Science.gov

Sample records for sliding clamp-dna interactions

  1. Sliding Clamp–DNA Interactions Are Required for Viability and Contribute to DNA Polymerase Management in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Heltzel, J.; Scouten Ponticelli, S; Sanders, L; Duzen, J; Cody, V; Pace, J; Snell, E; Sutton, M

    2009-01-01

    Sliding clamp proteins topologically encircle DNA and play vital roles in coordinating the actions of various DNA replication, repair, and damage tolerance proteins. At least three distinct surfaces of the Escherichia coli {beta} clamp interact physically with the DNA that it topologically encircles. We utilized mutant {beta} clamp proteins bearing G66E and G174A substitutions ({beta}159), affecting the single-stranded DNA-binding region, or poly-Ala substitutions in place of residues 148-HQDVR-152 ({beta}148-152), affecting the double-stranded DNA binding region, to determine the biological relevance of clamp-DNA interactions. As part of this work, we solved the X-ray crystal structure of {beta}148-152, which verified that the poly-Ala substitutions failed to significantly alter the tertiary structure of the clamp. Based on functional assays, both {beta}159 and {beta}148-152 were impaired for loading and retention on a linear primed DNA in vitro. In the case of {beta}148-152, this defect was not due to altered interactions with the DnaX clamp loader, but rather was the result of impaired {beta}148-152-DNA interactions. Once loaded, {beta}148-152 was proficient for DNA polymerase III (Pol III) replication in vitro. In contrast, {beta}148-152 was severely impaired for Pol II and Pol IV replication and was similarly impaired for direct physical interactions with these Pols. Despite its ability to support Pol III replication in vitro, {beta}148-152 was unable to support viability of E. coli. Nevertheless, physiological levels of {beta}148-152 expressed from a plasmid efficiently complemented the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of a strain expressing {beta}159 (dnaN159), provided that Pol II and Pol IV were inactivated. Although this strain was impaired for Pol V-dependent mutagenesis, inactivation of Pol II and Pol IV restored the Pol V mutator phenotype. Taken together, these results support a model in which a sophisticated combination of competitive clamp-DNA

  2. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M.

    2015-09-01

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand-receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  3. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand–receptor design

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand–receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand–receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:26350224

  4. A Single-Strand Annealing Protein Clamps DNA to Detect and Secure Homology.

    PubMed

    Ander, Marcel; Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Fahmy, Karim; Stewart, A Francis; Schäffer, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Repair of DNA breaks by single-strand annealing (SSA) is a major mechanism for the maintenance of genomic integrity. SSA is promoted by proteins (single-strand-annealing proteins [SSAPs]), such as eukaryotic RAD52 and λ phage Redβ. These proteins use a short single-stranded region to find sequence identity and initiate homologous recombination. However, it is unclear how SSAPs detect homology and catalyze annealing. Using single-molecule experiments, we provide evidence that homology is recognized by Redβ monomers that weakly hold single DNA strands together. Once annealing begins, dimerization of Redβ clamps the double-stranded region and nucleates nucleoprotein filament growth. In this manner, DNA clamping ensures and secures a successful detection for DNA sequence homology. The clamp is characterized by a structural change of Redβ and a remarkable stability against force up to 200 pN. Our findings not only present a detailed explanation for SSAP action but also identify the DNA clamp as a very stable, noncovalent, DNA-protein interaction. PMID:26271032

  5. A Single-Strand Annealing Protein Clamps DNA to Detect and Secure Homology

    PubMed Central

    Ander, Marcel; Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Fahmy, Karim; Stewart, A. Francis; Schäffer, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Repair of DNA breaks by single-strand annealing (SSA) is a major mechanism for the maintenance of genomic integrity. SSA is promoted by proteins (single-strand-annealing proteins [SSAPs]), such as eukaryotic RAD52 and λ phage Redβ. These proteins use a short single-stranded region to find sequence identity and initiate homologous recombination. However, it is unclear how SSAPs detect homology and catalyze annealing. Using single-molecule experiments, we provide evidence that homology is recognized by Redβ monomers that weakly hold single DNA strands together. Once annealing begins, dimerization of Redβ clamps the double-stranded region and nucleates nucleoprotein filament growth. In this manner, DNA clamping ensures and secures a successful detection for DNA sequence homology. The clamp is characterized by a structural change of Redβ and a remarkable stability against force up to 200 pN. Our findings not only present a detailed explanation for SSAP action but also identify the DNA clamp as a very stable, noncovalent, DNA–protein interaction. PMID:26271032

  6. The TCF C-clamp DNA binding domain expands the Wnt transcriptome via alternative target recognition

    PubMed Central

    Hoverter, Nate P.; Zeller, Michael D.; McQuade, Miriam M.; Garibaldi, Angela; Busch, Anke; Selwan, Elizabeth M.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Baldi, Pierre; Waterman, Marian L.

    2014-01-01

    LEF/TCFs direct the final step in Wnt/β-catenin signalling by recruiting β-catenin to genes for activation of transcription. Ancient, non-vertebrate TCFs contain two DNA binding domains, a High Mobility Group box for recognition of the Wnt Response Element (WRE; 5′-CTTTGWWS-3′) and the C-clamp domain for recognition of the GC-rich Helper motif (5′-RCCGCC-3′). Two vertebrate TCFs (TCF-1/TCF7 and TCF-4/TCF7L2) use the C-clamp as an alternatively spliced domain to regulate cell-cycle progression, but how the C-clamp influences TCF binding and activity genome-wide is not known. Here, we used a doxycycline inducible system with ChIP-seq to assess how the C-clamp influences human TCF1 binding genome-wide. Metabolic pulse-labeling of nascent RNA with 4′Thiouridine was used with RNA-seq to connect binding to the Wnt transcriptome. We find that the C-clamp enables targeting to a greater number of gene loci for stronger occupancy and transcription regulation. The C-clamp uses Helper sites concurrently with WREs for gene targeting, but it also targets TCF1 to sites that do not have readily identifiable canonical WREs. The coupled ChIP-seq/4′Thiouridine-seq analysis identified new Wnt target genes, including additional regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, C-clamp containing isoforms of TCFs are potent transcriptional regulators with an expanded transcriptome directed by C-clamp-Helper site interactions. PMID:25414359

  7. Transposase interaction with the β sliding clamp: effects on insertion sequence proliferation and transposition rate

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Maldonado, Héctor; Gómez, Manuel J.; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; San Martín-Úriz, Patxi; Amils, Ricardo; Parro, Víctor; López de Saro, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Insertion sequences (ISs) are ubiquitous and abundant mobile genetic elements in prokaryotic genomes. ISs often encode only one protein, the transposase, which catalyzes their transposition. Recent studies have shown that transposases of many different IS families interact with the β sliding clamp, a DNA replication factor of the host. However, it was unclear to what extent this interaction limits or favors the ability of ISs to colonize a chromosome from a phylogenetically-distant organism, or if the strength of this interaction affects the transposition rate. Here we describe the proliferation of a member of the IS1634 family in Acidiphilium over ~600 generations of cultured growth. We demonstrate that the purified transposase binds to the β sliding clamp of Acidiphilium, Leptospirillum and E. coli. Further, we also demonstrate that the Acidiphilium IS1634 transposase binds to the archaeal sliding clamp (PCNA) from Methanosarcina, and that the transposase encoded by Methanosarcina IS1634 binds to Acidiphilium β. Finally, we demonstrate that increasing the strength of the interaction between β and transposase results in a higher transposition rate in vivo. Our results suggest that the interaction could determine the potential of ISs to be mobilized in bacterial populations and also their ability to proliferate within chromosomes. PMID:26306550

  8. Dynamic Sliding Analysis of a Gravity Dam with Fluid-Structure-Foundation Interaction Using Finite Elements and Newmark's Sliding Block Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldgruber, Markus; Shahriari, Shervin; Zenz, Gerald

    2015-11-01

    To reduce the natural hazard risks—due to, e.g., earthquake excitation—seismic safety assessments are carried out. Especially under severe loading, due to maximum credible or the so-called safety evaluation earthquake, critical infrastructure, as these are high dams, must not fail. However, under high loading local failure might be allowed as long as the entire structure does not collapse. Hence, for a dam, the loss of sliding stability during a short time period might be acceptable if the cumulative displacements after an event are below an acceptable value. This performance is not only valid for gravity dams but also for rock blocks as sliding is even more imminent in zones with higher seismic activity. Sliding modes cannot only occur in the dam-foundation contact, but also in sliding planes formed due to geological conditions. This work compares the qualitative possible and critical displacements for two methods, the well-known Newmark's sliding block analysis and a Fluid-Foundation-Structure Interaction simulation with the finite elements method. The results comparison of the maximum displacements at the end of the seismic event of the two methods depicts that for high friction angles, they are fairly close. For low friction angles, the results are differing more. The conclusion is that the commonly used Newmark's sliding block analysis and the finite elements simulation are only comparable for high friction angles, where this factor dominates the behaviour of the structure. Worth to mention is that the proposed simulation methods are also applicable to dynamic rock wedge problems and not only to dams.

  9. Conditions for the sliding-bouncing transition for the interaction of a bubble with an inclined wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, C.; Legendre, D.; Zenit, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this study we analyze the interaction of a single rising bubble with an inclined wall. We conduct experiments considering different liquids and bubble sizes, to cover a wide range of Reynolds and Weber numbers, with wall angles from nearly horizontal to nearly vertical. For all cases, the bubble initially collides with the wall; after the initial interaction, in accord with previous studies, the bubble either steadily slides on the wall or ascends, colliding repeatedly with it. Considering a force balance for the bubble motion on the wall, we propose a set of conditions for the transition from sliding to bouncing that is validated with the present and previous data.

  10. Molecular sled is an eleven-amino acid vehicle facilitating biochemical interactions via sliding components along DNA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mangel, Walter F.; McGrath, William J.; Xiong, Kan; Graziano, Vito; Blainey, Paul C.

    2016-02-02

    Recently, we showed the adenovirus proteinase interacts productively with its protein substrates in vitro and in vivo in nascent virus particles via one-dimensional diffusion along the viral DNA. The mechanism by which this occurs has heretofore been unknown. We show sliding of these proteins along DNA occurs on a new vehicle in molecular biology, a ‘molecular sled’ named pVIc. This 11-amino acid viral peptide binds to DNA independent of sequence. pVIc slides on DNA, exhibiting the fastest one-dimensional diffusion constant, 26±1.8 × 106 (bp)2 s−1. pVIc is a ‘molecular sled,’ because it can slide heterologous cargos along DNA, for example, amore » streptavidin tetramer. Similar peptides, for example, from the C terminus of β-actin or NLSIII of the p53 protein, slide along DNA. Finally, characteristics of the ‘molecular sled’ in its milieu (virion, nucleus) have implications for how proteins in the nucleus of cells interact and imply a new form of biochemistry, one-dimensional biochemistry.« less

  11. Molecular sled is an eleven-amino acid vehicle facilitating biochemical interactions via sliding components along DNA

    PubMed Central

    Mangel, Walter F.; McGrath, William J.; Xiong, Kan; Graziano, Vito; Blainey, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we showed the adenovirus proteinase interacts productively with its protein substrates in vitro and in vivo in nascent virus particles via one-dimensional diffusion along the viral DNA. The mechanism by which this occurs has heretofore been unknown. We show sliding of these proteins along DNA occurs on a new vehicle in molecular biology, a ‘molecular sled' named pVIc. This 11-amino acid viral peptide binds to DNA independent of sequence. pVIc slides on DNA, exhibiting the fastest one-dimensional diffusion constant, 26±1.8 × 106 (bp)2 s−1. pVIc is a ‘molecular sled,' because it can slide heterologous cargos along DNA, for example, a streptavidin tetramer. Similar peptides, for example, from the C terminus of β-actin or NLSIII of the p53 protein, slide along DNA. Characteristics of the ‘molecular sled' in its milieu (virion, nucleus) have implications for how proteins in the nucleus of cells interact and imply a new form of biochemistry, one-dimensional biochemistry. PMID:26831565

  12. A bacterial toxin inhibits DNA replication elongation through a direct interaction with the β sliding clamp.

    PubMed

    Aakre, Christopher D; Phung, Tuyen N; Huang, David; Laub, Michael T

    2013-12-12

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are ubiquitous on bacterial chromosomes, yet the mechanisms regulating their activity and the molecular targets of toxins remain incompletely defined. Here, we identify SocAB, an atypical TA system in Caulobacter crescentus. Unlike canonical TA systems, the toxin SocB is unstable and constitutively degraded by the protease ClpXP; this degradation requires the antitoxin, SocA, as a proteolytic adaptor. We find that the toxin, SocB, blocks replication elongation through an interaction with the sliding clamp, driving replication fork collapse. Mutations that suppress SocB toxicity map to either the hydrophobic cleft on the clamp that binds DNA polymerase III or a clamp-binding motif in SocB. Our findings suggest that SocB disrupts replication by outcompeting other clamp-binding proteins. Collectively, our results expand the diversity of mechanisms employed by TA systems to regulate toxin activity and inhibit bacterial growth, and they suggest that inhibiting clamp function may be a generalizable antibacterial strategy. PMID:24239291

  13. Detachment of compliant films adhered to stiff substrates via van der Waals interactions: role of frictional sliding during peeling.

    PubMed

    Collino, Rachel R; Philips, Noah R; Rossol, Michael N; McMeeking, Robert M; Begley, Matthew R

    2014-08-01

    The remarkable ability of some plants and animals to cling strongly to substrates despite relatively weak interfacial bonds has important implications for the development of synthetic adhesives. Here, we examine the origins of large detachment forces using a thin elastomer tape adhered to a glass slide via van der Waals interactions, which serves as a model system for geckos, mussels and ivy. The forces required for peeling of the tape are shown to be a strong function of the angle of peeling, which is a consequence of frictional sliding at the edge of attachment that serves to dissipate energy that would otherwise drive detachment. Experiments and theory demonstrate that proper accounting for frictional sliding leads to an inferred work of adhesion of only approximately 0.5 J m(-2) (defined for purely normal separations) for all load orientations. This starkly contrasts with the interface energies inferred using conventional interface fracture models that assume pure sticking behaviour, which are considerably larger and shown to depend not only on the mode-mixity, but also on the magnitude of the mode-I stress intensity factor. The implications for developing frameworks to predict detachment forces in the presence of interface sliding are briefly discussed. PMID:24920120

  14. Detachment of compliant films adhered to stiff substrates via van der Waals interactions: role of frictional sliding during peeling

    PubMed Central

    Collino, Rachel R.; Philips, Noah R.; Rossol, Michael N.; McMeeking, Robert M.; Begley, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable ability of some plants and animals to cling strongly to substrates despite relatively weak interfacial bonds has important implications for the development of synthetic adhesives. Here, we examine the origins of large detachment forces using a thin elastomer tape adhered to a glass slide via van der Waals interactions, which serves as a model system for geckos, mussels and ivy. The forces required for peeling of the tape are shown to be a strong function of the angle of peeling, which is a consequence of frictional sliding at the edge of attachment that serves to dissipate energy that would otherwise drive detachment. Experiments and theory demonstrate that proper accounting for frictional sliding leads to an inferred work of adhesion of only approximately 0.5 J m−2 (defined for purely normal separations) for all load orientations. This starkly contrasts with the interface energies inferred using conventional interface fracture models that assume pure sticking behaviour, which are considerably larger and shown to depend not only on the mode-mixity, but also on the magnitude of the mode-I stress intensity factor. The implications for developing frameworks to predict detachment forces in the presence of interface sliding are briefly discussed. PMID:24920120

  15. Manual stage acquisition and interactive display of digital slides in histopathology.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, Alessandro; Bevilacqua, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    More powerful PC architectures, high-resolution cameras working at increasing frame rates, and more and more accurate motorized microscopes have boosted new applications in the field of biomedicine and medical imaging. In histopathology, the use of digital slides (DSs) imaging through dedicated hardware for digital pathology is increasing for several reasons: digital annotation of suspicious lesions, recorded clinical history, and telepathology as a collaborative environment. In this paper, we propose the first method known in the literature for real-time whole slide acquisition and displaying conceived for conventional nonautomated microscopes. Differently from DS scanner, our software enables biologists and histopathologists to build and view the DS in real time while inspecting the sample, as they are accustomed to. In addition, since our approach is compliant with existing common microscope positions, provided with camera and PC, this could contribute to disseminate the whole slide technology in the majority of small labs not endowed with DS hardware facilities. Experiments performed with different histologic specimens (referring to tumor tissues of different body parts as well as to tumor cells), acquired under different setup conditions and devices, prove the effectiveness of our approach both in terms of quality and speed performances. PMID:25014942

  16. Stacking interactions in RNA and DNA: Roll-slide energy hyperspace for ten unique dinucleotide steps.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanchita; Kailasam, Senthilkumar; Bansal, Manju; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2015-03-01

    Understanding dinucleotide sequence directed structures of nuleic acids and their variability from experimental observation remained ineffective due to unavailability of statistically meaningful data. We have attempted to understand this from energy scan along twist, roll, and slide degrees of freedom which are mostly dependent on dinucleotide sequence using ab initio density functional theory. We have carried out stacking energy analysis in these dinucleotide parameter phase space for all ten unique dinucleotide steps in DNA and RNA using DFT-D by ωB97X-D/6-31G(2d,2p), which appears to satisfactorily explain conformational preferences for AU/AU step in our recent study. We show that values of roll, slide, and twist of most of the dinucleotide sequences in crystal structures fall in the low energy region. The minimum energy regions with large twist values are associated with the roll and slide values of B-DNA, whereas, smaller twist values correspond to higher stability to RNA and A-DNA like conformations. Incorporation of solvent effect by CPCM method could explain the preference shown by some sequences to occur in B-DNA or A-DNA conformations. Conformational preference of BII sub-state in B-DNA is preferentially displayed mainly by pyrimidine-purine steps and partly by purine-purine steps. The purine-pyrimidine steps show largest effect of 5-methyl group of thymine in stacking energy and the introduction of solvent reduces this effect significantly. These predicted structures and variabilities can explain the effect of sequence on DNA and RNA functionality. PMID:25257334

  17. Using the Bias from Flow to Elucidate Single DNA Repair Protein Sliding and Interactions with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Zhao, Tong; Jian, Xing; Farooqui, Zishaan; Qu, Xiaohui; He, Chuan; Dinner, Aaron R.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2009-01-01

    We perform single-molecule spatial tracking measurements of a DNA repair protein, the C-terminal domain of Ada (C-Ada) from Escherichia coli, moving on DNA extended by flow. The trajectories of single proteins labeled with a fluorophore are constructed. We analyze single-protein dwell times on DNA for different flow rates and conclude that sliding (with essentially no hopping) is the mechanism of C-Ada motion along stretched DNA. We also analyze the trajectory results with a drift-diffusion Langevin equation approach to elucidate the influence of flow on the protein motion; systematic variation of the flow enables one to estimate the microscopic friction. We integrate the step-size probability distribution to obtain a version of the fluctuation theorem that articulates the relation between the entropy production and consumption under the adjustable drag (i.e., bias) from the flow. This expression allows validation of the Langevin equation description of the motion. Comparison of the rate of sliding with recent computer simulations of DNA repair suggests that C-Ada could conduct its repair function while moving at near the one-dimensional diffusion limit. PMID:19254550

  18. Handbuilt Slides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatto, Joseph

    1979-01-01

    The author suggests handbuilt slides as an art project for elementary or secondary students. Instructions are given for making slides with found objects, smoke, and magazine lifts. The article is illustrated with several examples of this technique. (SJL)

  19. Single-layer MoS{sub 2} roughness and sliding friction quenching by interaction with atomically flat substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Quereda, J.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Agraït, N.; Rubio-Bollinger, G.

    2014-08-04

    We experimentally study the surface roughness and the lateral friction force in single-layer MoS{sub 2} crystals deposited on different substrates: SiO{sub 2}, mica, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). Roughness and sliding friction measurements are performed by atomic force microscopy. We find a strong dependence of the MoS{sub 2} roughness on the underlying substrate material, being h-BN the substrate which better preserves the flatness of the MoS{sub 2} crystal. The lateral friction also lowers as the roughness decreases, and attains its lowest value for MoS{sub 2} flakes on h-BN substrates. However, it is still higher than for the surface of a bulk MoS{sub 2} crystal, which we attribute to the deformation of the flake due to competing tip-to-flake and flake-to-substrate interactions.

  20. Auger analysis of oxygen and sulfur interactions with various metals and the effect of sliding on these interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Various gases were adsorbed to copper, aluminum, and chromium surfaces. The gases included oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, and sulfur dioxide. Chemisorption was conducted on static surfaces and during dynamic friction experiments. An Auger cyclindrical mirror analyzer was used to monitor surface films. The sulfur containing gases adsorbed readily to all surfaces. Exposures of as little as 0.000001 (torr)(sec) (1 langmuir) were sufficient to reduce friction. Sliding contact did not affect chemisorption of copper or aluminum but did affect chemisorption to chromium surfaces. Oxygen removed sulfur films from all surfaces at room temperature (23 C). Gaseous exposures were from 0.000001 to 0.01 (torr)(sec) (1 to 10,000 langmuirs).

  1. On-Line Retrieval of Clinical Slides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgrom, Linda

    The Physical Diagnosis Slide Bank, a collaborative project of the Universities of Washington, California at San Diego, and Arizona, utilizes an online interactive computer program to access a collection of over 2000 teaching clinical slides. Searchable data elements for each slide in the bank include subject descriptors (MeSH); accession number;…

  2. Functional glass slides for in vitro evaluation of interactions between osteosarcoma TE85 cells and mineral-binding ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jie; Chen, Julia; Klapperich, Catherine M.; Eng, Vincent; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2004-07-20

    Primary amine-functionalized glass slides obtained through a multi-step plasma treatment were conjugated with anionic amino acids that are frequently found as mineral binding elements in acidic extracellular matrix components of natural bone. The modified glass surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements. Human osteosarcoma TE85 cells were cultured on these functionalized slides and analyses on both protein and gene expression levels were performed to probe the ''biocompatibility'' of the surface ligands. Cell attachment and proliferation on anionic surfaces were either better than or comparable to those of cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). The modified glass surfaces promoted the expression of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase activity and ECM proteins such as fibronectin and vitronectin under differentiation culture conditions. Transcript analysis using gene chip microarrays confirmed that culturing TE85 cells on anionic surfaces did not activate apoptotic pathways. Collectively, these results suggest that the potential mineral-binding anionic ligands examined here do not exert significant adverse effects on the expression of important osteogenic markers of TE85 cells. This work paves the way for the incorporation of these ligands into 3-dimensional artificial bone-like scaffolds.

  3. T-Slide Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John

    2009-01-01

    -the-shelf, electric servomotor, a motor angle resolution sensor (typically an encoder or resolver), and microprocessor-based intelligent software. In applications requiring precision positioning, it may be necessary to add strain gauges to the T-slide housing. Existing sensory- interactive motion control art will work for T slides. For open-loop positioning, a stepping motor emulation technique can be used.

  4. A Sliding Docking Interaction Is Essential for Sequential and Processive Phosphorylation of an SR Protein by SRPK1

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, Jacky Chi Ki; Giang, Kayla; Chakrabarti, Sutapa; Ma, Chen-Ting; Huynh, Nhat; Hagopian, Jonathan C.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Adams, Joseph A.; Ghosh, Gourisankar

    2008-09-17

    The 2.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the core SRPK1:ASF/SF2 complex reveals that the N-terminal half of the basic RS domain of ASF/SF2, which is destined to be phosphorylated, is bound to an acidic docking groove of SRPK1 distal to the active site. Phosphorylation of ASF/SF2 at a single site in the C-terminal end of the RS domain generates a primed phosphoserine that binds to a basic site in the kinase. Biochemical experiments support a directional sliding of the RS peptide through the docking groove to the active site during phosphorylation, which ends with the unfolding of a {beta} strand of the RRM domain and binding of the unfolded region to the docking groove. We further suggest that the priming of the first serine facilitates directional substrate translocation and efficient phosphorylation.

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis class II apurinic/apyrimidinic-endonuclease/3'-5' exonuclease III exhibits DNA regulated modes of interaction with the sliding DNA β-clamp.

