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Sample records for skyrme siii force

  1. Skyrme tensor force in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. D.; Suckling, E. B.; Fracasso, S.; Barton, M. C.; Umar, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Background: It is generally acknowledged that the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) method provides a useful foundation for a fully microscopic many-body theory of low-energy heavy ion reactions. The TDHF method is also known in nuclear physics in the small-amplitude domain, where it provides a useful description of collective states, and is based on the mean-field formalism, which has been a relatively successful approximation to the nuclear many-body problem. Currently, the TDHF theory is being widely used in the study of fusion excitation functions, fission, and deep-inelastic scattering of heavy mass systems, while providing a natural foundation for many other studies. Purpose: With the advancement of computational power it is now possible to undertake TDHF calculations without any symmetry assumptions and incorporate the major strides made by the nuclear structure community in improving the energy density functionals used in these calculations. In particular, time-odd and tensor terms in these functionals are naturally present during the dynamical evolution, while being absent or minimally important for most static calculations. The parameters of these terms are determined by the requirement of Galilean invariance or local gauge invariance but their significance for the reaction dynamics have not been fully studied. This work addresses this question with emphasis on the tensor force. Method: The full version of the Skyrme force, including terms arising only from the Skyrme tensor force, is applied to the study of collisions within a completely symmetry-unrestricted TDHF implementation. Results: We examine the effect on upper fusion thresholds with and without the tensor force terms and find an effect on the fusion threshold energy of the order several MeV. Details of the distribution of the energy within terms in the energy density functional are also discussed. Conclusions: Terms in the energy density functional linked to the tensor force can play a non

  2. Hyperon puzzle of neutron stars with Skyrme force models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yeunhwan; Hyun, Chang Ho; Kwak, Kyujin; Lee, Chang-Hwan

    2015-12-01

    We consider the so-called hyperon puzzle of neutron star (NS). We employ Skyrme force models for the description of in-medium nucleon-nucleon (NN), nucleon-Lambda hyperon (NΛ) and Lambda-Lambda (ΛΛ) interactions. A phenomenological finite-range force (FRF) for the ΛΛ interaction is considered as well. Equation of state (EoS) of NS matter is obtained in the framework of density functional theory, and Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff (TOV) equations are solved to obtain the mass-radius relations of NSs. It has been generally known that the existence of hyperons in the NS matter is not well supported by the recent discovery of large-mass NSs (M ≃ 2M⊙) since hyperons make the EoS softer than the one without them. For the selected interaction models, NΛ interactions reduce the maximum mass of NS by about 30%, while ΛΛ interactions can give about 10% enhancement. Consequently, we find that some Skyrme force models predict the maximum mass of NS consistent with the observation of 2M⊙ NSs, and at the same time satisfy observationally constrained mass-radius relations.

  3. Do Skyrme forces that fit nuclear matter work well in finite nuclei?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. D.; Goddard, P. M.; Stone, J. R.; Dutra, M.

    2013-05-01

    A short list of Skyrme force parameterizations, recently found to have passed a series of constraints relating to nuclear matter properties is analyzed for their ability to reproduce data in finite nuclei. We analyse binding energies, isotope shifts, neutron skin thicknesses and fission barriers. We find that the subset of forces have no common ability to reproduce(or otherwise)properties of finite nuclei, despite passing the extensive range of nuclear matter constraints.

  4. Description of elastic polarized-deuteron scattering in the optical model with Skyrme forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, V. V.; Kuprikov, V. I.

    2015-07-01

    Microscopic deuteron-nucleus optical potential was constructed on the basis of the nucleon-nucleus optical potentials recently obtained by the authors from approximate calculations of the mass operator of the single-particle Green function using the Skyrme forces, which in general involve additional density- and momentum-dependent terms. Both the nucleon- and deuteron-nucleus elastic scattering processes are described in a self-consistent approach using the effective nucleon-nucleon forces, which simultaneously provide a satisfactory description of nuclear structure. The calculations performed using the Watanabe-type approximation have made it possible to obtain reasonable results for describing differential cross sections and polarization observables for the elastic deuteron scattering in a wide range of target-nucleus mass numbers at different incident deuteron energies, when using several Skyrme-force variants both from literature and proposed by the authors. Contributions to elastic deuteron-nucleus scattering cross sections coming from the effects of deuteron virtual breakup have been estimated in the continuum-discretized coupled channels approach.

  5. Physical Origin of Density Dependent Force of the Skyrme Type within the Quark Meson Coupling Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre Guichon; Hrayr Matevosyan; N. Sandulescu; Anthony Thomas

    2006-03-17

    A density dependent, effective nucleon-nucleon force of the Skyrme type is derived from the quark-meson coupling model--a self-consistent, relativistic quark level description of nuclear matter. This new formulation requires no assumption that the mean scalar field is small and hence constitutes a significant advance over earlier work. The similarity of the effective interaction to the widely used SkM* force encourages us to apply it to a wide range of nuclear problems, beginning with the binding energies and charge distributions of doubly magic nuclei. Finding impressive results in this conventional arena, we apply the same effective interaction, within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach, to the properties of nuclei far from stability. The resulting two neutron drip lines and shell quenching are quite satisfactory. Finally, we apply the relativistic formulation to the properties of dense nuclear matter in anticipation of future application to the properties of neutron stars.

  6. Electrophysiological mechanisms of the SI SII SIII electrocardiographic morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Bayes de Luna, A.; Carrio, I.; Subirana, M.T.; Torner, P.; Cosin, J.; Sagues, F.; Guindo, J.

    1987-01-01

    We studied three groups of individuals by means of spatial-velocity electrocardiograms and thallium-201 myocardial imaging to figure out the electrophysiological explanation of the SI SII SIII electrocardiographic morphology. We studied twelve healthy individuals without SI SII SIII, seven healthy individuals with SI SII SIII and fifteen patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with SI SII SIII. The average values of the QRS-E and QRS-F intervals were higher in the second and third groups than in the first. One patient of the second group and thirteen of the third showed right ventricular enlargement. The slowing down of the right ventricular conduction explained the SI SII SIII morphology in normal individuals in more than half the cases. In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with SI SII SIII the conduction delay plays an important part in the electrogenesis of the right ventricular enlargement electrocardiographic morphology. We think that these observations can give further data about the electrophysiologic mechanism of the SI SII SIII morphology.

  7. Investigation of restricted baby Skyrme models

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, C.; Romanczukiewicz, T.; Wereszczynski, A.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.

    2010-04-15

    A restriction of the baby Skyrme model consisting of the quartic and potential terms only is investigated in detail for a wide range of potentials. Further, its properties are compared with those of the corresponding full baby Skyrme models. We find that topological (charge) as well as geometrical (nucleus/shell shape) features of baby Skyrmions are captured already by the soliton solutions of the restricted model. Further, we find a coincidence between the compact or noncompact nature of solitons in the restricted model, on the one hand, and the existence or nonexistence of multi-Skyrmions in the full baby Skyrme model, on the other hand.

  8. Baby Skyrme models without a potential term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashcroft, Jennifer; Haberichter, Mareike; Krusch, Steffen

    2015-05-01

    We develop a one-parameter family of static baby Skyrme models that do not require a potential term to admit topological solitons. This is a novel property as the standard baby Skyrme model must contain a potential term in order to have stable soliton solutions, though the Skyrme model does not require this. Our new models satisfy an energy bound that is linear in terms of the topological charge and can be saturated in an extreme limit. They also satisfy a virial theorem that is shared by the Skyrme model. We calculate the solitons of our new models numerically and observe that their form depends significantly on the choice of parameter. In one extreme, we find compactons while at the other there is a scale invariant model in which solitons can be obtained exactly as solutions to a Bogomolny equation. We provide an initial investigation into these solitons and compare them with the baby Skyrmions of other models.

  9. Monopoles and knots in skyrme theory.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y M

    2001-12-17

    We show that the Skyrme theory is actually a theory of monopoles which allows a new type of soliton, the topological knot made of the monopole-antimonopole pair, which is different from the well-known skyrmion. Furthermore, we derive a generalized Skyrme action from the Yang-Mills action of QCD, which we propose to be an effective action of QCD in the infrared limit. We discuss the physical implications of our results. PMID:11736568

  10. Baryon spectrum of the Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattis, Michael P.; Karliner, Marek

    1985-06-01

    We calculate the spectrum of nucleon and Δ resonances of the Skyrme model. The masses that we find are accurate on the average to within 8% of their experimental values up to 3 GeV. For most partial waves the model reproduces many significant features of the experimental Argand diagrams correctly. The values of the Skyrme parameters obtained from a best fit to the spectrum improve some of the static properties of the model.

  11. Gauged multisoliton baby Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilenka, A.; Shnir, Ya.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study of U (1 ) gauged modification of the 2 +1 -dimensional planar Skyrme model with a particular choice of the symmetry breaking potential term which combines a short-range repulsion and a long-range attraction. In the absence of the gauge interaction, the multisolitons of the model are aloof, as they consist of the individual constituents which are well separated. A peculiar feature of the model is that there are usually several different stable static multisoliton solutions of rather similar energy in a topological sector of given degree. We investigate the pattern of the solutions and find new previously unknown local minima. It is shown that coupling of the aloof planar multi-Skyrmions to the magnetic field strongly affects the pattern of interaction between the constituents. We analyze the dependency of the structure of the solutions, their energies, and magnetic fluxes on the strength of the gauge coupling. It is found that, generically, in the strong coupling limit, the coupling to the gauge field results in effective recovery of the rotational invariance of the configuration.

  12. A Skyrme-like model with an exact BPS bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. A.; Zakrzewski, Wojtek J.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a new Skyrme-like model with fields taking values on the sphere S 3 or, equivalently, on the group SU(2). The action of the model contains a quadratic kinetic term plus a quartic term which is the same as that of the Skyrme-Faddeev model. The novelty of the model is that it possess a first order Bogomolny type equation whose solutions automatically satisfy the second order Euler-Lagrange equations. It also possesses a lower bound on the static energy which is saturated by the Bogomolny solutions. Such Bogomolny equation is equivalent to the so-called force free equation used in plasma and solar Physics, and which possesses large classes of solutions. An old result due to Chandrasekhar prevents the existence of finite energy solutions for the force free equation on the entire three-dimensional space . We construct new exact finite energy solutions to the Bogomolny equations for the case where the space is the three-sphere S 3, using toroidal like coordinates.

  13. Tensor part of the Skyrme energy density functional: Spherical nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesinski, T.; Bender, M.; Bennaceur, K.; Duguet, T.; Meyer, J.

    2007-07-01

    We perform a systematic study of the impact of the J2 tensor term in the Skyrme energy functional on properties of spherical nuclei. In the Skyrme energy functional, the tensor terms originate from both zero-range central and tensor forces. We build a set of 36 parametrizations, covering a wide range of the parameter space of the isoscalar and isovector tensor term coupling constants with a fit protocol very similar to that of the successful SLy parametrizations. We analyze the impact of the tensor terms on a large variety of observables in spherical mean-field calculations, such as the spin-orbit splittings and single-particle spectra of doubly-magic nuclei, the evolution of spin-orbit splittings along chains of semi-magic nuclei, mass residuals of spherical nuclei, and known anomalies of radii. The major findings of our study are as follows: (i) Tensor terms should not be added perturbatively to existing parametrizations; a complete refit of the entire parameter set is imperative. (ii) The free variation of the tensor terms does not lower the χ2 within a standard Skyrme energy functional. (iii) For certain regions of the parameter space of their coupling constants, the tensor terms lead to instabilities of the spherical shell structure, or even to the coexistence of two configurations with different spherical shell structures. (iv) The standard spin-orbit interaction does not scale properly with the principal quantum number, such that single-particle states with one or several nodes have too large spin-orbit splittings, whereas those of nodeless intruder levels are tentatively too small. Tensor terms with realistic coupling constants cannot cure this problem. (v) Positive values of the coupling constants of proton-neutron and like-particle tensor terms allow for a qualitative description of the evolution of spin-orbit splittings in chains of Ca, Ni, and Sn isotopes. (vi) For the same values of the tensor term coupling constants, however, the overall agreement of

  14. Skyrme-Einstein closed cosmic chiral strings

    SciTech Connect

    Rybakov, Yu. P. Ivanova, I. S.

    2007-07-15

    Within the theory of general relativity, the configuration of a closed string (vortex) characterized by a topological charge of the degree type is described for the Skyrme-Einstein SU (2) chiral model. In the approximation of a large vortex-closure radius (a), a solution to equations of motion is obtained, along with estimates for the vortex energy and radius.

  15. Self-consistent RPA calculations with Skyrme-type interactions: The skyrme_rpa program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colò, Gianluca; Cao, Ligang; Van Giai, Nguyen; Capelli, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    the Random Phase Approximation (RPA). This work provides a tool where one starts from an assumed form of nuclear effective interaction (the Skyrme forces) and builds the self-consistent Hartree-Fock mean field of a given nucleus, and then the RPA multipole excitations of that nucleus. Solution method: The Hartree-Fock (HF) equations are solved in a radial mesh, using a Numerov algorithm. The solutions are iterated until self-consistency is achieved (in practice, when the energy eigenvalues are stable within a desired accuracy). In the obtained mean field, unoccupied states necessary for the RPA calculations are found. For all single-particle states, box boundary conditions are assumed. To solve the RPA problem for a given value of total angular momentum and parity Jπ a coupled basis is constructed and the RPA matrix is diagonalized (protons and neutrons are treated explicitly, and no approximation related to the use of isospin formalism is introduced). The transition amplitudes and transition strengths associated to given external operators are calculated. The HF densities and RPA transition densities are also evaluated. Restrictions: The main restrictions are related to the assumed spherical symmetry and absence of pairing correlations. Running time: The typical running time depends strongly on the nucleus, on the multipolarity, on the choice of the model space and of course on the computer. It can vary from a few minutes to several hours.

  16. Nuclear Mass Predictions within the Skyrme HFB Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Samyn, M.; Goriely, S.; Pearson, J.M.

    2005-05-24

    To increase the reliability of predictions of highly neutron-rich nuclear masses we systematically analyze the sensitivity of Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass formulae to various physical inputs, such as a density dependence of the pairing interaction, a low effective mass, the particle-number projection, the symmetry energy, ... We typically use a 10-parameter Skyrme force and a 4-parameter {delta}-function pairing force. The 14 degrees of freedom are adjusted to the masses of all measured nuclei with N,Z {>=} 8 given in the 2001 and 2003 Audi et al. compilations. The masses of light and proton-rich nuclei are corrected by a 4-parameter phenomenological Wigner term. With more than ten such parameter sets complete mass tables are constructed, going from one drip line to the other, up to Z = 120.

  17. Nuclear Mass Predictions within the Skyrme HFB Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samyn, M.; Goriely, S.; Pearson, J. M.

    2005-05-01

    To increase the reliability of predictions of highly neutron-rich nuclear masses we systematically analyze the sensitivity of Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass formulae to various physical inputs, such as a density dependence of the pairing interaction, a low effective mass, the particle-number projection, the symmetry energy, … We typically use a 10-parameter Skyrme force and a 4-parameter δ-function pairing force. The 14 degrees of freedom are adjusted to the masses of all measured nuclei with N,Z ⩾ 8 given in the 2001 and 2003 Audi et al. compilations. The masses of light and proton-rich nuclei are corrected by a 4-parameter phenomenological Wigner term. With more than ten such parameter sets complete mass tables are constructed, going from one drip line to the other, up to Z = 120.

  18. Exact kink solitons in Skyrme crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shouxin; Li, Yijun; Yang, Yisong

    2014-01-01

    We present an explicit integration of the kink soliton equation obtained in a recent interesting study of the classical Skyrme model where the field configurations are of a generalized hedgehog form which is of a domain-wall type. We also show that in such a reduced one-dimensional setting the first-order and second-order equations are equivalent. Consequently, in such a context, all finite-energy solitons are Bogomolnyi-Prasad-Sommerfield type and precisely known.

  19. New Skyrme interaction with improved spin-isospin properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Sagawa, H.

    2012-09-01

    A correct determination of the spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to, among other improvements, an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GTR). These nuclear excitations impact on a variety of physical processes: from the response in charge-exchange reactions of nuclei naturally present in the Earth, to the description of the stellar nucleosynthesis and of the pre-supernova explosion core-collapse evolution of massive stars in the Universe. A reliable description of the GTR provides also stringent tests for neutrinoless double-β decay calculations. We present a new Skyrme interaction as accurate as previous forces in the description of finite nuclei and of uniform matter properties around saturation density, and that accounts well for the GTR in 48Ca, 90Zr, and 208Pb, and the isobaric analog resonance and spin dipole resonance in 90Zr and 208Pb.

  20. Neutron Matter Properties Using Skyrme Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, H. M. M.; Guirguis, Jannette W.; Abdelmageed, A. I.; Hager, S. A.

    The purpose of the present work is to extend earlier nuclear matter calculations to study the properties of neutron matter. The binding energy per particle, symmetry energy, single particle potential, effective mass, and magnetic susceptibility are calculated using a modified Skyrme interaction. These are calculated as a function of the Fermi momentum kf in the range 0 < kf < 2 fm-1. Two sets of the interaction parameters are obtained by fitting the interaction parameters using the available information on neutron matter. Relativistic corrections to the order 1/c2 are also calculated. The relativistic corrections are very small and they increase as kf is increased.Translated AbstractDie Eigenschaften von Neutronenmaterie bei Annahme von Skyrme-WechselwirkungDie Arbeit zielt auf die Erweiterung früherer Berechnungen zur Kernmaterie auf die Eigenschaftsbestimmung von Neutronenmaterie. Unter Benutzung einer modifizierten Skyrme-Wechselwirkung werden die Bindungsenergie pro Partikel, die Symmetrieenergie, das Einteilchenpotential, die effektive Masse und die magnetische Suszeptibilität als Funktionen des Fermi-Impulses kf im Intervall 0 < kf < 2 fm-1 berechnet. Zwei angepaßte Parameter werden betrachtet. Die relativistischen Korrekturen werden bis zur Größenordnung 1/c2 berechnet. Sie sind sehr klein, wachsen mit wachsendem kf.

  1. Isovector splitting of nucleon effective masses, ab initio benchmarks and extended stability criteria for Skyrme energy functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Lesinski, T.; Meyer, J.

    2006-10-15

    We study the effect of the splitting of neutron and proton effective masses with isospin asymmetry on the properties of the Skyrme energy density functional. We discuss the ability of the latter to predict observables of infinite matter and finite nuclei, paying particular attention to controlling the agreement with ab initio predictions of the spin-isospin content of the nuclear equation of state, as well as diagnosing the onset of finite size instabilities, which we find to be of critical importance. We show that these various constraints cannot be simultaneously fulfilled by the standard Skyrme force, calling at least for an extension of its P-wave part.

  2. Skyrme-like models and supersymmetry in 3 +1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiruga, J. M.

    2015-11-01

    We construct supersymmetric extensions for different Skyrme-like models in 3 +1 dimensions. BPS equations and BPS bounds are obtained from supersymmetry in some cases. We discuss also the emergence of several Skyrme-like models from supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory and Born-Infeld theory in 5 dimensions.

  3. Nuclear matter magnetization in the Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, R.

    2011-05-15

    The effects of an external magnetic field on the nuclear medium are studied within the Skyrme model of the nuclear interaction. The equation of state, spin polarization, and magnetization are evaluated at zero temperature for both neutron matter and isospin symmetric nuclear matter. We consider the anomalous magnetic moments of the nucleons and the quantization induced by a magnetic field over the proton energy spectrum. A comparison of two versions of the model, allowing or not for spontaneous magnetization, is performed. We cover a range of magnetic-field strengths and matter densities appropriate for astrophysical studies.

