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Sample records for sleep-inducing lipid oleamide

  1. Mechanisms involved in oleamide-induced vasorelaxation in rat mesenteric resistance arteries

    PubMed Central

    Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Shaw, Sean; Imig, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acid amides are a new class of signaling lipids that have been implicated in diverse physiological and pathological conditions. Oleamide is a fatty acid amide that induces vasorelaxation. Here, we investigated the mechanisms behind the vasorelaxation effect of oleamide in rat mesenteric resistance arteries. Oleamide-induced concentration dependent (0.01 ?M–10?M) vasorelaxation in mesenteric resistance arteries. This relaxation was unaffected by the presence of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors. The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor antagonist, AM251 and the non-CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptor antagonist, O-1918, attenuated the oleamide vasodilatory response, however the cannabinoid CB2 receptor antagonist, AM630, did not affect the vascular response. Moreover, inhibition of the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1 receptor with capsazepine shifted the oleamide-induced vasorelaxation response to the right. In agreement with the vascular functional data, the cannabinoid CB1 and TRPV1 receptor proteins were expressed in mesenteric resistance arteries but cannabinoid CB2 receptors and the FAAH enzyme were not. In endothelium-denuded arteries, the oleamide-mediated vasorelaxation was attenuated and cannabinoid CB1 or non-CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptor blockade did not further reduce the dilatory response whereas TRPV1 antagonism further decreased the response. These findings indicate that cannabinoid receptors on the endothelium and endothelium-independent TRPV1 receptors contribute to the oleamide vasodilatory response. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the oleamide-induced vasorelaxation is mediated, in part, by cannabinoid CB1 receptors, non-CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptors, and TRPV1 receptors in rat mesenteric resistance arteries. These mechanisms are overlapping in respect to oleamide-induced mesenteric resistance artery dilation. PMID:19326479

  2. Enhanced radiosensitization of p53 mutant cells by oleamide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Chung, Da Yeon; Lee, Su-Jae; Ja Jhon, Gil; Lee, Yun-Sil . E-mail: yslee@kcch.re.kr

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Effect of oleamide, an endogenous fatty-acid primary amide, on tumor cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) has never before been explored. Methods and Materials: NCI H460, human lung cancer cells, and human astrocytoma cell lines, U87 and U251, were used. The cytotoxicity of oleamide alone or in combination with IR was determined by clonogenic survival assay, and induction of apoptosis was estimated by FACS analysis. Protein expressions were confirmed by Western blotting, and immunofluorescence analysis of Bax by use of confocal microscopy was also performed. The combined effect of IR and oleamide to suppress tumor growth was studied by use of xenografts in the thighs of nude mice. Results: Oleamide in combination with IR had a synergistic effect that decreased clonogenic survival of lung-carcinoma cell lines and also sensitized xenografts in nude mice. Enhanced induction of apoptosis of the cells by the combined treatment was mediated by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which resulted in the activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3 accompanied by cytochrome c release and Bid cleavage. The synergistic effects of the combined treatment were more enhanced in p53 mutant cells than in p53 wild-type cells. In p53 wild-type cells, both oleamide and radiation induced Bax translocation to mitochondria. On the other hand, in p53 mutant cells, radiation alone slightly induced Bax translocation to mitochondria, whereas oleamide induced a larger translocation. Conclusions: Oleamide may exhibit synergistic radiosensitization in p53 mutant cells through p53-independent Bax translocation to mitochondria.

  3. [INFLUENCE OF OLEAMIDE OF WATER AND ION TRANSPORT IN THE OSMOREGULATORY ORGANS].

    PubMed

    Shakhmatova, E I; Bogolepova, A E; Dubina, M V; Natochin, Yu V

    2015-01-01

    Application of oleamide (final concentration of 10 μM) at the skin basal surface of the frog, Rana temporaria L., augmented the short-circuit current (SCC) from 59.8 ± 2.5 to 78.2 ± 1.4 μA/cm2. Oleamide added to the serous membrane of the frog urinary bladder at a final dose of 1 μM induced more than 30-fold increase of osmotic permeability. The addition of arginine-vasotocin on the background of oleamide action further increased SCC across the isolated frog skin and osmotic permeability of the frog urinary bladder. Intraperitoneal injection of oleamide at a dose of 0.1 mM/100 g BW to water-loaded non-anesthetized Wistar rats decreased diuresis by 22%, enhanced solute-free water reabsorption and urinary sodium excretion by 31% and 55% respectively, but did not affect the renal potassium excretion. The results obtained provide evidence of similarity of oleamide and neurohypophyseal hormones effects on water and ion transport in epithelial cells of osmoregulatory organs in vertebrates. PMID:26983280

  4. Efficiency Enhancement of Inverted Structure Perovskite Solar Cells via Oleamide Doping of PCBM Electron Transport Layer.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Wu, Qiliang; Zhou, Pengcheng; Li, Yi; Chen, Xiang; Liu, Qing; Zhu, Jun; Dai, Songyuan; Lu, Yalin; Yang, Shangfeng

    2015-06-24

    An amphiphilic surfactant, oleamide, was applied to dope the PCBM electron transport layer (ETL) of inverted structure perovskite solar cells (ISPSCs), resulting in a dramatic efficiency enhancement. Under the optimized oleamide doping ratio of 5.0 wt %, the power conversion efficiency of the CH3NH3PbIxCl(3-x) perovskite-based ISPSC device is enhanced from 10.05% to 12.69%, and this is primarily due to the increases of both fill factor and short-circuit current. According to the surface morphology study of the perovskite/PCBM bilayer film, oleamide doping improves the coverage of PCBM ETL onto the perovskite layer, and this is beneficial for the interfacial contact between the perovskite layer and the Ag cathode and consequently the electron transport from perovskite to the Ag cathode. Such an improved electron transport induced by oleamide doping is further evidenced by the impedance spectroscopic study, revealing the prohibited electron-hole recombination at the interface between the perovskite layer and the Ag cathode. PMID:26053101

  5. Growth inhibition and possible mechanism of oleamide against the toxin-producing cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-843.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jihai; He, Yaxian; Li, Fan; Zhang, Huiling; Chen, Anwei; Luo, Si; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Oleamide, a fatty acid derivative, shows inhibitory effect against the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. The EC50 of oleamide on the growth of M. aeruginosa NIES-843 was 8.60 ± 1.20 mg/L. In order to elucidate the possible mechanism of toxicity of oleamide against M. aeruginosa, chlorophyll fluorescence transient, cellular ultrastructure, fatty acids composition and the transcription of the mcyB gene involved in microcystins synthesis were studied. The results of chlorophyll fluorescence transient showed that oleamide could destruct the electron accepting side of the photosystem II of M. aeruginosa NIES-843. Cellular ultrastructure examination indicated that the destruction of fatty acid constituents, the distortion of thylakoid membrane and the loss of integrity of cell membrane were associated with oleamide treatment and concentration. The damage of cellular membrane increased the release of microcystins from intact cells into the medium. Results presented in this study provide new information on the possible mechanisms involved and potential utilization of oleamide as an algicide in cyanobacterial bloom control. PMID:26547872

  6. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits growth of Caco-2 colon cancer cells: possible mediation by oleamide.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Kim EJ; Jun JG; Park HS; Kim SM; Ha YL; Park JH

    2002-07-01

    We have previously observed that dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibited colon tumorigenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in rats. The present study was performed to determine the mechanisms by which CLA inhibits colon cancer cell growth. CLA markedly inhibited Caco-2 cell growth, while linoleic acid (LA) slightly increased growth. Both CLA and LA increased the production of material reactive to antibodies against prostaglandin (PG)E2 and leukotriene (LT)B4, estimated by a competitive enzyme immunoassays (EIA), in a dose-dependent manner. However, the magnitude of the increase was markedly higher with CLA than that with LA, suggesting that this material was not PGE2 or LTB4. The active compound was isolated by thin-layer chromatography and the nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectra revealed that the structure was identical to that of oleamide. The purified oleamide inhibited cell growth and cross-reacted with the EIA. These results indicate that inhibition of Caco-2 cell growth by CLA may be due in part to increased oleamide production.

  7. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits growth of Caco-2 colon cancer cells: possible mediation by oleamide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ji; Jun, Jong-Gab; Park, Hyun Suh; Kim, Si-Min; Ha, Yeong Lae; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2002-01-01

    We have previously observed that dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibited colon tumorigenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in rats. The present study was performed to determine the mechanisms by which CLA inhibits colon cancer cell growth. CLA markedly inhibited Caco-2 cell growth, while linoleic acid (LA) slightly increased growth. Both CLA and LA increased the production of material reactive to antibodies against prostaglandin (PG)E2 and leukotriene (LT)B4, estimated by a competitive enzyme immunoassays (EIA), in a dose-dependent manner. However, the magnitude of the increase was markedly higher with CLA than that with LA, suggesting that this material was not PGE2 or LTB4. The active compound was isolated by thin-layer chromatography and the nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectra revealed that the structure was identical to that of oleamide. The purified oleamide inhibited cell growth and cross-reacted with the EIA. These results indicate that inhibition of Caco-2 cell growth by CLA may be due in part to increased oleamide production. PMID:12174903

  8. Rare Case of Rapidly Worsening REM Sleep Induced Bradycardia

    PubMed Central

    Duba, Ayyappa S.; Jasty, Suneetha; Mahajan, Ankit; Kodadhala, Vijay; Khan, Raza; Rai, Prithviraj; Ghazvini, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Sinoatrial arrest also known as sinus pause occurs when sinoatrial node of the heart transiently ceases to generate the electrical impulse necessary for the myocardium to contract. It may last from 2.0 seconds to several minutes. Etiologies of sinoatrial arrest can be complex and heterogeneous. During rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, sinus arrests unrelated to apnea or hypopnea are very rare and only a few cases have been reported. Here we report a case of 36-year-old male with no significant past medical history who presented to our hospital after a syncopal episode at night. Physical examination showed no cardiac or neurological abnormalities and initial EKG and neuroimaging were normal. Overnight telemonitor recorded several episodes of bradyarrhythmia with sinus arrest that progressively lengthened over time. Sleep study was done which confirmed that sinus arrests occurred more during REM sleep and are unrelated to apnea or hypopnea. Electrophysiology studies showed sinus nodal dysfunction with no junctional escape, subsequently a dual chamber pacemaker placed for rapidly worsening case of REM sleep induced bradycardia. PMID:26351588

  9. Preventive Effects of a Fermented Dairy Product against Alzheimer’s Disease and Identification of a Novel Oleamide with Enhanced Microglial Phagocytosis and Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ano, Yasuhisa; Ozawa, Makiko; Kutsukake, Toshiko; Sugiyama, Shinya; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Aruto; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ever-increasing number of patients with dementia worldwide, fundamental therapeutic approaches to this condition have not been established. Epidemiological studies suggest that intake of fermented dairy products prevents cognitive decline in the elderly. However, the active compounds responsible for the effect remain to be elucidated. The present study aims to elucidate the preventive effects of dairy products on Alzheimer’s disease and to identify the responsible component. Here, in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (5xFAD), intake of a dairy product fermented with Penicillium candidum had preventive effects on the disease by reducing the accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) and hippocampal inflammation (TNF-α and MIP-1α production), and enhancing hippocampal neurotrophic factors (BDNF and GDNF). A search for preventive substances in the fermented dairy product identified oleamide as a novel dual-active component that enhanced microglial Aβ phagocytosis and anti-inflammatory activity towards LPS stimulation in vitro and in vivo. During the fermentation, oleamide was synthesized from oleic acid, which is an abundant component of general dairy products owing to lipase enzymatic amidation. The present study has demonstrated the preventive effect of dairy products on Alzheimer’s disease, which was previously reported only epidemiologically. Moreover, oleamide has been identified as an active component of dairy products that is considered to reduce Aβ accumulation via enhanced microglial phagocytosis, and to suppress microglial inflammation after Aβ deposition. Because fermented dairy products such as camembert cheese are easy to ingest safely as a daily meal, their consumption might represent a preventive strategy for dementia. PMID:25760987

  10. Preventive effects of a fermented dairy product against Alzheimer's disease and identification of a novel oleamide with enhanced microglial phagocytosis and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Ano, Yasuhisa; Ozawa, Makiko; Kutsukake, Toshiko; Sugiyama, Shinya; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Aruto; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ever-increasing number of patients with dementia worldwide, fundamental therapeutic approaches to this condition have not been established. Epidemiological studies suggest that intake of fermented dairy products prevents cognitive decline in the elderly. However, the active compounds responsible for the effect remain to be elucidated. The present study aims to elucidate the preventive effects of dairy products on Alzheimer's disease and to identify the responsible component. Here, in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (5xFAD), intake of a dairy product fermented with Penicillium candidum had preventive effects on the disease by reducing the accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) and hippocampal inflammation (TNF-α and MIP-1α production), and enhancing hippocampal neurotrophic factors (BDNF and GDNF). A search for preventive substances in the fermented dairy product identified oleamide as a novel dual-active component that enhanced microglial Aβ phagocytosis and anti-inflammatory activity towards LPS stimulation in vitro and in vivo. During the fermentation, oleamide was synthesized from oleic acid, which is an abundant component of general dairy products owing to lipase enzymatic amidation. The present study has demonstrated the preventive effect of dairy products on Alzheimer's disease, which was previously reported only epidemiologically. Moreover, oleamide has been identified as an active component of dairy products that is considered to reduce Aβ accumulation via enhanced microglial phagocytosis, and to suppress microglial inflammation after Aβ deposition. Because fermented dairy products such as camembert cheese are easy to ingest safely as a daily meal, their consumption might represent a preventive strategy for dementia. PMID:25760987

  11. [The role of the delta sleep-inducing peptide in the formation of neuropathological syndromes].

    PubMed

    Shandra, A A; Godlevski?, L S; Vast'ianov, R S; Brusentsov, A I; Moalla, I; Nikel', B

    1995-09-01

    The authors considered the pathogenetic role of delta-sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) in different neuropathological syndromes development and manifestation. According to own as well as published in the literature data authors showed the parkinsonian and the rotational syndromes development following DSIP central administration. Briefly, DSIP is a neuropeptide which play significant role in the mechanisms of development of different neuropathological syndromes, namely, epileptic, parkinsonian, withdrawal, rotational and others syndromes. PMID:8581045

  12. On the Lipid Composition of Human Meibum and Tears: Comparative Analysis of Nonpolar Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Butovich, Igor A.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To qualitatively compare the nonpolar lipids present in meibomian gland (MG) secretions (samples T1) with aqueous tears (AT) collected from the lower tear menisci of healthy, non-dry eye volunteers using either glass microcapillaries (samples T2) or Schirmer test strips (samples T3). METHODS Samples T1 to T3 were analyzed with the use of high-pressure liquid chromatography/positive ion mode atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Where possible, the unknown lipids were compared with known standards. RESULTS Samples T1 had the simplest lipid composition among all the tested specimens. Samples T2 and T3 were similar to each other but were noticeably different from samples T1. In addition to all the compounds detected in samples T1, lower molecular weight wax esters and other compounds were found in samples T2 and T3. No appreciable amounts of fatty acid amides (e.g., oleamide), ceramides, or monoacyl glycerols were routinely detected. The occasionally observed minor signals of oleamide (m/z 282) in samples T3 were attributed to the contamination of the samples with common plasticizers routinely found in plastic ware extractives and organic solvents. CONCLUSIONS The MG is a prominent source of lipids for the tear film. However, it would have been a mistake to exclude from consideration other likely sources of lipids such as conjunctiva, cornea, and tears produced by the lacrimal glands. These data showed that lipids in AT are more complex than MG secretions, which necessitates more cautious interpretation of the functions of the latter in the tear film. PMID:18487374

  13. Effects of delta-sleep-inducing peptide in cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Shandra, A A; Godlevskii, L S; Brusentsov, A I; Vast'yanov, R S; Karlyuga, V A; Dzygal, A F; Nikel, B

    1998-01-01

    Experimental studies were carried out to investigate the neuroprotective effects of delta sleep-inducing peptide in animals with cerebral ischemia induced by bilateral compression of both carotid arteries, and to compare the efficacy of this peptide with that of MK-801. These studies led to the conclusion that the peptide had pronounced anti-ischemic effects, which were evident within 24 h and consisted of reductions in the severity of postural abnormalities in rats with bilateral cerebral ischemia, along with a reduction in lethality. Comparison of the efficacies of peptide and MK-801 showed the peptide to have the greater neuroprotective effect. These results are regarded as providing an experimental basis for using the peptide as a therapeutic agent in patients with stroke. PMID:9762721

  14. Delta-sleep inducing peptide entrapment in the charged macroporous matrices.

    PubMed

    Sukhanova, Tatiana V; Artyukhov, Alexander A; Gurevich, Yakov M; Semenikhina, Marina A; Prudchenko, Igor A; Shtilman, Mikhail I; Markvicheva, Elena A

    2014-09-01

    Various biomolecules, for example proteins, peptides etc., entrapped in polymer matrices, impact interactions between matrix and cells, including stimulation of cell adhesion and proliferation. Delta-sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) possesses numerous beneficial properties, including its abilities in burn treatment and neuronal protection. DSIP entrapment in two macroporous polymer matrices based on copolymer of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and methylen-bis-acrylamide (Co-DMAEMA-MBAA) and copolymer of acrylic acid and methylen-bis-acrylamide (Co-AA-MBAA) has been studied. Quite 100% of DSIP has been entrapped into positively charged Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix, while the quantity of DSIP adsorbed on negatively charged Co-AA-MBAA was only 2-6%. DSIP release from Co-DMAEMA-MBAA was observed in saline solutions (0.9% NaCl and PBS) while there was no DSIP release in water or 25% ethanol, thus ionic strength was a reason of this process. PMID:25063142

  15. Immunohistochemical mapping of delta sleep-inducing peptide in the cat brain and hypophysis. Relationships with the LHRH system and corticotropes.

    PubMed

    Charnay, Y; Léger, L; Golaz, J; Sallanon, M; Vallet, P G; Guntern, R; Bouras, C; Constantinidis, J; Jouvet, M; Tissot, R

    1990-01-01

    Using the indirect immunofluorescence method, the distribution of the delta sleep-inducing peptide was studied in the cat brain and hypophysis. Delta sleep-inducing peptide-like-immunoreactive cell bodies mostly visualized in colchicine-pretreated animals were mainly found scattered throughout the diagonal band of Broca, the ventral septum and the anterior hypothalamic areas. A few immunoreactive cell somata were also seen in the ventrolateral hypothalamic area and more occasionally in the triangular septal nucleus. The heaviest concentrations of delta sleep-inducing peptide-like-immunoreactive varicose fibres and terminal-like structures were observed in the septo-preoptic region, in the median eminence and pituitary stalk. Some other brain regions supplied with few delta sleep-inducing peptide-immunoreactive fibres included the fimbria-fornix, the dorsal part of the subfornical organ, the medial habenular nucleus and more caudally, the periaqueductal gray. Elution-restaining experiments revealed that delta sleep-inducing peptide-like immunoreactivity frequently occurred in luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-immunoreactive neurons and vice versa. At the pituitary level, delta sleep-inducing peptide-like immunoreactivity was detected in most, if not all, melanocorticotropes of the pars intermedia and further in a large subpopulation of corticotropes mainly located in the zona tuberalis of the pars distalis. Taken together these anatomical findings support the view that delta sleep-inducing peptide (or a closely related molecular form) could play a modulatory role at various levels of the hypothalamo-pituitary system. PMID:2222894

  16. Slow Wave Sleep Induced by GABA Agonist Tiagabine Fails to Benefit Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Gordon B.; Wilhelm, Ines; Ma, Ying; Groch, Sabine; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Mölle, Matthias; Born, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Slow wave sleep (SWS) plays a pivotal role in consolidating memories. Tiagabine has been shown to increase SWS in favor of REM sleep without impacting subjective sleep. However, it is unknown whether this effect is paralleled by an improved sleep-dependent consolidation of memory. Design: This double-blind within-subject crossover study tested sensitivity of overnight retention of declarative neutral and emotional materials (word pairs, pictures) as well as a procedural memory task (sequence finger tapping) to oral administration of placebo or 10 mg tiagabine (at 22:30). Participants: Fourteen healthy young men aged 21.9 years (range 18-28 years). Measurements and Results: Tiagabine significantly increased the time spent in SWS and decreased REM sleep compared to placebo. Tiagabine also enhanced slow wave activity (0.5-4.0 Hz) and density of < 1 Hz slow oscillations during NREM sleep. Fast (12-15 Hz) and slow (9-12 Hz) spindle activity, in particular that occurring phase-locked to the slow oscillation cycle, was decreased following tiagabine. Despite signs of deeper and more SWS, overnight retention of memory tested after sleep the next evening (19:30) was generally not improved after tiagabine, but on average even lower than after placebo, with this impairing effect reaching significance for procedural sequence finger tapping. Conclusions: Our data show that increasing slow wave sleep with tiagabine does not improve memory consolidation. Possibly this is due to functional differences from normal slow wave sleep, i.e., the concurrent suppressive influence of tiagabine on phase-locked spindle activity. Citation: Feld GB; Wilhelm I; Ma Y; Groch S; Binkofski F; Mölle M; Born J. Slow wave sleep induced by GABA agonist tiagabine fails to benefit memory consolidation. SLEEP 2013;36(9):1317-1326. PMID:23997364

  17. Differences in sleep-induced hypoxia between A/J and DBA/2J mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Arnon E; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Balbir, Alexander; Krishnan, Jerry A; Schwartz, Alan R; Smith, Philip L; Fitzgerald, Robert S; Tankersley, Clarke G; Shirahata, Machiko; O'Donnell, Christopher P

    2003-12-15

    In obstructive sleep apnea, hypoxic ventilatory sensitivity may affect the degree of hypoxic stress and sleep disruption that occurs in response to upper airway obstruction. We induced (1) sleep-induced hypoxia (SIH) or (2) sleep fragmentation (SF) without hypoxia for 5 days (12-hour light/dark cycle) in two inbred mouse strains with low (A/J) and high (DBA/2J) hypoxic ventilatory sensitivities. During SIH, the time to arousal (26.4 +/- 1.1 vs. 21.3 +/- 1.5 seconds, p<0.025) and the severity of hypoxic exposure (nadir FIO2: 11.5 +/- 0.4 vs. 13.6 +/- 0.1%, p<0.002) was greater in A/J than DBA/2J mice. Furthermore, A/J mice had a greater frequency of hypoxic events (640 +/- 29 vs. 368 +/- 33 events per 24 hours, p<0.001) and total sleep time (47.5 +/- 2.8% vs. 26.5 +/- 2.4% per 24 hours, p<0.0001) during SIH than DBA/2J mice. In contrast, the event characteristics and total sleep time during SF were the same in both strains. Furthermore, in the light phase, both strains showed a longer (p<0.01) time to arousal during SIH and SF compared with the dark phase. We conclude that genetic background can influence respiratory events and sleep architecture during SIH and that the arousal threshold is subject to circadian variation. Our data imply that individuals with low hypoxic sensitivity may be at a greater risk for hypoxia-related complications of obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:14512266

  18. Delta-sleep-inducing peptide and its analogs and the serotoninergic system in the development of anticonvulsive influences.

    PubMed

    Shandra, A A; Godlevskii, L S; Brusentsov, A I; Petrashevich, V P; Vast'yanov, R S; Nikel, B; Mikhaleva, I I

    1998-01-01

    Experiments on rats were carried out to study the effects of administration of delta-sleep-inducing peptide (DSIP) and its analogs (9-14) into the reticular part of the substantia nigra and ventral hippocampus on picrotoxin- and kainate-induced epileptic activity. Additionally, the uptake of [3H]tryptophan by brain structures was studied. Intranigral and intrahippocampal microinjections of peptide and its analogs were found to have anticonvulsant effects against both picrotoxin- and kainate-induced epileptic activity. Studies of the effects of DSIP and its structural analogs on the uptake of tryptophan by brain structures showed that peptides predominantly increased uptake of this amino acid. It is suggested that brain structures which modulate tryptophan uptake are largely responsible for the anticonvulsant actions of DSIP and its analogs. The results obtained here provide evidence that the serotoninergic system is not of key importance in mediating the anticonvulsant effects of DSIP and its analogs. PMID:9809291

  19. Effect of Leu-enkephalin and delta sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) on endogenous noradrenaline release by rat brain synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lozhanets, V.V.; Anosov, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    The nonapeptide delta-sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) causes specific changes in the encephalogram of recipient animals: It prolongs the phase of long-wave or delta sleep. The cellular mechanism of action of DSIP has not yet been explained. To test the hyporhesis that this peptide or its degradation product may be presynaptic regulators of catecholamine release, the action of Leu-enkephaline, DSIP, and amino acids composing DSIP on release of endogenous noradrenalin (NA) from synaptosomes during depolarization was compared. Subcellular fractions from cerebral hemisphere of noninbred male albino rats were isolated. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was determined in the suspension of synaptosomes before and after addition of 0.5% Triton X-100. The results were subjected to statistical analysis, using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney nonparametric test.

  20. Degradation and aggregation of delta sleep-inducing peptide (DSIP) and two analogs in plasma and serum

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, M.V.; Saegesser, B.; Schoenenberger, G.A.

    1987-07-01

    The biostability of DSIP (delta sleep-inducing peptide) and two analogs in blood was investigated in order to determine if rates of inactivation contribute to variable effects in vivo. Incubation of DSIP in human or rat blood led to release of products having retention times on a gel filtration column equivalent to Trp. Formation of products was dependent on temperature, time, and species. Incubation of /sup 125/I-N-Tyr-DSIP and /sup 125/I-N-Tyr-P-DSIP, a phosphorylated analog, revealed slower degradation and, in contrast to DSIP, produced complex formation. An excess of unlabeled material did not displace the radioactivity supporting the assumption of non-specific binding/aggregation. It was concluded that the rapid disappearance of injected DSIP in blood was due to degradation, whereas complex formation together with slower degradation resulted in longer persistence of apparently intact analogs. Whether this could explain the sometimes stronger and more consistent effects of DSIP-analogs remains to be examined.

  1. OAT LIPIDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oat has a higher lipid concentration than other cereals, and the lipid concentration is genetically controlled and highly heritable. Millers prefer low lipid oats, to minimize both storage problems and fat calories in food products, whereas for animal feed, high-lipid oat is preferred because of th...

  2. Keys to Lipid Selection in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Catalysis: Structural Flexibility, Gating Residues and Multiple Binding Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Giulia; Bauer, Inga; Campomanes, Pablo; Cavalli, Andrea; Armirotti, Andrea; Girotto, Stefania; Rothlisberger, Ursula; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) regulates the endocannabinoid system cleaving primarily the lipid messenger anandamide. FAAH has been well characterized over the years and, importantly, it represents a promising drug target to treat several diseases, including inflammatory-related diseases and cancer. But its enzymatic mechanism for lipid selection to specifically hydrolyze anandamide, rather than similar bioactive lipids, remains elusive. Here, we clarify this mechanism in FAAH, examining the role of the dynamic paddle, which is formed by the gating residues Phe432 and Trp531 at the boundary between two cavities that form the FAAH catalytic site (the “membrane-access” and the “acyl chain-binding” pockets). We integrate microsecond-long MD simulations of wild type and double mutant model systems (Phe432Ala and Trp531Ala) of FAAH, embedded in a realistic membrane/water environment, with mutagenesis and kinetic experiments. We comparatively analyze three fatty acid substrates with different hydrolysis rates (anandamide > oleamide > palmitoylethanolamide). Our findings identify FAAH’s mechanism to selectively accommodate anandamide into a multi-pocket binding site, and to properly orient the substrate in pre-reactive conformations for efficient hydrolysis that is interceded by the dynamic paddle. Our findings therefore endorse a structural framework for a lipid selection mechanism mediated by structural flexibility and gating residues between multiple binding cavities, as found in FAAH. Based on the available structural data, this exquisite catalytic strategy for substrate specificity seems to be shared by other lipid-degrading enzymes with similar enzymatic architecture. The mechanistic insights for lipid selection might assist de-novo enzyme design or drug discovery efforts. PMID:26111155

  3. Keys to Lipid Selection in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Catalysis: Structural Flexibility, Gating Residues and Multiple Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Giulia; Bauer, Inga; Campomanes, Pablo; Cavalli, Andrea; Armirotti, Andrea; Girotto, Stefania; Rothlisberger, Ursula; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-06-01

    The fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) regulates the endocannabinoid system cleaving primarily the lipid messenger anandamide. FAAH has been well characterized over the years and, importantly, it represents a promising drug target to treat several diseases, including inflammatory-related diseases and cancer. But its enzymatic mechanism for lipid selection to specifically hydrolyze anandamide, rather than similar bioactive lipids, remains elusive. Here, we clarify this mechanism in FAAH, examining the role of the dynamic paddle, which is formed by the gating residues Phe432 and Trp531 at the boundary between two cavities that form the FAAH catalytic site (the "membrane-access" and the "acyl chain-binding" pockets). We integrate microsecond-long MD simulations of wild type and double mutant model systems (Phe432Ala and Trp531Ala) of FAAH, embedded in a realistic membrane/water environment, with mutagenesis and kinetic experiments. We comparatively analyze three fatty acid substrates with different hydrolysis rates (anandamide > oleamide > palmitoylethanolamide). Our findings identify FAAH's mechanism to selectively accommodate anandamide into a multi-pocket binding site, and to properly orient the substrate in pre-reactive conformations for efficient hydrolysis that is interceded by the dynamic paddle. Our findings therefore endorse a structural framework for a lipid selection mechanism mediated by structural flexibility and gating residues between multiple binding cavities, as found in FAAH. Based on the available structural data, this exquisite catalytic strategy for substrate specificity seems to be shared by other lipid-degrading enzymes with similar enzymatic architecture. The mechanistic insights for lipid selection might assist de-novo enzyme design or drug discovery efforts. PMID:26111155

  4. Cyanogenic Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Selmar, Dirk; Grocholewski, Sabine; Seigler, David S.

    1990-01-01

    Large amounts of cyanogenic lipids (esters of 1 cyano-2-methylprop-2-ene-1-ol with C:20 fatty acids) are stored in the seeds of Ungnadia speciosa. During seedling development, these lipids are completely consumed without liberation of free HCN to the atmosphere. At the same time, cyanogenic glycosides are synthesized, but the total amount is much lower (about 26%) than the quantity of cyanogenic lipids formerly present in the seeds. This large decrease in the total content of cyanogens (HCN-potential) demonstrates that at least 74% of cyanogenic lipids are converted to noncyanogenic compounds. Whether the newly synthesized cyanogenic glycosides are derived directly from cyanogenic lipids or produced by de novo synthesis is still unknown. Based on the utilization of cyanogenic lipids for the synthesis of noncyanogenic compounds, it is concluded that these cyanogens serve as storage for reduced nitrogen. The ecophysiological significance of cyanolipids based on multifunctional aspects is discussed. PMID:16667514

  5. Milk lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Milk fat conveys a number of desirable qualities to food, and various lipid components contribute to human nutrition and health. Over 96% of milk lipids consist of triacylglycerols, which contain a variety of fatty acids. Di- and monoacylglycerols, free fatty acids, sterols, and phospho-, glyco-,...

  6. Lipid nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Mashaghi, Samaneh; Jadidi, Tayebeh; Koenderink, Gijsje; Mashaghi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary field that covers a vast and diverse array of devices and machines derived from engineering, physics, materials science, chemistry and biology. These devices have found applications in biomedical sciences, such as targeted drug delivery, bio-imaging, sensing and diagnosis of pathologies at early stages. In these applications, nano-devices typically interface with the plasma membrane of cells. On the other hand, naturally occurring nanostructures in biology have been a source of inspiration for new nanotechnological designs and hybrid nanostructures made of biological and non-biological, organic and inorganic building blocks. Lipids, with their amphiphilicity, diversity of head and tail chemistry, and antifouling properties that block nonspecific binding to lipid-coated surfaces, provide a powerful toolbox for nanotechnology. This review discusses the progress in the emerging field of lipid nanotechnology. PMID:23429269

  7. Lipid Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Mashaghi, Samaneh; Jadidi, Tayebeh; Koenderink, Gijsje; Mashaghi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary field that covers a vast and diverse array of devices and machines derived from engineering, physics, materials science, chemistry and biology. These devices have found applications in biomedical sciences, such as targeted drug delivery, bio-imaging, sensing and diagnosis of pathologies at early stages. In these applications, nano-devices typically interface with the plasma membrane of cells. On the other hand, naturally occurring nanostructures in biology have been a source of inspiration for new nanotechnological designs and hybrid nanostructures made of biological and non-biological, organic and inorganic building blocks. Lipids, with their amphiphilicity, diversity of head and tail chemistry, and antifouling properties that block nonspecific binding to lipid-coated surfaces, provide a powerful toolbox for nanotechnology. This review discusses the progress in the emerging field of lipid nanotechnology. PMID:23429269

  8. Lipid14: The Amber Lipid Force Field

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The AMBER lipid force field has been updated to create Lipid14, allowing tensionless simulation of a number of lipid types with the AMBER MD package. The modular nature of this force field allows numerous combinations of head and tail groups to create different lipid types, enabling the easy insertion of new lipid species. The Lennard-Jones and torsion parameters of both the head and tail groups have been revised and updated partial charges calculated. The force field has been validated by simulating bilayers of six different lipid types for a total of 0.5 ?s each without applying a surface tension; with favorable comparison to experiment for properties such as area per lipid, volume per lipid, bilayer thickness, NMR order parameters, scattering data, and lipid lateral diffusion. As the derivation of this force field is consistent with the AMBER development philosophy, Lipid14 is compatible with the AMBER protein, nucleic acid, carbohydrate, and small molecule force fields. PMID:24803855

  9. Irinotecan Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePLUS

    Irinotecan lipid complex is used in combination with other medications to treat pancreatic cancer that has spread to other ... worsened after treatment with other chemotherapy medications. Irinotecan lipid complex is in a class of antineoplastic medications ...

  10. Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePLUS

    Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to ... body) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  11. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePLUS

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma ( ...

  12. Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePLUS

    Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type of cancer ... least two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  13. Lipid Exchange by Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Drachmann, Nikolaj Düring; Olesen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Lipids play an important role in maintaining P-type ATPase structure and function, and often they are crucial for ATPase activity. When the P-type ATPases are in the membrane, they are surrounded by a mix of different lipid species with varying aliphatic chain lengths and saturation, and the complex interplay between the lipids and the P-type ATPases are still not well understood. We here describe a robust method to exchange the majority of the lipids surrounding the ATPase after solubilisation and/or purification with a target lipid of interest. The method is based on an ultracentrifugation step, where the protein sample is spun through a dense buffer containing large excess of the target lipid, which results in an approximately 80-85 % lipid exchange. The method is a very gently technique that maintains protein folding during the process, hence allowing further characterization of the protein in the presence of a target lipid of interest. PMID:26695050

  14. Lipids of Thermoplasma acidophilum

    PubMed Central

    Langworthy, Thomas A.; Smith, Paul F.; Mayberry, William R.

    1972-01-01

    Cells of Thermoplasma acidophilum contain about 3% total lipid on a dry weight basis. Total lipid was found to contain 17.5% neutral lipid, 25.1% glycolipid, and 56.6% phospholipid by chromatography on silicic acid. The lipids contain almost no fatty acid ester groups but appear to have long-chain alkyl groups in ether linkages to glycerol. The phospholipid fraction includes a major component which represents about 80% of the lipid phosphorus and 46% of the total lipids. We believe this component to be a long-chain isopranol glycerol diether analogue of glycerolphosphoryl monoglycosyl diglyceride. The glycolipids appear to contain isopranol diether analogues. Several components of the complex, neutral lipid fraction have been identified as hydrocarbons, vitamin K2-7, and isopranol glycerol diether analogues. Sterols are present in the neutral lipids but do not appear to be synthesized by the organism. Images PMID:4344918

  15. Lipids and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suburu, Janel; Chen, Yong Q.

    2012-01-01

    The role of lipid metabolism has gained particular interest in prostate cancer research. A large body of literature has outlined the unique upregulation of de novo lipid synthesis in prostate cancer. Concordant with this lipogenic phenotype is a metabolic shift, in which cancer cells use alternative enzymes and pathways to facilitate the production of fatty acids. These newly synthesized lipids may support a number of cellular processes to promote cancer cell proliferation and survival. Hence, de novo lipogenesis is under intense investigation as a therapeutic target. Epidemiologic studies suggest dietary fat may also contribute to prostate cancer; however, whether dietary lipids and de novo synthesized lipids are differentially metabolized remains unclear. Here, we highlight the lipogenic nature of prostate cancer, especially the promotion of de novo lipid synthesis, and the significance of various dietary lipids in prostate cancer development and progression. PMID:22503963

  16. Epidermal surface lipids

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A layer of lipids, which are of both sebaceous and keratinocyte origin, covers the surface of the skin. The apparent composition of surface lipids varies depending on the selected method of sampling. Lipids produced by the epidermal cells are an insignificant fraction of the total extractable surface lipid on areas rich in sebaceous glands. Due to the holocrine activity of the sebaceous gland, its product of secretion (sebum) is eventually released to the surface of the skin and coats the fur as well. Lipids of epidermal origin fill the spaces between the cells, like mortar or cement. The sebaceous lipids are primarily non polar lipids as triglycerides, wax esters and squalene, while epidermal lipids are a mixture of ceramides, free fatty acids and cholesterol. The composition of the sebaceous lipids is unique and intriguing and elevated sebum excretion is a major factor involved in the pathophysiology of acne. Recent studies have elucidated the roles that epidermal surface lipids have on normal skin functions and acne. PMID:20224687

  17. Lipids of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Susanne E; Daum, Günther

    2013-10-01

    A unique organelle for studying membrane biochemistry is the mitochondrion whose functionality depends on a coordinated supply of proteins and lipids. Mitochondria are capable of synthesizing several lipids autonomously such as phosphatidylglycerol, cardiolipin and in part phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidic acid and CDP-diacylglycerol. Other mitochondrial membrane lipids such as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sterols and sphingolipids have to be imported. The mitochondrial lipid composition, the biosynthesis and the import of mitochondrial lipids as well as the regulation of these processes will be main issues of this review article. Furthermore, interactions of lipids and mitochondrial proteins which are highly important for various mitochondrial processes will be discussed. Malfunction or loss of enzymes involved in mitochondrial phospholipid biosynthesis lead to dysfunction of cell respiration, affect the assembly and stability of the mitochondrial protein import machinery and cause abnormal mitochondrial morphology or even lethality. Molecular aspects of these processes as well as diseases related to defects in the formation of mitochondrial membranes will be described. PMID:24007978

  18. Microalgae lipid characterization.

    PubMed

    Yao, Linxing; Gerde, Jose A; Lee, Show-Ling; Wang, Tong; Harrata, Kamel A

    2015-02-18

    To meet the growing interest of utilizing microalgae biomass in the production of biofuels and nutraceutical and pharmaceutical lipids, we need suitable analytical methods and a comprehensive database for their lipid components. The objective of the present work was to demonstrate methodology and provide data on fatty acid composition, lipid class content and composition, characteristics of the unsaponifiables, and type of chlorophylls of five microalgae. Microalgae lipids were fractionated into TAG, FFA, and polar lipids using TLC, and the composition of fatty acids in total lipids and in each lipid class, hydrocarbons, and sterols were determined by GC-MS. Glyco- and phospholipids were profiled by LC/ESI-MS. Chlorophylls and their related metabolites were qualified by LC/APCI-MS. The melting and crystallization profiles of microalgae total lipids and their esters were analyzed by DSC to evaluate their potential biofuel applications. Significant differences and complexities of lipid composition among the algae tested were observed. The compositional information is valuable for strain selection, downstream biomass fractionation, and utilization. PMID:25608629

  19. Lipid Droplets And Cellular Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Tobias C.; Farese, Robert V.

    2013-01-01

    Among organelles, lipid droplets (LDs) uniquely constitute a hydrophobic phase in the aqueous environment of the cytosol. Their hydrophobic core of neutral lipids stores metabolic energy and membrane components, making LDs hubs for lipid metabolism. In addition, LDs are implicated in a number of other cellular functions, ranging from protein storage and degradation to viral replication. These processes are functionally linked to many physiological and pathological conditions, including obesity and related metabolic diseases. Despite their important functions and nearly ubiquitous presence in cells, many aspects of LD biology are unknown. In the past few years, the pace of LD investigation has increased, providing new insights. Here, we review the current knowledge of LD cell biology and its translation to physiology. PMID:22524315

  20. Lipids: Absorption and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid has long been recognized as an important dietary component. Dietary lipid (fat) is a critical source of metabolic energy and a substrate for the synthesis of metabolically active compounds (essential fatty acids), and serves as a carrier for other nutrients such as the fat-soluble vitamins A, ...

  1. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  2. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  3. Lipid Storage Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the lipid storage disorders, although Gaucher and Fabry diseases have effective enzyme replacement therapies. Eligustat tartrate has ... from infection or progressive neurological loss. Children with Fabry disease often die prematurely of complications from heart disease, ...

  4. Lipid Storage Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cholesterol metabolism or halt progression of the disease. Fabry disease , also known as alpha-galactosidase-A deficiency, causes ... autonomic nervous system, eyes, kidneys, and cardiovascular system. Fabry disease is the only X-linked lipid storage disease. ...

  5. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  6. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  7. Black lipid membranes of tetraether lipids from Thermoplasma acidophilum.

    PubMed

    Stern, J; Freisleben, H J; Janku, S; Ring, K

    1992-10-30

    Black lipid membranes were formed of tetraether lipids from Thermoplasma acidophilum and compared to the bilayer forming lipids diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine and diphythanylglucosylglycerol. Bilayer-forming lipids varied in thickness of black lipid membranes due to the organic solvent used. Measurements of the specific membrane capacitance (Cm = 0.744 microF/cm2) showed that the membrane-spanning tetraether lipids from Thermoplasma acidophilum form a monolayer of a constant thickness of 2.5-3.0 nm no matter from which solvent. This finding corresponds to the results of Gliozzi et al. for the lipids of another archaebacterium, Sulfolobus solfataricus. Black lipid membranes were formed at room temperature with a torus from bilayer-forming lipids, however, the torus could also be formed by the tetraether-lipid itself at room temperature and at defined concentration. In these stable black lipid membranes, conductance was measured in the presence of valinomycin, nonactin, and gramicidin. At 10(-7) M concentration, valinomycin mediated higher conductance in membranes from tetraether lipids (200-1200 microS/cm2) than from bilayer-forming lipids (125-480 microS/cm2). Nonactin, at 10(-6) M concentration, mediated a 6-fold higher conductance in a tetraether lipid membrane than in a bilayer, whereas conductance, in the presence of 5 x 10(-11) M gramicidin could reach higher values in bilayers than in tetraether lipid monolayers of comparable thickness. Monensin did not increase the conductance of black lipid membranes from tetraether lipids under all conditions applied in our experiments. Poly(L-lysine) destroyed black lipid membranes. Lipopolysaccharides from Thermoplasma acidophilum were not able to form stable black lipid membranes by themselves. The lipopolysaccharide complexes from Thermoplasma acidophilum and from Escherichia coli decreased the valinomycin-mediated conductance of monolayer and bilayer membranes. This influence was stronger than that of the polysaccharide dextran. PMID:1420295

  8. Lipid membranes for membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kukol, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of membrane proteins requires the setup of an accurate representation of lipid bilayers. This chapter describes the setup of a lipid bilayer system from scratch using generally available tools, starting with a definition of the lipid molecule POPE, generation of a lipid bilayer, energy minimization, MD simulation, and data analysis. The data analysis includes the calculation of area and volume per lipid, deuterium order parameters, self-diffusion constant, and the electron density profile. PMID:25330959

  9. Lipid Rafts and Pseudotyping

    PubMed Central

    Pickl, Winfried F.; Pimentel-Muiños, Felipe X.; Seed, Brian

    2001-01-01

    Specific interactions between envelope and core proteins govern the membrane assembly of most enveloped viruses. Despite this, mixed infections lead to pseudotyping, the association of the viral cores of one virus with the envelopes of another. How does this occur? We show here that the detergent-insoluble lipid rafts of the plasma membrane function as a natural meeting point for the transmembrane and core components of a phylogenetically diverse collection of enveloped viruses. As a result, viral particles preferentially incorporate both the envelope components of other viruses as well as the extra- and intracellular constituents of host cell lipid rafts, including gangliosides, glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored surface proteins, and intracellular signal transduction molecules. Pharmacological disruption of lipid rafts interferes with virus production. PMID:11435598

  10. Lipid Production from Nannochloropsis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Nian; Chen, Tian-Peng; Yang, Bo; Liu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are sunlight-driven green cell factories for the production of potential bioactive products and biofuels. Nannochloropsis represents a genus of marine microalgae with high photosynthetic efficiency and can convert carbon dioxide to storage lipids mainly in the form of triacylglycerols and to the ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Recently, Nannochloropsis has received ever-increasing interests of both research and public communities. This review aims to provide an overview of biology and biotechnological potential of Nannochloropsis, with the emphasis on lipid production. The path forward for the further exploration of Nannochloropsis for lipid production with respect to both challenges and opportunities is also discussed. PMID:27023568

  11. Bioorthogonal chemical reporters for analyzing protein lipidation and lipid trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Howard C.; Wilson, John P.; Charron, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Conspectus Protein lipidation and lipid trafficking control many key biological functions in all kingdoms of life. The discovery of diverse lipid species and their covalent attachment to many proteins has revealed a complex and regulated network of membranes and lipidated proteins that are central to fundamental aspects of physiology and human disease. Given the complexity of lipid trafficking and the protein targeting mechanisms involved with membrane lipids, precise and sensitive methods are needed to monitor and identify these hydrophobic molecules in bacteria, yeast, and higher eukaryotes. Although many analytical methods have been developed for characterizing membrane lipids and covalently modified proteins, traditional reagents and approaches have limited sensitivity, do not faithfully report on the lipids of interest, or are not readily accessible. The invention of bioorthogonal ligation reactions, such as the Staudinger ligation and azide–alkyne cycloadditions, has provided new tools to address these limitations, and their use has begun to yield fresh insight into the biology of protein lipidation and lipid trafficking. In this Account, we discuss how these new bioorthogonal ligation reactions and lipid chemical reporters afford new opportunities for exploring the biology of lipid-modified proteins and lipid trafficking. Lipid chemical reporters from our laboratory and several other research groups have enabled improved detection and large-scale proteomic analysis of fatty-acylated and prenylated proteins. For example, fatty acid and isoprenoid chemical reporters in conjunction with bioorthogonal ligation methods have circumvented the limited sensitivity and hazards of radioactive analogs, allowing rapid and robust fluorescent detection of lipidated proteins in all organisms tested. These chemical tools have revealed alterations in protein lipidation in different cellular states and are beginning to provide unique insights in mechanisms of regulation. Notably, the purification of proteins labeled with lipid chemical reporters has allowed both the large-scale analysis of lipidated proteins as well as the discovery of new lipidated proteins involved in metabolism, gene expression, and innate immunity. Specific lipid reporters have also been developed to monitor the trafficking of soluble lipids; these species are enabling bioorthogonal imaging of membranes in cells and tissues. Future advances in bioorthogonal chemistry, specific lipid reporters, and spectroscopy should provide important new insight into the functional roles of lipidated proteins and membranes in biology. PMID:21675729

  12. Immobilized lipid-bilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Yamanaka, Stacey A. (Dallas, TX)

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials in a silica matrix comprising preparing a silica sol, mixing a lipid-bilayer material in the silica sol and allowing the mixture to gel to form the encapsulated lipid-bilayer material. The mild processing conditions allow quantitative entrapment of pre-formed lipid-bilayer materials without modification to the material's spectral characteristics. The method allows for the immobilization of lipid membranes to surfaces. The encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials perform as sensitive optical sensors for the detection of analytes such as heavy metal ions and can be used as drug delivery systems and as separation devices.

  13. Lipid Droplet Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wilfling, Florian; Haas, Joel T.; Walther, Tobias C.; Farese, Robert V.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are found in most cells, where they play central roles in energy and membrane lipid metabolism. The de novo biogenesis of LDs is a fascinating, yet poorly understood process involving the formation of a monolayer bound organelle from a bilayer membrane. Additionally, large LDs can form either by growth of existing LDs or by the combination of smaller LDs through several distinct mechanisms. Here, we review recent insights into the molecular process governing LD biogenesis and highlight areas of incomplete knowledge. PMID:24736091

  14. Lipids in cheese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids are present in cheese at levels above 20 percent and are analyzed by several techniques. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy are used to examine the microstructure, gas chromatography is employed to look at fatty acid composition, and differential scanning cal...

  15. Lipids: Absorption and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the hydrophobic nature of lipids, dietary fat is handled differently than protein or carbohydrate with respect with digestion and absorption. Dietary fats are broken down throughout the gastrointestinal system. A unique group of enzymes and cofactors allows this process to proceed in an eff...

  16. Cytarabine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... used to treat lymphomatous meningitis (a type of cancer in the covering of the spinal cord and brain). Cytarabine lipid complex is in a class of medications called antimetabolites. It works by slowing or stopping the growth of cancer cells in your body.

  17. Lipid Microdomains in Cell Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cascianelli, Giacomo; Villani, Maristella; Tosti, Marcello; Marini, Francesca; Bartoccini, Elisa; Viola Magni, Mariapia

    2008-01-01

    It is known that nuclear lipids play a role in proliferation, differentiation, and apoptotic process. Cellular nuclei contain high levels of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin, which are partially linked with cholesterol and proteins to form lipid–protein complexes. These lipids are also associated with transcription factors and newly synthesized RNA but, up to date, their organization is still unknown. The aim of the present work was to study if these specific lipid–protein interactions could be nuclear membrane microdomains and to evaluate their possible role. The results obtained demonstrate for the first time the existence of nuclear microdomains characterized by a specific lipid composition similar to that of intranuclear lipid–protein complexes previously described. Nuclear microdomain lipid composition changes during cell proliferation when the content of newly synthesized RNA increases. Because previous data show a correlation between nuclear lipids and transcription process, the role of nuclear microdomains in cellular functions is discussed. PMID:18923143

  18. Big, Fat World of Lipids

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of these dynamics in human cells. Lipid Mechanics Omega-3 fatty acids-like those found in fish oil ... does its active ingredient—a lipid called an omega-3 fatty acid—actually operate? Using the lipidomics data ...

  19. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2010-06-29

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  20. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2009-06-09

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  1. Lanolin-derived lipid mixtures mimic closely the lipid composition and organization of vernix caseosa lipids.

    PubMed

    Rissmann, Robert; Oudshoorn, Marion H M; Kocks, Elise; Hennink, Wim E; Ponec, Maria; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to use semi-synthetic lipid mixtures to mimic the complex lipid composition, organization and thermotropic behaviour of vernix caseosa (VC) lipids. As VC shows multiple protecting and barrier supporting properties before and after birth, it is suggested that a VC substitute could be an innovative barrier cream for barrier deficient skin. Lanolin was selected as the source of the branched chain sterol esters and wax esters--the main lipid classes of VC. Different lipid fractions were isolated from lanolin and subsequently mixed with squalene, triglycerides, cholesterol, ceramides and fatty acids to generate semi-synthetic lipid mixtures that mimic the lipid composition of VC, as established by high-performance thin-layer chromatography. Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy investigations revealed that triglycerides play an important role in the (lateral) lipid organization and thermotropic behaviour of the synthetic lipid mixtures. Excellent resemblance of VC lipids was obtained when adding unsaturated triglycerides. Moreover, these lipid mixtures showed similar long range ordering as VC. The optimal lipid mixture was evaluated on tape-stripped hairless mouse skin in vivo. The rate of barrier recovery was increased and comparable to VC lipid treatment. PMID:18655769

  2. Lipids, fatty acids, and more

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy is the most expensive component in livestock diets. Lipids are concentrated energy sources and are known to affect growth, feed efficiency, feed dust, and diet palatability. A large majority of research evaluating lipids in livestock has utilized lipids of high quality, dealt mainly with anim...

  3. The SwissLipids knowledgebase for lipid biology

    PubMed Central

    Liechti, Robin; Hyka-Nouspikel, Nevila; Niknejad, Anne; Gleizes, Anne; Götz, Lou; Kuznetsov, Dmitry; David, Fabrice P.A.; van der Goot, F. Gisou; Riezman, Howard; Bougueleret, Lydie; Xenarios, Ioannis; Bridge, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Lipids are a large and diverse group of biological molecules with roles in membrane formation, energy storage and signaling. Cellular lipidomes may contain tens of thousands of structures, a staggering degree of complexity whose significance is not yet fully understood. High-throughput mass spectrometry-based platforms provide a means to study this complexity, but the interpretation of lipidomic data and its integration with prior knowledge of lipid biology suffers from a lack of appropriate tools to manage the data and extract knowledge from it. Results: To facilitate the description and exploration of lipidomic data and its integration with prior biological knowledge, we have developed a knowledge resource for lipids and their biology—SwissLipids. SwissLipids provides curated knowledge of lipid structures and metabolism which is used to generate an in silico library of feasible lipid structures. These are arranged in a hierarchical classification that links mass spectrometry analytical outputs to all possible lipid structures, metabolic reactions and enzymes. SwissLipids provides a reference namespace for lipidomic data publication, data exploration and hypothesis generation. The current version of SwissLipids includes over 244?000 known and theoretically possible lipid structures, over 800 proteins, and curated links to published knowledge from over 620 peer-reviewed publications. We are continually updating the SwissLipids hierarchy with new lipid categories and new expert curated knowledge. Availability: SwissLipids is freely available at http://www.swisslipids.org/. Contact: alan.bridge@isb-sib.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25943471

  4. Seaweed lipids as nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Mišurcová, Ladislava; Ambrožová, Jarmila; Samek, Dušan

    2011-01-01

    Seaweeds are known as low-energy food. Despite low lipid content, ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) introduce a significant part of seaweed lipids. PUFAs are the important components of all cell membranes and precursors of eicosanoids that are essential bioregulators of many cellular processes. PUFAs effectively reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, ostheoporosis, and diabetes. Because of the frequent usage of seaweeds in Asia and their increasing utilization as food also in other parts of the world, seaweeds could contribute to the improvement of a low level of ω-3 PUFAs, especially in the Western diet. The major commercial sources of ω-3 PUFAs are fish, but their wide usage as food additives is limited for the typical fishy smell, unpleasant taste, and oxidative nonstability. Nevertheless, growing requirements of healthy functional foods have led to produce PUFAs as nutraceuticals in controlled batch culture of marine microalgae, especially Thraustochytrium and Schizochytrium strains. PMID:22054960

  5. Lipid oxidation on foods.

    PubMed

    St Angelo, A J

    1996-02-01

    This review discusses the basic chemical reactions that affect food flavor quality. Although there are many reactions that can lead to the deterioration of quality in foods, this review focuses on lipid oxidation and how it adversely affects flavor principals. It also presents technological advances for studying the basic mechanism of lipid oxidation, for measuring its intensity, and for retaining food quality. The food commodities that provide the subject matter for this review include vegetable oils, legumes, cereal grains, eggs, beef, lamb, poultry, seafoods, and catfish. The methodologies for assessing food quality form a multidisciplinary approach that includes primarily instrumental analysis by direct gas chromatography, chemical analysis by the TBA test, and sensory analysis by quantitative descriptive determinations. The author hopes that the information presented in this review is applicable to food commodities not discussed. PMID:8744604

  6. Simplified lipid guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Allan, G. Michael; Lindblad, Adrienne J.; Comeau, Ann; Coppola, John; Hudson, Brianne; Mannarino, Marco; McMinis, Cindy; Padwal, Raj; Schelstraete, Christine; Zarnke, Kelly; Garrison, Scott; Cotton, Candra; Korownyk, Christina; McCormack, James; Nickel, Sharon; Kolber, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop clinical practice guidelines for a simplified approach to primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), concentrating on CVD risk estimation and lipid management for primary care clinicians and their teams; we sought increased contribution from primary care professionals with little or no conflict of interest and focused on the highest level of evidence available. Methods Nine health professionals (4 family physicians, 2 internal medicine specialists, 1 nurse practitioner, 1 registered nurse, and 1 pharmacist) and 1 nonvoting member (pharmacist project manager) comprised the overarching Lipid Pathway Committee (LPC). Member selection was based on profession, practice setting, and location, and members disclosed any actual or potential conflicts of interest. The guideline process was iterative through online posting, detailed evidence review, and telephone and online meetings. The LPC identified 12 priority questions to be addressed. The Evidence Review Group answered these questions. After review of the answers, key recommendations were derived through consensus of the LPC. The guidelines were drafted, refined, and distributed to a group of clinicians (family physicians, other specialists, pharmacists, nurses, and nurse practitioners) and patients for feedback, then refined again and finalized by the LPC. Recommendations Recommendations are provided on screening and testing, risk assessments, interventions, follow-up, and the role of acetylsalicylic acid in primary prevention. Conclusion These simplified lipid guidelines provide practical recommendations for prevention and treatment of CVD for primary care practitioners. All recommendations are intended to assist with, not dictate, decision making in conjunction with patients. PMID:26472792

  7. Tear film lipids.

    PubMed

    Butovich, Igor A

    2013-12-01

    Human meibomian gland secretions (MGS, or meibum) are formed from a complex mixture of lipids of different classes such as wax esters, cholesteryl esters, (O-acyl)-?-hydroxy fatty acids (OAHFA) and their esters, acylglycerols, diacylated diols, free fatty acids, cholesterol, and a smaller amount of other polar and nonpolar lipids, whose chemical nature and the very presence in MGS have been a matter of intense debates. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent results that were obtained using different experimental techniques, estimate limitations of their usability, and discuss their biochemical, biophysical, and physiological implications. To create a lipid map of MGS and tears, the results obtained in the author's laboratory were integrated with available information on chemical composition of MGS and tears. The most informative approaches that are available today to researchers, such as HPLC-MS, GC-MS, and proton NMR, are discussed in details. A map of the meibomian lipidome (as it is seen in reverse phase liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry experiments) is presented. Directions of future efforts in the area are outlined. PMID:23769846

  8. Intestinal lipid absorption.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Jahangir; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2009-06-01

    Our knowledge of the uptake and transport of dietary fat and fat-soluble vitamins has advanced considerably. Researchers have identified several new mechanisms by which lipids are taken up by enterocytes and packaged as chylomicrons for export into the lymphatic system or clarified the actions of mechanisms previously known to participate in these processes. Fatty acids are taken up by enterocytes involving protein-mediated as well as protein-independent processes. Net cholesterol uptake depends on the competing activities of NPC1L1, ABCG5, and ABCG8 present in the apical membrane. We have considerably more detailed information about the uptake of products of lipid hydrolysis, the active transport systems by which they reach the endoplasmic reticulum, the mechanisms by which they are resynthesized into neutral lipids and utilized within the endoplasmic reticulum to form lipoproteins, and the mechanisms by which lipoproteins are secreted from the basolateral side of the enterocyte. apoB and MTP are known to be central to the efficient assembly and secretion of lipoproteins. In recent studies, investigators found that cholesterol, phospholipids, and vitamin E can also be secreted from enterocytes as components of high-density apoB-free/apoAI-containing lipoproteins. Several of these advances will probably be investigated further for their potential as targets for the development of drugs that can suppress cholesterol absorption, thereby reducing the risk of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular disease. PMID:19158321

  9. Tear Film Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Butovich, Igor A.

    2013-01-01

    Human meibomian gland secretions (MGS, or meibum) are formed from a complex mixture of lipids of different classes such as wax esters, cholesteryl esters, (O-acyl)-ω-hydroxy fatty acids (OAHFA) and their esters, acylglycerols, diacylated diols, free fatty acids, cholesterol, and a smaller amount of other polar and nonpolar lipids, whose chemical nature and the very presence in MGS have been a matter of intense debates. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent results that were obtained using different experimental techniques, estimate limitations of their usability, and discuss their biochemical, biophysical, and physiological implications. To create a lipid map of MGS and tears, the results obtained in the author’s laboratory were integrated with available information on chemical composition of MGS and tears. The most informative approaches that are available today to researchers, such as HPLC-MS, GC-MS, and proton NMR, are discussed in details. A map of the meibomian lipidome (as it is seen in reverse phase liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry experiments) is presented. Directions of future efforts in the area are outlined. PMID:23769846

  10. LIPID11: A Modular Framework for Lipid Simulations using Amber

    PubMed Central

    Skjevik, Åge A.; Madej, Benjamin D.; Walker, Ross C.; eigen, Knut T

    2013-01-01

    Accurate simulation of complex lipid bilayers has long been a goal in condensed phase molecular dynamics (MD). Structure and function of membrane-bound proteins are highly dependent on the lipid bilayer environment and are challenging to study through experimental methods. Within Amber, there has been limited focus on lipid simulations, although some success has been seen with the use of the General Amber Force Field (GAFF). However, to date there are no dedicated Amber lipid force fields. In this paper we describe a new charge derivation strategy for lipids consistent with the Amber RESP approach, and a new atom and residue naming and type convention. In the first instance, we have combined this approach with GAFF parameters. The result is LIPID11, a flexible, modular framework for the simulation of lipids that is fully compatible with the existing Amber force fields. The charge derivation procedure, capping strategy and nomenclature for LIPID11, along with preliminary simulation results and a discussion of the planned long-term parameter development are presented here. Our findings suggest that Lipid11 is a modular framework feasible for phospholipids and a flexible starting point for the development of a comprehensive, Amber-compatible lipid force field. PMID:22916730

  11. Lipid Simulations: A Perspective on Lipids in Action

    PubMed Central

    Vattulainen, Ilpo; Rog, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we provide an overview of lipid simulations, describing how a computer can be used as a laboratory for lipid research. We briefly discuss the methodology of lipid simulations followed by a number of topical applications that show the benefit of computer modeling for complementing experiments. In particular, we show examples of cases in which simulations have made predictions of novel phenomena that have later been confirmed by experimental studies. Overall, the applications discussed in this article focus on the most recent state of the art and aim to provide a perspective of where the field of lipid simulations stands at the moment. PMID:21441592

  12. Cell-Based Lipid Flippase Assay Employing Fluorescent Lipid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Maria S; Costa, Sara; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; López-Marqués, Rosa L

    2016-01-01

    P-type ATPases in the P4 subfamily (P4-ATPases) are transmembrane proteins unique for eukaryotes that act as lipid flippases, i.e., to translocate phospholipids from the exofacial to the cytofacial monolayer of cellular membranes. While initially characterized as aminophospholipid translocases, studies of individual P4-ATPase family members from fungi, plants, and animals show that P4-ATPases differ in their substrate specificities and mediate transport of a broader range of lipid substrates. Here, we describe an assay based on fluorescent lipid derivatives to monitor and characterize lipid flippase activities in the plasma membrane of cells, using yeast as an example. PMID:26695048

  13. RF Microalgal lipid content characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Al-Zuhair, Sulaiman; Taher, Hanifa; Hilal-Alnaqbi, Ali

    2014-05-01

    Most conventional techniques for the determination of microalgae lipid content are time consuming and in most cases are indirect and require excessive sample preparations. This work presents a new technique that utilizes radio frequency (RF) for rapid lipid quantification, without the need for sample preparation. Tests showed that a shift in the resonance frequency of a RF open-ended coaxial resonator and a gradual increase in its resonance magnitude may occur as the lipids content of microalgae cells increases. These response parameters can be then calibrated against actual cellular lipid contents and used for rapid determination of the cellular lipids. The average duration of lipid quantification using the proposed technique was of about 1 minute, which is significantly less than all other conventional techniques, and was achieved without the need for any time consuming treatment steps.

