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Sample records for small animal radiography

  1. Small-animal dark-field radiography for pulmonary emphysema evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshenko, Andre; Meinel, Felix G.; Hellbach, Katharina; Bech, Martin; Velroyen, Astrid; Müller, Mark; Bamberg, Fabian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Yildirim, Ali Ã.-.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and emphysema is one of its main components. The disorder is characterized by irreversible destruction of the alveolar walls and enlargement of distal airspaces. Despite the severe changes in the lung tissue morphology, conventional chest radiographs have only a limited sensitivity for the detection of mild to moderate emphysema. X-ray dark-field is an imaging modality that can significantly increase the visibility of lung tissue on radiographic images. The dark-field signal is generated by coherent, small-angle scattering of x-rays on the air-tissue interfaces in the lung. Therefore, morphological changes in the lung can be clearly visualized on dark-field images. This is demonstrated by a preclinical study with a small-animal emphysema model. To generate a murine model of pulmonary emphysema, a female C57BL/6N mouse was treated with a single orotracheal application of porcine pancreatic elastase (80 U/kg body weight) dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Control mouse received PBS. The mice were imaged using a small-animal dark-field scanner. While conventional x-ray transmission radiography images revealed only subtle indirect signs of the pulmonary disorder, the difference between healthy and emphysematous lungs could be clearly directly visualized on the dark-field images. The dose applied to the animals is compatible with longitudinal studies. The imaging results correlate well with histology. The results of this study reveal the high potential of dark-field radiography for clinical lung imaging.

  2. Application of MOSFET detectors for dosimetry in small animal radiography using short exposure times.

    PubMed

    De Lin, Ming; Toncheva, Greta; Nguyen, Giao; Kim, Sangroh; Anderson-Evans, Colin; Johnson, G Allan; Yoshizumi, Terry T

    2008-08-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) X-ray imaging for small animals can be used for functional phenotyping given its ability to capture rapid physiological changes at high spatial and temporal resolution. The higher temporal and spatial requirements for small-animal imaging drive the need for short, high-flux X-ray pulses. However, high doses of ionizing radiation can affect the physiology. The purpose of this study was to verify and apply metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) technology to dosimetry for small-animal diagnostic imaging. A tungsten anode X-ray source was used to expose a tissue-equivalent mouse phantom. Dose measurements were made on the phantom surface and interior. The MOSFETs were verified with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). Bland-Altman analysis showed that the MOSFET results agreed with the TLD results (bias, 0.0625). Using typical small animal DSA scan parameters, the dose ranged from 0.7 to 2.2 cGy. Application of the MOSFETs in the small animal environment provided two main benefits: (1) the availability of results in near real-time instead of the hours needed for TLD processes and (2) the ability to support multiple exposures with different X-ray techniques (various of kVp, mA and ms) using the same MOSFET. This MOSFET technology has proven to be a fast, reliable small animal dosimetry method for DSA imaging and is a good system for dose monitoring for serial and gene expression studies. PMID:18666818

  3. Application of MOSFET Detectors for Dosimetry in Small Animal Radiography Using Short Exposure Times

    PubMed Central

    De Lin, Ming; Toncheva, Greta; Nguyen, Giao; Kim, Sangroh; Anderson-Evans, Colin; Johnson, G. Allan; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2008-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) X-ray imaging for small animals can be used for functional phenotyping given its ability to capture rapid physiological changes at high spatial and temporal resolution. The higher temporal and spatial requirements for small-animal imaging drive the need for short, high-flux X-ray pulses. However, high doses of ionizing radiation can affect the physiology. The purpose of this study was to verify and apply metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) technology to dosimetry for small-animal diagnostic imaging. A tungsten anode X-ray source was used to expose a tissue-equivalent mouse phantom. Dose measurements were made on the phantom surface and interior. The MOSFETs were verified with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). Bland-Altman analysis showed that the MOSFET results agreed with the TLD results (bias, 0.0625). Using typical small animal DSA scan parameters, the dose ranged from 0.7 to 2.2 cGy. Application of the MOSFETs in the small animal environment provided two main benefits: (1) the availability of results in near real-time instead of the hours needed for TLD processes and (2) the ability to support multiple exposures with different X-ray techniques (various of kVp, mA and ms) using the same MOSFET. This MOSFET technology has proven to be a fast, reliable small animal dosimetry method for DSA imaging and is a good system for dose monitoring for serial and gene expression studies. PMID:18666818

  4. Small Animal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livesey, Dennis W.; Fong, Stephen

    This small animal care course guide is designed for students who will be seeking employment in veterinary hospitals, kennels, grooming shops, pet shops, and small-animal laboratories. The guide begins with an introductory section that gives the educational philosophy of the course, job categories and opportunities, units of instruction required…

  5. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  6. Small animal disease surveillance.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Fernando; Jones, Philip H; Menacere, Tarek; Heayns, Bethaney; Wardeh, Maya; Newman, Jenny; Radford, Alan D; Dawson, Susan; Gaskell, Rosalind; Noble, Peter J M; Everitt, Sally; Day, Michael J; McConnell, Katie

    2015-12-12

    This is the first UK small animal disease surveillance report from SAVSNET. Future reports will expand to other syndromes and diseases. As data are collected for longer, the estimates of changes in disease burden will become more refined, allowing more targeted local and perhaps national interventions. Anonymised data can be accessed for research purposes by contacting the authors. SAVSNET welcomes feedback on this report. PMID:26667432

  7. Changes in the Small Intestine of a Cat Associated with Barium Sulphate Following Contrast Radiography.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, H; Oishi, M; Ohno, K; Tsuboi, M; Irie, N; Uchida, K; Tsujimoto, H

    2016-01-01

    A 7-year-old neutered male domestic short-haired cat that had undergone contrast radiography of the bowel with barium sulphate after acute episodes of vomiting 2 months previously, was presented with chronic vomiting, anorexia and weight loss. Abdominal radiography and ultrasonography revealed residual contrast enhancement and an obstruction of the small intestine. A contracted and stenosed ileum and distal jejunum were identified by exploratory laparotomy and surgically resected; subsequently, the clinical signs resolved. Histopathological examination of the ileum revealed mucosal ulceration with severe submucosal granulation tissue formation associated with scattered foreign crystalline material. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the crystals contained barium sulphate. This is the first report in animals of the rare complication of barium sulphate incorporation into the gastrointestinal mucosa after contrast radiography. PMID:26997652

  8. Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. G.

    1973-01-01

    Radiography is discussed as a method for nondestructive evaluation of internal flaws of solids. Gamma ray and X-ray equipment are described along with radiographic film, radiograph interpretation, and neutron radiography.

  9. Small animal radiotherapy research platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Granton, Patrick; Tryggestad, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Advances in conformal radiation therapy and advancements in pre-clinical radiotherapy research have recently stimulated the development of precise micro-irradiators for small animals such as mice and rats. These devices are often kilovolt x-ray radiation sources combined with high-resolution CT imaging equipment for image guidance, as the latter allows precise and accurate beam positioning. This is similar to modern human radiotherapy practice. These devices are considered a major step forward compared to the current standard of animal experimentation in cancer radiobiology research. The availability of this novel equipment enables a wide variety of pre-clinical experiments on the synergy of radiation with other therapies, complex radiation schemes, sub-target boost studies, hypofractionated radiotherapy, contrast-enhanced radiotherapy and studies of relative biological effectiveness, to name just a few examples. In this review we discuss the required irradiation and imaging capabilities of small animal radiation research platforms. We describe the need for improved small animal radiotherapy research and highlight pioneering efforts, some of which led recently to commercially available prototypes. From this, it will be clear that much further development is still needed, on both the irradiation side and imaging side. We discuss at length the need for improved treatment planning tools for small animal platforms, and the current lack of a standard therein. Finally, we mention some recent experimental work using the early animal radiation research platforms, and the potential they offer for advancing radiobiology research.

  10. Implantable telemetry for small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A series of totally implantable telemetry devices for use in measuring deep body parameters in small animals were developed. Under a collaborative agreement with NASA, several of these systems; the continuous wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter, the multichannel telemetry system, and the inductively-powered dual channel cardiac pacer were evaluated in a series of ten mongrel dogs (15 to 20 kg.). These systems were used to measure ascending aortic and coronary blood flow, aortic pressure, and subcutaneous EKG.

  11. Implantable telemetry for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-03-01

    A series of totally implantable telemetry devices for use in measuring deep body parameters in small animals were developed. Under a collaborative agreement with NASA, several of these systems; the continuous wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter, the multichannel telemetry system, and the inductively-powered dual channel cardiac pacer were evaluated in a series of ten mongrel dogs (15 to 20 kg.). These systems were used to measure ascending aortic and coronary blood flow, aortic pressure, and subcutaneous EKG.

  12. High School Small Animal Laboratory--Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Alan

    1974-01-01

    An Ohio vocational school Small Animal Care program prepares students for entry level employment as veterinary assistants, pet shop salesmen, kennel workers, animal groomers, Humane Society workers, laboratory animal assistants, and riding stable assistants. (EA)

  13. Development of a triple modality small animal planar imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    A. G. Weisenberger, Z. Lee, S. Majewski, B. Kross, V. Popov, B. Welch, R. Wojcik, C. Zorn

    2006-02-01

    Recently small animal research utilizing nuclear medicine based imaging has been combined with structural anatomical imaging from x-ray radiography providing a powerful tool for animal researchers. The addition of a third modality is the goal of our instrumentation development. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Case Western Reserve University have been collaborating on the development of a planar imaging system which in addition to radiopharmaceutical based functional imaging and x-ray radiography structural imaging also allows for the in vivo bioluminescence imaging thus providing another functional imaging modality. For the gamma camera we use is a Hamamatsu position sensitive photomultiplier tube coupled to a pixellated NaI(TI) scintillator array with individual crystal elements 1 mm × 1 mm × 5 mm in size and a 0.25 mm septum between each element. The gamma camera has a 10 cm diameter active area and can be used for 125I, 99mT and 111In radionuclide imaging. To acquire anatomical information we are using a Rad-Icon Shad-o-Box X-ray detector that provides a field of view of 5 cm × 10 cm. The x-ray source is a Source-Ray compact x-ray generator. We are using a Princeton Instruments cooled CCD based detector for the imaging of the bio-distribution of bioluminescence. All three imaging instruments will be integrated into a single light tight / x-ray tight enclosure.

  14. Exploring Small Animal Care. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livesey, Dennis W.

    This course guide in small animal care is designed to give students seeking employment in veterinary hospitals, kennels, or pet shops an opportunity to (1) develop basic skills in small animal handling, sanitation of housing, and nutrition, (2) acquire skills in dog and cat grooming, including shop operation, (3) develop attitudes which contribute…

  15. Barium Peritonitis in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    KO, Jae Jin; MANN, F. A. (Tony)

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Barium peritonitis is extremely rare, but is difficult to treat and may be life-threatening. Barium suspension leakage from the gastrointestinal tract into the abdominal cavity has a time-dependent and synergistically deleterious effect in patients who have generalized bacterial peritonitis. The severity of barium peritonitis is dependent on the quantity of barium in the abdominal cavity. Barium sulfate leakage results in hypovolemia and hypoproteinemia by worsening the exudation of extracellular fluid and albumin. Abdominal fluid analysis is a useful and efficient method to diagnose barium peritonitis. Serial radiographs may not be a reliable or timely diagnostic technique. Initial aggressive fluid resuscitation and empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment should be instituted promptly, followed quickly by celiotomy. During exploratory surgical intervention, copious irrigation and direct wiping with gauze are employed to remove as much barium as possible. Omentectomy should be considered when needed to expedite barium removal. Despite aggressive medical and surgical treatments, postoperative prognosis is guarded to poor due to complications, such as acute vascular shock, sepsis, diffuse peritonitis, hypoproteninemia, electrolyte imbalance, cardiac arrest, small bowel obstruction related to progression of granulomas and adhesions in the abdominal cavity. Therefore, intensive postoperative monitoring and prompt intervention are necessary to maximize chances for a positive outcome. For those that do survive, small bowel obstruction is a potential consequence due to progression of abdominal adhesions. PMID:24430662

  16. A thermocouple thermode for small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Thermode composed of two thin-walled stainless steel hypodermic needles and cooper-constantan thermocouple or small thermistor to indicate temperature at point of perfusion is used to measure brain temperature in animals. Because of relatively small size of thermode, structural damage to brain is minimized.

  17. Design of a small animal biopsy robot.

    PubMed

    Bebek, Ozkan; Hwang, Myun Joong; Fei, Baowei; Cavusoglu, M

    2008-01-01

    Small animals are widely used in biomedical research studies. They have compact anatomy and small organs. Therefore it is difficult to perceive tumors or cells and perform biopsies manually. Robotics technology offers a convenient and reliable solution for accurate needle insertion. In this paper, a novel 5 degrees of freedom (DOF) robot design for inserting needles into small animal subjects is proposed. The design has a compact size, is light weight, and has high resolution. Parallel mechanisms are used in the design for stable and reliable operation. The proposed robot has two gimbal joints that carry the needle mechanism. The robot can realize dexterous alignment of the needle before insertion. PMID:19163987

  18. Advances in Small Animal Imaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudos, George K.

    2007-11-01

    The rapid growth in genetics and molecular biology combined with the development of techniques for genetically engineering small animals has led to an increased interest in in vivo laboratory animal imaging during the past few years. For this purpose, new instrumentation, data acquisition strategies, and image processing and reconstruction techniques are being developed, researched and evaluated. The aim of this article is to give a short overview of the state of the art technologies for high resolution and high sensitivity molecular imaging techniques, primarily positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The basic needs of small animal imaging will be described. The evolution in instrumentation in the past two decades, as well as the commercially available systems will be overviewed. Finally, the new trends in detector technology and preliminary results from challenging applications will be presented. For more details a number of references are provided.

  19. Advances in Small Animal Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Loudos, George K.

    2007-11-26

    The rapid growth in genetics and molecular biology combined with the development of techniques for genetically engineering small animals has led to an increased interest in in vivo laboratory animal imaging during the past few years. For this purpose, new instrumentation, data acquisition strategies, and image processing and reconstruction techniques are being developed, researched and evaluated. The aim of this article is to give a short overview of the state of the art technologies for high resolution and high sensitivity molecular imaging techniques, primarily positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The basic needs of small animal imaging will be described. The evolution in instrumentation in the past two decades, as well as the commercially available systems will be overviewed. Finally, the new trends in detector technology and preliminary results from challenging applications will be presented. For more details a number of references are provided.

  20. Precision radiotherapy for small animal research.

    PubMed

    Matinfar, Mohammad; Iordachita, Iulian; Ford, Eric; Wong, John; Kazanzides, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Preclinical research using well characterized small animal models has provided tremendous benefits to medical research, enabling low cost, large scale trials with high statistical significance of observed effects. The goal of the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is to make those models available for the development and evaluation of novel radiation therapies. SARRP demonstrates the capabilities of delivering high resolution, sub-millimeter, optimally planned conformal of radiation with on-board cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance. The system requires accurate calibration of the x-ray beam for both imaging and radiation treatment. In this paper, we present a novel technique using an x-ray camera for calibration of the treatment beam. This technique does not require precise positioning or calibration of the x-ray camera. PMID:18982656

  1. An atmospheric exposure chamber for small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. M.; Weiss, H. S.; Pitt, J. F.; Grimard, M.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design a long-term environmental exposure chamber for small animals. This chamber is capable of producing hypoxic, normoxic and hyperoxic atmospheres which are closely regulated. The chamber, which is of the recycling type, is fashioned after clear plastic germ-free isolators. Oxygen concentration is set and controlled by a paramagnetic O2 analyzer and a 3-way solenoid valve. In this way either O2 or N2 may be provided to the system by way of negative O2 feedback. Relative humidity is maintained at 40-50 percent by a refrigeration type dryer. Carbon dioxide is absorbed by indicating soda lime. A diaphragm pump continuously circulates chamber gas at a high enough flow rate to prevent buildup of CO2 and humidity. This chamber has been used for numerous studies which involve prolonged exposure of small animals to various O2 concentrations.

  2. [New drugs for small animals in 2015].

    PubMed

    Emmerich, Ilka Ute

    2016-06-16

    In 2015, four active pharmaceutical ingredients were released on the German market for small animals. These were the calcium-channel blocker Amlodipine (Amodip®), the benzodiazepine Diazepam (Ziapam®), the allylamine antifungal agent Terbinafine (Osurnia®) and the loop diuretic Torasemide (UpCard®). One substance has been authorized for an additional species. The triazole antifungal drug Itraconazole (Fungitraxx®) is now authorized for use in ornamental birds. PMID:27223466

  3. Small animal cardiovascular MR imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bakermans, Adrianus J; Abdurrachim, Desiree; Moonen, Rik P M; Motaal, Abdallah G; Prompers, Jeanine J; Strijkers, Gustav J; Vandoorne, Katrien; Nicolay, Klaas

    2015-08-01

    The use of MR imaging and spectroscopy for studying cardiovascular disease processes in small animals has increased tremendously over the past decade. This is the result of the remarkable advances in MR technologies and the increased availability of genetically modified mice. MR techniques provide a window on the entire timeline of cardiovascular disease development, ranging from subtle early changes in myocardial metabolism that often mark disease onset to severe myocardial dysfunction associated with end-stage heart failure. MR imaging and spectroscopy techniques play an important role in basic cardiovascular research and in cardiovascular disease diagnosis and therapy follow-up. This is due to the broad range of functional, structural and metabolic parameters that can be quantified by MR under in vivo conditions non-invasively. This review describes the spectrum of MR techniques that are employed in small animal cardiovascular disease research and how the technological challenges resulting from the small dimensions of heart and blood vessels as well as high heart and respiratory rates, particularly in mice, are tackled. PMID:26282195

  4. Small Animal Imaging with Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Driehuys, Bastiaan; Nouls, John; Badea, Alexandra; Bucholz, Elizabeth; Ghaghada, Ketan; Petiet, Alexandra; Hedlund, Laurence W.

    2009-01-01

    Small animal magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) has evolved significantly from testing the boundaries of imaging physics to its expanding use today as a tool in non-invasive biomedical investigations. This review is intended to capture the state-of-the-art in MRM for scientists who may be unfamiliar with this modality, but who want to apply its capabilities to their research. We therefore include a brief review of MR concepts and methods of animal handling and support before covering a range of MRM applications including the heart, lung, brain, and the emerging field of MR histology. High-resolution anatomical imaging reveals increasingly exquisite detail in healthy animals and subtle architectural aberrations that occur in genetically altered models. Resolution of 100 µm in all dimensions is now routinely attained in living animals, and 10 µm3 is feasible in fixed specimens. Such images almost rival conventional histology while allowing the object to be viewed interactively in any plane. MRM is now increasingly used to provide functional information in living animals. Images of the beating heart, breathing lung, and functioning brain can be recorded. While clinical MRI focuses on diagnosis, MRM is used to reveal fundamental biology or to non-invasively measure subtle changes in the structure or function of organs during disease progression or in response to experimental therapies. The ability of MRM to provide a detailed functional and anatomical picture in rats and mice, and to track this picture over time, makes it a promising platform with broad applications in biomedical research. PMID:18172332

  5. MicroRT - Small animal conformal irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Stojadinovic, S.; Low, D. A.; Hope, A. J.; Vicic, M.; Deasy, J. O.; Cui, J.; Khullar, D.; Parikh, P. J.; Malinowski, K. T.; Izaguirre, E. W.; Mutic, S.; Grigsby, P. W.

    2007-12-15

    A novel small animal conformal radiation therapy system has been designed and prototyped: MicroRT. The microRT system integrates multimodality imaging, radiation treatment planning, and conformal radiation therapy that utilizes a clinical {sup 192}Ir isotope high dose rate source as the radiation source (teletherapy). A multiparameter dose calculation algorithm based on Monte Carlo dose distribution simulations is used to efficiently and accurately calculate doses for treatment planning purposes. A series of precisely machined tungsten collimators mounted onto a cylindrical collimator assembly is used to provide the radiation beam portals. The current design allows a source-to-target distance range of 1-8 cm at four beam angles: 0 deg. (beam oriented down), 90 deg., 180 deg., and 270 deg. The animal is anesthetized and placed in an immobilization device with built-in fiducial markers and scanned using a computed tomography, magnetic resonance, or positron emission tomography scanner prior to irradiation. Treatment plans using up to four beam orientations are created utilizing a custom treatment planning system--microRTP. A three-axis computer-controlled stage that supports and accurately positions the animals is programmed to place the animal relative to the radiation beams according to the microRTP plan. The microRT system positioning accuracy was found to be submillimeter. The radiation source is guided through one of four catheter channels and placed in line with the tungsten collimators to deliver the conformal radiation treatment. The microRT hardware specifications, the accuracy of the treatment planning and positioning systems, and some typical procedures for radiobiological experiments that can be performed with the microRT device are presented.

  6. [The pharmacy in small animal practice].

    PubMed

    Goedhart, P J

    1984-01-01

    A fairly new, possibly even unique, form of co-operation between practitioners is the joint purchasing and storage of drugs by five, otherwise independently acting small-animal practitioners. The scheme and mode of operation of this joint purchase of drugs will be explained and the benefits and drawbacks of this co-operation will be discussed, both the financial and the 'sentimental' arguments in favour of this buyers' combine being presented. Which conditions have to be fulfilled by those participating and what will the future developments of this co-operation be? This scheme will undoubtedly not only result in financial gain but also in increasing good fellowship. Starting from this co-operation, attention will also be paid to the knowledge and the manner in which this knowledge is kept up to date and increased, education on veterinary drugs, 'abidence by particular forms of treatment', counselling the client and the shop function of the dispensary. PMID:6691193

  7. [New drugs for small animals in 2014].

    PubMed

    Emmerich, I U

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, six active pharmaceutical ingredients were released on the German market for small animals. Those are the ektoparasiticide of the isoxazoline group afoxolaner (NexGard®) and fluralaner (Bravecto®) and the neonicotinoid dinotefuran (Vectra 3D, Vectra Felis), the antidiabetic protamine zinc insulin of human origin (ProZinc®), the antifungal agent ketoconazole (Fugazid®) as well as the cytostatic drug oclacitinib (Apoquel®). Two substances were authorized for an additional species. The antiparasiticide eprinomectin and the antibiotic clindamycin were also authorized for use in cats. In addition, two active pharmaceutical ingredients, which were approved 2014 for use in human medicine and are of potential interest to veterinary medicine, are discussed. These are the antihypertensive drug riociguat and the urological substance mirabegron. PMID:26013709

  8. Small animal lung imaging with an in-line X-ray phase contrast benchtop system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garson, A. B.; Gunsten, S.; Guan, H.; Vasireddi, S.; Brody, S.; Anastasio, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results from a benchtop X-ray phase-contrast (XPC) method for lung imaging that represents a paradigm shift in the way small animal lung imaging is performed. In our method, information regarding airway microstructure that is encoded within speckle texture of a single XPC radiograph is decoded to spatially resolve changes in lung properties such as microstructure sizes, air volumes, and compliance, to name a few. Such functional information cannot be derived from conventional lung radiography or any other 2D imaging modality. By computing these images at different time points within a breathing cycle, dynamic functional imaging can be potentially achieved without the need for tomography.

  9. Enclosure for small animals during awake animal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Jr., James S

    2013-11-26

    An enclosure or burrow restrains an awake animal during an imaging procedure. A tubular body, made from a radiolucent material that does not attenuate x-rays or gamma rays, accepts an awake animal. A proximal end of the body includes an attachment surface that corresponds to an attachment surface of an optically transparent and optically uniform window. An anti-reflective coating may be applied to an inner surface, an outer surface, or both surfaces of the window. Since the window is a separate element of the enclosure and it is not integrally formed as part of the body, it can be made with optically uniform thickness properties for improved motion tracking of markers on the animal with a camera during the imaging procedure. The motion tracking information is then used to compensate for animal movement in the image.

  10. Coupler for surgery on small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E., Jr.; Swartz, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    Minicoupler simplifies exchange of fluids with organs of laboratory animals enabling one person to perform surgery on experimental animals such as rats and mice. Innovation eliminates obstructing hands and instruments from areas of surgery.

  11. RESTRAINING SYSTEM FOR PLETHYSMOGRAPHY IN SMALL ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A restraining technique for immobilizing awake guinea pigs and rats during physiological measurements is described. The basic device consists of an adjustable acrylic holder that supports the animal in a standing position while restricting movement of the four legs. The holder al...

  12. EXPERIMENTAL RESPIRATORY CARCINOGENESIS IN SMALL LABORATORY ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies designed to test the ability of environmental pollutants to induce lung cancer in experimental animals by chronic inhalation exposure are summarized in this review. The studies are limited to those published in peer-reviewed journals and may not include all experiments co...

  13. Imaging of Small-Animal Models of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jelicks, Linda A.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Machado, Fabiana S.; Weiss, Louis M.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Desruisseaux, Mahalia S.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the second leading cause of death worldwide. Noninvasive small-animal imaging has become an important research tool for preclinical studies of infectious diseases. Imaging studies permit enhanced information through longitudinal studies of the same animal during the infection. Herein, we briefly review recent studies of animal models of infectious disease that have used imaging modalities. PMID:23201133

  14. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-03-06

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated.

  15. Cancer screening tests for small animals.

    PubMed

    Schleis, Stephanie E

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is increasingly more common. Several tests for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer in companion animals have been developed. Screening tests discussed include those for lymphoid neoplasia, hemangiosarcoma, and transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. None of these tests should be used in isolation for diagnosis. Vincristine and doxorubicin are mainstays in the treatment of canine lymphoma. However, it is important and accepted practice to test individuals of predisposed breeds for this mutation before administering these drugs in a lymphoma protocol. PMID:25174904

  16. Small animals models for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Martin, James G; Novali, Mauro

    2011-10-01

    There has been an explosion of studies of animal models of asthma in the past 20 years. The elucidation of fundamental immunological mechanisms underlying the development of allergy and the complex cytokine and chemokines networks underlying the responses have been substantially unraveled. Translation of findings to human asthma have been slow and hindered by the varied phenotypes that human asthma represents. New areas for expansion of modeling include virally mediated airway inflammation, oxidant stress, and the interactions of stimuli triggering innate immune and adaptive immune responses. PMID:21601000

  17. Do small animals have a biogeography?

    PubMed

    Valdecasas, A G; Camacho, A I; Peláez, M L

    2006-01-01

    It has been stated that small organisms do not have barriers for distribution and will not show biogeographic discreteness. General models for size-mediated biogeographies establish a transition region between ubiquitous dispersal and restricted biogeography at about 1-10 mm. We tested patterns of distribution versus size with water mites, a group of freshwater organisms with sizes between 300 microm and 10 mm. We compiled a list of all known water mite species for Sierra del Guadarrama (a mountain range in the centre of the Iberian Peninsula) from different authors and our own studies in the area. Recorded habitats include lotic, lentic and interstitial environments. Species body size and world distribution were drawn from our work and published specialized taxonomic literature. The null hypothesis was that distribution is size-independent. The relationship between distribution and size was approached via analysis of variance and between size and habitat via logistic regression. Contrary to expectations, there is no special relationship between water mite size and area size distribution. On the other hand, water mite size is differentially distributed among habitats, although this ecological sorting is very weak. Larger water mites are more common in lentic habitats and smaller water mites in lotic habitats. Size-dependent distribution in which small organisms tend to be cosmopolitan breaks down when the particular biology comes into play. Water mites do not fit a previously proposed size-dependent biogeographical distribution, and are in accordance with similar data published on Tardigrada, Rotifera, Gastrotricha and the like. PMID:17091388

  18. Tri-modality small animal imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, B.K.; Stolin, A.V.; Pole, J.; Baumgart, L.; Fontaine, M.; Wojcik, R.; Kross, B.; Zorn, C.; Majewski, S.; Williams, M.B.

    2006-02-01

    Our group is developing a scanner that combines x-ray, single gamma, and optical imaging on the same rotating gantry. Two functional modalities (SPECT and optical) are included because they have different strengths and weaknesses in terms of spatial and temporal decay lengths in the context of in vivo imaging, and because of the recent advent of multiple reporter gene constructs. The effect of attenuation by biological tissue on the detected intensity of the emitted signal was measured for both gamma and optical imaging. Attenuation by biological tissue was quantified for both the bioluminescent emission of luciferace and for the emission light of the near infrared fluorophore cyanine 5.5, using a fixed excitation light intensity. Experiments were performed to test the feasibility of using either single gamma or x-ray imaging to make depth-dependent corrections to the measured optical signal. Our results suggest that significant improvements in quantitation of optical emission are possible using straightforward correction techniques based on information from other modalities. Development of an integrated scanner in which data from each modality are obtained with the animal in a common configuration will greatly simplify this process.

  19. CAGE FOR USE WITH SMALL AQUATIC ANIMALS IN FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various cages are frequently used in assessing the effects of pesticides on non-target animals. In some cases, small animals offer advantages over larger ones because they may be more economical to raise in the laboratory or to purchase; immature stages often are more sensitive t...

  20. Development and dosimetry of a small animal lung irradiation platform

    PubMed Central

    McGurk, Ross; Hadley, Caroline; Jackson, Isabel L.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    Advances in large scale screening of medical counter measures for radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity are currently hampered by animal irradiation paradigms that are both inefficient and highly variable among institutions. Here, we introduce a novel high-throughput small animal irradiation platform for use in orthovoltage small animal irradiators. We used radiochromic film and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors to examine several parameters, including 2D field uniformity, dose rate consistency, and shielding transmission. We posit that this setup will improve efficiency of drug screens by allowing for simultaneous, targeted irradiation of multiple animals, improving efficiency within a single institution. Additionally, we suggest that measurement of the described parameters in all centers conducting counter measure studies will improve the translatability of findings among institutions. We also investigated the use of tissue equivalent phantoms in performing dosimetry measurements for small animal irradiation experiments. Though these phantoms are commonly used in dosimetry, we recorded a significant difference in both the entrance and target tissue dose rates between euthanized rats and mice with implanted detectors and the corresponding phantom measurement. This suggests that measurements using these phantoms may not provide accurate dosimetry for in vivo experiments. Based on these measurements, we propose that this small animal irradiation platform can increase the capacity of animal studies by allowing for more efficient animal irradiation. We also suggest that researchers fully characterize the parameters of whatever radiation setup is in use in order to facilitate better comparison among institutions. PMID:23091878

  1. Intramodality and Intermodality Comparisons of Storage Phosphor Computed Radiography and Conventional Film-Screen Radiography in the Recognition of Small Pneumoconiotic Opacities

    PubMed Central

    Petsonk, Edward L.; Attfield, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Digital radiography systems are replacing traditional film for chest radiographic monitoring in the recognition of pneumoconiosis. Methods: To further investigate previous findings regarding the equivalence of film-screen radiographs (FSRs) and storage phosphor computed radiographs (CRs), FSRs and CRs from 172 underground coal miners were classified independently by seven National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-approved B readers, using the International Labor Office (ILO) classification of radiographs of pneumoconiosis. Results: More CRs were classified as “good” quality compared with FSRs (prevalence ratio [PR], 1.5; 95% CI, 1.4-1.6; P , .001). B readers showed good overall agreement on scoring small opacity profusion using CRs vs FSRs (weighted κ, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.54-0.62). Significantly more irregular opacities (compared with rounded) were classified using CR images compared with FSR (PR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6; P = .01). Similarly, the smallest sized opacities (width < 1.5 mm, p and s type) were reported more frequently using CR vs FSR images (PR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.5; P < .001). Interreader and intrareader agreement was lower with respect to the classification of shape and size than for small opacity profusion. Overall, interreader and intrareader variability did not differ significantly using CR vs FSR. Conclusions: Under optimal conditions, using standardized methods and equipment, reader visualization of small pneumoconiotic opacities does not appear to differ meaningfully, whether using CR or FSR. Variability in ILO classifications between imaging modalities appears to be considerably lower than variability among readers. The well-documented challenge of reader variability does not appear to be resolved through the use of digital imaging alone, and additional approaches must be evaluated. PMID:21622551

  2. Small animal radiation research platform: imaging, mechanics, control and calibration.

    PubMed

    Matinfar, Mohammad; Gray, Owen; Iordachita, Iulian; Kennedy, Chris; Ford, Eric; Wong, John; Taylor, Russell H; Kazanzides, Peter

    2007-01-01

    In cancer research, well characterized small animal models of human cancer, such as transgenic mice, have greatly accelerated the pace of development of cancer treatments. The goal of the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is to make those same models available for the development and evaluation of novel radiation therapies. In combination with advanced imaging methods, small animal research allows detailed study of biological processes, disease progression, and response to therapy, with the potential to provide a natural bridge to the clinical environment. The SARRP will realistically model human radiation treatment methods in standard animal models. In this paper, we describe the mechanical and control structure of the system. This system requires accurate calibration of the x-ray beam for both imaging and radiation treatment, which is presented in detail in the paper. PMID:18044657

  3. [Housing situation of small animals in Swiss pet shops].

    PubMed

    Schrickel, B; Gebhardt-Henrich, S; Steiger, A

    2008-07-01

    This study investigates the situation regarding housing of small animals in Swiss pet shops. Data of 92 pet shops were collected with a questionnaire. On average 813 fish, 52.5 invertebrates, 32.2 small mammals, 26.9 birds, 8.9 reptiles and 2.7 amphibians were offered for sale per pet shop. Small mammals, birds and reptiles were mainly obtained from Swiss breeders, while fish and amphibians were almost exclusively purchased from foreign providers. The housing systems which were sold differed from those in which the animals were kept in the shop. This may be misleading to the future pet owners and may lead to faulty husbandry. Animals on reserve were often kept in different housing systems than those in the pet shop. Sick animals were usually treated or killed by the pet shop owners. The killing methods varied between the various species. PMID:18714938

  4. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system.

    PubMed

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S; Johnson, Perry B; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-04-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ~0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  5. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S.; Johnson, Perry B.; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ∼0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  6. Specific issues in small animal dosimetry and irradiator calibration

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizumi, Terry; Brady, Samuel L.; Robbins, Mike E.; Bourland, J. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In response to the increased risk of radiological terrorist attack, a network of Centers for Medical Countermeasures against Radiation (CMCR) has been established in the United States, focusing on evaluating animal model responses to uniform, relatively homogenous whole- or partial-body radiation exposures at relatively high dose rates. The success of such studies is dependent not only on robust animal models but on accurate and reproducible dosimetry within and across CMCR. To address this issue, the Education and Training Core of the Duke University School of Medicine CMCR organised a one-day workshop on small animal dosimetry. Topics included accuracy in animal dosimetry accuracy, characteristics and differences of cesium-137 and X-ray irradiators, methods for dose measurement, and design of experimental irradiation geometries for uniform dose distributions. This paper summarises the information presented and discussed. Conclusions Without ensuring accurate and reproducible dosimetry the development and assessment of the efficacy of putative countermeasures will not prove successful. Radiation physics support is needed, but is often the weakest link in the small animal dosimetry chain. We recommend: (i) A user training program for new irradiator users, (ii) subsequent training updates, and (iii) the establishment of a national small animal dosimetry center for all CMCR members. PMID:21961967

  7. Insect Nicotinic Receptor Agonists as Flea Adulticides in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Dai Tan; Hsu, Walter H.; Martin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Fleas are significant ectoparasites of small animals. They can be a severe irritant to animals and serve as a vector for a number of infectious diseases. In this article, we discuss the pharmacological characteristics of four insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists used as fleacides in dogs and cats, which include three neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, nitenpyram, and dinotefuran) and spinosad. Insect nAChR agonists are one of the most important new classes of insecticides, which are used to control sucking insects both on plants and on companion animals. These new compounds provide a new approach for practitioners to safely and effectively eliminate fleas. PMID:20646191

  8. Problems associated with veterinary dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Eisner, E R

    1990-03-01

    Veterinarians have been radiographing animal skulls for many years, but sophisticated dentistry was not widely used until the 1970s. Elevated awareness of veterinary dental techniques has led to the need for producing accurate radiographic images of the teeth and periodontal structures. Many problems arise for the clinician who treats small animals who has, before this time, radiographed the skull of dogs and cats solely for the purpose of assessing neoplastic, infectious, or traumatic disease of the mandible, maxilla, or calvarium and now desires to perform dental radiography. This chapter will describe the advantages and disadvantages of some of the more common types of radiographic equipment and supplies, discuss extraoral and intraoral radiographic positioning and technique, identify anatomic landmarks and diagnostic features of intraoral radiography, and offer suggestions concerning the art of using dental radiography in veterinary practice. PMID:2134590

  9. Treatment planning for a small animal using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, James C. L.; Leung, Michael K. K.

    2007-12-15

    The development of a small animal model for radiotherapy research requires a complete setup of customized imaging equipment, irradiators, and planning software that matches the sizes of the subjects. The purpose of this study is to develop and demonstrate the use of a flexible in-house research environment for treatment planning on small animals. The software package, called DOSCTP, provides a user-friendly platform for DICOM computed tomography-based Monte Carlo dose calculation using the EGSnrcMP-based DOSXYZnrc code. Validation of the treatment planning was performed by comparing the dose distributions for simple photon beam geometries calculated through the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system and measurements. A treatment plan for a mouse based on a CT image set by a 360-deg photon arc is demonstrated. It is shown that it is possible to create 3D conformal treatment plans for small animals with consideration of inhomogeneities using small photon beam field sizes in the diameter range of 0.5-5 cm, with conformal dose covering the target volume while sparing the surrounding critical tissue. It is also found that Monte Carlo simulation is suitable to carry out treatment planning dose calculation for small animal anatomy with voxel size about one order of magnitude smaller than that of the human.

  10. A Small Scale Experimental Study: Using Animations to Learn Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayaoglu, M. Naci; Dag Akbas, Raside; Ozturk, Zeynep

    2011-01-01

    This study attempts to investigate whether a difference exists between learning vocabulary via animation and via traditional paper-based method. This small scale study was conducted at Karadeniz Technical University in academic year 2009-2010. Two pre-intermediate classes were randomly selected as the experimental group (n = 17), and control group…

  11. Small-animal whole-body photoacoustic tomography: a review

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    With the wide use of small animals for biomedical studies, in vivo small-animal whole-body imaging plays an increasingly important role. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging whole-body imaging modality that shows great potential for preclinical research. As a hybrid technique, PAT is based on the acoustic detection of optical absorption from either endogenous tissue chromophores, such as oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin, or exogenous contrast agents. Because ultrasound scatters much less than light in tissue, PAT generates high-resolution images in both the optical ballistic and diffusive regimes. Using near-infrared light, which has relatively low blood absorption, PAT can image through the whole body of small animals with acoustically defined spatial resolution. Anatomical and vascular structures are imaged with endogenous hemoglobin contrast, while functional and molecular images are enabled by the wide choice of exogenous optical contrasts. This paper reviews the rapidly growing field of small-animal whole-body PAT and highlights studies done in the past decade. PMID:24108456

  12. Small Animal Radionuclide Imaging With Focusing Gamma-Ray Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R; Decker, T; Epstein, M; Ziock, K; Pivovaroff, M J; Craig, W W; Jernigan, J G; Barber, W B; Christensen, F E; Funk, T; Hailey, C J; Hasegawa, B H; Taylor, C

    2004-02-27

    Significant effort currently is being devoted to the development of noninvasive imaging systems that allow in vivo assessment of biological and biomolecular interactions in mice and other small animals. While physiological function in small animals can be localized and imaged using conventional radionuclide imaging techniques such as single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), these techniques inherently are limited to spatial resolutions of 1-2 mm. For this reason, we are developing a small animal radionuclide imaging system (SARIS) using grazing incidence optics to focus gamma-rays emitted by {sup 125}I and other radiopharmaceuticals. We have developed a prototype optic with sufficient accuracy and precision to focus the 27.5 keV photons from {sup 125}I onto a high-resolution imaging detector. Experimental measurements from the prototype have demonstrated that the optic can focus X-rays from a microfocus X-ray tube to a spot having physical dimensions (approximately 1500 microns half-power diameter) consistent with those predicted by theory. Our theoretical and numerical analysis also indicate that an optic can be designed and build that ultimately can achieve 100 {micro}m spatial resolution with sufficient efficiency to perform in vivo single photon emission imaging studies in small animal.

  13. Robotic Delivery of Complex Radiation Volumes for Small Animal Research

    PubMed Central

    Matinfar, Mohammad; Iordachita, Iulian; Wong, John; Kazanzides, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a novel and complete system capable of delivering multidirectional (focal), kilo-voltage radiation fields to targets in small animals under robotic control using cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance. The capability of the SARRP to deliver highly focused beams to multiple animal models provides new research opportunities that more realistically bridge laboratory research and clinical translation. This paper describes the design and operation of the SARRP for precise radiation delivery. Different delivery procedures are presented which enable the system to radiate through a series of points, representative of a complex shape. A particularly interesting case is shell dose irradiation, where the goal is to deliver a high dose of radiation to the shape surface, with minimal dose to the shape interior. The ability to deliver a dose shell allows mechanistic research of how a tumor interacts with its microenvironment to sustain its growth and lead to its resistance or recurrence. PMID:21643448

  14. Dissemination of parasites by animal movements in small ruminant farms.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, N G C; Fthenakis, G C; Papadopoulos, E

    2015-09-30

    The present paper discusses the spread of parasites by animal movements in small ruminant farms; it focuses in dissemination of parasitic forms that would lead to subsequent infection of sheep or goats. Systems of small ruminant production involve a component of animal movement (e.g., grazing) as part of routine husbandry, which favors spread of parasitic forms; that refers mainly to parasites of the digestive system (nematodes, trematodes, cestodes, protozoa), as well as helminthes of the respiratory system, although dissemination of the various parasitic forms in the environment would not always result to subsequent infection; external parasites may also be disseminated during movements, e.g., to inhabit wooden poles used in fencing. New livestock into a farm constitutes a biosecurity hazard and the most common means to introducing new parasitic pathogens into a farm; in contemporary small ruminant health management, this contributes in dissemination of anthelmintic resistant parasitic strains; other parasitic disease agents (e.g., mange mites, ticks) may also be spread into a farm that way. Often, especially in small scale farming, visits of rams or bucks take place from one farm to another during the mating season; in such cases, ectoparasites (e.g., mange mites) can be disseminated through direct contact of animals, as well other pathogens (e.g., Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum) via the semen. During transportation of sheep/goats, parasitic forms can also spread, as well as during movement of sheep or goats to slaughterhouses, in which case dogs present in these places would contribute to their dissemination. Spread of life forms of various parasites can also occur from animal species present in the environment of sheep or goats; these include animals present within a farm, stray dogs roaming around a farm (e.g., for spread of Multiceps multiceps, Echinococcus granulosus, Taenia hydatigena, N. caninum), cats commanding the environment of a farm (e.g., for

  15. Robotically assisted small animal MRI-guided mouse biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Emmanuel; Chiodo, Chris; Wong, Kenneth H.; Fricke, Stanley; Jung, Mira; Cleary, Kevin

    2010-02-01

    Small mammals, namely mice and rats, play an important role in biomedical research. Imaging, in conjunction with accurate therapeutic agent delivery, has tremendous value in small animal research since it enables serial, non-destructive testing of animals and facilitates the study of biomarkers of disease progression. The small size of organs in mice lends some difficulty to accurate biopsies and therapeutic agent delivery. Image guidance with the use of robotic devices should enable more accurate and repeatable targeting for biopsies and delivery of therapeutic agents, as well as the ability to acquire tissue from a pre-specified location based on image anatomy. This paper presents our work in integrating a robotic needle guide device, specialized stereotaxic mouse holder, and magnetic resonance imaging, with a long-term goal of performing accurate and repeatable targeting in anesthetized mice studies.

  16. Animals In Synchrotrons: Overcoming Challenges For High-Resolution, Live, Small-Animal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelley, Martin; Parsons, David; Morgan, Kaye; Siu, Karen

    2010-07-01

    Physiological studies in small animals can be complicated, but the complexity is increased dramatically when performing live-animal synchrotron X-ray imaging studies. Our group has extensive experience in high-resolution live-animal imaging at the Japanese SPring-8 synchrotron, primarily examining airways in two-dimensions. These experiments normally image an area of 1.8 mm×1.2 mm at a pixel resolution of 0.45 μm and are performed with live, intact, anaesthetized mice. There are unique challenges in this experimental setting. Importantly, experiments must be performed in an isolated imaging hutch not specifically designed for small-animal imaging. This requires equipment adapted to remotely monitor animals, maintain their anesthesia, and deliver test substances while collecting images. The horizontal synchrotron X-ray beam has a fixed location and orientation that limits experimental flexibility. The extremely high resolution makes locating anatomical regions-of-interest slow and can result in a high radiation dose, and at this level of magnification small animal movements produce motion-artifacts that can render acquired images unusable. Here we describe our experimental techniques and how we have overcome several challenges involved in performing live mouse synchrotron imaging. Experiments have tested different mouse strains, with hairless strains minimizing overlying skin and hair artifacts. Different anesthetics have also be trialed due to the limited choices available at SPring-8. Tracheal-intubation methods have been refined and controlled-ventilation is now possible using a specialized small-animal ventilator. With appropriate animal restraint and respiratory-gating, motion-artifacts have been minimized. The animal orientation (supine vs. head-high) also appears to affect animal physiology, and can alter image quality. Our techniques and image quality at SPring-8 have dramatically improved and in the near future we plan to translate this experience to the

  17. Animals In Synchrotrons: Overcoming Challenges For High-Resolution, Live, Small-Animal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelley, Martin; Parsons, David; Morgan, Kaye; Siu, Karen

    2010-07-23

    Physiological studies in small animals can be complicated, but the complexity is increased dramatically when performing live-animal synchrotron X-ray imaging studies. Our group has extensive experience in high-resolution live-animal imaging at the Japanese SPring-8 synchrotron, primarily examining airways in two-dimensions. These experiments normally image an area of 1.8 mmx1.2 mm at a pixel resolution of 0.45 {mu}m and are performed with live, intact, anaesthetized mice.There are unique challenges in this experimental setting. Importantly, experiments must be performed in an isolated imaging hutch not specifically designed for small-animal imaging. This requires equipment adapted to remotely monitor animals, maintain their anesthesia, and deliver test substances while collecting images. The horizontal synchrotron X-ray beam has a fixed location and orientation that limits experimental flexibility. The extremely high resolution makes locating anatomical regions-of-interest slow and can result in a high radiation dose, and at this level of magnification small animal movements produce motion-artifacts that can render acquired images unusable. Here we describe our experimental techniques and how we have overcome several challenges involved in performing live mouse synchrotron imaging.Experiments have tested different mouse strains, with hairless strains minimizing overlying skin and hair artifacts. Different anesthetics have also be trialed due to the limited choices available at SPring-8. Tracheal-intubation methods have been refined and controlled-ventilation is now possible using a specialized small-animal ventilator. With appropriate animal restraint and respiratory-gating, motion-artifacts have been minimized. The animal orientation (supine vs. head-high) also appears to affect animal physiology, and can alter image quality. Our techniques and image quality at SPring-8 have dramatically improved and in the near future we plan to translate this experience to the

  18. Surveillance of Zoonotic Infectious Disease Transmitted by Small Companion Animals

    PubMed Central

    Breitschwerdt, Edward; Cleaveland, Sarah; Karkare, Umesh; Khanna, Chand; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Kuiken, Thijs; Lappin, Michael R.; McQuiston, Jennifer; Mumford, Elizabeth; Myers, Tanya; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.; Rubin, Carol; Takashima, Gregg; Thiermann, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The One Health paradigm for global health recognizes that most new human infectious diseases will emerge from animal reservoirs. Little consideration has been given to the known and potential zoonotic infectious diseases of small companion animals. Cats and dogs closely share the domestic environment with humans and have the potential to act as sources and sentinels of a wide spectrum of zoonotic infections. This report highlights the lack of a coordinated global surveillance scheme that monitors disease in these species and makes a case for the necessity of developing a strategy to implement such surveillance.

  19. High-field small animal magnetic resonance oncology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High-field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging and hyperpolarized 13C MRS as well as diffusion-weighted, blood oxygen level dependent contrast imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies.

  20. Applications of penetrating radiation for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Wu, Max C.; Iwata, Koji; Hwang, Andrew B.; Wong, Kenneth H.; Barber, William C.; Dae, Michael W.; Sakdinawat, Anne E.

    2002-11-01

    Researchers long have relied on research involving small animals to unravel scientific mysteries in the biological sciences, and to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques in the medical and health sciences. Within the past 2 decades, new techniques have been developed to manipulate the genome of the mouse, allowing the development of transgenic and knockout models of mammalian and human disease, development, and physiology. Traditionally, much biological research involving small animals has relied on the use of invasive methods such as organ harvesting, tissue sampling, and autoradiography during which the animal was sacrificed to perform a single measurement. More recently, imaging techniques have been developed that assess anatomy and physiology in the intact animal, in a way that allows the investigator to follow the progression of disease, or to monitor the response to therapeutic interventions. Imaging techniques that use penetrating radiation at millimeter or submillimeter levels to image small animals include x-ray computed tomography (microCT), single-photon emission computed tomography (microSPECT), and imaging positron emission computed tomography (microPET). MicroCT generates cross-sectional slices which reveal the structure of the object with spatial resolution in the range of 50 to 100 microns. MicroSPECT and microPET are radionuclide imaging techniques in which a radiopharmaceutical is injected into the animal that is accumulated to metabolism, blood flow, bone remodeling, tumor growth, or other biological processes. Both microSPECT and microPET offer spatial resolutions in the range of 1-2 millimeters. However, microPET records annihilation photons produced by a positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical using electronic coincidence, and has a sensitivity approximately two orders of magnitude better than microSPECT, while microSPECT is compatible with gamma-ray emitting radiopharmaceuticals that are less expensive and more readily available

  1. Small-animal PET: what is it, and why do we need it?

    PubMed

    Yao, Rutao; Lecomte, Roger; Crawford, Elpida S

    2012-09-01

    Small-animal PET refers to imaging of animals such as rats and mice using dedicated PET scanners. Small-animal PET has been used extensively in modern biomedical research. It provides a quantitative measure of the 3-dimensional distribution of a radiopharmaceutical administered to a live subject noninvasively. In this article, we will discuss the operational and technical aspects of small-animal PET; make some comparisons between small-animal PET and human PET systems; identify the challenges of, opportunities for, and ultimate limitations in applying small-animal PET; and discuss some representative small-animal PET applications. Education objectives: After reading this article, the technologist will be able to explain the requirements and benefits of small-animal PET in biomedical research, describe the design and general characteristics of a small-animal PET system, list and describe some of the challenges of imaging small animals, and discuss several small-animal PET applications. PMID:22582006

  2. Fluorescence and Cerenkov luminescence imaging. Applications in small animal research.

    PubMed

    Schwenck, J; Fuchs, K; Eilenberger, S H L; Rolle, A-M; Castaneda Vega, S; Thaiss, W M; Maier, F C

    2016-04-12

    This review addresses small animal optical imaging (OI) applications in diverse fields of basic research. In the past, OI has proven to be cost- and time-effective, allows real-time imaging as well as high-throughput analysis and does not imply the usage of ionizing radiation (with the exception of Cerenkov imaging applications). Therefore, this technique is widely spread - not only geographically, but also among very different fields of basic research - and is represented by a large body of publications. Originally used in oncology research, OI is nowadays emerging in further areas like inflammation and infectious disease as well as neurology. Besides fluorescent probe-based contrast, the feasibility of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) has been recently shown in small animals and thus represents a new route for future applications. Thus, this review will focus on examples for OI applications in inflammation, infectious disease, cell tracking as well as neurology, and provides an overview over CLI. PMID:27067794

  3. Hollow fiber-optic Raman probes for small experimental animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagiri, Takashi; Hattori, Yusuke; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Yuji; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2007-02-01

    Two types of hollow fiber-optic probes are developed to measure the in vivo Raman spectra of small animals. One is the minimized probe which is end-sealed with the micro-ball lens. The measured spectra reflect the information of the sample's sub-surface. This probe is used for the measurement of the esophagus and the stomach via an endoscope. The other probe is a confocal Raman probe which consists of a single fiber and a lens system. It is integrated into the handheld microscope. A simple and small multimodal probe is realized because the hollow optical fiber requires no optical filters. The performance of each probe is examined and the effectiveness of these probes for in vivo Raman spectroscopy is shown by animal tests.

  4. [Application of paramunity inducers in small animal practice].

    PubMed

    Proksch, A L; Hartmann, K

    2016-01-01

    Paramunity inducers have been used to treat small animals for decades. Paramunity inducers are based on attenuated and inactivated poxviruses (avipox virus and parapox virus). Their applications include both therapeutic and prophylactic use in various diseases. Despite their wide and variable use, only a very small number of placebo-controlled studies has been published. Positive effects in preventing kitten mortality and in treating feline stomatitis have been reported, however, no statistically significant effect of their therapeutic use in canine parvovirus infection, feline leukemia infection virus infection or canine papillomavirus infection could be demonstrated. For these infectious diseases, paramunity inducers do not appear to be effective. PMID:26998822

  5. Gamma-Ray Focusing Optics for Small Animal Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivovaroff, M. J.; Barber, W. C.; Craig, W. W.; Hasegawa, B. H.; Ramsey, B. D.; Taylor, C.

    2004-01-01

    There is a well-established need for high-resolution radionuclide imaging techniques that provide non-invasive measurement of physiological function in small animals. We, therefore, have begun developing a small animal radionuclide imaging system using grazing incidence mirrors to focus low-energy gamma-rays emitted by I-125, and other radionuclides. Our initial prototype optic, fabricated from thermally-formed glass, demonstrated a resolution of 1500 microns, consistent with the performance predicted by detailed simulations. More recently, we have begun constructing mirrors using a replication technique that reduces low spatial frequency errors in the mirror surface, greatly improving the resolution. Each technique offers particular advantages: e.g., multilayer coatings are easily deposited on glass, while superior resolution is possible with replicated optics. Scaling the results from our prototype optics, which only have a few nested shells, to system where the lens has a full complement of several tens of nested shells, a sensitivity of approx. 1 cps/micro Ci is possible, with the exact number dependent on system magnification and radionuclide species. (Higher levels of efficiency can be obtained with multi-optic imaging systems.) The gamma-ray lens will achieve a resolution as good as 100 microns, independent of the final sensitivity. The combination of high spatial resolution and modest sensitivity will enable in vivo single photon emission imaging studies in small animals.

  6. Modality comparison for small animal radiotherapy: A simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Nelson, Geoff; Noll, John M.; Graves, Edward E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Small animal radiation therapy has advanced significantly in recent years. Whereas in the past dose was delivered using a single beam and a lead shield for sparing of healthy tissue, conformal doses can be now delivered using more complex dedicated small animal radiotherapy systems with image guidance. The goal of this paper is to investigate dose distributions for three small animal radiation treatment modalities. Methods: This paper presents a comparison of dose distributions generated by the three approaches—a single-field irradiator with a 200 kV beam and no image guidance, a small animal image-guided conformal system based on a modified microCT scanner with a 120 kV beam developed at Stanford University, and a dedicated conformal system, SARRP, using a 220 kV beam developed at Johns Hopkins University. The authors present a comparison of treatment plans for the three modalities using two cases: a mouse with a subcutaneous tumor and a mouse with a spontaneous lung tumor. A 5 Gy target dose was calculated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. Results: All treatment modalities generated similar dose distributions for the subcutaneous tumor case, with the highest mean dose to the ipsilateral lung and bones in the single-field plan (0.4 and 0.4 Gy) compared to the microCT (0.1 and 0.2 Gy) and SARRP (0.1 and 0.3 Gy) plans. The lung case demonstrated that due to the nine-beam arrangements in the conformal plans, the mean doses to the ipsilateral lung, spinal cord, and bones were significantly lower in the microCT plan (2.0, 0.4, and 1.9 Gy) and the SARRP plan (1.5, 0.5, and 1.8 Gy) than in single-field irradiator plan (4.5, 3.8, and 3.3 Gy). Similarly, the mean doses to the contralateral lung and the heart were lowest in the microCT plan (1.5 and 2.0 Gy), followed by the SARRP plan (1.7 and 2.2 Gy), and they were highest in the single-field plan (2.5 and 2.4 Gy). For both cases, dose uniformity was greatest in the single-field irradiator plan followed by

  7. Modality comparison for small animal radiotherapy: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova, Magdalena Nelson, Geoff; Noll, John M.; Graves, Edward E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Small animal radiation therapy has advanced significantly in recent years. Whereas in the past dose was delivered using a single beam and a lead shield for sparing of healthy tissue, conformal doses can be now delivered using more complex dedicated small animal radiotherapy systems with image guidance. The goal of this paper is to investigate dose distributions for three small animal radiation treatment modalities. Methods: This paper presents a comparison of dose distributions generated by the three approaches—a single-field irradiator with a 200 kV beam and no image guidance, a small animal image-guided conformal system based on a modified microCT scanner with a 120 kV beam developed at Stanford University, and a dedicated conformal system, SARRP, using a 220 kV beam developed at Johns Hopkins University. The authors present a comparison of treatment plans for the three modalities using two cases: a mouse with a subcutaneous tumor and a mouse with a spontaneous lung tumor. A 5 Gy target dose was calculated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. Results: All treatment modalities generated similar dose distributions for the subcutaneous tumor case, with the highest mean dose to the ipsilateral lung and bones in the single-field plan (0.4 and 0.4 Gy) compared to the microCT (0.1 and 0.2 Gy) and SARRP (0.1 and 0.3 Gy) plans. The lung case demonstrated that due to the nine-beam arrangements in the conformal plans, the mean doses to the ipsilateral lung, spinal cord, and bones were significantly lower in the microCT plan (2.0, 0.4, and 1.9 Gy) and the SARRP plan (1.5, 0.5, and 1.8 Gy) than in single-field irradiator plan (4.5, 3.8, and 3.3 Gy). Similarly, the mean doses to the contralateral lung and the heart were lowest in the microCT plan (1.5 and 2.0 Gy), followed by the SARRP plan (1.7 and 2.2 Gy), and they were highest in the single-field plan (2.5 and 2.4 Gy). For both cases, dose uniformity was greatest in the single-field irradiator plan followed by

  8. High Field Small Animal Magnetic Resonance Oncology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) imaging, and hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy as well as diffusion-weighted, Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies. PMID:24374985

  9. Computer-aided pulmonary image analysis in small animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ziyue; Mansoor, Awais; Mollura, Daniel J.; Bagci, Ulas; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela; Luna, Brian; Kubler, Andre; Dey, Bappaditya; Jain, Sanjay; Foster, Brent; Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Camp, Jeremy V.; Jonsson, Colleen B.; Bishai, William R.; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated pulmonary image analysis framework for infectious lung diseases in small animal models. Methods: The authors describe a novel pathological lung and airway segmentation method for small animals. The proposed framework includes identification of abnormal imaging patterns pertaining to infectious lung diseases. First, the authors’ system estimates an expected lung volume by utilizing a regression function between total lung capacity and approximated rib cage volume. A significant difference between the expected lung volume and the initial lung segmentation indicates the presence of severe pathology, and invokes a machine learning based abnormal imaging pattern detection system next. The final stage of the proposed framework is the automatic extraction of airway tree for which new affinity relationships within the fuzzy connectedness image segmentation framework are proposed by combining Hessian and gray-scale morphological reconstruction filters. Results: 133 CT scans were collected from four different studies encompassing a wide spectrum of pulmonary abnormalities pertaining to two commonly used small animal models (ferret and rabbit). Sensitivity and specificity were greater than 90% for pathological lung segmentation (average dice similarity coefficient > 0.9). While qualitative visual assessments of airway tree extraction were performed by the participating expert radiologists, for quantitative evaluation the authors validated the proposed airway extraction method by using publicly available EXACT’09 data set. Conclusions: The authors developed a comprehensive computer-aided pulmonary image analysis framework for preclinical research applications. The proposed framework consists of automatic pathological lung segmentation and accurate airway tree extraction. The framework has high sensitivity and specificity; therefore, it can contribute advances in preclinical research in pulmonary diseases.