  4. A new phase diagram of water under negative pressure: The rise of the lowest-density clathrate s-III

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yingying; Zhu, Chongqin; Wang, Lu; Cao, Xiaoxiao; Su, Yan; Jiang, Xue; Meng, Sheng; Zhao, Jijun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Ice and ice clathrate are not only omnipresent across polar regions of Earth or under terrestrial oceans but also ubiquitous in the solar system such as on comets, asteroids, or icy moons of the giant planets. Depending on the surrounding environment (temperature and pressure), ice alone exhibits an exceptionally rich and complicated phase diagram with 17 known crystalline polymorphs. Water molecules also form clathrate compounds with inclusion of guest molecules, such as cubic structure I (s-I), cubic structure II (s-II), hexagonal structure H (s-H), tetragonal structure T (s-T), and tetragonal structure K (s-K). Recently, guest-free clathrate structure II (s-II), also known as ice XVI located in the negative-pressure region of the phase diagram of water, is synthesized in the laboratory and motivates scientists to reexamine other ice clathrates with low density. Using extensive Monte Carlo packing algorithm and dispersion-corrected density functional theory optimization, we predict a crystalline clathrate of cubic structure III (s-III) composed of two large icosihexahedral cavities (8668412) and six small decahedral cavities (8248) per unit cell, which is dynamically stable by itself and can be fully stabilized by encapsulating an appropriate guest molecule in the large cavity. A new phase diagram of water ice with TIP4P/2005 (four-point transferable intermolecular potential/2005) model potential is constructed by considering a variety of candidate phases. The guest-free s-III clathrate with ultralow density overtakes s-II and s-H phases and emerges as the most stable ice polymorph in the pressure region below −5834 bar at 0 K and below −3411 bar at 300 K. PMID:26933681

  5. A new phase diagram of water under negative pressure: The rise of the lowest-density clathrate s-III.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yingying; Zhu, Chongqin; Wang, Lu; Cao, Xiaoxiao; Su, Yan; Jiang, Xue; Meng, Sheng; Zhao, Jijun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Ice and ice clathrate are not only omnipresent across polar regions of Earth or under terrestrial oceans but also ubiquitous in the solar system such as on comets, asteroids, or icy moons of the giant planets. Depending on the surrounding environment (temperature and pressure), ice alone exhibits an exceptionally rich and complicated phase diagram with 17 known crystalline polymorphs. Water molecules also form clathrate compounds with inclusion of guest molecules, such as cubic structure I (s-I), cubic structure II (s-II), hexagonal structure H (s-H), tetragonal structure T (s-T), and tetragonal structure K (s-K). Recently, guest-free clathrate structure II (s-II), also known as ice XVI located in the negative-pressure region of the phase diagram of water, is synthesized in the laboratory and motivates scientists to reexamine other ice clathrates with low density. Using extensive Monte Carlo packing algorithm and dispersion-corrected density functional theory optimization, we predict a crystalline clathrate of cubic structure III (s-III) composed of two large icosihexahedral cavities (8(6)6(8)4(12)) and six small decahedral cavities (8(2)4(8)) per unit cell, which is dynamically stable by itself and can be fully stabilized by encapsulating an appropriate guest molecule in the large cavity. A new phase diagram of water ice with TIP4P/2005 (four-point transferable intermolecular potential/2005) model potential is constructed by considering a variety of candidate phases. The guest-free s-III clathrate with ultralow density overtakes s-II and s-H phases and emerges as the most stable ice polymorph in the pressure region below -5834 bar at 0 K and below -3411 bar at 300 K. PMID:26933681

  6. Investigations of the Nature of Zn(II) -Si(II) Bonds.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Sebastian; Köppe, Ralf; Roesky, Peter W

    2016-05-17

    A series of zinc(II) silylenes was prepared by using the silylene {PhC(NtBu)2 }(C5 Me5 )Si. Whereas reaction of the silylene with ZnX2 (X=Cl, I) gave the halide-bridged dimers [{PhC(NtBu)2 }(C5 Me5 )SiZnX(μ-X)]2 , with ZnR2 (R=Ph, Et, C6 F5 ) as reagent the monomers [{PhC(NtBu)2 }(C5 Me5 )SiZnR2 ] were obtained. The stability of the complexes and the Zn-Si bond lengths clearly depend on the substitution pattern of the zinc atom. Electron-withdrawing groups stabilize these adducts, whereas electron-donating groups destabilize them. This could be rationalized by quantum chemical calculations. Two different bonding modes in these molecules were identified, which are responsible for the differences in reactivity: 1) strong polar Zn-Si single bonds with short Zn-Si distances, Zn-Si force constants close to that of a classical single bond, and strong binding energy (ca. 2.39 Å, 1.33 mdyn Å(-1) , and 200 kJ mol(-1) ), which suggest an ion pair consisting of a silyl cation with a Zn-Si single bond; 2) relatively weak donor-acceptor Zn-Si bonds with long Zn-Si distances, low Zn-Si force constants, and weak binding energy (ca. 2.49 Å, 0.89 mdyn Å(-1) , and 115 kJ mol(-1) ), which can be interpreted as a silylene-zinc adduct. PMID:27072620

  7. Skyrme black holes in the isolated horizons formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Alex B.

    2006-08-15

    We study static, spherically symmetric, Skyrme black holes in the context of the assumption that they can be viewed as bound states between ordinary bare black holes and solitons. This assumption and results stemming from the isolated horizons formalism lead to several conjectures about the static black hole solutions. These conjectures are tested against the Skyrme black hole solutions. It is shown that, while there is in general good agreement with the conjectures, a crucial aspect seems to violate one of the conjectures.

  8. Kantowski-Sachs universes sourced by a Skyrme fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, Luca; Radicella, Ninfa; Vilasi, Gaetano

    2015-03-01

    The Kantowski-Sachs cosmological model sourced by a Skyrme field and a cosmological constant is considered in the framework of general relativity. Assuming a constant radial profile function α =π /2 for the hedgehog ansatz, the Skyrme contribution to Einstein equations is shown to be equivalent to an anisotropic fluid. Using dynamical system techniques, a qualitative analysis of the cosmological equations is presented. Physically interesting features of the model such as isotropization, bounce and recollapse are discussed.

  9. Extended supersymmetry and BPS solutions in baby Skyrme models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Queiruga, J. M.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2013-05-01

    We continue the investigation of supersymmetric extensions of baby Skyrme models in d = 2 + 1 dimensions. In a first step, we show that the CP(1) form of the baby Skyrme model allows for the same N = 1 SUSY extension as its O(3) formulation. Then we construct the N = 1 SUSY extension of the gauged baby Skyrme model, i.e., the baby Skyrme model coupled to Maxwell electrodynamics. In a next step, we investigate the issue of N = 2 SUSY extensions of baby Skyrme models. We find that all gauged and ungauged submodels of the baby Skyrme model which support BPS soliton solutions allow for an N = 2 extension such that the BPS solutions are one-half BPS states (i.e., annihilated by one-half of the SUSY charges). In the course of our investigation, we also derive the general BPS equations for completely general N = 2 supersymmetric field theories of (both gauged and ungauged) chiral superfields, and apply them to the gauged nonlinear sigma model as a further, concrete example.

  10. Baby Skyrme model, near-BPS approximations, and supersymmetric extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognesi, S.; Zakrzewski, W.

    2015-02-01

    We study the baby Skyrme model as a theory that interpolates between two distinct BPS systems. For this, a near-BPS approximation can be used when there is a small deviation from each of the two BPS limits. We provide analytical explanation and numerical support for the validity of this approximation. We then study the set of all possible supersymmetric extensions of the baby Skyrme model with N =1 and the particular ones with extended N =2 supersymmetries and relate this to the above mentioned almost-BPS approximation.

  11. Peakons and Q-balls in the baby Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Lis, Jakub

    2011-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the Q-ball Ansatz in the baby Skyrme model. First, the appearance of peakons, i.e. solutions with extremely large absolute values of the second derivative at maxima, is analyzed. It is argued that such solutions are intrinsic to the baby Skyrme model and do not depend on the detailed form of a potential used in calculations. Next, we concentrate on compact nonspinning Q-balls. We show the failure of a small parameter expansion in this case. Finally, we explore the existence and parameter dependence of Q-ball solutions.

  12. Skyrme models and nuclear matter equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Haberichter, M.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the role of pressure in a class of generalized Skyrme models. We introduce pressure as the trace of the spatial part of the energy-momentum tensor and show that it obeys the usual thermodynamical relation. Then, we compute analytically the mean-field equation of state in the high- and medium-pressure regimes by applying topological bounds on compact domains. The equation of state is further investigated numerically for the charge-one Skyrmions. We identify which term in a generalized Skyrme model is responsible for which part in the equation of state. Further, we compare our findings with the corresponding results in the Walecka model.

  13. Further explorations of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mass formulas. XV: The spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goriely, S.

    2015-01-01

    We construct two new Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mass models, labeled HFB-28, HFB-29, which in addition to the generalized Skyrme form containing t4 and t5 terms, also include now a modified spin-orbit force. This alternative spin-orbit force allows for an unconventional isospin and/or density dependence relative to the traditional form included in Skyrme functionals. The new forces underlying these models are fitted to essentially all mass data and at the same time to a realistic equation of state of neutron matter. The inclusion of the modified spin-orbit terms allows us to reduce the rms deviation with respect to all the 2353 known masses with Z, N ≥ 8 by 20 keV, leading to a final model error of 0.52 MeV. It is shown that the newly optimized spin-orbit forces do not conform with the one deduced from the relativistic mean field theory, and consequently that the relativistic spin-orbit force might not be optimum to reproduce experimental masses. The spin-orbit splittings are shown to be reduced and in better agreement with empirical values when including a density-dependent form of the spin-orbit interaction. However, the new mass models with such modified spin-orbit terms still fail to reproduce the kink seen in the isotopic shift of the K or Pb charge radii around the neutron magic numbers, despite the fact that such generalizations of the spin-orbit terms were also introduced to improve the description of the isotopic shifts. Shell effects, in particular far away from stability, are shown to remain unaffected by the new spin-orbit terms, except at the N = 184 magic number.

  14. Further explorations of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mass formulas. XII. Stiffness and stability of neutron-star matter

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.; Chamel, N.; Pearson, J. M.

    2010-09-15

    We construct three new Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass models, labeled HFB-19, HFB-20, and HFB-21, with unconventional Skyrme forces containing t{sub 4} and t{sub 5} terms, i.e., density-dependent generalizations of the usual t{sub 1} and t{sub 2} terms, respectively. The new forces underlying these models are fitted respectively to three different realistic equations of state of neutron matter for which the density dependence of the symmetry energy ranges from the very soft to the very stiff, reflecting thereby our present lack of complete knowledge of the high-density behavior of nuclear matter. All unphysical instabilities of nuclear matter, including the transition to a polarized state in neutron-star matter, are eliminated with the new forces. At the same time the new models fit essentially all the available mass data with rms deviations of 0.58 MeV and give the same high-quality fits to measured charge radii that we obtained in earlier models with conventional Skyrme forces. Being constrained by neutron matter, these new mass models, which all give similar extrapolations out to the neutron drip line, are highly appropriate for studies of the r process and the outer crust of neutron stars. Moreover, the underlying forces, labeled BSk19, BSk20 and BSk21, respectively, are well adapted to the study of the inner crust and core of neutron stars. The new family of Skyrme forces thus opens the way to a unified description of all regions of neutron stars.

  15. Vibrational excitations and a separable approximation for Skyrme interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Severyukhin, A. P.; Voronov, V. V.; Nguyen Van Giai

    2009-01-28

    Starting from an effective Skyrme interaction we present the finite rank separable approach for the quasiparticle random phase approximation. The approach is generalized to take into account the residual particle-particle interaction. As an illustration of the method properties of the low-lying quadrupole states in the even-even nuclei around {sup 132}Sn are studied.

  16. Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov nuclear mass formulas: crossing the 0.6 MeV accuracy threshold with microscopically deduced pairing.

    PubMed

    Goriely, S; Chamel, N; Pearson, J M

    2009-04-17

    We present a new Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov nuclear-mass model in which the contact-pairing force is constructed from microscopic pairing gaps of symmetric nuclear matter and neutron matter calculated from realistic two- and three-body forces, with medium-polarization effects included. With the pairing being treated more realistically than in any of our earlier models, the rms deviation with respect to essentially all the available mass data falls to 0.581 MeV, the best value ever found within the mean-field framework. Since our Skyrme force is also constrained by the properties of pure neutron matter, this new model is particularly well suited for application to astrophysical problems involving a neutron-rich environment, such as the elucidation of the r process of nucleosynthesis, and the description of supernova cores and neutron-star crusts. PMID:19518625

  17. Effect of the tensor part of Skyrme interaction on the description of elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering on the basis of the optical model

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprikov, V. I.; Pilipenko, V. V.

    2013-01-15

    A microscopic optical nucleon-nucleus potential constructed on the basis of calculating the mass operator for the single-particle Green's function with Skyrme nucleon-nucleon forces was used to study the effect of the tensor part of Skyrme forces on describing differential cross sections for elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering and the structure of nuclei within a self-consistent approach. It was shown that an increase in the tensor terms of nucleon-nucleon forces impaired the description of nucleon-nucleus scattering within the model being considered. The parameters of Skyrme forces were optimized on the basis of an analysis of cross sections for neutron-nucleus scattering, the properties of nuclear matter and the structure of nuclei being tested in doing this. This optimization led to nucleon-nucleon force versions where the tensor part was small or zero and which described satisfactorily the structure of nuclei and cross sections for elastic neutron and proton scattering on nuclei over a broad range of target mass numbers.

  18. Genesis and evolution of the Skyrme model from 1954 to the present

    SciTech Connect

    San Yuk, V.I. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-10

    Not widely known facts on the genesis of the Skyrme model are presented in a historical survey, based on Skyrme's earliest papers and on his own published remembrance. This paper considers the evolution of Skyrme's model description of nuclear matter from the Mesonic Fluid model up to its final version, known as the baryon model. We pay special tribute to some well-known ideas in contemporary particle physics which one can find in Skyrme's earlier papers, such as: Nuclear Democracy, the Solitonic Mechanism, the Nonlinear Realization of Chiral Symmetry, Topological Charges, Fermi-Bose Transmutations, etc. It is curious to note in the final version of the Skyrme model gleams of Kelvin's Vortex Atoms theory. In conclusion we make a brief analysis of the validity of Skyrme's conjectures in view of recent results and pinpoint some questions which still remain.

  19. Hairy black holes in the general Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Kichakova, O.; Shnir, Ya.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2016-07-01

    We study the existence of hairy black holes in the generalized Einstein-Skyrme model. It is proven that in the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield model limit there are no hairy black hole solutions, although the model admits gravitating (and flat space) solitons. Furthermore, we find strong evidence that a necessary condition for the existence of black holes with Skyrmionic hair is the inclusion of the Skyrme term L4. As an example, we show that there are no hairy black holes in the L2+L6+L0 model and present a new kind of black hole solutions with compact Skyrmion hair in the L4+L6+L0 model.

  20. Inflating baby-Skyrme branes in six dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Brihaye, Yves; Delsate, Terence; Kodama, Yuta; Sawado, Nobuyuki

    2010-11-15

    We consider a six-dimensional brane world model, where the brane is described by a localized solution to the baby-Skyrme model extending in the extra dimensions. The branes have a cosmological constant modeled by inflating four-dimensional slices, and we further consider a bulk cosmological constant. We construct solutions numerically and present evidence that the solutions cease to exist for large values of the brane cosmological constant in some particular case. Then we study the stability of the model by considering perturbation of the gravitational part (resp. baby Skyrmion) with fixed matter fields (resp. gravitational background). Our results indicate that the perturbation equations do not admit localized solutions for certain type of perturbation. The stability analysis can be alternatively seen as leading to a particle spectrum; we give mass estimations for the baby-Skyrme perturbation and for the graviton.

  1. Exploration of a modified density dependence in the Skyrme functional

    SciTech Connect

    Erler, J.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Kluepfel, P.

    2010-10-15

    A variant of the basic Skyrme-Hartree-Fock functional is considered dealing with a new form of density dependence. It employs only integer powers and thus will allow a more sound basis for projection schemes (particle number, angular momentum). We optimize the new functional with exactly the same adjustment strategy as used in an earlier study with a standard Skyrme functional. This allows direct comparisons of the performance of the new functional relative to the standard one. We discuss various observables: bulk properties of finite nuclei, nuclear matter, giant resonances, superheavy elements, and energy systematics. The new functional performs at least as well as the standard one, but offers a wider range of applicability (e.g., for projection) and more flexibility in the regime of high densities.

  2. Quantum mass shift of the soliton in the Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Livne, H. )

    1993-02-01

    The quantum mass shift of the soliton in the Skyrme model has been calculated from all nonzero modes. The calculations were carried out using a method applied earlier to the sine-Gordon model. The mass shifts do not depend on the baryonic spin, therefore they are the same for the nucleon and the [Delta]. Our model parameters are the pion decay constant [ital F][sub [pi

  3. Extended Skyrme equation of state in asymmetric nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davesne, D.; Pastore, A.; Navarro, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new equation of state for infinite systems (symmetric, asymmetric, and neutron matter) based on an extended Skyrme functional that has been constrained by microscopic Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone results. The resulting equation of state reproduces the main features of microscopic calculations very accurately and is compatible with recent measurements of two times Solar-mass neutron stars. We provide all necessary analytical expressions to facilitate a quick numerical implementation of quantities of astrophysical interest.

  4. Large scale calculations for cluster structure of light nuclei with Skyrme interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Y.; Funaki, Y.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Yabana, K.

    2013-04-01

    We present a computational approach to describe structure of light nuclei including cluster states. Apart from the use of an empirical nuclear force, Skyrme interaction, our scheme does not utilize any a priori knowledge on the structure of nuclei. In our framework, we first generate a number of Slater determinants in a stochastic way. We then make projections of parity and angular momentum, and perform configuration mixing calculation. We show results for 12C and 16O nuclei. Our calculation provides a reasonable description for the ground state rotational band, Hoyle state, and low-lying negative parity states of 12C. We may also describe the 0+2 rotational band of 16O, although excitation energies are slightly overestimated.

  5. Skyrme random-phase-approximation description of lowest Kπ=2γ+ states in axially deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, V. O.; Kartavenko, V. G.; Kleinig, W.; Kvasil, J.; Repko, A.; Jolos, R. V.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2016-03-01

    The lowest quadrupole γ -vibrational Kπ=2+ states in axially deformed rare-earth (Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Yb, Hf, W) and actinide (U) nuclei are systematically investigated within the separable random-phase-approximation (SRPA) based on the Skyrme functional. The energies Eγ and reduced transition probabilities B (E 2 ) of 2γ+ states are calculated with the Skyrme forces SV-bas and SkM*. The energies of two-quasiparticle configurations forming the SRPA basis are corrected by using the pairing blocking effect. This results in a systematic downshift of Eγ by 0.3-0.5 MeV and thus in a better agreement with the experiment, especially in Sm, Gd, Dy, Hf, and W regions. For other isotopic chains, a noticeable overestimation of Eγ and too weak collectivity of 2γ+ states still persist. It is shown that domains of nuclei with low and high 2γ+ collectivity are related to the structure of the lowest two-quasiparticle states and conservation of the Nilsson selection rules. The description of 2γ+ states with SV-bas and SkM* is similar in light rare-earth nuclei but deviates in heavier nuclei. However SV-bas much better reproduces the quadrupole deformation and energy of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance. The accuracy of SRPA is justified by comparison with exact RPA. The calculations suggest that a further development of the self-consistent calculation schemes is needed for a systematic satisfactory description of the 2γ+ states.

  6. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  7. Dynamics of magnetic bubbles in a Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, N.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of magnetic bubbles is studied within a strictly 2D model in which a Skyrme-like term is included to ensure stability. We calculate the profile of static bubbles with unit winding number and then examine two basic dynamical questions. First, we demonstrate that magnetic bubbles exhibit skew deflection in an applied magnetic-field gradient where the semi-empirical golden rule of bubble dynamics is verified in its gross features but not its finer details. Second, we show that two interacting magnetic bubbles with the same winding number orbit around each other while undergoing a mild Larmor precession.

  8. beta. -Decay in the Skyrme-Witten representation of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Snyderman, N.J.

    1991-05-01

    The renormalized coupling strength of the {beta}-decay axial vector current is related to {pi}{plus minus} p cross sections through the Adler-Weisberger sum rule, that follows from chiral symmetry. We attempt to understand the Adler-Weisberger sum rule in the 1/N{sub c} expansion in QCD, and in the Skyrme-Witten model that realizes the 1/N{sub c} expansion in the low energy limit, using it to explicitly calculate both g{sub A} and the {pi}{plus minus} p cross sections. 32 refs.

  9. Quantum mass shift of the soliton in the Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livne, Hillel

    1993-02-01

    The quantum mass shift of the soliton in the Skyrme model has been calculated from all nonzero modes. The calculations were carried out using a method applied earlier to the sine-Gordon model. The mass shifts do not depend on the baryonic spin, therefore they are the same for the nucleon and the Δ. Our model parameters are the pion decay constant Fπ, with its experimental value, and the pionic mass mπ, once in the chiral limit mπ=0 and also with the experimental value. We justify taking for the Skyrme parameter e the experimental value of gρππ, the mesonic ρ-pion coupling constant. The results depend on the vibrational energy. In this case an energy cutoff must be introduced. Using renormalization considerations as in the nonlinear σ model, we have chosen this cutoff to be eFπ=1136 MeV. Our results (for e=gρππ=6.11 and Fπ=186 MeV) are MN=996 MeV, MΔ=1593 MeV for mπ=0 MN=857 MeV, MΔ=1641 MeV for mπ=138 MeV. The spin dependence and the energy contribution of the coupling term between vibrations and rotations are being considered here only in a qualitative way.

  10. Rotational-vibrational coupling in the BPS Skyrme model of baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2013-11-01

    We calculate the rotational-vibrational spectrum in the BPS Skyrme model for the hedgehog skyrmion with baryon number one. The resulting excitation energies for the nucleon and delta Roper resonances are slightly above their experimental values. Together with the fact that in the standard Skyrme model these excitation energies are significantly lower than the experimental ones, this provides strong evidence for the conjecture that the inclusion of the BPS Skyrme model is required for a successful quantitative description of physical properties of baryons and nuclei.

  11. Solitons in Skyrme - Faddeev spinor model and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, Y.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the possibility of unification of Skyrme and Faddeev approaches for the description of baryons and leptons respectively as topological solitons within the scope of 16-spinor model. The motivation for such a unification is based on a special 8- semispinor identity invented by the Italian geometrician F. Brioschi. This remarkable identity permits one to realize baryon or lepton states through the effect of spontaneous symmetry breaking emerging due to special structure of the Higgs potential in the model. At large distances from the particle - soliton small excitation of the vacuum satisfies Klein - Gordon equation with some mass that permits one to establish the correspondence with quantum mechanics in special stochastic representation of the wave function for extended particles - solitons. Finally, we illustrate the peculiar properties of stochastic representation by the famous T. Young's experiment with n slits in soliton realization.

  12. Toroidal Superheavy Nuclei in Skyrme-Hartree-Fock Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2009-01-01

    Within the self-consistent constraint Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS model (SHF+BCS), we found equilibrium toroidal nuclear density distributions in the region of superheavy elements. For nuclei with a sufficient oblate deformation (Q_{20} < -200 b), it becomes energetically favorable to change the genus of nuclear surface from 0 to 1, i.e., to switch the shape from a biconcave disc to a torus. The energy of the toroidal (genus=1) SHF+BCS solution relative to the compact (genus=0) ground state energy is strongly dependent both on the atomic number Z and the mass number A. We discuss the region of Z and A where the toroidal SHF+BCS total energy begins to be a global minimum.

  13. Skyrme-Maxwell solitons in 2+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Gladikowski, J.; Piette, B.M.; Schroers, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    A gauged (2+1)-dimensional version of the Skyrme model is investigated. The gauge group is U(1) and the dynamics of the associated gauge potential is governed by a Maxwell term. In this model there are topologically stable soliton solutions carrying magnetic flux which is not topologically quantized. The properties of static, rotationally symmetric solitons of degree one and two are discussed in detail. It is shown that the electric field of such solutions is necessarily zero. The solitons{close_quote} shape, mass, and magnetic flux depend on the U(1) coupling constant, and this dependence is studied numerically from very weak to very strong coupling. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. Topological phase transitions in the gauged BPS baby Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Romanczukiewicz, T.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate that the gauged BPS baby Skyrme model with a double vacuum potential allows for phase transitions from a non-solitonic to a solitonic phase, where the latter corresponds to a ferromagnetic liquid. Such a transition can be generated by increasing the external pressure P or by turning on an external magnetic field H. As a consequence, the topological phase where gauged BPS baby skyrmions exist, is a higher density phase. For smaller densities, obtained for smaller values of P and H, a phase without solitons is reached. We find the critical line in the P, H parameter space. Furthermore, in the soliton phase, we find the equation of state for the baby skyrmion matter V = V( P,H) at zero temperature, where V is the "volume", i.e., area of the solitons.