  14. Lipid Biomembrane in Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Brian; Jing, Benxin; Shah, Jindal; Maginn, Ed; Zhu, Y. Elaine; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Team

    2014-03-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been recently explored as new ``green'' chemicals in several chemical and biomedical processes. In our pursuit of understanding their toxicities towards aquatic and terrestrial organisms, we have examined the IL interaction with lipid bilayers as model cell membranes. Experimentally by fluorescence microscopy, we have directly observed the disruption of lipid bilayer by added ILs. Depending on the concentration, alkyl chain length, and anion hydrophobicity of ILs, the interaction of ILs with lipid bilayers leads to the formation of micelles, fibrils, and multi-lamellar vesicles for IL-lipid complexes. By MD computer simulations, we have confirmed the insertion of ILs into lipid bilayers to modify the spatial organization of lipids in the membrane. The combined experimental and simulation results correlate well with the bioassay results of IL-induced suppression in bacteria growth, thereby suggesting a possible mechanism behind the IL toxicity. National Science Foundation, Center for Research Computing at Notre Dame.

  15. RF Microalgal lipid content characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Al-Zuhair, Sulaiman; Taher, Hanifa; Hilal-Alnaqbi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Most conventional techniques for the determination of microalgae lipid content are time consuming and in most cases are indirect and require excessive sample preparations. This work presents a new technique that utilizes radio frequency (RF) for rapid lipid quantification, without the need for sample preparation. Tests showed that a shift in the resonance frequency of a RF open-ended coaxial resonator and a gradual increase in its resonance magnitude may occur as the lipids content of microalgae cells increases. These response parameters can be then calibrated against actual cellular lipid contents and used for rapid determination of the cellular lipids. The average duration of lipid quantification using the proposed technique was of about 1 minute, which is significantly less than all other conventional techniques, and was achieved without the need for any time consuming treatment steps. PMID:24870372

  16. Lipid-Protein-Wechselwirkungen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhoff, Konrad

    1980-09-01

    Investigations of the genetic basis of ganglioside catabolism have led to the characterisation of two types of lipid-enzyme interaction: a) Breakdown of membrane-bound glycolipids as far as catalysed by membrane-bound enzymes is regulated by the membrane itself. b) The degradation of micelle-forming glycolipids by water-soluble lysosomal enzymes is facilitated by cofactors known as activator proteins. A genetic defect in an activator protein can be just as fatal as the lack of the enzyme itself.

  17. Membrane lipids and vesicular traffic.

    PubMed

    van Meer, Gerrit; Sprong, Hein

    2004-08-01

    Lipids were long considered to be passive passengers of carrier vesicles with the single role of sealing the transport container. We now know that specific phospholipids are required for efficient fusion, while others facilitate budding and fission. Moreover, the various polyphosphoinositides assist in the recruitment from the cytosol of proteins of the transport machinery. Finally, the segregation of membrane lipids into different fluid phases appears to serve as a 'lipid raft' mechanism for protein sorting at various stages of the secretory and endocytic pathways. The current challenge is to understand how proteins control the metabolism and subcellular localization, and thereby the activity, of the various lipids. PMID:15261669

  18. Lipid-lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Ewang-Emukowhate, Mfon; Wierzbicki, Anthony S

    2013-09-01

    The role of lipid lowering in reducing the risk of mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established. Treatment particularly aimed at decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is effective in reducing the risk of death from coronary heart disease and stroke. Statins form the cornerstone of treatment. However, in some individuals with a high risk of CVD who are unable to achieve their target LDL-C due to either intolerance or lack of efficacy, there is the need for alternative therapies. This review provides an overview of the different classes of currently available lipid-lowering medications including statins, fibrates, bile acid sequestrants (resins), and omega-3 fatty acids. Data are presented on their indications, pharmacology, and the relevant end point clinical trial data with these drugs. It also discusses the human trial data on some novel therapeutic agents that are being developed including those for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia--the antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen and the microsomal transfer protein inhibitor lomitapide. Data are presented on phase II and III trials on agents with potentially wider applications, cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 inhibitors. The data on a licensed gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency are also presented. PMID:23811423

  19. Interaction of Daptomycin with Lipid Bilayers: A Lipid Extracting Effect

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Daptomycin is the first approved member of a new structural class of antibiotics, the cyclic lipopeptides. The peptide interacts with the lipid matrix of cell membranes, inducing permeability of the membrane to ions, but its molecular mechanism has been a puzzle. Unlike the ubiquitous membrane-acting host-defense antimicrobial peptides, daptomycin does not induce pores in the cell membranes. Thus, how it affects the permeability of a membrane to ions is not clear. We studied its interaction with giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and discovered a lipid-extracting phenomenon that correlates with the direct action of daptomycin on bacterial membranes observed in a recent fluorescence microscopy study. Lipid extraction occurred only when the GUV lipid composition included phosphatidylglycerol and in the presence of Ca2+ ions, the same condition found to be necessary for daptomycin to be effective against bacteria. Furthermore, it occurred only when the peptide/lipid ratio exceeded a threshold value, which could be the basis of the minimal inhibitory concentration of daptomycin. In this first publication on the lipid extracting effect, we characterize its dependence on ions and lipid compositions. We also discuss possibilities for connecting the lipid extracting effect to the antibacterial activity of daptomycin. PMID:25093761

  20. HPLC separation of acyl lipid classes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of complex acyl lipids ideally includes normal-phase HPLC to separate the acyl lipid classes followed by reversed-phase HPLC to separate the molecular species of a lipid class. Both polar lipid classes and non-polar lipid classes have been separated by normal-phase HPLC, mostly on sil...

  1. ANALYSIS OF POLAR LIPIDS FROM OAT GROATS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oats are a rich source of polar lipids and oat polar lipids are being applied to some unique applications. However, many characteristics of polar oat lipid composition have not yet been characterized with modern methodology. Our objective was to identify constitutive lipids of the polar lipid fracti...

  2. INOSITOL LIPID REGULATION OF LIPID TRANSFER IN SPECIALIZED MEMBRANE DOMAINS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeun Ju; Hernandez, Maria-Luisa Guzman; Balla, Tamas

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The highly dynamic membranous network of eukaryotic cells allows spatial organization of biochemical reactions to suit the complex metabolic needs of the cell. The unique lipid composition of organelle membranes in the face of dynamic membrane activities assumes that lipid gradients are constantly generated and maintained. Important advances have been made in identifying specialized membrane compartments and lipid transfer mechanisms that are critical for generating and maintaining lipid gradients. Remarkably, one class of minor phospholipids -- the phosphoinositides -- is emerging as important regulators of these processes. Here, we summarize several lines of research that led to our current understanding of the connection between phosphoinositides and the transport of structural lipids and offer some thoughts on general principles possibly governing these processes. PMID:23489878

  3. Neuroimaging of Lipid Storage Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieger, Deborah; Auerbach, Sarah; Robinson, Paul; Gropman, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Lipid storage diseases, also known as the lipidoses, are a group of inherited metabolic disorders in which there is lipid accumulation in various cell types, including the central nervous system, because of the deficiency of a variety of enzymes. Over time, excessive storage can cause permanent cellular and tissue damage. The brain is particularly…

  4. Lipids in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Hüsing, Anna; Kabar, Iyad; Schmidt, Hartmut H

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is very common after liver transplantation and can be observed in up to 71% of patients. The etiology of lipid disorders in these patients is multifactorial, with different lipid profiles observed depending on the immunosuppressive agents administered and the presence of additional risk factors, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and nutrition. Due to recent improvements in survival of liver transplant recipients, the prevention of cardiovascular events has become more important, especially as approximately 64% of liver transplant recipients present with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Management of dyslipidemia and of other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and smoking, has therefore become essential in these patients. Treatment of hyperlipidemia after liver transplantation consists of life style modification, modifying the dose or type of immunosuppressive agents and use of lipid lowering agents. At the start of administration of lipid lowering medications, it is important to monitor drug-drug interactions, especially between lipid lowering agents and immunosuppressive drugs. Furthermore, as combinations of various lipid lowering drugs can lead to severe side effects, such as myopathies and rhabdomyolysis, these combinations should therefore be avoided. To our knowledge, there are no current guidelines targeting the management of lipid metabolism disorders in liver transplant recipients. This paper therefore recommends an approach of managing lipid abnormalities occurring after liver transplantation.

  5. Neuroimaging of Lipid Storage Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieger, Deborah; Auerbach, Sarah; Robinson, Paul; Gropman, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Lipid storage diseases, also known as the lipidoses, are a group of inherited metabolic disorders in which there is lipid accumulation in various cell types, including the central nervous system, because of the deficiency of a variety of enzymes. Over time, excessive storage can cause permanent cellular and tissue damage. The brain is particularly…

  6. Polar lipids from oat kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oat (Avena sativa L.) kernels appear to contain much higher polar lipid concentrations than other plant tissues. We have extracted, identified, and quantified polar lipids from 18 oat genotypes grown in replicated plots in three environments in order to determine genotypic or environmental variation...

  7. Big, Fat World of Lipids

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The Big, Fat World of Lipids Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page The Big, Fat World of Lipids ... Fats Do in the Body? This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  8. Lipid oxidation in the skin.

    PubMed

    Niki, Etsuo

    2015-01-01

    Skin is the largest organ of the body and exerts several physiological functions such as a protective barrier against moisture loss and noxious agents including ultraviolet irradiation. Oxidation of skin may impair such functions and induce skin disorders including photoaging and skin cancer. Skin surface lipids, a mixture of sebaceous and epidermal lipids, have unique species and fatty acid profile. The major unsaturated lipids are squalene, sebaleic aicd, linoleic acid, and cholesterol. Singlet oxygen and ozone as well as free radicals and enzymes are important oxidants for skin lipids. Squalene is the major target for singlet oxygen, giving rise to twelve regio-isomeric squalene hydroperoxides. Ultraviolet radiation activates lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase, inducing specific enzymatic oxidation of lipids. Free radical mediated lipid peroxidation gives multiple oxidation products. Lipid oxidation products produced by these mechanisms are observed in human skin and induce various skin diseases, but in contrast to plasma and other tissues, identification and quantitative measurement of lipid oxidation products in skin are scarce and should be the subjects of future studies. PMID:25312699

  9. Lipids and RNA virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Konan, Kouacou V.; Sanchez-Felipe, Lorena

    2014-01-01

    Most viruses rely heavily on their host machinery to successfully replicate their genome and produce new virus particles. Recently, the interaction of positive-strand RNA viruses with the lipid biosynthetic and transport machinery has been the subject of intense investigation. In this review, we will discuss the contribution of various host lipids and related proteins in RNA virus replication and maturation. PMID:25262061

  10. Synthesis of LipidGreen2 and its application in lipid and fatty liver imaging.

    PubMed

    Chun, Hang-Suk; Jeon, Jong Hyun; Pagire, Haushabhau S; Lee, Jae Hong; Chung, Hee-Chung; Park, Myoung Joo; So, Ju-Hoon; Ryu, Jae-Ho; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Ahn, Jin Hee; Bae, Myung Ae

    2013-04-01

    We have developed LipidGreen2, a second generation small molecule probe for lipid imaging. LipidGreen2 has a better fluorescence signal compared with the previous LipidGreen, and selectively stains neutral lipids in cells and fat deposits in live zebrafish. We also demonstrate the application of LipidGreen2 for detecting fatty liver. PMID:23412429

  11. Lipid lather removes metals.

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, L

    2000-01-01

    Metal contamination has been linked to birth defects, cancer, skin lesions, retardation, learning disabilities, liver and kidney damage, and a host of other maladies, and the United States alone will spend some $7 trillion over the next five years or so to clean up sites contaminated with metals. Until recently, there have only been a few time-consuming, costly methods for dealing with metal contamination in soils, but research developed at the University of Arizona uses biosurfactants, lipids that form emulsions between liquids of different polarities, to virtually "wash" metals out of contaminated soil. Lab tests show that 80-100% of single metals including cadmium and lead can be removed through the use of environmentally benign biosurfactants. PMID:10903627

  12. Lipid lather removes metals.

    PubMed

    Frazer, L

    2000-07-01

    Metal contamination has been linked to birth defects, cancer, skin lesions, retardation, learning disabilities, liver and kidney damage, and a host of other maladies, and the United States alone will spend some $7 trillion over the next five years or so to clean up sites contaminated with metals. Until recently, there have only been a few time-consuming, costly methods for dealing with metal contamination in soils, but research developed at the University of Arizona uses biosurfactants, lipids that form emulsions between liquids of different polarities, to virtually "wash" metals out of contaminated soil. Lab tests show that 80-100% of single metals including cadmium and lead can be removed through the use of environmentally benign biosurfactants. PMID:10903627

  13. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins in Lipidic Mesophases. A Host Lipid Screen

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dianfan; Lee, Jean; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-11-30

    The default lipid for the bulk of the crystallogenesis studies performed to date using the cubic mesophase method is monoolein. There is no good reason, however, why this 18-carbon, cis-monounsaturated monoacylglycerol should be the preferred lipid for all target membrane proteins. The latter come from an array of biomembrane types with varying properties that include hydrophobic thickness, intrinsic curvature, lateral pressure profile, lipid and protein makeup, and compositional asymmetry. Thus, it seems reasonable that screening for crystallizability based on the identity of the lipid creating the hosting mesophase would be worthwhile. For this, monoacylglycerols with differing acyl chain characteristics, such as length and olefinic bond position, must be available. A lipid synthesis and purification program is in place in the author's laboratory to serve this need. In the current study with the outer membrane sugar transporter, OprB, we demonstrate the utility of host lipid screening as a means for generating diffraction-quality crystals. Host lipid screening is likely to prove a generally useful strategy for mesophase-based crystallization of membrane proteins.

  14. Fat caves: caveolae, lipid trafficking and lipid metabolism in adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Libin

    2011-01-01

    Caveolae are subdomains of the eukaryotic cell surface that are so-called because they resemble little caves, small omega-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane into the cytosol. They are present in many cell types and are especially abundant in adipocytes where they have been implicated as playing a role in lipid metabolism. Thus mice and humans lacking caveolae have small adipocytes and exhibit lipodystrophies along with other physiological abnormalities. Here we review the evidence supporting the role of caveolae in adipocyte lipid metabolism in the context of the protein and lipid composition of these structures. PMID:21592817

  15. Lipid mediators in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The implications of lipid lowering drugs in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy have been considered. At the same time, the clinical efficacy of lipid lowering drugs has resulted in improvement in the cardiovascular functions of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with or without diabetes, but no remarkable improvement has been observed in the kidney outcome. Earlier lipid mediators have been shown to cause accumulative effects in diabetic nephropathy (DN). Here, we attempt to analyze the involvement of lipid mediators in DN. The hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of diacyglycerol (DAG) is one of the causes for the activation of protein kinase C (PKCs), which is responsible for the activation of pathways, including the production of VEGF, TGF?1, PAI-1, NADPH oxidases, and NF?B signaling, accelerating the development of DN. Additionally, current studies on the role of ceramide are one of the major fields of study in DN. Researchers have reported excessive ceramide formation in the pathobiological conditions of DN. There is less report on the effect of lipid lowering drugs on the reduction of PKC activation and ceramide synthesis. Regulating PKC activation and ceramide biosynthesis could be a protective measure in the therapeutic potential of DN. Lipid lowering drugs also upregulate anti-fibrotic microRNAs, which could hint at the effects of lipid lowering drugs in DN. PMID:25206927

  16. Renal lipid metabolism and lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bobulescu, Ion Alexandru

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Lipid accumulation in nonadipose tissues is increasingly recognized to contribute to organ injury through a process termed lipotoxicity, but whether this process occurs in the kidney is still uncertain. This article briefly summarizes the normal role of lipids in renal physiology and the current evidence linking excess lipids and lipotoxicity to renal dysfunction. Recent findings Evidence suggesting that renal lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity may lead to kidney dysfunction has mounted significantly over recent years. Abnormal renal lipid content has been described in a number of animal models and has been successfully manipulated using pharmacologic or genetic strategies. There is some heterogeneity among studies with regard to the mechanisms, consequences, and localization of lipid accumulation in the kidney, explainable at least in part by inherent differences between animal models. The relevance of these findings for human pathophysiology remains to be established. Summary Current knowledge on renal lipid physiology and pathophysiology is insufficient, but provides a strong foundation and incentive for further exploration. The future holds significant challenges in this area, especially with regard to applicability of research findings to the human kidney in vivo, but also the opportunity to transform our understanding of an array of kidney disorders. PMID:20489613

  17. Lipid biology of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Jan; Sevinsky, Christopher; Conklin, Douglas S.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in lipid metabolism have been reported in many types of cancer. Lipids have been implicated in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammation, autophagy, motility and membrane homeostasis. It is required that their biosynthesis is tightly regulated to ensure homeostasis and to prevent unnecessary energy expenditure. This review focuses on the emerging understanding of the role of lipids and lipogenic pathway regulation in breast cancer, including parallels drawn from the study of metabolic disease models, and suggestions on how these findings can potentially be exploited to promote gains in HER2/neu-positive breast cancer research. PMID:23562840

  18. Ferroptosis: Death by Lipid Peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan Seok; Stockwell, Brent R

    2016-03-01

    Ferroptosis is a regulated form of cell death driven by loss of activity of the lipid repair enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4) and subsequent accumulation of lipid-based reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly lipid hydroperoxides. This form of iron-dependent cell death is genetically, biochemically, and morphologically distinct from other cell death modalities, including apoptosis, unregulated necrosis, and necroptosis. Ferroptosis is regulated by specific pathways and is involved in diverse biological contexts. Here we summarize the discovery of ferroptosis, the mechanism of ferroptosis regulation, and its increasingly appreciated relevance to both normal and pathological physiology. PMID:26653790

  19. Lipid Acquisition by Intracellular Chlamydiae

    PubMed Central

    Elwell, Cherilyn A.; Engel, Joanne N.

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydia species are obligate intracellular pathogens that are important causes of human genital tract, ocular, and respiratory infections. The bacteria replicate within a specialized membrane-bound compartment termed the inclusion and require host-derived lipids for intracellular growth and development. Emerging evidence indicates that Chlamydia has evolved clever strategies to fulfill its lipid needs by interacting with multiple host cell compartments and redirecting trafficking pathways to its intracellular niche. In this review, we highlight recent findings that have significantly expanded our understanding of how Chlamydia exploit lipid trafficking pathways to ensure the survival of this important human pathogen. PMID:22452394

  20. Hybrid lipid-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayani, Yasaman

    Biological membranes serve several important roles, such as structural support of cells and organelles, regulation of ionic and molecular transport, barriers to non-mediated transport, contact between cells within tissues, and accommodation of membrane proteins. Membrane proteins and other vital biomolecules incorporated into the membrane need a lipid membrane to function. Due to importance of lipid bilayers and their vital function in governing many processes in the cell, the development of various models as artificial lipid membranes that can mimic cell membranes has become a subject of great interest. Using different models of artificial lipid membranes, such as liposomes, planar lipid bilayers and supported or tethered lipid bilayers, we are able to study many biophysical processes in biological membranes. The ability of different molecules to interact with and change the structure of lipid membranes can be also investigated in artificial lipid membranes. An important application of lipid bilayer-containing interfaces is characterization of novel membrane proteins for high throughput drug screening studies to investigate receptor-drug interactions and develop biosensor systems. Membrane proteins need a lipid bilayer environment to preserve their stability and functionality. Fabrication of materials that can interact with biomolecules like proteins necessitates the use of lipid bilayers as a mimic of cell membranes. The objective of this research is to develop novel hybrid lipid-based nanostructures mimicking biological membranes. Toward this aim, two hybrid biocompatible structures are introduced: lipid bilayer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and hydrogel-anchored liposomes with double-stranded DNA anchors. These structures have potential applications in biosensing, drug targeting, drug delivery, and biophysical studies of cell membranes. In the first developed nanostructure, lipid molecules are covalently attached to the surfaces of MWCNTs, and then, using a sonication process, a uniform lipid bilayer that supports the incorporation of membrane proteins is formed. These bilayer-coated carbon nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution, and they can be used in development of various biosensors and energy producing devices. In the other hybrid nanostructure, the lipid bilayer of a liposome is covalently anchored to a biocompatible poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) hydrogel core using double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) linkers. Release studies shows that nano-size hydrogel-anchored liposomes are exceptionally stable, and they can be used as biomimetic model membranes that mimic the connectivity between the cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane. After lipid bilayer removal, dsDNA linkers can provide programmable nanogels decorated with oligonucleotides with potential sites for further molecular assembly. These stable nanostructures can be useful for oligonucleotide and drug delivery applications. The developed hydrogel-anchored liposomes are exploited for encapsulation and intracellular delivery of therapeutic peptide. Peptides with anti-cancer properties are successfully encapsulated in hydrogel core of pH-sensitive liposomes during rehydration process. Liposomes release their cargo at acidic pH. Confocal microscopy confirms the intracellular delivery of liposomes through an endocytotic pathway.

  1. Lipid exchange between membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Jähnig, F

    1984-01-01

    The exchange of lipid molecules between vesicle bilayers in water and a monolayer forming at the water surface was investigated theoretically within the framework of thermodynamics. The total number of exchanged molecules was found to depend on the bilayer curvature as expressed by the vesicle radius and on the boundary condition for exchange, i.e., whether during exchange the radius or the packing density of the vesicles remains constant. The boundary condition is determined by the rate of flip-flop within the bilayer relative to the rate of exchange between bi- and monolayer. If flip-flop is fast, exchange is independent of the vesicle radius; if flip-flop is slow, exchange increases with the vesicle radius. Available experimental results agree with the detailed form of this dependence. When the theory was extended to exchange between two bilayers of different curvature, the direction of exchange was also determined by the curvatures and the boundary conditions for exchange. Due to the dependence of the boundary conditions on flip-flop and, consequently, on membrane fluidity, exchange between membranes may partially be regulated by membrane fluidity. PMID:6518251

  2. [Lipid metabolism and exercise].

    PubMed

    Lacour, J R

    2001-06-30

    A high level of physical activity is associated with a lower cardiovascular risk in adult and elderly subjects. Several mechanisms are involved. Physical activity induces an increase in energy output. The contribution of fats to muscle energy metabolism increases with exercise duration. It decreases with exercise intensity. EPOC contributes by about 10% to the total energy cost of exercise. This supplementary energy expenditure is principally covered with fat oxidation, this being related to GH release. Part of energy expended during intermittent exercise is supplied by fat oxidation. The used lipids are taken from the muscular triacylglycerol stores and from the circulating FFA and lipoprotein triacylglycerols. Hydrolysis of triacylglycerols is achieved by LPL. Endurance training induces an increased contribution from fat to the exercise energy need. This results from increased muscle capillary density, enhanced activity of LPL and of the enzymes controlling beta-oxydation. The increased energy expenditure results in a reduced fat mass, which accounts for a decreased plasma triacylglycerol level. Endurance activity requiring approximately an expenditure of 60 kJ.kg-1 per week usually produces favourable lipoprotein changes. Level of post-prandial lipemia is lowered. These alterations disappear within the first two days of recovery. PMID:11505866

  3. Electronic polymers in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Patrik K.; Jullesson, David; Elfwing, Anders; Liin, Sara I.; Musumeci, Chiara; Zeglio, Erica; Elinder, Fredrik; Solin, Niclas; Inganäs, Olle

    2015-06-01

    Electrical interfaces between biological cells and man-made electrical devices exist in many forms, but it remains a challenge to bridge the different mechanical and chemical environments of electronic conductors (metals, semiconductors) and biosystems. Here we demonstrate soft electrical interfaces, by integrating the metallic polymer PEDOT-S into lipid membranes. By preparing complexes between alkyl-ammonium salts and PEDOT-S we were able to integrate PEDOT-S into both liposomes and in lipid bilayers on solid surfaces. This is a step towards efficient electronic conduction within lipid membranes. We also demonstrate that the PEDOT-S@alkyl-ammonium:lipid hybrid structures created in this work affect ion channels in the membrane of Xenopus oocytes, which shows the possibility to access and control cell membrane structures with conductive polyelectrolytes.

  4. Electronic polymers in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Patrik K; Jullesson, David; Elfwing, Anders; Liin, Sara I; Musumeci, Chiara; Zeglio, Erica; Elinder, Fredrik; Solin, Niclas; Inganäs, Olle

    2015-01-01

    Electrical interfaces between biological cells and man-made electrical devices exist in many forms, but it remains a challenge to bridge the different mechanical and chemical environments of electronic conductors (metals, semiconductors) and biosystems. Here we demonstrate soft electrical interfaces, by integrating the metallic polymer PEDOT-S into lipid membranes. By preparing complexes between alkyl-ammonium salts and PEDOT-S we were able to integrate PEDOT-S into both liposomes and in lipid bilayers on solid surfaces. This is a step towards efficient electronic conduction within lipid membranes. We also demonstrate that the PEDOT-S@alkyl-ammonium:lipid hybrid structures created in this work affect ion channels in the membrane of Xenopus oocytes, which shows the possibility to access and control cell membrane structures with conductive polyelectrolytes. PMID:26059023

  5. Electronic polymers in lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Patrik K.; Jullesson, David; Elfwing, Anders; Liin, Sara I.; Musumeci, Chiara; Zeglio, Erica; Elinder, Fredrik; Solin, Niclas; Inganäs, Olle

    2015-01-01

    Electrical interfaces between biological cells and man-made electrical devices exist in many forms, but it remains a challenge to bridge the different mechanical and chemical environments of electronic conductors (metals, semiconductors) and biosystems. Here we demonstrate soft electrical interfaces, by integrating the metallic polymer PEDOT-S into lipid membranes. By preparing complexes between alkyl-ammonium salts and PEDOT-S we were able to integrate PEDOT-S into both liposomes and in lipid bilayers on solid surfaces. This is a step towards efficient electronic conduction within lipid membranes. We also demonstrate that the PEDOT-S@alkyl-ammonium:lipid hybrid structures created in this work affect ion channels in the membrane of Xenopus oocytes, which shows the possibility to access and control cell membrane structures with conductive polyelectrolytes. PMID:26059023

  6. Defining Lipid Transport Pathways in Animal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Richard E.; Sleight, Richard G.

    1985-09-01

    A new technique for studying the metabolism and intracellular transport of lipid molecules in living cells based on the use of fluorescent lipid analogs is described. The cellular processing of various intermediates (phosphatidic acid and ceramide) and end products (phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine) in lipid biosynthesis is reviewed and a working model for compartmentalization during lipid biosynthesis is presented.

  7. Lipid droplets in inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Bozza, Patricia T; Viola, João P B

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of lipid droplets (also known as lipid bodies or adiposomes) within leukocytes, epithelial cells, hepatocytes and other non-adipocytic cells is a frequently observed phenotype in infectious, neoplastic and other inflammatory conditions. Lipid droplet biogenesis is a regulated cellular process that culminates in the compartmentalization of lipids and of an array of enzymes, protein kinases and other proteins, suggesting that lipid droplets are inducible organelles with roles in cell signaling, regulation of lipid metabolism, membrane trafficking and control of the synthesis and secretion of inflammatory mediators. Enzymes involved in eicosanoid synthesis are localized at lipid droplets and lipid droplets are sites for eicosanoid generation in cells during inflammation and cancer. In this review, we discuss the current evidence related to the biogenesis and function of lipid droplets in cell metabolism and signaling in inflammation and cancer. Moreover, the potential of lipid droplets as markers of disease and targets for novel anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic therapies will be discussed. PMID:20206487

  8. Fsp27 promotes lipid droplet growth by lipid exchange and transfer at lipid droplet contact sites

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jingyi; Sun, Zhiqi; Wu, Lizhen; Xu, Wenyi; Schieber, Nicole; Xu, Dijin; Shui, Guanghou; Yang, Hongyuan; Parton, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are dynamic cellular organelles that control many biological processes. However, molecular components determining LD growth are poorly understood. Genetic analysis has indicated that Fsp27, an LD-associated protein, is important in controlling LD size and lipid storage in adipocytes. In this paper, we demonstrate that Fsp27 is focally enriched at the LD–LD contacting site (LDCS). Photobleaching revealed the occurrence of lipid exchange between contacted LDs in wild-type adipocytes and Fsp27-overexpressing cells but not Fsp27-deficient adipocytes. Furthermore, live-cell imaging revealed a unique Fsp27-mediated LD growth process involving a directional net lipid transfer from the smaller to larger LDs at LDCSs, which is in accordance with the biophysical analysis of the internal pressure difference between the contacting LD pair. Thus, we have uncovered a novel molecular mechanism of LD growth mediated by Fsp27. PMID:22144693

  9. [Oxidative stability of the lipids in whitefish].

    PubMed

    Ushkalova, V N; Ioanidis, N V

    1985-01-01

    The manometric technique was employed to study the initiated oxidation of 7 samples of whitefish lipids of varying sites, to measure the kinetic parameters depending on the fatty acid composition and concentration of tocopherol. Changes in oxidative stability of lipids of varying localization was shown, a higher stability of muscle tissue lipids was noted as compared with brain and depot lipids. The possibility of testing oxidative stability of lipids according to the kinetic parameters is discussed. PMID:3984291

  10. Lipid bilayers on nano-templates

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Bakajin, Olgica; Stoeve, Pieter

    2009-08-04

    A lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising a nanotube or nanowire and a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire. One embodiment provides a method of fabricating a lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising the steps of providing a nanotube or nanowire and forming a lipid bilayer around the polymer cushion. One embodiment provides a protein pore in the lipid bilayer. In one embodiment the protein pore is sensitive to specific agents

  11. Lipid interactions during virus entry and infection

    PubMed Central

    Mazzon, Michela; Mercer, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Summary For entry and infection viruses have developed numerous strategies to subjugate indispensable cellular factors and functions. Host cell lipids and cellular lipid synthesis machinery are no exception. Not only do viruses exploit existing lipid signalling and modifications for virus entry and trafficking, they also reprogram lipid synthesis, metabolism, and compartmentalization for assembly and egress. Here we review these various concepts and highlight recent progress in understanding viral interactions with host cell lipids during entry and assembly. PMID:25131438

  12. The Lipids of Pneumocystis carinii

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshiro, Edna S.

    1998-01-01

    Information about a number of Pneumocystis carinii lipids obtained by the analyses of organisms isolated and purified from infected lungs of corticosteroid-immunosuppressed rats has been reported in recent years. Of the common opportunistic protists associated with AIDS (Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, and the microsporidia), more is currently known about the lipids of P. carinii than the others. Lipids that are synthesized by the organism but not by humans are attractive targets for drug development. Thus, the elucidation of Δ7C-24-alykylated sterol and cis-9,10-epoxystearic acid biosyntheses in P. carinii is currently being examined in detail, since these have been identified as P. carinii-specific lipids. The development of low-toxicity drugs that prevent sterol C-24 alkylation and the specific inhibition of the lipoxygenase that forms cis-9,10-epoxystearic acid might prove fruitful. Although humans can synthesize coenzyme Q10, the anti-P. carinii activity and low toxicity of ubiquinone analogs such as atovaquone suggest that the electron transport chain in the pathogen may differ importantly from that in the host. Although resistance to atovaquone has been observed, development of other naphthoquinone drugs would provide a broader armamentarium of drugs to treat patients with P. carinii pneumonia. Studies of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and of infected lungs have demonstrated that the infection causes a number of chemical abnormalities. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained after the removal of lung cellular material and the organisms has been shown to contain larger amounts of surfactant proteins and smaller amounts of phospholipids than do comparable samples from P. carinii-free lungs. Increased phospholipase activity, inhibition of surfactant secretion by type II cells, and uptake and catabolism of lipids by the pathogen may explain this phenomenon related to P. carinii pneumonia. Although not yet thoroughly examined, initial studies on the uptake and metabolism of lipids by P. carinii suggest that the organism relies heavily on exogenous lipid nutrients. PMID:9457427

  13. Lipids of Rhizopus arrhizus Fischer

    PubMed Central

    Weete, John D.; Weber, Darrell J.; Laseter, John L.

    1970-01-01

    The lipids of Rhizopus arrhizus Fischer mycelia and sporangiospores were extracted, isolated, and separated by thin-layer, liquid, and gas chromatography. Structural confirmations of the compounds were made by a gas chromatographmass spectrometer combination. The n-heptane fraction contained squalene (1%) as a major hydrocarbon constituent. Other major lipid classes detected were free fatty acids, naturally occurring methyl esters of fatty acids, triglycerides, sterols, and polar lipids. The polar lipids (44.4%) were found in the highest concentrations, and the triglycerides (22.1%), sterols (16.7%), and free fatty acids (11.7%) were present in lesser concentrations. This is the first report of naturally occuring methyl esters of long-chain fatty acids being present in fungal mycelium. There appears to be a preference for incorporation of unsaturated acids into the complex lipids, with the exception of the triglycerides. The major saturated fatty acids in the mycelium were palmitic (C16) and arachidic (C20), whereas the major unsaturated acids were oleic (C18:1) and linoleic (C18:2), respectively. PMID:5474875

  14. Mass Spectrometry Methodology in Lipid Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Han, Juanjuan; Wang, Zhenpeng; Liu, Jian’an; Wei, Jinchao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Zhenwen

    2014-01-01

    Lipidomics is an emerging field, where the structures, functions and dynamic changes of lipids in cells, tissues or body fluids are investigated. Due to the vital roles of lipids in human physiological and pathological processes, lipidomics is attracting more and more attentions. However, because of the diversity and complexity of lipids, lipid analysis is still full of challenges. The recent development of methods for lipid extraction and analysis and the combination with bioinformatics technology greatly push forward the study of lipidomics. Among them, mass spectrometry (MS) is the most important technology for lipid analysis. In this review, the methodology based on MS for lipid analysis was introduced. It is believed that along with the rapid development of MS and its further applications to lipid analysis, more functional lipids will be identified as biomarkers and therapeutic targets and for the study of the mechanisms of disease. PMID:24921707

  15. Lipid Metabolism, Apoptosis and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunfa; Freter, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules. These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways. Lipid metabolism participates in the regulation of many cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, inflammation, motility, membrane homeostasis, chemotherapy response, and drug resistance. Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases. In this review, we discuss recent data in the fields of lipid metabolism, lipid-mediated apoptosis, and cancer therapy. In conclusion, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of lipid metabolism and the function of different lipid molecules could provide the basis for cancer cell death rationale, discover novel and potential targets, and develop new anticancer drugs for cancer therapy. PMID:25561239

  16. Lipid metabolism, apoptosis and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunfa; Freter, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules. These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways. Lipid metabolism participates in the regulation of many cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, inflammation, motility, membrane homeostasis, chemotherapy response, and drug resistance. Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases. In this review, we discuss recent data in the fields of lipid metabolism, lipid-mediated apoptosis, and cancer therapy. In conclusion, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of lipid metabolism and the function of different lipid molecules could provide the basis for cancer cell death rationale, discover novel and potential targets, and develop new anticancer drugs for cancer therapy. PMID:25561239

  17. Fuel from microalgae lipid products

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, A.M.; Feinberg, D.A.

    1984-04-01

    The large-scale production of microalgae is a promising method of producing a renewable feedstock for a wide variety of fuel products currently refined from crude petroleum. These microalgae-derived products include lipid extraction products (triglycerides, fatty acids, and hydrocarbons) and catalytic conversion products (paraffins and olefins). Microalgal biomass productivity and lipid composition of current experimental systems are estimated at 66.0 metric tons per hectare year and 30% lipid content. Similar yields in a large-scale facility indicate that production costs are approximately six times higher than the average domestic price for crude, well-head petroleum. Based on achievable targets for productivity and production costs, the potential for microalgae as a fuel feedstock is presented in context with selected process refining routes and is compared with conventional and alternative feedstocks (e.g., oilseeds) with which microalgae must compete. 24 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.

  18. Gene therapy for lipid disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kawashiri, Masa-aki; Rader, Daniel J

    2000-01-01

    Lipid disorders are associated with atherosclerotic vascular disease, and therapy is associated with a substantial reduction in cardiovascular events. Current approaches to the treatment of lipid disorders are ineffective in a substantial number of patients. New therapies for refractory hypercholesterolemia, severe hypertriglyceridemia, and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are needed: somatic gene therapy is one viable approach. The molecular etiology and pathophysiology of most of the candidate diseases are well understood. Animal models exist for the diseases and in many cases preclinical proof-of-principle studies have already been performed. There has been progress in the development of vectors that provide long-term gene expression. New clinical gene therapy trials for lipid disorders are likely to be initiated within the next few years. PMID:11714424

  19. Crystallization modifiers in lipid systems.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Paula Badan; Masuchi, Monise Helen; Miyasaki, Eriksen Koji; Domingues, Maria Aliciane Fontenele; Stroppa, Valter Luís Zuliani; de Oliveira, Glazieli Marangoni; Kieckbusch, Theo Guenter

    2015-07-01

    Crystallization of fats is a determinant physical event affecting the structure and properties of fat-based products. The stability of these processed foods is regulated by changes in the physical state of fats and alterations in their crystallization behavior. Problems like polymorphic transitions, oil migration, fat bloom development, slow crystallization and formation of crystalline aggregates stand out. The change of the crystallization behavior of lipid systems has been a strategic issue for the processing of foods, aiming at taylor made products, reducing costs, improving quality, and increasing the applicability and stability of different industrial fats. In this connection, advances in understanding the complex mechanisms that govern fat crystallization led to the development of strategies in order to modulate the conventional processes of fat structuration, based on the use of crystallization modifiers. Different components have been evaluated, such as specific triacyglycerols, partial glycerides (monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols), free fatty acids, phospholipids and emulsifiers. The knowledge and expertise on the influence of these specific additives or minor lipids on the crystallization behavior of fat systems represents a focus of current interest for the industrial processing of oils and fats. This article presents a comprehensive review on the use of crystallization modifiers in lipid systems, especially for palm oil, cocoa butter and general purpose fats, highlighting: i) the removal, addition or fractionation of minor lipids in fat bases; ii) the use of nucleating agents to modify the crystallization process; iii) control of crystallization in lipid bases by using emulsifiers. The addition of these components into lipid systems is discussed in relation to the phenomena of nucleation, crystal growth, morphology, thermal behavior and polymorphism, with the intention of providing the reader with a complete panorama of the associated mechanisms with crystallization of fats and oils. PMID:26139862

  20. Charge-reversal Lipids, Peptide-based Lipids, and Nucleoside-based Lipids for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    LaManna, Caroline M.; Lusic, Hrvoje; Camplo, Michel; McIntosh, Thomas J.; Barthélémy, Philippe; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus Twenty years after gene therapy was introduced in the clinic, advances in the technique continue to garner headlines as successes pique the interest of clinicians, researchers, and the public. Gene therapy’s appeal stems from its potential to revolutionize modern medical therapeutics by offering solutions to a myriad of diseases by tailoring the treatment to a specific individual’s genetic code. Both viral and non-viral vectors have been used in the clinic, but the low transfection efficiencies when utilizing non-viral vectors have lead to an increased focus on engineering new gene delivery vectors. To address the challenges facing non-viral or synthetic vectors, specifically lipid-based carriers, we have focused on three main themes throughout our research: 1) that releasing the nucleic acid from the carrier will increase gene transfection; 2) that utilizing biologically inspired designs, such as DNA binding proteins, to create lipids with peptide-based headgroups will improve delivery; and 3) that mimicking the natural binding patterns observed within DNA, by using lipids having a nucleoside headgroup, will give unique supramolecular assembles with high transfection efficiency. The results presented in this Account demonstrate that cellular uptake and transfection efficacy can be improved by engineering the chemical components of the lipid vectors to enhance nucleic acid binding and release kinetics. Specifically, our research has shown that the incorporation of a charge-reversal moiety to initiate change of the lipid from positive to negative net charge during the transfection process improves transfection. In addition, by varying the composition of the spacer (rigid, flexible, short, long, and aromatic) between the cationic headgroup and the hydrophobic chains, lipids can be tailored to interact with different nucleic acids (DNA, RNA, siRNA) and accordingly affect delivery, uptake outcomes, and transfection efficiency. Introduction of a peptide headgroup into the lipid provides a mechanism to affect the binding of the lipid to the nucleic acid, to influence the supramolecular lipoplex structure, and to enhance gene transfection activity. Lastly, we discuss the in-vitro successes we have had when using lipids possessing a nucleoside headgroup to create unique self-assembled structures and to deliver DNA to cells. In this Account, we state our hypotheses and design elements as well as describe the techniques that we have utilized in our research, in order to provide readers with the tools to characterize and engineer new vectors. PMID:22439686

  1. Charge-reversal lipids, peptide-based lipids, and nucleoside-based lipids for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    LaManna, Caroline M; Lusic, Hrvoje; Camplo, Michel; McIntosh, Thomas J; Barthélémy, Philippe; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2012-07-17

    Twenty years after gene therapy was introduced in the clinic, advances in the technique continue to garner headlines as successes pique the interest of clinicians, researchers, and the public. Gene therapy's appeal stems from its potential to revolutionize modern medical therapeutics by offering solutions to myriad diseases through treatments tailored to a specific individual's genetic code. Both viral and non-viral vectors have been used in the clinic, but the low transfection efficiencies when non-viral vectors are used have lead to an increased focus on engineering new gene delivery vectors. To address the challenges facing non-viral or synthetic vectors, specifically lipid-based carriers, we have focused on three main themes throughout our research: (1) The release of the nucleic acid from the carrier will increase gene transfection. (2) The use of biologically inspired designs, such as DNA binding proteins, to create lipids with peptide-based headgroups will improve delivery. (3) Mimicking the natural binding patterns observed within DNA, by using lipids having a nucleoside headgroup, will produce unique supramolecular assembles with high transfection efficiencies. The results presented in this Account demonstrate that engineering the chemical components of the lipid vectors to enhance nucleic acid binding and release kinetics can improve the cellular uptake and transfection efficacy of nucleic acids. Specifically, our research has shown that the incorporation of a charge-reversal moiety to initiate a shift of the lipid from positive to negative net charge improves transfection. In addition, by varying the composition of the spacer (rigid, flexible, short, long, or aromatic) between the cationic headgroup and the hydrophobic chains, we can tailor lipids to interact with different nucleic acids (DNA, RNA, siRNA) and accordingly affect delivery, uptake outcomes, and transfection efficiency. The introduction of a peptide headgroup into the lipid provides a mechanism to affect the binding of the lipid to the nucleic acid, to influence the supramolecular lipoplex structure, and to enhance gene transfection activity. Lastly, we discuss the in vitro successes that we have had when using lipids possessing a nucleoside headgroup to create unique self-assembled structures and to deliver DNA to cells. In this Account, we state our hypotheses and design elements as well as describe the techniques that we have used in our research to provide readers with the tools to characterize and engineer new vectors. PMID:22439686

  2. [Advancement of the study in meibomian lipids].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jing; Yan, Xiao-ming

    2012-12-01

    Meibomian lipids are believed to compose the lipid layer of tear film and play important roles in maintaining the stability of tear film. Changes in composition of meibomian lipids contribute to the ocular surface disease, such as dry eye. The understanding of composition and role of meibomian lipids can help us understand the cause of these disease. This review is intended to summarize the current state of knowledge about meibomian lipids, lipidomic analysis of meibomian lipids and changes of medium regarding to diseases. PMID:23336421

  3. Lipid signals and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongben; Klett, Eric L; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2013-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of metabolic derangements that include obesity, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia and hypertension, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance has been proposed to be the common feature that links obesity to the metabolic syndrome, but the mechanism remains obscure. Although the excess content of triacylglycerol in muscle and liver is highly associated with insulin resistance in these tissues, triacylglycerol itself is not causal but merely a marker. Thus, attention has turned to the accumulation of cellular lipids known to have signaling roles. This review will discuss recent progress in understanding how glycerolipids and related lipid intermediates may impair insulin signaling. PMID:24533033

  4. Nanoparticle-lipid bilayer interactions studied with lipid bilayer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bin; Smith, Tyler; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2015-04-01

    The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which can provide insight into the nature of the particle-membrane interaction through variation of membrane and solution properties not possible with cell-based assays. However, the scope of these studies can be limited because of the low throughput characteristic of lipid bilayer platforms. We have recently described an easy to use, parallel lipid bilayer platform which we have used to electrically investigate the activity of 60 nm diameter amine and carboxyl modified polystyrene nanoparticles (NH2-NP and COOH-NP) with over 1000 lipid bilayers while varying lipid composition, bilayer charge, ionic strength, pH, voltage, serum, particle concentration, and particle charge. Our results confirm recent studies finding activity of NH2-NP but not COOH-NP. Detailed analysis shows that NH2-NP formed pores 0.3-2.3 nm in radius, dependent on bilayer and solution composition. These interactions appear to be electrostatic, as they are regulated by NH2-NP surface charge, solution ionic strength, and bilayer charge. The ability to rapidly measure a large number of nanoparticle and membrane parameters indicates strong potential of this bilayer array platform for additional nanoparticle bilayer studies.The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which can provide insight into the nature of the particle-membrane interaction through variation of membrane and solution properties not possible with cell-based assays. However, the scope of these studies can be limited because of the low throughput characteristic of lipid bilayer platforms. We have recently described an easy to use, parallel lipid bilayer platform which we have used to electrically investigate the activity of 60 nm diameter amine and carboxyl modified polystyrene nanoparticles (NH2-NP and COOH-NP) with over 1000 lipid bilayers while varying lipid composition, bilayer charge, ionic strength, pH, voltage, serum, particle concentration, and particle charge. Our results confirm recent studies finding activity of NH2-NP but not COOH-NP. Detailed analysis shows that NH2-NP formed pores 0.3-2.3 nm in radius, dependent on bilayer and solution composition. These interactions appear to be electrostatic, as they are regulated by NH2-NP surface charge, solution ionic strength, and bilayer charge. The ability to rapidly measure a large number of nanoparticle and membrane parameters indicates strong potential of this bilayer array platform for additional nanoparticle bilayer studies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Impact of ionic strength on particle-membrane interaction in POPC : POPE : Chol : POPS (3 : 1 : 1 : 1) bilayers; impact of voltage magnitude, bilayer charge, voltage sign and ionic strength on pore size. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06892k

  5. The Membrane and Lipids as Integral Participants in Signal Transduction: Lipid Signal Transduction for the Non-Lipid Biochemist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyster, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Reviews of signal transduction have often focused on the cascades of protein kinases and protein phosphatases and their cytoplasmic substrates that become activated in response to extracellular signals. Lipids, lipid kinases, and lipid phosphatases have not received the same amount of attention as proteins in studies of signal transduction.…

  6. The Membrane and Lipids as Integral Participants in Signal Transduction: Lipid Signal Transduction for the Non-Lipid Biochemist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyster, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Reviews of signal transduction have often focused on the cascades of protein kinases and protein phosphatases and their cytoplasmic substrates that become activated in response to extracellular signals. Lipids, lipid kinases, and lipid phosphatases have not received the same amount of attention as proteins in studies of signal transduction.…

  7. Evolution of lipid management guidelines

    PubMed Central

    John Bosomworth, N.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To understand how the new guidelines for management of cardiovascular risk by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology (AHA-ACC) can be interpreted and used in a Canadian setting. Sources of information The AHA-ACC guidelines were reviewed, along with all references. Independent PubMed searches were done to include the addition of other lipid-lowering therapy to statins and the use of medical calculators to enhance patient understanding. Main message The new AHA-ACC guidelines are based on the best current evidence related to lipid management. This includes use of 10-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk as the treatment threshold in place of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, as well as abandonment of low-density lipoprotein treatment targets. There is increased emphasis on dietary and exercise interventions, with the beginning of an effort to quantify the effect of these interventions. Statins are the main drug intervention, and the addition of other drugs to augment lipid lowering is no longer recommended. For application in Canada, Framingham risk tables are more appropriate for risk assessment than the pooled cohort equations used in the United States. Risk calculators for CVD risk should contain information on cardiovascular age and have the ability to represent risk and alternative interventions graphically in order to improve patient understanding and promote informed decision making. Conclusion Focus on the best evidence in CVD risk can simplify lipid management for both the physician and the patient. PMID:25022632

  8. You Sank My Lipid Rafts!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Tessa N.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane is the membrane that serves as a boundary between the interior of a cell and its extracellular environment. Lipid rafts are microdomains within a cellular membrane that possess decreased fluidity due to the presence of cholesterol, glycolipids, and phospholipids containing longer fatty acids. These domains are involved in many…

  9. You Sank My Lipid Rafts!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Tessa N.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane is the membrane that serves as a boundary between the interior of a cell and its extracellular environment. Lipid rafts are microdomains within a cellular membrane that possess decreased fluidity due to the presence of cholesterol, glycolipids, and phospholipids containing longer fatty acids. These domains are involved in many…

  10. Model Protocells from Single-Chain Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Mansy, Sheref S.

    2009-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the construction of laboratory models of protocells. Most frequently the developed vesicle systems utilize single-chain lipids rather than the double-chain lipids typically found in biological membranes. Although single-chain lipids yield less robust vesicles, their dynamic characteristics are highly exploitable for protocellular functions. Herein the advantages of using single-chain lipids in the construction of protocells are discussed. PMID:19399223

  11. Dibiphytanyl Ether Lipids in Nonthermophilic Crenarchaeotes

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, Edward F.; King, Linda L.; Massana, Ramon; Cittone, Henry; Murray, Alison; Schleper, Christa; Wakeham, Stuart G.

    1998-01-01

    The kingdom Crenarchaeota is now known to include archaea which inhabit a wide variety of low-temperature environments. We report here lipid analyses of nonthermophilic crenarchaeotes, which revealed the presence of cyclic and acyclic dibiphytanylglycerol tetraether lipids. Nonthermophilic crenarchaeotes appear to be a major biological source of tetraether lipids in marine planktonic environments. PMID:9501451

  12. Wheat leaf lipids during heat stress: II. Lipids experiencing coordinated metabolism are detected by analysis of lipid co-occurrence.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sruthi; Prasad, P V Vara; Welti, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    Identifying lipids that experience coordinated metabolism during heat stress would provide information regarding lipid dynamics under stress conditions and assist in developing heat-tolerant wheat varieties. We hypothesized that co-occurring lipids, which are up-regulated or down-regulated together through time during heat stress, represent groups that can be explained by coordinated metabolism. Wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L.) were subjected to 12 days of high day and/or night temperature stress, followed by a 4-day recovery period. Leaves were sampled at four time points, and 165 lipids were measured by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Correlation analysis of lipid levels in 160 leaf samples from each of two wheat genotypes revealed 13 groups of lipids. Lipids within each group co-occurred through the high day and night temperature stress treatments. The lipid groups can be broadly classified as groups containing extraplastidic phospholipids, plastidic glycerolipids, oxidized glycerolipids, triacylglycerols, acylated sterol glycosides and sterol glycosides. Current knowledge of lipid metabolism suggests that the lipids in each group co-occur because they are regulated by the same enzyme(s). The results suggest that increases in activities of desaturating, oxidizing, glycosylating and acylating enzymes lead to simultaneous changes in levels of multiple lipid species during high day and night temperature stress in wheat. PMID:26436445

  13. Lipid Bodies in Inflammatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rossana C. N.; D’Avila, Heloisa; Wan, Hsiao-Ching; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Dvorak, Ann M.; Weller, Peter F.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid bodies (LBs), also known as lipid droplets, have increasingly been recognized as functionally active organelles linked to diverse biological functions and human diseases. These organelles are actively formed in vivo within cells from the immune system, such as macrophages, neutrophils, and eosinophils, in response to different inflammatory conditions and are sites for synthesis and storage of inflammatory mediators. In this review, the authors discuss structural and functional aspects of LBs and current imaging techniques to visualize these organelles in cells engaged in inflammatory processes, including infectious diseases. The dynamic morphological aspects of LBs in leukocytes as inducible, newly formable organelles, elicitable in response to stimuli that lead to cellular activation, contribute to the evolving understanding of LBs as organelles that are critical regulators of different inflammatory diseases, key markers of leukocyte activation, and attractive targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:21430261

  14. Emerging targets in lipid-based therapy☆

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Stephanie C.; Honn, Kenneth V.

    2013-01-01

    The use of prostaglandins and NSAIDS in the clinic has proven that lipid mediators and their associated pathways make attractive therapeutic targets. When contemplating therapies involving lipid pathways, several basic agents come to mind. There are the enzymes and accessory proteins that lead to the metabolism of lipid substrates, provided through diet or through actions of lipases, the subsequent lipid products, and finally the lipid sensors or receptors. There is abundant evidence that molecules along this lipid continuum can serve as prognostic and diagnostic indicators and are in fact viable therapeutic targets. Furthermore, lipids themselves can be used as therapeutics. Despite this, the vernacular dialog pertaining to “biomarkers” does not routinely include mention of lipids, though this is rapidly changing. Collectively these agents are becoming more appreciated for their respective roles in diverse disease processes from cancer to preterm labor and are receiving their due appreciation after decades of ground work in the lipid field. By relating examples of disease processes that result from dysfunction along the lipid continuum, as well as examples of lipid therapies and emerging technologies, this review is meant to inspire further reading and discovery. PMID:23261527

  15. Metabolism and functions of lipids in myelin.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sebastian; Castelvetri, Ludovici Cantuti; Simons, Mikael

    2015-08-01

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin sheaths, which are lipid-rich and multilamellar membrane stacks. The lipid composition of myelin varies significantly from other biological membranes. Studies in mutant mice targeting various lipid biosynthesis pathways have shown that myelinating glia have a remarkable capacity to compensate the lack of individual lipids. However, compensation fails when it comes to maintaining long-term stability of myelin. Here, we summarize how lipids function in myelin biogenesis, axon-glia communication and in supporting long-term maintenance of myelin. We postulate that change in myelin lipid composition might be relevant for our understanding of aging and demyelinating diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue titled Brain Lipids. PMID:25542507

  16. Thermosensing via transmembrane protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Saita, Emilio A; de Mendoza, Diego

    2015-09-01

    Cell membranes are composed of a lipid bilayer containing proteins that cross and/or interact with lipids on either side of the two leaflets. The basic structure of cell membranes is this bilayer, composed of two opposing lipid monolayers with fascinating properties designed to perform all the functions the cell requires. To coordinate these functions, lipid composition of cellular membranes is tailored to suit their specialized tasks. In this review, we describe the general mechanisms of membrane-protein interactions and relate them to some of the molecular strategies organisms use to adjust the membrane lipid composition in response to a decrease in environmental temperature. While the activities of all biomolecules are altered as a function of temperature, the thermosensors we focus on here are molecules whose temperature sensitivity appears to be linked to changes in the biophysical properties of membrane lipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. PMID:25906947

  17. Lipid signaling in Drosophila photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Padinjat; Yadav, Shweta; Mallampati, Naresh Babu Naidu

    2012-08-01

    Drosophila photoreceptors are sensory neurons whose primary function is the transduction of photons into an electrical signal for forward transmission to the brain. Photoreceptors are polarized cells whose apical domain is organized into finger like projections of plasma membrane, microvilli that contain the molecular machinery required for sensory transduction. The development of this apical domain requires intense polarized membrane transport during development and it is maintained by post developmental membrane turnover. Sensory transduction in these cells involves a high rate of G-protein coupled phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2)] hydrolysis ending with the activation of ion channels that are members of the TRP superfamily. Defects in this lipid-signaling cascade often result in retinal degeneration, which is a consequence of the loss of apical membrane homeostasis. In this review we discuss the various membrane transport challenges of photoreceptors and their regulation by ongoing lipid signaling cascades in these cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Lipids and Vesicular Transport. PMID:22487656

  18. Lumenal lipid metabolism: implications for lipoprotein assembly.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Richard; Lian, Jihong; Quiroga, Ariel D

    2012-05-01

    Overproduction of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins by the liver and the intestine is 1 of the hallmarks of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes and a well-established risk factor of cardiovascular disease. The assembly of apoB lipoproteins is regulated by the availability of lipids that form the neutral lipid core (triacylglycerol and cholesteryl ester) and the limiting lipoprotein monolayer (phospholipids and cholesterol). Although tremendous advances have been made over the past decade toward understanding neutral lipid and phospholipid biosynthesis and neutral lipid storage in cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs), little is known about the mechanisms that govern the transfer of lipids to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum for apoB lipidation. ApoB-synthesizing organs can deposit synthesized neutral lipids into at least 3 different types of LDs, each decorated with a subset of specific proteins: perilipin-decorated cytosolic LDs, and 2 types of LDs formed in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, the secretion-destined LDs containing apoB, and resident lumenal LDs coated with microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and exchangeable apolipoproteins. This brief review will address the current knowledge of lumenal lipid metabolism in the context of apoB assembly and lipid storage. PMID:22517367

  19. Specificity of Intramembrane Protein–Lipid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Francesc-Xabier; Ernst, Andreas Max; Wieland, Felix; Brügger, Britta

    2011-01-01

    Our concept of biological membranes has markedly changed, from the fluid mosaic model to the current model that lipids and proteins have the ability to separate into microdomains, differing in their protein and lipid compositions. Since the breakthrough in crystallizing membrane proteins, the most powerful method to define lipid-binding sites on proteins has been X-ray and electron crystallography. More recently, chemical biology approaches have been developed to analyze protein–lipid interactions. Such methods have the advantage of providing highly specific cellular probes. With the advent of novel tools to study functions of individual lipid species in membranes together with structural analysis and simulations at the atomistic resolution, a growing number of specific protein–lipid complexes are defined and their functions explored. In the present article, we discuss the various modes of intramembrane protein–lipid interactions in cellular membranes, including examples for both annular and nonannular bound lipids. Furthermore, we will discuss possible functional roles of such specific protein–lipid interactions as well as roles of lipids as chaperones in protein folding and transport. PMID:21536707

  20. Cytoplasmic lipid bodies of human neutrophilic leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, P.F.; Ackerman, S.J.; Nicholson-Weller, A.; Dvorak, A.M. )

    1989-11-01

    The morphology and function of cytoplasmic lipid bodies in human neutrophils were evaluated. By transmission electron microscopy, neutrophil lipid bodies were cytoplasmic inclusions, usually several microns in diameter, that occasionally coalesced to attain a diameter up to 7 microM. Neutrophil lipid bodies were not enveloped by membrane but were often surrounded by a more electron-dense shell at their periphery. Normal peripheral blood neutrophils contained an average of approximately one lipid body per cell. Lipid bodies appeared in greater numbers in neutrophils from inflammatory lesions. Perturbation of neutrophils during conventional methods of cell isolation and purification modestly increased lipid body numbers in neutrophils, whereas incubation of neutrophils with 1 microM oleic acid rapidly induced lipid body formation over 30 to 60 minutes. After granulocytes were incubated for 2 hours with 3H-fatty acids, including arachidonic, oleic, and palmitic acids, electron microscopic autoradiography demonstrated that lipid bodies represented the predominant intracellular sites of localization of each of the three 3H-fatty acids. There was lesser labeling noted in the perinuclear cisterna, but not in cell membranes. Virtually all of each of the three 3H-fatty acids incorporated by the neutrophils were esterified into chromatographically resolved classes of neutral lipids or phospholipids. These findings indicate that cytoplasmic lipid bodies are more prominent in neutrophils in vivo engaged in inflammatory responses and that these organelles in human neutrophils function as sites of deposition of esterified, incorporated fatty acids.

  1. Lipid transport by mammalian ABC proteins.

    PubMed

    Quazi, Faraz; Molday, Robert S

    2011-09-01

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) proteins actively transport a wide variety of substrates, including peptides, amino acids, sugars, metals, drugs, vitamins and lipids, across extracellular and intracellular membranes. Of the 49 hum an ABC proteins, a significant number are known to mediate the extrusion of lipids from membranes or the flipping of membrane lipids across the bilayer to generate and maintain membrane lipid asymmetry. Typical lipid substrates include phospholipids, sterols, sphingolipids, bile acids and related lipid conjugates. Members of the ABCA subfamily of ABC transporters and other ABC proteins such as ABCB4, ABCG1 and ABCG5/8 implicated in lipid transport play important roles in diverse biological processes such as cell signalling, membrane lipid asymmetry, removal of potentially toxic compounds and metabolites, and apoptosis. The importance of these ABC lipid transporters in cell physiology is evident from the finding that mutations in the genes encoding many of these proteins are responsible for severe inherited diseases. For example, mutations in ABCA1 cause Tangier disease associated with defective efflux of cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine from the plasma membrane to the lipid acceptor protein apoA1 (apolipoprotein AI), mutations in ABCA3 cause neonatal surfactant deficiency associated with a loss in secretion of the lipid pulmonary surfactants from lungs of newborns, mutations in ABCA4 cause Stargardt macular degeneration, a retinal degenerative disease linked to the reduced clearance of retinoid compounds from photoreceptor cells, mutations in ABCA12 cause harlequin and lamellar ichthyosis, skin diseases associated with defective lipid trafficking in keratinocytes, and mutations in ABCB4 and ABCG5/ABCG8 are responsible for progressive intrafamilial hepatic disease and sitosterolaemia associated with defective phospholipid and sterol transport respectively. This chapter highlights the involvement of various mammalian ABC transporters in lipid transport in the context of their role in cell signalling, cellular homoeostasis, apoptosis and inherited disorders. PMID:21967062

  2. Lipid converter, a framework for lipid manipulations in molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Per; Kasson, Peter M

    2014-11-01

    Construction of lipid membrane and membrane protein systems for molecular dynamics simulations can be a challenging process. In addition, there are few available tools to extend existing studies by repeating simulations using other force fields and lipid compositions. To facilitate this, we introduce Lipid Converter, a modular Python framework for exchanging force fields and lipid composition in coordinate files obtained from simulations. Force fields and lipids are specified by simple text files, making it easy to introduce support for additional force fields and lipids. The converter produces simulation input files that can be used for structural relaxation of the new membranes. PMID:25081234

  3. The PerFect lipid optimizer kit for maximizing lipid-mediated transfection of eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, T; Russell, M; Froning, K; Brown, B D; Scanlon, S M; Almazan, M; Marcil, R; Hoeffler, J P

    1997-05-01

    The transfection efficiencies of a panel of eight uniquely different lipid reagents has been evaluated with two other commercially available lipids for use in transfecting a diversity of eukaryotic cell lines. The PerFect lipids are available individually or together in an optimization panel format that can be tested in any given cell line, enabling one to evaluate the optimal lipid for transfecting each individual cell line. Our results demonstrate that no single lipid is optimal for plasmid transfection over a broad range of cell types, thus emphasizing the need for multiple unique lipid reagents and a simple format for testing their transfection efficiency on a given cell type. PMID:9149886

  4. Analysis of lipid flow on minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmani, Fatemeh; Christenson, Joel; Rangamani, Padmini

    2015-07-01

    Interaction between the bilayer shape and surface flow is important for capturing the flow of lipids in many biological membranes. Recent microscopy evidence has shown that minimal surfaces (planes, catenoids, and helicoids) occur often in cellular membranes. In this study, we explore lipid flow in these geometries using a `stream function' formulation for viscoelastic lipid bilayers. Using this formulation, we derive two-dimensional lipid flow equations for the commonly occurring minimal surfaces in lipid bilayers. We show that for three minimal surfaces (planes, catenoids, and helicoids), the surface flow equations satisfy Stokes flow equations. In helicoids and catenoids, we show that the tangential velocity field is a Killing vector field. Thus, our analysis provides fundamental insight into the flow patterns of lipids on intracellular organelle membranes that are characterized by fixed shapes reminiscent of minimal surfaces.

