility properties, it is important for any successful in vitro method to have the ability to test compounds with low aqueous solubility. This is especially true for the medical device industry where device extracts must be prepared in both polar and non-polar vehicles in order to evaluate chemical sensitization. The aim of this research was to demonstrate the functionality and applicability of the human reconstituted skin models (MatTek Epiderm(®) and SkinEthic RHE) as a test system for the evaluation of chemical sensitization and its potential use for medical device testing. In addition, the development of the human 3D skin model should allow the in vitro sensitization assay to be used for finished product testing in the personal care, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. This approach combines solubility, chemical reactivity, cytotoxicity, and activation of the Nrf2/ARE expression pathway to identify and categorize chemical sensitizers. Known chemical sensitizers representing extreme/strong-, moderate-, weak-, and non-sensitizing potency categories were first evaluated in the skin models at six exposure concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 2500 µM for 24 h. The expression of eight Nrf2/ARE, one AhR/XRE and two Nrf1/MRE controlled gene were measured by qRT-PCR. The fold-induction at each exposure concentration was combined with reactivity and cytotoxicity data to determine the sensitization potential. The results demonstrated that

  7. Skin microvascular reactivity in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in relation to levels of physical activity and aerobic fitness.

    PubMed

    Roche, Denise M; Edmunds, Sarah; Cable, Tim; Didi, Mo; Stratton, Gareth

    2008-11-01

    No studies to date have evaluated the relationship between exercise and microvascular function in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Twenty-nine complication free children and adolescents with T1DM were assessed for skin microvascular reactivity, aerobic fitness (VO2peak) and physical activity. VO2peak but not physical activity was significantly and independently associated with maximal hyperemia of the skin microcirculation (p < .01). No significant associations were found between venoarteriolar reflex (VAR) vasoconstriction and VO2peak or physical activity. Aerobic fitness may be an important indicator or mediator of effective microvascular endothelial function in youth with T1DM. PMID:19168919

  8. In vitro test of nicotine's permeability through human skin. Risk evaluation and safety aspects.

    PubMed

    Zorin, S; Kuylenstierna, F; Thulin, H

    1999-08-01

    Permeability tests with Franz' diffusion cells and an in vitro test model were made to evaluate the importance of dermal absorption of nicotine as a pathway for intoxication. Studies were carried out to ensure that safety procedures, when spilling nicotine on skin, are sufficient to prevent poisoning. Pure nicotine and nicotine in various concentrations in water or ethanol were applied on human skin or gloves in Franz' cells. Washing was simulated by removing nicotine from skin after 3 or 5 min. Permeation rate (flux) and lag time were calculated and estimated for human skin. Different glove materials were tested for their nicotine breakthrough time. Flux depended on concentration in a non-linear way when nicotine-water solutions were tested. Highest flux was found in 50% w/w nicotine dissolved in water. Solutions with low concentration of nicotine (1% w/w) dissolved in water had a similar permeation rate to 100% nicotine. Flux was found to be low when using ethanol as a vehicle; flux was also pH-dependent. The nicotine-water solution containing acetic acid had the lowest flux. The tests where nicotine was washed away revealed that skin served as a possible nicotine depot, because nicotine concentration in the receptor compartment continued to increase after removing the nicotine from the surface. The length of contact time affected the amount of substance passing the skin, resulting in great difference between 3 and 5 min contact time, 5 min giving higher nicotine concentration and 3 min lower. This emphasizes the importance of washing away nicotine spilled on skin rapidly. Two glove types were tested and they were found to be appropriate in their use with nicotine if changed regularly. PMID:10518466

  9. Controlling tuberculosis in a llama (Lama glama) herd using clinical signs, tuberculin skin testing and serology.

    PubMed

    Twomey, D F; Collins, R; Cranwell, M P; Crawshaw, T R; Higgins, R J; Dean, G S; Vordermeier, H M; Hollingdale, A; de la Rua-Domenech, R

    2012-05-01

    An outbreak of tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis, was investigated in a small herd of llamas (Lama glama). Based on three ante-mortem diagnostic methods (clinical signs, tuberculin skin test reactions, and 'Rapid Test' serology), 12 llamas were selected for examination post-mortem. Grossly visible lesions suspicious of TB were observed in eight animals, four of which had exhibited clinical signs, one was a skin test 'reactor', and three had been seropositive. M. bovis was isolated from seven of these eight animals. Clinical signs combined with serology were found to be useful in identifying infected animals, but tuberculin skin testing had limited negative predictive value as four llamas that were subsequently confirmed as infected were not detected using this assay. PMID:21704542

  10. Tuberculin skin testing in US Navy and Marine Corps personnel and recruits, 1980-86.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, E R; Hyams, K C

    1990-01-01

    An extensive skin testing program is part of the United States Naval Medical Command's infectious disease control effort. From 1980 to 1986, 2,306,533 skin tests, using five TU PPD, were performed on active-duty Navy and Marine Corps personnel, 0.97 percent of which were positive. A downward trend in positive tests was found with a high of 1.43 percent in 1980 and a low of 0.80 percent in 1983. Since 1984, the percentage of positive tests has remained the same or increased. Shore-based medical facilities around the world reported 1,491,646 skin tests with 1.07 percent positive; Navy ships reported 814,887 skin tests with 0.78 percent positive. PPD-positivity for ships in the Pacific area was higher (0.98 percent) than for ships in the Atlantic (0.62 percent). During this same period, the percentage of positive tests in Navy and Marine Corps recruits ranged from a high of 1.82 percent in 1981 to a low of 1.23 percent in 1986. Since 1984, the percentage of positive tests has remained relatively stable in recruits. The frequency of positive PPD tests found in this study is lower than the percentage positive (1.59 percent) found in active-duty Navy personnel in 1969 and the percentage positive (5.2 percent) found in a study of Navy and Marine Corps recruits between 1958 and 1969. PMID:2316764

  11. The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Reus, Astrid A; Usta, Mustafa; Krul, Cyrille A M

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air-liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin. PMID:22507867

  12. Early skin testing is effective for diagnosis of hypersensitivity reactions occurring during anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, A; Javaloyes, G; Berroa, F; Goikoetxea, M J; Moncada, R; Núñez-Córdoba, J M; Cabrera-Freitag, P; D'Amelio, C; Sanz, M L; Gastaminza, G

    2013-06-01

    Allergic skin tests have to be performed 4-6 weeks after an allergic anesthetic reaction. Patients with allergic reactions during anesthesia were prospectively included (n = 44). Skin tests were performed in two stages: (i) Stage 1 (S1), 0-4 days after the reaction; and (ii) Stage 2 (S2), 4-8 weeks after. Five (11.5%) surgical procedures were suspended due to the reaction. Positive skin tests were obtained in 25/44 patients (57%). Allergic diagnosis was carried out at S1 in 15/25 (60%) and at S2 in 10/25 (40%). Three patients resulted positive only in S1. Overall agreement among S1 and S2 skin tests was 70.45%. The kappa statistic was 0.41 (P-value = 0.002). Odds ratio of obtaining a false negative in S1 (compared with S2) was 3.33. Early allergological study is useful, could minimize false negatives, but should be considered as a complement to late skin tests. PMID:23646901

  13. Cosmetics Europe multi-laboratory pre-validation of the SkinEthic™ reconstituted human corneal epithelium test method for the prediction of eye irritation.

    PubMed

    Alépée, N; Bessou-Touya, S; Cotovio, J; de Smedt, A; de Wever, B; Faller, C; Jones, P; Le Varlet, B; Marrec-Fairley, M; Pfannenbecker, U; Tailhardat, M; van Goethem, F; McNamee, P

    2013-08-01

    Cosmetics Europe, The Personal Care Association, known as Colipa before 2012, conducted a program of technology transfer and assessment of Within/Between Laboratory (WLV/BLV) reproducibility of the SkinEthic™ Reconstituted Human Corneal Epithelium (HCE) as one of two human reconstructed tissue eye irritation test methods. The SkinEthic™ HCE test method involves two exposure time treatment procedures - one for short time exposure (10 min - SE) and the other for long time exposure (60 min - LE) of tissues to test substance. This paper describes pre-validation studies of the SkinEthic™ HCE test method (SE and LE protocols) as well as the Eye Peptide Reactivity Assay (EPRA). In the SE WLV study, 30 substances were evaluated. A consistent outcome with respect to viability measurement across all runs was observed with all substances showing an SD of less than 18%. In the LE WLV study, 44 out of 45 substances were consistently classified. These data demonstrated a high level of reproducibility within laboratory for both the SE and LE treatment procedures. For the LE BLV, 19 out of 20 substances were consistently classified between the three laboratories, again demonstrating a high level of reproducibility between laboratories. The results for EPRA WLV and BLV studies demonstrated that all substances analysed were categorised similarly and that the method is reproducible. The SkinEthic™ HCE test method entered into the experimental phase of a formal ECVAM validation program in 2010. PMID:23524228

  14. Utility testing of an apple skin color MdMYB1 marker in two progenies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A reported allele-specific dCAP PCR marker associated with apple fruit red skin color was tested in 18 elite breeding parents and two apple cross populations. Among all tested cultivars except one, a consistent relationship was observed between red fruit color and the presence of allele. In both pop...

  15. Cigarette Smoking and Skin Prick Test in Patients With Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Khazaei, Hossein Ali; Khazaei, Bahman; Dashtizadeh, Gholam Ali; Mohammadi, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Allergic Rhinitis (AR) is the most common allergic disease, affecting 30% of population around the world. The disease is predominantly associated with exposure to some aeroallergens like cigarette smoking. Skin Prick Test (SPT) is a method of detecting immediate allergic reactions and is applied for controlling disease and therapeutic modality. Objectives: This study was designed to investigate the effect of cigarette smoking on SPT results among male and female individuals with AR disease. Patients and Methods: A total of 478 patients with AR admitted to the 2 main hospitals of Zahedan City from 2005 to 2012, were recruited in this analytic-descriptive study. Categories of smokers and never smokers were used based on patient’s statements and their history of smoking. SPT was performed with panel of some allergens and results were recorded and analyzed statistically. Odds ratio and confidence interval method were calculated using univariate logistic regression. Results: The results of this study indicated that 41.4% of patients with allergic rhinitis was smoker with ages ranged from 15 to 70 years. The result of this study also showed that smoking has no effect on SPT results of pollen and weeds aeroallergens conducted on male and female AR patients. However, male were significantly more sensitive than female in terms of sensitivity to the aspergillus, cladosporium, house dust mite, grasses, wheat, cockroach, and feather allergens. Conclusions: Our findings did not support the effect of cigarette smoking on SPT reactivity to pollen and weeds aeroallergens. However, male were significantly more sensitive than female in terms of sensitivity to some allergens. PMID:26495257

  16. Reactive and Reciprocal Inhibition Therapies in the Group Treatment of Test Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Maureen

    This experiment compares the effects of group reactive inhibition therapy and group reciprocal inhibition therapy with no treatment on the anxiety level of test-anxious college students. Twenty undergraduate students volunteered for the study and were assigned to either the reactive inhibition group, the reciprocal inhibition group, or the…

  17. Reactivity of Hontomín carbonate rocks to acidic solution injection: reactive "push-pull" tracer tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gaspari, Francesca; Cabeza, Yoar; Luquot, Linda; Rötting, Tobias; Saaltink, Maarten W.; Carrera, Jesus

    2014-05-01

    Several field tests will be carried out in order to characterize the reservoir for CO2 injection in Hontomín (Burgos, Spain) as part of the Compostilla project of "Fundación Ciudad de la Energía" (CIUDEN). Once injected, the dissolution of the CO2 in the resident brine will increase the acidity of the water and lead to the dissolution of the rocks, constituted mainly by carbonates. This mechanism will cause changes in the aquifer properties such as porosity and permeability. To reproduce the effect of the CO2 injection, a reactive solution with 2% of acetic acid is going to be injected in the reservoir and extracted from the same well (reactive "push-pull" tracer tests) to identify and quantify the geochemical reactions occurring into the aquifer. The reactivity of the rock will allow us also to evaluate the changes of its properties. Previously, theoretical calculations of Damkhöler numbers were done to determine the acid concentrations and injection flow rates needed to generate ramified-wormholes patterns, during theses "push-pull" experiments. The aim of this work is to present the results and a preliminary interpretation of the field tests.

  18. Skin prick test results to artesunate in children sensitized to Artemisia vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Mori, F; Pantano, S; Rossi, M E; Montagnani, C; Chiappini, E; Novembre, E; Galli, L; de Martino, M

    2015-09-01

    Artemisia vulgaris L and Artemisia annua L (Chinese: qinghao) are similar plants of the Asterbaceae family. Artesunate, a semi-synthetic derivate of artemisin which is the active principle extract of the plant qinghao, has antimalarial properties. Some cases of severe allergic reactions to artesunate have been described. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between positive skin tests to Artemisia vulgaris L allergen and a preparation of injectable artesunate. A total of 531 children were skin prick tested with inhalants (including Artemisia vulgaris L), foods, and artesunate. Among the 59 patients positive to Artemisia vulgaris L only one child was also positive to artesunate. No child was positive to artesunate in those negative to Artemisia vulgaris L. We conclude that Artemisia vulgaris L sensitization is not associated with sensitization to artesunate; consequently, skin test to artesunate should not be carried out before using the drug considering the rare allergic reactions. PMID:26157064

  19. Pulse testing in the presence of wellbore storage and skin effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ogbe, D.O.; Brigham, W.E.

    1984-08-01

    A pulse test is conducted by creating a series of short-time pressure transients in an active (pulsing) well and recording the observed pressure response at an observation (responding) well. Using the pressure response and flow rate data, the transmissivity and storativity of the tested formation can be determined. Like any other pressure transient data, the pulse-test response is significantly influenced by wellbore storage and skin effects. The purpose of this research is to examine the influence of wellbore storage and skin effects on interference testing in general and on pulse-testing in particular, and to present the type curves and procedures for designing and analyzing pulse-test data when wellbore storage and skin effects are active at either the responding well or the pulsing well. A mathematical model for interference testing was developed by solving the diffusivity equation for radial flow of a single-phase, slightly compressible fluid in an infinitely large, homogeneous reservoir. When wellbore storage and skin effects are present in a pulse test, the observed response amplitude is attenuated and the time lag is inflated. Consequently, neglecting wellbore storage and skin effects in a pulse test causes the calculated storativity to be over-estimated and the transmissivity to be under-estimated. The error can be as high as 30%. New correlations and procedures are developed for correcting the pulse response amplitude and time lag for wellbore storage effects. Using these correlations, it is possible to correct the wellbore storage-dominated response amplitude and time lag to within 3% of their expected values without wellbore storage, and in turn to calculate the corresponding transmissivity and storativity. Worked examples are presented to illustrate how to use the new correction techniques. 45 references.

  20. Testing of explosives mixed with clay to determine maximum explosive content of non-reactive mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Garza, R; Green, L; Maienschein, J; Pruneda, C

    1998-07-21

    This report contains a detailed description of the experiments conducted to demonstrate that debris from explosives testing in a shot tank that contains 4 weight percent or less of explosive is non-reactive under the specified testing protocol in the Code of Federal Regulations. As such it is a companion report to UCRL-ID-128999, "Program for Certification of Waste from Contained Firing Facility - Establishment of Waste as Non-Reactive and Discussion of Potential Waste Generation Problems."