  15. Collective nuclear excitations with Skyrme-second random-phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Gambacurta, D.; Catara, F.; Grasso, M.

    2010-05-15

    Second random-phase approximation (RPA) calculations with a Skyrme force are performed to describe both high- and low-lying excited states in {sup 16}O. The coupling between one particle-one hole and two particle-two hole as well as that between two particle-two hole configurations among themselves are fully taken into account, and the residual interaction is never neglected; we do not resort therefore to a generally used approximate scheme where only the first kind of coupling is considered. The issue of the rearrangement terms in the matrix elements beyond the standard RPA will be considered in detail in a forthcoming paper. Two approximations are employed here for these rearrangement terms: they are either neglected or evaluated with the RPA procedure. As a general feature of second RPA results, a several-MeV shift of the strength distribution to lower energies is systematically found with respect to RPA distributions. A much more important fragmentation of the strength is also naturally provided by the second RPA owing to the huge number of two particle-two hole configurations. A better description of the excitation energies of the low-lying 0{sup +} and 2{sup +} states is obtained with the second RPA than with the RPA.

  16. Second RPA calculations with the Skyrme and Gogny interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambacurta, Danilo; Grasso, Marcella

    2016-07-01

    The Second Random Phase Approximation (SRPA) is a natural extension of RPA where more general excitation operators are introduced. These operators contain, in addition to the one particle-one hole configurations already considered in RPA, also two particle-two hole excitations. Only in the last years, large-scale SRPA calculations have been performed, showing the merits and limits of this approach. In the first part of this paper, we present an overview of recent applications of the SRPA based on the Skyrme and Gogny interactions. Giant resonances in 16O will be studied and their properties discussed by using different models. In particular, we will present the first applications of the SRPA model with the finite-range Gogny interaction, discussing the advantages and drawbacks of using such an interaction in this type of calculations. After that, some more recent results, obtained by using a subtraction procedure to overcome double-counting in the SRPA, will be discussed. We will show that this procedure leads to results that are weakly cutoff dependent and that a strong reduction of the SRPA downwards shift with respect to the RPA spectra is found. Moreover, applying this procedure for the first time in the Gogny-SRPA framework, we will show that this method is able to reduce the anomalous shift found in previous calculations and related to some proton-neutron matrix elements of the residual interaction.

  17. Solitons and black holes in a generalized Skyrme model with dilaton-quarkonium field

    SciTech Connect

    Doneva, Daniela D.; Stefanov, Ivan Zh.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    2011-06-15

    Skyrme theory is among the viable effective theories which emerge from the low-energy limit of quantum chromodynamics. Many of its generalizations include also a dilaton. Here we find new self-gravitating solutions, both solitons and black holes, in a generalized Skyrme model in which a dilaton is present. The investigation of the properties of the solutions is done numerically. We find that the introduction of the dilaton in the theory does not change the picture qualitatively, only quantitatively. The model considered here has one free parameter more than the Einstein-Skyrme model which comes from the potential of the dilaton. We have applied also the turning point method to establish that one of the black-hole branches of solutions is unstable. The turning point method here is based on the first law of black-hole thermodynamics a detailed derivation of which is given in the Appendix of the paper.

  18. Towards the establishment of nonlinear hidden symmetries of the Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera-Aguilar, A.; Kanakoglou, K.; Paschalis, J. E.

    2006-09-25

    We present a preliminary attempt to establish the existence of hidden nonlinear symmetries of the SU(N) Skyrme model which could, in principle, lead to the further integration of the system. An explicit illustration is given for the SU(2) symmetry group.

  19. Symmetry energy from nuclear masses and neutron-star observations using generalised Skyrme functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamel, N.; Fantina, A. F.; Pearson, J. M.; Goriely, S.

    2016-01-01

    We study the constraints imposed by nuclear mass measurements and neutron-star observations on the symmetry energy. For this purpose, we use a family of unified equations of state of neutron-star interiors, based on generalised Skyrme functionals that were fitted to essentially all the experimental nuclear mass data while ensuring a realistic neutron-matter equation of state.

  20. Using 4th order Runge-Kutta method for solving a twisted Skyrme string equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Miftachul; Anderson, Malcolm; Husein, Andri

    2016-03-01

    We study numerical solution, especially using 4th order Runge-Kutta method, for solving a twisted Skyrme string equation. We find numerically that the value of minimum energy per unit length of vortex solution for a twisted Skyrmion string is 20.37 × 1060 eV/m.

  1. Fission barriers for neutron-rich nuclei by means of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Hashizume, K.; Wada, T.; Ohta, M.; Samyn, M.; Goriely, S.

    2007-02-26

    The nuclear fission barrier height has been estimated by means of the constraint Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method. The potential energy surfaces obtained by the method are analyzed with the flooding method to find several saddle points. The results for U, Np, Bk isotopes are compared with the barrier derived from the extended Thomas-Fermi plus Strutinsky integral method.

  2. Some properties of (3 + 1) dimensional vortex solutions in the extended CP N Skyrme-Faddeev model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. A.; Klimas, P.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2011-12-01

    We look at properties of vortex solutions of the extended CP N SkyrmeFaddeev model. We show that only holomorphic solutions of the CP N model are also solutions of the Skyrme-Faddeev model. As the total energy of these solutions is infinite these solutions should be interpreted as describing time dependent vortices. We describe their dynamics and, in partcular, point out that one of the terms in the energy density is related to the Noether charge of the model.

  3. Nuclear charge and neutron radii and nuclear matter: Trend analysis in Skyrme density-functional-theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Radii of charge and neutron distributions are fundamental nuclear properties. They depend on both nuclear interaction parameters related to the equation of state of infinite nuclear matter and on quantal shell effects, which are strongly impacted by the presence of nuclear surface. Purpose: In this work, by studying the correlation of charge and neutron radii, and neutron skin, with nuclear matter parameters, we assess different mechanisms that drive nuclear sizes. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory using a family of Skyrme functionals obtained by means of optimization protocols, which do not include any radius information. By performing the Monte Carlo sampling of reasonable functionals around the optimal parametrization, we scan all correlations between nuclear matter properties and observables characterizing charge and neutron distributions of spherical closed-shell nuclei 48Ca,208Pb, and 298Fl. Results: By considering the influence of various nuclear matter properties on charge and neutron radii in a multidimensional parameter space of Skyrme functionals, we demonstrate the existence of two strong relationships: (i) between the nuclear charge radii and the saturation density of symmetric nuclear matter ρ0, and (ii) between the neutron skins and the slope of the symmetry energy L . The impact of other nuclear matter properties on nuclear radii is weak or nonexistent. For functionals optimized to experimental binding energies only, proton and neutron radii are found to be weakly correlated due to canceling trends from different nuclear matter characteristics. Conclusion: The existence of only two strong relations connecting nuclear radii with nuclear matter properties has important consequences. First, by requiring that the nuclear functional reproduces the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter practically fixes the charge (or proton) radii, and vice versa. This explains the recent results of ab initio calculations

  4. Description of the dipole giant resonance in heavy and superheavy nuclei within Skyrme random-phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinig, W.; Nesterenko, V. O.; Kvasil, J.; Vesely, P.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2008-10-15

    The E1(T=1) isovector dipole giant resonance (GDR) in heavy and superheavy deformed nuclei is analyzed over a sample of 18 rare-earth nuclei, four actinides, and three chains of superheavy elements (Z=102, 114, and 120). The basis of the description is the self-consistent separable random-phase approximation (SRPA) using the Skyrme force SLy6. The model well reproduces the experimental data in the rare-earth and actinide regions. The trend of the resonance peak energies follows the estimates from collective models, showing a bias to the volume mode for the rare-earth isotopes and a mix of volume and surface modes for actinides and superheavy elements. The widths of the GDR are mainly determined by the Landau fragmentation, which in turn is found to be strongly influenced by deformation. A deformation splitting of the GDR can contribute to about one-third of the width, and about 1 MeV further broadening can be associated with mechanisms beyond the SRPA description (e.g., escape widths and coupling with complex configurations)

  5. Fermionic Quantization and Configuration Spaces for the Skyrme and Faddeev-Hopf Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auckly, Dave; Speight, Martin

    2006-04-01

    The fundamental group and rational cohomology of the configuration spaces of the Skyrme and Faddeev-Hopf models are computed. Physical space is taken to be a compact oriented 3-manifold, either with or without a marked point representing an end at infinity. For the Skyrme model, the codomain is any Lie group, while for the Faddeev-Hopf model it is S 2. It is determined when the topology of configuration space permits fermionic and isospinorial quantization of the solitons of the model within generalizations of the frameworks of Finkelstein-Rubinstein and Sorkin. Fermionic quantization of Skyrmions is possible only if the target group contains a symplectic or special unitary factor, while fermionic quantization of Hopfions is always possible. Geometric interpretations of the results are given.

  6. Solitons in a baby-Skyrme model with invariance under area-preserving diffeomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisiger, T.; Paranjape, M. B.

    1997-06-01

    We study the properties of soliton solutions in an analogue of the Skyrme model in 2+1 dimensions whose Lagrangian contains the Skyrme term and the mass term, but no usual kinetic term. The model admits a symmetry under area-preserving diffeomorphisms. We solve the dynamical equations of motion analytically for the case of spinning isolated baryon-type solitons. We take fully into account the induced deformation of the spinning Skyrmions and the consequent modification of its moment of inertia to give an analytical example of related numerical behavior found by Piette, Schroers, and Zakrzewski. We solve the equations of motion also for the case of an infinite, open string, and a closed annular string. In each case, the solitons are of finite extent, so called ``compactons,'' being exactly the vacuum outside a compact region. We end with indications on the scattering of baby Skyrmions, as well as some considerations as the properties of solitons on a curved space.

  7. ``Half a proton'' in the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukács, Árpád

    2016-07-01

    The BPS Skyrme model is a model containing an SU(2)-valued scalar field, in which a Bogomol'nyi-type inequality can be satisfied by soliton solutions (skyrmions). In this model, the energy density of static configurations is the sum of the square of the topological charge density plus a potential. The topological charge density is nothing else but the pull-back of the Haar measure of the group SU(2) on the physical space by the field configuration. As a consequence, this energy expression has a high degree of symmetry: it is invariant to volume preserving diffeomorphisms both on physical space and on the target space. We demonstrate here that in the BPS Skyrme model such solutions exist that a fraction of its charge and energy densities is localised, and the remaining part can be far away, not interacting with the localised part.

  8. Stochastic approach to correlations beyond the mean field with the Skyrme interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Y.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Funaki, Y.; Yabana, K.

    2012-10-01

    Large-scale calculation based on the multi-configuration Skyrme density functional theory is performed for the light N = Z even-even nucleus, 12C. Stochastic procedures and the imaginary-time evolution are utilized to prepare many Slater determinants. Each state is projected on eigenstates of parity and angular momentum. Then, performing the configuration mixing calculation with the Skyrme Hamiltonian, we obtain low-lying energy-eigenstates and their explicit wave functions. The generated wave functions are completely free from any assumption and symmetry restriction. Excitation spectra and transition probabilities are well reproduced, not only for the ground-state band, but for negative-parity excited states and the Hoyle state.

  9. Self-consistent theory of finite Fermi systems vs Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method. Spherical nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saperstein, E. E.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Recent results of the Fayans energy density functional (EDF) for spherical nuclei are reviewed. A comparison is made with predictions of several Skyrme EDFs. The charge radii and characteristics of the first 2+ excitations in semi-magic nuclei are briefly discussed. The single-particle spectra of doubly magic nuclei are considered in more detail. The phonon-particle coupling effects are analyzed including the tadpole term.

  10. E2/M1 ratio of the N to Delta transition in a modified Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Anthony Randolph

    1997-08-01

    I use a chiral effective Lagrangian to find the E2/M1 ratio. This ratio is a measure of the deformation of the nucleon. The Lagrangian is a modified Skyrme model (1). Its construction is guided by chiral symmetry and the symmetries of QCD, which dictates the addition of the Wess-Zumino term. The current is quantized using collective coordinates (2). I find the ratio to be - .118%, which is smaller than most other models.

  11. Exact results in the Skyrme model in (3+1) dimensions via the generalized hedgehog ansatz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfora, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    We present exact results in the (3 + 1) -dimensional Skyrme model. First of all, it will be shown that, in the Pionic sector, a quite remarkable phenomenon for a non-integrable (3 + 1) -dimensional field theory appears: a non-linear superposition law is available allowing the composition of solutions in order to generate new solutions of the full field equations keeping alive, at the same time, the interactions terms in the energy-density. Secondly, it will be shown that the generalized hedgehog ansatz can be extended to suitable curved backgrounds. Interestingly, one can choose the background metric in such a way to describe finite-volume effects and, at the same time, to simplify the Skyrme field equations. In this way, it is possible to construct the first exact multi-Skyrmionic configurations of the (3 + 1) -dimensional Skyrme model with arbitrary high winding number and living at finite volume. Last but not least, a novel BPS bound (which is sharper than the usual one in term of the winding number) will be derived which can be saturated and reduces the field equations to a first-order equation for the profile.

  12. Further explorations of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mass formulas. XVI. Inclusion of self-energy effects in pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goriely, S.; Chamel, N.; Pearson, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    Extending our earlier work, a new family of three Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass models, labeled HFB-30, HFB-31, and HFB-32, is presented, along with their underlying interactions, BSk30, BSk31, and BSk32, respectively. The principle new feature is a purely phenomenological pairing term that depends on the density gradient. This enables us to have a bulk pairing term that is fitted to realistic nuclear-matter calculations in which for the first time the self-energy corrections are included, while the behavior of the nucleon effective masses in asymmetric homogeneous nuclear matter is significantly improved. Furthermore, in the particle-hole channel all the highly realistic constraints of our earlier work are retained. In particular, the unconventional Skyrme forces containing t4 and t5 terms are still constrained to fit realistic equations of state of neutron matter stiff enough to support the massive neutron stars PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0348+0432. All unphysical long-wavelength spin and spin-isospin instabilities of nuclear matter, including the unphysical transition to a polarized state in neutron-star matter, are eliminated. Our three interactions are characterized by values of the symmetry coefficient J of 30, 31, and 32 MeV, respectively. The best fit to the database of 2353 nuclear masses is found for model HFB-31 (J =31 MeV ) with a model error of 0.561 MeV. This model also fits the charge-radius data with an root-mean-square error of 0.027 fm.

  13. Solitons in a baby-Skyrme model with invariance under area-preserving diffeomorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gisiger, T.; Paranjape, M.B.

    1997-06-01

    We study the properties of soliton solutions in an analogue of the Skyrme model in 2+1 dimensions whose Lagrangian contains the Skyrme term and the mass term, but no usual kinetic term. The model admits a symmetry under area-preserving diffeomorphisms. We solve the dynamical equations of motion analytically for the case of spinning isolated baryon-type solitons. We take fully into account the induced deformation of the spinning Skyrmions and the consequent modification of its moment of inertia to give an analytical example of related numerical behavior found by Piette, Schroers, and Zakrzewski. We solve the equations of motion also for the case of an infinite, open string, and a closed annular string. In each case, the solitons are of finite extent, so called {open_quotes}compactons,{close_quotes} being exactly the vacuum outside a compact region. We end with indications on the scattering of baby Skyrmions, as well as some considerations as the properties of solitons on a curved space. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Axially deformed solution of the Skyrme Hartree Fock Bogolyubov equations using the transformed harmonic oscillator basis. The program HFBTHO (v1.66p)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoitsov, M. V.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Ring, P.

    2005-04-01

    We describe the program HFBTHO for axially deformed configurational Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov calculations with Skyrme-forces and zero-range pairing interaction using Harmonic-Oscillator and/or Transformed Harmonic-Oscillator states. The particle-number symmetry is approximately restored using the Lipkin-Nogami prescription, followed by an exact particle number projection after the variation. The program can be used in a variety of applications, including systematic studies of wide ranges of nuclei, both spherical and axially deformed, extending all the way out to nucleon drip lines. Program summaryTitle of the program: HFBTHO (v1.66p) Catalogue number: ADUI Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUI Licensing provisions: none Computers on which the program has been tested: Pentium-III, Pentium-IV, AMD-Athlon, IBM Power 3, IBM Power 4, Intel Xeon Operating systems: LINUX, Windows Programming language used: FORTRAN-95 Memory required to execute with typical data: 59 MB when using N=20 No. of bits in a word: 64 No. of processors used: 1 Has the code been vectorized?: No No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 195 285 No. of lines in distributed program: 12 058 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of physical problem: The solution of self-consistent mean-field equations for weakly bound paired nuclei requires a correct description of the asymptotic properties of nuclear quasiparticle wave functions. In the present implementation, this is achieved by using the single-particle wave functions of the Transformed Harmonic Oscillator, which allows for an accurate description of deformation effects and pairing correlations in nuclei arbitrarily close to the particle drip lines. Method of solution: The program uses the axially Transformed Harmonic Oscillator (THO) single-particle basis to expand quasiparticle wave functions. It iteratively diagonalizes

  15. Pion-nucleon scattering in the Skyrme model and the P-wave Born amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, A.; Saito, S.; Uehara, M.

    1991-03-01

    We treat fluctuating pion fields around a rotating Skyrmion by means of Dirac's quantization method. The rotational collective motion of the Skyrmion is described by collective coordinates, and conventional gauge-fixing conditions are imposed. Taking into account all the relevant terms at the tree level appearing in the Hamiltonian, we show that pion-nucleon scattering amplitudes exhibit the P-wave Born amplitudes attributed to the Yukawa coupling of order √Nc , which is consistent with the prediction of chiral symmetry such as the Adler-Weisberger relation. This resolves the difficulty that the Skyrme model predicts a wrong Nc dependence for the coupling of order N-3/2c.

  16. Kaon-Nucleon systems and their interactions in the Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezoe, Takashi; Hosaka, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    We study kaon-nucleon systems in the Skyrme model in a method based on the bound state approach of Callan-Klebanov but with the kaon around the physical nucleon of the rotating hedgehog. This corresponds to the variation after projection, reversing the order of semiclassical quantization of 1 /Nc expansion. The method, however, is considered to be suited to the study of weakly interacting kaon-nucleon systems including loosely K ¯N bound states such as Λ (1405 ). We have found a bound state with binding energy of order 10 MeV, consistent with the observed state. We also discuss the K ¯N interaction and find that it consists of an attraction in the middle range and a repulsion in the short range.

  17. The Analytical Parametrization of Fusion Barrier by Using the Skyrme Energy-Density Function Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanganeh, V.; Mirzaei, M.; N., Wang

    2015-08-01

    Using the skyrme energy density formalism, a pocket formula is introduced for barrier heights and positions of 95 fusion reactions (48 ≤ ZP ZT ≤ 1520) with respect to the charge and mass numbers of the interacting nuclei. It is shown that the parameterized values of RB and VB are able to reproduce the corresponding experimental data with good accuracy. Moreover, the absolute errors of our formulas are less than those obtained using the analytical parametrization forms of the fusion barrier based on the proximity versions. The ability of the parameterized forms of the barrier heights and its positions to reproduce the experimental data of the fusion cross section have been analyzed using the Wong model.

  18. Multidimensional Skyrme-density-functional study of the spontaneous fission of 238U

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sadhukhan, J.; Mazurek, K.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2015-01-01

    We determined the spontaneous fission lifetime of 238U by a minimization of the action integral in a three-dimensional space of collective variables. Apart from the mass-distribution multipole moments Q20 (elongation) and Q30 (left–right asymmetry), we also considered the pairing-fluctuation parameter λ2 as a collective coordinate. The collective potential was obtained self-consistently using the Skyrme energy density functional SkM*. The inertia tensor was obtained within the nonperturbative cranking approximation to the adiabatic time-dependent Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov approach. As a result, the pairing-fluctuation parameter λ2 allowed us to control the pairing gap along the fission path, which significantly changed the spontaneous fission lifetime.

  19. Multidimensional Skyrme-density-functional study of the spontaneous fission of 238U

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, J.; Mazurek, K.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2015-01-01

    We determined the spontaneous fission lifetime of 238U by a minimization of the action integral in a three-dimensional space of collective variables. Apart from the mass-distribution multipole moments Q20 (elongation) and Q30 (left–right asymmetry), we also considered the pairing-fluctuation parameter λ2 as a collective coordinate. The collective potential was obtained self-consistently using the Skyrme energy density functional SkM*. The inertia tensor was obtained within the nonperturbative cranking approximation to the adiabatic time-dependent Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov approach. As a result, the pairing-fluctuation parameter λ2 allowed us to control the pairing gap along the fission path, which significantly changed the spontaneous fission lifetime.

  20. Systematics of the First 2{sup +} Excitation in Spherical Nuclei with Skyrme-QRPA

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, J.

    2009-05-07

    We use the Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA) and the Skyrme interactions SLy4 and SkM* to systematically calculate energies and transition strengths for the lowest 2{sup +} state in spherical even-even nuclei. The SkM* functional, applied to 178 spherical nuclei between Z = 10 and 90, produces excitation energies that are on average 11% higher than experimental values, with residuals that fluctuate about the average by -35%+55%. The predictions of SkM* and SLy4 have significant differences, in part because of differences in the calculated ground state deformations; SkM* performs better in both the average and dispersion of energies. Comparing the QRPA results with those of generator-coordinate-method (GCM) calculations, we find that the QRPA reproduces trends near closed shells better than the GCM, and overpredicts the energies less severely in general.

  1. Fractional vortex molecules and vortex polygons in a baby Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Michikazu; Nitta, Muneto

    2013-06-01

    We construct a molecule of fractional vortices with fractional topological lump charges as a baby Skyrmion with the unit topological lump charge in the antiferromagnetic (or XY) baby Skyrme model, that is, an O(3) sigma model with a four-derivative term and an antiferromagnetic or XY-type potential term quadratic in fields. We further construct configurations with topological lump charges Q≤7 and find that bound states of vortex molecules constitute regular polygons with 2Q vertices as vortices, where the rotational symmetry SO(2) in real space is spontaneously broken into a discrete subgroup ZQ. We also find metastable and arrayed bound states of fractional vortices for Q=5, 6. On the other hand, we find for Q=7 that the regular polygon is metastable and the arrayed bound state is stable. We calculate binding energies of all configurations.