  5. Lipid phase control of DNA delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana; Wang, Li; Tarahovsky, Yury; MacDonald, Robert C.

    2010-01-18

    Cationic lipids form nanoscale complexes (lipoplexes) with polyanionic DNA and can be utilized to deliver DNA to cells for transfection. Here we report the correlation between delivery efficiency of these DNA carriers and the mesomorphic phases they form when interacting with anionic membrane lipids. Specifically, formulations that are particularly effective DNA carriers form phases of highest negative interfacial curvature when mixed with anionic lipids, whereas less effective formulations form phases of lower curvature. Structural evolution of the carrier lipid/DNA complexes upon interaction with cellular lipids is hence suggested as a controlling factor in lipid-mediated DNA delivery. A strategy for optimizing lipofection is deduced. The behavior of a highly effective lipoplex formulation, DOTAP/DOPE, is found to conform to this 'efficiency formula'.

  6. The lipid organisation in the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Bouwstra, J A; Dubbelaar, F E; Gooris, G S; Ponec, M

    2000-01-01

    The main function of the skin is to protect the body against exogenous substances. The skin barrier is located in the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum. This layer consists of keratin enriched cells embedded in lipid lamellae. These lamellae form the main barrier for diffusion of substances through the skin. In diseased skin the barrier function is often impaired. For a full understanding of the properties of the human skin barrier, insight in the stratum corneum lipid organisation is of great importance. In this paper a short description of the lipid organisation in normal human stratum corneum will be given, after which the role the main lipid classes play in the stratum corneum lipid organisation will be described. In addition the effect of cholesterol sulfate and calcium on the lipid organisation will be discussed. Finally a new model, the "sandwich model", will be proposed that describe the localisation of the fluid phases in the stratum corneum. PMID:10884936

  7. Analysis of lipid flow on minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmani, Fatemeh; Christenson, Joel; Rangamani, Padmini

    2016-03-01

    Interaction between the bilayer shape and surface flow is important for capturing the flow of lipids in many biological membranes. Recent microscopy evidence has shown that minimal surfaces (planes, catenoids, and helicoids) occur often in cellular membranes. In this study, we explore lipid flow in these geometries using a `stream function' formulation for viscoelastic lipid bilayers. Using this formulation, we derive two-dimensional lipid flow equations for the commonly occurring minimal surfaces in lipid bilayers. We show that for three minimal surfaces (planes, catenoids, and helicoids), the surface flow equations satisfy Stokes flow equations. In helicoids and catenoids, we show that the tangential velocity field is a Killing vector field. Thus, our analysis provides fundamental insight into the flow patterns of lipids on intracellular organelle membranes that are characterized by fixed shapes reminiscent of minimal surfaces.

  8. Cholesterol Perturbs Lipid Bilayers Nonuniversally

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Jianjun; Mills, Thalia T.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F.

    2008-05-16

    Cholesterol is well known to modulate the physical properties of biomembranes. Using modern x-ray scattering methods, we have studied the effects of cholesterol on the bending modulus K{sub C}, the thickness D{sub HH}, and the orientational order parameter S{sub xray} of lipid bilayers. We find that the effects are different for at least three classes of phospholipids characterized by different numbers of saturated hydrocarbon chains. Most strikingly, cholesterol strongly increases K{sub C} when both chains of the phospholipid are fully saturated but not at all when there are two monounsaturated chains.

  9. Phosphoinositides alter lipid bilayer properties

    PubMed Central

    Hobart, E. Ashley; Koeppe, Roger E.; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), which constitutes ?1% of the plasma membrane phospholipid, plays a key role in membrane-delimited signaling. PIP2 regulates structurally and functionally diverse membrane proteins, including voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels, inwardly rectifying ion channels, transporters, and receptors. In some cases, the regulation is known to involve specific lipid–protein interactions, but the mechanisms by which PIP2 regulates many of its various targets remain to be fully elucidated. Because many PIP2 targets are membrane-spanning proteins, we explored whether the phosphoinositides might alter bilayer physical properties such as curvature and elasticity, which would alter the equilibrium between membrane protein conformational states—and thereby protein function. Taking advantage of the gramicidin A (gA) channels’ sensitivity to changes in lipid bilayer properties, we used gA-based fluorescence quenching and single-channel assays to examine the effects of long-chain PIP2s (brain PIP2, which is predominantly 1-stearyl-2-arachidonyl-PIP2, and dioleoyl-PIP2) on bilayer properties. When premixed with dioleoyl-phosphocholine at 2 mol %, both long-chain PIP2s produced similar changes in gA channel function (bilayer properties); when applied through the aqueous solution, however, brain PIP2 was a more potent modifier than dioleoyl-PIP2. Given the widespread use of short-chain dioctanoyl-phosphoinositides, we also examined the effects of diC8-phosphoinositol (PI), PI(4,5)P2, PI(3,5)P2, PI(3,4)P2, and PI(3,4,5)P3. The diC8 phosphoinositides, except for PI(3,5)P2, altered bilayer properties with potencies that decreased with increasing head group charge. Nonphosphoinositide diC8 phospholipids generally were more potent bilayer modifiers than the polyphosphoinositides. These results show that physiological increases or decreases in plasma membrane PIP2 levels, as a result of activation of PI kinases or phosphatases, are likely to alter lipid bilayer properties, in addition to any other effects they may have. The results further show that exogenous PIP2, as well as structural analogues that differ in acyl chain length or phosphorylation state, alters lipid bilayer properties at the concentrations used in many cell physiological experiments. PMID:23712549

  10. Polar lipid composition of a new halobacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tindall, B. J.; Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations of the polar lipid composition of a new aerobic, extremely halophilic aracheabacterium capable of nitrate reduction have shown that this organism contains two previously unknown phospholycolipids derived from diphytanyl glycerol diethers. Comparison of the lipid pattern from this new isolate with other known strains indicate that this organism is novel. On the basis of the unique polar lipid pattern it can be concluded that this organism represents a new taxon, at least at the species level.

  11. SEASONAL VARIABILTIY LIPIDS, LIPID CLASSES AND PCBS IN INDIGENOUS POPULATIONS OF RIBBED MUSSELS, MODIOLUS DEMISSUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two indigenous ribbed mussel (Modiolus demissus) populations were sampled approximately every four weeks during 1997 to investigate the seasonal variability of total lipids, lipid classes, and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations. One population was located in a highly c...

  12. Supported Lipid Bilayer/Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose; Craighead, Harold; McEuen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    We form supported lipid bilayers on single-walled carbon nanotubes and use this hybrid structure to probe the properties of lipid membranes and their functional constituents. We first demonstrate membrane continuity and lipid diffusion over the nanotube. A membrane-bound tetanus toxin protein, on the other hand, sees the nanotube as a diffusion barrier whose strength depends on the diameter of the nanotube. Finally, we present results on the electrical detection of specific binding of streptavidin to biotinylated lipids with nanotube field effect transistors. Possible techniques to extract dynamic information about the protein binding events will also be discussed.

  13. Lipid regulation of BK channel function

    PubMed Central

    Dopico, Alex M.; Bukiya, Anna N.

    2014-01-01

    This mini-review focuses on lipid modulation of BK (MaxiK, BKCa) current by a direct interaction between lipid and the BK subunits and/or their immediate lipid environment. Direct lipid-BK protein interactions have been proposed for fatty and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, phosphoinositides and cholesterol, evidence for such action being less clear for other lipids. BK ? (slo1) subunits are sufficient to support current perturbation by fatty and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, glycerophospholipids and cholesterol, while distinct BK ? subunits seem necessary for current modulation by most steroids. Subunit domains or amino acids that participate in lipid action have been identified in a few cases: hslo1 Y318, cerebral artery smooth muscle (cbv1) R334,K335,K336, cbv1 seven cytosolic CRAC domains, slo1 STREX and ?1 T169,L172,L173 for docosahexaenoic acid, PIP2, cholesterol, sulfatides, and cholane steroids, respectively. Whether these protein motifs directly bind lipids or rather transmit the energy of lipid binding to other areas and trigger protein conformation change remains unresolved. The impact of direct lipid-BK interaction on physiology is briefly discussed. PMID:25202277

  14. Lipid transport in cholecystokinin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    King, Alexandra; Yang, Qing; Huesman, Sarah; Rider, Therese; Lo, Chunmin C

    2015-11-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is released in response to lipid feeding and regulates pancreatic digestive enzymes vital to the absorption of nutrients. Our previous reports demonstrated that cholecystokinin knockout (CCK-KO) mice fed for 10 weeks of HFD had reduced body fat mass, but comparable glucose uptake by white adipose tissues and skeletal muscles. We hypothesized that CCK is involved in energy homeostasis and lipid transport from the small intestine to tissues in response to acute treatment with dietary lipids. CCK-KO mice with comparable fat absorption had increased energy expenditure and were resistant to HFD-induced obesity. Using intraduodenal infusion of butter fat and intravenous infusion using Liposyn III, we determined the mechanism of lipid transport from the small intestine to deposition in lymph and adipocytes in CCK-KO mice. CCK-KO mice had delayed secretion of Apo B48-chylomicrons, lipid transport to the lymphatic system, and triglyceride (TG)-derived fatty acid uptake by epididymal fat in response to acute treatment of intraduodenal lipids. In contrast, CCK-KO mice had comparable TG clearance and lipid uptake by white adipocytes in response to TGs in chylomicron-like emulsion. Thus, we concluded that CCK is important for lipid transport and energy expenditure to control body weight in response to dietary lipid feeding. PMID:26171590

  15. Dictyostelium Lipid Droplets Host Novel Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoli; Barisch, Caroline; Paschke, Peggy; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Bertinetti, Oliver; Pawolleck, Nadine; Otto, Heike; Rühling, Harald; Feussner, Ivo; Herberg, Friedrich W.

    2013-01-01

    Across all kingdoms of life, cells store energy in a specialized organelle, the lipid droplet. In general, it consists of a hydrophobic core of triglycerides and steryl esters surrounded by only one leaflet derived from the endoplasmic reticulum membrane to which a specific set of proteins is bound. We have chosen the unicellular organism Dictyostelium discoideum to establish kinetics of lipid droplet formation and degradation and to further identify the lipid constituents and proteins of lipid droplets. Here, we show that the lipid composition is similar to what is found in mammalian lipid droplets. In addition, phospholipids preferentially consist of mainly saturated fatty acids, whereas neutral lipids are enriched in unsaturated fatty acids. Among the novel protein components are LdpA, a protein specific to Dictyostelium, and Net4, which has strong homologies to mammalian DUF829/Tmem53/NET4 that was previously only known as a constituent of the mammalian nuclear envelope. The proteins analyzed so far appear to move from the endoplasmic reticulum to the lipid droplets, supporting the concept that lipid droplets are formed on this membrane. PMID:24036346

  16. Zebrafish: gaining popularity in lipid research.

    PubMed

    Hölttä-Vuori, Maarit; Salo, Veijo T V; Nyberg, Lena; Brackmann, Christian; Enejder, Annika; Panula, Pertti; Ikonen, Elina

    2010-07-15

    Zebrafish are an increasingly popular vertebrate model organism in which to study biological phenomena. It has been widely used, especially in developmental biology and neurobiology, and many aspects of its development and physiology are similar to those of mammals. The popularity of zebrafish relies on its relatively low cost, rapid development and ease of genetic manipulation. Moreover, the optical transparency of the developing fish together with novel imaging techniques enable the direct visualization of complex phenomena at the level of the entire organism. This potential is now also being increasingly appreciated by the lipid research community. In the present review we summarize basic information on the lipid composition and distribution in zebrafish tissues, including lipoprotein metabolism, intestinal lipid absorption, the yolk lipids and their mobilization, as well as lipids in the nervous system. We also discuss studies in which zebrafish have been employed for the visualization of whole-body lipid distribution and trafficking. Finally, recent advances in using zebrafish as a model for lipid-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, obesity, diabetes and hepatic steatosis are highlighted. As the insights into zebrafish lipid metabolism increase, it is likely that zebrafish as a model organism will become an increasingly powerful tool in lipid research. PMID:20578994

  17. Lipid Nanoparticles for Ocular Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Rajala, Raju V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Lipids contain hydrocarbons and are the building blocks of cells. Lipids can naturally form themselves into nano-films and nano-structures, micelles, reverse micelles, and liposomes. Micelles or reverse micelles are monolayer structures, whereas liposomes are bilayer structures. Liposomes have been recognized as carriers for drug delivery. Solid lipid nanoparticles and lipoplex (liposome-polycation-DNA complex), also called lipid nanoparticles, are currently used to deliver drugs and genes to ocular tissues. A solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) is typically spherical, and possesses a solid lipid core matrix that can solubilize lipophilic molecules. The lipid nanoparticle, called the liposome protamine/DNA lipoplex (LPD), is electrostatically assembled from cationic liposomes and an anionic protamine-DNA complex. The LPD nanoparticles contain a highly condensed DNA core surrounded by lipid bilayers. SLNs are extensively used to deliver drugs to the cornea. LPD nanoparticles are used to target the retina. Age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy are the most common retinal diseases in humans. There have also been promising results achieved recently with LPD nanoparticles to deliver functional genes and micro RNA to treat retinal diseases. Here, we review recent advances in ocular drug and gene delivery employing lipid nanoparticles. PMID:26062170

  18. Lipid membrane domains in the brain.

    PubMed

    Aureli, Massimo; Grassi, Sara; Prioni, Simona; Sonnino, Sandro; Prinetti, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    The brain is characterized by the presence of cell types with very different functional specialization, but with the common trait of a very high complexity of structures originated by their plasma membranes. Brain cells bear evident membrane polarization with the creation of different morphological and functional subcompartments, whose formation, stabilization and function require a very high level of lateral order within the membrane. In other words, the membrane specialization of brain cells implies the presence of distinct membrane domains. The brain is the organ with the highest enrichment in lipids like cholesterol, glycosphingolipids, and the most recently discovered brain membrane lipid, phosphatidylglucoside, whose collective behavior strongly favors segregation within the membrane leading to the formation of lipid-driven membrane domains. Lipid-driven membrane domains function as dynamic platforms for signal transduction, protein processing, and membrane turnover. Essential events involved in the development and in the maintenance of the functional integrity of the brain depend on the organization of lipid-driven membrane domains, and alterations in lipid homeostasis, leading to deranged lipid-driven membrane organization, are common in several major brain diseases. In this review, we summarize the forces behind the formation of lipid membrane domains and their biological roles in different brain cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids. PMID:25677824

  19. Biologic Activity of Porphyromonas endodontalis complex lipids

    PubMed Central

    Mirucki, Christopher S.; Abedi, Mehran; Jiang, Jin; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Yu-Hsiung; Safavi, Kamran E.; Clark, Robert B.; Nichols, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Periapical infections secondary to pulpal necrosis are associated with bacterial contamination of the pulp. Porphyromonas endodontalis, a Gram-negative organism, is considered to be a pulpal pathogen. P. gingivalis is phylogenetically related to P. endodontalis and synthesizes several classes of novel complex lipids that possess biological activity, including the capacity to promote osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activation. The purpose of this study was to extract and characterize constituent lipids of P. endodontalis, and evaluate their capacity to promote pro-inflammatory secretory responses in the macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, as well as their capacity to promote osteoclastogenesis and inhibit osteoblast activity. Methods Constituent lipids of both organisms were fractionated by HPLC and were structurally characterized using electrospray-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) or ESI-MS/MS. The virulence potential of P. endodontalis lipids was then compared with known biologically active lipids isolated from P. gingivalis. Results P. endodontalis total lipids were shown to promote TNF-? secretion from RAW 264.7 cells and the serine lipid fraction appeared to account for the majority of this effect. P. endodontalis lipid preparations also increased osteoclast formation from RAW 264.7 cells but osteoblast differentiation in culture was inhibited and appeared to be dependent on TLR2 expression. Conclusions These effects underscore the importance of P. endodontalis lipids in promoting inflammatory and bone cell activation processes that could lead to periapical pathology. PMID:25146013

  20. Intramembrane electrostatic interactions destabilize lipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, Scott D; Vanderlick, T Kyle

    2002-01-01

    Membrane stability is of central concern in many biology and biotechnology processes. It has been suggested that intramembrane electrostatic interactions play a key role in membrane stability. However, due primarily to a lack of supporting experimental evidence, they are not commonly considered in mechanical analyses of lipid membranes. In this paper, we use the micropipette aspiration technique to characterize the elastic moduli and critical tensions of lipid vesicles with varying surface charge. Charge was induced by doping neutral phosphatidylcholine vesicles with anionic lipids phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. Measurements were taken in potassium chloride (moderate ion-lipid binding) and tetramethylammonium chloride (low ion-lipid binding) solutions. We show that inclusion of anionic lipid does not appreciably alter the areal dilation elasticity of lipid vesicles. However, the tension required for vesicle rupture decreases with increasing anionic lipid fraction and is a function of electrolyte composition. Using vesicles with 30% charged (i.e., unbound) anionic lipid, we measured critical tension reductions of 75%, demonstrating the important role of electrostatic interactions in membrane stability. PMID:12324419

  1. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A.; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P.; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction. PMID:23016123

  2. Blebs in Model Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laradji, M.; Harvey, C. W.; Spangler, E. J.; Kumar, P. B. Sunil

    2009-03-01

    It is now widely recognized that biomembranes exhibit complex lateral heterogeneities. Among these are blebs, which are localized balloon-like membrane protrusions observed during cell apoptosis, necrosis, and cytokinesis. Despite the poorly understood mechanism of bleb formation and their physiological role, they recently received a renewed attention. In order to investigate the physical mechanism leading to bleb formation, we developed a model based on an implicit-solvent lipid membrane model with soft interactions recently proposed by us [J. Chem. Phys. 128, 035102 (2008)]. The model also incorporates an explicit fluctuating polymer meshwork simulating a cytoskeleton, which is anchored to the membrane. Using systematic large-scale simulations of membranes with varying values of the lipid density, cytoskeleton grafting-sites density and cytoskeleton tension, we found that localized blebs are formed on the membrane exoplasmic side in the presence of mismatch between tensions of the bare membrane and cytoskeleton. The blebs are pinned by the cytoskeleton anchors, reminiscent to those observed in apoptotic cells. The distance between neighboring anchors determines the neck of a bleb. The remaining membrane surrounding the blebs stiffens to accommodate the tensed cytoskeleton.

  3. DIRECT DETERMINATION OF THE LIPID CONTENT IN STARCH-LIPID COMPOSITES BY TIME-DOMAIN NMR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch-lipid composites, prepared by excess steam jet-cooking aqueous mixtures of starch and lipid, are used in various applications for which their performance can depend upon accurate quantitation of lipid contained within these composites. A rapid and non-destructive method based on time-domain ...

  4. Characterization of 3D Voronoi tessellation nearest neighbor lipid shells provides atomistic lipid disruption profile of protein containing lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sara Y; Duong, Hai V; Compton, Campbell; Vaughn, Mark W; Nguyen, Hoa; Cheng, Kwan H

    2015-03-01

    Quantifying protein-induced lipid disruptions at the atomistic level is a challenging problem in membrane biophysics. Here we propose a novel 3D Voronoi tessellation nearest-atom-neighbor shell method to classify and characterize lipid domains into discrete concentric lipid shells surrounding membrane proteins in structurally heterogeneous lipid membranes. This method needs only the coordinates of the system and is independent of force fields and simulation conditions. As a proof-of-principle, we use this multiple lipid shell method to analyze the lipid disruption profiles of three simulated membrane systems: phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol, and beta-amyloid/phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol. We observed different atomic volume disruption mechanisms due to cholesterol and beta-amyloid. Additionally, several lipid fractional groups and lipid-interfacial water did not converge to their control values with increasing distance or shell order from the protein. This volume divergent behavior was confirmed by bilayer thickness and chain orientational order calculations. Our method can also be used to analyze high-resolution structural experimental data. PMID:25637891

  5. 21 CFR 862.1470 - Lipid (total) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lipid (total) test system. 862.1470 Section 862....1470 Lipid (total) test system. (a) Identification. A lipid (total) test system is a device intended to measure total lipids (fats or fat-like substances) in serum and plasma. Lipid (total) measurements...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1470 - Lipid (total) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lipid (total) test system. 862.1470 Section 862....1470 Lipid (total) test system. (a) Identification. A lipid (total) test system is a device intended to measure total lipids (fats or fat-like substances) in serum and plasma. Lipid (total) measurements...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1470 - Lipid (total) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lipid (total) test system. 862.1470 Section 862....1470 Lipid (total) test system. (a) Identification. A lipid (total) test system is a device intended to measure total lipids (fats or fat-like substances) in serum and plasma. Lipid (total) measurements...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1470 - Lipid (total) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lipid (total) test system. 862.1470 Section 862....1470 Lipid (total) test system. (a) Identification. A lipid (total) test system is a device intended to measure total lipids (fats or fat-like substances) in serum and plasma. Lipid (total) measurements...

  9. Interactions in lipid stabilised foam films.

    PubMed

    Toca-Herrera, José Luis; Krasteva, Nadejda; Müller, Hans-Joachim; Krastev, Rumen

    2014-05-01

    The interaction between lipid bilayers in water has been intensively studied over the last decades. Osmotic stress was applied to evaluate the forces between two approaching lipid bilayers in aqueous solution. The force-distance relation between lipid mono- or bilayers deposited on mica sheets using a surface force apparatus (SFA) was also measured. Lipid stabilised foam films offer another possibility to study the interactions between lipid monolayers. These films can be prepared comparatively easy with very good reproducibility. Foam films consist usually of two adsorbed surfactant monolayers separated by a layer of the aqueous solution from which the film is created. Their thickness can be conveniently measured using microinterferometric techniques. Studies with foam films deliver valuable information on the interactions between lipid membranes and especially their stability and permeability. Presenting inverse black lipid membrane (BLM) foam films supply information about the properties of the lipid self-organisation in bilayers. The present paper summarises results on microscopic lipid stabilised foam films by measuring their thickness and contact angle. Most of the presented results concern foam films prepared from dispersions of the zwitterionic lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (DMPC) and some of its mixtures with the anionic lipid -- 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (DMPG). The strength of the long range and short range forces between the lipid layers is discussed. The van der Waals attractive force is calculated. The electrostatic repulsive force is estimated from experiments at different electrolyte concentrations (NaCl, CaCl?) or by modification of the electrostatic double layer surface potential by incorporating charged lipids in the lipid monolayers. The short range interactions are studied and modified by using small carbohydrates (fructose and sucrose), ethanol (EtOH) or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Some results are compared with the structure of lipid monolayers deposited at the liquid/air interface (monolayers spread in Langmuir trough), which are one of most studied biomembrane model system. The comparison between the film thickness and the free energy of film formation is used to estimate the contribution of the different components of the disjoining pressure to the total interaction in the film and their dependence on the composition of the film forming solution. PMID:24641908

  10. Lipid shedding from single oscillating microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Luan, Ying; Lajoinie, Guillaume; Gelderblom, Erik; Skachkov, Ilya; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Vos, Hendrik J; Versluis, Michel; De Jong, Nico

    2014-08-01

    Lipid-coated microbubbles are used clinically as contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and are being developed for a variety of therapeutic applications. The lipid encapsulation and shedding of the lipids by acoustic driving of the microbubble has a crucial role in microbubble stability and in ultrasound-triggered drug delivery; however, little is known about the dynamics of lipid shedding under ultrasound excitation. Here we describe a study that optically characterized the lipid shedding behavior of individual microbubbles on a time scale of nanoseconds to microseconds. A single ultrasound burst of 20 to 1000 cycles, with a frequency of 1 MHz and an acoustic pressure varying from 50 to 425 kPa, was applied. In the first step, high-speed fluorescence imaging was performed at 150,000 frames per second to capture the instantaneous dynamics of lipid shedding. Lipid detachment was observed within the first few cycles of ultrasound. Subsequently, the detached lipids were transported by the surrounding flow field, either parallel to the focal plane (in-plane shedding) or in a trajectory perpendicular to the focal plane (out-of-plane shedding). In the second step, the onset of lipid shedding was studied as a function of the acoustic driving parameters, for example, pressure, number of cycles, bubble size and oscillation amplitude. The latter was recorded with an ultrafast framing camera running at 10 million frames per second. A threshold for lipid shedding under ultrasound excitation was found for a relative bubble oscillation amplitude >30%. Lipid shedding was found to be reproducible, indicating that the shedding event can be controlled. PMID:24798388

  11. Complete wetting of graphene by biological lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Binquan; Huynh, Tien; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-03-01

    Graphene nanosheets have been demonstrated to extract large amounts of lipid molecules directly out of the cell membrane of bacteria and thus cause serious damage to the cell's integrity. This interesting phenomenon, however, is so far not well understood theoretically. Here through extensive molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical analyses, we show that this phenomenon can be categorized as a complete wetting of graphene by membrane lipids in water. A wetting-based theory was utilized to associate the free energy change during the microscopic extraction of a lipid with the spreading parameter for the macroscopic wetting. With a customized thermodynamic cycle for detailed energetics, we show that the dispersive adhesion between graphene and lipids plays a dominant role during this extraction as manifested by the curved graphene. Our simulation results suggest that biological lipids can completely wet the concave, flat or even convex (with a small curvature) surface of a graphene sheet.Graphene nanosheets have been demonstrated to extract large amounts of lipid molecules directly out of the cell membrane of bacteria and thus cause serious damage to the cell's integrity. This interesting phenomenon, however, is so far not well understood theoretically. Here through extensive molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical analyses, we show that this phenomenon can be categorized as a complete wetting of graphene by membrane lipids in water. A wetting-based theory was utilized to associate the free energy change during the microscopic extraction of a lipid with the spreading parameter for the macroscopic wetting. With a customized thermodynamic cycle for detailed energetics, we show that the dispersive adhesion between graphene and lipids plays a dominant role during this extraction as manifested by the curved graphene. Our simulation results suggest that biological lipids can completely wet the concave, flat or even convex (with a small curvature) surface of a graphene sheet. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The movie showing the simulation trajectory for the extraction of lipids from the membrane. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR00202A

  12. Lipid binding capacity of spider hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, M; Gómez, C; Pollero, R

    1999-09-01

    The spider hemocyanin capacity to bind different lipid classes was evaluated by measuring some binding kinetic parameters. A very high lipoprotein (VHDL) which contains hemocyanin, was isolated from Polybetes pythagoricus hemolymph plasma and delipidated. Hemocyanin was bound separately to labelled palmitic acid, phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, and triolein resulting in several artificial lipoprotein structures. It was possible to corroborate in vitro the lipid-hemocyanin interactions which had been previously observed and, consequently, the apolipoprotein role played by the respiratory pigment of spiders. Lipoproteins were analysed by gel filtration chromatography, and three subfractions with different hemocyanin structures were obtained. The four lipid classes were only bound to the hexameric structure (420 Kda), possibly to low polarity sites. Upon radioactivity measurements of the protein-associated lipids, maximal binding ratios (Mr), dissociation constants (Kd), and the maximal binding effectiveness at low lipid concentrations (Eo) were calculated. Lipid/protein ratios were increased proportionally to each available lipid concentration, following a hyperbolic binding model. Values of saturation, affinity, and maximal binding efficiency to hemocyanin were found to be different for each lipid class assayed. The highest lipid/protein ratio (41.5) was obtained with the free fatty acid and the lowest (7.2) with triolein. Phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol showed the highest relative affinities for hemocyanin (Kd = 63 x 10(-5) M and 74 x 10(-5) M, respectively). Phosphatidylcholine at low concentrations, similar to the physiological ones, presented the highest Eo value. Maximal lipid/protein ratios reached in vitro, were greater than those in P. pythagoricus VHDL, pointing out that hemocyanin could play the apolipoprotein role even under physiological conditions with a very high plasma lipid concentration. J. Exp. Zool. 284:368-373, 1999. PMID:10451413

  13. Hepatic stellate cell lipid droplets: a specialized lipid droplet for retinoid storage.

    PubMed

    Blaner, William S; O'Byrne, Sheila M; Wongsiriroj, Nuttaporn; Kluwe, Johannes; D'Ambrosio, Diana M; Jiang, Hongfeng; Schwabe, Robert F; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Piantedosi, Roseann; Libien, Jenny

    2009-06-01

    The majority of retinoid (vitamin A and its metabolites) present in the body of a healthy vertebrate is contained within lipid droplets present in the cytoplasm of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Two types of lipid droplets have been identified through histological analysis of HSCs within the liver: smaller droplets bounded by a unit membrane and larger membrane-free droplets. Dietary retinoid intake but not triglyceride intake markedly influences the number and size of HSC lipid droplets. The lipids present in rat HSC lipid droplets include retinyl ester, triglyceride, cholesteryl ester, cholesterol, phospholipids and free fatty acids. Retinyl ester and triglyceride are present at similar concentrations, and together these two classes of lipid account for approximately three-quarters of the total lipid in HSC lipid droplets. Both adipocyte-differentiation related protein and TIP47 have been identified by immunohistochemical analysis to be present in HSC lipid droplets. Lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT), an enzyme responsible for all retinyl ester synthesis within the liver, is required for HSC lipid droplet formation, since Lrat-deficient mice completely lack HSC lipid droplets. When HSCs become activated in response to hepatic injury, the lipid droplets and their retinoid contents are rapidly lost. Although loss of HSC lipid droplets is a hallmark of developing liver disease, it is not known whether this contributes to disease development or occurs simply as a consequence of disease progression. Collectively, the available information suggests that HSC lipid droplets are specialized organelles for hepatic retinoid storage and that loss of HSC lipid droplets may contribute to the development of hepatic disease. PMID:19071229

  14. Efficient conversion of biomass into lipids by using the simultaneous saccharification and enhanced lipid production process

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microbial lipid production by using lignocellulosic biomass as the feedstock holds a great promise for biodiesel production and biorefinery. This usually involves hydrolysis of biomass into sugar-rich hydrolysates, which are then used by oleaginous microorganisms as the carbon and energy sources to produce lipids. However, the costs of microbial lipids remain prohibitively high for commercialization. More efficient and integrated processes are pivotal for better techno-economics of microbial lipid technology. Results Here we describe the simultaneous saccharification and enhanced lipid production (SSELP) process that is highly advantageous in terms of converting cellulosic materials into lipids, as it integrates cellulose biomass hydrolysis and lipid biosynthesis. Specifically, Cryptococcus curvatus cells prepared in a nutrient-rich medium were inoculated at high dosage for lipid production in biomass suspension in the presence of hydrolytic enzymes without auxiliary nutrients. When cellulose was loaded at 32.3 g/L, cellulose conversion, cell mass, lipid content and lipid coefficient reached 98.5%, 12.4 g/L, 59.9% and 204 mg/g, respectively. Lipid yields of the SSELP process were higher than those obtained by using the conventional process where cellulose was hydrolyzed separately. When ionic liquid pretreated corn stover was used, both cellulose and hemicellulose were consumed simultaneously. No xylose was accumulated over time, indicating that glucose effect was circumvented. The lipid yield reached 112 mg/g regenerated corn stover. This process could be performed without sterilization because of the absence of auxiliary nutrients for bacterial contamination. Conclusions The SSELP process facilitates direct conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose of lignocellulosic materials into microbial lipids. It greatly reduces time and capital costs while improves lipid coefficient. Optimization of the SSELP process at different levels should further improve the efficiency of microbial lipid technology, which in turn, promote the biotechnological production of fatty acid-derived products from lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:23497564

  15. Electrostatic interactions of lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerami, Rouzbeh

    We examine the role of electrostatic interactions in various settings involving lipid bilayer membranes. We first develop a new theory for ion transport through transient pores in lipid bilayers and show that inclusion of the electrostatic effects of the polar head-group layer can address the deficiencies of the standard pore model. Depending on the value of the head-group dielectric constant, the pore may either stabilize or collapse, with the ion trapped within head-group molecules. We show that for values of head-group dielectric constant larger than some critical value, the large ion-head group interaction turns the Born barrier into a "Born well": it costs a negative energy to have an ion trapped inside a collapsed pore. The resulting proliferation of the ion-pore complexes leads to the charging up of the membrane. We also examine the problem of two dimensional charged smectic phases which is relevant for systems of charged macromolecules absorbed on the cationic lipid bilayers or other surfaces of opposite charge. Long-range intermolecular electrostatic interactions are repulsive and that makes fluctuations in the smectic order more costly. We derive the Hamiltonian, and find the mean-squared fluctuations in the chains positions as well as the structure factor. We show that the fluctuations are still divergent, but less strongly than in standard smectic phases and the structure factor exhibits exponentially decaying peaks. The smectic order in charged chains, therefore, is short-ranged. Finally, we study the phase profile of the system of DNA chains in interaction with condensed counterions in CL-DNA complexes. We show that the interplay of charge and smectic degrees of freedom would alter the nature of the phase diagram of either of them existing separately: the introduction of smectic fluctuations would fundamentally complicate the simple mapping of the charge fluctuations on rigid polyelectrolytes onto a quantum Josephson junction array introduced by Grason and Bruinsma100, whereas presence of the charge "Wigner crystal" at low temperatures changes the energetics of the smectic phase and possibly its phase behavior. We examine this interplay and find the phase diagram.

  16. GABA interaction with lipids in organic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Beltramo, D.; Kivatinitz, S.; Lassaga, E.; Arce, A.

    1987-08-10

    The interaction of TH-GABA and UC-glutamate with lipids in an aqueous organic partition system was studied. With this partition system TH-GABA and UC-glutamate were able to interact with sphingomyelin, sulfatide, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid but not with cholesterol or ceramide. In an homogeneous aqueous medium the authors could not demonstrate any interaction between TH-GABA-lipids. The apparent dissociation constants (K/sub d/) for TH-GABA-lipids or UC-glutamate-lipids interactions inorganic medium were in the millimolar range and maximal charge between 3 and 7 moles of GABA or glutamate by mole of lipid. Amino acids such as glutamic acid, US -alanine and glycine displaced TH-GABA with the same potency as GABA itself; thus these results show that the interaction lacks pharmacological specificity. To detect this interaction lipid concentrations higher than 2 M were required and in the partition system TH-GABA and lipid phosphorus were both concentrated at the interface. Therefore, lipids tested with a biphasic partition system do not fulfill the classical criteria for a neurotransmitter receptor at least not for GABA and glutamate. 15 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  17. [Mechanism of the antioxidant activity of lipids].

    PubMed

    Ushkalova, V N; Storozhok, N M

    1984-08-01

    The manometric method was used to study antioxidant activity of lipids, alpha-tocopherol, phospholipids and their mixtures. Antioxidant activity of the components under study was demonstrated to account for 10-60% of the total antioxidant activity of lipids. PMID:6466854

  18. Lipid profile in oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Ravi; Pandya, Shruti; Chaudhary, Ajay Kumar; Singh, Himanshu Pratap; Jaiswal, Ritesh Kumar; Singh, Mangal; Gupta, SC; Singh, Mamta

    2009-01-01

    Background Changes in lipid profile have long been associated with malignancies as lipids play a key role in maintenance of cell integrity. This study evaluated the alterations in extended lipid profile in untreated patients of oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and studied the correlation between lipid levels with tobacco consumption. Materials and methods In this hospital-based study, 65 clinically diagnosed and histopathologically proven patients of OSMF and 42 age and sex matched controls were studied. In these samples serum lipids including: (i) Total cholesterol, (ii) LDL cholesterol (LDLC), (iii) HDL cholesterol (HDLC) (iv) VLDL cholesterol (VLDLC) (v) triglycerides (vi) Apo-A1 (viii) Apo-B and (viii) LPa were analyzed. Results A significant decrease in plasma total cholesterol, HDLC and Apo-A1 was observed in patients with OSMF as compared to the controls. Thus an inverse relationship between plasma lipid levels and patients was found in OSMF. Conclusion The lower levels of plasma cholesterol and other lipid constituents in patients might be due to their increased utilization. The findings strongly warrant an in-depth study of alterations in plasma lipid profile in patients with oral precancerous conditions. PMID:19630946

  19. Lipid composition of winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus).

    PubMed

    Homma, S; Omachi, M; Tamura, A; Ishak, E; Fujimaki, M

    1983-06-01

    The lipids were extracted from the winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) seed with water-saturated n-butanol. Lipids were separated into groups by preparative TLC on silica gel G. The amount of each lipid type was determined by analysis of the fatty acid constituents in each lipid type. Glyceride was the major lipid accounting for 89.6% of the total, followed by an unknown lipid 4%, free fatty acid of 2.3%, 1,3-diglyceride, 1,2-diglyceride and steryl ester as 1% each and finally a polar lipid as 0.2%. The results show that winged bean oil should be suitable for edible purposes. Triglycerides showed a similar profile of fatty acids to those of whole lipid: the major fatty acids were palmitic (10.9%), stearic (4.5%), oleic (37.1%), linoleic (19.0%), eicosenoic (3.6%), behenic (18.5%) and lignoceric (4.2%) acids. Compared to soybean oil, winged bean oil contained long chain fatty acids and a fairly small amount of linolenic acid which is favorable regarding oil stability against autoxidation. PMID:6619998

  20. Imaging lipid droplets in Arabidopsis mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was adapted for the imaging of neutral lipids in plant leaves with defects in normal lipid metabolism using two different fluorescent dyes. Disruptions in a gene locus, At4g24160, yielded Arabidopsis thaliana plants with a preponderance of oil bodies in their leaves ...

  1. Do lipids influence the allergic sensitization process?

    PubMed

    Bublin, Merima; Eiwegger, Thomas; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2014-09-01

    Allergic sensitization is a multifactorial process that is not only influenced by the allergen and its biological function per se but also by other small molecular compounds, such as lipids, that are directly bound as ligands by the allergen or are present in the allergen source. Several members of major allergen families bind lipid ligands through hydrophobic cavities or electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions. These allergens include certain seed storage proteins, Bet v 1-like and nonspecific lipid transfer proteins from pollens and fruits, certain inhalant allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches, and lipocalins. Lipids from the pollen coat and furry animals and the so-called pollen-associated lipid mediators are codelivered with the allergens and can modulate the immune responses of predisposed subjects by interacting with the innate immune system and invariant natural killer T cells. In addition, lipids originating from bacterial members of the pollen microbiome contribute to the outcome of the sensitization process. Dietary lipids act as adjuvants and might skew the immune response toward a TH2-dominated phenotype. In addition, the association with lipids protects food allergens from gastrointestinal degradation and facilitates their uptake by intestinal cells. These findings will have a major influence on how allergic sensitization will be viewed and studied in the future. PMID:24880633

  2. Nanoplasmonic ruler to measure lipid vesicle deformation.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Joshua A; Špa?ková, Barbora; Linardy, Eric; Kim, Min Chul; Yoon, Bo Kyeong; Homola, Ji?í; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-12-15

    A nanoplasmonic ruler method is presented in order to measure the deformation of adsorbed, nm-scale lipid vesicles on solid supports. It is demonstrated that single adsorbed vesicles undergo greater deformation on silicon oxide over titanium oxide, offering direct experimental evidence to support membrane tension-based theoretical models of supported lipid bilayer formation. PMID:26466086

  3. Extraction and Analysis of Food Lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Along with proteins and carbohydrates, lipids are one of the main components of foods. Lipids are often defined as a group of biomolecules that are insoluble in water and soluble in organic solvents such as hexane, diethyl ether or chloroform. Modern methods for the extraction and analysis of lipi...

  4. Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Hina; Bala, Rajni; Arora, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    The principle objective of formulation of lipid-based drugs is to enhance their bioavailability. The use of lipids in drug delivery is no more a new trend now but is still the promising concept. Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) are one of the emerging technologies designed to address challenges like the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Lipid-based formulations can be tailored to meet a wide range of product requirements dictated by disease indication, route of administration, cost consideration, product stability, toxicity, and efficacy. These formulations are also a commercially viable strategy to formulate pharmaceuticals, for topical, oral, pulmonary, or parenteral delivery. In addition, lipid-based formulations have been shown to reduce the toxicity of various drugs by changing the biodistribution of the drug away from sensitive organs. However, the number of applications for lipid-based formulations has expanded as the nature and type of active drugs under investigation have become more varied. This paper mainly focuses on novel lipid-based formulations, namely, emulsions, vesicular systems, and lipid particulate systems and their subcategories as well as on their prominent applications in pharmaceutical drug delivery. PMID:26556202

  5. Do lipids influence the allergic sensitization process?

    PubMed Central

    Bublin, Merima; Eiwegger, Thomas; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2014-01-01

    Allergic sensitization is a multifactorial process that is not only influenced by the allergen and its biological function per se but also by other small molecular compounds, such as lipids, that are directly bound as ligands by the allergen or are present in the allergen source. Several members of major allergen families bind lipid ligands through hydrophobic cavities or electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions. These allergens include certain seed storage proteins, Bet v 1–like and nonspecific lipid transfer proteins from pollens and fruits, certain inhalant allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches, and lipocalins. Lipids from the pollen coat and furry animals and the so-called pollen-associated lipid mediators are codelivered with the allergens and can modulate the immune responses of predisposed subjects by interacting with the innate immune system and invariant natural killer T cells. In addition, lipids originating from bacterial members of the pollen microbiome contribute to the outcome of the sensitization process. Dietary lipids act as adjuvants and might skew the immune response toward a TH2-dominated phenotype. In addition, the association with lipids protects food allergens from gastrointestinal degradation and facilitates their uptake by intestinal cells. These findings will have a major influence on how allergic sensitization will be viewed and studied in the future. PMID:24880633

  6. Lipid rafts make for slippery platforms

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Eric C.

    2003-01-01

    What's in a raft? Although cell membranes are certainly not homogeneous mixtures of lipids and proteins, almost all aspects of lipid rafts—how to define them, their size, composition, lifetime, and biological relevance—remain controversial. The answers will shape our views of signaling and of membrane dynamics. PMID:12885764

  7. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Samta; Caforio, Antonella; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2014-01-01

    A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether bond to the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone. In bacteria and eukarya on the other hand, fatty acid side chains are linked via an ester bond to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbone. The polar head groups are globally shared in the three domains of life. The unique membrane lipids of archaea have been implicated not only in the survival and adaptation of the organisms to extreme environments but also to form the basis of the membrane composition of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). In nature, a diverse range of archaeal lipids is found, the most common are the diether (or archaeol) and the tetraether (or caldarchaeol) lipids that form a monolayer. Variations in chain length, cyclization and other modifications lead to diversification of these lipids. The biosynthesis of these lipids is not yet well understood however progress in the last decade has led to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of archaeol. This review describes the current knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of archaeal ether lipids; insights on the stability and robustness of archaeal lipid membranes; and evolutionary aspects of the lipid divide and the LUCA. It examines recent advances made in the field of pathway reconstruction in bacteria. PMID:25505460

  8. Lipid extraction from isolated single nerve cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnov, I. V.

    1977-01-01

    A method of extracting lipids from single neurons isolated from lyophilized tissue is described. The method permits the simultaneous extraction of lipids from 30-40 nerve cells and for each cell provides equal conditions of solvent removal at the conclusion of extraction.

  9. Lipid transport and human brain development.

    PubMed

    Betsholtz, Christer

    2015-07-01

    How the human brain rapidly builds up its lipid content during brain growth and maintains its lipids in adulthood has remained elusive. Two new studies show that inactivating mutations in MFSD2A, known to be expressed specifically at the blood-brain barrier, lead to microcephaly, thereby offering a simple and surprising solution to an old enigma. PMID:26111510

  10. Lipids in Amyloid-? Processing, Aggregation, and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Morgado, Isabel; Garvey, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of amyloid-beta (A?) peptide is the major event underlying neuronal damage in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Specific lipids and their homeostasis play important roles in this and other neurodegenerative disorders. The complex interplay between the lipids and the generation, clearance or deposition of A? has been intensively investigated and is reviewed in this chapter. Membrane lipids can have an important influence on the biogenesis of A? from its precursor protein. In particular, increased cholesterol in the plasma membrane augments A? generation and shows a strong positive correlation with AD progression. Furthermore, apolipoprotein E, which transports cholesterol in the cerebrospinal fluid and is known to interact with A? or compete with it for the lipoprotein receptor binding, significantly influences A? clearance in an isoform-specific manner and is the major genetic risk factor for AD. A? is an amphiphilic peptide that interacts with various lipids, proteins and their assemblies, which can lead to variation in A? aggregation in vitro and in vivo. Upon interaction with the lipid raft components, such as cholesterol, gangliosides and phospholipids, A? can aggregate on the cell membrane and thereby disrupt it, perhaps by forming channel-like pores. This leads to perturbed cellular calcium homeostasis, suggesting that A?-lipid interactions at the cell membrane probably trigger the neurotoxic cascade in AD. Here, we overview the roles of specific lipids, lipid assemblies and apolipoprotein E in A? processing, clearance and aggregation, and discuss the contribution of these factors to the neurotoxicity in AD. PMID:26149926

  11. Structure determination of lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, C R; Kharf, R S

    1978-01-01

    A method of determining the phases of X-ray reflections from oriented model membrane systems at low resolution is described. The method involves deconvolution and requires that d less than or equal to 2v where v is the width of the head group region within the bilayer and d is the thickness of the bilayer. The method can be used with a single set of X-ray data and applies to lipid bilayers which have a relatively constant density in the hydrocarbon region. Phases for the first five or six orders of phosphatidylethanolamine and lecithin are derived. A refined analysis based upon deconvolution but using information inherent in the Fourier profile is also described. PMID:698345

  12. Lipid metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Beloribi-Djefaflia, S; Vasseur, S; Guillaumond, F

    2016-01-01

    Many human diseases, including metabolic, immune and central nervous system disorders, as well as cancer, are the consequence of an alteration in lipid metabolic enzymes and their pathways. This illustrates the fundamental role played by lipids in maintaining membrane homeostasis and normal function in healthy cells. We reviewed the major lipid dysfunctions occurring during tumor development, as determined using systems biology approaches. In it, we provide detailed insight into the essential roles exerted by specific lipids in mediating intracellular oncogenic signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress and bidirectional crosstalk between cells of the tumor microenvironment and cancer cells. Finally, we summarize the advances in ongoing research aimed at exploiting the dependency of cancer cells on lipids to abolish tumor progression. PMID:26807644

  13. Role of intramyocelluar lipids in human health.

    PubMed

    Coen, Paul M; Goodpaster, Bret H

    2012-08-01

    Intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) is predominantly stored as intramuscular triglyceride (IMTG) in lipid droplets and is utilized as metabolic fuel during physical exercise. IMTG is also implicated in muscle insulin resistance (IR) in type 2 diabetes. However, it has become apparent that lipid moieties such as ceramide and diacylglycerol are the likely culprits of IR. This article reviews current knowledge of IMCL-mediated IR and important areas of investigation, including myocellular lipid transport and lipid droplet proteins. Several crucial questions remain unanswered, such as the identity of specific ceramide and diacylglycerol species that mediate IR in human muscle and their subcellular location. Quantitative lipidomics and proteomics of targeted subcellular organelles will help to better define the mechanisms underlying pathological IMCL accumulation and IR. PMID:22721584

  14. Complete wetting of graphene by biological lipids.

    PubMed

    Luan, Binquan; Huynh, Tien; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-03-01

    Graphene nanosheets have been demonstrated to extract large amounts of lipid molecules directly out of the cell membrane of bacteria and thus cause serious damage to the cell's integrity. This interesting phenomenon, however, is so far not well understood theoretically. Here through extensive molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical analyses, we show that this phenomenon can be categorized as a complete wetting of graphene by membrane lipids in water. A wetting-based theory was utilized to associate the free energy change during the microscopic extraction of a lipid with the spreading parameter for the macroscopic wetting. With a customized thermodynamic cycle for detailed energetics, we show that the dispersive adhesion between graphene and lipids plays a dominant role during this extraction as manifested by the curved graphene. Our simulation results suggest that biological lipids can completely wet the concave, flat or even convex (with a small curvature) surface of a graphene sheet. PMID:26910517

  15. Model answers to lipid membrane questions.

    PubMed

    Mouritsen, Ole G

    2011-09-01

    Ever since it was discovered that biological membranes have a core of a bimolecular sheet of lipid molecules, lipid bilayers have been a model laboratory for investigating physicochemical and functional properties of biological membranes. Experimental and theoretical models help the experimental scientist to plan experiments and interpret data. Theoretical models are the theoretical scientist's preferred toys to make contact between membrane theory and experiments. Most importantly, models serve to shape our intuition about which membrane questions are the more fundamental and relevant ones to pursue. Here we review some membrane models for lipid self-assembly, monolayers, bilayers, liposomes, and lipid-protein interactions and illustrate how such models can help answering questions in modern lipid cell biology. PMID:21610116

  16. Lipid metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Beloribi-Djefaflia, S; Vasseur, S; Guillaumond, F

    2016-01-01

    Many human diseases, including metabolic, immune and central nervous system disorders, as well as cancer, are the consequence of an alteration in lipid metabolic enzymes and their pathways. This illustrates the fundamental role played by lipids in maintaining membrane homeostasis and normal function in healthy cells. We reviewed the major lipid dysfunctions occurring during tumor development, as determined using systems biology approaches. In it, we provide detailed insight into the essential roles exerted by specific lipids in mediating intracellular oncogenic signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress and bidirectional crosstalk between cells of the tumor microenvironment and cancer cells. Finally, we summarize the advances in ongoing research aimed at exploiting the dependency of cancer cells on lipids to abolish tumor progression. PMID:26807644

  17. Lipid domains in sperm plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D E

    1995-01-01

    Mammalian sperm have unusual plasma membranes compared to those of somatic cells. After leaving the testes, sperm cease plasma membrane lipid and protein systhesis. A major fraction of mammalian sperm plasma membranes are lipid linked. A large fraction of their lipid chains are highly unsaturated. Biophysical studies reveal that lipids are regionalized on the sperm surface and are highly immobile. This immobile fraction evolves with sperm development. This non-diffusing fraction is also observed in bilayers reconstituted from lipid extracts of sperm head plasma membranes, suggesting the existence of gel phase domains in these membranes. This hypothesis is further supported by differential scanning calorimetry, which shares at least two relatively broad phase transitions with physiological temperature falling between these major transitions. PMID:7767367

  18. Lipid rafts, cholesterol, and the brain

    PubMed Central

    Korade, Zeljka; Kenworthy, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Lipid rafts are specialized membrane microdomains that serve as organizing centers for assembly of signaling molecules, influence membrane fluidity and trafficking of membrane proteins, and regulate different cellular processes such as neurotransmission and receptor trafficking. In this article, we provide an overview of current methods for studying lipid rafts and models for how lipid rafts might form and function. Next, we propose a potential mechanism for regulating lipid rafts in the brain via local control of cholesterol biosynthesis by neurotrophins and their receptors. Finally, we discuss evidence that altered cholesterol metabolism and/or lipid rafts play a critical role in the pathophysiology of multiple CNS disorders, including Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Huntington, Alzheimer's, and Niemman-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:18402986

  19. Phosphatidylglucoside: a new marker for lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Nagatsuka, Yasuko; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2008-03-01

    Lipid rafts are functional microdomains enriched with sphingolipids and cholesterol. The fatty acyl chain composition of sphingolipids is a critical factor in the localization of lipids in lipid rafts. The recent studies suggest that lipid rafts are more heterogeneous than previously thought. In addition, our discovery of a new glycolipid, phosphatidylglucoside (PtdGlc), also supports the notion of raft heterogeneity. The complete structural characterization of PtdGlc shows that it consists solely of saturated fatty acyl chains: C18:0 at the sn-1 and C20:0 at the sn-2 positions of the glycerol backbone. This unique fatty acyl composition comprising a single molecular species rarely occurs in known mammalian lipids. Although the structure of PtdGlc is similar to that of phosphatidylinositol, PtdGlc localizes to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane and is possibly involved in cell-cell interaction signaling in the central nervous system. PMID:17933468

  20. Altered renal lipid metabolism and renal lipid accumulation in human diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Herman-Edelstein, Michal; Scherzer, Pnina; Tobar, Ana; Levi, Moshe; Gafter, Uzi

    2014-03-01

    Animal models link ectopic lipid accumulation to renal dysfunction, but whether this process occurs in the human kidney is uncertain. To this end, we investigated whether altered renal TG and cholesterol metabolism results in lipid accumulation in human diabetic nephropathy (DN). Lipid staining and the expression of lipid metabolism genes were studied in kidney biopsies of patients with diagnosed DN (n = 34), and compared with normal kidneys (n = 12). We observed heavy lipid deposition and increased intracellular lipid droplets. Lipid deposition was associated with dysregulation of lipid metabolism genes. Fatty acid ?-oxidation pathways including PPAR-?, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, acyl-CoA oxidase, and L-FABP were downregulated. Downregulation of renal lipoprotein lipase, which hydrolyzes circulating TGs, was associated with increased expression of angiopoietin-like protein 4. Cholesterol uptake receptor expression, including LDL receptors, oxidized LDL receptors, and acetylated LDL receptors, was significantly increased, while there was downregulation of genes effecting cholesterol efflux, including ABCA1, ABCG1, and apoE. There was a highly significant correlation between glomerular filtration rate, inflammation, and lipid metabolism genes, supporting a possible role of abnormal lipid metabolism in the pathogenesis of DN. These data suggest that renal lipid metabolism may serve as a target for specific therapies aimed at slowing the progression of glomerulosclerosis. PMID:24371263

  1. Altered renal lipid metabolism and renal lipid accumulation in human diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Herman-Edelstein, Michal; Scherzer, Pnina; Tobar, Ana; Levi, Moshe; Gafter, Uzi

    2014-01-01

    Animal models link ectopic lipid accumulation to renal dysfunction, but whether this process occurs in the human kidney is uncertain. To this end, we investigated whether altered renal TG and cholesterol metabolism results in lipid accumulation in human diabetic nephropathy (DN). Lipid staining and the expression of lipid metabolism genes were studied in kidney biopsies of patients with diagnosed DN (n = 34), and compared with normal kidneys (n = 12). We observed heavy lipid deposition and increased intracellular lipid droplets. Lipid deposition was associated with dysregulation of lipid metabolism genes. Fatty acid ?-oxidation pathways including PPAR-?, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, acyl-CoA oxidase, and L-FABP were downregulated. Downregulation of renal lipoprotein lipase, which hydrolyzes circulating TGs, was associated with increased expression of angiopoietin-like protein 4. Cholesterol uptake receptor expression, including LDL receptors, oxidized LDL receptors, and acetylated LDL receptors, was significantly increased, while there was downregulation of genes effecting cholesterol efflux, including ABCA1, ABCG1, and apoE. There was a highly significant correlation between glomerular filtration rate, inflammation, and lipid metabolism genes, supporting a possible role of abnormal lipid metabolism in the pathogenesis of DN. These data suggest that renal lipid metabolism may serve as a target for specific therapies aimed at slowing the progression of glomerulosclerosis. PMID:24371263

  2. Lxr-driven enterocyte lipid droplet formation delays transport of ingested lipids[S

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Garcia, Lourdes; Schlegel, Amnon

    2014-01-01

    Liver X receptors (Lxrs) are master regulators of cholesterol catabolism, driving the elimination of cholesterol from the periphery to the lumen of the intestine. Development of pharmacological agents to activate Lxrs has been hindered by synthetic Lxr agonists’ induction of hepatic lipogenesis and hypertriglyceridemia. Elucidating the function of Lxrs in regulating enterocyte lipid handling might identify novel aspects of lipid metabolism that are pharmacologically amenable. We took a genetic approach centered on the single Lxr gene nr1h3 in zebrafish to study the role of Lxr in enterocyte lipid metabolism. Loss of nr1h3 function causes anticipated gene regulatory changes and cholesterol intolerance, collectively reflecting high evolutionary conservation of zebrafish Lxra function. Intestinal nr1h3 activation delays transport of absorbed neutral lipids, with accumulation of neutral lipids in enterocyte cytoplasmic droplets. This delay in transport of ingested neutral lipids protects animals from hypercholesterolemia and hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet. On a gene regulatory level, Lxra induces expression of acsl3a, which encodes acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 3a, a lipid droplet-anchored protein that directs fatty acyl chains into lipids. Forced overexpression of acls3a in enterocytes delays, in part, the appearance of neutral lipids in the vasculature of zebrafish larvae. Activation of Lxr in the intestine cell-autonomously regulates the rate of delivery of absorbed lipids by inducting a temporary lipid intestinal droplet storage depot. PMID:25030662

  3. Lxr-driven enterocyte lipid droplet formation delays transport of ingested lipids.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Garcia, Lourdes; Schlegel, Amnon

    2014-09-01

    Liver X receptors (Lxrs) are master regulators of cholesterol catabolism, driving the elimination of cholesterol from the periphery to the lumen of the intestine. Development of pharmacological agents to activate Lxrs has been hindered by synthetic Lxr agonists' induction of hepatic lipogenesis and hypertriglyceridemia. Elucidating the function of Lxrs in regulating enterocyte lipid handling might identify novel aspects of lipid metabolism that are pharmacologically amenable. We took a genetic approach centered on the single Lxr gene nr1h3 in zebrafish to study the role of Lxr in enterocyte lipid metabolism. Loss of nr1h3 function causes anticipated gene regulatory changes and cholesterol intolerance, collectively reflecting high evolutionary conservation of zebrafish Lxra function. Intestinal nr1h3 activation delays transport of absorbed neutral lipids, with accumulation of neutral lipids in enterocyte cytoplasmic droplets. This delay in transport of ingested neutral lipids protects animals from hypercholesterolemia and hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet. On a gene regulatory level, Lxra induces expression of acsl3a, which encodes acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 3a, a lipid droplet-anchored protein that directs fatty acyl chains into lipids. Forced overexpression of acls3a in enterocytes delays, in part, the appearance of neutral lipids in the vasculature of zebrafish larvae. Activation of Lxr in the intestine cell-autonomously regulates the rate of delivery of absorbed lipids by inducting a temporary lipid intestinal droplet storage depot. PMID:25030662

  4. Method of fabricating lipid bilayer membranes on solid supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Nam-Joon (Inventor); Frank, Curtis W. (Inventor); Glenn, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Cheong, Kwang Ho (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of producing a planar lipid bilayer on a solid support. With this method, a solution of lipid vesicles is first deposited on the solid support. Next, the lipid vesicles are destabilized by adding an amphipathic peptide solution to the lipid vesicle solution. This destabilization leads to production of a planar lipid bilayer on the solid support. The present invention also provides a supported planar lipid bilayer, where the planar lipid bilayer is made of naturally occurring lipids and the solid support is made of unmodified gold or titanium oxide. Preferably, the supported planar lipid bilayer is continuous. The planar lipid bilayer may be made of any naturally occurring lipid or mixture of lipids, including, but not limited to phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinsitol, cardiolipin, cholesterol, and sphingomyelin.

  5. 2011 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism, & Function Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Benning

    2011-02-04

    This is the second Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function'. It covers current topics in lipid structure, metabolism and function in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms including seed plants, algae, mosses and ferns. Work in photosynthetic bacteria is considered as well as it serves the understanding of specific aspects of lipid metabolism in plants. Breakthroughs are discussed in research on plant lipids as diverse as glycerolipids, sphingolipids, lipids of the cell surface, isoprenoids, fatty acids and their derivatives. The program covers nine concepts at the forefront of research under which afore mentioned plant lipid classes are discussed. The goal is to integrate areas such as lipid signaling, basic lipid metabolism, membrane function, lipid analysis, and lipid engineering to achieve a high level of stimulating interaction among diverse researchers with interests in plant lipids. One Emphasis is on the dynamics and regulation of lipid metabolism during plant cell development and in response to environmental factors.