    PubMed

    Khanam, Taran; Rai, Niyati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-10-01

    The class-II AP-endonuclease (XthA) acts on abasic sites of damaged DNA in bacterial base excision repair. We identified that the sliding DNA β-clamp forms in vivo and in vitro complexes with XthA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel 239 QLRFPKK245 motif in the DNA-binding domain of XthA was found to be important for the interactions. Likewise, the peptide binding-groove (PBG) and the C-terminal of β-clamp located on different domains interact with XthA. The β-clamp-XthA complex can be disrupted by clamp binding peptides and also by a specific bacterial clamp inhibitor that binds at the PBG. We also identified that β-clamp stimulates the activities of XthA primarily by increasing its affinity for the substrate and its processivity. Additionally, loading of the β-clamp onto DNA is required for activity stimulation. A reduction in XthA activity stimulation was observed in the presence of β-clamp binding peptides supporting that direct interactions between the proteins are necessary to cause stimulation. Finally, we found that in the absence of DNA, the PBG located on the second domain of the β-clamp is important for interactions with XthA, while the C-terminal domain predominantly mediates functional interactions in the substrate's presence. PMID:26103519

  6. Dust Slides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03677 Linear Clouds

    Dust slides are common in the dust covered region called Lycus Sulci. A large fracture is also visible in this image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 28.1N, Longitude 226.3E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Molten Steel Flow Patterns and Particle-Wall Interactions Inside a Slide-Gate Nozzle by a Hybrid Turbulent Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi-Ghaleni, Mahdi; Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Smith, Jeffrey D.; O'Malley, Ronald

    2016-06-01

    Melt flow patterns and turbulence inside a slide-gate throttled submerged entry nozzle (SEN) were studied using Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) model, which is a combination of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) models. The DES switching criterion between RANS and LES was investigated to closely reproduce the flow structures of low and high turbulence regions similar to RANS and LES simulations, respectively. The melt flow patterns inside the nozzle were determined by k-ɛ (a RANS model), LES, and DES turbulent models, and convergence studies were performed to ensure reliability of the results. Results showed that the DES model has significant advantages over the standard k-ɛ model in transient simulations and in regions containing flow separation from the nozzle surface. Moreover, due to applying a hybrid approach, DES uses a RANS model at wall boundaries which resolves the extremely fine mesh requirement of LES simulations, and therefore it is computationally more efficient. Investigation of particle distribution inside the nozzle and particle adhesion to the nozzle wall also reveals that the DES model simulations predict more particle-wall interactions compared to LES model.

  8. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  9. Sliding-Ring Catenanes.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Isurika R; Frasconi, Marco; Wu, Yilei; Liu, Wei-Guang; Wasielewski, Michael R; Goddard, William A; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-08-17

    Template-directed protocols provide a routine approach to the synthesis of mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs), in which the mechanical bonds are stabilized by a wide variety of weak interactions. In this Article, we describe a strategy for the preparation of neutral [2]catenanes with sliding interlocked electron-rich rings, starting from two degenerate donor-acceptor [2]catenanes, consisting of a tetracationic cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) cyclophane (CBPQT(4+)) and crown ethers containing either (i) hydroquinone (HQ) or (ii) 1,5-dioxynaphthalene (DNP) recognition units and carrying out four-electron reductions of the cyclophane components to their neutral forms. The donor-acceptor interactions between the CBPQT(4+) ring and both HQ and DNP units present in the crown ethers that stabilize the [2]catenanes are weakened upon reduction of the cyclophane components to their radical cationic states and are all but absent in their fully reduced states. Characterization in solution performed by UV-vis, EPR, and NMR spectroscopic probes reveals that changes in the redox properties of the [2]catenanes result in a substantial decrease of the energy barriers for the circumrotation and pirouetting motions of the interlocked rings, which glide freely through one another in the neutral states. The solid-state structures of the fully reduced catenanes reveal profound changes in the relative dispositions of the interlocked rings, with the glycol chains of the crown ethers residing in the cavities of the neutral CBPQT(0) rings. Quantum mechanical investigations of the energy levels associated with the four different oxidation states of the catenanes support this interpretation. Catenanes and rotaxanes with sliding rings are expected to display unique properties. PMID:27398609

  10. Whole slide imaging for educational purposes

    PubMed Central

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Szymas, Janusz; Yagi, Yukako; Wilbur, David

    2012-01-01

    Digitized slides produced by whole slide image scanners can be easily shared over a network or by transferring image files to optical or other data storage devices. Navigation of digitized slides is interactive and intended to simulate viewing glass slides with a microscope (virtual microscopy). Image viewing software permits users to edit, annotate, analyze, and easily share whole slide images (WSI). As a result, WSI have begun to replace the traditional light microscope, offering a myriad of opportunities for education. This article focuses on current applications of WSI in education and proficiency testing. WSI has been successfully explored for graduate education (medical, dental, and veterinary schools), training of pathology residents, as an educational tool in allied pathology schools (e.g., cytotechnology), for virtual tracking and tutoring, tele-education (tele-conferencing), e-learning, virtual workshops, at tumor boards, with interactive publications, and on examinations. WSI supports flexible and cost-effective distant learning and augments problem-oriented teaching, competency evaluation, and proficiency testing. WSI viewed on touchscreen displays and with tablet technology are especially beneficial for education. Further investigation is necessary to develop superior WSI applications that better support education and to design viewing stations with ergonomic tools that improve the WSI-human interface and navigation of virtual slides. Studies to determine the impact of training pathologists without exposure to actual glass slides are also needed. PMID:23372987

  11. Flexible sliding seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallenhorst, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    Circular seal both slides and flexes to accomodate relative motion between two sealed members. Originally developed for Space Shuttle orbiter, it contains sliding seal to accommodate engine gimbaling and flexible seal that absorbs forward motion at high thrust of engine heat shield relative to airframe. Other possible applications are in support structures of heavy machinery and vehicle engines. Flexible sliding seal is ring about 7 feet in diameter and can withstand temperatures up to 1,600 F.

  12. Physics in water slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomazo, Jean-Baptiste; Reyssat, Etienne; Fermigier, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Water slides are body-size inclined pipes fed with water to improve sliding. Water is allowed to freely flow down the slide. It forms a lubrication film that reduces friction between the slide and the body, allowing sliders to travel down at high speeds. We present the results of an experimental study on a model water slide at the scale of the laboratory. We analyze the sliding velocities of cylindrical objects of various masses and sizes sliding down an inclined gutter fed with a controlled flux of water. In the range of parameters that we have studied, we show that the speed of the model sliders is faster than the flow of the environing water. We propose a minimal model to account for the observed sliding velocities measured in our experiments. The sliding velocity is set by a balance of the apparent weight with inertial drag or viscous friction in the lubrication film under the slider. Other resisting mechanisms will also be discussed.

  13. Herbaceous Ornamental Plants. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Still, Steven

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with commercially important herbaceous ornamental plants. Included in the script are narrations for use with a total of 338 slides illustrating 150 different plants. Generally, two slides are used to illustrate each plant: one slide shows…

  14. Slide Classification and Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clawson, Catherine R.; Ronkowski, Charles A.

    1981-01-01

    Follows up an August 1978 article on the cataloging of slides using color photocopying, and presents unsolicited reactions to that article from librarians who were interested in the slide system developed for use in the C-E Refractories Research and Development Library. Twelve references are listed. (FM)

  15. Mailing microscope slides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many insects feed agriculturally important crops, trees, and ornamental plants and cause millions of dollars of damage annually. Identification for some of these require the preparation of a microscope slide for examination. There are times when a microscope slide may need to be sent away to a speci...

  16. UNDERSTANDING THE SLIDE RULE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JOHNSON, RONALD E.; AND OTHERS

    A BOOKLET DESIGNED FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS TO BE USED INDEPENDENTLY FROM AND IN ADDITION TO THE REGULAR CLASSROOM CURRICULUM IN MATHEMATICS IS GIVEN. THE FIFTH- OR SIXTH-GRADE STUDENT IS PRESENTED WITH A DISCUSSION OF THE APPLICATIONS OF THE SLIDE RULE AND WITH A BACKGROUND REVIEW OF NECESSARY CONCEPTS. THE CONCEPTS OF THE SLIDE RULE ARE…

  17. Analysis of slide exploration strategy of cytologists when reading digital slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Parwani, Anil; Tseytlin, Eugene; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2012-02-01

    Cytology is the sub-domain of Pathology that deals mainly with the diagnosis of cellular changes caused by disease. Current clinical practice involves a cytotechnologist that manually screens glass slides containing fixed cytology material using a light microscope. Screened slides are then forwarded to a specialized pathologist, a cytopathologist, for microscopic review and final diagnostic interpretation. If no abnormalities are detected, the specimen is interpreted as "normal", otherwise the abnormalities are marked with a pen on the glass slide by the cytotechnologist and then are used to render a diagnosis. As Pathology is migrating towards a digital environment it is important to determine whether these crucial screening and diagnostic tasks can be performed as well using digital slides as the current practice with glass slides. The purpose of this work is to make this assessment, by using a set of digital slides depicting cytological materials of different disease processes in several organs, and then to analyze how different cytologists including cytotechnologists, cytopathologists and cytotechnology-trainees explored the digital slides. We will (1) collect visual search data from the cytologists as they navigate the digital slides, as well as record any electronic marks (annotations) made by the cytologists; (2) convert the dynamic visual search data into a static representation of the observers' exploration strategy using 'search maps'; and (3) determine slide coverage, per viewing magnification range, for each group. We have developed a virtual microscope to collect this data, and this interface allows for interactive navigation of the virtual slide (including panning and zooming), as well as annotation of reportable findings. Furthermore, all interactions with the interface are time stamped, which allows us to recreate the cytologists' search strategy.

  18. Design for slides.

    PubMed

    Johns, M

    1995-09-01

    The basic principles of design for projection slides are discussed, with particular reference to the impact of the personal computer and commercial presentation software on the material that is destined to end up on the screen at meetings and in seminar rooms. While modern software can be a boon to the presenter, allowing simple creation of slides, it can also encourage some of the worst excesses. The keynote of the design of slides for educational purposes should be simplicity, and ways of achieving simple but effective results are described. PMID:8550965

  19. Slides, Swings and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreyer, Kay Jardon; Bryte, Janelle

    1990-01-01

    Described are eight science activities that may take place on a school playground using a parachute, balls, swings, slides, and a balance beam. Procedures and questions for each activity are included. (CW)

  20. Fundamentals of the Slide Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boerner, Susan Zee

    This paper is an introduction to the fundamentals of the art (including architecture) slide library, with some emphasis on basic procedures of the science slide library. Information in this paper is particularly relevant to the college, university, and museum slide library. Topics addressed include: (1) history of the slide library; (2) duties of…

  1. Ornamental Landscape Grasses. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Still, Steven M.; Adams, Denise W.

    This slide script to accompany the slide series, Ornamental Landscape Grasses, contains photographs of the 167 slides and accompanying narrative text intended for use in the study and identification of commercially important ornamental grasses and grasslike plants. Narrative text is provided for slides of 62 different perennial and annual species…

  2. Selected Landscape Plants. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Kevin

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with commercially important woody ornamental landscape plants. Included in the script are narrations for use with a total of 253 slides illustrating 92 different plants. Several slides are used to illustrate each plant: besides a view of…

  3. Prototype Slide Stainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The prototype slide staining system capable of performing both one-component Wright's staining of blood smears and eight-step Gram staining of heat fixed slides of microorganisms is described. Attention was given to liquid containment, waste handling, absence of contamination from previous staining, and stability of the staining reagents. The unit is self-contained, capable of independent operation under one- or zero-g conditions, and compatible with Skylab A.

  4. Water-slide alopecia.

    PubMed

    Adams, B B

    2001-05-01

    A 29-year-old male presented with large, symmetric, alopecic patches on the posterolateral aspects of both calves. A detailed history revealed that the individual had recently attended a water-slide amusement park. Repeated frictional trauma between the legs and the slide resulted in these alopecic patches. Friction, especially when encountered during sports-related and recreational activities, should be included in the differential diagnosis of well-defined alopecic patches. PMID:11381856

  5. Slowing the Summer Slide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lorna

    2012-01-01

    Research shows that summer slide--the loss of learning over the summer break--is a huge contributor to the achievement gap between low-income students and their higher-income peers. In fact, some researchers have concluded that two-thirds of the 9th-grade reading achievement gap can be explained by unequal access to summer learning opportunities…

  6. Reversing the Slide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Government is embarking on a grand market-based vision for the sector just at the moment when university enrolments will begin a long and perhaps inexorable slide. And according to Michael Gallagher, higher education is becoming a less attractive investment for the private sector even as the Government is pushing the sector towards ever higher…

  7. cryo-EM structures of the E. coli replicative DNA polymerase reveal its dynamic interactions with the DNA sliding clamp, exonuclease and τ

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Leiro, Rafael; Conrad, Julian; Scheres, Sjors HW; Lamers, Meindert H

    2015-01-01

    The replicative DNA polymerase PolIIIα from Escherichia coli is a uniquely fast and processive enzyme. For its activity it relies on the DNA sliding clamp β, the proofreading exonuclease ε and the C-terminal domain of the clamp loader subunit τ. Due to the dynamic nature of the four-protein complex it has long been refractory to structural characterization. Here we present the 8 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structures of DNA-bound and DNA-free states of the PolIII-clamp-exonuclease-τc complex. The structures show how the polymerase is tethered to the DNA through multiple contacts with the clamp and exonuclease. A novel contact between the polymerase and clamp is made in the DNA bound state, facilitated by a large movement of the polymerase tail domain and τc. These structures provide crucial insights into the organization of the catalytic core of the replisome and form an important step towards determining the structure of the complete holoenzyme. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11134.001 PMID:26499492

  8. An Easy Method for Preparing Presentation Slides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Norman A.; Blevins, Dennis D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a simplified method of preparing 35mm projection slides with a minimum of equipment and expertise. The quality of these slides compares favorably to professionally produced diazo slides. Twenty-five slides can easily be prepared in less than three hours. Material cost per slide is comparable to professional color slide processing. (JN)

  9. Slide system for machine tools

    DOEpatents

    Douglass, Spivey S.; Green, Walter L.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention relates to a machine tool which permits the machining of nonaxisymmetric surfaces on a workpiece while rotating the workpiece about a central axis of rotation. The machine tool comprises a conventional two-slide system (X-Y) with one of these slides being provided with a relatively short travel high-speed auxiliary slide which carries the material-removing tool. The auxiliary slide is synchronized with the spindle speed and the position of the other two slides and provides a high-speed reciprocating motion required for the displacement of the cutting tool for generating a nonaxisymmetric surface at a selected location on the workpiece.

  10. Slide system for machine tools

    DOEpatents

    Douglass, S.S.; Green, W.L.

    1980-06-12

    The present invention relates to a machine tool which permits the machining of nonaxisymmetric surfaces on a workpiece while rotating the workpiece about a central axis of rotation. The machine tool comprises a conventional two-slide system (X-Y) with one of these slides being provided with a relatively short travel high-speed auxiliary slide which carries the material-removing tool. The auxiliary slide is synchronized with the spindle speed and the position of the other two slides and provides a high-speed reciprocating motion required for the displacement of the cutting tool for generating a nonaxisymmetric surface at a selected location on the workpiece.

  11. Reconstitution of flagellar sliding.

    PubMed

    Alper, Joshua; Geyer, Veikko; Mukundan, Vikram; Howard, Jonathon

    2013-01-01

    The motile structure within eukaryotic cilia and flagella is the axoneme. This structure typically consists of nine doublet microtubules arranged around a pair of singlet microtubules. The axoneme contains more than 650 different proteins that have structural, force-generating, and regulatory functions. Early studies on sea urchin sperm identified the force-generating components, the dynein motors. It was shown that dynein can slide adjacent doublet microtubules in the presence of ATP. How this sliding gives rise to the beating of the axoneme is still unknown. Reconstitution assays provide a clean system, free from cellular effects, to elucidate the underlying beating mechanisms. These assays can be used to identify the components that are both necessary and sufficient for the generation of flagellar beating. PMID:23498749

  12. Peeling, sliding, pulling and bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, John; Peng, Gunnar

    2015-11-01

    The peeling of an elastic sheet away from thin layer of viscous fluid is a simply-stated and generic problem, that involves complex interactions between the flow and elastic deformation on a range of length scales. Consider an analogue of capillary spreading, where a blister of injected viscous fluid spreads due to tension in the overlying elastic sheet. Here the tension is coupled to the deformation of the sheet, and thus varies in time and space. A key question is whether or not viscous shear stresses ahead of the blister are sufficient to prevent the sheet sliding inwards and relieving the tension. Our asymptotic analysis reveals a dichotomy between fast and slow spreading, and between two-dimensional and axisymmetric spreading. In combination with bending stresses and gravity, which may dominate parts of the flow but not others, there is a plethora of dynamical regimes.

  13. Protein-Protein Interactions Leading to Recruitment of the Host DNA Sliding Clamp by the Hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus islandicus Rod-Shaped Virus 2

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andrew F.; Bell, Stephen D.; White, Malcolm F.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses infecting hyperthermophilic archaea typically do not encode DNA polymerases, raising questions regarding their genome replication. Here, using a yeast two-hybrid approach, we have assessed interactions between proteins of Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) and the host-encoded proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a key DNA replication protein in archaea. Five SIRV2 proteins were found to interact with PCNA, providing insights into the recruitment of host replisome for viral DNA replication. PMID:24696494

  14. Appearance Normalization of Histology Slides

    PubMed Central

    Niethammer, Marc; Borland, David; Marron, J. S.; Woosley, John; Thomas, Nancy E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method for automatic color and intensity normalization of digitized histology slides stained with two different agents. In comparison to previous approaches, prior information on the stain vectors is used in the estimation process, resulting in improved stability of the estimates. Due to the prevalence of hematoxylin and eosin staining for histology slides, the proposed method has significant practical utility. In particular, it can be used as a first step to standardize appearances across slides, that is very effective at countering effects due to differing stain amounts and protocols, and to slide fading. The approach is validated using synthetic experiments and 13 real datasets. PMID:25360444

  15. Single molecule study of a processivity clamp sliding on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T A; Kwon, Y; Johnson, A; Hollars, C; O?Donnell, M; Camarero, J A; Barsky, D

    2007-07-05

    Using solution based single molecule spectroscopy, we study the motion of the polIII {beta}-subunit DNA sliding clamp ('{beta}-clamp') on DNA. Present in all cellular (and some viral) forms of life, DNA sliding clamps attach to polymerases and allow rapid, processive replication of DNA. In the absence of other proteins, the DNA sliding clamps are thought to 'freely slide' along the DNA; however, the abundance of positively charged residues along the inner surface may create favorable electrostatic contact with the highly negatively charged DNA. We have performed single-molecule measurements on a fluorescently labeled {beta}-clamp loaded onto freely diffusing plasmids annealed with fluorescently labeled primers of up to 90 bases. We find that the diffusion constant for 1D diffusion of the {beta}-clamp on DNA satisfies D {le} 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s, much slower than the frictionless limit of D = 10{sup -10} cm{sup 2}/s. We find that the {beta} clamp remains at the 3-foot end in the presence of E. coli single-stranded binding protein (SSB), which would allow for a sliding clamp to wait for binding of the DNA polymerase. Replacement of SSB with Human RP-A eliminates this interaction; free movement of sliding clamp and poor binding of clamp loader to the junction allows sliding clamp to accumulate on DNA. This result implies that the clamp not only acts as a tether, but also a placeholder.

  16. Solar-Cell Slide Rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    Slide rule relates efficiency, impurity types, impurity concentrations, and process types. Solar cell slide rule calculations are determination of allowable impurity concentration for nonredistributive process, determination of impurity buildup factor for redistributive process and determination of allowable impurity concentration for redistributive process.

  17. Appearance normalization of histology slides.

    PubMed

    Vicory, Jared; Couture, Heather D; Thomas, Nancy E; Borland, David; Marron, J S; Woosley, John; Niethammer, Marc

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a method for automatic color and intensity normalization of digitized histology slides stained with two different agents. In comparison to previous approaches, prior information on the stain vectors is used in the plane estimation process, resulting in improved stability of the estimates. Due to the prevalence of hematoxylin and eosin staining for histology slides, the proposed method has significant practical utility. In particular, it can be used as a first step to standardize appearance across slides and is effective at countering effects due to differing stain amounts and protocols and counteracting slide fading. The approach is validated against non-prior plane-fitting using synthetic experiments and 13 real datasets. Results of application of the method to adjustment of faded slides are given, and the effectiveness of the method in aiding statistical classification is shown. PMID:25863518

  18. SurfaceSlide: A Multitouch Digital Pathology Platform

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinhai; Williamson, Kate E.; Kelly, Paul J.; James, Jacqueline A.; Hamilton, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Digital pathology provides a digital environment for the management and interpretation of pathological images and associated data. It is becoming increasing popular to use modern computer based tools and applications in pathological education, tissue based research and clinical diagnosis. Uptake of this new technology is stymied by its single user orientation and its prerequisite and cumbersome combination of mouse and keyboard for navigation and annotation. Methodology In this study we developed SurfaceSlide, a dedicated viewing platform which enables the navigation and annotation of gigapixel digitised pathological images using fingertip touch. SurfaceSlide was developed using the Microsoft Surface, a 30 inch multitouch tabletop computing platform. SurfaceSlide users can perform direct panning and zooming operations on digitised slide images. These images are downloaded onto the Microsoft Surface platform from a remote server on-demand. Users can also draw annotations and key in texts using an on-screen virtual keyboard. We also developed a smart caching protocol which caches the surrounding regions of a field of view in multi-resolutions thus providing a smooth and vivid user experience and reducing the delay for image downloading from the internet. We compared the usability of SurfaceSlide against Aperio ImageScope and PathXL online viewer. Conclusion SurfaceSlide is intuitive, fast and easy to use. SurfaceSlide represents the most direct, effective and intimate human–digital slide interaction experience. It is expected that SurfaceSlide will significantly enhance digital pathology tools and applications in education and clinical practice. PMID:22292040

  19. CI Slide: calibration slide for quantitative microscopy imaging in absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhzadeh, Fahime; Ye, Qian; Zulkafly, Nasir; Carraro, Anita; Korbelic, Jagoda; Chen, Zhaoyang; Harrison, Alan; Follen, Michele; MacAulay, Calum; Ward, Rabab K.; Guillaud, Martial

    2014-03-01

    New imaging technologies are changing the field of digital pathology. This field faces numerous challenges and there is a pressing need for standardization, calibration protocols, quality control and quantitative assessment. We have designed a new calibration imaging slide (Cancer Imaging Slide), specifically to measure the characteristics of old or new imaging systems or scanners. The layout of the slide consists of 138 boxes with the side length of 1.6 mm, containing objects of known morphologic and photometric characteristics. Among them, 112 boxes contain different permutations of circles, ovals, and squares. The circles have different radii, radius/pitch ratios and step transmissions. The ovals have different sizes and orientations. The squares are consistent in size and orientation but have different step transmission values. Also, 16 boxes contain three resolution test targets: crosses, USAF target and Siemens star. The last 10 boxes are blank boxes with different transmission values. Four slides were scanned and imaged on one commercial whole-slide scanner and one high resolution imaging system. After segmenting the images, about 200 features (photometric, morphologic and architectural) were measured with our in-house image processing software. The objective of the project is to develop a statistical process control using this new slide. In this paper, we describe the characteristics of the slide and present our preliminary results.

  20. Sliding Mode Thermal Control System for Space Station Furnace Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson Mark E.; Shtessel, Yuri B.

    1998-01-01

    The decoupled control of the nonlinear, multiinput-multioutput, and highly coupled space station furnace facility (SSFF) thermal control system is addressed. Sliding mode control theory, a subset of variable-structure control theory, is employed to increase the performance, robustness, and reliability of the SSFF's currently designed control system. This paper presents the nonlinear thermal control system description and develops the sliding mode controllers that cause the interconnected subsystems to operate in their local sliding modes, resulting in control system invariance to plant uncertainties and external and interaction disturbances. The desired decoupled flow-rate tracking is achieved by optimization of the local linear sliding mode equations. The controllers are implemented digitally and extensive simulation results are presented to show the flow-rate tracking robustness and invariance to plant uncertainties, nonlinearities, external disturbances, and variations of the system pressure supplied to the controlled subsystems.