  2. On the theory of phase transitions in dense neutron matter with generalized Skyrme interactions and anisotropic spin-triplet p-wave pairing in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, A. N.

    2014-03-01

    In the framework of the generalized non-relativistic Fermi-liquid approach we study phase transitions in spatially uniform dense pure neutron matter from normal to superfluid states with a spin-triplet p-wave pairing (similar to anisotropic superfluid phases 3He-A1 and 3He-A2) in a steady and homogeneous strong magnetic field H (but |\\mu_{\\text{n}}| H\\ll E_{\\text{c}}<\\varepsilon_{\\text{F}}(n) , where \\mu_{\\text{n}} is the magnetic dipole moment of a neutron, E_{\\text{c}} is the cutoff energy and \\varepsilon_{\\text{F}}(n) is the Fermi energy in neutron matter with density of particles n). The previously derived general formulas (valid for the arbitrary parametrization of the effective Skyrme interaction in neutron matter) for phase transition (PT) temperatures T_{\\text{c}1,2}(n,H) (which are nonlinear functions of the density n and linear functions of the magnetic field H) are specified here for new generalized BSk20 and BSk21 parameterizations of the Skyrme forces (with additional terms dependent on the density n) in the interval 0.1\\cdot n_{0} < n<3.0\\cdot n_{0} , where n_{0}=0.17\\ \\text{fm}^{-3} is the nuclear density. Our main results are mathematical expressions and figures for PT temperatures in the absence of magnetic field, T_{\\text{c0,BSk20}}(n)< 0.17\\ \\text{MeV} and T_{\\text{c0,BSk21}}(n)< 0.064\\ \\text{MeV} (at E_{\\text{c}}=10\\ \\text{MeV} ), and T_{\\text{c1,2}}(n,H) in strong magnetic fields (which may approach to 10^{17}\\ \\text{G} or even more as in the liquid outer core of magnetars —strongly magnetized neutron stars). These are realistic non-monotone functions with a bell-shaped density profile.

  3. Skyrme functional from a three-body pseudopotential of second order in gradients: Formalism for central terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoudi, J.; Duguet, T.; Meyer, J.; Bender, M.

    2013-12-01

    Background: In one way or another, all modern parametrizations of the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) do not respect the exchange symmetry associated with Pauli's principle. It has been recently shown that this practice jeopardizes multireference (MR) EDF calculations by contaminating the energy with spurious self-interactions that, for example, lead to finite steps or even divergences when plotting it as a function of collective coordinates [J. Dobaczewski , Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.76.054315 76, 054315 (2007); D. Lacroix , Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.79.044318 79, 044318 (2009)]. As of today, the only viable option to bypass these pathologies is to rely on EDF kernels that enforce Pauli's principle from the outset by strictly and exactly deriving from a genuine, i.e., density-independent, Hamilton operator.Purpose: The objective is to build cutting-edge parametrizations of the EDF kernel deriving from a pseudopotential that can be safely employed in symmetry restoration and configuration mixing calculations.Methods: We wish to develop the most general Skyrme-like EDF parametrization containing linear, bilinear, and trilinear terms in the density matrices with up to two gradients, under the key constraint that it derives strictly from an effective Hamilton operator. While linear and bilinear terms are obtained from a standard one-body kinetic energy operator and a (density-independent) two-body Skyrme pseudopotential, the most general three-body Skyrme-like pseudopotential containing up to two gradient operators is constructed to generate the trilinear part. The present study is limited to central terms. Spin orbit and tensor will be addressed in a forthcoming paper.Results: The most general central Skyrme-type zero-range three-body interaction is built up to second order in derivatives. The complete trilinear EDF, including time-odd and T=1 pairing parts, is derived along with the corresponding normal and anomalous

  4. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Cao, Li-Gang; Sagawa, H.

    2015-10-15

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in {sup 208}Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31−33 MeV and 75−95 MeV, respectively.

  5. Search for the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock solutions for chiral rotation in N=75 isotones

    SciTech Connect

    Olbratowski, P.; Dobaczewski, J.; Dudek, J.

    2006-05-15

    A search for self-consistent solutions for the chiral rotational bands in the N=75 isotones {sup 130}Cs, {sup 132}La, {sup 134}Pr, and {sup 136}Pm is performed within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock cranking approach using SKM* and SLy4 parametrizations. The dependence of the solutions on the time-odd contributions in the energy functional is studied. From among the four isotones considered, self-consistent chiral solutions are obtained only in {sup 132}La. The microscopic calculations are compared with the {sup 132}La experimental data and with results of a classical model that contains all the mechanisms underlying the chirality of the collective rotational motion. Strong similarities between the Hartree-Fock and classical model results are found. The suggestion formulated earlier by the authors that the chiral rotation cannot exist below a certain critical frequency is further illustrated and discussed, together with the microscopic origin of a transition from planar to chiral rotation in nuclei. We also formulate the separability rule by which the tilted-axis-cranking solutions can be inferred from three independent principal-axis-cranking solutions corresponding to three different axes of rotation.

  6. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Cao, Li-Gang; Sagawa, H.

    2015-10-01

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in 208Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31-33 MeV and 75-95 MeV, respectively.

  7. Deformation and cluster structures in 12C studied with configuration mixing using Skyrme interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Y.; Shinohara, S.; Funaki, Y.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Yabana, K.

    2013-07-01

    We report an investigation of the structure of the 12C nucleus employing a newly developed configuration-mixing method. In the three-dimensional coordinate-space representation, we generate a number of Slater determinants with various correlated structures using the imaginary-time algorithm. We then diagonalize a many-body Hamiltonian with the Skyrme interaction in the space spanned by the Slater determinants with parity and angular momentum projections. Our calculation reasonably describes the ground and excited states of the 12C nucleus, both for shell-model-like and cluster-like states. The excitation energies and transition strengths of the ground-state rotational band are well reproduced. Negative-parity excited states, 11-, 21-, and 31-, are also reasonably described. The second and third 0+ states, 02+ and 03+, appear at around 8.8 and 15 MeV, respectively. The 02+ state shows a structure consistent with former results of the α-cluster models. However, the calculated radius of the 02+ state is smaller than in those calculations. The three-α linear-chain configuration dominates in the 03+ state.

  8. Solution of the Skyrme HF + BCS equation on a 3D mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonche, P.; Flocard, H.; Heenen, P. H.

    2005-09-01

    Over the years, the ev8 code has been a very useful tool for the study of nuclear mean-field theory. Its main characteristic is that it solves the Hartree-Fock plus BCS equations for Skyrme type functionals via a discretization of the individual wave-functions on a three-dimensional Cartesian mesh. This allows maximal flexibility in the determination of the nuclear shape by the variational process. For instance, the same mesh can be used to describe the oblate deformed, spherical, prolate deformed, superdeformed and fission configurations of a given nucleus. The quadrupole constraining operator yielding the deformation energy curve covering all these configurations is included in ev8. This version of the code is restricted to even-even nuclei. Program summaryTitle of program:ev8 Catalogue identifier:ADWA Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWA Licensing provisions: none Computers on which the program has been tested: HP-RX4640, Compaq-Digital Alpha GS140, has run on several other platforms Computer for which the program is designed and others on which is has been tested:Unix, Linux Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested:FORTRAN-90 Programming language used:depends on problem; example given requires 60 MB Memory required to execute with typical data:yes No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:11 524 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:89 949 Distribution format:tar.gzip file Nature of the physical problem:By means of the Hartree-Fock plus BCS method using Skyrme type functionals, ev8 allows a study of the evolution of the binding energy of even-even nuclei for various shapes determined by the most general quadrupole constraint. Solution method:The program expands the single-particle wave-functions on a 3D Cartesian mesh. The nonlinear mean-field equations are solved by the

  9. Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals. II. Finite temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Duke, D.; Carr, H.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of induced nuclear fission for a broad range of neutron energies could help resolve fundamental science issues, such as the formation of elements in the universe, but could have also a large impact on societal applications in energy production or nuclear waste management. The goal of this paper is to set up the foundations of a microscopic theory to study the static aspects of induced fission as a function of the excitation energy of the incident neutron, from thermal to fast neutrons. To account for the high excitation energy of the compound nucleus, we employ a statistical approach based on finite temperature nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities, which we benchmark on the 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction. We compute the evolution of the least-energy fission pathway across multidimensional potential energy surfaces with up to five collective variables as a function of the nuclear temperature and predict the evolution of both the inner and the outer fission barriers as a function of the excitation energy of the compound nucleus. We show that the coupling to the continuum induced by the finite temperature is negligible in the range of neutron energies relevant for many applications of neutron-induced fission. We prove that the concept of quantum localization introduced recently can be extended to T >0 , and we apply the method to study the interaction energy and total kinetic energy of fission fragments as a function of the temperature for the most probable fission. While large uncertainties in theoretical modeling remain, we conclude that a finite temperature nuclear density functional may provide a useful framework to obtain accurate predictions of fission fragment properties.

  10. Applications of Skyrme energy-density functional to fusion reactions for synthesis of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ning; Scheid, Werner; Wu Xizhen; Liu Min; Li Zhuxia

    2006-10-15

    The Skyrme energy-density functional approach has been extended to study massive heavy-ion fusion reactions. Based on the potential barrier obtained and the parametrized barrier distribution the fusion (capture) excitation functions of a lot of heavy-ion fusion reactions are studied systematically. The average deviations of fusion cross sections at energies near and above the barriers from experimental data are less than 0.05 for 92% of 76 fusion reactions with Z{sub 1}Z{sub 2}<1200. For the massive fusion reactions, for example, the {sup 238}U-induced reactions and {sup 48}Ca+{sup 208}Pb, the capture excitation functions have been reproduced remarkably well. The influence of structure effects in the reaction partners on the capture cross sections is studied with our parametrized barrier distribution. By comparing the reactions induced by double-magic nucleus {sup 48}Ca and by {sup 32}S and {sup 35}Cl, the ''threshold-like'' behavior in the capture excitation function for {sup 48}Ca-induced reactions is explored and an optimal balance between the capture cross section and the excitation energy of the compound nucleus is studied. Finally, the fusion reactions with {sup 36}S, {sup 37}Cl, {sup 48}Ca, and {sup 50}Ti bombarding {sup 248}Cm, {sup 247,249}Bk, {sup 250,252,254}Cf, and {sup 252,254}Es, as well as the reactions leading to the same compound nucleus with Z=120 and N=182, are studied further. The calculation results for these reactions are useful for searching for the optimal fusion configuration and suitable incident energy in the synthesis of superheavy nuclei.

  11. Effect of particle-vibration coupling on single-particle states: A consistent study within the Skyrme framework

    SciTech Connect

    Colo, Gianluca; Bortignon, Pier Francesco; Sagawa, Hiroyuki

    2010-12-15

    We discuss calculations of the single-particle states in magic nuclei, performed within the particle-vibration coupling (PVC) approach by using consistently the Skyrme effective interaction. The vibrations are calculated within fully self-consistent random-phase approximation and the whole interaction is also used in the PVC vertex. Our main emphasis is therefore the discussion of our results in comparison with those in which some approximation is made. The perspectives for improving current density functional theory (DFT) calculations are also addressed.

  12. Exact Coulomb exchange calculations in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-BCS framework and tests of the Slater approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bloas, J.; Quentin, P.; Bonneau, L.; Ithnin, J. I. A.

    2011-07-15

    An exact treatment of the Coulomb interaction is performed within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock/Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer approach for even-even nuclei ranging from light to superheavy nuclei. A test of the usual Slater approximation for the exchange part is carried out. The error made on the exchange term of the Coulomb interaction when using this approximation follows two schematic patterns. Beyond a decreasing behavior when increasing the mass number A, a more important structural effect has been found. The relative error ranges roughly from 0 to 8% being maximal for light closed proton (sub-)shell nuclei and minimal for open proton (sub-)shell nuclei.

  13. Properties of nuclei in the nobelium region studied within the covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Dobaczewski, J.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Bender, M.; Shi, Yue

    2015-07-29

    In this study, we calculate properties of the ground and excited states of nuclei in the nobelium region for proton and neutron numbers of 92 ≤ Z ≤ 104 and 144 ≤ N ≤ 156, respectively. We use three different energy-density-functional (EDF) approaches, based on covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny functionals, each with two different parameter sets. A comparative analysis of the results obtained for quasiparticle spectra, odd–even and two-particle mass staggering, and moments of inertia allows us to identify single-particle and shell effects that are characteristic to these different models and to illustrate possible systematic uncertainties related to using the EDF modelling.

  14. Systematics of the first 2{sup +} excitation in spherical nuclei with the Skyrme quasiparticle random-phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, J.; Engel, J.; Bertsch, G. F.

    2008-10-15

    We use the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) and the Skyrme interactions SLy4 and SkM* to systematically calculate energies and transition strengths for the lowest 2{sup +} state in spherical even-even nuclei. The SkM* functional, applied to 178 spherical nuclei between Z=10 and 90, produces excitation energies that are on average 11% higher than experimental values, with residuals that fluctuate about the average by -35% to +55%. The predictions of SkM* and SLy4 have significant differences, in part because of differences in the calculated ground state deformations; SkM* performs better in both the average and dispersion of energies. Comparing the QRPA results with those of generator-coordinate-method (GCM) calculations, we find that the QRPA reproduces trends near closed shells better than the GCM, and that it overpredicts the energies less severely in general.

  15. Properties of nuclei in the nobelium region studied within the covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny energy density functionals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dobaczewski, J.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Bender, M.; Robledo, L. M.; Shi, Yue

    2015-07-29

    In this study, we calculate properties of the ground and excited states of nuclei in the nobelium region for proton and neutron numbers of 92 ≤ Z ≤ 104 and 144 ≤ N ≤ 156, respectively. We use three different energy-density-functional (EDF) approaches, based on covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny functionals, each with two different parameter sets. A comparative analysis of the results obtained for quasiparticle spectra, odd–even and two-particle mass staggering, and moments of inertia allows us to identify single-particle and shell effects that are characteristic to these different models and to illustrate possible systematic uncertainties related to using themore » EDF modelling.« less

  16. Neutron stars in the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Skyrme model: Mean-field limit versus full field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Vazquez, R.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2015-08-01

    Using a solitonic model of nuclear matter, the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) Skyrme model, we compare neutron stars obtained in the full field theory, where gravitational backreaction is completely taken into account, with calculations in a mean-field approximation using the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff approach. In the latter case, a mean-field-theory equation of state is derived from the original BPS field theory. We show that in the full field theory, where the energy density is nonconstant even at equilibrium, there is no universal and coordinate-independent equation of state of nuclear matter, in contrast to the mean-field approximation. We also study how neutron star properties are modified by going beyond mean-field theory and find that the differences between mean-field theory and exact results can be considerable. Further, we compare both exact and mean-field results with some theoretical and phenomenological constraints on neutron star properties, demonstrating thus the relevance of our model even in its most simple version.

  17. Collective coordinate quantization and spin statistics of the solitons in the C PN Skyrme-Faddeev model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, Yuki; Klimas, Paweł; Sawado, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-01

    The C PN extended Skyrme-Faddeev model possesses planar soliton solutions. We consider quantum aspects of the solutions applying collective coordinate quantization in regime of rigid body approximation. In order to discuss statistical properties of the solutions we include an Abelian Chern-Simons term (the Hopf term) in the Lagrangian. Since Π3(C P1)=Z then for N =1 the term becomes an integer. On the other hand for N >1 it became perturbative because Π3(C PN) is trivial. The prefactor of the Hopf term (anyon angle) Θ is not quantized and its value depends on the physical system. The corresponding fermionic models can fix value of the angle Θ for all N in a way that the soliton with N =1 is not an anyon type whereas for N >1 it is always an anyon even for Θ =n π , n ∈Z . We quantize the solutions and calculate several mass spectra for N =2 . Finally we discuss generalization for N ≧3 .

  18. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. (IV) HFODD (v2.08i): a new version of the program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Olbratowski, P.

    2004-04-01

    multipole, and magnetic moments in the principal-axes (intrinsic) reference frame has been added. Calculation of angular momenta in the center-of-mass and principal-axes reference frames has been added. New single-particle observables for a diabatic blocking have been added. Solution of the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations has been implemented. Non-standard spin-orbit energy density has been implemented. Non-standard center-of-mass corrections have been implemented. Definition of the time-odd terms through the Landau parameters has been implemented. Definition of Skyrme forces taken from the literature now includes the force parameters as well as the value of the nucleon mass and the treatment of tensor, spin-orbit, and center-of-mass terms specific to the given force. Interface to the LAPACK subroutine ZHPEVX has been implemented. Computer memory management has been improved by implementing the memory-allocation features available within FORTRAN-90. Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The main restriction is the CPU time required for calculations of heavy deformed nuclei and for a given precision required. Pairing correlations are only included for even-even nuclei and conserved simplex symmetry. Typical running time: One Hartree-Fock iteration for the superdeformed, rotating, parity conserving state of 15266Dy 86 takes about six seconds on the AMD-Athlon 1600+ processor. Starting from the Woods-Saxon wave functions, about fifty iterations are required to obtain the energy converged within the precision of about 0.1 keV. In case when every value of the angular velocity is converged separately, the complete superdeformed band with precisely determined dynamical moments J(2) can be obtained within forty minutes of CPU on the AMD-Athlon 1600+ processor. This time can be often reduced by a factor of three when a self-consistent solution for a given rotational frequency is used as a starting point for a neighboring rotational frequency. Unusual features of the

  19. Effect of a tensor force on the proton bubble structure of 206Hg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Z.; Hou, Z. Y.; Zhang, Q. L.; Tian, R. L.; Gu, J. Z.

    2015-01-01

    The proton density distribution of 206Hg is calculated in the framework of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach with the SLy5, SLy5 + T, and SLy5 + Tw interactions. It is shown that the central density drops strongly with the SLy5 and SLy5 + T interactions due to the vacancy of the 3 s1 /2 orbital. This means that the density depression in the interior of the nucleus is not so much influenced by the tensor force of the SLy5 + T interaction. However, with the SLy5 + Tw interaction the bubble structure does not exist because the tensor force effect of this interaction leads to the inversion between the single-proton states 3 s1 /2 and 1 h11 /2 (3 s1 /2-1 h11 /2 inversion) so that the 3 s1 /2 state is fully occupied by protons. In addition, a detailed discussion on the antibubble effect from the pairing interaction is performed by using the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach. It is found that a proton bubble structure in 206Hg is unlikely to appear because of the paring correlation.

  20. Nuclear forces

    SciTech Connect

    Machleidt, R.

    2013-06-10

    These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach, in which the forces between nucleons emerge from low-energy QCD via chiral effective field theory.

  1. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  2. Effects of the tensor force on the multipole response in finite nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Ligang; Colo, G.; Sagawa, H.; Bortignon, P. F.; Sciacchitano, L.

    2009-12-15

    We present a thorough analysis of the effects of tensor interaction on the multipole response of magic nuclei, using the fully self-consistent random phase approximation model with Skyrme interactions. We disentangle the modifications to the static mean field induced by the tensor terms, and the specific features of the residual particle-hole (p-h) tensor interaction, for quadrupole (2{sup +}), octupole (3{sup -}), and also magnetic dipole (1{sup +}) responses. It is pointed out that the tensor force has a larger effect on the magnetic dipole states than on the natural parity states 2{sup +} and 3{sup -}, especially at the mean-field level. Perspectives for a better assessment of the tensor force parameters are discussed.

  3. One Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald R.

    2002-04-01

    There is only one entity that can extend force and couple through space; and it should be apparent that Electromagnetism is that entity. In the cases of the nuclear strong force and the nuclear weak force, this is the same fundamental Electromagnetism manifesting itself in two different ways in the nucleus. It remains the same basic Electromagnetism. On the other hand, General Relativity fails to produce force at a distance, fails the Cavendish experiment, and does not allow an apple to fall to the ground. The result shows there is only Electromagnetism that functions through physical nature providing gravity, actions in the nucleus, as well as all other physical actions universally, including Gravity and Gravitation. There are many direct proofs of this, the same proofs as in NUCLEAR QUANTUM GRAVITATION. In contrast, General Relativity plainly relies on fallacy abstract and incoherent proofs; proofs which have now been mostly disproved. In the past it was deemed necessary by some to have an "ether" to propagate Electromagnetic waves. The fallacy concept of time space needs "space distortions" in order to cause gravity. However, Electromagnetic gravity does not have this problem. Clearly there is only ONE FORCE that causes Gravity, Electromagnetism, the Nuclear Strong Force, and the Nuclear Weak Force, and that ONE FORCE is Electromagnetism.

  4. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  5. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  6. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  7. Vacuum force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongquan

    2015-03-01

    To study on vacuum force, we must clear what is vacuum, vacuum is a space do not have any air and also ray. There is not exist an absolute the vacuum of space. The vacuum of space is relative, so that the vacuum force is relative. There is a certain that vacuum vacuum space exists. In fact, the vacuum space is relative, if the two spaces compared to the existence of relative vacuum, there must exist a vacuum force, and the direction of the vacuum force point to the vacuum region. Any object rotates and radiates. Rotate bend radiate- centripetal, gravity produced, relative gravity; non gravity is the vacuum force. Gravity is centripetal, is a trend that the objects who attracted wants to Centripetal, or have been do Centripetal movement. Any object moves, so gravity makes the object curve movement, that is to say, the radiation range curve movement must be in the gravitational objects, gravity must be existed in non vacuum region, and make the object who is in the region of do curve movement (for example: The earth moves around the sun), or final attracted in the form gravitational objects, and keep relatively static with attract object. (for example: objects on the earth moves but can't reach the first cosmic speed).