  1. A skin test survey of valley fever in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Fredrich, B E

    1989-01-01

    Results of a study of the prevalence of valley fever among 1128 residents of Tijuana, Baja California are presented. Children from primary and middle schools (n = 497) and adults from technical institutes and maquiladoras (assembly plants) were tested for reaction to both spherulin and coccidioidin during 1985-1986, and they completed a questionnaire containing 23 variables on their socio-environment. Place of residence was mapped. The population sampled is largely middle class. Discriminant analysis indicates the distribution of positive cases is not clustered, nor can it be correlated with geomorphic factors such as mesa tops, canyons, or valley bottoms. PMID:2588049

  2. The autologous serum skin test: a screening test for autoantibodies in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Sabroe, R A; Grattan, C E; Francis, D M; Barr, R M; Kobza Black, A; Greaves, M W

    1999-03-01

    One-third of patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) have circulating functional autoantibodies against the high affinity IgE receptor FcepsilonRI, or IgE. The intradermal injection of autologous serum causes a weal and flare reaction in many patients with CIU, and this reaction forms the basis of the autologous serum skin test (ASST). We have determined the parameters of the ASST which define the optimal sensitivity and specificity for the identification of patients with autoantibodies. Two physicians (R.A. S. and C.E.H.G.) performed ASSTs in a total of 155 patients with CIU, 40 healthy control subjects, 15 patients with dermographism, nine with cholinergic urticaria and 10 with atopic eczema. Patients were classified as having functional autoantibodies by demonstrating in vitro serum-evoked histamine release from the basophils of two healthy donors. There were significant differences (P < 0.001) in the mean weal diameter, weal volume, weal redness and flare area of the intradermal serum-induced cutaneous responses at 30 min between patients with CIU with autoantibodies and either those without autoantibodies or control subjects. The optimum combined sensitivity and specificity of the ASST was obtained if a positive test was defined as a red serum-induced weal with a diameter of >/= 1.5 mm than the saline-induced response at 30 min. For R.A.S. and C.E.H.G., the ASST sensitivity was 65% and 71% and specificity was 81% and 78%, respectively. Using these criteria, the following subjects had positive ASSTs: none of 15 dermographics, none of 10 atopics, one of nine cholinergics and one of 40 controls. PMID:10233264

  3. Carotenoid intake does not mediate a relationship between reactive oxygen species and bright colouration: experimental test in a lizard.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Mats; Wilson, Mark; Isaksson, Caroline; Uller, Tobias; Mott, Beth

    2008-04-01

    We performed experiments on male Australian painted dragon lizards (Ctenophorus pictus) to test the hypothesis that carotenoids can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), protecting the organism from oxidative stress, and that this capacity is reflected in skin colours involved in signalling. Subsequent to 4 weeks of carotenoid treatment we used flow cytometry to analyse unspecified ROS (H(2)O(2), singlet oxygen, superoxide and peroxynitrite level), hereafter termed ROS, and baseline superoxide specifically (bSO in peripheral blood cells). Mean background levels of ROS and bSO did not differ between carotenoid-treated and control males. bSO, which represents the superoxide level in un-manipulated blood, was negatively correlated with colour development in all males, regardless of carotenoid treatment. Thus, carotenoid intake does not reduce circulating levels of ROS or bSO, suggesting that carotenoids are inefficient antioxidants in vivo and, therefore, are unlikely to provide a direct link between oxidative stress and colouration. PMID:18375850

  4. Unsaturated fatty acids show clear elicitation responses in a modified local lymph node assay with an elicitation phase, and test positive in the direct peptide reactivity assay.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kunihiko; Shinoda, Shinsuke; Hagiwara, Saori; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Itagaki, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Test Guidelines (TG) adopted the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) and guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) as stand-alone skin sensitization test methods. However, unsaturated carbon-carbon double-bond and/or lipid acids afforded false-positive results more frequently in the LLNA compared to those in the GPMT and/or in human subjects. In the current study, oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic, fumaric, maleic, and succinic acid and squalene were tested in a modified LLNA with an elicitation phase (LLNA:DAE), and in a direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) to evaluate their skin-sensitizing potential. Oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic and maleic acid were positive in the LLNA:DAE, of which three, linoleic, linolenic, and maleic acid were positive in the DPRA. Furthermore, the results of the cross-sensitizing tests using four LLNA:DAE-positive chemicals were negative, indicating a chemical-specific elicitation response. In a previous report, the estimated concentration needed to produce a stimulation index of 3 (EC3) of linolenic acid, squalene, and maleic acid in the LLNA was < 10%. Therefore, these chemicals were classified as moderate skin sensitizers in the LLNA. However, the skin-sensitizing potential of all LLNA:DAE-positive chemicals was estimated as weak. These results suggested that oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic, and maleic acid had skin-sensitizing potential, and that the LLNA overestimated the skin-sensitizing potential compared to that estimated by the LLNA:DAE. PMID:26558466

  5. Analysis of skin patch test results and metalloproteinase-2 levels in a patient with contact dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Czajkowski, Rafał; Kowaliszyn, Bogna; Żbikowska-Gotz, Magdalena; Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The complex course of skin reactions that contact eczema involves is due in part to abnormalities of the extracellular matrix function. Proteins that degrade extracellular matrix components include metalloproteinases (MMP), which are divided into subcategories depending on the chemical structure and substrate specificity. Aim To analyse patch test results in contact dermatitis patients and to assess MMP-2 levels during skin lesion exacerbation and remission. Material and methods Fifty patients suffering from contact eczema were qualified to the study and 20 healthy volunteers as a control group. The study group patients had epidermal skin tests performed with the “European Standard” set. To assess the MMP-2 level in serum, venous blood was drawn, twice from study group patients – during contact dermatitis exacerbation and remission periods – and once from control group patients. Assessment of MMP-2 in serum was done with ELISA immunoassay. To verify the proposed hypotheses, parametric and nonparametric significance tests were used. Results Hands were the most frequent location of contact dermatitis. Nickel (II) sulphate was the most frequent sensitizing substance. Mean MMP-2 levels were statistically higher in the study group both in contact dermatitis exacerbation and remission periods than in the control group. There was no statistically significant difference between MMP-2 levels and skin patch test results. Conclusions Nickel is one of the most allergenic contact allergens in patients with contact dermatitis. Metalloproteinase-2 is a good marker of contact dermatitis in various stages of the disease. PMID:26161054

  6. Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) supplementation associated with reduced skin test lesional area in horses with Culicoides hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Wendy; McKee, Sharyn; Clarke, Andrew F.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) supplementation on the skin test response of atopic horses. Six horses that displayed a positive skin test for allergy to extract from Culicoides sp. participated in the 42-day, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over trial. Results showed that supplementation with flaxseed for 42 days in our experimental horses reduced the mean skin test response to Culicoides sp. This observation was concurrent with a significant decrease in the long-chain saturated fatty acids; behenic acid (22:0) and lignoceric acid (24:0), in the hair of horses receiving flaxseed. There was also a significant decrease in aspartate aminotransferase, and increase in serum glucose in the treatment animals at specific sampling points. It was concluded that; in this small pilot study, flaxseed was able to reduce the lesional area of the skin test response of atopic horses, alter the fatty acid profile of the hair, reduce inflammation, and did not elicit any negative side-effects in the experimental horses. PMID:12418783

  7. Anaphylaxis to Spirulina confirmed by skin prick test with ingredients of Spirulina tablets.

    PubMed

    Le, Thuy-My; Knulst, André C; Röckmann, Heike

    2014-12-01

    Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis), blue-green microalgae, has high content in proteins, γ-linoleic acid and vitamins and therefore gained popularity as food supplement. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Spirulina is also an interesting alternative and sustainable protein source with the growing world population. We present a case of a 17-year-old male, who developed anaphylaxis the first time he ingested a Spirulina tablet. Skin prick test with diluted Spirulina tablet was positive. Further skin prick testing with separated ingredients (Spirulina platensis algae, silicon dioxide, inulin and magnesium stearate) was only positive for Spirulina platensis algae and negative in controls, confirming the allergy was caused by Spirulina and not by one of the additives. This case report shows that diagnosis of Spirulina allergy can safely be made by skin prick test with dilutions of the A. platensis or even more simple by skin prick test with the diluted tablet. Since Spirulina has gained popularity as food and nutritional supplement, it is important to realize the potential risk of this dietary supplement. Before Spirulina is produced and consumed on a wider scale, allergenicity risk assessment should be performed, including investigation of potential crossreactivity with well-known inhalant allergens and foods. PMID:25445756

  8. Biaxial tensile tests identify epidermis and hypodermis as the main structural elements of sweet cherry skin

    PubMed Central

    Brüggenwirth, Martin; Fricke, Heiko; Knoche, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    The skin of developing soft and fleshy fruit is subjected to considerable growth stress, and failure of the skin is associated with impaired barrier properties in water transport and pathogen defence. The objectives were to establish a standardized, biaxial tensile test of the skin of soft and fleshy fruit and to use it to characterize and quantify mechanical properties of the sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit skin as a model. A segment of the exocarp (ES) comprising cuticle, epidermis, hypodermis and adhering flesh was mounted in the elastometer such that the in vivo strain was maintained. The ES was pressurized from the inner surface and the pressure and extent of associated bulging were recorded. Pressure : strain responses were almost linear up to the point of fracture, indicating that the modulus of elasticity was nearly constant. Abrading the cuticle decreased the fracture strain but had no effect on the fracture pressure. When pressure was held constant, bulging of the ES continued to increase. Strain relaxation upon releasing the pressure was complete and depended on time. Strains in longitudinal and latitudinal directions on the bulging ES did not differ significantly. Exocarp segments that released their in vivo strain before the test had higher fracture strains and lower moduli of elasticity. The results demonstrate that the cherry skin is isotropic in the tangential plane and exhibits elastic and viscoelastic behaviour. The epidermis and hypodermis, but not the cuticle, represent the structural ‘backbone’ in a cherry skin. This test is useful in quantifying the mechanical properties of soft and fleshy fruit of a range of species under standardized conditions. PMID:24876301

  9. Biaxial tensile tests identify epidermis and hypodermis as the main structural elements of sweet cherry skin.

    PubMed

    Brüggenwirth, Martin; Fricke, Heiko; Knoche, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    The skin of developing soft and fleshy fruit is subjected to considerable growth stress, and failure of the skin is associated with impaired barrier properties in water transport and pathogen defence. The objectives were to establish a standardized, biaxial tensile test of the skin of soft and fleshy fruit and to use it to characterize and quantify mechanical properties of the sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit skin as a model. A segment of the exocarp (ES) comprising cuticle, epidermis, hypodermis and adhering flesh was mounted in the elastometer such that the in vivo strain was maintained. The ES was pressurized from the inner surface and the pressure and extent of associated bulging were recorded. Pressure : strain responses were almost linear up to the point of fracture, indicating that the modulus of elasticity was nearly constant. Abrading the cuticle decreased the fracture strain but had no effect on the fracture pressure. When pressure was held constant, bulging of the ES continued to increase. Strain relaxation upon releasing the pressure was complete and depended on time. Strains in longitudinal and latitudinal directions on the bulging ES did not differ significantly. Exocarp segments that released their in vivo strain before the test had higher fracture strains and lower moduli of elasticity. The results demonstrate that the cherry skin is isotropic in the tangential plane and exhibits elastic and viscoelastic behaviour. The epidermis and hypodermis, but not the cuticle, represent the structural 'backbone' in a cherry skin. This test is useful in quantifying the mechanical properties of soft and fleshy fruit of a range of species under standardized conditions. PMID:24876301

  10. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF A HAZARDOUS WASTE REACTIVITY TESTING PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A test protocol to determine the gross chemical composition of waste materials has been developed for use at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. Included is a field test kit, flow diagrams, a descriptive manual and a mixing device to observe the effects of mixing two hazardous wa...

  11. Photopatch test reactivity: effect of photoallergen concentration and UVA dosaging.

    PubMed

    Hasan, T; Jansen, C T

    1996-06-01

    We have studied the influence of variations in allergen concentration and UVA dosaging on the results of photopatch testing with the Scandinavian standard photopatch series in 29 patients with photocontact and/or contact allergy to 1 or several of the allergens in that series. Photocontact test reactions were more sensitive to allergen dilution than plain contact test reactions. Even dilution from the standard 5% to 2.5% significantly reduced para-aminobenzoic acid photocontact test reactions. Reducing the UVA dose from the standard 5 J/cm2 to 2.5 or 1 J/cm2 in 2 out of 5 cases turned a significant (++) reaction into a doubtful one (+). Increasing the standard UVA dose of 5 J/ cm2 to 20-40 J/cm2 turned a single + photocontact reaction to trichlorcarbanilide and a single 1 + plain contact reaction to chlorhexidine into ++ reactions. In the majority of cases, however, neither photocontact nor plain contact test reactions were augemented by UVA doses up to 80 J/cm2. We conclude that a UVA dose of 5 J/cm2 is sufficient for eliciting photocontact allergic test reactions, and that a reduction of either the UVA dose level or the standard allergen concentrations of the Scandinavian photopatch test guidelines may cause loss of significant photocontact test reactions in a proportion of the cases. PMID:8879921

  12. The importance of awareness for veterinarians involved in cattle tuberculosis skin testing.

    PubMed

    Humblet, M-F; Moyen, J-L; Bardoux, P; Boschiroli, M L; Saegerman, C

    2011-12-01

    France is currently facing a re-emergence of bovine tuberculosis in several regions. To assess the knowledge of veterinary field practitioners concerning skin testing, a questionnaire-based methodology developed in Belgium was adapted to the context of the French department of Dordogne. The veterinarians involved in herds skin testing were solicited to participate to the survey (n = 94), through an anonymous postal questionnaire including items related to each step of the skin test procedure. Each item of the questionnaire was allotted a compliance score by 5 experts in the field of bovine tuberculosis (0, 1 or 2 a correct, acceptable and unacceptable answer, respectively). These scores were balanced over 30 criteria according to their potential impact on the non-detection of reactors, on the basis of 11 experts' opinion. A global score was calculated for each participating veterinarian. In addition, the Departmental sanitary authorities held meetings in December 2005 and June 2006 to make the veterinarians aware of the importance of correctly performing the skin test. The participants to the study were asked to fill in the questionnaire in duplicate: one related to their practices before the meeting, and the other one focusing on their practices after the meeting. A comparison of both situations was carried out (pre- and post-awareness meeting), as well as a comparison with the Belgian situation, arbitrarily selected as reference for the methodology. The participation was representative and reached a 23.4% rate. A significant difference was noticed between the mean global score reached before and after the meeting. These results show the usefulness of an appropriate awareness campaign of veterinarians in relation to skin testing and the importance of frequently holding awareness meetings in areas remaining confronted with bovine tuberculosis problems. It also highlights the interest of a structured auto-assessment process of veterinary practices. PMID:21569223

  13. 75 FR 47592 - Final Test Guideline; Product Performance of Skin-applied Insect Repellents of Insect and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ..., 2007 (72 FR 32647) (FRL-8135-9), of national experts in which the revisions made in June 2006, were... AGENCY Final Test Guideline; Product Performance of Skin-applied Insect Repellents of Insect and Other... Product Performance of Skin-applied Insect Repellents of Insect and Other Arthropods Test...

  14. Skin Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs that can help clear up this condition. Day-to-Day Skin Care See our tips for daily skin ... Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to Know Your ...

  15. The use of Reactive Ion Etching for obtaining “free” silica nano test tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukserin, Fatih; Martin, Charles R.

    2010-10-01

    Silica nano test tubes are one-dimensional inorganic nanostructures with several biotechnological applications including biosensing, magnetic resonance imaging, and targeted cancer therapeutics. They are generally prepared by sol-gel deposition of silica to nanoporous alumina templates. Preparing samples composed of isolated free silica nano test tubes can be a challenging process due to the conformal coating of silica on the template. This causes the formation of a top-surface silica layer which laterally connects the nano test tubes. Herein, we detailed the use of Reactive Ion Etching to remove this top-surface silica layer which yields free silica nano test tubes with template dissolution. Compared with the mechanical polishing approach, Reactive Ion Etching treatment allows a fine manipulation ability of the surface material at the nanoscale level. When used excessively, Reactive Ion Etching causes an orifice closing phenomenon that may be employed to create novel one-dimensional nanocapsules.