  6. Skin lipids from Saudi Arabian birds

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Haseeb A.; Arif, Ibrahim A.; Williams, Joseph B.; Champagne, Alex M.; Shobrak, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Skin lipids play an important role in the regulation of cutaneous water loss (CWL). Earlier studies have shown that Saudi desert birds exhibit a tendency of reduced CWL than birds from temperate environment due to adaptive changes in composition of their skin lipids. In this study, we used thin-layer chromatography (TLC) for separation and detection of non-polar and polar lipids from the skin of six bird species including sooty gull, brown booby, house sparrow, Arabian waxbill, sand partridge, and laughing dove. The lipids were separated and detected on Silica gel G coated TLC plates and quantified by using densitometric image analysis. Rf values of the non-polar lipids were as follows: cholesterol (0.29), free fatty acids (0.58), triacylglycerol (0.69), fatty acids methyl esters (0.84) and cholesterol ester (0.97). Rf values for the polar lipids were: cerebroside (0.42), ceramide (0.55) and cholesterol (0.73). The results showed the abundance of fatty acids methyl esters (47.75–60.46%) followed by triacylglycerol (12.69–24.14%). The remaining lipid compositions were as follows: cholesterol (4.09–13.18%), ceramide (2.18–13.27%), and cerebroside (2.53–12.81%). In conclusion, our findings showed that TLC is a simple and sensitive method for the separation and quantification of skin lipids. We also reported a new protocol for lipid extraction using the zirconia beads for efficient disruption of skin tissues. This study will help us better understand the role of skin lipids in adaptive physiology towards adverse climatic conditions. PMID:24600311

  7. Skin lipids from Saudi Arabian birds.

    PubMed

    Khan, Haseeb A; Arif, Ibrahim A; Williams, Joseph B; Champagne, Alex M; Shobrak, Mohammad

    2014-04-01

    Skin lipids play an important role in the regulation of cutaneous water loss (CWL). Earlier studies have shown that Saudi desert birds exhibit a tendency of reduced CWL than birds from temperate environment due to adaptive changes in composition of their skin lipids. In this study, we used thin-layer chromatography (TLC) for separation and detection of non-polar and polar lipids from the skin of six bird species including sooty gull, brown booby, house sparrow, Arabian waxbill, sand partridge, and laughing dove. The lipids were separated and detected on Silica gel G coated TLC plates and quantified by using densitometric image analysis. Rf values of the non-polar lipids were as follows: cholesterol (0.29), free fatty acids (0.58), triacylglycerol (0.69), fatty acids methyl esters (0.84) and cholesterol ester (0.97). Rf values for the polar lipids were: cerebroside (0.42), ceramide (0.55) and cholesterol (0.73). The results showed the abundance of fatty acids methyl esters (47.75-60.46%) followed by triacylglycerol (12.69-24.14%). The remaining lipid compositions were as follows: cholesterol (4.09-13.18%), ceramide (2.18-13.27%), and cerebroside (2.53-12.81%). In conclusion, our findings showed that TLC is a simple and sensitive method for the separation and quantification of skin lipids. We also reported a new protocol for lipid extraction using the zirconia beads for efficient disruption of skin tissues. This study will help us better understand the role of skin lipids in adaptive physiology towards adverse climatic conditions. PMID:24600311

  8. Interfacial & colloidal aspects of lipid digestion.

    PubMed

    Wilde, P J; Chu, B S

    2011-06-01

    Amongst the main issues challenging the food manufacturing sector, health and nutrition are becoming increasingly important. Global concerns such as obesity, the ageing population and food security will have to be addressed. Food security is not just about assuring food supply, but is also about optimising nutritional delivery from the food that is available [1]. Therefore one challenge is to optimise the health benefits from the lipids and lipid soluble nutrients. Colloid scientists have an affinity for lipids because they are water insoluble, however this presents a challenge to the digestive system, which has to convert them to structures that are less insoluble so they are available for uptake. Despite this, the human digestive system is remarkably effective at digesting and absorbing most lipids. This is primarily driven through maximising energy intake, as lipids possess the highest calorific value, which was a survival trait to survive times of famine, but is now an underlying cause of obesity in developed countries with high food availability. The critical region here is the lipid-water interface, where the key reactions take place to solubilise lipids and lipid soluble nutrients. Digestive lipases have to adsorb to the oil water interface in order to hydrolyse triacylglycerols into fatty acids and mono glycerides, which accumulate at the interface [2], and inhibit lipase activity. Pancreatic lipase, which is responsible for the majority of lipid hydrolysis, also requires the action of bile salts and colipase to function effectively. Bile salts both aid the adsorption of co-lipase and lipase, and help solubilise the lipolysis products which have accumulated at the interface, into mixed micelles composing bile salts and a range of other lipids, to facilitate transport to the gut mucosal surface prior to uptake and absorption. The process can be affected by the lipid type, as shorter chain, fatty acids are more easily absorbed, whereas the uptake of longer chain fatty acids, particularly the very long chain n-3 fatty acids from fish oils are dependent on source and so may depend on food microstructure for optimal uptake [3]. The uptake of some poorly water soluble nutrients are enhanced by the presence of lipids, but the mechanisms are not clear. In addition, controlling the digestion of lipids can be beneficial as slower release of lipids into the bloodstream can reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, and can promote gut feedback processes that reduce appetite. This presents an opportunity to colloid and interfacial science, as there are many unanswered questions regarding the specific physicochemical mechanisms underlying the process of lipid digestion and uptake. I will review our current knowledge of lipid digestion and present examples of how fundamental research in colloidal and interface science is beginning to address these issues. These include the adsorption behaviour of physiological surfactants such as bile salts; interfacial processes by which different polar lipids can influence lipolysis; and the effect of emulsion based delivery systems on cellular uptake of lipid soluble nutrients. A fundamental understanding of these processes is required if we are to develop intelligent design strategies for foods that will deliver optimal nutrition and improved health benefits in order to address the global challenges facing the food sector in the future. PMID:21377138

  9. Lipid-Based Nanocarriers for RNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui Yi; Guo, Pengbo; Wen, Wu-Cheng; Wong, Ho Lun

    2015-01-01

    RNA-interference (RNAi) agents such as small-interfering RNA (siRNA) and micro-RNA (miRNA) have strong potential as therapeutic agents for the treatment of a broad range of diseases such as malignancies, infections, autoimmune diseases and neurological diseases that are associated with undesirable gene expression. In recent years, several clinical trials of RNAi therapeutics especially siRNAs have been conducted with limited success so far. For systemic administration of these poorly permeable and easily degradable macromolecules, it is obvious that a safe and efficient delivery platform is highly desirable. Because of high biocompatibility, biodegradability and solid track record for clinical use, nanocarriers made of lipids and/or phospholipids have been commonly employed to facilitate RNA delivery. In this article, the key features of the major sub-classes of lipid-based nanocarriers, e.g. liposomes, lipid nanoparticles and lipid nanoemulsions, will be reviewed. Focus of the discussion is on the various challenges researchers face when developing lipid-based RNA nanocarriers, such as the toxicity of cationic lipids and issues related to PEGylated lipids, as well as the strategies employed in tackling these challenges. It is hoped that by understanding more about the pros and cons of these most frequently used RNA delivery systems, the pharmaceutical scientists, biomedical researchers and clinicians will be more successful in overcoming some of the obstacles that currently limit the clinical translation of RNAi therapy. PMID:26027572

  10. The lipid raft proteome of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Alvaro; Pérez, Alberto; Coleman, James L; Benach, Jorge L

    2015-11-01

    Eukaryotic lipid rafts are membrane microdomains that have significant amounts of cholesterol and a selective set of proteins that have been associated with multiple biological functions. The Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, is one of an increasing number of bacterial pathogens that incorporates cholesterol onto its membrane, and form cholesterol glycolipid domains that possess all the hallmarks of eukaryotic lipid rafts. In this study, we isolated lipid rafts from cultured B. burgdorferi as a detergent resistant membrane (DRM) fraction on density gradients, and characterized those molecules that partitioned exclusively or are highly enriched in these domains. Cholesterol glycolipids, the previously known raft-associated lipoproteins OspA and OpsB, and cholera toxin partitioned into the lipid rafts fraction indicating compatibility with components of the DRM. The proteome of lipid rafts was analyzed by a combination of LC-MS/MS or MudPIT. Identified proteins were analyzed in silico for parameters that included localization, isoelectric point, molecular mass and biological function. The proteome provided a consistent pattern of lipoproteins, proteases and their substrates, sensing molecules and prokaryotic homologs of eukaryotic lipid rafts. This study provides the first analysis of a prokaryotic lipid raft and has relevance for the biology of Borrelia, other pathogenic bacteria, as well as for the evolution of these structures. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002365 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002365). PMID:26256460

  11. Lipid nanoscaffolds in carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukner, Catharina; Koziol, Krzysztof K. K.; Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V.

    2013-09-01

    We present the fabrication of lipid nanoscaffolds inside carbon nanotube arrays by employing the nanostructural self-assembly of lipid molecules. The nanoscaffolds are finely tunable into model biomembrane-like architectures (planar), soft nanochannels (cylindrical) or 3-dimensionally ordered continuous bilayer structures (cubic). Carbon nanotube arrays hosting the above nanoscaffolds are formed by packing of highly oriented multiwalled carbon nanotubes which facilitate the alignment of lipid nanostructures without requiring an external force. Furthermore, the lipid nanoscaffolds can be created under both dry and hydrated conditions. We show their direct application in reconstitution of egg proteins. Such nanoscaffolds find enormous potential in bio- and nano-technological fields.We present the fabrication of lipid nanoscaffolds inside carbon nanotube arrays by employing the nanostructural self-assembly of lipid molecules. The nanoscaffolds are finely tunable into model biomembrane-like architectures (planar), soft nanochannels (cylindrical) or 3-dimensionally ordered continuous bilayer structures (cubic). Carbon nanotube arrays hosting the above nanoscaffolds are formed by packing of highly oriented multiwalled carbon nanotubes which facilitate the alignment of lipid nanostructures without requiring an external force. Furthermore, the lipid nanoscaffolds can be created under both dry and hydrated conditions. We show their direct application in reconstitution of egg proteins. Such nanoscaffolds find enormous potential in bio- and nano-technological fields. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) data on the alignment of lipid nanostructures, control and time resolved 2-d images of egg ovalbumin encapsulation and a summary picture of the present work. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02068a

  12. Membrane domains and the "lipid raft" concept.

    PubMed

    Sonnino, S; Prinetti, A

    2013-01-01

    The bulk structure of biological membranes consists of a bilayer of amphipathic lipids. According to the fluid mosaic model proposed by Singer and Nicholson, the glycerophospholipid bilayer is a two-dimensional fluid construct that allows the lateral movement of membrane components. Different types of lateral interactions among membrane components can take place, giving rise to multiple levels of lateral order that lead to highly organized structures. Early observations suggested that some of the lipid components of biological membranes may play active roles in the creation of these levels of order. In the late 1980s, a diverse series of experimental findings collectively gave rise to the lipid raft hypothesis. Lipid rafts were originally defined as membrane domains, i.e., ordered structures created as a consequence of the lateral segregation of sphingolipids and differing from the surrounding membrane in their molecular composition and properties. This definition was subsequently modified to introduce the notion that lipid rafts correspond to membrane areas stabilized by the presence of cholesterol within a liquid-ordered phase. During the past two decades, the concept of lipid rafts has become extremely popular among cell biologists, and these structures have been suggested to be involved in a great variety of cellular functions and biological events. During the same period, however, some groups presented experimental evidence that appeared to contradict the basic tenets that underlie the lipid raft concept. The concept is currently being re-defined, with greater consistency regarding the true nature and role of lipid rafts. In this article we will review the concepts, criticisms, and the novel confirmatory findings relating to the lipid raft hypothesis. PMID:23150999

  13. Molecular sorting of lipids by bacteriorhodopsin in dilauroylphosphatidylcholine/distearoylphosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, F; Sperotto, M M; Lebrun, M C; Tocanne, J F; Mouritsen, O G

    1997-01-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study is performed on binary dilauroylphosphatidylcholine/distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC/DSPC) lipid bilayer membranes incorporating bacteriorhodopsin (BR). The system is designed to investigate the possibility that BR, via a hydrophobic matching principle related to the difference in lipid bilayer hydrophobic thickness and protein hydrophobic length, can perform molecular sorting of the lipids at the lipid-protein interface, leading to lipid specificity/selectivity that is controlled solely by physical factors. The study takes advantage of the strongly nonideal mixing behavior of the DLPC/DSPC mixture and the fact that the average lipid acyl-chain length is strongly dependent on temperature, particularly in the main phase transition region. The experiments are based on fluorescence energy transfer techniques using specifically designed lipid analogs that can probe the lipid-protein interface. The theoretical calculations exploit a microscopic molecular interaction model that embodies the hydrophobic matching as a key parameter. At low temperatures, in the gel-gel coexistence region, experimental and theoretical data consistently indicate that BR is associated with the short-chain lipid DLPC. At moderate temperatures, in the fluid-gel coexistence region, BR remains in the fluid phase, which is mainly composed of short-chain lipid DLPC, but is enriched at the interface between the fluid and gel domains. At high temperatures, in the fluid phase, BR stays in the mixed lipid phase, and the theoretical data suggest a preference of the protein for the long-chain DSPC molecules at the expense of the short-chain DLPC molecules. The combined results of the experiments and the calculations provide evidence that a molecular sorting principle is active because of hydrophobic matching and that BR exhibits physical lipid selectivity. The results are discussed in the general context of membrane organization and compartmentalization and in terms of nanometer-scale lipid-domain formation. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9336190

  14. Isolation of lipids from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Furse, Samuel; Egmond, Maarten R; Killian, J Antoinette

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of the lipid fraction from biological samples has been a crucial part of countless studies over the last century. This considerable research interest has led to the development of a number of methods for isolating a range of molecular species that fall under the umbrella term "lipid". Such methods vary in popularity, complexity, specificity and even toxicity. In this review, we explore examples of published methods (1952-2014) for isolating lipids from biological samples and attempt to assess the limits of techniques both from a chemical and biological perspective. We also suggest how a suitable method might be chosen for a novel application. PMID:26212444

  15. DNA nanostructures interacting with lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Langecker, Martin; Arnaut, Vera; List, Jonathan; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA has been previously shown to be useful as a material for the fabrication of static nanoscale objects, and also for the realization of dynamic molecular devices and machines. In many cases, nucleic acid assemblies directly mimic biological structures, for example, cytoskeletal filaments, enzyme scaffolds, or molecular motors, and many of the applications envisioned for such structures involve the study or imitation of biological processes, and even the interaction with living cells and organisms. An essential feature of biological systems is their elaborate structural organization and compartmentalization, and this most often involves membranous structures that are formed by dynamic assemblies of lipid molecules. Imitation of or interaction with biological systems using the tools of DNA nanotechnology thus ultimately and necessarily also involves interactions with lipid membrane structures, and thus the creation of DNA-lipid hybrid assemblies. Due to their differing chemical nature, however, highly charged nucleic acids and amphiphilic lipids do not seem the best match for the construction of such systems, and in fact they are rarely found in nature. In recent years, however, a large variety of lipid-interacting DNA conjugates were developed, which are now increasingly being applied also for the realization of DNA nanostructures interacting with lipid bilayer membranes. In this Account, we will present the current state of this emerging class of nanosystems. After a brief overview of the basic biophysical and biochemical properties of lipids and lipid bilayer membranes, we will discuss how DNA molecules can interact with lipid membranes through electrostatic interactions or via covalent modification with hydrophobic moieties. We will then show how such DNA-lipid interactions have been utilized for the realization of DNA nanostructures attached to or embedded within lipid bilayer membranes. Under certain conditions, DNA nanostructures remain mobile on membranes and can dynamically associate into higher order complexes. Hydrophobic modification of DNA nanostructures can further result in intra- or intermolecular aggregation, which can also be utilized as a structural switching mechanism. Appropriate design and chemical modification even allows insertion of DNA nanostructures into lipid bilayer membranes, resulting in artificial ion channel mimics made from DNA. Interactions of DNA nanodevices with living cells also involve interactions with membrane structures. DNA-based nanostructures can be directed to cell surfaces via antibody-antigen interactions, and their cellular uptake can be stimulated by modification with appropriate receptor ligands. In the future, membrane-embedded DNA nanostructures are expected to find application in diverse areas ranging from basic biological research over nanotechnology to synthetic biology. PMID:24828105

  16. Regulation of Mitochondrial Morphology by Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Elizabeth E.-j.; Frohman, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Although great progress has been made in identifying key protein factors that regulate mitochondrial morphology through mediating fission and fusion, signaling lipids are increasingly being recognized as important in the process as well. We review here roles that have been proposed for the signaling and bulk lipids cardiolipin, phosphatidic acid, lysophosphatidic acid, diacylglycerol, and phosphatidylethanolamine and the enzymes that generate or catabolize them in the regulation of mitochondrial morphology in yeast and mammals. Mutations in some of these enzymes are causal in a number of disease settings, highlighting the significance of controlling the lipid environment in this setting. PMID:24771456

  17. Lipid Metabolism and Toxicity in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Ira J.; Trent, Chad M.; Schulze, P. Christian

    2012-01-01

    The heart has both the greatest caloric needs and the most robust oxidation of fatty acids. Under pathological conditions such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, cardiac uptake and oxidation are not balanced and hearts accumulate lipid potentially leading to cardiac lipotoxicity. We will first review the pathways utilized by the heart to acquire fatty acids from the circulation and to store triglyceride intracellularly. Then we will describe mouse models in which excess lipid accumulation causes heart dysfunction and experiments performed to alleviate this toxicity. Finally, the known relationships between heart lipid metabolism and dysfunction in humans will be summarized. PMID:22682221

  18. Electrostatics of lipid bilayer bending.

    PubMed

    Chou, T; Jarić, M V; Siggia, E D

    1997-05-01

    The electrostatic contribution to spontaneous membrane curvature is calculated within Poisson-Boltzmann theory under a variety of assumptions and emphasizing parameters in the physiological range. Asymmetrical surface charges can be fixed with respect to bilayer midplane area or with respect to the lipid-water area, but induce curvatures of opposite signs. Unequal screening layers on the two sides of a vesicle (e.g., multivalent cationic proteins on one side and monovalent salt on the other) also induce bending. For reasonable parameters, tubules formed by electrostatically induced bending can have radii in the 50-100-nm range, often seen in many intracellular organelles. Thus membrane associated proteins may induce curvature and subsequent budding, without themselves being intrinsically curved. Furthermore, we derive the previously unexplored effects of respecting the strict conservation of charge within the interior of a vesicle. The electrostatic component of the bending modulus is small under most of our conditions and is left as an experimental parameter. The large parameter space of conditions is surveyed in an array of graphs. PMID:9129807

  19. Hypersaline Microbial Mat Lipid Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra A.; Summons, Roger E.

    2002-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers and compound specific isotopic abundances are powerful tools for studies of contemporary microbial ecosystems. Knowledge of the relationship of biomarkers to microbial physiology and community structure creates important links for understanding the nature of early organisms and paleoenvironments. Our recent work has focused on the hypersaline microbial mats in evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, sulfur oxidizing and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface. The delta C-13 of cyanobacterial biomarkers such as the monomethylalkanes and hopanoids are consistent with the delta C-13 measured for bulk mat (-10%o), while a GNS biomarker, wax esters (WXE), suggests a more depleted delta C-13 for GNS biomass (-16%o). This isotopic relationship is different than that observed in mats at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park (YSNP) where GNS appear to grow photoheterotrophic ally. WXE abundance, while relatively low, is most pronounced in an anaerobic zone just below the cyanobacterial layer. The WXE isotope composition at GN suggests that these bacteria utilize photoautotrophy incorporating dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) via the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway using H2S or H2.

  20. Spastin Binds to Lipid Droplets and Affects Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Chrisovalantis; Orso, Genny; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Herholz, Marija; Gumeni, Sentiljana; Tadepalle, Nimesha; Jüngst, Christian; Tzschichholz, Anne; Schauss, Astrid; Höning, Stefan; Trifunovic, Aleksandra; Daga, Andrea; Rugarli, Elena I.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in SPAST, encoding spastin, are the most common cause of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). HSP is characterized by weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs, owing to progressive retrograde degeneration of the long corticospinal axons. Spastin is a conserved microtubule (MT)-severing protein, involved in processes requiring rearrangement of the cytoskeleton in concert to membrane remodeling, such as neurite branching, axonal growth, midbody abscission, and endosome tubulation. Two isoforms of spastin are synthesized from alternative initiation codons (M1 and M87). We now show that spastin-M1 can sort from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to pre- and mature lipid droplets (LDs). A hydrophobic motif comprised of amino acids 57 through 86 of spastin was sufficient to direct a reporter protein to LDs, while mutation of arginine 65 to glycine abolished LD targeting. Increased levels of spastin-M1 expression reduced the number but increased the size of LDs. Expression of a mutant unable to bind and sever MTs caused clustering of LDs. Consistent with these findings, ubiquitous overexpression of Dspastin in Drosophila led to bigger and less numerous LDs in the fat bodies and increased triacylglycerol levels. In contrast, Dspastin overexpression increased LD number when expressed specifically in skeletal muscles or nerves. Downregulation of Dspastin and expression of a dominant-negative variant decreased LD number in Drosophila nerves, skeletal muscle and fat bodies, and reduced triacylglycerol levels in the larvae. Moreover, we found reduced amount of fat stores in intestinal cells of worms in which the spas-1 homologue was either depleted by RNA interference or deleted. Taken together, our data uncovers an evolutionarily conserved role of spastin as a positive regulator of LD metabolism and open up the possibility that dysfunction of LDs in axons may contribute to the pathogenesis of HSP. PMID:25875445

  1. Lipid partitioning in maize (Zea mays L.) endosperm highlights relationships among starch lipids, amylose, and vitreousness.

    PubMed

    Gayral, Mathieu; Bakan, Bénédicte; Dalgalarrondo, Michele; Elmorjani, Khalil; Delluc, Caroline; Brunet, Sylvie; Linossier, Laurent; Morel, Marie-Hélène; Marion, Didier

    2015-04-01

    Content and composition of maize endosperm lipids and their partition in the floury and vitreous regions were determined for a set of inbred lines. Neutral lipids, i.e., triglycerides and free fatty acids, accounted for more than 80% of endosperm lipids and are almost 2 times higher in the floury than in the vitreous regions. The composition of endosperm lipids, including their fatty acid unsaturation levels, as well as their distribution may be related to metabolic specificities of the floury and vitreous regions in carbon and nitrogen storage and to the management of stress responses during endosperm cell development. Remarkably, the highest contents of starch lipids were observed systematically within the vitreous endosperm. These high amounts of starch lipids were mainly due to lysophosphatidylcholine and were tightly linked to the highest amylose content. Consequently, the formation of amylose-lysophosphatidylcholine complexes has to be considered as an outstanding mechanism affecting endosperm vitreousness. PMID:25794198

  2. Update of the LIPID MAPS comprehensive classification system for lipids1

    PubMed Central

    Fahy, Eoin; Subramaniam, Shankar; Murphy, Robert C.; Nishijima, Masahiro; Raetz, Christian R. H.; Shimizu, Takao; Spener, Friedrich; van Meer, Gerrit; Wakelam, Michael J. O.; Dennis, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the International Lipid Classification and Nomenclature Committee under the sponsorship of the LIPID MAPS Consortium developed and established a “Comprehensive Classification System for Lipids” based on well-defined chemical and biochemical principles and using an ontology that is extensible, flexible, and scalable. This classification system, which is compatible with contemporary databasing and informatics needs, has now been accepted internationally and widely adopted. In response to considerable attention and requests from lipid researchers from around the globe and in a variety of fields, the comprehensive classification system has undergone significant revisions over the last few years to more fully represent lipid structures from a wider variety of sources and to provide additional levels of detail as necessary. The details of this classification system are reviewed and updated and are presented here, along with revisions to its suggested nomenclature and structure-drawing recommendations for lipids. PMID:19098281

  3. Formation and Characterization of Supported Lipid Bilayers Composed of Hydrogenated and Deuterated Escherichia coli Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Tania Kjellerup; Wacklin, Hanna; Schiller, Jürgen; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Pomorski, Thomas Günther; Cárdenas, Marité

    2015-01-01

    Supported lipid bilayers are widely used for sensing and deciphering biomolecular interactions with model cell membranes. In this paper, we present a method to form supported lipid bilayers from total lipid extracts of Escherichia coli by vesicle fusion. We show the validity of this method for different types of extracts including those from deuterated biomass using a combination of complementary surface sensitive techniques; quartz crystal microbalance, neutron reflection and atomic force microscopy. We find that the head group composition of the deuterated and the hydrogenated lipid extracts is similar (approximately 75% phosphatidylethanolamine, 13% phosphatidylglycerol and 12% cardiolipin) and that both samples can be used to reconstitute high-coverage supported lipid bilayers with a total thickness of 41 ± 3 Å, common for fluid membranes. The formation of supported lipid bilayers composed of natural extracts of Escherichia coli allow for following biomolecular interactions, thus advancing the field towards bacterial-specific membrane biomimics. PMID:26658241

  4. Voltage-Gated Lipid Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Blicher, Andreas; Heimburg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic lipid membranes can display channel-like ion conduction events even in the absence of proteins. We show here that these events are voltage-gated with a quadratic voltage dependence as expected from electrostatic theory of capacitors. To this end, we recorded channel traces and current histograms in patch-experiments on lipid membranes. We derived a theoretical current-voltage relationship for pores in lipid membranes that describes the experimental data very well when assuming an asymmetric membrane. We determined the equilibrium constant between closed and open state and the open probability as a function of voltage. The voltage-dependence of the lipid pores is found comparable to that of protein channels. Lifetime distributions of open and closed events indicate that the channel open distribution does not follow exponential statistics but rather power law behavior for long open times. PMID:23823188

  5. Lipid-altering therapy and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Justin M; Majmudar, Maulik; Tompkins, Christine; Blumenthal, Roger S; Marine, Joseph E

    2008-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia with significant morbidity and public health cost. Because of limitations of efficacy and safety of conventional antiarrhythmic agents, alternative therapies for AF are needed. The potential antiarrhythmic properties of lipid-altering therapy, including the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors and fish oils, are increasingly recognized, particularly in light of their potential anti-inflammatory properties. This review examines the known effects of lipid-altering therapy on atrial arrhythmias in both experimental and clinical settings. Inflammatory states, such as post-cardiac surgery and AF of recent onset, show promise as targets. In contrast, lipid-lowering therapy is less likely to affect longstanding persistent AF. Current recommendations for the use of lipid-altering therapy for prevention and treatment of AF are summarized. PMID:18562810

  6. Supported lipid bilayer/carbon nanotube hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.; Craighead, Harold G.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotube transistors combine molecular-scale dimensions with excellent electronic properties, offering unique opportunities for chemical and biological sensing. Here, we form supported lipid bilayers over single-walled carbon nanotube transistors. We first study the physical properties of the nanotube/supported lipid bilayer structure using fluorescence techniques. Whereas lipid molecules can diffuse freely across the nanotube, a membrane-bound protein (tetanus toxin) sees the nanotube as a barrier. Moreover, the size of the barrier depends on the diameter of the nanotube-with larger nanotubes presenting bigger obstacles to diffusion. We then demonstrate detection of protein binding (streptavidin) to the supported lipid bilayer using the nanotube transistor as a charge sensor. This system can be used as a platform to examine the interactions of single molecules with carbon nanotubes and has many potential applications for the study of molecular recognition and other biological processes occurring at cell membranes.

  7. Coalescence Kinetics of Lipid Based Bicelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Andrew; Fan, Tai-Hsi; Katsaras, John; Xia, Yan; Li, Ming; Nieh, Mu-Ping

    2014-03-01

    Uniform nanodisc can be self-assembled from lipid mixtures of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG), and dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC). This study focuses on the theoretical and experimental growth kinetics of phospholipid based nanodiscs. Motivation for this project comes from the nanodisc's small size and their potential use as a carrier for drug delivery. It was observed that at high total lipid concentration the nanodiscs are stable at approximately 10 nm. However, growth of these nanodiscs is observed at relatively low total lipid concentrations. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is used to monitor the size and growth rate of these nanodiscs at different solution conditions. The growth at low concentrations is caused by to the transfer of charged lipid (DMPG) from the discs to the solution, reducing the Columbic interaction. The growth of nanodisc as a function of size and surface potential is modeled using the Smoluchowski transport equation with transport-limited boundary conditions.

  8. Overview of Cholesterol and Lipid Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol after fasting should be measured at least once every 4 ... 6 years. Collectively, these measurements are called the fasting lipid profile. Children should be screened using a ...

  9. Acyclic archaebacterial ether lipids in swamp sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauly, George G.; Van Vleet, Edward S.

    1986-06-01

    Acyclic phytanyl diether glycerol and biphytanyl ether lipids have been quantified in two modern swamp sediment cores in concentrations ranging up to 360 μg/ml porewater. Methanogenic bacteria are the only known source organisms which can inhabit the swamp sediments. Variations in relative abundance between these lipids may reflect taxonomic changes in methanogen populations or the stage of growth. Maxima in methanogen lipid concentrations coincide with local maxima of 13C of organic matter, possibly the result of a pool effect on CO 2 or acetate. Methane production estimates calculated from lipid concentrations in swamp sediments range from 0.1 to 1.3 mmol cm -2 yr -1, values which are consistent with published methane fluxes.

  10. Intercellular Lipid Mediators and GPCR Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Im, Dong-Soon

    2013-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are the largest superfamily of receptors responsible for signaling between cells and tissues, and because they play important physiological roles in homeostasis, they are major drug targets. New technologies have been developed for the identification of new ligands, new GPCR functions, and for drug discovery purposes. In particular, intercellular lipid mediators, such as, lysophosphatidic acid and sphingosine 1-phosphate have attracted much attention for drug discovery and this has resulted in the development of fingolimod (FTY-720) and AM095. The discovery of new intercellular lipid mediators and their GPCRs are discussed from the perspective of drug development. Lipid GPCRs for lysophospholipids, including lysophosphatidylserine, lysophosphatidylinositol, lysophosphatidylcholine, free fatty acids, fatty acid derivatives, and other lipid mediators are reviewed. PMID:24404331

  11. Structural investigations of pneumolysin/lipid complexes.

    PubMed

    Bonev, B; Gilbert, R; Watts, A

    2000-01-01

    Pneumolysin, a virulence factor from the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae, is a water-soluble protein which forms ring-shaped oligomeric structures upon binding to cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. It induces vesicle aggregation, membrane pore formation and withdrawal of lipid material into non-bilayer proteolipid complexes. Solid-state magic angle spinning and wideline static NMR, together with freeze-fracture electron microscopy, are used to characterize the phase changes in fully hydrated cholesterol-containing lipid membranes induced by the addition of pneumolysin. A structural model for the proteolipid complexes is proposed where a 30-50-meric pneumolysin ring lines the inside of a lipid torus. Cholesterol is found to be essential to the fusogenic action of pneumolysin. PMID:11302376

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection and Host Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Qianqian

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease. Approximately 8 million people are thought to be affected worldwide. Several players in host lipid metabolism have been implicated in T. cruzi-host interactions in recent research, including macrophages, adipocytes, low density lipoprotein (LDL), low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and high density lipoprotein (HDL). All of these factors are required to maintain host lipid homeostasis and are intricately connected via several metabolic pathways. We reviewed the interaction of T. cruzi with each of the relevant host components, in order to further understand the roles of host lipid metabolism in T. cruzi infection. This review sheds light on the potential impact of T. cruzi infection on the status of host lipid homeostasis. PMID:25276058

  13. Role of epoxide hydrolases in lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Morisseau, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Epoxide hydrolases (EH), enzymes present in all living organisms, transform epoxide-containing lipids to 1,2-diols by the addition of a molecule of water. Many of these oxygenated lipid substrates have potent biological activities: host defense, control of development, regulation of blood pressure, inflammation, and pain. In general, the bioactivity of these natural epoxides is significantly reduced upon metabolism to diols. Thus, through the regulation of the titer of lipid epoxides, EHs have important and diverse biological roles with profound effects on the physiological state of the host organism. This review will discuss the biological activity of key lipid epoxides in mammals. In addition, the use of EH specific inhibitors will be highlighted as possible therapeutic disease interventions. PMID:22722082

  14. Lipid droplet dynamics in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Wen

    2015-07-01

    Eukaryotic cells store excess fatty acids as neutral lipids, predominantly triacylglycerols and sterol esters, in organelles termed lipid droplets (LDs) that bulge out from the endoplasmic reticulum. LDs are highly dynamic and contribute to diverse cellular functions. The catabolism of the storage lipids within LDs is channeled to multiple metabolic pathways, providing molecules for energy production, membrane building blocks, and lipid signaling. LDs have been implicated in a number of protein degradation and pathogen infection processes. LDs may be linked to prevalent human metabolic diseases and have marked potential for biofuel production. The knowledge accumulated on LDs in recent years provides a foundation for diverse, and even unexpected, future research. This review focuses on recent advances in LD research, emphasizing the diverse physiological roles of LDs in the model system of budding yeast. PMID:25894691

  15. New methods for lipid nanoparticles preparation.

    PubMed

    Corrias, Francesco; Lai, Francesco

    2011-09-01

    Lipid nanoparticles have attracted many researchers during recent years due to the excellent tolerability and advantages compared to liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles. High pressure homogenization is the main technique used to prepare solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) encapsulating different type of drugs, however this method involves some critical process parameters. For this reason and in order to overcome patented methods, different production techniques for lipid nanoparticles have been widely investigated in recent years (last decade). The paper reviews new methods for lipid nanoparticles preparation, and their recent applications in pharmaceutical field, especially focusing on coacervation, microemulsions templates, supercritical fluid technology, phase-inversion temperature (PIT) techniques. References of the most relevant literature and patents published by various research groups on these fields are provided. PMID:21834772

  16. Interaction of Complex Liquids with Lipid Biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Benxin; Zhu, Y.

    2013-03-01

    With the emerging of smart molecular probes and functional nanocolloids for various biomedical applications, it becomes critical to understand the interaction of complex liquids with cell biomembranes in order to effectively use them with minimal cytotoxicity. Deciphered mainly by fluorescence imaging and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, this poster will emphasize some recent studies in our group of how ionic liquids, macroionic nanoclusters, and nanocolloids interact with cell biomembrane. Using lipid bilayers as model biomembranes, I will show that adsorbed molecules and nanocolloids can not only disrupt the morphology of lipid bilayers, but also induce their phase transition due to sufficiently strong electrostatic attraction. With ionic liquids and macroionic nanoclusters whose dimensions are comparable to lipids, intriguing supramolecular assembly is also observed at lipid bilayer interface, showing a strong dependence on the chemical makeup of adsorbed ionic species.

  17. Lipid rafts: heterogeneity on the high seas.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Linda J

    2004-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains that are enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. They have been implicated in processes as diverse as signal transduction, endocytosis and cholesterol trafficking. Recent evidence suggests that this diversity of function is accompanied by a diversity in the composition of lipid rafts. The rafts in cells appear to be heterogeneous both in terms of their protein and their lipid content, and can be localized to different regions of the cell. This review summarizes the data supporting the concept of heterogeneity among lipid rafts and outlines the evidence for cross-talk between raft components. Based on differences in the ways in which proteins interact with rafts, the Induced-Fit Model of Raft Heterogeneity is proposed to explain the establishment and maintenance of heterogeneity within raft populations. PMID:14662007

  18. Characterization of lipid DNA interactions. I. Destabilization of bound lipids and DNA dissociation.

    PubMed Central

    Harvie, P; Wong, F M; Bally, M B

    1998-01-01

    We have recently described a method for preparing lipid-based DNA particles (LDPs) that form spontaneously when detergent-solubilized cationic lipids are mixed with DNA. LDPs have the potential to be developed as carriers for use in gene therapy. More importantly, the lipid-DNA interactions that give rise to particle formation can be studied to gain a better understanding of factors that govern lipid binding and lipid dissociation. In this study the stability of lipid-DNA interactions was evaluated by measurement of DNA protection (binding of the DNA intercalating dye TO-PRO-1 and sensitivity to DNase I) and membrane destabilization (lipid mixing reactions measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques) after the addition of anionic liposomes. Lipid-based DNA transfer systems were prepared with pInexCAT v.2.0, a 4.49-kb plasmid expression vector that contains the marker gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). LDPs were prepared using N-N-dioleoyl-N,N-dimethylammonium chloride (DODAC) and either 1, 2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) or 1, 2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE). For comparison, liposome/DNA aggregates (LDAs) were also prepared by using preformed DODAC/DOPE (1:1 mole ratio) and DODAC/DOPC (1:1 mole ratio) liposomes. The addition of anionic liposomes to the lipid-based DNA formulations initiated rapid membrane destabilization as measured by the resonance energy transfer lipid-mixing assay. It is suggested that lipid mixing is a reflection of processes (contact, dehydration, packing defects) that lead to formulation disassembly and DNA release. This destabilization reaction was associated with an increase in DNA sensitivity to DNase I, and anionic membrane-mediated destabilization was not dependent on the incorporation of DOPE. These results are interpreted in terms of factors that regulate the disassembly of lipid-based DNA formulations. PMID:9675205

  19. Improved Characterization of EV Preparations Based on Protein to Lipid Ratio and Lipid Properties

    PubMed Central

    Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Balogh, Andrea; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Németh, Andrea; Szabó, Tamás Géza; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Sódar, Barbara; Kittel, Ágnes; György, Bence; Pállinger, Éva; Matkó, János; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the study of extracellular vesicles has gathered much scientific and clinical interest. As the field is expanding, it is becoming clear that better methods for characterization and quantification of extracellular vesicles as well as better standards to compare studies are warranted. The goal of the present work was to find improved parameters to characterize extracellular vesicle preparations. Here we introduce a simple 96 well plate-based total lipid assay for determination of lipid content and protein to lipid ratios of extracellular vesicle preparations from various myeloid and lymphoid cell lines as well as blood plasma. These preparations included apoptotic bodies, microvesicles/microparticles, and exosomes isolated by size-based fractionation. We also investigated lipid bilayer order of extracellular vesicle subpopulations using Di-4-ANEPPDHQ lipid probe, and lipid composition using affinity reagents to clustered cholesterol (monoclonal anti-cholesterol antibody) and ganglioside GM1 (cholera toxin subunit B). We have consistently found different protein to lipid ratios characteristic for the investigated extracellular vesicle subpopulations which were substantially altered in the case of vesicular damage or protein contamination. Spectral ratiometric imaging and flow cytometric analysis also revealed marked differences between the various vesicle populations in their lipid order and their clustered membrane cholesterol and GM1 content. Our study introduces for the first time a simple and readily available lipid assay to complement the widely used protein assays in order to better characterize extracellular vesicle preparations. Besides differentiating extracellular vesicle subpopulations, the novel parameters introduced in this work (protein to lipid ratio, lipid bilayer order, and lipid composition), may prove useful for quality control of extracellular vesicle related basic and clinical studies. PMID:25798862

  20. Lipid Microarray Biosensor for Biotoxin Detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anup K.; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Moran-Mirabal, Jose C.; Edel, Joshua B.; Meyer, Grant D.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2006-05-01

    We present the use of micron-sized lipid domains, patterned onto planar substrates and within microfluidic channels, to assay the binding of bacterial toxins via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The lipid domains were patterned using a polymer lift-off technique and consisted of ganglioside-populated DSPC:cholesterol supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). Lipid patterns were formed on the substrates by vesicle fusion followed by polymer lift-off, which revealed micron-sized SLBs containing either ganglioside GT1b or GM1. The ganglioside-populated SLB arrays were then exposed to either Cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) or Tetanus toxin fragment C (TTC). Binding was assayed on planar substrates by TIRFM down to 1 nM concentration for CTB and 100 nM for TTC. Apparent binding constants extracted from three different models applied to the binding curves suggest that binding of a protein to a lipid-based receptor is strongly affected by the lipid composition of the SLB and by the substrate on which the bilayer is formed. Patterning of SLBs inside microfluidic channels also allowed the preparation of lipid domains with different compositions on a single device. Arrays within microfluidic channels were used to achieve segregation and selective binding from a binary mixture of the toxin fragments in one device. The binding and segregation within the microfluidic channels was assayed with epifluorescence as proof of concept. We propose that the method used for patterning the lipid microarrays on planar substrates and within microfluidic channels can be easily adapted to proteins or nucleic acids and can be used for biosensor applications and cell stimulation assays under different flow conditions. KEYWORDS. Microarray, ganglioside, polymer lift-off, cholera toxin, tetanus toxin, TIRFM, binding constant.4

  1. Rapid modification of retroviruses using lipid conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Nimisha G.; Lyon, L. Andrew; LeDoux, Joseph M.

    2009-02-01

    Methods are needed to manipulate natural nanoparticles. Viruses are particularly interesting because they can act as therapeutic cellular delivery agents. Here we examine a new method for rapidly modifying retroviruses that uses lipid conjugates composed of a lipid anchor (1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine), a polyethylene glycol chain, and biotin. The conjugates rapidly and stably modified retroviruses and enabled them to bind streptavidin. The implication of this work for modifying viruses for gene therapy and vaccination protocols is discussed.

  2. Rapid Microfluidic Perfusion Enabling Kinetic Studies of Lipid Ion Channels in a Bilayer Lipid Membrane Chip

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chenren; Sun, Bing; Colombini, Marco; DeVoe, Don L.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing recognition that lipids play key roles in ion channel physiology, both through the dynamic formation and dissolution of lipid ion channels and by indirect regulation of protein ion channels. Because existing technologies cannot rapidly modulate the local (bio)chemical conditions at artificial bilayer lipid membranes used in ion channel studies, the ability to elucidate the dynamics of these lipid–lipid and lipid–protein interactions has been limited. Here we demonstrate a microfluidic system supporting exceptionally rapid perfusion of reagents to an on-chip bilayer lipid membrane, enabling the responses of lipid ion channels to dynamic changes in membrane boundary conditions to be probed. The thermoplastic microfluidic system allows initial perfusion of reagents to the membrane in less than 1 s, and enables kinetic behaviors with time constants below 10 s to be directly measured. Application of the platform is demonstrated toward kinetic studies of ceramide, a biologically important lipid known to self-assemble into transmembrane ion channels, in response to dynamic treatments of small ions (La3+) and proteins (Bcl-xL mutant). The results reveal the broader potential of the technology for studies of membrane biophysics, including lipid ion channel dynamics, lipid–protein interactions, and the regulation of protein ion channels by lipid micro domains. PMID:21556947

  3. Metabolic engineering of lipid catabolism increases microalgal lipid accumulation without compromising growth

    PubMed Central

    Trentacoste, Emily M.; Shrestha, Roshan P.; Smith, Sarah R.; Glé, Corine; Hartmann, Aaron C.; Hildebrand, Mark; Gerwick, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Biologically derived fuels are viable alternatives to traditional fossil fuels, and microalgae are a particularly promising source, but improvements are required throughout the production process to increase productivity and reduce cost. Metabolic engineering to increase yields of biofuel-relevant lipids in these organisms without compromising growth is an important aspect of advancing economic feasibility. We report that the targeted knockdown of a multifunctional lipase/phospholipase/acyltransferase increased lipid yields without affecting growth in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Antisense-expressing knockdown strains 1A6 and 1B1 exhibited wild-type–like growth and increased lipid content under both continuous light and alternating light/dark conditions. Strains 1A6 and 1B1, respectively, contained 2.4- and 3.3-fold higher lipid content than wild-type during exponential growth, and 4.1- and 3.2-fold higher lipid content than wild-type after 40 h of silicon starvation. Analyses of fatty acids, lipid classes, and membrane stability in the transgenic strains suggest a role for this enzyme in membrane lipid turnover and lipid homeostasis. These results demonstrate that targeted metabolic manipulations can be used to increase lipid accumulation in eukaryotic microalgae without compromising growth. PMID:24248374

  4. Dynamics imaging of lipid phases and lipid-marker interactions in model biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Ariola, Florly S; Mudaliar, Deepti J; Walvick, Ronn P; Heikal, Ahmed A

    2006-10-21

    Biomembranes are complex systems that regulate numerous biological processes. Lipid phases that constitute these membranes influence their properties and transport characteristics. Here, we demonstrate the potential of short-range dynamics imaging (excited-state lifetime, rotational diffusion, and order parameter) as a sensitive probe of lipid phases in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Liquid-disordered and gel phases were labeled with Bodipy-PC at room temperature. Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of single-phase GUVs reveals more heterogeneity in fluorescence lifetimes of Bodipy in the gel phase (DPPC: 3.8+/-0.6 ns) as compared with the fluid phase (DOPC: 5.2+/-0.2 ns). The phase-specificity of excited-state lifetime of Bodipy-PC is attributed to the stacking of ordered lipid molecules that possibly enhances homo-FRET. Fluorescence polarization anisotropy imaging also reveals distinctive molecular order that is phase specific. The results are compared with DiI-C12-labeled fluid GUVs to investigate the sensitivity of our fluorescence dynamics assay to different lipid-marker interactions. Our results provide a molecular perspective of lipid phase dynamics and the nature of their microenvironments that will ultimately help our understanding of the structure-function relationship of biomembranes in vivo. Furthermore, these ultrafast excited-state dynamics will be used for molecular dynamics simulation of lipid-lipid, lipid-marker and lipid-protein interactions. PMID:17047749

  5. PAT proteins, an ancient family of lipid droplet proteins that regulate cellular lipid stores

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, Perry E.; Tansey, John T.; Welte, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The PAT family of lipid droplet proteins includes 5 members in mammals: perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), tail-interacting protein of 47 kiloDaltons (TIP47), S3-12, and OXPAT. Members of this family are also present in evolutionarily distant organisms, including insects, slime molds and fungi. All PAT proteins share sequence similarity and the ability to bind intracellular lipid droplets, either constitutively or in response to metabolic stimuli, such as increased lipid flux into or out of lipid droplets. Positioned at the lipid droplet surface, PAT proteins manage access of other proteins (lipases) to the lipid esters within the lipid droplet core and can interact with cellular machinery important for lipid droplet biogenesis. Genetic variations in the gene for the best characterized of the mammalian PAT proteins, perilipin, have been associated with metabolic phenotypes, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we discuss how the PAT proteins regulate cellular lipid metabolism both in mammals and in model organisms. PMID:19375517

  6. Nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann model of charged lipid membranes: Accounting for the presence of zwitterionic lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengistu, Demmelash H.; May, Sylvio

    2008-09-01

    The nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann model is used to derive analytical expressions for the free energies of both mixed anionic-zwitterionic and mixed cationic-zwitterionic lipid membranes as function of the mole fraction of charged lipids. Accounting explicitly for the electrostatic properties of the zwitterionic lipid species affects the free energy of anionic and cationic membranes in a qualitatively different way: That of an anionic membrane changes monotonously as a function of the mole fraction of charged lipids, whereas it passes through a pronounced minimum for a cationic membrane.

  7. PAT proteins, an ancient family of lipid droplet proteins that regulate cellular lipid stores.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Perry E; Tansey, John T; Welte, Michael A

    2009-06-01

    The PAT family of lipid droplet proteins includes 5 members in mammals: perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa (TIP47), S3-12, and OXPAT. Members of this family are also present in evolutionarily distant organisms, including insects, slime molds and fungi. All PAT proteins share sequence similarity and the ability to bind intracellular lipid droplets, either constitutively or in response to metabolic stimuli, such as increased lipid flux into or out of lipid droplets. Positioned at the lipid droplet surface, PAT proteins manage access of other proteins (lipases) to the lipid esters within the lipid droplet core and can interact with cellular machinery important for lipid droplet biogenesis. Genetic variations in the gene for the best-characterized of the mammalian PAT proteins, perilipin, have been associated with metabolic phenotypes, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we discuss how the PAT proteins regulate cellular lipid metabolism both in mammals and in model organisms. PMID:19375517

  8. Metabolic engineering of lipid catabolism increases microalgal lipid accumulation without compromising growth.

    PubMed

    Trentacoste, Emily M; Shrestha, Roshan P; Smith, Sarah R; Glé, Corine; Hartmann, Aaron C; Hildebrand, Mark; Gerwick, William H

    2013-12-01

    Biologically derived fuels are viable alternatives to traditional fossil fuels, and microalgae are a particularly promising source, but improvements are required throughout the production process to increase productivity and reduce cost. Metabolic engineering to increase yields of biofuel-relevant lipids in these organisms without compromising growth is an important aspect of advancing economic feasibility. We report that the targeted knockdown of a multifunctional lipase/phospholipase/acyltransferase increased lipid yields without affecting growth in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Antisense-expressing knockdown strains 1A6 and 1B1 exhibited wild-type-like growth and increased lipid content under both continuous light and alternating light/dark conditions. Strains 1A6 and 1B1, respectively, contained 2.4- and 3.3-fold higher lipid content than wild-type during exponential growth, and 4.1- and 3.2-fold higher lipid content than wild-type after 40 h of silicon starvation. Analyses of fatty acids, lipid classes, and membrane stability in the transgenic strains suggest a role for this enzyme in membrane lipid turnover and lipid homeostasis. These results demonstrate that targeted metabolic manipulations can be used to increase lipid accumulation in eukaryotic microalgae without compromising growth. PMID:24248374

  9. Bending and Puncturing the Influenza Lipid Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sai; Eghiaian, Frederic; Sieben, Christian; Herrmann, Andreas; Schaap, Iwan A.T.

    2011-01-01

    Lysosomes, enveloped viruses, as well as synaptic and secretory vesicles are all examples of natural nanocontainers (diameter ? 100 nm) which specifically rely on their lipid bilayer to protect and exchange their contents with the cell. We have applied methods primarily based on atomic force microscopy and finite element modeling that allow precise investigation of the mechanical properties of the influenza virus lipid envelope. The mechanical properties of small, spherical vesicles made from PR8 influenza lipids were probed by an atomic force microscopy tip applying forces up to 0.2 nN, which led to an elastic deformation up to 20%, on average. The liposome deformation was modeled using finite element methods to extract the lipid bilayer elastic properties. We found that influenza liposomes were softer than what would be expected for a gel phase bilayer and highly deformable: Consistent with previous suggestion that influenza lipids do not undergo a major phase transition, we observe that the stiffness of influenza liposomes increases gradually and weakly (within one order of magnitude) with temperature. Surprisingly, influenza liposomes were, in most cases, able to withstand wall-to-wall deformation, and forces >1 nN were generally required to puncture the influenza envelope, which is similar to viral protein shells. Hence, the choice of a highly flexible lipid envelope may provide as efficient a protection for a viral genome as a stiff protein shell. PMID:21281578

  10. The nutritional significance of lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Parveen

    2009-01-01

    The structure, size, stability, and functionality of lipid rafts are still in debate, but recent techniques allowing direct visualization have characterized them in a wide range of cell types. Lipid rafts are potentially modifiable by diet, particularly (but not exclusively) by dietary fatty acids. However, it is not clear whether dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are incorporated into raft lipids or whether their low affinity to cholesterol disallows this and causes phase separation from rafts and displacement of raft proteins. This review examines the potential for dietary modification of raft structure and function in the immune system, brain and retinal tissue, the gut, and in cancer cells. Although there is increasing evidence to suggest that membrane microdomains, and their modulation, have an impact in health and disease, it is too early to judge whether modulation of lipid rafts is responsible for the immunomodulatory effects of n-3 PUFA. In addition to dietary fatty acids, gangliosides and cholesterol may also modulate microdomains in a number of tissues, and recent work has highlighted sphingolipids in membrane microdomains as potential targets for inhibition of tumor growth by n-3 PUFA. The roles of fatty acids and gangliosides in cognitive development, age-related cognitive decline, psychiatric disorders, and Alzheimer's disease are poorly understood and require clarification, particularly with respect to the contribution of lipid rafts. The roles of lipid rafts in cancer, in microbial pathogenesis, and in insulin resistance are only just emerging, but compelling evidence indicates the growing importance of membrane microdomains in health and disease. PMID:19400697

  11. Engineering Rhodosporidium toruloides for increased lipid production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyan; Skerker, Jeffrey M; Rutter, Charles D; Maurer, Matthew J; Arkin, Adam P; Rao, Christopher V

    2016-05-01

    Oleaginous yeast are promising organisms for the production of lipid-based chemicals and fuels from simple sugars. In this work, we explored Rhodosporidium toruloides for the production of lipid-based products. This oleaginous yeast natively produces lipids at high titers and can grow on glucose and xylose. As a first step, we sequenced the genomes of two strains, IFO0880, and IFO0559, and generated draft assemblies and annotations. We then used this information to engineer two R. toruloides strains for increased lipid production by over-expressing the native acetyl-CoA carboxylase and diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes using Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation. Our best strain, derived from IFO0880, was able to produce 16.4 ± 1.1 g/L lipid from 70 g/L glucose and 9.5 ± 1.3 g/L lipid from 70 g/L xylose in shake-flask experiments. This work represents one of the first examples of metabolic engineering in R. toruloides and establishes this yeast as a new platform for production of fatty-acid derived products. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1056-1066. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26479039

  12. Lipid phosphate phosphatases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Carman, George M; Wu, Wen-I

    2007-01-01

    DPP1-encoded and LPP1-encoded lipid phosphate phosphatases are integral membrane proteins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. They catalyze the Mg(2+)-independent dephosphorylation of bioactive lipid phosphate molecules such as diacylglycerol pyrophosphate and phosphatidate. These enzymes possess a three-domain lipid phosphatase motif that is localized to the hydrophilic surface of the membrane. The lipid phosphate phosphatase activities of DPP1-encoded and LPP1-encoded enzymes are measured by following the release of water-soluble radioactive inorganic phosphate from chloroform-soluble radioactive lipid phosphate substrate following a chloroform/methanol/water phase partition. The DPP1-encoded enzyme, commonly referred to as diacylglycerol pyrophosphate phosphatase, is purified from wild-type S. cerevisiae membranes by detergent solubilization with Triton X-100 followed by chromatography with DEAE-cellulose (DE53), Affi-Gel blue, hydroxylapatite, and Mono Q. The purification scheme yields an essentially homogeneous enzyme preparation that is stable for several years upon storage at -80 degrees . The properties of the DPP1-encoded and LPP1-encoded lipid phosphate phosphatase enzymes are summarized. PMID:17954255

  13. RHODOPSIN-LIPID INTERACTIONS STUDIED BY NMR

    PubMed Central

    Soubias, Olivier; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the lipid matrix are known to influence function of integral membrane proteins. We report on a sample preparation method for reconstitution of membrane proteins which uses porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) filters with 200 nm-wide pores of high density. The substrate permits formation of tubular, single membranes that line the inner surface of pores. One square centimeter of filter with a thickness of 60 ?m yields on the order of 500 cm2 of solid-supported single bilayer surface, sufficient for NMR studies. The tubular bilayers are free of detergent, fully hydrated and accessible for ligands from one side of the membrane. The use of AAO filters greatly improves reproducibility of the reconstitution process such that the influence of protein on lipid order parameters can be studied with high resolution. As an example, results for the G protein-coupled receptor of class A, bovine rhodopsin, are shown. By 2H NMR order parameter measurements it is detected that rhodopsin insertion elastically deforms membranes near the protein. Furthermore, by 1H saturation-transfer NMR under conditions of magic-angle spinning (MAS), we demonstrate detection of preferences in interactions of rhodopsin with particular lipid species. It is assumed that function of integral membrane proteins depends on both protein-induced elastic deformations of the lipid matrix and preferences for interaction of the protein with particular lipid species in the first layer of lipids surrounding the protein. PMID:23374188

  14. Lipids, curvature, and nano-medicine*

    PubMed Central

    Mouritsen, Ole G

    2011-01-01

    The physical properties of the lamellar lipid-bilayer component of biological membranes are controlled by a host of thermodynamic forces leading to overall tensionless bilayers with a conspicuous lateral pressure profile and build-in curvature-stress instabilities that may be released locally or globally in terms of morphological changes. In particular, the average molecular shape and the propensity of the different lipid and protein species for forming non-lamellar and curved structures are a source of structural transitions and control of biological function. The effects of different lipids, sterols, and proteins on membrane structure are discussed and it is shown how one can take advantage of the curvature-stress modulations brought about by specific molecular agents, such as fatty acids, lysolipids, and other amphiphilic solutes, to construct intelligent drug-delivery systems that function by enzymatic triggering via curvature. Practical applications: The simple concept of lipid molecular shape and how it impacts on the structure of lipid aggregates, in particular the curvature and curvature stress in lipid bilayers and liposomes, can be exploited to construct liposome-based drug-delivery systems, e.g., for use as nano-medicine in cancer therapy. Non-lamellar-forming lysolipids and fatty acids, some of which may be designed to be prodrugs, can be created by phospholipase action in diseased tissues thereby providing for targeted drug release and proliferation of molecular entities with conical shape that break down the permeability barrier of the target cells and may hence enhance efficacy. PMID:22164124

  15. Mechanical Properties of Nanoscopic Lipid Domains.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Jonathan D; Cheng, Xiaolin; Mostofian, Barmak; Stanley, Christopher; Lindner, Benjamin; Heberle, Frederick A; Perticaroli, Stefania; Feygenson, Mikhail; Egami, Takeshi; Standaert, Robert F; Smith, Jeremy C; Myles, Dean A A; Ohl, Michael; Katsaras, John

    2015-12-23

    The lipid raft hypothesis presents insights into how the cell membrane organizes proteins and lipids to accomplish its many vital functions. Yet basic questions remain about the physical mechanisms that lead to the formation, stability, and size of lipid rafts. As a result, much interest has been generated in the study of systems that contain similar lateral heterogeneities, or domains. In the current work we present an experimental approach that is capable of isolating the bending moduli of lipid domains. This is accomplished using neutron scattering and its unique sensitivity to the isotopes of hydrogen. Combining contrast matching approaches with inelastic neutron scattering, we isolate the bending modulus of ?13 nm diameter domains residing in 60 nm unilamellar vesicles, whose lipid composition mimics the mammalian plasma membrane outer leaflet. Importantly, the bending modulus of the nanoscopic domains differs from the modulus of the continuous phase surrounding them. From additional structural measurements and all-atom simulations, we also determine that nanoscopic domains are in-register across the bilayer leaflets. Taken together, these results inform a number of theoretical models of domain/raft formation and highlight the fact that mismatches in bending modulus must be accounted for when explaining the emergence of lateral heterogeneities in lipid systems and biological membranes. PMID:26415030

  16. Lipids and cell death in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Büttner, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding lipid-induced malfunction represents a major challenge of today's biomedical research. The connection of lipids to cellular and organ dysfunction, cell death, and disease (often referred to as lipotoxicity) is more complex than the sole lipotoxic effects of excess free fatty acids and requires genetically tractable model systems for mechanistic investigation. We herein summarize recent advances in the field of lipid-induced toxicity that employ the established model system for cell death and aging research of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies in yeast have shed light on various aspects of lipotoxicity, including free fatty acid toxicity, sphingolipid-modulated cell death as well as the involvement of cardiolipin and lipid peroxidation in the mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis. Regimens used range from exogenously applied lipids, genetic modulation of lipolysis and triacylglyceride synthesis, variations in sphingolipid/ceramide metabolism as well as changes in peroxisome function by either genetic or pharmacological means. In future, the yeast model of programmed cell death will further contribute to the clarification of crucial questions of lipid-associated malfunction. PMID:24119111

  17. Interaction of C(60) fullerene with lipids.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Franco

    2010-06-01

    Unsaturated lipids when exposed to air at room temperature undergo a slow autoxidation. When fullerene C(60) was dissolved in selected lipids (ethyl oleate, ethyl linoleate, linseed oil and castor oil) the spectrophotometric analysis shows that the oxidation is concentrated to C(60) which is converted to an epoxide C(60)O. Thus, fullerene C(60) displays antioxidant activity not only when dissolved in unsaturated lipids but also, more generally, when dissolved in unsaturated solvents subjected to autoxidation like, for example, in cyclohexene. The behaviour of C(60) in ethyl oleate has been compared with that of the known antioxidant TMPPD (N,N',N,N,'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine) in ethyl oleate. The mechanism of the antioxidant action of C(60) in lipids has been proposed. The kinetics of C(60) oxidation in lipids was determined spectrophotometrically both at room temperature in the dark and under UV irradiation. The oxidized products derived from C(60) photo-oxidation in lipids have been identified. PMID:20338159

  18. Beta-carotene-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, A; Gramdorf, S; Müller, R H; Kurz, T

    2008-03-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) technology was used to disperse hydrophobic beta-carotene in an aqueous phase. NLC are lipid nanoparticles with a particle matrix consisting of a blend of a liquid and solid lipid. They were produced by melting the lipid blend at 80 degrees C and dispersing it into a hot emulsifier solution. The aim of this study was to extend the limited knowledge of melt-emulsified lipidic colloids in food systems and to evaluate the feasibility for further applications as functional ingredient in beverages. Physical stability of the NLC suspension was examined at 2 different storage temperatures by measuring the particle size with photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and laser diffractometry (LD). All particles containing sufficient amounts of emulsifier were smaller than 1 microm (LD diameter 100%) at a mean particle size of around 0.3 microm (LD) for 9 wk at 20 degrees C and at least 30 wk at 4 to 8 degrees C. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the solid state of the lipids both in the beta-carotene loaded PGMS and in the NLC particles. Propylene glycol monostearate (PGMS) when dispersed as NLC recrystallized up to 98% during storage time. Within the regarded period of 7 mo no polymorph transitions were observed. Furthermore, stability of the beta-carotene in water dependent on NLC concentration and tocopherol content was measured photospectrometrically to get an estimation of the behavior of NLC in beverages. PMID:18298743

  19. Cholecystokinin elevates mouse plasma lipids.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lichun; Yang, Hong; Lin, Xinghua; Okoro, Emmanuel U; Guo, Zhongmao

    2012-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a peptide hormone that induces bile release into the intestinal lumen which in turn aids in fat digestion and absorption in the intestine. While excretion of bile acids and cholesterol into the feces eliminates cholesterol from the body, this report examined the effect of CCK on increasing plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in mice. Our data demonstrated that intravenous injection of [Thr28, Nle31]-CCK at a dose of 50 ng/kg significantly increased plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels by 22 and 31%, respectively, in fasting low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR(-/-)) mice. The same dose of [Thr28, Nle31]-CCK induced 6 and 13% increases in plasma triglyceride and cholesterol, respectively, in wild-type mice. However, these particular before and after CCK treatment values did not achieve statistical significance. Oral feeding of olive oil further elevated plasma triglycerides, but did not alter plasma cholesterol levels in CCK-treated mice. The increased plasma cholesterol in CCK-treated mice was distributed in very-low, low and high density lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL and HDL) with less of an increase in HDL. Correspondingly, the plasma apolipoprotein (apo) B48, B100, apoE and apoAI levels were significantly higher in the CCK-treated mice than in untreated control mice. Ligation of the bile duct, blocking CCK receptors with proglumide or inhibition of Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 transporter with ezetimibe reduced the hypercholesterolemic effect of [Thr28, Nle31]-CCK in LDLR(-/-) mice. These findings suggest that CCK-increased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides as a result of the reabsorption of biliary lipids from the intestine. PMID:23300532

  20. Microalgal lipids biochemistry and biotechnological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bellou, Stamatia; Baeshen, Mohammed N; Elazzazy, Ahmed M; Aggeli, Dimitra; Sayegh, Fotoon; Aggelis, George

    2014-12-01

    In the last few years, there has been an intense interest in using microalgal lipids in food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries and cosmetology, while a noteworthy research has been performed focusing on all aspects of microalgal lipid production. This includes basic research on the pathways of solar energy conversion and on lipid biosynthesis and catabolism, and applied research dealing with the various biological and technical bottlenecks of the lipid production process. In here, we review the current knowledge in microalgal lipids with respect to their metabolism and various biotechnological applications, and we discuss potential future perspectives. The committing step in fatty acid biosynthesis is the carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA that is then introduced in the fatty acid synthesis cycle leading to the formation of palmitic and stearic acids. Oleic acid may also be synthesized after stearic acid desaturation while further conversions of the fatty acids (i.e. desaturations, elongations) occur after their esterification with structural lipids of both plastids and the endoplasmic reticulum. The aliphatic chains are also used as building blocks for structuring storage acylglycerols via the Kennedy pathway. Current research, aiming to enhance lipogenesis in the microalgal cell, is focusing on over-expressing key-enzymes involved in the earlier steps of the pathway of fatty acid synthesis. A complementary plan would be the repression of lipid catabolism by down-regulating acylglycerol hydrolysis and/or ?-oxidation. The tendency of oleaginous microalgae to synthesize, apart from lipids, significant amounts of other energy-rich compounds such as sugars, in processes competitive to lipogenesis, deserves attention since the lipid yield may be considerably increased by blocking competitive metabolic pathways. The majority of microalgal production occurs in outdoor cultivation and for this reason biotechnological applications face some difficulties. Therefore, algal production systems need to be improved and harvesting systems need to be more effective in order for their industrial applications to become more competitive and economically viable. Besides, a reduction of the production cost of microalgal lipids can be achieved by combining lipid production with other commercial applications. The combined production of bioactive products and lipids, when possible, can support the commercial viability of both processes. Hydrophobic compounds can be extracted simultaneously with lipids and then purified, while hydrophilic compounds such as proteins and sugars may be extracted from the defatted biomass. The microalgae also have applications in environmental biotechnology since they can be used for bioremediation of wastewater and to monitor environmental toxicants. Algal biomass produced during wastewater treatment may be further valorized in the biofuel manufacture. It is anticipated that the high microalgal lipid potential will force research towards finding effective ways to manipulate biochemical pathways involved in lipid biosynthesis and towards cost effective algal cultivation and harvesting systems, as well. PMID:25449285

  1. Bilayer Deformation, Pores, and Micellation Induced by Oxidized Lipids.

    PubMed

    Boonnoy, Phansiri; Jarerattanachat, Viwan; Karttunen, Mikko; Wong-Ekkabut, Jirasak

    2015-12-17

    The influence of different oxidized lipids on lipid bilayers was investigated with 16 individual 1 μs atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Binary mixtures of lipid bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PLPC) and its peroxide and aldehyde products were performed at different concentrations. In addition, an asymmetrical short chain lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PDPC), was used to compare the effects of polar/apolar groups in the lipid tail on lipid bilayer. Although water defects occurred with both aldehyde and peroxide lipids, full pore formation was observed only for aldehyde lipids. At medium concentrations the pores were stable. At higher concentrations, however, the pores became unstable and micellation occurred. Data analysis shows that aldehyde lipids' propensity for pore formation is due to their shorter and highly mobile tail. The highly polar peroxide lipids are stabilized by strong hydrogen bonds with interfacial water. PMID:26673194

  2. Targeting bacteria via iminoboronate chemistry of amine-presenting lipids.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Anupam; McCarthy, Kelly A; Kelly, Michael A; Gao, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic molecules that target specific lipids serve as powerful tools for understanding membrane biology and may also enable new applications in biotechnology and medicine. For example, selective recognition of bacterial lipids may give rise to novel antibiotics, as well as diagnostic methods for bacterial infection. Currently known lipid-binding molecules primarily rely on noncovalent interactions to achieve lipid selectivity. Here we show that targeted recognition of lipids can be realized by selectively modifying the lipid of interest via covalent bond formation. Specifically, we report an unnatural amino acid that preferentially labels amine-presenting lipids via iminoboronate formation under physiological conditions. By targeting phosphatidylethanolamine and lysylphosphatidylglycerol, the two lipids enriched on bacterial cell surfaces, the iminoboronate chemistry allows potent labelling of Gram-positive bacteria even in the presence of 10% serum, while bypassing mammalian cells and Gram-negative bacteria. The covalent strategy for lipid recognition should be extendable to other important membrane lipids. PMID:25761996

  3. Targeting Bacteria via Iminoboronate Chemistry of Amine-Presenting Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Anupam; McCarthy, Kelly A.; Kelly, Michael A.; Gao, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic molecules that target specific lipids serve as powerful tools for understanding membrane biology and may also enable new applications in biotechnology and medicine. For example, selective recognition of bacterial lipids may give rise to novel antibiotics, as well as diagnostic methods for bacterial infection. Currently known lipid-binding molecules primarily rely on noncovalent interactions to achieve lipid selectivity. Here we show that targeted recognition of lipids can be realized by selectively modifying the lipid of interest via covalent bond formation. Specifically, we report an unnatural amino acid that preferentially labels amine-presenting lipids via iminoboronate formation under physiological conditions. By targeting phosphatidylethanolamine and lysylphosphatidylglycerol, the two lipids enriched on bacterial cell surfaces, the iminoboronate chemistry allows potent labeling of Gram-positive bacteria even in presence of 10% serum, while bypassing mammalian cells and Gram-negative bacteria. The covalent strategy for lipid recognition should be extendable to other important membrane lipids. PMID:25761996

  4. The Effect of Membrane Lipid Composition on the Formation of Lipid Ultrananodomains.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Priyadarshini; London, Erwin

    2015-10-20

    Some lipid mixtures form membranes containing submicroscopic (nanodomain) ordered lipid domains (rafts). Some of these nanodomains are so small (radius <5 nm) that they cannot be readily detected with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-labeled lipid pairs with large Ro. We define such domains as ultrananodomains. We studied the effect of lipid structure/composition on the formation of ultrananodomains in lipid vesicles using a dual-FRET-pair approach in which only one FRET pair had Ro values that were sufficiently small to detect the ultrananodomains. Using this approach, we measured the temperature dependence of domain and ultrananodomain formation for vesicles composed of various mixtures containing a high-Tm lipid (brain sphingomyelin (SM)) or dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)), low-Tm lipid (dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) or 1-palmitoyl 2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC)), and a lower (28 mol %) or higher (38 mol %) cholesterol concentration. For every lipid combination tested, the thermal stabilities of the ordered domains were similar, in agreement with our prior studies. However, the range of temperatures over which ultrananodomains formed was highly lipid-type dependent. Overall, vesicles that were closest to mammalian plasma membrane in lipid composition (i.e., with brain SM, POPC, and/or higher cholesterol) formed ultrananodomains in preference to larger domains over the widest temperature range. Relative to DPPC, the favorable effect of SM on ultrananodomain formation versus larger domains was especially large. In addition, the favorable effect of a high cholesterol concentration, and of POPC versus DOPC, on the formation of ultrananodomains versus larger domains was greater in vesicles containing SM than in those containing DPPC. We speculate that it is likely that natural mammalian lipids are tuned to maximize the tendency to form ultrananodomains relative to larger domains. The observation that domain size is more sensitive than domain formation to membrane composition has implications for how membrane domain properties may be regulated in vivo. PMID:26488654

  5. Non-enzymatically derived minor lipids found in Escherichia coli lipid extracts

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Teresa A.; Raetz, Christian R. H.; Son, Jennifer D.; Richardson, Travis D.; Bartling, Craig; Guan, Ziqiang

    2011-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is a powerful technique to analyze lipid extracts especially for the identification of new lipid metabolites. A hurdle to lipid identification is the presence of solvent contaminants that hinder the identification of low abundance species or covalently modify abundant lipid species. We have identified several non-enzymatically derived minor lipid species in lipid extracts of Escherichia coli, phosphatidylmethanol, ethyl and methyl carbamates of PE and N-succinyl PE were identified in lipid extracts of Escherichia coli. Phosphatidylmethanol (PM) was identified by exact mass measurement and collision induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Extraction in the presence of deuterated methanol leads to a 3 atomic mass unit shift in the [M-H]- ions of PM indicating its formation during extraction. Ethyl and methyl carbamates of PE, also identified by exact mass measurement and MS/MS, are likely to be formed by phosgene, a breakdown product of chloroform. Addition of phosgene to extractions containing synthetic PE significantly increases the levels of PE-MC detected in the lipid extracts by ESI-MS. Extraction in the presence of methylene chloride significantly reduced the levels of these lipid species. N-succinyl PE is formed from reaction of succinyl-CoA with PE during extraction. Interestingly N-succinyl PE can be formed in an aqueous reaction mixture in the absence of added E. coli proteins. This work highlights the reactivity of the amine of PE and emphasizes that careful extraction controls are required to ensure that new minor lipid species identified using mass spectrometry are indeed endogenous lipid metabolites. PMID:21925285

  6. Identification of lipids and lipid-binding proteins in phloem exudates from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Guelette, Brandon S.; Benning, Urs F.; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    The phloem plays a crucial role in assimilate and nutrient transport, pathogen response, and plant growth and development. Yet, few species have yielded pure phloem exudate and, if proteins need to be analysed, those species may not have sequenced genomes, making identification difficult. The enrichment of Arabidopsis thaliana phloem exudate in amounts large enough to allow for metabolite and protein analysis is described. Using this method, it was possible to identify 65 proteins present in the Arabidopsis phloem exudate. The majority of these proteins could be grouped by response to pathogens, stress, or hormones, carbon metabolism, protein interaction, modification, and turnover, and transcription factors. It was also possible to detect 11 proteins that play a role in lipid/fatty acid metabolism (aspartic protease, putative 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, UDP-sulphoquinovose synthase/SQD1, lipase, PIG-P-like protein: phosphatidylinositol-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase), storage (glycine-rich protein), binding (annexin, lipid-associated family protein, GRP17/oleosin), and/or signalling (annexin, putative lipase, PIG-P-like protein). Along with putative lipid-binding proteins, several lipids and fatty acids could be identified. Only a few examples exist of lipids (jasmonic acid, oxylipins) or lipid-binding proteins (DIR1, acyl-CoA-binding protein) in the phloem. Finding hydrophobic compounds in an aqueous environment is not without precedence in biological systems: human blood contains a variety of lipids, many of which play a significant role in human health. In blood, lipids are transported while bound to proteins. The present findings of lipids and lipid-binding proteins in phloem exudates suggest that a similar long-distance lipid signalling exists in plants and may play an important role in plant growth and development. PMID:22442409

  7. Perilipins: Lipid Droplet Coat Proteins Adapted for Tissue-Specific Energy Storage and Utilization, and Lipid Cytoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Sztalryd, Carole; Kimmel, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Cytosolic lipid storage droplets are primary functional organelles that regulate cellular lipid metabolism and homeostasis. Paradoxically, excess lipid stores are linked to both adaptive (fasting and chronic exercise) and mal-adaptive (obesity and related health complications) conditions. Thus, collective metabolic and physiological processes must balance lipid storage and utilization with prevention of lipocytotoxicity and compounding tissue dysfunctions, urging the need to further define the connection of mammalian lipid droplet function and lipid homeostasis. The perilipins are a multi-protein family that targets lipid droplet surfaces and regulates lipid storage and hydrolysis. Study of perilipin functions has provided insight into the physiological roles of cytosolic lipid droplets and their relationship with obesity-related pathologies. Here, we review the current knowledge of the multiple perilipin proteins in regulating tissue-specific lipid droplets and associations with tissue and systemic energetics. PMID:24036367

  8. Algal Lipids as Quantitative Paleosalinity Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, A.; Shinneman, A.; Hemeon, K.; Sachs, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    The tropics play an important role in driving climate. However it is difficult to uncover past changes in tropical precipitation due to a lack of tree ring records and low accumulation rates of marine sediments. Hydrogen isotope ratios of algal lipids preserved in lacustrine and marine sediments have been used to qualitatively reconstruct tropical paleohydrology. Changes in the hydrologic balance are reflected in salinity and in lake water D/H ratios, which are closely tracked by lipid D/H ratios of algal biomarkers. While useful for determining past periods of "wetter" or "drier" conditions, variability in isotope fractionation in algal lipids during lipid biosynthesis can be exploited to more quantitatively determine how much wetter or drier conditions were in the past. The estuarine diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonnana, was grown in continuous cultures under controlled light, temperature, nutrient, and growth rate conditions to assess the influence of salinity (9-40 PSU) on D/H fractionation between lipids and source water. Three fatty acids, 24-methylcholesta-5,24(28)-dien-3B-ol, and phytol show decreasing fractionation between lipid and source water as salinity increases with 0.8-1.3‰ change in fractionation per salinity unit. These results compliment field-based empirical observations of dinosterol in Chesapeake Bay suspended particles that change 0.99‰ per salinity unit and lipid biomarkers from hyper-saline ponds on Christmas Island that change 0.7-1.1‰ per salinity unit. Biological pathways responsible for the inverse relationship between fractionation and salinity will be discussed.