  1. Virtual slides: application in pulmonary pathology consultations.

    PubMed

    Słodkowska, Janina; Chyczewski, Lech; Wojciechowski, Michał

    2008-01-01

    The Virtual Slide (VS) is an interactive microscope emulator that presents a complete digitized tissue section via the Internet. A successful implementation of VS has been observed for educational, research venues and quality control. VS acquisition for consultative pathology is not so common. The purpose of this study was to explore the efficacy and usability of VS in the consultative pulmonary telepathology. 20 lung tumors entered the study. The performance was programmed for 2 medical centers specialized in pulmonary pathology (beginner and advancer in telepathology). A high-quality VSs were prepared by Coolscope (Nikon, Eclipsnet VSL, Japan), and were evaluated via the Internet. The cases were reviewed for the second time with conventional light microscope. VS diagnostic accuracy and the interobserver variability were evaluated. Also the time taken by examiners to render the diagnoses and time needed to scan the microscopic slide were analyzed. Percentage concordance between original glass-slides diagnosis and diagnosis for VSs was very high. Pathologists found the download speed of VSs adequate; experience in telepathology reduced the time of VS diagnosis. VS implementation suggests advantages for teleconsulation and education but also indicate some technical limitations. This is the first Polish trial of VS implementation in telepathology consultative service. PMID:18296275

  2. An Airship Slide Rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, E R; Pickering, S F

    1924-01-01

    This report prepared for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, describes an airship slide rule developed by the Gas-Chemistry Section of the Bureau of Standards, at the request of the Bureau of Engineering of the Navy Department. It is intended primarily to give rapid solutions of a few problems of frequent occurrence in airship navigation, but it can be used to advantage in solving a great variety of problems, involving volumes, lifting powers, temperatures, pressures, altitudes and the purity of the balloon gas. The rule is graduated to read directly in the units actually used in making observations, constants and conversion factors being taken care of by the length and location of the scales. It is thought that with this rule practically any problem likely to arise in this class of work can be readily solved after the user has become familiar with the operation of the rule; and that the solution will, in most cases, be as accurate as the data warrant.

  3. Understanding Learning Style by Eye Tracking in Slide Video Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Jianxia; Nishihara, Akinori

    2012-01-01

    More and more videos are now being used in e-learning context. For improving learning effect, to understand how students view the online video is important. In this research, we investigate how students deploy their attention when they learn through interactive slide video in the aim of better understanding observers' learning style. Felder and…

  4. Sliding Adhesion Dynamics of Isolated Gecko Setal Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sponberg, Simon; Autumn, Kellar

    2003-03-01

    The tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) can adhere to nearly any surface through van der Waals interactions of the specialized setae (b-keratin "hairs") of its toe pads. Our recent research has suggested that a gecko is substantially overbuilt for static adhesion requiring as little as 0.03of its theoretical adhesive capacity. We performed the first sliding adhesion experiments on this novel biological adhesive to determine its response to dynamic loading. We isolated arrays of setae and constructed a precision controlled Robo-toe to study sliding effects. Our results indicate that, unlike many typical adhesives, gecko setal arrays exhibit an increased frictional force upon sliding (mk > ms) which further increases with velocity, suggesting that perturbation rejection may be an evolutionary design principle underlying the evolution of the gecko adhesive. We compare these dynamic properties with those of other adhesives and explore the impacts of these results on the design of artificial adhesives.

  5. Reading virtual slide using web viewers: results of subjective experience with three different solutions

    PubMed Central

    Rojo, Marcial García; Gallardo, Antonio J; González, Lucía; Peces, Carlos; Murillo, Cristina; González, Jesús; Sacristán, Jose

    2008-01-01

    Background Virtual slides are viewed using interactive software that enables the user to simulate the behaviour of a conventional optical microscope, like adjusting magnifications and navigating to any portion of the image. Nowadays, information about the performance and features of web-based solutions for reading slides in real environments is still scarce. The objective of this study is analyzing the subjective experience of pathologists with virtual slides, comparing the time needed to read slides using different web viewers and different network connections. Methods Eight slides were randomly selected (4 biopsies and 2 cytologies) from Hospital General de Ciudad Real (HGCR) archives. Three different virtual slide web-viewing solutions were analyzed: Aperio web server, Olympus NetImage Server, and Aurora mScope. Five pathologists studied to time needed to access images of each virtual slide, selecting a panoramic view, 10 low magnification fields, and 20 high magnification fields. Results Aperio viewer is very efficient in overview images. Aurora viewer is especially efficient in lower magnifications (10×). For larger magnifications (20× and 40×) no significant differences were found between different vendors. Olympus was found to be the most user-friendly interface. When comparing Internet with intranet connections, despite being slower, users also felt comfortable using virtual slides through Internet connection. Conclusion Available web solutions for virtual slides have different advantages, mainly in functionalities and optimization for different magnifications. Pathologist should select the solutions adapted to their needs. PMID:18673512

  6. Automatic 35 mm slide duplicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, H. F.; Texler, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Automatic duplicator is readily assembled from conventional, inexpensive equipment and parts. Series of slides can be exposed without operator attention, eliminating considerable manual handling and processing ordinarily required. At end of programmed exposure sequence, unit shuts off and audible alarm signals completion of process.

  7. Transparent acrylic enamel slide holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce-Lee, E. L.; Olivares Pérez, A.; Ruiz-Limón, B.; Hernández-Garay, M. P.; Toxqui-López, S.

    2006-02-01

    We present holograms generated in a computer to an acrylic enamel slide (Comex (R)), getting phase holograms. The information in the mask is transferred to the material by temperature gradients generated by rubbing. The refraction index is transformed at each material point by the temperature changes, thus the film is recorded and developed by itself. this material can be used for soft lithography.

  8. Creating Slide Show Book Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Harriet G.; Stuhlmann, Janice M.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of "Kid Pix 2" software by fourth grade students to develop slide-show book reports. Highlights include collaboration with education majors from Louisiana State University, changes in attitudes of the education major students and elementary students, and problems with navigation and disk space. (LRW)

  9. Herbaceous Ornamental Plants. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Still, Steven

    This document, which is one in a series of curriculum materials that has been developed for use in Ohio agricultural education programs, contains 338 black-and-white photographs of a set of color slides and an accompanying script that, together, are intended as an aid in the study and identification of 150 different commercially important…

  10. Approved Practices in Dairy Reproduction. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roediger, Roger D.; Barr, Harry L.

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with approved practices in dairy reproduction. Included in the guide are narrations for use with 200 slides dealing with the following topics: the importance of good reproduction, the male and female roles in reproduction, selection of…

  11. Linear Classification of Dairy Cattle. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sipiorski, James; Spike, Peter

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with principles of the linear classification of dairy cattle. Included in the guide are narrations for use with 63 slides, which illustrate the following areas that are considered in the linear classification system: stature, strength,…

  12. Diseases of Landscape Ornamentals. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Charles C.; Sydnor, T. Davis

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with recognizing and controlling diseases found on ornamental landscape plants. Included in the script are narrations for use with a total of 80 slides illustrating various foliar diseases (anthracnose, black spot, hawthorn leaf blight,…

  13. Pressure vessel sliding support unit and system using the sliding support unit

    SciTech Connect

    Breach, Michael R.; Keck, David J.; Deaver, Gerald A.

    2013-01-15

    Provided is a sliding support and a system using the sliding support unit. The sliding support unit may include a fulcrum capture configured to attach to a support flange, a fulcrum support configured to attach to the fulcrum capture, and a baseplate block configured to support the fulcrum support. The system using the sliding support unit may include a pressure vessel, a pedestal bracket, and a plurality of sliding support units.

  14. Automated single-slide staining device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A simple apparatus and method is disclosed for making individual single Gram stains on bacteria inoculated slides to assist in classifying bacteria in the laboratory as Gram-positive or Gram-negative. The apparatus involves positioning a single inoculated slide in a stationary position and thereafter automatically and sequentially flooding the slide with increments of a primary stain, a mordant, a decolorizer, a counterstain and a wash solution in a sequential manner without the individual lab technician touching the slide and with minimum danger of contamination thereof from other slides.

  15. Phase field modeling of a glide dislocation transmission across a coherent sliding interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Songlin; Ni, Yong; He, Linghui

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional phase field microelasticity modeling and simulation capable of representing core structure and elastic interactions of dislocations are used to study a glide dislocation transmission across a coherent sliding interface in face-centered cubic metals. We investigate the role of the interface sliding process, which is described as the reversible motion of interface dislocation on the interfacial barrier strength to transmission. Numerical results show that a wider transient interface sliding zone develops on the interface with a lower interfacial unstable stacking fault energy to trap the glide dislocation leading to a stronger barrier to transmission. The interface sliding zone shrinks in the case of high applied stress and low mobility for the interfacial dislocation. This indicates that such interfacial barrier strength might be rate dependent. We discuss the calculated interfacial barrier strength for the Cu/Ni interface from the contribution of interface sliding comparable to previous atomistic simulations.

  16. Sliding mode control of magnetic suspensions for precision pointing and tracking applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misovec, Kathleen M.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Johnson, Bruce G.; Hedrick, J. Karl

    1991-01-01

    A recently developed nonlinear control method, sliding mode control, is examined as a means of advancing the achievable performance of space-based precision pointing and tracking systems that use nonlinear magnetic actuators. Analytic results indicate that sliding mode control improves performance compared to linear control approaches. In order to realize these performance improvements, precise knowledge of the plant is required. Additionally, the interaction of an estimating scheme and the sliding mode controller has not been fully examined in the literature. Estimation schemes were designed for use with this sliding mode controller that do not seriously degrade system performance. The authors designed and built a laboratory testbed to determine the feasibility of utilizing sliding mode control in these types of applications. Using this testbed, experimental verification of the authors' analyses is ongoing.

  17. Sliding seal materials for adiabatic engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, J.

    1985-01-01

    The sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising carbide, oxide, and nitride materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, loading conditions that are representative of the adiabatic engine environment. In order to provide guidance needed to improve materials for this application, the program stressed fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in friction and wear. Microhardness tests were performed on the candidate materials at elevated temperatures, and in atmospheres relevant to the piston seal application, and optical and electron microscopy were used to elucidate the micromechanisms of wear following wear testing. X-ray spectroscopy was used to evaluate interface/environment interactions which seemed to be important in the friction and wear process. Electrical effects in the friction and wear processes were explored in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of such effects in modifying the friction and wear rates in service. However, this factor was found to be of negligible significance in controlling friction and wear.

  18. Apparatus Would Stain Microscope Slides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breeding, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed apparatus meters specific amounts of fluid out of containers at specific times to stain microscope slides. Intended specifically for semiautomated staining of microbiological and hematological samples in microgravity, leakproof apparatus used in other environments in which technicians have little time to allocate to staining procedures and/or exposure to toxic staining agents or to micro-organisms to be stained hazardous. Apparatus adapted to perform almost any staining procedure and accommodates multiple staining reagents, useful for small or remote clinical laboratories.

  19. Triggering mechanism and tsunamogenic potential of the Cape Fear Slide complex, U.S. Atlantic margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbach, Matthew J.; Lavier, Luc L.; Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2007-12-01

    Analysis of new multibeam bathymetry data and seismic Chirp data acquired over the Cape Fear Slide complex on the U.S. Atlantic margin suggests that at least 5 major submarine slides have likely occurred there within the past 30,000 years, indicating that repetitive, large-scale mass wasting and associated tsunamis may be more common in this area than previously believed. Gas hydrate deposits and associated free gas as well as salt tectonics have been implicated in previous studies as triggers for the major Cape Fear slide events. Analysis of the interaction of the gas hydrate phase boundary and the various generations of slides indicates that only the most landward slide likely intersected the phase boundary and inferred high gas pressures below it. For much of the region, we believe that displacement along a newly recognized normal fault led to upward migration of salt, oversteepening of slopes, and repeated slope failures. Using new constraints on slide morphology, we develop the first tsunami model for the Cape Fear Slide complex. Our results indicate that if the most seaward Cape Fear slide event occurred today, it could produce waves in excess of 2 m at the present-day 100 m bathymetric contour.

  20. Triggering mechanism and tsunamogenic potential of the Cape Fear Slide complex, U.S. Atlantic margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hornbach, Matthew J.; Lavier, Luc L.; Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of new multibeam bathymetry data and seismic Chirp data acquired over the Cape Fear Slide complex on the U.S. Atlantic margin suggests that at least 5 major submarine slides have likely occurred there within the past 30,000 years, indicating that repetitive, large-scale mass wasting and associated tsunamis may be more common in this area than previously believed. Gas hydrate deposits and associated free gas as well as salt tectonics have been implicated in previous studies as triggers for the major Cape Fear slide events. Analysis of the interaction of the gas hydrate phase boundary and the various generations of slides indicates that only the most landward slide likely intersected the phase boundary and inferred high gas pressures below it. For much of the region, we believe that displacement along a newly recognized normal fault led to upward migration of salt, oversteepening of slopes, and repeated slope failures. Using new constraints on slide morphology, we develop the first tsunami model for the Cape Fear Slide complex. Our results indicate that if the most seaward Cape Fear slide event occurred today, it could produce waves in excess of 2 m at the present-day 100 m bathymetric contour.

  1. Current Status of Whole-Slide Imaging in Education.

    PubMed

    Saco, Adela; Bombi, Jose Antoni; Garcia, Adriana; Ramírez, Jose; Ordi, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Conventional light microscopy (CLM) has classically been the basic tool to teach histology and pathology. In recent years, whole-slide imaging (WSI), which consists of generating a high-magnification digital image of an entire histological glass slide, has emerged as a useful alternative to CLM offering a myriad of opportunities for education. Navigation through the digitized slides closely simulates viewing glass slides with a microscope and is also referred to as virtual microscopy. WSI has many advantages for education. Students feel more comfortable with its use, and it can be used in any classroom as it only requires a computer with Internet access and it allows remote access from anywhere and from any device. WSI can be used simultaneously by a large number of people, stimulating cooperation between students and improving the interaction with the teachers. It allows making marks and annotations on specific fields, which enable specific directed questions to the teacher. Finally, WSI supports are cost-effective compared with CLM. Consequently, WSI has begun to replace CLM in many institutions. WSI has shown to be an extremely useful tool for undergraduate education (medical, dental and veterinary schools), for the training of residents of pathology, tele-education and in tumor boards. PMID:27101397

  2. Hydrogeologic insights for a Devil's Slide-like system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Matthew A.; Loague, Keith

    2014-08-01

    Tectonically active coastal margins commonly host landslides that are influenced by hydrologic, geologic, and/or anthropogenic perturbations. The work reported here is motivated by the hydrologically driven, deep-seated bedrock slides that intersect the (former) Pacific Coast Highway in the active landslide zone at Devil's Slide near Pacifica, California. Numerical simulation of subsurface flow is employed to investigate saturated zone fluid pressure scenarios for 3-D Devil's Slide-like systems. The four-phase concept-development effort is comprised of 134 hydrogeologic simulation scenarios which investigate fluid pressure response for complex subsurface conditions and historically based climate forcings. Recharge, heterogeneity, and anisotropy are shown to increase fluid pressures in targeted failure-prone locations by up to 73.8, 10.3, and 1.8 %, respectively. The interaction between fault zone characteristics and topographically driven flow are shown to influence fluid pressures for up to 85% of the approximately 7.0 × 105 m2 study area. Simulated fluid pressures support the known slope instability for the Devil's Slide site. A quantitative hypothesis-testing discussion explores the likelihood of perched water above the regional water table at the site. Further understanding of hydrologically driven slope movement in the active landslide zone will require additional data focused on rigorous characterization of the unsaturated zone.

  3. Pleistocene Suvero slide, Paola basin, southern Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trincardi, F.; Normark, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Suvero slide covers an area of about 225 km2 in the Paola slope basin on the Eastern Tyrrhenian margin. The shape and lateral extent of the deposit reflect topographic confinement of the slide between the continental slope and a morphologic barrier formed by a margin-parallel slope ridge. No headwall or slide plane comparable in scale with the slide deposit were found, suggesting that quasi in situ deformation of semi-consolidated sediments took place when the failed materials reached the floor of the slope basin. The failure occurred downslope from a basement high originating from local uplift. Continued uplift, after the Suvero slide occurred, is documented by the presence of steep upper-slope gradients within the study area and by the presence of small-scale creep and failure events that postdate the Suvero slide. ?? 1989.

  4. Secondary Reverse Slide Tracheoplasty for Airway Rescue.

    PubMed

    Kopelovich, Jonathan C; Wine, Todd M; Rutter, Michael J; Mitchell, Max B; Prager, Jeremy D

    2016-03-01

    Slide tracheoplasty is used in cases of tracheal stenosis or injury. With expanding indications for its use at tertiary centers, salvage techniques for dehiscence or restenosis after slide tracheoplasty are increasingly relevant. We present a case in which slide tracheoplasty was augmented with an anterior costochondral graft that stenosed again and ultimately failed. We salvaged this airway emergency by performing a secondary reverse slide tracheoplasty. Using this technique, we were able to establish a safe and durable airway using only native airway tissue. PMID:26897214

  5. Tape-recorded Lectures With Slide Synchronization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhue, D.

    1969-01-01

    Describes "Taped Explanation Slide Synchronization" programs used for individual study or group showing in college zoology. Discusses preparation of programs, class organization, equipment, and costs. (EB)

  6. "Slide less pathology": Fairy tale or reality?

    PubMed

    Indu, M; Rathy, R; Binu, M P

    2016-01-01

    Pathology practice is significantly advanced in various frontiers. Therefore, "slide less digital" pathology will not be a mere imagination in near future. Digitalization of histopathological slides (whole slide imaging [WSI]) is possible with the help of whole slide scanner. The WSI has a positive impact not only in routine practice but also in research field, medical education and bioindustry. Even if digital pathology has definitive advantages, its widespread use is not yet possible. As it is an upcoming technology in our field, this article is aimed to discussessential aspects of WSI. PMID:27601824

  7. Getting Clever with the Sliding Ladder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De, Subhranil

    2014-01-01

    The familiar system involving a uniform ladder sliding against a vertical wall and a horizontal floor is considered again. The floor is taken to be smooth and the wall to be possibly rough--a situation where no matter how large the static friction coefficient between the ladder and the wall, the ladder cannot lean at rest and must slide down.…

  8. The Cancer Digital Slide Archive - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. David Gutman and Dr. Lee Cooper developed The Cancer Digital Slide Archive (CDSA), a web platform for accessing pathology slide images of TCGA samples. Find out how they did it and how to use the CDSA website in this Case Study.

  9. Sliding induced crystallization of metallic glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Sliding friction and wear experiments, electron microscopy, and diffraction studies were conducted with an Fe67Co18B14Si1 ferrous-base metallic glass in sliding contact with aluminum oxide at room temperature in air. The results indicate that the amorphous alloy can be crystallized during the sliding process. Crystallization of the wear surface causes high friction. Plastic flow occurred on the amorphous alloy with sliding, and the flow film of the alloy transferred to the aluminum oxide surface. Two distinct types of wear debris were observed as a result of sliding: an alloy wear debris, and powdery and whiskery oxide debris. Generation of oxide wear debris particles on an alloy can cause transitions in friction behavior.

  10. Slide Star: An Approach to Videodisc/Computer Aided Instruction

    PubMed Central

    McEnery, Kevin W.

    1984-01-01

    One of medical education's primary goals is for the student to be proficient in the gross and microscopic identification of disease. The videodisc, with its storage capacity of up to 54,000 photomicrographs is ideally suited to assist in this educational process. “Slide Star” is a method of interactive instruction which is designed for use in any subject where it is essential to identify visual material. The instructional approach utilizes a computer controlled videodisc to display photomicrographs. In the demonstration program, these are slides of normal blood cells. The program is unique in that the instruction is created by the student's commands manipulating the photomicrograph data base. A prime feature is the use of computer generated multiple choice questions to reinforce the learning process.

  11. On damping characteristics of frictional hysteresis in pre-sliding range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, Michael; Iwasaki, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Frictional hysteresis at relative motion in the pre-sliding range is considered. This effect is characterized by an elasto-plastic interaction, and that on the micro-scale, between two rubbing surfaces in contact that gives rise to nonlinear friction force. The pre-sliding friction force yields hysteresis in displacement. In this study, the damping characteristics of frictional hysteresis are analyzed. It is worth noting that we exclude the viscous damping mechanisms and focus on the pure hysteresis damping to be accounted in the friction modeling. The general properties of pre-sliding friction hysteresis are demonstrated and then compared with the limit case of discontinuous Coulomb friction. Further we consider two advanced dynamic friction models, LuGre and Maxwell-slip, so as demonstrate their damping properties and convergence of the motion system to equilibrium state. Experimental observations of the free motion in pre-sliding range are also shown and discussed.

  12. Deformation and stabilisation mechanisms of slow rock slides in crystalline bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangerl, C.; Prager, C.

    2009-04-01

    changes which in turn may influence the slope deformation behaviour and stabilisation mechanisms. In order to study these processes for selected case studies in paragneissic rock masses the impact of the sliding mass geometry and sliding zone shape on the in-situ stresses has been investigated by applying the discrete element method. This numerical approach enables the simulation of large shear displacements and complex block assembly interactions. Results show that slope stabilisation can be achieved when the dip angle of the sliding zone flattens downslope. In this case and after a certain amount of displacement the lower part of the rock slide mass reaches stable slope conditions (shear strength of the sliding zone material exceeds the shear stress acting on the sliding zone) and acts as a resisting mass for the still unstable upper part of the slope. Furthermore numerical models show that secondary slides at the lower part of the slope have a similar effect. In both case cases the observed slope stabilisation can be clearly attributed to the formation of natural buttressing masses at the toe.

  13. An updated nuclear criticality slide rule

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, C.M.; Broadhead, B.L.

    1998-04-01

    This Volume 2 contains the functional version of the updated nuclear criticality slide rule (more accurately, sliding graphs) that is referenced in An Updated Nuclear Criticality Slide Rule: Technical Basis, NUREG/CR-6504, Vol. 1 (ORNL/TM-13322/V1). This functional slide rule provides a readily usable {open_quotes}in-hand{close_quotes} method for estimating pertinent nuclear criticality accident information from sliding graphs, thereby permitting (1) the rapid estimation of pertinent criticality accident information without laborious or sophisticated calculations in a nuclear criticality emergency situation, (2) the appraisal of potential fission yields and external personnel radiation exposures for facility safety analyses, and (3) a technical basis for emergency preparedness and training programs at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The slide rule permits the estimation of neutron and gamma dose rates and integrated doses based upon estimated fission yields, distance from the fission source, and time-after criticality accidents for five different critical systems. Another sliding graph permits the estimation of critical solution fission yields based upon fissile material concentration, critical vessel geometry, and solution addition rate. Another graph provides neutron and gamma dose-reduction factors for water, steel, and concrete. Graphs from historic documents are provided as references for estimating critical parameters of various fissile material systems. Conversion factors for various English and metric units are provided for quick reference.

  14. SlideToolkit: An Assistive Toolset for the Histological Quantification of Whole Slide Images

    PubMed Central

    Nelissen, Bastiaan G. L.; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Moll, Frans L.; van Diest, Paul J.; Pasterkamp, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    The demand for accurate and reproducible phenotyping of a disease trait increases with the rising number of biobanks and genome wide association studies. Detailed analysis of histology is a powerful way of phenotyping human tissues. Nonetheless, purely visual assessment of histological slides is time-consuming and liable to sampling variation and optical illusions and thereby observer variation, and external validation may be cumbersome. Therefore, within our own biobank, computerized quantification of digitized histological slides is often preferred as a more precise and reproducible, and sometimes more sensitive approach. Relatively few free toolkits are, however, available for fully digitized microscopic slides, usually known as whole slides images. In order to comply with this need, we developed the slideToolkit as a fast method to handle large quantities of low contrast whole slides images using advanced cell detecting algorithms. The slideToolkit has been developed for modern personal computers and high-performance clusters (HPCs) and is available as an open-source project on github.com. We here illustrate the power of slideToolkit by a repeated measurement of 303 digital slides containing CD3 stained (DAB) abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue from a tissue biobank. Our workflow consists of four consecutive steps. In the first step (acquisition), whole slide images are collected and converted to TIFF files. In the second step (preparation), files are organized. The third step (tiles), creates multiple manageable tiles to count. In the fourth step (analysis), tissue is analyzed and results are stored in a data set. Using this method, two consecutive measurements of 303 slides showed an intraclass correlation of 0.99. In conclusion, slideToolkit provides a free, powerful and versatile collection of tools for automated feature analysis of whole slide images to create reproducible and meaningful phenotypic data sets. PMID:25372389

  15. Rheological behavior of Slide Ring Gels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vivek; Park, Jong Seung; Park, Jung O.; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2006-03-01

    Slide ring gels were synthesized by chemically crosslinking, sparsely populated α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) present on the polyrotaxanes consisting of α-CD and polyethylene glycol (PEG). [1] Unlike physically or chemically crosslinked gels, slide ring gels are topological gels where crosslinks can slide along the chain. [2] We investigate the rheological behavior of these gels swollen in water and compare their viscoelastic properties to those of physical and chemical gels. We also study the equilibrium swelling behavior of these gels. [1] Okumura and Ito, Adv. Mater. 2001, 13, 485 [2] C. Zhao et al, J. Phys. Cond. Mat. 2005, 17, S2841

  16. Increase in friction force with sliding speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2005-09-01

    A block sliding down an inclined plane normally accelerates. However, if the friction force increases with speed, then the block can slide at a constant terminal speed in a manner similar to the fall of an object through a fluid. Measurements of the increase in the coefficient of friction for tennis ball cloth sliding on a smooth surface are described over speeds varying by a factor of 9000. For the low speed measurements, the ball cloth was attached to the bottom of a weighted box and pulled along a horizontal surface by a constant horizontal force. Results at higher speeds were obtained by bouncing a tennis ball off the surface.