  16. American cutaneous leishmaniasis: use of a skin test as a predictor of relapse after treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Passos, V. M.; Barreto, S. M.; Romanha, A. J.; Krettli, A. U.; Volpini, A. C.; Lima e Costa, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    While relapses following clinical cure of American cutaneous leishmaniasis are frequent, no test has been described until now to predict such relapses. A cohort of 318 American cutaneous leishmaniasis patients was followed up for two years after treatment with meglumine antimoniate, during which time 32 relapses occurred, 30 in the first year and two in the second (accumulated risk: 10.5%). No association was found between these relapses and the parasite-specific antibody response before and after treatment, or between the relapses and stratification by sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. However when Leishmania was used as antigen, patients with a negative skin test at the time of diagnosis presented a 3.4-fold higher risk (hazard risk = 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-7.0) of American cutaneous leishmaniasis relapse, compared with patients with a positive response. This result shows that the skin test can be a predictor of American cutaneous leishmaniasis relapse after treatment. PMID:10994280

  17. Testing and Analysis of Composite Skin/Stringer Debonding Under Multi-Axial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Cvitkovich, Michael K.; O'Brien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2000-01-01

    A consistent step-wise approach is presented to investigate the damage mechanism in composite bonded skin/stringer constructions under uniaxial and biaxial (in-plane/out-of-plane) loading conditions. The approach uses experiments to detect the failure mechanism, computational stress analysis to determine the location of first matrix cracking and computational fracture mechanics to investigate the potential for delamination growth. In a first step, tests were performed on specimens, which consisted of a tapered composite flange, representing a stringer or frame, bonded onto a composite skin. Tests were performed under monotonic loading conditions in tension, three-point bending, and combined tension/bending to evaluate the debonding mechanisms between the skin and the bonded stringer. For combined tension/bending testing, a unique servohydraulic load frame was used that was capable of applying both in-plane tension and out-of-plane bending loads simultaneously. Specimen edges were examined on the microscope to document the damage occurrence and to identify typical damage patterns. For all three load cases, observed failure initiated in the flange, near the flange tip, causing the flange to almost fully debond from skin. In a second step, a two dimensional plane-strain finite element model was developed to analyze the different test cases using a geometrically nonlinear solution. For all three loading conditions, computed principal stresses exceeded the transverse strength of the material in those areas of the flange where the matrix cracks had developed during the tests. In a third step, delaminations of various lengths were simulated in two locations where delaminations were observed during the tests. The analyses showed that at the loads corresponding to matrix ply crack initiation computed strain energy release rates exceeded the values obtained from a mixed mode failure criterion in one location, Hence. Unstable delamination propagation is likely to occur as

  18. Testing and Analysis of Composite Skin/Stringer Debonding under Multi-Axial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Cvitkovich, Michael; OBrien, Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2000-01-01

    A consistent step-wise approach is presented to investigate the damage mechanism in composite bonded skin/stringer constructions under uniaxial and biaxial (in-plane/out-of-plane) loading conditions. The approach uses experiments to detect the failure mechanism, computational stress analysis to determine the location of first matrix cracking and computational fracture mechanics to investigate the potential for delamination growth. In a first step, tests were performed on specimens, which consisted of a tapered composite flange, representing a stringer or frame, bonded onto a composite skin. Tests were performed under monotonic loading conditions in tension, three-point bending, and combined tension/bending to evaluate the debonding mechanisms between the skin and the bonded stringer. For combined tension/bending testing, a unique servohydraulic load frame was used that was capable of applying both in-plane tension and out-of-plane bending loads simultaneously. Specimen edges were examined on the microscope to document the damage occurrence and to identify typical damage patterns. For all three load cases, observed failure initiated in the flange, near the flange tip, causing the flange to almost fully debond from the skin. In a second step, a two-dimensional plane-strain finite element model was developed to analyze the different test cases using a geometrically nonlinear solution. For all three loading conditions, computed principal stresses exceeded the transverse strength of the material in those areas of the flange where the matrix cracks had developed during the tests. In a third step, delaminations of various lengths were simulated in two locations where delaminations were observed during the tests. The analyses showed that at the loads corresponding to matrix ply crack initiation computed strain energy release rates exceeded the values obtained from a mixed mode failure criterion in one location. Hence, unstable delamination propagation is likely to occur as

  19. Parasitic infection may be associated with discordant responses to QuantiFERON and tuberculin skin test in apparently healthy children and adolescents in a tuberculosis endemic setting, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background M. tuberculosis remains one of the world’s deadliest pathogens in part because of its ability to establish persistent, latent infections, which can later reactivate to cause disease. In regions of the globe where disease is endemic, as much as 50% of the population is thought to be latently infected, complicating diagnosis and tuberculosis control. The tools most commonly used for diagnosis of latent M. tuberculosis infection are the tuberculin skin test and the newer interferon-gamma release assays, both of which rely on an antigen-specific memory response as an indicator of infection. It is clear that the two tests, do not always give concordant results, but the factors leading to this are only partially understood. Methods In this study we examined 245 healthy school children aged from 12 to 20 years from Addis Ababa, a tuberculosis-endemic region, characterised them with regard to response in the tuberculin skin test and QuantIFERON™ test and assessed factors that might contribute to discordant responses. Results Although concordance between the tests was generally fair (90% concordance), there was a subset of children who had a positive QuantIFERON™ result but a negative tuberculin skin test. After analysis of multiple parameters the data suggest that discordance was most strongly associated with the presence of parasites in the stool. Conclusions Parasitic gut infections are frequent in most regions where M. tuberculosis is endemic. This study, while preliminary, suggests that the tuberculin skin test should be interpreted with caution where this may be the case. PMID:23738853

  20. A regulatory assessment of test data for reactivity accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.O.; Scott, H.H.; Chung, Hee M.

    1997-09-01

    An assessment is made of recent test data from France, Japan, and Russia, and of earlier test data from the U.S., in relation to the safety analysis performed for power reactors in the U.S. Considerations include mode of cladding failure, oxidation, hydriding, and pulse-width effects. From the data trend and from these considerations, it is concluded that the cladding failure threshold for fuel rods with moderate-to-high burnup is roughly 100 cal/g for BWRs and PWRs. Realistic plant calculations suggest that cladding failure would not occur for rod-ejection or rod-drop accidents and, therefore, that pellet fragmentation and enhanced fission product release from fuel pellets should not have to be considered in the safety analysis for these accidents. However, the data base is sparse and contains a lot of uncertainty.

  1. Assuring consumer safety without animal testing: a feasibility case study for skin sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Gavin; Aleksic, Maja; Aptula, Aynur; Carmichael, Paul; Fentem, Julia; Gilmour, Nicola; Mackay, Cameron; Pease, Camilla; Pendlington, Ruth; Reynolds, Fiona; Scott, Daniel; Warner, Guy; Westmoreland, Carl

    2008-11-01

    Allergic Contact Dermatitis (ACD; chemical-induced skin sensitisation) represents a key consumer safety endpoint for the cosmetics industry. At present, animal tests (predominantly the mouse Local Lymph Node Assay) are used to generate skin sensitisation hazard data for use in consumer safety risk assessments. An animal testing ban on chemicals to be used in cosmetics will come into effect in the European Union (EU) from March 2009. This animal testing ban is also linked to an EU marketing ban on products containing any ingredients that have been subsequently tested in animals, from March 2009 or March 2013, depending on the toxicological endpoint of concern. Consequently, the testing of cosmetic ingredients in animals for their potential to induce skin sensitisation will be subject to an EU marketing ban, from March 2013 onwards. Our conceptual framework and strategy to deliver a non-animal approach to consumer safety risk assessment can be summarised as an evaluation of new technologies (e.g. 'omics', informatics), leading to the development of new non-animal (in silico and in vitro) predictive models for the generation and interpretation of new forms of hazard characterisation data, followed by the development of new risk assessment approaches to integrate these new forms of data and information in the context of human exposure. Following the principles of the conceptual framework, we have been investigating existing and developing new technologies, models and approaches, in order to explore the feasibility of delivering consumer safety risk assessment decisions in the absence of new animal data. We present here our progress in implementing this conceptual framework, with the skin sensitisation endpoint used as a case study. PMID:19025323

  2. Test systems for the determination of glucocorticoid receptor ligand induced skin atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Schäcke, Heike; Asadullah, Khusru

    2011-01-01

    Topical glucocorticoids are highly anti-inflammatory effective but limited by their side effect potential, with skin atrophy being the most prominent one. Thus, determining the atrophogenic potential of novel compounds targeting the glucocorticoid receptor is important. Significant progress in the understanding of glucocorticoid receptor mediated molecular action has been made providing the basis for novel glucocorticoid receptor ligands with a potentially superior effect/side effect profile. Such compounds, however, need to be tested. The present gold standard for the reliable prediction of glucocorticoid induced skin atrophy are still in vivo models, however, in vitro models may replace them to some extent in the future. Indeed, advances in technologies to determine the atrophogenic potential of compounds in vitro has been made recently and promising novel test models like the human full thickness skin models are emerging. Their full predictive value, however, needs to be further evaluated. Currently, a screening approach starting with a combination of several in vitro test systems followed by subsequent testing of the most promising compounds in rodent models is recommended prior entering clinical studies with selected development compounds. PMID:22110776

  3. Skin sensitization--a critical review of predictive test methods in animals and man.

    PubMed

    Botham, P A; Basketter, D A; Maurer, T; Mueller, D; Potokar, M; Bontinck, W J

    1991-04-01

    With the exception of the Draize Test, the guinea-pig test methods currently accepted by regulatory authorities worldwide are well able to predict the potential of a material to cause skin sensitization. Nevertheless, (a) some methods are more sensitive than others (e.g. adjuvant tests are generally more sensitive than non-adjuvant tests); (b) methods cannot be sufficiently standardized to give full reproducibility of results between laboratories; and (c) most methods are based on subjective visual grading of skin reactions--difficulties thus arise when testing coloured or irritant materials. Laboratories must be able to show the sensitivity of the method(s) they use by demonstrating that positive reactions occur with mild/moderate contact allergens rather than the strong/extreme sensitizers currently recommended in certain guidelines, specifically in the EEC Test Method. The sensitivity of the adjuvant tests is such that it is possible to halve the minimum number of animals required by present regulatory guidelines without compromising the capacity of the tests to detect weak/mild sensitizers. A similar review has not yet been made for non-adjuvant tests. Alternative test methods, including some recently developed mouse models, offer several advantages, including more objective endpoints. These tests have not been extensively validated and this precludes their use at present for regulatory purposes other than to confirm the sensitization potential of a material. Two new test methods using mice, the Mouse Ear-swelling Test and the Local Lymph Node Assay, appear promising. They should undergo rigorous interlaboratory testing to determine their sensitivity and specificity. In vitro methods do not represent a viable alternative in the foreseeable future. An approach using quantitative structure-activity relationships is the most likely route to a non-animal model, but this will require considerable research, development and validation. Human sensitization tests have

  4. Tuberculin Skin Test Negativity Is Under Tight Genetic Control of Chromosomal Region 11p14-15 in Settings With Different Tuberculosis Endemicities

    PubMed Central

    Cobat, Aurélie; Poirier, Christine; Hoal, Eileen; Boland-Auge, Anne; de La Rocque, France; Corrard, François; Grange, Ghislain; Migaud, Mélanie; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Schurr, Erwin; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Delacourt, Christophe; Abel, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of subjects exposed to a contagious tuberculosis case display lack of tuberculin skin test (TST) reactivity. We previously mapped a major locus (TST1) controlling lack of TST reactivity in families from an area in South Africa where tuberculosis is hyperendemic. Here, we conducted a household tuberculosis contact study in a French area where the endemicity of tuberculosis is low. A genome-wide analysis of TST negativity identified a significant linkage signal (P < 3 × 10−5) in close vicinity of TST1. Combined analysis of the 2 samples increased evidence of linkage (P = 2.4 × 10−6), further implicating genetic factors located on 11p14-15. This region overlaps the TNF1 locus controlling mycobacteria-driven tumor necrosis factor α production. PMID:25143445

  5. Skin reactivity of unsensitized monkeys upon challenge with staphylococcal enterotoxin B: a new approach for investigating the site of toxin action.

    PubMed Central

    Scheuber, P H; Golecki, J R; Kickhöfen, B; Scheel, D; Beck, G; Hammer, D K

    1985-01-01

    The correlation between skin tests and emetic responses in unsensitized monkeys was used to elucidate the cellular site of action of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). Evidence is presented that SEB administered intradermally provoked immediate-type skin reactions associated with mild degranulation of cutaneous mast cells. The cytoplasma showed signs of synthetic and metabolic activity, with formation of vesicles and increased prominence of mitochondria. Carboxymethylation of histidine residues of SEB altered the molecule (cSEB) from more alkaline components to more acidic species with increased microheterogeneity. This modification caused a loss in toxicity and completely abrogated the skin-sensitizing activity without changing the immunological specificity. cSEB, however, could compete with SEB for binding sites on the target cell surface. Previously, compound 48/80-treated skin sites behaved refractively to challenge with SEB, indicating that mediators from cutaneous mast cells are required for SEB-induced skin reactions. Skin reactions as well as emetic responses challenged with SEB were completely inhibited by H2 receptor antagonists and calcium channel blockers but not by H1 antihistamine or competitive antagonists of serotonin. This new approach provides a model for investigating the mechanisms of SEB action. Images PMID:2866161

  6. Sensitization to Food Additives in Patients with Allergy: A Study Based on Skin Test and Open Oral Challenge.

    PubMed

    Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Hejrati, Zinatosadat; Dehghani, Zahra; Dehghani, Faranak; Kolahi, Niloofar

    2016-06-01

    There has been a great increase in the consumption of various food additives in recent years. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence of sensitization to food additives by using skin prick test in patients with allergy and to determine the concordance rate between positive skin tests and oral challenge in hypersensitivity to additives. This cross-sectional study included 125 (female 71, male 54) patients aged 2-76 years with allergy and 100 healthy individuals. Skin tests were performed in both patient and control groups with 25 fresh food additives. Among patients with allergy, 22.4% showed positive skin test at least to one of the applied materials. Skin test was negative to all tested food additives in control group. Oral food challenge was done in 28 patients with positive skin test, in whom 9 patients showed reaction to culprit (Concordance rate=32.1%). The present study suggested that about one-third of allergic patients with positive reaction to food additives showed positive oral challenge; it may be considered the potential utility of skin test to identify the role of food additives in patients with allergy. PMID:27424134

  7. Evaluation of combinations of in vitro sensitization test descriptors for the artificial neural network-based risk assessment model of skin sensitization.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Morihiko; Fukui, Shiho; Okamoto, Kenji; Kurotani, Satoru; Imai, Noriyasu; Fujishiro, Miyuki; Kyotani, Daiki; Kato, Yoshinao; Kasahara, Toshihiko; Fujita, Masaharu; Toyoda, Akemi; Sekiya, Daisuke; Watanabe, Shinichi; Seto, Hirokazu; Takenouchi, Osamu; Ashikaga, Takao; Miyazawa, Masaaki

    2015-11-01

    The skin sensitization potential of chemicals has been determined with the use of the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). However, in recent years public concern about animal welfare has led to a requirement for non-animal risk assessment systems for the prediction of skin sensitization potential, to replace LLNA. Selection of an appropriate in vitro test or in silico model descriptors is critical to obtain good predictive performance. Here, we investigated the utility of artificial neural network (ANN) prediction models using various combinations of descriptors from several in vitro sensitization tests. The dataset, collected from published data and from experiments carried out in collaboration with the Japan Cosmetic Industry Association (JCIA), consisted of values from the human cell line activation test (h-CLAT), direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA), SH test and antioxidant response element (ARE) assay for chemicals whose LLNA thresholds have been reported. After confirming the relationship between individual in vitro test descriptors and the LLNA threshold (e.g. EC3 value), we used the subsets of chemicals for which the requisite test values were available to evaluate the predictive performance of ANN models using combinations of h-CLAT/DPRA (N = 139 chemicals), the DPRA/ARE assay (N = 69), the SH test/ARE assay (N = 73), the h-CLAT/DPRA/ARE assay (N = 69) and the h-CLAT/SH test/ARE assay (N = 73). The h-CLAT/DPRA, h-CLAT/DPRA/ARE assay and h-CLAT/SH test/ARE assay combinations showed a better predictive performance than the DPRA/ARE assay and the SH test/ARE assay. Our data indicates that the descriptors evaluated in this study were all useful for predicting human skin sensitization potential, although combinations containing h-CLAT (reflecting dendritic cell-activating ability) were most effective for ANN-based prediction. PMID:25824844