  9. [Lipid therapy in daily routine].

    PubMed

    Sonntag, F; Schaefer, J R; Gitt, A K; Weizel, A; Jannowitz, C; Karmann, B; Pittrow, D; Bestehorn, K

    2012-10-01

    Patients with increased cardiovascular risk profile are frequently seen in general practice. Comprehensive management of modifiable risk factors, in particular dyslipidemia, is mandatory. Many studies in clinical practice have shown a gap between the recommendations in clinical guidelines and the actual situation. Current data on the management situation of patients with high cardiovascular risk is provided by the prospective registry LIMA. Primary care physicians in 2,387 offices throughout Germany documented 13,924 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diabetes mellitus or peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Treatment with simvastatin 40?mg was an inclusion criterion. Physicians documented drug utilization, laboratory values (lipids, blood glucose), blood pressure and clinical events over one year and received feedback about the target value attainment of their patients after data entry. Mean age of the patients was 65.7 years, and 61.6?% were men. CAD was reported in 70.6?%, diabetes mellitus in 58.2?% and PAD in 14.9?%. Most patients (68?%) received simvastatin as monotherapy also after the inclusion visit; 20.6?% of patients received in addition the cholesterol absorption inhibitor (ezetimibe) in the first 6 months, and 23.3?% in the second 6 months. Patients achieved the LDL-cholesterol target value in 31.8?% at entry and 50.0?% after one year. The blood pressure target

  10. Biodegradable Lipids Enabling Rapidly Eliminated Lipid Nanoparticles for Systemic Delivery of RNAi Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Martin A; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Matsuda, Shigeo; Liu, Ju; Barros, Scott; Querbes, William; Tam, Ying K; Ansell, Steven M; Kumar, Varun; Qin, June; Zhang, Xuemei; Wang, Qianfan; Panesar, Sue; Hutabarat, Renta; Carioto, Mary; Hettinger, Julia; Kandasamy, Pachamuthu; Butler, David; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Pang, Bo; Charisse, Klaus; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Mui, Barbara L; Du, Xinyao; Cullis, Pieter; Madden, Thomas D; Hope, Michael J; Manoharan, Muthiah; Akinc, Akin

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, RNA interference (RNAi) therapeutics, most notably with lipid nanoparticle-based delivery systems, have advanced into human clinical trials. The results from these early clinical trials suggest that lipid nanoparticles (LNPs), and the novel ionizable lipids that comprise them, will be important materials in this emerging field of medicine. A persistent theme in the use of materials for biomedical applications has been the incorporation of biodegradability as a means to improve biocompatibility and/or to facilitate elimination. Therefore, the aim of this work was to further advance the LNP platform through the development of novel, next-generation lipids that combine the excellent potency of the most advanced lipids currently available with biodegradable functionality. As a representative example of this novel class of biodegradable lipids, the lipid evaluated in this work displays rapid elimination from plasma and tissues, substantially improved tolerability in preclinical studies, while maintaining in vivo potency on par with that of the most advanced lipids currently available. PMID:23799535

  11. Incorporation of liquid lipid in lipid nanoparticles for ocular drug delivery enhancement.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Sun, Minjie; Ping, Qineng; Ying, Zhi; Liu, Wen

    2010-01-15

    The present work investigates the effect of liquid lipid incorporation on the physicochemical properties and ocular drug delivery enhancement of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) and attempts to elucidate in vitro and in vivo the potential of NLCs for ocular drug delivery. The CyA-loaded or fluorescein-marked nanocarriers composed of Precifac ATO 5 and Miglyol 840 (as liquid lipid) were prepared by melting-emulsion technology, and the physicochemical properties of nanocarriers were determined. The uptake of nanocarriers by human corneal epithelia cell lines (SDHCEC) and rabbit cornea was examined. Ex vivo fluorescence imaging was used to investigate the ocular distribution of nanocarriers. The in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo acute tolerance were evaluated. The higher drug loading capacity and improved in vitro sustained drug release behavior of lipid nanoparticles was found with the incorporation of liquid lipid in lipid nanoparticles. The uptake of nanocarriers by the SDHCEC was increased with the increase in liquid lipid loading. The ex vivo fluorescence imaging of the ocular tissues indicated that the liquid lipid incorporation could improve the ocular retention and penetration of ocular therapeutics. No alternation was macroscopically observed in vivo after ocular surface exposure to nanocarriers. These results indicated that NLC was a biocompatible and potential nanocarrier for ocular drug delivery enhancement. PMID:19955616

  12. Lipid Clustering Correlates with Membrane Curvature as Revealed by Molecular Simulations of Complex Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Koldsø, Heidi; Shorthouse, David; Hélie, Jean; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2014-01-01

    Cell membranes are complex multicomponent systems, which are highly heterogeneous in the lipid distribution and composition. To date, most molecular simulations have focussed on relatively simple lipid compositions, helping to inform our understanding of in vitro experimental studies. Here we describe on simulations of complex asymmetric plasma membrane model, which contains seven different lipids species including the glycolipid GM3 in the outer leaflet and the anionic lipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphophate (PIP2), in the inner leaflet. Plasma membrane models consisting of 1500 lipids and resembling the in vivo composition were constructed and simulations were run for 5 µs. In these simulations the most striking feature was the formation of nano-clusters of GM3 within the outer leaflet. In simulations of protein interactions within a plasma membrane model, GM3, PIP2, and cholesterol all formed favorable interactions with the model ?-helical protein. A larger scale simulation of a model plasma membrane containing 6000 lipid molecules revealed correlations between curvature of the bilayer surface and clustering of lipid molecules. In particular, the concave (when viewed from the extracellular side) regions of the bilayer surface were locally enriched in GM3. In summary, these simulations explore the nanoscale dynamics of model bilayers which mimic the in vivo lipid composition of mammalian plasma membranes, revealing emergent nanoscale membrane organization which may be coupled both to fluctuations in local membrane geometry and to interactions with proteins. PMID:25340788

  13. Cholesterol-lipid interactions in membranes. The saturation concentration of cholesterol in bilayers of various lipids.

    PubMed

    Reiber, H

    1978-09-11

    1. The integration of cholesterol in a lipid bilayer can be visualized by changes in the fluorescence properties of the probe N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN). An increasing cholesterol content in the lipid phase corresponds to decreasing fluorescence intensity of NPN and a short wave shift of the emission spectrum. 2. Equilibrium constants for the partition of NPN between water and the various lipid phases are reported. An increasing cholesterol content in a bilayer decreases the solubility of NPN in the bilayer. 3. The saturation concentration of cholesterol in bilayers of various lipids prepared by ultrasonication is determined using the flourescence probe NPN. The maximal molar ratio of cholesterol : lipid is 2 : 1 for sphingomyelin or egg phosphatidylcholine and 1 : 1 for cerebroside, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, or dipalmitoyl phosphatidylethanolamine. 4. The comparison of the maximal molar ratio of cholesterol : lipid with the number of proton donor and proton acceptor sites in the lipid moiety is used for a discussion of the polar interactions of cholesterol within a lipid bilayer. PMID:698219

  14. Incorporation of liquid lipid in lipid nanoparticles for ocular drug delivery enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jie; Sun, Minjie; Ping, Qineng; Ying, Zhi; Liu, Wen

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigates the effect of liquid lipid incorporation on the physicochemical properties and ocular drug delivery enhancement of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) and attempts to elucidate in vitro and in vivo the potential of NLCs for ocular drug delivery. The CyA-loaded or fluorescein-marked nanocarriers composed of Precifac ATO 5 and Miglyol 840 (as liquid lipid) were prepared by melting-emulsion technology, and the physicochemical properties of nanocarriers were determined. The uptake of nanocarriers by human corneal epithelia cell lines (SDHCEC) and rabbit cornea was examined. Ex vivo fluorescence imaging was used to investigate the ocular distribution of nanocarriers. The in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo acute tolerance were evaluated. The higher drug loading capacity and improved in vitro sustained drug release behavior of lipid nanoparticles was found with the incorporation of liquid lipid in lipid nanoparticles. The uptake of nanocarriers by the SDHCEC was increased with the increase in liquid lipid loading. The ex vivo fluorescence imaging of the ocular tissues indicated that the liquid lipid incorporation could improve the ocular retention and penetration of ocular therapeutics. No alternation was macroscopically observed in vivo after ocular surface exposure to nanocarriers. These results indicated that NLC was a biocompatible and potential nanocarrier for ocular drug delivery enhancement.

  15. Lipid bilayer membrane affinity rationalizes inhibition of lipid peroxidation by a natural lignan antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Podloucká, Pavlína; Berka, Karel; Fabre, Gabin; Paloncýová, Markéta; Duroux, Jean-Luc; Otyepka, Michal; Trouillas, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a degenerative oxidative process that modifies the structure of membranes, influencing their biological functions. Lignans, natural polyphenolic antioxidants widely distributed in plants, can prevent this membrane damage by free-radical scavenging. Here, we rationalize the difference in lipid peroxidation inhibition activity of argenteane, a natural dilignan isolated from wild nutmeg, and 3,3'-dimethoxy-1,1'-biphenyl-2,2'-diol, which represents the central part of argenteane responsible for its antioxidant activity. Although both compounds have the same capacity to scavenge free radicals, argenteane is a more active inhibitor of lipid peroxidation. We show that both compounds penetrate into DOPC and PLPC lipid bilayers and adopt similar positions and orientations, which therefore does not explain the difference in their lipid peroxidation inhibition activity. However, free energy profiles indicate that argenteane has a significantly higher affinity to the lipid bilayer, and thus a higher effective concentration to scavenge radicals formed during lipid peroxidation. This finding explains the higher activity of argenteane to inhibit lipid peroxidation. PMID:23560800

  16. Membrane-spanning lipids for an uncompromised monitoring of membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer.

    PubMed

    Schwarzmann, Günter; Breiden, Bernadette; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-10-01

    A Förster resonance energy transfer-based fusion and transfer assay was developed to study, in model membranes, protein-mediated membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer of fluorescent sphingolipid analogs. For this assay, it became necessary to apply labeled reporter molecules that are resistant to spontaneous as well as protein-mediated intermembrane transfer. The novelty of this assay is the use of nonextractable fluorescent membrane-spanning bipolar lipids. Starting from the tetraether lipid caldarchaeol, we synthesized fluorescent analogs with fluorophores at both polar ends. In addition, we synthesized radioactive glycosylated caldarchaeols. These labeled lipids were shown to stretch through bilayer membranes rather than to loop within a single lipid layer of liposomes. More important, the membrane-spanning lipids (MSLs) in contrast to phosphoglycerides proved to be nonextractable by proteins. We could show that the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) is promiscuous with respect to glycero- and sphingolipid transfer. Saposin (Sap) B also transferred sphingolipids albeit with kinetics different from GM2AP. In addition, we could unambiguously show that the recombinant activator protein Sap C x His6 induced membrane fusion rather than intermembrane lipid transfer. These findings showed that these novel MSLs, in contrast with fluorescent phosphoglycerolipids, are well suited for an uncompromised monitoring of membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer. PMID:26269359

  17. Interactions and Translational Dynamics of Phosphatidylinositol Bisphosphate (PIP2) Lipids in Asymmetric Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaojun; Kohram, Maryam; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Smith, Adam W

    2016-02-23

    Phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) lipids are critical to many cell signaling pathways, in part by acting as molecular beacons that recruit peripheral membrane proteins to specific locations within the plasma membrane. Understanding the biophysics of PIP-protein interactions is critical to developing a chemically detailed model of cell communication. Resolving such interactions is challenging, even in model membrane systems, because of the difficulty in preparing PIP-containing membranes with high fluidity and integrity. Here we report on a simple, vesicle-based protocol for preparing asymmetric supported lipid bilayers in which fluorescent PIP lipid analogues are found only on the top leaflet of the supported membrane facing the bulk solution. With this asymmetric distribution of lipids between the leaflets, the fluorescent signal from the PIP lipid analogue reports directly on interactions between the peripheral molecules and the top leaflet of the membrane. Asymmetric PIP-containing bilayers are an ideal platform to investigate the interaction of PIP with peripheral membrane proteins using fluorescence-based imaging approaches. We demonstrate their usefulness here with a combined fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and single particle tracking study of the interaction between PIP2 lipids and a polycationic polymer, quaternized polyvinylpyridine (QPVP). With this approach we are able to quantify the microscopic features of the mobility coupling between PIP2 lipids and polybasic QPVP. With single particle tracking we observe individual PIP2 lipids switch from Brownian to intermittent motion as they become transiently trapped by QPVP. PMID:26829708

  18. Modeling Lipid-Lipid Correlations across a Bilayer Membrane Using the Quasi-chemical Approximation.

    PubMed

    Bossa, Guilherme Volpe; Roth, Joseph; May, Sylvio

    2015-09-15

    Mixed fluid-like lipid membranes exhibit interactions not only among the lipids within a given leaflet but also across the bilayer. The ensuing collective interleaflet coupling of entire membrane domains has been modeled previously using various mean-field approaches. Yet, also on the level of individual lipids have correlations across the bilayer been observed experimentally for binary mixtures of charged/uncharged lipids with mismatching combinations of short and long acyl chain lengths. The present study proposes a lattice gas model to quantify these correlations. To this end, we represent a macroscopically homogeneous lipid bilayer by two coupled two-dimensional lattice gases that we study using the quasi-chemical approximation. We demonstrate that the rationalization of previous experimental results is only possible if besides two-body lipid-lipid interactions within and across the bilayer our model also accounts for an additional multibody interaction mechanism, namely the local hydrophobic height mismatch created by pairing short and long chain lipids together. The robustness of the quasi-chemical approximation is verified by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:26302019

  19. Effect of lipid composition and packing on the adsorption of apolipoproteins to lipid monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ibdah, J.A.; Lund-Katz, S.; Phillips, M.C.

    1987-05-01

    The monolayer system has been used to study the effects of lipoprotein surface lipid composition and packing on the affinities of apolipoproteins for the surfaces of lipoprotein particles. The adsorption of apolipoproteins injected beneath lipid monolayers prepared with pure lipids or lipoprotein surface lipids is evaluated by monitoring the surface pressure of the film and the surface concentration (Gamma) of /sup 14/C-labelled apolipoprotein. At a given initial film pressure (..pi../sub i/) there is a higher adsorption of human apo A-I to unsaturated phosphatidylcholine (PC) monolayers compared to saturated PC monolayers (e.g., at ..pi../sub i/ = 10 mN/m, Gamma = 0.35 and 0.06 mg/m/sup 2/ for egg PC and distearoyl PC, respectively, with 3 x 10/sup -4/ mg/ml apo A-I in the subphase). In addition, adsorption of apo A-I is less to an egg sphingomyelin monolayer than to an egg PC monolayer. The adsorption of apo A-I to PC monolayers is decreased by addition of cholesterol. Generally, apo A-I adsorption diminishes as the lipid molecular area decreases. Apo A-I adsorbs more to monolayers prepared with HDL/sub 3/ surface lipids than with LDL surface lipids. These studies suggest that lipoprotein surface lipid composition and packing are crucial factors influencing the transfer and exchange of apolipoproteins among various lipoprotein classes during metabolism of lipoprotein particles.

  20. Chain ordering of hybrid lipids can stabilize domains in saturated/hybrid/cholesterol lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Brewster, R.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-07-01

    We use a liquid-crystal model to predict that hybrid lipids (lipids that have one saturated and one unsaturated tail) can stabilize line interfaces between domains in mixed membranes of saturated lipids, hybrid lipids, and cholesterol (SHC membranes). The model predicts the phase separation of SHC membranes with both parabolic and loop binodals depending on the cholesterol concentration, modeled via an effective pressure. In some cases, the hybrid lipids can reduce the line tension to zero in SHC membranes at temperatures that approach the critical temperature as the pressure is increased. The differences in the hybrid saturated tail conformational order in bulk and at the interface are responsible for the reduction of the line tension.

  1. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers: Structure, Preparation and Application.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Neda; Valizadeh, Hadi; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2015-09-01

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) have attracted special interest during last few decades. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) are two major types of Lipid-based nanoparticles. SLNs were developed to overcome the limitations of other colloidal carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles because they have advantages like good release profile and targeted drug delivery with excellent physical stability. In the next generation of the lipid nanoparticle, NLCs are modified SLNs which improve the stability and capacity loading. Three structural models of NLCs have been proposed. These LNPs have potential applications in drug delivery field, research, cosmetics, clinical medicine, etc. This article focuses on features, structure and innovation of LNPs and presents a wide discussion about preparation methods, advantages, disadvantages and applications of LNPs by focusing on SLNs and NLCs. PMID:26504751

  2. Shape Transformations of Lipid Vesicles by Insertion of Bulky-Head Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Soichiro; Sakakura, Tatsuya; Fujii, Satoshi; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Lipid vesicles, in particular Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs), have been increasingly important as compartments of artificial cells to reconstruct living cell-like systems in a bottom-up fashion. Here, we report shape transformations of lipid vesicles induced by polyethylene glycol-lipid conjugate (PEG lipids). Statistical analysis of deformed vesicle shapes revealed that shapes vesicles tend to deform into depended on the concentration of the PEG lipids. When compared with theoretically simulated vesicle shapes, those shapes were found to be more energetically favorable, with lower membrane bending energies than other shapes. This result suggests that the vesicle shape transformations can be controlled by externally added membrane molecules, which can serve as a potential method to control the replications of artificial cells. PMID:26176953

  3. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers: Structure, Preparation and Application

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Neda; Valizadeh, Hadi; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) have attracted special interest during last few decades. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) are two major types of Lipid-based nanoparticles. SLNs were developed to overcome the limitations of other colloidal carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles because they have advantages like good release profile and targeted drug delivery with excellent physical stability. In the next generation of the lipid nanoparticle, NLCs are modified SLNs which improve the stability and capacity loading. Three structural models of NLCs have been proposed. These LNPs have potential applications in drug delivery field, research, cosmetics, clinical medicine, etc. This article focuses on features, structure and innovation of LNPs and presents a wide discussion about preparation methods, advantages, disadvantages and applications of LNPs by focusing on SLNs and NLCs. PMID:26504751

  4. The molecular mechanism of lipid monolayer collapse

    PubMed Central

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Monticelli, Luca; Risselada, H. Jelger; Marrink, Siewert J.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Lipid monolayers at an air–water interface can be compressed laterally and reach high surface density. Beyond a certain threshold, they become unstable and collapse. Lipid monolayer collapse plays an important role in the regulation of surface tension at the air–liquid interface in the lungs. Although the structures of lipid aggregates formed upon collapse can be characterized experimentally, the mechanism leading to these structures is not fully understood. We investigate the molecular mechanism of monolayer collapse using molecular dynamics simulations. Upon lateral compression, the collapse begins with buckling of the monolayer, followed by folding of the buckle into a bilayer in the water phase. Folding leads to an increase in the monolayer surface tension, which reaches the equilibrium spreading value. Immediately after their formation, the bilayer folds have a flat semielliptical shape, in agreement with theoretical predictions. The folds undergo further transformation and form either flat circular bilayers or vesicles. The transformation pathway depends on macroscopic parameters of the system: the bending modulus, the line tension at the monolayer–bilayer connection, and the line tension at the bilayer perimeter. These parameters are determined by the system composition and temperature. Coexistence of the monolayer with lipid aggregates is favorable at lower tensions of the monolayer–bilayer connection. Transformation into a vesicle reduces the energy of the fold perimeter and is facilitated for softer bilayers, e.g., those with a higher content of unsaturated lipids, or at higher temperatures. PMID:18669655

  5. General strategies in chromatographic analysis of lipids.

    PubMed

    Myher, J J; Kuksis, A

    1995-09-15

    Lipid extracts of natural sources contain a large number of lipid classes and molecular species. Completely reproducible samples are obtained only with great care and skill. Analytical methods other than chromatography and/or mass spectrometry are of little use for resolution and identification of lipid molecules even in simple mixtures. The analytical information desired governs the selection of the chromatographic and mass spectrometric method, which determine the sample preparation and derivative needed. Usually a combination of chromatographic methods is necessary to identify specific species of lipids. The recent development of soft ionization techniques, that are readily interfaced with mass spectrometers, have greatly simplified the sample preparation and have largely eliminated the need for derivatization. Because these techniques require expensive equipment and dedicated operators, the methods selected must be consistent with the true analytical needs and the available resources. Although personal preference cannot be eliminated entirely, the general strategies outlined below should help to reduce the number of possibilities facing a lipid analyst to a few practical choices. PMID:8520698

  6. Nanosecond Lipid Dynamics in Membranes Containing Cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Haeussler, Wolfgang; Seydel, Tilo; Katsaras, John; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2014-01-01

    Lipid dynamics in the cholesterol-rich (40 mol%) liquid-ordered (lo) phase of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membranes were studied using neutron spin-echo and neutron backscattering. Recent theoretical and experimental evidence supports the notion of the liquid-ordered phase in phospholipid membranes as a locally structured liquid, with small ordered domains of a highly dynamic nature in equilibrium with a disordered matrix [S. Meinhardt, R. L. C. Vink and F. Schmid, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2013, 110(12), 4476 4481, C. L. Armstrong et al., PLoS One, 2013, 8(6), e66162]. This local structure was found to have a pronounced impact on the membranes' dynamical properties. We found that the long-wavelength dynamics in the liquid-ordered phase, associated with the elastic properties of the membranes, were faster by two orders of magnitude as compared to the liquid disordered phase. At the same time, collective nanoscale diffusion was significantly slower. The presence of a soft-mode (a slowing down) in the longwavelength dispersion relationship suggests an upper size limit for the ordered lipid domain of ~220 A. Moreover, from the relaxation rate of the collective lipid diffusion of lipid lipid distances, the lifetime of these domains was estimated to be about 100 nanoseconds.

  7. Transformation of lipids in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Dueholm, T E; Andreasen, K H; Nielsen, P H

    2001-01-01

    Transformation of lipids in activated sludge treatment plants is of interest for two reasons: lipids contribute 30-40% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) in wastewater, and they may stimulate the growth of filamentous microorganisms in nutrient removal activated sludge plants. The transformation of lipids was investigated under aerobic and anoxic conditions by measuring the oxygen and nitrate uptake rates (OUR and NUR). The maximal OUR and NUR of long-chain fatty acid was found to be at the same level as acetate indicating that long-chain fatty acid was as easily consumable. However, the adsorption of long-chain fatty acid to surfaces of sludge flocs made it difficult to determine initial uptake rates of long-chain fatty acids. It was not possible to describe the hydrolysis rate of triacylglyceride by OUR and NUR to long-chain fatty acids because the hydrolysis rate was very slow. For a better description of the processes involved in transformation of lipids, a conceptual model was suggested. The processes in the suggested model were the adsorption/desorption of both triacylglyceride, and long-chain fatty acid onto surfaces of sludge flocs, hydrolysis of triacylglyceride by lipases and the uptake of long-chain fatty acid by bacteria under various conditions. The model can be helpful to structure design and evaluation of activated sludge experiment with lipids. PMID:11379087

  8. Relation between optimism and lipids in midlife.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Julia K; Williams, David R; Rimm, Eric B; Ryff, Carol; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2013-05-15

    The present research examined optimism's relation with total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. The hypothesis that optimism is associated with a healthier lipid profile was tested. The participants were 990 mostly white men and women from the Midlife in the United States study, who were, on average, 55.1 years old. Optimism was assessed by self-report using the Life Orientation Test. A fasting blood sample was used to assess the serum lipid levels. Linear and logistic regression models examined the cross-sectional association between optimism and lipid levels, accounting for covariates such as demographic characteristics (e.g., education) and health status (e.g., chronic medical conditions). After adjusting for covariates, the results suggested that greater optimism was associated with greater high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and lower triglycerides. Optimism was not associated with low-density lipoprotein or total cholesterol. The findings were robust to a variety of modeling strategies that considered the effect of treatment of cholesterol problems. The results also indicated that diet and body mass index might link optimism with lipids. In conclusion, this is the first study to suggest that optimism is associated with a healthy lipid profile; moreover, these associations can be explained, in part, by the presence of healthier behaviors and a lower body mass index. PMID:23433765

  9. ROLE OF THE GUT IN LIPID HOMEOSTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Abumrad, Nada A.; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal lipid transport plays a central role in fat homeostasis. Here we review the pathways regulating intestinal absorption and delivery of dietary and biliary lipid substrates, principally long-chain fatty acid, cholesterol, and other sterols. We discuss the regulation and functions of CD36 in fatty acid absorption, NPC1L1 in cholesterol absorption, as well as other lipid transporters including FATP4 and SRB1. We discuss the pathways of intestinal sterol efflux via ABCG5/G8 and ABCA1 as well as the role of the small intestine in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) biogenesis and reverse cholesterol transport. We review the pathways and genetic regulation of chylomicron assembly, the role of dominant restriction points such as microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and apolipoprotein B, and the role of CD36, L-FABP, and other proteins in formation of the prechylomicron complex. We will summarize current concepts of regulated lipoprotein secretion (including HDL and chylomicron pathways) and include lessons learned from families with genetic mutations in dominant pathways (i.e., abetalipoproteinemia, chylomicron retention disease, and familial hypobetalipoproteinemia). Finally, we will provide an integrative view of intestinal lipid homeostasis through recent findings on the role of lipid flux and fatty acid signaling via diverse receptor pathways in regulating absorption and production of satiety factors. PMID:22811425

  10. Preservation of Microbial Lipids in Geothermal Sinters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Mountain, Bruce W.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Pancost, Richard D.

    2011-04-01

    Lipid biomarkers are widely used to study the earliest life on Earth and have been invoked as potential astrobiological markers, but few studies have assessed their survival and persistence in geothermal settings. Here, we investigate lipid preservation in active and inactive geothermal silica sinters, with ages of up to 900 years, from Champagne Pool, Waiotapu, New Zealand. Analyses revealed a wide range of bacterial biomarkers, including free and bound fatty acids, 1,2-di-O-alkylglycerols (diethers), and various hopanoids. Dominant archaeal lipids include archaeol and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs). The predominance of generally similar biomarker groups in all sinters suggests a stable microbial community throughout Champagne Pool's history and indicates that incorporated lipids can be well preserved. Moreover, subtle differences in lipid distributions suggest that past changes in environmental conditions can be elucidated. In this case, higher archaeol abundances relative to the bacterial diethers, a greater proportion of cyclic GDGTs, the high average chain length of the bacterial diethers, and greater concentrations of hopanoic acids in the older sinters all suggest hotter conditions at Champagne Pool in the past.

  11. Atomistic Monte Carlo Simulation of Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches. We use our recently devised chain breakage/closure (CBC) local move set in the bond-/torsion angle space with the constant-bond-length approximation (CBLA) for the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). We demonstrate rapid conformational equilibration for a single DPPC molecule, as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol. PMID:24469314

  12. Lipid Peroxidation by Human Blood Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stossel, Thomas P.; Mason, Robert J.; Smith, Arnold L.

    1974-01-01

    Cell suspensions enriched in human blood monocytes, obtained from normal peripheral blood by sedimentation on sodium diatrizoate-Ficoll gradients or from the blood of patients with neutropenia and monocytosis, accumulated malonyldialdehyde, a labile catabolite of lipid peroxidation, during incubations with polystyrene beads or heat-killed Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mixed blood leukocytes principally composed of granulocytes or granulocytes purified by density gradient sedimentation did not accumulate malonyldialdehyde during incubations with these particles, but did when ingesting particles containing linolenate. The phospholipid fatty acid composition of monocyte-enriched and purified granulocyte preparations from the same donors were compared. The molar fraction of arachidonate (20:4) in phospholipids from monocyte-rich preparations was 62% greater than that of purified granulocytes. The findings indicate that human monocytes, possibly because of a greater content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in their membranes, peroxidize a greater quantity of endogenous lipids than granulocytes during endocytosis. Normal human granulocytes have the capacity to peroxidize ingested lipids. However, mixed leukocytes from two patients with chronic granulomatous disease produced little malonyldialdehyde when engulfing linolenate-containing particles. Therefore the capacity to peroxidize lipid is related to cellular oxygen metabolism, a function in which chronic granulomatous disease granulocytes are dificient. Malonyldialdehyde chemically prepared by hydrolysis of tetramethoxypropane, by extraction from peroxidized linolenic acid, or purified from extracts of phagocytizing rabbit alveolar macrophages had bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli and S. epidermidis. Therefore, toxic catabolites of lipid hydroperoxides may potentiate the bactericidal activity of hydrogen peroxide in mononuclear phagocytes. PMID:4853010

  13. Lipid binding proteins from parasitic platyhelminthes

    PubMed Central

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Two main families of lipid binding proteins have been identified in parasitic Platyhelminthes: hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs) and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs). Members of the former family of proteins are specific to the Cestoda class, while FABPs are conserved across a wide range of animal species. Because Platyhelminthes are unable to synthesize their own lipids, these lipid-binding proteins are important molecules in these organisms. HLBPs are a high molecular mass complex of proteins and lipids. They are composed of subunits of low molecular mass proteins and a wide array of lipid molecules ranging from CoA esters to cholesterol. These proteins are excretory-secretory molecules and are key serological tools for diagnosis of diseases caused by cestodes. FABPs are mainly intracellular proteins of low molecular weight. They are also vaccine candidates. Despite that the knowledge of their function is scarce, the differences in their molecular organization, ligand preferences, intra/extracellular localization, evolution, and phylogenetic distribution, suggest that platyhelminths HLBPs and FABPs should play different functions. FABPs might be involved in the removal of fatty acids from the inner surface of the cell membrane and in their subsequent targeting to specific cellular destinations. In contrast, HLBPs might be involved in fatty acid uptake from the host environment. PMID:22988444

  14. Intravenous Lipids for Preterm Infants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Ghassan SA; Kaabneh, Mahmmoud AF; Almasaeed, Mai N; Alquran, Mohammad IA

    2015-01-01

    Extremely low birth weight infants (ELBW) are born at a time when the fetus is undergoing rapid intrauterine brain and body growth. Continuation of this growth in the first several weeks postnatally during the time these infants are on ventilator support and receiving critical care is often a challenge. These infants are usually highly stressed and at risk for catabolism. Parenteral nutrition is needed in these infants because most cannot meet the majority of their nutritional needs using the enteral route. Despite adoption of a more aggressive approach with amino acid infusions, there still appears to be a reluctance to use early intravenous lipids. This is based on several dogmas that suggest that lipid infusions may be associated with the development or exacerbation of lung disease, displace bilirubin from albumin, exacerbate sepsis, and cause CNS injury and thrombocytopena. Several recent reviews have focused on intravenous nutrition for premature neonate, but very little exists that provides a comprehensive review of intravenous lipid for very low birth and other critically ill neonates. Here, we would like to provide a brief basic overview, of lipid biochemistry and metabolism of lipids, especially as they pertain to the preterm infant, discuss the origin of some of the current clinical practices, and provide a review of the literature, that can be used as a basis for revising clinical care, and provide some clarity in this controversial area, where clinical care is often based more on tradition and dogma than science. PMID:25698888

  15. Lipid-modifying therapy in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton-Craig, Ian; Colquhoun, David; Kostner, Karam; Woodhouse, Stan; d’Emden, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and morbidity increases with increasing age, largely as a result of increased lifetime exposure as well as increased prevalence of CVD risk factors. Hospitalization for CVD increases by a factor of over 18× for those aged 85+ years versus those aged <30 years. In spite of this, life expectancy continues to increase, and in Australia for people reaching the age of 65 years, it is now 84 years in men and 87 years in women. The number of people for whom lipid management is potentially indicated therefore increases with aging. This is especially the case for secondary prevention and for people aged 65–75 years for whom there is also evidence of benefit from primary prevention. Many people in this age group are not treated with lipid-lowering drugs, however. Even those with CVD may be suboptimally treated, with one study showing treatment rates to fall from ~60% in those aged <50 years to <15% for those aged 85+ years. Treatment of the most elderly patient groups remains controversial partly from the lack of randomized trial intervention data and partly from the potential for adverse effects of lipid therapy. There are many complex issues involved in the decision to introduce effective lipid-lowering therapy and, unfortunately, in many instances there is not adequate data to make evidence-based decisions regarding management. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the management of lipid disorders in the elderly and proposes guidelines for management. PMID:25999729

  16. Orphan enzymes in ether lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Watschinger, Katrin; Werner, Ernst R

    2013-01-01

    Ether lipids are an emerging class of lipids which have so far not been investigated and understood in every detail. They have important roles as membrane components of e.g. lens, brain and testis, and as mediators such as platelet-activating factor. The metabolic enzymes for biosynthesis and degradation have been investigated to some extent. As most involved enzymes are integral membrane proteins they are tricky to handle in biochemical protocols. The sequence of some ether lipid metabolising enzymes has only recently been reported and other sequences still remain obscure. Defined enzymes without assigned sequence are known as orphan enzymes. One of these enzymes with uncharacterised sequence is plasmanylethanolamine desaturase, a key enzyme for the biosynthesis of one of the most abundant phospholipids in our body, the plasmalogens. This review aims to briefly summarise known functions of ether lipids, give an overview on their metabolism including the most prominent members, platelet-activating factor and the plasmalogens. A special focus is set on the description of orphan enzymes in ether lipid metabolism and on the successful strategies how four previous orphans have recently been assigned a sequence. Only one of these four was characterised by classical protein purification and sequencing, whereas the other three required alternative strategies such as bioinformatic candidate gene selection and recombinant expression or development of an inhibitor and multidimensional metabolic profiling. PMID:22771767

  17. Electrostatic swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid phases.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Arwen I I; Barriga, Hanna M G; Parsons, Edward S; McCarthy, Nicola L C; Ces, Oscar; Law, Robert V; Seddon, John M; Brooks, Nicholas J

    2015-04-28

    Lipid bicontinuous cubic phases have attracted enormous interest as bio-compatible scaffolds for use in a wide range of applications including membrane protein crystallisation, drug delivery and biosensing. One of the major bottlenecks that has hindered exploitation of these structures is an inability to create targeted highly swollen bicontinuous cubic structures with large and tunable pore sizes. In contrast, cubic structures found in vivo have periodicities approaching the micron scale. We have been able to engineer and control highly swollen bicontinuous cubic phases of spacegroup Im3m containing only lipids by (a) increasing the bilayer stiffness by adding cholesterol and (b) inducing electrostatic repulsion across the water channels by addition of anionic lipids to monoolein. By controlling the composition of the ternary mixtures we have been able to achieve lattice parameters up to 470 Å, which is 5 times that observed in pure monoolein and nearly twice the size of any lipidic cubic phase reported previously. These lattice parameters significantly exceed the predicted maximum swelling for bicontinuous cubic lipid structures, which suggest that thermal fluctuations should destroy such phases for lattice parameters larger than 300 Å. PMID:25790335

  18. Effects of dietary lipid levels on lipid deposition and activities of lipid metabolic enzymes in hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus × O. aureus).

    PubMed

    Han, C-Y; Wen, X-B; Zheng, Q-M; Li, H-B

    2011-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of dietary lipid levels on growth performance, lipid deposition and activities of lipid metabolic enzymes in hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus × O. aureus). Four isonitrogenous (300 g/kg crude protein) experimental diets containing graded levels of lipid (25, 55, 85 and 115 g/kg) were randomly assigned to triplicate groups of 180 juvenile fish. Fish were fed twice daily for 8 weeks. At the end of the experiment, the growth performance and proximate composition of fish were determined. The activities and gene expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) were assessed as well. Fish fed the diets with 55 and 85 g/kg lipid had a significantly (p < 0.05) higher body weight gain than those fed the diets with 25 and 115 g/kg lipid. The whole-body and liver lipid contents were significantly (p < 0.05) elevated with increasing dietary lipid levels. Moreover, the activities and mRNA abundances of LPL and HSL in the liver, dorsal muscle and fat tissues were markedly altered by dietary lipid levels. Our data demonstrate a profound influence of dietary lipid levels on the growth and lipid deposition in hybrid tilapia, which is likely associated with the regulation of lipid metabolic enzymes including LPL and HSL. PMID:21114544

  19. A Caenorhabditis elegans model for ether lipid biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xun; Tarazona, Pablo; Brock, Trisha J; Browse, John; Feussner, Ivo; Watts, Jennifer L

    2016-02-01

    Ether lipids are widespread in nature, and they are structurally and functionally important components of membranes. The roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans, synthesizes numerous lipid species containing alkyl and alkenyl ether bonds. We isolated C. elegans strains carrying loss-of-function mutations in three genes encoding the proteins required for the initial three steps in the ether lipid biosynthetic pathway, FARD-1/FAR1, ACL-7/GNPAT, and ADS-1/AGPS. Analysis of the mutant strains show that they lack ether lipids, but possess the ability to alter their lipid composition in response to lack of ether lipids. We found that increases in de novo fatty acid synthesis and reduction of stearoyl- and palmitoyl-CoA desaturase activity, processes that are at least partially regulated transcriptionally, mediate the altered lipid composition in ether lipid-deficient mutants. Phenotypic analysis demonstrated the importance of ether lipids for optimal fertility, lifespan, survival at cold temperatures, and resistance to oxidative stress.Caenorhabditis. PMID:26685325

  20. Dividing Cells Regulate Their Lipid Composition and Localization

    PubMed Central

    Atilla-Gokcumen, G. Ekin; Muro, Eleonora; Relat-Goberna, Josep; Sasse, Sofia; Bedigian, Anne; Coughlin, Margaret L.; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Eggert, Ulrike S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although massive membrane rearrangements occur during cell division, little is known about specific roles that lipids might play in this process. We report that the lipidome changes with the cell cycle. LC-MS-based lipid profiling shows that 11 lipids with specific chemical structures accumulate in dividing cells. Using AFM, we demonstrate differences in the mechanical properties of live dividing cells and their isolated lipids relative to nondividing cells. In parallel, systematic RNAi knockdown of lipid biosynthetic enzymes identified enzymes required for division, which highly correlated with lipids accumulated in dividing cells. We show that cells specifically regulate the localization of lipids to midbodies, membrane-based structures where cleavage occurs. We conclude that cells actively regulate and modulate their lipid composition and localization during division, with both signaling and structural roles likely. This work has broader implications for the active and sustained participation of lipids in basic biology. PMID:24462247

  1. Characteristics of lipids and their feeding value in swine diets.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Brian J; Kellner, Trey A; Shurson, Gerald C

    2015-01-01

    In livestock diets, energy is one of the most expensive nutritional components of feed formulation. Because lipids are a concentrated energy source, inclusion of lipids are known to affect growth rate and feed efficiency, but are also known to affect diet palatability, feed dustiness, and pellet quality. In reviewing the literature, the majority of research studies conducted on the subject of lipids have focused mainly on the effects of feeding presumably high quality lipids on growth performance, digestion, and metabolism in young animals. There is, however, the wide array of composition and quality differences among lipid sources available to the animal industry making it essential to understand differences in lipid composition and quality factors affecting their digestion and metabolism more fully. In addition there is often confusion in lipid nomenclature, measuring lipid content and composition, and evaluating quality factors necessary to understand the true feeding value to animals. Lastly, advances in understanding lipid digestion, post-absorption metabolism, and physiological processes (e.g., cell division and differentiation, immune function and inflammation); and in metabolic oxidative stress in the animal and lipid peroxidation, necessitates a more compressive assessment of factors affecting the value of lipid supplementation to livestock diets. The following review provides insight into lipid classification, digestion and absorption, lipid peroxidation indices, lipid quality and nutritional value, and antioxidants in growing pigs. PMID:26207182

  2. Surface features of the lipid droplet mediate perilipin 2 localization

    PubMed Central

    Sletten, Arthur; Seline, Alison; Rudd, Andrew; Logsdon, Michelle; Listenberger, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    All eukaryotic organisms store excess lipid in intracellular lipid droplets. These dynamic structures are associated with and regulated by numerous proteins. Perilipin 2, an abundant protein on most lipid droplets, promotes neutral lipid accumulation in lipid droplets. However, the mechanism by which perilipin 2 binds to and remains anchored on the lipid droplet surface is unknown. Here we identify features of the lipid droplet surface that influence perilipin 2 localization. We show that perilipin 2 binding to the lipid droplet surface requires both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Reagents that disrupt these interactions also decrease binding. Moreover, perilipin 2 binding does not depend on other lipid droplet-associated proteins but is influenced by the lipid composition of the surface. Perilipin 2 binds to synthetic vesicles composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, a phospholipid with unsaturated acyl chains. Decreasing the temperature of the binding reaction, or introducing phospholipids with saturated acyl chains, decreases binding. We therefore demonstrate a role for surface lipids and acyl chain packing in perilipin 2 binding to lipid droplets. The ability of the lipid droplet phospholipid composition to impact protein binding may link changes in nutrient availability to lipid droplet homeostasis. PMID:25172666

  3. Leukocyte lipid bodies - Biogenesis and functions in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bozza, Patricia T; Magalhães, Kelly G; Weller, Peter F

    2009-06-01

    Lipid body accumulation within leukocytes is a common feature in both clinical and experimental infectious, neoplasic and other inflammatory conditions. Here, we will review the contemporary evidence related to the biogenesis and structure of leukocyte lipid bodies (also known as lipid droplets) as inflammatory organelles. Studies of leukocyte lipid bodies are providing functional, ultrastructural and protein compositional evidences that lipid bodies are not solely storage depots of neutral lipid. Over the past years substantial progresses have been made to demonstrate that lipid body biogenesis is a highly regulated process, that culminate in the compartmentalization of a specific set of proteins and lipids, that place leukocyte lipid bodies as inducible cytoplasmic organelles with roles in cell signaling and activation, regulation of lipid metabolism, membrane trafficking and control of the synthesis and secretion of inflammatory mediators. Pertinent to the roles of lipid bodies in inflammation and cell signaling, enzymes involved in eicosanoid synthesis are localized at lipid bodies and lipid bodies are sites for eicosanoid generation. Collectively, lipid bodies in leukocytes are emerging as critical regulators of different inflammatory diseases, key markers of leukocyte activation and attractive targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:19416659

  4. Lipid exchange and transfer on nanoparticle supported lipid bilayers: effect of defects, ionic strength, and size.

    PubMed

    Drazenovic, Jelena; Ahmed, Selver; Tuzinkiewicz, Nicole-Marie; Wunder, Stephanie L

    2015-01-20

    Lipid exchange/transfer has been compared for zwitterionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-d54-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) and for the same lipids on silica (SiO2) nanoparticle supported lipid bilayers (NP-SLBs) as a function of ionic strength, temperature, temperature cycling, and NP size, above the main gel-to-liquid crystal phase transition temperature, Tm, using d- and h-DMPC and DPPC. Increasing ionic strength decreases the exchange kinetics for the SUVs, but more so for the NP-SLBs, due to better packing of the lipids and increased attraction between the lipid and support. When the NP-SLBs (or SUVs) are cycled above and below Tm, the exchange rate increases compared with exchange at the same temperature without cycling, for similar total times, suggesting that defects provide sites for more facile removal and thus exchange of lipids. Defects can occur: (i) at the phase boundaries between coexisting gel and fluid phases at Tm; (ii) in bare regions of exposed SiO2 that form during NP-SLB formation due to mismatched surface areas of lipid and NPs; and (iii) during cycling as the result of changes in area of the lipids at Tm and mismatched thermal expansion coefficient between the lipids and SiO2 support. Exchange rates are faster for NP-SLBs prepared with the nominal amount of lipid required to form a NP-SLB compared with NP-SLBs that have been prepared with excess lipids to minimize SiO2 patches. Nanosystems prepared with equimolar mixtures of NP-SLBs composed of d-DMPC (d(DMPC)-NP-SLB) and SUVs composed of h-DMPC (h(DMPC)-SUV) show that the calorimetric transition of the "donor" h(DMPC)-SUV decreases in intensity without an initial shift in Tm, indicating that the "acceptor" d(DMPC)-NP-SLB can accommodate more lipids, through either further fusion or insertion of lipids into the distal monolayer. Exchange for d/h(DMPC)-NP-SLB is in the order 100 nm SiO2 > 45 nm SiO2 > 5 nm SiO2. PMID:25425021

  5. Lipids of a Sterol-Nonrequiring Mycoplasma

    PubMed Central

    Plackett, P.; Smith, P. F.; Mayberry, W. R.

    1970-01-01

    The lipids of the sterol nonrequiring Mycoplasma strain S743 were found to include both ester glycerophosphatides (phosphatidylglycerol, acylphosphatidylglycerol, and diphosphatidylglycerol) and ceramide glycerophosphate compounds containing N-hydroxyacyl groups. The major phosphosphingolipid was tentatively identified as a hydroxyceramidephosphorylglycerol containing an O-acyl group. These compounds became labeled during growth in the presence of 32P-orthophosphate, 14C-glycerol, or 14C-palmitate. The lipid fraction also contained free long-chain base. 14C-palmitate was converted to labeled sphinganine. The long-chain base composition of the lipids was modified by growing the organisms in media containing different fatty acids, which were converted to bases containing two more C atoms per molecule. Ninety per cent of the long-chain base from cells grown in medium supplemented with elaidate consisted of monounsaturated C20 base. Images PMID:5489436

  6. ER Stress and Lipid Metabolism in Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Beth S.; Zhou, Huiping

    2012-01-01

    The role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a rapidly emerging field of interest in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. Recent studies have shown that chronic activation of ER stress is closely linked to dysregulation of lipid metabolism in several metabolically important cells including hepatocytes, macrophages, ?-cells, and adipocytes. Adipocytes are one of the major cell types involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Recent advances in dissecting the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of adipogenesis and lipid metabolism indicate that activation of ER stress plays a central role in regulating adipocyte function. In this paper, we discuss the current understanding of the potential role of ER stress in lipid metabolism in adipocytes. In addition, we touch upon the interaction of ER stress and autophagy as well as inflammation. Inhibition of ER stress has the potential of decreasing the pathology in adipose tissue that is seen with energy overbalance. PMID:22400114

  7. Autophagy, lipophagy and lysosomal lipid storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Ward, Carl; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Otten, Elsje G; Carroll, Bernadette; Maetzel, Dorothea; Singh, Rajat; Sarkar, Sovan; Korolchuk, Viktor I

    2016-04-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process with an essential function in the maintenance of cellular and tissue homeostasis. It is primarily recognised for its role in the degradation of dysfunctional proteins and unwanted organelles, however in recent years the range of autophagy substrates has also been extended to lipids. Degradation of lipids via autophagy is termed lipophagy. The ability of autophagy to contribute to the maintenance of lipo-homeostasis becomes particularly relevant in the context of genetic lysosomal storage disorders where perturbations of autophagic flux have been suggested to contribute to the disease aetiology. Here we review recent discoveries of the molecular mechanisms mediating lipid turnover by the autophagy pathways. We further focus on the relevance of autophagy, and specifically lipophagy, to the disease mechanisms. Moreover, autophagy is also discussed as a potential therapeutic target in several key lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:26778751

  8. Plasma lipids and lipoproteins in liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, N

    1978-01-01

    There are many changes in the plasma, lipids, and lipoproteins in patients with liver disease. They have proved difficult to study but our understanding of these changes has increased greatly during recent years. In obstructive jaundice hyperlipidaemia is a fairly constant finding and this appears to be due to the regurgitation of phospholipid from the obstructed biliary tree. The plasma lipids tend to fall with parenchymal liver disease. The composition of the lipoproteins depends on the activity of the plasma enzyme lecithin: cholesterol acyl transferase. When LCAT activity is high the individual lipoprotein fractions are normal. When it is reduced all of the lipoprotein fractions are affected but the pattern found with obstruction is quite different from that found with parenchymal disease. The changes in plasma lipoproteins appear to be associated with change in the lipid composition of cellular membranes and this may have important functional implications. PMID:355066

  9. Biosynthesis and function of plant lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, W.W.; Mudd, J.B.; Gibbs, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Sixth Annual Symposium in Botany and Plant Physiology was held January 13-15, 1983, at the University of California, Riverside. This volume comprises the papers that were presented. Subjects discussed at the symposium covered a wide range in the field of plant lipids. Biosynthesis of lipids occupied an important fraction of the presentations at the symposium. Subjects included detailed studies of the enzymes of fatty acid synthesis, several discussions of the incorporation of fatty acids into glycerolipids and the further modification of the fatty acids, and the synthesis of glycerolipids and desaturation of fatty acids in both maturing oilseeds and chloroplasts. The physicochemical studies of glycerolipids and sterols in artificial membranes have led to distinct conclusions about their behaviour which must be relevant in the biological membrane. Results on the functional consequences of modifying the galactolipid composition in the chloroplast were an encouraging sign of progress in the attempts to relate membrane lipid composition to physiological function.

  10. Regulation of Golgi function via phosphoinositide lipids

    PubMed Central

    Mayinger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Phosphoinositides play important roles in Golgi traffic and structural integrity. Specific lipid kinases and phosphatases associate with the Golgi complex and regulate the multiplicity of trafficking routes from this organelle. Work in different model systems showed that the basic elements that regulate lipid signaling at the Golgi are conserved form yeast to humans. Many of the enzymes involved in Golgi phosphoinositide metabolism are essential for viability or cause severe human disease when malfunctioning. Phosphoinositide effectors at the Golgi control both non-vesicular transfer of lipids and sorting of secretory and membrane proteins. In addition, Golgi phosphoinositides were recently implicated in the metabolic and cell growth-dependent regulation of the secretory pathway. PMID:19508852

  11. Lipid Acyl Chain Remodeling in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Renne, Mike F.; Bao, Xue; De Smet, Cedric H.; de Kroon, Anton I. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane lipid homeostasis is maintained by de novo synthesis, intracellular transport, remodeling, and degradation of lipid molecules. Glycerophospholipids, the most abundant structural component of eukaryotic membranes, are subject to acyl chain remodeling, which is defined as the post-synthetic process in which one or both acyl chains are exchanged. Here, we review studies addressing acyl chain remodeling of membrane glycerophospholipids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model organism that has been successfully used to investigate lipid synthesis and its regulation. Experimental evidence for the occurrence of phospholipid acyl chain exchange in cardiolipin, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine is summarized, including methods and tools that have been used for detecting remodeling. Progress in the identification of the enzymes involved is reported, and putative functions of acyl chain remodeling in yeast are discussed. PMID:26819558

  12. Lipid droplets and associated proteins in sebocytes.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Marlon R

    2016-01-15

    Mammalian skin is characterized by the presence of sebaceous glands (SGs), which develop with the hair follicle and whose predominant cell type is the sebocyte. Sebocytes are epithelial cells that progressively accumulate lipids and eventually release their content (sebum) by holocrine secretion as cells disrupt. In addition to thermoregulatory and pheromonal actions, numerous additional functions have been demonstrated or postulated for sebum, including antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. The SG has also been involved in the pathogenesis of skin diseases as acne vulgaris and some forms of alopecia. Although lipid accumulation culminating in cell disruption and content release is the hallmark of sebocyte differentiation, only a surprisingly low number of studies have so far focused on sebocyte lipid droplets and their associated proteins. PMID:26571075

  13. Unconventional membrane lipid biosynthesis in Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Meriyem; Narberhaus, Franz

    2015-09-01

    All bacteria are surrounded by at least one bilayer membrane mainly composed of phospholipids (PLs). Biosynthesis of the most abundant PLs phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and cardiolipin (CL) is well understood in model bacteria such as Escherichia coli. It recently emerged, however, that the diversity of bacterial membrane lipids is huge and that not yet explored biosynthesis pathways exist, even for the common PLs. A good example is the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. It contains PE, PG and CL as major lipids and small amounts of the N-methylated PE derivatives monomethyl PE and phosphatidylcholine (PC = trimethylated PE). Xanthomonas campestris uses a repertoire of canonical and non-canonical enzymes for the synthesis of its membrane lipids. In this minireview, we briefly recapitulate standard pathways and integrate three recently discovered pathways into the overall picture of bacterial membrane biosynthesis. PMID:26119594

  14. Dengue virus induced autophagy regulates lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Nicholas S.; Randall, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    Summary Autophagy influences numerous cellular processes, including innate and adaptive immunity against intracellular pathogens. However, some viruses, including dengue virus (DENV), usurp autophagy to enhance their replication. The mechanism for a positive role of autophagy in DENV infection is unclear. We present data that DENV induction of autophagy regulates cellular lipid metabolism. DENV infection leads to an autophagy-dependent processing of lipid droplets and triglycerides to release free fatty acids. This results in an increase in cellular β-oxidation, which generates ATP. These processes are required for efficient DENV replication. Importantly, exogenous fatty acids can supplant the requirement of autophagy in DENV replication. These results define a role for autophagy in DENV infection and provide a mechanism by which viruses can alter cellular lipid metabolism to promote their replication. PMID:21075353

  15. Lipid-based nanoformulations for peptide delivery.

    PubMed

    Matougui, Nada; Boge, Lukas; Groo, Anne-Claire; Umerska, Anita; Ringstad, Lovisa; Bysell, Helena; Saulnier, Patrick

    2016-04-11

    Nanoformulations have attracted a lot of attention because of their size-dependent properties. Among the array of nanoformulations, lipid nanoformulations (LNFs) have evoked increasing interest because of the advantages of their high degree of biocompatibility and versatility. The performance of lipid nanoformulations is greatly influenced by their composition and structure. Therapeutic peptides represent a growing share of the pharmaceutical market. However, the main challenge for their development into commercial products is their inherent physicochemical and biological instability. Important peptides such as insulin, calcitonin and cyclosporin A have been incorporated into LNFs. The association or encapsulation of peptides within lipid-based carriers has shown to protect the labile molecules against enzymatic degradation. This review describes strategies used for the formulation of peptides and some methods used for the assessment of association efficiency. The advantages and drawbacks of such carriers are also described. PMID:26899976

  16. Lipids and lipoproteins in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J L; Chamberlain, S; Robinson, N

    1980-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an autosomal recessively inherited disease affecting the nervous system with a high incidence of heart involvement. Abnormalities of lipid metabolism are known to be associated with several progressive ataxic conditions. In this study of 46 Friedreich's ataxia patients, serum lipids, fatty acids and lipoproteins were assayed and compared with some earlier findings on Friedreich's ataxia and related disorders. Abnormalities of low and high density lipoproteins suggestive of a major defect have been reported; in the present study the level and chemical composition of high density lipoprotein has been assessed in 20 Friedreich's ataxia patients but previous abnormalities could not be substantiated. Lipid compositional analysis of Friedreich's ataxia central nervous tissue and heart, which has not been previously reported, did not markedly differ from control tissue. PMID:7359148

  17. Peptide-Lipid Interactions: Experiments and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Galdiero, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Cantisani, Marco; Vitiello, Mariateresa; Morelli, Giancarlo; Galdiero, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between peptides and lipids are of fundamental importance in the functioning of numerous membrane-mediated cellular processes including antimicrobial peptide action, hormone-receptor interactions, drug bioavailability across the blood-brain barrier and viral fusion processes. Moreover, a major goal of modern biotechnology is obtaining new potent pharmaceutical agents whose biological action is dependent on the binding of peptides to lipid-bilayers. Several issues need to be addressed such as secondary structure, orientation, oligomerization and localization inside the membrane. At the same time, the structural effects which the peptides cause on the lipid bilayer are important for the interactions and need to be elucidated. The structural characterization of membrane active peptides in membranes is a harsh experimental challenge. It is in fact accepted that no single experimental technique can give a complete structural picture of the interaction, but rather a combination of different techniques is necessary. PMID:24036440

  18. Apolipoprotein gene involved in lipid metabolism

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Edward; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2007-07-03

    Methods and materials for studying the effects of a newly identified human gene, APOAV, and the corresponding mouse gene apoAV. The sequences of the genes are given, and transgenic animals which either contain the gene or have the endogenous gene knocked out are described. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene are described and characterized. It is demonstrated that certain SNPs are associated with diseases involving lipids and triglycerides and other metabolic diseases. These SNPs may be used alone or with SNPs from other genes to study individual risk factors. Methods for intervention in lipid diseases, including the screening of drugs to treat lipid-related or diabetic diseases are also disclosed.