  17. Sliding bubble dynamics and the effects on surface heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, B.; Robinson, A. J.; Delauré, Y. M. C.; Murray, D. B.

    2012-11-01

    An investigation into the effects of a single sliding air bubble on heat transfer from a submerged, inclined surface has been undertaken. Existing literature has shown that both vapour and gas bubbles can increase heat transfer rates from adjacent heated surfaces. However, the mechanisms involved are complex and dynamic and in some cases poorly understood. The present study utilises high speed, high resolution, infrared thermography and video photography to measure two dimensional surface heat transfer and three dimensional bubble position and shape. This provides a unique insight into the complex interactions at the heated surface. Bubbles of volume 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 ml were released onto a surface inclined at 30 degrees to horizontal. Results confirmed that sliding bubbles can enhance heat transfer rates up to a factor of 9 and further insight was gained about the mechanisms behind this phenomenon. The enhancement effects were observed over large areas and persisted for a long duration with the bubble exhibiting complex shape and path oscillations. It is believed that the periodic wake structure present behind the sliding bubble affects the bubble motion and is responsible for the heat transfer effects observed. The nature of this wake is proposed to be that of a chain of horseshoe vortices.

  18. Color standardization in whole slide imaging using a color calibration slide

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Pinky A.; Hashimoto, Noriaki; Yagi, Yukako

    2014-01-01

    Background: Color consistency in histology images is still an issue in digital pathology. Different imaging systems reproduced the colors of a histological slide differently. Materials and Methods: Color correction was implemented using the color information of the nine color patches of a color calibration slide. The inherent spectral colors of these patches along with their scanned colors were used to derive a color correction matrix whose coefficients were used to convert the pixels’ colors to their target colors. Results: There was a significant reduction in the CIELAB color difference, between images of the same H & E histological slide produced by two different whole slide scanners by 3.42 units, P < 0.001 at 95% confidence level. Conclusion: Color variations in histological images brought about by whole slide scanning can be effectively normalized with the use of the color calibration slide. PMID:24672739

  19. The Relation Between Grain-Boundary Structure and Sliding Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoagland, Richard G.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2002-04-01

    During sliding, the grain boundary (GB) energy depends on the atomic structures produced during relative translation of the two grains. The variation of the GB energy within the two-dimensional boundary unit cell (BUC) constitutes the GB gamma surface. Maxima in the slope of the gamma surface determines the sliding resistance, i.e., the stress required to move the system over the lowest saddle points along a particular path within the BUC. In this paper we present the results of an atomistic study of the gamma surfaces for two types of boundaries in an fcc metal, a, Sigma 11<110>{131} is a low energy boundary and has a simple gamma surface with a single stable configuration located at the corners and center of the BUC. The resistance to sliding was determined by chain-of-states methods along four shear vectors connecting equivalent states within the BUC and is found to be very high in all cases. The asymmetric GB has a higher GB energy and its gamma surface is much more complex, with distinctly different structures appearing at various locations in the BUC. At certain locations more than one structure is found for the asymmetric GB. Although complex, a chain-of-states calculation along one path across the BUC suggests that the shear strength of this GB is also quite high. Extrinsic GB dislocations are found to lower the resistance to shear considerably, and, therefore, perform the same role in shear of GBs as do glide dislocations in slip of the lattice. The existence of multiple configurations has significant implications for the interaction of lattice dislocations with GBs, the core structure of GB dislocations, the temperature dependence of GB properties, and the GB sliding resistance, which we discuss.

  20. Stereoscopic Projection of 35mm Slides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    Describes ways of projecting stereoscopic images of geologic environments for students with difficulty reasoning in three-dimensions. The photographic procedures needed to produce stereo slides are included. (MA)

  1. Automated single-slide staining system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, S. M.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus developed to Gram-stain single slides automatically is flexible enough to accommodate other types of staining procedures. Method frees operator and eliminates necessity for subjective evaluations as to length of staining or decolorizing time.

  2. Foam-filled cushions for sliding trays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahin, S. B.; Robb, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene tube filled with polyurethane foam forms low friction sliding surface that cushions vibrations and absorbs manufacturing tolerances and misalignment. Possible uses include packaging of components for shipping and seals for doors in lockers, cars, and refrigerators.

  3. Slide Rule For Calculating Curing Schedules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heater, Don

    1995-01-01

    Special-purpose slide rule devised for calculating schedules for storing and curing adhesives, sealants, and other materials characterized by known curing times and shelf lives. Prevents mistakes commonly made in determining storage and curing schedules.

  4. Water Slides: Look Before You Leap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barks, Dan

    1986-01-01

    The Campbell County Parks and Recreation Department discovered that higher costs, more details, insurance difficulties, and longer construction periods were the rule when a water slide was planned and constructed. The project is described. (MT)

  5. The sliding clamp tethers the endonuclease domain of MutL to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Pillon, Monica C.; Babu, Vignesh M. P.; Randall, Justin R.; Cai, Jiudou; Simmons, Lyle A.; Sutton, Mark D.; Guarné, Alba

    2015-01-01

    The sliding clamp enhances polymerase processivity and coordinates DNA replication with other critical DNA processing events including translesion synthesis, Okazaki fragment maturation and DNA repair. The relative binding affinity of the sliding clamp for its partners determines how these processes are orchestrated and is essential to ensure the correct processing of newly replicated DNA. However, while stable clamp interactions have been extensively studied; dynamic interactions mediated by the sliding clamp remain poorly understood. Here, we characterize the interaction between the bacterial sliding clamp (β-clamp) and one of its weak-binding partners, the DNA mismatch repair protein MutL. Disruption of this interaction causes a mild mutator phenotype in Escherichia coli, but completely abrogates mismatch repair activity in Bacillus subtilis. We stabilize the MutL-β interaction by engineering two cysteine residues at variable positions of the interface. Using disulfide bridge crosslinking, we have stabilized the E. coli and B. subtilis MutL-β complexes and have characterized their structures using small angle X-ray scattering. We find that the MutL-β interaction greatly stimulates the endonuclease activity of B. subtilis MutL and supports this activity even in the absence of the N-terminal region of the protein. PMID:26384423

  6. The sliding clamp tethers the endonuclease domain of MutL to DNA.

    PubMed

    Pillon, Monica C; Babu, Vignesh M P; Randall, Justin R; Cai, Jiudou; Simmons, Lyle A; Sutton, Mark D; Guarné, Alba

    2015-12-15

    The sliding clamp enhances polymerase processivity and coordinates DNA replication with other critical DNA processing events including translesion synthesis, Okazaki fragment maturation and DNA repair. The relative binding affinity of the sliding clamp for its partners determines how these processes are orchestrated and is essential to ensure the correct processing of newly replicated DNA. However, while stable clamp interactions have been extensively studied; dynamic interactions mediated by the sliding clamp remain poorly understood. Here, we characterize the interaction between the bacterial sliding clamp (β-clamp) and one of its weak-binding partners, the DNA mismatch repair protein MutL. Disruption of this interaction causes a mild mutator phenotype in Escherichia coli, but completely abrogates mismatch repair activity in Bacillus subtilis. We stabilize the MutL-β interaction by engineering two cysteine residues at variable positions of the interface. Using disulfide bridge crosslinking, we have stabilized the E. coli and B. subtilis MutL-β complexes and have characterized their structures using small angle X-ray scattering. We find that the MutL-β interaction greatly stimulates the endonuclease activity of B. subtilis MutL and supports this activity even in the absence of the N-terminal region of the protein. PMID:26384423

  7. Sliding Wear Response of Beryl Reinforced Aluminum Composite - A Factorial Design Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharat, V.; Durga Prasad, B.; Prabhakar, M. Bhovi; Venkateswarlu, K.

    2016-02-01

    Al-Beryl MMCs were successfully fabricated using powder metallurgy route. Processing conditions such as beryl content and particle size were varied and its influence on dry sliding wear response was studied. Effect of test parameters like applied load and sliding distance on wear performance of Al-Beryl MMCs were discussed detail. Sliding wear tests were conducted using a pin on disc machine based on the 24 (4 factors at 2 levels) factorial design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to obtain the contribution of control parameters on wear rate. The present study shows that wear resistance of Al-beryl MMCs not only depends on the beryl content but also influenced by normal load, sliding distance and particle size. The results show that most significant variables affecting wear rate of Al - beryl MMCs are size of the beryl particles (22%), beryl content (19.60%), sliding distance (18.47%), and normal load (10.30%). The interaction effects of these parameters are less significant in influencing wear rate compared to the individual parameters. The correlation between sliding wear and its parameters was obtained by multiple regression analysis. Regression model developed in the present study can be successfully implemented to predict the wear response of Al-Beryl MMCs.

  8. Ornamental Annual Plants and Their Uses. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Still, Steven

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with ornamental annual plants and their uses. Included in the script are narrations for use with a total of 254 slides illustrating 97 different plants. At least two slides are provided for each plant: one shows the growth habits of the…

  9. The Louisiana Slide Library; A Humanities Program. Bulletin 1755.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Council for Music and Performing Arts, New Orleans.

    The Louisiana Slide Library is an extensive collection of slides, lectures, and tapes designed for use in the arts, the humanities, social and ethnic studies, languages, home economics, careers, crafts, and special education. This bibliography lists these slide sets and indicates the grade level intended for each set and the number of slides in…

  10. WTP Pretreatment Facility Potential Design Deficiencies--Sliding Bed and Sliding Bed Erosion Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E. K.

    2015-05-06

    This assessment is based on readily available literature and discusses both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries with respect to sliding beds and erosion due to sliding beds. This report does not quantify the size of the sliding beds or erosion rates due to sliding beds, but only assesses if they could be present. This assessment addresses process pipelines in the Pretreatment (PT) facility and the high level waste (HLW) transfer lines leaving the PT facility to the HLW vitrification facility concentrate receipt vessel.

  11. Speckle tracking technology for quantifying lung sliding.

    PubMed

    Dori, Guy; Jakobson, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound (US) is gaining recognition as a useful tool for assessing lung physiology and pathology. Yet, currently the skill of performing lung US is taught by experienced operators to novice ones, mainly by recognizing expected patterns. Recognizing the latter may be difficult and subjective. In this hypothesis we propose to apply a well-known and used image processing technology in echocardiography, speckle tracking (ST), to lung sliding - the marker of normal lung function. If implementing ST to lung sliding is technically feasible, several outcomes are expected: (1) Lung sliding will become an objective, operator-independent marker of normal lung function. (2) Subsequently, ST will provide normal values for lung sliding. (3) Lastly, the effects of pulmonary pathologies on lung sliding may be assessed. It is stressed, however, that the preliminary idea suggested here is limited to a single physiological phenomenon (lung sliding). Only when technical feasibility is demonstrated then ST technology may potentially be applied and investigated in other clinical settings of lung diseases. PMID:27142150

  12. Preparing Scientific Papers, Posters, and Slides.

    PubMed

    Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Maeno, Misato

    2016-01-01

    Publications and presentations are important in academic medicine. The ability to present information in a standard fashion is critically important. Papers, posters, and slides must be prepared appropriately to maximize their chance of being accepted. The first step is to use word processing software correctly. English language usage must conform to standard scientific English usage. Abbreviations should be avoided as much as possible. Numerical data must be presented with the appropriate number of significant figures. The first step in preparing a paper is to decide the target journal. Papers should always be written in 12 point Times New Roman font, while slides and posters should be in Arial or Helvetica. The Results section must contain actual data with appropriate statistical analysis. Take great care to prepare figures and tables according to the journal's instructions. Posters must be prepared to allow easy reading at a distance of 2m. Use a white background and dark letters. The majority of the area of your poster should be Results, and there is no need to include the abstract or references on a poster. Slide presentations should be limited to about one slide for each minute of the talk. Avoid the use of animations and excessive use of color. Do not use abbreviations on slides. Following these simple guidelines will meet the requirements of most journals and allow your audience to appreciate the data on your posters and slides. PMID:26572095

  13. Compact, Automated Centrifugal Slide-Staining System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Directional Acceleration Vector-Driven Displacement of Fluids (DAVD-DOF) system, under development at the time of reporting the information for this article, would be a relatively compact, automated, centrifugally actuated system for staining blood smears and other microbiological samples on glass microscope slides in either a microgravitational or a normal Earth gravitational environment. The DAVD-DOF concept is a successor to the centrifuge-operated slide stainer (COSS) concept, which was reported in Slide-Staining System for Microgravity or Gravity (MSC-22949), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 64. The COSS includes reservoirs and a staining chamber that contains a microscope slide to which a biological sample is affixed. The staining chamber is sequentially filled with and drained of staining and related liquids from the reservoirs by use of a weighted plunger to force liquid from one reservoir to another at a constant level of hypergravity maintained in a standard swing-bucket centrifuge. In the DAVD-DOF system, a staining chamber containing a sample would also be sequentially filled and emptied, but with important differences. Instead of a simple microscope slide, one would use a special microscope slide on which would be fabricated a network of very small reservoirs and narrow channels connected to a staining chamber (see figure). Unlike in the COSS, displacement of liquid would be effected by use of the weight of the liquid itself, rather than the weight of a plunger.

  14. Rolling motion: experiments and simulations focusing on sliding friction forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onorato, Pasquale; Malgieri, Massimiliano; De Ambrosis, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents an activity sequence aimed at elucidating the role of sliding friction forces in determining/shaping the rolling motion. The sequence is based on experiments and computer simulations and it is devoted both to high school and undergraduate students. Measurements are carried out by using the open source Tracker Video Analysis software, while interactive simulations are realized by means of Algodoo, a freeware 2D-simulation software. Data collected from questionnaires before and after the activities, and from final reports, show the effectiveness of combining simulations and Video Based Analysis experiments in improving students' understanding of rolling motion.

  15. Semantic Focusing Allows Fully Automated Single-Layer Slide Scanning of Cervical Cytology Slides

    PubMed Central

    Lahrmann, Bernd; Valous, Nektarios A.; Eisenmann, Urs; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Grabe, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Liquid-based cytology (LBC) in conjunction with Whole-Slide Imaging (WSI) enables the objective and sensitive and quantitative evaluation of biomarkers in cytology. However, the complex three-dimensional distribution of cells on LBC slides requires manual focusing, long scanning-times, and multi-layer scanning. Here, we present a solution that overcomes these limitations in two steps: first, we make sure that focus points are only set on cells. Secondly, we check the total slide focus quality. From a first analysis we detected that superficial dust can be separated from the cell layer (thin layer of cells on the glass slide) itself. Then we analyzed 2,295 individual focus points from 51 LBC slides stained for p16 and Ki67. Using the number of edges in a focus point image, specific color values and size-inclusion filters, focus points detecting cells could be distinguished from focus points on artifacts (accuracy 98.6%). Sharpness as total focus quality of a virtual LBC slide is computed from 5 sharpness features. We trained a multi-parameter SVM classifier on 1,600 images. On an independent validation set of 3,232 cell images we achieved an accuracy of 94.8% for classifying images as focused. Our results show that single-layer scanning of LBC slides is possible and how it can be achieved. We assembled focus point analysis and sharpness classification into a fully automatic, iterative workflow, free of user intervention, which performs repetitive slide scanning as necessary. On 400 LBC slides we achieved a scanning-time of 13.9±10.1 min with 29.1±15.5 focus points. In summary, the integration of semantic focus information into whole-slide imaging allows automatic high-quality imaging of LBC slides and subsequent biomarker analysis. PMID:23585899

  16. Sahara Slide: Age, initiation, and processes of a giant submarine slide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiopoulou, Aggeliki; Masson, Douglas G.; Wynn, Russell B.; Krastel, Sebastian

    2010-07-01

    The Sahara Slide is a giant submarine landslide on the northwest African continental margin. The landslide is located on the open continental slope offshore arid Western Sahara, with a headwall at a water depth of ˜2000 m. High primary productivity in surface waters drives accumulation of thick fine-grained pelagic/hemipelagic sediment sequences in the slide source area. Rare but large-scale slope failures, such as the Sahara Slide that remobilized approximately 600 km3 of sediment, are characteristic of this sedimentological setting. Seismic profiles collected from the slide scar reveal a stepped profile with two 100 m high headwalls, suggesting that the slide occurred retrogressively as a slab-type failure. Sediment cores recovered from the slide deposit provide new insights into the process by which the slide eroded and entrained a volcaniclastic sand layer. When this layer was entrained at the base of the slide it became fluidized and resulted in low apparent friction, facilitating the exceptionally long runout of ˜900 km. The slide location appears to be controlled by the buried headwall of an older slope failure, and we suggest that the cause of the slide relates to differential sedimentation rates and compaction across these scarps, leading to local increases of pore pressure. Sediment cores yield a date of 50-60 ka for the main slide event, a period of global sea level rise which may have contributed to pore pressure buildup. The link with sea level rising is consistent with other submarine landslides on this margin, drawing attention to this potential hazard during global warming.

  17. Exploring virtual reality technology and the Oculus Rift for the examination of digital pathology slides

    PubMed Central

    Farahani, Navid; Post, Robert; Duboy, Jon; Ahmed, Ishtiaque; Kolowitz, Brian J.; Krinchai, Teppituk; Monaco, Sara E.; Fine, Jeffrey L.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Background: Digital slides obtained from whole slide imaging (WSI) platforms are typically viewed in two dimensions using desktop personal computer monitors or more recently on mobile devices. To the best of our knowledge, we are not aware of any studies viewing digital pathology slides in a virtual reality (VR) environment. VR technology enables users to be artificially immersed in and interact with a computer-simulated world. Oculus Rift is among the world's first consumer-targeted VR headsets, intended primarily for enhanced gaming. Our aim was to explore the use of the Oculus Rift for examining digital pathology slides in a VR environment. Methods: An Oculus Rift Development Kit 2 (DK2) was connected to a 64-bit computer running Virtual Desktop software. Glass slides from twenty randomly selected lymph node cases (ten with benign and ten malignant diagnoses) were digitized using a WSI scanner. Three pathologists reviewed these digital slides on a 27-inch 5K display and with the Oculus Rift after a 2-week washout period. Recorded endpoints included concordance of final diagnoses and time required to examine slides. The pathologists also rated their ease of navigation, image quality, and diagnostic confidence for both modalities. Results: There was 90% diagnostic concordance when reviewing WSI using a 5K display and Oculus Rift. The time required to examine digital pathology slides on the 5K display averaged 39 s (range 10–120 s), compared to 62 s with the Oculus Rift (range 15–270 s). All pathologists confirmed that digital pathology slides were easily viewable in a VR environment. The ratings for image quality and diagnostic confidence were higher when using the 5K display. Conclusion: Using the Oculus Rift DK2 to view and navigate pathology whole slide images in a virtual environment is feasible for diagnostic purposes. However, image resolution using the Oculus Rift device was limited. Interactive VR technologies such as the Oculus Rift are novel tools

  18. Resistance to Sliding on Atomic Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominik, C.; Tielens, A.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The structure and stability of agglomerates of micron-sized particles is determined by the mechanical properties of the individual contacts between the constituent particles. In this paper we study the possibility of aggregate rearrangements by sliding. Since the contacts between (sub)micron particles are only a few hundred atoms in diameter, processes on atomic levels will play the dominating roll. We study a theoretical model of sliding friction for surfaces that are either flat or contain steps in their grids. The results show that sliding over flat surfaces may produce a large range of friction coefficients, including zero if the adhesive forces are small compared to the binding forces inside a body. However, both grid alignment and steps in the surface will lead to high values for friction. These processes combined virtually eliminate the possibility of sliding in a collision of two (sub)micron sized particles at velocities low enough for sticking to occur. On the other hand we show that in collisions between aggregates sliding may be an important factor for energy dissipation and compaction.

  19. On a model of frictional sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrin, Y.; Bréchet, Y.

    1996-10-01

    A model of frictional sliding with an N-shaped curve for the sliding velocity dependence of the coefficient of friction is considered. This type of friction law is shown to be related to dynamic i.e., velocity dependent ‘ageing’ of asperity junctions. Mechanisms of ‘ageing’ for ductile (Bowden-Tabor) and brittle (Byerlee) materials, though different in nature, lead to qualitatively similar N-shaped velocity dependencies of the coefficient of friction. Estimates for the velocities limiting the range of negative velocity sensitivity of the coefficient of friction are obtained for the ductile case and—albeit with a lesser degree of reliability—for the brittle one. It is shown by linear stability analysis that discontinuous sliding (stick-slip) is associated with the descending portion of the N-shaped curve. An instability criterion is obtained. An expression for the period of the attendant relaxation oscillations of the sliding velocity is given in terms of the calculated velocity dependence of the coefficient of friction. It is suggested that the micromechanically motivated friction law proposed should be used in models of earthquakes due to discontinuous frictional sliding on a crustal fault.

  20. Physical essence of the multibody contact-sliding at atomic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xuesong

    2014-01-01

    Investigation the multibody contact-sliding occurred at atomic discrete contact spot will play an important role in determine the origin of tribology behavior and evaluates the micro-mechanical property of nanomaterials and thus optimizing the design of surface texture. This paper carries out large scale parallel molecular dynamics simulation on contact-sliding at atomic scale to uncover the special physical essence. The research shows that some kind of force field exists between nanodot pair and the interaction can be expressed by the linear combination of exponential function while the effective interaction distance limited in 1 angstrom for nanodot with several tens of nanometer diameter. The variation tendency about the interaction force between nanodot array is almost the same between nanodot pairs and thus the interaction between two nanodot array can be characterized by parallel mechanical spring. Multibody effect which dominates the interaction between atoms or molecules will gradually diminish with the increasing of length scales.

  1. The Laser Videodisc, A Slide-Management System for Your Classroom Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Phyllis Knerl; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Compares the use of a laser videodisc system in the art classroom to the use of a standard slide projection system. Describes the three levels of interactivity that are possible and discusses methods of use, product availability, and equipment cost. (GEA)

  2. Bending Flexibility of Actin Filaments during Motor-Induced Sliding

    PubMed Central

    Vikhorev, Petr G.; Vikhoreva, Natalia N.; Månsson, Alf

    2008-01-01

    Muscle contraction and other forms of cell motility occur as a result of cyclic interactions between myosin molecules and actin filaments. Force generation is generally attributed to ATP-driven structural changes in myosin, whereas a passive role is ascribed to actin. However, some results challenge this view, predicting structural changes in actin during motor activity, e.g., when the actin filaments slide on a myosin-coated surface in vitro. Here, we analyzed statistical properties of the sliding filament paths, allowing us to detect changes of this type. It is interesting to note that evidence for substantial structural changes that led to increased bending flexibility of the filaments was found in phalloidin-stabilized, but not in phalloidin-free, actin filaments. The results are in accordance with the idea that a high-flexibility structural state of actin is a prerequisite for force production, but not the idea that a low-to-high flexibility transition of the actin filament should be an important component of the force-generating step per se. Finally, our data challenge the general view that phalloidin-stabilized filaments behave as native actin filaments in their interaction with myosin. This has important implications, since phalloidin stabilization is a routine procedure in most studies of actomyosin function. PMID:18835897

  3. NEMD simulations for ductile metal sliding

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James E; Germann, Timothy C; Ravelo, Ramon J; Holian, Brad L

    2011-01-31

    We have studied the sliding behavior for a 19 M Al(110)/Al(110) defective crystal at 15 GPa as a function of relative sliding velocity. The general features are qualitatively similar to smaller scale (1.4 M) atom simulations for Al(111)/Al(110) nondefective single crystal sliding. The critical velocity, v{sub c}, is approximately the same for the defective crystal as the size scaled v{sub c}. The lower velocity tangential force is depressed relative to the perfect crystal. The critical temperature, T*, is depressed relative to the perfect crystal. These conclusions are consistent with a lower value for f{sub c} for the defective crystal. The detailed features of structural transformation and the high velocity regime remain to be mapped.