  8. Tests of Flammability of Cotton Fabrics and Expected Skin Burns in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanagh, Jane M.; Torvi, David A.; Gabriel, Kamiel S.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    During a shuttle launch and other portions of space flight, astronauts wear specialized flame resistant clothing. However during most of their missions on board the Space Shuttle or International Space Station, astronauts wear ordinary clothing, such as cotton shirts and pants. As the behaviour of flames is considerably different in microgravity than under earth's gravity, fabrics are expected to burn in a different fashion in microgravity than when tested on earth. There is interest in determining how this change in burning behaviour may affect times to second and third degree burn of human skin, and how the results of standard fabric flammability tests conducted under earth's gravity correlate with the expected fire behaviour of textiles in microgravity. A new experimental apparatus was developed to fit into the Spacecraft Fire Safety Facility (SFSF), which is used on NASA's KC-135 low gravity aircraft. The new apparatus was designed to be similar to the apparatus used in standard vertical flammability tests of fabrics. However, rather than using a laboratory burner, the apparatus uses a hot wire system to ignite 200 mm high by 80 mm wide fabric specimens. Fabric temperatures are measured using thermocouples and/or an infrared imaging system, while flame spread rates are measured using real time observations or video. Heat flux gauges are placed between 7 and 13 mm away from the fabric specimen, so that heat fluxes from the burning fabric to the skin can be estimated, along with predicted times required to produce skin burns. In November of 2003, this new apparatus was used on the KC-135 aircraft to test cotton and cotton/polyester blend fabric specimens in microgravity. These materials were also been tested using the same apparatus in 1-g, and using a standard vertical flammability test that utilizes a flame. In this presentation, the design of the test apparatus will be briefly described. Examples of results from the KC-135 tests will be provided, including

  9. Regulatory T Cells Modulate Th17 Responses in Tuberculin skin test positive (TST+) individuals

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Subash; Bhat, Sajid Q.; Kumar, N. Pavan; Kumaraswami, V.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Background The factors governing latency in tuberculosis (TB) are not well understood but appear to include pathogen and host factors. We have used Tuberculin skin test positivity as a tool to study cytokine responses in latent TB. Methods To identify host factors important in maintenance of TST positivity, we examined mycobacteria-specific immune responses of tuberculin skin test positive (TST+; latent TB) or negative (TST−; healthy) individuals in South India where skin test positivity can define TB latency. Results While PPD- and Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate Ag-specific Th1 and Th2 cytokines were not significantly different between the two groups, the Th17 cytokines—IL-17 and IL-23—were significantly decreased in TST+ individuals compared with the TST− individuals. This Th17 cytokine modulation was associated with significantly increased expression of CTLA-4 and Foxp3. Although CTLA-4 blockade failed to restore full production of IL-17 and IL-23 in TST+ individuals, depletion of regulatory T cells significantly increased production of these cytokines. Conclusion TST positivity is characterized by increased activity of regulatory T cells and a coincident downregulation of the Th17 response. PMID:19929695

  10. Testing and Analysis of Composite Skin/Stringer Debonding Under Multi-Axial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Cvitkovich, Michael K.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    1999-01-01

    Damage mechanisms in composite bonded skin/stringer constructions under uniaxial and biaxial (in-plane/out- of-plane) loading conditions were examined. Specimens consisted of a tapered composite flange bonded onto a composite skin. Tests were performed under monotonic loading conditions in tension, three-point bending, and combined tension/bending . For combined tension/bending testing, a unique servohydraulic load frame was used that was capable of applying both in-plane tension and out-of-plane bending loads simultaneously. Specimen edges were examined on the microscope to document the damage occurrence and to identify typical damage patterns. The observations showed that, for all three load cases, failure initiated in the flange, near the flange tip, causing the flange to almost fully debond from the skin. A two-dimensional plane-strain finite element model was developed to analyze the different test cases using a geometrically nonlinear solution. For all three loading conditions, principal stresses exceeded the transverse strength of the material in the flange area. Additionally, delaminations of various lengths were simulated in two locations where delaminations were observed. The analyses showed that unstable delamination propagation is likely to occur in one location at the loads corresponding to matrix ply crack initiation for all three load cases.

  11. Tests of Flammability of Cotton Fabrics and Expected Skin Burns in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanagh, Jane M.; Torvi, David A.; Gabriel, Kamiel S.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    During a shuttle launch and other portions of space flight, astronauts wear specialized flame resistant clothing. However during most of their missions on board the Space Shuttle or International Space Station, astronauts wear ordinary clothing, such as cotton shirts and pants. As the behaviour of flames is considerably different in microgravity than under earth s gravity, fabrics are expected to burn in a different fashion in microgravity than when tested on earth. There is interest in determining how this change in burning behaviour may affect times to second and third degree burn of human skin, and how the results of standard fabric flammability tests conducted under earth s gravity correlate with the expected fire behaviour of textiles in microgravity. A new experimental apparatus was developed to fit into the Spacecraft Fire Safety Facility (SFSF), which is used on NASA s KC-135 low gravity aircraft. The new apparatus was designed to be similar to the apparatus used in standard vertical flammability tests of fabrics. However, rather than using a laboratory burner, the apparatus uses a hot wire system to ignite 200 mm high by 80 mm wide fabric specimens. Fabric temperatures are measured using thermocouples and/or an infrared imaging system, while flame spread rates are measured using real time observations or video. Heat flux gauges are placed between 7 and 13 mm away from the fabric specimen, so that heat fluxes from the burning fabric to the skin can be estimated, along with predicted times required to produce skin burns.

  12. Improved procedures for in vitro skin irritation testing of sticky and greasy natural botanicals.

    PubMed

    Molinari, J; Eskes, C; Andres, E; Remoué, N; Sá-Rocha, V M; Hurtado, S P; Barrichello, C

    2013-02-01

    Skin irritation evaluation is an important endpoint for the safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients required by various regulatory authorities for notification and/or import of test substances. The present study was undertaken to investigate possible protocol adaptations of the currently validated in vitro skin irritation test methods based on reconstructed human epidermis (RhE) for the testing of plant extracts and natural botanicals. Due to their specific physico-chemical properties, such as lipophilicity, sticky/buttery-like texture, waxy/creamy foam characteristics, normal washing procedures can lead to an incomplete removal of these materials and/or to mechanical damage to the tissues, resulting in an impaired prediction of the true skin irritation potential of the materials. For this reason different refined washing procedures were evaluated for their ability to ensure appropriate removal of greasy and sticky substances while not altering the normal responses of the validated RhE test method. Amongst the different procedures evaluated, the use of a SDS 0.1% PBS solution to remove the sticky and greasy test material prior to the normal washing procedures was found to be the most suitable adaptation to ensure efficient removal of greasy and sticky in-house controls without affecting the results of the negative control. The predictive capacity of the refined SDS 0.1% washing procedure, was investigated by using twelve oily and viscous compounds having known skin irritation effects supported by raw and/or peer reviewed in vivo data. The normal washing procedure resulted in 8 out of 10 correctly predicted compounds as compared to 9 out of 10 with the refined washing procedures, showing an increase in the predictive ability of the assay. The refined washing procedure allowed to correctly identify all in vivo skin irritant materials showing the same sensitivity as the normal washing procedures, and further increased the specificity of the assay from 5 to 6 correct

  13. The Myeloid U937 Skin Sensitization Test (U-SENS) addresses the activation of dendritic cell event in the adverse outcome pathway for skin sensitization.

    PubMed

    Piroird, Cécile; Ovigne, Jean-Marc; Rousset, Françoise; Martinozzi-Teissier, Silvia; Gomes, Charles; Cotovio, José; Alépée, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    The U-SENS™ assay, formerly known as MUSST (Myeloid U937 Skin Sensitization Test), is an in vitro method to assess skin sensitization. Dendritic cell activation following exposure to sensitizers was modelled in the U937 human myeloid cell line by measuring the induction of the expression of CD86 by flow cytometry. The predictive performance of U-SENS™ was assessed via a comprehensive comparison analysis with the available human and LLNA data of 175 substances. U-SENS™ showed 79% specificity, 90% sensitivity and 88% accuracy. A four laboratory ring study demonstrated the transferability, reliability and reproducibility of U-SENS™, with a reproducibility of 95% within laboratories and 79% between-laboratories, showing that the U-SENS™ assay is a promising tool in a skin sensitization risk assessment testing strategy. PMID:25820135

  14. Cutaneous Surgical Denervation: A Method for Testing the Requirement for Nerves in Mouse Models of Skin Disease.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Shelby C; Brownell, Isaac; Wong, Sunny Y

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous somatosensory nerves function to detect diverse stimuli that act upon the skin. In addition to their established sensory roles, recent studies have suggested that nerves may also modulate skin disorders including atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and cancer. Here, we describe protocols for testing the requirement for nerves in maintaining a cutaneous mechanosensory organ, the touch dome (TD). Specifically, we discuss methods for genetically labeling, harvesting and visualizing TDs by whole-mount staining, and for performing unilateral surgical denervation on mouse dorsal back skin. Together, these approaches can be used to directly compare TD morphology and gene expression in denervated as well as sham-operated skin from the same animal. These methods can also be readily adapted to examine the requirement for nerves in mouse models of skin pathology. Finally, the ability to repeatedly sample the skin provides an opportunity to monitor disease progression at different stages and times after initiation. PMID:27404892

  15. Exploring the cause of initially reactive bovine brains on rapid tests for BSE

    PubMed Central

    Dudas, Sandor; James, Jace; Anderson, Renee; Czub, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is an invariably fatal prion disease of cattle. The identification of the zoonotic potential of BSE prompted safety officials to initiate surveillance testing for this disease. In Canada, BSE surveillance is primarily focused on high risk cattle including animals which are dead, down and unable to rise, diseased or distressed. This targeted surveillance results in the submission of brain samples with a wide range of tissue autolysis and associated contaminants. These contaminants have the potential to interfere with important steps of surveillance tests resulting in initially positive test results requiring additional testing to confirm the disease status of the animal. The current tests used for BSE screening in Canada utilize the relative protease resistance of the prion protein gained when it misfolds from PrPC to PrPSc as part of the disease process. Proteinase K completely digests PrPC in normal brains, but leaves most of the PrPSc in BSE positive brains intact which is detected using anti-prion antibodies. These tests are highly reliable but occasionally give rise to initially reactive/false positive results. Test results for these reactive samples were close to the positive/negative cut-off on a sub set of test platforms. This is in contrast to all of the previous Canadian positive samples whose numeric values on these same test platforms were 10 to 100 fold greater than the test positive/negative cut-off. Here we explore the potential reason why a sample is repeatedly positive on a sub-set of rapid surveillance tests, but negative on other test platforms. In order to better understand and identify what might cause these initial reactions, we have conducted a variety of rapid and confirmatory assays as well as bacterial isolation and identification on BSE positive, negative and initially reactive samples. We observed high levels of viable bacterial contamination in initially reactive samples suggesting that the

  16. Antibiotic skin testing accompanied by provocative challenges in children is a useful clinical tool

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diagnostic testing to antibiotics other than to penicillin has not been widely available, making the diagnosis of antibiotic allergy difficult and often erroneous. There is often reluctance in performing challenges to antibiotics when standardized testing is lacking. However, while the immunogenic determinants are not known for most antibiotics, a skin reaction at a non-irritating concentration (NIC) may mean that antibodies to the native form are present in the circulation. While the NIC’s for many non penicillin antibiotics have been determined in adults, the use of these concentrations for skin testing pediatric subjects prior to provocative challenge has not been done. Our objective was to determine if we could successfully uncover the true nature of antibiotic allergy in children using these concentrations for testing. Methods Children were included between 2003–2009 upon being referred to the Drug and Adverse Reaction/Toxicology (DART) clinic of the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario Canada. The referral needed to demonstrate that clinical care was being compromised by the limitation in antibiotic options or there was a significant medical condition for which the label of antibiotic allergy may prove detrimental. Patients were not seen if there was a suggestion of serum like sickness, Stevens Johnson Syndrome or Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis. Patients were excluded from testing if there was objective evidence of anaphylaxis. All other patients were consented to receive testing and/or challenges. A retrospective chart review was then performed of the results. Results We were able to exclude an antibiotic allergy in the majority of our patients who had a negative intradermal test result and were then challenged (>90%). Only one patient was challenged with a positive intradermal test to Cotrimoxazole because of a questionable history and this patient failed the provocative challenge. While we did not challenge more patients with positive

  17. Non-occlusive topical exposure of human skin in vitro as model for cytotoxicity testing of irritant compounds.

    PubMed

    Lönnqvist, Susanna; Briheim, Kristina; Kratz, Gunnar

    2016-02-01

    Testing of irritant compounds has traditionally been performed on animals and human volunteers. Animal testing should always be restricted and for skin irritancy mice and rabbits hold poor predictive value for irritant potential in humans. Irritant testing on human volunteers is restricted by the duration subjects can be exposed, and by the subjectivity of interpreting the visual signs of skin irritation. We propose an irritant testing system using viable human full thickness skin with the loss of cell viability in the exposed skin area as end point measurement. Skin was exposed to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at 20% concentration by non-occluded topical exposure to establish a positive control response and subsequent test compounds were statistically compared with the 20% SDS response. Cell viability and metabolism were measured with 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The model presents correlation between increased concentration of SDS and decreased viability of cells in the exposed skin area (R(2) = 0.76). We propose the model to be used for cytotoxicity testing of irritant compounds. With fully intact barrier function, the model comprises all cells present in the skin with quantifiable end point measurement. PMID:26446981

  18. Ethanol extract of Dalbergia odorifera protects skin keratinocytes against ultraviolet B-induced photoaging by suppressing production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ham, Sun Ah; Hwang, Jung Seok; Kang, Eun Sil; Yoo, Taesik; Lim, Hyun Ho; Lee, Won Jin; Paek, Kyung Shin; Seo, Han Geuk

    2015-01-01

    Dalbergia odorifera T. Chen (Leguminosae), an indigenous medicinal herb, has been widely used in northern and eastern Asia to treat diverse diseases. Here, we investigated the anti-senescent effects of ethanolic extracts of Dalbergia odorifera (EEDO) in ultraviolet (UV) B-irradiated skin cells. EEDO significantly inhibited UVB-induced senescence of human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner, concomitant with inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. UVB-induced increases in the levels of p53 and p21, biomarkers of cellular senescence, were almost completely abolished in the presence of EEDO. Sativanone, a major constituent of EEDO, also attenuated UVB-induced senescence and ROS generation in keratinocytes, indicating that sativanone is an indexing (marker) molecule for the anti-senescence properties of EEDO. Finally, treatment of EEDO to mice exposed to UVB significantly reduced ROS levels and the number of senescent cells in the skin. Thus, EEDO confers resistance to UVB-induced cellular senescence by inhibiting ROS generation in skin cells. PMID:25560618

  19. New Skin Test for Detection of Bovine Tuberculosis on the Basis of Antigen-Displaying Polyester Inclusions Produced by Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuxiong; Parlane, Natalie A.; Lee, Jason; Wedlock, D. Neil; Buddle, Bryce M.