  19. Revisiting transbilayer distribution of lipids in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Murate, Motohide; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    Whereas asymmetric transbilayer lipid distribution in the plasma membrane is well recognized, methods to examine the precise localization of lipids are limited. In this review, we critically evaluate the methods that are applied to study transbilayer asymmetry of lipids, summarizing the factors that influence the measurement. Although none of the present methods is perfect, the current application of immunoelectron microscopy-based technique provides a new picture of lipid asymmetry. Next, we summarize the transbilayer distribution of individual lipid in both erythrocytes and nucleated cells. Finally we discuss the concept of the interbilayer communication of lipids. PMID:26319805

  20. New insights on glucosylated lipids: metabolism and functions.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yohei; Kohyama-Koganeya, Ayako; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2013-09-01

    Ceramide, cholesterol, and phosphatidic acid are major basic structures for cell membrane lipids. These lipids are modified with glucose to generate glucosylceramide (GlcCer), cholesterylglucoside (ChlGlc), and phosphatidylglucoside (PtdGlc), respectively. Glucosylation dramatically changes the functional properties of lipids. For instance, ceramide acts as a strong tumor suppressor that causes apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, while GlcCer has an opposite effect, downregulating ceramide activities. All glucosylated lipids are enriched in lipid rafts or microdomains and play fundamental roles in a variety of cellular processes. In this review, we discuss the biological functions and metabolism of these three glucosylated lipids. PMID:23770033

  1. N-terminus of seed caleosins is essential for lipid droplet sorting but not for lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Purkrtová, Zita; Chardot, Thierry; Froissard, Marine

    2015-08-01

    Caleosin, a calcium-binding protein associated with plant lipid droplets, stimulates lipid accumulation when heterologously expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Accumulated lipids are stored in cytoplasmic lipid droplets that are stabilised by incorporated caleosin. We designed a set of mutants affecting putative crucial sites for caleosin function and association with lipid droplets, i.e. the N-terminus, the EF-hand motif and the proline-knot motif. We investigated the effect of introduced mutations on caleosin capacity to initiate lipid accumulation and on caleosin sorting within cell as well as on its association with lipid droplets. Our results strongly suggest that the N-terminal domain is essential for proper protein sorting and targeting to lipid droplets but not for enhancing lipid accumulation. PMID:26032334

  2. Lipid Bilayers: Clusters, Domains and Phases

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, David G.; Feigenson, Gerald W.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss the complex mixing behavior of plasma membrane lipids. To do so, we first introduce the plasma membrane and membrane mixtures often used to model its complexity. We then discuss the nature of lipid phase behavior in bilayers and the distinction between these phases and other manifestations of nonrandom mixing found in one-phase mixtures, such as clusters, micelles, and microemulsions. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of Gibbs phase diagrams to the study of increasingly complex model membrane systems, with a focus on phase coexistence, morphology and their implications for the cell plasma membrane. PMID:25658342

  3. SERUM LIPID PROFILE IN SUICIDE ATTEMPTERS

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sandeep; Trivedi, J.K.; Singh, H.; Dalal, P.K.; Asthana, O.P.; Srivastava, J.S.; Mishra, Rakesh; Ramakant; Sinha, P.K.

    1999-01-01

    Practical difficulties associated with assessment of central parameters necessitates the development of peripheral markers of suicidal risk. Recent research suggest that serum lipid profile may be a useful indicator of suicidal behaviour. Serum lipid profiles of forty suicide attempters were compared with forty age, sex and BMI matched controls. Total serum cholesterol, serum Triglyceride, LDL levels and HDL levels were found to be lower in suicide attempters but were not statistically significant. Statistically significant negative con-elation was seen between risk-rescue score and above mentioned parameters. No statitically significant difference was observed when various diagnostic break-up groups of patients were compared. PMID:21430801

  4. Argon laser treatment of lipid keratopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, R J

    1988-01-01

    Sixty-three cases of vascularised lipid keratopathy were treated with the argon laser to occlude feeder vessels which had been identified by fluorescein angiography. There was a reduction in extent in 62% and density in 49%. Visual acuity was improved in 48%. Six patients had keratoplasties shortly after treatment, none of which showed graft rejection. Minor complications included temporary haemorrhage into the cornea and iris atrophy. A more serious problem was severe corneal thinning after resorption of lipid. The patients had to be carefully followed up and maintained on a low dose of topical steroid. Images PMID:3228545

  5. Computationally efficient prediction of area per lipid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2014-11-01

    Area per lipid (APL) is an important property of biological and artificial membranes. Newly constructed bilayers are characterized by their APL and newly elaborated force fields must reproduce APL. Computer simulations of APL are very expensive due to slow conformational dynamics. The simulated dynamics increases exponentially with respect to temperature. APL dependence on temperature is linear over an entire temperature range. I provide numerical evidence that thermal expansion coefficient of a lipid bilayer can be computed at elevated temperatures and extrapolated to the temperature of interest. Thus, sampling times to predict accurate APL are reduced by a factor of ?10.

  6. [Lipids in the diet and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Fauré Nogueras, E

    1990-01-01

    Description of the main metabolic methods of different lipoproteins in relation to transportation of both exogenous lipids and endogenous lipids, with special reference to the regulation of synthesis and the destination of colesterol. An analysis was then made of the influence of dietetic colesterol on the different lipoproteins, and that of fatty acids. An evaluation was made of its possible influence on the pathogeny of the atheroma plate. Finally, an alternative unified diet was proposed as a main dietetic guide, both in prevention and therapy. PMID:2132763

  7. Self-assembly between biomacromolecules and lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hongjun

    Anionic DNA and cationic lipsomes can self-assemble into a multi-lamellar structure where two-dimensional (2-D) lipid sheets confine a periodic one-dimensional (1-D) lattice of parallel DNA chains, between which Cd2+ ions can condense, and be subsequently reacted with H 2S to template CdS nanorods with crystallographic control analogous to biomineralization. The strong electrostatic interactions align the templated CdS (002) polar planes parallel to the negatively charged sugar-phosphate DNA backbone, which indicates that molecular details of the DNA molecule are imprinted onto the inorganic crystal structure. The resultant nanorods have (002) planes tilted by ˜60° with respect to the rod axis, in contrast to all known II-VI semiconductor nanorods. Rational design of the biopolymer-membrane templates is possible, as demonstrated by the self-assembly between anionic M13 virus and cationic membrane. The filamentous virus has diameter ˜3x larger but similar surface charge density as DNA, the self-assembled complexes maintain the multi-lamellar structure, but pore sizes are ˜10x larger in area, which can be used to package and organize large functional molecules. Not only the counter-charged objects can self-assemble, the like-charged biopolymer and membrane can also self-assemble with the help of multivalent ions. We have investigated anionic lipid-DNA complexes induced by a range of divalent ions to show how different ion-mediated interactions are expressed in the self-assembled structures, which include two distinct lamellar phases and an inverted hexagonal phase. DNA can be selectively organized into or expelled out of the lamellar phases depending on membrane charge density and counterion concentration. For a subset of ion (Zn2+ etc.) at high enough concentration, 2-D inverted hexagonal phase can be formed where DNA strands are coated with anionic lipid tubes via interaction with Zn2+ ions. We suggest that the effect of ion binding on lipid's spontaneous curvature is sufficient to explain the lamellar to inverted hexagonal transition. Finally, we studied the interaction of anionic DNA with zwitterionic lipids at the presence of multivalent ions. Polymorphism of phases was found depending on lipid's intrinsic curvature. The anionic lipid-DNA and zwitterionic lipid-DNA complexes are currently emerged as new types of gene delivery systems with low cytotoxicity.

  8. Influence of cationic lipid concentration on properties of lipid–polymer hybrid nanospheres for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Rajendran JC; Arai, Yoshie; Ahn, Jong Chan; Park, Hansoo; Lee, Soo-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been widely used for nonviral gene delivery. Recently, cationic hybrid nanoparticles consisting of two different materials were suggested as a promising delivery vehicle. In this study, nanospheres with a poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core and cationic lipid shell were prepared, and the effect of cationic lipid concentrations on the properties of lipid polymer hybrid nanocarriers investigated. Lipid–polymer hybrid nanospheres (LPHNSs) were fabricated by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method using different concentrations of cationic lipids and characterized for size, surface charge, stability, plasmid DNA-binding capacity, cytotoxicity, and transfection efficiency. All LPHNSs had narrow size distribution with positive surface charges (?-potential 52–60 mV), and showed excellent plasmid DNA-binding capacity. In vitro cytotoxicity measurements with HEK293T, HeLa, HaCaT, and HepG2 cells also showed that LPHNSs exhibited less cytotoxicity than conventional transfection agents, such as Lipofectamine and polyethyleneimine–PLGA. As cationic lipid concentrations increased, the particle size of LPHNSs decreased while their ?-potential increased. In addition, the in vitro transfection efficiency of LPHNSs increased as lipid concentration increased. PMID:26379434

  9. Preventive obesity agent montmorillonite adsorbs dietary lipids and enhances lipid excretion from the digestive tract

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pengfei; Dai, Shu; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jin; Wang, Fang; Zhai, Yonggong

    2016-01-01

    Western diets are typically high in fat and are associated with long-term complications such as obesity and hepatic steatosis. Because of the enjoyable taste of high-fat diets (HFDs), we are interested in determining how to decrease lipid absorption and enhance lipid excretion from the digestive tract after the consumption of eating fatty foods. Montmorillonite was initially characterized as a gastrointestinal mucosal barrier protective agent for the treatment of diarrhoea. Dietary lipid adsorbent- montmorillonite (DLA-M) was isolated and purified from Xinjiang montmorillonite clay via the water extraction method. Here, we show that DLA-M has an unexpected role in preventing obesity, hyperlipidaemia and hepatic steatosis in HFD-fed rats. Interestingly, combined application of polarized light microscopy and lipid staining analyses, showed that DLA-M crystals have dietary lipid-adsorbing ability in vitro and in vivo, which enhances lipid excretion via bowel movements. In summary, our results indicate that DLA-M prevent HFD-induced obesity. This novel dietary lipid-adsorbing agent can help prevent obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:26891902

  10. Role of neutral lipids in tear fluid lipid layer: coarse-grained simulation study.

    PubMed

    Telenius, Jelena; Koivuniemi, Artturi; Kulovesi, Pipsa; Holopainen, Juha M; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2012-12-11

    Tear fluid lipid layer (TFLL) residing at the air-water interface of tears has been recognized to play an important role in the development of dry eye syndrome. Yet, the composition, structure, and mechanical properties of TFLL are only partly known. Here, we report results of coarse-grained simulations of a lipid layer comprising phospholipids, free fatty acids, cholesteryl esters, and triglycerides at the air-water interface to shed light on the properties of TFLL. We consider structural as well as dynamical properties of the lipid layer as a function of surface pressure. Simulations revealed that neutral lipids reside heterogeneously between phospholipids at relatively low pressures but form a separate hydrophobic phase with increasing surface pressure, transforming the initial lipid monolayer to a two-layered structure. When the model of TFLL was compared to a one-component phospholipid monolayer system, we found drastic differences in both structural and dynamical properties that explain the prominent role of neutral lipids as stabilizers of the TFLL. Based on our results, we suggest that neutral lipids are able to increase the stability of the TFLL by modulating its dynamical and structural behavior, which is important for the proper function of tear film. PMID:23151187

  11. A comparative study: the impact of different lipid extraction methods on current microalgal lipid research.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Ghasemi Naghdi, Forough; Garg, Sourabh; Adarme-Vega, Tania Catalina; Thurecht, Kristofer J; Ghafor, Wael Abdul; Tannock, Simon; Schenk, Peer M

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae cells have the potential to rapidly accumulate lipids, such as triacylglycerides that contain fatty acids important for high value fatty acids (e.g., EPA and DHA) and/or biodiesel production. However, lipid extraction methods for microalgae cells are not well established, and there is currently no standard extraction method for the determination of the fatty acid content of microalgae. This has caused a few problems in microlagal biofuel research due to the bias derived from different extraction methods. Therefore, this study used several extraction methods for fatty acid analysis on marine microalga Tetraselmis sp. M8, aiming to assess the potential impact of different extractions on current microalgal lipid research. These methods included classical Bligh & Dyer lipid extraction, two other chemical extractions using different solvents and sonication, direct saponification and supercritical CO? extraction. Soxhlet-based extraction was used to weigh out the importance of solvent polarity in the algal oil extraction. Coupled with GC/MS, a Thermogravimetric Analyser was used to improve the quantification of microalgal lipid extractions. Among these extractions, significant differences were observed in both, extract yield and fatty acid composition. The supercritical extraction technique stood out most for effective extraction of microalgal lipids, especially for long chain unsaturated fatty acids. The results highlight the necessity for comparative analyses of microalgae fatty acids and careful choice and validation of analytical methodology in microalgal lipid research. PMID:24456581

  12. Clustering of ?-Synuclein on Supported Lipid Bilayers: Role of Anionic Lipid, Protein, and Divalent Ion Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anjan P.; Haque, Farzin; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Hovis, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract ?-Synuclein is the major component of Lewy body inclusions found in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease. Several studies indicate that ?-synuclein binds to negatively charged phospholipid bilayers. We examined the binding of ?-synuclein to membranes containing different amounts of negatively charged lipids using supported lipid bilayers, epifluorescence microscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and bulk fluorescence techniques. The membranes contained phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. In the absence of protein, these lipids mix uniformly. Our results show that the propensity of ?-synuclein to cluster on the membrane increases as the concentration of anionic lipid and/or protein increases. Regions on the lipid bilayer where ?-synuclein is clustered are enriched in phosphatidylglycerol. We also observe divalent metal ions stimulate protein cluster formation, primarily by promoting lipid demixing. The importance of protein structure, lipid demixing, and divalent ions, as well as the physiological implications, will be discussed. Because membrane-bound ?-synuclein assemblies may play a role in neurotoxicity, it is of interest to determine how membranes can be used to tune the propensity of ?-synuclein to aggregate. PMID:19167303

  13. Influence of cationic lipid concentration on properties of lipid-polymer hybrid nanospheres for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Bose, Rajendran J C; Arai, Yoshie; Ahn, Jong Chan; Park, Hansoo; Lee, Soo-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been widely used for nonviral gene delivery. Recently, cationic hybrid nanoparticles consisting of two different materials were suggested as a promising delivery vehicle. In this study, nanospheres with a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core and cationic lipid shell were prepared, and the effect of cationic lipid concentrations on the properties of lipid polymer hybrid nanocarriers investigated. Lipid-polymer hybrid nanospheres (LPHNSs) were fabricated by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method using different concentrations of cationic lipids and characterized for size, surface charge, stability, plasmid DNA-binding capacity, cytotoxicity, and transfection efficiency. All LPHNSs had narrow size distribution with positive surface charges (?-potential 52-60 mV), and showed excellent plasmid DNA-binding capacity. In vitro cytotoxicity measurements with HEK293T, HeLa, HaCaT, and HepG2 cells also showed that LPHNSs exhibited less cytotoxicity than conventional transfection agents, such as Lipofectamine and polyethyleneimine-PLGA. As cationic lipid concentrations increased, the particle size of LPHNSs decreased while their ?-potential increased. In addition, the in vitro transfection efficiency of LPHNSs increased as lipid concentration increased. PMID:26379434

  14. Lipid Rafts and Alzheimer’s Disease: Protein-Lipid Interactions and Perturbation of Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, David A.; Nalivaeva, Natalia N.; Turner, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane domains, more ordered than the bulk membrane and enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. They represent a platform for protein-lipid and protein–protein interactions and for cellular signaling events. In addition to their normal functions, including membrane trafficking, ligand binding (including viruses), axonal development and maintenance of synaptic integrity, rafts have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Lipid rafts promote interaction of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) with the secretase (BACE-1) responsible for generation of the amyloid β peptide, Aβ. Rafts also regulate cholinergic signaling as well as acetylcholinesterase and Aβ interaction. In addition, such major lipid raft components as cholesterol and GM1 ganglioside have been directly implicated in pathogenesis of the disease. Perturbation of lipid raft integrity can also affect various signaling pathways leading to cellular death and AD. In this review, we discuss modulation of APP cleavage by lipid rafts and their components, while also looking at more recent findings on the role of lipid rafts in signaling events. PMID:22737128

  15. A comparative study: the impact of different lipid extraction methods on current microalgal lipid research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae cells have the potential to rapidly accumulate lipids, such as triacylglycerides that contain fatty acids important for high value fatty acids (e.g., EPA and DHA) and/or biodiesel production. However, lipid extraction methods for microalgae cells are not well established, and there is currently no standard extraction method for the determination of the fatty acid content of microalgae. This has caused a few problems in microlagal biofuel research due to the bias derived from different extraction methods. Therefore, this study used several extraction methods for fatty acid analysis on marine microalga Tetraselmis sp. M8, aiming to assess the potential impact of different extractions on current microalgal lipid research. These methods included classical Bligh & Dyer lipid extraction, two other chemical extractions using different solvents and sonication, direct saponification and supercritical CO2 extraction. Soxhlet-based extraction was used to weigh out the importance of solvent polarity in the algal oil extraction. Coupled with GC/MS, a Thermogravimetric Analyser was used to improve the quantification of microalgal lipid extractions. Among these extractions, significant differences were observed in both, extract yield and fatty acid composition. The supercritical extraction technique stood out most for effective extraction of microalgal lipids, especially for long chain unsaturated fatty acids. The results highlight the necessity for comparative analyses of microalgae fatty acids and careful choice and validation of analytical methodology in microalgal lipid research. PMID:24456581

  16. Lipid Anti-Lipid Antibody Responses Correlate with Disease Activity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Jovanović, Vojislav; Abdul Aziz, Nurhuda; Lim, Yan Ting; Ng Ai Poh, Amanda; Jin Hui Chan, Sherlynn; Ho Xin Pei, Eliza; Lew, Fei Chuin; Shui, Guanghou; Jenner, Andrew M.; Bowen, Li; McKinney, Eoin F.; Lyons, Paul A.; Kemeny, Michael D.; Smith, Kenneth G. C.; Wenk, Markus R.; MacAry, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by broad clinical manifestations including cardiovascular and renal complications with periodic disease flares and significant morbidity and mortality. One of the main contributing factors to the pathology of SLE is the accumulation and impaired clearance of immune complexes of which the principle components are host auto-antigens and antibodies. The contribution of host lipids to the formation of these autoimmune complexes remains poorly defined. The aim of the present study was to identify and analyze candidate lipid autoantigens and their corresponding anti–lipid antibody responses in a well-defined SLE patient cohort using a combination of immunological and biophysical techniques. Disease monitoring in the SLE cohort was undertaken with serial British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) scoring. Correlations between specific lipid/anti-lipid responses were investigated as disease activity developed from active flares to quiescent during a follow up period. We report a significant negative correlation between anti-lipid antibodies for 24S-hydroxycholesterol, cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine with SLE disease activity. Taken together, these data suggest that lipid autoantigens represent a new family of biomarkers that can be employed to monitor disease activity plus the efficacy of therapeutic intervention in SLE. PMID:23409013

  17. Preventive obesity agent montmorillonite adsorbs dietary lipids and enhances lipid excretion from the digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfei; Dai, Shu; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jin; Wang, Fang; Zhai, Yonggong

    2016-01-01

    Western diets are typically high in fat and are associated with long-term complications such as obesity and hepatic steatosis. Because of the enjoyable taste of high-fat diets (HFDs), we are interested in determining how to decrease lipid absorption and enhance lipid excretion from the digestive tract after the consumption of eating fatty foods. Montmorillonite was initially characterized as a gastrointestinal mucosal barrier protective agent for the treatment of diarrhoea. Dietary lipid adsorbent- montmorillonite (DLA-M) was isolated and purified from Xinjiang montmorillonite clay via the water extraction method. Here, we show that DLA-M has an unexpected role in preventing obesity, hyperlipidaemia and hepatic steatosis in HFD-fed rats. Interestingly, combined application of polarized light microscopy and lipid staining analyses, showed that DLA-M crystals have dietary lipid-adsorbing ability in vitro and in vivo, which enhances lipid excretion via bowel movements. In summary, our results indicate that DLA-M prevent HFD-induced obesity. This novel dietary lipid-adsorbing agent can help prevent obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:26891902

  18. Influences of the Structure of Lipids on Thermal Stability of Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Nan-Nan; Zhou, Xin; Li, Ming

    2015-08-01

    The binding free energy (BFE) of lipid to lipid bilayer is a critical factor to determine the thermal or mechanical stability of the bilayer. Although the molecular structure of lipids has significant impacts on BFE of the lipid, there lacks a systematic study on this issue. In this paper we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation to investigate this problem for several typical phospholipids. We find that both the tail length and tail unsaturation can significantly affect the BFE of lipids but in opposite way, namely, BFE decreases linearly with increasing length, but increases linearly with addition of unsaturated bonds. Inspired by the specific structure of cholesterol which is a crucial component of biomembrane, we also find that introduction of carbo-ring-like structures to the lipid tail or to the bilayer may greatly enhance the stability of the bilayer. Our simulation also shows that temperature can influence the bilayer stability and this effect can be significant when the bilayer undergoes phase transition. These results may be helpful to the design of liposome or other self-assembled lipid systems. Support by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 91027046 and 11105218.

  19. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  20. Complex roles of hybrid lipids in the composition, order, and size of lipid membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Hassan-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Baykal-Caglar, Eda; Alwarawrah, Mohammad; Huang, Juyang

    2014-02-11

    Hybrid lipids (HL) are phospholipids with one saturated chain and one unsaturated chain. HL are hypothesized to act as linactants (i.e., 2D surfactants) in cell membranes, reducing line tension and creating nanoscopic lipid domains. Here we compare three hybrid lipids of different chain unsaturation (16:0-18:1PC (POPC), 16:0-18:2PC (PLPC), and 16:0-20:4PC (PAPC)) in their abilities to alter the composition, line tension, order, and compactness of lipid domains. We found that the liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) lipid domains in PAPC/di18:0PC(DSPC)/cholesterol and PLPC/DSPC/cholesterol mixtures are micrometer-sized, and only the POPC/DSPC/cholesterol system has nanoscopic domains. The results indicate that some HLs with polyunsaturated chains are not linactants, and the monounsaturated POPC displays both properties of weak linactants and "Ld-phase" lipids such as di18:1PC (DOPC). The obtained phase boundaries from giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV) show that both POPC and PLPC partition well in the Lo phases. Our MD simulations reveal that these hybrid lipids decrease the order and compactness of Lo domains. Thus, hybrid lipids distinguish themselves from other lipid groups in this combined "partitioning and loosening" ability, which could explain why the Lo domains of GUVs, which often do not contain HL, are more compact than the raft domains in cell membranes. Our line tension measurement and Monte Carlo simulation both show that even the monounsaturated POPC is a weak linactant with only modest ability to occupy domain boundaries and reduce line tension. A more important property of HLs is that they can reduce physical property differences of Lo and Ld bulk domains, which also reduces line tension at domain boundaries. PMID:24456489

  1. A compositional based model for the tear film lipid layer.

    PubMed Central

    McCulley, J P; Shine, W

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The tear film lipid layer is formed from lipids secreted by meibomian glands of the eyelid. After initial analyses of these lipids we concluded that an understanding of the function of the various classes of lipids in a normal lipid layer could only be understood after detailed investigations of both polar and nonpolar lipids of the meibomian gland. METHODS: Meibomian gland secretions were obtained from normals. Lipids were separated by thin layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography, and analyzed by UV absorbance, gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. RESULTS: Based on our analyses we concluded that the current understanding of lipid layer composition and function were inadequate or misleading. We therefore propose that the more polar lipids function as a structure (with surfactant characteristics) upon which the functional stability of the more nonpolar lipids are dependent. We further suggest that the interrelationships between lipid classes present, length of fatty acids and alcohols, their unsaturation, and hydroxylation are important for maintaining proper thixotropic characteristics of the lipid layer as well as optimal barrier properties. CONCLUSION: The tear film lipid layer is composed of 2 phases: (1) a thin polar phase adjacent to the aqueous-mucin phase and (2) a thick nonpolar phase associated with both the polar phase and the air interface. The structural characteristics of the polar phase and the barrier functions of the nonpolar phase are a direct result of specific compositional parameters. PMID:9440164

  2. [Interaction between proteins and oxidized lipids].

    PubMed

    Pokorný, J; Janícek, G

    1975-01-01

    Oxidized lipids react with proteins to form lipoproteid complexes in which the lipids are bound to the proteins in part by physical forces, in part by covalency. The free radicals resulting from the cleavage by hydroperoxides are the major precursors of the lipoproteid complexes. The interaction is associated with protein denaturation and oligomer formation. The lipids contained in the lipoproteid complexes are only in part extracted by chloroform-methanol; in part not until after acid or alkaline hydrolysis. The nutritive value of the protein moiety is diminished by the reaction of the hydroperoxides with methionine and cysteine and by the reaction of the peroxidic radicals and aldehydes with lysine and other basic amino acids. Secondary reactions of the lipoproteid complexes lead to brown coloured, only partly soluble compounds which often impair the organoleptic value. The rancidity products of the fats are neutralized by the reaction with proteins. The action of highly unsaturated oxidized lipids on proteins results in the development of a fishy aroma. PMID:1226221

  3. Density and viscosity of lipids under pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a lack of data for the viscosity of lipids under pressure. The current report is a part of the effort to fill this gap. The viscosity, density, and elastohydrodynamic film thicknesses of vegetable oil (HOSuO) were investigated. Pressure–viscosity coefficients (PVC) of HOSuO at different tem...

  4. Molecular Transport Studies Through Unsupported Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rock, William; Parekh, Sapun; Bonn, Mischa

    2014-03-01

    Dendrimers, spherical polymeric nanoparticles made from branched monomers around a central core, show great promise as drug delivery vehicles. Dendrimer size, core contents, and surface functionality can be synthetically tuned, providing unprecedented versatility. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers have been shown to enter cells; however, questions remain about their biophysical interactions with the cell membrane, specifically about the presence and size of transient pores. We monitor dendrimer-lipid bilayer interactions using unsupported black lipid membranes (BLMs) as model cell membranes. Custom bilayer slides contain two vertically stacked aqueous chambers separated by a 25 ?m Teflon sheet with a 120 ?m aperture where the bilayer is formed. We vary the composition of model membranes (cholesterol content and lipid phase) to create biomimetic systems and study the interaction of PAMAM G6 and G3 dendrimers with these bilayers. Dendrimers, dextran cargo, and bilayers are monitored and quantified using time-lapse fluorescence imaging. Electrical capacitance measurements are simultaneously recorded to determine if the membrane is porous, and the pore size is deduced by monitoring transport of fluorescent dextrans of increasing molecular weight. These experiments shed light on the importance of cholesterol content and lipid phase on the interaction of dendrimer nanoparticles with membranes.

  5. Engineering Lipid Bilayer Membranes for Protein Studies

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Shuja; Dosoky, Noura Sayed; Williams, John Dalton

    2013-01-01

    Lipid membranes regulate the flow of nutrients and communication signaling between cells and protect the sub-cellular structures. Recent attempts to fabricate artificial systems using nanostructures that mimic the physiological properties of natural lipid bilayer membranes (LBM) fused with transmembrane proteins have helped demonstrate the importance of temperature, pH, ionic strength, adsorption behavior, conformational reorientation and surface density in cellular membranes which all affect the incorporation of proteins on solid surfaces. Much of this work is performed on artificial templates made of polymer sponges or porous materials based on alumina, mica, and porous silicon (PSi) surfaces. For example, porous silicon materials have high biocompatibility, biodegradability, and photoluminescence, which allow them to be used both as a support structure for lipid bilayers or a template to measure the electrochemical functionality of living cells grown over the surface as in vivo. The variety of these media, coupled with the complex physiological conditions present in living systems, warrant a summary and prospectus detailing which artificial systems provide the most promise for different biological conditions. This study summarizes the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data on artificial biological membranes that are closely matched with previously published biological systems using both black lipid membrane and patch clamp techniques. PMID:24185908

  6. Lipid and Fatty Acid Requirements of Tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary lipids are an important source of highly digestible energy and are the only source of essential fatty acids required for normal growth and development. They are also carriers and assist in the absorption of fat-soluble nutrients, such as sterols and fat-soluble vitamins, serve as a source of...

  7. Starch-lipid composites containing cimmamaldehyde

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The formulation of a starch-lipid composite containing cinnamaldehyde as antimicrobial agent has been studied. Cinnamaldehyde was incorporated as an emulsion using Acetem 90-50K as a carrier and Tween 60 as the emulsifier. Oil in water emulsions were prepared by direct emulsification using a high sh...

  8. Lipid Flippases for Bacterial Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Natividad

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of cellular polysaccharides and glycoconjugates often involves lipid-linked intermediates that need to be translocated across membranes. Essential pathways such as N-glycosylation in eukaryotes and biogenesis of the peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall in bacteria share a common strategy where nucleotide-sugars are used to build a membrane-bound oligosaccharide precursor that is linked to a phosphorylated isoprenoid lipid. Once made, these lipid-linked intermediates must be translocated across a membrane so that they can serve as substrates in a different cellular compartment. How translocation occurs is poorly understood, although it clearly requires a transporter or flippase. Identification of these transporters is notoriously difficult, and, in particular, the identity of the flippase of lipid II, an intermediate required for PG biogenesis, has been the subject of much debate. Here, I will review the body of work that has recently fueled this controversy, centered on proposed flippase candidates FtsW, MurJ, and AmJ. PMID:26792999

  9. Dietary lipid metabolism in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y T; Rohde, J M; Baldwin, R L

    1978-10-01

    Effects of feeding an oil seed supplement treated with formalin upon lipid patterns of blood and synthesis of milk fat were evaluated. Percentages and yields of fatty acids of milk fat with chain lengths between 6 and 16 carbons were decreased while percentages and yields of stearate and linoleate were increased when the lipid supplement was fed. Calculations in cows fed control and supplement, 60% and 80%, respectively, of fatty acids of milk were derived from lipids of blood were supported by arterial-venous differences. Comparisons of the fatty acid compositions of triacylglycerol of plasma and milk fat suggested that triacylglycerol may not be the sole source of linoleate transferred from blood to milk fat. A preliminary evaluation of supplement effects upon lipoprotein patterns of serum indicated two peaks in the low density lipoprotein class and that the increase in total cholesterol of blood caused by feeding lipid supplement is due to increases in cholesterol content of the low density and high density lipoprotein classes. PMID:568635

  10. Waxes: A Forgotten Topic in Lipid Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Eva; Heredia, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the biological importance of the lipids categorized as waxes and describes some of the organic chemistry of these compounds. Presents a short laboratory exercise on the extraction of plant waxes and their analysis by thin layer chromatography. (Author/CCM)

  11. The lipid biosynthesis hole in the rickettsiales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a complementation assay in E. coli, we have shown that the propionyl-CoA carboxylase complex (PCC) from Wolbachia pipientis wMel, order Rickettsiales, provides for lipid biosynthesis through malonyl-CoA production. Normally, the prototypical prokaryote fatty acid synthesis (FASII) initiation ...

  12. The organization of melatonin in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Dies, Hannah; Cheung, Bonnie; Tang, Jennifer; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-04-01

    Melatonin is a hormone that has been shown to have protective effects in several diseases that are associated with cholesterol dysregulation, including cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and certain types of cancers. We studied the interaction of melatonin with model membranes made of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) at melatonin concentrations ranging from 0.5mol% to 30mol%. From 2-dimensional X-ray diffraction measurements, we find that melatonin induces a re-ordering of the lipid membrane that is strongly dependent on the melatonin concentration. At low melatonin concentrations, we observe the presence of melatonin-enriched patches in the membrane, which are significantly thinner than the lipid bilayer. The melatonin molecules were found to align parallel to the lipid tails in these patches. At high melatonin concentrations of 30mol%, we observe a highly ordered melatonin structure that is uniform throughout the membrane, where the melatonin molecules align parallel to the bilayers and one melatonin molecule associates with 2 lipid molecules. Understanding the organization and interactions of melatonin in membranes, and how these are dependent on the concentration, may shed light into its anti-amyloidogenic, antioxidative and photoprotective properties and help develop a structural basis for these properties. PMID:25602914

  13. Many Roads Lead to the Lipid Droplet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this journal article, we review the recent work by Farese and colleagues (Functional genomic screen reveals genes involved in lipid-droplet formation and utilization. Guo Y, Walther TC, Rao M, Stuurman N, Goshima G, Terayama K, Wong JS, Vale RD, Walter P, Farese RV. Nature. 2008 May 29;453(7195):...

  14. Pyrolysis of lipids using various catalysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A specific pursuit of the thermochemical (combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, and liquefaction) conversion of biomass to energy research effort is the potential of converting lipids to alkanes, petroleum-like fuels and chemicals. Arguments can be made for, and against, the use of agricultural lipi...

  15. Lipid encapsulated docosahexaenoic acid methyl ester

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Encapsulation of structurally sensitive compounds within a solid lipid matrix provides a barrier to prooxidant compounds and effectively limits the extent of oxidative degradation. Encapsulated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) methyl ester was examined as a model compound for functional foods and feeds. S...

  16. Anaphylaxis caused by tomato lipid transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Asero, R; Mistrello, G; Amato, S

    2011-08-01

    This study reports an unusual case of anaphylaxis induced by tomato. Inhibition studies carried out in-vitro showed the complete cross-reactivity between the relevant tomato allergen and purified peach lipid transferprotein (LTP). Tomato LTP may sometimes cause severe allergic reactions. PMID:21980801

  17. Nutrigenetics, plasma lipids, and cardiovascular risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) results from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. The evidence supports that gene-environment interactions modulate plasma lipid concentrations and potentially CVD risk. Several genes (eg, apolipoprotein A-I and A-IV, apolipoprotein E, and he...

  18. Lipid Flippases for Bacterial Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Natividad

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of cellular polysaccharides and glycoconjugates often involves lipid-linked intermediates that need to be translocated across membranes. Essential pathways such as N-glycosylation in eukaryotes and biogenesis of the peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall in bacteria share a common strategy where nucleotide-sugars are used to build a membrane-bound oligosaccharide precursor that is linked to a phosphorylated isoprenoid lipid. Once made, these lipid-linked intermediates must be translocated across a membrane so that they can serve as substrates in a different cellular compartment. How translocation occurs is poorly understood, although it clearly requires a transporter or flippase. Identification of these transporters is notoriously difficult, and, in particular, the identity of the flippase of lipid II, an intermediate required for PG biogenesis, has been the subject of much debate. Here, I will review the body of work that has recently fueled this controversy, centered on proposed flippase candidates FtsW, MurJ, and AmJ. PMID:26792999

  19. Variation in seed lipids in Calendula germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calendula officinalis (pot marigold) has considerable promise as an industrial crop, with a long history as an ornamental and medicinal plant. It is also marketed as an ingredient in cosmetics and a colorant. It produces unusual seed lipids, which can provide an additional market for commercial Ca...

  20. A rainbow coalition of lipid transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rock, Charles O

    2010-10-01

    Lipids are essential structural constituents of bacterial cell membranes and walls, and their biosynthetic pathways are stringently regulated at both biochemical and genetic levels. The recent surge of new information about transcriptional regulation of bacterial lipid metabolism is highlighted by two studies in this issue of Molecular Microbiology by Hugo Gramajo's research group, who add two transcription factors to the diverse repertoire of lipid biosynthesis regulators. FasR is a Streptomyces coelicolor transcriptional activator of genes in fatty acid synthesis, which supplies substrates for membrane phospholipid and triglyceride storage droplets. MabR is a regulator in Mycobacterium tuberculosis that functions as a repressor of essential genes in the cell wall mycolic acid biosynthetic pathway. MabR also affects the expression of fas, which encodes the multifunctional fatty acid synthase that supports phospholipid and triglyceride synthesis. Despite belonging to the same protein family, the distinct ligand binding domains of FasR and MabR suggest different ligands may regulate their DNA binding. The characterization of FasR/MabR exemplifies the structural and functional diversity of the rainbow coalition of lipid transcriptional regulators that reflects the diverse life styles of bacteria. PMID:20941840

  1. Fluorescent measurement of microalgal neutral lipids.

    PubMed

    Elsey, Danielle; Jameson, David; Raleigh, Barry; Cooney, Michael J

    2007-03-01

    Nile Red, a dye that fluoresces at defined wavelengths depending upon the polarity of the surrounding medium, has been proposed to determine the neutral lipid content of microalgal cells. Herein we communicate modifications to this technique that facilitate its use as a high-throughput screening technology, as well as improving its accuracy and versatility. PMID:17189655

  2. Irregular bilayer structure in vesicles prepared from Halobacterium cutirubrum lipids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    Fluorescent probes were used to study the structure of the cell envelope of Halobacterium cutirubrum, and, in particular, to explore the effect of the heterogeneity of the lipids in this organism on the structure of the bilayers. The fluorescence polarization of perylene was followed in vesicles of unfractionated lipids and polar lipids as a function of temperature in 3.4 M solutions of NaCl, NaNO3, and KSCN, and it was found that vesicles of unfractionated lipids were more perturbed by chaotropic agents than polar lipids. The dependence of the relaxation times of perylene on temperature was studied in cell envelopes and in vesicles prepared from polar lipids, unfractionated lipids, and mixtures of polar and neutral lipids.

  3. LipidII: Just Another Brick in the Wall?

    PubMed Central

    Scheffers, Dirk-Jan; Tol, Menno B.

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all bacteria contain a peptidoglycan cell wall. The peptidoglycan precursor molecule is LipidII, containing the basic peptidoglycan building block attached to a lipid. Although the suitability of LipidII as an antibacterial target has long been recognized, progress on elucidating the role(s) of LipidII in bacterial cell biology has been slow. The focus of this review is on exciting new developments, both with respect to antibacterials targeting LipidII as well as the emerging role of LipidII in organizing the membrane and cell wall synthesis. It appears that on both sides of the membrane, LipidII plays crucial roles in organizing cytoskeletal proteins and peptidoglycan synthesis machineries. Finally, the recent discovery of no less than three different categories of LipidII flippases will be discussed. PMID:26679002

  4. Theoretical study of protein--lipid interactions in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Owicki, J C; Springgate, M W; McConnell, H M

    1978-01-01

    An analysis is given for the perturbation of the order and composition of lipid bilayers near an intrinsic membrane protein. Two cases are examined: the protein influences the lipid order (i.e., "fluidity"), and the protein associates with one component of a lipid mixture preferentially. The order perturbation is studied as a function of temperature and lateral pressure by using Landau--de Gennes theory and a variational procedure. It is concluded that, for a given lateral pressure, the greatest amount of boundary lipid is present at the lipid phase-transition temperature. A critical point for the phase transition occurs, near which the amount of boundary lipid increases dramatically. The composition perturbation is modeled in a binary lipid mixture by using a simple regular solution theory. The perturbation is found not to extent much beyond the directly bound layer of lipids unless the solution is near a critical mixing point. PMID:273895

  5. An Introduction to Lipid Analysis in the Cell Biology Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuh, Timothy J.

    2002-01-01

    Explains a thin-layer chromatography (TLC) experiment that allows students to study complex mixtures of lipids using small volumes. Uses a water-soluble dye to stain lipids that is fast and safe. (YDS)

  6. Near infrared Raman spectra of human brain lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, Christoph; Neudert, Lars; Simat, Thomas; Salzer, Reiner

    2005-05-01

    Human brain tissue, in particular white matter, contains high lipid content. These brain lipids can be divided into three principal classes: neutral lipids including the steroid cholesterol, phospholipids and sphingolipids. Major lipids in normal human brain tissue are phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidic acid, sphingomyelin, galactocerebrosides, gangliosides, sulfatides and cholesterol. Minor lipids are cholesterolester and triacylglycerides. During transformation from normal brain tissue to tumors, composition and concentration of lipids change in a specific way. Therefore, analysis of lipids might be used as a diagnostic parameter to distinguish normal tissue from tumors and to determine the tumor type and tumor grade. Raman spectroscopy has been suggested as an analytical tool to detect these changes even under intra-operative conditions. We recorded Raman spectra of the 12 major and minor brain lipids with 785 nm excitation in order to identify their spectral fingerprints for qualitative and quantitative analyses.

  7. Dietary lipids and risk of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, G

    1994-08-01

    In summary, it is well established that moderate calorie restriction or reduction in overall high calorie food intake prevents or forestalls the development of age-associated disease incidence such as breast cancer and renal disease in rodents. A similar approach could also readily be applied in humans for preventing the risk and rise of life-shortening diseases. Many age-associated diseases, particularly autoimmune diseases with viral etiology, appear to be exacerbated in the presence of adverse lipid intake such as an increased level of vegetable oils or trans-fatty acids from the usage of hydrogenated dietary oils. At present, nearly 35-40% of the total calories are from dietary fats and/or of lipid origin. Although usage of saturated fat, which increases cardiovascular disease, has been reduced to a large extent in the United States, consumption of both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats of omega-6 origin has either increased or simply been substituted in place of saturated fats. Further, for the past 50 years, a significant reduction in highly polyunsaturated fat consumption such as marine oil has also occurred specifically in the United States. The reduction in omega-3 lipids of marine or vegetable source occurs primarily because of short shelf life due to rancidity. However, the increased consumption of omega-6 or a vegetable source of oils and decreased omega-3 intake may increase in vivo the production of free radicals and higher proinflammatory cytokines. Our ongoing studies reveal that proinflammatory vegetable oil could increase autoimmune disease by increasing the free radical formation by decreasing the antioxidant enzyme mRNA levels, thereby further decreasing immune function, particularly the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-2 and TGF beta mRNA levels. In contrast, omega-3 lipid intake in the presence of an antioxidant supplement appears to exert protection against autoimmunity by enhancing antioxidant enzymes and TGF beta mRNA levels and by preventing the rise in oncogene expression. However, detailed studies are required to establish the protective and deleterious role of different commonly consumed lipids or dietary oils by the general population, particularly during middle and aging years. Further, we also propose that combining nonsteroidal drug therapy along with moderate calorie reduction in the presence of more protective omega-3 dietary lipids of either marine or vegetable source and decreasing the levels of mono- and polyunsaturated lipids may provide additional protection against the age-associated rise in malignancy and autoimmune disorders. PMID:8050192

  8. Lipid-based colloidal carriers for peptide and protein delivery – liposomes versus lipid nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Susana; Sarmento, Bruno; Ferreira, Domingos C; Souto, Eliana B

    2007-01-01

    This paper highlights the importance of lipid-based colloidal carriers and their pharmaceutical implications in the delivery of peptides and proteins for oral and parenteral administration. There are several examples of biomacromolecules used nowadays in the therapeutics, which are promising candidates to be delivered by means of liposomes and lipid nanoparticles, such as solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC). Several production procedures can be applied to achieve a high association efficiency between the bioactives and the carrier, depending on the physicochemical properties of both, as well as on the production procedure applied. Generally, this can lead to improved bioavailability, or in case of oral administration a more consistent temporal profile of absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. Advantages and drawbacks of such colloidal carriers are also pointed out. This article describes strategies used for formulation of peptides and proteins, methods used for assessment of association efficiency and practical considerations regarding the toxicological concerns. PMID:18203427

  9. A lipid zipper triggers bacterial invasion

    PubMed Central

    Eierhoff, Thorsten; Bastian, Björn; Thuenauer, Roland; Madl, Josef; Audfray, Aymeric; Aigal, Sahaja; Juillot, Samuel; Rydell, Gustaf E.; Müller, Stefan; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Imberty, Anne; Fleck, Christian; Römer, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids are important structural constituents of cellular membranes. They are involved in the formation of nanodomains (“lipid rafts”), which serve as important signaling platforms. Invasive bacterial pathogens exploit these signaling domains to trigger actin polymerization for the bending of the plasma membrane and the engulfment of the bacterium—a key process in bacterial uptake. However, it is unknown whether glycosphingolipids directly take part in the membrane invagination process. Here, we demonstrate that a “lipid zipper,” which is formed by the interaction between the bacterial surface lectin LecA and its cellular receptor, the glycosphingolipid Gb3, triggers plasma membrane bending during host cell invasion of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In vitro experiments with Gb3-containing giant unilamellar vesicles revealed that LecA/Gb3-mediated lipid zippering was sufficient to achieve complete membrane engulfment of the bacterium. In addition, theoretical modeling elucidated that the adhesion energy of the LecA–Gb3 interaction is adequate to drive the engulfment process. In cellulo experiments demonstrated that inhibition of the LecA/Gb3 lipid zipper by either lecA knockout, Gb3 depletion, or application of soluble sugars that interfere with LecA binding to Gb3 significantly lowered P. aeruginosa uptake by host cells. Of note, membrane engulfment of P. aeruginosa occurred independently of actin polymerization, thus corroborating that lipid zippering alone is sufficient for this crucial first step of bacterial host-cell entry. Our study sheds new light on the impact of glycosphingolipids in the cellular invasion of bacterial pathogens and provides a mechanistic explication of the initial uptake processes. PMID:25136128

  10. Role of cholesterol and lipid organization in disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxfield, Frederick R.; Tabas, Ira

    2005-12-01

    Membrane lipids are essential for biological functions ranging from membrane trafficking to signal transduction. The composition of lipid membranes influences their organization and properties, so it is not surprising that disorders in lipid metabolism and transport have a role in human disease. Significant recent progress has enhanced our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of lipid-associated disorders such as Tangier disease, Niemann-Pick disease type C and atherosclerosis. These insights have also led to improved understanding of normal physiology.

  11. Assay of Flippase Activity in Proteoliposomes Using Fluorescent Lipid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Specific membrane proteins, termed lipid flippases, play a central role in facilitating the movement of lipids across cellular membranes. In this protocol, we describe the reconstitution of ATP-driven lipid flippases in liposomes and the analysis of their in vitro flippase activity based on the use of fluorescent lipid derivatives. Working with purified and reconstituted systems provides a well-defined experimental setup and allows to directly characterize these membrane proteins at the molecular level. PMID:26695033

  12. Theory of fission for two-component lipid vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-M.; Higgs, P. G.; Mackintosh, F. C.

    1998-03-01

    The coupling between Gaussian curvature and local lipid composition for two-component lipid vesicles can destabilize the narrow neck in a budding transition. Such a coupling reduces the Gaussian rigidity of a membrane and enhances the fission transition if the minor component lipids prefer to stay at regions with large Gaussian curvature. On the other hand, it increases the Gaussian rigidity and a fusion transition is enhanced if the minor component lipids are expelled from regions with large Gaussian curvature.

  13. Theory of Fission for Two-Component Lipid Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-M.; Higgs, P. G.; Mackintosh, F. C.

    1997-08-01

    The coupling between Gaussian curvature and local lipid composition for two-component lipid vesicles can destabilize the narrow neck in a budding transition. Such a coupling reduces the Gaussian rigidity of a membrane and enhances the fission transition if the minor component lipids prefer to stay at regions with large positive Gaussian curvature. On the other hand, it increases the Gaussian rigidity and a fusion transition is enhanced if the minor component lipids are expelled from regions with large positive Gaussian curvature.

  14. LipidBlast - in-silico tandem mass spectrometry database for lipid identification

    PubMed Central

    Kind, Tobias; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Yup Lee, Do; DeFelice, Brian; Meissen, John K.; Fiehn, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Current tandem mass spectral libraries for lipid annotations in metabolomics are limited in size and diversity. We provide a freely available computer generated in-silico tandem mass spectral library of 212,516 MS/MS spectra covering 119,200 compounds from 26 lipid compound classes, including phospholipids, glycerolipids, bacterial lipoglycans and plant glycolipids. Platform independence is shown by using tandem mass spectra from 40 different mass spectrometer types including low-resolution and high-resolution instruments. PMID:23817071

  15. Quercetin Induces Hepatic Lipid Omega-Oxidation and Lowers Serum Lipid Levels in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hoek-van den Hil, Elise F.; Keijer, Jaap; Bunschoten, Annelies; Vervoort, Jacques J. M.; Stankova, Barbora; Bekkenkamp, Melissa; Herreman, Laure; Venema, Dini; Hollman, Peter C. H.; Tvrzicka, Eva; Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M.; van Schothorst, Evert M.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated circulating lipid levels are known risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In order to examine the effects of quercetin on lipid metabolism, mice received a mild-high-fat diet without (control) or with supplementation of 0.33% (w/w) quercetin for 12 weeks. Gas chromatography and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance were used to quantitatively measure serum lipid profiles. Whole genome microarray analysis of liver tissue was used to identify possible mechanisms underlying altered circulating lipid levels. Body weight, energy intake and hepatic lipid accumulation did not differ significantly between the quercetin and the control group. In serum of quercetin-fed mice, triglycerides (TG) were decreased with 14% (p<0.001) and total poly unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were increased with 13% (p<0.01). Palmitic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid were all decreased by 9–15% (p<0.05) in quercetin-fed mice. Both palmitic acid and oleic acid can be oxidized by omega (ω)-oxidation. Gene expression profiling showed that quercetin increased hepatic lipid metabolism, especially ω-oxidation. At the gene level, this was reflected by the up-regulation of cytochrome P450 (Cyp) 4a10, Cyp4a14, Cyp4a31 and Acyl-CoA thioesterase 3 (Acot3). Two relevant regulators, cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (Por, rate limiting for cytochrome P450s) and the transcription factor constitutive androstane receptor (Car; official symbol Nr1i3) were also up-regulated in the quercetin-fed mice. We conclude that quercetin intake increased hepatic lipid ω-oxidation and lowered corresponding circulating lipid levels, which may contribute to potential beneficial effects on CVD. PMID:23359794

  16. Photopolymerization of Dienoyl Lipids Creates Planar Supported Poly(lipid) Membranes with Retained Fluidity.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Kristina S; Jones, Ian W; Keogh, John P; Smith, Christopher M; Griffin, Kaitlyn R; Xu, Juhua; Comi, Troy J; Hall, H K; Saavedra, S Scott

    2016-02-16

    Polymerization of substrate-supported bilayers composed of dienoylphosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids is known to greatly enhance their chemical and mechanical stability; however, the effects of polymerization on membrane fluidity have not been investigated. Here planar supported lipid bilayers (PSLBs) composed of dienoyl PCs on glass substrates were examined to assess the degree to which UV-initiated polymerization affects lateral lipid mobility. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was used to measure the diffusion coefficients (D) and mobile fractions of rhodamine-DOPE in unpolymerized and polymerized PSLBs composed of bis-sorbyl phosphatidylcholine (bis-SorbPC), mono-sorbyl-phosphatidylcholine (mono-SorbPC), bis-dienoyl-phosphatidylcholine (bis-DenPC), and mono-dienoyl phosphatidylcholine (mono-DenPC). Polymerization was performed in both the L? and L? phase for each lipid. In all cases, polymerization reduced membrane fluidity; however, measurable lateral diffusion was retained which is attributed to a low degree of polymerization. The D values for sorbyl lipids were less than those of the denoyl lipids; this may be a consequence of the distal location of polymerizable group in the sorbyl lipids which may facilitate interleaflet bonding. The D values measured after polymerization were 0.1-0.8 of those measured before polymerization, a range that corresponds to fluidity intermediate between that of a L? phase and a L? phase. This D range is comparable to ratios of D values reported for liquid-disordered (Ld) and liquid-ordered (Lo) lipid phases and indicates that the effect of UV polymerization on lateral diffusion in a dienoyl PSLB is similar to the transition from a Ld phase to a Lo phase. The partial retention of fluidity in UV-polymerized PSLBs, their enhanced stability, and the activity of incorporated transmembrane proteins and peptides is discussed. PMID:26794208

  17. JAZF1 can regulate the expression of lipid metabolic genes and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ming, Guang-feng; Xiao, Di; Gong, Wei-jing; Liu, Hui-xia; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Hong-hao; Liu, Zhao-qian

    2014-03-14

    Highlights: • JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited the expression of SREBP1, ACC, and FAS. • JAZF1 overexpression upregulated the expression of HSL and ATGL. • SREBP1 and JAZF1 could regulate each other in adipocytes. - Abstract: JAZF1 is a newly identified gene with unknown functions. A recent genome-wide association study showed that JAZF1 is associated with type 2 diabetes and is highly expressed in liver and adipose tissue. Studies have demonstrated that JAZF1 is the co-repressor for nuclear orphan receptor TAK1, whereas most nuclear orphan receptor family members are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Therefore, JAZF1 could be closely related to glycolipid metabolism. In this study, JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the induced differentiation process of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The overexpression of JAZF1 inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes and significantly inhibited the expression of SREBPl, ACC, and FAS, which were important in lipid synthesis, while upregulating the expression of key enzyme hormone-sensitive lipase in lipoclasis. Moreover, SREBPl exhibited an inhibitory function on the expression of JAZF1. SREBP1 reversed the inhibitory action on lipid accumulation of JAZF1. SREBP1 and JAZF1 were observed to regulate each other in adipocytes. Therefore, JAZF1 could regulate the expression of particular genes related to lipid metabolism and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes. This result suggests that JAZF1 may be a potential target for the treatment of diseases, such as obesity and lipid metabolism disorders.

  18. Permeability and electrical properties of planar lipid membranes from thylakoid lipids.

    PubMed Central

    Fuks, B; Homblé, F

    1994-01-01

    Electrical measurements were carried out on planar lipid membranes from thylakoid lipids. The specific capacitance of membranes formed from decane-containing monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), which accounts for 57% of the total lipid content of thylakoids, showed that it adopted a bilayer structure. Solvent-free bilayers of MGDG were not formed, with very rare exceptions, indicating that decane is required to stabilize the planar conformation. However, this cone-shaped lipid produces bilayer structures in combination with other cylindrical thylakoid lipids even in the absence of organic solvent. We compared the properties of solvent-free and decane-containing bilayers from MGDG, soybean lecithin, and the quaternary mixture of lipids similar to that found in vivo. The conductance of decane-MGDG was 26 times higher than that of decane-lecithin. The flux through the decane-lecithin bilayer was found to be slightly dependent on pH, whereas the decane-MGDG membrane was not. The specific conductance of bilayers formed from the quaternary mixture of lipids was 5 to 10 times larger than lecithin (with alkane or not). Further experiments with bilayers made in the presence of a KCl gradient showed that decane-MGDG, decane-MGDG/DGDG/SQDG/PG, and solvent-free MGDG/DGDG/SQDG/PG were cation-selective. The permeability coefficient for potassium ranged from 4.9 to 8.3 x 10(-11) cm s-1. The permeability coefficient for protons in galactolipids, however, was determined to be about six orders of magnitude higher than the value for potassium ions. The HCl permeation mechanism through the lipid membranes was determined from diffusion potentials measured in HCl gradients. Our results suggest that HCl was not transported as neutral molecules. The data is discussed with regard to the function of galactolipids in the ion transport through thylakoid membranes. PMID:8061192

  19. Lipid interaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A. Acid-triggered permeabilization and aggregation of lipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Menestrina, G; Pederzolli, C; Forti, S; Gambale, F

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of Pseudomonas exotoxin A with small unilamellar vesicles comprised of different phospholipids as a function of pH, toxin, and lipid concentration. We have found that this toxin induces vesicle permeabilization, as measured by the release of a fluorescent dye. Permeabilization is due to the formation of ion-conductive channels which we have directly observed in planar lipid bilayers. The toxin also produces vesicle aggregation, as indicated by an increase of the turbidity. Aggregation and permeabilization have completely different time course and extent upon toxin dose and lipid composition, thus suggesting that they are two independent events. Both time constants decrease by lowering the pH of the bulk phase or by introducing a negative lipid into the vesicles. Our results indicate that at least three steps are involved in the interaction of Pseudomonas exotoxin A with lipid vesicles. After protonation of one charged group the toxin becomes competent to bind to the surface of the vesicles. Binding is probably initiated by an electrostatic interaction because it is absolutely dependent on the presence of acidic phospholipids. Binding is a prerequisite for the subsequent insertion of the toxin into the lipid bilayer, with a special preference for phosphatidylglycerol-containing membranes, to form ionic channels. At high toxin and vesicle concentrations, bound toxin may also induce aggregation of the vesicles, particularly when phosphatidic acid is present in the lipid mixture. A quenching of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the protein, which is induced by lowering the pH of the solution, becomes more drastic in the presence of lipid vesicles. However, this further quenching takes so long that it cannot be a prerequisite to either vesicle permeabilization or aggregation. Pseudomonas exotoxin A shares many of these properties with other bacterial toxins like diphtheria and tetanus toxin. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 12 PMID:1723312

  20. The role of helper lipids in lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) designed for oligonucleotide delivery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xinwei; Lee, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) have shown promise as delivery vehicles for therapeutic oligonucleotides, including antisense oligos (ONs), siRNA, and microRNA mimics and inhibitors. In addition to a cationic lipid, LNPs are typically composed of helper lipids that contribute to their stability and delivery efficiency. Helper lipids with cone-shape geometry favoring the formation hexagonal II phase, such as dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), can promote endosomal release of ONs. Meanwhile, cylindrical-shaped lipid phosphatidylcholine can provide greater bilayer stability, which is important for in vivo application of LNPs. Cholesterol is often included as a helper that improves intracellular delivery as well as LNP stability in vivo. Inclusion of a PEGylating lipid can enhance LNP colloidal stability in vitro and circulation time in vivo but may reduce uptake and inhibit endosomal release at the cellular level. This problem can be addressed by choosing reversible PEGylation in which the PEG moiety is gradually released in blood circulation. pH-sensitive anionic helper lipids, such as fatty acids and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHEMS), can trigger low-pH-induced changes in LNP surface charge and destabilization that can facilitate endosomal release of ONs. Generally speaking, there is no correlation between LNP activity in vitro and in vivo because of differences in factors limiting the efficiency of delivery. Designing LNPs requires the striking of a proper balance between the need for particle stability, long systemic circulation time, and the need for LNP destabilization inside the target cell to release the oligonucleotide cargo, which requires the proper selection of both the cationic and helper lipids. Customized design and empirical optimization is needed for specific applications. PMID:26900977

  1. Structure of a lipid-bound extended synaptotagmin indicates a role in lipid transfer.

    PubMed

    Schauder, Curtis M; Wu, Xudong; Saheki, Yasunori; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Torta, Federico; Wenk, Markus R; De Camilli, Pietro; Reinisch, Karin M

    2014-06-26

    Growing evidence suggests that close appositions between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and other membranes, including appositions with the plasma membrane (PM), mediate exchange of lipids between these bilayers. The mechanisms of such exchange, which allows lipid transfer independently of vesicular transport, remain poorly understood. The presence of a synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial-lipid-binding protein (SMP) domain, a proposed lipid-binding module, in several proteins localized at membrane contact sites has raised the possibility that such domains may be implicated in lipid transport. SMP-containing proteins include components of the ERMES complex, an ER–mitochondrial tether, and the extended synaptotagmins (known as tricalbins in yeast), which are ER–PM tethers. Here we present at 2.44 Å resolution the crystal structure of a fragment of human extended synaptotagmin 2 (E-SYT2), including an SMP domain and two adjacent C2 domains. The SMP domain has a β-barrel structure like protein modules in the tubular-lipid-binding (TULIP) superfamily. It dimerizes to form an approximately 90-Å-long cylinder traversed by a channel lined entirely with hydrophobic residues, with the two C2A–C2B fragments forming arched structures flexibly linked to the SMP domain. Importantly, structural analysis complemented by mass spectrometry revealed the presence of glycerophospholipids in the E-SYT2 SMP channel, indicating a direct role for E-SYTs in lipid transport. These findings provide strong evidence for a role of SMP-domain-containing proteins in the control of lipid transfer at membrane contact sites and have broad implications beyond the field of ER-to-PM appositions. PMID:24847877

  2. Lipid Vesicles for the Skin Delivery of Diclofenac: Cerosomes vs. Other Lipid Suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Fathi-Azarbayjani, Anahita; Ng, Kai Xin; Chan, Yew Weng; Chan, Sui Yung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Lipid suspensions as drug carriers, including conventional liposomes, ethosomes, transferosomes, proniosomes, niosomes, PEG-PPG-PEG niosomes and stratum corneum liposomes (cerosomes), were formulated and compared. Methods: Lipid vesicles were formulated and assessed with regards to enhancement of skin permeation of diclofenac and stability profiles of the formulations. Formulation-induced changes of the biophysical structure of excised human skin were monitored using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results: The stability profiles of these suspensions over 12 weeks did not show any significant drug leakage from the vesicles of interest (p > 0.05). FTIR observations indicated that the vesicles increased stratum corneum (SC) lipid fluidization and altered protein conformation. Skin permeability experiments showed that the free unencapsulated drug in the cerosomal formulations caused significant increase in drug permeation across the skin (p < 0.01). Low skin permeability of drug from the other lipid suspensions could be due to the entrapment of diclofenac within these vesicles which decreased the solubility of the hydrophilic drug in the skin lipids and the partition coefficient of the drug from these vesicles into the SC. Conclusion: Optimal drug entrapment in vesicles or alteration of the skin structure may not necessarily enhance the permeation of hydrophilic drugs across the human skin. These lipid vesicles may be further developed into carriers of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs for topical and transdermal delivery, respectively. PMID:25789216

  3. Lipid tail protrusions initiate spontaneous insertion of charged, amphiphilic nanoparticles into lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lehn, Reid; Ricci, Maria; Carney, Randy; Voitchovsky, Kislon; Stellacci, Francesco; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    Vesicle fusion is a primary mechanism used to mediate the uptake and trafficking of materials both into and between cells. The pathway of vesicle fusion involves the formation of a lipid stalk in which the hydrophobic core regions of two closely associated bilayers merge. The transition state for stalk formation requires the transient protrusion of hydrophobic lipid tails into solvent; favorable contact between these hydrophobic tails then drives stalk creation. In this work, we use unbiased atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to show that lipid tail protrusions can also induce the insertion of charged, amphiphilic nanoparticles (NPs) into lipid bilayers. As in the case of vesicle fusion, the rate-limiting step for NP-bilayer fusion is the stochastic protrusion of aliphatic lipid tails into solvent and into contact with hydrophobic material in the amphiphilic NP monolayer. We confirm our predictions with experiments on supported lipid bilayers. The strong agreement between simulation and experiments indicates that the pre-stalk transition associated with vesicle fusion may be a general mechanism for the insertion of amphiphilic nano-objects that could be prominent in biological systems given the widespread use of NPs in applications ranging from drug delivery to biosensing.