  4. Do grain boundaries in nanophase metals slide?

    SciTech Connect

    Bringa, E M; Leveugle, E; Caro, A

    2006-10-27

    Nanophase metallic materials show a maximum in strength as grain size decreases to the nano scale, indicating a break down of the Hall-Petch relation. Grain boundary sliding, as a possible accommodation mechanisms, is often the picture that explain computer simulations results and real experiments. In a recent paper, Bringa et al. Science 309, 1838 (2005), we report on the observation of an ultra-hard behavior in nanophase Cu under shock loading, explained in terms of a reduction of grain boundary sliding under the influence of the shock pressure. In this work we perform a detailed study of the effects of hydrostatic pressure on nanophase Cu plasticity and find that it can be understood in terms of pressure dependent grain boundary sliding controlled by a Mohr-Coulomb law.

  5. Experimental Testing of Glacier Sliding Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoet, L.; Iverson, N. R.

    2013-12-01

    Glacier sliding laws exist in various forms and are applied in modeling of glacier dynamics. Sliding laws have been, in most cases, theoretically derived but not experimentally tested. Under certain conditions ice sliding over a rigid bed will generate cavities in the lees of bedrock bumps. These cavities will redistribute shear stress to regions of the bed that are in contact with ice. Sliding laws that incorporate cavity formation relate drag to the maximum adverse slope of the region of ice-bed contact. Sinusoidal and stepped-bed geometries are, therefore, predicted to affect basal drag differently. A sinusoidal bed is predicted to have a double-valued drag response as a function of sliding velocity, whereas the steady-state drag on a stepped bed with linear adverse slopes is expected to be independent of sliding velocity. We have conducted an experimental study of sliding laws using a ring shear apparatus that slides ice over a rigid bed. The device rotates a ring of ice that is 20 cm wide, 20 cm tall, with outer diameter of 90 cm. The sliding speed at the ice ring's centerline was incrementally stepped between 7.25--324 m/yr, and a vertical stress of 500 kPa was applied to the ice ring. The ice consisted initially of randomly oriented crystals that with sliding quickly developed a fabric like those observed in ice near glacier beds. The temperature of the ice is held at the pressure melting point and is regulated to ~0.01oC by a bath of circulating fluid that surrounds the sample chamber. Experiments have been conducted on a stepped bed with a constant slope of 8.3 and a sinusoidal bed with a wavelength of 183.3 mm and an amplitude of 15.3 mm. Water was allowed to drain from cavities, so effective stress at the bed was equal to the total vertical stress. Our experimental results differ from theoretical predictions. For the stepped bed, a decrease in shear stress of ~50% over a 12-fold increase in velocity is observed, in contrast to theoretical predictions of

  6. Newly recognized submarine slide complexes in the southern California Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, J. E.; Lee, H. J.; Edwards, B. D.; McGann, M.; Sliter, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    New high-resolution bathymetric and seismic-reflection surveys have imaged large (<0.5 km3) submarine landslides offshore southern California that have not been previously recognized in the Borderland. The new data show several large slides or slide complexes that include: 1) a slide complex consisting of numerous (>7) individual overlapping slides along the western margin of Santa Cruz Basin (SCB slide); 2) a series of slumps and slide scars on the slope south of San Pedro shelf (SPS slide); and 3) a slope failure along the shelf edge in northern San Diego County, termed the Del Mar slide. The SCB slide complex extends for 30 km along the western slope of Santa Cruz Basin, with debris lobes extending 5-8 km into the basin. Head scarps of some of these slides are 50-75 m high. The SPS slide complex also appears to consist of multiple slides, which roughly parallel the Palos Verdes Fault and the San Gabriel Canyon submarine channel on the shelf edge and slope south of San Pedro shelf. Slide deposits associated with this complex are only partially mapped due to limited high-resolution bathymetric coverage, but extend to the south in the area SW of Lasuen Knoll. Seismic-reflection profiles show that some of these deposits are up to 20 m thick. The Del Mar slide is located about 10 km north of La Jolla Canyon and extends about 6 km along the shelf edge. The head scarp lies along the trend of a branch of the Rose Canyon Fault Zone. Radiocarbon ages of sediment overlying this slide indicate the Del Mar slide is approximately 12-16 ka. These large slide complexes have several characteristics in common. Nearly all occur in areas of tectonic uplift. All of the complexes show evidence of recurrent slide activity, exhibiting multiple headwall scarps and debris lobes, and where available, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles of these slide areas provide evidence of older, buried mass transport deposits. Assuming typical sedimentation rates, the recurrence interval of

  7. Develop and Manufacture an airlock sliding tray

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Cindy M.

    2014-02-26

    Objective: The goal of this project is to continue to develop an airlock sliding tray and then partner with an industrial manufacturing company for production. The sliding tray will be easily installed into and removed from most glovebox airlocks in a few minutes. Technical Approach: A prototype of a sliding tray has been developed and tested in the LANL cold lab and 35 trays are presently being built for the plutonium facility (PF-4). The current, recently approved design works for a 14-inch diameter round airlock and has a tray length of approximately 20 inches. The grant will take the already tested and approved round technology and design for the square airlock. These two designs will be suitable for the majority of the existing airlocks in the multitude of DOE facilities. Partnering with an external manufacturer will allow for production of the airlock trays at a much lower cost and increase the availability of the product for all DOE sites. Project duration is estimated to be 12-13 months. Benefits: The purpose of the airlock sliding trays is fourfold: 1) Mitigate risk of rotator cuff injuries, 2) Improve ALARA, 3) Reduce risk of glovebox glove breaches and glove punctures, and 4) Improve worker comfort. I have had the opportunity to visit many other DOE facilities including Savannah, Y-12, ORNL, Sandia, and Livermore for assistance with ergonomic problems and/or injuries. All of these sites would benefit from the airlock sliding tray and I can assume all other DOE facilities with gloveboxes built prior to 1985 could also use the sliding trays.

  8. Railgun rail gouging by hypervelocity sliding contact

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, L.M.; Trucano, T.G. ); Susoeff, A.R. )

    1989-01-01

    A description is given of a recently resolved mechanisms of gouging which occurs during hypervelocity sliding contact between two materials. A parameter study based on computer modeling of the gouging mechanism is presented in which gouging velocity thresholds are determined for several combinations of sliding materials. Materials which can gouge each other are found to do so only within a certain range of velocities. Related calculations of gaseous material ahead of railgun projectiles are also presented. Gun bore gouging experience with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory railgun project is reviewed.

  9. Railgun rail gouging by hypervelocity sliding contact

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, L.M.; Trucano, T.G.; Susoeff, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of a recently resolved mechanism of gouging which occurs during hypervelocity sliding contact between two materials. A parameter study based on computer modelling of the gouging mechanism is presented in which gouging velocity thresholds are determined for several combinations of sliding materials. Materials which can gouge each other are found to do so only within a certain range of velocities. Related calculations of gaseous material ahead of railgun projectiles are also presented. Gun bore gouging experience with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory railgun project is reviewed.

  10. Sliding mode control of wind-induced vibrations using fuzzy sliding surface and gain adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thenozhi, Suresh; Yu, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Although fuzzy/adaptive sliding mode control can reduce the chattering problem in structural vibration control applications, they require the equivalent control and the upper bounds of the system uncertainties. In this paper, we used fuzzy logic to approximate the standard sliding surface and designed a dead-zone adaptive law for tuning the switching gain of the sliding mode control. The stability of the proposed controller is established using Lyapunov stability theory. A six-storey building prototype equipped with an active mass damper has been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller towards the wind-induced vibrations.

  11. Decoupled thermal control for space station furnace facility using sliding mode techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Mark E.; Shtessel, Yuri B.

    1996-03-01

    The Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) provides the necessary core systems to operate various material processing furnaces. The Thermal Control System (TCS) is defined as one of the core systems and its function is to collect excess heat from furnaces and to provide precise cold temperature control of components and of certain furnace zones. Physical interconnection of parallel thermal control subsystems through a common pump implies the description of the whole TCS by coupled nonlinear differential equations in flow and pressure. The paper formulates the system equations and develops the sliding mode controllers that cause the interconnected subsystems to operate in the local sliding modes, resulting in control system invariance to interaction disturbances. The desired de-coupled flow rate profile tracking is achieved by optimization of the local linear sliding mode equations. Extensive digital simulation results are presented to show the flow rate tracking robustness and invariance to plant nonlinearities and variations of the pump pressure supplied to the controlled subsystems.

  12. How to Prepare Clay-Lift and Sandwich Slides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barman, Charles R.

    1984-01-01

    Describes two techniques for making 35 millimeter slides without using photographic film. One method uses clear adhesive contact paper and the other uses transparency film. Both techniques are inexpensive and require only a few minutes of preparation per slide. (JM)

  13. Solenoid valve design minimizes vibration and sliding wear problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillon, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Two-way cryogenic solenoid valve resists damage from vibration and metallic interfacial sliding. The new system features a flat-faced armature guided by a flexure disk which eliminates sliding surfaces and is less subject to contamination and wear.

  14. From Peru to Pamplona: Integrating Slides into the Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiss, Marilyn

    1989-01-01

    For a visual generation of students, slides are an effective learning and teaching tool and a constant stimulus for writing, reading, and speaking activities. Ways in which slides have been effectively incorporated into foreign language instruction lessons are described. (CB)

  15. Simulation of sliding of liquid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alen, Saif Khan; Farhat, Nazia; Rahman, Md. Ashiqur

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations of sliding behavior of liquid droplets on flat and periodic microgrooved surfaces with a range of groove geometry are conducted. A numerical model is developed which is capable of predicting the critical sliding angle of the drop by comparing the advancing and the receding angles obtained from numerical and experimental findings. The effect of microgroove topography, droplet size and inclination angle on the droplet sliding characteristics is analysed. Using an open-source platform (Surface Evolver), a 3D drop-shape model is developed to numerically determine the drop stability and contact angle hysteresis on tilted surfaces. In this numerical model, the three phase contact line of the drop is obtained by numerically calculating the vertex force and local contact angle at each vertex of the base contour. Several numerical models are developed based on various assumptions of base contour shape (circular or elliptical) and implementation of gravitational force to the droplet. Droplet shapes and critical sliding angles, obtained from these numerical models, are compared with those of experimental results and are found to be in very good agreement.

  16. Ceramic wear in indentation and sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved with single-crystal ceramic materials in indentation and in sliding contacts. Experiments simulating interfacial events have been conducted with hemispherical, conical and pyramidal indenters (riders). With spherical riders, under either abrasive or adhesive conditions, two types of fracture pits have been observed. First, spherical-shaped fracture pits and wear particles are found as a result of either indenting or sliding. These are shown to be due to a spherical-shaped fracture along the circular or spherical stress trajectories. Second, polyhedral fracture pits and debris, produced by anisotropic fracture, and also found both during indenting and sliding. These are primarily controlled by surface and subsurface cracking along cleavage planes. Several quantitative results have also been obtained from this work. For example, using a pyramidal diamond, crack length of Mn-Zn ferrite in the indentation process grows linearly with increasing normal load. Moreover, the critical load to fracture both in indentation and sliding is essentially isotropic and is found to be directly proportional to the indenter radius.

  17. Color Microfiche as a Replacement for Slides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Philip

    This is the summary of a larger paper describing the evolution of a mediated elementary accounting course at the University of Wisconsin-Stout. The course was initially developed as a 25 slide-tape lesson course which included 950 visuals and approximately 25 hours of instruction. One hundred students per semester took the course in the following…

  18. Particle Sliding on a Rough Incline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    We study a particle sliding on a rough inclined plane as an example of a mechanical problem with nonholonomic constraint. The particle is launched in an arbitrary direction so that its motion has both a horizontal and a "vertical" (i.e., up- and downhill) direction. The friction force acts along the instantaneous velocity, so that the horizontal…

  19. Sliding, Insulating Window Panel Reduces Heat Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1984

    1984-01-01

    A new sliding insulated panel reduces window heat loss up to 86 percent, and infiltration 60-90 percent, paying for itself in 3-9 years. This article discusses the panel's use and testing in the upper Midwest, reporting both technical characteristics and users' reactions. (MCG)

  20. Enhancing Creative Thinking through Designing Electronic Slides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokaram, Al-Ali Khaled; Al-Shabatat, Ahmad Mohammad; Fong, Fook Soon; Abdallah, Andaleeb Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    During the shifting of teaching and learning methods using computer technologies, much emphasis was paid on the knowledge content more than the thinking skills. Thus, this study investigated the effects of a computer application, namely, designing electronic slides on the development of creative thinking skills of a sample of undergraduate…

  1. [Development of an obstetrical pocket slide rule].

    PubMed

    Krüger, G

    1986-01-01

    We present a slide rule to value old obstetric and ultrasound findings in prenatal care day by day. We have developed the scale. Manufacturer is VEB Mantissa Dresden, sales department is Staatliches Versorgungskontor für Pharmazie und Medizintechnik. PMID:3727852

  2. Transistor h parameter conversion slide rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantner, R. E.

    1967-01-01

    Slide rule enables the ready conversion of transistor h parameters from one form to another and reduces calculation time by a factor of 5 to 10. The scales are selected to cover all ranges of each parameter that will normally exist for any transistor, and answers are given in the correct order of magnitude, making powers-of-ten calculations unnecessary.

  3. Slides and the Foreign Language Teacher: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galt, Alan

    This bibliography lists 275 items relating to the use of visual and audiovisual aids in the foreign language classroom. The items are entered under the following major headings: (1) Audiovisual Aids; (2) Photography; (3) Picture Composition; (4) Slides and Photographs for Teaching; and (5) Slides and Slide Shows: Production and Presentation.…

  4. Classification and Cataloging of Slides Using Color Photocopying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clawson, Catherine R.; Rankowski, Charles A.

    1978-01-01

    The classification and cataloging of slides pose unique and critical problems in every field where they are used. A brief overview of the literature is presented, along with observations on local area slide systems and a description of a slide system developed for use in C-E Refractories' Research and Development Library utilizing color…

  5. 45 CFR 98.42 - Sliding fee scales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sliding fee scales. 98.42 Section 98.42 Public... Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements § 98.42 Sliding fee scales. (a) Lead Agencies shall establish, and periodically revise, by rule, a sliding fee scale(s)...

  6. 45 CFR 98.42 - Sliding fee scales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sliding fee scales. 98.42 Section 98.42 Public... Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements § 98.42 Sliding fee scales. (a) Lead Agencies shall establish, and periodically revise, by rule, a sliding fee scale(s)...

  7. 45 CFR 98.42 - Sliding fee scales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sliding fee scales. 98.42 Section 98.42 Public... Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements § 98.42 Sliding fee scales. (a) Lead Agencies shall establish, and periodically revise, by rule, a sliding fee scale(s)...

  8. 45 CFR 98.42 - Sliding fee scales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sliding fee scales. 98.42 Section 98.42 Public... Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements § 98.42 Sliding fee scales. (a) Lead Agencies shall establish, and periodically revise, by rule, a sliding fee scale(s)...

  9. 45 CFR 98.42 - Sliding fee scales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sliding fee scales. 98.42 Section 98.42 Public... Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements § 98.42 Sliding fee scales. (a) Lead Agencies shall establish, and periodically revise, by rule, a sliding fee scale(s)...

  10. 21 CFR 864.3800 - Automated slide stainer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated slide stainer. 864.3800 Section 864.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Automated slide stainer. (a) Identification. An automated slide stainer is a device used to stain...

  11. 21 CFR 864.3800 - Automated slide stainer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated slide stainer. 864.3800 Section 864.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Automated slide stainer. (a) Identification. An automated slide stainer is a device used to stain...

  12. 21 CFR 864.3800 - Automated slide stainer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated slide stainer. 864.3800 Section 864.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Automated slide stainer. (a) Identification. An automated slide stainer is a device used to stain...

  13. 21 CFR 864.3800 - Automated slide stainer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated slide stainer. 864.3800 Section 864.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Automated slide stainer. (a) Identification. An automated slide stainer is a device used to stain...

  14. 21 CFR 864.3800 - Automated slide stainer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated slide stainer. 864.3800 Section 864.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Automated slide stainer. (a) Identification. An automated slide stainer is a device used to stain...

  15. Sliding Seal Materials for Adiabatic Engines, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, J.; Wei, W.

    1986-01-01

    An essential task in the development of the heavy-duty adiabatic diesel engine is identification and improvements of reliable, low-friction piston seal materials. In the present study, the sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising carbide, oxide, and nitride materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, and loading conditions that are representative of the adiabatic engine environment. In addition, silicon nitride and partially stabilized zirconia disks were ion implanted with TiNi, Ni, Co, and Cr, and subsequently run against carbide pins, with the objective of producing reduced friction via solid lubrication at elevated temperature. In order to provide guidance needed to improve materials for this application, the program stressed fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in friction and wear. Electron microscopy was used to elucidate the micromechanisms of wear following wear testing, and Auger electron spectroscopy was used to evaluate interface/environment interactions which seemed to be important in the friction and wear process. Unmodified ceramic sliding couples were characterized at all temperatures by friction coefficients of 0.24 and above. The coefficient at 800 C in an oxidizing environment was reduced to below 0.1, for certain material combinations, by the ion implanation of TiNi or Co. This beneficial effect was found to derive from lubricious Ti, Ni, and Co oxides.

  16. Interfacial sliding in fibrous brittle-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Herbert Frederick, II

    Ceramic materials have desirable characteristics for use in high temperature applications, but due to their brittle nature they were avoided until the recent advent of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) in which ceramic fibers are inserted into a ceramic matrix to toughen the material by retarding crack growth. This work investigates the role of sliding at interfaces in making brittle matrix composites (BMCs) more crack resistant. A two-dimensional study investigates the effects of roughness, toughness, and friction on the fracture behavior of BMCs. This study was then expanded to an axisymmetric study of a fiber engulfed by a crack. The results indicate that there are significant interaction effects between friction and the other parameters. To achieve 'long' sliding lengths, the magnitude of the interfacial critical energy release rate must be significantly less than the magnitude required to ensure crack deflection. The study then investigates the three-dimensional nature of a crack as it flows past a fiber. A computational analysis is performed to determine the crack propagation angle at a frictional interface. The computational results show good agreement with a novel experimental analysis using modified DCDC specimens. The experiments show, in real time, the propagation of a crack which is perpendicular to and intersects a frictional interface.

  17. A measure for characterizing sliding on lung boundaries.

    PubMed

    Amelon, Ryan E; Cao, Kunlin; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Christensen, Gary E; Raghavan, Madhavan L

    2014-03-01

    The lobes of the lung slide relative to each other during breathing. Quantifying lobar sliding can aid in better understanding lung function, better modeling of lung dynamics, and for studying phenomenon such as pleural adhesion. We propose a novel measure to characterize lobe sliding in the lung based on the displacement field obtained from image registration of CT scans. When two sliding lobes are modeled as a continuum, the discontinuity in the displacement field at the fissure will manifest as elevated maximum shear--the proposed measure--which is capable of capturing both the level and orientation of sliding. Six human lungs were analyzed using scans spanning functional residual capacity to total lung capacity. The lung lobes were segmented and registered on a lobe-by-lobe basis to obtain the displacement field from which the proposed sliding measure was calculated. The sliding measure was found to be insignificant in the parenchyma, as relatively little tissue shear occurs here. On the other hand, it was elevated along the fissures. Thus, a map of the proposed sliding measure of the entire lung clearly delineates and quantifies sliding between lung lobes. Sliding is a key aspect of lung deformation during breathing. The proposed measure may help resolve artifacts introduced by sliding in deformation analysis techniques used for radiotherapy. PMID:24114112

  18. Sliding distance per ATP molecule hydrolyzed by myosin heads during isotonic shortening of skinned muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, H; Goldman, Y E

    1995-01-01

    We measured isotonic sliding distance of single skinned fibers from rabbit psoas muscle when known and limited amounts of ATP were made available to the contractile apparatus. The fibers were immersed in paraffin oil at 20 degrees C, and laser pulse photolysis of caged ATP within the fiber initiated the contraction. The amount of ATP released was measured by photolyzing 3H-ATP within fibers, separating the reaction products by high-pressure liquid chromatography, and then counting the effluent peaks by liquid scintillation. The fiber stiffness was monitored to estimate the proportion of thick and thin filament sites interacting during filament sliding. The interaction distance, Di, defined as the sliding distance while a myosin head interacts with actin in the thin filament per ATP molecule hydrolyzed, was estimated from the shortening distance, the number of ATP molecules hydrolyzed by the myosin heads, and the stiffness. Di increased from 11 to 60 nm as the isotonic tension was reduced from 80% to 6% of the isometric tension. Velocity and Di increased with the concentration of ATP available. As isotonic load was increased, the interaction distance decreased linearly with decrease of the shortening velocity and extrapolated to 8 nm at zero velocity. Extrapolation of the relationship between Di and velocity to saturating ATP concentration suggests that Di reaches 100-190 nm at high shortening velocity. The interaction distance corresponds to the sliding distance while cross-bridges are producing positive (working) force plus the distance while they are dragging (producing negative forces). The results indicate that the working and drag distances increase as the velocity increases. Because Di is larger than the size of either the myosin head or the actin monomer, the results suggest that for each ATPase cycle, a myosin head interacts mechanically with several actin monomers either while working or while producing drag. PMID:8534820

  19. Fuzzy fractional order sliding mode controller for nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delavari, H.; Ghaderi, R.; Ranjbar, A.; Momani, S.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, an intelligent robust fractional surface sliding mode control for a nonlinear system is studied. At first a sliding PD surface is designed and then, a fractional form of these networks PDα, is proposed. Fast reaching velocity into the switching hyperplane in the hitting phase and little chattering phenomena in the sliding phase is desired. To reduce the chattering phenomenon in sliding mode control (SMC), a fuzzy logic controller is used to replace the discontinuity in the signum function at the reaching phase in the sliding mode control. For the problem of determining and optimizing the parameters of fuzzy sliding mode controller (FSMC), genetic algorithm (GA) is used. Finally, the performance and the significance of the controlled system two case studies (robot manipulator and coupled tanks) are investigated under variation in system parameters and also in presence of an external disturbance. The simulation results signify performance of genetic-based fuzzy fractional sliding mode controller.

  20. Sliding friction on wet and dry sand.

    PubMed

    Fall, A; Weber, B; Pakpour, M; Lenoir, N; Shahidzadeh, N; Fiscina, J; Wagner, C; Bonn, D

    2014-05-01

    We show experimentally that the sliding friction on sand is greatly reduced by the addition of some-but not too much-water. The formation of capillary water bridges increases the shear modulus of the sand, which facilitates the sliding. Too much water, on the other hand, makes the capillary bridges coalesce, resulting in a decrease of the modulus; in this case, we observe that the friction coefficient increases again. Our results, therefore, show that the friction coefficient is directly related to the shear modulus; this has important repercussions for the transport of granular materials. In addition, the polydispersity of the sand is shown to also have a large effect on the friction coefficient. PMID:24836256

  1. Plastic deformation at surface during unlubricated sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The plastic deformation and wear of 304 stainless-steel surface slid against an aluminum oxide rider were observed by using a scanning electron microscope and an optical microscope. Experiments were conducted in a vacuum of 0.000001 Pa and in an environment of 0.0005 Pa chlorine gas at 25 C. The load was 500 grams and the sliding velocity was 0.5 centimeter per second. The deformed surface layer which accumulates and develops successively is left behind the rider, and step-shaped protuberances are developed even after single pass sliding under both environmental conditions. A fully developed surface layer is gradually torn off leaving a characteristic pattern. These observations result from both adhesion and an adhesive wear mechanism.