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) in cattle lacks specificity if animals are sensitized to environmental mycobacteria, as some antigens in purified protein derivative (PPD) prepared from Mycobacterium bovis are present in nonpathogenic mycobacteria. Three immunodominant TB antigens, ESAT6, CFP10, and Rv3615c, are present in members of the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex but absent from the majority of environmental mycobacteria. These TB antigens have the potential to enhance skin test specificity. To increase their immunogenicity, these antigens were displayed on polyester beads by translationally fusing them to a polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase which mediated formation of antigen-displaying inclusions in recombinant Escherichia coli. The most common form of these inclusions is poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid) (PHB). The respective fusion proteins displayed on these PHB inclusions (beads) were identified using tryptic peptide fingerprinting analysis in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The surface exposure and accessibility of antigens were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Polyester beads displaying all three TB antigens showed greater reactivity with TB antigen-specific antibody than did beads displaying only one TB antigen. This was neither due to cross-reactivity of antibodies with the other two antigens nor due to differences in protein expression levels between beads displaying single or three TB antigens. The triple-antigen-displaying polyester beads were used for skin testing of cattle and detected all cattle experimentally infected with M. bovis with no false-positive reactions observed in those sensitized to environmental mycobacteria. The results suggested applicability of TB antigen-displaying polyester inclusions as diagnostic reagents for distinguishing TB-infected from noninfected animals. PMID:24532066

  20. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity Testing of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product (Test Report)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants, or fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), has been hypothesized as a contributory cause of an anomaly which occurred in the chamber pressure (PC) transducer tube on the Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) aft thruster 467 on flight STS-51. A small hole was found in the titanium-alloy PC tube at the first bend below the pressure transducer. It was surmised that the hole may have been caused by heat and pressure resulting from ignition of FORP. The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to define the chemical characteristics of FORP, characterize its reactivity, and simulate the events in a controlled environment which may have lead to the Pc-tube failure. Samples of FORP were obtained from the gas-phase reaction of MMH with NTO under laboratory conditions, the pulsed firings of RCS thrusters with modified PC tubes using varied oxidizer or fuel lead times, and the nominal RCS thruster firings at WSTF and Kaiser-Marquardt. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC), ion chromatography (IC), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to FTIR (TGA/FTIR), and mechanical impact testing were used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the chemical, thermal, and ignition properties of FORP. These studies showed that the composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depends on the fuel loxidizer ratio at the time of formation, composition of the post-formation atmosphere (reducing or oxidizing), and reaction or postreaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate (MMHN), ammonium nitrate (AN), methylammonium nitrate (MAN), and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. The thermal decomposition

  1. A Tracer Test to Characterize Treatment of TCE in a Permeable Reactive Barrier

    EPA Science Inventory

    A tracer test was conducted to characterize the flow of ground water surrounding a permeable reactive barrier constructed with plant mulch (a biowall) at the OU-1 site on Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. This biowall is intended to intercept and treat ground water contaminated by ...

  2. A new method of wound treatment: targeted therapy of skin wounds with reactive oxygen species-responsive nanoparticles containing SDF-1α

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tao; Jiang, Hao; Yu, Yuan; He, Fang; Ji, Shi-zhao; Liu, Ying-ying; Wang, Zhong-shan; Xiao, Shi-chu; Tang, Cui; Wang, Guang-Yi; Xia, Zhao-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To accelerate wound healing through promoting vascularization by using reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive nanoparticles loaded with stromal cell-derived factor-1α(SDF-1α). Methods The ROS-reactive nanomaterial poly-(1,4-phenyleneacetone dimethylene thioketal) was synthesized, and its physical and chemical properties were characterized. ROS-responsive nanoparticles containing SDF-1α were prepared through a multiple emulsion solvent evaporation method. The loading capacity, stability, activity of the encapsulated protein, toxicity, and in vivo distribution of these nanoparticles were determined. These nanoparticles were administered by intravenous infusion to mice with full-thickness skin defects to study their effects on the directed chemotaxis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, wound vascularization, and wound healing. Results The synthesized ROS-reactive organic polymer poly-(1,4-phenyleneacetone dimethylene thioketal) possessed a molecular weight of approximately 11.5 kDa with a dispersity of 1.97. ROS-responsive nanoparticles containing SDF-1α were prepared with an average diameter of 110 nm and a drug loading capacity of 1.8%. The encapsulation process showed minimal effects on the activity of SDF-1α, and it could be effectively released from the nanoparticles in the presence of ROS. Encapsulated SDF-1α could exist for a long time in blood. In mice with full-thickness skin defects, SDF-1α was effectively released and targeted to the wounds, thus promoting the chemotaxis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells toward the wound and its periphery, inducing wound vascularization, and accelerating wound healing. PMID:26527874

  3. In Chemico Evaluation of Tea Tree Essential Oils as Skin Sensitizers: Impact of the Chemical Composition on Aging and Generation of Reactive Species.

    PubMed

    Avonto, Cristina; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Wang, Mei; Vasquez, Yelkaira; Rua, Diego; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2016-07-18

    Tea tree oil (TTO) is an essential oil obtained from the leaves of Melaleuca alternifolia, M. linariifolia, or M. dissitiflora. Because of the commercial importance of TTO, substitution or adulteration with other tea tree species (such as cajeput, niaouli, manuka, or kanuka oils) is common and may pose significant risks along with perceived health benefits. The distinctive nature, qualitative and quantitative compositional variation of these oils, is responsible for the various pharmacological as well as adverse effects. Authentic TTOs (especially aged ones) have been identified as potential skin sensitizers, while reports of adverse allergic reactions to the other tea trees essential oils are less frequent. Chemical sensitizers are usually electrophilic compounds, and in chemico methods have been developed to identify skin allergens in terms of their ability to bind to biological nucleophiles. However, little information is available on the assessment of sensitization potential of mixtures, such as essential oils, due to their complexity. In the present study, 10 "tea tree" oils and six major TTO constituents have been investigated for their sensitization potential using a fluorescence in chemico method. The reactivity of authentic TTOs was found to correlate with the age of the oils, while the majority of nonauthentic TTOs were less reactive, even after aging. Further thio-trapping experiments with DCYA and characterization by UHPLC-DAD-MS led to the identification of several possible DCYA-adducts which can be used to deduce the structure of the candidate reactive species. The major TTO components, terpinolene, α-terpinene, and terpinene-4-ol, were unstable under accelerated aging conditions, which led to the formation of several DCYA-adducts. PMID:27286037

  4. Derivation and application of mathematical model for well test analysis with variable skin factor in hydrocarbon reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengcheng; Li, Wenhui; Xia, Jing; Jiao, Yuwei; Bie, Aifang

    2016-06-01

    Skin factor is often regarded as a constant in most of the mathematical model for well test analysis in oilfields, but this is only a kind of simplified treatment with the actual skin factor changeable. This paper defined the average permeability of a damaged area as a function of time by using the definition of skin factor. Therefore a relationship between a variable skin factor and time was established. The variable skin factor derived was introduced into existing traditional models rather than using a constant skin factor, then, this newly derived mathematical model for well test analysis considering variable skin factor was solved by Laplace transform. The dimensionless wellbore pressure and its derivative changed with dimensionless time were plotted with double logarithm and these plots can be used for type curve fitting. The effects of all the parameters in the expression of variable skin factor were analyzed based on the dimensionless wellbore pressure and its derivative. Finally, actual well testing data were used to fit the type curves developed which validates the applicability of the mathematical model from Sheng-2 Block, Shengli Oilfield, China.

  5. The Results of Autologous Skin Test in Patients with Chronic Urticaria in Hamadan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Mojgan; Sayemiri, Hooshyar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The etiology of chronic urticaria is unknown in many cases. In this study, we demonstrated the presence of autoimmune antibodies in patients with chronic urticaria by using of the Autologous Serum Skin Test (ASST). Methods We performed a cross-sectional study to detect the presence of autologous antibodies in the serum of 38 patients (25 females and 13 males) with idiopathic chronic urticaria who were referred to the Hamedan Allergy Clinic in 2014. All of the necessary tests for demonstrating chronic urticaria were performed, including complete blood count (CBC), thyroid and liver functionality tests, and the prick test but they did not confirm the cause of chronic urticaria. We conducted the Autologous Serum Skin Test on the patients and analyzed the results. Results In 15 patients (39%), the ASST was positive. Of the 15 patients with positive autoimmune chronic urticaria, five patients (33%) were males, and 10 patients (67%) were females. Conclusion We concluded that many patients with chronic urticaria have autoimmune urticaria. It is the reason for the lack of the response to treatment with common medications for urticaria. New ways of treatment must be considered for them. PMID:27504169

  6. Efficacy of skin barrier creams (II). Ineffectiveness of a popular "skin protector" against various irritants in the repetitive irritation test in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Frosch, P J; Schulze-Dirks, A; Hoffmann, M; Axthelm, I

    1993-08-01

    A popular "skin protector" consisting of an emulsion-like foam of lipophilic and hydrophilic substances (Marly skin) was evaluated in a previously described repetitive irritation guinea pig model. The product failed to inhibit the irritation due to sodium lauryl sulphate and toluene. In striking contrast to the recommended use, the irritant response of sodium hydroxide was aggravated, as demonstrated by significant differences for all test parameters (clinical score for erythema and scaling, transepidermal water loss, blood flow volume). The results show that protection against chemical irritants may be quite specific and that some formulations may actually be harmful. PMID:8365180

  7. Sensitivity Comparison of the Skin Prick Test and Serum and Fecal Radio Allergosorbent Test (RAST) in Diagnosis of Food Allergy in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Pourreza, Alireza; Jabbari Azad, Farahzad; Yousefzadeh, Hadis; Masomi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of food allergy is difficult in children. Food allergies are diagnosed using several methods that include medical histories, clinical examinations, skin prick and serum-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) tests, radio-allergosorbent test (RAST), food challenge, and supervised elimination diets. In this study we evaluated allergies to cow's milk, egg, peanut, and fish in children with suspected food allergies with skin prick tests and serum and feces RAST. Methods: Forty-one children with clinical symptoms of food allergies were enrolled in the study. Skin prick tests and serum and fecal RAST were performed and compared with challenge tests. Results: The most common sites of food allergy symptoms were gastrointestinal (82.9%) and skin (48.8%). 100% of the patients responded to the challenge tests with cow’s milk, egg, peanut, and fish. 65% of the patients tested positive with the skin prick test, 12.1% tested positive with serum RAST, and 29.2% tested positive with fecal RAST. Conclusion: The skin prick test was more sensitive than serum or fecal RAST, and fecal RAST was more than twice as sensitive as serum RAST.

  8. Reactivity to nickel sulfate at sodium lauryl sulfate pretreated skin sites is higher in atopics: an echographic evaluation by means of image analysis performed on 20 MHz B-scan recordings.

    PubMed

    Seidenari, S

    1994-07-01

    The aim of this study was to establish an objectively assessable procedure simulating simultaneous exposure to irritants and allergens in domestic and occupational environments, in order to evaluate differences in the reactivity to the combination of these substances in atopic and non-atopic nickel-sensitized subjects. Thirty-four nickel-sensitive patients, 20 of whom were affected by atopic dermatitis, underwent four patch tests with NiSO4 0.05% aq. on two adjacent sites of both volar forearms, with a 24-h application time. Two of the test sites were treated with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) 5% for 30 min, before application of the nickel sulfate preparation. Echographic recordings were performed by a 20-MHz B-scanner and processed by an image analysis program, providing a numerical representation of the picture data, based on the attribution of fictional values to the amplitudes of the echoes. The dermal inflammatory reaction was quantified by an amplitude band, marking the hypo-reflecting part of the dermis, whereas epidermal damage was assessed by a band highlighting the entrance echo. Pre-treatment with SLS of the skin area where nickel sulfate was subsequently applied greatly enhanced the allergic response at 24 and 72 h, both in subjects with atopic dermatitis and in subjects with allergic contact dermatitis. However, in atopics, the increase in the allergic reactivity after irritation of the skin was more pronounced both by clinical and by echographic evaluation. These observations stress the importance of the concurrent action of irritants and allergens in maintaining the dermatitis in atopics. PMID:7976078

  9. Wavelet analysis of skin perfusion to assess the effects of FREMS therapy before and after occlusive reactive hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Popa, Stefan Octavian; Ferrari, Myriam; Andreozzi, Giuseppe Maria; Martini, Romeo; Bagno, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Laser Doppler Fluxmetry is used to evaluate the hemodynamics of skin microcirculation. Laser Doppler signals contain oscillations due to fluctuations of microvascular perfusion. By performing spectral analysis, six frequency intervals from 0.005 to 2 Hz have been identified and assigned to distinct cardiovascular structures: heart, respiration, vascular myocites, sympathetic terminations and endothelial cells (dependent and independent on nitric oxide). Transcutaneous electrical pulses are currently applied to treat several diseases, i.e. neuropathies and chronic painful leg ulcers. Recently, FREMS (Frequency Rhythmic Electrical Modulation System) has been applied to vasculopathic patients, too. In this study Laser Doppler signals of skin microcirculation were measured in five patients with intermittent claudication, before and after the FREMS therapy. Changes in vascular activities were assessed by wavelet transform analysis. Preliminary results demonstrate that FREMS induces alterations in vascular activities. PMID:26391066

  10. Assessment of electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation tests to qualify stainless steel for nitric acid service

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, A.R.; Dillon, J.J.; Peters, A.H.; Clift, T.L.

    1986-12-31

    To minimize the costs and delivery time delays associated with purchasing type 304L stainless steel materials for service in nitric-acid-containing media, an alternative to the current Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant requirement of testing in accordance with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) A 262, Practice C (the boiling nitric acid test), is being sought. A possible candidate is the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test being developed for the nuclear industry and under consideration for acceptance as an ASTM standard. Based on a review of the literature and some limited screening tests, this test, as currently proposed, is not a suitable substitute for the nitric acid test. However, with additional development the EPR test is a likely candidate for providing a quantitative substitute for the current qualitative oxalic acid etching (ASTM A 282, Practice A) often used to accept, but not reject, materials for use in a nitric acid medium.