  4. Specific Adhesion of Lipid Membranes Can Simultaneously Produce Two Types of Lipid and Protein Heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindell, Orrin; Micah, Natalie; Ritzer, Max; Gordon, Vernita

    2015-03-01

    Living cells adhere to one another and their environment. Adhesion is associated with re-organization of the lipid and protein components of the cell membrane. The resulting heterogeneities are functional structures involved in biological processes. We use artificial lipid membranes that contain a single type of binding protein. Before adhesion, the lipid, protein, and dye components in the membrane are well-mixed and constitute a single disordered-liquid phase (Ld) . After adhesion, two distinct types of heterogeneities coexist in the adhesion zone: a central domain of ordered lipid phase that excludes both binding proteins and membrane dye, and a peripheral domain of disordered lipid phase that is densely packed with adhesion proteins and enriched in membrane dye relative to the non-adhered portion of the vesicle. Thus, we show that adhesion that is mediated by only one type of protein can organize the lipid and protein components of the membranes into heterogeneities that resemble those found in biology, for example the immune synapse.

  5. Binding Orientations and Lipid Interactions of Human Amylin at Zwitterionic and Anionic Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhenyu; Jia, Yan; Wei, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the interaction of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) with lipids may facilitate hIAPP aggregation and cause the death of pancreatic islet β-cells. However, the detailed hIAPP-membrane interactions and the influences of lipid compositions are unclear. In this study, as a first step to understand the mechanism of membrane-mediated hIAPP aggregation, we investigate the binding behaviors of hIAPP monomer at zwitterionic palmitoyloleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayer by performing atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The results are compared with those of hIAPP at anionic palmitoyloleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) bilayers. We find that the adsorption of hIAPP to POPC bilayer is mainly initiated from the C-terminal region and the peptide adopts a helical structure with multiple binding orientations, while the adsorption to POPG bilayer is mostly initiated from the N-terminal region and hIAPP displays one preferential binding orientation, with its hydrophobic residues exposed to water. hIAPP monomer inserts into POPC lipid bilayers more readily than into POPG bilayers. Peptide-lipid interaction analyses show that the different binding features of hIAPP at POPC and POPG bilayers are attributed to different magnitudes of electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with lipids. This study provides mechanistic insights into the different interaction behaviors of hIAPP with zwitterionic and anionic lipid bilayers. PMID:26649316

  6. Intravenous fish oil lipid emulsion promotes a shift toward anti-inflammatory proresolving lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Brian T; Le, Hau D; Fitzgerald, Jonathan M; Wang, Samantha; Seamon, Kyle; Gura, Kathleen M; Gronert, Karsten; Puder, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN)-associated liver disease (PNALD) is a life-threatening complication of the administration of PN. The development of PNALD may be partly due to the composition of the lipid emulsion administered with PN: soybean oil-based lipid emulsions (SOLE) are associated with liver disease, while fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLE) are associated with prevention and improvement of liver disease. The objective of this study was to determine how the choice of lipid emulsion modified the production of bioactive lipid mediators (LMs). We utilized a mouse model of steatosis to study the differential effect of FOLE and SOLE. We subsequently validated these results in serum samples from a small cohort of human infants transitioning from SOLE to FOLE. In mice, FOLE was associated with production of anti-inflammatory, proresolving LMs; SOLE was associated with increased production of inflammatory LMs. In human infants, the transition from SOLE to FOLE was associated with a shift toward a proresolving lipidome. Together, these results demonstrate that the composition of the lipid emulsion directly modifies inflammatory homeostasis. PMID:24091595

  7. Enhanced bioavailability of tripterine through lipid nanoparticles using broccoli-derived lipids as a carrier material.

    PubMed

    Li, Wan; Zhang, Tianpeng; Ye, Yanghuan; Zhang, Xingwang; Wu, Baojian

    2015-11-30

    Chemotherapy via the oral route remains a considerable challenge due to poor water-solubility and permeability of anticancer agents. This study aimed to construct lipid nanoparticles using broccoli-derived lipids for oral delivery of tripterine (Tri), a natural anticancer candidate, and to enhance its oral bioavailability. Tri-loaded broccoli lipid nanoparticles (Tri-BLNs) were prepared by a solvent-diffusion method. The resulting Tri-BLNs were 75±10 nm in particle size with entrapment efficiency over 98%. In vitro release study indicated that Tri was almost not released from Tri-BLNs (<2%), whereas the lipolytic experiment showed that Tri-BLNs possessed a relatively strong anti-enzymatic degradation ability to Tri-CLNs (Tri-loaded common lipid nanoparticles). In situ single-pass intestinal perfusion manifested that the effective permeability of Tri-BLNs were significantly higher than that of Tri-CLNs. Further, Tri-BLNs exhibited more efficient cellular uptake in MDCK-II cells as evidenced by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The relative bioavailability of Tri-BLNs and Tri-CLNs was 494.13% and 281.95% compared with Tri suspensions, respectively. Depending on the ability in enhancement of biomembrane permeability, broccoli-derived lipids as an alternative source should be useful to construct lipid nanoparticles for bettering oral delivery of drugs with low bioavailability. PMID:26453780

  8. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles of Guggul Lipid as Drug Carrier for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Praveen Kumar; Mishra, Shikha; Purohit, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Diclofenac sodium loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were formulated using guggul lipid as major lipid component and analyzed for physical parameters, permeation profile, and anti-inflammatory activity. The SLNs were prepared using melt-emulsion sonication/low temperature-solidification method and characterized for physical parameters, in vitro drug release, and accelerated stability studies, and formulated into gel. Respective gels were compared with a commercial emulgel (CEG) and plain carbopol gel containing drug (CG) for ex vivo and in vivo drug permeation and anti-inflammatory activity. The SLNs were stable with optimum physical parameters. GMS nanoparticle 1 (GMN-1) and stearic acid nanoparticle 1 (SAN-1) gave the highest in vitro drug release. Guggul lipid nanoparticle gel 3 (GLNG-3) showed 104.68 times higher drug content than CEG in receptor fluid. The enhancement ratio of GLNG-3 was 39.43 with respect to CG. GLNG-3 showed almost 8.12 times higher Cmax than CEG at 4 hours. The AUC value of GLNG-3 was 15.28 times higher than the AUC of CEG. GLNG-3 showed edema inhibition up to 69.47% in the first hour. Physicochemical properties of major lipid component govern the properties of SLN. SLN made up of guggul lipid showed good physical properties with acceptable stability. Furthermore, it showed a controlled drug release profile along with a promising permeation profile. PMID:24058913

  9. Binding Orientations and Lipid Interactions of Human Amylin at Zwitterionic and Anionic Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhenyu; Jia, Yan; Wei, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the interaction of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) with lipids may facilitate hIAPP aggregation and cause the death of pancreatic islet ?-cells. However, the detailed hIAPP-membrane interactions and the influences of lipid compositions are unclear. In this study, as a first step to understand the mechanism of membrane-mediated hIAPP aggregation, we investigate the binding behaviors of hIAPP monomer at zwitterionic palmitoyloleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayer by performing atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The results are compared with those of hIAPP at anionic palmitoyloleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) bilayers. We find that the adsorption of hIAPP to POPC bilayer is mainly initiated from the C-terminal region and the peptide adopts a helical structure with multiple binding orientations, while the adsorption to POPG bilayer is mostly initiated from the N-terminal region and hIAPP displays one preferential binding orientation, with its hydrophobic residues exposed to water. hIAPP monomer inserts into POPC lipid bilayers more readily than into POPG bilayers. Peptide-lipid interaction analyses show that the different binding features of hIAPP at POPC and POPG bilayers are attributed to different magnitudes of electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with lipids. This study provides mechanistic insights into the different interaction behaviors of hIAPP with zwitterionic and anionic lipid bilayers. PMID:26649316

  10. Lipid-lipid interactions in aminated reduced graphene oxide interface for biosensing application.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Azahar; Kamil Reza, K; Srivastava, Saurabh; Agrawal, Ved Varun; John, Renu; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2014-04-15

    A label-free biosensor based on antiapolipoprotein B 100 functionalized-aminated reduced graphene oxide interface has been fabricated for detection of low density lipoprotein (LDL or lipid) cholesterol. The aminated reduced graphene oxide (NH2-rGO) based electrode surface is covalently functionalized with antiapolipoprotein B 100 (AAB or lipid) using EDC/NHS coupling chemistry. The lipid-lipid interactions at the NH2-rGO electrode surface have been investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopic technique. The structural and morphological investigations of NH2-rGO based immunosensor have been accomplished via transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible, and electrochemical techniques. The impedimetric response of the proposed immunosensor shows excellent sensitivity (612 Ω mg(-1) dL cm(-2)), a response time of 250 s, and a low detection limit of 5 mg/dL of LDL molecules. The association, dissociation, and equilibrium rate constants for this immunoelectrode are found to be 1.66 M(-1) s(-1), 0.6 s(-1), and 2.77 M(-1), respectively. The long-term stability and excellent reproducibility of the proposed immunosensor indicates a suitable platform for detection of LDL or lipid molecules. This immunosensor provides an efficient platform for analysis of the antigen-antibody interactions of lipid molecules. PMID:24673363

  11. Hybrid lipid-silica microcapsules engineered by phase coacervation of Pickering emulsions to enhance lipid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Simovic, Spomenka; Heard, Peter; Prestidge, Clive A

    2010-07-14

    We report on the fabrication of dry hybrid lipid-silica microcapsules for enhanced lipid hydrolysis using Pickering emulsion templates formed by interfacial nanoparticle-emulsifier electrostatic interaction. The microcapsules are produced by controlled precipitation of emulsion droplets by oppositely charged silica nanoparticles at room temperature. Microcapsule formation is driven by the interfacial structure of the initial Pickering emulsion, which is in turn controlled by the nanoparticle to lipid ratio. In the region of charge reversed, precipitated and aggregated droplets, droplet-nanoparticle networks have been identified by freeze-fracture SEM imaging. The microcapsules have diameters in the range 20-50 mum and contain approximately 65% oil distributed within an internal matrix structure composed of a labyrinth of interconnected pores approximately 20-100 nm. Pore distribution and diameters depend on the silica to nanoparticle ratio that in turn determines droplet coating and stability. The microcapsules facilitate enhanced lipid hydrolysis kinetics, i.e. their pseudo first-order rate constant for lipid hydrolysis is approximately 3 times greater than for equivalent submicron lipid droplets. This behaviour is attributed to the increased oil surface area within the microcapsule due to the specific porous structure that causes rapid release of submicron and micron size oil droplets. The simple route for fabrication of porous microcapsule morphologies may present new opportunities for applications in encapsulation, delivery, coatings, and catalysis. PMID:20490395

  12. Extraction of Lipids from Flax Processing Waste Using Hot Ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cuticle of flax stems contain lipids that provide a protective barrier to pathogens and control moisture loss. These lipids include wax esters and long chain fatty alcohols or policosanols. Cuticle fragments generated during several different fiber processing operations retain these lipid compou...

  13. Deciphering tissue-induced Klebsiella pneumoniae lipid A structure.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Enrique; Martínez-Moliner, Verónica; Moranta, David; Dahlström, Käthe M; Regueiro, Verónica; Tomás, Anna; Cano, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Frank, Christian G; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Insua, José Luis; Salminen, Tiina A; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-17

    The outcome of an infection depends on host recognition of the pathogen, hence leading to the activation of signaling pathways controlling defense responses. A long-held belief is that the modification of the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide could help Gram-negative pathogens to evade innate immunity. However, direct evidence that this happens in vivo is lacking. Here we report the lipid A expressed in the tissues of infected mice by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings demonstrate that Klebsiella remodels its lipid A in a tissue-dependent manner. Lipid A species found in the lungs are consistent with a 2-hydroxyacyl-modified lipid A dependent on the PhoPQ-regulated oxygenase LpxO. The in vivo lipid A pattern is lost in minimally passaged bacteria isolated from the tissues. LpxO-dependent modification reduces the activation of inflammatory responses and mediates resistance to antimicrobial peptides. An lpxO mutant is attenuated in vivo thereby highlighting the importance of this lipid A modification in Klebsiella infection biology. Colistin, one of the last options to treat multidrug-resistant Klebsiella infections, triggers the in vivo lipid A pattern. Moreover, colistin-resistant isolates already express the in vivo lipid A pattern. In these isolates, LpxO-dependent lipid A modification mediates resistance to colistin. Deciphering the lipid A expressed in vivo opens the possibility of designing novel therapeutics targeting the enzymes responsible for the in vivo lipid A pattern. PMID:26578797

  14. Chemical Changes in Lipids Produced by Thermal Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nawar, Wassef W.

    1984-01-01

    Describes heat effects on lipids, indicating that the chemical and physical changes that occur depend on the lipid's composition and conditions of treatment. Thermolytic and oxidation reactions, thermal/oxidative interaction of lipids with other food components and the chemistry of frying are considered. (JN)

  15. A Teaching Laboratory for Comprehensive Lipid Characterization from Food Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bendinskas, Kestutis; Weber, Benjamin; Nsouli, Tamara; Nguyen, Hoangvy V.; Joyce, Carolyn; Niri, Vadoud; Jaskolla, Thorsten W.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional and state-of-the-art techniques were combined to probe for various lipid classes from egg yolk and avocado qualitatively and quantitatively. A total lipid extract was isolated using liquid-liquid extraction. An aliquot of the total lipid extract was subjected to transesterification to form volatile fatty acid methyl esters suitable for…

  16. Final Report: 17th international Symposium on Plant Lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Christoph Benning

    2007-03-07

    This meeting covered several emerging areas in the plant lipid field such as the biosynthesis of cuticle components, interorganelle lipid trafficking, the regulation of lipid homeostasis, and the utilization of algal models. Stimulating new insights were provided not only based on research reports based on plant models, but also due to several excellent talks by experts from the yeast field.

  17. A Teaching Laboratory for Comprehensive Lipid Characterization from Food Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bendinskas, Kestutis; Weber, Benjamin; Nsouli, Tamara; Nguyen, Hoangvy V.; Joyce, Carolyn; Niri, Vadoud; Jaskolla, Thorsten W.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional and state-of-the-art techniques were combined to probe for various lipid classes from egg yolk and avocado qualitatively and quantitatively. A total lipid extract was isolated using liquid-liquid extraction. An aliquot of the total lipid extract was subjected to transesterification to form volatile fatty acid methyl esters suitable for…

  18. Solid lipid nanodispersions containing mixed lipid core and a polar heterolipid: characterization.

    PubMed

    Attama, A A; Schicke, B C; Paepenmüller, T; Müller-Goymann, C C

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the characterization of solid lipid nanodispersions (SLN) prepared with a 1:1 mixture of theobroma oil and goat fat as the main lipid matrix and Phospholipon 90G (P90G) as a stabilizer heterolipid, using polysorbate 80 as the mobile surfactant, with a view to applying the SLN in drug delivery. The 1:1 lipid mixture and P90G constituting the lipid matrix was first homogeneously prepared by fusion. Thereafter, the SLN were formulated with a gradient of polysorbate 80 and constant lipid matrix concentration by melt-high pressure homogenisation. The SLN were characterized by time-resolved particle size analysis, zeta potential and osmotic pressure measurements, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and isothermal heat conduction microcalorimetry (IMC) which monitors the in situ crystallization were also carried out on the SLN containing P90G and 1.0 % w/w of polysorbate 80. The results obtained in these studies were compared with SLN prepared with theobroma oil with and without phospholipid. Particle size analysis of SLN indicated reduction in size with increase in concentration of mobile surfactant and was in the lower nanometer range after 3 months except SLN prepared without P90G or polysorbate 80. The lipid nanoparticles had negative potentials after 3 months. WAXD and DSC studies revealed low crystalline SLN after 3 months of storage except in WAXD of SLN formulated with 1.0 % w/w polysorbate 80. TEM micrograph of the SLN containing 1.0 % w/w polysorbate 80 revealed discrete particles whose sizes were in consonance with the static light scattering measurement. In situ crystallization studies in IMC revealed delayed crystallization of the SLN with 1.0 % w/w polysorbate 80. Results indicate lipid mixtures produced SLN with lower crystallinity and higher particle sizes compared with SLN prepared with theobroma oil alone with or without P90G, and would lead to higher drug incorporation efficiency when used in formulation of actives. Mixtures of theobroma oil and goat fat would be suitable for the preparation of nanostructured lipid carriers. SLN of theobroma oil containing phospholipid could prove to be a good ocular or parenteral drug delivery system considering the low particle size, particle size stability and in vivo tolerability of the component lipids. SLN prepared with lipid admixture, which had higher increase in d(90%) on storage are suitable for preparation of topical and transdermal products. PMID:17276663

  19. Balancing of lipid, protein, and carbohydrate intake in a predatory beetle following hibernation, and consequences for lipid restoration.

    PubMed

    Noreika, Norbertas; Madsen, Natalia E L; Jensen, Kim; Toft, Søren

    2016-05-01

    Carnivorous animals are known to balance their consumption of lipid and protein, and recent studies indicate that some mammalian carnivores also regulate their intake of carbohydrate. We investigated macronutrient balancing and lipid restoration following hibernation in the ground beetle Anchomenus dorsalis, hypothesizing that carbohydrates might be important energy sources upon hibernation when predator lipid stores are exhausted and prey are equally lean. We recorded the consumption of lipid, protein, and carbohydrate over nine days following hibernation, as the beetles foraged to refill their lipid stores. Each beetle was given the opportunity to regulate consumption from two semi-artificial foods differing in the proportion of two of the three macronutrients, while the third macronutrient was kept constant. When analyzing consumption of the three macronutrients on an energetic basis, it became apparent that the beetles regulated lipid and carbohydrate energy interchangeably and balanced the combined energy intake from the two macronutrients against protein intake. Restoration of lipid stores was independent of the availability of any specific macronutrient. However, the energetic consumption required to refill lipid stores was higher when a low proportion of lipids was ingested, suggesting that lipids were readily converted into lipid stores while there were energetic costs associated with converting carbohydrate and protein into stored lipids. Our experiment demonstrates that carbohydrates are consumed and regulated as a non-protein energy source by A. dorsalis despite an expectedly low occurrence of carbohydrates in their natural diet. Perhaps carbohydrates are in fact an overlooked supplementary energy source in the diet of carnivorous arthropods. PMID:26868725

  20. Multiscale molecular modeling of tertiary supported lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranz, Holden T.; Faller, Roland

    2015-08-01

    Ternary lipid bilayer systems assembled from mixtures of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and cholesterol have been studied using coarse-grained molecular dynamics at biologically relevant temperatures (280 K to 310 K), which are between the chain melting temperatures of the pure lipid component. Free lipid bilayers were simulated using the MARTINI model (Stage I) and a variant with water-water interactions reduced to 76% (Stage II). The latter was subsequently used for preparing supported lipid bilayer simulations (Stage III). Clustering of like lipids was observed, but the simulation timescale did not yield larger phaseseparated domains.

  1. Lipid A as a Drug Target and Therapeutic Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sang Hoon

    2015-01-01

    In this review, lipid A, from its discovery to recent findings, is presented as a drug target and therapeutic molecule. First, the biosynthetic pathway for lipid A, the Raetz pathway, serves as a good drug target for antibiotic development. Several assay methods used to screen for inhibitors of lipid A synthesis will be presented, and some of the promising lead compounds will be described. Second, utilization of lipid A biosynthetic pathways by various bacterial species can generate modified lipid A molecules with therapeutic value. PMID:26535075

  2. Functional lipids and lipoplexes for improved gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiang; McIntosh, Thomas J.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Cationic lipids are the most common non-viral vectors used in gene delivery with a few currently being investigated in clinical trials. However, like most other synthetic vectors, these vectors suffer from low transfection efficiencies. Among the various approaches to address this challenge, functional lipids (i.e., lipids responding to a stimuli) offer a myriad of opportunities for basic studies of nucleic acid–lipid interactions and for in vitro and in vivo delivery of nucleic acid for a specific biological/medical application. This manuscript reviews recent advances in pH, redox, and charge-reversal sensitive lipids. PMID:21621581

  3. Lipid-Drug Interaction and Colligative Properties in Phospholipid Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Banerjee; Bennouna; Ferreira-Marques; Ruysschaert; Caspers

    1999-11-01

    Imipramine penetration into the lipid core of a membrane was demonstrated through measurements on lipid monolayers (surface pressure and surface potential). The surface pressure measurements allow us to calculate the intrinsic binding constant (partition coefficient) for the lipid-Imipramine interaction. This latter value is in correct agreement with the results obtained by electrophoretic mobility measurements on liposomes. In addition, it was observed that the same mole fraction of "lipid-soluble drug" (Chlorpromazine or Imipramine) incorporated in a given lipidic phase (DPPC) induced the same shift in the transition temperature. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10527584

  4. Formation of supported lipid bilayers at surfaces with controlled curvatures: influence of lipid charge.

    PubMed

    Sundh, Maria; Svedhem, Sofia; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2011-06-23

    We have developed and characterized novel biomimetic membranes, formed at nanostructured sensor substrates with controlled curvatures, motivated by the many biological processes that involve membrane curvature. Model systems with convex nanostructures, with radii of curvatures (ROCs) of 70, 75, and 95 nm, were fabricated utilizing colloidal assembly and used as substrates for supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). The SLBs were formed via vesicle adsorption and rupture, and the vesicle deposition pathway was studied by means of quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and fluorescence microscopy. SLBs conforming to the underlying nanostructured surfaces, which exhibit increased surface area with decreased ROC, were confirmed from excess mass, monitored by QCM-D, and excess total fluorescence intensities. The formation of SLBs at the nanostructured surfaces was possible, however, depending on the ROC of the structures and the lipid vesicle charge the quality varied. The presence of nanostructures was shown to impair vesicle rupture and SLB formation was progressively hindered at surfaces with structures of decreasing ROCs. The introduction of a fraction of the positively charged lipid POEPC in the lipid vesicle membrane allowed for good quality and conformal bilayers at all surfaces. Alternatively, for vesicles formed from lipid mixtures with a fraction of the negatively charged lipid POPS, SLB formation was not at all possible at surfaces with the lowest ROC. Interestingly, the vesicle adsorption rate and the SLB formation were faster at surfaces with nanostructures of progressively smaller ROCs at high ratios of POPS in the vesicles. Development of templated SLBs with controlled curvatures provides a new experimental platform, especially at the nanoscale, at which membrane events such as lipid sorting, phase separation, and protein binding can be studied. PMID:21630649

  5. Structure of a lipid-bound Extended-Synaptotagmin indicates a role in lipid transfer

    PubMed Central

    Schauder, Curtis M.; Wu, Xudong; Saheki, Yasunori; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Torta, Federico; Wenk, Markus R.; De Camilli, Pietro; Reinisch, Karin M.

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that close appositions between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and other membranes, including appositions with the plasma membrane (PM), mediate exchange of lipids between the two bilayers. The mechanisms of such exchange, which allows lipid transfer independently of vesicular transport, remain poorly understood. The presence of an SMP (synaptotagmin-like-mitochondrial-lipid binding protein) domain, a proposed lipid binding module, in several proteins localized at membrane contact sites raised the possibility that such domains may be implicated in lipid transport1,2. SMP-containing proteins include components of the ERMES complex, an ER-mitochondrial tether3, and the Extended-Synaptotagmins/tricalbins, which are ER-PM tethers4-6. Here we present at 2.44 Å resolution the crystal structure of a fragment of Extended-Synaptotagmin 2 (E-Syt2), including an SMP domain and two adjacent C2 domains. The SMP domain has a beta-barrel structure like protein modules in the TULIP superfamily. It dimerizes to form a ~90 Å long cylinder traversed by a channel lined entirely with hydrophobic residues, with the two C2A-C2B fragments forming arched structures flexibly linked to the SMP domain. Importantly, structural analysis complemented by mass spectrometry revealed the presence of glycerophospholipids in the E-Syt2 SMP channel, indicating a direct role for E-Syts in lipid transport. These findings provide strong evidence for a role of SMP domain containing proteins in the control of lipid transfer at membrane contact sites and have broad implication beyond the field of ER to PM appositions. PMID:24847877

  6. Low abundances of synthetics lipids in phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva-Luna, A. E.; Santiago-Alvarado, A.; Castro-Ramos, J.; Vazquez-Montiel, S.; Flores-Gil, A.; Aguilar-Soto, J.; Delgado-Atencio, J. A.

    2012-03-01

    Phantoms simulate optical characteristics of tissues. Phantoms use to mimic light distributions in living tissue. Several Phantoms compositions made of silicone, polyester, polyurethane, and epoxy resin have been described in the literature. These kinds of phantoms have the problem of long time preservation. In this work, we describe the fabrication and characterization of phantoms with low concentrations of synthetic lipid using Raman spectroscopy. We fabricate four phantoms made of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). These phantoms have synthetic lipid content of cholesterol and triglycerides. The size of our phantoms is 1 x 1 cm and 5 mm of thickness.We used the point-to-point mapping technique. Finally, we compared advantages and performance of made PDMS and gelatin phantoms.

  7. Cationic lipids activate intracellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lonez, Caroline; Vandenbranden, Michel; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie

    2012-12-01

    Cationic liposomes are commonly used as a transfection reagent for DNA, RNA or proteins and as a co-adjuvant of antigens for vaccination trials. A high density of positive charges close to cell surface is likely to be recognized as a signal of danger by cells or contribute to trigger cascades that are classically activated by endogenous cationic compounds. The present review provides evidence that cationic liposomes activate several cellular pathways like pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory cascades. An improved knowledge of the relationship between the cationic lipid properties (nature of the lipid hydrophilic moieties, hydrocarbon tail, mode of organization) and the activation of these pathways opens the way to the use and design of cationic tailored for a specific application (e.g. for gene transport or as adjuvants). PMID:22634161

  8. Analysis of lipids containing hydroxy fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, F; Maier, R; Mukherjee, K D; Mangold, H K

    1987-06-01

    Lipids containing hydroxy fatty acids or hydroxyacyl moieties are acetylated with [1-14C]acetic anhydride or [3H]acetic anhydride, and the content of hydroxy fatty acids or hydroxyacyl moieties is estimated from the specific radioactivity of the acetylated products with respect to that of radioactive standards, such as radioacetylated ricinoleic acid or triricinoleoylglycerol. Mixtures of triacylglycerols containing one, two and three hydroxyl groups per molecule are derivatized in a similar manner, and the resulting acetates are fractionated by thin layer chromatography according to the number of acetate groups per molecule. The relative proportion of each type of triacylglycerols in the mixture is estimated from the distribution of radioactivity in the various fractions. Applications of these techniques are demonstrated by the analysis of several seed lipids. PMID:3112485

  9. Anisotropic spontaneous curvatures in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walani, Nikhil; Torres, Jennifer; Agrawal, Ashutosh

    2014-06-01

    Symmetry restrictions due to fluidity require the strain energy in the Helfrich theory of lipid membranes to be locally isotropic in nature. Although this framework is suitable for modeling the interaction of membranes with proteins that generate spherical curvature such as clathrin, there are other important membrane-bending proteins such as BIN-amphiphysin-Rvs proteins that form a cylindrical coat with different curvatures in the longitudinal and the circumferential directions. In this work, we present a detailed mathematical treatment of the theory of lipid membranes incorporating anisotropic spontaneous curvatures. We derive the associated Euler-Lagrange equations and the edge conditions in a generalized setting that allows spatial heterogeneities in the properties of the membrane-protein system. We employ this theory to model the constriction of a membrane tubule by a cylindrical scaffold. In particular, we highlight the role of the equilibrium equation in the tangential plane in regulating the spatial variation of the surface tension field.

  10. Content of lipids in finnish peat mires

    SciTech Connect

    Fagernaes, L.; Ekman, R.

    1985-01-01

    Peat is a potential raw material for chemical products. Peat extracts, bitumens, obtained from peat with neutral organic solvents, and, in particular, their wax fractions have been of interest with regard to their substituting for other natural waxes. Yields and characteristics of peat extracts have been studied by numerous researchers and acid and saponification values, molecular weights and elements analyses have been determined since the 1930s. New analytical methods have recently been introduced and made it possible to determine the amount and detailed composition of the lipid components of peat extracts by capillary gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry. The aim of this study was to determine the yield and lipid composition of extracts from peat samples collected from different mires in Finland.

  11. Membrane lipids and the origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Holzer, G.; Rao, M.; Tornabene, T. G.

    1981-01-01

    The current state of knowledge regarding the development of biological systems is briefly reviewed. At a crucial stage concerning the evolution of such systems, the mechanisms leading to more complex structures must have evolved within the confines of a protected microenvironment, similar to those provided by the contemporary cell membranes. The major components found normally in biomembranes are phospholipids. The structure of the biomembrane is examined, and attention is given to questions concerning the availability of the structural components which are necessary in the formation of primitive lipid membranes. Two approaches regarding the study of protomembranes are discussed. The probability of obtaining ether lipids under prebiotic conditions is considered, taking into account the formation of cyclic and acyclic isoprenoids by the irradiation of isoprene with UV.

  12. Jumping acoustic bubbles on lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Der Loughian, Christelle; Muleki Seya, Pauline; Pirat, Christophe; Inserra, Claude; Béra, Jean-Christophe; Rieu, Jean-Paul

    2015-05-01

    In the context of sonoporation, we use supported lipid bilayers as a model for biological membranes and investigate the interactions between the bilayer and microbubbles induced by ultrasound. Among the various types of damage caused by bubbles on the surface, our experiments exhibit a singular dynamic interaction process where bubbles are jumping on the bilayer, forming a necklace pattern of alteration on the membrane. This phenomenon was explored with different time and space resolutions and, based on our observations, we propose a model for a microbubble subjected to the combined action of van der Waals, acoustic and hydrodynamic forces. Describing the repeated jumps of the bubble, this model explains the lipid exchanges between the bubble and bilayer. PMID:25799328

  13. SERUM LIPIDS : NEW BIOLOGICAL MARKERS IN DEPRESSION ?

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Abdul; Lal, Narottam; Trivedi, J.K.; Dalal, P.K.; Asthana, O.P.; Srivastava, J.S.; Akhtar, Asif

    1998-01-01

    Several studies suggest that a low cholesterol concentration is associated with depression. The authors sought to determine whether an association exists between serum lipid concentrations and depression. 28 drug-naive patients of major depression diagnosed according to DSMlll- R criteria were included in the study and severity of depression was measured on Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. Suicidal intent was assessed on Suicidal Intent Questionnaire. 28 normal healthy controls were selected and matched for age, sex and body-mass index with the depressives. Serum lipid estimations were done in each subject after 12 hours overnight fasting. The main finding of the study is that total serum cholesterol, serum triglycerides and serum LDL cholesterol are decreased while serum HDL cholesterol is increased in depression and these changes were more marked in depressed subjects with definite suicidal intent. On regression analysis, total serum cholesterol was the most important predictive variable of the severity of depression. PMID:21494476

  14. Biliary lipid excretion after hepatic portoenterostomy.

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, J R; Javitt, N B

    1976-01-01

    Since 1974, 16 consecutive infants with biliary atresia have been treated by hepatic portoenterostomy employing an exteriorized Roux-en-Y intestinal segment (Miluliez). Simultaneous, sequential analyses of bile pigments and lipids in serum and biliary drainage were performed. In the 11 patients with sustained bile drainage, progressive increases in bile volume, bilirubin and biliary lipid concentrations correlated well with their subsequent return toward normal in the serum. Despite relief of biliary obstruction, four patients have had progressive liver cirrhosis. The other 7 have residual liver damage which has been stable, or in two instances, improved, at late biopsy. The clinical and biochemical results suggest that both obstructive and parenchymal factors are operative in infants with biliary atresia. Images Fig. 2. PMID:962401

  15. Delivery of oligonucleotides with lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhua; Miao, Lei; Satterlee, Andrew; Huang, Leaf

    2015-06-29

    Since their inception in the 1980s, oligonucleotide-based (ON-based) therapeutics have been recognized as powerful tools that can treat a broad spectrum of diseases. The discoveries of novel regulatory methods of gene expression with diverse mechanisms of action are still driving the development of novel ON-based therapeutics. Difficulties in the delivery of this class of therapeutics hinder their in vivo applications, which forces drug delivery systems to be a prerequisite for clinical translation. This review discusses the strategy of using lipid nanoparticles as carriers to deliver therapeutic ONs to target cells in vitro and in vivo. A discourse on how chemical and physical properties of the lipid materials could be utilized during formulation and the resulting effects on delivery efficiency constitutes the major part of this review. PMID:25733311

  16. Capsinoids suppress fat accumulation via lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    HONG, QIN; XIA, CHEN; XIANGYING, HU; QUAN, YUAN

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, found in red peppers, has been reported to have anti-obesity, anti-hypertension, anti-diabetes and anti-inflammatory functions. In the present study, we determined the effect of non-pungent capsinoids on the metabolism of adipocytes. We demonstrated that capsinoids suppressed fat accumulation in vivo and in vitro in mice. Liver, the main tissue of lipid metabolism, was treated by capsinoids, and HMG-CoA reductase, CPT-1, FAT/CD36 and GLUT4 were found to be increased significantly, which demonstrated promotion of the lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissues. In addition, by adding capsinoids, the induced adipocytes also demonstrated significantly increased levels of HMG-CoA reductase, CPT-1, FAT/CD36 and GLUT4. Oil red O staining also demonstrated that capsinoids decreased fat accumulation in the adipocytes. In conclusion, these results indicate that capsinoids may be worth investigating as a potential cure for obesity. PMID:25421144

  17. Hot-melt coating with lipid excipients.

    PubMed

    Jannin, Vincent; Cuppok, Yvonne

    2013-12-01

    Polymer coatings are widely used to provide drug protection, taste masking, coloration and modified drug release. Typically, coating polymers must be diluted or dispersed in solvents (water or organic) prior to coating and gliding agents are commonly added to prevent particle sticking throughout processing. Lipid excipients present an attractive alternative to standard polymer coatings as they only require melting before application directly onto the substrate. Solvent evaporation is not required; consequently powders with very high specific surface areas can be coated rapidly. A number of different lipid excipients can be used in coating and choosing the appropriate excipient for the application requires an understanding of their physico-chemical properties and its associated effect on drug release. PMID:23089578

  18. Lipid Transport in the Lactating Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    McManaman, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells depend on phospholipid (PL) and fatty acid (FA) transport to maintain membrane structure and organization, and to fuel and regulate cellular functions. In mammary glands of lactating animals, copious milk secretion, including large quantities of lipid in some species, requires adaptation and integration of PL and FA synthesis and transport processes to meet secretion demands. At present few details exist about how these processes are regulated within the mammary gland. However, recent advances in our understanding of the structural and molecular biology of membrane systems and cellular lipid trafficking provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the regulation and integration of PL and FA transport processes the lactating mammary gland. This review discusses the PL and FA transport processes required to maintain the structural integrity and organization of the mammary gland and support its secretory functions within the context of current molecular and cellular models of their regulation. PMID:24567110

  19. Hydrodynamic trapping of molecules in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Peter; McColl, James; Clarke, Richard W; Ostanin, Victor P; Jönsson, Bengt; Klenerman, David

    2012-06-26

    In this work we show how hydrodynamic forces can be used to locally trap molecules in a supported lipid bilayer (SLB). The method uses the hydrodynamic drag forces arising from a flow through a conical pipette with a tip radius of 1-1.5 ?m, placed approximately 1 ?m above the investigated SLB. This results in a localized forcefield that acts on molecules protruding from the SLB, yielding a hydrodynamic trap with a size approximately given by the size of the pipette tip. We demonstrate this concept by trapping the protein streptavidin, bound to biotin receptors in the SLB. It is also shown how static and kinetic information about the intermolecular interactions in the lipid bilayer can be obtained by relating how the magnitude of the hydrodynamic forces affects the accumulation of protein molecules in the trap. PMID:22699491

  20. Lysosome: regulator of lipid degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic pathway that has a fundamental role in the adaptation to fasting and primarily relies on the activity of the endolysosomal system, to which the autophagosome targets substrates for degradation. Recent studies have revealed that the lysosomal-autophagic pathway plays an important part in the early steps of lipid degradation. In this review, we discuss the transcriptional mechanisms underlying co-regulation between lysosome, autophagy, and other steps of lipid catabolism, including the activity of nutrient-sensitive transcription factors (TFs) and of members of the nuclear receptor family. In addition, we discuss how the lysosome acts as a metabolic sensor and orchestrates the transcriptional response to fasting. PMID:25061009

  1. Lipids as universal biomarkers of extraterrestrial life.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Christos D; Deamer, David W

    2014-06-01

    In 1965, James Lovelock published a general statement, based on thermodynamic chemical equilibrium principles, about how to detect extant or extinct life on a planet other than Earth. Nearly 50 years later, it is possible to make such measurements with robotic missions such as current and future Mars rovers, and probes to sample icy plumes of Enceladus or Europa. We make a specific recommendation that certain characteristic patterns in the composition of lipid hydrocarbons can only result from a biological process, because the signal arises from a universal requirement related to lipid bilayer fluidity and membrane stability. Furthermore, the pattern can be preserved over millions of years, and instrumentation is already available to be incorporated into flight missions. PMID:24735484

  2. Lipid raft: A floating island of death or survival

    SciTech Connect

    George, Kimberly S.; Department of Chemistry, Marietta College, Marietta, OH 45750 ; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-03-15

    Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, and play an important role in the initiation of many pharmacological agent-induced signaling pathways and toxicological effects. The structure of lipid rafts is dynamic, resulting in an ever-changing content of both lipids and proteins. Cholesterol, as a major component of lipid rafts, is critical for the formation and configuration of lipid raft microdomains, which provide signaling platforms capable of activating both pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. A change of cholesterol level can result in lipid raft disruption and activate or deactivate raft-associated proteins, such as death receptor proteins, protein kinases, and calcium channels. Several anti-cancer drugs are able to suppress growth and induce apoptosis of tumor cells through alteration of lipid raft contents via disrupting lipid raft integrity. -- Highlights: ► The role of lipid rafts in apoptosis ► The pro- and anti-apoptotic effects of lipid raft disruption ► Cancer treatments targeting lipid rafts.

  3. SAR11 lipid renovation in response to phosphate starvation.

    PubMed

    Carini, Paul; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S; Thrash, J Cameron; White, Angelicque; Zhao, Yanlin; Campbell, Emily O; Fredricks, Helen F; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2015-06-23

    Phytoplankton inhabiting oligotrophic ocean gyres actively reduce their phosphorus demand by replacing polar membrane phospholipids with those lacking phosphorus. Although the synthesis of nonphosphorus lipids is well documented in some heterotrophic bacterial lineages, phosphorus-free lipid synthesis in oligotrophic marine chemoheterotrophs has not been directly demonstrated, implying they are disadvantaged in phosphate-deplete ecosystems, relative to phytoplankton. Here, we show the SAR11 clade chemoheterotroph Pelagibacter sp. str. HTCC7211 renovates membrane lipids when phosphate starved by replacing a portion of its phospholipids with monoglucosyl- and glucuronosyl-diacylglycerols and by synthesizing new ornithine lipids. Lipid profiles of cells grown with excess phosphate consisted entirely of phospholipids. Conversely, up to 40% of the total lipids were converted to nonphosphorus lipids when cells were starved for phosphate, or when growing on methylphosphonate. Cells sequentially limited by phosphate and methylphosphonate transformed >75% of their lipids to phosphorus-free analogs. During phosphate starvation, a four-gene cluster was significantly up-regulated that likely encodes the enzymes responsible for lipid renovation. These genes were found in Pelagibacterales strains isolated from a phosphate-deficient ocean gyre, but not in other strains from coastal environments, suggesting alternate lipid synthesis is a specific adaptation to phosphate scarcity. Similar gene clusters are found in the genomes of other marine ?-proteobacteria, implying lipid renovation is a common strategy used by heterotrophic cells to reduce their requirement for phosphorus in oligotrophic habitats. PMID:26056292

  4. SAR11 lipid renovation in response to phosphate starvation

    PubMed Central

    Carini, Paul; Van Mooy, Benjamin A. S.; Thrash, J. Cameron; White, Angelicque; Zhao, Yanlin; Campbell, Emily O.; Fredricks, Helen F.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton inhabiting oligotrophic ocean gyres actively reduce their phosphorus demand by replacing polar membrane phospholipids with those lacking phosphorus. Although the synthesis of nonphosphorus lipids is well documented in some heterotrophic bacterial lineages, phosphorus-free lipid synthesis in oligotrophic marine chemoheterotrophs has not been directly demonstrated, implying they are disadvantaged in phosphate-deplete ecosystems, relative to phytoplankton. Here, we show the SAR11 clade chemoheterotroph Pelagibacter sp. str. HTCC7211 renovates membrane lipids when phosphate starved by replacing a portion of its phospholipids with monoglucosyl- and glucuronosyl-diacylglycerols and by synthesizing new ornithine lipids. Lipid profiles of cells grown with excess phosphate consisted entirely of phospholipids. Conversely, up to 40% of the total lipids were converted to nonphosphorus lipids when cells were starved for phosphate, or when growing on methylphosphonate. Cells sequentially limited by phosphate and methylphosphonate transformed >75% of their lipids to phosphorus-free analogs. During phosphate starvation, a four-gene cluster was significantly up-regulated that likely encodes the enzymes responsible for lipid renovation. These genes were found in Pelagibacterales strains isolated from a phosphate-deficient ocean gyre, but not in other strains from coastal environments, suggesting alternate lipid synthesis is a specific adaptation to phosphate scarcity. Similar gene clusters are found in the genomes of other marine ?-proteobacteria, implying lipid renovation is a common strategy used by heterotrophic cells to reduce their requirement for phosphorus in oligotrophic habitats. PMID:26056292

  5. Lipid dip-pen nanolithography on self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavutis, Martynas; Navikas, Vytautas; Rakickas, Tomas; Vaitekonis, Šarūnas; Valiokas, Ramūnas

    2016-02-01

    Dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) with lipids as an ink enables functional micro/nanopatterning on different substrates at high process speeds. However, only a few studies have addressed the influence of the physicochemical properties of the surface on the structure and phase behavior of DPN-printed lipid assemblies. Therefore, by combining the scanning probe and optical imaging techniques in this work we have analyzed lipid microdomain formation on the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold as well-defined model surfaces that displayed hydrophilic (protein-repellent) or hydrophobic (protein-adhesive) characteristics. We have found that on the tri(ethylene glycol)-terminated SAM the lipid ink transfer was fast (~10–1 μm3 s‑1), quasi-linear and it yielded unstable, sparsely packed lipid microspots. Contrary to this, on the methyl-terminated SAM the lipid transfer was ~20 times slower, nonlinear, and the obtained stable dots of ~1 μm in diameter consisted of lipid multilayers. Our comparative analysis indicated that the measured lipid transfer was consistent with the previously reported so-called polymer transfer model (Felts et al 2012, Nanotechnology 23 215301). Further on, by employing the observed distinct contrast in the DPN ink behavior we constructed confined lipid microdomains on pre-patterned SAMs, in which the lipids assembled either into monolayer or multilamellar phases. Such microdomains can be further utilized for lipid membrane mimetics in microarray and lab-on-a-chip device formats.

  6. Lipidic nanovesicles stabilize suspensions of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Rojo, Noemi; Lete, Marta G; Rojas, Elena; Gil, David; Valle, Mikel; Alonso, Alicia; Moya, Sergio E; Goñi, Félix M

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the effect of adding lipid nanovesicles (liposomes) on the aggregation of commercial titanium oxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO), or cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (NPs) suspensions in Hepes buffer. Liposomes were prepared with pure phospholipids or mixtures of phospholipids and/or cholesterol. Changes in turbidity were recorded as a function of time, either of metal nanoparticles alone, or for a mixture of nanoparticles and lipidic nanovesicles. Lipid nanovesicles markedly decrease the NPs tendency to sediment irrespective of size or lipid compositions, thus keeping the metal oxide NPs in suspension. Cryo-electron microscopy, fluorescence anisotropy of TMA-DPH and general polarization of laurdan failed to reveal any major effect of the NPs on the lipid bilayer structure or phase state of the lipids. The above data may help in developing studies of the interaction of inhaled particles with lung surfactant lipids and alveolar macrophages. PMID:26301898

  7. Control of lipid metabolism by Tachykinin in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Veenstra, Jan A.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Summary The intestine is a key organ for lipid uptake and distribution, and abnormal intestinal lipid metabolism is associated with obesity and hyperlipidemia. Although multiple regulatory gut hormones secreted from enteroendocrine cells (EEs) regulate systemic lipid homeostasis, such as appetite control and energy balance in adipose tissue, their respective roles regarding lipid metabolism in the intestine are not well understood. We demonstrate that Tachykinins (TKs), one of the most abundant secreted peptides expressed in midgut EEs, regulate intestinal lipid production and subsequently control systemic lipid homeostasis in Drosophila, and that TKs repress lipogenesis in enterocytes (ECs) associated with the TKR99D receptor and PKA signaling. Interestingly, nutrient deprivation enhances the production of TKs in the midgut. Finally, unlike the physiological roles of TKs produced from the brain, gut-derived TKs do not affect behavior, thus demonstrating that gut TK hormones specifically regulate intestinal lipid metabolism without affecting neuronal functions. PMID:25263556

  8. Lipids in cell biology: how can we understand them better?

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Eleonora; Atilla-Gokcumen, G. Ekin; Eggert, Ulrike S.

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are a major class of biological molecules and play many key roles in different processes. The diversity of lipids is on the same order of magnitude as that of proteins: cells express tens of thousands of different lipids and hundreds of proteins to regulate their metabolism and transport. Despite their clear importance and essential functions, lipids have not been as well studied as proteins. We discuss here some of the reasons why it has been challenging to study lipids and outline technological developments that are allowing us to begin lifting lipids out of their “Cinderella” status. We focus on recent advances in lipid identification, visualization, and investigation of their biophysics and perturbations and suggest that the field has sufficiently advanced to encourage broader investigation into these intriguing molecules. PMID:24925915

  9. Lipid modulation of neuronal cholinergic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bottiglieri, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Phospholipids are the major lipids in the plasma membrane, and it is now evident that the function of phospholipids exceeds that of the role of barrier between different aqueous compartments. Several lines of evidence suggest that a major plasma membrane lipids, phosphatidylcholine, may be a useful compound for modulating presynaptic cholinergic transmission. In order to investigate the effects of PC on cholinergic terminals, rat cortical synaptosomes were preloaded with (/sup 3/H)-ACh and then treated with small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) at concentrations (0.8-1.5 mg/ml) similar to those found circulating in plasma. The effects of DPPC on levels, hydrolysis, release, and synthesis of (/sup 3/H)-ACh were then examined. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine decreased the levels of (/sup 3/H)-ACh. This decrease does not result from a dilution of the radioactive (/sup 3/H)-choline by nonradioactive choline derived from PC. Specifically, it is the S/sub 3/ (cytoplasmic) level of (/sup 3/H)-ACh that is decreased by DPPC treatment. This decrease appears to be partially due to lipid activation of an intraterminal cholinesterase which results in hydrolysis of nonvesicular (/sup 3/H)-ACh. The ability of the lipid to interfere with exocytosis may account for the blockade of the K/sup +/ induced (/sup 3/H)-ACh release from the P/sub 3/ (vesicular) fraction. The high affinity choline transporter was competitively inhibited by DPPC treatment when synaptosomes were treated with DPPC prior to (/sup 3/H)-choline loading; the ubiquitous low affinity transport was not affected. These effects were specific for cholinergic neurons since the uptake and release of dopamine and norepinephrine from the substantia nigra and the cortex, respectively, were not affected.

  10. Metabotropic purinergic receptors in lipid membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    D' Ambrosi, N; Volonte, C

    2013-01-01

    There is broad evidence that association of transmembrane receptors and signalling molecules with lipid rafts/caveolae provides an enriched environment for protein-protein interactions necessary for signal transduction, and a mechanism for the modulation of neurotransmitter and/or growth factor receptor function. Several receptors translocate into submembrane compartments after ligand binding, while others move in the opposite direction. The role of such a dynamic localization and functional facilitation is signalling modulation and receptor desensitization or internalization. Purine and pyrimidine nucleotides have been viewed as primordial precursors in the evolution of all forms of intercellular communication, and they are now regarded as fundamental extracellular signalling molecules. They propagate the purinergic signalling by binding to ionotropic and metabotropic receptors expressed on the plasma membrane of almost all cell types, tissues and organs. Here, we have illustrated the localization in lipid rafts/caveolae of G protein-coupled P1 receptors for adenosine and P2Y receptors for nucleoside tri- and di-phosphates. We have highlighted that microdomain partitioning of these purinergic GPCRs is cell-specific, as is the overall expression levels of these same receptors. Moreover, we have described that disruption of submembrane compartments can shift the purinergic receptors from raft/caveolar to non-raft/non-caveolar fractions, and then abolish their ability to activate lipid signalling pathways and to integrate with additional lipid-controlled signalling events. This modulates the biological response to purinergic ligands and most of all indicates that the topology of the various purinergic components at the cell surface not only organizes the signal transduction machinery, but also controls the final cellular response. PMID:23151003

  11. Oncostatin M Modulation of Lipid Storage

    PubMed Central

    Elks, Carrie M.; Stephens, Jacqueline M.

    2015-01-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM) is a cytokine belonging to the gp130 family, whose members serve pleiotropic functions. However, several actions of OSM are unique from those of other gp130 cytokines, and these actions may have critical roles in inflammatory mechanisms influencing several metabolic and biological functions of insulin-sensitive tissues. In this review, the actions of OSM in adipose tissue and liver are discussed, with an emphasis on lipid metabolism. PMID:25689119

  12. Microorganism lipid droplets and biofuel development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingmei; Zhang, Congyan; Shen, Xipeng; Zhang, Xuelin; Cichello, Simon; Guan, Hongbin; Liu, Pingsheng

    2013-01-01

    Lipid droplet (LD) is a cellular organelle that stores neutral lipids as a source of energy and carbon. However, recent research has emerged that the organelle is involved in lipid synthesis, transportation, and metabolism, as well as mediating cellular protein storage and degradation. With the exception of multi-cellular organisms, some unicellular microorganisms have been observed to contain LDs. The organelle has been isolated and characterized from numerous organisms. Triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in LDs can be in excess of 50% of the dry weight in some microorganisms, and a maximum of 87% in some instances. These microorganisms include eukaryotes such as yeast and green algae as well as prokaryotes such as bacteria. Some organisms obtain carbon from CO2 via photosynthesis, while the majority utilizes carbon from various types of biomass. Therefore, high TAG content generated by utilizing waste or cheap biomass, coupled with an efficient conversion rate, present these organisms as bio-tech ‘factories’ to produce biodiesel. This review summarizes LD research in these organisms and provides useful information for further LD biological research and microorganism biodiesel development. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(12): 575-581] PMID:24355300

  13. Lipid peroxidation in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Biji T; Scofield, R Hal

    2006-05-01

    Lipid peroxidation is an important process in oxygen toxicity. Free radicals inflict this damage by attacking polyunsaturated fatty acids, thus setting off a deleterious chain reaction that ultimately results in their disintegration into malondialdehye, 4 hydroxy-2-nonenal and other harmful by-products. Peroxidation of lipids has been implicated in several diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is an autoimmune disorder with unknown aetiology, characterized by the presence of autoantibodies to self-antigens. There is a significant increase in the production of free radicals like superoxide and hydroxyl radicals in SLE. Indices of lipid peroxidation, like conjugated dienes, malondialdehyde, 8-isoprostaglandin F2 alpha are significantly elevated in SLE. Increased ceruloplasmin levels and decreased transferrin levels in the sera of SLE patients have also been described. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase and the amounts of the antioxidant reduced glutathione are also significantly altered in this disease. In addition, there are significant changes in the essential fatty acid profile in the sera of those affected with the disease. In animal models of the disease, immunization of mice with peptides derived from autoantigens induces SLE like disease. Immunization with an oxidatively modified autoantigen led to the rapid development of autoimmunity compared to immunization with the unmodified autoantigen. Thus, oxidative damage appears to play an important role in SLE pathogenesis. PMID:16708886

  14. Electrostatics of DNA complexes with cationic lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherstvy, Andrey

    2007-03-01

    We present the exact solutions of the linear Poisson-Boltzmann theory for several problems relevant to electrostatics of DNA complexes with cationic lipids. We calculate the electrostatic potential and energy for lamellar and inverted hexagonal phases, concentrating on the effects of water-membrane dielectric boundaries. Our results for the complex energy agree qualitatively well with the known numerical solutions of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation. Using the solution for the lamellar phase, we calculate its compressibility modulus and compare our findings with experimental data available suggesting a new scaling dependence on DNA-DNA separations in the complex. Also, we treat analytically charge-charge electrostatic interactions across, along, and in between two low-dielectric membranes. We obtain an estimate for the strength of electrostatic interactions of 1D DNA smectic layers across a lipid membrane. We discuss also some aspects of 2D DNA condensation and DNA-DNA attraction in DNA-lipid lamellar phase in the presence of di- and tri-valent cations and analyze the equilibrium intermolecular separations using the recently developed theory of electrostatic interactions of DNA helical charge motifs.

  15. Lipid Interventions in Aortic Valvular Disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang Jin; Tsomidou, Christiana; Lerakis, Stamatios; Madanieh, Raef; Vittorio, Timothy J; Kosmas, Constantine E

    2015-10-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valvular disease in the elderly population. Presently, there is increasing evidence that aortic stenosis (AS) is an active process of lipid deposition, inflammation, fibrosis and calcium deposition. The pathogenesis of AS shares many similarities to that of atherosclerosis; therefore, it was hypothesized that certain lipid interventions could prevent or slow the progression of aortic valve stenosis. Despite the early enthusiasm that statins may slow the progression of AS, recent large clinical trials did not consistently demonstrate a decrease in the progression of AS. However, some researchers believe that statins may have a benefit early on in the disease process, where inflammation (and not calcification) is the predominant process, in contrast to severe or advanced AS, where calcification (and not inflammation) predominates. Positron emission tomography using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 18F-sodium fluoride can demonstrate the relative contributions of valvular calcification and inflammation in AS, and thus this method might potentially be useful in providing the answer as to whether lipid interventions at the earlier stages of AS would be more effective in slowing the progression of the disease. Currently, there is a strong interest in recombinant apolipoprotein A-1 Milano and in the development of new pharmacological agents, targeting reduction of lipoprotein (a) levels and possibly reduction of the expression of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, as potential means to slow the progression of aortic valvular stenosis. PMID:26263237

  16. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    W?glarz, Ludmi?a; Dzier?ewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100??M and 500??M effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10–20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100??M and 500??M significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100??M and 500??M) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products. PMID:24260736

  17. Supramolecular Protein Immobilization on Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Ralph P G; Hendriksen, Wouter E; Verheijden, Mark; Eelkema, Rienk; Jonkheijm, Pascal; van Esch, Jan H; Brunsveld, Luc

    2015-12-01

    Protein immobilization on surfaces, and on lipid bilayers specifically, has great potential in biomolecular and biotechnological research. Of current special interest is the immobilization of proteins using supramolecular noncovalent interactions. This allows for a reversible immobilization and obviates the use of harsh ligation conditions that could denature fragile proteins. In the work presented here, reversible supramolecular immobilization of proteins on lipid bilayer surfaces was achieved by using the host-guest interaction of the macrocyclic molecule cucurbit[8]uril. A fluorescent protein was successfully immobilized on the lipid bilayer by making use of the property of cucurbit[8]uril to host together a methylviologen and the indole of a tryptophan positioned on the N-terminal of the protein. The supramolecular complex was anchored to the bilayer through a cholesterol moiety that was attached to the methylviologen tethered with a small polyethylene glycol spacer. Protein immobilization studies using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) showed the assembly of the supramolecular complexes on the bilayer. Specific immobilization through the protein N-terminus is more efficient than through protein side-chain events. Reversible surface release of the proteins could be achieved by washing with cucurbit[8]uril or buffer alone. The described system shows the potential of supramolecular assembly of proteins and provides a method for site-specific protein immobilization under mild conditions in a reversible manner. PMID:26527541

  18. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins Using Lipidic Mesophases

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Martin; Cherezov, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    A detailed protocol for crystallizing membrane proteins that makes use of lipidic mesophases is described. This has variously been referred to as the lipid cubic phase or in meso method. The method has been shown to be quite general in that it has been used to solve X-ray crystallographic structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins, proteins that are monomeric, homo- and hetero-multimeric, chromophore-containing and chromophore-free, and α-helical and β-barrel proteins. Its most recent successes are the human engineered β2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A G protein-coupled receptors. Protocols are provided for preparing and characterizing the lipidic mesophase, for reconstituting the protein into the monoolein-based mesophase, for functional assay of the protein in the mesophase, and for setting up crystallizations in manual mode. Methods for harvesting micro-crystals are also described. The time required to prepare the protein-loaded mesophase and to set up a crystallization plate manually is about one hour. PMID:19390528

  19. Lipids, blood pressure and kidney update 2015.

    PubMed

    Banach, Maciej; Aronow, Wilbert S; Serban, Maria-Corina; Rysz, Jacek; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    The most important studies and guidelines in the topics of lipid, blood pressure and kidney published in 2015 were reviewed. In lipid research, the IMProved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial (IMPROVE-IT) trial revalidated the concept "lower is better" for low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol as a target for therapy, increasing the necessity of treatment the high-risk patients to achieve LDL-C goals. After these results, ezetimibe might become the preferred additional drug in the combination therapy of lipid disorders because of oral dosage form and lower acquisition cost. However, for the statin-intolerant patients and those patients requiring essential reductions in LDL-C to achieve their goals, new therapies, including PCSK9 inhibitors remain promising drugs. In blood pressure research, American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2015 guidelines recommended a target for blood pressure below 140/90 mmHg in stable or unstable coronary artery disease patients and below 150/90 mmHg in patients older than 80 years of age, however the recent results of the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) trial have suggested that there might be significant benefits, taking into account cardiovascular risk, for hypertensive patients over 50 without diabetes and blood pressure levels <120/80. In kidney research, reducing the progression of chronic kidney disease and related complications such as anemia, metabolic acidosis, bone and mineral diseases, acute kidney injury and cardiovascular disease is still a goal for clinicians. PMID:26718096

  20. Tumor-induced alterations in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, M; Tutino, V; Caruso, M G

    2014-01-01

    Alterations of lipid metabolism have been increasingly recognized as a hallmark of cancer cells. Cancer cells esterify fatty acids predominantly to phospholipids, an essential component of cell membranes. The main pathway along which proliferating cells gain lipids for membrane synthesis is the endogenous mevalonate pathway. Increased synthesis of mevalonate and mevalonate-derived isoprenoids supports increased cell proliferation through activating growth-regulatory proteins and oncoproteins and promoting DNA synthesis. The importance of a better knowledge of metabolic changes in lipogenic enzymes pathways, as well as of the role of each biochemical pathway in carcinogenesis, provides the rationale for in-depth study of the oncogenic signaling important for the initiation and progression of tumors. The dependence of tumor cells on a dysregulated lipid metabolism suggests that the proteins involved in this process may be excellent chemotherapeutic targets for cancer treatment. Here, we confirm the vital link between lipogenesis and cell proliferation, and our recent findings suggest that nutritional intervention is an effective and safe way to reduce cell proliferation in experimental models of carcinogenesis. The olive oil diet significantly reduces the protein activities of lipogenic enzymes associated with cell growth. The use of natural dietary components could potentially assist in the management of subjects with metabolic disorders-related tumors. PMID:24606524

  1. Plasma flux-dependent lipid A deactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hung-Wen; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Ahmed, Musahid; Liu, Suet Yi; Fang, Yigang; Seog, Joonil; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Graves, David B.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the influence of gas plasma flux on endotoxin lipid A film deactivation. To study the effect of the flux magnitude of reactive species, a modified low-pressure inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with O radical flux ˜1016 cm-2 s-1 was used. After ICP exposures, it was observed that while the Fourier transform infrared absorbance of fatty chains responsible for the toxicity drops by 80% through the film, no obvious film endotoxin deactivation is seen. This is in contrast to that previously observed under low flux exposure conducted in a vacuum beam system: near-surface only loss of fatty chains led to significant film deactivation. Secondary ion mass spectrometry characterization of changes at the film surface did not appear to correlate with the degree of deactivation. Lipid A films need to be nearly completely removed in order to detect significant deactivation under high flux conditions. Additional high reactive species flux experiments were conducted using an atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet and a UV/ozone device. Exposure of lipid A films to reactive species with these devices showed similar deactivation behaviour. The causes for the difference between low and high flux exposures may be due to the nature of near-surface structural modifications as a function of the rate of film removal.