  10. Computer-aided pulmonary image analysis in small animal models

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ziyue; Bagci, Ulas; Mansoor, Awais; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela; Luna, Brian; Kubler, Andre; Dey, Bappaditya; Foster, Brent; Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Camp, Jeremy V.; Jonsson, Colleen B.; Bishai, William R.; Jain, Sanjay; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an automated pulmonary image analysis framework for infectious lung diseases in small animal models. Methods: The authors describe a novel pathological lung and airway segmentation method for small animals. The proposed framework includes identification of abnormal imaging patterns pertaining to infectious lung diseases. First, the authors’ system estimates an expected lung volume by utilizing a regression function between total lung capacity and approximated rib cage volume. A significant difference between the expected lung volume and the initial lung segmentation indicates the presence of severe pathology, and invokes a machine learning based abnormal imaging pattern detection system next. The final stage of the proposed framework is the automatic extraction of airway tree for which new affinity relationships within the fuzzy connectedness image segmentation framework are proposed by combining Hessian and gray-scale morphological reconstruction filters. Results: 133 CT scans were collected from four different studies encompassing a wide spectrum of pulmonary abnormalities pertaining to two commonly used small animal models (ferret and rabbit). Sensitivity and specificity were greater than 90% for pathological lung segmentation (average dice similarity coefficient > 0.9). While qualitative visual assessments of airway tree extraction were performed by the participating expert radiologists, for quantitative evaluation the authors validated the proposed airway extraction method by using publicly available EXACT’09 data set. Conclusions: The authors developed a comprehensive computer-aided pulmonary image analysis framework for preclinical research applications. The proposed framework consists of automatic pathological lung segmentation and accurate airway tree extraction. The framework has high sensitivity and specificity; therefore, it can contribute advances in preclinical research in pulmonary diseases. PMID:26133591

  11. Determination of Small Animal Long Bone Properties Using Densitometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, Gregory A.; Goldberg, BethAnn K.; Whalen, Robert T.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Assessment of bone structural property changes due to loading regimens or pharmacological treatment typically requires destructive mechanical testing and sectioning. Our group has accurately and non-destructively estimated three dimensional cross-sectional areal properties (principal moments of inertia, Imax and Imin, and principal angle, Theta) of human cadaver long bones from pixel-by-pixel analysis of three non-coplanar densitometry scans. Because the scanner beam width is on the order of typical small animal diapbyseal diameters, applying this technique to high-resolution scans of rat long bones necessitates additional processing to minimize errors induced by beam smearing, such as dependence on sample orientation and overestimation of Imax and Imin. We hypothesized that these errors are correctable by digital image processing of the raw scan data. In all cases, four scans, using only the low energy data (Hologic QDR-1000W, small animal mode), are averaged to increase image signal-to-noise ratio. Raw scans are additionally processed by interpolation, deconvolution by a filter derived from scanner beam characteristics, and masking using a variable threshold based on image dynamic range. To assess accuracy, we scanned an aluminum step phantom at 12 orientations over a range of 180 deg about the longitudinal axis, in 15 deg increments. The phantom dimensions (2.5, 3.1, 3.8 mm x 4.4 mm; Imin/Imax: 0.33-0.74) were comparable to the dimensions of a rat femur which was also scanned. Cross-sectional properties were determined at 0.25 mm increments along the length of the phantom and femur. The table shows average error (+/- SD) from theory of Imax, Imin, and Theta) over the 12 orientations, calculated from raw and fully processed phantom images, as well as standard deviations about the mean for the femur scans. Processing of phantom scans increased agreement with theory, indicating improved accuracy. Smaller standard deviations with processing indicate increased

  12. Compact CT/SPECT Small-Animal Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Kastis, George A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Peterson, Todd E.; Barber, H. Bradford; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a dual-modality CT/SPECT imaging system for small-animal imaging applications. The X-ray system comprises a commercially available micro-focus X-ray tube and a CCD-based X-ray camera. X-ray transmission measurements are performed based on cone-beam geometry. Individual projections are acquired by rotating the animal about a vertical axis in front of the CCD detector. A high-resolution CT image is obtained after reconstruction using an ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction algorithm. The SPECT system utilizes a compact semiconductor camera module previously developed in our group. The module is mounted perpendicular to the X-ray tube/CCD combination. It consists of a 64×64 pixellated CdZnTe detector and a parallel-hole tungsten collimator. The field of view is 1 square inch. Planar projections for SPECT reconstruction are obtained by rotating the animal in front of the detector. Gamma-ray and X-ray images are presented of phantoms and mice. Procedures for merging the anatomical and functional images are discussed. PMID:26538684

  13. A multipinhole small animal SPECT system with submillimeter spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Tobias; Despres, Philippe; Barber, William C.; Shah, Kanai S.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2006-05-15

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an important technology for molecular imaging studies of small animals. In this arena, there is an increasing demand for high performance imaging systems that offer improved spatial resolution and detection efficiency. We have designed a multipinhole small animal imaging system based on position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) detectors with the goal of submillimeter spatial resolution and high detection efficiency, which will allow us to minimize the radiation dose to the animal and to shorten the time needed for the imaging study. Our design will use 8x24 mm{sup 2} PSAPD detector modules coupled to thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl)] scintillators, which can achieve an intrinsic spatial resolution of 0.5 mm at 140 keV. These detectors will be arranged in rings of 24 modules each; the animal is positioned in the center of the 9 stationary detector rings which capture projection data from the animal with a cylindrical tungsten multipinhole collimator. The animal is supported on a bed which can be rocked about the central axis to increase angular sampling of the object. In contrast to conventional SPECT pinhole systems, in our design each pinhole views only a portion of the object. However, the ensemble of projection data from all of the multipinhole detectors provide angular sampling that is sufficient to reconstruct tomographic data from the object. The performance of this multipinhole PSAPD imaging system was simulated using a ray tracing program that models the appropriate point spread functions and then was compared against the performance of a dual-headed pinhole SPECT system. The detection efficiency of both systems was simulated and projection data of a hot rod phantom were generated and reconstructed to assess spatial resolution. Appropriate Poisson noise was added to the data to simulate an acquisition time of 15 min and an activity of 18.5 MBq distributed in the phantom. Both sets of data

  14. A Time Domain Fluorescence Tomography System for Small Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Scott B.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Boas, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the application of a time domain diffuse fluorescence tomography system for whole body small animal imaging. The key features of the system are the use of point excitation in free space using ultrashort laser pulses and noncontact detection using a gated, intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Mouse shaped epoxy phantoms, with embedded fluorescent inclusions, were used to verify the performance of a recently developed asymptotic lifetime-based tomography algorithm. The asymptotic algorithm is based on a multiexponential analysis of the decay portion of the data. The multiexponential model is shown to enable the use of a global analysis approach for a robust recovery of the lifetime components present within the imaging medium. The surface boundaries of the imaging volume were acquired using a photogrammetric camera integrated with the imaging system, and implemented in a Monte-Carlo model of photon propagation in tissue. The tomography results show that the asymptotic approach is able to separate axially located fluorescent inclusions centered at depths of 4 and 10 mm from the surface of the mouse phantom. The fluorescent inclusions had distinct lifetimes of 0.5 and 0.95 ns. The inclusions were nearly overlapping along the measurement axis and shown to be not resolvable using continuous wave (CW) methods. These results suggest the practical feasibility and advantages of a time domain approach for whole body small animal fluorescence molecular imaging, particularly with the use of lifetime as a contrast mechanism. PMID:18672432

  15. Quantitative tomographic imaging of intermolecular FRET in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Vivek; Chen, Jin; Barroso, Margarida; Intes, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a nonradiative transfer of energy between two fluorescent molecules (a donor and an acceptor) in nanometer range proximity. FRET imaging methods have been applied to proteomic studies and drug discovery applications based on intermolecular FRET efficiency measurements and stoichiometric measurements of FRET interaction as quantitative parameters of interest. Importantly, FRET provides information about biomolecular interactions at a molecular level, well beyond the diffraction limits of standard microscopy techniques. The application of FRET to small animal imaging will allow biomedical researchers to investigate physiological processes occurring at nanometer range in vivo as well as in situ. In this work a new method for the quantitative reconstruction of FRET measurements in small animals, incorporating a full-field tomographic acquisition system with a Monte Carlo based hierarchical reconstruction scheme, is described and validated in murine models. Our main objective is to estimate the relative concentration of two forms of donor species, i.e., a donor molecule involved in FRETing to an acceptor close by and a nonFRETing donor molecule. PMID:23243567

  16. Shielding considerations for the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP).

    PubMed

    Sayler, Elaine; Dolney, Derek; Avery, Stephen; Koch, Cameron

    2013-05-01

    The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a commercially available platform designed to deliver conformal, image-guided radiation to small animals using a dual-anode kV x-ray source. At the University of Pennsylvania, a free-standing 2 m enclosure was designed to shield the SARRP according to federal code regulating cabinet x-ray systems. The initial design consisted of 4.0-mm-thick lead for all secondary barriers and proved wholly inadequate. Radiation levels outside the enclosure were 15 times higher than expected. Additionally, the leakage appeared to be distributed broadly within the enclosure, so concern arose that a subject might receive significant doses outside the intended treatment field. Thus, a detailed analysis was undertaken to identify and block all sources of leakage. Leakage sources were identified by Kodak X-OmatV (XV) film placed throughout the enclosure. Radiation inside the enclosure was quantified using Gafchromic film. Outside the enclosure, radiation was measured using a survey meter. Sources of leakage included (1) an unnecessarily broad beam exiting the tube, (2) failure of the secondary collimator to confine the primary beam entirely, (3) scatter from the secondary collimator, (4) lack of beam-stop below the treatment volume, and (5) incomplete shielding of the x-ray tube. The exit window was restricted, and a new collimator was designed to address problems (1-3). A beam-stop and additional tube shielding were installed. These modifications reduced internal scatter by more than 100-fold. Radiation outside the enclosure was reduced to levels compliant with federal regulations, provided the SARRP is operated using tube potentials of 175 kV or less. In addition, these simple and relatively inexpensive modifications eliminate the possibility of exposing a larger animal (such as a rat) to significant doses outside the treatment field. PMID:23532076

  17. SHIELDING CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE SMALL ANIMAL RADIATION RESEARCH PLATFORM (SARRP)

    PubMed Central

    Sayler, Elaine; Dolney, Derek; Avery, Stephen; Koch, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a commercially available platform designed to deliver conformal, image-guided radiation to small animals using a dual-anode kV x-ray source. At the University of Pennsylvania, a free-standing 2 m3 enclosure was designed to shield the SARRP according to federal code regulating cabinet x-ray systems. The initial design consisted of 4.0-mm-thick lead for all secondary barriers and proved wholly inadequate. Radiation levels outside the enclosure were 15 times higher than expected. Additionally, the leakage appeared to be distributed broadly within the enclosure, so concern arose that a subject might receive significant doses outside the intended treatment field. Thus, a detailed analysis was undertaken to identify and block all sources of leakage. Leakage sources were identified by Kodak X-OmatV (XV) film placed throughout the enclosure. Radiation inside the enclosure was quantified using Gafchromic film. Outside the enclosure, radiation was measured using a survey meter. Sources of leakage included (1) an unnecessarily broad beam exiting the tube, (2) failure of the secondary collimator to confine the primary beam entirely, (3) scatter from the secondary collimator, (4) lack of beam-stop below the treatment volume, and (5) incomplete shielding of the x-ray tube. The exit window was restricted, and a new collimator was designed to address problems (1–3). A beam-stop and additional tube shielding were installed. These modifications reduced internal scatter by more than 100-fold. Radiation outside the enclosure was reduced to levels compliant with federal regulations, provided the SARRP is operated using tube potentials of 175 kV or less. In addition, these simple and relatively inexpensive modifications eliminate the possibility of exposing a larger animal (such as a rat) to significant doses outside the treatment field. PMID:23532076

  18. Integration of optical imaging with a small animal irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Weersink, Robert A.; Ansell, Steve; Wang, An; Wilson, Graham; Shah, Duoaud; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jaffray, David A.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The authors describe the integration of optical imaging with a targeted small animal irradiator device, focusing on design, instrumentation, 2D to 3D image registration, 2D targeting, and the accuracy of recovering and mapping the optical signal to a 3D surface generated from the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The integration of optical imaging will improve targeting of the radiation treatment and offer longitudinal tracking of tumor response of small animal models treated using the system. Methods: The existing image-guided small animal irradiator consists of a variable kilovolt (peak) x-ray tube mounted opposite an aSi flat panel detector, both mounted on a c-arm gantry. The tube is used for both CBCT imaging and targeted irradiation. The optical component employs a CCD camera perpendicular to the x-ray treatment/imaging axis with a computer controlled filter for spectral decomposition. Multiple optical images can be acquired at any angle as the gantry rotates. The optical to CBCT registration, which uses a standard pinhole camera model, was modeled and tested using phantoms with markers visible in both optical and CBCT images. Optically guided 2D targeting in the anterior/posterior direction was tested on an anthropomorphic mouse phantom with embedded light sources. The accuracy of the mapping of optical signal to the CBCT surface was tested using the same mouse phantom. A surface mesh of the phantom was generated based on the CBCT image and optical intensities projected onto the surface. The measured surface intensity was compared to calculated surface for a point source at the actual source position. The point-source position was also optimized to provide the closest match between measured and calculated intensities, and the distance between the optimized and actual source positions was then calculated. This process was repeated for multiple wavelengths and sources. Results: The optical to CBCT registration error was 0.8 mm. Two

  19. Prompt gamma-ray imaging for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Libai

    Small animal imaging is recognized as a powerful discovery tool for small animal modeling of human diseases, which is providing an important clue to complete understanding of disease mechanisms and is helping researchers develop and test new treatments. The current small animal imaging techniques include positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound (US). A new imaging modality called prompt gamma-ray imaging (PGI) has been identified and investigated primarily by Monte Carlo simulation. Currently it is suggested for use on small animals. This new technique could greatly enhance and extend the present capabilities of PET and SPECT imaging from ingested radioisotopes to the imaging of selected non-radioactive elements, such as Gd, Cd, Hg, and B, and has the great potential to be used in Neutron Cancer Therapy to monitor neutron distribution and neutron-capture agent distribution. This approach consists of irradiating small animals in the thermal neutron beam of a nuclear reactor to produce prompt gamma rays from the elements in the sample by the radiative capture (n, gamma) reaction. These prompt gamma rays are emitted in energies that are characteristic of each element and they are also produced in characteristic coincident chains. After measuring these prompt gamma rays by surrounding spectrometry array, the distribution of each element of interest in the sample is reconstructed from the mapping of each detected signature gamma ray by either electronic collimations or mechanical collimations. In addition, the transmitted neutrons from the beam can be simultaneously used for very sensitive anatomical imaging, which provides the registration for the elemental distributions obtained from PGI. The primary approach is to use Monte Carlo simulation methods either with the specific purpose code CEARCPG, developed at NC State University or with the general purpose

  20. Iodine imaging using spectral analysis. [radiography for visualization of small blood vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macovski, A.

    1978-01-01

    Existing radiographic imaging systems provide images which represent an integration or averaging over the energy spectrum. In order to provide noninvasive angiography it is necessary to image the relatively small amounts of iodine which are available following an intravenous administration. This is accomplished by making use of the special spectral characteristics of iodine. Two methods will be presented. One involves a special grating for encoding the iodine information in the form of a fine line pattern. This is subsequently decoded to provide images of iodinated structures which are otherwise almost invisible. The second method utilizes a scanned X-ray beam which is rapidly switched in the high energy region. In this region, iodine experiences significant variations in the attenuation coefficient while bone and soft tissue do not. An efficient and accurate X-ray detector can be used with scanned X-ray beams. This provides a high degree of sensitivity enabling the visualization of small vessels containing relatively dilute iodine.

  1. Photoacoustic tomography of small-animal and human peripheral joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Chamberland, David L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Jamadar, David A.

    2008-02-01

    As an emerging imaging technology that combines the merits of both light and ultrasound, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) holds promise for screening and diagnosis of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, the feasibility of PAT in imaging small-animal joints and human peripheral joints in a noninvasive manner was explored. Ex vivo rat tail and fresh cadaveric human finger joints were imaged. Based on the intrinsic optical contrast, intra- and extra-articular tissue structures in the joints were visualized successfully. Using light in the near-infrared region, the imaging depth of PAT is sufficient for cross-sectional imaging of a human peripheral joint as a whole organ. PAT, as a novel imaging modality with unique advantages, may contribute significantly to the early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders and accurate monitoring of disease progression and response to therapy.

  2. A Gamma Ray Imaging Device for Small-Animal Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Robert; Bradley, Eric; Majewski, Stan; Saha, Margaret S.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Welsh, Robert E.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, modular nuclear imaging device for in vivo imaging of small animals is described. A segmented scintillator is coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier. This combination is used to view the living system under study with a variety of collimators employed to limit the angular acceptance. A personal computer is coupled to a CAMAC electronic system for event-by-event data acquisition and subsequent selective data analysis. The system has been designed to exploit the availability of a wide range of ligands tagged with the isotope 125I. It has most recently been employed for a study of the transport of the cocaine analog, RTI-55, to the brain of a mouse. Results of studies to date and options for future expansion of the system will be described.

  3. The therapeutic lamp: treating small-animal phobias.

    PubMed

    Wrzesien, Maja; Alcañiz, Mariano; Botella, Cristina; Burkhardt, Jean-Marie; Bretón-López, Juana; Ortega, Mario; Brotons, Daniel Beneito

    2013-01-01

    We all have an irrational fear or two. Some of us get scared by an unexpected visit from a spider in our house; others get nervous when they look down from a high building. Fear is an evolutionary and adaptive function that can promote self-preservation and help us deal with the feared object or situation. However, when this state becomes excessive, it might develop into psychological disorders such as phobias, producing high anxiety and affecting everyday life. The Therapeutic Lamp is an interactive projection-based augmented-reality system for treating small-animal phobias. It aims to increase patient-therapist communication, promote more natural interaction, and improve the patient's engagement in the therapy. PMID:24807885

  4. Acoustic method for levitation of small living animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, W. J.; Cao, C. D.; Lü, Y. J.; Hong, Z. Y.; Wei, B.

    2006-11-01

    Ultrasonic levitation of some small living animals such as ant, ladybug, and young fish has been achieved with a single-axis acoustic levitator. The vitality of ant and ladybug is not evidently influenced during the acoustic levitation, whereas that of the young fish is reduced because of the inadequacy of water supply. Numerical analysis shows that the sound pressures on the ladybug's surface almost reach the incident pressure amplitude p0 due to sound scattering. It is estimated that 99.98% of the acoustic energy is reflected away from the ladybug. The acoustic radiation pressure pa on the ladybug's surface is only 1%-3% of p0, which plays a compression role on the central region and a suction role on the peripheral region.

  5. Hyperspectral and multispectral bioluminescence optical tomography for small animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Darvas, Felix; Bading, James R; Moats, Rex A; Conti, Peter S; Smith, Desmond J; Cherry, Simon R; Leahy, Richard M

    2005-12-01

    For bioluminescence imaging studies in small animals, it is important to be able to accurately localize the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the underlying bioluminescent source. The spectrum of light produced by the source that escapes the subject varies with the depth of the emission source because of the wavelength-dependence of the optical properties of tissue. Consequently, multispectral or hyperspectral data acquisition should help in the 3D localization of deep sources. In this paper, we describe a framework for fully 3D bioluminescence tomographic image acquisition and reconstruction that exploits spectral information. We describe regularized tomographic reconstruction techniques that use semi-infinite slab or FEM-based diffusion approximations of photon transport through turbid media. Singular value decomposition analysis was used for data dimensionality reduction and to illustrate the advantage of using hyperspectral rather than achromatic data. Simulation studies in an atlas-mouse geometry indicated that sub-millimeter resolution may be attainable given accurate knowledge of the optical properties of the animal. A fixed arrangement of mirrors and a single CCD camera were used for simultaneous acquisition of multispectral imaging data over most of the surface of the animal. Phantom studies conducted using this system demonstrated our ability to accurately localize deep point-like sources and show that a resolution of 1.5 to 2.2 mm for depths up to 6 mm can be achieved. We also include an in vivo study of a mouse with a brain tumour expressing firefly luciferase. Co-registration of the reconstructed 3D bioluminescent image with magnetic resonance images indicated good anatomical localization of the tumour. PMID:16306643

  6. Hyperspectral and multispectral bioluminescence optical tomography for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Darvas, Felix; Bading, James R.; Moats, Rex A.; Conti, Peter S.; Smith, Desmond J.; Cherry, Simon R.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2005-12-01

    For bioluminescence imaging studies in small animals, it is important to be able to accurately localize the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the underlying bioluminescent source. The spectrum of light produced by the source that escapes the subject varies with the depth of the emission source because of the wavelength-dependence of the optical properties of tissue. Consequently, multispectral or hyperspectral data acquisition should help in the 3D localization of deep sources. In this paper, we describe a framework for fully 3D bioluminescence tomographic image acquisition and reconstruction that exploits spectral information. We describe regularized tomographic reconstruction techniques that use semi-infinite slab or FEM-based diffusion approximations of photon transport through turbid media. Singular value decomposition analysis was used for data dimensionality reduction and to illustrate the advantage of using hyperspectral rather than achromatic data. Simulation studies in an atlas-mouse geometry indicated that sub-millimeter resolution may be attainable given accurate knowledge of the optical properties of the animal. A fixed arrangement of mirrors and a single CCD camera were used for simultaneous acquisition of multispectral imaging data over most of the surface of the animal. Phantom studies conducted using this system demonstrated our ability to accurately localize deep point-like sources and show that a resolution of 1.5 to 2.2 mm for depths up to 6 mm can be achieved. We also include an in vivo study of a mouse with a brain tumour expressing firefly luciferase. Co-registration of the reconstructed 3D bioluminescent image with magnetic resonance images indicated good anatomical localization of the tumour.

  7. Television image compression and small animal remote monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.; Jackson, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    It was shown that a subject can reliably discriminate a difference in video image quality (using a specific commercial product) for image compression levels ranging from 384 kbits per second to 1536 kbits per second. However, their discriminations are significantly influenced by whether or not the TV camera is stable or moving and whether or not the animals are quiescent or active, which is correlated with illumination level (daylight versus night illumination, respectively). The highest video rate used here was 1.54 megabits per second, which is about 18 percent of the so-called normal TV resolution of 8.4MHz. Since this video rate was judged to be acceptable by 27 of the 34 subjects (79 percent), for monitoring the general health and status of small animals within their illuminated (lights on) cages (regardless of whether the camera was stable or moved), it suggests that an immediate Space Station Freedom to ground bandwidth reduction of about 80 percent can be tolerated without a significant loss in general monitoring capability. Another general conclusion is that the present methodology appears to be effective in quantifying visual judgments of video image quality.

  8. Television image compression and small animal remote monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Richard F.; Jackson, Robert W.

    1990-04-01

    It was shown that a subject can reliably discriminate a difference in video image quality (using a specific commercial product) for image compression levels ranging from 384 kbits per second to 1536 kbits per second. However, their discriminations are significantly influenced by whether or not the TV camera is stable or moving and whether or not the animals are quiescent or active, which is correlated with illumination level (daylight versus night illumination, respectively). The highest video rate used here was 1.54 megabits per second, which is about 18 percent of the so-called normal TV resolution of 8.4MHz. Since this video rate was judged to be acceptable by 27 of the 34 subjects (79 percent), for monitoring the general health and status of small animals within their illuminated (lights on) cages (regardless of whether the camera was stable or moved), it suggests that an immediate Space Station Freedom to ground bandwidth reduction of about 80 percent can be tolerated without a significant loss in general monitoring capability. Another general conclusion is that the present methodology appears to be effective in quantifying visual judgments of video image quality.

  9. PET Quantification of Cerebral Oxygen Metabolism in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Temma, Takashi; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Enmi, Jun-ichiro; Iida, Hidehiro

    2014-01-01

    Understanding cerebral oxygen metabolism is of great importance in both clinical diagnosis and animal experiments because oxygen is a fundamental source of brain energy and supports brain functional activities. Since small animals such as rats are widely used to study various diseases including cerebral ischemia, cerebrovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases, the development of a noninvasive in vivo measurement method of cerebral oxygen metabolic parameters such as oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) as well as cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) has been a priority. Although positron emission tomography (PET) with 15O labeled gas tracers has been recognized as a powerful way to evaluate cerebral oxygen metabolism in humans, this method could not be applied to rats due to technical problems and there were no reports of PET measurement of cerebral oxygen metabolism in rats until an 15O-O2 injection method was developed a decade ago. Herein, we introduce an intravenous administration method using two types of injectable 15O-O2 and an 15O-O2 gas inhalation method through an airway placed in the trachea, which enables oxygen metabolism measurements in rats. PMID:25202714

  10. In vivo imaging of small animal models by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Shuoqi; Yang, Ran; Xiong, Jingwei; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Li, Changhui; Ren, Qiushi

    2012-02-01

    Small animal models, such as zebrafish, drosophila, C. elegan, is considered to be important models in comparative biology and diseases researches. Traditional imaging methods primarily employ several optical microscopic imaging modalities that rely on fluorescence labeling, which may have potential to affect the natural physiological progress. Thus a label-free imaging method is desired. Photoacoustic (PA) microscopy (PAM) is an emerging biomedical imaging method that combines optical contrast with ultrasonic detection, which is highly sensitive to the optical absorption contrast of living tissues, such as pigments, the vasculature and other optically absorbing organs. In this work, we reported the whole body label-free imaging of zebrafish larvae and drosophila pupa by PAM. Based on intrinsic optical absorption contrast, high resolution images of pigments, microvasculature and several other major organs have been obtained in vivo and non-invasively, and compared with their optical counterparts. We demonstrated that PAM has the potential to be a powerful non-invasive imaging method for studying larvae and pupa of various animal models.

  11. Laser surgery for selected small animal soft-tissue conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Kenneth E.

    1991-05-01

    With the acquisition of a Nd:YAG and a CO2 laser in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Oklahoma State University in 1989, over 100 small animal clinical cases have been managed with these modern modalities for surgical excision and tissue vaporization. Most procedures have been for oncologic problems, but inflammatory, infectious, or congenital conditions including vaporization of acral lick 'granulomas,' excision/vaporization of foreign body induced, infected draining tracts, and resection of elongated soft palates have been successfully accomplished. Laser excision or vaporization of both benign and malignant neoplasms have effectively been performed and include feline nasal squamous cell carcinoma, mast cell tumors, and rectal/anal neoplasms. Results to date have been excellent with animals exhibiting little postoperative pain, swelling, and inflammation. Investigations involving application of laser energy for tissue welding of esophageal lacerations and hepatitic interstitial hyperthermia for metastatic colorectal cancer have also shown potential. A review of cases with an emphasis on survival time and postoperative morbidity suggests that carefully planned laser surgical procedures in clinical veterinary practice done with standardized protocols and techniques offer an acceptable means of treating conditions that were previously considered extremely difficult or virtually impossible to perform.

  12. Dosimetry in small-animal CT using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.-L.; Park, S.-J.; Jeon, P.-H.; Jo, B.-D.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Small-animal computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging devices are increasingly being used in biological research. While investigators are mainly interested in high-contrast, low-noise, and high-resolution anatomical images, relatively large radiation doses are required, and there is also growing concern over the radiological risk from preclinical experiments. This study was conducted to determine the radiation dose in a mouse model for dosimetric estimates using the GEANT4 application for tomographic emission simulations (GATE) and to extend its techniques to various small-animal CT applications. Radiation dose simulations were performed with the same parameters as those for the measured micro-CT data, using the MOBY phantom, a pencil ion chamber and an electrometer with a CT detector. For physical validation of radiation dose, absorbed dose of brain and liver in mouse were evaluated to compare simulated results with physically measured data using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The mean difference between simulated and measured data was less than 2.9% at 50 kVp X-ray source. The absorbed doses of 37 brain tissues and major organs of the mouse were evaluated according to kVp changes. The absorbed dose over all of the measurements in the brain (37 types of tissues) consistently increased and ranged from 42.4 to 104.0 mGy. Among the brain tissues, the absorbed dose of the hypothalamus (157.8-414.30 mGy) was the highest for the beams at 50-80 kVp, and that of the corpus callosum (11.2-26.6 mGy) was the lowest. These results can be used as a dosimetric database to control mouse doses and preclinical targeted radiotherapy experiments. In addition, to accurately calculate the mouse-absorbed dose, the X-ray spectrum, detector alignment, and uncertainty in the elemental composition of the simulated materials must be accurately modeled.

  13. Quantum Dots for In Vivo Small-Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bentolila, Laurent A.; Ebenstein, Yuval; Weiss, Shimon

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is poised to transform research, prevention, and treatment of cancer through the development of novel diagnostic imaging methods and targeted therapies. In particular, the use of nanoparticles for imaging has gained considerable momentum in recent years. This review focuses on the growing contribution of quantum dots (QDs) for in vivo imaging in small-animal models. Fluorescent QDs, which are small nanocrystals (1–10 nm) made of inorganic semiconductor materials, possess several unique optical properties best suited for in vivo imaging. Because of quantum confinement effects, the emission color of QDs can be precisely tuned by size from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared. QDs are extremely bright and photostable. They are also characterized by a wide absorption band and a narrow emission band, which makes them ideal for multiplexing. Finally, the large surface area of QDs permits the assembly of various contrast agents to design multimodality imaging probes. To date, biocompatible QD conjugates have been used successfully for sentinel lymph node mapping, tumor targeting, tumor angiogenesis imaging, and metastatic cell tracking. Here we consider these novel breakthroughs in light of their potential clinical applications and discuss how QDs might offer a suitable platform to unite disparate imaging modalities and provide information along a continuum of length scales. PMID:19289434

  14. Oral and dental imaging equipment and techniques for small animals.

    PubMed

    Coffman, Curt R; Brigden, Glenn M

    2013-05-01

    In the diagnosis and treatment of oral and dental diseases in dogs and cats, digital intraoral radiography offers many advantages over the use of standard dental radiographic film, including rapid image generation, easier exposure correction, enhancement, and paperless storage. Digital image receptors can be divided into 2 main types, direct digital systems using charged coupled devices and complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensors, and indirect digital systems using phosphor plates with a computerized scanner. Each system is paired with a computer software system to allow handling, visualization, enhancement, sharing, and archiving of the images. PMID:23643018

  15. Simultaneous x-rays/optical tomography of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, A.; Leabad, M.; Bordy, T.; Dinten, J.-M.; Peltié, P.; Rizo, P.

    2007-03-01

    A small animal multimodality tomographer dedicated to the co-registration of fluorescence optical signal and X-rays measurements has been developed in our laboratory. The purpose of such a system is to offer the possibility to get in vivo anatomical and functional information at once. Moreover, anatomical measurements can be used as a regularization factor in order to get the reconstructions of the biodistribution of fluorochromes more accurate and to speed up the treatment. The optical system is basically composed with a CW laser (Krypton, 752 nm) for an optimal excitation of Alexa-Fluor 750 fluorochromes, and a CCD camera coupled with a combination of filters for the fluorescence detection. The animal is placed inside a transparent tube filled with an index matching fluid. In order to perform multiple views of fluorescence data acquisitions, the cylinder is fixed to a rotating stage. The excitation beam is brought to the cylinder via two mirrors mounted on translation plates allowing a vertical scan. The optical data acquisitions are performed with a high sensitivity CCD camera. The X-ray generator and the X-ray detector have been placed perpendicularly to the optical chain. A first study on phantoms was conducted to evaluate the feasibility, to test the linearity and the reproducibility, and to fix the parameters for the co-registration. These test experiments were reproduced by considering mice in the oesophagus of which thin glass tubes containing fluorochromes were inserted. Finally, the performance of the system was evaluated in vivo on mice bearing tumours in the lungs, tagged with Transferin-AlexaFluor 750.

  16. A High Spatial Resolution CT Scanner for Small Animal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicalini, E.; Baldazzi, G.; Belcari, N.; Del Guerra, A.; Gombia, M.; Motta, A.; Panetta, D.

    2006-01-01

    We have built a micro-CT system that will be integrated with a small animal PET scanner. The components are: an X-ray source with a peak voltage of up to 60 kV, a power of 10 W and a focal spot size of 30 μm; a CCD coupled to CsI(Tl) scintillator, subdivided into 128×3072 square pixels, each with a size of 48 μm; stepping motors for the sample roto-translation; a PCI acquisition board; electronic boards to control and read-out the CCD. A program in Lab VIEW controls the data acquisition. Reconstruction algorithms have been implemented for fan-beam and cone-beam configurations. Images of a bar pattern have been acquired to evaluate the detector performance: the CTF curve has been extracted from the data, obtaining a value of 10 % at 5 lp/mm and about 3 % at 10 lp/mm. Tomographic acquisitions have been performed with a test phantom consisting of a Plexiglas cylinder, 3 cm in diameter, with holes ranging from 3 mm down to 0.6 mm in diameter, filled with different materials. The contrast resolution has been extracted from the reconstructed images: a value of 6 % (in water) for a cubic voxel size of 80 μm has been obtained.

  17. Bioavailability and bioinequivalence of drug formulations in small animals.

    PubMed

    Watson, A D

    1992-06-01

    Differences in bioavailability of many drugs from their various dosage forms have been shown to be relatively common in human medicine. Although comparable bioavailability ('bioequivalence') is though to ensure comparable clinical effectiveness and safety ('therapeutic equivalence'), the relationship between bioinequivalence and therapeutic inequivalence is less clear. Thus the prevalence of clinically important differences in bioavailability is unknown. While similar concerns have arisen about drug products used in small animal practice, there have been few investigations and some earlier reports are incomplete. However, there are indications of bioinequivalence with enteral formulations of ampicillin, aspirin, chloramphenicol, digoxin, mitotane, oxytetracycline, penicillin V and theophylline. Other studies have suggested bioequivalence with enteral formulations of chloramphenicol, digoxin, phenytoin, oxytetracycline and thyroxine. Limited data for injectable preparations showed bioinequivalence with chloramphenicol and possibly oxytetracycline. There is no reason to expect formulation-related bioinequivalence to be less prevalent in veterinary than in human medicine. Indeed, it may be more common in veterinary practice because other potential influences on bioavailability (food, diseases, other drugs, etc.) are frequently ignored, and cheaper generic products are often favoured for economic reasons. PMID:1433477

  18. Near-field thermoacoustic tomography of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Hajiaboli, Amir; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-06-01

    Near-field radiofrequency thermoacoustic (NRT) tomography is a new imaging method that was developed to mitigate limitations of conventional thermoacoustic imaging approaches, related to hard compromises between signal strength and spatial resolution. By utilizing ultrahigh-energy electromagnetic impulses at ~20 ns duration along with improved energy absorption coupling in the near-field, this method can deliver high-resolution images without compromising signal to noise ratio. NRT is a promising modality, offering cost-effectiveness and ease of implementation and it can be conveniently scaled to image small animals and humans. However, several of the performance metrics of the method are not yet documented. In this paper, we characterize the expected imaging performance via numerical simulations based on a finite-integration time-domain (FITD) technique and experiments using tissue mimicking phantoms and different biological samples. Furthermore, we show for the first time whole-body tomographic imaging results from mice, revealing clear anatomical details along with highly dissipative inclusions introduced for control. The best spatial resolution achieved for those experiments was 150 µm.

  19. Development of automatic movement analysis system for a small laboratory animal using image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, Satoshi; Kawasue, Kikuhito; Koshimoto, Chihiro

    2013-03-01

    Activity analysis in a small laboratory animal is an effective procedure for various bioscience fields. The simplest way to obtain animal activity data is just observation and recording manually, even though this is labor intensive and rather subjective. In order to analyze animal movement automatically and objectivity, expensive equipment is usually needed. In the present study, we develop animal activity analysis system by means of a template matching method with video recorded movements in laboratory animal at a low cost.

  20. Small animal behavioral triage: a guide for practitioners.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kenneth M; Martin, Debbie; Shaw, Julie K

    2014-05-01

    Behavioral concerns are the principal cause of a weakened human-animal bond and pet relinquishment. Triaging behavioral concerns and providing early intervention may be the difference between a patient remaining in its current home or relinquishment. Prevention and intervention behavior services using a team approach may also improve pet retention through client education and appropriate assistance. Identifying and integrating qualified animal behavior professionals to assist with the hospital's behavior team ensures appropriate support is provided to the client and patient. PMID:24766692

  1. Digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Mattoon, J S

    2006-01-01

    Digital radiography has been used in human medical imaging since the 1980s with recent and rapid acceptance into the veterinary profession. Using advanced image capture and computer technology, radiographic images are viewed on a computer monitor. This is advantageous because radiographic images can be adjusted using dedicated computer software to maximize diagnostic image quality. Digital images can be accessed at computer workstations throughout the hospital, instantly retrieved from computer archives, and transmitted via the internet for consultation or case referral. Digital radiographic data can also be incorporated into a hospital information system, making record keeping an entirely paperless process. Digital image acquisition is faster when compared to conventional screen-film radiography, improving workflow and patient throughput. Digital radiography greatly reduces the need for 'retake' radiographs because of wide latitude in exposure factors. Also eliminated are costs associated with radiographic film and x-ray film development. Computed radiography, charged coupled devices, and flat panel detectors are types of digital radiography systems currently available. PMID:16971994

  2. Theoretical considerations on maximum running speeds for large and small animals.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Mauricio A

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical equations for fast running speeds are presented and analyzed. One of the equations and its associated model predict that animals tend to experience larger mechanical stresses in their limbs (muscles, tendons and bones) as a result of larger stride lengths, suggesting a structural restriction entailing the existence of an absolute maximum possible stride length. The consequence for big animals is that an increasingly larger body mass implies decreasing maximal speeds, given that the stride frequency generally decreases for increasingly larger animals. Another restriction, acting on small animals, is discussed only in preliminary terms, but it seems safe to assume from previous studies that for a given range of body masses of small animals, those which are bigger are faster. The difference between speed scaling trends for large and small animals implies the existence of a range of intermediate body masses corresponding to the fastest animals. PMID:26646766

  3. Comparison between diagnostic ultrasonography and radiography in the evaluation of horses and cattle with thoracic disease: 56 cases (1984-1985).

    PubMed

    Reef, V B; Boy, M G; Reid, C F; Elser, A

    1991-06-15

    The results of radiography and ultrasonography were compared on 56 horses and cows with lower respiratory tract disease. Ultrasonography was more sensitive than radiography for the detection of small pleural effusions and consolidations in large animals. The side of the thorax affected and the character of the pleural fluid and lung in large animals with pleural effusion can be evaluated ultrasonographically. The periphery of the lung must be affected to characterize pulmonary lesions ultrasonographically. Radiography is the best technique to characterize lesions deep within the lung when the periphery of the lung is normal. PMID:1885315

  4. Construct validation of a small-animal thoracocentesis simulator.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Training students to perform emergency procedures is a critical but challenging component of veterinary education. Thoracocentesis is traditionally taught in the classroom, with students progressing to "see one, do one, teach one" during the clinical phase of their education. This method of teaching does not permit students to gain proficiency before performing thoracocentesis on a live animal in a high-stakes, high-stress environment and is dependent on the availability of animals requiring the procedure. A veterinary thoracocentesis simulator has been created to allow students an opportunity for repetitive practice in a low-stakes environment. This study evaluated the face, content, and construct validity of the thoracocentesis simulator. Face and content validation were confirmed by survey results, and construct validity was assessed through comparison of student and veterinarian performance on the simulator. Students' median checklist and global rating scores were significantly lower than those of the veterinarians, and students took significantly longer to perform the procedure, indicating that the simulator was able to differentiate the relative expertise of the user and establishing construct validity. This study supported the use of the thoracocentesis simulator for educators to demonstrate proper technique, for students to practice the steps needed to perform the procedure and experience an approximation of the tactile aspects of the task, and for formative assessment before performing the procedure on client-owned animals. PMID:25148881

  5. A resistive heating system for homeothermic maintenance in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Kersemans, Veerle; Gilchrist, Stuart; Allen, Philip D.; Beech, John S.; Kinchesh, Paul; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Smart, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop an MR-compatible resistive heater for temperature maintenance of anaesthetized animals. Materials and Methods An MR-compatible resistive electrical heater was formed from a tightly-wound twisted pair wire, interfaced to a homeothermic maintenance controller. Fat-suppressed images and localized spectra were acquired with the twisted pair heater and a near-identical single strand heater during operation at maximum power. Data were also acquired in the absence of heating to demonstrate the insensitivity of MR to distortions arising from the passage of current through the heater elements. The efficacy of temperature maintenance was examined by measuring rectal temperature immediately following induction of general anesthesia and throughout and after the acquisition of a heater artifact-prone image series. Results Images and spectra acquired in the presence and absence of DC current through the twisted pair heater were identical whereas the passage of current through the single strand wire created field shifts and lineshape distortions. Temperature that is lost during anesthesia induction was recovered within approximately 10–20 minutes of induction, and a stable temperature is reached as the animal's temperature approaches the set target. Conclusion The twisted pair wire heater does not interfere with MR image quality and maintains adequate thermal input to the animal to maintain body temperature. PMID:25863135

  6. High Sensitivity SPECT for Small Animals and Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Gregory S.

    2015-02-28

    Imaging systems using single gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes typically implement collimators in order to form the images. However, a tradeoff in sensitivity is inherent in the use of collimators, and modern preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems detect a very small fraction of emitted gamma-rays (<0.3%). We have built a collimator-less system, which can reach sensitivity of 40% for 99mTc imaging, while still producing images of sufficient spatial resolution for certain applications in thin objects such as mice, small plants, and well plates used for in vitro experiments.

  7. Skull Radiography

    MedlinePlus

    What you need to know about… Skull Radiography X-ray images of the skull are taken when it is necessary to see the cranium, facial bones or jaw bones. ... Among other things, x-ray exams of the skull can show fractures. Patient Preparation Before the examination, ...

  8. Endodontic radiography.

    PubMed

    Nixon, P P; Robinson, P B

    1997-05-01

    The ability to take radiographs of good diagnostic quality is an essential prerequisite for successful root canal therapy. However, the operator also has a responsibility to limit the radiation dose to the patient. This article reviews the radiography required for root canal treatment with these criteria in mind. PMID:9515363

  9. An Ethanol Vapor Chamber System for Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Jiang, Lihong; Du, Hongying; Mason, Graeme F.

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol vapor chambers have been utilized widely in alcohol research since their introduction in 1971, and implementations of these systems are now available commercially. Here, we present a modification of the chamber that can be built at lower cost and greater simplicity of operation. The six-chamber system for rats has multiple air pumps. Ethanol vapor levels are adjusted with the air flow rate, ethanol drip rate, and dilution with room air, without a heater or fans. Ethanol vapor concentrations are measured with a breathalyzer, using room air to dilute the vapor chamber output into the range of the breathalyzer. Multiple pumps provide backup to ensure animal survival in the case of failure of the primary air pump. Tests in animals demonstrated comfortable and stable elevation of blood ethanol, with tight control of the ethanol vapor concentrations and the ability to select from a broad range of levels. The ethanol vapor measurement was rapid and efficient. The parts cost was a few thousand U.S. dollars. This vapor chamber system features low cost, ease of use, and convenient and inexpensive measurement of ethanol vapor concentrations. The lack of a heater and electrical components that could come into contact with ethanol in our case facilitated institutional approval. PMID:22575431

  10. Wireless neural stimulation in freely behaving small animals.

    PubMed

    Arfin, Scott K; Long, Michael A; Fee, Michale S; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2009-07-01

    We introduce a novel wireless, low-power neural stimulation system for use in freely behaving animals. The system consists of an external transmitter and a miniature, implantable wireless receiver-stimulator. The implant uses a custom integrated chip to deliver biphasic current pulses to four addressable bipolar electrodes at 32 selectable current levels (10 microA to 1 mA). To achieve maximal battery life, the chip enters a sleep mode when not needed and can be awakened remotely when required. To test our device, we implanted bipolar stimulating electrodes into the songbird motor nucleus HVC (formerly called the high vocal center) of zebra finches. Single-neuron recordings revealed that wireless stimulation of HVC led to a strong increase of spiking activity in its downstream target, the robust nucleus of the arcopallium. When we used this device to deliver biphasic pulses of current randomly during singing, singing activity was prematurely terminated in all birds tested. Thus our device is highly effective for remotely modulating a neural circuit and its corresponding behavior in an untethered, freely behaving animal. PMID:19386759

  11. An ethanol vapor chamber system for small animals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Jiang, Lihong; Du, Hongying; Mason, Graeme F

    2012-06-30

    Ethanol vapor chambers have been utilized widely in alcohol research since their introduction in 1971, and implementations of these systems are now available commercially. Here, we present a modification of the chamber that can be built at lower cost and greater simplicity of operation. The six-chamber system for rats has multiple air pumps. Ethanol vapor levels are adjusted with the air flow rate, ethanol drip rate, and dilution with room air, without a heater or fans. Ethanol vapor concentrations are measured with a breathalyzer, using room air to dilute the vapor chamber output into the range of the breathalyzer. Multiple pumps provide backup to ensure animal survival in the case of failure of the primary air pump. Tests in animals demonstrated comfortable and stable elevation of blood ethanol, with tight control of the ethanol vapor concentrations and the ability to select from a broad range of levels. The ethanol vapor measurement was rapid and efficient. The parts cost was a few thousand U.S. dollars. This vapor chamber system features low cost, ease of use, and convenient and inexpensive measurement of ethanol vapor concentrations. The lack of a heater and electrical components that could come into contact with ethanol in our case facilitated institutional approval. PMID:22575431

  12. Wireless Neural Stimulation in Freely Behaving Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Arfin, Scott K.; Long, Michael A.; Fee, Michale S.; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a novel wireless, low-power neural stimulation system for use in freely behaving animals. The system consists of an external transmitter and a miniature, implantable wireless receiver–stimulator. The implant uses a custom integrated chip to deliver biphasic current pulses to four addressable bipolar electrodes at 32 selectable current levels (10 μA to 1 mA). To achieve maximal battery life, the chip enters a sleep mode when not needed and can be awakened remotely when required. To test our device, we implanted bipolar stimulating electrodes into the songbird motor nucleus HVC (formerly called the high vocal center) of zebra finches. Single-neuron recordings revealed that wireless stimulation of HVC led to a strong increase of spiking activity in its downstream target, the robust nucleus of the arcopallium. When we used this device to deliver biphasic pulses of current randomly during singing, singing activity was prematurely terminated in all birds tested. Thus our device is highly effective for remotely modulating a neural circuit and its corresponding behavior in an untethered, freely behaving animal. PMID:19386759

  13. Modeling in vivo fluorescence of small animals using TracePro software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas; Rajwa, Bartek; Freniere, Edward R.; Smith, Linda; Hassler, Richard; Robinson, J. Paul

    2007-02-01

    The theoretical modeling of fluorescence excitation, emission, and propagation within living tissue has been a limiting factor in the development and calibration of in vivo small animal fluorescence imagers. To date, no definitive calibration standard, or phantom, has been developed for use with small animal fluorescence imagers. Our work in the theoretical modeling of fluorescence in small animals using solid modeling software is useful in optimizing the design of small animal imaging systems, and in predicting their response to a theoretical model. In this respect, it is also valuable in the design of a fluorescence phantom for use in in vivo small animal imaging. The use of phantoms is a critical step in the testing and calibration of most diagnostic medical imaging systems. Despite this, a realistic, reproducible, and informative phantom has yet to be produced for use in small animal fluorescence imaging. By modeling the theoretical response of various types of phantoms, it is possible to determine which parameters are necessary for accurately modeling fluorescence within inhomogenous scattering media such as tissue. Here, we present the model that has been developed, the challenges and limitations associated with developing such a model, and the applicability of this model to experimental results obtained in a commercial small animal fluorescence imager.

  14. [Animal experiments on cementing small osteochondral fragments with fibrin glue].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H

    1980-01-01

    An experiment on revascularization of glued osteochondral fragments was carried out. A chiseled part of the medial femoral condyle of the knee joint of the rabbit was fixed on the right side with an acryl adhesive and on the left side with a new fibrinogen adhesive system (FAS), consisting of highly concentrated fibrinogen, thrombin, and factor XIII. The animals were sacrificed after three, six, ten, and twenty eight days. The FAS is changed into granulation tissue rich in vessels and, therefore, there is a quick revascularization of the fragments soon after three days. On the contrary the acryl adhesive is a foreign body and prevents ingrowth of capillaries during the time of investigation. Immobilization with plaster is necessary to prevent the fragment from gliding off. PMID:6972890

  15. Innovations in Small-Animal PET/MR Imaging Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Tsoumpas, Charalampos; Visvikis, Dimitris; Loudos, George

    2016-04-01

    Multimodal imaging has led to a more detailed exploration of different physiologic processes with integrated PET/MR imaging being the most recent entry. Although the clinical need is still questioned, it is well recognized that it represents one of the most active and promising fields of medical imaging research in terms of software and hardware. The hardware developments have moved from small detector components to high-performance PET inserts and new concepts in full systems. Conversely, the software focuses on the efficient performance of necessary corrections without the use of CT data. The most recent developments in both directions are reviewed. PMID:26952725

  16. Small animal ocular biometry using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Marco; Kocaoglu, Omer; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Borja, David; Urs, Raksha; Chou, Tsung-Han; Porciatti, Vittorio; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice

    2010-02-01

    A custom-built OCT system was used to obtain images of the whole mouse eye. We developed a semi-automated segmentation method to detect the boundaries of the anterior and posterior corneal, lens and retinal surfaces as well as the anterior surface of the iris. The radii of curvature of the surfaces were calculated using a conic section fit of each boundary. Image distortions due to refraction of the OCT beam at the successive boundaries were corrected using a ray-tracing algorithm. Corrected ocular distances, radii of curvature of the cornea and lens surfaces, and anterior chamber angle were obtained on 3 C57BL/6J mice. In vivo imaging of the whole eye, segmentation, conic function fits and correction were successful in all three animals. The posterior lens surface of one mouse could not be fit accurately with a conic section. Biometric parameters of C57BL/6J mice compared well with previous published data obtained from histological sections. The study demonstrates the feasibility of quantitative in vivo biometry of mouse models.

  17. In situ synchrotron study of liquid phase separation process in Al-10 wt.% Bi immiscible alloys by radiography and small angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W. Q.; Zhang, S. G.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    Liquid phase separation process of immiscible alloys has been repeatedly tuned to create special structure for developing materials with unique properties. However, the fundamental understanding of the liquid phase separation process is still under debate due to the characteristics of immiscible alloys in opacity and high temperature environment of alloy melt. Here, the liquid phase separation process in solidifying Al-Bi immiscible alloys was investigated by synchrotron radiography and small angle X-ray scattering. We provide the first direct evidence of surface segregation prior to liquid decomposition and present that the time dependence on the number of Bi droplets follows Logistic curve. The liquid decomposition results from a nucleation and growth process rather than spinodal decomposition mechanism because of the positive deviation from Porod's law. We also found that the nanometer-sized Bi-rich droplets in Al matrix melt present mass fractal characteristics.

  18. [The application of industrial endoscope to observation of the ocular-fundus in small laboratory animals].

    PubMed

    Kiyosawa, I; Aruga, N; Kawakubo, M; Naito, J; Saito, T R; Takahashi, K W

    1992-01-01

    Observation and recording methods of the ocular-fundus in small laboratory animals were studied using the industrial endoscope and VTR systems, respectively. The ocular-fundus was observed widely, brightly and clearly in the usual animal facility. In addition, the ocular-fundus was recorded easily and it was possible to examine the ocular-fundus recorded by the VTR systems. PMID:1740168

  19. Antimicrobial stewardship in small animal veterinary practice: from theory to practice.

    PubMed

    Guardabassi, Luca; Prescott, John F

    2015-03-01

    Despite the increasing recognition of the critical role for antimicrobial stewardship in preventing the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria, examples of effective antimicrobial stewardship programs are rare in small animal veterinary practice. This article highlights the basic requirements for establishing stewardship programs at the clinic level. The authors provide suggestions and approaches to overcome constraints and to move from theoretic concepts toward implementation of effective antimicrobial stewardship programs in small animal clinics. PMID:25721619

  20. Recommendations on vaccination for Asian small animal practitioners: a report of the WSAVA Vaccination Guidelines Group.

    PubMed

    Day, M J; Karkare, U; Schultz, R D; Squires, R; Tsujimoto, H

    2015-02-01

    In 2012 and 2013, the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) Vaccination Guidelines Group (VGG) undertook fact-finding visits to several Asian countries, with a view to developing advice for small companion animal practitioners in Asia related to the administration of vaccines to dogs and cats. The VGG met with numerous first opinion practitioners, small animal association leaders, academic veterinarians, government regulators and industry representatives and gathered further information from a survey of almost 700 veterinarians in India, China, Japan and Thailand. Although there were substantial differences in the nature and magnitude of the challenges faced by veterinarians in each country, and also differences in the resources available to meet those challenges, overall, the VGG identified insufficient undergraduate and postgraduate training in small companion animal microbiology, immunology and vaccinology. In most of the countries, there has been little academic research into small animal infectious diseases. This, coupled with insufficient laboratory diagnostic support, has limited the growth of knowledge concerning the prevalence and circulating strains of key infectious agents in most of the countries visited. Asian practitioners continue to recognise clinical infections that are now considered uncommon or rare in western countries. In particular, canine rabies virus infection poses a continuing threat to animal and human health in this region. Both nationally manufactured and international dog and cat vaccines are variably available in the Asian countries, but the product ranges are small and dominated by multi-component vaccines with a licensed duration of immunity (DOI) of only 1 year, or no description of DOI. Asian practitioners are largely unaware of current global trends in small animal vaccinology or of the WSAVA vaccination guidelines. Consequently, most practitioners continue to deliver annual revaccination with both core and non

  1. Animal Well-Being in Small Poultry Flocks: Improving bird health and product quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumer interest in farm animal welfare is increasing and, while there is little legislation, voluntary welfare assurance programs exist; however, most small poultry producers do not participate in these programs. Raising birds in small flocks has some inherent welfare advantages, such as ample sp...

  2. Digital Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    System One, a digital radiography system, incorporates a reusable image medium (RIM) which retains an image. No film is needed; the RIM is read with a laser scanner, and the information is used to produce a digital image on an image processor. The image is stored on an optical disc. System allows the radiologist to "dial away" unwanted images to compare views on three screens. It is compatible with existing equipment and cost efficient. It was commercialized by a Stanford researcher from energy selective technology developed under a NASA grant.

  3. NEW INSTRUMENTS AND MEASUREMENT METHODS: Medical ion radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafranova, M. G.; Shafranov, M. D.

    1980-06-01

    The aim of this review is to acquaint the reader with the principles and methods of ion radiography—a method of studying the inner structure of an object by using heavy charged particles. Along with the refinement of the traditional x-ray method of diagnostics and the development of a number of new methods, such as positron tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance, and in spite of the great advances attained in x-radiography in recent years, a persistent search continues for new, refined methods. First of all, efforts are directed toward seeking effective methods of early diagnosis of tumor lesions with less danger than in x-radiography. Studies have been conducted in a number of countries in the past decade on the possibility of applying heavy charged particles of relatively high energies for these purposes. Ion radiography enables one to obtain a higher contrast image than x-radiography at lower doses of irradiation, and to differentiate soft tissues and to detect in them anomalies of small dimensions. It opens up the possibility of obtaining new diagnostic information. Theoretical studies in the field of ion radiography and experiments on animals, on human tissues, and in a number of cases, on patients, have shown the promise offered by using ions for diagnosing not only tumors, but also a number of other serious lesions. This new field of study has incorporated the experience of particle and nuclear physics and widely employs its variety of investigational methods. This article also treats problems involving the application of accelerators for ion radiography and specifications for the beam parameters and for the particle detectors. This review gives an account of the advances in this new field of studies and the prospects for its development and the difficulties on the pathway of introducing it into practice.

  4. Frequency domain tomography in small animals with the equation of radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Kui; Moa-Anderson, Bryte; Bal, Guillaume; Gu, Xuejun; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a model-based iterative image reconstruction scheme based on the equation of radiative transfer in the frequency domain for the applications in small animal optical tomographic imaging. To test the utility of such a code in small animal imaging we have furthermore developed a numerical phantom of a mouse. In simulation studies using this and other phantoms, we found that to make truly use of phase information in the reconstruction process modulation frequencies well above 100 MHz are necessary. Only at these higher frequencies the phase shifts introduced by the lesions of interest are large enough to be measured. For smaller frequencies no substantial improvements over steady-state systems are achieved in small geometries typical for small animal imaging.

  5. Particle Beam Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken; Ekdahl, Carl

    2014-02-01

    Particle beam radiography, which uses a variety of particle probes (neutrons, protons, electrons, gammas and potentially other particles) to study the structure of materials and objects noninvasively, is reviewed, largely from an accelerator perspective, although the use of cosmic rays (mainly muons but potentially also high-energy neutrinos) is briefly reviewed. Tomography is a form of radiography which uses multiple views to reconstruct a three-dimensional density map of an object. There is a very wide range of applications of radiography and tomography, from medicine to engineering and security, and advances in instrumentation, specifically the development of electronic detectors, allow rapid analysis of the resultant radiographs. Flash radiography is a diagnostic technique for large high-explosive-driven hydrodynamic experiments that is used at many laboratories. The bremsstrahlung radiation pulse from an intense relativistic electron beam incident onto a high-Z target is the source of these radiographs. The challenge is to provide radiation sources intense enough to penetrate hundreds of g/cm2 of material, in pulses short enough to stop the motion of high-speed hydrodynamic shocks, and with source spots small enough to resolve fine details. The challenge has been met with a wide variety of accelerator technologies, including pulsed-power-driven diodes, air-core pulsed betatrons and high-current linear induction accelerators. Accelerator technology has also evolved to accommodate the experimenters' continuing quest for multiple images in time and space. Linear induction accelerators have had a major role in these advances, especially in providing multiple-time radiographs of the largest hydrodynamic experiments.

  6. Imaging Techniques for Small Animal Models of Pulmonary Disease: MR Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Driehuys, Bastiaan; Hedlund, Laurence W.

    2009-01-01

    In vivo magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) of the small animal lung has become a valuable research tool, especially for preclinical studies. MRM offers a noninvasive and nondestructive tool for imaging small animals longitudinally and at high spatial resolution. We summarize some of the technical and biologic problems and solutions associated with imaging the small animal lung and describe several important pulmonary disease applications. A major advantage of MR is direct imaging of the gas spaces of the lung using breathable gases such as helium and xenon. When polarized, these gases become rich MR signal sources. In animals breathing hyperpolarized helium, the dynamics of gas distribution can be followed and airway constrictions and obstructions can be detected. Diffusion coefficients of helium can be calculated from diffusion-sensitive images, which can reveal micro-structural changes in the lungs associated with pathologies such as emphysema and fibrosis. Unlike helium, xenon in the lung is absorbed by blood and exhibits different frequencies in gas, tissue, or erythrocytes. Thus, with MR imaging, the movement of xenon gas can be tracked through pulmonary compartments to detect defects of gas transfer. MRM has become a valuable tool for studying morphologic and functional changes in small animal models of lung diseases. PMID:17325972

  7. Electron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher

    2005-05-17

    A system capable of performing radiography using a beam of electrons. Diffuser means receive a beam of electrons and diffuse the electrons before they enter first matching quadrupoles where the diffused electrons are focused prior to the diffused electrons entering an object. First imaging quadrupoles receive the focused diffused electrons after the focused diffused electrons have been scattered by the object for focusing the scattered electrons. Collimator means receive the scattered electrons and remove scattered electrons that have scattered to large angles. Second imaging quadrupoles receive the collimated scattered electrons and refocus the collimated scattered electrons and map the focused collimated scattered electrons to transverse locations on an image plane representative of the electrons' positions in the object.

  8. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Kang-Hsin Wang, Ken; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (‘tubular’ geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (‘pancake’ geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry

  9. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal ('tubular' geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal ('pancake' geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry, respectively

  10. Multimodality imaging combination in small animal via point-based registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. C.; Wu, T. H.; Lin, M. H.; Huang, Y. H.; Guo, W. Y.; Chen, C. L.; Wang, T. C.; Yin, W. H.; Lee, J. S.

    2006-12-01

    We present a system of image co-registration in small animal study. Marker-based registration is chosen because of its considerable advantage that the fiducial feature is independent of imaging modality. We also experimented with different scanning protocols and different fiducial marker sizes to improve registration accuracy. Co-registration was conducted using rat phantom fixed by stereotactic frame. Overall, the co-registration accuracy was in sub-millimeter level and close to intrinsic system error. Therefore, we conclude that the system is an accurate co-registration method to be used in small animal studies.

  11. A new procedure for fundus photography and fluorescein angiography in small laboratory animal eyes.

    PubMed

    DiLoreto, D; Grover, D A; del Cerro, C; del Cerro, M

    1994-02-01

    Increasing interest in retinal research demands continuous improvement of experimental techniques and interpretation. Thus, the purpose of our research was to devise a new method for funduscopic photography and fluorescein angiography in the normal or diseased retina of the small laboratory animal that would produce results comparable in optical quality and field coverage to those obtained in human clinical practice. To enhance the view of the small eye, a 2.2 Volk Panretinal lens was held in apposition to the lens of a clinical fundus camera, the Topcon TRC 50FT, by means of a custom made metal sleeve. Albino mice, albino rats, and pigmented rats were photographed. Fluorescein angiography was performed on pigmented rats. Fluorescein was administered intravenously via the jugular vein at a dose of 5 mg/kg. Various speeds of film and flash settings were used depending on the light source and the pigmentation of the animal. Attachment of the 2.2 Panretinal lens to the clinical fundus camera allowed for more clearly defined fundus photographs of the small laboratory animal, as well as an enlarged field of observation over conventional techniques. Consequently, angiography fields and stages documented in the small laboratory animal approximated those obtained in human clinical practice. This technique facilitates the visualization of small fundi and it allows for a fuller documentation of experimental retinal models. PMID:8194363

  12. Practical method for radioactivity distribution analysis in small-animal PET cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    Slavine, Nikolai V.; Antich, Peter P.

    2008-01-01

    We present a practical method for radioactivity distribution analysis in small-animal tumors and organs using positron emission tomography imaging with a calibrated source of known activity and size in the field of view. We reconstruct the imaged mouse together with a source under the same conditions, using an iterative method, Maximum Likelihood Expectation-Maximization with System Modeling, capable of delivering high resolution images. Corrections for the ratios of geometrical efficiencies, radioisotope decay in time and photon attenuation are included in the algorithm. We demonstrate reconstruction results for the amount of radioactivity within the scanned mouse in a sample study of osteolytic and osteoblastic bone metastasis from prostate cancer xenografts. Data acquisition was performed on the small-animal PET system which was tested with different radioactive sources, phantoms and animals to achieve high sensitivity and spatial resolution. Our method uses high resolution images to determine the volume of organ or tumor and the amount of their radioactivity, has the possibility of saving time, effort and the necessity to sacrifice animals. This method has utility for prognosis and quantitative analysis in small-animal cancer studies, and will enhance the assessment of characteristics of tumor growth, identifying metastases, and potentially determining the effectiveness of cancer treatment. The possible application for this technique could be useful for the organ radioactivity dosimetry studies. PMID:18667322

  13. [Small animal image-guided radiotherapy: A new era for preclinical studies].

    PubMed

    Delpon, G; Frelin-Labalme, A-M; Heinrich, S; Beaudouin, V; Noblet, C; Begue, M; Le Deroff, C; Pouzoulet, F; Chiavassa, S

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical external beam radiotherapy irradiations used to be delivered with a static broad beam. To promote the transfer from animal to man, the preclinical treatment techniques dedicated to the animal have been optimized to be similar to those delivered to patients in clinical practice. In this context, preclinical irradiators have been developed. Due to the small sizes of the animals, and the irradiation beams, the scaling to the small animal dimensions involves specific problems. Reducing the size and energy of the irradiation beams require very high technical performance, especially for the mechanical stability of the irradiator and the spatial resolution of the imaging system. In addition, the determination of the reference absorbed dose rate must be conducted with a specific methodology and suitable detectors. To date, three systems are used for preclinical studies in France. The aim of this article is to present these new irradiators dedicated to small animals from a physicist point of view, including the commissioning and the quality control. PMID:26856635

  14. Investigating the dopaminergic synapse in vivo. II. Molecular imaging studies in small laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Larisch, Rolf; Beu, Markus; Antke, Christina; Kley, Konstantin; Forutan, Farhad; Wirrwar, Andreas; Müller, Hans-Wilhelm

    2007-01-01

    Dopaminergic synaptic function may be assessed either at the presynaptic terminal or at the postsynaptic binding sites using molecular in vivo imaging methods. Apart from the density of binding sites, parameters such as alterations in dopamine synthesis, dopamine storage or dopamine release can be quantified either by application of specific radiotracers or by assessing the competition between the exogenous radioligand and endogenous dopamine. The performance of animal studies allows the induction of specific short-term or long-term synaptic conditions via pharmacological challenges or infliction of neurotoxic lesions. Therefore, small laboratory animals such as rats and mice have become invaluable models for a variety of human disorders. This article gives an overview of those small animal studies which have been performed so far on dopaminergic neurotransmission using in vivo imaging methods, with a special focus on the relevance of findings within the functional entity of the dopaminergic synapse. Taken together, in vivo investigations on animal models of Parkinson's disease showed decreases of dopamine storage, dopamine release and dopamine transporter binding, no alterations of dopamine synthesis and DA release, and either increases or no alterations of D2 receptor binding, while in vivo investigations of animal models of Huntington's disease. showed decreases of DAT and D1 receptor binding. For D2 receptor binding, both decreases and increases have been reported, dependent on the radioligand employed. Substances of abuse, such as alcohol, amphetamine and methylphenidate, led to an increase of dopamine release in striatal regions. This held for the acute application of substances to both healthy animals and animal models of drug abuse. Findings also showed that chronic application of cocaine induced long-term reductions of both D1 and D2 receptor binding, which disappeared after several weeks of withdrawal. Finally, preliminary results yielded the first

  15. Precise image-guided irradiation of small animals: a flexible non-profit platform.

    PubMed

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Löck, Steffen; Dietrich, Antje; Fursov, Andriy; Haase, Robert; Lukas, Mathias; Rimarzig, Bernd; Sobiella, Manfred; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael; Bütof, Rebecca; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-21

    Preclinical in vivo studies using small animals are essential to develop new therapeutic options in radiation oncology. Of particular interest are orthotopic tumour models, which better reflect the clinical situation in terms of growth patterns and microenvironmental parameters of the tumour as well as the interplay of tumours with the surrounding normal tissues. Such orthotopic models increase the technical demands and the complexity of preclinical studies as local irradiation with therapeutically relevant doses requires image-guided target localisation and accurate beam application. Moreover, advanced imaging techniques are needed for monitoring treatment outcome. We present a novel small animal image-guided radiation therapy (SAIGRT) system, which allows for precise and accurate, conformal irradiation and x-ray imaging of small animals. High accuracy is achieved by its robust construction, the precise movement of its components and a fast high-resolution flat-panel detector. Field forming and x-ray imaging is accomplished close to the animal resulting in a small penumbra and a high image quality. Feasibility for irradiating orthotopic models has been proven using lung tumour and glioblastoma models in mice. The SAIGRT system provides a flexible, non-profit academic research platform which can be adapted to specific experimental needs and therefore enables systematic preclinical trials in multicentre research networks. PMID:27008208

  16. Small-animal SPECT and SPECT/CT: important tools for preclinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Franc, Benjamin L; Acton, Paul D; Mari, Carina; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2008-10-01

    The need to study dynamic biologic processes in intact small-animal models of disease has stimulated the development of high-resolution nuclear imaging methods. These methods are capable of clarifying molecular interactions important in the onset and progression of disease, assessing the biologic relevance of drug candidates and potential imaging agents, and monitoring therapeutic effectiveness of pharmaceuticals serially within a single-model system. Single-photon-emitting radionuclides have many advantages in these applications, and SPECT can provide 3-dimensional spatial distributions of gamma- (and x-) ray-emitting radionuclide imaging agents or therapeutics. Furthermore, combining SPECT with CT in a SPECT/CT system can assist in defining the anatomic context of biochemical processes and improve the quantitative accuracy of the SPECT data. Over the past decade, dedicated small-animal SPECT and SPECT/CT systems have been developed in academia and industry. Although significant progress in this arena has been realized through system development and biologic application, further innovation continues to address challenges in camera sensitivity, spatial resolution, and image reconstruction and quantification. The innumerable applications of small-animal SPECT and SPECT/CT in drug development, cardiology, neurology, and oncology are stimulating further investment in education, research, and development of these dedicated small-animal imaging modalities. PMID:18794275

  17. Precise image-guided irradiation of small animals: a flexible non-profit platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Löck, Steffen; Dietrich, Antje; Fursov, Andriy; Haase, Robert; Lukas, Mathias; Rimarzig, Bernd; Sobiella, Manfred; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael; Bütof, Rebecca; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Preclinical in vivo studies using small animals are essential to develop new therapeutic options in radiation oncology. Of particular interest are orthotopic tumour models, which better reflect the clinical situation in terms of growth patterns and microenvironmental parameters of the tumour as well as the interplay of tumours with the surrounding normal tissues. Such orthotopic models increase the technical demands and the complexity of preclinical studies as local irradiation with therapeutically relevant doses requires image-guided target localisation and accurate beam application. Moreover, advanced imaging techniques are needed for monitoring treatment outcome. We present a novel small animal image-guided radiation therapy (SAIGRT) system, which allows for precise and accurate, conformal irradiation and x-ray imaging of small animals. High accuracy is achieved by its robust construction, the precise movement of its components and a fast high-resolution flat-panel detector. Field forming and x-ray imaging is accomplished close to the animal resulting in a small penumbra and a high image quality. Feasibility for irradiating orthotopic models has been proven using lung tumour and glioblastoma models in mice. The SAIGRT system provides a flexible, non-profit academic research platform which can be adapted to specific experimental needs and therefore enables systematic preclinical trials in multicentre research networks.