  11. Melanoma Genetic Testing, Counseling, and Adherence to Skin Cancer Prevention and Detection Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Glanz, Karen; Volpicelli, Kathryn; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Ming, Michael E.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Jepson, Christopher; Domchek, Susan M.; Armstrong, Katrina

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about the impact of knowledge of CDKN2A and MC1R genotype on melanoma prevention behaviors like sun avoidance and skin examination in the context of familial melanoma. Methods 73 adults with a family history of melanoma were randomly assigned to be offered individualized CDKN2A and MC1R genotyping results in the context of a genetic counseling session, or the standard practice of not being offered counseling or disclosure of genotyping results. Mixed effects or longitudinal logistic models were used to determine whether the intervention affected change in sun protection habits, skin examinations and perception and beliefs related to melanoma risk, prevention, and genetic counseling. Results All participants in the intervention group who attended genetic counseling sessions chose to receive their test results. From baseline to follow-up, participants in the intervention group reported an increase in the frequency of skin self-examinations compared to a slight decrease in the control group (p=0.002). Participants in the intervention group reported a smaller decrease in frequency of wearing a shirt with long sleeves than did participants in the control group (p =0.047). No effect of the intervention was noted for other outcomes. Conclusions Feedback of CDKN2A and MC1R genotype among families without known pathogenic CDKN2A mutations does not appear to decrease sun protection behaviors. Impact While disclosure of CDKN2A and MC1R genotype did not have negative effects on prevention, the benefits of communicating this information remain unclear. The small number of families who tested positive for CDKN2A mutations in this study is a limitation. PMID:23392000

  12. Apigenin, a bioactive flavonoid from Lycopodium clavatum, stimulates nucleotide excision repair genes to protect skin keratinocytes from ultraviolet B-induced reactive oxygen species and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Das, Sreemanti; Das, Jayeeta; Paul, Avijit; Samadder, Asmita; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we examined the antioxidative and the DNA protective potentials of apigenin, a flavonoid polyphenol isolated from Lycopodium clavatum, in both in-vitro (HaCaT skin keratinocytes) and in-vivo (mice) models against UV-B radiation. We used DAPI staining in UV-B-irradiated HaCaT skin keratinocytes pre-treated with and without apigenin to assess DNA damage. We also used a flow-cytometric analysis in mice exposed to UV-B radiation with or without topical application of apigenin to assess, through a comet assay, chromosomal aberrations and quanta from reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Data from the stability curves for the Gibb's free energy determined from a melting-temperature profile study indicated that apigenin increased the stability of calf thymus DNA. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that apigenin caused a reduction in the number of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) after 24 h, the time at which the nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes were activated. Thus, apigenin accelerated reversal of UV-B-induced CPDs through up-regulation of NER genes, removal of cyclobutane rings, inhibition of ROS generation, and down-regulation of NF-κB and MAPK, thereby revealing the precise mechanism of DNA repair. PMID:24139463

  13. Tamarind seed coat extract restores reactive oxygen species through attenuation of glutathione level and antioxidant enzyme expression in human skin fibroblasts in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Nakchat, Oranuch; Nalinratana, Nonthaneth; Meksuriyen, Duangdeun; Pongsamart, Sunanta

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role and mechanism of tamarind seed coat extract (TSCE) on normal human skin fibroblast CCD-1064Sk cells under normal and oxidative stress conditions induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Methods Tamarind seed coats were extracted with boiling water and then partitioned with ethyl acetate before the cell analysis. Effect of TSCE on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) level, antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase activity including antioxidant protein expression was investigated. Results TSCE significantly attenuated intracellular ROS in the absence and presence of H2O2 by increasing GSH level. In the absence of H2O2, TSCE significantly enhanced SOD and catalase activity but did not affected on GPx. Meanwhile, TSCE significantly increased the protein expression of SOD and GPx in H2O2-treated cells. Conclusions TSCE exhibited antioxidant activities by scavenging ROS, attenuating GSH level that could protect human skin fibroblast cells from oxidative stress. Our results highlight the antioxidant mechanism of tamarind seed coat through an antioxidant enzyme system, the extract potentially benefits for health food and cosmeceutical application of tamarind seed coat. PMID:25182723

  14. pH profiles in human skin: influence of two in vitro test systems for drug delivery testing.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Heike; Kostka, Karl Heinz; Lehr, Claus Michael; Schaefer, Ulrich F

    2003-01-01

    Investigations to determine pH profiles across human stratum corneum (SC), in vivo as well as in vitro, were carried out using the tape stripping technique and a flat surface pH electrode. This method was extended to the deeper skin layers (=viable epidermis+dermis; DSL) in vitro. Statistically significant changes in the pH values were detected in the SC between in vivo and in vitro investigations and also between male and female skin in vivo. For the DSL, no gender-dependent differences in pH were observed. While the results achieved for the SC are in accordance with data already published in the literature, the values for the DSL were surprising: An alkaline pH, with a steep increase of about two pH units in the first 100 microm of the DSL and a plateau of this level was thereafter detected. Research was also done to examine the influence of different in vitro test systems on the results of pH measurements across the skin. A permeation model (Franz diffusion cell; FD-C) and a penetration model (Saarbruecken penetration model; SB-M) were compared. Experiments were carried out concerning the incubation time as well as the pH of the acceptor solution in the FD-C. Independent of the test system used, no change in the pH profiles could be observed for the SC, but a strong effect of the acceptor medium and its pH on the pH profiles across the DSL could be demonstrated using the FD-C, which showed itself partly after 30 min in statistically significant differences between incubated and formerly frozen skin. The results after the use of buffer solutions with different pH values, the pH across the DSL seemed to come into line with the one of the buffer solution, which was investigated for acidic as well as alkaline pH values. The results obtained with the flat surface pH electrode were confirmed using two different dyes: the pH-dependent fluorescent dye carboxy-SNARF-1 and the pH indicator bromthymolblue. PMID:12551704

  15. The dilemma of the negative skin test reactors with a history of venom anaphylaxis: will this always be the case?

    PubMed

    Bilò, M B; Brianzoni, F; Cinti, B; Napoli, G; Bonifazi, F

    2005-11-01

    The loss of sensitization over time, the involvement of a different pathogenetic mechanism and the poor sensitivity of diagnostic tests have been included among the causes of a non IgE-mediated anaphylaxis triggered by an insect sting. To provide further insight into this topic we describe the case of a patient suffering from urticaria pigmentosa, anaphylactic shock due to a Vespid sting and monosensitive to Polistes dominulus venom, who was previous diagnosed with non-IgE mediated insect sting anaphylaxis in subjects with urticaria pigmentosa. Therefore ultra-rush specific immunotherapy using an acqueous Polistes dominulus venom extract was performed over two mornings until a total dose of 100mcg was reached without any side effects. Presently the patient is undergoing maintenance therapy with a depot Polistes dominulus venom extract at 4-weekly intervals and is free of side effects. In conclusion, despite the high cross-reactivity among the venoms of the various species of Polistes, recent evidence of a selective specificity unique to European Polistes allergens raises the problem of the need to make the American Polistes venom as well as that of Polistes dominulus (a very common insect in Europe) available both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Besides the fact that the presence of urticaria pigmentosa alone could have explained the anaphylactic reaction to the aspecific stimulation triggered by the venom, this case history also demonstrates that omitting to perform skin tests for Polistes dominulus venom would have led to the same misdiagnosis of non IgE-mediated anaphylaxis and served only to further delay commencing specific immunotherapy. PMID:16453965

  16. Reactive Power Laboratory: Synchronous Condenser Testing&Modeling Results - Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, SD

    2005-09-27

    The subject report documents the work carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during months 5-7 (May-July 2005) of a multi-year research project. The project has the overall goal of developing methods of incorporating distributed energy (DE) that can produce reactive power locally and for injecting into the distribution system. The objective for this new type of DE is to be able to provide voltage regulation and dynamic reactive power reserves without the use of extensive communication and control systems. The work performed over this three-month period focused on four aspects of the overall objective: (1) characterization of a 250HP (about 300KVAr) synchronous condenser (SC) via test runs at the ORNL Reactive Power Laboratory; (2) development of a data acquisition scheme for collecting the necessary voltage, current and power readings at the synchronous condenser and on the distribution system; (3) development of algorithms for analyzing raw test data from the various test runs; and (4) validation of a steady-state model for the synchronous condenser via the use of a commercial software package to study its effects on the ORNL 13.8/2.4kV distribution network.

  17. Testing the developmental distinctiveness of male proactive and reactive aggression with a nested longitudinal experimental intervention.

    PubMed

    Barker, Edward D; Vitaro, Frank; Lacourse, Eric; Fontaine, Nathalie M G; Carbonneau, Rene; Tremblay, Richard E

    2010-01-01

    An experimental preventive intervention nested into a longitudinal study was used to test the developmental distinctiveness of proactive and reactive aggression. The randomized multimodal preventive intervention targeted a subsample of boys rated disruptive by their teachers. These boys were initially part of a sample of 895 boys, followed from kindergarten to 17 years of age. Semiparametric analyses of developmental trajectories for self-reported proactive and reactive aggression (between 13 and 17 years of age) indicated three trajectories for each type of aggression that varied in size and shape (Low, Moderate, and High Peaking). Intent-to-treat comparisons between the boys in the prevention group and the control group confirmed that the preventive intervention between 7 and 9 years of age, which included parenting skills and social skills training, could impact the development of reactive more than proactive aggression. The intervention effect identified in reactive aggression was related to a reduction in self-reported coercive parenting. The importance of these results for the distinction between subtypes of aggressive behaviors and the value of longitudinal-experimental studies from early childhood onward is discussed. PMID:20052694

  18. [A Case of Rocuronium Anaphylaxis in which Anesthesia was Safely Performed after Selection of an Alternative Drug after a Skin Test].

    PubMed

    Naruse, Satoshi; Iwata, Hiroki; Suzuki, Kota; Uraoka, Masahiro; Katoh, Takasumi; Sato, Shigehito

    2016-06-01

    We report our experience of a patient with a history of anaphylactic shock suspected to be caused by rocuronium who was scheduled to undergo hepatic tumor resection. The patient was a 17-year-old female (height : 166 cm, weight : 46 kg). During general anesthesia at another hospital several years ago, she had an anaphylactic shock, and rocuronium was suspected to be the offending drug. To collect information and search for the cause, skin tests were performed for rocuronium, vecuronium and suxamethonium. She was positive for rocuronium, and negative for other drugs. At anesthesia induction, we administered vecuronium and confirmed no development of anaphylaxis before commencement of surgery. In the perioperative period, she had no symptoms that indicated anaphylaxis. Since there is potential high cross-reactivity among muscle relaxants, it is important to perform a test for alternative drugs when a muscle relaxant may be a cause of anaphylaxis. Selection and administration of an alternative drug should be carefully performed, even when a skin test is negative for the alternative drug. PMID:27483667

  19. Predictive value of the tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-tuberculosis Gold In-Tube test for development of active tuberculosis in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Seyhan, Ekrem Cengiz; Gunluoglu, Gulşah; Gunluoglu, Mehmet Zeki; Tural, Seda; Sökücü, Sinem

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hemodialysis (HD) patients are at increased risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) compared with the general population. QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) for LTBI detection is more promising than tuberculin skin test (TST) in HD patients. AIM: In our study, we evaluated the value of the TST and QFT-G In-Tube (QFG-IT) test in the development of active tuberculosis (TB), in the HD patients, and in healthy controls. METHODS: The study enrolled 95 HD patients and ninety age-matched, healthy controls. The TST and QFG-IT were performed. All the subjects were followed up 5 years for active TB disease. RESULTS: Compared to the healthy controls, a high prevalence of LTBI was found in the HD patients by QFG-IT (41% vs. 25%). However, no significant difference was detected by TST (32% vs. 31%). Four HD patients and one healthy control progressed to active TB disease within the 5-year follow-up. For active TB discovered subjects, QFG-IT was positive in all, but TST was positive in two (one patient and one healthy control). In HD patients; sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of QFG-IT, and TST for active TB was 100% and 25%, 62% and 67%, 10%, and 3%, and 100% and 95%, respectively. Receiver operating curve analysis revealed that the results are significantly different (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: QFG-IT test is a more useful diagnostic method than TST for detecting those who will progress to active TB in HD patients. PMID:27168859

  20. Sensitization to Aeroallergens in Patients with Respiratory Allergies Based on Skin-Prick Test Results

    PubMed Central

    Lokaj-Berisha, V; Berisha, N; Lumezi, B; Ahmetaj, L; Bejtullahu, G; Karahoda, N; Pupovci, H

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to identify the most common aeroallergens in patients with asthma and rhinitis. Methods: The study enrolled 102 participants including 64 patients with respiratory allergies (among them 15 were clinically diagnosed as asthma patients, 41 with rhinitis, 8 were both) and 38 healthy controls. All of participants were subject of skin prick tests (SPT) with series of common allergenic extracts. Sera from all participants were tested for total IgE and eosinophil count. To measure airflow limitation and reversibility in asthma patients the pulmonary function testing were carried out. Results: M/F ratio was 1:1.6 in patients and 1:0.7 in control group with mean age 28.88 year (SD 13.16; range 6 – 55 year) and 20.47 respectively (SD 1.16; range 19–23 year). The most common risk factors in these patients were total IgE more than 100 IU/ml, eosinophils above 4% and positive family history of atopy. Skin prick testing results showed prevalence rates for allergen groups in this manner: house dust mites 81.3 %, pollens 57.8 %, animal dandruff 12.5% and moulds 4.9%. Polysensitization was common in 51.6% of all sensitized patients being positive to more than one group of allergens. Conclusion: House dust mites are the main sensitizing allergens among our allergic patients as well as healthy controls. Next in importance, in all participants, are grasses. This pattern of prevalence was expected based on herbal geography, climate and specially lifestyle. It was also compatible with the results from studies carried out in places with the same habitat. PMID:23304660

  1. Laser heat stimulation of tiny skin areas adds valuable information to quantitative sensory testing in postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Franz, Marcel; Spohn, Dorothee; Ritter, Alexander; Rolke, Roman; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Patients suffering from postherpetic neuralgia often complain about hypo- or hypersensation in the affected dermatome. The loss of thermal sensitivity has been demonstrated by quantitative sensory testing as being associated with small-fiber (Aδ- and C-fiber) deafferentation. We aimed to compare laser stimulation (radiant heat) to thermode stimulation (contact heat) with regard to their sensitivity and specificity to detect thermal sensory deficits related to small-fiber dysfunction in postherpetic neuralgia. We contrasted detection rate of laser stimuli with 5 thermal parameters (thresholds of cold/warm detection, cold/heat pain, and sensory limen) of quantitative sensory testing. Sixteen patients diagnosed with unilateral postherpetic neuralgia and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects were tested. Quantitative sensory testing and laser stimulation of tiny skin areas were performed in the neuralgia-affected skin and in the contralateral homologue of the neuralgia-free body side. Across the 5 thermal parameters of thermode stimulation, only one parameter (warm detection threshold) revealed sensory abnormalities (thermal hypoesthesia to warm stimuli) in the neuralgia-affected skin area of patients but not in the contralateral area, as compared to the control group. In contrast, patients perceived significantly less laser stimuli both in the affected skin and in the contralateral skin compared to controls. Overall, laser stimulation proved more sensitive and specific in detecting thermal sensory abnormalities in the neuralgia-affected skin, as well as in the control skin, than any single thermal parameter of thermode stimulation. Thus, laser stimulation of tiny skin areas might be a useful diagnostic tool for small-fiber dysfunction. PMID:22657400

  2. Current status of pharmacogenomics testing for anti-tumor drug therapies: approaches to non-melanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Grealy, Rebecca; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2009-01-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most commonly occurring cancer types, with substantial social, physical, and financial burdens on both individuals and societies. Although the role of UV light in initiating skin cancer development has been well characterized, genetic studies continue to show that predisposing factors can influence an individual's susceptibility to skin cancer and response to treatment. In the future, it is hoped that genetic profiles, comprising a number of genetic markers collectively involved in skin cancer susceptibility and response to treatment or prognosis, will aid in more accurately informing practitioners' choices of treatment. Individualized treatment based on these profiles has the potential to increase the efficacy of treatments, saving both time and money for the patient by avoiding the need for extensive or repeated treatment. Increased treatment responses may in turn prevent recurrence of skin cancers, reducing the burden of this disease on society. Currently existing pharmacogenomic tests, such as those that assess variation in the metabolism of the anticancer drug fluorouracil, have the potential to reduce the toxic effects of anti-tumor drugs used in the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) by determining individualized appropriate dosage. If the savings generated by reducing adverse events negate the costs of developing these tests, pharmacogenomic testing may increasingly inform personalized NMSC treatment. PMID:19537842

  3. Quiz: Test Your Skin Cancer IQ | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... most dangerous form of skin cancer is melanoma squamous cell carcinoma basal cell carcinoma 4. The most common type of skin cancer is melanoma squamous cell carcinoma basal cell carcinoma 5. Men tend to develop ...