  2. Validation of diagnostic accuracy using digital slides in routine histopathology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Robust hardware and software tools have been developed in digital microscopy during the past years for pathologists. Reports have been advocated the reliability of digital slides in routine diagnostics. We have designed a retrospective, comparative study to evaluate the scanning properties and digital slide based diagnostic accuracy. Methods 8 pathologists reevaluated 306 randomly selected cases from our archives. The slides were scanned with a 20× Plan-Apochromat objective, using a 3-chip Hitachi camera, resulting 0.465 μm/pixel resolution. Slide management was supported with dedicated Data Base and Viewer software tools. Pathologists used their office PCs for evaluation and reached the digital slides via intranet connection. The diagnostic coherency and uncertainty related to digital slides and scanning quality were analyzed. Results Good to excellent image quality of slides was recorded in 96%. In half of the critical 61 digital slides, poor image quality was related to section folds or floatings. In 88.2% of the studied cases the digital diagnoses were in full agreement with the consensus. Out of the overall 36 incoherent cases, 7 (2.3%) were graded relevant without any recorded uncertainty by the pathologist. Excluding the non-field specific cases from each pathologist's record this ratio was 1.76% of all cases. Conclusions Our results revealed that: 1) digital slide based histopathological diagnoses can be highly coherent with those using optical microscopy; 2) the competency of pathologists is a factor more important than the quality of digital slide; 3) poor digital slide quality do not endanger patient safety as these errors are recognizable by the pathologist and further actions for correction could be taken. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1913324336747310. PMID:22463804

  3. Vesicocutaneous fistula after sliding hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Varun; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sureka, Sanjoy

    2016-01-01

    Sliding inguinal hernias are usually direct inguinal hernias containing various abdominal viscera. The incidence of bladder forming a part of an inguinal hernia, called as “scrotal cystocele,” is 1–4%. The risk of bladder injury is as high as 12% when repairing this type of hernia. This case report emphasizes this aspect in a 65-year-old man who presented with urinary leak through the scrotal wound following right inguinal hernia repair. PMID:26941501

  4. Terminal Sliding Modes In Nonlinear Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Subramanian T.; Gulati, Sandeep

    1993-01-01

    Control systems of proposed type called "terminal controllers" offers increased precision and stability of robotic operations in presence of unknown and/or changing parameters. Systems include special computer hardware and software implementing novel control laws involving terminal sliding modes of motion: closed-loop combination of robot and terminal controller converge, in finite time, to point of stable equilibrium in abstract space of velocity and/or position coordinates applicable to particular control problem.

  5. Rough viscoelastic sliding contact: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, G.; Putignano, C.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we show how the numerical theory introduced by the authors [Carbone and Putignano, J. Mech. Phys. Solids 61, 1822 (2013), 10.1016/j.jmps.2013.03.005] can be effectively employed to study the contact between viscoelastic rough solids. The huge numerical complexity is successfully faced up by employing the adaptive nonuniform mesh developed by the authors in Putignano et al. [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 60, 973 (2012), 10.1016/j.jmps.2012.01.006]. Results mark the importance of accounting for viscoelastic effects to correctly simulate the sliding rough contact. In detail, attention is, first, paid to evaluate the viscoelastic dissipation, i.e., the viscoelastic friction. Fixed the sliding speed and the normal load, friction is completely determined. Furthermore, since the methodology employed in the work allows to study contact between real materials, a comparison between experimental outcomes and numerical prediction in terms of viscoelastic friction is shown. The good agreement seems to validate—at least partially—the presented methodology. Finally, it is shown that viscoelasticity entails not only the dissipative effects previously outlined, but is also strictly related to the anisotropy of the contact solution. Indeed, a marked anisotropy is present in the contact region, which results stretched in the direction perpendicular to the sliding speed. In the paper, the anisotropy of the deformed surface and of the contact area is investigated and quantified.

  6. Slide-specific models for segmentation of differently stained digital histopathology whole slide images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieu, Nicolas; Pauly, Olivier; Zimmermann, Johannes; Binnig, Gerd; Schmidt, Günter

    2016-03-01

    The automatic analysis of whole slide images (WSIs) of stained histopathology tissue sections plays a crucial role in the discovery of predictive biomarkers in the field on immuno-oncology by enabling the quantification of the phenotypic information contained in the tissue sections. The automatic detection of cells and nuclei, while being one of the major steps of such analysis, remains a difficult problem because of the low visual differentiation of high pleomorphic and densely cluttered objects and of the diversity of tissue appearance between slides. The key idea of this work is to take advantage of well-differentiated objects in each slide to learn about the appearance of the tissue and in particular about the appearance of low-differentiated objects. We detect well-differentiated objects on a automatically selected set of representative regions, learn slide-specific visual context models, and finally use the resulting posterior maps to perform the final detection steps on the whole slide. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated against manual annotations on a set of differently stained images.

  7. The Afen Slide a multistage slope failure in the Faroe Shetland Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. K.; Long, D.; Bulat, J.

    2003-04-01

    The West Shetland slope in the Faroe Shetland Channel is the site of glaciomarine sedimentation modified by the interaction of along-slope and down-slope processes. An extensive range of seismic and sample data collected since 1984 has revealed an history of a small submarine landslide, 13 km long, 3 km wide and 10-20 m thick between 850 m and 1130 m waterdepth on a slope of less than 2°, on the continental slope. 3D and 2D high resolution seismic data suggests at least four phases of failure. The initial slip surface is thought to have been around 4.5km long and was followed by further retrogressive movement lengthening the slide scar by almost a kilometre upslope. The final major movement was a block failure on one flank with 5m thick blocks up to 500 m in length, which moved intact 1-2 km down-slope. Minor sidewall failures have also occurred, however, their relative timing is more difficult to establish. Some of the limits of failure reflect faulting detected on 3D seismic more than 100 m below the slide replicating the modern seabed. The detachment is thought to have occurred within a poorly consolidated contouritic sands/silts. The slide profile shows a distinct change in geometry just down-slope of a regional change in slope gradient changing from predominantly erosion to predominantly deposition. The multiphase failure events are correlated with multiphase debris lobes now identified on the channel floor. Cores collected through the debris lobe show multiphase deposits comprising blocks of sediment within a matrix of silty clay. The blocks and matrix can be distinguished on the grounds of colour, lithology and geotechnics. The boundaries between phases of debris lobes are interpreted on the basis of sedimentological units and frequency of blocks. Below the debris lobe a ripped up sand unit may indicate the pre-slide seabed. Geotechnical studies highlight the composite nature of the deposits within the slide. Results from outside the slide indicate a normal

  8. Slide-and-exchange mechanism for rapid and selective transport through the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Raveh, Barak; Karp, Jerome M; Sparks, Samuel; Dutta, Kaushik; Rout, Michael P; Sali, Andrej; Cowburn, David

    2016-05-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is mediated by the interaction of transport factors (TFs) with disordered phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats that fill the central channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). However, the mechanism by which TFs rapidly diffuse through multiple FG repeats without compromising NPC selectivity is not yet fully understood. In this study, we build on our recent NMR investigations showing that FG repeats are highly dynamic, flexible, and rapidly exchanging among TF interaction sites. We use unbiased long timescale all-atom simulations on the Anton supercomputer, combined with extensive enhanced sampling simulations and NMR experiments, to characterize the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of FG repeats and their interaction with a model transport factor. Both the simulations and experimental data indicate that FG repeats are highly dynamic random coils, lack intrachain interactions, and exhibit significant entropically driven resistance to spatial confinement. We show that the FG motifs reversibly slide in and out of multiple TF interaction sites, transitioning rapidly between a strongly interacting state and a weakly interacting state, rather than undergoing a much slower transition between strongly interacting and completely noninteracting (unbound) states. In the weakly interacting state, FG motifs can be more easily displaced by other competing FG motifs, providing a simple mechanism for rapid exchange of TF/FG motif contacts during transport. This slide-and-exchange mechanism highlights the direct role of the disorder within FG repeats in nucleocytoplasmic transport, and resolves the apparent conflict between the selectivity and speed of transport. PMID:27091992

  9. Two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ruiting; Liu, Geng; Liu, Tianxiang

    2016-05-01

    Detailed behaviors of nanoscale textured surfaces during the reciprocating sliding contacts are still unknown although they are widely used in mechanical components to improve tribological characteristics. The current research of sliding contacts of textured surfaces mainly focuses on the experimental studies, while the cost is too high. Molecular dynamics(MD) simulation is widely used in the studies of nanoscale single-pass sliding contacts, but the CPU cost of MD simulation is also too high to simulate the reciprocating sliding contacts. In this paper, employing multiscale method which couples molecular dynamics simulation and finite element method, two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces are investigated. Four textured surfaces with different texture shapes are designed, and a rigid cylindrical tip is used to slide on these textured surfaces. For different textured surfaces, average potential energies and average friction forces of the corresponding sliding processes are analyzed. The analyzing results show that "running-in" stages are different for each texture, and steady friction processes are discovered for textured surfaces II, III and IV. Texture shape and sliding direction play important roles in reciprocating sliding contacts, which influence average friction forces greatly. This research can help to design textured surfaces to improve tribological behaviors in nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts.

  10. Two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ruiting; Liu, Geng; Liu, Tianxiang

    2016-04-01

    Detailed behaviors of nanoscale textured surfaces during the reciprocating sliding contacts are still unknown although they are widely used in mechanical components to improve tribological characteristics. The current research of sliding contacts of textured surfaces mainly focuses on the experimental studies, while the cost is too high. Molecular dynamics(MD) simulation is widely used in the studies of nanoscale single-pass sliding contacts, but the CPU cost of MD simulation is also too high to simulate the reciprocating sliding contacts. In this paper, employing multiscale method which couples molecular dynamics simulation and finite element method, two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces are investigated. Four textured surfaces with different texture shapes are designed, and a rigid cylindrical tip is used to slide on these textured surfaces. For different textured surfaces, average potential energies and average friction forces of the corresponding sliding processes are analyzed. The analyzing results show that "running-in" stages are different for each texture, and steady friction processes are discovered for textured surfaces II, III and IV. Texture shape and sliding direction play important roles in reciprocating sliding contacts, which influence average friction forces greatly. This research can help to design textured surfaces to improve tribological behaviors in nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts.

  11. Plan averaging for multicriteria navigation of sliding window IMRT and VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, David Papp, Dávid; Unkelbach, Jan

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To describe a method for combining sliding window plans [intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)] for use in treatment plan averaging, which is needed for Pareto surface navigation based multicriteria treatment planning. Methods: The authors show that by taking an appropriately defined average of leaf trajectories of sliding window plans, the authors obtain a sliding window plan whose fluence map is the exact average of the fluence maps corresponding to the initial plans. In the case of static-beam IMRT, this also implies that the dose distribution of the averaged plan is the exact dosimetric average of the initial plans. In VMAT delivery, the dose distribution of the averaged plan is a close approximation of the dosimetric average of the initial plans. Results: The authors demonstrate the method on three Pareto optimal VMAT plans created for a demanding paraspinal case, where the tumor surrounds the spinal cord. The results show that the leaf averaged plans yield dose distributions that approximate the dosimetric averages of the precomputed Pareto optimal plans well. Conclusions: The proposed method enables the navigation of deliverable Pareto optimal plans directly, i.e., interactive multicriteria exploration of deliverable sliding window IMRT and VMAT plans, eliminating the need for a sequencing step after navigation and hence the dose degradation that is caused by such a sequencing step.

  12. Motion of a DNA Sliding Clamp Observed by Single Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, Ted A.; Kwon, Youngeun; Johnson, Aaron; Hollars, Christopher W.; O'Donnell, Mike; Camarero, Julio A.; Barsky, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    DNA sliding clamps attach to polymerases and slide along DNA to allow rapid, processive replication of DNA. These clamps contain many positively charged residues that could curtail the sliding due to attractive interactions with the negatively charged DNA. By single-molecule spectroscopy we have observed a fluorescently labeled sliding clamp (polymerase III β subunit or β clamp) loaded onto freely diffusing, single-stranded M13 circular DNA annealed with fluorescently labeled DNA oligomers of up to 90 bases. We find that the diffusion constant for the β clamp diffusing along DNA is on the order of 10–14 m2/s, at least 3 orders of magnitude less than that for diffusion through water alone. We also find evidence that the β clamp remains at the 3′ end in the presence of Escherichia coli single-stranded-binding protein. These results may imply that the clamp not only acts to hold the polymerase on the DNA but also prevents excessive drifting along the DNA. PMID:18556658

  13. Significance of grain sliding mechanisms for ductile deformation of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimanov, A.; Bourcier, M.; Gaye, A.; Héripré, E.; Bornert, M.; Raphanel, J.; Ludwig, W.

    2013-12-01

    Ductile shear zones at depth present polyphase and heterogeneous rocks and multi-scale strain localization patterns. Most strain concentrates in ultramylonitic layers, which exhibit microstructural signatures of several concomitant deformation mechanisms. The latter are either active in volume (dislocation creep), or in the vicinity and along interfaces (grain sliding and solution mass transfer). Because their chronology of appearance and interactions are unclear, inference of the overall rheology seems illusory. We have therefore characterized over a decade the rheology of synthetic lower crustal materials with different compositions and fluid contents, and for various microstructures. Non-Newtonian flow clearly related to dominant dislocation creep. Conversely, Newtonian behavior involved grain sliding mechanisms, but crystal plasticity could be identified as well. In order to clarify the respective roles of these mechanisms we underwent a multi-scale investigation of the ductile deformation of rock analog synthetic halite with controlled microstructures. The mechanical tests were combined with in-situ optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X ray computed tomography, allowing for digital image correlation (DIC) techniques and retrieval of full strain field. Crystal plasticity dominated, as evidenced by physical slip lines and DIC computed slip bands. Crystal orientation mapping allowed to identify strongly active easy glide {110} <110> systems. But, all other slip systems were observed as well, and especially near interfaces, where their activity is necessary to accommodate for the plastic strain incompatibilities between neighboring grains. We also evidenced grain boundary sliding (GBS), which clearly occurred as a secondary, but necessary, accommodation mechanism. The DIC technique allowed the quantification of the relative contribution of each mechanism. The amount of GBS clearly increased with decreasing grain size. Finite element (FE) modeling

  14. Slide identification for lecture movies by matching characters and images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Noriaki; Takebe, Hiroaki; Katsuyama, Yutaka; Naoi, Satoshi; Yokota, Haruo

    2003-12-01

    Slide identification is very important when creating e-Learning materials as it detects slides being changed during lecture movies. Simply detecting the change would not be enough for e-Learning purposes. Because, which slide is now displayed in the frame is also important for creating e-Learning materials. A matching technique combined with a presentation file containing answer information is very useful in identifying slides in a movie frame. We propose two methods for slide identification in this paper. The first is character-based, which uses the relationship between the character code and its coordinates. The other is image-based, which uses normalized correlation and dynamic programming. We used actual movies to evaluate the performance of these methods, both independently and in combination, and the experimental results revealed that they are very effective in identifying slides in lecture movies.

  15. Sliding wear and friction behaviour of zircaloy-4 in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Garima; Limaye, P. K.; Jadhav, D. T.

    2009-11-01

    In water cooled nuclear reactors, the sliding of fuel bundles in fuel channel handling system can lead to severe wear and it is an important topic to study. In the present study, sliding wear behaviour of zircaloy-4 was investigated in water (pH ˜ 10.5) using ball-on-plate sliding wear tester. Sliding wear resistance zircaloy-4 against SS 316 was examined at room temperature. Sliding wear tests were carried out at different load and sliding frequencies. The coefficient of friction of zircaloy-4 was also measured during each tests and it was found to decrease slightly with the increase in applied load. The micro-mechanisms responsible for wear in zircaloy-4 were identified to be microcutting, micropitting and microcracking of deformed subsurface zones in water.

  16. Presentation video retrieval using automatically recovered slide and spoken text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    Video is becoming a prevalent medium for e-learning. Lecture videos contain text information in both the presentation slides and lecturer's speech. This paper examines the relative utility of automatically recovered text from these sources for lecture video retrieval. To extract the visual information, we automatically detect slides within the videos and apply optical character recognition to obtain their text. Automatic speech recognition is used similarly to extract spoken text from the recorded audio. We perform controlled experiments with manually created ground truth for both the slide and spoken text from more than 60 hours of lecture video. We compare the automatically extracted slide and spoken text in terms of accuracy relative to ground truth, overlap with one another, and utility for video retrieval. Results reveal that automatically recovered slide text and spoken text contain different content with varying error profiles. Experiments demonstrate that automatically extracted slide text enables higher precision video retrieval than automatically recovered spoken text.

  17. Slide rule for gamma-ray flaw detection

    SciTech Connect

    Borovin, I.V.

    1984-03-01

    This article describes a slide rule which makes it possible to determine the exposure time quickly and with sufficient accuracy when inspecting steel parts using Cs-137 and Ir-192 as radioactive sources and x-ray films of types RT-1, RM-1, RT-5, etc. The slide rule scales were designed on the basis of experimental data regarding absorption of gamma rays in steel. The slide rule is similar in construction to a normal doublesided slide rule with one slide and a cursor. Gamma-ray flow detection is one of the most common methods of identifying defects using radiation. The films of different components shot by different operators using the slide rule for determining exposure time can be simultaneously developed without visually controlling the photographic density.

  18. Bi-directional planar slide mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.

    2003-11-04

    A bi-directional slide mechanism. A pair of master and slave disks engages opposite sides of the platform. Rotational drivers are connected to master disks so the disks rotate eccentrically about their respective axes of rotation. Opposing slave disks are connected to master disks on opposite sides of the platform by a circuitous mechanical linkage, or are electronically synchronized together using stepper motors, to effect coordinated motion. The synchronized eccentric motion of the pairs of master/slave disks compels smooth linear motion of the platform forwards and backwards without backlash. The apparatus can be incorporated in a MEMS device.

  19. Collective sliding states for colloidal molecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    We study the driving of colloidal molecular crystals over periodic substrates such as those created with optical traps. The n-merization that occurs in the colloidal molecular crystal states produces a remarkably rich variety of distinct dynamical behaviors, including polarization effects within the pinned phase and the formation of both ordered and disordered sliding phases. Using computer simulations, we map the dynamic phase diagrams as a function of substrate strength for dimers and trimers on a triangular substrate, and correlate features on the phase diagram with transport signatures.

  20. Electrically assisted drop sliding on inclined planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Mannetje, D. J. C. M.; Murade, C. U.; van den Ende, D.; Mugele, F.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that electrowetting using alternating current (ac) voltage can be used to overcome pinning of small drops due to omnipresent heterogeneities on solid surfaces. By balancing contact angle hysteresis with gravity on inclined planes, we find that the critical electrowetting number for mobilizing drops is consistent with the voltage-dependent reduction in contact angle hysteresis in ac electrowetting. Moreover, the terminal velocity of sliding drops under ac electrowetting is found to increase linearly with the electrowetting number. Based on this effect, we present a prototype of a wiper-free windscreen.

  1. Second order sliding mode control for a quadrotor UAV.

    PubMed

    Zheng, En-Hui; Xiong, Jing-Jing; Luo, Ji-Liang

    2014-07-01

    A method based on second order sliding mode control (2-SMC) is proposed to design controllers for a small quadrotor UAV. For the switching sliding manifold design, the selection of the coefficients of the switching sliding manifold is in general a sophisticated issue because the coefficients are nonlinear. In this work, in order to perform the position and attitude tracking control of the quadrotor perfectly, the dynamical model of the quadrotor is divided into two subsystems, i.e., a fully actuated subsystem and an underactuated subsystem. For the former, a sliding manifold is defined by combining the position and velocity tracking errors of one state variable, i.e., the sliding manifold has two coefficients. For the latter, a sliding manifold is constructed via a linear combination of position and velocity tracking errors of two state variables, i.e., the sliding manifold has four coefficients. In order to further obtain the nonlinear coefficients of the sliding manifold, Hurwitz stability analysis is used to the solving process. In addition, the flight controllers are derived by using Lyapunov theory, which guarantees that all system state trajectories reach and stay on the sliding surfaces. Extensive simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method. PMID:24751475

  2. Application of partial sliding mode in guidance problem.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, M H; Binazadeh, T

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the problem of 3-dimensional guidance law design is considered and a new guidance law based on partial sliding mode technique is presented. The approach is based on the classification of the state variables within the guidance system dynamics with respect to their required stabilization properties. In the proposed law by using a partial sliding mode technique, only trajectories of a part of states variables are forced to reach the partial sliding surfaces and slide on them. The resulting guidance law enables the missile to intercept highly maneuvering targets within a finite interception time. Effectiveness of the proposed guidance law is demonstrated through analysis and simulations. PMID:23260528

  3. Slide less pathology”: Fairy tale or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Indu, M; Rathy, R; Binu, MP

    2016-01-01

    Pathology practice is significantly advanced in various frontiers. Therefore, “slide less digital” pathology will not be a mere imagination in near future. Digitalization of histopathological slides (whole slide imaging [WSI]) is possible with the help of whole slide scanner. The WSI has a positive impact not only in routine practice but also in research field, medical education and bioindustry. Even if digital pathology has definitive advantages, its widespread use is not yet possible. As it is an upcoming technology in our field, this article is aimed to discussessential aspects of WSI. PMID:27601824

  4. A Sliding Mode Controller Using Nonlinear Sliding Surface Improved With Fuzzy Logic: Application to the Coupled Tanks System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubakir, A.; Boudjema, F.; Boubakir, C.

    2008-06-01

    This paper proposes an approach of hybrid control that is based on the concept of combining fuzzy logic and the methodology of sliding mode control (SMC). In the present works, a first-order nonlinear sliding surface is presented, on which the developed control law is based. Mathematical proof for the stability and convergence of the system is presented. In order to reduce the chattering in sliding mode control, a fixed boundary layer around the switch surface is used. Within the boundary layer, since the fuzzy logic control is applied, the chattering phenomenon, which is inherent in a sliding mode control, is avoided by smoothing the switch signal. Outside the boundary, the sliding mode control is applied to driving the system states into the boundary layer. Experimental studies carried out on a coupled Tanks system indicate that the proposed fuzzy sliding mode control (FSMC) is a good candidate for control applications.

  5. Numerical Modelling of Tsunami Generated by Deformable Submarine Slides: Parameterisation of Slide Dynamics for Coupling to Tsunami Propagation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. C.; Collins, G. S.; Hill, J.; Piggott, M. D.; Mouradian, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical modelling informs risk assessment of tsunami generated by submarine slides; however, for large-scale slides modelling can be complex and computationally challenging. Many previous numerical studies have approximated slides as rigid blocks that moved according to prescribed motion. However, wave characteristics are strongly dependent on the motion of the slide and previous work has recommended that more accurate representation of slide dynamics is needed. We have used the finite-element, adaptive-mesh CFD model Fluidity, to perform multi-material simulations of deformable submarine slide-generated waves at real world scales for a 2D scenario in the Gulf of Mexico. Our high-resolution approach represents slide dynamics with good accuracy, compared to other numerical simulations of this scenario, but precludes tracking of wave propagation over large distances. To enable efficient modelling of further propagation of the waves, we investigate an approach to extract information about the slide evolution from our multi-material simulations in order to drive a single-layer wave propagation model, also using Fluidity, which is much less computationally expensive. The extracted submarine slide geometry and position as a function of time are parameterised using simple polynomial functions. The polynomial functions are used to inform a prescribed velocity boundary condition in a single-layer simulation, mimicking the effect the submarine slide motion has on the water column. The approach is verified by successful comparison of wave generation in the single-layer model with that recorded in the multi-material, multi-layer simulations. We then extend this approach to 3D for further validation of this methodology (using the Gulf of Mexico scenario proposed by Horrillo et al., 2013) and to consider the effect of lateral spreading. This methodology is then used to simulate a series of hypothetical submarine slide events in the Arctic Ocean (based on evidence of historic

  6. Sliding screw implants for extracapsular hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kouvidis, George; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A; Stavrakakis, Loannis; Katonis, Pavlos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2012-01-01

    Hip fractures are associated with significant mortality and morbidity for the patients, more dependent residual status, and increased socio-economic cost. Many hip-fracture patients experience severe functional impairment, and most never recover their pre-fracture level of function. Current research has sought to identify the most effective treatments to reduce the incidence of hip fractures, improve survival and quality of life, and minimize complications and disability. The treatment of these fractures in the elderly aims to return these people to their pre-fracture mobility and functional level. This article reviews the surgical treatment options for extracapsular hip fractures and discusses their associated advantages, disadvantages, and complications. Two types of implants are currently available: the dynamic hip screw (DHS), and the intramedullary hip nail with one or two sliding screws. In this review, no clear advantage of one implant over another for the treatment of extracapsular hip fractures was evident. Both the DHS and hip nails can be used successfully for the treatment of stable hip fractures; for unstable fractures and low subtrochanteric fractures, hip nails are preferred. Although hip nails are associated with limited exposure, lower blood loss and transfusion requirements, and shorter operative time, complications are more common with hip nails. Long-term survival and function are similar in the two approaches. Hip nails with two sliding screws do not seem to make the difference in clinical practice that is reported in biomechanical studies. PMID:23016784

  7. Sliding viscoelastic drops on slippery surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Clarke, A.; Rothstein, J. P.; Poole, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We study the sliding of drops of constant-viscosity dilute elastic liquids (Boger fluids) on various surfaces caused by sudden surface inclination. For smooth or roughened hydrophilic surfaces, such as glass or acrylic, there is essentially no difference between these elastic liquids and a Newtonian comparator fluid (with identical shear viscosity, surface tension, and static contact angle). In contrast for embossed polytetrafluoroethylene superhydrophobic surfaces, profound differences are observed: the elastic drops slide at a significantly reduced rate and complex branch-like patterns are left on the surface by the drop's wake including, on various scales, beads-on-a-string like phenomena. Microscopy images indicate that the strong viscoelastic effect is caused by stretching filaments of fluid from isolated islands, residing at pinning sites on the surface pillars, of the order ˜30 μm in size. On this scale, the local strain rates are sufficient to extend the polymer chains, locally increasing the extensional viscosity of the solution, retarding the drop and leaving behind striking branch-like structures on much larger scales.