  18. Basic Laboratory Techniques for Students of Biology and Small Animal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Jerome; Berman, Paul

    This document provides descriptions of lessons, activities, and laboratory experiments to be used in a course on basic laboratory techniques for students in biology and small animal care. These learning experiences are designed to be completed during one class period daily for approximately 70 days per semester. (It is assumed that this would…

  19. Small animal imaging platform for quantitative assessment of short-wave infrared-emitting contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Philip; Mingozzi, Marco; Higgins, Laura M.; Ganapathy, Vidya; Zevon, Margot; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-03-01

    We report the design, calibration, and testing of a pre-clinical small animal imaging platform for use with short-wave infrared (SWIR) emitting contrast agents. Unlike materials emitting at visible or near-infrared wavelengths, SWIR-emitting agents require detection systems with sensitivity in the 1-2 μm wavelength region, beyond the range of commercially available small animal imagers. We used a collimated 980 nm laser beam to excite rare-earth-doped NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites, as an example of a SWIR emitting material under development for biomedical imaging applications. This beam was raster scanned across the animal, with fluorescence in the 1550 nm wavelength region detected by an InGaAs area camera. Background adjustment and intensity non-uniformity corrections were applied in software. The final SWIR fluorescence image was overlaid onto a standard white-light image for registration of contrast agent uptake with respect to anatomical features.

  20. Design and in vivo evaluation of a robotized needle insertion system for small animals.

    PubMed

    Goffin, Laurent; Bour, Gaetan; Martel, Fernand; Nicolau, Stephane; Gangloff, Jacques; Egly, Jean-Marc; Bayle, Bernard

    2013-08-01

    The development of imaging devices adapted to small animals has opened the way to image-guided procedures in biomedical research. In this paper, we focus on automated procedures to study the effects of the recurrent administration of substances to the same animal over time. A dedicated system and the associated workflow have been designed to percutaneously position a needle into the abdominal organs of mice. Every step of the procedure has been automated: the camera calibration, the needle access planning, the robotized needle positioning, and the respiratory-gated needle insertion. Specific devices have been developed for the registration, the animal binding under anesthesia, and the skin puncture. Among the presented results, the system accuracy is particularly emphasized, both in vitro using gelose phantoms and in vivo by injecting substances into various abdominal organs. The study shows that robotic assistance could be routinely used in biomedical research laboratories to improve existing procedures, allowing automated accurate treatments and limited animal sacrifices. PMID:23475327

  1. Design, construction and testing of a DC bioeffects test enclosure for small animals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, M J; Preache, M M

    1980-11-01

    This final report describes both the engineering development of a DC bioeffects test enclosure for small laboratory animals, and the biological protocol for the use of such enclosures in the testing of animals to determine possible biological effects of the environment associated with HVDC transmission lines. The test enclosure which has been designed is a modular unit, which will house up to eight rat-sized animals in individual compartments. Multiple test enclosures can be used to test larger numbers of animals. A prototype test enclosure has been fabricated and tested to characterize its electrical performance characteristics. The test enclosure provides a simulation of the dominant environment associated with HVDC transmission lines; namely, a static electric field and an ion current density. A biological experimental design has been developed for assessing the effects of the dominant components of the HVDC transmission line environment.

  2. An environmental chamber system for prolonged metabolic studies on small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. P.; Huston, L. J.; Simmons, J. B., II; Clarkson, D. P.; Martz, W. W.; Schatte, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of metabolic adaptation to marginally stressful environments requires both precise regulation of a variety of atmospheric factors for extended periods of time and the capacity to employ sensitive parameters in an undisturbed subject. This paper describes a metabolic chamber system which can simultaneously maintain groups of small animals in two completely separate closed environments having different pressures, temperatures and gas compositions for an indefinite period. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, food and water consumption and animal activity cycles can be continuously monitored and quantified 24 h per day while the animals are in an unrestrained state. Each chamber can be serviced and the animals handled, injected and sacrificed without subjecting them to barometric stress. Several unique electrical and mechanical components allow semi-automated data collection on a continuous basis for indefinite periods of time.

  3. Radiovisiography versus conventional radiography for detection of small instruments in endodontic length determination. II. In vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ellingsen, M A; Hollender, L G; Harrington, G W

    1995-10-01

    Radiovisiography was compared clinically to conventional D-speed and E-speed radiographs viewed with X 2 magnification using the mesiobuccal root of maxillary molars of 22 patients. Clarity of size 8 and 10 endodontic file tips in relation to the radiographic apex was the object of comparison. Five images of radovisiography, (original, enhanced, negative-to-positive mode), were compared to D-speed and E-speed radiographs. D-speed radiographs were also compared to E-speed radiographs. D-speed radiographs were statistically superior to all five radiovisiography images. Four of the radiovisiography images were equivalent to E-speed radiographs. D-speed radiographs provided superior recognition of small file tips when compared to E-speed radiographs 100% of the time. Accurate identification of the small file tips was achieved on 95% of D-speed and 70% of E-speed radiographs. With radiovisiography, identification was achieved on 95% of the zoom images in the negative-to-positive mode, 86% of enhanced, 82% of standard zoom, and 77% of the images in negative-to-positive conversion. PMID:8596074

  4. Development of a combined microSPECT/CT system for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingshan

    Modern advances in the biomedical sciences have placed increased attention on small animals such as mice and rats as models of human biology and disease in biological research and pharmaceutical development. Their small size and fast breeding rate, their physiologic similarity to human, and, more importantly, the availability of sophisticated genetic manipulations, all have made mice and rats the laboratory mammals of choice in these experimental studies. However, the increased use of small animals in biomedical research also calls for new instruments that can measure the anatomic and metabolic information noninvasively with adequate spatial resolution and measurement sensitivity to facilitate these studies. This dissertation describes the engineering development of a combined single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) system dedicated for small animals imaging. The system aims to obtain both the anatomic and metabolic images with submillimeter spatial resolution in a way that the data can be correlated to provide improved image quality and to offer more complete biological evaluation for biomedical studies involving small animals. The project requires development of complete microSPECT and microCT subsystems. Both subsystems are configured with a shared gantry and animal bed with integrated instrumentation for data acquisition and system control. The microCT employs a microfocus X-ray tube and a CCD-based detector for low noise, high resolution imaging. The microSPECT utilizes three semiconductor detectors coupled with pinhole collimators. A significant contribution of this dissertation project is the development of iterative algorithms with geometrical compensation that allows radionuclide images to be reconstructed at submillimeter spatial resolution, but with significantly higher detection efficiency than conventional methods. Both subsystems are capable of helical scans, offering lengthened field of view and improved

  5. First Observation of Small Fractures on a Human Dried Proximal Phalanx by Synchrotron X-Ray Interference Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Koichi; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Shikano, Naoto; Ando, Masami

    1999-11-01

    By taking photographs using wiggler synchrotron radiation (SR),clear images of fine fissures on a human dried proximal phalanx wereobtained. This has never been achieved by the conventional X-raymethod. The 40 mm×40 mm exposure field used to coverthe object was prepared by magnifying the original SR beam crosssection (7 mm×7 mm) with two successive asymmetricreflections of Si crystals. The width of the fissures images wasapproximately 20 µm on medical X-ray film. These images can beexplained by X-ray phase contrast. This new method may enable anaccurate diagnostic method in the field of orthopedics, such as thatfor small fractures associated with a bruise.

  6. Improving the quality of small animal brain pinhole SPECT imaging by Bayesian reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sohlberg, Antti; Lensu, Sanna; Jolkkonen, Jukka; Tuomisto, Leena; Ruotsalainen, Ulla; Kuikka, Jyrki T

    2004-07-01

    The possibility of using existing hardware makes pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) attractive when pursuing the ultra-high resolution required for small animal brain imaging. Unfortunately, the poor sensitivity and the heavy weight of the collimator hamper the use of pinhole SPECT in animal studies by generating noisy and misaligned projections. To improve the image quality we have developed a new Bayesian reconstruction method, pinhole median root prior (PH-MRP), which prevents the excessive noise accumulation from the projections to the reconstructed image. The PH-MRP algorithm was used to reconstruct data acquired with our small animal rotating device, which was designed to reduce the rotation orbit misalignments. Phantom experiments were performed to test the device and compare the PH-MRP with the conventional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) and pinhole ordered subsets maximum likelihood expectation maximisation (PH-OSEM) reconstruction algorithms. The feasibility of the system for small animal brain imaging was studied with Han-Wistar rats injected with (123)I-epidepride and (99m)Tc-hydroxy methylene diphosphonate. Considering all the experiments, no shape distortions due to orbit misalignments were encountered and remarkable improvements in noise characteristics and also in overall image quality were observed when the PH-MRP was applied instead of the FDK or PH-OSEM. In addition, the proposed methods utilise existing hardware and require only a certain amount of construction and programming work, making them easy to implement. PMID:14991246

  7. In vivo fluorescence enhanced optical tomography reconstruction of lung cancer of non immersed small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, L.; Koenig, A.; Da Silva, A.; Berger, M.; Boutet, J.; Dinten, J. M.; Peltié, P.; Rizo, P.

    2007-02-01

    Fluorescence enhanced diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) is envisioned to be useful to collect functional information from small animal models. For oncology applications, cancer-targeted fluorescent markers can be used as a surrogate of the cancer activity. We are developing a continuous wave fDOT bench intended to be integrated in systems dedicated to whole body small animal fluorescence analyses. The focus is currently put on the reconstruction of non immersed small animals imaged by a CCD camera. The reconstruction stage already corrects the tissue heterogeneity artifacts through the computation of an optical heterogeneity map. We will show how this formalism coupled with the determination of the animal boundaries performed by a laser scanner, can be used to manage non contact acquisitions. The time of reconstruction for a 10 × 9 laser source positions, 45 × 40 detector elements and 14 × 11 × 14 mesh voxels is typically 10 minutes on a 3GHz PCs corresponding to the acquisition time allowing the two tasks to be performed in parallel. The system is validated on an in vivo experiment performed on three healthy nude mice and a mouse bearing a lung tumor at 10, 12 and 14 days after implantation allowing the follow up of the disease. The 3D fluorescence reconstructions of this mouse are presented and the total fluorescence amounts are compared.

  8. The evaluation of 6 and 18 MeV electron beams for small animal irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, T. C.; Chen, A. M.; Tu, S. J.; Tung, C. J.; Hong, J. H.; Lee, C. C.

    2009-10-01

    A small animal irradiator is critical for providing optimal radiation dose distributions for pre-clinical animal studies. This paper focuses on the evaluation of using 6 or 18 MeV electron beams as small animal irradiators. Compared with all other prototypes which use photons to irradiate small animals, an electron irradiator has many advantages in its shallow dose distribution. Two major approaches including simulation and measurement were used to evaluate the feasibility of applying electron beams in animal irradiation. These simulations and measurements were taken in three different fields (a 6 cm × 6 cm square field, and 4 mm and 30 mm diameter circular fields) and with two different energies (6 MeV and 18 MeV). A PTW Semiflex chamber in a PTW-MP3 water tank, a PTW Markus chamber type 23343, a PTW diamond detector type 60003 and KODAK XV films were used to measure PDDs, lateral beam profiles and output factors for either optimizing parameters of Monte Carlo simulation or to verify Monte Carlo simulation in small fields. Results show good agreement for comparisons of percentage depth doses (<=2.5% for 6 MeV e; <=1.8% for 18 MeV e) and profiles (FWHM <= 0.5 mm) between simulations and measurements on the 6 cm field. Greater deviation can be observed in the 4 mm field, which is mainly caused by the partial volume effects of the detectors. The FWHM of the profiles for the 18 MeV electron beam is 32.6 mm in the 30 mm field, and 4.7 mm in the 4 mm field at d90. It will take 1-13 min to complete one irradiation of 5-10 Gy. In addition, two different digital phantoms were also constructed, including a homogeneous cylindrical water phantom and a CT-based heterogeneous mouse phantom, and were implemented into Monte Carlo to simulate dose distribution with different electron irradiations.

  9. Cross-sectional survey of antimicrobial prescribing patterns in UK small animal veterinary practice.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Laura A; Williams, Nicola; Clegg, Peter; Callaby, Rebecca; Nuttall, Tim; Coyne, Karen; Pinchbeck, Gina; Dawson, Susan

    2012-05-01

    The increase in the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance has resulted in both human and veterinary antimicrobial use coming under increased scrutiny. The aim of this study was to characterise antimicrobial prescribing patterns in small-animal veterinary practices in the UK. A cross-sectional survey of UK small animal veterinarians was undertaken. A postal questionnaire to evaluate antimicrobial prescribing habits was sent to 900 clinicians. Data were collected on the clinicians, their practices and their sources of information regarding antimicrobials and their use. Respondents were asked if they would prescribe antimicrobials to animals described in four clinical scenarios, and, if so, to provide details of the prescription(s). Questionnaires were completed by 51% of the veterinarians. Only 3.5% of clinicians reported that their practice had an antimicrobial use policy. Penicillins were most commonly prescribed in three clinical scenarios, and 1st generation cephalosporins were most commonly prescribed in a scenario about canine pyoderma. In one scenario, fluoroquinolones and 3rd generation cephalosporins accounted for 10% and 13% of prescriptions respectively. Five percent of all prescriptions were under the recommended dose and 20% were over the recommended dose. Overall, 2.3% of prescriptions were not licensed for use in dogs or cats in the UK. Associations between the use of various antimicrobial drugs and independent variables were analysed using multivariable logistic regression models. Off-license prescriptions and inaccurate dosing of antimicrobials by small-animal clinicians in the UK appears to occur. Antimicrobial use guidelines are rare in small animal practice. The introduction of such guidelines has been shown to lead to more appropriate use of antimicrobials and is therefore recommended. PMID:22225772

  10. Monitoring of small laboratory animal experiments by a designated web-based database.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, T; Grohmann, C; Schumacher, U; Krüll, A

    2015-10-01

    Multiple-parametric small animal experiments require, by their very nature, a sufficient number of animals which may need to be large to obtain statistically significant results.(1) For this reason database-related systems are required to collect the experimental data as well as to support the later (re-) analysis of the information gained during the experiments. In particular, the monitoring of animal welfare is simplified by the inclusion of warning signals (for instance, loss in body weight >20%). Digital patient charts have been developed for human patients but are usually not able to fulfill the specific needs of animal experimentation. To address this problem a unique web-based monitoring system using standard MySQL, PHP, and nginx has been created. PHP was used to create the HTML-based user interface and outputs in a variety of proprietary file formats, namely portable document format (PDF) or spreadsheet files. This article demonstrates its fundamental features and the easy and secure access it offers to the data from any place using a web browser. This information will help other researchers create their own individual databases in a similar way. The use of QR-codes plays an important role for stress-free use of the database. We demonstrate a way to easily identify all animals and samples and data collected during the experiments. Specific ways to record animal irradiations and chemotherapy applications are shown. This new analysis tool allows the effective and detailed analysis of huge amounts of data collected through small animal experiments. It supports proper statistical evaluation of the data and provides excellent retrievable data storage. PMID:25673665

  11. Ultrahigh-speed ultrahigh-resolution adaptive optics: optical coherence tomography system for in-vivo small animal retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Yifan; Xu, Jing; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2013-03-01

    Small animal models of human retinal diseases are a critical component of vision research. In this report, we present an ultrahigh-resolution ultrahigh-speed adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) system for small animal retinal imaging (mouse, fish, etc.). We adapted our imaging system to different types of small animals in accordance with the optical properties of their eyes. Results of AO-OCT images of small animal retinas acquired with AO correction are presented. Cellular structures including nerve fiber bundles, capillary networks and detailed double-cone photoreceptors are visualized.

  12. An automated robot arm system for small animal tissue biopsy under dual-image modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. H.; Wu, T. H.; Lin, M. H.; Yang, C. C.; Guo, W. Y.; Wang, Z. J.; Chen, C. L.; Lee, J. S.

    2006-12-01

    The ability to non-invasively monitor cell biology in vivo is one of the most important goals of molecular imaging. Imaging procedures could be inter-subject performed repeatedly at different investigating stages; thereby need not sacrifice small animals during the entire study period. Thus, the ultimate goal of this study was to design a stereotactic image-guided system for small animals and integrated it with an automatic robot arm for in vivo tissue biopsy analysis. The system was composed of three main parts, including one small animal stereotactic frame, one imaging-fusion software and an automatic robot arm system. The system has been thoroughly evaluated with three components; the robot position accuracy was 0.05±0.02 mm, the image registration accuracy was 0.37±0.18 mm and the system integration was satisfactorily within 1.20±0.39 mm of error. From these results, the system demonstrated sufficient accuracy to guide the micro-injector from the planned delivery routes into practice. The entire system accuracy was limited by the image fusion and orientation procedures, due to its nature of the blurred PET imaging obtained from the small objects. The primary improvement is to acquire as higher resolution as possible the fused imaging for localizing the targets in the future.

  13. Animator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Art and animation work is the most significant part of electronic game development, but is also found in television commercials, computer programs, the Internet, comic books, and in just about every visual media imaginable. It is the part of the project that makes an abstract design idea concrete and visible. Animators create the motion of life in…

  14. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS LABORATORY GUIDE WAS DEVELOPED FOR AN 80-HOUR COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES TRAINING TO BECOME BEGINNING RADIOGRAPHERS. IT IS USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH TWO OTHER VOLUMES--(1) INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, AND (2) INUDSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY MANUAL. THE PROGRAM WAS DEVELOPED BY A COMMITTEE OF REPRESENTATIVES…

  15. Tumor glucose metabolism imaged in vivo in small animals with whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, Muhammad Rameez; Xia, Jun; Sohn, Rebecca; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Kun; Xia, Younan; Anastasio, Mark; Arbeit, Jeffrey; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-07-01

    With the increasing use of small animals for human disease studies, small-animal whole-body molecular imaging plays an important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose molecular information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image co-registration, the spatial resolution of the molecular imaging modality is not improved. Utilizing a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography system, we demonstrate, for the first time, that both anatomy and glucose uptake can be imaged in a single modality. Anatomy was imaged with the endogenous hemoglobin contrast, and glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose.

  16. Measurement of the toughness of bone: A tutorial with special reference to small animal studies✩

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, R.O.; Koester, K.J.; Ionova, S.; Yao, W.; Lane, N.E.; Ager, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the strength and toughness of bone has become an integral part of many biological and bioengineering studies on the structural properties of bone and their degradation due to aging, disease and therapeutic treatment. Whereas the biomechanical techniques for characterizing bone strength are well documented, few studies have focused on the theory, methodology, and various experimental procedures for evaluating the fracture toughness of bone, i.e., its resistance to fracture, with particular reference to whole bone testing in small animal studies. In this tutorial, we consider the many techniques for evaluating toughness and assess their specific relevance and application to the mechanical testing of small animal bones. Parallel experimental studies on wild-type rat and mouse femurs are used to evaluate the utility of these techniques and specifically to determine the coefficient of variation of the measured toughness values. PMID:18647665

  17. Thick Silicon Double-Sided Strip Detectors for Low-Energy Small-Animal SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Durko, Heather L.; Fritz, Mark A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Peterson, Todd E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents characterization studies of thick silicon double-sided strip detectors for a high-resolution small-animal SPECT. The dimension of these detectors is 60.4 mm × 60.4 mm × 1 mm. There are 1024 strips on each side that give the coordinates of the photon interaction, with each strip processed by a separate ASIC channel. Our measurement shows that intrinsic spatial resolution equivalent to the 59 μm strip pitch is attainable. Good trigger uniformity can be achieved by proper setting of a 4-bit DAC in each ASIC channel to remove trigger threshold variations. This is particularly important for triggering at low energies. The thick silicon DSSD (Double-sided strip detector) shows high potential for small-animal SPECT. PMID:20686626

  18. Experimental Acquisitions with ^125I on a Small Animal SPECT Device*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Kevin; Welsh, Robert E.; Bradley, Eric L.; Saha, Margaret S.; Kross, Brian; Majewski, Stan; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randolph

    2001-04-01

    We have performed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies on a small animal scanning system for which the detector employed position sensitive phototubes (125 mm dia. Hamamatsu R3292 and 18 x 18 mm Hamamatsu M-64) coupled to pixelated scintillators CsI(Tl) and CsI(Na) Phantom acquisitions were used to investigate the effects of angular sampling and scan time on reconstructed image quality and noise. Results from these studies will be described and extended to in vivo studies with small animals. *Supported in part by the Thomas F. and Kate Miller Jeffress Trust, the Department of Energy, The American Diabetes Association, The National Science Foundation, the Howard Hughes Foundation and the Virginia Commonwealth Health Research Board.

  19. Cell-Associated Transmission of HIV Type 1 and Other Lentiviruses in Small-Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Moench, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Small-animal models of lentivirus transmission have repeatedly demonstrated transmission by cell-associated virus via vaginal, rectal, and oral routes. The earliest experiments were in the cat/feline immunodeficiency virus model, followed a decade later by successful vaginal transmission of cell-associated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in mice bearing transplanted human immune cells. After early unsuccessful attempts at cell-associated transmission in nonhuman primates, renewed investigation in diverse primate models has now confirmed the findings from the cat and humanized mouse models. Improvements in humanized mouse models have made them the preferred small-animal models to study HIV mucosal transmission. They provide complementary systems to nonhuman primate models to aid in the elucidation of the many remaining questions on the mechanism of and means to prevent both cell-associated and cell-free HIV transmission across mucosal barriers. PMID:25414420

  20. Angle correction for small animal tumor imaging with spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanyu; Tabassum, Syeda; Piracha, Shaheer; Nandhu, Mohan Sobhana; Viapiano, Mariano; Roblyer, Darren

    2016-01-01

    Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) is a widefield imaging technique that allows for the quantitative extraction of tissue optical properties. SFDI is currently being explored for small animal tumor imaging, but severe imaging artifacts occur for highly curved surfaces (e.g. the tumor edge). We propose a modified Lambertian angle correction, adapted from the Minnaert correction method for satellite imagery, to account for tissue surface angles up to 75°. The method was tested in a hemisphere phantom study as well as a small animal tumor model. The proposed method reduced µa and µs` extraction errors by an average of 64% and 16% respectively compared to performing no angle correction, and provided more physiologically agreeable optical property and chromophore values on tumors. PMID:27375952

  1. Performance Evaluation of a Dedicated Camera Suitable for Dynamic Radiopharmaceuticals Evaluation in Small Animals

    SciTech Connect

    Loudos, George; Majewski, Stanislaw; Wojcik, Randolph; Weisenberger, Andrew; Sakelios, Nikolas; Nikita, Konstantina; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos; Bouziotis, Penelope; Xanthopoulos, Stavros; Varvarigou, Alexandra

    2007-06-01

    As the result of a collaboration between the Detector and Imaging Group of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (US), the Institute of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products (IRRP) of N.C.S.R. ldquoDemokritosrdquo and the Biomedical Simulations and Imaging Applications Laboratory (BIOSIM) of National Technical University of Athens (Greece), a mouse sized camera optimized for Tc^99m imaging was developed. The detector was built in Jefferson Lab and transferred to Greece, where it was evaluated with phantoms and small animals. The system will be used initially for planar dynamic studies in small animals, in order to assess the performance of new radiolabeled biomolecules for oncological studies. The active area of the detector is approximately 48 mm times 96 mm. It is based on two flat-panel Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT), a pixelated NaI(Tl) scintillator and a high resolution lead parallel-hole collimator. The system was developed to optim

  2. Attenuation correction for small animal SPECT imaging using x-ray CT data

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Andrew B.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2005-09-15

    Photon attenuation in small animal nuclear medicine scans can be significant when using isotopes that emit lower energy photons such as iodine-125. We have developed a method to use microCT data to perform attenuation corrected small animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A microCT calibration phantom was first imaged, and the resulting calibration curve was used to convert microCT image values to linear attenuation coefficient values that were then used in an iterative SPECT reconstruction algorithm. This method was applied to reconstruct a SPECT image of a uniform phantom filled with {sup 125}I-NaI. Without attenuation correction, the image suffered a 30% decrease in intensity in the center of the image, which was removed with the addition of attenuation correction. This reduced the relative standard deviation in the region of interest from 10% to 6%.

  3. Characterization of a high-purity germanium detector for small-animal SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lindsay C; Campbell, Desmond L; Hull, Ethan L; Peterson, Todd E

    2011-01-01

    We present an initial evaluation of a mechanically-cooled, high-purity germanium double-sided strip detector as a potential gamma camera for small-animal SPECT. It is 90 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with two sets of 16 orthogonal strips that have a 4.5 mm width with a 5 mm pitch. We found an energy resolution of 0.96% at 140 keV, an intrinsic efficiency of 43.3% at 122 keV and a FWHM spatial resolution of approximately 1.5 mm. We demonstrated depth-of-interaction estimation capability through comparison of pinhole acquisitions with a point source on and off axis. Finally, a flood-corrected-flood image exhibited a strip-level uniformity of less than 1%. This high-purity germanium offers many desirable properties for small-animal SPECT. PMID:21852723

  4. Tumor glucose metabolism imaged in vivo in small animals with whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chatni, Muhammad Rameez; Xia, Jun; Sohn, Rebecca; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Kun; Xia, Younan; Anastasio, Mark; Arbeit, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. With the increasing use of small animals for human disease studies, small-animal whole-body molecular imaging plays an important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose molecular information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image co-registration, the spatial resolution of the molecular imaging modality is not improved. Utilizing a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography system, we demonstrate, for the first time, that both anatomy and glucose uptake can be imaged in a single modality. Anatomy was imaged with the endogenous hemoglobin contrast, and glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose. PMID:22894495

  5. Tumor glucose metabolism imaged in vivo in small animals with whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Chatni, Muhammad Rameez; Xia, Jun; Sohn, Rebecca; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Kun; Xia, Younan; Anastasio, Mark; Arbeit, Jeffrey; Wang, Lihong V

    2012-07-01

    With the increasing use of small animals for human disease studies, small-animal whole-body molecular imaging plays an important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose molecular information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image co-registration, the spatial resolution of the molecular imaging modality is not improved. Utilizing a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography system, we demonstrate, for the first time, that both anatomy and glucose uptake can be imaged in a single modality. Anatomy was imaged with the endogenous hemoglobin contrast, and glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose. PMID:22894495

  6. Dynamic studies of small animals with a four-color diffuse optical tomography imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Christoph H.; Graber, Harry L.; Pei, Yaling; Farber, Mark; Stewart, Mark; Levina, Rita D.; Levin, Mikhail B.; Xu, Yong; Barbour, Randall L.

    2005-09-01

    We present newly developed instrumentation for full-tomographic four-wavelength, continuous wave, diffuse optical tomography (DOT) imaging on small animals. A small-animal imaging stage was constructed, from materials compatible with in-magnet studies, which offers stereotaxic fixation of the animal and precise, stable probe positioning. Instrument performance, based on calibration and phantom studies, demonstrates excellent long-term signal stability. DOT measurements of the functional rat brain response to electric paw stimulation are presented, and these demonstrate high data quality and excellent sensitivity to hemodynamic changes. A general linear model analysis on individual trials is used to localize and quantify the occurrence of functional behavior associated with the different hemoglobin state responses. Statistical evaluation of outcomes of individual trials is employed to identify significant regional response variations for different stimulation sites. Image results reveal a diffuse cortical response and a strong reaction of the thalamus, both indicative of activation of pain pathways by the stimulation. In addition, a weaker lateralized functional component is observed in the brain response, suggesting presence of motor activation. An important outcome of the experiment is that it shows that reactions to individual provocations can be monitored, without having to resort to signal averaging. Thus the described technology may be useful for studies of long-term trends in hemodynamic response, as would occur, for example, in behavioral studies involving freely moving animals.

  7. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Andrew B; Franc, Benjamin L; Gullberg, Grant T; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2009-01-01

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50% when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25% when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30%, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50%) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the use of resolution

  8. Increased concentration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus sp. in small animals exposed to aerospace environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guthrie, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of increased concentrations of PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS in the total bacterial flora of small animals exposed to simulated spacecraft environments were evaluated. Tests to detect changes in infectivity, effects of antibiotic treatments, immune responses to bacterial antigens, and effectiveness of immune responses in the experimental environment were conducted. The most significant results appear to be the differences in immune responses at simulated altitudes and the production of infection in the presence of a specific antibody.

  9. End-tidal carbon dioxide (CO2) monitoring in small animals.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Felts, P A

    1989-03-01

    A simple modification of a commercially available capnometer (Traverse Medical Monitors model 2000) is described which suits it for use with small animals such as rats. The modification involves the omission of the fluids separator from the gas pathway, while maintaining a connection to the separator to permit the continued function of the "automatic zero" feature, which corrects for any zero-drift. The capnometer has several functions which recommend its use even when artificial ventilation is not required. PMID:2496893

  10. [Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) in small animal medicine. Mechanisms of action, applications and indications].

    PubMed

    Nolff, M C; Meyer-Lindenberg, A

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of open wounds is a daily challenge in veterinary medicine. During the past years, a special treatment option, the Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT), has been developed. Usage of this therapy significantly increases the healing rate of open wounds as well as free skin grafts in small animals. This review describes the mechanisms of action, indications as well as the known complications associated with this therapy. PMID:26830725

  11. Progress of Focusing X-ray and Gamma-ray Optics for Small Animal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovaroff, M J; Funk, T; Barber, W C; Ramsey, B D; Hasegawa, B H

    2005-08-05

    Significant effort is currently being devoted to the development of noninvasive imaging systems that allow in vivo assessment of biological and biomolecular interactions in mice and other small animals. Ideally, one would like to discern these functional and metabolic relationships with in vivo radionuclide imaging at spatial resolutions approaching those that can be obtained using the anatomical imaging techniques (i.e., <100 {micro}m), which would help to answer outstanding questions in many areas of biomedicine. In this paper, we report progress on our effort to develop high-resolution focusing X-ray and gamma-ray optics for small-animal radionuclide imaging. The use of reflective optics, in contrast to methods that rely on absorptive collimation like single- or multiple-pinhole cameras, decouples spatial resolution from sensitivity (efficiency). Our feasibility studies have refined and applied ray-tracing routines to design focusing optics for small animal studies. We also have adopted a replication technique to manufacture the X-ray mirrors, and which in experimental studies have demonstrated a spatial resolution of {approx}190 {micro}m. We conclude that focusing optics can be designed and fabricated for gamma-ray energies, and with spatial resolutions, and field of view suitable for in vivo biological studies. While the efficiency of a single optic is limited, fabrication methods now are being developed that may make it possible to develop imaging systems with multiple optics that could collect image data over study times that would be practical for performing radionuclide studies of small animals.

  12. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    SciTech Connect

    Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, San Francisco and University of California, Berkeley; Department of Radiology, University of California; Gullberg, Grant T; Hwang, Andrew B.; Franc, Benjamin L.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2008-02-15

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50percent when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25percent when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30percent, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50percent) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the

  13. Design of a multimodal fibers optic system for small animal optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Antonello E; Pagliazzi, Marco; Boschi, Federico

    2015-02-01

    Small animals optical imaging systems are widely used in pre-clinical research to image in vivo the bio-distribution of light emitting probes using fluorescence or bioluminescence modalities. In this work we presented a set of simulated results of a novel small animal optical imaging module based on a fibers optics matrix, coupled with a position sensitive detector, devoted to acquire bioluminescence and Cerenkov images. Simulations were performed using GEANT 4 code with the GAMOS architecture using the tissue optics plugin. Results showed that it is possible to image a 30 × 30 mm region of interest using a fiber optics array containing 100 optical fibers without compromising the quality of the reconstruction. The number of fibers necessary to cover an adequate portion of a small animal is thus quite modest. This design allows integrating the module with magnetic resonance (MR) in order to acquire optical and MR images at the same time. A detailed model of the mouse anatomy, obtained by segmentation of 3D MRI images, will improve the quality of optical 3D reconstruction. PMID:25465071

  14. Open-Source Medical Devices (OSMD) Design of a Small Animal Radiotherapy System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, S.; Mackie, T. R.; Jeraj, R.

    2014-03-01

    Open-Source Medical Devices (OSMD) was initiated with the goal of facilitating medical research by developing medical technologies including both hardware and software on an open-source platform. Our first project was to develop an integrated imaging and radiotherapy device for small animals that includes computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and radiation therapy (RT) modalities for which technical specifications were defined in the first OSMD conference held in Madison, Wisconsin, USA in December 2011. This paper specifically focuses on the development of a small animal RT (micro-RT) system by designing a binary micro multileaf collimator (bmMLC) and a small animal treatment planning system (SATPS) to enable intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Both hardware and software projects are currently under development and their current progresses are described. After the development, both bmMLC and TPS will be validated and commissioned for a micro-RT system. Both hardware design and software development will be open-sourced after completion.

  15. In Vivo Small Animal Imaging using Micro-CT and Digital Subtraction Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Badea, C.T.; Drangova, M.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Johnson, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Small animal imaging has a critical role in phenotyping, drug discovery, and in providing a basic understanding of mechanisms of disease. Translating imaging methods from humans to small animals is not an easy task. The purpose of this work is to review in vivo X-ray based small animal imaging, with a focus on in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). We present the principles, technologies, image quality parameters and types of applications. We show that both methods can be used not only to provide morphological, but also functional information, such as cardiac function estimation or perfusion. Compared to other modalities, x-ray based imaging is usually regarded as being able to provide higher throughput at lower cost and adequate resolution. The limitations are usually associated with the relatively poor contrast mechanisms and potential radiation damage due to ionizing radiation, although the use of contrast agents and careful design of studies can address these limitations. We hope that the information will effectively address how x-ray based imaging can be exploited for successful in vivo preclinical imaging. PMID:18758005

  16. A Novel Restraining Device for Small Animal Imaging Exams: Validation in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Carlos Henrique; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos; de Souza, Sérgio; Machado, Fernanda; Guedes, Fábio; Monteiro, André; Schanaider, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To develop, validate, and patent a Restraining Device for Small Animal Imaging Exams (RDSAIE) that allows exams to be comfortably conducted without risks to animals and professionals. Methods. A RDSAIE with a mobile cover and shelf was built with transparent acrylic material. A total of six anesthetized rabbits were used to perform the following imaging exams of the skull: Cone Beam Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Scintigraphy. Results. The device showed great functionality and full visibility of the animal behavior, which remained fully stabilized and immobilized in either the horizontal or vertical position without the need for a person to remain in the test room to assist them. The procedures were performed without difficulty, and images of good resolution and without artifacts were obtained. Conclusion. The RDSAIE is comfortable, safe, efficient, and ergonomic. It allows the easy placement of animals in different body positions, including the vertical, the maintenance of postural stability, and full visibility. It may be constructed for animals heavier than 4 kg and it is adaptable for translational studies in anima nobile. PMID:26114109

  17. Optimal energy window selection of a CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Su-Jin; Yu, A. Ram; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has desirable characteristics such as superior energy resolution, but data acquisition for SPECT imaging has been widely performed with a conventional energy window. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal energy window settings for technetium-99 m (99mTc) and thallium-201 (201Tl), the most commonly used isotopes in SPECT imaging, using CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy. We experimentally investigated quantitative measurements with respect to primary count rate, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and scatter fraction (SF) within various energy window settings using Triumph X-SPECT. The two ways of energy window settings were considered: an on-peak window and an off-peak window. In the on-peak window setting, energy centers were set on the photopeaks. In the off-peak window setting, the ratios of energy differences between the photopeak from the lower- and higher-threshold varied from 4:6 to 3:7. In addition, the energy-window width for 99mTc varied from 5% to 20%, and that for 201Tl varied from 10% to 30%. The results of this study enabled us to determine the optimal energy windows for each isotope in terms of primary count rate, CNR, and SF. We selected the optimal energy window that increases the primary count rate and CNR while decreasing SF. For 99mTc SPECT imaging, the energy window of 138-145 keV with a 5% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was determined to be the optimal energy window. For 201Tl SPECT imaging, the energy window of 64-85 keV with a 30% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was selected as the optimal energy window. Our results demonstrated that the proper energy window should be carefully chosen based on quantitative measurements in order to take advantage of desirable characteristics of CZT-based small-animal SPECT. These results provided valuable reference information for the establishment of new protocol for CZT

  18. The hydrodynamic principle for the caudal fin shape of small aquatic animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongsu; Park, Yong-Jai; Cho, Kyu-Jin; Kim, Ho-Young

    2014-11-01

    The shape of caudal fins of small aquatic animals is completely different from that of large cruising animals like dolphin and tuna which have high aspect-ratio lunate tail. To unveil the physical principle behind natural selection of caudal fins of small aquatic animals, here we investigate the hydrodynamics of an angularly reciprocating plate as a model for the caudal fin oscillation. We find that the thrust production of a reciprocating plate at high Strouhal numbers is dominated by generation of two distinct vortical structures associated with the acceleration and deceleration of the plate regardless of their shape. Based on our observations, we construct a scaling law to predict the thrust of the flapping plate, which agrees well with the experimental data. We then seek the optimal aspect ratio to maximize thrust and efficiency of a flapping plate for fixed flapping frequency and amplitude. Thrust is maximized for the aspect ratio of approximately 0.7. We also theoretically explain the power law behaviors of the thrust and efficiency as a function of the aspect ratio.

  19. Vermicomposting as manure management strategy for urban small-holder animal farms - Kampala case study.

    PubMed

    Lalander, Cecilia Helena; Komakech, Allan John; Vinnerås, Björn

    2015-05-01

    Inadequate organic waste management can contribute to the spread of diseases and have negative impacts on the environment. Vermicomposting organic waste could have dual beneficial effects by generating an economically viable animal feed protein in the form of worm biomass, while alleviating the negative effects of poor organic waste management. In this study, a low-maintenance vermicomposting system was evaluated as manure and food waste management system for small-holder farmers. A vermicomposting system using the earthworm species Eudrilus eugeniae and treating cow manure and food waste was set up in Kampala, Uganda, and monitored for 172days. The material degradation and protein production rates were evaluated after 63days and at the end of the experiment. The material reduction was 45.9% and the waste-to-biomass conversion rate was 3.5% in the vermicomposting process on a total solids basis. A possible increase in the conversion rate could be achieved by increasing the frequency of worm harvesting. Vermicomposting was found to be a viable manure management method in small-scale urban animal agriculture; the return of investment was calculated to be 280% for treating the manure of a 450kg cow. The vermicompost was not sanitised, although hygiene quality could be improved by introducing a post-stabilisation step in which no fresh material is added. The value of the animal feed protein generated in the process can act as an incentive to improve current manure management strategies. PMID:25728090

  20. Anaphylaxis Imaging: Non-Invasive Measurement of Surface Body Temperature and Physical Activity in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-Szalai, Krisztina; Pali-Schöll, Isabella; Krishnamurthy, Durga; Stremnitzer, Caroline; Flaschberger, Ingo; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2016-01-01

    In highly sensitized patients, the encounter with a specific allergen from food, insect stings or medications may rapidly induce systemic anaphylaxis with potentially lethal symptoms. Countless animal models of anaphylaxis, most often in BALB/c mice, were established to understand the pathophysiology and to prove the safety of different treatments. The most common symptoms during anaphylactic shock are drop of body temperature and reduced physical activity. To refine, improve and objectify the currently applied manual monitoring methods, we developed an imaging method for the automated, non-invasive measurement of the whole-body surface temperature and, at the same time, of the horizontal and vertical movement activity of small animals. We tested the anaphylaxis imaging in three in vivo allergy mouse models for i) milk allergy, ii) peanut allergy and iii) egg allergy. These proof-of-principle experiments suggest that the imaging technology represents a reliable non-invasive method for the objective monitoring of small animals during anaphylaxis over time. We propose that the method will be useful for monitoring diseases associated with both, changes in body temperature and in physical behaviour. PMID:26963393

  1. Design and characterization of an economical 192Ir hemi-brain small animal irradiator

    PubMed Central

    Sio, Terence T.; Beltran, Chris J.; Tryggestad, Erik J.; Gupta, Shiv K.; Blackwell, Charles R.; McCollough, Kevin P.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Furutani, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the design and dosimetric characterization of a simple and economical small animal irradiator. Materials and methods A high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy source from a commercially available afterloader was used with a 1.3 cm thick tungsten collimator to provide sharp beam penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. The unit was equipped with continuous gas anesthesia to allow robust animal immobilization. Dosimetric characterization of the device was performed with Gafchromic film measurements. Results The tungsten collimator provided a sharp penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation, and dose rates on the order of 200 cGy/minute were achieved. The sharpness of the penumbra attainable with this device compares favorably to those measured experimentally for 6 MV photons, and 6 and 20 MeV electron beams from a linear accelerator, and was comparable to those measured for a 300 kVp orthovoltage beam and a Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV proton beam. Conclusions Due to its simplicity and low cost, the apparatus described is an attractive alternative for small animal irradiation experiments requiring steep dose gradients. PMID:24844370

  2. Preliminary experience with small animal SPECT imaging on clinical gamma cameras.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, P; Silva-Rodríguez, J; Herranz, M; Ruibal, A

    2014-01-01

    The traditional lack of techniques suitable for in vivo imaging has induced a great interest in molecular imaging for preclinical research. Nevertheless, its use spreads slowly due to the difficulties in justifying the high cost of the current dedicated preclinical scanners. An alternative for lowering the costs is to repurpose old clinical gamma cameras to be used for preclinical imaging. In this paper we assess the performance of a portable device, that is, working coupled to a single-head clinical gamma camera, and we present our preliminary experience in several small animal applications. Our findings, based on phantom experiments and animal studies, provided an image quality, in terms of contrast-noise trade-off, comparable to dedicated preclinical pinhole-based scanners. We feel that our portable device offers an opportunity for recycling the widespread availability of clinical gamma cameras in nuclear medicine departments to be used in small animal SPECT imaging and we hope that it can contribute to spreading the use of preclinical imaging within institutions on tight budgets. PMID:24963478

  3. A small animal holding fixture system with positional reproducibility for longitudinal multimodal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokuryo, Daisuke; Kimura, Yuichi; Obata, Takayuki; Yamaya, Taiga; Kawamura, Kazunori; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Kanno, Iwao; Aoki, Ichio

    2010-07-01

    This study presents a combined small animal holding fixture system, termed a 'bridge capsule', which provides for small animal re-fixation with positional reproducibility. This system comprises separate holding fixtures for the head and lower body and a connecting part to a gas anesthesia system. A mouse is fixed in place by the combination of a head fixture with a movable part made from polyacetal resin, a lower body fixture made from vinyl-silicone and a holder for the legs and tail. For re-fixation, a similar posture could be maintained by the same holding fixtures and a constant distance between the head and lower body fixtures is maintained. Artifacts caused by the bridge capsule system were not observed on magnetic resonance (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) images. The average position differences of the spinal column and the iliac body before and after re-fixation for the same modality were approximately 1.1 mm. The difference between the MRI and PET images was approximately 1.8 mm for the lower body fixture after image registration using fiducial markers. This system would be useful for longitudinal, repeated and multimodal imaging experiments requiring similar animal postures.

  4. Experiments with small animals in BIOLAB and EMCS on the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckmann, E.; Schiller, P.

    Two ESA facilities will be available for animal research and other biological experiments on the International Space Station: the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) in the US Lab "Destiny" and BIOLAB in the European "Columbus" Laboratory. Both facilities use standard Experiment Containers, mounted on two centrifuge rotors allowing either research in microgravity or acceleration studies with variable g-levels from 0.001 to 2.0x g. Standard interface plates provide each container with power and data lines, gas supply (controlled CO 2, O 2 concentration and relative humidity), and -for EMCS only- connectors to fresh and waste water reservoirs. The experiment hardware inside the containers will be developed by the user, but ESA conducted a feasibility study for several kinds of Experiment Support Equipment with potential use for research on small animals: design concepts for experiments with insects, with aquatic organisms like rotifers and nematodes, and with small aquatic animals (sea urchin larvae, tadpoles, fish youngsters) are described in detail in this presentation. Also ESA's initial steps to support experiments with rodents on the Space Station are presented.

  5. RFID Technology for Continuous Monitoring of Physiological Signals in Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Volk, Tobias; Gorbey, Stefan; Bhattacharyya, Mayukh; Gruenwald, Waldemar; Lemmer, Björn; Reindl, Leonhard M; Stieglitz, Thomas; Jansen, Dirk

    2015-02-01

    Telemetry systems enable researchers to continuously monitor physiological signals in unrestrained, freely moving small rodents. Drawbacks of common systems are limited operation time, the need to house the animals separately, and the necessity of a stable communication link. Furthermore, the costs of the typically proprietary telemetry systems reduce the acceptance. The aim of this paper is to introduce a low-cost telemetry system based on common radio frequency identification technology optimized for battery-independent operational time, good reusability, and flexibility. The presented implant is equipped with sensors to measure electrocardiogram, arterial blood pressure, and body temperature. The biological signals are transmitted as digital data streams. The device is able of monitoring several freely moving animals housed in groups with a single reader station. The modular concept of the system significantly reduces the costs to monitor multiple physiological functions and refining procedures in preclinical research. PMID:25314693

  6. A programmable closed-loop recording and stimulating wireless system for behaving small laboratory animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angotzi, Gian Nicola; Boi, Fabio; Zordan, Stefano; Bonfanti, Andrea; Vato, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    A portable 16-channels microcontroller-based wireless system for a bi-directional interaction with the central nervous system is presented in this work. The device is designed to be used with freely behaving small laboratory animals and allows recording of spontaneous and evoked neural activity wirelessly transmitted and stored on a personal computer. Biphasic current stimuli with programmable duration, frequency and amplitude may be triggered in real-time on the basis of the recorded neural activity as well as by the animal behavior within a specifically designed experimental setup. An intuitive graphical user interface was developed to configure and to monitor the whole system. The system was successfully tested through bench tests and in vivo measurements on behaving rats chronically implanted with multi-channels microwire arrays.

  7. A programmable closed-loop recording and stimulating wireless system for behaving small laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    Angotzi, Gian Nicola; Boi, Fabio; Zordan, Stefano; Bonfanti, Andrea; Vato, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    A portable 16-channels microcontroller-based wireless system for a bi-directional interaction with the central nervous system is presented in this work. The device is designed to be used with freely behaving small laboratory animals and allows recording of spontaneous and evoked neural activity wirelessly transmitted and stored on a personal computer. Biphasic current stimuli with programmable duration, frequency and amplitude may be triggered in real-time on the basis of the recorded neural activity as well as by the animal behavior within a specifically designed experimental setup. An intuitive graphical user interface was developed to configure and to monitor the whole system. The system was successfully tested through bench tests and in vivo measurements on behaving rats chronically implanted with multi-channels microwire arrays. PMID:25096831

  8. Validation of fast Monte Carlo dose calculation in small animal radiotherapy with EBT3 radiochromic films.

    PubMed

    Noblet, C; Chiavassa, S; Smekens, F; Sarrut, D; Passal, V; Suhard, J; Lisbona, A; Paris, F; Delpon, G

    2016-05-01

    In preclinical studies, the absorbed dose calculation accuracy in small animals is fundamental to reliably investigate and understand observed biological effects. This work investigated the use of the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma based Monte Carlo dose calculation method for preclinical radiotherapy using a small animal precision micro irradiator, the X-RAD 225Cx. Monte Carlo modelling of the irradiator with GATE/GEANT4 was extensively evaluated by comparing measurements and simulations for half-value layer, percent depth dose, off-axis profiles and output factors in water and water-equivalent material for seven circular fields, from 20 mm down to 1 mm in diameter. Simulated and measured dose distributions in cylinders of water obtained for a 360° arc were also compared using dose, distance-to-agreement and gamma-index maps. Simulations and measurements agreed within 3% for all static beam configurations, with uncertainties estimated to 1% for the simulation and 3% for the measurements. Distance-to-agreement accuracy was better to 0.14 mm. For the arc irradiations, gamma-index maps of 2D dose distributions showed that the success rate was higher than 98%, except for the 0.1 cm collimator (92%). Using the seTLE method, MC simulations compute 3D dose distributions within minutes for realistic beam configurations with a clinically acceptable accuracy for beam diameter as small as 1 mm. PMID:27055114

  9. Validation of fast Monte Carlo dose calculation in small animal radiotherapy with EBT3 radiochromic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noblet, C.; Chiavassa, S.; Smekens, F.; Sarrut, D.; Passal, V.; Suhard, J.; Lisbona, A.; Paris, F.; Delpon, G.

    2016-05-01

    In preclinical studies, the absorbed dose calculation accuracy in small animals is fundamental to reliably investigate and understand observed biological effects. This work investigated the use of the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma based Monte Carlo dose calculation method for preclinical radiotherapy using a small animal precision micro irradiator, the X-RAD 225Cx. Monte Carlo modelling of the irradiator with GATE/GEANT4 was extensively evaluated by comparing measurements and simulations for half-value layer, percent depth dose, off-axis profiles and output factors in water and water-equivalent material for seven circular fields, from 20 mm down to 1 mm in diameter. Simulated and measured dose distributions in cylinders of water obtained for a 360° arc were also compared using dose, distance-to-agreement and gamma-index maps. Simulations and measurements agreed within 3% for all static beam configurations, with uncertainties estimated to 1% for the simulation and 3% for the measurements. Distance-to-agreement accuracy was better to 0.14 mm. For the arc irradiations, gamma-index maps of 2D dose distributions showed that the success rate was higher than 98%, except for the 0.1 cm collimator (92%). Using the seTLE method, MC simulations compute 3D dose distributions within minutes for realistic beam configurations with a clinically acceptable accuracy for beam diameter as small as 1 mm.

  10. Small-intestinal or colonic microbiota as a potential amino acid source in animals.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Werner G

    2015-02-01

    Factors affecting physiological impacts of the microbiome on protein nutrition are discussed for hind-gut fermenters (humans, pigs, rodents). The microbiome flourishes in all gastrointestinal organs, and is a major source of amino acids to fore-gut fermenting animals. In humans, rats and pigs the net effect of microbiome biomass synthesis on amino acid requirements is much less certain. Dietary proteins, amino acids, peptides, endogenous-secreted protein and recycled urea may all be utilized as nitrogen source by growing bacteria in the small intestine and colon. The inclusions of radiolabelled amino acid precursors will result in labeled bacteria which can be digested and absorbed in the ileum and to some degree in the colon. This does not necessarily indicate a significant nutritional role of the microbiome in humans, pigs and rodents. The physiological attributes required for small-intestinal and colon microbiome utilization are a vigorous proteolytic digestion with pancreatic or intestinal enzymes and the presence of amino acid transporters. Findings to date seem to suggest that these two physiological attributes for effective bacterial protein utilization are present in the small intestine; however, these attributes have a much lower capacity/impact in the colon. The gastrointestinal microbiome is likely a protein source of medium to high nutritional quality, but overall the microbiome is not an important amino acid source in humans and animals fed amino acids at requirement levels. PMID:25466904

  11. Application study of the optical biopsy system for small experimental animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Morita, Shin-ichi; Maruyama, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Toru; Matsuura, Yuji; Kanai, Gen'ichi; Ura, Nobuo; Masutani, Koji; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2008-02-01

    An optical biopsy system for small experimental animals has been developed. The system includes endoscope probe, portable probe and two kinds of miniaturized Raman probes. The micro Raman probe (MRP) is made of optical fibers and the ball lens hollow optical fiber Raman probe (BHRP) is made of hollow fiber. The former has large focal depth and suitable to measure average spectra of subsurface tissue. The latter has rather small focal depth and it is possible to control focal length by selecting ball lens attached at the probe head. It is suitable to survey materials at the fixed depth in the tissue. The system is applied to study various small animal cancer models, such as esophagus and stomach rat models and subcutaneous mouse models of pancreatic cancers. In the studies of subcutaneous tumor model mouse, it is suggested that protein conformational changes occur in the tumor tissue within few minutes after euthanasia of the mouse. No more change is observed for the following ten minutes. Any alterations in the molecular level are not observed in normal skin, muscle tissues. Since the change completes in such a short time, it is suggested that this phenomenon caused by termination of blood circulation.

  12. Fully automated intrinsic respiratory and cardiac gating for small animal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, J.; Dinkel, J.; Zwick, S.; Bäuerle, T.; Grasruck, M.; Kiessling, F.; Gupta, R.; Semmler, W.; Bartling, S. H.

    2010-04-01

    A fully automated, intrinsic gating algorithm for small animal cone-beam CT is described and evaluated. A parameter representing the organ motion, derived from the raw projection images, is used for both cardiac and respiratory gating. The proposed algorithm makes it possible to reconstruct motion-corrected still images as well as to generate four-dimensional (4D) datasets representing the cardiac and pulmonary anatomy of free-breathing animals without the use of electrocardiogram (ECG) or respiratory sensors. Variation analysis of projections from several rotations is used to place a region of interest (ROI) on the diaphragm. The ROI is cranially extended to include the heart. The centre of mass (COM) variation within this ROI, the filtered frequency response and the local maxima are used to derive a binary motion-gating parameter for phase-sensitive gated reconstruction. This algorithm was implemented on a flat-panel-based cone-beam CT scanner and evaluated using a moving phantom and animal scans (seven rats and eight mice). Volumes were determined using a semiautomatic segmentation. In all cases robust gating signals could be obtained. The maximum volume error in phantom studies was less than 6%. By utilizing extrinsic gating via externally placed cardiac and respiratory sensors, the functional parameters (e.g. cardiac ejection fraction) and image quality were equivalent to this current gold standard. This algorithm obviates the necessity of both gating hardware and user interaction. The simplicity of the proposed algorithm enables adoption in a wide range of small animal cone-beam CT scanners.

  13. Three-dimensional in vivo near-infrared photoacoustic tomography of whole small animal head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kwang Hyun; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-02-01

    A three-dimensional in vivo near-infrared photoacoustic tomography imaging system was newly designed and built to visualize the structure of a whole small animal head. For high sensitivity, a single flat 2.25MHz low frequency transducer, whose active element size is 6mm, was employed. To increase the penetration depth of light, a wavelength of 804nm in the NIR range, which matches the oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin isosbestic point, was chosen. To avoid strong photoacoustic signal generation from the skin surface, we applied dark field illumination. To illuminate efficiently, we split the laser light into two beams, which were delivered to an animal by two mirrors and were finally homogenized by two ground glasses. To complete the dark field illumination, the transducer was located in the middle of two light sources. Two key devices for the in vivo imaging were rotating devices and animal holders. The rotating devices were composed of two parts, located at the top and bottom, which rotated at the same angular speed. The holders were composed of a head holder and a body holder. Both holders fixed the animal firmly to reduce motion artifacts. This system achieved radial resolution of up to 260μm. We accomplished successful in vivo imaging of arterial and venous vessels deeply, as well as superficially, with the animal head of up to 1.7cm diameter. The technique forms a basis for functional imaging, such as measurement of the oxygen consumption ratio in the brain, which is a vital parameter in a brain disease research.

  14. First Results of Small Animal Imaging Spect Detector for Cardiovascular Disease Studies on Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliozzi, M. L.; Ballerini, M.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Veneroni, P.; Majewsky, S.; Mok, S. P. G.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Wang, Y.; Marano, G.; Musumeci, M.; Palazzesi, S.; Ciccariello, G.; de Vincentis, G.; Accorsi, R.

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a compact, open, Dual Head pinhole SPECT system for high resolution molecular imaging with radionuclides of mice, dedicated mainly to preclinical study of stem cells capability to recover myocardial infarction. The gamma detector is made of pinhole tungsten collimators, pixellated scintillators, matrix of multi-anode PMTs and individual channel readout. Measurements have been performed on phantoms and live mice devoted initially to test and calibrate the system and to optimize protocols. The implemented system and the first results will be presented, demonstrating the effectiveness of our dedicated SPECT detector for small animal imaging.

  15. Phase contrast x-ray velocimetry of small animal lungs: optimising imaging rates

    PubMed Central

    Murrie, R. P.; Paganin, D. M.; Fouras, A.; Morgan, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases affect a vast portion of the world’s population. One of the key difficulties in accurately diagnosing and treating chronic lung disease is our inability to measure dynamic motion of the lungs in vivo. Phase contrast x-ray imaging (PCXI) allows us to image the lungs in high resolution by exploiting the difference in refractive indices between tissue and air. Combining PCXI with x-ray velocimetry (XV) allows us to track the local motion of the lungs, improving our ability to locate small regions of disease under natural ventilation conditions. Via simulation, we investigate the optimal imaging speed and sequence to capture lung motion in vivo in small animals using XV on both synchrotron and laboratory x-ray sources, balancing the noise inherent in a short exposure with motion blur that results from a long exposure. PMID:26819819

  16. Time-gated perturbation Monte Carlo for whole body functional imaging in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin; Intes, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a time-resolved functional imaging method based on Monte Carlo model for whole-body functional imaging of small animals. To improve the spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy of the functional map, a Bayesian hierarchical method with a high resolution spatial prior is applied to guide the optical reconstructions. Simulated data using the proposed approach are employed on an anatomically accurate mouse model where the optical properties range and volume limitations of the diffusion equation model exist. We investigate the performances of using time-gated data type and spatial priors to quantitatively image the functional parameters of multiple organs. Accurate reconstructions of the two main functional parameters of the blood volume and the relative oxygenation are demonstrated by using our method. Moreover, nonlinear optode settings guided by anatomical prior is proved to be critical to imaging small organs such as the heart. PMID:19997176

  17. Small animal deworming protocols, client education, and veterinarian perception of zoonotic parasites in western Canada

    PubMed Central

    Stull, Jason W.; Carr, Anthony P.; Chomel, Bruno B.; Berghaus, Roy D.; Hird, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Questionnaires were mailed to veterinarians in western Canada to determine dog and cat deworming protocols and the association between perceived zoonotic risk and perceived prevalence of endoparasites and deworming protocols. Of the responding veterinarians (545), 13% and 39% recommended deworming protocols consistent with established guidelines for puppies and kittens, respectively. Mixed animal practitioners and high-perceived prevalence of Toxocara cati were associated with increased appropriate kitten deworming (P < 0.01 and P = 0.04, respectively). High-perceived zoonotic concern of Toxocara canis was associated with increased appropriate puppy deworming (P = 0.01). Sixty-eight percent of veterinarians noted an established hospital deworming protocol, although only 78% followed the protocol. Forty-four percent of veterinarians stated they discussed with all clients the zoonotic risk of animal-derived endoparasites, whereas the remainder discussed it only under particular circumstances or not at all. Most small animal deworming protocols recommended in western Canada begin too late to inhibit endoparasite shedding. Increased educational efforts directed at veterinarians are warranted. PMID:17436903

  18. Three-dimensional segmentation and skeletonization to build an airway tree data structure for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Lee, Zhenghong

    2005-04-01

    Quantitative analysis of intrathoracic airway tree geometry is important for objective evaluation of bronchial tree structure and function. Currently, there is more human data than small animal data on airway morphometry. In this study, we implemented a semi-automatic approach to quantitatively describe airway tree geometry by using high-resolution computed tomography (CT) images to build a tree data structure for small animals such as rats and mice. Silicon lung casts of the excised lungs from a canine and a mouse were used for micro-CT imaging of the airway trees. The programming language IDL was used to implement a 3D region-growing threshold algorithm for segmenting out the airway lung volume from the CT data. Subsequently, a fully-parallel 3D thinning algorithm was implemented in order to complete the skeletonization of the segmented airways. A tree data structure was then created and saved by parsing through the skeletonized volume using the Python programming language. Pertinent information such as the length of all airway segments was stored in the data structure. This approach was shown to be accurate and efficient for up to six generations for the canine lung cast and ten generations for the mouse lung cast.

  19. Characterization of a rotating slat collimator system dedicated to small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisson, F.; Bekaert, V.; El Bitar, Z.; Wurtz, J.; Steibel, J.; Brasse, D.

    2011-03-01

    Some current investigations based on small animal models are dedicated to functional cerebral imaging. They represent a fundamental tool to understand the mechanisms involved in neurodegenerative diseases. In the radiopharmaceutical development approach, the main challenge is to measure the radioactivity distribution in the brain of a subject with good temporal and spatial resolutions. Classical SPECT systems mainly use parallel hole or pinhole collimators. In this paper we investigate the use of a rotating slat collimator system for small animal brain imaging. The proposed prototype consists of a 64-channel multi-anode photomultiplier tube (H8804, Hamamatsu Corp.) coupled to a YAP:Ce crystal highly segmented into 32 strips of 0.575 × 18.4 × 10 mm3. The parameters of the rotating slat collimator are optimized using GATE Monte Carlo simulations. The performance of the proposed prototype in terms of spatial resolution, detection efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio is compared to that obtained with a gamma camera equipped with a parallel hole collimator. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate that a spatial resolution of 1.54 mm can be achieved with a detection efficiency of 0.012% for a source located at 20 mm, corresponding to the position of the brain in the prototype field of view.

  20. Full 3-D cluster-based iterative image reconstruction tool for a small animal PET camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valastyán, I.; Imrek, J.; Molnár, J.; Novák, D.; Balkay, L.; Emri, M.; Trón, L.; Bükki, T.; Kerek, A.

    2007-02-01

    Iterative reconstruction methods are commonly used to obtain images with high resolution and good signal-to-noise ratio in nuclear imaging. The aim of this work was to develop a scalable, fast, cluster based, fully 3-D iterative image reconstruction package for our small animal PET camera, the miniPET. The reconstruction package is developed to determine the 3-D radioactivity distribution from list mode type of data sets and it can also simulate noise-free projections of digital phantoms. We separated the system matrix generation and the fully 3-D iterative reconstruction process. As the detector geometry is fixed for a given camera, the system matrix describing this geometry is calculated only once and used for every image reconstruction, making the process much faster. The Poisson and the random noise sensitivity of the ML-EM iterative algorithm were studied for our small animal PET system with the help of the simulation and reconstruction tool. The reconstruction tool has also been tested with data collected by the miniPET from a line and a cylinder shaped phantom and also a rat.

  1. Small-animal whole-body imaging using a photoacoustic full ring array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun; Guo, Zijian; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    In this report, we present a novel 3D photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system for small-animal whole-body imaging. The PACT system, based on a 512-element full-ring transducer array, received photoacoustic signals primarily from a 2-mm-thick slice. The light was generated by a pulse laser, and can either illuminate from the top or be reshaped to illuminate the sample from the side, using a conical lens and an optical condenser. The PACT system was capable of acquiring an in-plane image in 1.6 s; by scanning the sample in the elevational direction, a 3D tomographic image could be constructed. We tested the system by imaging a cylindrical phantom made of human hairs immersed in a scattering medium. The reconstructed image achieved an in-plane resolution of 0.1 mm and an elevational resolution of 1 mm. After deconvolution in the elevational direction, the 3D image was found to match well with the phantom. The system was also used to image a baby mouse in situ; the spinal cord and ribs can be seen easily in the reconstructed image. Our results demonstrate that the PACT system has the potential to be used for fast small-animal whole-body tomographic imaging.

  2. Feasibility study of small animal imaging using clinical PET/CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wen-Lin; Chen, Chia-Lin; Wang, Ze-Jing; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Liu, Dai-Wei; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2007-02-01

    The feasibility of small animal imaging using a clinical positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy- D-glucose (FDG) was evaluated. Two protocols in PET/CT system, single-mouse high-resolution mode (SHR) and multi-mouse high throughput mode (MHT) protocol were employed to investigate the ability of the scanner and also explored the performance differences between microPET and clinical PET/CT. In this study, we have found that even the clinical PET/CT scanner could not compete with the microPET scanner, especially in spatial resolution; the high-resolution CT image could advance the anatomical information to sub-millimeter level. Besides, CT-based attenuation correction can improve the image uniformity characteristics and quantification accuracy, and the large bore of a human whole-body scanner broadens the possibility of high throughput studies. Considering all the benefits, clinical PET/CT imaging might be a potential alternative for small animal study.