  8. The swim force as a body force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    Net (as opposed to random) motion of active matter results from an average swim (or propulsive) force. It is shown that the average swim force acts like a body force - an internal body force [Yan and Brady, Soft Matter, DOI:10.1039/C5SM01318F]. As a result, the particle-pressure exerted on a container wall is the sum of the swim pressure [Takatori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 028103] and the `weight' of the active particles. A continuum mechanical description is possible when variations occur on scales larger than the run length of the active particles and gives a Boltzmann-like distribution from a balance of the swim force and the swim pressure. Active particles may also display `action at a distance' and accumulate adjacent to (or be depleted from) a boundary without any external forces. In the momentum balance for the suspension - the mixture of active particles plus fluid - only external body forces appear.

  9. Nanonet Force Microscopy for Measuring Cell Forces.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Kevin; Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wei; Kapania, Rakesh; Nain, Amrinder S

    2016-07-12

    The influence of physical forces exerted by or felt by cells on cell shape, migration, and cytoskeleton arrangement is now widely acknowledged and hypothesized to occur due to modulation of cellular inside-out forces in response to changes in the external fibrous environment (outside-in). Our previous work using the non-electrospinning Spinneret-based Tunable Engineered Parameters' suspended fibers has revealed that cells are able to sense and respond to changes in fiber curvature and structural stiffness as evidenced by alterations to focal adhesion cluster lengths. Here, we present the development and application of a suspended nanonet platform for measuring C2C12 mouse myoblast forces attached to fibers of three diameters (250, 400, and 800 nm) representing a wide range of structural stiffness (3-50 nN/μm). The nanonet force microscopy platform measures cell adhesion forces in response to symmetric and asymmetric external perturbation in single and cyclic modes. We find that contractility-based, inside-out forces are evenly distributed at the edges of the cell, and that forces are dependent on fiber structural stiffness. Additionally, external perturbation in symmetric and asymmetric modes biases cell-fiber failure location without affecting the outside-in forces of cell-fiber adhesion. We then extend the platform to measure forces of (1) cell-cell junctions, (2) single cells undergoing cyclic perturbation in the presence of drugs, and (3) cancerous single-cells transitioning from a blebbing to a pseudopodial morphology. PMID:27410747

  10. Periodic intensity variation in (SIII) 9531 A emission from the Jupiter plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesler, F. L.; Scherb, F.; Oliversen, R. J.

    1984-02-01

    The intensity variation of [S III] 9531 Å line emission from the hot plasma torus of Jupiter was measured from Kitt Peak National Observatory during April 1982 using a scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer with a field of view 2 RJ in diameter centered at 6 RJ on the centrifugal equator. During the observational period, which covered 43 rotations of Jupiter, the intensities showed a periodic variation consistent with a zone of enhanced emission approximately 90° in longitude rotating with a period of 10.2 hours, or 2.8% longer than Jupiter's rotational period.

  11. Force propagation and force generation in cells.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Oliver; Duschl, Claus

    2010-09-01

    Determining how forces are produced by and propagated through the cytoskeleton (CSK) of the cell is of great interest as dynamic processes of the CSK are intimately correlated with many molecular signaling pathways. We are presenting a novel approach for integrating measurements on cell elasticity, transcellular force propagation, and cellular force generation to obtain a comprehensive description of dynamic and mechanical properties of the CSK under force loading. This approach uses a combination of scanning force microscopy (SFM) and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We apply well-defined loading schemes onto the apical cell membrane of fibroblasts using the SFM and simultaneously use TIRF microscopy to image the topography of the basal cell membrane. The locally distinct changes of shape and depth of the cytoskeletal imprints onto the basal membrane are interpreted as results of force propagation through the cytoplasm. This observation provides evidence for the tensegrity model and demonstrates the usefulness of our approach that does not depend on potentially disturbing marker compounds. We confirm that the actin network greatly determines cell stiffness and represents the substrate that mediates force transduction through the cytoplasm of the cell. The latter is an essential feature of tensegrity. Most importantly, our new finding that, both intact actin and microtubule networks are required for enabling the cell to produce work, can only be understood within the framework of the tensegrity model. We also provide, for the first time, a direct measurement of the cell's mechanical power output under compression at two femtowatts. PMID:20607861

  12. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis.. (VII) HFODD (v2.49t): A new version of the program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Dobaczewski, J.; McDonnell, J.; Satuła, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, M.; Toivanen, P.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the new version (v2.49t) of the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (HF) or Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented the following physics features: (i) the isospin mixing and projection, (ii) the finite-temperature formalism for the HFB and HF + BCS methods, (iii) the Lipkin translational energy correction method, (iv) the calculation of the shell correction. A number of specific numerical methods have also been implemented in order to deal with large-scale multi-constraint calculations and hardware limitations: (i) the two-basis method for the HFB method, (ii) the Augmented Lagrangian Method (ALM) for multi-constraint calculations, (iii) the linear constraint method based on the approximation of the RPA matrix for multi-constraint calculations, (iv) an interface with the axial and parity-conserving Skyrme-HFB code HFBTHO, (v) the mixing of the HF or HFB matrix elements instead of the HF fields. Special care has been paid to using the code on massively parallel leadership class computers. For this purpose, the following features are now available with this version: (i) the Message Passing Interface (MPI) framework, (ii) scalable input data routines, (iii) multi-threading via OpenMP pragmas, (iv) parallel diagonalization of the HFB matrix in the simplex-breaking case using the ScaLAPACK library. Finally, several little significant errors of the previous published version were corrected. New version program summaryProgram title:HFODD (v2.49t) Catalogue identifier: ADFL_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADFL_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public Licence v3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 190 614 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 985 898 Distribution

  13. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  14. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  15. Crossflow force transducer. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-05-01

    A force transducer for measuring lift and drag coefficients for a circular cylinder in turbulent water flow is presented. In addition to describing the actual design and construction of the strain-gauged force- ring based transducer, requirements for obtained valid fluid force test data are discussed, and pertinent flow test experience is related.

  16. Forces in General Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  17. Debunking Coriolis Force Myths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written and debated about the Coriolis force. Unfortunately, this has done little to demystify the paradoxes surrounding this fictitious force invoked by an observer in a rotating frame of reference. It is the purpose of this article to make another valiant attempt to slay the dragon of the Coriolis force! This will be done without…

  18. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  19. Efficacy of climate forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Lacis, A.; Schmidt, G. A.; Russell, G.; Aleinov, I.; Bauer, M.; Bauer, S.; Bell, N.; Cairns, B.; Canuto, V.; Chandler, M.; Cheng, Y.; Del Genio, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Fleming, E.; Friend, A.; Hall, T.; Jackman, C.; Kelley, M.; Kiang, N.; Koch, D.; Lean, J.; Lerner, J.; Lo, K.; Menon, S.; Miller, R.; Minnis, P.; Novakov, T.; Oinas, V.; Perlwitz, Ja.; Perlwitz, Ju.; Rind, D.; Romanou, A.; Shindell, D.; Stone, P.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.; Thresher, D.; Wielicki, B.; Wong, T.; Yao, M.; Zhang, S.

    2005-09-01

    We use a global climate model to compare the effectiveness of many climate forcing agents for producing climate change. We find a substantial range in the "efficacy" of different forcings, where the efficacy is the global temperature response per unit forcing relative to the response to CO2 forcing. Anthropogenic CH4 has efficacy ˜110%, which increases to ˜145% when its indirect effects on stratospheric H2O and tropospheric O3 are included, yielding an effective climate forcing of ˜0.8 W/m2 for the period 1750-2000 and making CH4 the largest anthropogenic climate forcing other than CO2. Black carbon (BC) aerosols from biomass burning have a calculated efficacy ˜58%, while fossil fuel BC has an efficacy ˜78%. Accounting for forcing efficacies and for indirect effects via snow albedo and cloud changes, we find that fossil fuel soot, defined as BC + OC (organic carbon), has a net positive forcing while biomass burning BC + OC has a negative forcing. We show that replacement of the traditional instantaneous and adjusted forcings, Fi and Fa, with an easily computed alternative, Fs, yields a better predictor of climate change, i.e., its efficacies are closer to unity. Fs is inferred from flux and temperature changes in a fixed-ocean model run. There is remarkable congruence in the spatial distribution of climate change, normalized to the same forcing Fs, for most climate forcing agents, suggesting that the global forcing has more relevance to regional climate change than may have been anticipated. Increasing greenhouse gases intensify the Hadley circulation in our model, increasing rainfall in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), Eastern United States, and East Asia, while intensifying dry conditions in the subtropics including the Southwest United States, the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, and an expanding Sahel. These features survive in model simulations that use all estimated forcings for the period 1880-2000. Responses to localized forcings, such

  20. Forces in molecules.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another? PMID:17328425

  1. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  2. Coulomb force as an entropic force

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Tower

    2010-05-15

    Motivated by Verlinde's theory of entropic gravity, we give a tentative explanation to the Coulomb's law with an entropic force. When trying to do this, we find the equipartition rule should be extended to charges and the concept of temperature should be reinterpreted. If one accepts the holographic principle as well as our generalizations and reinterpretations, then Coulomb's law, the Poisson equation, and the Maxwell equations can be derived smoothly. Our attempt can be regarded as a new way to unify the electromagnetic force with gravity, from the entropic origin. Possibly some of our postulates are related to the D-brane picture of black hole thermodynamics.

  3. Coulomb force as an entropic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tower

    2010-05-01

    Motivated by Verlinde’s theory of entropic gravity, we give a tentative explanation to the Coulomb’s law with an entropic force. When trying to do this, we find the equipartition rule should be extended to charges and the concept of temperature should be reinterpreted. If one accepts the holographic principle as well as our generalizations and reinterpretations, then Coulomb’s law, the Poisson equation, and the Maxwell equations can be derived smoothly. Our attempt can be regarded as a new way to unify the electromagnetic force with gravity, from the entropic origin. Possibly some of our postulates are related to the D-brane picture of black hole thermodynamics.

  4. Debunking Coriolis Force Myths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif

    2014-11-01

    Much has been written and debated about the Coriolis force.1-8 Unfortunately, this has done little to demystify the paradoxes surrounding this fictitious force invoked by an observer in a rotating frame of reference. It is the purpose of this article to make another valiant attempt to slay the dragon of the Coriolis force! This will be done without unleashing the usual mathematical apparatus, which we believe is more of a hindrance than a help.

  5. Lathe tool force

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, J.D.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes a computer program that computes the forces exerted on a lathe tool as a part is being machined. The program is based on a mechanistic model which assumes that the normal force on the tool face is proportional to the cross-sectional area of the chip that is being removed from the part. This report gives transcripts of program runs, a comparison with experimentally measured forces, a bibliography, and a listing of the program.

  6. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  7. Mechanotransduction: use the force(s).

    PubMed

    Paluch, Ewa K; Nelson, Celeste M; Biais, Nicolas; Fabry, Ben; Moeller, Jens; Pruitt, Beth L; Wollnik, Carina; Kudryasheva, Galina; Rehfeldt, Florian; Federle, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction - how cells sense physical forces and translate them into biochemical and biological responses - is a vibrant and rapidly-progressing field, and is important for a broad range of biological phenomena. This forum explores the role of mechanotransduction in a variety of cellular activities and highlights intriguing questions that deserve further attention. PMID:26141078

  8. Electrodynamic force law controversy.

    PubMed

    Graneau, P; Graneau, N

    2001-05-01

    Cavalleri et al. [Phys. Rev. E 52, 2505 (1998); Eur. J. Phys. 17, 205 (1996)] have attempted to resolve the electrodynamic force law controversy. This attempt to prove the validity of either the Ampère or Lorentz force law by theory and experiment has revealed only that the two are equivalent when predicting the force on part of a circuit due to the current in the complete circuit. However, in our analysis of internal stresses, only Ampère's force law agrees with experiment. PMID:11415053

  9. No fifth force?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Hopes that geophysicists might be able to document a fifth force of nature have diminished, as new measurements and analyses of earlier geodetic experiments have yielded no solid evidence of a non-Newtonian component of gravity.Modern physics recognizes four fundamental forces with distinct spheres of influence: The strong and weak nuclear forces operate over the range of one atom, while gravity and electromagnetism have an infinite range. Gravity measurements over a few centimeters in laboratories and over millions of kilometers in space continue to buttress Issac Newton's conclusion that the gravitational force between two objects decreases as the square of the distance between them.

  10. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption

  11. Elementary Particles and Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Chris

    1985-01-01

    Discusses subatomic particles (quarks, leptons, and others) revealed by higher accelerator energies. A connection between forces at this subatomic level has been established, and prospects are good for a description of forces that encompass binding atomic nuclei. Colors, fundamental interactions, screening, camouflage, electroweak symmetry, and…

  12. Forces in yeast flocculation

    PubMed Central

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Flos, Marta Abellán; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2014-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (“flocculation”) is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding. PMID:25515338

  13. SCM-Forcing Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xie, Shaocheng; Tang,Shuaiqi; Zhang,Yunyan; Zhang,Minghua

    2016-07-01

    Single-Column Model (SCM) Forcing Data are derived from the ARM facility observational data using the constrained variational analysis approach (Zhang and Lin 1997 and Zhang et al., 2001). The resulting products include both the large-scale forcing terms and the evaluation fields, which can be used for driving the SCMs and Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) and validating model simulations.

  14. Force Concept Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hestenes, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reports the rationale, design, validation, and uses of the "Force Concept Inventory," an instrument to assess the students' beliefs on force. Includes results and implications of two studies that compared the inventory with the "Mechanics Baseline." Includes a copy of the instrument. (MDH)

  15. Forces in yeast flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  16. Lorentz force velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Thess, A; Votyakov, E V; Kolesnikov, Y

    2006-04-28

    We describe a noncontact technique for velocity measurement in electrically conducting fluids. The technique, which we term Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV), is based on exposing the fluid to a magnetic field and measuring the drag force acting upon the magnetic field lines. Two series of measurements are reported, one in which the force is determined through the angular velocity of a rotary magnet system and one in which the force on a fixed magnet system is measured directly. Both experiments confirm that the measured signal is a linear function of the flow velocity. We then derive the scaling law that relates the force on a localized distribution of magnetized material to the velocity of an electrically conducting fluid. This law shows that LFV, if properly designed, has a wide range of potential applications in metallurgy, semiconductor crystal growth, and glass manufacturing. PMID:16712237

  17. Feeble forces and gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bars, Itzhak; Visser, Matt

    1987-03-01

    We develop a scenario in which feeble intermediate range forces emerge as an effect resulting from the compactification (à la Kaluza-Klein) of multidimensional theories. These feeble forces compete with gravity and in general permit different bodies to fall to earth with different accelerations. We show that these feeble forces are mediated by vectors (V) and/or scalars (S), whose dimensionless coupling constants are typically of order gv ≈ gs ≈ 10-10 Under certain plausible assumptions the ranges of these feeble forces are expected to be of order 1 m to 1 km. It is conjectured that the general strategy will prove applicable to realistic multidimensional theories such as the 10-dimensional superstring theories. We speculate that deviations from the standard gravitational force-similar to the ones reported recently as a “fifth force”-may be interpreted as evidence for higher dimensions.

  18. Conservative entropic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    2011-10-01

    Entropic forces have recently attracted considerable attention as ways to reformulate, retrodict, and perhaps even "explain" classical Newtonian gravity from a rather specific thermodynamic perspective. In this article I point out that if one wishes to reformulate classical Newtonian gravity in terms of an entropic force, then the fact that Newtonian gravity is described by a conservative force places significant constraints on the form of the entropy and temperature functions. (These constraints also apply to entropic reinterpretations of electromagnetism, and indeed to any conservative force derivable from a potential.) The constraints I will establish are sufficient to present real and significant problems for any reasonable variant of Verlinde's entropic gravity proposal, though for technical reasons the constraints established herein do not directly impact on either Jacobson'sor Padmanabhan's versions of entropic gravity. In an attempt to resolve these issues, I will extend the usual notion of entropic force to multiple heat baths with multiple "temperatures" and multiple "entropies".

  19. Linearly Forced Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Stationary isotropic turbulence is often studied numerically by adding a forcing term to the Navier-Stokes equation. This is usually done for the purpose of achieving higher Reynolds number and longer statistics than is possible for isotropic decaying turbulence. It is generally accepted that forcing the Navier-Stokes equation at low wave number does not influence the small scale statistics of the flow provided that there is wide separation between the largest and smallest scales. It will be shown, however, that the spectral width of the forcing has a noticeable effect on inertial range statistics. A case will be made here for using a broader form of forcing in order to compare computed isotropic stationary turbulence with (decaying) grid turbulence. It is shown that using a forcing function which is directly proportional to the velocity has physical meaning and gives results which are closer to both homogeneous and non-homogeneous turbulence. Section 1 presents a four part series of motivations for linear forcing. Section 2 puts linear forcing to a numerical test with a pseudospectral computation.

  20. Turbomachinery rotor forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, Norbert

    1988-01-01

    The fluid-induced forces, both steady and unsteady, acting upon an impeller of a centrifugal pump, and impeller blade-diffuser vane interaction in centrifugal pumps with vaned radial diffusers were evaluated experimentally and theoretically. Knowledge of the steady and unsteady forces, and the associated rotordynamic coefficients are required to effectively model the rotor dynamics of the High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). These forces and rotordynamic coefficients were investigated using different impellers in combination with volutes and vaned diffusers, and axial inducers. These rotor forces are global. Local forces and pressures are also important in impeller-diffuser interaction, for they may cause cavitation damage and even vane failures. Thus, in a separate investigation, impeller wake, and impeller blade and diffuser vane pressure measurements were made. The nature of the rotordynamic forces is discussed, the experimental facility is described, and the measurements of unsteady forces and pressure are reported together with a brief and incomplete attempt to calculate these flows.

  1. OOTW Force Design Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  2. Manual discrimination of force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Xiao-Dong; Tan, HONG-Z.; Durlach, Nathaniel I.

    1991-01-01

    Optimal design of human-machine interfaces for teleoperators and virtual-environment systems which involve the tactual and kinesthetic modalities requires knowledge of the human's resolving power in these modalities. The resolution of the interface should be appropriately matched to that of the human operator. We report some preliminary results on the ability of the human hand to distinguish small differences in force under a variety of conditions. Experiments were conducted on force discrimination with the thumb pushing an interface that exerts a constant force over the pushing distance and the index finger pressing against a fixed support. The dependence of the sensitivity index d' on force increment can be fit by a straight line through the origin and the just-noticeable difference (JND) in force can thus be described by the inverse of the slope of this line. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was measured by varying the a priori probabilities of the two alternatives, reference force and reference force plus an increment, in one-interval, two-alternative, forced-choice experiments. When plotted on normal deviate coordinates, the ROC's were roughly straight lines of unit slope, thus supporting the assumption of equal-variance normal distributions and the use of the conventional d' measure. The JND was roughly 6-8 percent for reference force ranging from 2.5 to 10 newtons, pushing distance from 5 to 30 mm, and initial finger-span from 45 to 125 mm. Also, the JND remained the same when the subjects were instructed to change the average speed of pushing from 23 to 153 mm/sec. The pushing was terminated by reaching either a wall or a well, and the JND's were essentially the same in both cases.

  3. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis.. (VI) HFODD (v2.40h): A new version of the program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Satuła, W.; Carlsson, B. G.; Engel, J.; Olbratowski, P.; Powałowski, P.; Sadziak, M.; Sarich, J.; Schunck, N.; Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, M.; Zalewski, M.; Zduńczuk, H.

    2009-11-01

    We describe the new version (v2.40h) of the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock or Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented: (i) projection on good angular momentum (for the Hartree-Fock states), (ii) calculation of the GCM kernels, (iii) calculation of matrix elements of the Yukawa interaction, (iv) the BCS solutions for state-dependent pairing gaps, (v) the HFB solutions for broken simplex symmetry, (vi) calculation of Bohr deformation parameters, (vii) constraints on the Schiff moments and scalar multipole moments, (viii) the DT2h transformations and rotations of wave functions, (ix) quasiparticle blocking for the HFB solutions in odd and odd-odd nuclei, (x) the Broyden method to accelerate the convergence, (xi) the Lipkin-Nogami method to treat pairing correlations, (xii) the exact Coulomb exchange term, (xiii) several utility options, and we have corrected three insignificant errors. New version program summaryProgram title: HFODD (v2.40h) Catalogue identifier: ADFL_v2_2 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADFL_v2_2.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 79 618 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 372 548 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN-77 and Fortran-90 Computer: Pentium-III, AMD-Athlon, AMD-Opteron Operating system: UNIX, LINUX, Windows XP Has the code been

  4. Dilatonic Entropic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.

    2011-08-01

    We show in detail that the entropic force of the static spherically symmetric spacetimes with unusual asymptotics can be calculated through the Verlinde's arguments. We introduce three different holographic screen candidates, which are first employed thoroughly by Myung and Kim [Phys. Rev. D 81, 105012 (2010)] for Schwarzschild black hole solutions, in order to identify the entropic force arising between a charged dilaton black hole and a test particle. The significance of the dilaton parameter on the entropic force is highlighted, and shown graphically.

  5. Axially deformed solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations using the transformed harmonic oscillator basis (II) HFBTHO v2.00d: A new version of the program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoitsov, M. V.; Schunck, N.; Kortelainen, M.; Michel, N.; Nam, H.; Olsen, E.; Sarich, J.; Wild, S.

    2013-06-01

    We describe the new version 2.00d of the code HFBTHO that solves the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (HF) or Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) problem by using the cylindrical transformed deformed harmonic oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented the following features: (i) the modified Broyden method for non-linear problems, (ii) optional breaking of reflection symmetry, (iii) calculation of axial multipole moments, (iv) finite temperature formalism for the HFB method, (v) linear constraint method based on the approximation of the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) matrix for multi-constraint calculations, (vi) blocking of quasi-particles in the Equal Filling Approximation (EFA), (vii) framework for generalized energy density with arbitrary density-dependences, and (viii) shared memory parallelism via OpenMP pragmas. Program summaryProgram title: HFBTHO v2.00d Catalog identifier: ADUI_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUI_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 167228 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2672156 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN-95. Computer: Intel Pentium-III, Intel Xeon, AMD-Athlon, AMD-Opteron, Cray XT5, Cray XE6. Operating system: UNIX, LINUX, WindowsXP. RAM: 200 Mwords Word size: 8 bits Classification: 17.22. Does the new version supercede the previous version?: Yes Catalog identifier of previous version: ADUI_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 167 (2005) 43 Nature of problem: The solution of self-consistent mean-field equations for weakly-bound paired nuclei requires a correct description of the asymptotic properties of nuclear quasi-particle wave functions. In the present implementation, this is achieved by using the single-particle wave functions

  6. Forces in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an activity to give students experience with the variables and forces impacting a moving body on an inclined plane by observing a ball as it rolls down an inclined PVC pipe of fixed length. Includes a student worksheet. (MKR)

  7. Causal reasoning with forces

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Phillip; Barbey, Aron K.