  8. Influence of normal loads and sliding velocities on friction properties of engineering plastics sliding against rough counterfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuruzzaman, D. M.; Chowdhury, M. A.; Rahaman, M. L.; Oumer, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    Friction properties of plastic materials are very important under dry sliding contact conditions for bearing applications. In the present research, friction properties of engineering plastics such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and nylon are investigated under dry sliding contact conditions. In the experiments, PTFE and nylon slide against different rough counterfaces such as mild steel and stainless steel 316 (SS 316). Frictional tests are carried out at low loads 5, 7.5 and 10 N, low sliding velocities 0.5, 0.75 and 1 m/s and relative humidity 70%. The obtained results reveal that friction coefficient of PTFE increases with the increase in normal loads and sliding velocities within the observed range. On the other hand, frictional values of nylon decrease with the increase in normal loads and sliding velocities. It is observed that in general, these polymers show higher frictional values when sliding against SS 316 rather than mild steel. During running-in process, friction coefficient of PTFE and nylon steadily increases with the increase in rubbing time and after certain duration of rubbing, it remains at steady level. At identical operating conditions, the frictional values are significantly different depending on normal load, sliding velocity and material pair. It is also observed that in general, the influence of normal load on the friction properties of PTFE and nylon is greater than that of sliding velocity.

  9. Assessing agreement between malaria slide density readings

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several criteria have been used to assess agreement between replicate slide readings of malaria parasite density. Such criteria may be based on percent difference, or absolute difference, or a combination. Neither the rationale for choosing between these types of criteria, nor that for choosing the magnitude of difference which defines acceptable agreement, are clear. The current paper seeks a procedure which avoids the disadvantages of these current options and whose parameter values are more clearly justified. Methods and Results Variation of parasite density within a slide is expected, even when it has been prepared from a homogeneous sample. This places lower limits on sensitivity and observer agreement, quantified by the Poisson distribution. This means that, if a criterion of fixed percent difference criterion is used for satisfactory agreement, the number of discrepant readings is over-estimated at low parasite densities. With a criterion of fixed absolute difference, the same happens at high parasite densities. For an ideal slide, following the Poisson distribution, a criterion based on a constant difference in square root counts would apply for all densities. This can be back-transformed to a difference in absolute counts, which, as expected, gives a wider range of acceptable agreement at higher average densities. In an example dataset from Tanzania, observed differences in square root counts correspond to a 95% limits of agreement of -2,800 and +2,500 parasites/μl at average density of 2,000 parasites/μl, and -6,200 and +5,700 parasites/μl at 10,000 parasites/μl. However, there were more outliers beyond those ranges at higher densities, meaning that actual coverage of these ranges was not a constant 95%, but decreased with density. In a second study, a trial of microscopist training, the corresponding ranges of agreement are wider and asymmetrical: -8,600 to +5,200/μl, and -19,200 to +11,700/μl, respectively. By comparison, the optimal

  10. Screening and dotting virtual slides: A new challenge for cytotechnologists.

    PubMed

    Khalbuss, Walid E; Cuda, Jackie; Cucoranu, Ioan C

    2013-01-01

    Digital images are increasingly being used in cytopathology. Whole-slide imaging (WSI) is a digital imaging modality that uses computerized technology to scan and convert entire cytology glass slides into digital images that can be viewed on a digital display using the image viewer software. Digital image acquisition of cytology glass slides has improved significantly over the years due to the use of liquid-based preparations and advances in WSI scanning technology such as automatic multipoint pre-scan focus technology or z-stack scanning technology. Screening cytotechnologists are responsible for every cell that is present on an imaged slide. One of the challenges users have to overcome is to establish a technique to review systematically the entire imaged slide and to dot selected abnormal or significant findings. The scope of this article is to review the current user interface technology available for virtual slide navigation when screening digital slides in cytology. WSI scanner vendors provide tools, built into the image viewer software that allow for a more systematic navigation of the virtual slides, such as auto-panning, keyboard-controlled slide navigation and track map. Annotation tools can improve communication between the screener and the final reviewer or can be used for education. The tracking functionality allows recording of the WSI navigation process and provides a mechanism for confirmation of slide coverage by the screening cytotechnologist as well as a useful tool for quality assurance. As the WSI technology matures, additional features and tools to support navigation of a cytology virtual slide are anticipated. PMID:24379891

  11. Screening and dotting virtual slides: A new challenge for cytotechnologists

    PubMed Central

    Khalbuss, Walid E.; Cuda, Jackie; Cucoranu, Ioan C.

    2013-01-01

    Digital images are increasingly being used in cytopathology. Whole-slide imaging (WSI) is a digital imaging modality that uses computerized technology to scan and convert entire cytology glass slides into digital images that can be viewed on a digital display using the image viewer software. Digital image acquisition of cytology glass slides has improved significantly over the years due to the use of liquid-based preparations and advances in WSI scanning technology such as automatic multipoint pre-scan focus technology or z-stack scanning technology. Screening cytotechnologists are responsible for every cell that is present on an imaged slide. One of the challenges users have to overcome is to establish a technique to review systematically the entire imaged slide and to dot selected abnormal or significant findings. The scope of this article is to review the current user interface technology available for virtual slide navigation when screening digital slides in cytology. WSI scanner vendors provide tools, built into the image viewer software that allow for a more systematic navigation of the virtual slides, such as auto-panning, keyboard-controlled slide navigation and track map. Annotation tools can improve communication between the screener and the final reviewer or can be used for education. The tracking functionality allows recording of the WSI navigation process and provides a mechanism for confirmation of slide coverage by the screening cytotechnologist as well as a useful tool for quality assurance. As the WSI technology matures, additional features and tools to support navigation of a cytology virtual slide are anticipated. PMID:24379891

  12. In situ TEM characterization of shear-stress-induced interlayer sliding in the cross section view of molybdenum disulfide.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, Juan Pablo; KC, Santosh; Lu, Ning; Wang, Jinguo; Cho, Kyeongjae; Wallace, Robert M; Kim, Moon J

    2015-02-24

    The experimental study of interlayer sliding at the nanoscale in layered solids has been limited thus far by the incapability of mechanical and imaging probes to simultaneously access sliding interfaces and overcome through mechanical stimulus the van der Waals and Coulombic interactions holding the layers in place. For this purpose, straightforward methods were developed to achieve interlayer sliding in molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) while under observation within a transmission electron microscope. A method to manipulate, tear, and slide free-standing atomic layers of MoS2 is demonstrated by electrostatically coupling it to an oxidized tungsten probe attached to a micromanipulator at a bias above ±7 V. A first-principles model of a MoS2 bilayer polarized by a normal electric field of 5 V/nm, emanating from the tip, demonstrates the appearance of a periodic negative sliding potential energy barrier when the layers slide into the out-of-registry stacking configuration, hinting at electrostatic gating as a means of modifying the interlayer tribology to facilitate shear exfoliation. A method to shear focused ion beam prepared MoS2 cross section samples using a nanoindenter force sensor is also demonstrated, allowing both the observation and force measurement of its interlayer dynamics during shear-induced sliding. From this experiment, the zero normal load shear strength of MoS2 can be directly obtained: 25.3 ± 0.6 MPa. These capabilities enable the site-specific mechanical testing of dry lubricant-based nanoelectromechanical devices and can lead to a better understanding of the atomic mechanisms from which the interlayer tribology of layered materials originates. PMID:25494557

  13. Sequence-dependent Kink-and-Slide Deformations of Nucleosomal DNA Facilitated by Histone Arginines Bound in the Minor Groove

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Difei; Ulyanov, Nikolai B.; Zhurkin, Victor B.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to bending and twisting deformabilities, the lateral displacements of the DNA axis (Kink-and-Slide) play an important role in DNA wrapping around the histone core (M. Y. Tolstorukov, A. V. Colasanti, D. M. McCandlish, W. K. Olson, V. B. Zhurkin, J. Mol. Biol. 371, 725-738 (2007)). Here, we show that these Kink-and-Slide deformations are likely to be stabilized by the arginine residues of histones interacting with the minor groove of DNA. The arginines are positioned asymmetrically in the minor groove, being closer to one strand. The asymmetric arginine-DNA interactions facilitate lateral displacement of base pairs across the DNA grooves, thus leading to a stepwise accumulation of the superhelical pitch of nucleosomal DNA. To understand the sequence dependence of such Kink-and-Slide deformations, we performed all-atom calculations of DNA hexamers with the YR and RY steps in the center. We found that when the unrestrained DNA deformations are allowed, the YR steps tend to bend into the major groove, and RY steps bend into the minor groove. However, when the nucleosomal Kink-and-Slide deformation is considered, the YR steps prove to be more favorable for bending into the minor groove. Overall, the Kink-and-Slide deformation energy of DNA increases in the order TA < CA < CG < GC < AC < AT. We propose a simple stereochemical model accounting for this sequence dependence. Our results agree with experimental data indicating that the TA step most frequently occurs in the minor-groove kink positions in the most stable nucleosomes. Our computations demonstrate that the Kink-and-Slide distortion is accompanied by the BI to BII transition. This fact, together with irregularities in the two-dimensional (Roll, Slide) energy contour maps, suggest that the Kink-and-Slide deformations represent a nonharmonic behavior of the duplex. This explains the difference between the two estimates of the DNA deformation energy in nucleosome – the earlier one made using knowledge

  14. 8. Photocopy of original USRS glass plate slide (from original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of original USRS glass plate slide (from original slide on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, Colorado) Photographer unknown, ca. 1908 The diversion weir of the Okanogan National Irrigation Project - Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, Salmon Creek, Okanogan, Okanogan County, WA

  15. Detection of felt tip markers on microscope slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, David; Meyer-Ebrecht, Dietrich; Böcking, Alfred; Merhof, Dorit

    2014-03-01

    Sensitivity and specificity of conventional cytological methods for cancer diagnosis can be raised significantly by applying further adjuvant cytological methods. To this end, the pathologist marks regions of interest (ROI) with a felt tip pen on the microscope slide for further analysis. This paper presents algorithms for the automated detection of these ROIs, which enables further automated processing of these regions by digital pathology solutions and image analysis. For this purpose, an overview scan is obtained at low magnification. Slides from different manufacturers need to be treated, as they might contain certain regions which need to be excluded from the analysis. Therefore the slide type is identified first. Subsequently, the felt tip marks are detected automatically, and gaps appearing in the case of ROIs which have been drawn incompletely are closed. Based on the marker detection, the ROIs are obtained. The algorithms have been optimized on a training set of 82 manually annotated images. On the test set, the slide types of all but one out of 81 slides were identified correctly. A sensitivity of 98.31% and a positive predictive value of 97.48% were reached for the detection of ROIs. In combination with a slide loader or a whole slide imaging scanner as well as automated image analysis, this enables fully automated batch processing of slides.

  16. The big problem of the missing cytology slides

    PubMed Central

    Gatter, Ken M

    2004-01-01

    Cytology slides are often unique and irreplaceable. Unlike surgical pathology cases, where additional paraffin sections can be cut, cytology slides often cannot be duplicated because there are only a few direct smears or the diagnostic material is present on a single slide. Cytology slides are often "sent out" to other physicians, laboratories or hospitals, typically so that the pathologist at the institution where the patient will receive treatment can review the slides. Less often, a cytology lab sends out the slides for a second opinion or as part of the discovery process in a lawsuit, where they may or may not be defendants. Rarely, unique and irreplaceable cytology slides are lost. This article presents a hypothetical scenario that is based on reported state appellate court decisions. The article discusses some of the legal issues that will affect the defendant cytologist/cytology lab and the "expert cytologist," and suggests some steps a cytologist/cytology lab can take to minimize the risk of repercussions from a lost unique and irreplaceable cytology slide. PMID:15500703

  17. Optimizing Student Learning: Examining the Use of Presentation Slides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Judy; Corrigan, Hope; Hofacker, Charles F.

    2011-01-01

    Sensory overload and split attention result in reduced learning when instructors read slides with bullet points and complex graphs during a lecture. Conversely, slides containing relevant visual elements, when accompanied by instructor narration, use both the visual and verbal channels of a student's working memory, thus improving the chances of…

  18. A Simple Measurement of the Sliding Friction Coefficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratton, Luigi M.; Defrancesco, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple computer-aided experiment for investigating Coulomb's law of sliding friction in a classroom. It provides a way of testing the possible dependence of the friction coefficient on various parameters, such as types of materials, normal force, apparent area of contact and sliding velocity.

  19. Alternative Films for Making Presentation Slides for the Occasional User.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Harold R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    As alternatives to the well-known Kodak Kodalith film for making presentation slides, suggests using Kodak Technical Pan Film, 2415 and Kodak Precision Fine Film LPD4. Although less known, both films are capable of making excellent quality slides with minimum effort and, for the occasional user, offer advantages over the Kodalith-Diazochrome…

  20. The Easy Way to Create Computer Slide Shows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mary Alice

    1995-01-01

    Discusses techniques for creating computer slide shows. Topics include memory; format; color use; HyperCard and CD-ROM; font styles and sizes; graphs and graphics; the slide show option; special effects; and tips for effective presentation. (Author/AEF)

  1. Computer Slide Shows: A Trap for Bad Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemm, W. R.

    2007-01-01

    Slide shows presented with software such as PowerPoint or WordPerfect Presentations can trap instructors into bad teaching practices. Research on memory suggests that slide-show instruction can actually be less effective than traditional lecturing when the teacher uses a blackboard or overhead projector. The author proposes a model of classroom…

  2. Determining the Ecosystem Services Important for Urban Landscapes-Slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation consists of introductory slides on ecosystem services in urban landscapes and then a discussion of two case studies concerning the provision of water quality in urban landscapes. The introductory slides will explore the range of ecosystem services provided by u...

  3. Lecture Handouts of Projected Slides in a Medical Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amato, Dominick; Quirt, Ian

    1991-01-01

    In a third-year medical school hematology course, handouts reproducing all or most of the 35mm slides used during the lecture are given at the beginning of class. The slides are reproduced on the left, with room for note-taking on the right. Despite some disadvantages, the method is seen as helpful. (Author/MSE)

  4. Qualification test unit slide stainer (Beckman P/N 673753)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernier, P. S.

    1972-01-01

    Specifications for a slide stainer unit for the Skylab program are presented. The qualification test slide stainer was designed to be a self-contained system capable of performing an eight-step Gram stain of microorganisms and a Wright's stain of blood smears.

  5. AFRD WAREHOUSE, WEST SIDE DETAIL OF ALTERED SLIDING DOORS, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AFRD WAREHOUSE, WEST SIDE DETAIL OF ALTERED SLIDING DOORS, FACING EAST. WEATHER COVER OVER RAIL IS ORIGINAL. SHEET METAL SIDING HAS BEEN INSERTED BETWEEN TWO HALVES OF SLIDING DOORS. - Minidoka Relocation Center Warehouse, 111 South Fir Street, Shoshone, Lincoln County, ID

  6. Presentable Slides: A Practical Approach for Amateur Draftsmen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seel, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    To contribute usefully to a lecture, slides containing tabulated or diagrammatic textual information need to be simple and legible. Such slides can be made by following a few straightforward rules and techniques. Several of these rules and techniques are provided. (JN)

  7. 30 CFR 816.99 - Slides and other damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Slides and other damage. 816.99 Section 816.99... § 816.99 Slides and other damage. (a) An undisturbed natural barrier shall be provided beginning at the... determined by the regulatory authority as is needed to assure stability. The barrier shall be retained...

  8. A Transformational Approach to Slip-Slide Factoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steckroth, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    In this "Delving Deeper" article, the author introduces the slip-slide method for solving Algebra 1 mathematics problems. This article compares the traditional method approach of trial and error to the slip-slide method of factoring. Tools that used to be taken for granted now make it possible to investigate relationships visually,…

  9. Various sizes of sliding event bursts in the plastic flow of metallic glasses based on a spatiotemporal dynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jingli E-mail: g.wang@shu.edu.cn; Chen, Cun; Wang, Gang E-mail: g.wang@shu.edu.cn; Cheung, Wing-Sum; Sun, Baoan; Mattern, Norbert; Siegmund, Stefan; Eckert, Jürgen

    2014-07-21

    This paper presents a spatiotemporal dynamic model based on the interaction between multiple shear bands in the plastic flow of metallic glasses during compressive deformation. Various sizes of sliding events burst in the plastic deformation as the generation of different scales of shear branches occurred; microscopic creep events and delocalized sliding events were analyzed based on the established model. This paper discusses the spatially uniform solutions and traveling wave solution. The phase space of the spatially uniform system applied in this study reflected the chaotic state of the system at a lower strain rate. Moreover, numerical simulation showed that the microscopic creep events were manifested at a lower strain rate, whereas the delocalized sliding events were manifested at a higher strain rate.

  10. [Whole slide imaging technology: from digitization to online applications].

    PubMed

    Ameisen, David; Le Naour, Gilles; Daniel, Christel

    2012-11-01

    As e-health becomes essential to modern care, whole slide images (virtual slides) are now an important clinical, teaching and research tool in pathology. Virtual microscopy consists of digitizing a glass slide by acquiring hundreds of tiles of regions of interest at different zoom levels and assembling them into a structured file. This gigapixel image can then be remotely viewed over a terminal, exactly the way pathologists use a microscope. In this article, we will first describe the key elements of this technology, from the acquisition, using a scanner or a motorized microscope, to the broadcasting of virtual slides through a local or distant viewer over an intranet or Internet connection. As virtual slides are now commonly used in virtual classrooms, clinical data and research databases, we will highlight the main issues regarding its uses in modern pathology. Emphasis will be made on quality assurance policies, standardization and scaling. PMID:23171902

  11. Teaching Veterinary Histopathology: A Comparison of Microscopy and Digital Slides.

    PubMed

    Brown, Peter J; Fews, Debra; Bell, Nick J

    2016-01-01

    Virtual microscopy using digitized slides has become more widespread in teaching in recent years. There have been no direct comparisons of the use of virtual microscopy and the use of microscopes and glass slides. Third-year veterinary students from two different schools completed a simple objective test, covering aspects of histology and histopathology, before and after a practical class covering relevant material presented as either glass slides viewed with a microscope or as digital slides. There was an overall improvement in performance by students at both veterinary schools using both practical formats. Neither format was consistently better than the other, and neither school consistently outperformed the other. In a comparison of student appraisal of use of digital slides and microscopes, the digital technology was identified as having many advantages. PMID:26752020

  12. Yeast actin filaments display ATP-dependent sliding movement over surfaces coated with rabbit muscle myosin.

    PubMed Central

    Kron, S J; Drubin, D G; Botstein, D; Spudich, J A

    1992-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to study the function of components of the actin cytoskeleton in vivo, mainly because it is easy to derive and characterize mutations affecting these proteins. In contrast, biochemical studies have generally used proteins derived from higher eukaryotes. We have devised a simple procedure to prepare, in high yield, homogeneous native actin from wild-type and act1 mutant yeast. Using intensified video fluorescence microscopy, we found that actin filaments polymerized from these preparations exhibit ATP-dependent sliding movement over surfaces coated with rabbit skeletal muscle myosin. The rates of sliding movement of the wild-type and mutant yeast actins were each about half that of rabbit skeletal muscle actin under similar conditions. We conclude that over the large evolutionary distance between yeast and mammals there has been significant conservation of actin function, specifically the ability to be moved by interaction with myosin. Images PMID:1533933

  13. Sliding Mode Control of Steerable Needles

    PubMed Central

    Rucker, D. Caleb; Das, Jadav; Gilbert, Hunter B.; Swaney, Philip J.; Miga, Michael I.; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Webster, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Steerable needles can potentially increase the accuracy of needle-based diagnosis and therapy delivery, provided they can be adequately controlled based on medical image information. We propose a novel sliding mode control law that can be used to deliver the tip of a flexible asymmetric-tipped needle to a desired point, or to track a desired trajectory within tissue. The proposed control strategy requires no a priori knowledge of model parameters, has bounded input speeds, and requires little computational resources. We show that if the standard nonholonomic model for tip-steered needles holds, then the control law will converge to desired targets in a reachable workspace, within a tolerance that can be defined by the control parameters. Experimental results validate the control law for target points and trajectory following in phantom tissue and ex vivo liver. Experiments with targets that move during insertion illustrate robustness to disturbances caused by tissue deformation. PMID:25400527

  14. Sliding Mode Control of Steerable Needles.

    PubMed

    Rucker, D Caleb; Das, Jadav; Gilbert, Hunter B; Swaney, Philip J; Miga, Michael I; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Webster, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    Steerable needles can potentially increase the accuracy of needle-based diagnosis and therapy delivery, provided they can be adequately controlled based on medical image information. We propose a novel sliding mode control law that can be used to deliver the tip of a flexible asymmetric-tipped needle to a desired point, or to track a desired trajectory within tissue. The proposed control strategy requires no a priori knowledge of model parameters, has bounded input speeds, and requires little computational resources. We show that if the standard nonholonomic model for tip-steered needles holds, then the control law will converge to desired targets in a reachable workspace, within a tolerance that can be defined by the control parameters. Experimental results validate the control law for target points and trajectory following in phantom tissue and ex vivo liver. Experiments with targets that move during insertion illustrate robustness to disturbances caused by tissue deformation. PMID:25400527

  15. Waves in stratified geomaterials with sliding layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady

    2016-04-01

    Wave propagation in stratified geomaterials with sliding layers is strongly anisotropic. The simplest representation of this behaviour is an elastic transverse-isotropic (orthotropic in 2D) continuum. Such a model is however only applicable when loading that is sufficiently uniform or when the wavelength is much larger than the layer thickness. In this case the stress non-uniformity over the layer thickness and the associated layer bending can be neglected. In an intermediate case when the wavelength is still higher than the layer thickness but not as high to neglect the stress non-uniformity at least bending moments and layer bending need to be taken into account. This is equivalent to retaining only the linear term of the normal stress variation over the layer thickness. The layer bending creates additional, rotational degrees of freedom. In 2D only one rotational degree of freedom exists, which considerably simplifies the modelling. The corresponding rotation is represented by the average gradient of layer deflection. The presence of rotations makes the stress tensor non-symmetrical. On top of that the rotation gradient creates moment stresses, which represent bending moments over the unit area in the layer cross-section. This requires the use of a 2D orthotropic Cosserat continuum to model the dynamics of such a stratified geomaterial. We show that in the stratified geomaterial shear-bending waves propagate. We determine the wave velocities and demonstrate that as the resistance to sliding reduces, the waves tend to localise over a line normal to the layering.