  3. An Implantable MEMS Micropump System for Drug Delivery in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Gensler, Heidi; Sheybani, Roya; Li, Po-Ying; Lo, Ronalee; Meng, Ellis

    2012-01-01

    We present the first implantable drug delivery system for controlled dosing, timing, and location in small animals. Current implantable drug delivery devices do not provide control over these factors or are not feasible for implantation in research animals as small as mice. Our system utilizes an integrated electrolysis micropump, is refillable, has an inert drug reservoir for broad drug compatibility, and is capable of adjustment to the delivery regimen while implanted. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used for characterization of electrodes on glass substrate and a flexible Parylene substrate. Benchtop testing of the electrolysis actuator resulted in flow rates from 1 to 34 μL/min on glass substrate and up to 6.8 μL/min on Parylene substrate. The fully integrated system generated a flow rate of 4.72 ± 0.35 μL/min under applied constant current of 1.0 mA while maintaining a power consumption of only ~3 mW. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo application of the system for anti-cancer drug delivery in mice. PMID:22273985

  4. Optical coherence tomography for assessment of microbicide safety in a small animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Brent A.; Vincent, Kathleen L.; Bourne, Nigel; Vargas, Gracie; Motamedi, Massoud

    2013-04-01

    Sensitive imaging techniques for small animals are needed to assess drug toxicity in preclinical studies. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides a noninvasive tool for high-resolution, depth-resolved visualization of drug-induced changes in tissue morphology. In a mouse model, we utilize OCT to assess vaginal tissue integrity following the application of topical microbicides (drugs used to prevent infection). Mice are challenged with herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) to determine the correlation of tissue damage as quantified by OCT to increased susceptibility. The microbicide benzalkonium chloride (BZK) (0.02, 0.2, or 2%) or phosphate buffered saline control is administered intravaginally. In vivo OCT imaging and collection of tissue samples are performed after treatment. A quantitative OCT scoring system is applied to assess epithelial damage, and the results are compared with those of histology. A separate group of mice are treated similarly then challenged with HSV-2. Epithelial morphology quantified noninvasively by OCT and histology are dose-dependent (p<0.0001). The OCT scoring system detected a significant increase in epithelial damage with increasing BZK concentration (p<0.0001). These results paralleled an increase in HSV-2 susceptibility (p<0.005). OCT can be used as a noninvasive tool to assess topical drug toxicity in a small animal model with potential to predict increased susceptibility to vaginal infection.

  5. Small-animal tomography with a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, D. H.; Lundström, U.; Westermark, U.; Takman, P. A. C.; Burvall, A.; Arsenian Henriksson, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray tomography of small animals is an important tool for medical research. For high-resolution x-ray imaging of few-cm-thick samples such as, e.g., mice, high-brightness x-ray sources with energies in the few-10-keV range are required. In this paper we perform the first small-animal imaging and tomography experiments using liquid-metal-jet-anode x-ray sources. This type of source shows promise to increase the brightness of microfocus x-ray systems, but present sources are typically optimized for an energy of 9 keV. Here we describe the details of a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact laboratory microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-In/Ga-jet anode. The source normally operates with 40 W of electron-beam power focused onto the metal jet, producing a 7×7 μm2 FWHM x-ray spot. The peak spectral brightness is 4 × 109 photons / ( s × mm2 × mrad2 × 0.1%BW) at the 24.2 keV In Kα line. We use the new In/Ga source and an existing Ga/In/Sn source for high-resolution imaging and tomography of mice.

  6. Mid-Range Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Small Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, S. E.; Tomasi, D.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2008-08-01

    The vast majority of articles on MRI RF coils over the past two decades have focused on large coils, where sample losses dominate, or on micro-coils, where sample and capacitor losses are negligible. Few have addressed the mid-range coils, seen in the majority of small-animal applications, where all the sources of loss are important, for example, mouse brain and body coils from 125 to 750 MHz. We developed a four-saddle coil array for magnetic resonance imaging of small animals. The saddle coil elements in the array were evenly distributed to cover the rat's head. The coil array was tuned to the resonant frequency of 170 MHz. Due to the close proximity of the coil elements, it was necessary to decouple the coil array using nonmagnetic trimmers and, it was operated in the transceiver mode and quadrature-driven. To test the coil array performance at high field, phantom images were acquired with our saddle coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Ex vivo brain images of a rat were also acquired, and proved the feasibility of the scaled version of a saddle coil array and, its compatibility with standard pulse sequences when used in a high field magnetic resonance imager.

  7. A method for small-animal PET/CT alignment calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascau, J.; Vaquero, J. J.; Chamorro-Servent, J.; Rodríguez-Ruano, A.; Desco, M.

    2012-06-01

    Small-animal positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners provide anatomical and molecular imaging, which enables the joint visualization and analysis of both types of data. A proper alignment calibration procedure is essential for small-animal imaging since resolution is much higher than that in human devices. This work presents an alignment phantom and two different calibration methods that provide a reliable and repeatable measurement of the spatial geometrical alignment between the PET and the CT subsystems of a hybrid scanner. The phantom can be built using laboratory materials, and it is meant to estimate the rigid spatial transformation that aligns both modalities. It consists of three glass capillaries filled with a positron-emitter solution and positioned in a non-coplanar triangular geometry inside the system field of view. The calibration methods proposed are both based on automatic line detection, but with different approaches to calculate the transformation of the lines between both modalities. Our results show an average accuracy of the alignment estimation of 0.39 mm over the whole field of view.

  8. Diffuse fluorescence tomography based on the radiative transfer equation for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yihan; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng; Li, Jiao

    2014-02-01

    Diffuse florescence tomography (DFT) as a high-sensitivity optical molecular imaging tool, can be applied to in vivo visualize interior cellular and molecular events for small-animal disease model through quantitatively recovering biodistributions of specific molecular probes. In DFT, the radiative transfer equation (RTE) and its approximation, such as the diffuse equation (DE), have been used as the forward models. The RTE-based DFT methodology is more suitable for biological tissue having void-like regions and the near-source area as in the situations of small animal imaging. We present a RTE-based scheme for the steady state DFT, which combines the discrete solid angle method and the finite difference method to obtain numerical solutions of the 2D steady RTE, with the natural boundary condition and collimating light source model. The approach is validated using the forward data from the Monte Carlo simulation for its better performances in the spatial resolution and reconstruction fidelity compared to the DE-based scheme.

  9. Online virtual isocenter based radiation field targeting for high performance small animal microirradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, James M. P.; Ansell, Steve; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jaffray, David A.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in precision microirradiators for small animal radiation oncology studies have provided the framework for novel translational radiobiological studies. Such systems target radiation fields at the scale required for small animal investigations, typically through a combination of on-board computed tomography image guidance and fixed, interchangeable collimators. Robust targeting accuracy of these radiation fields remains challenging, particularly at the millimetre scale field sizes achievable by the majority of microirradiators. Consistent and reproducible targeting accuracy is further hindered as collimators are removed and inserted during a typical experimental workflow. This investigation quantified this targeting uncertainty and developed an online method based on a virtual treatment isocenter to actively ensure high performance targeting accuracy for all radiation field sizes. The results indicated that the two-dimensional field placement uncertainty was as high as 1.16 mm at isocenter, with simulations suggesting this error could be reduced to 0.20 mm using the online correction method. End-to-end targeting analysis of a ball bearing target on radiochromic film sections showed an improved targeting accuracy with the three-dimensional vector targeting error across six different collimators reduced from 0.56+/- 0.05 mm (mean  ±  SD) to 0.05+/- 0.05 mm for an isotropic imaging voxel size of 0.1 mm.

  10. Online virtual isocenter based radiation field targeting for high performance small animal microirradiation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, James M P; Ansell, Steve; Lindsay, Patricia E; Jaffray, David A

    2015-12-01

    Advances in precision microirradiators for small animal radiation oncology studies have provided the framework for novel translational radiobiological studies. Such systems target radiation fields at the scale required for small animal investigations, typically through a combination of on-board computed tomography image guidance and fixed, interchangeable collimators. Robust targeting accuracy of these radiation fields remains challenging, particularly at the millimetre scale field sizes achievable by the majority of microirradiators. Consistent and reproducible targeting accuracy is further hindered as collimators are removed and inserted during a typical experimental workflow. This investigation quantified this targeting uncertainty and developed an online method based on a virtual treatment isocenter to actively ensure high performance targeting accuracy for all radiation field sizes. The results indicated that the two-dimensional field placement uncertainty was as high as 1.16 mm at isocenter, with simulations suggesting this error could be reduced to 0.20 mm using the online correction method. End-to-end targeting analysis of a ball bearing target on radiochromic film sections showed an improved targeting accuracy with the three-dimensional vector targeting error across six different collimators reduced from [Formula: see text] mm (mean  ±  SD) to [Formula: see text] mm for an isotropic imaging voxel size of 0.1 mm. PMID:26540304

  11. Small Animal Models for Human Metapneumovirus: Cotton Rat is More Permissive than Hamster and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Niewiesk, Stefan; Li, Jianrong

    2014-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is the second most prevalent causative agent of pediatric respiratory infections worldwide. Currently, there are no vaccines or antiviral drugs against this virus. One of the major hurdles in hMPV research is the difficulty to identify a robust small animal model to accurately evaluate the efficacy and safety of vaccines and therapeutics. In this study, we compared the replication and pathogenesis of hMPV in BALB/c mice, Syrian golden hamsters, and cotton rats. It was found that BALB/c mice are not permissive for hMPV infection despite the use of a high dose (6.5 log10 PFU) of virus for intranasal inoculation. In hamsters, hMPV replicated efficiently in nasal turbinates but demonstrated only limited replication in lungs. In cotton rats, hMPV replicated efficiently in both nasal turbinate and lung when intranasally administered with three different doses (4, 5, and 6 log10 PFU) of hMPV. Lungs of cotton rats infected by hMPV developed interstitial pneumonia with mononuclear cells infiltrates and increased lumen exudation. By immunohistochemistry, viral antigens were detected at the luminal surfaces of the bronchial epithelial cells in lungs. Vaccination of cotton rats with hMPV completely protected upper and lower respiratory tract from wildtype challenge. The immunization also elicited elevated serum neutralizing antibody. Collectively, these results demonstrated that cotton rat is a robust small animal model for hMPV infection. PMID:25438015

  12. 3D-Printed Small-Animal Immobilizer for Use in Preclinical Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    McCarroll, Rachel E; Rubinstein, Ashley E; Kingsley, Charles V; Yang, Jinzhong; Yang, Peiying; Court, Laurence E

    2015-01-01

    We have designed a method for immobilizing the subjects of small-animal studies using a study group–specific 3D-printed immobilizer that significantly reduces interfraction rotational variation. A cone-beam CT scan acquired from a single specimen in a study group was used to create a 3D-printed immobilizer that can be used for all specimens in the same study group. 3D printing allows for the incorporation of study-specific features into the immobilizer design, including geometries suitable for use in MR and CT scanners, holders for fiducial markers, and anesthesia nose cones of various sizes. Using metrics of rotational setup variations, we compared the current setup in our small-animal irradiation system, a half-pipe bed, with the 3D-printed device. We also assessed translational displacement within the immobilizer. The printed design significantly reduced setup variation, with average reductions in rotational displacement of 76% ± 3% (1.57 to 0.37°) in pitch, 78% ± 3% (1.85 to 0.41°) in yaw, and 87% ± 3% (5.39 to 0.70°) in roll. Translational displacement within the printed immobilizer was less than 1.5 ± 0.3 mm. This method of immobilization allows for repeatable setup when using MR or CT scans for the purpose of radiotherapy, streamlines the workflow, and places little burden on the study subjects. PMID:26424253

  13. Comprehensive quality assurance phantom for the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP)

    PubMed Central

    Jermoumi, M.; Korideck, H.; Bhagwat, M.; Zygmanski, P.; Makrigiogos, G.M.; Berbeco, R.I.; Cormack, R.C.; Ngwa, W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop and test the suitability and performance of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) phantom for the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP). Methods and materials A QA phantom was developed for carrying out daily, monthly and annual QA tasks including: imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning system (TPS) performance evaluation of the SARRP. The QA phantom consists of 15 (60 × 60 × 5 mm3) kV-energy tissue equivalent solid water slabs. The phantom can incorporate optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD), Mosfet or film. One slab, with inserts and another slab with hole patterns are particularly designed for image QA. Results Output constancy measurement results showed daily variations within 3%. Using the Mosfet in phantom as target, results showed that the difference between TPS calculations and measurements was within 5%. Annual QA results for the Percentage depth dose (PDD) curves, lateral beam profiles, beam flatness and beam profile symmetry were found consistent with results obtained at commissioning. PDD curves obtained using film and OSLDs showed good agreement. Image QA was performed monthly, with image-quality parameters assessed in terms of CBCT image geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, image spatial resolution, noise and image uniformity. Conclusions The results show that the developed QA phantom can be employed as a tool for comprehensive performance evaluation of the SARRP. The study provides a useful reference for development of a comprehensive quality assurance program for the SARRP and other similar small animal irradiators, with proposed tolerances and frequency of required tests. PMID:25964129

  14. Capillary Rise on Legs of a Small Animal and on Artificially Textured Surfaces Mimicking Them

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Marie; Ishii, Daisuke; Ito, Shuto; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Okumura, Ko

    2014-01-01

    The wharf roach Ligia exotica is a small animal that lives by the sea and absorbs water from the sea through its legs by virtue of a remarkable array of small blades of micron scale. We find that the imbibition dynamics on the legs is rather complex on a microscopic scale, but on a macroscopic scale the imbibition length seems to simply scale linearly with elapsed time. This unusual dynamics of imbibition, which usually slows down with time, is advantageous for long-distance water transport and results from repetition of unit dynamics. Inspired by the remarkable features, we study artificially textured surfaces mimicking the structure on the legs of the animal. Unlike the case of the wharf roach, the linear dynamics were not reproduced on the artificial surfaces, which may result from more subtle features on the real legs that are not faithfully reflected on the artificial surfaces. Instead, the nonlinear dynamics revealed that hybrid structures on the artificial surfaces speed up the water transport compared with non-hybrid ones. In addition, the dynamics on the artificial surfaces turn out to be well described by a composite theory developed here, with the theory giving useful guiding principles for designing hybrid textured surfaces for rapid imbibition and elucidating physical advantages of the microscopic design on the legs. PMID:24849071

  15. Mid-Range Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Small Animals

    SciTech Connect

    Solis, S. E.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2008-08-11

    The vast majority of articles on MRI RF coils over the past two decades have focused on large coils, where sample losses dominate, or on micro-coils, where sample and capacitor losses are negligible. Few have addressed the mid-range coils, seen in the majority of small-animal applications, where all the sources of loss are important, for example, mouse brain and body coils from 125 to 750 MHz. We developed a four-saddle coil array for magnetic resonance imaging of small animals. The saddle coil elements in the array were evenly distributed to cover the rat's head. The coil array was tuned to the resonant frequency of 170 MHz. Due to the close proximity of the coil elements, it was necessary to decouple the coil array using nonmagnetic trimmers and, it was operated in the transceiver mode and quadrature-driven. To test the coil array performance at high field, phantom images were acquired with our saddle coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Ex vivo brain images of a rat were also acquired, and proved the feasibility of the scaled version of a saddle coil array and, its compatibility with standard pulse sequences when used in a high field magnetic resonance imager.

  16. Raytest ClearPET™, a new generation small animal PET scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempere Roldan, P.; Chereul, E.; Dietzel, O.; Magnier, L.; Pautrot, C.; Rbah, L.; Sappey-Marinier, D.; Wagner, A.; Zimmer, L.; Janier, M.; Tarazona, V.; Dietzel, G.

    2007-02-01

    The ClearPET is a high-performance small animal PET scanner that has been developed by the Crystal Clear Collaboration (CCC) and is now commercially available to customers worldwide through the Raytest group. Its high sensitivity and spatial resolution are achieved, thanks to a patented phoswich configuration made of two types of scintillating crystals: L(Y)SO and LuYAP:Ce, thus providing depth of interaction information. The ClearPET presents a modular design and it allows for 360° rotation of the detector modules around the field of view (FOV). The ClearPET also presents the unique feature of having an adjustable FOV diameter, thus being suitable for small and medium size animal PET studies. This paper shows the performances of the commercial ClearPET in terms of its spatial resolution, sensitivity and quality of phantoms and preclinical images obtained. It also describes the updated situation of the first commercial unit sold to the Animage platform in Lyon.

  17. Quantification of Central Substance P Receptor Occupancy by Aprepitant Using Small Animal Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Tadashi; Saijo, Takeaki; Haneda, Eisuke; Maeda, Jun; Tokunaga, Masaki; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Kannami, Ayako; Asai, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central substance P receptors, termed NK-1 receptors, have been considered as therapeutic targets in the development of drugs against diverse conditions, including emesis, overactive bladder, and depression. Methods: Here, we applied small animal positron emission tomography (PET) and a radioligand for NK-1 receptors ([18F]FE-SPA-RQ) for measuring occupancies of these receptors by a selective antagonist (aprepitant) in order to examine the validity of this in vivo imaging system for preclinical characterization of candidate agents acting on NK-1 receptors, and as a tool for predicting optimal doses in humans. Results: PET in gerbils depicted high uptake in the striatum and dose-dependent displacement with increasing doses of aprepitant. Occupancies increased as a function of aprepitant plasma concentrations according to a one-site competition model, which agrees with reported occupancy-concentration relationships in clinical studies after correction for species differences in plasma protein-unbound aprepitant fractions. These occupancy data were further supported by ex vivo autoradiography of brain samples from aprepitant-treated gerbils. In a pilot study of a marmoset, we obtained more accurate determinations of NK-1 receptor occupancy, less affected by spillover of signals from extracranial tissues than in gerbil experiments. Conclusions: These findings support the utility of small animals and quantitative PET in the development of drugs targeting NK-1 receptors. PMID:25609595

  18. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC AND ULTRASONOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF CAVERNOUS TRANSFORMATION OF THE OBSTRUCTED PORTAL VEIN IN SMALL ANIMALS.

    PubMed

    Specchi, Swan; Pey, Pascaline; Ledda, Gianluca; Lustgarten, Meghann; Thrall, Donald; Bertolini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    In humans, the process of development of collateral vessels with hepatopetal flow around the portal vein in order to bypass an obstruction is called "cavernous transformation of the portal vein." The purpose of this retrospective, cross-sectional, multicentric study was to describe presumed cavernous transformation of the portal vein in small animals with portal vein obstruction using ultrasound and multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Databases from three different institutions were searched for patients with an imaging diagnosis of cavernous transformation of the portal vein secondary to portal vein obstruction of any cause. Images were retrieved and reanalyzed. With MDCT-angiography, two main portoportal collateral pathways were identified: short tortuous portoportal veins around/inside the thrombus and long portoportal collaterals bypassing the site of portal obstruction. Three subtypes of the long collaterals, often coexisting, were identified. Branches of the hepatic artery where involved in collateral circulation in nine cases. Concomitant acquired portosystemic shunts were identified in six patients. With ultrasound, cavernous transformation of the portal vein was suspected in three dogs and one cat based on visualization of multiple and tortuous vascular structures corresponding to periportal collaterals. In conclusion, the current study provided descriptive MDCT and ultrasonographic characteristics of presumed cavernous transformation of the portal vein in a sample of small animals. Cavernous transformation of the portal vein could occur as a single condition or could be concurrent with acquired portosystemic shunts. PMID:25877678

  19. Canine blastomycosis in Wisconsin: a survey of small-animal veterinary practices.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jennifer L; Dieckman, Jordan L; Reed, Kurt D; Meece, Jennifer K

    2014-10-01

    The disease burden and impact of canine blastomycosis in Wisconsin is uncertain. We surveyed small-animal veterinary practices to obtain estimates of disease incidence, determine patient outcomes, and investigate variation in diagnostic and treatment strategies used by veterinarians. Veterinarians representing small-animal practices in Wisconsin were contacted by mail with the option to complete a paper or online questionnaire. Questionnaires were returned from 68 of 443 veterinary practices (15%) that estimated diagnosing 239 cases of canine blastomycosis annually, with an overall mortality of 36%. Annual incidence rates of canine blastomycosis were calculated for 43 individual veterinary clinics and differed significantly between clinics in endemic and nonendemic counties (P = 0.01), with the mean in endemic counties being 204/100,000/yr and nonendemic counties being 72/100,000/yr. Veterinarians reported an increase in canine blastomycosis cases from April through August. A wide variety of methods were used for diagnosis, ranging from clinical signs alone to antigen testing and "in-house" cytology. Of note, fungal culture was used rarely for diagnosis. In addition, veterinarians at these 68 clinics estimated diagnosing 36 cases of feline blastomycosis annually. The incidence of canine blastomycosis is high but quite variable among veterinary practices in Wisconsin. Diagnosis is based frequently on clinical signs exclusively due, in part, to the perceived high cost of laboratory tests. Similarly, the mortality associated with blastomycosis is likely negatively impacted because some dog owners defer therapy due to the cost of antifungal drugs. PMID:25187628

  20. Using accelerometers to remotely and automatically characterize behavior in small animals.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Talisin T; Springthorpe, Dwight; Walsh, Rachel E; Berg-Kirkpatrick, Taylor

    2016-06-01

    Activity budgets in wild animals are challenging to measure via direct observation because data collection is time consuming and observer effects are potentially confounding. Although tri-axial accelerometers are increasingly employed for this purpose, their application in small-bodied animals has been limited by weight restrictions. Additionally, accelerometers engender novel complications, as a system is needed to reliably map acceleration to behaviors. In this study, we describe newly developed, tiny acceleration-logging devices (1.5-2.5 g) and use them to characterize behavior in two chipmunk species. We collected paired accelerometer readings and behavioral observations from captive individuals. We then employed techniques from machine learning to develop an automatic system for coding accelerometer readings into behavioral categories. Finally, we deployed and recovered accelerometers from free-living, wild chipmunks. This is the first time to our knowledge that accelerometers have been used to generate behavioral data for small-bodied (<100 g), free-living mammals. PMID:26994177

  1. Investigation of Attenuation Correction for Small-Animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsin-Hui; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative accuracy of SPECT is limited by photon attenuation and scatter effect when photons interact with atoms. In this study, we developed a new attenuation correction (AC) method, CT-based mean attenuation correction (CTMAC) method, and compared it with various methods that were often used currently to assess the AC phenomenon by using the small-animal SPECT/CT data that were acquired from various physical phantoms and a rat. The physical phantoms and an SD rat, which were injected with 99mTc, were scanned by a parallel-hole small-animal SPECT, and then they were imaged by the 80 kVp micro-CT. Scatter was estimated and corrected by the triple-energy window (TEW) method. Absolute quantification was derived from a known activity point source scan. In the physical-phantom studies, we compared the images with original, scatter correction (SC) only, and the scatter-corrected images with AC performed by using Chang's method, CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC), CT-based iterative attenuation compensation during reconstruction (CTIACR), and the CTMAC. From the correction results, we find out that the errors of the previous six configurations are mostly quite similar. The CTMAC needs the shortest correction time while obtaining good AC results. PMID:23840278

  2. In vivo small animal micro-CT using nanoparticle contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Jeffrey R.; West, Jennifer L.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most valuable modalities for in vivo imaging because it is fast, high-resolution, cost-effective, and non-invasive. Moreover, CT is heavily used not only in the clinic (for both diagnostics and treatment planning) but also in preclinical research as micro-CT. Although CT is inherently effective for lung and bone imaging, soft tissue imaging requires the use of contrast agents. For small animal micro-CT, nanoparticle contrast agents are used in order to avoid rapid renal clearance. A variety of nanoparticles have been used for micro-CT imaging, but the majority of research has focused on the use of iodine-containing nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles. Both nanoparticle types can act as highly effective blood pool contrast agents or can be targeted using a wide variety of targeting mechanisms. CT imaging can be further enhanced by adding spectral capabilities to separate multiple co-injected nanoparticles in vivo. Spectral CT, using both energy-integrating and energy-resolving detectors, has been used with multiple contrast agents to enable functional and molecular imaging. This review focuses on new developments for in vivo small animal micro-CT using novel nanoparticle probes applied in preclinical research. PMID:26581654

  3. Noise reduction in small-animal PET images using a multiresolution transform.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Jose M; Ochoa Domínguez, Humberto de Jesús; Vergara Villegas, Osslan Osiris; Ortega Máynez, Leticia; Mederos, Boris

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of denoising reconstructed small animal positron emission tomography (PET) images, based on a multiresolution approach which can be implemented with any transform such as contourlet, shearlet, curvelet, and wavelet. The PET images are analyzed and processed in the transform domain by modeling each subband as a set of different regions separated by boundaries. Homogeneous and heterogeneous regions are considered. Each region is independently processed using different filters: a linear estimator for homogeneous regions and a surface polynomial estimator for the heterogeneous region. The boundaries between the different regions are estimated using a modified edge focusing filter. The proposed approach was validated by a series of experiments. Our method achieved an overall reduction of up to 26% in the %STD of the reconstructed image of a small animal NEMA phantom. Additionally, a test on a simulated lesion showed that our method yields better contrast preservation than other state-of-the art techniques used for noise reduction. Thus, the proposed method provides a significant reduction of noise while at the same time preserving contrast and important structures such as lesions. PMID:24951682

  4. Comparison of two detector systems for cone beam CT small animal imaging - a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yang; Shaw, Chris C.; Liu, Xinming; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Chen, Lingyun; Tu, Shu-Ju; Kappadath, S. Cheenu; Lai, Chao-Jen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To compare two detector systems - one based on the charge-coupled device (CCD) and image amplifier, the other based on a-Si/CsI flat panel, for cone beam computed-tomography (CT) imaging of small animals. A high resolution, high framing rate detector system for the cone beam CT imaging of small animals was developed. The system consists of a 2048×3072×12 bit CCD optically coupled to an image amplifier and an x-ray phosphor screen. The CCD has an intrinsic pixel size of 12 μm but the effective pixel size can be adjusted through the magnification adjustment of the optical coupling systems. The system is used in conjunction with an x-ray source and a rotating stage for holding and rotating the scanned object in the cone beam CT imaging experiments. The advantages of the system include but are not limited to the ability to adjust the effective pixel size and to achieve extremely high spatial resolution and temporal resolution. However, the need to use optical coupling compromises the detective quanta efficiency (DQE) of the system. In this paper, the imaging characteristics of the system were presented and compared with those of an a-Si/CsI flat-panel detector system. PMID:18160972

  5. Development of an Extracorporeal Perfusion Device for Small Animal Free Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Fichter, Andreas M.; Ritschl, Lucas M.; Borgmann, Anna; Humbs, Martin; Luppa, Peter B.; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Mücke, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal perfusion (ECP) might prolong the vital storage capabilities of composite free flaps, potentially opening a wide range of clinical applications. Aim of the study was the development a validated low-cost extracorporeal perfusion model for further research in small animal free flaps. Methods After establishing optimal perfusion settings, a specially designed extracorporeal perfusion system was evaluated during 8-hour perfusion of rat epigastric flaps followed by microvascular free flap transfer. Controls comprised sham-operation, ischemia and in vivo perfusion. Flaps and perfusate (diluted blood) were closely monitored by blood gas analysis, combined laser Doppler flowmetry and remission spectroscopy and Indocyanine-Green angiography. Evaluations were complemented by assessment of necrotic area and light microscopy at day 7. Results ECP was established and maintained for 8 hours with constant potassium and pH levels. Subsequent flap transfer was successful. Notably, the rate of necrosis of extracorporeally perfused flaps (27%) was even lower than after in vivo perfusion (49%), although not statistically significant (P = 0,083). After sham-operation, only 6% of the total flap area became necrotic, while 8-hour ischemia led to total flap loss (98%). Angiographic and histological findings confirmed these observations. Conclusions Vital storage capabilities of microvascular flaps can be prolonged by temporary ECP. Our study provides important insights on the pathophysiological processes during extracorporeal tissue perfusion and provides a validated small animal perfusion model for further studies. PMID:26808996

  6. Vermicomposting as manure management strategy for urban small-holder animal farms – Kampala case study

    SciTech Connect

    Lalander, Cecilia Helena; Komakech, Allan John; Vinnerås, Björn

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Poor manure management can increase burden of disease and environmental impact. • A low-maintenance vermicompost reactor was set-up in Kampala, Uganda. • High material reduction (45.9%) and waste-to-biomass conversion (3.6% on a TS basis). • Five year return on investment of 275% of system in Uganda. • Technically and economically viable system for improved urban manure management. - Abstract: Inadequate organic waste management can contribute to the spread of diseases and have negative impacts on the environment. Vermicomposting organic waste could have dual beneficial effects by generating an economically viable animal feed protein in the form of worm biomass, while alleviating the negative effects of poor organic waste management. In this study, a low-maintenance vermicomposting system was evaluated as manure and food waste management system for small-holder farmers. A vermicomposting system using the earthworm species Eudrilus eugeniae and treating cow manure and food waste was set up in Kampala, Uganda, and monitored for 172 days. The material degradation and protein production rates were evaluated after 63 days and at the end of the experiment. The material reduction was 45.9% and the waste-to-biomass conversion rate was 3.5% in the vermicomposting process on a total solids basis. A possible increase in the conversion rate could be achieved by increasing the frequency of worm harvesting. Vermicomposting was found to be a viable manure management method in small-scale urban animal agriculture; the return of investment was calculated to be 280% for treating the manure of a 450 kg cow. The vermicompost was not sanitised, although hygiene quality could be improved by introducing a post-stabilisation step in which no fresh material is added. The value of the animal feed protein generated in the process can act as an incentive to improve current manure management strategies.

  7. SU-E-T-217: Intrinsic Respiratory Gating in Small Animal CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y; Smith, M; Mistry, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Preclinical animal models of lung cancer can provide a controlled test-bed for testing dose escalation or function-based-treatment-planning studies. However, to extract lung function, i.e. ventilation, one needs to be able to image the lung at different phases of ventilation (in-hale / ex-hale). Most respiratory-gated imaging using micro-CT involves using an external ventilator and surgical intervention limiting the utility in longitudinal studies. A new intrinsic respiratory retrospective gating method was developed and tested in mice. Methods: A fixed region of interest (ROI) that covers the diaphragm was selected on all projection images to estimate the mean intensity (M). The mean intensity depends on the projection angle and diaphragm position. A 3-point moving average (A) of consecutive M values: Mpre, Mcurrent and Mpost, was calculated to be subtracted from Mcurrent. A fixed threshold was used to enable amplitude based sorting into 4 different phases of respiration. Images at full-inhale and end-exhale phases of respiration were reconstructed using the open source OSCaR. Lung volumes estimated at the 2 phases of respiration were validated against literature values. Results: Intrinsic retrospective gating was accomplished without the use of any external breathing waveform. While projection images were acquired at 360 different angles. Only 138 and 104 projections were used to reconstruct images at full-inhale and end-exhale. This often results in non-uniform under-sampled angular projections leading to some minor streaking artifacts. The calculated expiratory, inspiratory and tidal lung volumes correlated well with the values known from the literature. Conclusion: Our initial result demonstrates an intrinsic gating method that is suitable for flat panel cone beam small animal CT systems. Reduction in streaking artifacts can be accomplished by oversampling the data or using iterative reconstruction methods. This initial experience will enable

  8. A Modified Carbon Monoxide Breath Test for Measuring Erythrocyte Lifespan in Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yong-Jian; Zhang, Hou-De; Ji, Yong-Qiang; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Huang, Jia-Liang; Du, Li-Tao; Cao, Ping; Zang, De-Yue; Du, Ji-Hui; Li, Rong; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    This study was to develop a CO breath test for RBC lifespan estimation of small animals. The ribavirin induced hemolysis rabbit models were placed individually in a closed rebreath cage and air samples were collected for measurement of CO concentration. RBC lifespan was calculated from accumulated CO, blood volume, and hemoglobin concentration data. RBC lifespan was determined in the same animals with the standard biotin-labeling method. RBC lifespan data obtained by the CO breath test method for control (CON, 49.0 ± 5.9 d) rabbits, rabbits given 10 mg/kg·d(-1) of ribavirin (RIB10, 31.0 ± 4.0 d), and rabbits given 20 mg/kg·d(-1) of ribavirin (RIB20, 25.0 ± 2.9 d) were statistically similar (all p > 0.05) to and linearly correlated (r = 0.96, p < 0.01) with the RBC lifespan data obtained for the same rabbits by the standard biotin-labeling method (CON, 51.0 ± 2.7 d; RIB10, 33.0 ± 1.3 d; and RIB20, 27.0 ± 0.8 d). The CO breath test method takes less than 3 h to complete, whereas the standard method requires at least several weeks. In conclusion, the CO breath test method provides a simple and rapid means of estimating RBC lifespan and is feasible for use with small animal models. PMID:27294128

  9. A Modified Carbon Monoxide Breath Test for Measuring Erythrocyte Lifespan in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yong-Jian; Zhang, Hou-De; Ji, Yong-Qiang; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Huang, Jia-Liang; Du, Li-Tao; Cao, Ping; Zang, De-Yue; Du, Ji-Hui; Li, Rong; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    This study was to develop a CO breath test for RBC lifespan estimation of small animals. The ribavirin induced hemolysis rabbit models were placed individually in a closed rebreath cage and air samples were collected for measurement of CO concentration. RBC lifespan was calculated from accumulated CO, blood volume, and hemoglobin concentration data. RBC lifespan was determined in the same animals with the standard biotin-labeling method. RBC lifespan data obtained by the CO breath test method for control (CON, 49.0 ± 5.9 d) rabbits, rabbits given 10 mg/kg·d−1 of ribavirin (RIB10, 31.0 ± 4.0 d), and rabbits given 20 mg/kg·d−1 of ribavirin (RIB20, 25.0 ± 2.9 d) were statistically similar (all p > 0.05) to and linearly correlated (r = 0.96, p < 0.01) with the RBC lifespan data obtained for the same rabbits by the standard biotin-labeling method (CON, 51.0 ± 2.7 d; RIB10, 33.0 ± 1.3 d; and RIB20, 27.0 ± 0.8 d). The CO breath test method takes less than 3 h to complete, whereas the standard method requires at least several weeks. In conclusion, the CO breath test method provides a simple and rapid means of estimating RBC lifespan and is feasible for use with small animal models. PMID:27294128

  10. Multiple-image radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernick, Miles N.; Wirjadi, Oliver; Chapman, Dean; Zhong, Zhong; Galatsanos, Nikolas P.; Yang, Yongyi; Brankov, Jovan G.; Oltulu, Oral; Anastasio, Mark A.; Muehleman, Carol

    2003-12-01

    Conventional radiography produces a single image of an object by measuring the attenuation of an x-ray beam passing through it. When imaging weakly absorbing tissues, x-ray attenuation may be a suboptimal signature of disease-related information. In this paper we describe a new phase-sensitive imaging method, called multiple-image radiography (MIR), which is an improvement on a prior technique called diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI). This paper elaborates on our initial presentation of the idea in Wernick et al (2002 Proc. Int. Symp. Biomed. Imaging pp 129-32). MIR simultaneously produces several images from a set of measurements made with a single x-ray beam. Specifically, MIR yields three images depicting separately the effects of refraction, ultra-small-angle scatter and attenuation by the object. All three images have good contrast, in part because they are virtually immune from degradation due to scatter at higher angles. MIR also yields a very comprehensive object description, consisting of the angular intensity spectrum of a transmitted x-ray beam at every image pixel, within a narrow angular range. Our experiments are based on data acquired using a synchrotron light source; however, in preparation for more practical implementations using conventional x-ray sources, we develop and evaluate algorithms designed for Poisson noise, which is characteristic of photon-limited imaging. The results suggest that MIR is capable of operating at low photon count levels, therefore the method shows promise for use with conventional x-ray sources. The results also show that, in addition to producing new types of object descriptions, MIR produces substantially more accurate images than its predecessor, DEI. MIR results are shown in the form of planar images of a phantom and a biological specimen. A preliminary demonstration of the use of MIR for computed tomography is also presented.

  11. A high resolution small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) with x-ray tomographic guidance capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Wong, John; Armour, Elwood; Kazanzides, Peter; Iordachita, Iulian; Tryggestad, Erik; Deng, Hua; Matinfar, Mohammad; Kennedy, Christopher; Liu, Zejian; Chan, Timothy; Gray, Owen; Verhaegen, Frank; McNutt, Todd; Ford, Eric; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the CT imaging, conformal irradiation and treatment planning capabilities of a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP). Methods The SARRP employs a dual-focal spot, constant voltage x-ray source mounted on a gantry with a source-to-isocenter distance of 35 cm. Gantry rotation is limited to 120° from vertical. Eighty to 100 kVp x-rays from the smaller 0.4 mm focal spot are used for imaging. Both 0.4 mm and 3.0 mm focal spots operate at 225 kVp for irradiation. Robotic translate/rotate stages are used to position the animal. Cone-beam (CB) CT imaging is achieved by rotating the horizontal animal between the stationary x-ray source and a flat-panel detector. Radiation beams range from 0.5 mm in diameter to (60 × 60) mm2. Dosimetry is measured with radio-chromic films. Monte Carlo dose calculations are employed for treatment planning. The combination of gantry and robotic stage motions facilitate conformal irradiation. Results The SARRP spans 3 ft × 4 ft × 6 ft (WxLxH). Depending on filtration, the isocenter dose outputs at 1 cm depth in water range from 22 to 375 cGy/min from the smallest to the largest radiation fields. The 20% to 80% dose fall-off spans 0.16 mm. CBCT with (0.6 × 0.6 × 0.6) mm3 voxel resolution is acquired with less than 1 cGy. Treatment planning is performed at sub-mm resolution. Conclusions The capability of the SARRP to deliver highly focal beams to multiple animal model systems provides new research opportunities that more realistically bridge laboratory research and clinical translation. PMID:18640502

  12. Improved instrumentation for blood flow velocity measurements in the microcirculation of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mesquita, Jayme Alves; Bouskela, Eliete; Wajnberg, Eliane; de Melo, Pedro Lopes

    2007-02-01

    Microcirculation is the generic name of vessels with internal diameter less than 100μm of the circulatory system, whose main functions are tissue nutrition and oxygen supply. In microcirculatory studies, it is important to know the amount of oxyhemoglobin present in the blood and how fast it is moving. The present work describes improvements introduced in a classical hardware-based instrument that has usually been used to monitor blood flow velocity in the microcirculation of small animals. It consists of a virtual instrument that can be easily incorporated into existing hardware-based systems, contributing to reduce operator related biases and allowing digital processing and storage. The design and calibration of the modified instrument are described as well as in vitro and in vivo results obtained with electrical models and small animals, respectively. Results obtained in in vivo studies showed that this new system is able to detect a small reduction in blood flow velocity comparing arteries and arterioles (p<0.002) and a further reduction in capillaries (p<0.0001). A significant increase in velocity comparing capillaries and venules (p<0.001) and venules and veins (p<0.001) was also observed. These results are in close agreement with biophysical principles. Moreover, the improvements introduced in the device allowed us to clearly observe changes in blood flow introduced by a pharmacological intervention, suggesting that the system has enough temporal resolution to track these microcirculatory events. These results were also in close conformity to physiology, confirming the high scientific potential of the modified system and indicating that this instrument can also be useful for pharmacological evaluations.

  13. Improved instrumentation for blood flow velocity measurements in the microcirculation of small animals

    SciTech Connect

    Mesquita, Jayme Alves Jr. de; Bouskela, Eliete; Wajnberg, Eliane; Lopes de Melo, Pedro

    2007-02-15

    Microcirculation is the generic name of vessels with internal diameter less than 100 {mu}m of the circulatory system, whose main functions are tissue nutrition and oxygen supply. In microcirculatory studies, it is important to know the amount of oxyhemoglobin present in the blood and how fast it is moving. The present work describes improvements introduced in a classical hardware-based instrument that has usually been used to monitor blood flow velocity in the microcirculation of small animals. It consists of a virtual instrument that can be easily incorporated into existing hardware-based systems, contributing to reduce operator related biases and allowing digital processing and storage. The design and calibration of the modified instrument are described as well as in vitro and in vivo results obtained with electrical models and small animals, respectively. Results obtained in in vivo studies showed that this new system is able to detect a small reduction in blood flow velocity comparing arteries and arterioles (p<0.002) and a further reduction in capillaries (p<0.0001). A significant increase in velocity comparing capillaries and venules (p<0.001) and venules and veins (p<0.001) was also observed. These results are in close agreement with biophysical principles. Moreover, the improvements introduced in the device allowed us to clearly observe changes in blood flow introduced by a pharmacological intervention, suggesting that the system has enough temporal resolution to track these microcirculatory events. These results were also in close conformity to physiology, confirming the high scientific potential of the modified system and indicating that this instrument can also be useful for pharmacological evaluations.

  14. 75 FR 53973 - Guidance for Industry; Small Entities Compliance Guide-Designation of New Animal Drugs for Minor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... requirements of the final rule published in the Federal Register of July 26, 2007 (72 FR 41010). FDA has...-- Designation of New Animal Drugs for Minor Uses or Minor Species; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... Animal Drugs for Minor Uses or Minor Species.'' This small entities compliance guide (SECG) aids...

  15. An x-ray image guidance system for small animal stereotactic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, K. H.; Pidikiti, R.; Stojadinovic, S.; Speiser, M.; Seliounine, S.; Saha, D.; Solberg, T. D.

    2010-12-01

    An x-ray image-guided small animal stereotactic irradiator was developed and characterized to enable tumor visualization and accurate target localization for small field, high dose irradiation. The system utilizes a custom collimation system, a motorized positioning system (x, y, θ), a digital imaging panel and operating software, and is integrated with a commercial x-ray unit. The essential characteristics of the irradiator include small radiation fields (1-10 mm), high dose rate (>10 Gy min-1) and submillimeter target localization. The software enables computer-controlled image acquisition, stage motion and target localization providing simple and precise automated target localization. The imaging panel was characterized in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution. Overall localization accuracy and precision were assessed. SNR, CNR and spatial resolution are 24 dB, 21 dB and 2.8 lp mm-1, respectively, and localization accuracy is approximately 65 µm with 6 µm precision. With the aid of image guidance, system performance was subsequently used to evaluate radiation response in a rat orthotopic lung tumor effectively sparing normal tissues and in a mouse normal lung. The capabilities of 3D treatment and cone-beam computed tomography are presented for 3D localization and delivery as a work in progress.

  16. An x-ray image guidance system for small animal stereotactic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Song, K H; Pidikiti, R; Stojadinovic, S; Speiser, M; Seliounine, S; Saha, D; Solberg, T D

    2010-12-01

    An x-ray image-guided small animal stereotactic irradiator was developed and characterized to enable tumor visualization and accurate target localization for small field, high dose irradiation. The system utilizes a custom collimation system, a motorized positioning system (x, y, θ), a digital imaging panel and operating software, and is integrated with a commercial x-ray unit. The essential characteristics of the irradiator include small radiation fields (1-10 mm), high dose rate (>10 Gy min(-1)) and submillimeter target localization. The software enables computer-controlled image acquisition, stage motion and target localization providing simple and precise automated target localization. The imaging panel was characterized in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution. Overall localization accuracy and precision were assessed. SNR, CNR and spatial resolution are 24 dB, 21 dB and 2.8 lp mm(-1), respectively, and localization accuracy is approximately 65 µm with 6 µm precision. With the aid of image guidance, system performance was subsequently used to evaluate radiation response in a rat orthotopic lung tumor effectively sparing normal tissues and in a mouse normal lung. The capabilities of 3D treatment and cone-beam computed tomography are presented for 3D localization and delivery as a work in progress. PMID:21081818

  17. Evaluation of Matrix9 silicon photomultiplier array for small-animal PET

    PubMed Central

    Du, Junwei; Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Yang, Yongfeng; Di, Kun; Roncali, Emilie; Mitchell, Gregory S.; Buckley, Steve; Jackson, Carl; Cherry, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The MatrixSL-9-30035-OEM (Matrix9) from SensL is a large-area silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) photodetector module consisting of a 3 × 3 array of 4 × 4 element SiPM arrays (total of 144 SiPM pixels) and incorporates SensL’s front-end electronics board and coincidence board. Each SiPM pixel measures 3.16 × 3.16 mm2 and the total size of the detector head is 47.8 × 46.3 mm2. Using 8 × 8 polished LSO/LYSO arrays (pitch 1.5 mm) the performance of this detector system (SiPM array and readout electronics) was evaluated with a view for its eventual use in small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Measurements of noise, signal, signal-to-noise ratio, energy resolution, flood histogram quality, timing resolution, and array trigger error were obtained at different bias voltages (28.0–32.5 V in 0.5 V intervals) and at different temperatures (5 °C–25 °C in 5 °C degree steps) to find the optimal operating conditions. Results: The best measured signal-to-noise ratio and flood histogram quality for 511 keV gamma photons were obtained at a bias voltage of 30.0 V and a temperature of 5 °C. The energy resolution and timing resolution under these conditions were 14.2% ± 0.1% and 4.2 ± 0.1 ns, respectively. The flood histograms show that all the crystals in the 1.5 mm pitch LSO array can be clearly identified and that smaller crystal pitches can also be resolved. Flood histogram quality was also calculated using different center of gravity based positioning algorithms. Improved and more robust results were achieved using the local 9 pixels for positioning along with an energy offset calibration. To evaluate the front-end detector readout, and multiplexing efficiency, an array trigger error metric is introduced and measured at different lower energy thresholds. Using a lower energy threshold greater than 150 keV effectively eliminates any mispositioning between SiPM arrays. Conclusions: In summary, the Matrix9 detector system can resolve

  18. Feasibility of small animal cranial irradiation with the microRT system

    PubMed Central

    Kiehl, Erich L.; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Limbrick, David; Jost, Sarah C.; Garbow, Joel R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Khullar, Divya; Izaguirre, Enrique W.; Parikh, Parag J.; Low, Daniel A.; Hope, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate methods for small-animal CNS radiotherapy using the microRT system. Materials and Methods: A custom head immobilizer was designed and built to integrate with a pre-existing microRT animal couch. The Delrin® couch-immobilizer assembly, compatible with multiple imaging modalities (CT, microCT, microMR, microPET, microSPECT, optical), was first imaged via CT in order to verify the safety and reproducibility of the immobilization method. Once verified, the subject animals were CT-scanned while positioned within the couch-immobilizer assembly for treatment planning purposes. The resultant images were then imported into CERR, an in-house-developed research treatment planning system, and registered to the microRTP treatment planning space using rigid registration. The targeted brain was then contoured and conformal radiotherapy plans were constructed for two separate studies: (1) a whole-brain irradiation comprised of two lateral beams at the 90° and 270° microRT treatment positions and (2) a hemispheric (left-brain) irradiation comprised of a single A-P vertex beam at the 0° microRT treatment position. During treatment, subject animals (n=48) were positioned to the CERR-generated treatment coordinates using the three-axis microRT motor positioning system and were irradiated using a clinical Ir-192 high-dose-rate remote after-loading system. The radiation treatment course consisted of 5 Gy fractions, 3 days per week. 90% of the subjects received a total dose of 30 Gy and 10% received a dose of 60 Gy. Results: Image analysis verified the safety and reproducibility of the immobilizer. CT scans generated from repeated reloading and repositioning of the same subject animal in the couch-immobilizer assembly were fused to a baseline CT. The resultant analysis revealed a 0.09 mm average, center-of-mass translocation and negligible volumetric error in the contoured, murine brain. The experimental use of the head immobilizer added ±0.1 mm to

  19. Feasibility of small animal cranial irradiation with the microRT system

    SciTech Connect

    Kiehl, Erich L.; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Limbrick, David; Jost, Sarah C.; Garbow, Joel R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Khullar, Divya; Izaguirre, Enrique W.; Parikh, Parag J.; Low, Daniel A.; Hope, Andrew J.

    2008-10-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate methods for small-animal CNS radiotherapy using the microRT system. Materials and Methods: A custom head immobilizer was designed and built to integrate with a pre-existing microRT animal couch. The Delrin couch-immobilizer assembly, compatible with multiple imaging modalities (CT, microCT, microMR, microPET, microSPECT, optical), was first imaged via CT in order to verify the safety and reproducibility of the immobilization method. Once verified, the subject animals were CT-scanned while positioned within the couch-immobilizer assembly for treatment planning purposes. The resultant images were then imported into CERR, an in-house-developed research treatment planning system, and registered to the microRTP treatment planning space using rigid registration. The targeted brain was then contoured and conformal radiotherapy plans were constructed for two separate studies: (1) a whole-brain irradiation comprised of two lateral beams at the 90 degree sign and 270 degree sign microRT treatment positions and (2) a hemispheric (left-brain) irradiation comprised of a single A-P vertex beam at the 0 degree sign microRT treatment position. During treatment, subject animals (n=48) were positioned to the CERR-generated treatment coordinates using the three-axis microRT motor positioning system and were irradiated using a clinical Ir-192 high-dose-rate remote after-loading system. The radiation treatment course consisted of 5 Gy fractions, 3 days per week. 90% of the subjects received a total dose of 30 Gy and 10% received a dose of 60 Gy. Results: Image analysis verified the safety and reproducibility of the immobilizer. CT scans generated from repeated reloading and repositioning of the same subject animal in the couch-immobilizer assembly were fused to a baseline CT. The resultant analysis revealed a 0.09 mm average, center-of-mass translocation and negligible volumetric error in the contoured, murine brain. The experimental use of the head

  20. Implementation and assessment of an animal management system for small-animal micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, David W.; Detombe, Sarah A.; Chiodo, Chris; Fricke, Stanley T.; Drangova, Maria

    2011-03-01

    Advances in laboratory imaging systems for CT, SPECT, MRI, and PET facilitate routine micro-imaging during pre-clinical investigations. Challenges still arise when dealing with immune-compromised animals, biohazardous agents, and multi-modality imaging. These challenges can be overcome with an appropriate animal management system (AMS), with the capability for supporting and monitoring a rat or mouse during micro-imaging. We report the implementation and assessment of a new AMS system for mice (PRA-3000 / AHS-2750, ASI Instruments, Warren MI), designed to be compatible with a commercial micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging system (eXplore speCZT, GE Healthcare, London ON). The AMS was assessed under the following criteria: 1) compatibility with the imaging system (i.e. artifact generation, geometric dimensions); 2) compatibility with live animals (i.e. positioning, temperature regulation, anesthetic supply); 3) monitoring capabilities (i.e. rectal temperature, respiratory and cardiac monitoring); 4) stability of co-registration; and 5) containment. Micro-CT scans performed using a standardized live-animal protocol (90 kVp, 40 mA, 900 views, 16 ms per view) exhibited low noise (+/-19 HU) and acceptable artifact from high-density components within the AMS (e.g. ECG pad contacts). Live mice were imaged repeatedly (with removal and replacement of the AMS) and spatial registration was found to be stable to within +/-0.07 mm. All animals tolerated enclosure within the AMS for extended periods (i.e. > one hour) without distress, based on continuous recordings of rectal temperature, ECG waveform and respiratory rate. A sealed AMS system extends the capability of a conventional micro-imaging system to include immune-compromised and biosafety level 2 mouse-imaging protocols.

  1. A SPECT camera for combined MRI and SPECT for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, D.; Wagenaar, D. J.; Chen, S.; Xu, J.; Yu, J.; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2011-10-01

    We describe an MR-compatible SPECT camera for small animals. The SPECT camera system can be inserted into the bore of a state-of-the-art MRI system and allows researchers to acquire tomographic images from a mouse in-vivo with the MRI and the SPECT acquiring simultaneously. The SPECT system provides functional information, while MRI provides anatomical information. Until today it was impossible to operate conventional SPECT inside the MRI because of mutual interference. The new SPECT technology is based on semiconductor radiation sensors (CZT, ASICs), and it fits into conventional high field MRI systems with a minimum 12-cm bore size. The SPECT camera has an MR-compatible multi-pinhole collimator for mice with a Ø25-mm field-of-view. For the work reported here we assembled a prototype SPECT camera system and acquired SPECT and MRI data from radioactive sources and resolution phantoms using the camera outside and inside the MRI.

  2. First results in the application of silicon photomultiplier matrices to small animal PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llosá, G.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M. G.; Collazuol, G.; Marcatili, S.; Boscardin, M.; Melchiorri, M.; Tarolli, A.; Piemonte, C.; Zorzi, N.; Barrillon, P.; Bondil-Blin, S.; Chaumat, V.; de La Taille, C.; Dinu, N.; Puill, V.; Vagnucci, J.-F.; Del Guerra, A.

    2009-10-01

    A very high resolution small animal PET scanner that employs matrices of silicon photomultipliers as photodetectors is under development at the University of Pisa and INFN Pisa. The first SiPM matrices composed of 16 (4×4)1 mm×1 mm pixel elements on a common substrate have been produced at FBK-irst, and are being evaluated for this application. The MAROC2 ASIC developed at LAL-Orsay has been employed for the readout of the SiPM matrices. The devices have been tested with pixelated and continuous LYSO crystals. The results show the good performance of the matrices and lead to the fabrication of matrices with 64 SiPM elements.

  3. Development of visible and NIR imaging equipment for small animals with smart pad.

    PubMed

    Eum, Nyeon Sik; Han, Jung Hyun; Seong, Ki Woong; Lee, Jong Ha; Park, Hee Joon

    2014-01-01

    The portable visible and near-infrared (NIR) imaging equipment for a pre-clinical test with small animals was designed and developed in this paper. The developed equipment is composed of a CCD camera, a focusing lens, an objective lens, a NIR band pass filter and a NIR filter driving motor. An NIR ray is mainly used for imaging equipment because it has high light penetration depth in biological tissue. Therefore, NIR fluorescent agents are available for chemical conjugation to targeting molecules in vivo. This equipment can provide a visible image, NIR image and merged image simultaneously. A communication system was specifically established to check obtained images through a smart pad in real time. It is less dependent on space and time than the conventional system. PMID:25227011

  4. Evaluation and histological examination of a Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis small animal infection model.

    PubMed

    Koya, A; de Wet, S C; Turner, S; Cawdell-Smith, J; Venus, B; Greer, R M; Lew-Tabor, A E; Boe-Hansen, G B

    2015-04-01

    Bovine genital campylobacteriosis (BGC), caused by Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis, is associated with production losses in cattle worldwide. This study aimed to develop a reliable BGC guinea pig model to facilitate future studies of pathogenicity, abortion mechanisms and vaccine efficacy. Seven groups of five pregnant guinea pigs (1 control per group) were inoculated with one of three strains via intra-peritoneal (IP) or intra-vaginal routes. Samples were examined using culture, PCR and histology. Abortions ranged from 0% to 100% and re-isolation of causative bacteria from sampled sites varied with strain, dose of bacteria and time to abortion. Histology indicated metritis and placentitis, suggesting that the bacteria induce inflammation, placental detachment and subsequent abortion. Variation of virulence between strains was observed and determined by culture and abortion rates. IP administration of C. fetus subsp. venerealis to pregnant guinea pigs is a promising small animal model for the investigation of BGC abortion. PMID:25599935

  5. A new design for high stability pressure-controlled ventilation for small animal lung imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, M. J.; Habib, A.; Fouras, A.; Dubsky, S.; Lewis, R. A.; Wallace, M. J.; Hooper, S. B.

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a custom-designed ventilator to deliver a stable pressure to the lungs of small animals for use in imaging experiments. Our ventilator was designed with independent pressure vessels to separately control the Peak Inspiratory Pressure (PIP) and Positive End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) to minimise pressure fluctuations during the ventilation process. The ventilator was computer controlled through a LabVIEW interface, enabling experimental manipulations to be performed remotely whilst simultaneously imaging the lungs in situ. Mechanical ventilation was successfully performed on newborn rabbit pups to assess the most effective ventilation strategies for aerating the lungs at birth. Highly stable pressures enabled reliable respiratory gated acquisition of projection radiographs and a stable prolonged (15 minute) breath-hold for high-resolution computed tomography of deceased rabbit pups at different lung volumes.

  6. Efficient system modeling for a small animal PET scanner with tapered DOI detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mengxi; Zhou, Jian; Yang, Yongfeng; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-01-01

    A prototype small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for mouse brain imaging has been developed at UC Davis. The new scanner uses tapered detector arrays with depth of interaction (DOI) measurement. In this paper, we present an efficient system model for the tapered PET scanner using matrix factorization and a virtual scanner geometry. The factored system matrix mainly consists of two components: a sinogram blurring matrix and a geometrical matrix. The geometric matrix is based on a virtual scanner geometry. The sinogram blurring matrix is estimated by matrix factorization. We investigate the performance of different virtual scanner geometries. Both simulation study and real data experiments are performed in the fully 3D mode to study the image quality under different system models. The results indicate that the proposed matrix factorization can maintain image quality while substantially reduce the image reconstruction time and system matrix storage cost. The proposed method can be also applied to other PET scanners with DOI measurement.

  7. Optimal self-calibration of tomographic reconstruction parameters in whole-body small animal optoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Subhamoy; Nasonova, Elena; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In tomographic optoacoustic imaging, multiple parameters related to both light and ultrasound propagation characteristics of the medium need to be adequately selected in order to accurately recover maps of local optical absorbance. Speed of sound in the imaged object and surrounding medium is a key parameter conventionally assumed to be uniform. Mismatch between the actual and predicted speed of sound values may lead to image distortions but can be mitigated by manual or automatic optimization based on metrics of image sharpness. Although some simple approaches based on metrics of image sharpness may readily mitigate distortions in the presence of highly contrasting and sharp image features, they may not provide an adequate performance for smooth signal variations as commonly present in realistic whole-body optoacoustic images from small animals. Thus, three new hybrid methods are suggested in this work, which are shown to outperform well-established autofocusing algorithms in mouse experiments in vivo. PMID:25431756

  8. Whole-body ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography of small animals in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jun; Chatni, Muhammad R.; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Wang, Kun; Anastasio, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We report a novel small-animal whole-body imaging system called ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography (RC-PACT). RC-PACT is based on a confocal design of free-space ring-shaped light illumination and 512-element full-ring ultrasonic array signal detection. The free-space light illumination maximizes the light delivery efficiency, and the full-ring signal detection ensures a full two-dimensional view aperture for accurate image reconstruction. Using cylindrically focused array elements, RC-PACT can image a thin cross section with 0.10 to 0.25 mm in-plane resolutions and 1.6  s/frame acquisition time. By translating the mouse along the elevational direction, RC-PACT provides a series of cross-sectional images of the brain, liver, kidneys, and bladder. PMID:22612121

  9. Balloon Type Elasticity Sensing of Left Ventricular Tissue for Small Experimental Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashimori, Mitsuru; Ishii, Ryohei; Tadakuma, Kenjiro; Kaneko, Makoto; Tamaki, Syunsuke; Sakata, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    This paper describes an elasticity sensing system for a left ventricular tissue of small experimental animal. We first show the basic concept of the proposed method, where a ring shaped specimen is dilated by a balloon type probe with pressure based control and the elasticity is estimated by using the stress and strain information. We introduce the dual cylinder model for approximating the strengths of material of the specimen and the balloon. Based on this model, we can derive the Young's modulus of the specimen. After showing the developed experimental system, we show basic experiments using silicone specimens. We finally show a couple of experimental results using rat and mouse, where specimens with HFPEF (Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction) can be separated from normal specimens.

  10. A small animal time-resolved optical tomography platform using wide-field excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Vivek

    Small animal imaging plays a critical role in present day biomedical research by filling an important gap in the translation of research from the bench to the bedside. Optical techniques constitute an emerging imaging modality which have tremendous potential in preclinical applications. Optical imaging methods are capable of non-invasive assessment of the functional and molecular characteristics of biological tissue. The three-dimensional optical imaging technique, referred to as diffuse optical tomography, provides an approach for the whole-body imaging of small animal models and can provide volumetric maps of tissue functional parameters (e.g. blood volume, oxygen saturation etc.) and/or provide 3D localization and quantification of fluorescence-based molecular markers in vivo. However, the complex mathematical reconstruction problem associated with optical tomography and the cumbersome instrumental designs limits its adoption as a high-throughput quantitative whole-body imaging modality in current biomedical research. The development of new optical imaging paradigms is thus necessary for a wide-acceptance of this new technology. In this thesis, the design, development, characterization and optimization of a small animal optical tomography system is discussed. Specifically, the platform combines a highly sensitive time-resolved imaging paradigm with multi-spectral excitation capability and CCD-based detection to provide a system capable of generating spatially, spectrally and temporally dense measurement datasets. The acquisition of such data sets however can take long and translate to often unrealistic acquisition times when using the classical point source based excitation scheme. The novel approach in the design of this platform is the adoption of a wide-field excitation scheme which employs extended excitation sources and in the process allows an estimated ten-fold reduction in the acquisition time. The work described herein details the design of the imaging

  11. Simultaneous fluorescence and positron emission tomography for in vivo imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Liu, Shuangquan; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Xiaochun; Xu, Yanyan; Luo, Jianwen; Shan, Baoci; Bai, Jing

    2011-12-01

    Simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence tomography (FT) for in vivo imaging of small animals is proposed by a dual-modality system. This system combines a charge-coupled device-based near-infrared fluorescence imaging with a planar detector pair-based PET. With [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose radioactive tracer and the protease activated fluorescence probe, on the one hand, the simultaneous metabolic activity and protease activity in tumor region are revealed by the PET and FT, respectively. On the other hand, the protease activity both on the surface layer and the deep tissue of the tumor is provided by the fluorescence reflection imaging and FT, respectively.

  12. Osteomyelitis and neoplasia associated with use of the Jonas intramedullary splint in small animals.

    PubMed

    Sinibaldi, K R; Pugh, J; Rosen, H; Liu, S K

    1982-11-01

    In 11 cases (10 dogs, 1 cat) in which fractures were repaired with the Jonas intramedullary splint, osteomyelitis developed in 6 and tumors developed in 5. In each case, the tumor originated in close proximity to the splint, at the midshaft of the femur or radius. All implants had been in place for 6 months to 6 years in the case of tumors, and for 4 months to 6 years in the cases involving osteomyelitis. Corrosion was evident in all retrieved implants. The corrosion was attributed to fabrication of the devices with a corrosion-susceptible stainless steel, AISI type 304. The corrosion was believed to have been accelerated by stress effect due to differences in cold work of the sleeve and pin and the difference in composition between the sleeve and spring of the splint. It was concluded that fixation of fractures in small animals should not be performed with the Jonas intramedullary splint. PMID:6958670

  13. Whole-body three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography system for small animals

    PubMed Central

    Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Fronheiser, Matthew; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Conjusteau, Andre; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2009-01-01

    We develop a system for three-dimensional whole-body optoacoustic tomography of small animals for applications in preclinical research. The tomographic images are obtained while the objects of study (phantoms or mice) are rotated within a sphere outlined by a concave arc-shaped array of 64 piezocomposite transducers. Two pulsed lasers operating in the near-IR spectral range (755 and 1064 nm) with an average pulsed energy of about 100 mJ, a repetition rate of 10 Hz, and a pulse duration of 15 to 75 ns are used as optical illumination sources. During the scan, the mouse is illuminated orthogonally to the array with two wide beams of light from a bifurcated fiber bundle. The system is capable of generating images of individual organs and blood vessels through the entire body of a mouse with spatial resolution of ∼0.5 mm. PMID:20059245

  14. A SPECT Camera for Combined MRI and SPECT for Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Meier, D; Wagenaar, D J; Chen, S; Xu, J; Yu, J; Tsui, B M W

    2011-10-01

    We describe an MR-compatible SPECT camera for small animals. The SPECT camera system can be inserted into the bore of a state-of-the-art MRI system and allows researchers to acquire tomographic images from a mouse in-vivo with the MRI and the SPECT acquiring simultaneously. The SPECT system provides functional information, while MRI provides anatomical information. Until today it was impossible to operate conventional SPECT inside the MRI because of mutual interference. The new SPECT technology is based on semiconductor radiation sensors (CZT, ASICs), and it fits into conventional high field MRI systems with a minimum 12-cm bore size. The SPECT camera has an MR-compatible multi-pinhole collimator for mice with a ø25-mm field-of-view. For the work reported here we assembled a prototype SPECT camera system and acquired SPECT and MRI data from radioactive sources and resolution phantoms using the camera outside and inside the MRI. PMID:21966076

  15. A SPECT Camera for Combined MRI and SPECT for Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Meier, D.; Wagenaar, D. J.; Chen, S.; Xu, J.; Yu, J.; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2010-01-01

    We describe an MR-compatible SPECT camera for small animals. The SPECT camera system can be inserted into the bore of a state-of-the-art MRI system and allows researchers to acquire tomographic images from a mouse in-vivo with the MRI and the SPECT acquiring simultaneously. The SPECT system provides functional information, while MRI provides anatomical information. Until today it was impossible to operate conventional SPECT inside the MRI because of mutual interference. The new SPECT technology is based on semiconductor radiation sensors (CZT, ASICs), and it fits into conventional high field MRI systems with a minimum 12-cm bore size. The SPECT camera has an MR-compatible multi-pinhole collimator for mice with a ø25-mm field-of-view. For the work reported here we assembled a prototype SPECT camera system and acquired SPECT and MRI data from radioactive sources and resolution phantoms using the camera outside and inside the MRI. PMID:21966076

  16. High- Tc superconducting rf receiver coils for magnetic resonance imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosik, J.; Nesteruk, K.; Xie, L.-M.; Strikovski, M.; Wang, F.; Miller, J. H.; Bilgen, M.; Narayana, P. A.