    2015-01-01

    Causal composition allows people to generate new causal relations by combining existing causal knowledge. We introduce a new computational model of such reasoning, the force theory, which holds that people compose causal relations by simulating the processes that join forces in the world, and compare this theory with the mental model theory (Khemlani et al., 2014) and the causal model theory (Sloman et al., 2009), which explain causal composition on the basis of mental models and structural equations, respectively. In one experiment, the force theory was uniquely able to account for people's ability to compose causal relationships from complex animations of real-world events. In three additional experiments, the force theory did as well as or better than the other two theories in explaining the causal compositions people generated from linguistically presented causal relations. Implications for causal learning and the hierarchical structure of causal knowledge are discussed. PMID:25653611

  8. Quantized Casimir force.

    PubMed

    Tse, Wang-Kong; MacDonald, A H

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the Casimir effect between two-dimensional electron systems driven to the quantum Hall regime by a strong perpendicular magnetic field. In the large-separation (d) limit where retardation effects are essential, we find (i) that the Casimir force is quantized in units of 3ħcα(2)/8π(2)d(4) and (ii) that the force is repulsive for mirrors with the same type of carrier and attractive for mirrors with opposite types of carrier. The sign of the Casimir force is therefore electrically tunable in ambipolar materials such as graphene. The Casimir force is suppressed when one mirror is a charge-neutral graphene system in a filling factor ν=0 quantum Hall state. PMID:23368242

  9. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  10. Force user's manual, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Harry F.; Benten, Muhammad S.; Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Ramanan, Aruna V.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology for writing parallel programs for shared memory multiprocessors has been formalized as an extension to the Fortran language and implemented as a macro preprocessor. The extended language is known as the Force, and this manual describes how to write Force programs and execute them on the Flexible Computer Corporation Flex/32, the Encore Multimax and the Sequent Balance computers. The parallel extension macros are described in detail, but knowledge of Fortran is assumed.

  11. Strategic forces briefing

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.; Chrzanowski, P.; May, M.; Nordyke, M.

    1989-04-06

    The Strategic Forces Briefing'' is our attempt, accomplished over the past several months, to outline and highlight the more significant strategic force issues that must be addressed in the near future. Some issues are recurrent: the need for an effective modernized Triad and a constant concern for force survivability. Some issues derive from arms control: the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (SALT) are sufficiently advanced to set broad numerical limits on forces, but not so constraining as to preclude choices among weapon systems and deployment modes. Finally, a new administration faced with serious budgetary problems must strive for the most effective strategic forces limited dollars can buy and support. A review of strategic forces logically begins with consideration of the missions the forces are charged with. We begin the briefing with a short review of targeting policy and implementation within the constraints of available unclassified information. We then review each element of the Triad with sections on SLBMs, ICBMs, and Air-Breathing (bomber and cruise missile) systems. A short section at the end deals with the potential impact of strategic defense on offensive force planning. We consider ABM, ASAT, and air defense; but we do not attempt to address the technical issues of strategic defense per se. The final section gives a brief overview of the tritium supply problem. We conclude with a summary of recommendations that emerge from our review. The results of calculation on the effectiveness of various weapon systems as a function of cost that are presented in the briefing are by Paul Chrzanowski.

  12. Van der Waals Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2006-03-01

    This should prove to be the definitive work explaining van der Waals forces, how to calculate them and take account of their impact under any circumstances and conditions. These weak intermolecular forces are of truly pervasive impact, and biologists, chemists, physicists and engineers will profit greatly from the thorough grounding in these fundamental forces that this book offers. Parsegian has organized his book at three successive levels of mathematical sophistication, to satisfy the needs and interests of readers at all levels of preparation. The Prelude and Level 1 are intended to give everyone an overview in words and pictures of the modern theory of van der Waals forces. Level 2 gives the formulae and a wide range of algorithms to let readers compute the van der Waals forces under virtually any physical or physiological conditions. Level 3 offers a rigorous basic formulation of the theory. Author is among the most highly respected biophysicists Van der Waals forces are significant for a wide range of questions and problems in the life sciences, chemistry, physics, and engineering, ranging up to the macro level No other book that develops the subject vigorously, and this book also makes the subject intuitively accessible to students who had not previously been mathematically sophisticated enough to calculate them

  13. Optical Bernoulli forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movassagh, Ramis; Johnson, Steven G.

    2013-08-01

    By Bernoulli's law, an increase in the relative speed of a fluid around a body is accompanied by a decrease in the pressure. Therefore, a rotating body in a fluid stream experiences a force perpendicular to the motion of the fluid because of the unequal relative speed of the fluid across its surface. It is well known that light has a constant speed irrespective of the relative motion. Does a rotating body immersed in a stream of photons experience a Bernoulli-like force? We show that, indeed, a rotating dielectric cylinder experiences such a lateral force from an electromagnetic wave. In fact, the sign of the lateral force is the same as that of the fluid-mechanical analog as long as the electric susceptibility is positive (ɛ>ɛ0), but for negative-susceptibility materials (e.g., metals) we show that the lateral force is in the opposite direction. Because these results are derived from a classical electromagnetic scattering problem, Mie-resonance enhancements that occur in other scattering phenomena also enhance the lateral force.

  14. Lenz's Law: Feel the Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawicki, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a simple, inexpensive system that allows students to have hands-on contact with simple experiments involving forces generated by induced currents. Discusses the use of a dynamic force sensor in making quantitative measurements of the forces generated. (JRH)

  15. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  16. Radiative Forcing by Contrails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meerkoetter, R.; Schumann, U.; Doelling, D. R.; Nakajima, T.; Tsushima, Y.

    1999-01-01

    A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmospheres The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, mid-latitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 W/m(exp 2)a daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover.

  17. Carbohydrate force fields

    PubMed Central

    Foley, B. Lachele; Tessier, Matthew B.; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates present a special set of challenges to the generation of force fields. First, the tertiary structures of monosaccharides are complex merely by virtue of their exceptionally high number of chiral centers. In addition, their electronic characteristics lead to molecular geometries and electrostatic landscapes that can be challenging to predict and model. The monosaccharide units can also interconnect in many ways, resulting in a large number of possible oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, both linear and branched. These larger structures contain a number of rotatable bonds, meaning they potentially sample an enormous conformational space. This article briefly reviews the history of carbohydrate force fields, examining and comparing their challenges, forms, philosophies, and development strategies. Then it presents a survey of recent uses of these force fields, noting trends, strengths, deficiencies, and possible directions for future expansion. PMID:25530813

  18. Linear force device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, John P.

    1988-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide a mechanical force actuator which is lightweight and manipulatable and utilizes linear motion for push or pull forces while maintaining a constant overall length. The mechanical force producing mechanism comprises a linear actuator mechanism and a linear motion shaft mounted parallel to one another. The linear motion shaft is connected to a stationary or fixed housing and to a movable housing where the movable housing is mechanically actuated through actuator mechanism by either manual means or motor means. The housings are adapted to releasably receive a variety of jaw or pulling elements adapted for clamping or prying action. The stationary housing is adapted to be pivotally mounted to permit an angular position of the housing to allow the tool to adapt to skewed interfaces. The actuator mechanisms is operated by a gear train to obtain linear motion of the actuator mechanism.

  19. [Forced spirometry procedure].

    PubMed

    Cortés Aguilera, Antonio Javier

    2008-11-01

    Forced spirometry consists in a complementary test which is carried out in a health office in a workplace in order to determine the lung capacity of workers exposed to determined professional risks or those susceptible to determined working conditions which could lead to the development of respiratory problems. This test has been developed based on health vigilance laws under Article 22 of the Law for Prevention of Risks in the Workplace and requires that the technician, a nurse in a workplace, who performs it have some knowledge and skills regarding its use, following the norms for forced spirometry set by the Spanish Association for Pneumatology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR). PMID:19203116

  20. Air Force Seal Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, Ellen R.

    1996-01-01

    Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue to become more extreme as the engine thermodynamic cycles advance towards these IHPTET goals. Seal technology continues to be pursued by the Air Force to control leakage at the required conditions. This presentation briefly describes current seal research and development programs and gives a summary of seal applications in demonstrator and developmental engines.

  1. Radiative Forcing of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

  2. Introduction to low-momentum effective interactions with Brown-Rho scaling and three-nucleon forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, T. T. S.; Holt, J. W.; Osnes, E.

    2016-03-01

    Model-space effective interactions V eff derived from free-space nucleon-nucleon interactions V NN are reviewed. We employ a double decimation approach: first we extract a low-momentum interaction {V}{low-k} from V NN using a T-matrix equivalence decimation method. Then V eff is obtained from {V}{low-k} by way of a folded-diagram effective interaction method. For decimation momentum {{Λ }}≃ 2 {{fm}}-1, the {V}{low-k} interactions derived from different realistic V NN models are nearly model independent, and so are the resulting shell-model effective interactions. For nucleons in a low-density nuclear medium like valence nucleons near the nuclear surface, such effective interactions derived from free-space V NN are satisfactory in reproducing experimental nuclear properties. But it is not so for nucleons in a nuclear medium with density near or beyond nuclear matter saturation density. In this case it may be necessary to include the effects from Brown-Rho (BR) scaling of hadrons and/or three-nucleon forces V 3N , effectively changing the free-space V NN into a density-dependent one. The density-dependent effects from BR scaling and V 3N are compared with those from empirical Skyrme effective interactions.

  3. Reduction in Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, R. Craig

    This chapter of "Principles of School Business Management" reviews several concerns that must be addressed by school business administrators in districts facing declining enrollments and the need for reductions in force. The chapter first looks at the business administrator's significant role in planning for retrenchment. The chapter then…

  4. Reduction in Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phay, Robert

    Chapter 2 in a book on school law discusses the reasons for reduction in force (RIF) and presents a set of model regulations for school districts as the best means of minimizing legal problems resulting from RIF. The reasons for RIF include declining student enrollments; reduced turnover among teachers; changes in programs; and more constrained…

  5. Wearing Forces Spectacles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, Graham

    2012-01-01

    When providing training to teachers struggling with the concept of forces, the author encourages them to start with something within the experience of the children they are teaching. For example, show them photographs taken on windy days, such as that of a tree, and ask them to explain what is happening. This encourages the children to focus on…

  6. Forces in nonlinear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2002-02-01

    I investigate the properties of forces on bodies in theories governed by the generalized Poisson equation μ(|ϕ| /a0)ϕ] ∝ Gρ, for the potential ϕ produced by a distribution of sources ρ. This equation describes, inter alia, media with a response coefficient, μ, that depends on the field strength, such as in nonlinear, dielectric or diamagnetic, media; nonlinear transport problems with field-strength-dependent conductivity or diffusion coefficient; nonlinear electrostatics, as in the Born-Infeld theory; certain stationary potential flows in compressible fluids, in which case the forces act on sources or obstacles in the flow. The expressions for the force on a point charge are derived exactly for the limits of very low and very high charge. The force on an arbitrary body in an external field of asymptotically constant gradient, -g0, is shown to be F = Qg0, where Q is the total effective charge of the body. The corollary Q = 0 → F = 0 is a generalization of d'Alembert's paradox. I show that for G > 0 (as in Newtonian gravity) two point charges of the same (opposite) sign still attract (repel). The opposite is true for G < 0. I discuss its generalization to extended bodies and derive virial relations.

  7. Force limited vibration testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of conducting lab vibration tests of spacecraft equipment was developed to more closely simulate the vibration environment experienced when the spacecraft is launched on a rocket. The improved tests are tailored to identify equipment design and workmanship problems without inducing artificial failures that would not have occurred at launch. These new, less destructive types of vibration tests are essential to JPL's protoflight test approach in which lab testing is conducted using the flight equipment, often one of a kind, to save time and money. In conventional vibration tests, only the input vibratory motion is specified; the feedback, or reaction force, between the test item and the vibration machine is ignored. Most test failures occur when the test item goes into resonance, and the reaction force becomes very large. It has long been recognized that the large reaction force is a test artifact which does not occur with the lightweight, flexible mounting structures characteristic of spacecraft and space vehicles. In new vibration tests, both the motion and the force provided to the test item by the vibration machine are controlled, so that the vibration ride experienced by the test item is as in flight.

  8. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  9. The Dynamic Force Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, John B.; Black, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    We examine an experimental apparatus that is used to motivate the connections between the basic properties of vectors, potential functions, systems of nonlinear equations, and Newton's method for nonlinear systems of equations. The apparatus is an adaptation of a force table where we remove the center-pin and allow the center-ring to move freely.…

  10. Mining Task Force Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saskatchewan Inst. of Applied Science and Technology, Saskatoon.

    In fall 1988, the Board of Directors of the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) created a task force to study the training needs of the mining industry in the province and evaluate SIAST's responsiveness to those needs. After assessing the technological changes taking place in the industry, surveying manpower needs,…

  11. The Force of Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Carol

    2005-01-01

    "The Force of Ideas" describes a little-known aspect of both educational history and Viennese psychoanalysis during the interwar years: the movement for psychoanalytic pedagogy. The author traces her father's own story, beginning with his application to the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society for training as a psychoanalytic pedagogue, as a way to…

  12. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Taylor, Foreword by John C.

    2005-10-01

    Foreword John C. Taylor; 1. Unification of fundamental forces Abdus Salam; 2. History unfolding: an introduction to the two 1968 lectures by W. Heisenberg and P. A. M. Dirac Abdus Salam; 3. Theory, criticism, and a philosophy Werner Heisenberg; 4. Methods in theoretical physics Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac.

  13. Lorentz force particle analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Thess, André; Moreau, René; Tan, Yanqing; Dai, Shangjun; Tao, Zhen; Yang, Wenzhi; Wang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    A new contactless technique is presented for the detection of micron-sized insulating particles in the flow of an electrically conducting fluid. A transverse magnetic field brakes this flow and tends to become entrained in the flow direction by a Lorentz force, whose reaction force on the magnetic-field-generating system can be measured. The presence of insulating particles suspended in the fluid produce changes in this Lorentz force, generating pulses in it; these pulses enable the particles to be counted and sized. A two-dimensional numerical model that employs a moving mesh method demonstrates the measurement principle when such a particle is present. Two prototypes and a three-dimensional numerical model are used to demonstrate the feasibility of a Lorentz force particle analyzer (LFPA). The findings of this study conclude that such an LFPA, which offers contactless and on-line quantitative measurements, can be applied to an extensive range of applications. These applications include measurements of the cleanliness of high-temperature and aggressive molten metal, such as aluminum and steel alloys, and the clean manufacturing of semiconductors.

  14. Chiral drag force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Krishna; Sadofyev, Andrey V.

    2015-10-01

    We provide a holographic evaluation of novel contributions to the drag force acting on a heavy quark moving through strongly interacting plasma. The new contributions are chiral in the sense that they act in opposite directions in plasmas containing an excess of left- or right-handed quarks. The new contributions are proportional to the coefficient of the axial anomaly, and in this sense also are chiral. These new contributions to the drag force act either parallel to or antiparallel to an external magnetic field or to the vorticity of the fluid plasma. In all these respects, these contributions to the drag force felt by a heavy quark are analogous to the chiral magnetic effect (CME) on light quarks. However, the new contribution to the drag force is independent of the electric charge of the heavy quark and is the same for heavy quarks and antiquarks, meaning that these novel effects do not in fact contribute to the CME current. We show that although the chiral drag force can be non-vanishing for heavy quarks that are at rest in the local fluid rest frame, it does vanish for heavy quarks that are at rest in a suitably chosen frame. In this frame, the heavy quark at rest sees counterpropagating momentum and charge currents, both proportional to the axial anomaly coefficient, but feels no drag force. This provides strong concrete evidence for the absence of dissipation in chiral transport, something that has been predicted previously via consideration of symmetries. Along the way to our principal results, we provide a general calculation of the corrections to the drag force due to the presence of gradients in the flowing fluid in the presence of a nonzero chemical potential. We close with a consequence of our result that is at least in principle observable in heavy ion collisions, namely an anticorrelation between the direction of the CME current for light quarks in a given event and the direction of the kick given to the momentum of all the heavy quarks and

  15. Investigation of Calibrating Force Transducer Using Sinusoidal Force

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Li; Wang Yu; Zhang Lizhe

    2010-05-28

    Sinusoidal force calibration method was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). A similar dynamic force calibration system is developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electro-dynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1 N to 20 kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. The force transducer to be calibrated is mounted on the shaker, and a mass block is screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition. The methods of determining Spatial-dependent acceleration on mass block and measuring the end mass of force transducer in dynamic force calibration are discussed in this paper.

  16. Force control in chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kang, Nyeonju; Cauraugh, James H

    2015-05-01

    Force control deficits are common dysfunctions after a stroke. This review concentrates on various force control variables associated with motor impairments and suggests new approaches to quantifying force control production and modulation. Moreover, related neurophysiological mechanisms were addressed to determine variables that affect force control capabilities. Typically, post stroke force control impairments include: (a) decreased force magnitude and asymmetrical forces between hands, (b) higher task error, (c) greater force variability, (d) increased force regularity, and (e) greater time-lag between muscular forces. Recent advances in force control analyses post stroke indicated less bimanual motor synergies and impaired low-force frequency structure. Brain imaging studies demonstrate possible neurophysiological mechanisms underlying force control impairments: (a) decreased activation in motor areas of the ipsilesional hemisphere, (b) increased activation in secondary motor areas between hemispheres, (c) cerebellum involvement, and (d) relatively greater interhemispheric inhibition from the contralesional hemisphere. Consistent with identifying neurophysiological mechanisms, analyzing bimanual motor synergies as well as low-force frequency structure will advance our understanding of post stroke force control. PMID:25704075

  17. Suicide and Forced Marriage

    PubMed Central

    Pridmore, Saxby; Walter, Garry

    2013-01-01

    Background: The prevailing view that the vast majority of those who complete suicide have an underlying psychiatric disorder has been recently challenged by research on the contribution of “predicaments”, in the absence of mental illness, to suicide. In this paper, we sought data to support the notion that forced marriage may lead to suicide without the presence of psychiatric disorder. Methods: Historical records, newspapers, and the electronic media were searched for examples. Results: Two examples from ancient times and six from the last hundred years were located and described. Conclusion: These cases suggest that forced marriage may lead to suicide and complements earlier findings that loss of fortune, health, liberty, and reputation may lead to suicide in the absence of mental disorder. PMID:23983577

  18. Forces Driving Chaperone Action.

    PubMed

    Koldewey, Philipp; Stull, Frederick; Horowitz, Scott; Martin, Raoul; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-07-14

    It is still unclear what molecular forces drive chaperone-mediated protein folding. Here, we obtain a detailed mechanistic understanding of the forces that dictate the four key steps of chaperone-client interaction: initial binding, complex stabilization, folding, and release. Contrary to the common belief that chaperones recognize unfolding intermediates by their hydrophobic nature, we discover that the model chaperone Spy uses long-range electrostatic interactions to rapidly bind to its unfolded client protein Im7. Short-range hydrophobic interactions follow, which serve to stabilize the complex. Hydrophobic collapse of the client protein then drives its folding. By burying hydrophobic residues in its core, the client's affinity to Spy decreases, which causes client release. By allowing the client to fold itself, Spy circumvents the need for client-specific folding instructions. This mechanism might help explain how chaperones can facilitate the folding of various unrelated proteins. PMID:27293188

  19. Miniature drag force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature drag force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring dynamic velocity head and flow direction. The anemometer consists of a silicon cantilevered beam 2.5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, and 0.25 mm thick with an integrated diffused strain gage bridge, located at the base of the beam, as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like that of a second order system with a natural frequency of about 42 kHz and a damping coefficient of 0.007. The anemometer can be used in both forward and reversed flow. Measured flow characteristics up to Mach 0.6 are presented along with application examples including turbulence measurements.

  20. Stochastically forced zonal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Kaushik

    This thesis investigates the dynamics of multiple zonal jets, that spontaneously emerge on the barotropic beta-plane, driven by a homogenous and rapidly decorrelating forcing and damped by bottom drag. Decomposing the barotropic vorticity equation into the zonal-mean and eddy equations, and neglecting the eddy-eddy interactions, defines the quasi-linear (QL) system. Numerical solution of the QL system shows zonal jets with length scales comparable to jets obtained by solving the nonlinear (NL) system. Starting with the QL system, one can construct a deterministic equation for the evolution of the two-point single-time correlation function of the vorticity, from which one can obtain the Reynolds stress that drives the zonal mean flow. This deterministic system has an exact nonlinear solution, which is a homogenous eddy field with no jets. When the forcing is also isotropic in space, we characterize the linear stability of this jetless solution by calculating the critical stability curve in the parameter space and successfully comparing this analytic result with numerical solutions of the QL system. But the critical drag required for the onset of NL zonostrophic instability is up to a factor of six smaller than that for QL zonostrophic instability. The constraint of isotropic forcing is then relaxed and spatially anisotropic forcing is used to drive the jets. Meridionally drifting jets are observed whenever the forcing breaks an additional symmetry that we refer to as mirror, or reflexional symmetry. The magnitude of drift speed in our results shows a strong variation with both mu and beta: while the drift speed decreases almost linearly with decreasing mu, it actually increases as beta decreases. Similar drifting jets are also observed in QL, with the same direction (i.e. northward or southward) and similar magnitude as NL jet-drift. Starting from the laminar solution, and assuming a mean-flow that varies slowly with reference to the scale of the eddies, we obtain

  1. Force Feedback Joystick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    I-FORCE, a computer peripheral from Immersion Corporation, was derived from virtual environment and human factors research at the Advanced Displays and Spatial Perception Laboratory at Ames Research Center in collaboration with Stanford University Center for Design Research. Entrepreneur Louis Rosenberg, a former Stanford researcher, now president of Immersion, collaborated with Dr. Bernard Adelstein at Ames on studies of perception in virtual reality. The result was an inexpensive way to incorporate motors and a sophisticated microprocessor into joysticks and other game controllers. These devices can emulate the feel of a car on the skid, a crashing plane, the bounce of a ball, compressed springs, or other physical phenomenon. The first products incorporating I-FORCE technology include CH- Products' line of FlightStick and CombatStick controllers.