  16. Resultant knee joint moments for lateral movement tasks on sliding and non-sliding sport surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Benno M; Stefanyshyn, Darren J; Rozitis, Antra I; Mundermann, Annegret

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare ankle and knee joint moments observed when playing on sport surfaces that slide slightly relative to the ground with the moments observed when playing on conventional sport surfaces. Three-dimensional resultant internal joint moments and kinematic characteristics of the lower extremity were quantified for 21 university basketball players when performing v-cut and side-shuffle tasks on three types of sliding surface (interlocking tiles) and on two types of conventional surface (maple wood and rolled vinyl). Translational and rotational friction between the five test surfaces and a test shoe were also quantified. The five sport surfaces moved horizontally between 0.2 and 1.6 mm during the landing phase of the two tasks. The medio-lateral ground reaction forces were lowest for the surfaces with the highest horizontal movement. Resultant ankle joint moments were lower and resultant knee moments were higher on the sliding surfaces than the conventional surfaces. Sport surfaces that allow a few millimetres of horizontal movement during ground contact may reduce joint loading at the ankle joint, but increase joint loading at the knee joint, when compared with conventional sport surfaces, and thus may influence the prevalence of knee injuries. PMID:19253080

  17. Reverse actin sliding triggers strong myosin binding that moves tropomyosin.

    PubMed

    Bekyarova, T I; Reedy, M C; Baumann, B A J; Tregear, R T; Ward, A; Krzic, U; Prince, K M; Perz-Edwards, R J; Reconditi, M; Gore, D; Irving, T C; Reedy, M K

    2008-07-29

    Actin/myosin interactions in vertebrate striated muscles are believed to be regulated by the "steric blocking" mechanism whereby the binding of calcium to the troponin complex allows tropomyosin (TM) to change position on actin, acting as a molecular switch that blocks or allows myosin heads to interact with actin. Movement of TM during activation is initiated by interaction of Ca(2+) with troponin, then completed by further displacement by strong binding cross-bridges. We report x-ray evidence that TM in insect flight muscle (IFM) moves in a manner consistent with the steric blocking mechanism. We find that both isometric contraction, at high [Ca(2+)], and stretch activation, at lower [Ca(2+)], develop similarly high x-ray intensities on the IFM fourth actin layer line because of TM movement, coinciding with x-ray signals of strong-binding cross-bridge attachment to helically favored "actin target zones." Vanadate (Vi), a phosphate analog that inhibits active cross-bridge cycling, abolishes all active force in IFM, allowing high [Ca(2+)] to elicit initial TM movement without cross-bridge attachment or other changes from relaxed structure. However, when stretched in high [Ca(2+)], Vi-"paralyzed" fibers produce force substantially above passive response at pCa approximately 9, concurrent with full conversion from resting to active x-ray pattern, including x-ray signals of cross-bridge strong-binding and TM movement. This argues that myosin heads can be recruited as strong-binding "brakes" by backward-sliding, calcium-activated thin filaments, and are as effective in moving TM as actively force-producing cross-bridges. Such recruitment of myosin as brakes may be the major mechanism resisting extension during lengthening contractions. PMID:18658238

  18. Reverse actin sliding triggers strong myosin binding that moves tropomyosin

    SciTech Connect

    Bekyarova, T.I.; Reedy, M.C.; Baumann, B.A.J.; Tregear, R.T.; Ward, A.; Krzic, U.; Prince, K.M.; Perz-Edwards, R.J.; Reconditi, M.; Gore, D.; Irving, T.C.; Reedy, M.K.

    2008-09-03

    Actin/myosin interactions in vertebrate striated muscles are believed to be regulated by the 'steric blocking' mechanism whereby the binding of calcium to the troponin complex allows tropomyosin (TM) to change position on actin, acting as a molecular switch that blocks or allows myosin heads to interact with actin. Movement of TM during activation is initiated by interaction of Ca{sup 2+} with troponin, then completed by further displacement by strong binding cross-bridges. We report x-ray evidence that TM in insect flight muscle (IFM) moves in a manner consistent with the steric blocking mechanism. We find that both isometric contraction, at high [Ca{sup 2+}], and stretch activation, at lower [Ca{sup 2+}], develop similarly high x-ray intensities on the IFM fourth actin layer line because of TM movement, coinciding with x-ray signals of strong-binding cross-bridge attachment to helically favored 'actin target zones.' Vanadate (Vi), a phosphate analog that inhibits active cross-bridge cycling, abolishes all active force in IFM, allowing high [Ca{sup 2+}] to elicit initial TM movement without cross-bridge attachment or other changes from relaxed structure. However, when stretched in high [Ca{sup 2+}], Vi-'paralyzed' fibers produce force substantially above passive response at pCa {approx} 9, concurrent with full conversion from resting to active x-ray pattern, including x-ray signals of cross-bridge strong-binding and TM movement. This argues that myosin heads can be recruited as strong-binding 'brakes' by backward-sliding, calcium-activated thin filaments, and are as effective in moving TM as actively force-producing cross-bridges. Such recruitment of myosin as brakes may be the major mechanism resisting extension during lengthening contractions.

  19. Humboldt slide - A large shear-dominated retrogressive slope failure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, J.V.; Prior, D.B.; Field, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Humboldt Slide is a large, complex slide zone located on the northern California continental margin. Its three-dimensional architecture has been imaged by a combination of multibeam bathymetry, Huntec Deep-Tow seismic profiling, and sidescan sonar. The slide is interpreted to be Late Pleistocene to early Holocene in age and was caused by a combination of factors. The area of the slide is a local depocenter with high accumulation rates of organic-rich sediment; there has been local steepening of slopes by tectonic uplifts; and the entire area is one of high seismicity. Overall, the failure occurred by retrogressive, shear-dominated, minimum movement apparently as a sequence of events. Failure initially occurred by subsidence extension at the middle of the feature, followed by upslope retrogressive failure and downslope compression, and finally by translational sliding at the top of the slide. Degassing, as evidenced by abundant pockmarks, may have inhibited downslope translation. The slide may still be active, as suggested by offsets in Holocene hemipelagic sediment draped over some of the shear surfaces. Crown cracks occur above the present head of the failure and may represent the next generation of failure.

  20. Second-order sliding mode control with experimental application.

    PubMed

    Eker, Ilyas

    2010-07-01

    In this article, a second-order sliding mode control (2-SMC) is proposed for second-order uncertain plants using equivalent control approach to improve the performance of control systems. A Proportional + Integral + Derivative (PID) sliding surface is used for the sliding mode. The sliding mode control law is derived using direct Lyapunov stability approach and asymptotic stability is proved theoretically. The performance of the closed-loop system is analysed through an experimental application to an electromechanical plant to show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed second-order sliding mode control and factors involved in the design. The second-order plant parameters are experimentally determined using input-output measured data. The results of the experimental application are presented to make a quantitative comparison with the traditional (first-order) sliding mode control (SMC) and PID control. It is demonstrated that the proposed 2-SMC system improves the performance of the closed-loop system with better tracking specifications in the case of external disturbances, better behavior of the output and faster convergence of the sliding surface while maintaining the stability. PMID:20413118

  1. Estimation of lung lobar sliding using image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelon, Ryan; Cao, Kunlin; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Christensen, Gary E.; Raghavan, Madhavan

    2012-03-01

    MOTIVATION: The lobes of the lungs slide relative to each other during breathing. Quantifying lobar sliding can aid in better understanding lung function, better modeling of lung dynamics, and a better understanding of the limits of image registration performance near fissures. We have developed a method to estimate lobar sliding in the lung from image registration of CT scans. METHODS: Six human lungs were analyzed using CT scans spanning functional residual capacity (FRC) to total lung capacity (TLC). The lung lobes were segmented and registered on a lobe-by-lobe basis. The displacement fields from the independent lobe registrations were then combined into a single image. This technique allows for displacement discontinuity at lobar boundaries. The displacement field was then analyzed as a continuum by forming finite elements from the voxel grid of the FRC image. Elements at a discontinuity will appear to have undergone significantly elevated 'shear stretch' compared to those within the parenchyma. Shear stretch is shown to be a good measure of sliding magnitude in this context. RESULTS: The sliding map clearly delineated the fissures of the lung. The fissure between the right upper and right lower lobes showed the greatest sliding in all subjects while the fissure between the right upper and right middle lobe showed the least sliding.

  2. Comparing whole slide digital images versus traditional glass slides in the detection of common microscopic features seen in dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Nikki S.; Markow, Michael; Prieto-Granada, Carlos; Gaudi, Sudeep; Turner, Leslie; Rodriguez-Waitkus, Paul; Messina, Jane L.; Jukic, Drazen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The quality and limitations of digital slides are not fully known. We aimed to estimate intrapathologist discrepancy in detecting specific microscopic features on glass slides and digital slides created by scanning at ×20. Methods: Hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid–Schiff glass slides were digitized using the Mirax Scan (Carl Zeiss Inc., Germany). Six pathologists assessed 50–71 digital slides. We recorded objective magnification, total time, and detection of the following: Mast cells; eosinophils; plasma cells; pigmented macrophages; melanin in the epidermis; fungal bodies; neutrophils; civatte bodies; parakeratosis; and sebocytes. This process was repeated using the corresponding glass slides after 3 weeks. The diagnosis was not required. Results: The mean time to assess digital slides was 176.77 s and 137.61 s for glass slides (P < 0.001, 99% confidence interval [CI]). The mean objective magnification used to detect features using digital slides was 18.28 and 14.07 for glass slides (P < 0.001, 99.99% CI). Parakeratosis, civatte bodies, pigmented macrophages, melanin in the epidermis, mast cells, eosinophils, plasma cells, and neutrophils, were identified at lower objectives on glass slides (P = 0.023–0.001, 95% CI). Average intraobserver concordance ranged from κ = 0.30 to κ = 0.78. Features with poor to fair average concordance were: Melanin in the epidermis (κ = 0.15–0.58); plasma cells (κ = 0.15–0.49); and neutrophils (κ = 0.12–0.48). Features with moderate average intrapathologist concordance were: parakeratosis (κ = 0.21–0.61); civatte bodies (κ = 0.21–0.71); pigment-laden macrophages (κ = 0.34–0.66); mast cells (κ = 0.29–0.78); and eosinophils (κ = 0.31–0.79). The average intrapathologist concordance was good for sebocytes (κ = 0.51–1.00) and fungal bodies (κ = 0.47–0.76). Conclusions: Telepathology using digital slides scanned at ×20 is sufficient for detection of histopathologic features routinely

  3. Introducing Slide Sets for the Introductory Astronomy Instructor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Bonnie K.; Schneider, Nicholas; Brain, David; Schultz, Gregory; Buxner, Sanlyn; Smith, Denise

    2014-11-01

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Science Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) community and Forums work together to bring the cutting-edge discoveries of NASA Astrophysics and Planetary Science missions to the introductory astronomy college classroom. These mission- and grant-based E/PO programs are uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We present two new opportunities for college instructors to bring the latest NASA discoveries in Space Science into their classrooms.In an effort to keep the astronomy classroom apprised of the fast moving field of planetary science, the Division of Planetary Sciences (DPS) has developed “DPS Discoveries”, which are short, topical presentations that can be incorporated into college lectures. The slide sets are targeted at the Introductory Astronomy undergraduate level. Each slide set consists of three slides that cover a description of the discovery, a discussion of the underlying science, and a presentation of the big picture implications of the discovery, with a fourth slide that includes links to associated press releases, images, and primary sources. Topics span all subdisciplines of planetary science, and sets are available in Farsi and Spanish. The NASA SMD Planetary Science Forum has recently partnered with the DPS to continue producing the Discovery slides and connect them to NASA mission science. http://dps.aas.org/education/dpsdisc Similarly, the NASA SMD Astrophysics Forum is coordinating the development of a series of slide sets to help Astronomy 101 instructors incorporate new discoveries in their classrooms. The “Astro 101 slide sets” are presentations 5-7 slides in length on a new development or discovery from a NASA Astrophysics mission relevant to topics in introductory astronomy courses. We intend for these slide sets to help Astronomy 101 instructors include new developments (not yet in their textbooks) into the

  4. Planar shock wave sliding over a water layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, V.; Jourdan, G.; Marty, A.; Allou, A.; Parisse, J.-D.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we conduct experiments to study the interaction between a horizontal free water layer and a planar shock wave that is sliding over it. Experiments are performed at atmospheric pressure in a shock tube with a square cross section (200× 200 mm^2) for depths of 10, 20, and 30 mm; a 1500-mm-long water layer; and two incident planar shock waves having Mach numbers of 1.11 and 1.43. We record the pressure histories and high-speed visualizations to study the flow patterns, surface waves, and spray layers behind the shock wave. We observe two different flow patterns with ripples formed at the air-water interface for the weaker shock wave and the dispersion of a droplet mist for the stronger shock wave. From the pressure signals, we extract the delay time between the arrival of the compression wave into water and the shock wave in air at the same location. We show that the delay time evolves with the distance traveled over the water layer, the depth of the water layer, and the Mach number of the shock wave.

  5. Design of anti-slide piles for slope stabilization in Wanzhou city, Three Gorges Area, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chunmei; van Westen, Cees

    2013-04-01

    This study is related to the design of anti-slide piles for several landslides in Wanzhou city located in the Three Gorges area. Due to the construction of the Three Gorges Reservoir the hydro-geological conditions in this area have deteriorated significantly, leading to larger instability problems. China has invested a lot of money in slope stabilization measures for the treatment of landslides in the Three Gorges area. One of the methods for the stabilization of large landslides is the design of anti-sliding piles. This paper focuses on extensive slope stability analysis and modeling of the mechanical behavior of the landslide masses, and the parameters required for designing the number, size and dimensions of reinforced concrete stabilization piles. The study focuses on determining the rock parameters, anchor depth, and the pile and soil interaction coefficient. The study aims to provide guidelines for anti-slide pile stabilization works for landslides in the Wanzhou area. The research work contains a number of aspects. First a study is carried out on the distribution of pressures expected on the piles, using two different methods that take into account the expected pore water pressure and seismic acceleration. For the Ercengyan landslide , the Limit Equilibrium Method and Strength Reduction Method of FEM are compared through the results of the landslide pressure distributions on the piles and stress fields in the piles. The second component is the study of the required anchor depth of antislide piles, which is carried out using a statistical analysis with data from 20 landslides that have been controlled with anti-sliding piles. The rock characteristics of the anchor locations were obtained using laboratory tests, and a classification of rock mass quality is made for the anchors of antislide piles. The relationship between the critical anchor height and the angle of the landslide slip surface is determined. Two different methods are presented for the length

  6. Sliding of Proteins Non-specifically Bound to DNA: Brownian Dynamics Studies with Coarse-Grained Protein and DNA Models

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Tadashi; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    DNA binding proteins efficiently search for their cognitive sites on long genomic DNA by combining 3D diffusion and 1D diffusion (sliding) along the DNA. Recent experimental results and theoretical analyses revealed that the proteins show a rotation-coupled sliding along DNA helical pitch. Here, we performed Brownian dynamics simulations using newly developed coarse-grained protein and DNA models for evaluating how hydrodynamic interactions between the protein and DNA molecules, binding affinity of the protein to DNA, and DNA fluctuations affect the one dimensional diffusion of the protein on the DNA. Our results indicate that intermolecular hydrodynamic interactions reduce 1D diffusivity by 30%. On the other hand, structural fluctuations of DNA give rise to steric collisions between the CG-proteins and DNA, resulting in faster 1D sliding of the protein. Proteins with low binding affinities consistent with experimental estimates of non-specific DNA binding show hopping along the CG-DNA. This hopping significantly increases sliding speed. These simulation studies provide additional insights into the mechanism of how DNA binding proteins find their target sites on the genome. PMID:25504215

  7. Coarse Graining and Localized Plasticity between Sliding Nanocrystalline Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Pedro A.; Järvi, Tommi T.; Beckmann, Nils; Mrovec, Matous; Moseler, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Tribological shearing of polycrystalline metals typically leads to grain refinement at the sliding interface. This study, however, shows that nanocrystalline metals exhibit qualitatively different behavior. Using large-scale atomistic simulations, we demonstrate that during sliding, contact interface nanocrystalline grains self-organize through extensive grain coarsening and lattice rotation until the optimal plastic slip orientation is established. Subsequently, plastic deformation is frequently confined to localized nanoshear bands aligned with the shearing direction and emanating from voids and other defects in the vicinity of the sliding interface.

  8. Robust sliding mode control applied to double Inverted pendulum system

    SciTech Connect

    Mahjoub, Sonia; Derbel, Nabil; Mnif, Faical

    2009-03-05

    A three hierarchical sliding mode control is presented for a class of an underactuated system which can overcome the mismatched perturbations. The considered underactuated system is a double inverted pendulum (DIP), can be modeled by three subsystems. Such structure allows the construction of several designs of hierarchies for the controller. For all hierarchical designs, the asymptotic stability of every layer sliding mode surface and the sliding mode surface of subsystems are proved theoretically by Barbalat's lemma. Simulation results show the validity of these methods.

  9. Art History Interactive Videodisc Project at the University of Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sustik, Joan M.

    A project which developed a retrieval system to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of an interactive computer and video display system over traditional methods for using a slide library is described in this publication. The art school slide library of the University of Iowa stores transparencies which are arranged alphabetically within…

  10. Frictional sliding at a compressed polycrystalline 50 nm grain size Al-Al interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerberg, J. E.; Ravelo, R. J.; Germann, T. C.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of large-scale NEMD simulations for a polycrystalline Al-Al interface sliding at a relative velocity of 60 m/s and a pressure of 15 GPa with a boundary temperature of 300K. The sample consisted of annealed grains, 125 grains on either side of the initial sliding interface, with dimensions of 2x(236) nm in the normal direction and 236 nm in the periodic sliding and transverse directions. Simulation times were of order 20 ns and the sample had 1.8B atoms interacting with an Al-EAM potential. The initial grain structure evolves to a complex dynamic steady state grain morphology that is very different from the initial grain structure and is characterized by large plastic strains and strain rates in a deformation region of thickness 150 nm at the interface in the normal direction. The steady state shows a sequence of grain growth and refinement and a highly strained graded microstructure. This behavior is similar to that seen in simulations for 13 and 20 nm grains and a mesoscale model that takes into account the large plastic strains and strain rates, and the size of the deformation region is able to reproduce the values of the frictional force per unit area. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. The support of the LANL ASC-PEM program is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Electrical charging effects on the sliding friction of a model nano-confined ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Capozza, R.; Vanossi, A.; Benassi, A.; Tosatti, E.

    2015-10-14

    Recent measurements suggest the possibility to exploit ionic liquids (ILs) as smart lubricants for nano-contacts, tuning their tribological and rheological properties by charging the sliding interfaces. Following our earlier theoretical study of charging effects on nanoscale confinement and squeezout of a model IL, we present here molecular dynamics simulations of the frictional and lubrication properties of that model under charging conditions. First, we describe the case when two equally charged plates slide while being held together to a confinement distance of a few molecular layers. The shear sliding stress is found to rise strongly and discontinuously as the number of IL layers decreases stepwise. However, the shear stress shows, within each given number of layers, only a weak dependence upon the precise value of the normal load, a result in agreement with data extracted from recent experiments. We subsequently describe the case of opposite charging of the sliding plates and follow the shear stress when the charging is slowly and adiabatically reversed in the course of time, under fixed load. Despite the fixed load, the number and structure of the confined IL layers change with changing charge, and that in turn drives strong friction variations. The latter involves first of all charging-induced freezing of the IL film, followed by a discharging-induced melting, both made possible by the nanoscale confinement. Another mechanism for charging-induced frictional changes is a shift of the plane of maximum shear from mid-film to the plate-film interface, and vice versa. While these occurrences and results invariably depend upon the parameters of the model IL and upon its specific interaction with the plates, the present study helps identifying a variety of possible behavior, obtained under very simple assumptions, while connecting it to an underlying equilibrium thermodynamics picture.

  12. Soft hydrated sliding interfaces as complex fluids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiho; Dunn, Alison C

    2016-08-21

    Hydrogel surfaces are biomimics for sensing and mobility systems in the body such as the eyes and large joints due to their important characteristics of flexibility, permeability, and integrated aqueous component. Recent studies have shown polymer concentration gradients resulting in a less dense region in the top micrometers of the surface. Under shear, this gradient is hypothesized to drive lubrication behavior due to its rheological similarity to a semi-dilute polymer solution. In this work we map 3 distinct lubricating regimes between a polyacrylamide surface and an aluminum annulus using stepped-velocity tribo-rheometry over 5 decades of sliding speed in increasing and decreasing steps. These regimes, characterized by weakly or strongly time-dependent response and thixotropy-like hysteresis, provide the skeleton of a lubrication curve for hydrogel-against-hard material interfaces and support hypotheses of polymer mechanics-driven lubrication. Tribo-rheometry is particularly suited to uncover the lubrication mechanisms of complex interfaces such as are formed with hydrated hydrogel surfaces and biological surfaces. PMID:27425448

  13. INTERIOR ELEVATION SHOWING THE SLIDING DOORS AND ROOF TRUSSES. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR ELEVATION SHOWING THE SLIDING DOORS AND ROOF TRUSSES. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Seaplane Hangar, Lexington Boulevard, south of Enterprise Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Disk calculator indicates legible lettering size for slide projection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultberg, R. R.

    1965-01-01

    Hand-operated disk calculator indicates the minimum size of letters and numbers in relation to the width and height of a working drawing. The lettering is legible when a slide of the drawing is projected.

  15. 17. Sliding access doors typical of those covering opening to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Sliding access doors typical of those covering opening to filtration bed. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  16. High-Temperature Seal for Sliding-Gate Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    Sliding-gate valve originally developed for rocket exhaust-gas ducts is sealed by a Belleville spring. It is simple, compact, and operates over a wider range of temperatures than conventional O-ring sealed valves.

  17. 21. INTERIOR OF SOUTHEAST REAR BEDROOM SHOWING ALUMINUMFRAME SLIDING GLASS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. INTERIOR OF SOUTHEAST REAR BEDROOM SHOWING ALUMINUM-FRAME SLIDING GLASS WINDOWS. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  18. 19. INTERIOR OF NORTHEAST REAR BEDROOM SHOWING ALUMINUMFRAME SLIDING GLASS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. INTERIOR OF NORTHEAST REAR BEDROOM SHOWING ALUMINUM-FRAME SLIDING GLASS WINDOWS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  19. Physical Geography Slide Sets of America's National Parks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, E. Willard

    1984-01-01

    The national parks of the United States are widely known for their unique physical environments. Described are 10 sets of slides that will acquaint students with the parks' landforms and geologic processes. (RM)

  20. BASEMENT, A view looking southwest toward the three panel, sliding ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BASEMENT, A view looking southwest toward the three panel, sliding glass door of walk-in hood and dial guage - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Hydrolysis House Building (HH Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  1. 25. VIEW SHOWING SLIDE GATE OUTLET TRASH RACK STRUCTURE AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW SHOWING SLIDE GATE OUTLET TRASH RACK STRUCTURE AT BASE OF ARCH 8. NOTE TWO SECTIONS OF NEEDLE VALVE TRASH RACKS IN PLACE BETWEEN ARCHES 8 AND 9. December 20, 1938 - Bartlett Dam, Verde River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. 30 CFR 816.99 - Slides and other damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 816.99 Slides and other damage. (a) An undisturbed natural barrier shall be provided beginning at the... determined by the regulatory authority as is needed to assure stability. The barrier shall be retained...

  3. QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SLIDE-BASED SYSTEMS: INSTABLITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: All slide-based fluorescence cytometry detections systems basically include an excitation light source, intermediate optics, and a detection device (CCD or PMT). Occasionally, this equipment becomes unstable, generating unreliable and inferior data. Methods: A num...

  4. 2. WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING TAILRACE AND SLIDING DOOR UNDER SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING TAILRACE AND SLIDING DOOR UNDER SHED ROOF. ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE IS IN BACKGROUND AT RIGHT. VIEW TO EAST-NORTHEAST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  5. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE LANAI. NOTE THE SURFACEMOUNT SLIDING DOORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF THE LANAI. NOTE THE SURFACE-MOUNT SLIDING DOORS TO THE LIVING ROOM AT LEFT. VIEW FACING NORTH EAST. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type F, 602 Beard Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  6. 32. DETAIL OF CONCRETE TOWER AND SLIDE GATE LIFTING GEARS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. DETAIL OF CONCRETE TOWER AND SLIDE GATE LIFTING GEARS ON HEADWORKS OF DEER FLAT LOW LINE CANAL ON LOWER EMBANKMENT. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  7. 13. DETAIL OF CONCRETE TOWER AND SLIDE GATE LIFTING GEARS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL OF CONCRETE TOWER AND SLIDE GATE LIFTING GEARS ON HEADWORKS OF DEER FLAT NAMPA CANAL ON UPPER EMBANKMENT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  8. Interior, first floor, sliding metal door separating sections of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, first floor, sliding metal door separating sections of the medical library. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Infirmary, Northwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. 9. Bronze slide expansion plate at Pier 3, on right, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Bronze slide expansion plate at Pier 3, on right, fixed end left. - Monongahela Connecting Railroad Company, Hot Metal Bridge, Spanning Monongahela River at mile post 3.1, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  10. 7 CFR 3201.73 - Slide way lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... eliminate stick-slip and table chatter by reducing friction between mating surfaces, or slides, found in machine tools. (b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred procurement product must have a...