    We report on an HTS rf receiver surface probe designed for 2-Tesla MRI imaging of spinal cord injuries in small animals. The 2-T probe is used in lieu of an implanted copper coil being currently used in research on spinal cord injuries. The HTS probe was designed with a virtual ground plane, thus reducing the coil-to-ground losses and making its unloaded quality factor and resonant frequency less sensitive to body proximity. Each coil was fabricated using patterned double-sided YBa 2Cu 3O x (YBCO) films deposited either on sapphire or LaAlO 3 substrates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was analyzed numerically using complete solutions to Maxwell's equations and the reciprocity principle for a rectangular coil next to a finite lossy dielectric cylinder. A comparison of images obtained with superconducting and cooled copper probes is shown.

  17. Quantitative multi-pinhole small-animal SPECT: uniform versus non-uniform Chang attenuation correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; de Jong, J. R.; Gratama van Andel, H. A.; van der Have, F.; Vastenhouw, B.; Laverman, P.; Boerman, O. C.; Dierckx, R. A. J. O.; Beekman, F. J.

    2011-09-01

    Attenuation of photon flux on trajectories between the source and pinhole apertures affects the quantitative accuracy of reconstructed single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. We propose a Chang-based non-uniform attenuation correction (NUA-CT) for small-animal SPECT/CT with focusing pinhole collimation, and compare the quantitative accuracy with uniform Chang correction based on (i) body outlines extracted from x-ray CT (UA-CT) and (ii) on hand drawn body contours on the images obtained with three integrated optical cameras (UA-BC). Measurements in phantoms and rats containing known activities of isotopes were conducted for evaluation. In 125I, 201Tl, 99mTc and 111In phantom experiments, average relative errors comparing to the gold standards measured in a dose calibrator were reduced to 5.5%, 6.8%, 4.9% and 2.8%, respectively, with NUA-CT. In animal studies, these errors were 2.1%, 3.3%, 2.0% and 2.0%, respectively. Differences in accuracy on average between results of NUA-CT, UA-CT and UA-BC were less than 2.3% in phantom studies and 3.1% in animal studies except for 125I (3.6% and 5.1%, respectively). All methods tested provide reasonable attenuation correction and result in high quantitative accuracy. NUA-CT shows superior accuracy except for 125I, where other factors may have more impact on the quantitative accuracy than the selected attenuation correction.

  18. Imaging Circulating Tumor Cells in Freely Moving Awake Small Animals Using a Miniaturized Intravital Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Sasportas, Laura Sarah; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM) strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals. PMID:24497977

  19. A review of small animal imaging planar and pinhole spect Gamma camera imaging.

    PubMed

    Peremans, Kathelijne; Cornelissen, Bart; Van Den Bossche, Bieke; Audenaert, Kurt; Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Scintigraphy (positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) techniques) allows qualitative and quantitative measurement of physiologic processes as well as alterations secondary to various disease states. With the use of specific radioligands, molecular pathways and pharmaco-kinetic processes can be investigated. Radioligand delivery can be (semi)quantified in the region of interest in cross-sectional and longitudinal examinations, which can be performed under the same conditions or after physiologic or pharmacologic interventions. Most preclinical pharmacokinetic studies on physiological and experimentally altered physiological processes are performed in laboratory animals using high-resolution imaging systems. Single photon emission imaging has the disadvantage of decreased spatial and temporal resolution compared with PET. The advantage of SPECT is that equipment is generally more accessible and commonly used radionuclides have a longer physical half-life allowing for investigations over a longer time interval. This review will focus on single photon emission scintigraphy. An overview of contemporary techniques to measure biodistribution and kinetics of radiopharmaceuticals in small animal in vivo is presented. Theoretical as well as practical aspects of planar gamma camera and SPECT pinhole (PH) imaging are discussed. Current research is focusing on refining PH SPECT methodology, so specific regarding technical aspects and applications of PH SPECT will be reviewed. PMID:15869162

  20. Animal origins of SARS coronavirus: possible links with the international trade in small carnivores.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Diana; Roberton, Scott; Hunter, Paul R

    2004-01-01

    The search for animal host origins of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus has so far remained focused on wildlife markets, restaurants and farms within China. A significant proportion of this wildlife enters China through an expanding regional network of illegal, international wildlife trade. We present the case for extending the search for ancestral coronaviruses and their hosts across international borders into countries such as Vietnam and Lao People's Democratic Republic, where the same guilds of species are found on sale in similar wildlife markets or food outlets. The three species that have so far been implicated, a viverrid, a mustelid and a canid, are part of a large suite of small carnivores distributed across this region currently overexploited by this international wildlife trade. A major lesson from SARS is that the underlying roots of newly emergent zoonotic diseases may lie in the parallel biodiversity crisis of massive species loss as a result of overexploitation of wild animal populations and the destruction of their natural habitats by increasing human populations. To address these dual threats to the long-term future of biodiversity, including man, requires a less anthropocentric and more interdisciplinary approach to problems that require the combined research expertise of ecologists, conservation biologists, veterinarians, epidemiologists, virologists, as well as human health professionals. PMID:15306396

  1. MOSFET assessment of radiation dose delivered to mice using the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP).

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Korideck, Houari; Chin, Lee M; Makrigiorgos, G Mike; Berbeco, Ross I

    2011-12-01

    The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a novel isocentric irradiation system that enables state-of-the-art image-guided radiotherapy research to be performed with animal models. This paper reports the results obtained from investigations assessing the radiation dose delivered by the SARRP to different anatomical target volumes in mice. Surgically implanted metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET) dosimeters were employed for the dose assessment. The results reveal differences between the calculated and measured dose of -3.5 to 0.5%, -5.2 to -0.7%, -3.9 to 0.5%, -5.9 to 2.5%, -5.5 to 0.5%, and -4.3 to 0% for the left kidney, liver, pancreas, prostate, left lung, and brain, respectively. Overall, the findings show less than 6% difference between the delivered and calculated dose, without tissue heterogeneity corrections. These results provide a useful assessment of the need for tissue heterogeneity corrections in SARRP dose calculations for clinically relevant tumor model sites. PMID:21962005

  2. Split exponential track length estimator for Monte-Carlo simulations of small-animal radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, F.; Létang, J. M.; Noblet, C.; Chiavassa, S.; Delpon, G.; Freud, N.; Rit, S.; Sarrut, D.

    2014-12-01

    We propose the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma-based method combining the exponential variant of the TLE and a splitting strategy to speed up Monte Carlo (MC) dose computation for low energy photon beams. The splitting strategy is applied to both the primary and the secondary emitted photons, triggered by either the MC events generator for primaries or the photon interactions generator for secondaries. Split photons are replaced by virtual particles for fast dose calculation using the exponential TLE. Virtual particles are propagated by ray-tracing in voxelized volumes and by conventional MC navigation elsewhere. Hence, the contribution of volumes such as collimators, treatment couch and holding devices can be taken into account in the dose calculation. We evaluated and analysed the seTLE method for two realistic small animal radiotherapy treatment plans. The effect of the kerma approximation, i.e. the complete deactivation of electron transport, was investigated. The efficiency of seTLE against splitting multiplicities was also studied. A benchmark with analog MC and TLE was carried out in terms of dose convergence and efficiency. The results showed that the deactivation of electrons impacts the dose at the water/bone interface in high dose regions. The maximum and mean dose differences normalized to the dose at the isocenter were, respectively of 14% and 2% . Optimal splitting multiplicities were found to be around 300. In all situations, discrepancies in integral dose were below 0.5% and 99.8% of the voxels fulfilled a 1%/0.3 mm gamma index criterion. Efficiency gains of seTLE varied from 3.2 × 105 to 7.7 × 105 compared to analog MC and from 13 to 15 compared to conventional TLE. In conclusion, seTLE provides results similar to the TLE while increasing the efficiency by a factor between 13 and 15, which makes it particularly well-suited to typical small animal radiation therapy applications.

  3. Establishment of drug-resistant HBV small-animal models by hydrodynamic injection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Junjun; Han, Yanxing; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2014-01-01

    In antiviral therapy of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, drug resistance remains a huge obstacle to the long-term effectiveness of nucleoside/tide analogs (NAs). Primary resistance mutation (rtM204V) contributes to lamivudine (LAM)-resistance, and compensatory mutations (rtL180M and rtV173L) restore viral fitness and increase replication efficiency. The evaluation of new anti-viral agents against drug-resistant HBV is limited by the lack of available small-animal models. We established LAM-resistance HBV replication mice models based on clinical LAM-resistant HBV mutants. Double (rtM204V+rtL180M) or triple (rtM204V+rtL180M+rtV173L) lamivudine-resistant mutations were introduced into HBV expression vector, followed by hydrodynamic injection into tail vein of NOD/SCID mice. Viremia was detected on days 5, 9, 13 and 17 and liver HBV DNA was detected on day 17 after injection. The serum and liver HBV DNA levels in LAM-resistant model carrying triple mutations are the highest among the models. Two NAs, LAM and entecavir (ETV), were used to test the availability of the models. LAM and ETV inhibited viral replication on wild-type model. LAM was no longer effective on LAM-resistant models, but ETV retains a strong activity. Therefore, these models can be used to evaluate anti-viral agents against lamivudine-resistance, affording new opportunities to establish other drug-resistant HBV small-animal models. PMID:26579395

  4. SU-E-T-89: Comprehensive Quality Assurance Phantom for the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W; Korideck, H; Zygmanski, P; Berbeco, R; Makrigiorgos, G; Cormack, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Use of Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) systems for conducting state-of-the-art image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) research on small animals has become more common over the past years. The purpose of this work is to develop and test the suitability and performance of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) phantom for the SARRP. Methods: A QA phantom was developed for carrying out daily, monthly and annual QA tasks including imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning system (TPS) performance evaluation of the SARRP. The QA phantom consists of nine (60×60×5 mm3) KV-energy tissue equivalent solid water slabs that can be employed for annual dosimetry QA with film. Three of the top slabs are replaceable with ones incorporating Mosfets or OSLDs arranged in a quincunx pattern, or a slab drilled to accommodate an ion chamber insert. These top slabs are designed to facilitate routine daily and monthly QA tasks such as output constancy, isocenter congruency test, treatment planning system (TPS) QA, etc. One slab is designed with inserts for image QA. A prototype of the phantom was applied to test the performance of the imaging, planning and treatment delivery systems. Results: Output constancy test results showed daily variations within 3%. For isocenter congruency test, the phantom could be used to detect 0.3 mm deviations of the CBCT isocenter from the radiation isocenter. Using the Mosfet in phantom as target, the difference between TPS calculations and measurements was within 5%. Image-quality parameters could also be assessed in terms of geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity, etc. Conclusion: The developed phantom can be employed as a simple tool for comprehensive performance evaluation of the SARRP. The study provides a reference for development of a comprehensive quality assurance program for the SARRP, with proposed tolerances and frequency of required tests.

  5. Current British veterinary attitudes to the use of perioperative antimicrobials in small animal surgery.

    PubMed

    Knights, C B; Mateus, A; Baines, S J

    2012-06-23

    A questionnaire was sent to 2951 mixed and small animal veterinary practices to examine the use of perioperative antimicrobials in cats and dogs in the UK. The percentage of respondents who always used antimicrobials in two surgical procedures classified according to NRC criteria as 'clean' was 25.3 per cent for removal of a 1 cm cutaneous mass and 32.1 per cent for routine prescrotal castration. Factors considered important in decision-making about when to use antimicrobial agents included immunosuppression, presence of a drain, degree of wound contamination, potential for spillage of visceral contents and implantation of prosthesis. The most common antimicrobial agents mentioned were potentiated amoxicillin (98.0 per cent), amoxicillin (60.5 per cent), clindamycin (21.8 per cent), enrofloxacin (21.7 per cent), cephalexin (18.6 per cent) and metronidazole (12.7 per cent). Forty-three per cent of all responding veterinarians listed a long-acting preparation for perioperative use. The routes used were subcutaneous (76.1 per cent), intravenous (25.8 per cent), intramuscular (19.8 per cent), oral (13.5 per cent) and topical (7.7 per cent). Antimicrobials were given before surgery (66.6 per cent), during surgery (30.2 per cent), immediately after surgery (12.0 per cent) and after surgery (6.3 per cent). This survey has identified the suboptimal use of perioperative antimicrobials in small animal surgery with improvements needed with respect to timing, duration, choice of antimicrobial and a more prudent selection of surgical cases requiring prophylaxis. PMID:22562102

  6. A detector head design for small-animal PET with silicon photomultipliers (SiPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehrs, Sascha; DelGuerra, Alberto; Herbert, Deborah J.; Mandelkern, Mark A.

    2006-03-01

    Small-animal PET systems are now striving for sub-millimetre resolution. Current systems based upon PSPMTs and finely pixellated scintillators can be pushed to higher resolution, but at the expense of other performance parameters and a rapidly escalating cost. Moreover, depth of interaction (DOI) information is usually difficult to assess in such systems, even though this information is highly desirable to reduce the parallax error, which is often the dominant error for such high-resolution systems. In this study we propose a high-resolution detector head for a small-animal PET imaging system with intrinsic DOI information. Instead of a pixellated scintillator, our design is based upon the classic Anger camera principle, i.e. the head is constructed of modular layers each consisting of a continuous slab of scintillator, viewed by a new type of compact silicon photodetector. The photodetector is the recently developed silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) that as well as being very compact has many other attractive properties: high gain at low bias voltage, excellent single-photoelectron resolution and fast timing. A detector head of about 4 × 4 cm2 in area is proposed, constructed from three modular layers of the type described above. We perform a simulation study, using the Monte Carlo simulation package Geant4. The simulation results are used to optimize the geometry of the detector head and characterize its performance. Additionally, hit estimation algorithms are studied to determine the interaction position of annihilation photons correctly over the whole detector surface. The resulting detector has a nearly uniform efficiency for 511 keV photons of ~70% and an intrinsic spatial resolution of less than ~0.4 mm full width at half maximum (fwhm).

  7. A detector head design for small-animal PET with silicon photomultipliers (SiPM).

    PubMed

    Moehrs, Sascha; Del Guerra, Alberto; Herbert, Deborah J; Mandelkern, Mark A

    2006-03-01

    Small-animal PET systems are now striving for sub-millimetre resolution. Current systems based upon PSPMTs and finely pixellated scintillators can be pushed to higher resolution, but at the expense of other performance parameters and a rapidly escalating cost. Moreover, depth of interaction (DOI) information is usually difficult to assess in such systems, even though this information is highly desirable to reduce the parallax error, which is often the dominant error for such high-resolution systems. In this study we propose a high-resolution detector head for a small-animal PET imaging system with intrinsic DOI information. Instead of a pixellated scintillator, our design is based upon the classic Anger camera principle, i.e. the head is constructed of modular layers each consisting of a continuous slab of scintillator, viewed by a new type of compact silicon photodetector. The photodetector is the recently developed silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) that as well as being very compact has many other attractive properties: high gain at low bias voltage, excellent single-photoelectron resolution and fast timing. A detector head of about 4 x 4 cm2 in area is proposed, constructed from three modular layers of the type described above. We perform a simulation study, using the Monte Carlo simulation package Geant4. The simulation results are used to optimize the geometry of the detector head and characterize its performance. Additionally, hit estimation algorithms are studied to determine the interaction position of annihilation photons correctly over the whole detector surface. The resulting detector has a nearly uniform efficiency for 511 keV photons of approximately 70% and an intrinsic spatial resolution of less than approximately 0.4 mm full width at half maximum (fwhm). PMID:16481681

  8. Development of a MicroCT-Based Image-Guided Conformal Radiotherapy System for Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hu; Rodriguez, Manuel; van den Haak, Fred; Nelson, Geoffrey; Jogani, Rahil; Xu, Jiali; Zhu, Xinzhi; Xian, Yongjiang; Tran, Phuoc T.; Felsher, Dean W.; Keall, Paul J.; Graves, Edward E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The need for clinically-relevant radiation therapy technology for the treatment of preclinical models of disease has spurred the development of a variety of dedicated platforms for small animal irradiation. Our group has taken the approach of adding the ability to deliver conformal radiotherapy to an existing 120 kVp micro-computed tomography (microCT) scanner. Methods A GE eXplore RS120 microCT scanner was modified by the addition of a two-dimensional subject translation stage and a variable aperture collimator. Quality assurance protocols for these devices, including measurement of translation stage positioning accuracy, collimator aperture accuracy, and collimator alignment with the x-ray beam, were devised. Use of this system for image-guided radiotherapy was assessed by irradiation of a solid water phantom as well as of two mice bearing spontaneous MYC-induced lung tumors. Radiation damage was assessed ex vivo by immunohistochemical detection of γH2AX foci. Results The positioning error of the translation stage was found to be less than 0.05 mm, while after alignment of the collimator with the x-ray axis through adjustment of its displacement and rotation, the collimator aperture error was less than 0.1 mm measured at isocenter. CT image-guided treatment of a solid water phantom demonstrated target localization accuracy to within 0.1 mm. γH2AX foci were detected within irradiated lung tumors in mice, with contralateral lung tissue displaying background staining. Conclusions Addition of radiotherapy functionality to a microCT scanner is an effective means of introducing image-guided radiation treatments into the preclinical setting. This approach has been shown to facilitate small animal conformal radiotherapy while leveraging existing technology. PMID:20395069

  9. Development of a PET Scanner for Simultaneously Imaging Small Animals with MRI and PET

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Christopher J; Goertzen, Andrew L; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Bishop, Daryl; Stortz, Greg; Kozlowski, Piotr; Retière, Fabrice; Zhang, Xuezhu; Sossi, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT) scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT) in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs) and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs) are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay) and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution. PMID:25120157

  10. Development of a PET scanner for simultaneously imaging small animals with MRI and PET.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Christopher J; Goertzen, Andrew L; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Bishop, Daryl; Stortz, Greg; Kozlowski, Piotr; Retière, Fabrice; Zhang, Xuezhu; Sossi, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT) scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT) in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs) and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs) are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay) and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution. PMID:25120157

  11. Wireless Neural/EMG Telemetry Systems for Small Freely Moving Animals.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R R; Fotowat, H; Chan, R; Kier, R J; Olberg, R; Leonardo, A; Gabbiani, F

    2011-04-01

    We have developed miniature telemetry systems that capture neural, EMG, and acceleration signals from a freely moving insect or other small animal and transmit the data wirelessly to a remote digital receiver. The systems are based on custom low-power integrated circuits (ICs) that amplify, filter, and digitize four biopotential signals using low-noise circuits. One of the chips also digitizes three acceleration signals from an off-chip microelectromechanical-system accelerometer. All information is transmitted over a wireless ~ 900-MHz telemetry link. The first unit, using a custom chip fabricated in a 0.6- μm BiCMOS process, weighs 0.79 g and runs for two hours on two small batteries. We have used this system to monitor neural and EMG signals in jumping and flying locusts as well as transdermal potentials in weakly swimming electric fish. The second unit, using a custom chip fabricated in a 0.35-μ m complementary metal-oxide semiconductor CMOS process, weighs 0.17 g and runs for five hours on a single 1.5-V battery. This system has been used to monitor neural potentials in untethered perching dragonflies. PMID:23851198

  12. Accurate method to study static volume-pressure relationships in small fetal and neonatal animals.

    PubMed

    Suen, H C; Losty, P D; Donahoe, P K; Schnitzer, J J

    1994-08-01

    We designed an accurate method to study respiratory static volume-pressure relationships in small fetal and neonatal animals on the basis of Archimedes' principle. Our method eliminates the error caused by the compressibility of air (Boyle's law) and is sensitive to a volume change of as little as 1 microliters. Fetal and neonatal rats during the period of rapid lung development from day 19.5 of gestation (term = day 22) to day 3.5 postnatum were studied. The absolute lung volume at a transrespiratory pressure of 30-40 cmH2O increased 28-fold from 0.036 +/- 0.006 (SE) to 0.994 +/- 0.042 ml, the volume per gram of lung increased 14-fold from 0.39 +/- 0.07 to 5.59 +/- 0.66 ml/g, compliance increased 12-fold from 2.3 +/- 0.4 to 27.3 +/- 2.7 microliters/cmH2O, and specific compliance increased 6-fold from 24.9 +/- 4.5 to 152.3 +/- 22.8 microliters.cmH2O-1.g lung-1. This technique, which allowed us to compare changes during late gestation and the early neonatal period in small rodents, can be used to monitor and evaluate pulmonary functional changes after in utero pharmacological therapies in experimentally induced abnormalities such as pulmonary hypoplasia, surfactant deficiency, and congenital diaphragmatic hernia. PMID:8002489

  13. Design and engineering aspects of a high resolution positron tomograph for small animal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lecomte, R.; Cadorette, J.; Richard, P.; Rodrique, S.; Rouleau, D. . Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology)

    1994-08-01

    The authors describe the Sherbrooke positron emission tomograph, a very high resolution device dedicated to dynamic imaging of small laboratory animals. Its distinctive features are: small discrete scintillation detectors based on avalanche photodiodes (APD) to achieve uniform, isotropic, very high spatial resolution; parallel processing for low deadtime and high count rate capability; multispectral data acquisition hardware to improve sensitivity and scatter correction; modularity to allow design flexibility and upgradability. The system implements the clam-shell'' sampling scheme and a rotating rod transmission source. All acquisition parameters can be adjusted under computer control. Temperature stability at the detector site is ensured by the use of thermoelectric modules. The initial system consists of one layer of 256 modules (two rings of detectors) defining 3 image slices in a 118 mm diameter by 10.5 mm thick field. The axial field can be extended to 50 mm using 4 layers of modules (8 rings of detectors). The design constraints and engineering aspects of an APD-based PET scanner are reviewed and preliminary results are reported.

  14. Preliminary evaluation of the tomographic performance of the mediSPECT small animal imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accorsi, Roberto; Curion, Assunta Simona; Frallicciardi, Paola; Lanza, Richard C.; Lauria, Adele; Mettivier, Giovanni; Montesi, Maria Cristina; Russo, Paolo

    2007-02-01

    We report on the tests of a prototype (MediSPECT) system developed at University & INFN Napoli, for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging on small animals with a small Field of View (FoV) and high spatial resolution. MediSPECT is a SPECT imaging system based on a 1-mm-thick CdTe pixel detector, bump-bonded to the Medipix2 CMOS readout circuit operating in single-photon counting. The CdTe detector has 256×256 square array of pixels arranged with a 55 μm pitch, for a sensitive area of 14×14 mm 2. In its present version, this system implements a single detector head, mounted on a rotating gantry. For preliminary testing and calibration of the acquisition equipment and image reconstruction algorithms, 90 projections of a γ-ray point source ( 109Cd) through a single pinhole (diameter 0.4 mm; radius of rotation about 2.5 cm; focal length about 4.5 cm) were acquired for 20 min each in a step-and-shoot mode. Capillaries, 800 μm in diameter, were arranged in a Y-shape to form a more complex phantom ( 125I, 1 mm pinhole diameter, 45 projections, each acquired for 25 min). Images were reconstructed with a custom algorithm implementing standard OS-EM with center of rotation correction and spatial resolution of 0.2 mm over a FoV of 2 mm was obtained.

  15. Evaluation of Lunar small animal software for measuring bone mineral content in excised rat bones.

    PubMed

    Kiebzak, G M; Meyer, M H; Meyer, R A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate software from Lunar Corporation (Madison, WI) designed for the measurement of bone mineral content ([BMC],g) in excised rat femurs using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Femurs were harvested from intact 2- to 12-mo-old female Sprague-Dawley rats, stripped of soft tissues, wrapped in saline-soaked gauze, and frozen at -20 degrees F. Thawed bones were scanned in air on a 1.7-cm-thick Lucite plate that was laid on the manufacturer's supplied Delrin platform. Bones were in an anteroposterior position and scanned in a proximal-to-distal manner. Small animal software version 1.0d was used with a Lunar DPX-L densitometer. Regions of interest (ROIs) were the middle one-third of the diaphysis, a small central area of the distal metaphysis, and the total bone. Precision (n = 6 femurs) was calculated for each region of interest. After DXA scanning, one group of bones (n = 10 femurs) was dried and incinerated in a muffle furnace to obtain bone ash. The ash was then digested in acid and aliquots assayed for calcium using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. This group of bones was used to correlate BMC with ash weight and areal bone mineral density (BMD) with calcium concentration. A second group of bones (n = 14 femurs) was used to correlate BMC with maximal load to failure (N), a biomechanical variable that provides information about bone strength. Precision of repetitive measurements for the three ROIs was 1.2, 3.0, and 0.65%, respectively. Total femur BMC and total femur ash weights were significantly correlated (r = 0.974, p <0.0001). Total femur area BMD (g/cm2) was significantly correlated with calcium concentration (microM) of the bone hydrolysate (r = 0.686, p = 0.029). Total femur BMC and maximum load to midshaft fracture were also significantly correlated (r = 0.914, p<0.0001). The greatest problem with the software was with edge detection: operator intervention was necessary to place edges manually during scan

  16. Portocaval shunt for hepatocyte package: challenging application of small intestinal graft in animal models.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Junji; Hata, Toshiyuki; Uemoto, Shinji; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Kanazawa, Hiroyuki; Teratani, Takumi; Hishikawa, Shuji; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2013-10-01

    In developing therapeutic alternatives to liver transplantation, we have used the strategy of applying a small intestinal segment as a scaffold for hepatocyte transplantation and also as a portocaval shunt (PCS) system to address both liver dysfunction and portal hypertension. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of such an intestinal segment in animal models. Hepatocytes isolated from luciferase-transgenic Lewis rats were transplanted into jejunal segments of wild-type Lewis rats with mucosa removal without PCS application. Luciferase-derived luminescence from transplanted hepatocytes was stably detected for 30 days. Then, we performed autologous hepatocyte transplantation into the submucosal layer of an isolated and vascularized small intestinal segment in pigs. Transplanted hepatocytes were isolated from the resected left-lateral lobe of the liver. On day 7, hepatocyte clusters and bile duct-like structures were observed histologically. To create an intestinal PCS system in pigs, an auto-graft of the segmental ileum and interposing vessel graft were anastomosed to the portal vein trunk and inferior vena cava. However, thrombi were observed in vessels of the intestinal PCSs. We measured the correlation between infusion pressure and flow volume in whole intestines ex vivo in both species and found that the high pressure corresponding to portal hypertension was still insufficient to maintain the patency of the intestinal grafts. In conclusion, we demonstrated the feasibility of the small intestine as a scaffold for hepatocyte transplantation in rat and pig models, but PCS using an intestinal graft failed to maintain patency in a pig model. PMID:23974217

  17. Trauma and Mobile Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Drafke, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Trauma and Mobile Radiography focuses on the radiography of trauma patients and of patients confined to bed. This book offers students a foundation in the skills they need to produce quality radiograms without causing additional injury or pain to the patient. Features of this new book include: coverage of the basics of radiography and patient care, including monitoring of heavily sedated, immobile, and accident patients. Information on the injuries associated with certain types of accidents, and methods for dealing with these problems. Detailed explanation of the positioning of each anatomical area. A Quick Reference Card with information on evaluating, monitoring and radiographing trauma patients.

  18. Low relative error in consumer-grade GPS units make them ideal for measuring small-scale animal movement patterns.

    PubMed

    Breed, Greg A; Severns, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Consumer-grade GPS units are a staple of modern field ecology, but the relatively large error radii reported by manufacturers (up to 10 m) ostensibly precludes their utility in measuring fine-scale movement of small animals such as insects. Here we demonstrate that for data collected at fine spatio-temporal scales, these devices can produce exceptionally accurate data on step-length and movement patterns of small animals. With an understanding of the properties of GPS error and how it arises, it is possible, using a simple field protocol, to use consumer grade GPS units to collect step-length data for the movement of small animals that introduces a median error as small as 11 cm. These small error rates were measured in controlled observations of real butterfly movement. Similar conclusions were reached using a ground-truth test track prepared with a field tape and compass and subsequently measured 20 times using the same methodology as the butterfly tracking. Median error in the ground-truth track was slightly higher than the field data, mostly between 20 and 30 cm, but even for the smallest ground-truth step (70 cm), this is still a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1, and for steps of 3 m or more, the ratio is greater than 10:1. Such small errors relative to the movements being measured make these inexpensive units useful for measuring insect and other small animal movements on small to intermediate scales with budgets orders of magnitude lower than survey-grade units used in past studies. As an additional advantage, these units are simpler to operate, and insect or other small animal trackways can be collected more quickly than either survey-grade units or more traditional ruler/gird approaches. PMID:26312190

  19. Low relative error in consumer-grade GPS units make them ideal for measuring small-scale animal movement patterns

    PubMed Central

    Severns, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Consumer-grade GPS units are a staple of modern field ecology, but the relatively large error radii reported by manufacturers (up to 10 m) ostensibly precludes their utility in measuring fine-scale movement of small animals such as insects. Here we demonstrate that for data collected at fine spatio-temporal scales, these devices can produce exceptionally accurate data on step-length and movement patterns of small animals. With an understanding of the properties of GPS error and how it arises, it is possible, using a simple field protocol, to use consumer grade GPS units to collect step-length data for the movement of small animals that introduces a median error as small as 11 cm. These small error rates were measured in controlled observations of real butterfly movement. Similar conclusions were reached using a ground-truth test track prepared with a field tape and compass and subsequently measured 20 times using the same methodology as the butterfly tracking. Median error in the ground-truth track was slightly higher than the field data, mostly between 20 and 30 cm, but even for the smallest ground-truth step (70 cm), this is still a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1, and for steps of 3 m or more, the ratio is greater than 10:1. Such small errors relative to the movements being measured make these inexpensive units useful for measuring insect and other small animal movements on small to intermediate scales with budgets orders of magnitude lower than survey-grade units used in past studies. As an additional advantage, these units are simpler to operate, and insect or other small animal trackways can be collected more quickly than either survey-grade units or more traditional ruler/gird approaches. PMID:26312190

  20. Fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography and nuclear imaging system for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, I.-Chih; Lu, Yujie; Darne, Chinmay; Rasmussen, John C.; Zhu, Banghe; Azhdarinia, Ali; Yan, Shikui; Smith, Anne M.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence is an alternative modality for molecular imaging that has been demonstrated in animals and recently in humans. Fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography (FEOT) using continuous wave or frequency domain photon migration techniques could be used to provide quantitative molecular imaging in vivo if it could be validated against "gold-standard," nuclear imaging modalities, using dual-labeled imaging agents. Unfortunately, developed FEOT systems are not suitable for incorporation with CT/PET/SPECT scanners because they utilize benchtop devices and require a large footprint. In this work, we developed a miniaturized fluorescence imaging system installed in the gantry of the Siemens Inveon PET/CT scanner to enable NIR transillumination measurements. The system consists of a CCD camera equipped with NIR sensitive intensifier, a diode laser controlled by a single board compact controller, a 2-axis galvanometer, and RF circuit modules for homodyne detection of the phase and amplitude of fluorescence signals. The performance of the FEOT system was tested and characterized. A mouse-shaped solid phantom of uniform optical properties with a fluorescent inclusion was scanned using CT, and NIR fluorescence images at several projections were collected. The method of high-order approximation to the radioactive transfer equation was then used to reconstruct the optical images. Dual-labeled agents were also used on a tumor bearing mouse to validate the results of the FEOT against PET/CT image. The results showed that the location of the fluorophore obtained from the FEOT matches the location of tumor obtained from the PET/CT images. Besides validation of FEOT, this hybrid system could allow multimodal molecular imaging (FEOT/PET/CT) for small animal imaging.

  1. X-ray and optical multimodality tomographer for small animal examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, A.; Leabad, M.; Bordy, T.; Dinten, J.-M.; Peltié, P.; Rizo, P.

    2007-02-01

    A small animal multimodality tomographer dedicated to the co-registration of fluorescence optical signal and X-rays measurements has been developed in our laboratory. The purpose of such a system is to offer the possibility to get in vivo anatomical and functional information at once. Moreover, anatomical measurements can be used as a regularization factor in order to get the reconstructions of the biodistribution of fluorochromes more accurate and to speed up the treatment. The optical system is basically composed with a CW laser (Krypton, 752 nm) for an optimal excitation of Alexa-Fluor 750 fluorochromes, and a CCD camera coupled with a combination of filters for the fluorescence detection. The animal is placed inside a transparent tube filled with an index matching fluid. In order to perform multiple views of fluorescence data acquisitions, the cylinder is fixed to a rotating stage. The excitation beam is brought to the cylinder via two mirrors mounted on translation plates allowing a vertical scan. The optical data acquisitions are performed with a high sensitivity CCD camera. The X-ray generator and the X-ray detector have been placed perpendicularly to the optical chain. A first study on phantoms was conducted to evaluate the feasibility, to test the linearity and the reproducibility, and to fix the parameters for the co-registration. These test experiments were reproduced by considering mice in the oesophagus of which the previous tubes were inserted. Finally, the performance of the system was evaluated in vivo on mice bearing tumours in the lungs, tagged with Transferrin-AlexaFluor 750.

  2. Method to reduce non-specific tissue heating of small animals in solenoid coils

    PubMed Central

    KUMAR, ANANDA; ATTALURI, ANILCHANDRA; MALLIPUDI, RAJIV; CORNEJO, CHRISTINE; BORDELON, DAVID; ARMOUR, MICHAEL; MORUA, KATHERINE; DEWEESE, THEODORE L.; IVKOV, ROBERT

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Solenoid coils that generate time-varying or alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) are used in biomedical devices for research, imaging and therapy. Interactions of AMF and tissue produce eddy currents that deposit power within tissue, thus limiting effectiveness and safety. We aim to develop methods that minimise excess heating of mice exposed to AMFs for cancer therapy experiments. Materials and methods Numerical and experimental data were obtained to characterise thermal management properties of water using a continuous, custom water jacket in a four-turn simple solenoid. Theoretical data were obtained with method-of-moments (MoM) numerical field calculations and finite element method (FEM) thermal simulations. Experimental data were obtained from gel phantoms and mice exposed to AMFs having amplitude >50kA/m and frequency of 160 kHz. Results Water has a high specific heat and thermal conductivity, is diamagnetic, polar, and nearly transparent to magnetic fields. We report at least a two-fold reduction of temperature increase from gel phantom and animal models when a continuous layer of circulating water was placed between the sample and solenoid, compared with no water. Thermal simulations indicate the superior efficiency in thermal management by the developed continuous single chamber cooling system over a double chamber non-continuous system. Further reductions of heating were obtained by regulating water temperature and flow for active cooling. Conclusions These results demonstrate the potential value of a contiguous layer of circulating water to permit sustained exposure to high intensity alternating magnetic fields at this frequency for research using small animal models exposed to AMFs. PMID:23402327

  3. Evaluation of Matrix9 silicon photomultiplier array for small-animal PET

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Junwei Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Yang, Yongfeng; Di, Kun; Roncali, Emilie; Mitchell, Gregory S.; Buckley, Steve; Jackson, Carl; Cherry, Simon R.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The MatrixSL-9-30035-OEM (Matrix9) from SensL is a large-area silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) photodetector module consisting of a 3 × 3 array of 4 × 4 element SiPM arrays (total of 144 SiPM pixels) and incorporates SensL’s front-end electronics board and coincidence board. Each SiPM pixel measures 3.16 × 3.16 mm{sup 2} and the total size of the detector head is 47.8 × 46.3 mm{sup 2}. Using 8 × 8 polished LSO/LYSO arrays (pitch 1.5 mm) the performance of this detector system (SiPM array and readout electronics) was evaluated with a view for its eventual use in small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Measurements of noise, signal, signal-to-noise ratio, energy resolution, flood histogram quality, timing resolution, and array trigger error were obtained at different bias voltages (28.0–32.5 V in 0.5 V intervals) and at different temperatures (5 °C–25 °C in 5 °C degree steps) to find the optimal operating conditions. Results: The best measured signal-to-noise ratio and flood histogram quality for 511 keV gamma photons were obtained at a bias voltage of 30.0 V and a temperature of 5 °C. The energy resolution and timing resolution under these conditions were 14.2% ± 0.1% and 4.2 ± 0.1 ns, respectively. The flood histograms show that all the crystals in the 1.5 mm pitch LSO array can be clearly identified and that smaller crystal pitches can also be resolved. Flood histogram quality was also calculated using different center of gravity based positioning algorithms. Improved and more robust results were achieved using the local 9 pixels for positioning along with an energy offset calibration. To evaluate the front-end detector readout, and multiplexing efficiency, an array trigger error metric is introduced and measured at different lower energy thresholds. Using a lower energy threshold greater than 150 keV effectively eliminates any mispositioning between SiPM arrays. Conclusions: In summary, the Matrix9 detector system

  4. Correction of MRI-induced geometric distortions in whole-body small animal PET-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Frohwein, Lynn J. Schäfers, Klaus P.; Hoerr, Verena; Faber, Cornelius

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The fusion of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data can be a challenging task in whole-body PET-MRI. The quality of the registration between these two modalities in large field-of-views (FOV) is often degraded by geometric distortions of the MRI data. The distortions at the edges of large FOVs mainly originate from MRI gradient nonlinearities. This work describes a method to measure and correct for these kind of geometric distortions in small animal MRI scanners to improve the registration accuracy of PET and MRI data. Methods: The authors have developed a geometric phantom which allows the measurement of geometric distortions in all spatial axes via control points. These control points are detected semiautomatically in both PET and MRI data with a subpixel accuracy. The spatial transformation between PET and MRI data is determined with these control points via 3D thin-plate splines (3D TPS). The transformation derived from the 3D TPS is finally applied to real MRI mouse data, which were acquired with the same scan parameters used in the phantom data acquisitions. Additionally, the influence of the phantom material on the homogeneity of the magnetic field is determined via field mapping. Results: The spatial shift according to the magnetic field homogeneity caused by the phantom material was determined to a mean of 0.1 mm. The results of the correction show that distortion with a maximum error of 4 mm could be reduced to less than 1 mm with the proposed correction method. Furthermore, the control point-based registration of PET and MRI data showed improved congruence after correction. Conclusions: The developed phantom has been shown to have no considerable negative effect on the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The proposed method yields an appropriate correction of the measured MRI distortion and is able to improve the PET and MRI registration. Furthermore, the method is applicable to whole-body small animal

  5. Design and simulation of a high-resolution stationary SPECT system for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beekman, Freek J.; Vastenhouw, Brendan

    2004-10-01

    Exciting new SPECT systems can be created by combining pinhole imaging with compact high-resolution gamma cameras. These new systems are able to solve the problem of the limited sensitivity-resolution trade-off that hampers contemporary small animal SPECT. The design presented here (U-SPECT-III) uses a set of detectors placed in a polygonal configuration and a cylindrical collimator that contains 135 pinholes arranged in nine rings. Each ring contains 15 gold pinhole apertures that focus on the centre of the cylinder. A non-overlapping projection is acquired via each pinhole. Consequently, when a mouse brain is placed in the central field-of-view, each voxel in the cerebrum can be observed via 130 to 135 different pinholes simultaneously. A method for high-resolution scintillation detection is described that eliminates the depth-of-interaction problem encountered with pinhole cameras, and is expected to provide intrinsic detector resolutions better than 150 µm. By means of simulations U-SPECT-III is compared to a simulated dual pinhole SPECT (DP-SPECT) system with a pixelated array consisting of 2.0 × 2.0 mm NaI crystals. Analytic calculations indicate that the proposed U-SPECT-III system yields an almost four times higher linear and about sixty times higher volumetric system resolution than DP-SPECT, when the systems are compared at matching system sensitivity. In addition, it should be possible to achieve a 15 up to 30 times higher sensitivity with U-SPECT-III when the systems are compared at equal resolution. Simulated images of a digital mouse-brain phantom show much more detail with U-SPECT-III than with DP-SPECT. In a resolution phantom, 0.3 mm diameter cold rods are clearly visible with U-SPECT-III, whereas with DP-SPECT the smallest visible rods are about 0.6-0.8 mm. Furthermore, with U-SPECT-III, the image deformations outside the central plane of reconstruction that hamper conventional pinhole SPECT are strongly suppressed. Simulation results indicate

  6. TH-A-18C-08: Design of a Small Animal Contrast Enhanced Dual Energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R; Pan, T; Li, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT has a variety of uses in a small animal setting including quantification and enhanced visualization of contrast agent. This study aims to determine the best energy combinations for contrast enhanced DECT on the XRAD 225Cx (Precision x-ray), a small animal IGRT system with a nominal energy range of 20 – 225 kVp. Focus was placed on material density accuracy and low contrast detectability. Methods: Simulations of single energy scans of an object containing concentrations of iodine varying from 0.5 to 50 mg/ml were performed using the simulation package ImaSim. Energy spectra from 50 – 220 kVp were calculated using the same software. For approximate Poisson noise modeling, mAs were chosen such that 30% of the total 10cGy dose was assigned to the low energy scan. A calibration involving projections of objects containing different thicknesses of iodine (0–0.5 mm) and water (0–50 mm) was performed for each energy and fit to a cubic equation as the calibration curve for each energy pair. Results: Contrast to noise ratios of the iodine material images and accuracies in iodine density measurements were measured. Gradual improvements in each metric were seen with increasing high energy. Larger improvements in CNR were observed for decreasing the low energy. Errors in iodine density were generally close to 5% for concentrations of iodine above 3 mg/ml but increased to around 15% for 50 kVp, likely due to its proximity to the discontinuity caused by the k-edge of iodine. Conclusion: Based on these simulations, the best energy combination for detecting low concentrations of iodine using a projection space calibration procedure is 50/200 kVp. However, if accuracy is most important 80/220 kVp is ideal, with 60/220 kVp being a good compromise to achieve both goals. Future work is necessary to verify these conclusions with physical data.

  7. Functionalized silica nanoparticles: a platform for fluorescence imaging at the cell and small animal levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kemin; He, Xiaoxiao; Yang, XiaoHai; Shi, Hui

    2013-07-16

    Going in vivo, including living cells and the whole body, is very important for gaining a better understanding of the mystery of life and requires specialized imaging techniques. The diversity, composition, and temporal-spatial variation of life activities from cells to the whole body require the analysis techniques to be fast-response, noninvasive, highly sensitive, and stable, in situ and in real-time. Functionalized nanoparticle-based fluorescence imaging techniques have the potential to meet such needs through real-time and noninvasive visualization of biological events in vivo. Functionalized silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) doped with fluorescent dyes appear to be an ideal and flexible platform for developing fluorescence imaging techniques used in living cells and the whole body. We can select and incorporate different dyes inside the silica matrix either noncovalently or covalently. These form the functionalized hybrid SiNPs, which support multiplex labeling and ratiometric sensing in living systems. Since the silica matrix protects dyes from outside quenching and degrading factors, this enhances the photostability and biocompatibility of the SiNP-based probes. This makes them ideal for real-time and long-time tracking. One nanoparticle can encapsulate large numbers of dye molecules, which amplifies their optical signal and temporal-spatial resolution response. Integrating fluorescent dye-doped SiNPs with targeting ligands using various surface modification techniques can greatly improve selective recognition. Along with the endocytosis, functionalized SiNPs can be efficiently internalized into cells for noninvasive localization, assessment, and monitoring. These unique characteristics of functionalized SiNPs substantially support their applications in fluorescence imaging in vivo. In this Account, we summarize our efforts to develop functionalized dye-doped SiNPs for fluorescence imaging at the cell and small animal levels. We first discuss how to design and

  8. Split exponential track length estimator for Monte-Carlo simulations of small-animal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Smekens, F; Létang, J M; Noblet, C; Chiavassa, S; Delpon, G; Freud, N; Rit, S; Sarrut, D

    2014-12-21

    We propose the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma-based method combining the exponential variant of the TLE and a splitting strategy to speed up Monte Carlo (MC) dose computation for low energy photon beams. The splitting strategy is applied to both the primary and the secondary emitted photons, triggered by either the MC events generator for primaries or the photon interactions generator for secondaries. Split photons are replaced by virtual particles for fast dose calculation using the exponential TLE. Virtual particles are propagated by ray-tracing in voxelized volumes and by conventional MC navigation elsewhere. Hence, the contribution of volumes such as collimators, treatment couch and holding devices can be taken into account in the dose calculation.We evaluated and analysed the seTLE method for two realistic small animal radiotherapy treatment plans. The effect of the kerma approximation, i.e. the complete deactivation of electron transport, was investigated. The efficiency of seTLE against splitting multiplicities was also studied. A benchmark with analog MC and TLE was carried out in terms of dose convergence and efficiency.The results showed that the deactivation of electrons impacts the dose at the water/bone interface in high dose regions. The maximum and mean dose differences normalized to the dose at the isocenter were, respectively of 14% and 2% . Optimal splitting multiplicities were found to be around 300. In all situations, discrepancies in integral dose were below 0.5% and 99.8% of the voxels fulfilled a 1%/0.3 mm gamma index criterion. Efficiency gains of seTLE varied from 3.2 × 10(5) to 7.7 × 10(5) compared to analog MC and from 13 to 15 compared to conventional TLE.In conclusion, seTLE provides results similar to the TLE while increasing the efficiency by a factor between 13 and 15, which makes it particularly well-suited to typical small animal radiation therapy applications. PMID:25419562

  9. SPECT data acquisition and image reconstruction in a stationary small animal SPECT/MRI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingyan; Chen, Si; Yu, Jianhua; Meier, Dirk; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2010-04-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate data acquisition strategies and image reconstruction methods for a stationary SPECT insert that can operate inside an MRI scanner with a 12 cm bore diameter for simultaneous SPECT/MRI imaging of small animals. The SPECT insert consists of 3 octagonal rings of 8 MR-compatible CZT detectors per ring surrounding a multi-pinhole (MPH) collimator sleeve. Each pinhole is constructed to project the field-of-view (FOV) to one CZT detector. All 24 pinholes are focused to a cylindrical FOV of 25 mm in diameter and 34 mm in length. The data acquisition strategies we evaluated were optional collimator rotations to improve tomographic sampling; and the image reconstruction methods were iterative ML-EM with and without compensation for the geometric response function (GRF) of the MPH collimator. For this purpose, we developed an analytic simulator that calculates the system matrix with the GRF models of the MPH collimator. The simulator was used to generate projection data of a digital rod phantom with pinhole aperture sizes of 1 mm and 2 mm and with different collimator rotation patterns. Iterative ML-EM reconstruction with and without GRF compensation were used to reconstruct the projection data from the central ring of 8 detectors only, and from all 24 detectors. Our results indicated that without GRF compensation and at the default design of 24 projection views, the reconstructed images had significant artifacts. Accurate GRF compensation substantially improved the reconstructed image resolution and reduced image artifacts. With accurate GRF compensation, useful reconstructed images can be obtained using 24 projection views only. This last finding potentially enables dynamic SPECT (and/or MRI) studies in small animals, one of many possible application areas of the SPECT/MRI system. Further research efforts are warranted including experimentally measuring the system matrix for improved geometrical accuracy, incorporating the co

  10. SU-E-I-90: Characterizing Small Animal Lung Properties Using Speckle Observed with An In-Line X-Ray Phase Contrast Benchtop System

    SciTech Connect

    Garson, A; Gunsten, S; Guan, H; Brody, S; Anastasio, M; Vasireddi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We demonstrate a novel X-ray phase-contrast (XPC) method for lung imaging representing a paradigm shift in the way small animal functional imaging is performed. In our method, information regarding airway microstructure that is encoded within speckle texture of a single XPC radiograph is decoded to produce 2D parametric images that will spatially resolve changes in lung properties such as microstructure sizes and air volumes. Such information cannot be derived from conventional lung radiography or any other 2D imaging modality. By computing these images at different points within a breathing cycle, dynamic functional imaging will be readily achieved without the need for tomography. Methods: XPC mouse lung radiographs acquired in situ with an in-line X-ray phase contrast benchtop system. The lung air volume is varied and controlled with a small animal ventilator. XPC radiographs will be acquired for various lung air volume levels representing different phases of the respiratory cycle. Similar data will be acquired of microsphere-based lung phantoms containing hollow glass spheres with known distributions of diameters. Image texture analysis is applied to the data to investigate relationships between texture characteristics and airspace/microsphere physical properties. Results: Correlations between Fourier-based texture descriptors (FBTDs) and regional lung air volume indicate that the texture features in 2D radiographs reveal information on 3D properties of the lungs. For example, we find for a 350 × 350 πm2 lung ROI a linear relationship between injected air volume and FBTD value with slope and intercept of 8.9×10{sup 5} and 7.5, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrate specific image texture measures related to lung speckle features are correlated with physical characteristics of refracting elements (i.e. lung air spaces). Furthermore, we present results indicating the feasibility of implementing the technique with a simple imaging system design, short

  11. Auditory evoked fields measured noninvasively with small-animal MEG reveal rapid repetition suppression in the guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, G. Björn; Chait, Maria; de Cheveigné, Alain

    2014-01-01

    In animal models, single-neuron response properties such as stimulus-specific adaptation have been described as possible precursors to mismatch negativity, a human brain response to stimulus change. In the present study, we attempted to bridge the gap between human and animal studies by characterising responses to changes in the frequency of repeated tone series in the anesthetised guinea pig using small-animal magnetoencephalography (MEG). We showed that 1) auditory evoked fields (AEFs) qualitatively similar to those observed in human MEG studies can be detected noninvasively in rodents using small-animal MEG; 2) guinea pig AEF amplitudes reduce rapidly with tone repetition, and this AEF reduction is largely complete by the second tone in a repeated series; and 3) differences between responses to the first (deviant) and later (standard) tones after a frequency transition resemble those previously observed in awake humans using a similar stimulus paradigm. PMID:25231619

  12. Endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging: in vivo small animal tumor model validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tianming; Bao, Chengpeng; Hu, Zhenhua; Wang, Kun; Liu, Xia; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Background: Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) provides a great potential for clinical translation of optical molecular imaging techniques through using clinical approved radiotracers. However, it is difficult to obtain the Cerenkov luminescence signal of deeper biological tissues due to the small magnitude of the signal. To efficiently acquire the weak Cerenkov luminescence, we developed an endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging (ECLI) system to reduce the in vivo imaging depth with minimum invasion, and validated the system on small animal tumor models. Methods: For the ECLI system, the laparoscope was connected to a high sensitive charge-couple device (CCD) camera (DU888+, Andor, UK) by a custom made adapter. We conducted a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments by use of the system. In the in vitro experiment, the endoscopic luminescence images of the 18F-FDG with various activities in EP tubes were acquired using ECLI system, and the sensitivity was compared with conventional CLI system. In the in vivo tumor experiment, 18F-FDG with the activity of 200μCi were intravenously injected into 3 tumor mice. Then the ECLI system was used to acquire the optical images for both non-invasive and invasive conditions. Conclusion: Experimental data showed the ECLI system could detect the 18F-FDG with the activity as low as 1μCi. Furthermore, our preliminary results indicated the possibility of ECLI technique for detecting Cerenkov signals inside the tumor tissue with deeper depth and guiding the surgical operation of tumor excision. We believe that this technique can help to accelerate the clinical translation of CLI.

  13. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  14. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy in Small Animal Research: Applications in Molecular and Preclinical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Greco, A.; Mancini, M.; Gargiulo, S.; Gramanzini, M.; Claudio, P. P.; Brunetti, A.; Salvatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) is a noninvasive multimodality technique that allows high-resolution imaging in mice. It is affordable, widely available, and portable. When it is coupled to Doppler ultrasound with color and power Doppler, it can be used to quantify blood flow and to image microcirculation as well as the response of tumor blood supply to cancer therapy. Target contrast ultrasound combines ultrasound with novel molecular targeted contrast agent to assess biological processes at molecular level. UBM is useful to investigate the growth and differentiation of tumors as well as to detect early molecular expression of cancer-related biomarkers in vivo and to monitor the effects of cancer therapies. It can be also used to visualize the embryological development of mice in uterus or to examine their cardiovascular development. The availability of real-time imaging of mice anatomy allows performing aspiration procedures under ultrasound guidance as well as the microinjection of cells, viruses, or other agents into precise locations. This paper will describe some basic principles of high-resolution imaging equipment, and the most important applications in molecular and preclinical imaging in small animal research. PMID:22163379

  15. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in small animal research: applications in molecular and preclinical imaging.

    PubMed

    Greco, A; Mancini, M; Gargiulo, S; Gramanzini, M; Claudio, P P; Brunetti, A; Salvatore, M

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) is a noninvasive multimodality technique that allows high-resolution imaging in mice. It is affordable, widely available, and portable. When it is coupled to Doppler ultrasound with color and power Doppler, it can be used to quantify blood flow and to image microcirculation as well as the response of tumor blood supply to cancer therapy. Target contrast ultrasound combines ultrasound with novel molecular targeted contrast agent to assess biological processes at molecular level. UBM is useful to investigate the growth and differentiation of tumors as well as to detect early molecular expression of cancer-related biomarkers in vivo and to monitor the effects of cancer therapies. It can be also used to visualize the embryological development of mice in uterus or to examine their cardiovascular development. The availability of real-time imaging of mice anatomy allows performing aspiration procedures under ultrasound guidance as well as the microinjection of cells, viruses, or other agents into precise locations. This paper will describe some basic principles of high-resolution imaging equipment, and the most important applications in molecular and preclinical imaging in small animal research. PMID:22163379

  16. A microcomputed tomography guided fluorescence tomography system for small animal molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepshire, Dax; Mincu, Niculae; Hutchins, Michael; Gruber, Josiah; Dehghani, Hamid; Hypnarowski, Justin; Leblond, Frederic; Khayat, Mario; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-04-01

    A prototype small animal imaging system was created for coupling fluorescence tomography (FT) with x-ray microcomputed tomography (microCT). The FT system has the potential to provide synergistic information content resultant from using microCT images as prior spatial information and then allows overlay of the FT image onto the original microCT image. The FT system was designed to use single photon counting to provide maximal sensitivity measurements in a noncontact geometry. Five parallel detector locations are used, each allowing simultaneous sampling of the fluorescence and transmitted excitation signals through the tissue. The calibration and linearity range performance of the system are outlined in a series of basic performance tests and phantom studies. The ability to image protoporphyrin IX in mouse phantoms was assessed and the system is ready for in vivo use to study biological production of this endogenous marker of tumors. This multimodality imaging system will have a wide range of applications in preclinical cancer research ranging from studies of the tumor microenvironment and treatment efficacy for emerging cancer therapeutics.

  17. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, N. J.; Dean, R. S.; Cobb, M.; Brennan, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research. PMID:25564472

  18. Modern Spirometry Supports Anesthetic Management in Small Animal Clinical Practice: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Calice, Ivana; Moens, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Modern spirometry, like no other monitoring technique, allows insight into breath-to-breath respiratory mechanics. Spirometers continuously measure volume, airway pressure, and flow while calculating and continuously displaying respiratory system compliance and resistance in the form of loops. The aim of this case series is to show how observation of spirometric loops, similar to electrocardiogram or CO2 curve monitoring, can improve safety of anesthetic management in small animals. Spirometric monitoring cases described in this case series are based on use of the anaesthesia monitor Capnomac Ultima with a side stream spirometry sensor. The cases illustrate how recognition and understanding of spirometric loops allows for easy diagnosis of iatrogenic pneumothorax, incorrect ventilator settings, leaks in the system, kinked or partially obstructed endotracheal tube, and spontaneous breathing interfering with intermittent positive-pressure ventilation. The case series demonstrates the potential of spirometry to improve the quality and safety of anesthetic management, and, hence, its use can be recommended during intermittent positive-pressure ventilation and procedures in which interference with ventilation can be expected. PMID:27487353

  19. A microcomputed tomography guided fluorescence tomography system for small animal molecular imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kepshire, Dax; Gruber, Josiah; Hypnarowski, Justin; Leblond, Frederic; Pogue, Brian W.; Mincu, Niculae; Hutchins, Michael; Khayat, Mario; Dehghani, Hamid

    2009-04-15

    A prototype small animal imaging system was created for coupling fluorescence tomography (FT) with x-ray microcomputed tomography (microCT). The FT system has the potential to provide synergistic information content resultant from using microCT images as prior spatial information and then allows overlay of the FT image onto the original microCT image. The FT system was designed to use single photon counting to provide maximal sensitivity measurements in a noncontact geometry. Five parallel detector locations are used, each allowing simultaneous sampling of the fluorescence and transmitted excitation signals through the tissue. The calibration and linearity range performance of the system are outlined in a series of basic performance tests and phantom studies. The ability to image protoporphyrin IX in mouse phantoms was assessed and the system is ready for in vivo use to study biological production of this endogenous marker of tumors. This multimodality imaging system will have a wide range of applications in preclinical cancer research ranging from studies of the tumor microenvironment and treatment efficacy for emerging cancer therapeutics.

  20. Stable Small Animal Mechanical Ventilation for Dynamic Lung Imaging to Support Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Lamm, W. J.

    2011-11-08

    Pulmonary computational fluid dynamics models require 3D images to be acquired over multiple points in the dynamic breathing cycle, with no breath holds or changes in ventilatory mechanics. With small animals, these requirements result in long imaging times ({approx}90 minutes), over which lung mechanics, such as compliance, can gradually change if not carefully monitored and controlled. These changes, caused by derecruitment of parenchymal tissue, are manifested as an upward drift in peak inspiratory pressure or by changes in the pressure waveform and/or lung volume over the course of the experiment. We demonstrate highly repeatable mechanical ventilation in anesthetized rats over a long duration for pulmonary CT imaging throughout the dynamic breathing cycle. We describe significant updates to a basic commercial ventilator that was acquired for these experiments. Key to achieving consistent results was the implementation of periodic deep breaths, or sighs, of extended duration to maintain lung recruitment. In addition, continuous monitoring of breath-to-breath pressure and volume waveforms and long-term trends in peak inspiratory pressure and flow provide diagnostics of changes in breathing mechanics.

  1. All-optical anatomical co-registration for molecular imaging of small animals using dynamic contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Moore, Anna

    2007-09-01

    Optical molecular imaging in small animals harnesses the power of highly specific and biocompatible contrast agents for drug development and disease research. However, the widespread adoption of in vivo optical imaging has been inhibited by its inability to clearly resolve and identify targeted internal organs. Optical tomography and combined X-ray and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) approaches developed to address this problem are generally expensive, complex or incapable of true anatomical co-registration. Here, we present a remarkably simple all-optical method that can generate co-registered anatomical maps of a mouse's internal organs, while also acquiring in vivo molecular imaging data. The technique uses a time series of images acquired after injection of an inert dye. Differences in the dye's in vivo biodistribution dynamics allow precise delineation and identification of major organs. Such co-registered anatomical maps permit longitudinal organ identification irrespective of repositioning or weight gain, thereby promising greatly improved accuracy and versatility for studies of orthotopic disease, diagnostics and therapies.

  2. Design of a Second Generation Firewire Based Data Acquisition System for Small Animal PET Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Lewellen, T.K.; Miyaoka, R.S.; MacDonald, L.R.; Haselman, M.; DeWitt, D.; Hunter, William; Hauck, S.

    2009-01-01

    The University of Washington developed a Firewire based data acquisition system for the MiCES small animal PET scanner. Development work has continued on new imaging scanners that require more data channels and need to be able to operate within a MRI imaging system. To support these scanners, we have designed a new version of our data acquisition system that leverages the capabilities of modern field programmable gate arrays (FPGA). The new design preserves the basic approach of the original system, but puts almost all functions into the FPGA, including the Firewire elements, the embedded processor, and pulse timing and pulse integration. The design has been extended to support implementation of the position estimation and DOl algorithms developed for the cMiCE detector module. The design is centered around an acquisition node board (ANB) that includes 65 ADC channels, Firewire 1394b support, the FPGA, a serial command bus and signal lines to support a rough coincidence window implementation to reject singles events from being sent on the Firewire bus. Adapter boards convert detector signals into differential paired signals to connect to the ANB. PMID:20228958

  3. Small animal optoacoustic tomography system for molecular imaging of contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Richard; Liopo, Anton; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a new and improved Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System, LOIS-3D for preclinical research applications in small animal models. The advancements include (i) a new stabilized imaging module with a more homogeneous illumination of the mouse yielding a better spatial resolution (<0.2 mm) and (ii) a new low noise amplifier incorporated into the ultrasonic probe and providing the noise equivalent pressure around 2 Pa resulting in increased signal-to-noise ratio and the optical absorption sensitivity of about 0.15 cm-1. We also improved scan time and the image reconstruction times. This prototype has been commercialized for a number of biomedical research applications, such as imaging vascularization and measuring hemoglobin / oxyhemoglobin distribution in the organs as well as imaging exogenous or endogenous optoacoustic contrast agents. As examples, we present in vivo experiments using phantoms and mice with and without tumor injected with contrast agents with indocyanine green (ICG). LOIS-3D was capable of detecting ~1-2 pmole of the ICG, in tissues with relatively low blood content. With its high sensitivity and excellent spatial resolution LOIS-3D is an advanced alternative to fluorescence and bioluminescence based modalities for molecular imaging in live mice.

  4. Digital signal processing applied to crystal identification in Positron Emission Tomography dedicated to small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Réjean; Viscogliosi, Nicolas; Semmaoui, Hicham; Bélanger, François; Lemieux, François; Tétrault, Marc-André; Michaud, Jean-Baptiste; Bérard, Philippe; Cadorette, Jules; Pepin, Catherine M.; Lecomte, Roger

    2007-02-01

    The recent introduction of all-digital electronic architecture in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners, enables new paradigms to be explored for extracting relevant information from the detector signals, such as energy, time and crystal identification. The LabPET™ small animal scanner, which implements free-running 45-MHz sampling directly at the output of the charge sensitive preamplifiers, provides an excellent platform to test such advanced digital algorithms. A real-time identification method, based on an Auto-Regressive Moving-Average (ARMA) scheme, was tested for discriminating between LYSO (t r˜40 ns) and LGSO (t r˜65 ns) scintillators in phoswich detectors, coupled to a single Avalanche Photodiode (APD). Even with a low energy threshold of 250 keV applied individually, error rates<4% can be achieved, as compared to >10%, typically with conventional analog pulse shape discrimination techniques. Such digital crystal identification techniques can be readily implemented with phoswich detectors for improving spatial resolution in PET, either by increasing crystal pixellization or by mitigating parallax errors through depth-of-interaction determination. It also allows to reduce the event rate presented to the real-time coincidence engine by applying a low energy limit at the crystal granularity and rejecting more Compton photons.