  2. Force Modulator System

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond Clark

    2009-04-30

    Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better

  3. Air Force seal activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, Ellen R.

    1994-01-01

    Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue to become more extreme as the engine thermodynamic cycles advance towards these IHPTET goals. Brush seal technology continues to be pursued by the Air Force to reduce leakage at the required conditions. Likewise, challenges in engine mainshaft air/oil seals are also being addressed. Counter-rotating intershaft applications within the IHPTET initiative involve very high rubbing velocities. This viewgraph presentation briefly describes past and current seal research and development programs and gives a summary of seal applications in demonstrator and developmental engine testing.

  4. Modified entropic force

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Changjun

    2010-04-15

    The theory of statistical thermodynamics tells us the equipartition law of energy does not hold in the limit of very low temperatures. It is found the Debye model is very successful in explaining the experimental results for most of the solid objects. Motivated by this fact, we modify the entropic force formula which is proposed very recently. Since the Unruh temperature is proportional to the strength of the gravitational field, so the modified entropic force formula is an extension of the Newtonian gravity to the weak field. On the contrary, general relativity extends Newtonian gravity to the strong field case. Corresponding to Debye temperature, there exists a Debye acceleration g{sub D}. It is found the Debye acceleration is g{sub D}=10{sup -15} N kg{sup -1}. This acceleration is very much smaller than the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -4} N kg{sup -1} which is felt by Neptune and the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -10} N kg{sup -1} felt by the Sun. Therefore, the modified entropic force can be very well approximated by the Newtonian gravity in the Solar System and in the Galaxy. With this Debye acceleration, we find the current cosmic speeding up can be explained without invoking any kind of dark energy.

  5. Finger force perception during ipsilateral and contralateral force matching tasks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woo-Hyung; Leonard, Charles T.; Li, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to compare matching performance between ipsilateral and contralateral finger force matching tasks and to examine the effect of handedness on finger force perception. Eleven subjects were instructed to produce reference forces by an instructed finger (index – I or little – L finger) and to reproduce the same amount force by the same or a different finger within the hand (i.e., ipsilateral matching task), or by a finger of the other hand (i.e., contralateral matching task). The results of the ipsilateral and contralateral tasks in the present study commonly showed that 1) the reference and matching forces were matched closely when the two forces were produced by the same or homologous finger(s) such as I/I task; 2) the weaker little finger underestimated the magnitude of reference force of the index finger (I/L task), even with the higher level of effort (relative force), but the two forces were matched when considering total finger forces; 3) the stronger index finger closely matched the reference force of the little finger with the lower level of relative force (i.e., L/I task); 4) when considering the constant errors, I/L tasks showed an underestimation and L/I tasks showed an overestimation compared to I/I tasks. There was no handedness effect during ipsilateral tasks. During the contralateral task, the dominant hand overestimated the force of the non-dominant hand, while the non-dominant hand attempted to match the absolute force of the dominant hand. The overall results support the notion that the absolute, rather than relative, finger force is perceived and reproduced during ipsilateral and contralateral finger force matching tasks, indicating the uniqueness of finger force perception. PMID:18488212

  6. Force reflection with compliance control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Two types of systems for force-reflecting control, which enables high force-reflection gain, are presented: position-error-based force reflection and low-pass-filtered force reflection. Both of the systems are combined with shared compliance control. In the position-error-based class, the position error between the commanded and the actual position of a compliantly controlled robot is used to provide force reflection. In the low-pass-filtered force reflection class, the low-pass-filtered output of the compliance control is used to provide force reflection. The increase in force reflection gain can be more than 10-fold as compared to a conventional high-bandwidth pure force reflection system, when high compliance values are used for the compliance control.

  7. Adding Value to Force Diagrams: Representing Relative Force Magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, Paul

    2011-05-01

    Nearly all physics instructors recognize the instructional value of force diagrams, and this journal has published several collections of exercises to improve student skill in this area.1-4 Yet some instructors worry that too few students perceive the conceptual and problem-solving utility of force diagrams,4-6 and over recent years a rich variety of approaches has been proposed to add value to force diagrams. Suggestions include strategies for identifying candidate forces,6,7 emphasizing the distinction between "contact" and "noncontact" forces,5,8 and the use of computer-based tutorials.9,10 Instructors have suggested a variety of conventions for constructing force diagrams, including approaches to arrow placement and orientation2,11-13 and proposed notations for locating forces or marking action-reaction force pairs.8,11,14,15

  8. The Forces at Play in Optical Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocious, Jordan

    Optical force microscopy is a novel technique where mechanical detection with a cantilevered probe replaces the detection of photons to investigate optically induced processes and states. A theoretical and experimental analysis is performed here of the forces present in optical force microscopy operated in tapping mode, which reveals two dominant optically induced forces, the gradient force and the scattering force. Force-distance curves are reconstructed from experimental amplitude and phase information for glass, gold nanowires and molecular clusters of silicon naphtalocyanine samples. The scattering force is shown to be insensitive to both nano-scale tip-sample distances and sample polarizability and is dependent on the form of the tip. The gradient force demonstrates a z-4 tip-sample distance dependence, localized to a few nanometers, and is strongly dependent on the polarizability of the sample which enables spectroscopic imaging through force detection. The different distance-dependence and polarizability-dependence of the gradient and scattering forces give rise to a complex force-distance curve which determines imaging contrast along with the cantilever set-point, knowledge of which is essential for image interpretation.

  9. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  10. Radiative forcing of climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramanswamy, V.; Shine, Keith; Leovy, Conway; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Rodhe, Henning; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Ding, M.; Lelieveld, Joseph; Edmonds, Jae A.; Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1991-01-01

    An update of the scientific discussions presented in Chapter 2 of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report is presented. The update discusses the atmospheric radiative and chemical species of significance for climate change. There are two major objectives of the present update. The first is an extension of the discussion on the Global Warming Potentials (GWP's), including a reevaluation in view of the updates in the lifetimes of the radiatively active species. The second important objective is to underscore major developments in the radiative forcing of climate due to the observed stratospheric ozone losses occurring between 1979 and 1990.

  11. Causal Entropic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissner-Gross, A. D.; Freer, C. E.

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in fields ranging from cosmology to computer science have hinted at a possible deep connection between intelligence and entropy maximization, but no formal physical relationship between them has yet been established. Here, we explicitly propose a first step toward such a relationship in the form of a causal generalization of entropic forces that we find can cause two defining behaviors of the human “cognitive niche”—tool use and social cooperation—to spontaneously emerge in simple physical systems. Our results suggest a potentially general thermodynamic model of adaptive behavior as a nonequilibrium process in open systems.

  12. Lateral Casimir force beyond the proximity-force approximation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Robson B; Neto, Paulo A Maia; Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge

    2006-03-17

    We argue that the appropriate variable to study a nontrivial geometry dependence of the Casimir force is the lateral component of the Casimir force, which we evaluate between two corrugated metallic plates outside the validity of the proximity-force approximation. The metallic plates are described by the plasma model, with arbitrary values for the plasma wavelength, the plate separation, and the corrugation period, the corrugation amplitude remaining the smallest length scale. Our analysis shows that in realistic experimental situations the proximity-force approximation overestimates the force by up to 30%. PMID:16605712

  13. Uncertainty in NIST Force Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Tom

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses upon the uncertainty of force calibration measurements at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The uncertainty of the realization of force for the national deadweight force standards at NIST is discussed, as well as the uncertainties associated with NIST’s voltage-ratio measuring instruments and with the characteristics of transducers being calibrated. The combined uncertainty is related to the uncertainty of dissemination for force transfer standards sent to NIST for calibration. PMID:27308181

  14. Forces Stabilizing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. 1. Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 2. The burial of nonpolar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. 3. Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 5. Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 6. Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. 7. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability. PMID:24846139

  15. Pairing forces in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution, the author mentions some features of pairing forces that are unique to nuclei and cover some areas of major interest in nuclear structure research, that involve pairing. At the level of most nuclear structure studies, nuclei are treated as consisting of two kinds of fermions (protons and neutrons) in a valence space with rather few levels. These features give rise to unique aspects of pairing forces in nuclei: (1) n-p pairing in T = 0 as well as the usual T = 1 pairing that is characteristic of like fermions; (2) a need to correct pairing calculations for the (1/N) effects that can typically be neglected in superconducting solids. An issue of current concern is the nature of the pairing interaction: several recent studies suggest a need for a density dependent form of the pairing interaction. There is a good deal of feedback between the questions of accurate calculations of pairing interactions and the form and magnitude of the pairing interaction. Finally, the authors discuss some many-body wave functions that are a generalization of the BCS wave function form, and apply them to a calculation of energy level spacings in superdeformed rotational bands.

  16. Force reflecting hand controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaffee, Douglas A. (Inventor); Snow, Edward R. (Inventor); Townsend, William T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A universal input device for interfacing a human operator with a slave machine such as a robot or the like includes a plurality of serially connected mechanical links extending from a base. A handgrip is connected to the mechanical links distal from the base such that a human operator may grasp the handgrip and control the position thereof relative to the base through the mechanical links. A plurality of rotary joints is arranged to connect the mechanical links together to provide at least three translational degrees of freedom and at least three rotational degrees of freedom of motion of the handgrip relative to the base. A cable and pulley assembly for each joint is connected to a corresponding motor for transmitting forces from the slave machine to the handgrip to provide kinesthetic feedback to the operator and for producing control signals that may be transmitted from the handgrip to the slave machine. The device gives excellent kinesthetic feedback, high-fidelity force/torque feedback, a kinematically simple structure, mechanically decoupled motion in all six degrees of freedom, and zero backlash. The device also has a much larger work envelope, greater stiffness and responsiveness, smaller stowage volume, and better overlap of the human operator's range of motion than previous designs.

  17. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  18. Electronic Force Gage for Welders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J. W.; Gates, G.

    1983-01-01

    Welding force monitored in process. Electronic force gage uses strain gage on deformable member. Oscilloscope trace of welding force photographed and compared with standard trace during calibration and troubleshooting of resistance welding equipment. Adaptable to small scale resistance welding in electronics industry.

  19. Force-Field Parameter Fitter

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-05-27

    ParFit is a flexible and extendable framework and library of classes for fitting force-field parameters to data from high-level ab-initio calculations on the basis of deterministic and stochastic algorithms. Currently, the code is fitting MM3 and Merck force-field parameters but could easily extend to other force-field types.

  20. Gradient and scattering forces in photoinduced force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahng, Junghoon; Brocious, Jordan; Fishman, Dmitry A.; Huang, Fei; Li, Xiaowei; Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar; Potma, Eric Olaf

    2014-10-01

    A theoretical and experimental analysis of the dominant forces measured in photoinduced force microscopy is presented. It is shown that when operated in the noncontact and soft-contact modes, the microscope is sensitive to the optically induced gradient force (Fg) and the scattering force (Fsc). The reconstructed force-distance curve reveals a tip-dependent scattering force in the 30-60 pN range. Whereas the scattering force is virtually insensitive to the nanoscopic tip-sample distance, the gradient force shows a z-4 dependence and is manifest only for tip-sample distances of a few nm. Measurements on glass, gold nanowires, and molecular clusters of silicon naphtalocyanine confirm that the gradient force is strongly dependent on the polarizability of the sample, enabling spectroscopic imaging through force detection. The nearly constant Fsc and the spatially dependent Fg give rise to a complex force-distance curve, which varies from point to point in the specimen and dictates the image contrast observed for a given set point of the cantilevered tip.

  1. Interfacial force sensor with force-feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, S.A.; Houston, J.E.; Smith, B.K.

    1990-01-01

    A new interfacial force microscope capable of measuring the forces between two surfaces over the entire range of surface separations, up to contact, has been developed. The design is centered around a differential capacitance displacement sensor where the common capacitor plate is supported by torsion bars. A force-feedback control system balances the interfacial forces at the sensor, maintaining the common capacitor plate at its rest position. This control eliminates the instability which occurs with the conventional cantilever-based force sensors when the attractive force gradient exceeds the mechanical stiffness of the cantilever. The ability to measure interfacial forces at surface separations smaller than this instability point using the feedback control is demonstrated. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Parallel computation with the force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology, called the force, supports the construction of programs to be executed in parallel by a force of processes. The number of processes in the force is unspecified, but potentially very large. The force idea is embodied in a set of macros which produce multiproceossor FORTRAN code and has been studied on two shared memory multiprocessors of fairly different character. The method has simplified the writing of highly parallel programs within a limited class of parallel algorithms and is being extended to cover a broader class. The individual parallel constructs which comprise the force methodology are discussed. Of central concern are their semantics, implementation on different architectures and performance implications.

  3. Updates on Force Limiting Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Scharton, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The following conventional force limiting methods currently practiced in deriving force limiting specifications assume one-dimensional translation source and load apparent masses: Simple TDOF model; Semi-empirical force limits; Apparent mass, etc.; Impedance method. Uncorrelated motion of the mounting points for components mounted on panels and correlated, but out-of-phase, motions of the support structures are important and should be considered in deriving force limiting specifications. In this presentation "rock-n-roll" motions of the components supported by panels, which leads to a more realistic force limiting specifications are discussed.

  4. Force protection: today's reality.

    PubMed

    Torgerson, Ron

    2004-11-11

    Most US infrastructure and major chemical manufacturing facilities as well as their supporting utility systems are inherently vulnerable to a terrorist attack. Force protection is a military and civilian term used to protect personnel and critical facilities and assets against would-be aggressors or terrorists. The war on terrorism is a 200-300-year war. Terrorist attacks on US soil could become as common-place as in the State of Israel. It is very easy to penetrate infrastructure or plants as evidenced by vulnerability assessments performed for states, cities, plants, and military facilities by Versar and others around the country. Chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive weapons can be readily used to attack facilities in the US. This paper will explain some of those vulnerabilities, outline the current DoD standard as it relates to vulnerability assessments, and explain how this may be used in commercial applications to deter potential aggressors. PMID:15573418

  5. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus

    1990-05-01

    This is an expanded version of the third Dirac Memorial Lecture, given in 1988 by the Nobel Laureate Abdus Salam. Salam's lecture presents an overview of the developments in modern particle physics from its inception at the turn of the century to the present theories seeking to unify all the fundamental forces. In addition, two previously unpublished lectures by Paul Dirac, and Werner Heisenberg are included. These lectures provide a fascinating insight into their approach to research and the developments in particle physics at that time. Nonspecialists, undergraduates and researchers will find this a fascinating book. It contains a clear introduction to the major themes of particle physics and cosmology by one of the most distinguished contemporary physicists.

  6. Silicon force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  7. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century. PMID:25029818

  8. Forced Migration: Refugee Populations

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Joyceen S.

    2015-01-01

    Undocumented migration is a global phenomenon that manifests in various contexts. This article describes the impact of the movement of large numbers of people in several African countries, producing a unique type of migrant—the refugee. We describe issues that refugee movements create on fragile health care systems, situations that precipitate refugee movements, certain human rights violations that are of particular concern such as gender based violence (GBV) and child soldiers, and lastly, implications for nursing practice and policy. We use examples from several countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Mozambique. Drawing on key documents from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, current literature, as well as the international experience of the authors, this article presents an overview of forced migration and discusses opportunities for nurses to impact research, practice and policy related to refugee health. PMID:25645484

  9. Force Limit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlik, Ralph; Krause, David; Bremenour, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Force Limit System (FLS) was developed to protect test specimens from inadvertent overload. The load limit value is fully adjustable by the operator and works independently of the test system control as a mechanical (non-electrical) device. When a test specimen is loaded via an electromechanical or hydraulic test system, a chance of an overload condition exists. An overload applied to a specimen could result in irreparable damage to the specimen and/or fixturing. The FLS restricts the maximum load that an actuator can apply to a test specimen. When testing limited-run test articles or using very expensive fixtures, the use of such a device is highly recommended. Test setups typically use electronic peak protection, which can be the source of overload due to malfunctioning components or the inability to react quickly enough to load spikes. The FLS works independently of the electronic overload protection.

  10. Flow mechanotransduction regulates traction forces, intercellular forces, and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Lucas H.; Jahn, Jessica R.; Jung, Joon I.; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Feghhi, Shirin; Han, Sangyoon J.; Rodriguez, Marita L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress through mechanotransduction responses that affect their cytoskeleton and cell-cell contacts. Here, endothelial cells were grown as monolayers on arrays of microposts and exposed to laminar or disturbed flow to examine the relationship among traction forces, intercellular forces, and cell-cell junctions. Cells under laminar flow had traction forces that were higher than those under static conditions, whereas cells under disturbed flow had lower traction forces. The response in adhesion junction assembly matched closely with changes in traction forces since adherens junctions were larger in size for laminar flow and smaller for disturbed flow. Treating the cells with calyculin-A to increase myosin phosphorylation and traction forces caused an increase in adherens junction size, whereas Y-27362 cause a decrease in their size. Since tugging forces across cell-cell junctions can promote junctional assembly, we developed a novel approach to measure intercellular forces and found that these forces were higher for laminar flow than for static or disturbed flow. The size of adherens junctions and tight junctions matched closely with intercellular forces for these flow conditions. These results indicate that laminar flow can increase cytoskeletal tension while disturbed flow decreases cytoskeletal tension. Consequently, we found that changes in cytoskeletal tension in response to shear flow conditions can affect intercellular tension, which in turn regulates the assembly of cell-cell junctions. PMID:22447948

  11. Normal Force and Drag Force in Magnetorheological Finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, C.; Shafrir, S.N.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2010-01-13

    The material removal in magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is known to be controlled by shear stress, tau, which equals drag force, Fd, divided by spot area, As. However, it is unclear how the normal force, Fn, affects the material removal in MRF and how the measured ratio of drag force to normal force Fd/Fn, equivalent to coefficient of friction, is related to material removal. This work studies, for the first time for MRF, the normal force and the measured ratio Fd/Fn as a function of material mechanical properties. Experimental data were obtained by taking spots on a variety of materials including optical glasses and hard ceramics with a spot-taking machine (STM). Drag force and normal force were measured with a dual load cell. Drag force decreases linearly with increasing material hardness. In contrast, normal force increases with hardness for glasses, saturating at high hardness values for ceramics. Volumetric removal rate decreases with normal force across all materials. The measured ratio Fd/Fn shows a strong negative linear correlation with material hardness. Hard materials exhibit a low “coefficient of friction”. The volumetric removal rate increases with the measured ratio Fd/Fn which is also correlated with shear stress, indicating that the measured ratio Fd/Fn is a useful measure of material removal in MRF.

  12. Force measurements during vibration testing

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, D.O.; Coleman, R.G.

    1993-12-31

    Experimental measurements of force into a ``rigid`` test item representing a typical system level vibration test were conducted to evaluate several methods of force measurements. The methods evaluated included: (1) Direct measurement with force gages between the test item and the fixturing; (2) Measurement of the force at the shaker/fixture interface and correcting the force required to drive the fixturing using two methods, (a) mass subtraction and (b) SWAT (sum of weighted accelerations technique), (3) Force deduced from voltage and current needed to drive the test item. All of the methods worked over a limited frequency range of five to a few hundred Hertz. The widest bandwidth was achieved with force at the shaker/fixture interface with SWAT corrections and from the voltage and current measurements.

  13. Microphotonic Forces from Superfluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuslan, D. L.; Harris, G. I.; Baker, C.; Sachkou, Y.; He, X.; Sheridan, E.; Bowen, W. P.

    2016-04-01

    In cavity optomechanics, radiation pressure and photothermal forces are widely utilized to cool and control micromechanical motion, with applications ranging from precision sensing and quantum information to fundamental science. Here, we realize an alternative approach to optical forcing based on superfluid flow and evaporation in response to optical heating. We demonstrate optical forcing of the motion of a cryogenic microtoroidal resonator at a level of 1.46 nN, roughly 1 order of magnitude larger than the radiation pressure force. We use this force to feedback cool the motion of a microtoroid mechanical mode to 137 mK. The photoconvective forces we demonstrate here provide a new tool for high bandwidth control of mechanical motion in cryogenic conditions, while the ability to apply forces remotely, combined with the persistence of flow in superfluids, offers the prospect for new applications.

  14. Future Air Force systems.

    PubMed

    Tremaine, S A

    1986-10-01

    Planning for the future is under way in earnest at the Aeronautical Systems Division (ASD) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It has been statistically established that it takes from 14-16 years from the generation of a new system idea to enter into engineering development. With this unpleasing, but realistic, schedule in mind, ASD has, during the last 3 years, been initiating long-term planning projects that are pre-starts for new system ideas. They are generated from throughout the Air Force and are locally managed and funded. Through this process, which spans from 12-14 months, specific and revolutionary new ideas for the systems of the future are generated. This article addresses more than a dozen specific new ideas in work at ASD today. These ideas range from a need to replace the C-130 type aircraft after the year 2000 to planning a follow-on to the B-18 well into the 21st century. Among other specific projects are investigation into an immortal fighter intended to be free of reliability and maintenance demands for an especially long period of operation, a new training system and advanced trainer to replace the T-38, a transatmospheric vehicle that could operate in the 100,000-500,000 foot flight region (30,480-152,400 m), and a new means of defending against hostile cruise missile launchers and cruise missiles. Other ideas are also addressed. The article concludes with emphasis on systems that can operate hypersonically in and out of the known atmosphere and greater use of airbreathing propulsion systems operating between Mach 3 and Mach 6. PMID:3778403

  15. Chin force in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Obata, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Force generated between the left mandible of violinists and the chinrest of the violin was examined using a force-sensing chinrest developed in this study. A strain-gauge force sensor was built, and it was fixed between the violin's top plate and a chin cup. Fifteen professional/amateur violinists held the violin statically, played musical scales with different sound properties and sounding techniques, as well as an excerpt from a Max Bruch concerto. Peak and mean forces were evaluated for each task. In a separate experiment, lateral movement of the lower teeth due to different levels of voluntary chin force exertion was measured. Static holding forces observed were 15 and 22 N with and without the help of the left hand, respectively. Peak force increased from 16 N at soft dynamics to 20 N at strong dynamics during scales. The force further increased to 29 N with the use of vibrato technique and 35 N during shifts. Tempo and hand position did not affect the force. Playing a Bruch concerto induced a mean peak force of 52 N, ranging from 31 to 82 N among the violinists. The developed force-sensing chinrest could accurately record the generated chin force. Typical chin force to stabilize the violin during ordinary musical performance was less than 30 N, but it could momentarily exceed 50 N when technically demanding musical pieces were performed. The lateral shift of the mandible was fairly small (<0.4 mm) even with high chin-force exertion, possibly due to clenching of the molars. PMID:21952980

  16. Anterior Hip Joint Force Increases with Hip Extension, Decreased Gluteal Force, or Decreased Iliopsoas Force

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cara L.; Sahrmann, Shirley A.; Moran, Daniel W.