  2. Microorganism lipid droplets and biofuel development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingmei; Zhang, Congyan; Shen, Xipeng; Zhang, Xuelin; Cichello, Simon; Guan, Hongbin; Liu, Pingsheng

    2013-12-01

    Lipid droplet (LD) is a cellular organelle that stores neutral lipids as a source of energy and carbon. However, recent research has emerged that the organelle is involved in lipid synthesis, transportation, and metabolism, as well as mediating cellular protein storage and degradation. With the exception of multi-cellular organisms, some unicellular microorganisms have been observed to contain LDs. The organelle has been isolated and characterized from numerous organisms. Triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in LDs can be in excess of 50% of the dry weight in some microorganisms, and a maximum of 87% in some instances. These microorganisms include eukaryotes such as yeast and green algae as well as prokaryotes such as bacteria. Some organisms obtain carbon from CO2 via photosynthesis, while the majority utilizes carbon from various types of biomass. Therefore, high TAG content generated by utilizing waste or cheap biomass, coupled with an efficient conversion rate, present these organisms as bio-tech 'factories' to produce biodiesel. This review summarizes LD research in these organisms and provides useful information for further LD biological research and microorganism biodiesel development. PMID:24355300

  3. Lipidized giant-cell glioblastoma of cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, L S; Faria, A V; Zanardi, V A; Netto, J R Menezes

    2005-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is recognized rarely in the cerebellum. We describe a peculiar case with lipid accumulation in giant tumor cells, possibly the second example so far reported in this unusual location. A 46-year-old man with a 5-month history of headache, vomiting, dizziness and instability of gait, was found to have on magnetic resonance imaging an expanding mass situated deep in the left cerebellar hemisphere. The lesion was hypointense in T 1- and hyperintense in T2-weighted images, had poorly defined borders, peripheral edema and annular foci of contrast enhancement. Eight months after subtotal removal and radiotherapy, control MRI showed tumor recurrence with aggressive features. The patient was alive 15 months after operation but follow-up was eventually lost. Histologically, the tumor showed marked pleomorphism, with many giant cells characterized by finely vacuolated cytoplasm strongly suggestive of lipid accumulation. There were few, sometimes atypical mitotic figures and foci of endothelial proliferation. The tumor cells were strongly positive for GFAP, vimentin and S100 protein, all of which stressed the foamy appearance of the giant cells. About 15% of nuclei were positive for Ki-67. We considered the case to be a so-called lipidized glioblastoma, first recognized as a subtype by Kepes and Rubinstein [1981]. Differential diagnosis with anaplastic pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma is discussed. PMID:16320820

  4. Lipid-anchored DNA mediates vesicle fusion as observed by lipid and content mixing.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yee-Hung M; van Lengerich, Bettina; Boxer, Steven G

    2008-06-01

    A general method for synthesizing 5(')- and 3(')-coupled DNA-lipid conjugates has been developed and employed in DNA-mediated vesicle fusion. Vesicles presenting complementary DNA fuse, resulting in both outer and inner leaflet mixing as well as content mixing. Fusion is maximized using 5(')- and 3(')-coupled DNA on opposite vesicle partners, rather than only 5(')-coupled DNA, showing the importance of DNA orientation to the process. Lipid and content mixing assays show a dependence of fusion kinetics on the sequence and average number of DNA per vesicle. Vesicles without DNA or presenting noncomplementary sequences also appear to undergo some degree of lipid mixing or exchange, but no content mixing. Total lipid mixing appears to occur more efficiently than inner leaflet mixing and content mixing, and this may be explained by the observed nonspecific lipid mixing and/or the rise of a hemifused intermediate. The ability to control DNA sequence and the relative experimental simplicity of this system make it highly attractive to probe fundamental questions of membrane fusion using both ensemble and single vesicle assays. PMID:20408664

  5. Effects of porcine hemoglobin on serum lipid content and fecal lipid excretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Ryota; Fukunaga, Kenji; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of dietary hemoglobin on serum and liver lipid contents in rats, and the ability of hemoglobin hydrolysates to disrupt lipid absorption. After rats had been fed on casein- or porcine hemoglobin-containing diets for 4 weeks, their serum and liver lipid contents and fecal cholesterol, bile acid, and nitrogen excretion were measured. To elucidate the mechanism of lipid absorption by dietary hemoglobin, we also examined lipase activity, micellar solubility of cholesterol, and bile acid binding activity in the presence of hemoglobin hydrolysates. Dietary hemoglobin decreased serum and liver triglyceride and cholesterol contents and increased fecal fatty acid, cholesterol, and bile acid excretion. In addition, hemoglobin hydrolysates inhibited lipase activity compared with casein hydrolysates in an in vitro study. These results suggested that the hypolipidemic effect of hemoglobin is mediated by increased fecal lipid excretion, and that decreased lipase activity by hemoglobin is at least partially responsible for this result. The observed effects were documented with an 8?g/kg hemoglobin diet, which is lower than in other studies; therefore. hemoglobin may be useful in the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases. PMID:24320987

  6. Lipids of Cunninghamella echinulata with emphasis to gamma-linolenic acid distribution among lipid classes.

    PubMed

    Fakas, Stylianos; Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Galiotou-Panayotou, Maria; Komaitis, Michael; Aggelis, George

    2006-12-01

    Changes in lipid composition of the oleaginous fungus Cunninghamella echinulata were monitored during growth. Lipid fractions and individual lipid classes varied in amount, relative proportions, and fatty acid profile depending on the developmental stage. Neutral lipids (N), comprised mainly of triacylglycerol, were accumulated in the fungal mycelium during both the late exponential and the stationary growth phases with a concomitant decrease in the amount of polar lipids. While fatty acid composition of N fraction remained almost constant, individual N classes showed a noticeable alteration in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) concentration. The glycolipid plus sphingolipid (G+S) fraction consisted mainly of monoglycosylglycerol and diglycosylglycerol. The sugar composition of G+S fraction was analyzed and showed a partial replacement of galactose for glucose as growth proceeded. Phospholipid (P) major classes were phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine, followed by phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and diphosphatidylglycerol. P fatty acid composition showed significant changes with time, resulting in a considerable drop in the unsaturation index of this fraction. While in mid exponential growth phase, all P classes contained more than 20% w/w GLA of total fatty acids, and their concentration decreased to 12-17% w/w, except for the PC class where GLA concentration remained at high levels (e.g., more than 20% w/w). The constant level of GLA in PC at all growth phases suggests that PC was the major source of GLA. Sterol analysis showed that their concentration increased during growth, whereas ergosterol was the major component. PMID:16850299

  7. Design of lipid microparticle dispersions based on the physicochemical properties of the lipid and aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Andreas; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2015-10-15

    Lipid microparticle (LMP) dispersions may be utilized as novel pharmaceutical dosage forms for different administration routes. The particle size and particle size distribution of the LMPs can be classified to the most crucial specifications for therapeutical and research applications. The size parameters can be adjusted via the physicochemical properties of the inner lipid and the outer aqueous phase. In the present study, ten different solid lipids with incorporated lecithin and four concentrations of the surfactant poloxamer 407 (P407) were utilized for LMP dispersion preparation. Physicochemical properties of the bulk and dispersed lipid matrices as well as features of the P407 solutions were determined. Correlations between the mean particle size (mean) of the LMPs and the span as parameter for the particle size distribution as responses were identified by plotting against the measured physicochemical parameters. Most significant linear correlations were found between the mean and the micellization onset temperature (Tmicell) in the parent solution and the dynamic viscosity of the emulsifier solution at 25 °C and between the span and the Tmicell in the LMP dispersion. Consequently, P407 micelles as a reservoir for surfactant monomers and the overall viscosity as a separator between newly-formed lipid droplets are fundamental stabilizing parameters. PMID:26315123

  8. Reversible Effects of Peptide Concentration and Lipid Composition on H-Ras Lipid Anchor Clustering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xubo; Li, Zhenlong; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2015-12-15

    Dynamic clusters of lipid-anchored Ras proteins are important for high-fidelity signal transduction in cells. The average size of Ras nanoclusters was reported to be independent of protein expression levels, and cholesterol depletion is commonly used to test the raft-preference of nanoclusters. However, whether protein concentration and membrane domain stability affect Ras clustering in a reversible manner is not well understood. We used coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to examine the reversibility of the effects of peptide and cholesterol concentrations as well as a lipid domain-perturbing nanoparticle (C60) on the dynamics and stability of H-Ras lipid-anchor nanoclusters. By comparing results from these simulations with previous observations from the literature, we show that effects of peptide/cholesterol concentrations on the dynamics and stability of H-Ras peptide nanoclusters are reversible. Our results also suggest a correlation between the stabilities of lipid domains and Ras nanoclusters, which is supported by our finding that C60 penetrates into the liquid-disordered domain of the bilayer, destabilizing lipid domains and thereby the stability of the nanoclusters. PMID:26682805

  9. Zebrafish yolk lipid processing: a tractable tool for the study of vertebrate lipid transport and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Miyares, Rosa L.; de Rezende, Vitor B.; Farber, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Dyslipidemias are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the world, particularly in developed nations. Investigating lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in experimentally tractable animal models is a crucial step towards understanding and treating human dyslipidemias. The zebrafish, a well-established embryological model, is emerging as a notable system for studies of lipid metabolism. Here, we describe the value of the lecithotrophic, or yolk-metabolizing, stages of the zebrafish as a model for studying lipid metabolism and lipoprotein transport. We demonstrate methods to assay yolk lipid metabolism in embryonic and larval zebrafish. Injection of labeled fatty acids into the zebrafish yolk promotes efficient uptake into the circulation and rapid metabolism. Using a genetic model for abetalipoproteinemia, we show that the uptake of labeled fatty acids into the circulation is dependent on lipoprotein production. Furthermore, we examine the metabolic fate of exogenously delivered fatty acids by assaying their incorporation into complex lipids. Moreover, we demonstrate that this technique is amenable to genetic and pharmacologic studies. PMID:24812437

  10. Chemical Enhancer Solubility in Human Stratum Corneum Lipids and Enhancer Mechanism of Action on Stratum Corneum Lipid Domain

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Sarah A.; Li, S. Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Previously, chemical enhancer-induced permeation enhancement on human stratum corneum (SC) lipoidal pathway at enhancer thermodynamic activities approaching unity in the absence of cosolvents (defined as Emax) was determined and hypothesized to be related to the enhancer solubilities in the SC lipid domain. The objectives of the present study were to (a) quantify enhancer uptake into SC lipid domain at saturation, (b) elucidate enhancer mechanism(s) of action, and (c) study the SC lipid phase behavior at Emax. It was concluded that direct quantification of enhancer uptake into SC lipid domain using intact SC was complicated. Therefore a liposomal model of extracted human SC lipids was used. In the liposome study, enhancer uptake into extracted human SC lipid liposomes (EHSCLL) was shown to correlate with Emax. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to evaluate lipid phase alterations in enhancer-treated intact SC. IR spectra demonstrated an increase in the lipid domain fluidity and DSC thermograms indicated a decrease in the phase transition temperature with increasing Emax. These results suggest that the enhancer mechanism of action is through enhancer intercalation into SC intercellular lipids and subsequent lipid lamellae fluidization related to enhancer lipid concentration. PMID:19747970

  11. Industrial wastes as a promising renewable source for production of microbial lipid and direct transesterification of the lipid into biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Cheirsilp, Benjamas; Louhasakul, Yasmi

    2013-08-01

    Two strategies of converting industrial wastes to microbial lipid and direct transesterification of obtained lipid into biodiesel were attempted. Several oleaginous yeasts were cultivated on industrial wastes. The yeasts grew well on the wastes with low C/N ratio (i.e. serum latex) but accumulated high lipid content only when the wastes had a high C/N ratio (i.e. palm oil mill effluent and crude glycerol). The yeast lipids have similar fatty acid composition to that of plant oil indicating their potential use as biodiesel feedstocks. The combination of these wastes and two-phase cultivation for cell growth and lipid accumulation improved lipid productivity of the selected yeast. The direct transesterification process that eliminates cell drying and lipid extraction steps, gave comparable yield of biodiesel (fatty acid methyl ester >70% within 1h) to that of conventional method. These two successful strategies may contribute greatly to industrializing oil production from microbes and industrial wastes. PMID:23747444

  12. Multiscale Modeling of Supported Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, Matthew I.; Xing, Chenyue; Faller, Roland

    Cell membranes consist of a multitude of lipid molecules that serve as a framework for the even greater variety of membrane associated proteins [1-4]. As this highly complex (nonequilibrium) system cannot easily be understood and studied in a controlled way, a wide variety of model systems have been devised to understand the dynamics, structure, and thermodynamics in biological membranes. One such model system is a supported lipid bilayer (SLB), a two-dimensional membrane suspended on a surface. SLBs have been realized to be manageable experimentally while reproducing many of the key features of real biological membranes [5,6]. One of the main advantages of supported bilayers is the physical stability due to the solid support that enables a wide range of surface characterization techniques not available to free or unsupported membranes. As SLBs maintain some of the crucial structural and dynamic properties of biological membranes, they provide an important bridge to natural systems. In order to mimic cell membranes reliably, certain structural and dynamic features have to be reliably reproduced in the artificially constructed lipid bilayers. SLBs should display lateral mobility as in living cells, because many membrane activities involve transport, recruitment, or assembly of specific components. It is also critical for membranes to exhibit the correct thermodynamic phase, namely, a fluid lipid bilayer, to respond to environmental stress such as temperature and pressure changes [7]. There are several ways to fabricate supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) on planar substrates. One can use vesicle fusion on solid substrates [5,8-10] as well as Langmuir-Blodgett deposition [11,12]. Proteoliposome adsorption and subsequent membrane formation on a mica surface was first demonstrated by Brian and McConnell [13]. Because of its simplicity and reproducibility, this is one of the most common approaches to prepare supported membranes. A diverse range of different solid substrates has been used as support material below the bilayer [14,15]. Silicon oxide is the material of choice for vesicle fusion [16]. Polymer cushions dampen the effect of hard surfaces and therefore have been actively investigated [17-20]. However, it is not fully understood which changes the introduction of a solid support introduces into such a biomimetic system. Experimentally it is almost impossible to address such changes, as extremely highresolution data would be required.

  13. Lipid oxidation in unfractionated serum and plasma.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, E; Pinchuk, I; Bor, A; Fainaru, M; Samuni, A M; Lichtenberg, D

    1998-05-01

    In an attempt to develop an assay for the susceptibility of plasma lipids to oxidation, we have studied the kinetics of copper-induced oxidation in diluted serum and plasma prepared with different anticoagulants (heparin, citrate and EDTA) by monitoring the absorbance of oxidation-products at several wavelengths. These studies revealed the complex and interrelated effects of the water-soluble antioxidant ascorbic acid, citrate and chloride ions on the kinetics of copper-induced oxidation of plasma lipids. Specifically, the onset of oxidation induced by copper-citrate chelates is only slightly affected by chloride ions and is accelerated upon increasing the copper concentration. By contrast, in the absence of citrate, the lag preceding oxidation in diluted serum or plasma (but not the maximal rate of oxidation) depends markedly on the chloride concentration in the diluting medium. In the absence of Cl-, the lag preceding oxidation is a decreasing saturable function of copper concentration, whereas in a normal phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS), the lag shows a biphasic dependence on copper concentration such that at copper concentrations above 10-30 microM (depending on the extent of plasma dilution), increasing the concentration of copper results in prolongation of the lag. This dependence of copper-induced oxidation on the concentration of copper is not observed for dialyzed serum unless ascorbic acid is added. Our interpretation of these results is that water-soluble reductants and chloride ions act synergistically to stabilize Cu+, on the expense of Cu2+. Quenching of free radicals by Cu+ may be responsible for the prolongation of the lag at high copper concentrations, with no reduction of the maximal rate of oxidation. In spite of the complex dependencies described above, spectrophotometric monitoring of the kinetics of oxidation of plasma lipids, under 'optimized conditions' (50-fold diluted serum, in PBS containing 720 microM sodium citrate and 100 microM copper), agrees with independent measurements of the consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Hence, the spectroscopic method may become useful for evaluation of the susceptibility of plasma lipids to oxidation. This possibility, however, has yet to be elucidated through investigations of the correlation between the susceptibility of serum lipids to copper-induced oxidation in vitro and clinical factors of significance. PMID:9682469

  14. Radiation-induced lipid peroxidation and the fluidity of erythrocyte membrane lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Guille, J.; Raison, J.K.; Gebicki, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of radiation-induced peroxidation on the fluidity of the phospholipids of the erythrocyte membrane was studied using both erythrocyte ghosts and liposomes formed from the polar lipids of erythrocytes. In liposomes, the oxidation of the phospholipids increased with radiation dose, but there was no change in the fluidity of the lipids as measured by spin-label motion. Under the same conditions of irradiation, no oxidation of phospholipid was detected in erythrocyte ghosts, although changes occurred in the motion of spin labels intercalated with the membrane. These changes were attributed to radiation-induced alterations in the membrane proteins. It is concluded that alterations in motion of spin labels, observed with intact membranes after irradiation, are most likely the result of changes in the structure of membrane proteins rather than the lipids.

  15. Lipids around the Clock: Focus on Circadian Rhythms and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gnocchi, Davide; Pedrelli, Matteo; Hurt-Camejo, Eva; Parini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and transport are responsible for the development of a large spectrum of pathologies, ranging from cardiovascular diseases, to metabolic syndrome, even to tumour development. Recently, a deeper knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that control our biological clock and circadian rhythms has been achieved. From these studies it has clearly emerged how the molecular clock tightly regulates every aspect of our lives, including our metabolism. This review analyses the organisation and functioning of the circadian clock and its relevance in the regulation of physiological processes. We also describe metabolism and transport of lipids and lipoproteins as an essential aspect for our health, and we will focus on how the circadian clock and lipid metabolism are greatly interconnected. Finally, we discuss how a deeper knowledge of this relationship might be useful to improve the recent spread of metabolic diseases. PMID:25665169

  16. Changes in lipid composition, fatty acid profile and lipid oxidative stability during Cantonese sausage processing.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chaoying; Zhao, Mouming; Sun, Weizheng; Zhou, Feibai; Cui, Chun

    2013-03-01

    Lipid composition, fatty acid profile and lipid oxidative stability were evaluated during Cantonese sausage processing. Free fatty acids increased with concomitant decrease of phospholipids. Total content of free fatty acids at 72 h in muscle and adipose tissue was 7.341 mg/g and 3.067 mg/g, respectively. Total amount of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (SFA, MUFA, and PUFA) in neutral lipid exhibited a little change during processing, while the proportion of PUFA significantly decreased in the PL fraction. The main triacylglycerols were POO+SLO+OOO, PSO (P = palmitic acid, O = oleic acid, L = linoleic acid, S = stearic acid), and a preferential hydrolysis of palmitic, oleic and linoleic acid was observed. Phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) were the main components of phospholipids and PE exhibited the most significant degradation during processing. Thiobarbituric acid values (TBARS) increased while peroxide values and hexanal contents varied during processing. PMID:23273460

  17. Pulmonary vascular resistance during lipid infusion in neonates.

    PubMed Central

    Prasertsom, W.; Phillipos, E. Z.; Van Aerde, J. E.; Robertson, M.

    1996-01-01

    Using two-dimensional echocardiography, pulmonary vascular resistance was estimated from right ventricular pre-ejection period to ejection time (RVPEP/ET) in 11 preterm infants with respiratory distress, to test the effect of different doses of continuous lipid infusion. Echocardiography was performed at baseline with no lipid infusing 2 and 24 hours after 1.5 and 3 g/kg/day of intravenous lipid, 24 hours after discontinuing intravenous lipid emulsion, and 2 hours after restarting intravenous lipid. After 24 hours of intravenous lipid at 1.5 g/kg/day the RVPEP/ET rose to mean (SD) 0.287 (0.03) from a baseline value of 0.225 (0.02) and to 0.326 (0.05) after 24 hours of intravenous lipid at 3 g/kg/day. Pulmonary arterial pressure returned to baseline 24 hours after the intravenous lipid had been discontinued. Continuous 24 hour infusion of lipid caused significant dose and time-dependent increases in pulmonary vascular resistance. Intravenous lipid may aggravate pulmonary hypertension. PMID:8777674

  18. Case Series of Lipid Accumulation in the Human Corpus Cavernosum

    PubMed Central

    Alwaal, Amjad; Wang, Lin; Zaid, Uwais B.; Lin, Guiting; Lue, Tom F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Erectile dysfunction is a prevalent problem affecting millions of men in the United States and around the world. There have been no reports of the presence of lipids within the human penile corporal bodies, whether in normal or diseased states. We present here a case series of 9 patients who underwent penile corporal tissue biopsy during penile prosthesis insertion with severe intracorporal fibrosis and difficulties during insertion. Oil Red O staining was done to identify lipids; LipidTOX and phalloidin double staining was used to identify lipid location within the corpora, and Masson's trichrome staining was done to assess fibrosis. We identified lipid accumulation in those 9 corporal tissue samples, and further analysis showed the distribution to be 10% intramyocellular lipids and 90% extramyocellular lipids. These 9 specimens contained increased amount of collagen when compared with controls. In addition, we analyzed corporal samples from 10 random erectile dysfunction patients presenting for penile prosthesis insertion and identified no lipid accumulation in those control patients. This is the first report of lipid accumulation in the human corpus cavernosum. Possible mechanisms of lipid accumulation include androgen deficiency and dedifferentiation of corpus smooth muscle cells into other phenotypes; however, the exact mechanism is unknown and further research is needed. PMID:25674764

  19. Composition Based Strategies for Controlling Radii in Lipid Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Kurczy, Michael E.; Mellander, Lisa J.; Najafinobar, Neda; Cans, Ann-Sofie

    2014-01-01

    Nature routinely carries out small-scale chemistry within lipid bound cells and organelles. Liposome–lipid nanotube networks are being developed by many researchers in attempt to imitate these membrane enclosed environments, with the goal to perform small-scale chemical studies. These systems are well characterized in terms of the diameter of the giant unilamellar vesicles they are constructed from and the length of the nanotubes connecting them. Here we evaluate two methods based on intrinsic curvature for adjusting the diameter of the nanotube, an aspect of the network that has not previously been controllable. This was done by altering the lipid composition of the network membrane with two different approaches. In the first, the composition of the membrane was altered via lipid incubation of exogenous lipids; either with the addition of the low intrinsic curvature lipid soy phosphatidylcholine (soy-PC) or the high intrinsic curvature lipid soy phosphatidylethanolamine (soy-PE). In the second approach, exogenous lipids were added to the total lipid composition during liposome formation. Here we show that for both lipid augmentation methods, we observed a decrease in nanotube diameter following soy-PE additions but no significant change in size following the addition of soy-PC. Our results demonstrate that the effect of soy-PE on nanotube diameter is independent of the method of addition and suggests that high curvature soy-PE molecules facilitate tube membrane curvature. PMID:24392077

  20. Lipid Quality in Infant Nutrition: Current Knowledge and Future Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Delplanque, Bernadette; Gibson, Robert; Koletzko, Berthold; Lapillonne, Alexandre; Strandvik, Birgitta

    2015-07-01

    Dietary lipids are key for infants to not only meet their high energy needs but also fulfill numerous metabolic and physiological functions critical to their growth, development, and health. The lipid composition of breast milk varies during lactation and according to the mother's diet, whereas the lipid composition of infant formulae varies according to the blend of different fat sources. This report compares the compositions of lipids in breast milk and infant formulae, and highlights the roles of dietary lipids in term and preterm infants and their potential biological and health effects. The major differences between breast milk and formulae lie in a variety of saturated fatty acids (such as palmitic acid, including its structural position) and unsaturated fatty acids (including arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid), cholesterol, and complex lipids. The functional outcomes of these differences during infancy and for later child and adult life are still largely unknown, and some of them are discussed, but there is consensus that opportunities exist for improvements in the qualitative lipid supply to infants through the mother's diet or infant formulae. Furthermore, research is required in several areas, including the needs of term and preterm infants for long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, the sites of action and clinical effects of lipid mediators on immunity and inflammation, the role of lipids on metabolic, neurological, and immunological outcomes, and the mechanisms by which lipids act on short- and long-term health. PMID:25883056

  1. Analysis of Lipoplex Structure and Lipid Phase Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana

    2012-07-18

    Efficient delivery of genetic material to cells is needed for tasks of utmost importance in the laboratory and clinic, such as gene transfection and gene silencing. Synthetic cationic lipids can be used as delivery vehicles for nucleic acids and are now considered the most promising nonviral gene carriers. They form complexes (lipoplexes) with the polyanionic nucleic acids. A critical obstacle for clinical application of the lipid-mediated DNA delivery (lipofection) is its unsatisfactory efficiency for many cell types. Understanding the mechanism of lipid-mediated DNA delivery is essential for their successful application, as well as for a rational design and synthesis of novel cationic lipoid compounds for enhanced gene delivery. A viewpoint now emerging is that the critical factor in lipid-mediated transfection is the structural evolution of lipoplexes within the cell, upon interacting and mixing with cellular lipids. In particular, recent studies showed that the phase evolution of lipoplex lipids upon interaction and mixing with membrane lipids appears to be decisive for transfection success: specifically, lamellar lipoplex formulations, which were readily susceptible to undergoing lamellar-nonlamellar phase transition upon mixing with cellular lipids and were found rather consistently associated with superior transfection potency, presumably as a result of facilitated DNA release. Thus, understanding the lipoplex structure and the phase changes upon interacting with membrane lipids is important for the successful application of the cationic lipids as gene carriers.

  2. Perilipin-related protein regulates lipid metabolism in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chughtai, Ahmed Ali; Kaššák, Filip; Kostrouchová, Markéta; Novotný, Jan Philipp; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    Perilipins are lipid droplet surface proteins that contribute to fat metabolism by controlling the access of lipids to lipolytic enzymes. Perilipins have been identified in organisms as diverse as metazoa, fungi, and amoebas but strikingly not in nematodes. Here we identify the protein encoded by the W01A8.1 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans as the closest homologue and likely orthologue of metazoan perilipin. We demonstrate that nematode W01A8.1 is a cytoplasmic protein residing on lipid droplets similarly as human perilipins 1 and 2. Downregulation or elimination of W01A8.1 affects the appearance of lipid droplets resulting in the formation of large lipid droplets localized around the dividing nucleus during the early zygotic divisions. Visualization of lipid containing structures by CARS microscopy in vivo showed that lipid-containing structures become gradually enlarged during oogenesis and relocate during the first zygotic division around the dividing nucleus. In mutant embryos, the lipid containing structures show defective intracellular distribution in subsequent embryonic divisions and become gradually smaller during further development. In contrast to embryos, lipid-containing structures in enterocytes and in epidermal cells of adult animals are smaller in mutants than in wild type animals. Our results demonstrate the existence of a perilipin-related regulation of fat metabolism in nematodes and provide new possibilities for functional studies of lipid metabolism. PMID:26357594

  3. Apolipoprotein-mediated pathways of lipid antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    van den Elzen, Peter; Garg, Salil; León, Luis; Brigl, Manfred; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A; Gumperz, Jenny E; Dascher, Chris C; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Sacks, Frank M; Illarionov, Petr A; Besra, Gurdyal S; Kent, Sally C; Moody, D Branch; Brenner, Michael B

    2005-10-01

    Peptide antigens are presented to T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, with endogenous peptides presented by MHC class I and exogenous peptides presented by MHC class II. In contrast to the MHC system, CD1 molecules bind lipid antigens that are presented at the antigen-presenting cell (APC) surface to lipid antigen-reactive T cells. Because CD1 molecules survey endocytic compartments, it is self-evident that they encounter antigens from extracellular sources. However, the mechanisms of exogenous lipid antigen delivery to CD1-antigen-loading compartments are not known. Serum apolipoproteins are mediators of extracellular lipid transport for metabolic needs. Here we define the pathways mediating markedly efficient exogenous lipid antigen delivery by apolipoproteins to achieve T-cell activation. Apolipoprotein E binds lipid antigens and delivers them by receptor-mediated uptake into endosomal compartments containing CD1 in APCs. Apolipoprotein E mediates the presentation of serum-borne lipid antigens and can be secreted by APCs as a mechanism to survey the local environment to capture antigens or to transfer microbial lipids from infected cells to bystander APCs. Thus, the immune system has co-opted a component of lipid metabolism to develop immunological responses to lipid antigens. PMID:16208376

  4. Zinc Regulates Lipid Metabolism and MMPs Expression in Lipid Disturbance Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenggui; Huang, Zhibin; Liu, Lijuan; Luo, Chufan; Lu, Guihua; Li, Qinglang; Gao, Xiuren

    2015-12-01

    Lipid disturbance induced by high-fat diet is a worldwide problem, and it can induce inflammation and oxidative stress in vivo. Zinc is considered as an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory agent. Since matrix metalloprotease 2 (MMP2) and matrix metalloprotease 9 (MMP9)'s expressions are changed under many pathological conditions, we would like to know how zinc affects lipid metabolism and MMP2, MMP9's expressions in the lipid disturbance rabbits. Twenty-four male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into four groups. Each group had six rabbits, and they were fed with regular diet, high-fat diet, high-fat diet+zinc, and regular diet+zinc separately for 12 weeks. High-fat diet induced lipid disturbance significantly which raised the level of aspartate aminotransferase (p<0.01) and alanine transaminase (p<0.05) in the high-fat diet group, but zinc supplement reversed this phenomenon (p<0.05). Zinc did not reduce total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (p>0.05), but it lowered triglyceride (TG) and raised high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (p<0.01). Zinc also reduced high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (p<0.01) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)'s expressions (p<0.05). Zinc reduced the epicardial adipose tissue and alleviated the hepatic steatosis. Zinc suppressed MMP2 and MMP9's expressions in vivo, but it did not alleviate the aorta fatty streak's severity in the lipid disturbance rabbits. Zinc protected the liver, reduced TG, hs-CRP, and IL-6 and raised HDL-C in the lipid disturbance rabbits. Zinc suppressed MMP2 and MMP9's expressions in vivo, but it did not alleviate the severity of aorta fatty streak induced by the high-fat diet. PMID:25987270

  5. Response of pigeon guillemots to variable abundance of high-lipid and low-lipid prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litzow, M.A.; Piatt, J.F.; Prichard, A.K.; Roby, D.D.

    2002-01-01

    Populations of the pigeon guillemot (Cepphus columba) and other piscivores have been in decline for several decades in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea, and a decline in abundance of lipid-rich schooling fishes is hypothesized as the major cause. We tested this hypothesis by studying the breeding biology of pigeon guillemots during 1995-1999 while simultaneously measuring prey abundance with beach seines and bottom trawls. Our study area (Kachemak Bay, Alaska) comprises two oceanographically distinct areas. Populations of a lipid-rich schooling fish, Pacific sand lance (Ammodytes hexapterus), were higher in the warmer Inner Bay than in the colder Outer Bay, and sand lance abundance was higher during warm years. Populations of low-lipid content demersal fishes were similar between areas. Chick survival to age 15 days was 47% higher in the Inner Bay (high-lipid diet) than in the Outer Bay (low-lipid diet), and estimated reproductive success (chicks fledged nest-1) was 62% higher in the Inner Bay than in the Outer Bay. Chick provisioning rate (kJ chick-1 h-1) increased with the proportion of sand lance in the diet (r2=0.21), as did growth rate (g day-1) of younger (beta) chicks in two-chick broods (r2=0.14). Pigeon guillemots in the Inner Bay switched to demersal prey during years of below-average sand lance abundance, and these birds reacted to 38-fold interannual changes in sand lance abundance with reductions in beta chick growth rates, with no decline in beta chick survival. In contrast, the proportion of nests experiencing brood reduction in the Outer Bay (demersal diet) increased >300% during years of below-average demersal abundance, although demersal fish abundance varied only 4-fold among years. Our results support the hypothesis that recovery of pigeon guillemot populations from the effects of the Exxon Valdez oil spill is limited by availability of lipid-rich prey.

  6. Conservation of Lipid Functions in Cytochrome bc Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, S. Saif; Yamashita, Eiki; Ryan, Christopher M.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Cramer, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid binding sites and properties are compared in two families of hetero-oligomeric membrane protein complexes known to have similar functions in order to gain further understanding of the role of lipid in the function, dynamics, and assembly of these complexes. Using the crystal structure information for both complexes, lipid binding properties were compared for the cytochrome b6f and bc1 complexes that function in photosynthetic and respiratory membrane energy transduction. Comparison of lipid and detergent binding sites in the b6f complex with those in bc1 shows significant conservation of lipid positions. Seven lipid binding sites in the cyanobacterial b6f complex overlap three natural sites in the C. reinhardtii algal complex, and four sites in the yeast mitochondrial bc1 complex. The specific identity of lipids is different in b6f and bc1 complexes: b6f contains SDG, PG, MGDG, and DGDG, whereas cardiolipin, PE, and PA are present in the yeast bc1 complex. The lipidic chlorophyll a and ?-carotene in cyanobacterial b6f, as well as eicosane in C. reinhardtii, are unique to the photosynthetic b6f complex. The inferences of lipid binding sites and functions were supported by sequence, intermolecular distance, and B-factor information on interacting lipid groups and coordinating amino acid residues. The lipid functions inferred in the b6f complex are: (i) substitution of a trans-membrane helix (TMH) by a lipid and chlorin ring; (ii) lipid and ?-carotene connection of peripheral and core domains; (iii) stabilization of iron-sulfur protein TMH; (iv) n-side charge and polarity compensation; (v) ?-carotene-mediated super-complex with photosystem I complex. PMID:21978667

  7. Exploration of polar lipid accumulation profiles in Euglena gracilis using LipidBlast, an MS/MS spectral library constructed in silico.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takumi; Furuhashi, Takeshi; Okazawa, Atsushi; Nakai, Rai; Nakazawa, Masami; Kind, Tobias; Fiehn, Oliver; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Arita, Masanori; Ohta, Daisaku

    2014-01-01

    A rapid protocol for polar lipid profiling was applied to Euglena gracilis lipid metabolism by LipidBlast, an MS/MS spectral similarity search tool. The similarity search results suggested anoxia-induced polar lipid metabolism in Euglena characterized by the accumulation of differential lipid classes, carbon chain lengths, and unsaturated bond numbers. The informatics-supported MS spectral search provides an alternative option for global lipid profiling studies. PMID:25036478

  8. Lipid and lipid mediator profiling of human synovial fluid in rheumatoid arthritis patients by means of LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Giera, Martin; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea; Toes, Rene; Gao, Fei; Dalli, Jesmond; Deelder, André M; Serhan, Charles N; Mayboroda, Oleg A

    2012-11-01

    Human synovial fluid (SF) provides nutrition and lubrication to the articular cartilage. Particularly in arthritic diseases, SF is extensively accumulating in the synovial junction. During the last decade lipids have attracted considerable attention as their role in the development and resolution of diseases became increasingly recognized. Here, we describe a capillary LC-MS/MS screening platform that was used for the untargeted screening of lipids present in human SF of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Using this platform we give a detailed overview of the lipids and lipid-derived mediators present in the SF of RA patients. Almost 70 different lipid components from distinct lipid classes were identified and quantification was achieved for the lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylcholine species. In addition, we describe a targeted LC-MS/MS lipid mediator metabolomics strategy for the detection, identification and quantification of maresin 1, lipoxin A(4) and resolvin D5 in SF from RA patients. Additionally, we present the identification of 5S,12S-diHETE as a major marker of lipoxygenase pathway interactions in the investigated SF samples. These results are the first to provide a comprehensive approach to the identification and profiling of lipids and lipid mediators present in SF and to describe the presence of key anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediators identified in SF from RA patients. PMID:22841830

  9. Systems-Level Lipid Analysis Methodologies for Qualitative and Quantitative Investigation of Lipid Signaling Events During Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Wijesinghe, Dayanjan S.; Chalfant, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Accumulating evidence implicates a prominent role for lipid signaling molecules in the regulation of wound healing. These lipids regulate hemostasis, onset and resolution of inflammation, migration and proliferation cells, angiogenesis, epithelialization, and remodeling of collagen. The objective of this overview is to demonstrate the applicability of systems level lipid analyses to identify and quantify lipid involved in events leading to wound healing. Approach Current advances in liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry have provided the means for carrying out quantitative and qualitative analysis of lipids at a systems level. This emerging field is collectively referred to as lipidomics and its potential in wound healing research is largely ignored. Results While comprehensive applications of lipidomics in wound healing are limited, studies carried out by the authors as well as others demonstrate distinct changes in the lipidome during the wound healing process. Innovation Until recently, investigations into lipids were limited to the study of a few lipids at a time. Lipidomics approaches provide the capability to quantitatively and qualitatively assay almost the full complement of lipid signaling circuits at the same time. This allows obtaining a system level understanding of changes to the entire lipidome during the wound healing process. Conclusion The technology provides promising approach to understanding new signaling pathways based on lipids involved in wound healing. The understanding gained from such studies has the potential for the development of novel lipid based treatment strategies to promote wound healing. PMID:24527363

  10. 2013 PLANT LIPIDS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR (JANUARY 27-FEBRUARY 1, 2013 - HOTEL GALVEZ, GALVESTON TX)

    SciTech Connect

    Welti, Ruth

    2012-11-01

    Presenters will discuss the latest advances in plant and algal lipid metabolism, oil synthesis, lipid signaling, lipid visualization, lipid biotechnology and its applications, the physiological and developmental roles of lipids, and plant lipids in health. Sessions include: Producing Nutritional Lipids; Metabolic biochemistry in the next decade; Triacylglycerols: Metabolism, function, and as a target for engineering; Lipids in Protection, Reproduction, and Development; Genetic and Lipidomic Approaches to Understanding Lipid Metabolism and Signaling; Lipid Signaling in Stress Responses; New Insights on the Path to Triacylglycerols; Membrane Lipid Signaling; Lipid Visualization; Development of Biofuels and Industrial Lipids.

  11. Lipid accumulation, lipid oxidation, and low plasma levels of acquired antibodies against oxidized lipids associate with degeneration and rupture of the intracranial aneurysm wall

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (sIA) causes an often fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Why some sIAs rupture remains unknown. Since sIA walls bear some histological similarities with early atherosclerotic lesions, we hypothesized that accumulation and oxidation of lipids might occur in the sIA wall and might associate with sIA wall degeneration. Tissue samples from sIA fundi (n = 54) were studied with histochemistry and a panel of previously characterized antibodies for epitopes of oxidized LDL (OxLDL). Plasma samples from sIA carriers (n = 125) were studied with ELISA and EIA for IgG and IgM -antibodies against a panel of OxLDL epitopes. Results Lipid accumulation, foam cells, and oxidized lipids were found both in unruptured and ruptured sIA walls. Lipid accumulation associated with wall degeneration (P < 0.001), as did the expression of adipophilin, a marker of lipid ingestion by cells. Lipid accumulation associated also with loss of mural cells (P < 0.001), as did the accumulation of OxLDL (P < 0.001). Plasma IgG antibody titers against OxLDL or malondialdehyde modified LDL were higher in patients with unruptured sIAs than in patients with aneurysmal SAH (P ? 0.001). A trend but not statistically significant differences were found in plasma IgM antibodies against oxidized lipids. Conclusions Accumulation of lipids and their oxidation in the sIA wall associates with the degeneration of the sIA wall. Acquired immunity against oxidized lipid epitopes may be protective of lipid associated sIA wall degeneration, but warrants further studies. PMID:24252658

  12. [Role of lipid intake in obesity].

    PubMed

    García-Lorda, P

    2002-02-01

    It is a commonly accepted fact that the fat in our diet plays an important role in the onset and maintenance of obesity. The excess consumption of energy associated with a high intake of fat and the greater metabolic efficiency in its use are the mechanisms suggested to support the relationship between dietary fat and adiposity. Nonetheless, the epidemiological evidence in favour of lipid intake as a promoter of obesity is not conclusive. Intervention studies, on the other hand, consistently show that there is a modest decrease in weight associated with low fat diets ad libitum, which seems to be explained by the reduction in the intake associated with such an intervention. However, this effect on weight is not maintained over time as considerable reductions in the intake of lipids in the long term seem to have no or minimal effects on corporal adiposity. It has been consistently proven that the restriction of total calories leads to greater weight losses than those achieved exclusively with fat restrictions and, on the other hand, there is very little evidence that low-fat diets per se lead to a weight loss regardless of the calorie restriction. Finally, it must be remembered that low-fat diets rich in carbohydrates are not without undesirable side effects, particularly on cardiovascular risk factors. In conclusion, a change in habits leading to an overall restriction in calories and the promotion of physical activity is a much more desirable strategy in the treatment and prevention of obesity than the apparently promising restriction of lipids in isolation. PMID:11928539

  13. Drug release mechanisms of cast lipid implants.

    PubMed

    Kreye, F; Siepmann, F; Willart, J F; Descamps, M; Siepmann, J

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work was to better understand which physicochemical processes are involved in the control of drug release from lipid implants prepared by melting and casting. Lipid implants gain steadily in importance as controlled parenteral drug delivery systems: In contrast to PLGA-based devices, no acidic microclimates are created, which can inactivate incorporated drugs. The melting and casting method offers various advantages over the commonly used direct compression technique. For example, powder de-mixing during manufacturing and highly challenging scale-up due to poor powder flowability are avoided. Importantly, broad spectra of drug release patterns can be easily provided by varying the type of lipid. The resulting drug release rates are generally lower than those of implants prepared by direct compression. This is probably due to the differences in the microstructure of the pore network of the systems. Drug or water diffusion plays a dominant role for the control of drug release, potentially combined with limited drug solubility effects, caused by the low amounts of water available within the implants. In the case of pure diffusion control, a mechanistic realistic mathematical theory is proposed, which allows for quantitative predictions of the effects of formulation parameters on the resulting drug release kinetics. Importantly, these theoretical predictions could be successfully confirmed by independent experiments. Thus, the obtained new insight into the underlying drug release mechanisms can significantly facilitate the optimization of this type of advanced drug delivery systems. This is particularly helpful if long release periods are targeted, requiring time-consuming experimental studies. PMID:21352913

  14. Insect endosymbiont proliferation is limited by lipid availability

    PubMed Central

    Herren, Jeremy K; Paredes, Juan C; Schüpfer, Fanny; Arafah, Karim; Bulet, Philippe; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Spiroplasma poulsonii is a maternally transmitted bacterial endosymbiont that is naturally associated with Drosophila melanogaster. S. poulsonii resides extracellularly in the hemolymph, where it must acquire metabolites to sustain proliferation. In this study, we find that Spiroplasma proliferation specifically depletes host hemolymph diacylglyceride, the major lipid class transported by the lipoprotein, Lpp. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Lpp expression, which reduces the amount of circulating lipids, inhibits Spiroplasma proliferation demonstrating that bacterial proliferation requires hemolymph-lipids. Altogether, our study shows that an insect endosymbiont acquires specific lipidic metabolites from the transport lipoproteins in the hemolymph of its host. In addition, we show that the proliferation of this endosymbiont is limited by the availability of hemolymph lipids. This feature could limit endosymbiont over-proliferation under conditions of host nutrient limitation as lipid availability is strongly influenced by the nutritional state. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02964.001 PMID:25027439

  15. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Lipid Bilayers and Tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Linda S.; Yuan, Jing; Pramudya, Yohannes; Nguyen, Lam T.

    2007-03-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are found in a variety of biological membranes and have been implicated with lipid raft formation and possible function, typical molecules include DHA (Docosahexanoic Acid) and AA (Alphalinoleic Acid) which have been the focus of considerable attention in recent years. We are interested in the phase behavior of these molecules in the lipid bilayer. The addition of lipid molecules with polyunsaturated chains has a clear effect on the fluidity and curvature of the membrane and we investigate the effects the addition of polyunsaturated lipids on bilayer structure and tubule formation. Self-assembled cylindrical lipid tubules have attracted considerable attention because of their interesting structures and potential technological applications. Using x-ray diffraction techniques, Atomic Force Microscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging, both symmetric and mixed chain lipids were incorporated into model membranes and the effects on bilayer structure and tubule formation investigated.

  16. Protein-lipid interactions in food systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Alzagtat, Ahmeda A; Alli, Inteaz

    2002-05-01

    Proteins and lipids, both individually or as complexes, play important functional roles in foods. Since the 1970s food scientists have devoted attention to the nature of these interactions and particularly to their effects on functional characteristics of protein-based foods. Previously, most of the published work was devoted to the biochemical aspects of protein-lipid interactions in biological systems. This article reviews the protein-lipid interactions of both naturally occurring protein-lipid complexes and protein-lipid complexes formed by induced interactions in foods and food products. The physicochemical characteristics of known protein-lipid complexes, the nature of binding which results in formation of these complexes and the effect of the interactions on food functionality are reviewed. PMID:11951587

  17. Electrostatically driven lipid-protein interaction: Answers from FRET.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fábio; Coutinho, Ana; Prieto, Manuel; Loura, Luís M S

    2015-09-01

    Electrostatics govern the association of a large number of proteins with cellular membranes. In some cases, these proteins present specialized lipid-binding modules or membrane targeting domains while in other cases association is achieved through nonspecific interaction of unstructured clusters of basic residues with negatively charged lipids. Given its spatial resolution in the nanometer range, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful tool to give insight into protein-lipid interactions and provide molecular level information which is difficult to retrieve with other spectroscopic techniques. In this review we present and discuss the basic formalisms of both hetero- and homo-FRET pertinent to the most commonly encountered problems in lipid-protein interaction studies and highlight some examples of implementations of different FRET methodologies to characterize lipid/protein systems in which electrostatic interactions play a crucial role. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. PMID:25769805

  18. New intercellular lipid mediators and their GPCRs: an update.

    PubMed

    Im, Dong-Soon

    2009-09-01

    Intercellular lipid mediators such as prostaglandins and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) interact with their G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) in the plasma membrane to modulate functions of target cells or tissues. Discovery of new members of intercellular lipid mediators and their GPCRs have been milestones in lipid biology and the foundation for drug development. Recent advances in intercellular lipid mediators are very interesting. New lipid molecules have been recognized as intercellular signaling mediators acting on GPCRs including resolvin E1, eoxin, acylethanolamides (arachidnonylethanolamide and oleoylethanolamide), fatty acids, bile acids, lipoamino aicd (N-palmitoyl glycine and N-arachidonyl glycine), estrogen, 5-oxo-ETE and 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid, among others. Also new GPCRs for LPA have been identified. New intercellular lipid mediators and their GPCRs are reviewed. PMID:19442546

  19. Applications of Mass Spectrometry to Lipids and Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Harkewicz, Richard; Dennis, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    Lipidomics, a major part of metabolomics, constitutes the detailed analysis and global characterization, both spatial and temporal, of the structure and function of lipids (the lipidome) within a living system. As with proteomics, mass spectrometry has earned a central analytical role in lipidomics, and this role will continue to grow with technological developments. Currently, there exist two mass spectrometry-based lipidomics approaches, one based on a division of lipids into categories and classes prior to analysis, the “comprehensive lipidomics analysis by separation simplification” (CLASS), and the other in which all lipid species are analyzed together without prior separation, shotgun. In exploring the lipidome of various living systems, novel lipids are being discovered, and mass spectrometry is helping characterize their chemical structure. Deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) is being used to investigate the association of lipids and membranes with proteins and enzymes, and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is being applied to the in situ analysis of lipids in tissues. PMID:21469951

  20. Nanostructured lipid matrices for improved microencapsulation of drugs.

    PubMed

    Müller, R H; Radtke, M; Wissing, S A

    2002-08-21

    At the beginning of the nineties solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) have been introduced as a novel nanoparticulate delivery system produced from solid lipids. Potential problems associated with SLN such as limited drug loading capacity, adjustment of drug release profile and potential drug expulsion during storage are avoided or minimised by the new generation, the nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC). NLC are produced by mixing solid lipids with spatially incompatible lipids leading to special structures of the lipid matrix, i.e. three types of NLC: (I) the imperfect structured type, (II) the structureless type and (III) the multiple type. A special preparation process-applicable to NLC but also SLN-allows the production of highly concentrated particle dispersions (>30-95%). Potential applications as drug delivery system are described. PMID:12176234

  1. Cyanogenic Lipids: Utilization during Seedling Development of Ungnadia speciosa.

    PubMed

    Selmar, D; Grocholewski, S; Seigler, D S

    1990-06-01

    Large amounts of cyanogenic lipids (esters of 1 cyano-2-methylprop-2-ene-1-ol with C:20 fatty acids) are stored in the seeds of Ungnadia speciosa. During seedling development, these lipids are completely consumed without liberation of free HCN to the atmosphere. At the same time, cyanogenic glycosides are synthesized, but the total amount is much lower (about 26%) than the quantity of cyanogenic lipids formerly present in the seeds. This large decrease in the total content of cyanogens (HCN-potential) demonstrates that at least 74% of cyanogenic lipids are converted to noncyanogenic compounds. Whether the newly synthesized cyanogenic glycosides are derived directly from cyanogenic lipids or produced by de novo synthesis is still unknown. Based on the utilization of cyanogenic lipids for the synthesis of noncyanogenic compounds, it is concluded that these cyanogens serve as storage for reduced nitrogen. The ecophysiological significance of cyanolipids based on multifunctional aspects is discussed. PMID:16667514

  2. Microbial lipid-based lignocellulosic biorefinery: feasibility and challenges.

    PubMed

    Jin, Mingjie; Slininger, Patricia J; Dien, Bruce S; Waghmode, Suresh; Moser, Bryan R; Orjuela, Andrea; Sousa, Leonardo da Costa; Balan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    Although single-cell oil (SCO) has been studied for decades, lipid production from lignocellulosic biomass has received substantial attention only in recent years as biofuel research moves toward producing drop-in fuels. This review gives an overview of the feasibility and challenges that exist in realizing microbial lipid production from lignocellulosic biomass in a biorefinery. The aspects covered here include biorefinery technologies, the microbial oil market, oleaginous microbes, lipid accumulation metabolism, strain development, process configurations, lignocellulosic lipid production, technical hurdles, lipid recovery, and technoeconomics. The lignocellulosic SCO-based biorefinery will be feasible only if a combination of low- and high-value lipids are coproduced, while lignin and protein are upgraded to high-value products. PMID:25483049

  3. Linking Lipids to Alzheimer’s Disease: Cholesterol and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, Gilbert; Kim, Tae-Wan

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-mediated signaling regulates a plethora of physiological processes, including critical aspects of brain function. In addition, dysregulation of lipid pathways has been implicated in a growing number of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although much attention has been given to the link between cholesterol and AD pathogenesis, growing evidence suggests that other lipids, such as phosphoinositides, play an important role. Because regulators of lipid metabolism (e.g. statins) are a highly successful class of marketed drugs, exploration of lipid dysregulation in AD and identification of novel therapeutic agents acting through relevant lipid pathways offers new and effective options for the treatment of this devastating disorder. PMID:21448224

  4. Lipid accumulation in prosthetic vascular grafts. Experimental study.

    PubMed Central

    Chignier, E.; Guidollet, J.; Lhopital, C.; Louisot, P.; Eloy, R.

    1990-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that the endoprosthetic tissue, developed at the contact of Dacron and Gore-Tex vascular prostheses replacing the infrarenal aortae of healthy dogs, presents a particular lipidic pattern as compared with the adjacent intimal arterial layer. The modified lipidic pattern is characterized by a significant increase in the total amounts of cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides, despite a normal lipidic plasma profile. Histochemical studies showed that lipid droplets are accumulated in the cytoplasm of deeply situated cells and in the extracellular matrix. These findings support the idea that lipids may be trapped within the pseudo-intima of synthetic vascular grafts, even in the absence of a major plasma lipid disorder, and contribute to the prosthesis failure. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2399933

  5. Enhanced lipid production in Chlorella pyrenoidosa by continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaobin; Geng, Yahong; Li, Yeguang

    2014-06-01

    Usually microalgae growth and lipid accumulation do not run in parallel throughout cultivation, which necessarily lowers overall lipid productivity. However, we show through batch and feed-batch studies of Chlorella pyrenoidosa XQ-20044 that by varying the nitrate concentration, conditions which produce fairly high lipid content could be achieved without sacrificing algal growth. Simultaneous microalgae growth and lipid production was achieved in continuous chemostat culture when the specific nitrate input rate was in the range of 0.78-4.56mmolg(-1)d(-1). Moreover, the maximum lipid productivity (144.93mgL(-1)d(-1)) in the continuous culture was significantly higher than in batch culture (96.28mgL(-1)d(-1)), thus indicating the feasibility and great advantage of one-step production of microalgal lipids. PMID:24717322

  6. Lipid dependence of diacylglycerol kinase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bohnenberger, E; Sandermann, H

    1983-05-16

    Diacylglycerol kinase apoprotein was purified from membranes of Escherichia coli K 12. The protein was catalytically inactive, but regained activity upon recombination with phospholipids, certain neutral lipids, or fatty acids. Activation proceeded with positive cooperativity and was independent of the exact chemical structure, bilayer arrangement or electrical charge of the lipid. The apoprotein was activated by lysophosphatidylethanolamine but not by lysophosphatidylcholine. 1-Monooleoylglycerol was an effective activator and substrate at the same time. The fluidity and the polarity of lipids appeared to be generally important for activation. Lipid polarity was estimated by a triacylglycerol/phosphatidylcholine-partitioning procedure. All lipids showing preferential association with triacylglycerol failed to activate the kinase apoprotein even in the presence of detergent. It is concluded that a defined hydrophilic/lipophilic balance of the lipid was required for the formation of a functional lipoprotein complex. PMID:6303781

  7. Gemfibrozil, stretching arms beyond lipid lowering

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Avik; Pahan, Kalipada

    2009-01-01

    Gemfibrozil is long known for its ability to reduce the level of triglycerides in the blood circulation and to decrease the risk of hyperlipidemia. However, a number of recent studies reveal that apart from its lipid-lowering effects, gemfibrozil can also regulate many other signaling pathways responsible for inflammation, switching of T-helper cells, cell-to-cell contact, migration, and oxidative stress. In this review, we have made an honest attempt to analyze various biological activities of gemfibrozil and associated mechanisms that may help to consider this drug for different human disorders as primary or adjunct therapy. PMID:19694602

  8. Women's Health Considerations for Lipid Management.

    PubMed

    Wild, Robert; Weedin, Elizabeth A; Gill, Edward A

    2016-03-01

    Understanding opportunities to reduce dyslipidemia before, during, and after pregnancy has major implications for cardiovascular disease risk prevention for the entire population. The best time to screen for dyslipidemia is before pregnancy or in the early antenatal period. The differential diagnosis of hypertriglyceridemia in pregnancy is the same as in nonpregnant women except that clinical lipidologists need to be aware of the potential obstetric complications associated with hypertriglyceridemia. Dyslipidemia discovered during pregnancy should be treated with diet and exercise intervention, as well as glycemic control if indicated. A complete lipid profile assessment during each trimester of pregnancy is recommended. PMID:26892998

  9. Two new lipid-regulating drugs.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    ▼Evolocumab (Repatha-Amgen Ltd) and ▼alirocumab (Praluent-Sanofi) are the first in a novel class of lipid-regulating drugs, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, to be licensed in the UK. Both drugs have marketing authorisation for the treatment of primary hypercholesterolaemia (heterozygous familial and non-familial) or mixed dyslipidaemia and are administered by subcutaneous injection.(1-3) Here we consider the evidence for evolocumab and alirocumab in the management of primary hypercholesterolaemia and dyslipidaemias. PMID:26868931

  10. Lipid profiles of judo athletes during Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Chaouachi, A; Chamari, K; Roky, R; Wong, P; Mbazaa, A; Bartagi, Z; Amri, M

    2008-04-01

    The effect of Ramadan intermittent fasting (RIF) was studied on a battery of blood lipid markers in 15 elite judo athletes during a period when they were maintaining their training load without competing. Nine-to-twelve hours postprandial serum lipid and lipoproteins were measured on five occasions: before, three times during Ramadan, and three weeks post-Ramadan. Dietary data were collected using a 24-hour recall method for three days before, during and after the Ramadan month. Mean energy intake (12.9 MJ/d) remained similar throughout the study as did the macronutrient constituents of the diet. Mean body mass was slightly reduced (2 %; p < 0.01) by the end of Ramadan due mainly to a 0.65 +/- 0.68 kg decrease in body fat (p < 0.05). The RIF produced significant changes in some of the blood lipid levels: both HDL-C and LDL-C increased by 0.12 (p < 0.01) and 0.20 mmol . l (-1) (p < 0.05), respectively. During Ramadan, mean non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels decreased from 0.73 to 0.28 mmol . l (-1) (p < 0.01) during the first week, then increased (p < 0.05) to 1.22 mmol . l (-1) over the middle of Ramadan and recovered to pre-Ramadan concentrations for the end and the post-Ramadan periods. Apolipoprotein A1 (Apo-A1) levels were significantly elevated at the end (p < 0.01) and the post-Ramadan periods (p < 0.05). Three weeks after Ramadan, blood levels of glucose, NEFA, Apo-A1, and Apo-B did not return to the values observed before Ramadan. In conclusion, the present results show that the combination of the change in diet pattern during Ramadan, along with intense exercise training, induced a significant decrease in body mass associated with a reduction in body fat and changes in some of the serum lipids and lipoproteins. Nevertheless, all the measured serum parameters remained within normal levels for young and active individuals. The volunteers, in this study, were able to maintain a constant training load during RIF. PMID:17879887

  11. Lipid tubule growth by osmotic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, Padmini; Zhang, Di; Oster, George; Shen, Amy Q.

    2013-01-01

    We present here a procedure for growing lipid tubules in vitro. This method allows us to grow tubules of consistent shape and structure, and thus can be a useful tool for nano-engineering applications. There are three stages during the tubule growth process: initiation, elongation and termination. Balancing the forces that act on the tubule head shows that the growth of tubules during the elongation phase depends on the balance between osmotic pressure and the viscous drag exerted on the membrane from the substrate and the external fluid. Using a combination of mathematical modelling and experiment, we identify the key forces that control tubule growth during the elongation phase. PMID:24004559

  12. Self-assembled lipid bilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Waggoner, Tina A.; Last, Julie A.

    2005-11-08

    The present invention is a self-assembling material comprised of stacks of lipid bilayers formed in a columnar structure, where the assembly process is mediated and regulated by chemical recognition events. The material, through the chemical recognition interactions, has a self-regulating system that corrects the radial size of the assembly creating a uniform diameter throughout most of the structure. The materials form and are stable in aqueous solution. These materials are useful as structural elements for the architecture of materials and components in nanotechnology, efficient light harvesting systems for optical sensing, chemical processing centers, and drug delivery vehicles.

  13. Lipid Metabolism of Rumen Ciliates and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, J.; Williams, P. P.; Davis, R. E.; Warwick, E. J.

    1962-01-01

    Washed suspensions of the ruminal ciliates, Isotricha prostoma and Entodinium simplex, concentrated C14-labeled oleic, palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acids within the cells during short incubation periods. Radioautographs demonstrated that oleic acid-1-C14 was hydrogenated to stearic acid by I. prostoma, and Warburg manometric data showed that the sodium salts of oleic, valeric, caproic, and acetic acids, and methyl myristate, methyl laurate, and the triglyceride tributyrin stimulated fermentation of I. prostoma. The total lipid and free fatty acid contents of I. prostoma were determined. PMID:13951437

  14. Orientation and conformation of lipids in crystals of transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Derek; Páli, Tibor

    2013-03-01

    Orientational order parameters and individual dihedral torsion angles are evaluated for phospholipid and glycolipid molecules that are resolved in X-ray structures of integral transmembrane proteins in crystals. The order parameters of the lipid chains and glycerol backbones in protein crystals are characterised by a much wider distribution of orientational order than is found in fluid lipid bilayers and reconstituted lipid-protein membranes. This indicates that the lipids that are resolved in crystals of membrane proteins are mostly not representative of the entire lipid-protein interface. Much of the chain configurational disorder of the membrane-bound lipids in crystals arises from C-C bonds in energetically disallowed skew conformations. This suggests configurational heterogeneity of the lipids at a single binding site: eclipsed conformations occur also in the glycerol backbone torsion angles and the C-C torsion angles of the lipid head groups. Conformations of the lipid glycerol backbone in protein crystals are not restricted to the gauche C1-C2 rotamers found invariably in phospholipid bilayer crystals. Lipid head-group conformations in the protein crystals also do not conform solely to the bent-down conformation, with gauche-gauche configuration of the phosphodiester, that is characteristic of phospholipid bilayer membranes. Stereochemical violations in the protein-bound lipids are evidenced by ester carboxyl groups in non-planar configurations, and even in the cis configuration. Some lipids have the incorrect enantiomeric configuration of the glycerol backbone, and many of the branched methyl groups in the phytanyl chains associated with bacteriorhodopsin have the incorrect S configuration. PMID:22644500

  15. Working towards an exegesis for lipids in biology

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H Alex; Murphy, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    As a field, lipidomics is in its infancy, yet it has already begun to influence lipid biochemistry in myriad ways. As with other omic technologies, the field is driven by advances in analytical chemistry, particularly by mass spectrometry. At the heart of a renaissance in lipid biochemistry, systems biology is being used to define the cellular lipome, build a comprehensive picture of metabolic interconnections, discover new molecular species and determine how lipids modulate biological functions. PMID:19690530

  16. Bicarbonate trigger for inducing lipid accumulation in algal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Robert; Peyton, Brent; Cooksey, Keith E.

    2015-08-04

    The present invention provides bicarbonate containing and/or bicarbonate-producing compositions and methods to induce lipid accumulation in an algae growth system, wherein the algae growth system is under light-dark cycling condition. By adding said compositions at a specific growth stage, said methods lead to much higher lipid accumulation and/or significantly reduced total time required for accumulating lipid in the algae growth system.

  17. Synthesis and transfection activity of novel galactosylated polycationic lipid.

    PubMed

    Maslov, M A; Medvedeva, D A; Rapoport, D A; Serikov, R N; Morozova, N G; Serebrennikova, G A; Vlassov, V V; Zenkova, M A

    2011-05-15

    In this study, we synthesized a new galactosylated cationic lipid and investigated its biological activity. The structure of lipid combines both spermine residue for DNA compaction and galactose moiety for the improvement of aggregation behavior of lipoplexes. Lipid was low toxic for different mammalian cells, and was able both to compact plasmid DNA and to mediate cellular accumulation of various nucleic acids (ODN, pDNA and siRNA) exhibiting biological activity (transgene expression, gene silencing). PMID:21463941

  18. Correlations between anthropometry and lipid profile in type 2 diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Himabindu, Yalamanchali; Sriharibabu, Manne; Alekhya, Katamreddy; Saisumanth, Kandula; Lakshmanrao, Nambaru; Komali, Kanagala

    2013-01-01

    Over a period of time, anthropometric parameters have evolved into reliable indicators for predicting the incidence of diabetes mellitus. A number of studies have shown correlations between anthropometry and lipid profiles in healthy volunteers. This study examined correlations between anthropometry and lipid profile in type 2 diabetics. The limited observations made in this study reveal that anthropometric parameters are not ideal for predicting lipid profile abnormalities in type 2 diabetics. PMID:23961494

  19. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) for application of ascorbyl palmitate.

    PubMed

    Uner, M; Wissing, S A; Yener, G; Müller, R H

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the chemical stability of ascorbyl palmitate (AP) in a colloidal lipid carrier for its topical use. For this purpose, AP-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) and for comparison, a nanoemulsion (NE) were prepared employing the high pressure homogenization technique and stored at room temperature (RT), 4 degrees C and 40 degrees C. During 3 months, physical stability of these formulations compared to placebo formulations which were prepared by the same production method, was studied including recrystallization behaviour of the lipid with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), particle size distribution and storage stability with photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and laser diffractometry (LD). After evaluating data indicating excellent physical stability, AP-loaded SLN, NLC and NE were incorporated into a hydrogel by the same production method as the next step. Degradation of AP by HPLC and physical stability in the same manner were investigated at the same storage temperatures during 3 months. As a result, AP was found most stable in both the NLC and SLN stored at 4 degrees C (p > 0.05) indicating the importance of storage temperature. Nondegraded AP content in NLC, SLN and NE was found to be 71.1% +/- 1.4, 67.6% +/- 2.9 and 55.2% +/- 0.3 after 3 months, respectively. Highest degradation was observed with NE at all the storage temperatures indicating even importance of the carrier structure. PMID:16124399

  20. Polyglutamine aggregates impair lipid membrane integrity and enhance lipid membrane rigidity.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chian Sing; Khadka, Nawal K; She, Fengyu; Cai, Jianfeng; Pan, Jianjun

    2016-04-01

    Lipid membranes are suggested as the primary target of amyloid aggregates. We study aggregates formed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) peptide, and their disruptive effect on lipid membranes. Using solution atomic force microscopy (AFM), we observe polyQ oligomers coexisting with short fibrils, which have a twisted morphology that likely corresponds to two intertwined oligomer strings. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals that the content of ?-sheet enriched aggregates increases with incubation time. Using fluorescence microscopy, we find that exposure to polyQ aggregates results in deflated morphology of giant unilamellar vesicles. PolyQ aggregates induced membrane disruption is further substantiated by time-dependent calcein leakage from the interior to the exterior of lipid vesicles. Detailed structural and mechanical perturbations of lipid membranes are revealed by solution AFM. We find that membrane disruption by polyQ aggregates proceeds by a two-step process, involving partial and full disruption. In addition to height contrast, the resulting partially and fully disrupted bilayers have distinct rigidity and adhesion force properties compared to the intact bilayer. Specifically, the bilayer rigidity increases as the intact bilayer becomes partially and fully disrupted. Surprisingly, the adhesion force first decreases and then increases during the disruption process. By resolving individual fibrils deposited on bilayer surface, we show that both the length and the number of fibrils can increase with incubation time. Our results highlight that membrane disruption could be the molecular basis of polyQ aggregates induced cytotoxicity. PMID:26806158