  5. Stable Small Animal Ventilation for Dynamic Lung Imaging to Support Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Richard E.; Lamm, Wayne J.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary computational fluid dynamics models require that three-dimensional images be acquired over multiple points in the dynamic breathing cycle without breath holds or changes in ventilatory mechanics. With small animals, these requirements can result in long imaging times (∼90 minutes), over which lung mechanics, such as compliance, may gradually change if not carefully monitored and controlled. These changes, caused by derecruitment of parenchymal tissue, are manifested as an upward drift in peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) or by changes in the pressure waveform and/or lung volume over the course of the experiment. We demonstrate highly repeatable mechanical ventilation in anesthetized rats over a long duration for dynamic lung x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. We describe significant updates to a basic commercial ventilator that was acquired for these experiments. Key to achieving consistent results was the implementation of periodic deep breaths, or sighs, of extended duration to maintain lung recruitment. In addition, continuous monitoring of breath-to-breath pressure and volume waveforms and long-term trends in PIP and flow provide diagnostics of changes in breathing mechanics. PMID:22087338

  6. Adherence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius to suture materials commonly used in small animal surgery.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Shauna; Singh, Ameet; Rousseau, Joyce; Weese, J Scott

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate adherence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) to 5 suture materials commonly used in small animal surgery. SAMPLE 10 epidemiologically unrelated MRSP isolates (obtained from dogs with clinical infections) that had strong biofilm-forming ability and 5 types of suture. PROCEDURES The 5 types of suture evaluated were monofilament polyglecaprone 25, monofilament polydioxanone, triclosan-coated (TC)-monofilament polydioxanone, braided polyglactin 910, and barbed monofilament polydioxanone. Suture segments were incubated in standard suspensions of MRSP for 2 minutes. Segments were then placed in tryptone soy broth and incubated overnight. After incubation, segments were rinsed with PBS solution and sonicated to dislodge adherent bacteria. Resulting suspensions were used to create serial dilutions that were plated, incubated overnight, and counted the following day. Bacterial adherence to 1 segment of each suture type was assessed by use of scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS There was significantly less adherence of MSRP to TC-monofilament polydioxanone than to polyglecaprone 25, polyglactin 910, barbed monofilament polydioxanone, and monofilament polydioxanone. There was significantly less adherence of MSRP to polyglecaprone than to polyglactin 910. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Barbed suture had a bacterial adherence profile comparable to that for monofilament suture. Adherence of MRSP was greatest for braided polyglactin 910. Use of TC-monofilament polydioxanone can be considered for patients that are at high risk of developing surgical site infections and for which a surgeon chooses a multifilament suture. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:194-198). PMID:27027714

  7. Evaluation of catheter-manometer systems for adequate intravascular blood pressure measurements in small animals.

    PubMed

    Idvall, J; Aronsen, K F; Lindström, K; Ulmsten, U

    1977-09-30

    Various catheter-manometer systems possible for intravascular blood pressure measurments on rats have been elaborated and tested in vitro and in vivo. Using a pressure-step calibrator, it was observed from in vitro studies that microtransducers had superior frequency response compared to conventional transducers. Of the catheters tested, Pe-90 tapered to a 40 mm tip with an inner diameter of 0.3 mm had the best frequency response as judged from fall and settling times. Because of the damping effect, tapering increased fall time to 1.8 ms, which was still quite acceptable. By the same token settling time was minimized to 22.4 ms. With a special calculation method the theoretical percentile fault of the recordings was estimated to be 9.66%. When the measurement error was calculated from the actual in vivo recordings, it was found to be no more than 2.7%. These results show that the technique described is adequate for continuous intravascular blood pressure recordings on small animals. Finally it is emphasized that careful handling of the catheters and avoidance of stopcocks and air bubbles are essential for obtaining accurate and reproducible values. PMID:928971

  8. Investigation of different sparsity transforms for the PICCS algorithm in small-animal respiratory gated CT.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Juan F P J; Abella, Monica; Sisniega, Alejandro; Vaquero, Juan Jose; Desco, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory gating helps to overcome the problem of breathing motion in cardiothoracic small-animal imaging by acquiring multiple images for each projection angle and then assigning projections to different phases. When this approach is used with a dose similar to that of a static acquisition, a low number of noisy projections are available for the reconstruction of each respiratory phase, thus leading to streak artifacts in the reconstructed images. This problem can be alleviated using a prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm, which enables accurate reconstruction of highly undersampled data when a prior image is available. We compared variants of the PICCS algorithm with different transforms in the prior penalty function: gradient, unitary, and wavelet transform. In all cases the problem was solved using the Split Bregman approach, which is efficient for convex constrained optimization. The algorithms were evaluated using simulations generated from data previously acquired on a micro-CT scanner following a high-dose protocol (four times the dose of a standard static protocol). The resulting data were used to simulate scenarios with different dose levels and numbers of projections. All compressed sensing methods performed very similarly in terms of noise, spatiotemporal resolution, and streak reduction, and filtered back-projection was greatly improved. Nevertheless, the wavelet domain was found to be less prone to patchy cartoon-like artifacts than the commonly used gradient domain. PMID:25836670

  9. Ultrafast micro-CT for in vivo small animal imaging and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasov, Alexander

    2004-10-01

    A new, ultra-fast microCT instrument with scanning+reconstruction cycle under 50 seconds for full 3D-volume has been created. The scanner based on the scanning geometry with static object and rotation of source-camera pair(s), which allows using it for industrial applications as well as for low-dose in-vivo imaging of small laboratory animals where rotation of the object is not acceptable. Acquisition part contains two pairs of x-ray sources and cameras for data collection from complementary directions simultaneously. Reconstruction engine (cone-beam reconstruction by modified Feldkamp algotithm) includes 1, 2 or 4 dual Intel-Xeon computers working in parallel under control of the host PC through local network. The instrument specifications are following: voxel size is 48 or 96 um for corresponding 1024x1024x1024 or 512x512x512 reconstruction array; scanning time with parallel reconstruction is 50 seconds for 96um resolution. X-ray sources peak energy can be adjusted in the range of 20-65kV. Typical scanning dose is 0.4Gy. The scanner itself is a compact desktop instrument, which contains all x-ray parts and necessary shielding for safe operations in the normal laboratory environments.

  10. A Mechatronic System for Quantitative Application and Assessment of Massage-Like Actions in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Zeng, Hansong; Best, Thomas M.; Haas, Caroline; Heffner, Ned T.; Agarwal, Sudha; Zhao, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Massage therapy has a long history and has been widely believed effective in restoring tissue function, relieving pain and stress, and promoting overall well-being. However, the application of massage-like actions and the efficacy of massage are largely based on anecdotal experiences that are difficult to define and measure. This leads to a somewhat limited evidence-based interface of massage therapy with modern medicine. In this study, we introduce a mechatronic device that delivers highly reproducible massage-like mechanical loads to the hind limbs of small animals (rats and rabbits), where various massage-like actions are quantified by the loading parameters (magnitude, frequency and duration) of the compressive and transverse forces on the subject tissues. The effect of massage is measured by the difference in passive viscoelastic properties of the subject tissues before and after mechanical loading, both obtained by the same device. Results show that this device is useful in identifying the loading parameters that are most conducive to a change in tissue mechanical properties, and can determine the range of loading parameters that result in sustained changes in tissue mechanical properties and function. This device presents the first step in our effort for quantifying the application of massage-like actions used clinically and measurement of their efficacy that can readily be combined with various quantitative measures (e.g., active mechanical properties and physiological assays) for determining the therapeutic and mechanistic effects of massage therapies. PMID:23943071

  11. Small animal fluorescence and bioluminescence tomography: a review of approaches, algorithms and technology update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darne, Chinmay; Lu, Yujie; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging fluorescence and bioluminescence tomography approaches have several common, yet several distinct features from established emission tomographies of PET and SPECT. Although both nuclear and optical imaging modalities involve counting of photons, nuclear imaging techniques collect the emitted high energy (100-511 keV) photons after radioactive decay of radionuclides while optical techniques count low-energy (1.5-4.1 eV) photons that are scattered and absorbed by tissues requiring models of light transport for quantitative image reconstruction. Fluorescence imaging has been recently translated into clinic demonstrating high sensitivity, modest tissue penetration depth, and fast, millisecond image acquisition times. As a consequence, the promise of quantitative optical tomography as a complement of small animal PET and SPECT remains high. In this review, we summarize the different instrumentation, methodological approaches and schema for inverse image reconstructions for optical tomography, including luminescence and fluorescence modalities, and comment on limitations and key technological advances needed for further discovery research and translation.

  12. Study of body composition in small animals by a multifrequency impedancemeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribbe, E.; Khider, N.; Moreno, M. V.

    2010-04-01

    Bioimpedance is essentially used today to study the body composition in the human body but not really in small animals. The aim of this paper is to develop a model for body composition in rats to help pharmaceutical labs assessing effects of medicine on rats. We propose a non invasive, rapid and scientific method. With a multifrequency impedancemeter, Z-Métrix® (BioparHom© Company France), resistances and reactances are measured at 55 frequencies for a population of 40 rats (males and females). With our model, derived from Cole-Cole model, resistances of extracellular (Re) and total body (Rinf) compartment are extrapolated. Three methods were applied: posterior to posterior leg, anterior to posterior leg on the left and on the right side. Measurements by CT imaging were performed on the anesthetized population to determine Fat Mass (FM), Lean Body Mass (LBM) and Bone Mineral Content (BMC), as our reference measurements. With electrical data, age, sex and weight, equations are created to calculate FM, LBM and BMC with the three methods. Graphs of correlation, between tissue masses calculated by bioimpedance and obtained with scanner, indicate that measurements with posterior to posterior leg are better. Moreover, there is no significantly difference between tissue masses measured by bioimpedance and with the scanner.

  13. Phase-selective image reconstruction of the lungs in small animals using micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, S. M.; Perez, B. A.; Kirsch, D. G.; Badea, C. T.

    2010-04-01

    Gating in small animal imaging can compensate for artifacts due to physiological motion. This paper presents a strategy for sampling and image reconstruction in the rodent lung using micro-CT. The approach involves rapid sampling of freebreathing mice without any additional hardware to detect respiratory motion. The projection images are analyzed postacquisition to derive a respiratory signal, which is used to provide weighting factors for each projection that favor a selected phase of the respiration (e.g. end-inspiration or end-expiration) for the reconstruction. Since the sampling cycle and the respiratory cycle are uncorrelated, the sets of projections corresponding to any of the selected respiratory phases do not have a regular angular distribution. This drastically affects the image quality of reconstructions based on simple filtered backprojection. To address this problem, we use an iterative reconstruction algorithm that combines the Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique with Total Variation minimization (SART-TV). At each SART-TV iteration, backprojection is performed with a set of weighting factors that favor the desired respiratory phase. To reduce reconstruction time, the algorithm is implemented on a graphics processing unit. The performance of the proposed approach was investigated in simulations and in vivo scans of mice with primary lung cancers imaged with our in-house developed dual tube/detector micro-CT system. We note that if the ECG signal is acquired during sampling, the same approach could be used for phase-selective cardiac imaging.

  14. A small animal image guided irradiation system study using 3D dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xin; Admovics, John; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2015-01-01

    In a high resolution image-guided small animal irradiation platform, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is integrated with an irradiation unit for precise targeting. Precise quality assurance is essential for both imaging and irradiation components. The conventional commissioning techniques with films face major challenges due to alignment uncertainty and labour intensive film preparation and scanning. In addition, due to the novel design of this platform the mouse stage rotation for CBCT imaging is perpendicular to the gantry rotation for irradiation. Because these two rotations are associated with different mechanical systems, discrepancy between rotation isocenters exists. In order to deliver x-ray precisely, it is essential to verify coincidence of the imaging and the irradiation isocenters. A 3D PRESAGE dosimeter can provide an excellent tool for checking dosimetry and verifying coincidence of irradiation and imaging coordinates in one system. Dosimetric measurements were performed to obtain beam profiles and percent depth dose (PDD). Isocentricity and coincidence of the mouse stage and gantry rotations were evaluated with starshots acquired using PRESAGE dosimeters. A single PRESAGE dosimeter can provide 3 -D information in both geometric and dosimetric uncertainty, which is crucial for translational studies.

  15. Denoising of high resolution small animal 3D PET data using the non-subsampled Haar wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa Domínguez, Humberto de Jesús; Máynez, Leticia O.; Vergara Villegas, Osslan O.; Mederos, Boris; Mejía, José M.; Cruz Sánchez, Vianey G.

    2015-06-01

    PET allows functional imaging of the living tissue. However, one of the most serious technical problems affecting the reconstructed data is the noise, particularly in images of small animals. In this paper, a method for high-resolution small animal 3D PET data is proposed with the aim to reduce the noise and preserve details. The method is based on the estimation of the non-subsampled Haar wavelet coefficients by using a linear estimator. The procedure is applied to the volumetric images, reconstructed without correction factors (plane reconstruction). Results show that the method preserves the structures and drastically reduces the noise that contaminates the image.

  16. Kilovoltage beam Monte Carlo dose calculations in submillimeter voxels for small animal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Zhou, Hu; Keall, Paul J.; Graves, Edward E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Small animal conformal radiotherapy (RT) is essential for preclinical cancer research studies and therefore various microRT systems have been recently designed. The aim of this paper is to efficiently calculate the dose delivered using our microRT system based on a microCT scanner with the Monte Carlo (MC) method and to compare the MC calculations to film measurements. Methods: Doses from 2–30 mm diameter 120 kVp photon beams deposited in a solid water phantom with 0.2×0.2×0.2 mm3 voxels are calculated using the latest versions of the EGSnrc codes BEAMNRC and DOSXYZNRC. Two dose calculation approaches are studied: a two-step approach using phase-space files and direct dose calculation with BEAMNRC simulation sources. Due to the small beam size and submillimeter voxel size resulting in long calculation times, variance reduction techniques are studied. The optimum bremsstrahlung splitting number (NBRSPL in BEAMNRC) and the optimum DOSXYZNRC photon splitting (Nsplit) number are examined for both calculation approaches and various beam sizes. The dose calculation efficiencies and the required number of histories to achieve 1% statistical uncertainty—with no particle recycling—are evaluated for 2–30 mm beams. As a final step, film dose measurements are compared to MC calculated dose distributions. Results: The optimum NBRSPL is approximately 1×106 for both dose calculation approaches. For the dose calculations with phase-space files, Nsplit varies only slightly for 2–30 mm beams and is established to be 300. Nsplit for the DOSXYZNRC calculation with the BEAMNRC source ranges from 300 for the 30 mm beam to 4000 for the 2 mm beam. The calculation time significantly increases for small beam sizes when the BEAMNRC simulation source is used compared to the simulations with phase-space files. For the 2 and 30 mm beams, the dose calculations with phase-space files are more efficient than the dose calculations with BEAMNRC sources by factors of 54 and 1

  17. Cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography for diagnosis of dental abnormalities in dogs and cats

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Luiz Antonio F.; Barriviera, Mauricio; Januário, Alessandro L.; Bezerra, Ana Cristina B.; Fioravanti, Maria Clorinda S.

    2011-01-01

    The development of veterinary dentistry has substantially improved the ability to diagnose canine and feline dental abnormalities. Consequently, examinations previously performed only on humans are now available for small animals, thus improving the diagnostic quality. This has increased the need for technical qualification of veterinary professionals and increased technological investments. This study evaluated the use of cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography as complementary exams for diagnosing dental abnormalities in dogs and cats. Cone beam computed tomography was provided faster image acquisition with high image quality, was associated with low ionizing radiation levels, enabled image editing, and reduced the exam duration. Our results showed that radiography was an effective method for dental radiographic examination with low cost and fast execution times, and can be performed during surgical procedures. PMID:22122905

  18. Small-animal CT: Its difference from, and impact on, clinical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritman, Erik L.

    2007-10-01

    For whole-body computed tomography (CT) images of small rodents, a voxel resolution of at least 10 -3 mm 3 is needed for scale-equivalence to that currently achieved in clinical CT scanners (˜1 mm 3) in adult humans. These "mini-CT" images generally require minutes rather than seconds to complete a scan. The radiation exposure resulting from these mini-CT scans, while higher than clinical CT scans, is below the level resulting in acute tissue damage. Hence, these scans are useful for performing clinical-type diagnostic and monitoring scans for animal models of disease and their response to treatment. "Micro-CT", with voxel size <10 -5 mm 3, has been useful for imaging isolated, intact organs at an almost cellular level of resolution. Micro-CT has the great advantage over traditional microscopic methods in that it generates detailed three-dimensional images in relatively large, opaque volumes such as an intact rodent heart or kidney. The radiation exposure needed in these scans results in acute tissue damage if used in living animals. Experience with micro-CT is contributing to exploration of new applications for clinical CT imaging by providing insights into different modes of X-ray image formation as follows: Spatial resolution should be sufficient to detect an individual Basic Functional Unit (BFU, the smallest collection of diverse cells, such as hepatic lobule, that behaves like the organ), which requires voxels ˜10 -3 mm 3 in volume, so that the BFUs can be counted. Contrast resolution sufficient to allow quantitation of: New microvascular growth, which manifests as increased tissue contrast due to X-ray contrast agent in those vessels' lumens during passage of injected contrast agent in blood. Impaired endothelial integrity which manifests as increased opacification and delayed washout of contrast from tissues. Discrimination of pathological accumulations of metals such as Fe and Ca, which occur in the arterial wall following hemorrhage or tissue damage

  19. SU-E-T-457: Design and Characterization of An Economical 192Ir Hemi-Brain Small Animal Irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Grams, M; Wilson, Z; Sio, T; Beltran, C; Tryggestad, E; Gupta, S; Blackwell, C; McCollough, K; Sarkaria, J; Furutani, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To describe the design and dosimetric characterization of a simple and economical small animal irradiator. Methods: A high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source from a commercially available afterloader was used with a 1.3 centimeter thick tungsten collimator to provide sharp beam penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. The unit is equipped with continuous gas anesthesia to allow robust animal immobilization. Dosimetric characterization of the device was performed with Gafchromic film. The penumbra from the small animal irradiator was compared under similar collimating conditions to the penumbra from 6 MV photons, 6 MeV electrons, and 20 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator as well as 300 kVp photons from an orthovoltage unit and Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV protons. Results: The tungsten collimator provides a sharp penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation, and dose rates on the order of 200 cGy/minute were achieved. The sharpness of the penumbra attainable with this device compares favorably to those measured experimentally for 6 MV photons, and 6 and 20 MeV electron beams from a linear accelerator. Additionally, the penumbra was comparable to those measured for a 300 kVp orthovoltage beam and a Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV proton beam. Conclusions: The small animal irradiator described here can be built for under $1,000 and used in conjunction with any commercial brachytherapy afterloader to provide a convenient and cost-effective option for small animal irradiation experiments. The unit offers high dose rate delivery and sharp penumbra, which is ideal for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. With slight modifications to the design, irradiation of sites other than the brain could be accomplished easily. Due to its simplicity and low cost, the apparatus described is an attractive alternative for small animal irradiation experiments requiring a sharp penumbra.

  20. Low cost venom extractor based on Arduino(®) board for electrical venom extraction from arthropods and other small animals.

    PubMed

    Besson, Thomas; Debayle, Delphine; Diochot, Sylvie; Salinas, Miguel; Lingueglia, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Extracting venom from small species is usually challenging. We describe here an affordable and versatile electrical venom extractor based on the Arduino(®) Mega 2560 Board, which is designed to extract venom from arthropods and other small animals. The device includes fine tuning of stimulation time and voltage. It was used to collect venom without apparent deleterious effects, and characterized for the first time the venom of Zoropsis spinimana, a common spider in French Mediterranean regions. PMID:27158113

  1. 8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND BETA BACKSCATTERING. (7/13/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  2. System calibration and image reconstruction for a new small-animal SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Chun

    A novel small-animal SPECT imager, FastSPECT II, was recently developed at the Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging. FastSPECT II consists of two rings of eight modular scintillation cameras and list-mode data-acquisition electronics that enable stationary and dynamic imaging studies. The instrument is equipped with exchangeable aperture assemblies and adjustable camera positions for selections of magnifications, pinhole sizes, and fields of view (FOVs). The purpose of SPECT imaging is to recover the radiotracer distribution in the object from the measured image data. Accurate knowledge of the imaging system matrix (referred to as H) is essential for image reconstruction. To assure that all of the system physics is contained in the matrix, experimental calibration methods for the individual cameras and the whole imaging system were developed and carefully performed. The average spatial resolution over the FOV of FastSPECT II in its low-magnification (2.4X) configuration is around 2.4 mm, computed from the Fourier crosstalk matrix. The system sensitivity measured with a 99mTc point source at the center of the FOV is about 267 cps/MBq. The system detectability was evaluated by computing the ideal-observer performance on SKE/BKE (signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly) detection tasks. To reduce the system-calibration time and achieve finer reconstruction grids, two schemes for interpolating H were implemented and compared: these are centroid interpolation with Gaussian fitting and Fourier interpolation. Reconstructed phantom and mouse-cardiac images demonstrated the effectiveness of the H-matrix interpolation. Tomographic reconstruction can be formulated as a linear inverse problem and solved using statistical-estimation techniques. Several iterative reconstruction algorithms were introduced, including maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) and its ordered-subsets (OS) version, and some least-squares (LS) and weighted-least-squares (WLS) algorithms such

  3. Multi-institutional dosimetric and geometric commissioning of image-guided small animal irradiators

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, P. E.; Granton, P. V.; Hoof, S. van; Hermans, J.; Gasparini, A.; Jelveh, S.; Clarkson, R.; Kaas, J.; Wittkamper, F.; Sonke, J.-J.; Verhaegen, F.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric and geometric properties of a commercial x-ray based image-guided small animal irradiation system, installed at three institutions and to establish a complete and broadly accessible commissioning procedure. Methods: The system consists of a 225 kVp x-ray tube with fixed field size collimators ranging from 1 to 44 mm equivalent diameter. The x-ray tube is mounted opposite a flat-panel imaging detector, on a C-arm gantry with 360° coplanar rotation. Each institution performed a full commissioning of their system, including half-value layer, absolute dosimetry, relative dosimetry (profiles, percent depth dose, and relative output factors), and characterization of the system geometry and mechanical flex of the x-ray tube and detector. Dosimetric measurements were made using Farmer-type ionization chambers, small volume air and liquid ionization chambers, and radiochromic film. The results between the three institutions were compared. Results: At 225 kVp, with 0.3 mm Cu added filtration, the first half value layer ranged from 0.9 to 1.0 mm Cu. The dose-rate in-air for a 40 × 40 mm{sup 2} field size, at a source-to-axis distance of 30 cm, ranged from 3.5 to 3.9 Gy/min between the three institutions. For field sizes between 2.5 mm diameter and 40 × 40 mm{sup 2}, the differences between percent depth dose curves up to depths of 3.5 cm were between 1% and 4% on average, with the maximum difference being 7%. The profiles agreed very well for fields >5 mm diameter. The relative output factors differed by up to 6% for fields larger than 10 mm diameter, but differed by up to 49% for fields ≤5 mm diameter. The mechanical characteristics of the system (source-to-axis and source-to-detector distances) were consistent between all three institutions. There were substantial differences in the flex of each system. Conclusions: With the exception of the half-value layer, and mechanical properties, there were significant differences between the

  4. Frequency Domain Fluorescent Molecular Tomography and Molecular Probes for Small Animal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujala, Naresh Gandhi

    Fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) is a noninvasive biomedical optical imaging that enables 3-dimensional quantitative determination of fluorochromes distributed in biological tissues. There are three methods for imaging large volume tissues based on different light sources: (a) using a light source of constant intensity, through a continuous or constant wave, (b) using a light source that is intensity modulated with a radio frequency (RF), and (c) using ultrafast pulses in the femtosecond range. In this study, we have developed a frequency domain fluorescent molecular tomographic system based on the heterodyne technique, using a single source and detector pair that can be used for small animal imaging. In our system, the intensity of the laser source is modulated with a RF frequency to produce a diffuse photon density wave in the tissue. The phase of the diffuse photon density wave is measured by comparing the reference signal with the signal from the tissue using a phasemeter. The data acquisition was performed by using a Labview program. The results suggest that we can measure the phase change from the heterogeneous inside tissue. Combined with fiber optics and filter sets, the system can be used to sensitively image the targeted fluorescent molecular probes, allowing the detection of cancer at an early stage. We used the system to detect the tumor-targeting molecular probe Alexa Fluor 680 and Alexa Fluor 750 bombesin peptide conjugates in phantoms as well as mouse tissues. We also developed and evaluated fluorescent Bombesin (BBN) probes to target gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors for optical molecular imaging. GRP receptors are over-expressed in several types of human cancer cells, including breast, prostate, small cell lung, and pancreatic cancers. BBN is a 14 amino acid peptide that is an analogue to human gastrin-releasing peptide that binds specifically to GRPr receptors. BBN conjugates are significant in cancer detection and therapy. The

  5. Post-acquisition small-animal respiratory gated imaging using micro cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jicun; Haworth, Steven T.; Molthen, Robert C.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2004-04-01

    On many occasions, it is desirable to image lungs in vivo to perform a pulmonary physiology study. Since the lungs are moving, gating with respect to the ventilatory phase has to be performed in order to minimize motion artifacts. Gating can be done in real time, similar to cardiac imaging in clinical applications, however, there are technical problems that have lead us to investigate different approaches. The problems include breath-to-breath inconsistencies in tidal volume, which makes the precise detection of ventilatory phase difficult, and the relatively high ventilation rates seen in small animals (rats and mice have ventilation rates in the range of a hundred cycles per minute), which challenges the capture rate of many imaging systems (this is particularly true of our system which utilizes cone-beam geometry and a 2 dimensional detector). Instead of pre-capture ventilation gating we implemented a method of post-acquisition gating. We acquire a sequence of projections images at 30 frames per second for each of 360 viewing angles. During each capture sequence the rat undergoes multiple ventilation cycles. Using the sequence of projection images, an automated region of interest algorithm, based on integrated grayscale intensity, tracts the ventilatory phase of the lungs. In the processing of an image sequence, multiple projection images are identified at a particular phase and averaged to improve the signal-to-ratio. The resulting averaged projection images are input to a Feldkamp cone-beam algorithm reconstruction algorithm in order to obtain isotropic image volumes. Minimal motion artifact data sets improve qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques useful in physiologic studies of pulmonary structure and function.

  6. Quantitative analysis of L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Tasneem; Tahtali, Murat; Pickering, Mark R.

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate the performance of a newly proposed L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging. The L-SPECT system consists of an array of 100 × 100 micro range diameter pinholes. The proposed detector module has a 48 mm by 48 mm active area and the system is based on a pixelated array of NaI crystals (10×10×10 mm elements) coupled with an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). The performance of this system was evaluated with pinhole radii of 50 μm, 60 μm and 100 μm. Monte Carlo simulation studies using the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) software package validate the performance of this novel dual head L-SPECT system where a geometric mouse phantom is used to investigate its performance. All SPECT data were obtained using 120 projection views from 0° to 360° with a 3° step. Slices were reconstructed using conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. We have evaluated the quality of the images in terms of spatial resolution (FWHM) based on line spread function, the system sensitivity, the point source response function and the image quality. The sensitivity of our newly proposed L- SPECT system was about 4500 cps/μCi at 6 cm along with excellent full width at half-maximum (FWHM) using 50 μm pinhole aperture at several radii of rotation. The analysis results show the combination of excellent spatial resolution and high detection efficiency over an energy range between 20-160 keV. The results demonstrate that SPECT imaging using a pixelated L-SPECT detector module is applicable in a quantitative study of mouse brain imaging.

  7. Investigations on x-ray luminescence CT for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Stanton, I. N.; Johnston, S. M.; Johnson, G. A.; Therien, M. J.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray Luminescence CT (XLCT) is a hybrid imaging modality combining x-ray and optical imaging in which x-ray luminescent nanophosphors (NPs) are used as emissive imaging probes. NPs are easily excited using common CT energy x-ray beams, and the NP luminescence is efficiently collected using sensitive light-based detection systems. XLCT can be recognized as a close analog to fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT). However, XLCT has remarkable advantages over FDOT due to the substantial excitation penetration depths provided by x-rays relative to laser light sources, long-term photo-stability of NPs, and the ability to tune NP emission within the NIR spectral window. Since XCLT uses an x-ray pencil beam excitation, the emitted light can be measured and back-projected along the x-ray path during reconstruction, where the size of the x-ray pencil beam determines the resolution for XLCT. In addition, no background signal competes with NP luminescence (i.e., no auto fluorescence) in XLCT. Currently, no small animal XLCT system has been proposed or tested. This paper investigates an XLCT system built and integrated with a dual source micro-CT system. A novel sampling paradigms that results in more efficient scanning is proposed and tested via simulations. Our preliminary experimental results in phantoms indicate that a basic CT-like reconstruction is able to recover a map of the NP locations and differences in NP concentrations. With the proposed dual source system and faster scanning approaches, XLCT has the potential to revolutionize molecular imaging in preclinical studies.

  8. Evaluation and reduction of respiratory motion artifacts in small animal SPECT with GATE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.-L.; Park, S.-J.; Kim, H.-J.

    2015-09-01

    The degradation of image quality caused by respiration is a major impediment to accurate lesion detection in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of lung motion on image quantification. A small animal SPECT system with NaI(Tl) was modeled in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) simulation for a lung lesion using a 4D mouse whole-body phantom. SPECT images were obtained using 120 projection views acquired from 0o to 360o with a 3o step. Slices were reconstructed using ordered subsets expectation maximization (OS-EM) without attenuation correction with five iterations and four subsets. Image quality was compared between the static mode without respiratory motion, and dynamic mode with respiratory motion in terms of spatial resolution was measured by the full width at half maximum (FWHM), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The FWHM of the non-gated image and the respiratory gated image were also compared. Spatial resolution improved as activity increased and lesion diameter decreased in the static and dynamic modes. The SNR and CNR increased significantly as lesion activity increased and lesion diameter decreased. Our results show that respiratory motion leads to reduced contrast and quantitative accuracy and that image quantification depends on both the amplitude and the pattern of the respiratory motion. We verified that respiratory motion can have a major effect on the accuracy of measurement of lung lesions and that respiratory gating can reduce activity smearing on SPECT images.

  9. Gradient-Based Algorithm for Determining Tumor Volumes in Small Animals Using Planar Fluorescence Imaging Platform

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jessica P.; Egbulefu, Christopher; Prior, Julie L.; Zhou, Mingzhou; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Planar fluorescence imaging is widely used in biological research because of its simplicity, use of non-ionizing radiation, and high-throughput data acquisition. In cancer research, where small animal models are used to study the in vivo effects of cancer therapeutics, the output of interest is often the tumor volume. Unfortunately, inaccuracies in determining tumor volume from surface-weighted projection fluorescence images undermine the data, and alternative physical or conventional tomographic approaches are prone to error or are tedious for most laboratories. Here, we report a method that uses a priori knowledge of a tumor xenograft model, a tumor-targeting near infrared probe, and a custom-developed image analysis planar view tumor volume algorithm (PV-TVA) to estimate tumor volume from planar fluorescence images. Our algorithm processes images obtained using near infrared light for improving imaging depth in tissue in comparison with light in the visible spectrum. We benchmarked our results against the actual tumor volume obtained from a standard water volume displacement method. Compared with a caliper-based method that has an average deviation from an actual volume of 18% (204.34 ± 115.35 mm3), our PV-TVA average deviation from the actual volume was 9% (97.24 ± 70.45 mm3; P < .001). Using a normalization-based analysis, we found that bioluminescence imaging and PV-TVA average deviations from actual volume were 36% and 10%, respectively. The improved accuracy of tumor volume assessment from planar fluorescence images, rapid data analysis, and the ease of archiving images for subsequent retrieval and analysis potentially lend our PV-TVA method to diverse cancer imaging applications. PMID:27200417

  10. In Vivo Biodistribution and Small Animal PET of 64Cu Labeled Antimicrobial Peptoids

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jiwon; Ren, Gang; Liu, Hongguang; Miao, Zheng; Park, Minyoung; Wang, Yihong; Miller, Tyler M.; Barron, Annelise E.; Cheng, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Peptoids are a rapidly developing class of biomimetic polymers based on oligo-N-substituted glycine backbones, designed to mimic peptides and proteins. Inspired by natural antimicrobial peptides, a group of cationic amphipathic peptoids has been successfully discovered with a potent and broad-spectrum activity against pathogenic bacteria; however, there are limited studies to address the in vivo pharmacokinetics of the peptoids. Herein, 64Cu labeled DOTA conjugates of three different peptoids and two control peptides were synthesized and assayed in vivo by both biodistribution studies and small animal positron emission tomography (PET). The study was designed in a way to assess how structural differences of the peptidomimetics affect in vivo pharmacokinetics. As amphipathic molecules, major uptake of the peptoids occurred at the liver. Increased kidney uptake was observed by deleting one hydrophobic residue in the peptoid, and 64Cu-3 achieved the highest kidney uptake of all the conjugates tested in this study. In comparison to peptides, our data indicated that peptoids had general in vivo properties of higher tissue accumulation, slower elimination, and higher in vivo stability. Different administration routes (intravenous, intraperitoneal, and oral) were investigated with peptoids. When administered orally, the peptoids showed poor bioavailability, reminiscent to that of peptide. But, remarkably longer passage through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract without rapid digestion was observed for peptoids. These unique in vivo properties of peptoids were rationalized by efficient cellular membrane permeability and protease resistance of peptoids. The results observed in the biodistribution studies could be confirmed by the PET imaging, which provides a reliable way to evaluate in vivo pharmacokinetic properties of peptoids noninvasively and in real time. The pharmacokinetic data presented here can provide an insight for further development of the antimicrobial peptoids

  11. Small Animal In Vivo X-Ray Tomosynthesis: Anatomical Relevance of the Reconstructed Images.

    PubMed

    Barquero, H; Brasse, D

    2016-02-01

    Whole body X-ray micro-Digital Tomosynthesis (micro-DT) for small animal imaging is introduced in this work. Such a system allows to deal with geometrical constraints that do not allow to use a micro-CT system as well as to reduce the radiological dose compared to a micro-CT scan. Data was simulated using the Digimouse anatomical model of the mouse with the designed system. An algebraic reconstruction algorithm regularized by Total Variation norm (TV) minimization was used to reconstruct images. Parameters for the reconstruction were optimized and the algorithm performance was evaluated quantitatively. High contrast tissues were subsequently segmented by thresholding the image. Quantitative analysis of the segmented domains indicates that a relevant anatomical information can possibly be extracted from micro-DT images. Indeed the Dice's coefficient values are greater than 0.8 for the segmented High Contrast Tissues compared to the phantom, which indicates an important overlap between the domains. The volume of the segmented tissues is over-estimated for the bones and skin-with 1.313 and 1.113 ratios of the estimated over reference volumes, respectively-and under-estimated in the case of the lungs with a 0.762 ratio. The mean point to surface distance is inferior to the voxel size of 400 μm, for the three segmented tissues. These results are very encouraging and let us consider micro-DT as an alternative to micro-CT to deal with geometrical constraints. PMID:26302512

  12. Dosimetry for spectral molecular imaging of small animals with MARS-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganet, Noémie; Anderson, Nigel; Bell, Stephen; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phil; Carbonez, Pierre; Cook, Nicholas; Cotterill, Tony; Marsh, Steven; Panta, Raj Kumar; Laban, John; Walker, Sophie; Yeabsley, Adam; Damet, Jérôme

    2015-03-01

    The Medipix All Resolution Scanner (MARS) spectral CT is intended for small animal, pre-clinical imaging and uses an x-ray detector (Medipix) operating in single photon counting mode. The MARS system provides spectrometric information to facilitate differentiation of tissue types and bio-markers. For longitudinal studies of disease models, it is desirable to characterise the system's dosimetry. This dosimetry study is performed using three phantoms each consisting of a 30 mm diameter homogeneous PMMA cylinder simulating a mouse. The imaging parameters used for this study are derived from those used for gold nanoparticle identification in mouse kidneys. Dosimetry measurement are obtained with thermo-luminescent Lithium Fluoride (LiF:CuMgP) detectors, calibrated in terms of air kerma and placed at different depths and orientations in the phantoms. Central axis TLD air kerma rates of 17.2 (± 0.71) mGy/min and 18.2 (± 0.75) mGy/min were obtained for different phantoms and TLD orientations. Validation measurements were acquired with a pencil ionization chamber, giving an air-kerma rate of 20.3 (±1) mGy/min and an estimated total air kerma of 81.2 (± 4) mGy for a 720 projection acquisition. It is anticipated that scanner design improvements will significantly decrease future dose requirements. The procedures developed in this work will be used for further dosimetry calculations when optimizing image acquisition for the MARS system as it undergoes development towards human clinical applications.

  13. A compact frequency-domain photon migration system for integration into commercial hybrid small animal imaging scanners for fluorescence tomography.

    PubMed

    Darne, Chinmay D; Lu, Yujie; Tan, I-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C; Smith, Anne M; Yan, Shikui; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2012-12-21

    The work presented herein describes the system design and performance evaluation of a miniaturized near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) system with non-contact excitation and homodyne detection capability for small animal fluorescence tomography. The FDPM system was developed specifically for incorporation into a Siemens micro positron emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) commercial scanner for hybrid small animal imaging, but could be adapted to other systems. Operating at 100 MHz, the system noise was minimized and the associated amplitude and phase errors were characterized to be ±0.7% and ±0.3°, respectively. To demonstrate the tomographic ability, a commercial mouse-shaped phantom with 50 µM IRDye800CW and ⁶⁸Ga containing inclusion was used to associate PET and NIRF tomography. Three-dimensional mesh generation and anatomical referencing was accomplished through CT. A third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP₃) algorithm, for efficient prediction of light propagation in small animals, was tailored to incorporate the FDPM approach. Finally, the PET-NIRF target co-localization accuracy was analyzed in vivo with a dual-labeled imaging agent targeting orthotopic growth of human prostate cancer. The obtained results validate the integration of time-dependent fluorescence tomography system within a commercial microPET/CT scanner for multimodality small animal imaging. PMID:23171509

  14. A compact frequency-domain photon migration system for integration into commercial hybrid small animal imaging scanners for fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darne, Chinmay D.; Lu, Yujie; Tan, I.-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Smith, Anne M.; Yan, Shikui; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-12-01

    The work presented herein describes the system design and performance evaluation of a miniaturized near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) system with non-contact excitation and homodyne detection capability for small animal fluorescence tomography. The FDPM system was developed specifically for incorporation into a Siemens micro positron emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) commercial scanner for hybrid small animal imaging, but could be adapted to other systems. Operating at 100 MHz, the system noise was minimized and the associated amplitude and phase errors were characterized to be ±0.7% and ±0.3°, respectively. To demonstrate the tomographic ability, a commercial mouse-shaped phantom with 50 µM IRDye800CW and 68Ga containing inclusion was used to associate PET and NIRF tomography. Three-dimensional mesh generation and anatomical referencing was accomplished through CT. A third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP3) algorithm, for efficient prediction of light propagation in small animals, was tailored to incorporate the FDPM approach. Finally, the PET-NIRF target co-localization accuracy was analyzed in vivo with a dual-labeled imaging agent targeting orthotopic growth of human prostate cancer. The obtained results validate the integration of time-dependent fluorescence tomography system within a commercial microPET/CT scanner for multimodality small animal imaging.

  15. A compact frequency-domain photon migration system for integration into commercial hybrid small animal imaging scanners for fluorescence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Darne, Chinmay D.; Lu, Yujie; Tan, I-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Smith, Anne M.; Yan, Shikui; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2012-01-01

    The work presented herein describes system design and performance evaluation of a miniaturized near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) system with non-contact excitation and homodyne detection capability for small animal fluorescence tomography. The FDPM system was developed specifically for incorporation into a Siemens microPET/CT commercial scanner for hybrid small animal imaging, but could be adapted to other systems. Operating at 100 MHz, the system noise was minimized and the associated amplitude and phase errors were characterized to be ±0.7% and ±0.3°, respectively. To demonstrate the tomographic ability, a commercial mouse-shaped phantom with 50 μM IRDye800CW and 68Ga containing inclusion was used to associate PET and NIRF tomography. 3-D mesh generation and anatomical referencing was accomplished through CT. A simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP3) algorithm, for efficient prediction of light propagation in small animals, was tailored to incorporate FDPM approach. Finally, PET-NIRF target co-localization accuracy was analyzed in vivo with a dual-labeled imaging agent targeting orthotopic growth of human prostate cancer. The results obtained validate the integration of time-dependent fluorescence tomography system within a commercial microPET/CT scanner for multimodality small animal imaging. PMID:23171509

  16. Three-dimensional optical metrology and models for non-contact diffuse optical tomography of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comtois, Maxime; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2007-07-01

    We introduce a novel approach for calibrating an axis of rotation in a 3D optical metrology system. The system uses a stereo camera pair, along with rotation and translation stages for obtaining a 3D model of the surface of small animals. The metrology system will be part of a fully non-contact diffuse optical tomography (DOT) scanner for small animal imaging. The rotation axis calibration technique is based on measuring, with the stereo pair, the 3D position of a small ball as it is moved by the rotation stage (turntable). Our system has the advantage of using the tomograph's laser beam to measure the outer shape of the subject, thereby reducing overall system complexity, and allowing simultaneous surface and DOT measurements. Additionnaly, the exact position where laser light penetrates the animal is measured, while traditionally, this information is indirectly inferred with less accuracy. This information plays an important role in a tomographic reconstruction algorithm. Our new approach for the calibration of the rotation axis is compared to another technique we previously developed, where a checkerboard pattern is tracked instead of a ball. We present measurements of a reference shape and a small animal taken by our system.

  17. A Shift From Cell Cultures to Creatures: In Vivo Imaging of Small Animals in Experimental Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Studwell, Anna J; Kotton, Darrell N

    2011-01-01

    Although the use of small animals for in vivo experimentation has been widespread, only recently has there been easy availability of techniques that allow noninvasive in vivo imaging of small animals. Because these techniques allow the same individual subject to be followed longitudinally throughout the duration of an experiment, their use is rapidly changing the way small animals are employed in the laboratory. In this review, we focus on six imaging modalities that are increasingly employed for small animal in vivo imaging: optical imaging (OI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), ultrasound (US), and positron-emission tomography (PET). Each modality allows for the noninvasive tracking of cells and cell products in vivo. In addition, multimodality imaging, combining two or more of these techniques, has also been increasingly employed to overcome the limitations of each independent technique. After reviewing these available imaging modalities, we detail their experimental application, exemplified by the emerging field of regenerative medicine, referring to publications whose conclusions would otherwise be difficult to support without the availability of in vivo imaging. PMID:21952170

  18. AMMONIA ABATEMENT SYSTEM FOR WHOLE-BODY SMALL ANIMAL INHALATION EXPOSURES TO ACID MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conducting whole-body acid aerosol inhalation exposures of laboratory animals is complicated by ammonia arising from the excrement of the test animals which is sufficient to completely neutralize much of the acid aerosol. he neutralization of acid by ammonia con only be controlle...

  19. Design and implementation of a calibrated hyperspectral small-animal imager: Practical and theoretical aspects of system optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas Josiah

    Pre-clinical imaging has been an important development within the bioscience and pharmacology fields. A rapidly growing area within these fields is small animal fluorescence imaging, in which molecularly targeted fluorescent probes are used to non-invasively image internal events on a gross anatomical scale. Small-animal fluorescence imaging has transitioned from a research technique to pre-clinical technology very quickly, due to its molecular specificity, low cost, and relative ease of use. In addition, its potential uses in gene therapy and as a translational technology are becoming evident. This thesis outlines the development of an alternative modality for small animal/tissue imaging, using hyperspectral techniques to enable the collection of fluorescence images at different excitation and emission wavelengths. In specific, acousto-optical tunable filters (AOTFs) were used to construct emission-wavelength-scanning and excitation-wavelength-scanning small animal fluorescence imagers. Statistical, classification, and unmixing algorithms have been employed to extract specific fluorescent-dye information from hyperspectral image sets. In this work, we have designed and implemented hyperspectral imaging and analysis techniques to remove background autofluorescence from the desired fluorescence signal, resulting in highly specific and localized fluorescence. Therefore, in practice, it is possible to more accurately pin-point the location and size of diagnostic anatomical markers (e.g. tumors) labeled with fluorescent probes. Furthermore, multiple probes can be individually distinguished. In addition to imaging hardware and acquisition and analysis software, we have designed an optical tissue phantom for quality control and inter-system comparison. The phantom has been modeled using Monte Carlo techniques. The culmination of this work results in an understanding of the advantages and complexities in applying hyperspectral techniques to small animal fluorescence

  20. The Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD)

    SciTech Connect

    Imel, G.R.; McClellan, G.C.; Pruett, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) operated by Argonne National Laboratory is described in this paper. NRAD was designed to allow radiography of highly absorbing reactor fuel assemblies in the vertical position on the routine basis. 7 figs.

  1. Small-Animal PET Imaging of Tau Pathology with 18F-THK5117 in 2 Transgenic Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Matthias; Jaworska, Anna; Probst, Federico; Overhoff, Felix; Korzhova, Viktoria; Lindner, Simon; Carlsen, Janette; Bartenstein, Peter; Harada, Ryuichi; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Haass, Christian; Van Leuven, Fred; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Herms, Jochen; Rominger, Axel

    2016-05-01

    Abnormal accumulation of tau aggregates in the brain is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease neuropathology. We visualized tau deposition in vivo with the previously developed 2-arylquinoline derivative (18)F-THK5117 using small-animal PET in conjunction with autoradiography and immunohistochemistry gold standard assessment in 2 transgenic mouse models expressing hyperphosphorylated tau. Small-animal PET recordings were obtained in groups of P301S (n = 11) and biGT mice (n = 16) of different ages, with age-matched wild-type (WT) serving as controls. After intravenous administration of 16 ± 2 MBq of (18)F-THK5117, a dynamic 90-min emission recording was initiated for P301S mice and during 20-50 min after injection for biGT mice, followed by a 15-min transmission scan. After coregistration to the MRI atlas and scaling to the cerebellum, we performed volume-of-interest-based analysis (SUV ratio [SUVR]) and statistical parametric mapping. Small-animal PET results were compared with autoradiography ex vivo and in vitro and further validated with AT8 staining for neurofibrillary tangles. SUVRs calculated from static recordings during the interval of 20-50 min after tracer injection correlated highly with estimates of binding potential based on the entire dynamic emission recordings (R = 0.85). SUVR increases were detected in the brain stem of aged P301S mice (+11%; P < 0.001) and in entorhinal/amygdaloidal areas (+15%; P < 0.001) of biGT mice when compared with WT, whereas aged WT mice did not show increased tracer uptake. Immunohistochemical tau loads correlated with small-animal PET SUVR for both P301S (R = 0.8; P < 0.001) and biGT (R = 0.7; P < 0.001) mice, and distribution patterns of AT8-positive neurons matched voxelwise statistical parametric mapping analysis. Saturable binding of the tracer was verified by autoradiographic blocking studies. In the first dedicated small-animal PET study in 2 different transgenic tauopathy mouse models using the tau tracer

  2. Real-time radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, R.H.; Oien, C.T.

    1981-02-26

    Real-time radiography is used for imaging both dynamic events and static objects. Fluorescent screens play an important role in converting radiation to light, which is then observed directly or intensified and detected. The radiographic parameters for real-time radiography are similar to conventional film radiography with special emphasis on statistics and magnification. Direct-viewing fluoroscopy uses the human eye as a detector of fluorescent screen light or the light from an intensifier. Remote-viewing systems replace the human observer with a television camera. The remote-viewing systems have many advantages over the direct-viewing conditions such as safety, image enhancement, and the capability to produce permanent records. This report reviews real-time imaging system parameters and components.

  3. Energy and dose considerations for diffraction enhanced CT in small animal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Dean; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Parham, Christopher; Kao, Teresa; Zhong, Zhong

    2007-03-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) uses monochromatic x-rays coupled to an analyzer crystal to extract information about the refraction of x-rays within the object. Studies of excised biological tissues show that DEI has significant contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) advantages for soft tissue when compared to standard radiography. DEI differs from conventional CT in that its refraction contrast depends on x-ray energy as 1/E, thus the energy and dose considerations for conventional CT will be inappropriate. The goal of this study was to assess the optimal energy for in vivo CT imaging of a mouse head to obtain the largest soft tissue refraction CNR. Through a theoretical model, optimum refraction CNR for mouse brain imaging was found to be about 20 keV. The findings were tested experimentally using the DEI system at the X15A beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source. Using the parameters for optimized refraction CNR (20 keV, silicon [333] reflection), large image artifacts were caused by DEI's scatter-rejection properties. By increasing the x-ray energy and using a lower order diffraction, silicon [111], soft tissue features within the brain, including the hippocampus, could be resolved.

  4. Small and Large Animal Models in Cardiac Contraction Research: Advantages and Disadvantages

    PubMed Central

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian heart is responsible for not only pumping blood throughout the body but also adjusting this pumping activity quickly depending upon sudden changes in the metabolic demands of the body. For the most part, the human heart is capable of performing its duties without complications; however, throughout many decades of use, at some point this system encounters problems. Research into the heart’s activities during healthy states and during adverse impacts that occur in disease states is necessary in order to strategize novel treatment options to ultimately prolong and improve patients’ lives. Animal models are an important aspect of cardiac research where a variety of cardiac processes and therapeutic targets can be studied. However, there are differences between the heart of a human being and an animal and depending on the specific animal, these differences can become more pronounced and in certain cases limiting. There is no ideal animal model available for cardiac research, the use of each animal model is accompanied with its own set of advantages and disadvantages. In this review, we will discuss these advantages and disadvantages of commonly used laboratory animals including mouse, rat, rabbit, canine, swine, and sheep. Since the goal of cardiac research is to enhance our understanding of human health and disease and help improve clinical outcomes, we will also discuss the role of human cardiac tissue in cardiac research. This review will focus on the cardiac ventricular contractile and relaxation kinetics of humans and animal models in order to illustrate these differences. PMID:24140081

  5. Improved Pose Measurement and Tracking System for Motion Correction of Awake, Unrestrained Small Animal SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Weisenberger, A G; Smith, M F

    2007-01-01

    An improved optical landmark-based pose measurement and tracking system has been developed to provide 3D animal pose data for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system for awake, unanesthetized, unrestrained laboratory animals. The six degree of freedom animal position and orientation measurement data are time synchronized with the SPECT list mode data to provide for motion correction after the scan and before reconstruction. The tracking system employs infrared (IR) markers placed on the animal's head along with synchronized, strobed IR LEDs to illuminate the reflectors and freeze motion while minimizing reflections. A new design trinocular stereo image acquisition system using IEEE 1394 CMOS cameras acquires images of the animal with markers contained within a transparent enclosure. The trinocular configuration provides improved accuracy, range of motion, and robustness over the binocular stereo used previously. Enhanced software detects obstructions, automatically segments the markers, rejects reflections, performs marker correspondence, and calculates the 3D pose of the animal's head using image data from three cameras. The new hardware design provides more compact camera positioning with enhanced animal viewing through the 360 degree SPECT scan. This system has been implemented on a commercial scanner and tested using live mice and has been shown to be more reliable with higher accuracy than the previous system. Experimental results showing the improved motion tracking results are given.

  6. Metal thickness measurements using radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achrekar, P. M.

    1986-04-01

    The present invention relates broadly to a radiographic inspection technique, and in particular to a metal thickness measurement method using radiography. The localized areas wherein the effective metal thickness is less than the minimum that is required for radiation shielding and which can render a shielding enclosure functionless, is readily determined. The invention comprises a process for assuring metal thickness in small regions. The actual metal thickness of small regions can be verified by comparing the optical densities of sections of the metal i.e., stepwedge. A comparator microphotometer, which compares optical densities of spectrum lines from spectrophotometers, compares the optical density of spectrum lines on an exposed spectrum plate (metal under test) with a standard plate (stepwedge).

  7. Validation of a small-animal PET simulation using GAMOS: a GEANT4-based framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañadas, M.; Arce, P.; Rato Mendes, P.

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo-based modelling is a powerful tool to help in the design and optimization of positron emission tomography (PET) systems. The performance of these systems depends on several parameters, such as detector physical characteristics, shielding or electronics, whose effects can be studied on the basis of realistic simulated data. The aim of this paper is to validate a comprehensive study of the Raytest ClearPET small-animal PET scanner using a new Monte Carlo simulation platform which has been developed at CIEMAT (Madrid, Spain), called GAMOS (GEANT4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations). This toolkit, based on the GEANT4 code, was originally designed to cover multiple applications in the field of medical physics from radiotherapy to nuclear medicine, but has since been applied by some of its users in other fields of physics, such as neutron shielding, space physics, high energy physics, etc. Our simulation model includes the relevant characteristics of the ClearPET system, namely, the double layer of scintillator crystals in phoswich configuration, the rotating gantry, the presence of intrinsic radioactivity in the crystals or the storage of single events for an off-line coincidence sorting. Simulated results are contrasted with experimental acquisitions including studies of spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and count rates in accordance with the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 4-2008 protocol. Spatial resolution results showed a discrepancy between simulated and measured values equal to 8.4% (with a maximum FWHM difference over all measurement directions of 0.5 mm). Sensitivity results differ less than 1% for a 250-750 keV energy window. Simulated and measured count rates agree well within a wide range of activities, including under electronic saturation of the system (the measured peak of total coincidences, for the mouse-sized phantom, was 250.8 kcps reached at 0.95 MBq mL-1 and the simulated peak was

  8. Combined system of fluorescence diffuse optical tomography and microcomputed tomography for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoquan; Gong, Hui; Quan, Guotao; Deng, Yong; Luo, Qingming

    2010-05-01

    We developed a dual-modality system that combines fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) and flat panel detector-based microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) to simultaneously reveal molecular and structural information in small animals. In fDOT, a 748 nm diode laser was used as an excitation source, while a cooled charge coupled device camera was adopted to collect transmission fluorescence. In micro-CT, a flat panel detector based on amorphous silicon, with active area of 13×13 cm2, and a microfocus x-ray tube were used. The fDOT system was mounted orthogonally to the micro-CT and the projection images were acquired without rotation of the sample, which is different from the method used for micro-CT alone. Both the finite element method and the algebraic reconstruction technique were used to reconstruct images from the fDOT. Phantom data showed that the resolution of the fDOT system was about 3 mm at an imaging depth of 7 mm. Quantitative error was no more than 5% and imaging sensitivity for 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-etramethylindotricarbocyanine iodide bis-oleate (DiR-BOA) was estimated to be higher than 100 nM at a depth of 7 mm. Calculations of the phantom's center of mass showed that the location accuracy of fDOT was about 0.7 mm. We applied a Feldkamp algorithm to reconstruct the micro-CT image. By measuring the presampled modulation transfer function with a 30 μm tungsten thread, we estimated that the micro-CT has a resolution of 5 mm-1 when the field of view was 6.5 cm. Our results indicate the uniformity of the transaxial micro-CT image and the contrast-to-noise ratio was measured as 1.95 for a radiation dose of 1 cGy. A non-image-based method was employed for merging images from the two imaging modalities. A nude mouse with DiR-BOA, imaged ex vivo, was used to validate the feasibility of the dual-modality system.

  9. Multimodal fluorescence mediated tomography and SPECT/CT for small animals imaging

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Metasebya; Nothdruft, Ralph E.; Akers, Walter; Edwards, W. Barry; Liang, Kexian; Xu, Baogang; Suddlow, Gail P.; Deghani, Hamid; Tai, Yuan-Chuan; Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Achilefu, Samuel; Culver, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial and temporal co-registration of nuclear and optical images would enable the fusion of the information from theses complementary molecular imaging modalities. A critical challenge in integration is fitting optical hardware into the nuclear imaging platforms. Flexible fiber-based fluorescence mediated tomography (FMT) systems provide a viable solution because the various imaging bore sizes of small animal nuclear imaging systems can potentially accommodate the FMT fiber imaging arrays. Further, FMT imaging facilitates co-registering the nuclear and optical contrasts in time. Herein, we combine a fiber based FMT system with a preclinical NanoSPECT/CT platform. Feasibility of in vivo imaging is demonstrated by tracking the accumulation of a monomolecular multimodal imaging agent (MOMIA) in a sentinel lymph node (SLN) of a rat. Methods The fiber-based, video-rate FMT imaging system is composed of 12 alternating sources (785nm and 830nm LDs) and 13 detectors. To maintain high temporal sampling, the system simultaneously acquires ratio-metric data at each detector. The data is reconstructed using the normalized Born approach with a three-dimensional finite element model derived from an anatomical CT image of a rat for accurate light propagation modeling. Nuclear and optical contrasts are integrated by using a MOMIA. Data collection begins immediately after injection of the MOMIA intradermally into the forepaw with the FMT data acquired simultaneously with both the SPECT and CT. Results Fluorescence and radioactivity from the MOMIA were co-localized in a spatially coincident region. Intravital imaging with surgical exposure of the lymph node validated the localization of the optical contrast. The optical and nuclear contrasts where integrated by incorporating SPECT as a prior in the DOT reconstruction. Conclusion The feasibility of integrating a fiber-based, video-rate FMT system with a commercial preclinical NanoSPECT/CT platform was established. The co

  10. Design and assembly of an ultra-light motorized microdrive for chronic neural recordings in small animals.

    PubMed

    Otchy, Timothy M; Ölveczky, Bence P

    2012-01-01

    The ability to chronically record from populations of neurons in freely behaving animals has proven an invaluable tool for dissecting the function of neural circuits underlying a variety of natural behaviors, including navigation(1) , decision making (2,3), and the generation of complex motor sequences(4,5,6). Advances in precision machining has allowed for the fabrication of light-weight devices suitable for chronic recordings in small animals, such as mice and songbirds. The ability to adjust the electrode position with small remotely controlled motors has further increased the recording yield in various behavioral contexts by reducing animal handling.(6,7) Here we describe a protocol to build an ultra-light motorized microdrive for long-term chronic recordings in small animals. Our design evolved from an earlier published version(7), and has been adapted for ease-of use and cost-effectiveness to be more practical and accessible to a wide array of researchers. This proven design (8,9,10,11) allows for fine, remote positioning of electrodes over a range of ~ 5 mm and weighs less than 750 mg when fully assembled. We present the complete protocol for how to build and assemble these drives, including 3D CAD drawings for all custom microdrive components. PMID:23169237

  11. Design and Assembly of an Ultra-light Motorized Microdrive for Chronic Neural Recordings in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Otchy, Timothy M.; Ӧlveczky, Bence P.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to chronically record from populations of neurons in freely behaving animals has proven an invaluable tool for dissecting the function of neural circuits underlying a variety of natural behaviors, including navigation1 , decision making 2,3, and the generation of complex motor sequences4,5,6. Advances in precision machining has allowed for the fabrication of light-weight devices suitable for chronic recordings in small animals, such as mice and songbirds. The ability to adjust the electrode position with small remotely controlled motors has further increased the recording yield in various behavioral contexts by reducing animal handling.6,7 Here we describe a protocol to build an ultra-light motorized microdrive for long-term chronic recordings in small animals. Our design evolved from an earlier published version7, and has been adapted for ease-of use and cost-effectiveness to be more practical and accessible to a wide array of researchers. This proven design 8,9,10,11 allows for fine, remote positioning of electrodes over a range of ~ 5 mm and weighs less than 750 mg when fully assembled. We present the complete protocol for how to build and assemble these drives, including 3D CAD drawings for all custom microdrive components. PMID:23169237

  12. Quantitative accuracy of MAP reconstruction for dynamic PET imaging in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ju-Chieh (Kevin); Shoghi, Kooresh; Laforest, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction algorithms are becoming more commonly employed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging; however, the quantitative accuracy of the reconstructed images still requires validation for various levels of contrast and counting statistics. Methods: The authors present an evaluation of the quantitative accuracy of the 3D maximum a posteriori (3D-MAP) image reconstruction algorithm for dynamic PET imaging with comparisons to two of the most widely used reconstruction algorithms: the 2D filtered-backprojection (2D-FBP) and 2D-ordered subsets expectation maximization (2D-OSEM) on the Siemens microPET scanners. The study was performed for various levels of count density encountered in typical dynamic scanning as well as the imaging of cardiac activity concentration in small animal studies on the Focus 120. Specially designed phantoms were used for evaluation of the spatial resolution, image quality, and quantitative accuracy. A normal mouse was employed to evaluate the accuracy of the blood time activity concentration extracted from left ventricle regions of interest (ROIs) within the images as compared to the actual blood activity concentration measured from arterial blood sampling. Results: For MAP reconstructions, the spatial resolution and contrast have been found to reach a stable value after 20 iterations independent of the β values (i.e., hyper parameter which controls the weight of the penalty term) and count density within the frame. The spatial resolution obtained with 3D-MAP reaches values of ∼1.0 mm with a β of 0.01 while the 2D-FBP has value of 1.8 mm and 2D-OSEM has a value of 1.6 mm. It has been observed that the lower the hyper parameter β used in MAP, more iterations are needed to reach the stable noise level (i.e., image roughness). The spatial resolution is improved by using a lower β value at the expense of higher image noise. However, with similar noise level the spatial resolution achieved by 3D-MAP was

  13. High-throughput screening and small animal models, where are we?

    PubMed Central

    Giacomotto, Jean; Ségalat, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Current high-throughput screening methods for drug discovery rely on the existence of targets. Moreover, most of the hits generated during screenings turn out to be invalid after further testing in animal models. To by-pass these limitations, efforts are now being made to screen chemical libraries on whole animals. One of the most commonly used animal model in biology is the murine model Mus musculus. However, its cost limit its use in large-scale therapeutic screening. In contrast, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and the fish Danio rerio are gaining momentum as screening tools. These organisms combine genetic amenability, low cost and culture conditions that are compatible with large-scale screens. Their main advantage is to allow high-throughput screening in a whole-animal context. Moreover, their use is not dependent on the prior identification of a target and permits the selection of compounds with an improved safety profile. This review surveys the versatility of these animal models for drug discovery and discuss the options available at this day. PMID:20423335

  14. Factors associated with development of Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC) in dogs in 5 Canadian small animal clinics

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Daniel J.; Lelewski, Roxana; Weese, J. Scott; Mcgill-Worsley, Jamie; Shankel, Catharine; Mendonca, Sonia; Sager, Tara; Smith, Michael; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the association between presence of respiratory pathogens and development of Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC) in dogs in 5 Canadian small animal clinics. In total, 86 dogs were tested using a commercial PCR respiratory panel; 64 dogs were considered as cases and 22 were control dogs matched by veterinary clinic. No control animals (0/22) were positive for canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), whereas 27/64 (42%) CIRDC cases were positive. Furthermore, 81% of case dogs tested positive for Mycoplasma cynos, compared with 73% of control dogs. Canine respiratory corona virus (CRCoV) was detected in no control dogs compared with 9.4% of clinical dogs. No animals were positive for any influenza virus type A present in the diagnostic panel. Presence of CPIV was associated (P < 0.01) with the occurrence of CIRDC after adjustment for demographic factors and presence of CRCoV (P = 0.09). PMID:26740697

  15. Factors associated with development of Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC) in dogs in 5 Canadian small animal clinics.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Daniel J; Lelewski, Roxana; Weese, J Scott; Mcgill-Worsley, Jamie; Shankel, Catharine; Mendonca, Sonia; Sager, Tara; Smith, Michael; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the association between presence of respiratory pathogens and development of Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC) in dogs in 5 Canadian small animal clinics. In total, 86 dogs were tested using a commercial PCR respiratory panel; 64 dogs were considered as cases and 22 were control dogs matched by veterinary clinic. No control animals (0/22) were positive for canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), whereas 27/64 (42%) CIRDC cases were positive. Furthermore, 81% of case dogs tested positive for Mycoplasma cynos, compared with 73% of control dogs. Canine respiratory corona virus (CRCoV) was detected in no control dogs compared with 9.4% of clinical dogs. No animals were positive for any influenza virus type A present in the diagnostic panel. Presence of CPIV was associated (P < 0.01) with the occurrence of CIRDC after adjustment for demographic factors and presence of CRCoV (P = 0.09). PMID:26740697

  16. Non-rigid registration of small animal skeletons from micro-CT using 3D shape context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Fripp, Jurgen; Acosta Tamayo, Oscar; Gregoire, Marie Claude; Salvado, Olivier

    2009-02-01

    Small animal registration is an important step for molecular image analysis. Skeleton registration from whole-body or only partial micro Computerized Tomography (CT) image is often performed to match individual rats to atlases and templates, for example to identify organs in positron emission tomography (PET). In this paper, we extend the shape context matching technique for 3D surface registration and apply it for rat hind limb skeleton registration from CT images. Using the proposed method, after standard affine iterative closest point (ICP) registration, correspondences between the 3D points from sour and target objects were robustly found and used to deform the limb skeleton surface with thin-plate-spline (TPS). Experiments are described using phantoms and actual rat hind limb skeletons. On animals, mean square errors were decreased by the proposed registration compared to that of its initial alignment. Visually, skeletons were successfully registered even in cases of very different animal poses.