    2008-01-01

    Abnormal or excessive force on the anterior hip joint may cause anterior hip pain, subtle hip instability and a tear of the acetabular labrum. We propose that both the pattern of muscle force and hip joint position can affect the magnitude of anterior joint force and thus possibly lead to excessive force and injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of hip joint position and of weakness of the gluteal and iliopsoas muscles on anterior hip joint force. We used a musculoskeletal model to estimate hip joint forces during simulated prone hip extension and supine hip flexion under 4 different muscle force conditions and across a range of hip extension and flexion positions. Weakness of specified muscles was simulated by decreasing the modeled maximum force value for the gluteal muscles during hip extension and the iliopsoas muscle during hip flexion. We found that decreased force contribution from the gluteal muscles during hip extension and the iliopsoas muscle during hip flexion resulted in an increase in the anterior hip joint force. The anterior hip joint force was greater when the hip was in extension than when the hip was in flexion. Further studies are warranted to determine if increased utilization of the gluteal muscles during hip extension and of the iliopsoas muscle during hip flexion, and avoidance of hip extension beyond neutral would be beneficial for people with anterior hip pain, subtle hip instability, or an anterior acetabular labral tear. PMID:17707385

  17. An Integrated Higgs Force Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colella, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    An Integrated Higgs force theory (IHFT) was based on 2 key requirement amplifications: a matter particle/Higgs force was one and inseparable; a matter particle/Higgs force bidirectionally condensed/evaporated from/to super force. These were basis of 5 theories: particle creation, baryogenesis, superpartner/quark decays, spontaneous symmetry breaking, and stellar black holes. Our universe's 129 matter/force particles contained 64 supersymmetric Higgs particles; 9 transient matter particles/Higgs forces decayed to 8 permanent matter particles/Higgs forces; mass was given to a matter particle by its Higgs force and gravitons; and sum of 8 Higgs force energies of 8 permanent matter particles was dark energy. An IHFT's essence is the intimate physical relationships between 8 theories. These theories are independent because physicists in one theory worked independently of physicists in the other seven. An IHFT's premise is without sacrificing their integrities, 8 independent existing theories are replaced by 8 interrelated amplified theories. Requirement amplifications provide interfaces between the 8 theories. Intimate relationships between 8 theories including the above 5 and string, Higgs forces, and Super Universe are described. The sorting category selected was F. PARTICLES AND FIELDS (e.g., F1 Higgs Physics, F10 Alternative Beyond the Standard Model Physics, F11 Dark Sector Theories and Searches, and F12 Particle Cosmology).

  18. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Atsushi; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-05-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollable drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed. PMID:27250433

  19. Theory of Casimir Forces without the Proximity-Force Approximation.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Pérez-Madrid, Agustín; Rubí, J Miguel

    2016-03-18

    We analyze both the attractive and repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces recently reported in experimental investigations. By using a kinetic approach, we obtain the Casimir forces from the power absorbed by the materials. We consider collective material excitations through a set of relaxation times distributed in frequency according to a log-normal function. A generalized expression for these forces for arbitrary values of temperature is obtained. We compare our results with experimental measurements and conclude that the model goes beyond the proximity-force approximation. PMID:27035293

  20. Theory of Casimir Forces without the Proximity-Force Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Pérez-Madrid, Agustín; Rubí, J. Miguel

    2016-03-01

    We analyze both the attractive and repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces recently reported in experimental investigations. By using a kinetic approach, we obtain the Casimir forces from the power absorbed by the materials. We consider collective material excitations through a set of relaxation times distributed in frequency according to a log-normal function. A generalized expression for these forces for arbitrary values of temperature is obtained. We compare our results with experimental measurements and conclude that the model goes beyond the proximity-force approximation.

  1. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  2. Deep atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H.; Drake, B.; Randall, C.; Hansma, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) possesses several desirable imaging features including the ability to produce height profiles as well as two-dimensional images, in fluid or air, at high resolution. AFM has been used to study a vast selection of samples on the scale of angstroms to micrometers. However, current AFMs cannot access samples with vertical topography of the order of 100 μm or greater. Research efforts have produced AFM scanners capable of vertical motion greater than 100 μm, but commercially available probe tip lengths are still typically less than 10 μm high. Even the longest probe tips are below 100 μm and even at this range are problematic. In this paper, we present a method to hand-fabricate “Deep AFM” probes with tips of the order of 100 μm and longer so that AFM can be used to image samples with large scale vertical topography, such as fractured bone samples.

  3. Maximum bow force revisited.

    PubMed

    Mores, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Schelleng [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 53, 26-41 (1973)], Askenfelt [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 86, 503-516 (1989)], Schumacher [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 1985-1998 (1994)], and Schoonderwaldt, Guettler, and Askenfelt [Acta Acust. Acust. 94, 604-622 (2008)] formulated-in different ways-how the maximum bow force relates to bow velocity, bow-bridge distance, string impedance, and friction coefficients. Issues of uncertainty are how to account for friction or for the rotational admittance of the strings. Related measurements at the respective transitions between regimes of Helmholtz motion and non-Helmholtz motion employ a variety of bowing machines and stringed instruments. The related findings include all necessary parameters except the friction coefficients, leaving the underlying models unconfirmed. Here, a bowing pendulum has been constructed which allows precise measurement of relevant bowing parameters, including the friction coefficients. Two cellos are measured across all strings for three different bow-bridge distances. The empirical data suggest that-taking the diverse elements of existing models as options-Schelleng's model combined with Schumacher's velocity term yields the best fit. Furthermore, the pendulum employs a bow driving mechanism with adaptive impedance which discloses that mentioned regimes are stable and transitions between them sometimes require a hysteresis on related parameters. PMID:27586745

  4. Force Limited Vibration Testing Monograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1997-01-01

    The practice of limiting the shaker force in vibration tests was investigated at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in 1990 after the mechanical failure of an aerospace component during a vibration test. Now force limiting is used in almost every major vibration test at JPL and in many vibration tests at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and at many aerospace contractors. The basic ideas behind force limiting have been in the literature for several decades, but the piezo-electric force transducers necessary to conveniently implement force limiting have been available only in the last decade. In 1993, funding was obtained from the NASA headquarters Office of Chief Engineer to develop and document the technology needed to establish force limited vibration testing as a standard approach available to all NASA centers and aerospace contractors. This monograph is the final report on that effort and discusses the history, theory, and applications of the method in some detail.

  5. Entropic force and entanglement system

    SciTech Connect

    Myung, Yun Soo; Kim, Yong-Wan

    2010-05-15

    We introduce the isothermal cavity, static holographic screen, and accelerating surface as holographic screen to study the entropic force in the presence of the Schwarzschild black hole. These may merge to provide a consistent holographic screen to define the entropic force on the stretched horizon near the event horizon. Considering the similarity between the stretched horizon of black hole and the entanglement system, we may define the entropic force in the entanglement system without referring to the source mass.

  6. Coaxial atomic force microscope tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. A.; Aguilar, J. A.; Westervelt, R. M.

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate coaxial atomic force microscope (AFM) tweezers that can trap and place small objects using dielectrophoresis (DEP). An attractive force is generated at the tip of a coaxial AFM probe by applying a radio frequency voltage between the center conductor and a grounded shield; the origin of the force is found to be DEP by measuring the pull-off force versus applied voltage. We show that the coaxial AFM tweezers can perform three-dimensional assembly by picking up a specified silica microsphere, imaging with the microsphere at the end of the tip, and placing it at a target destination.

  7. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V.; Wang, Chengpu

    2004-11-16

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  8. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2006-08-22

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  9. Force As A Momentum Current

    SciTech Connect

    Munera, Hector A.

    2010-07-28

    Advantages of a neo-Cartesian approach to classical mechanics are noted. If conservation of linear momentum is the fundamental principle, Newton's three laws become theorems. A minor paradox in static Newtonian mechanics is identified, and solved by reinterpreting force as a current of momentum. Contact force plays the role of a mere midwife in the exchange of momentum; however, force cannot be eliminated from physics because it provides the numerical value for momentum current. In this sense, in a neo-Cartesian formulation of mechanics the concept of force becomes strengthened rather than weakened.

  10. Adding Value to Force Diagrams: Representing Relative Force Magnitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendel, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all physics instructors recognize the instructional value of force diagrams, and this journal has published several collections of exercises to improve student skill in this area. Yet some instructors worry that too few students perceive the conceptual and problem-solving utility of force diagrams, and over recent years a rich variety of…

  11. Bacterial adhesion force quantification by fluidic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2015-02-01

    Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many cells. The contact time and setpoint dependence of the adhesion forces of E. coli and Streptococcus pyogenes, as well as the sequential detachment of bacteria out of a chain, are shown, revealing distinct force patterns in the detachment curves. This study demonstrates the potential of the FluidFM technology for quantitative bacterial adhesion measurements of cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions that are relevant in biofilms and infection biology.Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many

  12. Atomic Force Microscope Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation (large file)

    This animation is a scientific illustration of the operation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The AFM is used to image the smallest Martian particles using a very sharp tip at the end of one of eight beams.

    The beam of the AFM is set into vibration and brought up to the surface of a micromachined silicon substrate. The substrate has etched in it a series of pits, 5 micrometers deep, designed to hold the Martian dust particles.

    The microscope then maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with the tip.

    At the end of the animation is a 3D representation of the AFM image of a particle that was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress.' The sample was delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Exotic nuclei and nuclear forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    2013-01-01

    I overview new aspects of the structure of exotic nuclei as compared to stable nuclei, focusing on several characteristic effects of nuclear forces. The shell structure of nuclei has been proposed by Mayer and Jensen, and has been considered to be kept valid basically for all nuclei, with well-known magic numbers, 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, …. Nuclear forces were shown, very recently, to change this paradigm. It will be presented that the evolution of shell structure occurs in various ways as more neutrons and/or protons are added, and I will present basic points of this shell evolution in terms of the monopole interaction of nuclear forces. I will discuss three types of nuclear forces. The first one is the tensor force. The tensor force is one of the most fundamental nuclear forces, but its first-order effect on the shell structure has been clarified only recently in studies on exotic nuclei. The tensor force can change the spin-orbit splitting depending on the occupation of specific orbits. This results in changes of the shell structure in many nuclei, and consequently some of Mayer-Jensen's magic numbers are lost and new ones emerge, in certain nuclei. This mechanism can be understood in an intuitive way, meaning that the effect is general and robust. The second type of nuclear forces is central force. I will show a general but unknown property of the central force in the shell-model Hamiltonian that can describe nuclear properties in a good agreement with experiment. I will then demonstrate how it can be incorporated into a simple model of the central force, and will discuss how this force works in the shell evolution. Actually, by combining this central force with the tensor force, one can understand and foresee how the same proton-neutron interaction drives the shell evolution, for examples such as Sn/Sb isotopes, N = 20 nuclei and Ni/Cu isotopes. The distribution of single-particle strength is discussed also in comparison to (e,e‧p) experiment on 48Ca. The shell

  14. Force Generation by Flapping Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P. R.; Donnelly, M.

    1996-11-01

    Aquatic animals like fish use flapping caudal fins to produce axial and cross-stream forces. During WW2, German scientists had built and tested an underwater vehicle powered by similar flapping foils. We have examined the forces produced by a pair of flapping foils. We have examined the forced produced by a pair of flapping foils attached to the tail end of a small axisymmetric cylinder. The foils operate in-phase (called waving), or in anti-phase (called clapping). In a low-speed water tunnel, we have undertaken time-dependent measurements of axial and cross-stream forces and moments that are exerted by the vortex shedding process over the entire body. Phase-matched LDV measurements of vorticity-velocity vectors, as well as limited flow visualization of the periodic vortex shedding process have also been carried out. The direction of the induced velocity within a pair of shed vortices determines the nature of the forces produced, viz., thrust or drag or cross-stream forces. The clapping mode produces a widely dispersed symmetric array of vortices which results in axial forces only (thrust and rag). On the other hand, the vortex array is staggered in the waving mode and cross-stream (maneuvering) forces are then generated.

  15. Dielectrophoresis force of colloidal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hao; Ou-Yang, Daniel

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is the motion of a polarizable colloidal particle in a non­uniform electric field. The magnitude of the DEP force is known to be proportional to the gradient of E2. The DEP force also depends on the relative polarizability of the particle to that of the surrounding medium. Due to its ease of use, DEP has been proposed for a variety of applications to manipulate colloidal particles in a microfluidic setting. However, accurate measurements of the DEP force on colloidal nanoparticles are lacking. A new method is proposed to measure accurately the DEP potential force of colloidal nanoparticles by using confocal fluorescence imaging to determine the density distributions of dilute colloidal nanoparticle in a DEP potential force field. The DEP potential field can be calculated from the particle density distributions since the spatial distribution of the particle number density follows the Boltzmann distribution of the DEP potential energy. The validity of the measured DEP force is tested by examining the force as a function of the E field strength and particle size. The classic Maxwell­Wagner­O'Konski is found to be inadequate to fully describe the frequency dependence of the DEP force. NSF 0928299, Emulsion Polymer Institute, Department of Physics of Lehigh University.

  16. The Forced Hard Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, various examples of the Duffing type forced spring equation with epsilon positive, are studied. Since [epsilon] is positive, all solutions to the associated homogeneous equation are periodic and the same is true with the forcing applied. The damped equation exhibits steady state trajectories with the interesting…

  17. Hebrew as a Binding Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischler, Ben-Zion

    1990-01-01

    The role of the Hebrew language as a cohesive force and the history of modern Hebrew instruction are chronicled. It is proposed that despite the scattering of its speakers and periods of use only as a literary or business language, Hebrew has been a binding force for the Jewish people. It was with considerable struggle that Hebrew gained…

  18. Pseudo force acting between bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Abhinav Ray; Deva, Anish; Sarma, Arun

    It has been shown that a non-contact force acts between two macroscopic physical objects held close together, which is not associated with the gravitational and electrostatic force. An experiment was conducted with objects of different mass, material and geometry to find the magnitude and properties of this apparent or pseudo force. The order of magnitude was found to be 10-5 and it remained constant for all types of objects while only the coefficient increased as the distance between the objects reduced. It only started acting at small distances and failed to make a body move if it experienced static friction from any contact surface. The nature of the force was found to be attractive as well as repulsive. Due to gravitation being a solely attractive force, it was eliminated as a possible reason for the pseudo force. The experiment was performed twice, once by grounding the apparatus and then again without grounding. The order of the force remained the same for both cases. As the test objects were held by hand, they were grounded through the human body. Also, none of the objects used were in contact with each other for the duration of this work, preventing any contact electrification. Due to these factors, the force was not considered electrostatic in nature.

  19. How Does Force Affect Motion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    Whether playing soccer at recess, walking to lunch, or sitting at their desk, children encounter forces every moment of their lives. The connection between force and motion is absolutely amazing to children, so anyone working with them better be prepared for the battery of tough questions they ask: "What made the ball move that way? Why does a…

  20. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces.

    PubMed

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces. PMID:27097797

  1. Entropic forces in Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Nico

    2014-12-01

    Interest in the concept of entropic forces has risen considerably since Verlinde proposed in 2011 to interpret the force in Newton's second law and gravity as entropic forces. Brownian motion—the motion of a small particle (pollen) driven by random impulses from the surrounding molecules—may be the first example of a stochastic process in which such forces are expected to emerge. In this article, it is shown that at least two types of entropic force can be identified in three-dimensional Brownian motion. This analysis yields simple derivations of known results of Brownian motion, Hooke's law, and—applying an external (non-radial) force—Curie's law and the Langevin-Debye equation.

  2. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces.

  3. Gene regulation by mechanical forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oluwole, B. O.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Endothelial cells are subjected to various mechanical forces in vivo from the flow of blood across the luminal surface of the blood vessel. The purpose of this review was to examine the data available on how these mechanical forces, in particular cyclic strain, affect the expression and regulation of endothelial cell function. Studies from various investigators using models of cyclic strain in vitro have shown that various vasoactive mediators such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin are induced by the effect of mechanical deformation, and that the expression of these mediators may be regulated at the transcription level by mechanical forces. There also seems to be emerging evidence that endothelial cells may also act as mechanotransducers, whereby the transmission of external forces induces various cytoskeletal changes and second messenger cascades. Furthermore, it seems these forces may act on specific response elements of promoter genes.

  4. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces

    PubMed Central

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces. PMID:27097797

  5. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy by Dissipative Electrostatic Force Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Yoichi; Topple, Jessica; Schumacher, Zeno; Grutter, Peter

    2015-11-01

    We report an experimental technique for Kelvin probe force microscopy using the dissipation signal of frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy for bias-voltage feedback. It features a simple implementation and faster scanning as it requires no low-frequency modulation. The dissipation is caused by the oscillating electrostatic force that is coherent with the tip oscillation, which is induced by a sinusoidally oscillating voltage applied between the tip and sample. We analyze the effect of the phase of the oscillating force on the frequency shift and dissipation and found that the relative phase of 90° that causes only the dissipation is the most appropriate for Kelvin-probe-force-microscopy measurements. The present technique requires a significantly smaller ac-voltage amplitude by virtue of enhanced force detection due to the resonance enhancement and the use of fundamental flexural-mode oscillation for electrostatic force detection. This feature will be of great importance in the electrical characterizations of technically relevant materials whose electrical properties are influenced by the externally applied electric field as is the case in semiconductor electronic devices.

  6. The new neutron rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gridnev, K. A.; Gridnev, D. K.; Tarasov, V. N.; Tarasov, D. V.; Viñas, X.; Greiner, W.

    2014-07-23

    Using HF+BCS method with Skyrme forces we analyze the neutron drip line. It is shown that around magic and new magic numbers the drip line may form stability peninsulas. It is shown that the location of these peninsulas does not depend on the choice of Skyrme forces. It is found that the size of the peninsulas is sensitive to the choice of Skyrme forces and the most extended peninsulas appear with the SkI2 set.

  7. Van der Waals Forces in Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacBeth, Melissa; Garbini, Joseph; Sidles, John; Dougherty, William; Chao, Shih-Hui

    2001-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy detects modulated spin-gradient forces by means of a soft, high phQ cantilever. When the magnetic tip of the cantilever is brought close to the sample surface, static forces significantly change the net restoring force, altering the cantilever mechanical resonance frequency. This frequency shift can be very large compared to the width of the cantilever resonance. As previously demonstrated, active feedback control of the cantilever motion greatly improves cantilever dynamics. The control algorithm is obtained by formal optimal control techniques and implemented with a digital signal processor (DSP). We have recently enabled the DSP to continuously evaluate the frequency of the cantilever as the tip approaches the sample and seamlessly adapt control parameters for optimized performance. Tip-sample approach under adaptive control can avoid snap-in and obtain much smaller separations than uncontrolled approach, and the static potential is reliably characterized.

  8. Force reconstruction from tapping mode force microscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payam, Amir F.; Martin-Jimenez, Daniel; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    Fast, accurate, and robust nanomechanical measurements are intensely studied in materials science, applied physics, and molecular biology. Amplitude modulation force microscopy (tapping mode) is the most established nanoscale characterization technique of surfaces for air and liquid environments. However, its quantitative capabilities lag behind its high spatial resolution and robustness. We develop a general method to transform the observables into quantitative force measurements. The force reconstruction algorithm has been deduced on the assumption that the observables (amplitude and phase shift) are slowly varying functions of the tip-surface separation. The accuracy and applicability of the method is validated by numerical simulations and experiments. The method is valid for liquid and air environments, small and large free amplitudes, compliant and rigid materials, and conservative and non-conservative forces.

  9. Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Charlson, R J; Schwartz, S E; Hales, J M; Cess, R D; Coakley, J A; Hansen, J E; Hofmann, D J

    1992-01-24

    Although long considered to be of marginal importance to global climate change, tropospheric aerosol contributes substantially to radiative forcing, and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol in particular has imposed a major perturbation to this forcing. Both the direct scattering of shortwavelength solar radiation and the modification of the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by sulfate aerosol particles increase planetary albedo, thereby exerting a cooling influence on the planet. Current climate forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate is estimated to be -1 to -2 watts per square meter, globally averaged. This perturbation is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign. Thus, the aerosol forcing has likely offset global greenhouse warming to a substantial degree. However, differences in geographical and seasonal distributions of these forcings preclude any simple compensation. Aerosol effects must be taken into account in evaluating anthropogenic influences on past, current, and projected future climate and in formulating policy regarding controls on emission of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide. Resolution of such policy issues requires integrated research on the magnitude and geographical distribution of aerosol climate forcing and on the controlling chemical and physical processes. PMID:17842894

  10. Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlson, R. J.; Schwartz, S. E.; Hales, J. M.; Cess, R. D.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.; Hansen, J. E.; Hofmann, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Although long considered to be of marginal importance to global climate change, tropospheric aerosol contributes substantially to radiative forcing, and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol, in particular, has imposed a major perturbation to this forcing. Both the direct scattering of short-wavelength solar radiation and the modification of the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by sulfate aerosol particles increase planetary albedo, thereby exerting a cooling influence on the planet. Current climate forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate is estimated to be -1 to -2 watts per square meter, globally averaged. This perturbation is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign. Thus, the aerosol forcing has likely offset global greenhouse warming to a substantial degree. However, differences in geographical and seasonal distributions of these forcings preclude any simple compensation. Aerosol effects must be taken into account in evaluating anthropogenic influences on past, current, and projected future climate and in formulating policy regarding controls on emission of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide. Resolution of such policy issues requires integrated research on the magnitude and geographical distribution of aerosol climate forcing and on the controlling chemical and physical processes.