  4. Characterization of the mechanical properties of skin by inverse analysis combined with the indentation test.

    PubMed

    Delalleau, Alexandre; Josse, Gwendal; Lagarde, Jean-Michel; Zahouani, Hassan; Bergheau, Jean-Michel

    2006-01-01

    This study proposes a new method to determine the mechanical properties of human skin by the use of the indentation test [Pailler-Mattei, 2004. Caractérisation mécanique et tribologique de la peau humaine in vivo, Ph.D. Thesis, ECL-no. 2004-31; Pailler-Mattei, Zahouani, 2004. Journal of Adhesion Science and Technology 18, 1739-1758]. The principle of the measurements consists in applying an in vivo compressive stress [Zhang et al., 1994. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers 208, 217-222; Bosboom et al., 2001. Journal of Biomechanics 34, 1365-1368; Oomens et al., 1984. Selected Proceedings of Meetings of European Society of Biomechanics, pp. 227-232; Oomens et al., 1987. Journal of Biomechanics 20(9), 877-885] on the skin tissue of an individual's forearm. These measurements show an increase in the normal contact force as a function of the indentation depth. The interpretation of such results usually requires a long and tedious phenomenological study. We propose a new method to determine the mechanical parameters which control the response of skin tissue. This method is threefold: experimental, numerical, and comparative. It consists combining experimental results with a numerical finite elements model in order to find out the required parameters. This process uses a scheme of extended Kalman filters (EKF) [Gu et al., 2003. Materials Science and Engineering A345, 223-233; Nakamura et al., 2000. Acta Mater 48, 4293-4306; Leustean and Rosu, 2003. Certifying Kalman filters. RIACS Technical Report 03.02, 27pp. http://gureni.cs.uiuc.edu/~grosu/download/luta + leo.pdf; Welch and Bishop, An introduction to Kalman filter, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 16p. http://www.cs.unc.edu/~welch/kalman/]. The first results presented in this study correspond to a simplified numerical modeling of the global system. The skin is assumed to be a semi-infinite layer with an isotropic linear elastic mechanical behavior [Zhang et al., 1994. Proceedings of

  5. Frequency and temperature dependence of skin bioimpedance during a contralateral cold test.

    PubMed

    Podtaev, S; Nikolaev, D; Samartsev, V; Gavrilov, V; Tsiberkin, K

    2015-03-01

    A study of the α- and β-dispersion of skin bioimpedance dependence on temperature and micro-hemodynamics is presented. The vascular tone changes during the cold test are verified by the wavelet-analysis of skin temperature signals obtained simultaneously with impedance measurements. Thirty three normal healthy subjects of 28  ±  7 years old were entered into the study. The tetra-polar electrode system was used to record the resistance and reactance; measurements were carried out at 67 frequencies, in a frequency range from 2 Hz to 50 kHz. It has been found that the impedance decreases with vasodilation and increases with vasoconstriction. The high values of correlation among thermal oscillation amplitudes and Nyquist diagram parameters prove the impedance dependence on blood flow in three frequency bands corresponding to the myogenic, neurogenic and endothelial vascular tone regulation mechanisms. Using an equivalent RC circuit, we obtained the changes in the Nyquist diagram matching the experimental data. The proposed descriptive α-dispersion model can be used to study mechanisms responsible for intercellular interaction. PMID:25690397

  6. Positive skin prick tests of immediate type in non-allergic children.

    PubMed

    Cserháti, E; Kiss, A G; Mezei, G; Kelemen, J; Puskás, J

    1983-01-01

    Prick tests with twenty different Beneard antigens were performed in 300 children aged 2-16 years, all having a negative individual and familial history for allergic disease. At least one positive result was obtained in 64% of the children and among the 6000 tests a total of 727 were positive. Of the positive tests 93% were + or ++, 7% were +++ or ++++. No relationship was found between age and the incidence of positive skin tests. Mild reactions against more than one antigen in the same individual were quite frequent, pronounced reactions (+++ or ++++) against more than one antigen were exceptional. The incidence of mild reactions was found to be independent of the gender; strong reactions occurred in girls twice as often as in boys. The highest incidence of positive reactions was observed with house-dust mite, pollens, hay and straw dust, and canine and feline hairs. The diagnostic value of mild positivity is slight but pronounced positivity, especially against more than one antigen, must carefully be considered and in any case followed by a bronchial provocation test. PMID:6639791

  7. Development and preliminary testing of a standardized method for quantifying excess water in over-hydrated skin using evaporimetry.

    PubMed

    Fader, M; Clark-O'Neill, S R; Wong, W K R; Runeman, B; Farbrot, A; Cottenden, A M

    2011-03-01

    Although evaporimetry (the measurement of water vapour flux density from the skin) has often been used to study the impact on skin hydration of using products such as baby diapers and incontinence pads, it is difficult to interpret results and to compare data from different studies because of the diversity of unvalidated methodologies used. The aim of this work was to develop a robust methodology for measuring the excess water in over-hydrated skin and test it on volar forearm and hip skin which had been occluded with saline soaked patches. Three repeat measurements were made on the volar forearm and the hip of five young (31-44 years) and six older (67-85 years) women and moderately good within-subject repeatability was found for both skin sites for both subject groups. Measurements taken from the hip were significantly higher (P = 0.001) than those from the arm and had larger coefficients of variation (3.5-22.1%) compared to arms (3.0-14.0%). There were no significant differences between young and older skin, implying that women for future studies could be recruited without regard to age. This is the first time that a robust evaporimetric methodology for quantifying excess water in over-hydrated skin has been described and validated, and it will form a solid basis for future work. PMID:21285481

  8. Evaluation of Human Semenogelin Membrane Strip Test for Species Cross-reactivity in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Stern, A W; Lanka, S

    2016-09-01

    Semenogelins are proteins originating in the seminal vesicle and are useful markers for the presumptive identification of human semen. Detection of semenogelin can be done with a commercially available membrane test. In this study, a commercially available membrane test for human semenogelin proteins was used to assess for cross-reactivity in dog bodily fluids to allow for the potential utilization for detection of human semen in dog bodily fluids. The authors analyzed canine semen and other bodily fluids, including urine, saliva, vaginal secretions, fecal material, and blood. They also examined the distribution of human semenogelin I transcripts in the canine testis, prostate, and several bodily fluids by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. No cross-reactivity was observed in the canine bodily fluids tested except for a single rectal swab, which was negative on a second test. Further testing should be done to validate the use of this kit for screening samples from dogs suspected to have been victims of sexual abuse. PMID:26574559

  9. Concurrent conservative and reactive tracer tests in a stream undergoing hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Dennis; Liao, Zijie; WöHling, Thomas; Osenbrück, Karsten; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2013-05-01

    Knowledge about the strength and travel times of hyporheic exchange is vital to predict reactive transport and biogeochemical cycling in streams. In this study, we outline how to perform and analyze stream tracer tests using pulse injections of fluorescein as conservative and resazurin as reactive tracer, which is selectively transformed to resorufin when exposed to metabolically active zones, presumably located in the hyporheic zone. We present steps of preliminary data analysis and apply a conceptually simple mathematical model of the tracer tests to separate effects of in-stream transport from hyporheic exchange processes. To overcome the dependence of common parameter estimation schemes on the initial guess, we derive posterior parameter probability density functions using an adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo scheme. By this, we can identify maximum-likelihood parameter values of in-stream transport, strength of hyporheic exchange, distribution of hyporheic travel times as well as sorption and reactivity coefficients of the hyporheic zone. We demonstrate the approach by a tracer experiment at River Goldersbach in southern Germany (60 L/s discharge). In-stream breakthrough curves were recorded with online fluorometers and jointly fitted to simulations of a one-dimensional reactive transport model assuming an exponential hyporheic travel-time distribution. The findings show that the additional analysis of resazurin not only improved the physical basis of the modeling, but was crucial to differentiate between surface transport and hyporheic transient storage of stream solutes. Parameter uncertainties were usually small and could not explain parameter variability between adjacent monitoring stations. The latter as well as a systematic underestimation of the tailing are due to structural errors of the model, particularly the exponential hyporheic travel-time distribution. Mean hyporheic travel times were in the range of 12 min, suggesting that small streambed

  10. Practical applications of genomics research for treatment of aging skin.

    PubMed

    Kaczvinsky, Joseph R; Grimes, Pearl E

    2009-07-01

    Skin aging integrates the impact of extrinsic skin insults (e.g., ultraviolet [UV] light, etc.) with chronological, genetically programmed decreases in cellular function. A genomic study of aged skin highlighted the mechanistic importance of skin barrier function, exfoliation, control of reactive oxygen species and maintenance of extracellular matrix to the aging process. A set of topical products designed to address these mechanistic themes was developed and clinically tested. The individual products improved skin barrier function, hydration and skin turnover, as well as the smoothness and depth of periorbital wrinkles. Treatment with a regimen of these products improved the appearance of facial wrinkles after eight weeks. Changes in treated subjects' stratum corneum protein biomarker levels were consistent with the mechanistic pathways identified in the genomic work. Thus, leveraging a genomic understanding of skin aging led to the development of a clinically efficacious, aesthetically pleasing cosmetic regimen that improved the appearance of aged skin. PMID:19623780

  11. Assessing skin sensitization hazard in mice and men using non-animal test methods.

    PubMed

    Urbisch, Daniel; Mehling, Annette; Guth, Katharina; Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Honarvar, Naveed; Kolle, Susanne; Landsiedel, Robert; Jaworska, Joanna; Kern, Petra S; Gerberick, Frank; Natsch, Andreas; Emter, Roger; Ashikaga, Takao; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Sakaguchi, Hitoshi

    2015-03-01

    Sensitization, the prerequisite event in the development of allergic contact dermatitis, is a key parameter in both hazard and risk assessments. The pathways involved have recently been formally described in the OECD adverse outcome pathway (AOP) for skin sensitization. One single non-animal test method will not be sufficient to fully address this AOP and in many cases the use of a battery of tests will be necessary. A number of methods are now fully developed and validated. In order to facilitate acceptance of these methods by both the regulatory and scientific communities, results of the single test methods (DPRA, KeratinoSens, LuSens, h-CLAT, (m)MUSST) as well for a the simple '2 out of 3' ITS for 213 substances have been compiled and qualitatively compared to both animal and human data. The dataset was also used to define different mechanistic domains by probable protein-binding mechanisms. In general, the non-animal test methods exhibited good predictivities when compared to local lymph node assay (LLNA) data and even better predictivities when compared to human data. The '2 out of 3' prediction model achieved accuracies of 90% or 79% when compared to human or LLNA data, respectively and thereby even slightly exceeded that of the LLNA. PMID:25541156

  12. Tuberculin Skin Tests versus Interferon-Gamma Release Assays in Tuberculosis Screening among Immigrant Visa Applicants

    PubMed Central

    Chuke, Stella O.; Yen, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Laserson, Kayla F.; Phuoc, Nguyen Huu; Trinh, Nguyen An; Nhung, Duong Thi Cam; Mai, Vo Thi Chi; Qui, An Dang; Hai, Hoang Hoa; Loan, Le Thien Huong; Jones, Warren G.; Whitworth, William C.; Shah, J. Jina; Painter, John A.; Mazurek, Gerald H.; Maloney, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Use of tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) and interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) as part of tuberculosis (TB) screening among immigrants from high TB-burden countries has not been fully evaluated. Methods. Prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (MTBI) based on TST, or the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT-G), was determined among immigrant applicants in Vietnam bound for the United States (US); factors associated with test results and discordance were assessed; predictive values of TST and QFT-G for identifying chest radiographs (CXRs) consistent with TB were calculated. Results. Of 1,246 immigrant visa applicants studied, 57.9% were TST positive, 28.3% were QFT-G positive, and test agreement was 59.4%. Increasing age was associated with positive TST results, positive QFT-G results, TST-positive but QFT-G-negative discordance, and abnormal CXRs consistent with TB. Positive predictive values of TST and QFT-G for an abnormal CXR were 25.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Conclusion. The estimated prevalence of MTBI among US-bound visa applicants in Vietnam based on TST was twice that based on QFT-G, and 14 times higher than a TST-based estimate of MTBI prevalence reported for the general US population in 2000. QFT-G was not better than TST at predicting abnormal CXRs consistent with TB. PMID:24738031

  13. Testing of an Integrated Reactor Core Simulator and Power Conversion System with Simulated Reactivity Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Hervol, David S.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    A Direct Drive Gas-Cooled (DDG) reactor core simulator has been coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) for integrated system testing at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio. This is a closed-cycle system that incorporates an electrically heated reactor core module, turboalternator, recuperator, and gas cooler. Nuclear fuel elements in the gas-cooled reactor design are replaced with electric resistance heaters to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel in the corresponding fast spectrum nuclear reactor. The thermodynamic transient behavior of the integrated system was the focus of this test series. In order to better mimic the integrated response of the nuclear-fueled system, a simulated reactivity feedback control loop was implemented. Core power was controlled by a point kinetics model in which the reactivity feedback was based on core temperature measurements; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. These dynamic system response tests demonstrate the overall capability of a non-nuclear test facility in assessing system integration issues and characterizing integrated system response times and response characteristics.

  14. Testing of an Integrated Reactor Core Simulator and Power Conversion System with Simulated Reactivity Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Hervol, David S.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    A Direct Drive Gas-Cooled (DDG) reactor core simulator has been coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) for integrated system testing at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH. This is a closed-cycle system that incorporates an electrically heated reactor core module, turbo alternator, recuperator, and gas cooler. Nuclear fuel elements in the gas-cooled reactor design are replaced with electric resistance heaters to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel in the corresponding fast spectrum nuclear reactor. The thermodynamic transient behavior of the integrated system was the focus of this test series. In order to better mimic the integrated response of the nuclear-fueled system, a simulated reactivity feedback control loop was implemented. Core power was controlled by a point kinetics model in which the reactivity feedback was based on core temperature measurements; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. These dynamic system response tests demonstrate the overall capability of a non-nuclear test facility in assessing system integration issues and characterizing integrated system response times and response characteristics.

  15. Constructing Human Skin Equivalents on Porcine Acellular Peritoneum Extracellular Matrix for In Vitro Irritation Testing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Chin; Zhang, Zheng; Florek, Charles; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena B

    2016-01-01

    The irritancy of topical products has to be investigated to ensure the safety and compliance. Although several reconstructed human epidermal models have been adopted by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to replace in vivo animal irritation testing, these models are based on a single cell type and lack dermal components, which may be insufficient to reflect all of the components of irritation. In our study, we investigated the use of acellular porcine peritoneum extracellular matrix as a substrate to construct full-thickness human skin equivalents (HSEs) for use as irritation screening tool. The acellular peritoneum matrix (APM) exhibited excellent skin cell attachment (>80%) and proliferation for human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). APM-HSEs based on coculture of HDF and HaCaT were prepared. Increased HDF seeding density up to 5 × 10(4)/cm(2) resulted in APM-HSEs with a thicker and more organized epidermis. The epidermis of APM-HSEs expressed keratin 15, a keratinocyte proliferation marker, and involucrin, a differentiation marker, respectively. To assess the use of APM-HSEs for irritation testing, six proficiency chemicals, including three nonirritants (phosphate-buffered saline, polyethylene glycol 400, and isopropanol) and three irritants (1-bromohexane, heptanol, and sodium dodecyl sulfate) were applied. The APM-HSEs were able to discriminate nonirritants from irritants based on the viability. Levels of cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1α, IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-8, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]) in these treatment groups further assisted the irritancy ranking. In conclusion, we have developed partially differentiated full-thickness APM-HSEs based on acellular porcine peritoneum matrix, and these APM-HSEs demonstrated utility as an in vitro irritation screening tool. PMID:26415037

  16. Rat epidermal keratinocyte organotypic culture (ROC) as a model for chemically induced skin irritation testing

    SciTech Connect

    Pappinen, Sari . E-mail: sari.pappinen@uku.fi; Pasonen-Seppaenen, Sanna; Suhonen, Marjukka; Tammi, Raija; Urtti, Arto

    2005-11-01

    The potential of rat epidermal keratinocyte (REK) organotypic culture (ROC) with proper stratum corneum barrier as a model for screening skin irritants was evaluated. The test chemicals were selected from ECETOC database (1995) and the observed in vitro irritation potential was compared to ECETOC in vivo primary irritation index (PII), to EU risk phrases, and to the harmonized OECD criteria. Chemicals were applied onto the stratum corneum surface of ROC for 30 min and samples were taken from the underlying medium at 4 and 8 h after exposure. Cell membrane integrity (determined by LDH assay) and pro-inflammatory effect (determined by IL-1{alpha} release) were verified at both time points and correlated to PII values. The best correlation (R {sup 2} = 0.831) was seen with LDH leakage test. Based on obtained data, chemicals were classified according to criteria defined by EU and OECD. From 12 chemicals, only two were incorrectly classified according to OECD criteria when using LDH leakage and IL-1{alpha} release as irritation markers. At the end of experiment, chemical-treated ROC cultures were fixed and histological changes were assessed. Typical signs for irritation were lightly stained cytoplasm, condensed nuclei, cellular vacuolization, eosinophilic cytoplasms, and blebbing. These irritation effects of chemicals were graded visually into four classes (A-D). The extent of morphological perturbations of the cultures mostly correlated with PII. The present results indicate the validity of the ROC model in predicting skin irritation potential of chemicals and show that the use of set of irritation markers with different mechanistic responses gives more information on irritation than if only one marker was used.