  17. Factors influencing common diagnoses made during first-opinion small-animal consultations in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N J; Dean, R S; Cobb, M; Brennan, M L

    2016-09-01

    It is currently unclear how frequently a diagnosis is made during small-animal consultations or how much of a role making a diagnosis plays in veterinary decision-making. Understanding more about the diagnostic process will help direct future research towards areas relevant to practicing veterinary surgeons. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency with which a diagnosis was made, classify the types of diagnosis made (and the factors influencing these) and determine which specific diagnoses were made for health problems discussed during small-animal consultations. Data were gathered during real-time direct observation of small-animal consultations in eight practices in the United Kingdom. Data collected included characteristics of the consultation (e.g. consultation type), patient (e.g. breed), and each problem discussed (e.g. new or pre-existing problem). Each problem discussed was classified into one of the following diagnosis types: definitive; working; presumed; open; previous. A three-level multivariable logistic-regression model was developed, with problem (Level 1) nested within patient (Level 2) nested within consulting veterinary surgeon (Level 3). Problems without a previous diagnosis, in cats and dogs only, were included in the model, which had a binary outcome variable of definitive diagnosis versus no definitive diagnosis. Data were recorded for 1901 animals presented, and data on diagnosis were gathered for 3192 health problems. Previous diagnoses were the most common diagnosis type (n=1116/3192; 35.0%), followed by open (n=868/3192; 27.2%) then definitive (n=660/3192; 20.7%). The variables remaining in the final model were patient age, problem history, consultation type, who raised the problem, and body system affected. New problems, problems in younger animals, and problems raised by the veterinary surgeon were more likely to result in a definitive diagnosis than pre-existing problems, problems in older animals, and problems raised by

  18. Animal welfare and meat quality: the perspective of Uruguay, a "small" exporter country.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, M; Brito, G; Montossi, F; Soares de Lima, J M; San Julián, R

    2014-11-01

    Public sensitivity towards animal welfare has risen in recent years. Uruguay is a primary meat exporter. Therefore, it is compulsory not only to provide good quality and safe meat, but also to project a welfare friendly image. Uruguayan meat production systems are mainly based on rangeland pastures but, due to international meat prices and the opening of new markets, intensive fattening systems increased. These systems include a wide range of feeding alternatives between pasture and concentrate utilization, involving differences in terms of animal welfare, carcass and meat quality, that require to be studied. Accordingly, some husbandry practices associated mainly with extensive systems must be evaluated, as well as their applicability to international recommendations related to pre-slaughter handling which may not be suitable for local conditions. In the present paper we share scientific results related to the impact of different production systems, husbandry practices and pre-slaughter procedures associated to animal welfare and meat quality in Uruguayan conditions. PMID:25052465

  19. Dual modality micro-SPECT and micro-CT for small animal imaging: technical advances and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaguirre, Enrique W.; Sun, Mingshan; Carver, James; Thompson, Steve; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2005-09-01

    Small animal dual modality microSPECT-micro CT has seen many technological advances during recent years. The design of small animal dual modality scanners is a multidisciplinary field, where several interrelated technological problems must be integrated in a complex instrument. This article describes the general concepts that must be taken into consideration during the design process of dual modality microSPECT- microCT scanners. A description of the contemporary scanner technology is presented using the recently designed dual modality micro SPECT -microCT at the Physics Research Laboratory at UCSF. The technology is described with a simple approach to introduce the reader to the complex process of the dual modality scanner design. This article includes a discussion of current technological challenges that have potential to improve or expand the microSPECT-microCT performance and its applications.

  20. Flash Proton Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Frank E.

    Protons were first investigated as radiographic probes as high energy proton accelerators became accessible to the scientific community in the 1960s. Like the initial use of X-rays in the 1800s, protons were shown to be a useful tool for studying the contents of opaque materials, but the electromagnetic charge of the protons opened up a new set of interaction processes which complicated their use. These complications in combination with the high expense of generating protons with energies high enough to penetrate typical objects resulted in proton radiography becoming a novelty, demonstrated at accelerator facilities, but not utilized to their full potential until the 1990s at Los Alamos. During this time Los Alamos National Laboratory was investigating a wide range of options, including X-rays and neutrons, as the next generation of probes to be used for thick object flash radiography. During this process it was realized that the charge nature of the protons, which was the source of the initial difficulty with this idea, could be used to recover this technique. By introducing a magnetic imaging lens downstream of the object to be radiographed, the blur resulting from scattering within the object could be focused out of the measurements, dramatically improving the resolution of proton radiography of thick systems. Imaging systems were quickly developed and combined with the temporal structure of a proton beam generated by a linear accelerator, providing a unique flash radiography capability for measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This technique has now been employed at LANSCE for two decades and has been adopted around the world as the premier flash radiography technique for the study of dynamic material properties.

  1. Analgesia, anesthesia, and chemical restraint in the emergent small animal patient.

    PubMed

    Quandt, Jane

    2013-07-01

    Appropriate stabilization of the critically ill animal before sedation or anesthesia is imperative to minimize anesthetic complications. Problems should be anticipated and an appropriate and efficient therapeutic plan should be formulated before anesthetic induction. Use of a balanced anesthesia technique should be considered to minimize potential deleterious effects of single-use drug therapy. Using a combination of different classes of analgesics may be more effective in treating established pain than using a single agent. The critically ill animal should have drugs titrated to effect to minimize the amount of drug needed and lessen potential side effects. PMID:23747267

  2. Adaptation, Commissioning, and Evaluation of a 3D Treatment Planning System for High-Resolution Small-Animal Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jeho; Chen, Qing; Febo, Robert; Yang, Jie; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jian-Ping; Zanzonico, Pat B; Deasy, Joseph O; Humm, John L; Mageras, Gig S

    2016-06-01

    Although spatially precise systems are now available for small-animal irradiations, there are currently limited software tools available for treatment planning for such irradiations. We report on the adaptation, commissioning, and evaluation of a 3-dimensional treatment planning system for use with a small-animal irradiation system. The 225-kV X-ray beam of the X-RAD 225Cx microirradiator (Precision X-Ray) was commissioned using both ion-chamber and radiochromic film for 10 different collimators ranging in field size from 1 mm in diameter to 40 × 40 mm(2) A clinical 3-dimensional treatment planning system (Metropolis) developed at our institution was adapted to small-animal irradiation by making it compatible with the dimensions of mice and rats, modeling the microirradiator beam orientations and collimators, and incorporating the measured beam data for dose calculation. Dose calculations in Metropolis were verified by comparison with measurements in phantoms. Treatment plans for irradiation of a tumor-bearing mouse were generated with both the Metropolis and the vendor-supplied software. The calculated beam-on times and the plan evaluation tools were compared. The dose rate at the central axis ranges from 74 to 365 cGy/min depending on the collimator size. Doses calculated with Metropolis agreed with phantom measurements within 3% for all collimators. The beam-on times calculated by Metropolis and the vendor-supplied software agreed within 1% at the isocenter. The modified 3-dimensional treatment planning system provides better visualization of the relationship between the X-ray beams and the small-animal anatomy as well as more complete dosimetric information on target tissues and organs at risk. It thereby enhances the potential of image-guided microirradiator systems for evaluation of dose-response relationships and for preclinical experimentation generally. PMID:25948321

  3. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography for in-vivo three-dimensional retinal imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Marco; Wehbe, Hassan; Jiao, Shuliang; Gregori, Giovanni; Jockovich, Maria E.; Hackam, Abigail; Duan, Yuanli; Puliafito, Carmen A.

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the application of ultrahigh-resolution Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) for non contact in vivo imaging of the retina of small animals and quantitative retinal information extraction using 3D segmentation of the OCT images. An ultrahigh-resolution SD-OCT system was specifically designed for in vivo retinal imaging of small animal. En face fundus image was constructed from the measured OCT data, which enables precise registration of the OCT images on the fundus. 3D segmentation algorithms were developed for the calculation of retinal thickness map. High quality OCT images of the retina of mice (B6/SJLF2 for normal retina, Rho -/- for photoreceptor degeneration and LH BETAT AG for retinoblastoma) and rats (Wistar for normal retina) were acquired, where all the retinal layers can be clearly recognized. The calculated retinal thickness map makes successful quantitative comparison of the retinal thickness distribution between normal and degenerative mouse retina. The capabilities of the OCT system provide a valuable tool for longitudinal studies of small animal models of ocular diseases.

  4. Non-Invasive imaging of small-animal tumors: high-frequency ultrasound vs. MicroPET.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Li, Chen-Han; Cheng, Weng-Fang; Li, Pai-Chi

    2005-01-01

    Tumor volume measurement on small animals is important but currently invasive. We employ ultrasonic micro-imaging (UMI) in this study and demonstrate its feasibility. In addition, we use small animal positron emission tomography (microPET) as a preliminary effort to develop multi-modality small animal imaging techniques. The tumor growth curve from UMI is also compared to radioactivity from microPET. Both UMI and [18F] FDG microPET imaging were performed on C57BL/6J black mice bearing WF-3 ovary cancer cells at various stages from the second week till up to the eighth week. Segmentation and 3D reconstruction were also done. The growth curve was obtained in vivo noninvasively by UMI. The cell doubling time was 7.46 days according to UMI. This result was compared with vernier caliper measurement and radioactivity counting by microPET. In microPET, we obtained the time-activity curves from the tumor and the tumor-surrounding tissue. The tumor-to-normal-tissues ratios reached maximum at the fifth week after tumor cell implantation. PMID:17281549

  5. [Dose measurement in small animal radiology: how intense is the influence of distance and position of the investigator in relation to the patient?].

    PubMed

    Ludewig, Eberhard; Gensler, Astrid; Oechtering, Gerhard; Gosch, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Radiation exposure of body parts of persons, needed to restrain small animal during the examination, varies depending on the distance and position in relation to the patient, the region investigated, and the exposure settings applied. The aim of the study was to quantify the effects of these factors on the ambient dose. The dosimeter was positioned with varying distance from the direct beam (from 30 to 150 cm) and on different level above the floor (55 cm, 85 cm, and 150 cm. The study consisted of two parts. In the first part a plastic water tank (thickness: 18 cm) was used as source of scatter radiation. Different exposure settings (77 kVp; 20 - 10 - 5 - 2.5 - 1.25 mAs) were applied. In the second part dose was measured during the examination of the abdomen of a large dog (thickness: 18 cm; 77 kVp, 20 mAs) and of the skull of a cat (thickness: 6 cm; 55 kVp, 20 mAs). At the level of the patient (85 cm above the floor) the dose decline relative to the distance followed a quadratic function. In the series "abdomen-dog" the mean dose values ranged from 51.6 microSv (30 cm distance) to 1.02 microSv (150 cm distance). The corresponding doses for the series "skull-cat" were 0.98 microSv and 0.02 microSv, respectively. Comparably lower doses were measured on the lines along the table, when non-irradiated parts of the body were located between the exposed patient volume and the dosimeter. At 150 cm above the floor higher doses were observed relative to the doses at the level of the table. The following conclusions can be drawn: (1.) Depending on the target volume the ambient dose varies in a wide range. (2.) An increase of the distance of only few centimetres is reducing exposure considerably. Therefore persons should make use of it whenever this is possible. (3.) Persons should stand on the short sides of the table while fixing the patient. (4.) Head and neck are relatively highly exposed. Methods to protect the thyroid gland and the eye lens are indicated. (5.) Since

  6. High resolution gamma detector for small-animal positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Tao

    In this study, the performance of continuous miniature crystal element (cMiCE) detectors with LYSO crystals of different thickness were investigated. Potential designs of a cMiCE small animal positron emission tomography scanner were also evaluated by an analytical simulation approach. The cMiCE detector was proposed as a high sensitivity, low cost alternative to the prevailing discrete crystal detectors. A statistics based positioning (SBP) algorithm was developed to solve the scintillation position estimation problem and proved to be successful on a cMiCE detector with a 4 mm thick crystal. By assuming a Gaussian distribution, the distributions of the photomultiplier signals could be characterized by mean and variance, which are functions of scintillation position. After calibrating the detector on a grid of locations, a 2D table of the mean and variance can be built. The SBP algorithm searches the tables to find the location that maximizes the likelihood between the mean and variance of known positions and the incoming scintillation event. In this work, the performance of the SBP algorithm on cMiCE detectors with thicker crystals (6 and 8 mm) was studied. The stopping power of a cMiCE detector is 40% and 49% for 6 and 8 mm thick crystals respectively. The intrinsic spatial resolution is 1.2 mm and 1.4 mm FWHM for the center and corner sections of a 6 mm thick crystal detector, and 1.3 mm and 1.6 mm for center and corner of an 8 mm thick crystal detector. These results demonstrate that the cMiCE detector is a promising candidate for high resolution, high sensitivity PET applications. A maximum-likelihood (ML) clustering method was developed to empirically separate the experimental data set into two to four subgroups according to the depth-of-interaction of the detected photons. This method enabled us to build 2-DOI lookup tables (LUT) (mean and variance lookup tables for front group and back group). Using the 2-DOI SBP LUTs, the scintillation position and DOI

  7. Counseling with Pocket Pets: Using Small Animals in Elementary Counseling Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flom, Barbara L.

    2005-01-01

    The power of the human-animal bond has been described in sources as diverse as ancient literature, modern fiction, and research reports in the professional literature (Chandler, 2001; Mallon, 1992; Parshall, 2003; Siegel, 1993). Educators have used classic examples, such as those found in the children's books Old Yeller and Where the Red Fern…

  8. Creatures in the Classroom: Including Insects and Small Animals in Your Preschool Gardening Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hachey, Alyse C.; Butler, Deanna

    2012-01-01

    When doing spring planting activities, what does a teacher do while waiting for the plants to grow? This waiting time is a golden opportunity to explore another side of gardening--the creatures that make it all possible. Insects are an integral part of everyday world, having existed for over 300 million years; they are the most common animal on…

  9. A Protective Eye Shield for Prevention of Media Opacities during Small Animal Ocular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Brent A.; Kaul, Charles; Hollyfield, Joe G.

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT), scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and other non-invasive imaging techniques are increasingly used in eye research to document disease-related changes in rodent eyes. Corneal dehydration is a major contributor to the formation of ocular opacities that can limit the repeated application of these techniques to individual animals. General anesthesia is usually required for imaging, which is accompanied by the loss of the blink reflex. As a consequence, the tear film cannot be maintained, drying occurs and the cornea becomes dehydrated. Without supplemental hydration, structural damage to the cornea quickly follows. Soon thereafter, anterior lens opacities can also develop. Collectively these changes ultimately compromise image quality, especially for studies involving repeated use of the same animal over several weeks or months. To minimize these changes, a protective shield was designed for mice and rats that prevent ocular dehydration during anesthesia. The eye shield, along with a semi-viscous ophthalmic solution, is placed over the corneas as soon as the anesthesia immobilizes the animal. Eye shields are removed for only the brief periods required for imaging and then reapplied before the fellow eye is examined. As a result, the corneal surface of each eye is exposed only for the time required for imaging. The device and detailed methods described here minimize the corneal and lens changes associated with ocular surface desiccation. When these methods are used consistently, high quality images can be obtained repeatedly from individual animals. PMID:25245081

  10. Small-animal microangiography using phase-contrast X-ray imaging and gas as contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Westermark, Ulrica K.; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2014-03-01

    We use propagation-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging with gas as contrast agent to visualize the microvasculature in small animals like mice and rats. The radiation dose required for absorption X-ray imaging is proportional to the minus fourth power of the structure size to be detected. This makes small vessels impossible to image at reasonable radiation doses using the absorption of conventional iodinated contrast agents. Propagation-based phase contrast gives enhanced contrast for high spatial frequencies by moving the detector away from the sample to let phase variations in the transmitted X-rays develop into intensity variations at the detector. Blood vessels are normally difficult to observe in phase contrast even with iodinated contrast agents as the density difference between blood and most tissues is relatively small. By injecting gas into the blood stream this density difference can be greatly enhanced giving strong phase contrast. One possible gas to use is carbon dioxide, which is a clinically accepted X-ray contrast agent. The gas is injected into the blood stream of patients to temporarily displace the blood in a region and thereby reduce the X-ray absorption in the blood vessels. We have shown that this method can be used to image blood vessels down to 8 μm in diameter in mouse ears. The low dose requirements of this method indicate a potential for live small-animal imaging and longitudinal studies of angiogenesis.

  11. Developments in undergraduate teaching of small-animal soft-tissue surgical skills at the University of Sydney.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Deepa; McGreevy, Paul D; Zuber, Richard M; Klupiec, Corinna; Baguley, John; Barrs, Vanessa R

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses recent developments in soft-tissue surgery teaching at the University of Sydney, Faculty of Veterinary Science. An integrated teaching program was developed for Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) students with the aim of providing them with optimal learning opportunities to meet "Day One" small-animal soft-tissue surgical competencies. Didactic lectures and tutorials were introduced earlier into the curriculum to prepare students for live-animal surgery practical. In addition to existing clinics, additional spay/neuter clinics were established in collaboration with animal welfare organizations to increase student exposure to live-animal surgery. A silicon-based, life-like canine ovariohysterectomy model was developed with the assistance of a model-making and special effects company. The model features elastic ovarian pedicles and suspensory ligaments, which can be stretched and broken like those of an actual dog. To monitor the volume and type of student surgical experience, an E-portfolio resource was established. This resource allows for the tracking of numbers of live, student-performed desexing surgeries and incorporates competency-based assessments and reflective tasks to be completed by students. Student feedback on the integrated surgical soft-tissue teaching program was assessed. Respondents were assessed in the fourth year of the degree and will have further opportunities to develop Day One small-animal soft-tissue surgical competencies in the fifth year. Ninety-four percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they were motivated to participate in all aspects of the program, while 78% agreed or strongly agreed that they received an adequate opportunity to develop their skills and confidence in ovariohysterectomy or castration procedures through the fourth-year curriculum. PMID:22430078

  12. An accurate and portable eye movement detector for studying sleep in small animals.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-López, Álvaro; Escudero, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    Although eye movements are a highly valuable variable in attempts to precisely identify different periods of the sleep-wake cycle, their indirect measurement by electrooculography is not good enough. The present article describes an accurate and portable scleral search coil that allows the detection of tonic and phasic characteristics of eye movements in free-moving animals. Six adult Wistar rats were prepared for chronic recording of electroencephalography, electromyography and eye movements using the scleral search coil technique. We developed a miniature magnetic field generator made with two coils, consisting of 35 turns and 15 mm diameter of insulated 0.2 mm cooper wire, mounted in a frame of carbon fibre. This portable scleral search coil was fixed on the head of the animal, with each magnetic coil parallel to the eye coil and at 5 mm from each eye. Eye movements detected by the portable scleral search coil were compared with those measured by a commercial scleral search coil requiring immobilizing the head of the animal. No qualitative differences were found between the two scleral search coil systems in their capabilities to detect eye movements. This innovative portable scleral search coil system is an essential tool to detect slow changes in eye position and miniature rapid eye movements during sleep. The portable scleral search coil is much more suitable for detecting eye movements than any previously available system because of its precision and simplicity, and because it does not require immobilization of the animal's head. PMID:25590417

  13. 3D mapping of somatotopic reorganization with small animal functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Wang, Shumin; Chen, Der-Yow; Dodd, Stephen; Goloshevsky, Artem; Koretsky, Alan P.

    2009-01-01

    There are few in vivo noninvasive methods to study neuroplasticity in animal brains. Functional MRI (fMRI) has been developed for animal brain mapping, but few fMRI studies have analyzed functional alteration due to plasticity in animal models. One major limitation is that fMRI maps are characterized by statistical parametric mapping making the apparent boundary dependent on the statistical threshold used. Here, we developed a method to characterize the location of center-of-mass in fMRI maps that is shown not to be sensitive to statistical threshold. Utilizing centers-of-mass as anchor points to fit the spatial distribution of the BOLD response enabled quantitative group analysis of altered boundaries of functional somatosensory maps. This approach was used to study cortical reorganization in the rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1) after sensory deprivation to the barrel cortex by follicle ablation (F.A.). FMRI demonstrated an enlarged nose S1 representation in the 3D somatotopic functional maps. This result clearly demonstrates that fMRI enables the spatial mapping of functional changes that can characterize multiple regions of S1 cortex and still be sensitive to changes due to plasticity. PMID:19770051

  14. Apparatus for proton radiography

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors.

  15. Quantitative film radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, G.; Dobie, D.; Fugina, J.; Hernandez, J.; Logan, C.; Mohr, P.; Moss, R.; Schumacher, B.; Updike, E.; Weirup, D.

    1991-02-26

    We have developed a system of quantitative radiography in order to produce quantitative images displaying homogeneity of parts. The materials that we characterize are synthetic composites and may contain important subtle density variations not discernible by examining a raw film x-radiograph. In order to quantitatively interpret film radiographs, it is necessary to digitize, interpret, and display the images. Our integrated system of quantitative radiography displays accurate, high-resolution pseudo-color images in units of density. We characterize approximately 10,000 parts per year in hundreds of different configurations and compositions with this system. This report discusses: the method; film processor monitoring and control; verifying film and processor performance; and correction of scatter effects.

  16. Cosmic Ray Scattering Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Cosmic ray muons are ubiquitous, are highly penetrating, and can be used to measure material densities by either measuring the stopping rate or by measuring the scattering of transmitted muons. The Los Alamos team has studied scattering radiography for a number of applications. Some results will be shown of scattering imaging for a range of practical applications, and estimates will be made of the utility of scattering radiography for nondestructive assessments of large structures and for geological surveying. Results of imaging the core of the Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA) Reactor in Kawasaki, Japan and simulations of imaging the damaged cores of the Fukushima nuclear reactors will be presented. Below is an image made using muons of a core configuration for the NCA reactor.

  17. SU-E-U-02: The Development of a Practical Ultrasonic System for Cross-Sectional Imaging of Small Animals

    SciTech Connect

    Kamp, J; Malyarenko, E; Chen, D; Wydra, A; Maev, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of developing a practical medium frequency ultrasound tomography method for small animal imaging. The ability to produce cross-sectional or full body images of a live small animal using a low-cost tabletop ultrasound scanner without any special license would be very beneficial to long term biological studies, where repeated scanning is often required over an extended period of time. Methods: The cross sectional images were produced by compounding multiple B-scans of a laboratory phantom or an animal acquired at different projection angles. Two imaging systems were used to test the concept. The first system included a programmable 64-channel phased array controller driving a 128-channel, 5–10 MHz linear probe to produce 143 B-Mode projections of the spinning object. The second system designed and manufactured in house, produced 64 or 128 B-Mode projections with a single unfocused 8 MHz transducer scanning with a 0.116 mm step size. Results: The phased array system provided good penetration through the phantoms/mice (with the exception of the lungs) and allowed to acquire data in a very short time. The cross-sectional images have enough resolution and dynamic range to detect both high- and low-contrast organs. The single transducer system takes longer to scan, and the data require more sophisticated processing. To date, our images allow seeing details as small as 1–2 mm in the phantoms and in small animals, with the contrast mostly due to highly reflecting bones and air inclusions. Conclusion: The work indicates that very detailed and anatomically correct images can be created by relatively simple and inexpensive means. With more advanced algorithms and improved system design, scan time can be reduced considerably, enabling high-resolution full 3D imaging. This will allow for quick and easy scans that can help monitor tumor growth and/or regression without contributing any dose to the animal. The authors would like to acknowledge

  18. Digital radiography in space.

    PubMed

    Hart, Rob; Campbell, Mark R

    2002-06-01

    With the permanent habitation of the International Space Station, the planning of longer duration exploration missions, and the possibility of space tourism, it is likely that digital radiography will be needed in the future to support medical care in space. Ultrasound is currently the medical imaging modality of choice for spaceflight. Digital radiography in space is limited because of prohibitive launch costs (in the region of $20,000/kg) that severely restrict the volume, weight, and power requirements of medical care hardware. Technological increases in radiography, a predicted ten-fold decrease in future launch costs, and an increasing clinical need for definitive medical care in space will drive efforts to expand the ability to provide medical care in space including diagnostic imaging. Normal physiological responses to microgravity, in conjunction with the high-risk environment of spaceflight, increase the risk of injury and could imply an extended recovery period for common injuries. The advantages of gravity on Earth, such as the stabilization of patients undergoing radiography and the drainage of fluids, which provide radiographic contrast, are unavailable in space. This creates significant difficulties in patient immobilization and radiographic positioning. Gravity-dependent radiological signs, such as lipohemarthrosis in knee and shoulder trauma, air or fluid levels in pneumoperitoneum, pleural effusion, or bowel obstruction, and the apical pleural edge in pneumothorax become unavailable. Impaired healing processes such as delayed callus formation following fracture will have implications on imaging, and recovery time lines are unknown. The confined nature of spacecraft and the economic impossibility of launching lead-based personal protective equipment present significant challenges to crew radiation safety. A modified, free-floating radiographic C-arm device equipped with a digital detector and utilizing teleradiology support is proposed as a

  19. Patient care in radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.A.; McCloskey, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on patient care procedures for radiographers. The authors focus on the role of the radiographer as a member of the health care team. The authors report on such topics as communication in patient care: safety, medico-legal considerations, transfer and positioning; physical needs; infection control; medication; CPR standards, acute situations; examination of the GI tract; contrast media; special imaging techniques and bedside radiography.

  20. Small animal imaging using a flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography (FPD-CBCT) imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, David L.; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Yong; Lu, Xianghua; Wood, Ronald W.; Reeder, Jay E.; Johnson, Aimee M.

    2005-04-01

    Flat panel detector-based cone beam CT (FPD-CBCT) imaging system prototypes have been constructed based on modified clinical CT scanners (a modified GE 8800 CT system and a modified GE HighSpeed Advantage (HSA) spiral CT system) each with a Varian PaxScan 2520 imager. The functions of the electromechanical and radiographic subsystems of the CT system were controlled through specially made hardware, software and data acquisition modules to perform animal cone beam CT studies. Small animal (mouse) imaging studies were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of an optimized CBCT imaging system to have the capability to perform longitudinal studies to monitor the progression of cancerous tumors or the efficacy of treatments. Radiographic parameters were optimized for fast (~10 second) scans of live mice to produce good reconstructed image quality with dose levels low enough to avoid any detectable radiation treatment to the animals. Specifically, organs in the pelvic region were clearly imaged and contrast studies showed the feasibility to visualize small vasculature and space-filling bladder tumors. In addition, prostate and mammary tumors were monitored in volume growth studies.

  1. [Questionnaire on the incidence and control of fleas in dogs and cats presented to German small animal practices].

    PubMed

    Beck, Wieland; Pfister, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    2590 small animal practitioners in Germany have been asked by a questionnaire from which 1694 (65.4%) replied. 1186 of these veterinarians (70%) often see ectoparasite infestation. Fleas are predominant and occur on cats (1016/60%), followed by dogs (424/25%), small mammals and birds (254/15%). Flea infestations on dogs and cats are observed throughout the year, but the prevalences are generally higher during the summer season. The results reveal that topically administered spot-on formulations is the most popular method used for flea control. The most common applied antiparasitic substances both in dogs and in cats were fipronil (535/31.6%; 690/40.7%), imidacloprid (290/17.1%; 417/24.6%) and selamectin (267/15.8%; 319/18.8%). Due to 771 (45.5%) of the answering veterinarians the animal owner himself, and according 694 (41%) respectively 229 (13.5%) of the replies the veterinarian or the veterinary technician applies the antiparasiticide onto the skin. 1457 veterinarians (86%) administer compounds against adult fleas and their developmental stages also in the animal's environment. PMID:17009722

  2. A three-dimensional multispectral fluorescence optical tomography imaging system for small animals based on a conical mirror design.

    PubMed

    Li, Changqing; Mitchell, Gregory S; Dutta, Joyita; Ahn, Sangtae; Leahy, Richard M; Cherry, Simon R

    2009-04-27

    We have developed a three dimensional (3D) multispectral fluorescence optical tomography small animal imaging system with an innovative geometry using a truncated conical mirror, allowing simultaneous viewing of the entire surface of the animal by an EMCCD camera. A conical mirror collects photons approximately three times more efficiently than a flat mirror. An x-y mirror scanning system makes it possible to scan a collimated excitation laser beam to any location on the mouse surface. A pattern of structured light incident on the small animal surface is used to extract the surface geometry for reconstruction. A finite element based algorithm is applied to model photon propagation in the turbid media and a preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) method is used to solve the large linear system matrix. The reconstruction algorithm and the system feasibility are evaluated by phantom experiments. These experiments show that multispectral measurements improve the spatial resolution of reconstructed images. Finally, an in vivo imaging study of a xenograft tumor in a mouse shows good correlation of the reconstructed image with the location of the fluorescence probe as determined by subsequent optical imaging of cryosections of the mouse. PMID:19399136

  3. Non-contact small animal fluorescence imaging system for simultaneous multi-directional angular-dependent data acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Keol; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Lee, Francis Young-In; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel non-contact small animal fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) imaging system. At the heart of the system is a new mirror-based imaging head that was designed to provide 360-degree measurement data from an entire animal surface in one step. This imaging head consists of two conical mirrors, which considerably reduce multiple back reflections between the animal and mirror surfaces. These back reflections are common in existing mirror-based imaging heads and tend to degrade the quality of raw measurement data. In addition, the introduction of a novel ray-transfer operator allows for the inclusion of the angular dependent data in the image reconstruction process, which results in higher image resolution. We describe in detail the system design and implementation of the hardware components as well as the transport-theory-based image reconstruction algorithm. Using numerical simulations, measurements on a well-defined phantom and a live animal, we evaluate the system performance and show the advantages of our approach. PMID:25071965

  4. Non-contact small animal fluorescence imaging system for simultaneous multi-directional angular-dependent data acquisition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Keol; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Lee, Francis Young-In; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel non-contact small animal fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) imaging system. At the heart of the system is a new mirror-based imaging head that was designed to provide 360-degree measurement data from an entire animal surface in one step. This imaging head consists of two conical mirrors, which considerably reduce multiple back reflections between the animal and mirror surfaces. These back reflections are common in existing mirror-based imaging heads and tend to degrade the quality of raw measurement data. In addition, the introduction of a novel ray-transfer operator allows for the inclusion of the angular dependent data in the image reconstruction process, which results in higher image resolution. We describe in detail the system design and implementation of the hardware components as well as the transport-theory-based image reconstruction algorithm. Using numerical simulations, measurements on a well-defined phantom and a live animal, we evaluate the system performance and show the advantages of our approach. PMID:25071965

  5. Considerations for Assessing Maximum Critical Temperatures in Small Ectothermic Animals: Insights from Leaf-Cutting Ants

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Pedro Leite; Camacho, Agustín; Navas, Carlos Arturo

    2012-01-01

    The thermal limits of individual animals were originally proposed as a link between animal physiology and thermal ecology. Although this link is valid in theory, the evaluation of physiological tolerances involves some problems that are the focus of this study. One rationale was that heating rates shall influence upper critical limits, so that ecological thermal limits need to consider experimental heating rates. In addition, if thermal limits are not surpassed in experiments, subsequent tests of the same individual should yield similar results or produce evidence of hardening. Finally, several non-controlled variables such as time under experimental conditions and procedures may affect results. To analyze these issues we conducted an integrative study of upper critical temperatures in a single species, the ant Atta sexdens rubropiosa, an animal model providing large numbers of individuals of diverse sizes but similar genetic makeup. Our specific aims were to test the 1) influence of heating rates in the experimental evaluation of upper critical temperature, 2) assumptions of absence of physical damage and reproducibility, and 3) sources of variance often overlooked in the thermal-limits literature; and 4) to introduce some experimental approaches that may help researchers to separate physiological and methodological issues. The upper thermal limits were influenced by both heating rates and body mass. In the latter case, the effect was physiological rather than methodological. The critical temperature decreased during subsequent tests performed on the same individual ants, even one week after the initial test. Accordingly, upper thermal limits may have been overestimated by our (and typical) protocols. Heating rates, body mass, procedures independent of temperature and other variables may affect the estimation of upper critical temperatures. Therefore, based on our data, we offer suggestions to enhance the quality of measurements, and offer recommendations to

  6. Measurement of Contractile Activity in Small Animal's Digestive Organ by Carbon Nanotube-Based Force Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Takeda, Naoki; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Koike, Kanako; Shimatani, Yuichi; Sakai, Takafumi; Akiya, Masahiro; Taguchi, Akira

    2011-03-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT)-based force transducer designed to be embedded in the body of a live animal was fabricated and implanted into the stomach of a rat omit to measure contractile movement. The transducer comprised dispersed poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted multiwalled CNTs applied to a comb-like Au-electrode formed on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) sheet. The implanted rat was injected with acetylcholine to induce muscular contractions and changes in the resistance of the transducer were measured. Such changes arise owing to strain in the CNT network upon distortion. The measured resistance change was found to be proportional to the concentration of injected acetylcholine.

  7. Regulatory aspects of neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J.

    1999-11-01

    While full legislation for industrial radiography with gamma and X-rays already exists in many countries, the situation is different for neutron radiography. Therefore, the licensing for equipment and procedures in this field has to be based on basic principles of national and international rules. This contribution will explain how the regulatory body in Switzerland deals with neutron radiography installations in order to maintain national standards of health and safety.

  8. Miniature multichannel preamplifier for extracellular recordings of single unit activity in freely moving and swimming small animals.

    PubMed

    Korshunov, Victor A

    2012-04-30

    The design of a miniature multichannel preamplifier for extracellular recordings of single unit activity in freely moving and swimming small animals is presented. The advantages of this design include perfect protection of the critical components and electric contacts from water. Thus, neuronal activity and EEG may be recorded differentially in any kinds of behavioral tasks including swimming in Morris water maze. Recordings are stable even if an animal is diving and swimming under the water surface. The reusable dismountable base can adopt different types of chronically implanted fine wire electrodes and movable arrays. Electrodes may be implanted to any desired depth. The assembly weight is less than 240 mg. Thus, the construction is light enough even for mice. This work is the first successful attempt for multichannel recording of neuronal activity in mice performing spatial task in Morris water maze. PMID:22348856

  9. SemiSPECT: A Small-animal Imaging System Based on Eight CdZnTe Pixel Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd E.; Kim, Hyunki; Crawford, Michael J.; Gershman, Benjamin M.; Hunter, William C.J.; Barber, H. Bradford; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Woolfenden, James M.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed a SPECT system for small animals that utilizes eight CdZnTe pixel detectors. The eight detectors are arranged in a single octagonal ring, where each views the object to be imaged through a single pinhole. Additional projections are obtained via rotation of the animal. Each CdZnTe detector is approximately 2 mm in thickness and is patterned on one surface into a 64×64 array of pixels with 380 micron pitch. We have designed an electronic readout system capable of collecting data from the eight detectors in listmode. In this scheme each event entry for a gamma-ray hit includes the pulse height of the pixel with the largest signal and the pulse height for each of its eight nearest neighbors. We present details of the overall design, the electronics, and system performance. PMID:26568674

  10. A restraint-free small animal SPECT imaging system with motion tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenberger, A.G.; Gleason, S.S.; Goddard, J.; Kross, B.; Majewski, S.; Meikle, S.R.; Paulus, M.J.; Pomper, M.; Popov, V.; Smith, M.F.; Welch, B.L.; Wojcik, R.

    2005-06-01

    We report on an approach toward the development of a high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system to image the biodistribution of radiolabeled tracers such as Tc-99m and I-125 in unrestrained/unanesthetized mice. An infrared (IR)-based position tracking apparatus has been developed and integrated into a SPECT gantry. The tracking system is designed to measure the spatial position of a mouse's head at a rate of 10-15 frames per second with submillimeter accuracy. The high-resolution, gamma imaging detectors are based on pixellated NaI(Tl) crystal scintillator arrays, position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes, and novel readout circuitry requiring fewer analog-digital converter (ADC) channels while retaining high spatial resolution. Two SPECT gamma camera detector heads based upon position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes have been built and installed onto the gantry. The IR landmark-based pose measurement and tracking system is under development to provide animal position data during a SPECT scan. The animal position and orientation data acquired by the tracking system will be used for motion correction during the tomographic image reconstruction.

  11. Biological effects of 60-Hz electric fields on small and large laboratory animals

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    Rats and mice were exposed to 60-Hz electric fields up to 330 kV/m for durations as long as four months. No significant effects were found in the following major areas: metabolic status and growth; organ and tissue morphology; brain morphology; cardiovascular function; serum chemistry; reproduction; prenatal growth and development; teratology; bone growth; peripheral nerve function; humoral and cell-mediated immunity; susceptibility to viral infection; cell and membrane function; illness/malaise; and cytogenetics. Statistically significant effects of electric field exposures were observed in the following areas: bone fracture repair; neonatal development; neuromuscular function; endocrinology; hematology; neurochemistry; urine volume and chemistry; sympathetic nervous system; behavior. It is likely that many of the effects observed are secondary to chronic stimulation of the animal by the field. Our research efforts have shifted to an in-depth investigation of nervous system functions, with emphasis in behavior, neurochemistry, neurophysiology, and dosimetry. Current and future research in these areas will focus on: relationship of effects to field strength and duration of exposure; recovery from observed effects; fundamental understanding of observed effects; fundamental understanding of interaction of field with animal (dosimetry); and biological significance of observed effects. (ERB)

  12. Preparedness of small animal veterinary practices to communicate with Spanish-speaking pet owners with limited proficiency in English.

    PubMed

    Landau, Ruth E; Beck, Alan; Glickman, Larry T; Litster, Annette; Widmar, Nicole J Olynk; Moore, George E

    2016-03-15

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the preparedness of small animal veterinary personnel to communicate with Spanish-speaking pet owners with limited English-language proficiency (LEP). DESIGN Cross-sectional telephone survey. SAMPLE Data from 383 small animal veterinary practices. PROCEDURES Telephone surveys were conducted with veterinarians and office or practice managers from a random sample of US small animal veterinary practices in 10 states to estimate the number of Spanish-speaking pet owners with LEP visiting these practices, proportion of practices that used services to facilitate communication with Spanish-speaking clients with LEP, and degree of veterinarian satisfaction with their communication with those clients. RESULTS Responses were obtained from 383 of 1,245 (31%) eligible practices, of which 340 (89%) had Spanish-speaking clients with LEP and 200 (52%) had such clients on a weekly basis. Eight percent of practices had veterinary personnel who were conversant or fluent in spoken Spanish. Veterinarians who depended on clients' friends or family to translate were significantly less satisfied with client communication than were those who could converse in Spanish with clients directly. Availability of Spanish-speaking staff and offering of Spanish-language resources were associated with an increase in the number of Spanish-speaking clients with LEP seen on a weekly basis. Industry- and practice-generated Spanish-language materials were offered at 32% (124/383) and 21% (81/383) of practices, respectively; 329 (86%) practices had no Spanish-language marketing. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Opportunities were identified for improving communication with pet owners with LEP in the veterinary clinical setting, which could ultimately positively impact patient well-being and client compliance. PMID:26953924

  13. Occupational exposure assessment in procedures of portable digital veterinary radiology for small size animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canato, G. R.; Drumond, L. F.; Paschuk, S. A.; Asfora, V. K.; Andrade, M. E. A.; Denyak, V.; Schelin, H. R.

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluates the dose received by veterinarians and assistants involved in portable digital veterinary radiology procedures and checks the dose reduction obtained with the use of individual protection equipment. For this evaluation measurements were made using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD-100, positioned at different parts of the body: hands, thorax, thyroids, gonads, left and right eye corners and at the center of the eyes. The dose was evaluated through 65 procedures performed with 55 animals. The results showed that in the case of assistants the received dose is significantly larger than that of the veterinarian. The most likely reason of this effect is that they are closer to the primary beam and thus are exposed to higher level of primary radiation first of all in regions of eyes and thyroids. The doses received by various body parts of the assistant are close to the annual limit recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection.

  14. Detection of small trace molecules in human and animal exhalation by tunable diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Eugene V.; Kouznetsov, Andrian I.; Zyrianov, Pavel V.; Skrupskii, Vladimir A.; Shulagin, Yurii A.; Galagan, Marina E.

    1995-09-01

    Tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) is proposed for content measurements of trace gases like CO, CO2, NH3, CH4, NO, NO2 in human and animal's exhalation. High sensitivity and wide dynamic range of the method ensure fast detection of these gases at ppb level and within the accuracy better than 10%. One-expiration sample is enough to reach these parameters. There is no need for any preliminary preparation of tested samples. Some pairs of the gases, for instance, CO and CO2, NH3, and CO2, and CO and N2O, can be measured simultaneously by one laser providing complex studies. The high sensitive gas analysis could provide necessary background to the noninvasive diagnostics in a wide variety of medical problems. Perspectives of the TDLS methods in application to medicine diagnostics are demonstrated by the first results of exhalation tests.

  15. Dosimetric variation due to the photon beam energy in the small-animal irradiation: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, James C. L.; Leung, Michael K. K.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jaffray, David A.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The impact of photon beam energy and tissue heterogeneities on dose distributions and dosimetric characteristics such as point dose, mean dose, and maximum dose was investigated in the context of small-animal irradiation using Monte Carlo simulations based on the EGSnrc code. Methods: Three Monte Carlo mouse phantoms, namely, heterogeneous, homogeneous, and bone homogeneous were generated based on the same mouse computed tomography image set. These phantoms were generated by overriding the tissue type of none of the voxels (heterogeneous), all voxels (homogeneous), and only the bone voxels (bone homogeneous) to that of soft tissue. Phase space files of the 100 and 225 kVp photon beams based on a small-animal irradiator (XRad225Cx, Precision X-Ray Inc., North Branford, CT) were generated using BEAMnrc. A 360 deg. photon arc was simulated and three-dimensional (3D) dose calculations were carried out using the DOSXYZnrc code through DOSCTP in the above three phantoms. For comparison, the 3D dose distributions, dose profiles, mean, maximum, and point doses at different locations such as the isocenter, lung, rib, and spine were determined in the three phantoms. Results: The dose gradient resulting from the 225 kVp arc was found to be steeper than for the 100 kVp arc. The mean dose was found to be 1.29 and 1.14 times higher for the heterogeneous phantom when compared to the mean dose in the homogeneous phantom using the 100 and 225 kVp photon arcs, respectively. The bone doses (rib and spine) in the heterogeneous mouse phantom were about five (100 kVp) and three (225 kVp) times higher when compared to the homogeneous phantom. However, the lung dose did not vary significantly between the heterogeneous, homogeneous, and bone homogeneous phantom for the 225 kVp compared to the 100 kVp photon beams. Conclusions: A significant bone dose enhancement was found when the 100 and 225 kVp photon beams were used in small-animal irradiation. This dosimetric effect, due to

  16. Design optimization of a small-animal SPECT system using LGSO continuous crystals and micro parallel-hole collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joong Hyun; Ito, Mikiko; Kim, Soo Mee; Hong, Seong Jong; Lee, Jae Sung

    2015-07-01

    A small-animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system having compact size and low cost was designed using monolithic LGSO scintillation crystals and micro parallel-hole collimators through Monte Carlo simulations. A spatial resolution of ~1 mm and a sensitivity of ~100 cps/MBq were achieved with a four-head SPECT system. A hot rod with a diameter of 1.0 mm was resolved in the SPECT image of the ultra-micro hot spot phantom. Using a thin monolithic crystal and micro collimator, we achieved high spatial resolution and high sensitivity.

  17. Application of photostable quantum dots for indirect immunofluorescent detection of specific bacterial serotypes on small marine animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decho, Alan W.; Beckman, Erin M.; Chandler, G. Thomas; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro

    2008-06-01

    An indirect immunofluorescence approach was developed using semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystals to label and detect a specific bacterial serotype of the bacterial human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus, attached to small marine animals (i.e. benthic harpacticoid copepods), which are suspected pathogen carriers. This photostable labeling method using nanotechnology will potentially allow specific serotypes of other bacterial pathogens to be detected with high sensitivity in a range of systems, and can be easily applied for sensitive detection to other Vibrio species such as Vibrio cholerae.

  18. Implantable RF power converter for small animal in vivo biological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chaimanonart, Nattapon; Olszens, Keith; Zimmerman, Mark; Ko, Wen; Young, Darrin

    2005-01-01

    A miniature, long-term, implantable radio frequency (RF) power converter for freely moving samll animal in vivo biological monitoring is proposed. An environment consisting of a laboratory mouse inside a cage is used for a prototype monitoring system design. By employing an inductive coupling network, a prototype implant device with a dimension of approximately 6 m x 6 mm x 1 mm and a weight of 100 mg including medical-grade silicone coating can wirelessly receive an input FR power from an array of external coils positioned underneath the cage. Each coil is designed to be 5 cm x 5 cm, comparable to a typical mouse size for minimizing power coupling variation. The received AC voltage is further rectified by a half-wave rectivier to supply DC current to a 3 kω resistance, representing a typical bio-implant microsystem loading. The proposed RF power converter was implanted in the peritoneal cavity of a laboratory mouse for performance evaluation. With a 5-turn external coil loop separated from a 30-turn internal coil by 1cm distance and centered to each other, an optimal voltage gain of 3.5 can be achieved with a 10 MHz operating frequency to provide a maximum rectified output DC voltage of 21 V. The DC voltage varies at different animal tilting angles and positions with a minimum voltage of 4 V at 60° tilting angle near the corner of the external coil. This variation can be further minimized by overlapping the external loops layout. PMID:17281418

  19. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography or ... Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract radiography, also ...

  20. Computed tomography-guided time-domain diffuse fluorescence tomography in small animals for localization of cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tichauer, Kenneth M; Holt, Robert W; Samkoe, Kimberley S; El-Ghussein, Fadi; Gunn, Jason R; Jermyn, Michael; Dehghani, Hamid; Leblond, Frederic; Pogue, Brian W

    2012-01-01

    Small animal fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) can be a powerful tool for preclinical drug discovery and development studies. However, light absorption by tissue chromophores (e.g., hemoglobin, water, lipids, melanin) typically limits optical signal propagation through thicknesses larger than a few millimeters. Compared to other visible wavelengths, tissue absorption for red and near-infrared (near-IR) light absorption dramatically decreases and non-elastic scattering becomes the dominant light-tissue interaction mechanism. The relatively recent development of fluorescent agents that absorb and emit light in the near-IR range (600-1000 nm), has driven the development of imaging systems and light propagation models that can achieve whole body three-dimensional imaging in small animals. Despite great strides in this area, the ill-posed nature of diffuse fluorescence tomography remains a significant problem for the stability, contrast recovery and spatial resolution of image reconstruction techniques and the optimal approach to FMI in small animals has yet to be agreed on. The majority of research groups have invested in charge-coupled device (CCD)-based systems that provide abundant tissue-sampling but suboptimal sensitivity, while our group and a few others have pursued systems based on very high sensitivity detectors, that at this time allow dense tissue sampling to be achieved only at the cost of low imaging throughput. Here we demonstrate the methodology for applying single-photon detection technology in a fluorescence tomography system to localize a cancerous brain lesion in a mouse model. The fluorescence tomography (FT) system employed single photon counting using photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and information-rich time-domain light detection in a non-contact conformation. This provides a simultaneous collection of transmitted excitation and emission light, and includes automatic fluorescence excitation exposure control, laser referencing, and co

  1. Fabrication and operation of GRIN probes for in vivo fluorescence cellular imaging of internal organs in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Ki; Lee, Woei Ming; Kim, Pilhan; Choi, Myunghwan; Jung, Keehoon; Kim, Seonghoon; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Intravital fluorescence microscopy has emerged as a powerful technique to visualize cellular processes in vivo. However, the size of the objective lenses has limited physical accessibility to various tissue sites in the internal organs of small animals. The use of small-diameter probes using graded-index (GRIN) lenses expands the capabilities of conventional intravital microscopes into minimally invasive internal organs imaging. In this protocol, we describe the detailed steps for the fabrication of front- and side-view GRIN probes and the integration and operation of the probes in a confocal microscope for visualizing fluorescent cells and microvasculature in various murine organs. We further present longitudinal imaging of immune cells in renal allografts and the tumor development in the colon. The fabrication and integration can be completed in 5–7 hours, and a typical in vivo imaging session takes 1–2 hours. PMID:22767088

  2. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Amy; Imhoff, Seth; Gibbs, Paul; Cooley, Jason; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Hollander, Brian; Mariam, Fesseha; Ott, Thomas; Barker, Martha; Tucker, Tim; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian; Clarke, Kester; Montalvo, Joel; Field, Robert; Thoma, Dan; Smith, James; Teter, David

    2013-01-01

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. Here we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1 mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. Real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models. PMID:23779063

  3. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Ott, Thomas J.; Barker, Martha R.; Tucker, Tim J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian M.; Clarke, Kester D.; Montalvo, Joel D.; Field, Robert D.; Thoma, Dan J.; Smith, James L.; Teter, David F.

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.

  4. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Ott, Thomas J.; Barker, Martha R.; et al

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification.more » We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.« less

  5. Novel embossed radiography system utilizing energy subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osawa, Akihiro; Sato, Eiichi; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Nagao, Jiro; Abderyim, Purkhet; Tanaka, Etsuro; Izumisawa, Mitsuru; Ogawa, Akira; Sato, Shigehiro

    2008-08-01

    Digital subtraction is useful for carrying out embossed radiography by shifting an x-ray source, and energy subtraction is an important technique for imaging target region by deleting unnecessary region in vivo. X-ray generator had a 100-μm-focus tube, energy subtraction was performed at tube voltages of 40 and 60 kV, and a 3.0-mm-thick aluminum filter was used to absorb low-photon-energy bremsstrahlung x-rays. Embossed radiography was achieved with cohesion imaging using a flat panel detector (FPD) with pixel sizes of 48×48 μm, and the shifting distance of the x-ray source in horizontal direction and the distance between the x-ray source and the FPD face were 5.0 mm and 1.0 m, respectively. At a tube voltage of 60 kV and a tube current of 0.50 mA, x-ray intensities without filtering and with filtering were 307 and 28.4 μGy/s, respectively, at 1.0 m from the source. In embossed radiography of non-living animals, the spatial resolution measured using a lead test chart was approximately 70 μm, and we observed embossed images of fine bones, soft tissues, and coronary arteries of approximately 100 μm.

  6. Survey of electronic veterinary medical record adoption and use by independent small animal veterinary medical practices in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Krone, Lauren M.; Brown, Catherine M.; Lindenmayer, Joann M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the proportion of independent small animal veterinary medical practices in Massachusetts that use electronic veterinary medical records (EVMRs), determine the purposes for which EVMRs are used, and identify perceived barriers to their use. Design Survey. Sample 100 veterinarians. Procedures 213 of 517 independent small animal veterinary practices operating in Massachusetts were randomly chosen for study recruitment. One veterinarian at each practice was invited by telephone to answer a hardcopy survey regarding practice demographics, medical records type (electronic, paper, or both), purposes of EVMR use, and perceived barriers to adoption. Surveys were mailed to the first 100 veterinarians who agreed to participate. Practices were categorized by record type and size (large [≥ 5 veterinarians], medium [3 to 4 veterinarians], or small [1 to 2 veterinarians]). Results 84 surveys were returned; overall response was 84 of 213 (39.4%). The EVMRs were used alone or together with paper records in 66 of 82 (80.5%) practices. Large and medium-sized practices were significantly more likely to use EVMRs combined with paper records than were small practices. The EVMRs were most commonly used for ensuring billing, automating reminders, providing cost estimates, scheduling, recording medical and surgical information, and tracking patient health. Least common uses were identifying emerging infectious diseases, research, and insurance. Eleven veterinarians in paper record–only practices indicated reluctance to change, anticipated technological problems, time constraints, and cost were barriers to EVMR use. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results indicated EVMRs were underutilized as a tool for tracking and improving population health and identifying emerging infectious diseases. Efforts to facilitate adoption of EVMRs for these purposes should be strengthened by the veterinary medical, human health, and public health professions. PMID:25029312

  7. Point projection radiography with the FXI

    SciTech Connect

    Budil, K.; Perry, T.S.; Alvarez, S.A.

    1996-05-06

    Radiography techniques utilizing large area x-ray sources (typically {<=} 7 keV) and pinhole-imaging gated x-ray diagnostics have long been used at the Nova laser facility. However, for targets requiring higher energy x-ray backlighters (> 9 keV), low conversion efficiencies and pinhole losses combine to make this scheme unworkable. The technique of point projection radiography has been improved upon to make imaging at high x-ray energies feasible. In this scheme a {open_quotes}point{close_quotes} source of x-rays, usually a small diameter ({<=}25 {mu}m) fiber, is illuminated with a single, 100 ps pulse from the Nova laser. A gated x-ray imager with a 500 ps electronic gate width is used to record the projected image. The experimental challenges this technique presents and experimental results will be discussed.

  8. A system for fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.

    1996-05-01

    A system has been designed and a neutron generator installed to perform fast neutron radiography. With this sytem, objects as small as a coin or as large as a waste drum can be radiographed. The neutron source is an MF Physics A-711 neutron generator which produces 3x10{sup 10} neutrons/second with an average energy of 14.5 MeV. The radiography system uses x-ray scintillation screens and film in commercially available cassettes. The cassettes have been modified to include a thin sheet of plastic to convert neutrons to protons through elastic scattering from hydrogen and other low Z materials in the plastic. For film densities from 1.8 to 3.0, exposures range from 1.9x10{sup 7} to 3.8x10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} depending on the type of screen and film.

  9. Characterisation of a cobalt-60 small-beam animal irradiator using a realtime silicon pixelated detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porumb, C. S.; Davies, J. B.; Perevertaylo, V.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Petasecca, M.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a study performed by the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP) using a high spatial and temporal resolution silicon pixelated detector named MagicPlate-512. The study focuses on the characterisation of three pencil beams from a low-dose rate, 6 TBq, cobalt-60 source, in terms of percentage depth dose, beam profiles, output factor and shutter timing. Where applicable, the findings were verified against radiochromic EBT3 film and ionization chambers. It was found that the results of the MagicPlate-512 and film agreed within 0.9 mm for penumbra and full-width at half-maximum measurements of the beam profiles, and within 0.75% for percentage depth dose study. The dose rate of the cobalt-60 source was determined to be (10.65 ± 0.03) cGy/min at 1.5 cm depth in Solid Water. A significant asymmetry of the small pencil beam profile was found, which is due to the irregular machining of the small collimator. The average source shutter speed was calculated to be 26 cm/s. The study demonstrates that the MagicPlate-512 dosimetry system, developed at CMRP, is capable of beam characterisation even in cases of very low dose rate sources.

  10. Three-axis optical force plate for studies in small animal locomotor mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, S. Tonia

    2006-05-15

    The use of force plates to measure whole-body locomotor mechanics is a well-established technique. However, commercially available force plates are not sensitive enough for use on small-bodied vertebrates or invertebrates. The standard design for single- and multiple-axis, high-sensitivity force plates built by individual research groups uses semiconductor foil strain gauges to measure deflections; yet foil strain gauges are highly temperature and position sensitive, resulting in a drifting base line and nonlinear responses. I present here a design for a three-axis optical force plate that was successfully calibrated to measure forces as small as 1.5 mN and is capable of determining the position of center of pressure with a mean error of 0.07 cm along the X axis and 0.13 cm along the Y axis. Using optical sensors instead of foil strain gauges to measure deflection, this force plate is not subject to temperature-related drift and is more robust against slight positioning inaccuracies. This force plate was used to measure forces produced by amphibious fishes weighing less than 2 g as they jumped off the force platform.

  11. Three-axis optical force plate for studies in small animal locomotor mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, S. Tonia

    2006-05-01

    The use of force plates to measure whole-body locomotor mechanics is a well-established technique. However, commercially available force plates are not sensitive enough for use on small-bodied vertebrates or invertebrates. The standard design for single- and multiple-axis, high-sensitivity force plates built by individual research groups uses semiconductor foil strain gauges to measure deflections; yet foil strain gauges are highly temperature and position sensitive, resulting in a drifting base line and nonlinear responses. I present here a design for a three-axis optical force plate that was successfully calibrated to measure forces as small as 1.5mN and is capable of determining the position of center of pressure with a mean error of 0.07cm along the X axis and 0.13cm along the Y axis. Using optical sensors instead of foil strain gauges to measure deflection, this force plate is not subject to temperature-related drift and is more robust against slight positioning inaccuracies. This force plate was used to measure forces produced by amphibious fishes weighing less than 2g as they jumped off the force platform.

  12. A method of image registration for small animal, multi-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Chow, Patrick L; Stout, David B; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Chatziioannou, Arion F

    2006-01-21

    Many research institutions have a full suite of preclinical tomographic scanners to answer biomedical questions in vivo. Routine multi-modality imaging requires robust registration of images generated by various tomographs. We have implemented a hardware registration method for preclinical imaging that is similar to that used in the combined positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scanners in the clinic. We designed an imaging chamber which can be rigidly and reproducibly mounted on separate microPET and microCT scanners. We have also designed a three-dimensional grid phantom with 1288 lines that is used to generate the spatial transformation matrix from software registration using a 15-parameter perspective model. The imaging chamber works in combination with the registration phantom synergistically to achieve the image registration goal. We verified that the average registration error between two imaging modalities is 0.335 mm using an in vivo mouse bone scan. This paper also estimates the impact of image misalignment on PET quantitation using attenuation corrections generated from misregistered images. Our technique is expected to produce PET quantitation errors of less than 5%. The methods presented are robust and appropriate for routine use in high throughput animal imaging facilities. PMID:16394345

  13. Monitoring of small lymphatics function under different impact on animal model by integrated optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Chowdhury, Parimal; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2004-08-01

    The digital transmission microscopy is very informative, noninvasive for vessels, simple and available method for studying and measuring lymph microvessels function in vivo. Rat mesentery can use as promising animal model of lymph microvessels in vivo. Such imaging system allowed visualizing the entire lymphangion (with input and output valves), its wall, lymphatic valves, lymph flow as well as single cells in flow; obtaining anew basic information on lymph microcirculation and quantitative data on lymphatic function including indexes of phasic contractions and valve function, the quantitative parameters of lymph-flow velocity. Rat mesentery is good model to create different types of lymphedemas in acute and chronic experiments. The obtained data revealed that significant edema started immediately after lymph node dissection in one-half of cases and was accompanied by lymphatic disturbances. The greatest degree of edema was found after 1 week. After 4 weeks, the degree of edema sometimes decreased, but functional lymphatic disturbances progressed. Nicotine had significant direct dose-dependent effect on microlymphatic function at the acute local application, but the same dose of this drug was not effect on microcirculation in chronic intoxication. Despite yielding interesting data, transmittance microscopy had some limitations when applied to microcirculation studies. The problems could be solved at the application of integrated measuring technique.

  14. Imaging of Small Animal Peripheral Artery Disease Models: Recent Advancements and Translational Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jenny B.; Phillips, Evan H.; Riggins, Ti’Air E.; Sangha, Gurneet S.; Chakraborty, Sreyashi; Lee, Janice Y.; Lycke, Roy J.; Hernandez, Clarissa L.; Soepriatna, Arvin H.; Thorne, Bradford R. H.; Yrineo, Alexa A.; Goergen, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a broad disorder encompassing multiple forms of arterial disease outside of the heart. As such, PAD development is a multifactorial process with a variety of manifestations. For example, aneurysms are pathological expansions of an artery that can lead to rupture, while ischemic atherosclerosis reduces blood flow, increasing the risk of claudication, poor wound healing, limb amputation, and stroke. Current PAD treatment is often ineffective or associated with serious risks, largely because these disorders are commonly undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Active areas of research are focused on detecting and characterizing deleterious arterial changes at early stages using non-invasive imaging strategies, such as ultrasound, as well as emerging technologies like photoacoustic imaging. Earlier disease detection and characterization could improve interventional strategies, leading to better prognosis in PAD patients. While rodents are being used to investigate PAD pathophysiology, imaging of these animal models has been underutilized. This review focuses on structural and molecular information and disease progression revealed by recent imaging efforts of aortic, cerebral, and peripheral vascular disease models in mice, rats, and rabbits. Effective translation to humans involves better understanding of underlying PAD pathophysiology to develop novel therapeutics and apply non-invasive imaging techniques in the clinic. PMID:25993289

  15. Effect of geometric and motion tracking errors on awake small animal SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Joon; Baba, Justin S; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Weisenberger, A G; Stolin, A; McKisson, J; Smith, M F

    2009-01-01

    A series of simulation studies were performed to evaluate the effects of geometric and motion tracking errors on reconstruction image quality for a single pinhole collimator awake animal imaging SPECT system. List-mode SPECT data generated using a custom Monte Carlo program that incorporated experimental mouse motion data were reconstructed by MLEM with Siddon's ray tracing. To better understand the impact of motion tracking and system geometric parameter errors on reconstructed system data, an offset of up to 1 mm or degree was separately applied to each for evaluation. In the absence of motion tracking or system geometric error, the applied motion compensation algorithm successfully reconstructed volumes without any degradation or distortion. Presented results reveal that motion tracking errors propagate through the SPECT reconstruction process. However, it is confirmed that the impact of tracking errors in the currently employed motion tracking system, is minimal because of their accuracy. The results also reveal the direct and indirect impact of geometric errors to motion compensated reconstruction quality and that a wrong assumption of pinhole transaxial position produces the most amount of distortion of all the investigated errors. Finally, system geometric errors are shown to have a greater impact on reconstruction quality than equivalent tracking errors.

  16. Advances in small animal mesentery models for in vivo flow cytometry, dynamic microscopy, and drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Tuchin, Valery V; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2007-01-01

    Using animal mesentery with intravital optical microscopy is a well-established experimental model for studying blood and lymph microcirculation in vivo. Recent advances in cell biology and optical techniques provide the basis for extending this model for new applications, which should generate significantly improved experimental data. This review summarizes the achievements in this specific area, including in vivo label-free blood and lymph photothermal flow cytometry, super-sensitive fluorescence image cytometry, light scattering and speckle flow cytometry, microvessel dynamic microscopy, infrared (IR) angiography, and high-speed imaging of individual cells in fast flow. The capabilities of these techniques, using the rat mesentery model, were demonstrated in various studies; e.g., real-time quantitative detection of circulating and migrating individual blood and cancer cells, studies on vascular dynamics with a focus on lymphatics under normal conditions and under different interventions (e.g. lasers, drugs, nicotine), assessment of lymphatic disturbances from experimental lymphedema, monitoring cell traffic between blood and lymph systems, and high-speed imaging of cell transient deformability in flow. In particular, the obtained results demonstrated that individual cell transportation in living organisms depends on cell type (e.g., normal blood or leukemic cells), the cell’s functional state (e.g., live, apoptotic, or necrotic), and the functional status of the organism. Possible future applications, including in vivo early diagnosis and prevention of disease, monitoring immune response and apoptosis, chemo- and radio-sensitivity tests, and drug screening, are also discussed. PMID:17226898

  17. Effect of geometric and motion tracking error for awake small animal SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Lee, J.S. Baba, J. S. Goddard, A. Stolin, J. McKisson, A.G. Weisenberger, M.F. Smith

    2010-01-01

    A series of simulation studies were performed to evaluate the effects of geometric and motion tracking errors on reconstruction image quality for a single pinhole collimator awake animal imaging SPECT system. List-mode SPECT data generated using a custom Monte Carlo program that incorporated experimental mouse motion data were reconstructed by MLEM with Siddon's ray tracing. To better understand the impact of motion tracking and system geometric parameter errors on reconstructed system data, an offset of up to 1 mm or degree was separately applied to each for evaluation. In the absence of motion tracking or system geometric error, the applied motion compensation algorithm successfully reconstructed volumes without any degradation or distortion. Presented results reveal that motion tracking errors propagate through the SPECT reconstruction process. However, it is confirmed that the impact of tracking errors in the currently employed motion tracking system, is minimal because of their accuracy. The results also reveal the direct and indirect impact of geometric errors to motion compensated reconstruction quality and that a wrong assumption of pinhole transaxial position produces the most amount of distortion of all the investigated errors. Finally, system geometric errors are shown to have a greater impact on reconstruction quality than equivalent tracking errors.

  18. A Molecular Imaging Paradigm to Rapidly Profile Response to Angiogenesis-directed Therapy in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Virostko, John; Xie, Jingping; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Gore, John C.; Manning, H. Charles

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The development of novel angiogenesis-directed therapeutics is hampered by the lack of non-invasive imaging metrics capable of assessing treatment response. We report the development and validation of a novel molecular imaging paradigm to rapidly assess response to angiogenesis-directed therapeutics in preclinical animal models. Procedures A monoclonal antibody-based optical imaging probe targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) expression was synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo via multispectral fluorescence imaging. Results The optical imaging agent demonstrated specificity for the target receptor in cultured endothelial cells and in vivo. The agent exhibited significant accumulation within 4T1 xenograft tumors. Mice bearing 4T1 xenografts and treated with sunitinib exhibited both tumor growth arrest and decreased accumulation of NIR800-αVEGFR2ab compared to untreated cohorts (p=0.0021). Conclusions Molecular imaging of VEGFR2 expression is a promising non-invasive biomarker for assessing angiogenesis and evaluating the efficacy of angiogenesis-directed therapies. PMID:19130143

  19. MediSPECT: Single photon emission computed tomography system for small field of view small animal imaging based on a CdTe hybrid pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accorsi, R.; Autiero, M.; Celentano, L.; Chmeissani, M.; Cozzolino, R.; Curion, A. S.; Frallicciardi, P.; Laccetti, P.; Lanza, R. C.; Lauria, A.; Maiorino, M.; Marotta, M.; Mettivier, G.; Montesi, M. C.; Riccio, P.; Roberti, G.; Russo, P.