  17. Chemical Reactivity Testing for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program. Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, H.C.

    1999-01-24

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) summarizes requirements used by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (LMES) Development Division at Y-12 for conducting chemical reactivity testing of Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel, sponsored by the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). The requirements are based on the NSNFP Statement of Work PRO-007 (Statement of Work for Laboratory Determination of Uranium Hydride Oxidation Reaction Kinetics.) This QAPjP will utilize the quality assurance program at Y-12, QA-101PD, revision 1, and existing implementing procedures for the most part in meeting the NSNFP Statement of Work PRO-007 requirements, exceptions will be noted.

  18. Utilization of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold Test in a Two-Step Process with the Tuberculin Skin Test To Evaluate Health Care Workers for Latent Tuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Abdalhamid, Baha; Hinrichs, Steven H.; Garrett, Jodi L.; O'Neill, Jean M.; Hansen-Cain, Kristine M.; Armbrust, Amy A.; Iwen, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    A cost analysis of combining a tuberculin skin test (TST) and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT-GT) to detect latent tuberculosis in newly hired health care workers was performed. An approximately 50% reduction in the cost of additional care was realized when workers with positive TST results were subsequently screened using the QFT-GT. PMID:20573876

  19. Responsive corneosurfametry following in vivo skin preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Uhoda, E; Goffin, V; Pierard, G E

    2003-12-01

    Skin is subjected to many environmental threats, some of which altering the structure and function of the stratum corneum. Among them, surfactants are recognized factors that may influence irritant contact dermatitis. The present study was conducted to compare the variations in skin capacitance and corneosurfametry (CSM) reactivity before and after skin exposure to repeated subclinical injuries by 2 hand dishwashing liquids. A forearm immersion test was performed on 30 healthy volunteers. 2 daily soak sessions were performed for 5 days. At inclusion and the day following the last soak session, skin capacitance was measured and cyanoacrylate skin-surface strippings were harvested. The latter specimens were used for the ex vivo microwave CSM. Both types of assessments clearly differentiated the 2 hand dishwashing liquids. The forearm immersion test allowed the discriminant sensitivity of CSM to increase. Intact skin capacitance did not predict CSM data. By contrast, a significant correlation was found between the post-test conductance and the corresponding CSM data. In conclusion, a forearm immersion test under realistic conditions can discriminate the irritation potential between surfactant-based products by measuring skin conductance and performing CSM. In vivo skin preconditioning by surfactants increases CSM sensitivity to the same surfactants. PMID:15025702

  20. Cytotoxicity testing of silver-containing burn treatments using primary and immortal skin cells.

    PubMed

    Boonkaew, Benjawan; Kempf, Margit; Kimble, Roy; Cuttle, Leila

    2014-12-01

    A novel burn wound hydrogel dressing has been previously developed which is composed of 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid sodium salt with silver nanoparticles (silver AMPS). This study compared the cytotoxicity of this dressing to the commercially available silver products; Acticoat™, PolyMem Silver(®) and Flamazine™ cream. Human keratinocytes (HaCaT and primary HEK) and normal human fibroblasts (NHF) were exposed to dressings incubated on Nunc™ polycarbonate inserts for 24, 48 and 72h. Four different cytotoxicity assays were performed including; Trypan Blue cell count, MTT, Celltiter-Blue™ and Toluidine Blue surface area assays. The results were expressed as relative cell viability compared to an untreated control. The cytotoxic effects of Acticoat™ and Flamazine™ cream were dependent on exposure time and cell type. After 24h exposure, Acticoat™ and Flamazine™ cream were toxic to all tested cell lines. Surprisingly, HaCaTs treated with Acticoat™ and Flamazine™ had an improved ability to survive at 48 and 72h while HEKs and NHFs had no improvement in survival with any treatment. The novel silver hydrogel and PolyMem Silver(®) showed low cytotoxicity to all tested cell lines at every time interval and these results support the possibility of using the novel silver hydrogel as a burn wound dressing. Researchers who rely on HaCaT cells as an accurate keratinocyte model should be aware that they can respond differently to primary skin cells. PMID:24767717

  1. Autologous serum skin test in chronic idiopathic urticaria: prevalence, correlation and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Jiamton, Sukhum; Gorvanich, Taniya; Pinkaew, Sumruay

    2006-12-01

    Some cases of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) have histamine-releasing IgG autoantibodies in their blood. This disease subgroup is called "autoimmune urticaria". To date, the autologous serum skin test (ASST) is the best in vivo clinical test for the detection of basophil histamine-releasing activity in vitro. This study aimed to find the prevalence of ASST positive cases in Thai patients with CIU, to identify factors related to the positivity of ASST and to find the clinical implications of ASST in CIU. A retrospective study was performed among 85 CIU patients who attended the Urticaria Clinic at the Department of Dermatology, Siriraj Hospital and were willing to perform ASST, from January 2002 to December 2003. Twenty-one (24.7%) patients had a positive ASST. There was no significant difference between patients with positive ASST and negative ASST as to the severity of the disease (wheal numbers, wheal size, itching scores and the extent of body involvement) as well as the duration of the disease. PMID:17348242

  2. Skin Prick Test Analysis in Allergic Rhinitis Patients: A Preliminary Study in Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ibekwe, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is prevalent in Nigeria, though little information exists on the allergen. We assessed the clinical features of AR patients in our environment based on the allergic rhinitis impact on asthma (ARIA) classification. Only patients with positive skin prick test (SPT) were recruited. Seventy-four patients participated in the study. AR and asthma comorbidity were observed in 13.5%. The proportion of “sneezers-runners” was higher than “blockers” with significantly more “sneezers-runners” having persistent AR (P = 0.007). No relationship was established between these predominant symptoms and the aeroallergens used in this study. Intermittent mild and moderate/severe AR were evident in 13.5% and 31.1%, while persistent mild and moderate/severe were seen in 20.3% and 35.1%, respectively. House dust mites allergen yielded the highest number of positive responses (22.6%) followed by tree pollen (16.8%). No relationship was observed between the allergens tested and AR severity. Majority of patients were oligosensitive (33.8%) and polysensitive (35.1%) and were not significantly associated with AR severity (P = 0.07). Most AR patients presenting for treatment in Abuja, Nigeria, had moderate-severe persistent AR and showed similar SPT sensitization pattern with countries having similar climatic conditions. Sensitization patterns were not related to ARIA classification or predominant AR symptoms. PMID:27247577

  3. [Which tuberculin skin test hyperreactive child should be treated with -our experience].

    PubMed

    Pavić, Ivan; Hojsak, Iva; Žmak, Ljiljana; Tješić-Drinković, Dorian; Bogović, Jasna Čepin; Katalinić-Janković, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Since persons with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) represent a huge reservoir of potential tuberculosis (TB) disease, accurate diagnosis and treatment of LTBI is essential for TB control and eradication. The aim was to assess the diagnostic value of determination of interferon-gamma release assay in school children with hyperreactive tuberculin skin test (TST) reaction. A total of 120 BCG-vaccinated children were investigated due to a hyperreactive TST results. The QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT) was performed. Fifteen children (12.5%) had positive QFT-GIT and 105 (87.5%) children had negative QFT-GIT. There was no statistically significant difference in TST reaction (21.5 mm u QFT+ vs. 20.9 mm u QFT-group, p=0.458). The children with positive QFT-GIT had a statistically higher level of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) than children with negative QFT-GIT. There were no statistically significant differences in concentrations of IFN-y either basic or upon stimulation with mitogen phytohemagglutinin. After isoniazid prophylaxis QFT-GIT remained positive in two children (p=0.019). In a difficult procedure for diagnosing LTBI in BCG-vaccinated children determination of IFN-γ could be the key factor in making decision whether to use preventive therapy or not. PMID:26502676

  4. Skin turgor

    MedlinePlus

    Doughy skin; Poor skin turgor; Good skin turgor; Decreased skin turgor ... Call your health care provider if: Poor skin turgor occurs with vomiting, diarrhea, or fever. The skin is very slow to return to normal, or the skin "tents" up ...

  5. Sensitization to cereals and peanut evidenced by skin prick test and specific IgE in food-tolerant, grass pollen allergic patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The botanical relation between grass and cereal grains may be relevant when diagnosing food allergy to cereals. The aim was to investigate the diagnostic specificity of skin prick test (SPT) and specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE) tests to cereals and peanut in grass pollen allergic subjects without history of, and clinically reactions to foods botanically related to grass. Methods 70 subjects (41 females; mean age 32 years) and 20 healthy controls (13 females; mean age 24 years) were tested by open food challenge (OFC) with cereals and peanut. SPT and sIgE both with Immulite® (Siemens) and ImmunoCAP® (Phadia) to grass and birch pollen, cereals, peanut and bromelain were performed. Results Of the 65 OFC-negative subjects 29-46% (SPT, depending on cut-off), 20% (Immulite) and 38% (ImmunoCAP) had positive results to one or more of the foods tested. Controls were negative in all tests. Cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCD) as evidenced by reaction to bromelain could explain only a minority of the measured IgE-sensitizations. Conclusion Grass pollen allergic patients with documented food tolerance to cereals and peanut may express significant sensitization. False-positive cereal or peanut allergy diagnoses may be a quantitatively important problem both in routine clinical work and epidemiological studies. PMID:22409998

  6. Behavioural responses in a net restraint test predict interrenal reactivity in Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus.

    PubMed

    Magnhagen, C; Backström, T; Øverli, Ø; Winberg, S; Nilsson, J; Vindas, M A; Brännäs, E

    2015-07-01

    In this study, a 1 min net restraint test was evaluated as a method to predict stress-coping style in Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus, by investigating the relationship between behaviour during the test and levels of plasma cortisol sampled after 30 min confinement. In two separate groups of S. alpinus, general linearized model revealed significant correlations between cortisol levels and principal component scores extracted from principal component analysis, combining measures of activity in the tests. With the use of glmulti, the model selection ruled out any effects of size, sex and order of capture on interrenal reactivity. In general, S. alpinus that were more active in the net restraint test also had low levels of circulating cortisol, suggesting a proactive coping style. The results from two repeated runs were not correlated, but both runs, performed eight days apart, show a negative correlation between post-stress cortisol level and activity in the net. The lack of consistency could be explained by different treatments before each run and individual differences in behavioural plasticity. The net restraint test is thus predictive of stress-coping style in S. alpinus, and has the benefit of being less time-consuming than the commonly used confinement stress test. PMID:25919345

  7. REACTIVITY INITIATED ACCIDENT TEST SERIES TEST RIA 1-4 EXPERIMENT PREDICTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, S. K.; Martinson, Z. R.

    1980-02-01

    The results of the pretest analyses for Test RIA 1-4 are presented. Test RIA 1-4 consists of a 3x3 array of previously irradiated MAP! fuel rods. The rods have 5.7% enriched UO{sub 2} fuel in zircaloy-4 cladding with an average burnup of 5300 MWd/t. The objective for Test RIA 1-4 is to provide information regarding loss-of-coolable fuel rod geometry following RIA event for a radial-average peak fuel enthalpy equivalent to the present licensing criteria of 1172 J/g (280 cal/g UO{sub 2}). Radial averaged peak fuel enthalpies of 1172 J/g (280 cal/g) 1077 J/g {257 cal/g), and 978 J/g (234 cal/g) for the corner, side, and center fuel rods, respectively, are planned to be achieved during a 2.7 ms reactor period power burst. The results of the FRAP-T5 analyses indicate that all nine rods will fail within 26 ms from the start of the power burst due to pellet-cladding mechanical interaction. All of the rods will undergo partial fuel melting. All rods will operate under extended film boiling (>30 sec) conditions and about 70% of the cladding length is expected to be molten. Approximately 15% of the cladding thickness will be oxided. Fuel swelling due to fission gas release and melting combined with fuel and cladding fragmentation, will probably produce a complete coolant flow blockage within the flow shroud.

  8. New strategies for development of a safe and effective skin decontamination system. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Langenmayr, E.J.

    1988-11-09

    Under previous contract to USAMRDC, Rohm and Haas Company has demonstrated the concept of using small particle size, insoluble reactive sorptive resins as the basis for a safe and effective skin decontamination kit (SDK). The objective of the current contract is to identify new resins for skin decontamination which show improved reactivity, sorptivity, and retentivity for CW agents over those resins evaluated in previous contracts yet which remain safe for use on human skin. Reactive and sorbent resins were evaluated using several in vitro methods which measured reactivity, reactive capacity, retentivity and wettability. Chloroethylisobutyl sulfide (CIS) was used as a mustard simulant and diisopropylflurophosphate (DFP) was used as a G agent simulant. Nineteen sorbent resins and sixty-five reactive resins were evaluated. Of the sorbent resins evaluated, the carbonaceous sorbents and the macronet sorbents were found to be clearly superior to the other sorbent resins tested with respect to performance in the in vitro tests. Reactive resins containing hydroxide ion performed, as a group, better than reactive resins containing other reactive functionality in all of the in vitro tests. Resins with the highest reactivity toward simulants were those which contained hydroxide ion as nucleophile. Several other polymer-bound nucleophiles were highly reactive toward the G agent simulant DFP but only hydroxide ion had high reactivity against the mustard simulant CIS.

  9. A few days of social separation affects yearling horses' response to emotional reactivity tests and enhances learning performance.

    PubMed

    Lansade, Léa; Neveux, Claire; Levy, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    Learning performance is influenced by emotional reactivity, low reactivity being generally beneficial. Previous experiments show that emotional reactivity can be modified after a period of social isolation. We hypothesized that eleven days of isolation would affect yearlings' emotional reactivity and improve their learning abilities. Twenty-five yearlings were divided into two groups: 12 were continuously isolated for 11 days (isolated) and 13 stayed together (control). During the period of isolation, all yearlings underwent two learning tasks: a habituation procedure in which a novel object was presented for 120 s every day, either when the horse was alone (isolated) or with conspecifics (control); an instrumental learning task in which the yearling had to walk forwards or backwards to obtain a food reward. At the end of the isolation period, animals performed tests to assess aspects of emotional reactivity: reactivity to novelty, to humans, to social separation, to suddenness and to sensory stimuli. Results showed that isolated yearlings habituated more to the novel object than controls and performed better in the instrumental task. Moreover, they were less reactive to novelty, to social separation and to suddenness than controls. Overall, these data suggest that the better performance of isolated yearlings could be explained by a decrease in their emotional reactivity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: insert SI title. PMID:22705773

  10. Application of a Virtual Reactivity Feedback Control Loop in Non-Nuclear Testing of a Fast Spectrum Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Forsbacka, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    For a compact, fast-spectrum reactor, reactivity feedback is dominated by core deformation at elevated temperature. Given the use of accurate deformation measurement techniques, it is possible to simulate nuclear feedback in non-nuclear electrically heated reactor tests. Implementation of simulated reactivity feedback in response to measured deflection is being tested at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF). During tests of the SAFE-100 reactor prototype, core deflection was monitored using a high resolution camera. "virtual" reactivity feedback was accomplished by applying the results of Monte Carlo calculations (MCNPX) to core deflection measurements; the computational analysis was used to establish the reactivity worth of van'ous core deformations. The power delivered to the SAFE-100 prototype was then dusted accordingly via kinetics calculations, The work presented in this paper will demonstrate virtual reactivity feedback as core power was increased from 1 kilowatt(sub t), to 10 kilowatts(sub t), held approximately constant at 10 kilowatts (sub t), and then allowed to decrease based on the negative thermal reactivity coefficient.