    2007-02-01

    We describe MediSPECT, a new scanner developed at University and INFN Napoli, for SPECT studies on small animals with a small field of view (FOV) and high spatial resolution. The CdTe pixel detector (a 256×256 matrix of 55 μm square pixels) operating in single photon counting for detection of gamma-rays with low and medium energy (e.g. 125I, 27-35 keV, 99mTc, 140 keV), is bump bonded to the Medipix2 readout chip. The FOV of the MediSPECT scanner with a coded aperture mask collimator ranges from 6.3 mm (system spatial resolution 110 μm at 27-35 keV) to 24.3 mm. With a 0.30 mm pinhole the FOV ranges from 2.4 to 29 mm (where the system spatial resolution is 1.0 mm at 27-35 keV and 2.0 mm at 140 keV). MediSPECT will be used for in vivo imaging of small organs or tissue structures in mouse, e.g., brain, thyroid, heart or tumor.

  20. Evaluating hypotheses of basal animal phylogeny using complete sequences of large and small subunit rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Mónica; Collins, Allen G.; Silberman, Jeffrey D.; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the evolutionary relationships among basal metazoan lineages by using complete large subunit (LSU) and small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA sequences for 23 taxa. After identifying competing hypotheses, we performed maximum likelihood searches for trees conforming to each hypothesis. Kishino–Hasegawa tests were used to determine whether the data (LSU, SSU, and combined) reject any of the competing hypotheses. We also conducted unconstrained tree searches, compared the resulting topologies, and calculated bootstrap indices. Shimodaira–Hasegawa tests were applied to determine whether the data reject any of the topologies resulting from the constrained and unconstrained tree searches. LSU, SSU, and the combined data strongly contradict two assertions pertaining to sponge phylogeny. Hexactinellid sponges are not likely to be the basal lineage of a monophyletic Porifera or the sister group to all other animals. Instead, Hexactinellida and Demospongia form a well-supported clade of siliceous sponges, Silicea. It remains unclear, on the basis of these data alone, whether the calcarean sponges are more closely related to Silicea or to nonsponge animals. The SSU and combined data reject the hypothesis that Bilateria is more closely related to Ctenophora than it is to Cnidaria, whereas LSU data alone do not refute either hypothesis. LSU and SSU data agree in supporting the monophyly of Bilateria, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, and Metazoa. LSU sequence data reveal phylogenetic structure in a data set with limited taxon sampling. Continued accumulation of LSU sequences should increase our understanding of animal phylogeny. PMID:11504944

  1. Evaluating hypotheses of basal animal phylogeny using complete sequences of large and small subunit rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, Monica; Collins, Allen G.; Silberman, Jeffrey; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2001-06-21

    We studied the evolutionary relationships among basal metazoan lineages by using complete large subunit (LSU) and small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA sequences for 23 taxa. After identifying competing hypotheses, we performed maximum likelihood searches for trees conforming to each hypothesis. Kishino-Hasegawa tests were used to determine whether the data (LSU, SSU, and combined) reject any of the competing hypotheses. We also conducted unconstrained tree searches, compared the resulting topologies, and calculated bootstrap indices. Shimodaira-Hasegawa tests were applied to determine whether the data reject any of the topologies resulting from the constrained and unconstrained tree searches. LSU, SSU, and the combined data strongly contradict two assertions pertaining to sponge phylogeny. Hexactinellid sponges are not likely to be the basal lineage of amonophyletic Porifera or the sister group to all other animals. Instead, Hexactinellida and Demospongia form a well-supported clade of siliceous sponges, Silicea. It remains unclear, on the basis of these data alone, whether the calcarean sponges are more closely related to Silicea or to nonsponge animals. The SSU and combined data reject the hypothesis that Bilateria is more closely related to Ctenophora than it is to Cnidaria, whereas LSU data alone do not refute either hypothesis. LSU and SSU data agree in supporting the monophyly of Bilateria, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, and Metazoa. LSU sequence data reveal phylogenetic structure in a data set with limited taxon sampling. Continued accumulation of LSU sequences should increase our understanding of animal phylogeny.

  2. In vivo small animal imaging for early assessment of therapeutic efficacy of photodynamic therapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Baowei; Wang, Hesheng; Chen, Xiang; Meyers, Joseph; Mulvilhill, John; Feyes, Denise; Edgehouse, Nancy; Duerk, Jeffrey L.; Pretlow, Thomas G.; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2007-03-01

    We are developing in vivo small animal imaging techniques that can measure early effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for prostate cancer. PDT is an emerging therapeutic modality that continues to show promise in the treatment of cancer. At our institution, a new second-generation photosensitizing drug, the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4, has been developed and evaluated at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. In this study, we are developing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques that provide therapy monitoring and early assessment of tumor response to PDT. We generated human prostate cancer xenografts in athymic nude mice. For the imaging experiments, we used a highfield 9.4-T small animal MR scanner (Bruker Biospec). High-resolution MR images were acquired from the treated and control tumors pre- and post-PDT and 24 hr after PDT. We utilized multi-slice multi-echo (MSME) MR sequences. During imaging acquisitions, the animals were anesthetized with a continuous supply of 2% isoflurane in oxygen and were continuously monitored for respiration and temperature. After imaging experiments, we manually segmented the tumors on each image slice for quantitative image analyses. We computed three-dimensional T2 maps for the tumor regions from the MSME images. We plotted the histograms of the T2 maps for each tumor pre- and post-PDT and 24 hr after PDT. After the imaging and PDT experiments, we dissected the tumor tissues and used the histologic slides to validate the MR images. In this study, six mice with human prostate cancer tumors were imaged and treated at the Case Center for Imaging Research. The T2 values of treated tumors increased by 24 +/- 14% 24 hr after the therapy. The control tumors did not demonstrate significant changes of the T2 values. Inflammation and necrosis were observed within the treated tumors 24 hour after the treatment. Preliminary results show that Pc 4-PDT is effective for the treatment of human prostate cancer in mice. The small animal MR

  3. A comprehensive system for dosimetric commissioning and Monte Carlo validation for the small animal radiation research platform

    PubMed Central

    Tryggestad, E; Armour, M; Iordachita, I; Verhaegen, F; Wong, J W

    2011-01-01

    Our group has constructed the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) for delivering focal, kilo-voltage radiation to targets in small animals under robotic control using cone-beam CT guidance. The present work was undertaken to support the SARRP’s treatment planning capabilities. We have devised a comprehensive system for characterizing the radiation dosimetry in water for the SARRP and have developed a Monte Carlo dose engine with the intent of reproducing these measured results. We find that the SARRP provides sufficient therapeutic dose rates ranging from 102 to 228 cGy min−1 at 1 cm depth for the available set of high-precision beams ranging from 0.5 to 5 mm in size. In terms of depth–dose, the mean of the absolute percentage differences between the Monte Carlo calculations and measurement is 3.4% over the full range of sampled depths spanning 0.5–7.2 cm for the 3 and 5 mm beams. The measured and computed profiles for these beams agree well overall; of note, good agreement is observed in the profile tails. Especially for the smallest 0.5 and 1 mm beams, including a more realistic description of the effective x-ray source into the Monte Carlo model may be important. PMID:19687532

  4. Dual isotope cross-talk correction in Tc-99m/In-111 small-animal SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmins, Rachel

    Dual-isotope imaging via energy discrimination is a major strength of SPECT but image quality is degraded by cross-talk interference. Direct application of clinically developed cross-talk correction techniques in small-animals is not ideal. Reduced subject size may allow adequate quantification with simpler cross-talk correction methods. This study evaluated four simple cross-talk correction methods for In-111/Tc--99m small-animal imaging: triple energy window (TEW), applied pre- and post-correction, convolution subtraction, and a vendor-supplied correction. Each method was evaluated using a three-syringe phantom filled with either Tc-99m, In-111, or a mixture of the two at five different ratios. The optimal method was tested on in-vivo rat images. A modified TEW applied in projection space visually provided the best removal of In-111 cross-talk and reduced it quantitatively by 96%. The mixed syringe ratios were recovered to within 5%. In-vivo testing provided inconclusive results indicating that a true dual-isotope study is still necessary.

  5. Phantom experiments on a PSAPD-based compact gamma camera with submillimeter spatial resolution for small animal SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangtaek; McClish, Mickel; Alhassen, Fares; Seo, Youngho; Shah, Kanai S.; Gould, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) based compact gamma camera for the application of small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The silicon PSAPD with a two-dimensional resistive layer and four readout channels is implemented as a gamma ray detector to record the energy and position of radiation events from a radionuclide source. A 2 mm thick monolithic CsI:Tl scintillator is optically coupled to a PSAPD with a 8mm×8mm active area, providing submillimeter intrinsic spatial resolution, high energy resolution (16% full-width half maximum at 140 keV) and high gain. A mouse heart phantom filled with an aqueous solution of 370 MBq 99mTc-pertechnetate (140 keV) was imaged using the PSAPD detector module and a tungsten knife-edge pinhole collimator with a 0.5 mm diameter aperture. The PSAPD detector module was cooled with cold nitrogen gas to suppress dark current shot noise. For each projection image of the mouse heart phantom, a rotated diagonal readout algorithm was used to calculate the position of radiation events and correct for pincushion distortion. The reconstructed image of the mouse heart phantom demonstrated reproducible image quality with submillimeter spatial resolution (0.7 mm), showing the feasibility of using the compact PSAPD-based gamma camera for a small animal SPECT system. PMID:21278833

  6. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Wang, Shi; Ma, Tianyu; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang

    2015-06-01

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance.

  7. Development of a large-angle pinhole gamma camera with depth-of-interaction capability for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, C.-H.; An, S. J.; Kim, H.-I.; Choi, Y.; Chung, Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    A large-angle gamma camera was developed for imaging small animal models used in medical and biological research. The simulation study shows that a large field of view (FOV) system provides higher sensitivity with respect to a typical pinhole gamma cameras by reducing the distance between the pinhole and the object. However, this gamma camera suffers from the degradation of the spatial resolution at the periphery region due to parallax error by obliquely incident photons. We propose a new method to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) using three layers of monolithic scintillators to reduce the parallax error. The detector module consists of three layers of monolithic CsI(Tl) crystals with dimensions of 50.0 × 50.0 × 2.0 mm3, a Hamamatsu H8500 PSPMT and a large-angle pinhole collimator with an acceptance angle of 120°. The 3-dimensional event positions were determined by the maximum-likelihood position-estimation (MLPE) algorithm and the pre-generated look up table (LUT). The spatial resolution (FWHM) of a Co-57 point-like source was measured at different source position with the conventional method (Anger logic) and with DOI information. We proved that high sensitivity can be achieved without degradation of spatial resolution using a large-angle pinhole gamma camera: this system can be used as a small animal imaging tool.

  8. Experimental task-based optimization of a four-camera variable-pinhole small-animal SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.

    2005-04-01

    We have previously utilized lumpy object models and simulated imaging systems in conjunction with the ideal observer to compute figures of merit for hardware optimization. In this paper, we describe the development of methods and phantoms necessary to validate or experimentally carry out these optimizations. Our study was conducted on a four-camera small-animal SPECT system that employs interchangeable pinhole plates to operate under a variety of pinhole configurations and magnifications (representing optimizable system parameters). We developed a small-animal phantom capable of producing random backgrounds for each image sequence. The task chosen for the study was the detection of a 2mm diameter sphere within the phantom-generated random background. A total of 138 projection images were used, half of which included the signal. As our observer, we employed the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with Laguerre-Gauss channels. The signal-to-noise (SNR) of this observer was used to compare different system configurations. Results indicate agreement between experimental and simulated data with higher detectability rates found for multiple-camera, multiple-pinhole, and high-magnification systems, although it was found that mixtures of magnifications often outperform systems employing a single magnification. This work will serve as a basis for future studies pertaining to system hardware optimization.

  9. A small-animal imaging system capable of multipinhole circular/helical SPECT and parallel-hole SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jianguo; Bradley, Eric L.; Majewski, Stan; Popov, Vladimir; Saha, Margaret S.; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Welsh, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    We have designed and built a small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system equipped with parallel-hole and multipinhole collimators and capable of circular or helical SPECT. Copper-beryllium parallel-hole collimators suitable for imaging the ~35 keV photons from the decay of 125I have been built and installed to achieve useful spatial resolution over a range of object-detector distances and to reduce imaging time on our dual-detector array. To address the resolution limitations in the parallel-hole SPECT and the sensitivity and limited field of view of single-pinhole SPECT, we have incorporated multipinhole circular and helical SPECT in addition to expanding the parallel-hole SPECT capabilities. The pinhole SPECT system is based on a 110 mm diameter circular detector equipped with a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator array (1×1×5 mm3/pixel). The helical trajectory is accomplished by two stepping motors controlling the rotation of the detector-support gantry and displacement of the animal bed along the axis of rotation of the gantry. Results obtained in SPECT studies of various phantoms show an enlarged field of view, very good resolution and improved sensitivity using multipinhole circular or helical SPECT. Collimators with one, three and five 1 mm diameter pinholes have been implemented and compared in these tests. Our objective is to develop a system on which one may readily select a suitable mode of either parallel-hole SPECT or pinhole circular or helical SPECT for a variety of small animal imaging applications. PMID:19701447

  10. A small-animal imaging system capable of multipinhole circular/helical SPECT and parallel-hole SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jianguo; Bradley, Eric L.; Majewski, Stan; Popov, Vladimir; Saha, Margaret S.; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Welsh, Robert E.

    2008-08-01

    We have designed and built a small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system equipped with parallel-hole and multipinhole collimators and capable of circular or helical SPECT. Copper-beryllium parallel-hole collimators suitable for imaging the ˜35 keV photons from the decay of 125I have been built and installed to achieve useful spatial resolution over a range of object-detector distances and to reduce imaging time on our dual-detector array. To address the resolution limitations in the parallel-hole SPECT and the sensitivity and limited field of view of single-pinhole SPECT, we have incorporated multipinhole circular and helical SPECT in addition to expanding the parallel-hole SPECT capabilities. The pinhole SPECT system is based on a 110 mm diameter circular detector equipped with a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator array (1×1×5 mm 3/pixel). The helical trajectory is accomplished by two stepping motors controlling the rotation of the detector-support gantry and displacement of the animal bed along the axis of rotation of the gantry. Results obtained in SPECT studies of various phantoms show an enlarged field of view, very good resolution and improved sensitivity using multipinhole circular or helical SPECT. Collimators with one, three and five, 1-mm-diameter pinholes have been implemented and compared in these tests. Our objective is to develop a system on which one may readily select a suitable mode of either parallel-hole SPECT or pinhole circular or helical SPECT for a variety of small animal imaging applications.

  11. A small animal PET based on GAPDs and charge signal transmission approach for hybrid PET-MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jihoon; Choi, Yong; Hong, Key Jo; Hu, Wei; Jung, Jin Ho; Huh, Yoonsuk; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2011-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) employing Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GAPDs) and charge signal transmission approach was developed for small animal imaging. Animal PET contained 16 LYSO and GAPD detector modules that were arranged in a 70 mm diameter ring with an axial field of view of 13 mm. The GAPDs charge output signals were transmitted to a preamplifier located remotely using 300 cm flexible flat cables. The position decoder circuits (PDCs) were used to multiplex the PET signals from 256 to 4 channels. The outputs of the PDCs were digitized and further-processed in the data acquisition unit. The cross-compatibilities of the PET detectors and MRI were assessed outside and inside the MRI. Experimental studies of the developed full ring PET were performed to examine the spatial resolution and sensitivity. Phantom and mouse images were acquired to examine the imaging performance. The mean energy and time resolution of the PET detector were 17.6% and 1.5 ns, respectively. No obvious degradation on PET and MRI was observed during simultaneous PET-MRI data acquisition. The measured spatial resolution and sensitivity at the CFOV were 2.8 mm and 0.7%, respectively. In addition, a 3 mm diameter line source was clearly resolved in the hot-sphere phantom images. The reconstructed transaxial PET images of the mouse brain and tumor displaying the glucose metabolism patterns were imaged well. These results demonstrate GAPD and the charge signal transmission approach can allow the development of high performance small animal PET with improved MR compatibility.

  12. An intact small animal model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion: Characterization of metabolic changes by hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Bastiaansen, Jessica A M; Berthonneche, Corinne; Comment, Arnaud; Schwitter, Juerg

    2015-12-15

    Hyperpolarized carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((13)C MRS) enables the sensitive and noninvasive assessment of the metabolic changes occurring during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion. Ischemia-reperfusion models using hyperpolarized (13)C MRS are established in heart preparations ex vivo and in large animals in vivo, but an in vivo model in small animals would be advantageous to allow the study of reperfusion metabolism with neuroendocrine and inflammatory responses intact with the option to perform a greater number of experiments. A novel intact rat model of ischemia-reperfusion is presented that incorporates hyperpolarized (13)C MRS to characterize reperfusion metabolism. Typically, in an in vivo model, a tissue input function (TIF) is required to account for apparent changes in the metabolism of injected hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate resulting from changes in perfusion. Whereas the measurement of a TIF by metabolic imaging is particularly challenging in small animals, the ratios of downstream metabolites can be used as an alternative. The ratio of [(13)C]bicarbonate:[1-(13)C]lactate (RatioBic/Lac) measured within 1-2 min after coronary release decreased vs. baseline in ischemic rats (n = 10, 15-min occlusion, controls: n = 10; P = 0.017 for interaction, 2-way ANOVA). The decrease in oxidative pyruvate metabolism [RatioBic/Lac(Ischemia)/RatioBic/Lac(Baseline)] modestly correlated with area at risk (r = 0.66; P = 0.002). Hyperpolarized (13)C MRS was also used to examine alanine production during ischemia, which is observed in ex vivo models, but no significant change was noted; metrics incorporating [1-(13)C]alanine did not substantially improve the discrimination of ischemic-reperfused myocardium from nonischemic myocardium. This intact rat model, which mimics the human situation of reperfused myocardial infarction, could be highly valuable for the testing of new drugs to treat reperfusion injury, thereby facilitating translational research. PMID

  13. SR high-speed K-edge subtraction angiography in the small animal (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, T.; Akisada, M.; Nakajima, T.; Anno, I.; Ueda, K.; Umetani, K.; Yamaguchi, C.

    1989-07-01

    To assess the ability of the high-speed K-edge energy subtraction system which was made at beamline 8C of Photon Factory, Tsukuba, we performed an animal experiment. Rabbits were used for the intravenous K-edge subtraction angiography. In this paper, the actual images of the artery obtained by this system, are demonstrated. The high-speed K-edge subtraction system consisted of movable silicon (111) monocrystals, II-ITV, and digital memory system. Image processing was performed by 68000-IP computer. The monochromatic x-ray beam size was 50×60 mm. Photon energy above and below iodine K edge was changed within 16 ms and 32 frames of images were obtained sequentially. The rabbits were anaesthetized by phenobarbital and a 5F catheter was inserted into inferior vena cava via the femoral vein. 1.5 ml/kg of contrast material (Conlaxin H) was injected at the rate of 0.5 ml/kg/s. TV images were obtained 3 s after the starting point of injection. By using this system, the clear K-edge subtracted images were obtained sequentially as a conventional DSA system. The quality of the images were better than that obtained by DSA. The dynamical blood flow was analyzed, and the best arterial image could be selected from the sequential images. The structures of aortic arch, common carotid arteries, right subclavian artery, and internal thoracic artery were obtained at the chest. Both common carotid arteries and vertebral arteries were recorded at the neck. The diameter of about 0.3-0.4 mm artery could be clearly revealed. The high-speed K-edge subtraction system demonstrates the very sharp arterial images clearly and dynamically.

  14. Small animal simultaneous PET/MRI: initial experiences in a 9.4 T microMRI.

    PubMed

    Maramraju, Sri Harsha; Smith, S David; Junnarkar, Sachin S; Schulz, Daniela; Stoll, Sean; Ravindranath, Bosky; Purschke, Martin L; Rescia, Sergio; Southekal, Sudeepti; Pratte, Jean-François; Vaska, Paul; Woody, Craig L; Schlyer, David J

    2011-04-21

    We developed a non-magnetic positron-emission tomography (PET) device based on the rat conscious animal PET that operates in a small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, thereby enabling us to carry out simultaneous PET/MRI studies. The PET detector comprises 12 detector blocks, each being a 4 × 8 array of lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals (2.22 × 2.22 × 5 mm(3)) coupled to a matching non-magnetic avalanche photodiode array. The detector blocks, housed in a plastic case, form a 38 mm inner diameter ring with an 18 mm axial extent. Custom-built MRI coils fit inside the positron-emission tomography (PET) device, operating in transceiver mode. The PET insert is integrated with a Bruker 9.4 T 210 mm clear-bore diameter MRI scanner. We acquired simultaneous PET/MR images of phantoms, of in vivo rat brain, and of cardiac-gated mouse heart using [(11)C]raclopride and 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose PET radiotracers. There was minor interference between the PET electronics and the MRI during simultaneous operation, and small effects on the signal-to-noise ratio in the MR images in the presence of the PET, but no noticeable visual artifacts. Gradient echo and high-duty-cycle spin echo radio frequency (RF) pulses resulted in a 7% and a 28% loss in PET counts, respectively, due to high PET counts during the RF pulses that had to be gated out. The calibration of the activity concentration of PET data during MR pulsing is reproducible within less than 6%. Our initial results demonstrate the feasibility of performing simultaneous PET and MRI studies in adult rats and mice using the same PET insert in a small-bore 9.4 T MRI. PMID:21441651

  15. UCD-SPI: Un-Collimated Detector Single-Photon Imaging System for Small Animal and Plant Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Katherine Leigh

    Medical imaging systems using single gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes implement collimators in order to form images. However, a tradeoff in sensitivity is inherent in the use of collimators, and modern preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems detect a very small fraction of emitted gamma-rays (<0.3%). We have built a collimator-less system, which can reach sensitivity of 40% for 99mTc imaging, while still producing images of sufficient spatial resolution for certain applications in "thin" objects such as mice, small plants, and well plates used for in vitro experiments. This flexible geometry un-collimated detector single-photon imaging (UCD-SPI) system consists of two large (5 cm x 10 cm), thin (3 mm and 5 mm), closely spaced, pixelated scintillation detectors of either NaI(Tl), CsI(Na), or BGO. The detectors are read out by two adjacent Hamamatsu H8500 multichannel photomultiplier tubes. The detector heads enable the interchange of scintillation detectors of different materials and thicknesses to optimize performance for a wide range of gamma-ray energies and imaging subjects. The detectors are horizontally oriented for animal imaging, and for plant imaging the system is rotated on its side to orient the detectors vertically. While this un-collimated detector system is unable to approach the sub-mm spatial resolution obtained by the most advanced preclinical pinhole SPECT systems, the high sensitivity could enable significant and new use in molecular imaging applications which do not require good spatial resolution- for example, screening applications for drug development (small animals), for material transport and sequestration studies for phytoremediation (plants), or for counting radiolabeled cells in vitro (well plates).

  16. Small animal simultaneous PET/MRI: initial experiences in a 9.4T microMRI

    SciTech Connect

    Maramraju, S.H.; Schlyer, D.; Maramraju, S.H.; Smith, S.D.; Junnarkar, S.S.; Schulz, D.; Stoll, S.; Ravindranath, B.; Purschke, M.L.; Rescia, S.; Southekal, S.; Pratte, J.-F.; Vaska, P.; Woody, C.L.; Schlyer, D.J.

    2011-03-25

    We developed a non-magnetic positron-emission tomography (PET) device based on the rat conscious animal PET that operates in a small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, thereby enabling us to carry out simultaneous PET/MRI studies. The PET detector comprises 12 detector blocks, each being a 4 x 8 array of lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals (2.22 x 2.22 x 5 mm{sup 3}) coupled to a matching non-magnetic avalanche photodiode array. The detector blocks, housed in a plastic case, form a 38 mm inner diameter ring with an 18 mm axial extent. Custom-built MRI coils fit inside the positron-emission tomography (PET) device, operating in transceiver mode. The PET insert is integrated with a Bruker 9.4 T 210 mm clear-bore diameter MRI scanner. We acquired simultaneous PET/MR images of phantoms, of in vivo rat brain, and of cardiac-gated mouse heart using [{sup 11}C]raclopride and 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-d-glucose PET radiotracers. There was minor interference between the PET electronics and the MRI during simultaneous operation, and small effects on the signal-to-noise ratio in the MR images in the presence of the PET, but no noticeable visual artifacts. Gradient echo and high-duty-cycle spin echo radio frequency (RF) pulses resulted in a 7% and a 28% loss in PET counts, respectively, due to high PET counts during the RF pulses that had to be gated out. The calibration of the activity concentration of PET data during MR pulsing is reproducible within less than 6%. Our initial results demonstrate the feasibility of performing simultaneous PET and MRI studies in adult rats and mice using the same PET insert in a small-bore 9.4 T MRI.

  17. Small animal simultaneous PET/MRI: initial experiences in a 9.4 T microMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsha Maramraju, Sri; Smith, S. David; Junnarkar, Sachin S.; Schulz, Daniela; Stoll, Sean; Ravindranath, Bosky; Purschke, Martin L.; Rescia, Sergio; Southekal, Sudeepti; Pratte, Jean-François; Vaska, Paul; Woody, Craig L.; Schlyer, David J.

    2011-04-01

    We developed a non-magnetic positron-emission tomography (PET) device based on the rat conscious animal PET that operates in a small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, thereby enabling us to carry out simultaneous PET/MRI studies. The PET detector comprises 12 detector blocks, each being a 4 × 8 array of lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals (2.22 × 2.22 × 5 mm3) coupled to a matching non-magnetic avalanche photodiode array. The detector blocks, housed in a plastic case, form a 38 mm inner diameter ring with an 18 mm axial extent. Custom-built MRI coils fit inside the positron-emission tomography (PET) device, operating in transceiver mode. The PET insert is integrated with a Bruker 9.4 T 210 mm clear-bore diameter MRI scanner. We acquired simultaneous PET/MR images of phantoms, of in vivo rat brain, and of cardiac-gated mouse heart using [11C]raclopride and 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose PET radiotracers. There was minor interference between the PET electronics and the MRI during simultaneous operation, and small effects on the signal-to-noise ratio in the MR images in the presence of the PET, but no noticeable visual artifacts. Gradient echo and high-duty-cycle spin echo radio frequency (RF) pulses resulted in a 7% and a 28% loss in PET counts, respectively, due to high PET counts during the RF pulses that had to be gated out. The calibration of the activity concentration of PET data during MR pulsing is reproducible within less than 6%. Our initial results demonstrate the feasibility of performing simultaneous PET and MRI studies in adult rats and mice using the same PET insert in a small-bore 9.4 T MRI.

  18. Commissioning of a novel microCT/RT system for small animal conformal radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Manuel; Zhou, Hu; Keall, Paul; Graves, Edward

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to commission a 120 kVp photon beam produced by a micro-computed tomography (microCT) scanner for use in irradiating mice to therapeutic doses. A variable-aperture collimator has been integrated with a microCT scanner to allow the delivery of beams with pseudocircular profiles of arbitrary width between 0.1 and 6.0 cm. The dose rate at the isocenter of the system was measured using ion chamber and gafchromic EBT film as 1.56-2.13 Gy min-1 at the water surface for field diameters between 0.2 and 6.0 cm. The dose rate decreases approximately 10% per every 5 mm depth in water for field diameters between 0.5 and 1.0 cm. The flatness, symmetry and penumbra of the beam are 3.6%, 1.0% and 0.5 mm, respectively. These parameters are sufficient to accurately conform the radiation dose delivered to target organs on mice. The irradiated field size is affected principally by the divergence of the beam. In general, the beam has appropriate dosimetric characteristics to accurately deliver the dose to organs inside the mice's bodies. Using multiple beams delivered from a variety of angular directions, targets as small as 2 mm may be irradiated while sparing surrounding tissue. This microCT/RT system is a feasible tool to irradiate mice using treatment planning and delivery methods analogous to those applied to humans.

  19. High Resolution, High Sensitivity Detectors for Molecular Imaging of Small Animals and Tumor Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliozzi, M. L.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lo Meo, S.; Lucentini, M.; Santavenere, F.; Veneroni, P.; Schillaci, O.; Simonetti, G.; Majewsky, S.; Cinti, M. N.; de Vincentis, G.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Scopinaro, F.

    2006-04-01

    Imaging techniques with radionuclides provide very sensitive measures of a wide range of specific processes underying disease in the body. Detection of very small tumors with high specificity is therefore possible but the tecnique requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity. We present the first simulations, performed by means of GEANT4 code, of breast tumors, imaged by different configurations of a compact discrete gamma camera, in order to optimize the performances of dedicated detectors for these tasks. Simulated planar images from 6 to 10 mm diameter tumors, placed at 5 mm from the collimator, were generated for NaI scintillator pixel sizes of 1.0×1.0 and 1.2×1.2 mm2, hexagonal hole Pb collimators with hole size of 1.5 and 1.9 mm. The generated photons have been sampled by two modelled Hamamatsu H8500 and H9500 PMT. Tumor to background uptake ratio from 1:6 to 1:12 has been considered. The preliminary results in terms of spatial resolution and SNR show a slightly better performance of the high efficiency collimator, larger crystal size and H9500 combination.

  20. Monitoring the Spatiotemporal Activities of miRNAs in Small Animal Models Using Molecular Imaging Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Baril, Patrick; Ezzine, Safia; Pichon, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding mRNA targets via sequence complementary inducing translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. A current challenge in the field of miRNA biology is to understand the functionality of miRNAs under physiopathological conditions. Recent evidence indicates that miRNA expression is more complex than simple regulation at the transcriptional level. MiRNAs undergo complex post-transcriptional regulations such miRNA processing, editing, accumulation and re-cycling within P-bodies. They are dynamically regulated and have a well-orchestrated spatiotemporal localization pattern. Real-time and spatio-temporal analyses of miRNA expression are difficult to evaluate and often underestimated. Therefore, important information connecting miRNA expression and function can be lost. Conventional miRNA profiling methods such as Northern blot, real-time PCR, microarray, in situ hybridization and deep sequencing continue to contribute to our knowledge of miRNA biology. However, these methods can seldom shed light on the spatiotemporal organization and function of miRNAs in real-time. Non-invasive molecular imaging methods have the potential to address these issues and are thus attracting increasing attention. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of methods used to detect miRNAs and discusses their contribution in the emerging field of miRNA biology and therapy. PMID:25749473

  1. A LSO β microprobe for measuring input functions for quantitative small animal PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maramraju, S.; Stoll, S.; Woody, C.; Schlyer, D.; Schiffer, W.; Lee, D.; Dewey, S.; Vaska, P.

    2007-02-01

    A miniature scintillation microprobe has been developed to measure the input function in live rodents for use in longitudinal, quantitative PET studies. The probe consists of a small lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystal measuring typically 0.3-0.5 mm diameter ×0.5-2 mm in length that is used to directly detect positrons in the blood or tissue. The probe has a sensitivity of 10-30 Hz/μCi/cm 3 and is primarily sensitive to short-range positrons emitted by labeled radiotracers in the blood. The sensitivity to γ-ray background can be minimized using a variable threshold in the readout to discriminate between positrons and γ's. The probe was implanted in one of the tail veins of a Sprague-Dawley rat and the input function was measured for the injection of 0.8 mCi of FDG in the other tail vein. The probe exhibits a fast time response that is able to quickly and accurately measure the concentration of 18F circulating in the bloodstream. Additional tests were also carried out to study the probe's sensitivity to γ-ray background.

  2. Scatter in Cargo Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Erin A. Miller; Joseph A. Caggiano; Robert C. Runkle; Timothy A. White; Aaron M. Bevill

    2011-03-01

    As a complement to passive detection systems, radiographic inspection of cargo is an increasingly important tool for homeland security because it has the potential to detect highly attenuating objects associated with special nuclear material or surrounding shielding, in addition to screening for items such as drugs or contraband. Radiographic detection of such threat objects relies on high image contrast between regions of different density and atomic number (Z). Threat detection is affected by scatter of the interrogating beamin the cargo, the radiographic system itself, and the surrounding environment, which degrades image contrast. Here, we estimate the extent to which scatter plays a role in radiographic imaging of cargo containers. Stochastic transport simulations were performed to determine the details of the radiography equipment and surrounding environment, which are important in reproducing measured data and to investigate scatter magnitudes for typical cargo. We find that scatter plays a stronger role in cargo radiography than in typicalmedical imaging scenarios, even for low-density cargo, with scatter-toprimary ratios ranging from 0.14 for very low density cargo, to between 0.20 and 0.40 for typical cargo, and higher yet for dense cargo.

  3. Optimisation in general radiography

    PubMed Central

    Martin, CJ

    2007-01-01

    Radiography using film has been an established method for imaging the internal organs of the body for over 100 years. Surveys carried out during the 1980s identified a wide range in patient doses showing that there was scope for dosage reduction in many hospitals. This paper discusses factors that need to be considered in optimising the performance of radiographic equipment. The most important factor is choice of the screen/film combination, and the preparation of automatic exposure control devices to suit its characteristics. Tube potential determines the photon energies in the X-ray beam, with the selection involving a compromise between image contrast and the dose to the patient. Allied to this is the choice of anti-scatter grid, as a high grid ratio effectively removes the larger component of scatter when using higher tube potentials. However, a high grid ratio attenuates the X-ray beam more heavily. Decisions about grids and use of low attenuation components are particularly important for paediatric radiography, which uses lower energy X-ray beams. Another factor which can reduce patient dose is the use of copper filtration to remove more low-energy X-rays. Regular surveys of patient dose and comparisons with diagnostic reference levels that provide a guide representing good practice enable units for which doses are higher to be identified. Causes can then be investigated and changes implemented to address any shortfalls. Application of these methods has led to a gradual reduction in doses in many countries. PMID:21614270

  4. Image Acquisition and Quality in Digital Radiography.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    Medical imaging has undergone dramatic changes and technological breakthroughs since the introduction of digital radiography. This article presents information on the development of digital radiography and types of digital radiography systems. Aspects of image quality and radiation exposure control are highlighted as well. In addition, the article includes related workplace changes and medicolegal considerations in the digital radiography environment. PMID:27601691

  5. Comparison between Different Methods for Biomechanical Assessment of Ex Vivo Fracture Callus Stiffness in Small Animal Bone Healing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Malte; Volkheimer, David; Meyers, Nicholaus; Wehner, Tim; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita

    2015-01-01

    For ex vivo measurements of fracture callus stiffness in small animals, different test methods, such as torsion or bending tests, are established. Each method provides advantages and disadvantages, and it is still debated which of those is most sensitive to experimental conditions (i.e. specimen alignment, directional dependency, asymmetric behavior). The aim of this study was to experimentally compare six different testing methods regarding their robustness against experimental errors. Therefore, standardized specimens were created by selective laser sintering (SLS), mimicking size, directional behavior, and embedding variations of respective rat long bone specimens. For the latter, five different geometries were created which show shifted or tilted specimen alignments. The mechanical tests included three-point bending, four-point bending, cantilever bending, axial compression, constrained torsion, and unconstrained torsion. All three different bending tests showed the same principal behavior. They were highly dependent on the rotational direction of the maximum fracture callus expansion relative to the loading direction (creating experimental errors of more than 60%), however small angular deviations (<15°) were negligible. Differences in the experimental results between the bending tests originate in their respective location of maximal bending moment induction. Compared to four-point bending, three-point bending is easier to apply on small rat and mouse bones under realistic testing conditions and yields robust measurements, provided low variation of the callus shape among the tested specimens. Axial compressive testing was highly sensitive to embedding variations, and therefore cannot be recommended. Although it is experimentally difficult to realize, unconstrained torsion testing was found to be the most robust method, since it was independent of both rotational alignment and embedding uncertainties. Constrained torsional testing showed small errors (up to

  6. Anatomical and metabolic small-animal whole-body imaging using ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun; Chatni, Muhammad; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Due to the wide use of animals for human disease studies, small animal whole-body imaging plays an increasingly important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose metabolic information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image coregistration, the spatial resolution of the metabolic imaging modality is not improved. We present a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography (RC-PACT) system that can provide both assessments in a single modality. Utilizing the novel design of confocal full-ring light delivery and ultrasound transducer array detection, RC-PACT provides full-view cross-sectional imaging with high spatial resolution. Scanning along the orthogonal direction provides three-dimensional imaging. While the mouse anatomy was imaged with endogenous hemoglobin contrast, the glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose. Through mouse tumor models, we demonstrate that RC-PACT may be a paradigm shifting imaging method for preclinical research.

  7. Design of an advanced positron emission tomography detector system and algorithms for imaging small animal models of human disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foudray, Angela Marie Klohs

    Detecting, quantifying and visualizing biochemical mechanism in a living system without perturbing function is the goal of the instrument and algorithms designed in this thesis. Biochemical mechanisms of cells have long been known to be dependent on the signals they receive from their environment. Studying biological processes of cells in-vitro can vastly distort their function, since you are removing them from their natural chemical signaling environment. Mice have become the biological system of choice for various areas of biomedical research due to their genetic and physiological similarities with humans, the relatively low cost of their care, and their quick breeding cycle. Drug development and efficacy assessment along with disease detection, management, and mechanism research all have benefited from the use of small animal models of human disease. A high resolution, high sensitivity, three-dimensional (3D) positioning positron emission tomography (PET) detector system was designed through device characterization and Monte Carlo simulation. Position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) were characterized in various packaging configurations; coupled to various configurations of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystals. Forty novelly packaged final design devices were constructed and characterized, each providing characteristics superior to commercially available scintillation detectors used in small animal imaging systems: ˜1mm crystal identification, 14-15% of 511 keV energy resolution, and averaging 1.9 to 5.6 ns coincidence time resolution. A closed-cornered box-shaped detector configuration was found to provide optimal photon sensitivity (˜10.5% in the central plane) using dual LSO-PSAPD scintillation detector modules and Monte Carlo simulation. Standard figures of merit were used to determine optimal system acquisition parameters. A realistic model for constituent devices was developed for understanding the signals reported by the

  8. A High-Frequency High Frame Rate Duplex Ultrasound Linear Array Imaging System for Small Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lequan; Xu, Xiaochen; Hu, Changhong; Sun, Lei; Yen, Jesse T.; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency (HF) ultrasound imaging has been shown to be useful for non-invasively imaging anatomical structures of the eye and small animals in biological and pharmaceutical research, achieving superior spatial resolution. Cardiovascular research utilizing mice requires not only real-time B-scan imaging, but also ultrasound Doppler to evaluate both anatomy and blood flow of the mouse heart. This paper reports the development of a high frequency ultrasound duplex imaging system capable of both B-mode imaging and Doppler flow measurements, using a 64-element linear array. The system included a HF pulsed-wave Doppler module, a 32-channel HF B-mode imaging module, a PC with a 200 MS/s 14-bit A/D card, and real-time LabView software. A 50dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and a depth of penetration of larger than 12 mm were achieved using a 35 MHz linear array with 50 μm pitch. The two-way beam widths were determined to be 165 μm to 260 μm and the clutter energy to total energy ratio (CTR) were 9.1 dB to 12 dB, when the array was electronically focused at different focal points at depths from 4.8 mm to 9.6 mm. The system is capable of acquiring real-time B-mode images at a rate greater than 400 frames per second (fps) for a 4.8 × 13 mm field of view, using a 30 MHz 64-element linear array with 100 μm pitch. Sample in vivo cardiac high frame rate images and duplex images of mouse hearts are shown to assess its current imaging capability and performance for small animals. PMID:20639149

  9. An MRI-compatible three-axis focused ultrasound system for performing drug delivery studies in small animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Chau, Anthony; Kukic, Aleksandra; Chopra, Rajiv; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-03-01

    MRI-guided focused-ultrasound is a non-invasive technique that can enhance the delivery of therapeutic agents. The objective of this work was to develop a focused-ultrasound system for preclinical research in small animals that is capable of sonicating with high spatial precision within a closed-bore MRI. The system features a computer-controlled, non-magnetic, three-axis positioning system that uses piezoelectric actuators and linear optical encoders to position a focused-ultrasound transducer to targeted tissues under MRI guidance. The actuator and encoder signals are transmitted through low-pass-filtered connectors on a grounded RF-penetration panel to prevent artifacts during image acquisition. The transducer is attached to the positioning system by a rigid arm and is submerged within a closed water tank. The arm passes into the tank through flexible bellows to ensure that the system remains sealed. An RF coil acquires high-resolution images in the vicinity of the target tissue. An aperture on the water tank, centered about the RF coil, provides an access point for target sonication. Registration between ultrasound and MRI coordinates involves sonicating a temperature-sensitive phantom and measuring the centroid of the thermal focal zone in 3D with MR thermometry. Linear distances of 5 cm with a positioning resolution of 0.05 mm can be achieved for each axis. The system was operated successfully on MRI scanners from different vendors at both 1.5 and 3.0 T, and simultaneous motion and imaging was possible without any mutual interference or imaging artifacts. This system is used for high-throughput small-animal experiments to study the efficacy of ultrasound-enhanced drug delivery.

  10. A Novel Prior- and Motion-Based Compressed Sensing Method for Small-Animal Respiratory Gated CT

    PubMed Central

    Marinetto, Eugenio; Pascau, Javier; Desco, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Low-dose protocols for respiratory gating in cardiothoracic small-animal imaging lead to streak artifacts in the images reconstructed with a Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) method. We propose a novel prior- and motion-based reconstruction (PRIMOR) method, which improves prior-based reconstruction (PBR) by adding a penalty function that includes a model of motion. The prior image is generated as the average of all the respiratory gates, reconstructed with FDK. Motion between respiratory gates is estimated using a nonrigid registration method based on hierarchical B-splines. We compare PRIMOR with an equivalent PBR method without motion estimation using as reference the reconstruction of high dose data. From these data acquired with a micro-CT scanner, different scenarios were simulated by changing photon flux and number of projections. Methods were evaluated in terms of contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR), mean square error (MSE), streak artefact indicator (SAI), solution error norm (SEN), and correction of respiratory motion. Also, to evaluate the effect of each method on lung studies quantification, we have computed the Jaccard similarity index of the mask obtained from segmenting each image as compared to those obtained from the high dose reconstruction. Both iterative methods greatly improved FDK reconstruction in all cases. PBR was prone to streak artifacts and presented blurring effects in bone and lung tissues when using both a low number of projections and low dose. Adopting PBR as a reference, PRIMOR increased CNR up to 33% and decreased MSE, SAI and SEN up to 20%, 4% and 13%, respectively. PRIMOR also presented better compensation for respiratory motion and higher Jaccard similarity index. In conclusion, the new method proposed for low-dose respiratory gating in small-animal scanners shows an improvement in image quality and allows a reduction of dose or a reduction of the number of projections between two and three times with respect to previous PBR approaches. PMID

  11. A Novel Prior- and Motion-Based Compressed Sensing Method for Small-Animal Respiratory Gated CT.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Juan F P J; Abella, Monica; Marinetto, Eugenio; Pascau, Javier; Desco, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Low-dose protocols for respiratory gating in cardiothoracic small-animal imaging lead to streak artifacts in the images reconstructed with a Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) method. We propose a novel prior- and motion-based reconstruction (PRIMOR) method, which improves prior-based reconstruction (PBR) by adding a penalty function that includes a model of motion. The prior image is generated as the average of all the respiratory gates, reconstructed with FDK. Motion between respiratory gates is estimated using a nonrigid registration method based on hierarchical B-splines. We compare PRIMOR with an equivalent PBR method without motion estimation using as reference the reconstruction of high dose data. From these data acquired with a micro-CT scanner, different scenarios were simulated by changing photon flux and number of projections. Methods were evaluated in terms of contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR), mean square error (MSE), streak artefact indicator (SAI), solution error norm (SEN), and correction of respiratory motion. Also, to evaluate the effect of each method on lung studies quantification, we have computed the Jaccard similarity index of the mask obtained from segmenting each image as compared to those obtained from the high dose reconstruction. Both iterative methods greatly improved FDK reconstruction in all cases. PBR was prone to streak artifacts and presented blurring effects in bone and lung tissues when using both a low number of projections and low dose. Adopting PBR as a reference, PRIMOR increased CNR up to 33% and decreased MSE, SAI and SEN up to 20%, 4% and 13%, respectively. PRIMOR also presented better compensation for respiratory motion and higher Jaccard similarity index. In conclusion, the new method proposed for low-dose respiratory gating in small-animal scanners shows an improvement in image quality and allows a reduction of dose or a reduction of the number of projections between two and three times with respect to previous PBR approaches. PMID

  12. A Longitudinal Evaluation of Partial Lung Irradiation in Mice by Using a Dedicated Image-Guided Small Animal Irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Granton, Patrick V.; Dubois, Ludwig; Elmpt, Wouter van; Hoof, Stefan J. van; Lieuwes, Natasja G.; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In lung cancer radiation therapy, the dose constraints are determined mostly by healthy lung toxicity. Preclinical microirradiators are a new tool to evaluate treatment strategies closer to clinical irradiation devices. In this study, we quantified local changes in lung density symptomatic of radiation-induced lung fibrosis (RILF) after partial lung irradiation in mice by using a precision image-guided small animal irradiator integrated with micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6 adult male mice (n=76) were divided into 6 groups: a control group (0 Gy) and groups irradiated with a single fraction of 4, 8, 12, 16, or 20 Gy using 5-mm circular parallel-opposed fields targeting the upper right lung. A Monte Carlo model of the small animal irradiator was used for dose calculations. Following irradiation, all mice were imaged at regular intervals over 39 weeks (10 time points total). Nonrigid deformation was used to register the initial micro-CT scan to all subsequent scans. Results: Significant differences could be observed between the 3 highest (>10 Gy) and 3 lowest irradiation (<10 Gy) dose levels. A mean difference of 120 ± 10 HU between the 0- and 20-Gy groups was observed at week 39. RILF was found to be spatially limited to the irradiated portion of the lung. Conclusions: The data suggest that the severity of RILF in partial lung irradiation compared to large field irradiation in mice for the same dose is reduced, and therefore higher doses can be tolerated.

  13. A flat-panel detector based micro-CT system: performance evaluation for small-animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Ho Kyung; Chun, In Kon; Cho, Myung Hye; Lee, Soo Yeol; Cho, Min Hyoung

    2003-12-21

    A dedicated small-animal x-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) system has been developed to screen laboratory small animals such as mice and rats. The micro-CT system consists of an indirect-detection flat-panel x-ray detector with a field-of-view of 120 x 120 mm2, a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder and a parallel data processing system. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array fabricated by a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) process coupled to a CsI:T1 (thallium-doped caesium iodide) scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. Principal imaging performances of the micro-CT system have been evaluated in terms of image uniformity, voxel noise and spatial resolution. It has been found that the image non-uniformity mainly comes from the structural non-uniform sensitivity pattern of the flat-panel detector and the voxel noise is about 48 CT numbers at the voxel size of 100 x 100 x 200 microm3 and the air kerma of 286 mGy. When the magnification ratio is 2, the spatial resolution of the micro-CT system is about 14 1p/mm (line pairs per millimetre) that is almost determined by the flat-panel detector showing about 7 1p/mm resolving power. Through low-contrast phantom imaging studies, the minimum resolvable contrast has been found to be less than 36 CT numbers at the air kerma of 95 mGy. Some laboratory rat imaging results are presented. PMID:14727760

  14. Integration and evaluation of a needle-positioning robot with volumetric microcomputed tomography image guidance for small animal stereotactic interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Waspe, Adam C.; McErlain, David D.; Pitelka, Vasek; Holdsworth, David W.; Lacefield, James C.; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Preclinical research protocols often require insertion of needles to specific targets within small animal brains. To target biologically relevant locations in rodent brains more effectively, a robotic device has been developed that is capable of positioning a needle along oblique trajectories through a single burr hole in the skull under volumetric microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) guidance. Methods: An x-ray compatible stereotactic frame secures the head throughout the procedure using a bite bar, nose clamp, and ear bars. CT-to-robot registration enables structures identified in the image to be mapped to physical coordinates in the brain. Registration is accomplished by injecting a barium sulfate contrast agent as the robot withdraws the needle from predefined points in a phantom. Registration accuracy is affected by the robot-positioning error and is assessed by measuring the surface registration error for the fiducial and target needle tracks (FRE and TRE). This system was demonstrated in situ by injecting 200 {mu}m tungsten beads into rat brains along oblique trajectories through a single burr hole on the top of the skull under micro-CT image guidance. Postintervention micro-CT images of each skull were registered with preintervention high-field magnetic resonance images of the brain to infer the anatomical locations of the beads. Results: Registration using four fiducial needle tracks and one target track produced a FRE and a TRE of 96 and 210 {mu}m, respectively. Evaluation with tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms showed that locations could be targeted with a mean error of 154{+-}113 {mu}m. Conclusions: The integration of a robotic needle-positioning device with volumetric micro-CT image guidance should increase the accuracy and reduce the invasiveness of stereotactic needle interventions in small animals.

  15. Digital radiography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Parks, Edwin T; Williamson, Gail F

    2002-11-15

    Since the discovery of X-rays in 1895, film has been the primary medium for capturing, displaying, and storing radiographic images. It is a technology that dental practitioners are the most familiar and comfortable with in terms of technique and interpretation. Digital radiography is the latest advancement in dental imaging and is slowly being adopted by the dental profession. Digital imaging incorporates computer technology in the capture, display, enhancement, and storage of direct radiographic images. Digital imaging offers some distinct advantages over film, but like any emerging technology, it presents new and different challenges for the practitioner to overcome. This article presents an overview of digital imaging including basic terminology and comparisons with film-based imaging. The principles of direct and indirect digital imaging modalities, intraoral and extraoral applications, image processing, and diagnostic efficacy will be discussed. In addition, the article will provide a list of questions dentists should consider prior to purchasing digital imaging systems for their practice. PMID:12444400

  16. Filters For Chest Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, N.; Paron, J.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of low dose radiography is achieved by a judicious combination of proper kV selection, fast film-screen systems and beam filtration. A systematic study of filters was undertaken to evaluate the improvements that can be realized in terms of patient Entrance Skin Exposures (ESE) for chest radiographs. The Picker CD 135 Generator and the Automatic Chest Filmer with dynamic phototiming were used for the study. The kV dependence of ESE with various amounts of zinc and aluminum filtration is presented. The effect of filtration on image contrast is discussed. The variations of ESE with phantom thickness under different filtration conditions are also considered. It was found that the ESE can be reduced by as much as a factor of 1.8 ± .1 with no significant increase in tube loading.

  17. Qualitative study of factors associated with antimicrobial usage in seven small animal veterinary practices in the UK.

    PubMed

    Mateus, Ana L P; Brodbelt, David C; Barber, Nick; Stärk, Katharina D C

    2014-11-01

    Responsible use of antimicrobials by veterinarians is essential to contain antimicrobial resistance in pathogens relevant to public health. Inappropriate antimicrobial use has been previously described in practice. However, there is scarce information on factors influencing antimicrobial usage in dogs and cats. We investigated intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing decision-making of antimicrobial usage in first opinion small animal practices in the UK through the application of qualitative research methods. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 veterinarians from seven veterinary first opinion practices in the UK in 2010. Topics investigated included: a) criteria used for selection of antimicrobials, b) influences by colleagues, c) influences by clients, d) pet characteristics, e) sources of knowledge, f) awareness of guidelines and g) protocols implemented in practice that may affect antimicrobial usage by veterinarians. Hypothetical scenarios selected to assess appropriateness of antimicrobial usage were: a) vomiting in a Yorkshire Terrier due to dietary indiscretion, b) deep pyoderma in a Shar-Pei, c) Feline Lower Urinary Tract disease in an 7 year-old male neutered cat and d) neutering of a 6-months dog. Interviews were recorded and transcribed by the interviewer. Thematic analysis was used to analyse content of transcribed interviews. Data management and analysis was conducted with qualitative analysis software NVivo8 (QSR International Pty Ltd). Antimicrobial usage by participants was influenced by factors other than clinical evidence and scientific knowledge. Intrinsic factors included veterinarian's preference of substances and previous experience. Extrinsic factors influencing antimicrobial selection were; perceived efficacy, ease of administration of formulations, perceived compliance, willingness and ability to treat by pet owners, and animal characteristics. Cost of therapy was only perceived as an influential factor in low, mixed

  18. A novel aerosol generator for homogenous distribution of powder over the lungs after pulmonary administration to small laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Tonnis, Wouter F; Bagerman, Marieke; Weij, Michel; Sjollema, Jelmer; Frijlink, Henderik W; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate powder formulations for pulmonary administration in pre-clinic research, the powder should be administered to the lungs of small laboratory animals. To do so properly, a device is needed that generates particles small enough to reach deep into the lungs. In this study a newly developed aerosol generator was tested for pulmonary administration of powder to the lungs of mice and its performance was compared to the only currently available device, the Penn-Century insufflator. Results showed that both devices generated powder particles of approximately the same size distribution, but the fine particle fraction needed for deep lung administration was strongly improved when the aerosol generator was used.Imaging studies in mice showed that powder particles from the aerosol generator deposited into the deep lung, where powder from the Penn-Century insufflator did not reach further than the conducting airways.Furthermore, powder administered by using the aerosol generator was more homogenously distributed over the five individual lungs lobes than powder administrated by using the Penn-Century insufflator. PMID:25460152

  19. Detecting metastasis of gastric carcinoma using high-resolution micro-CT system: in vivo small animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junting; Tian, Jie; Liang, Jimin; Li, Xiangsi; Yang, Xiang; Chen, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yi; Zhou, Yuanfang; Wang, Xiaorui

    2011-03-01

    Immunocytochemical and immunofluorescence staining are used for identifying the characteristics of metastasis in traditional ways. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a useful tool for monitoring and longitudinal imaging of tumor in small animal in vivo. In present study, we evaluated the feasibility of the detection for metastasis of gastric carcinoma by high-resolution micro-CT system with omnipaque accumulative enhancement method in the organs. Firstly, a high-resolution micro-CT ZKKS-MCT-sharp micro-CT was developed by our research group and Guangzhou Zhongke Kaisheng Medical Technology Co., Ltd. Secondly, several gastric carcinoma models were established through inoculating 2x106 BGC-823 gastric carcinoma cells subcutaneously. Thirdly, micro-CT scanning was performed after accumulative enhancement method of intraperitoneal injection of omnipaque contrast agent containing 360 mg iodine with a concentration of 350 mg I/ml. Finally, we obtained high-resolution anatomical information of the metastasis in vivo in a BALB/c NuNu nude mouse, the 3D tumor architecture is revealed in exquisite detail at about 35 μm spatial resolution. In addition, the accurate shape and volume of the micrometastasis as small as 0.78 mm3 can be calculated with our software. Overall, our data suggest that this imaging approach and system could be used to enhance the understanding of tumor proliferation, metastasis and could be the basis for evaluating anti-tumor therapies.

  20. [2D imaging simulations of a small animal PET scanner with DOI measurement: jPET-RD.].

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Taiga; Kitamura, Keishi; Hagiwara, Naoki; Obi, Takashi; Hasegawa, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Eiji; Tsuda, Tomoaki; Inadama, Naoko; Wada, Yasuhiro; Murayama, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    We present a preliminary study on the design of a high sensitivity small animal DOI-PET scanner: jPET-RD (for Rodents with DOI detectors), which will contribute to molecular imaging. The 4-layer DOI block detector for the jPET-RD that consists of scintillation crystals (1.4 mm x 1.4 mm x 4.5 mm) and a flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (52 mm x 52 mm) was previously proposed. In this paper, we investigate imaging performance of the jPET-RD through numerical simulations. The scanner has a hexagonal geometry with a small diameter and a large axial aperture. Therefore DOI information is expected to improve resolution uniformity in the whole field of view (FOV). We simulate the scanner for various parameters of the number of DOI channels and the crystal length. Simulated data are reconstructed using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization with accurate system modeling. The trade-off results between background noise and spatial resolution show that only shortening the length of crystal does not improve the trade-off at all, and that 4-layer DOI information improves uniformity of spatial resolution in the whole FOV. Excellent performance of the jPET-RD can be expected based on the numerical simulation results. PMID:15961924

  1. On the use of an analytic source model for dose calculations in precision image-guided small animal radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granton, Patrick V.; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-05-01

    Precision image-guided small animal radiotherapy is rapidly advancing through the use of dedicated micro-irradiation devices. However, precise modeling of these devices in model-based dose-calculation algorithms such as Monte Carlo (MC) simulations continue to present challenges due to a combination of very small beams, low mechanical tolerances on beam collimation, positioning and long calculation times. The specific intent of this investigation is to introduce and demonstrate the viability of a fast analytical source model (AM) for use in either investigating improvements in collimator design or for use in faster dose calculations. MC models using BEAMnrc were developed for circular and square fields sizes from 1 to 25 mm in diameter (or side) that incorporated the intensity distribution of the focal spot modeled after an experimental pinhole image. These MC models were used to generate phase space files (PSFMC) at the exit of the collimators. An AM was developed that included the intensity distribution of the focal spot, a pre-calculated x-ray spectrum, and the collimator-specific entrance and exit apertures. The AM was used to generate photon fluence intensity distributions (ΦAM) and PSFAM containing photons radiating at angles according to the focal spot intensity distribution. MC dose calculations using DOSXYZnrc in a water and mouse phantom differing only by source used (PSFMC versus PSFAM) were found to agree within 7% and 4% for the smallest 1 and 2 mm collimator, respectively, and within 1% for all other field sizes based on depth dose profiles. PSF generation times were approximately 1200 times faster for the smallest beam and 19 times faster for the largest beam. The influence of the focal spot intensity distribution on output and on beam shape was quantified and found to play a significant role in calculated dose distributions. Beam profile differences due to collimator alignment were found in both small and large collimators sensitive to shifts of 1

  2. Antibiotic Resistance in Animal and Environmental Samples Associated with Small-Scale Poultry Farming in Northwestern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Braykov, Nikolay P.; Eisenberg, Joseph N. S.; Grossman, Marissa; Zhang, Lixin; Vasco, Karla; Cevallos, William; Muñoz, Diana; Acevedo, Andrés; Moser, Kara A.; Marrs, Carl F.; Trostle, James; Trueba, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effects of animal agriculture on the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) are cross-cutting and thus require a multidisciplinary perspective. Here we use ecological, epidemiological, and ethnographic methods to examine populations of Escherichia coli circulating in the production poultry farming environment versus the domestic environment in rural Ecuador, where small-scale poultry production employing nontherapeutic antibiotics is increasingly common. We sampled 262 “production birds” (commercially raised broiler chickens and laying hens) and 455 “household birds” (raised for domestic use) and household and coop environmental samples from 17 villages between 2010 and 2013. We analyzed data on zones of inhibition from Kirby-Bauer tests, rather than established clinical breakpoints for AR, to distinguish between populations of organisms. We saw significantly higher levels of AR in bacteria from production versus household birds; resistance to either amoxicillin-clavulanate, cephalothin, cefotaxime, and gentamicin was found in 52.8% of production bird isolates and 16% of household ones. A strain jointly resistant to the 4 drugs was exclusive to a subset of isolates from production birds (7.6%) and coop surfaces (6.5%) and was associated with a particular purchase site. The prevalence of AR in production birds declined with bird age (P < 0.01 for all antibiotics tested except tetracycline, sulfisoxazole, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). Farming status did not impact AR in domestic environments at the household or village level. Our results suggest that AR associated with small-scale poultry farming is present in the immediate production environment and likely originates from sources outside the study area. These outside sources might be a better place to target control efforts than local management practices. IMPORTANCE In developing countries, small-scale poultry farming employing antibiotics as growth promoters is being advanced as an

  3. Antibiotic Resistance in Animal and Environmental Samples Associated with Small-Scale Poultry Farming in Northwestern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Braykov, Nikolay P; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Grossman, Marissa; Zhang, Lixin; Vasco, Karla; Cevallos, William; Muñoz, Diana; Acevedo, Andrés; Moser, Kara A; Marrs, Carl F; Foxman, Betsy; Trostle, James; Trueba, Gabriel; Levy, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The effects of animal agriculture on the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) are cross-cutting and thus require a multidisciplinary perspective. Here we use ecological, epidemiological, and ethnographic methods to examine populations of Escherichia coli circulating in the production poultry farming environment versus the domestic environment in rural Ecuador, where small-scale poultry production employing nontherapeutic antibiotics is increasingly common. We sampled 262 "production birds" (commercially raised broiler chickens and laying hens) and 455 "household birds" (raised for domestic use) and household and coop environmental samples from 17 villages between 2010 and 2013. We analyzed data on zones of inhibition from Kirby-Bauer tests, rather than established clinical breakpoints for AR, to distinguish between populations of organisms. We saw significantly higher levels of AR in bacteria from production versus household birds; resistance to either amoxicillin-clavulanate, cephalothin, cefotaxime, and gentamicin was found in 52.8% of production bird isolates and 16% of household ones. A strain jointly resistant to the 4 drugs was exclusive to a subset of isolates from production birds (7.6%) and coop surfaces (6.5%) and was associated with a particular purchase site. The prevalence of AR in production birds declined with bird age (P < 0.01 for all antibiotics tested except tetracycline, sulfisoxazole, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). Farming status did not impact AR in domestic environments at the household or village level. Our results suggest that AR associated with small-scale poultry farming is present in the immediate production environment and likely originates from sources outside the study area. These outside sources might be a better place to target control efforts than local management practices. IMPORTANCE In developing countries, small-scale poultry farming employing antibiotics as growth promoters is being advanced as an inexpensive source of

  4. A computational pipeline for quantification of pulmonary infections in small animal models using serial PET-CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are the second leading cause of death worldwide. In order to better understand and treat them, an accurate evaluation using multi-modal imaging techniques for anatomical and functional characterizations is needed. For non-invasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET), there have been many engineering improvements that have significantly enhanced the resolution and contrast of the images, but there are still insufficient computational algorithms available for researchers to use when accurately quantifying imaging data from anatomical structures and functional biological processes. Since the development of such tools may potentially translate basic research into the clinic, this study focuses on the development of a quantitative and qualitative image analysis platform that provides a computational radiology perspective for pulmonary infections in small animal models. Specifically, we designed (a) a fast and robust automated and semi-automated image analysis platform and a quantification tool that can facilitate accurate diagnostic measurements of pulmonary lesions as well as volumetric measurements of anatomical structures, and incorporated (b) an image registration pipeline to our proposed framework for volumetric comparison of serial scans. This is an important investigational tool for small animal infectious disease models that can help advance researchers’ understanding of infectious diseases. Methods We tested the utility of our proposed methodology by using sequentially acquired CT and PET images of rabbit, ferret, and mouse models with respiratory infections of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB), H1N1 flu virus, and an aerosolized respiratory pathogen (necrotic TB) for a total of 92, 44, and 24 scans for the respective studies with half of the scans from CT and the other half from PET. Institutional Administrative Panel on Laboratory Animal

  5. Irradiation of prolate spheroidal models of humans and animals in the near field of a small loop antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhtakia, A.; Iskander, M. F.; Durney, C. H.; Massoudi, H.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of the near-field irradiation of prolate spheroidal models of humans and animals by a small coaxial loop antenna is described. The near fields of the antenna are known exactly and hence are used to identify the suitable field parameters involved in the near-field absorption in the spheroidal model. An integral equation is formulated in terms of the transverse dyadic Green's function, and the fields radiated by the current loop are expanded in terms of the vector spherical harmonics. The extended boundary condition method is then employed to solve the integral equation. The power distribution and the average specific absorption rate (SAR) are calculated and plotted, for different human and animal models, as a function of the separation distance from the loop. It is shown that for distances less than 5λ the average SAR values oscillate about the far-field value. In particular, for d/λ < 0.4 an increase in the average SAR values was generally observed. It is also shown that in spite of the complicated nature of the near fields the absorption characteristics can still be explained in terms of the incident radiation. Furthermore, from the calculated SAR distributions at different frequencies it is shown that at all frequencies, excessive heating occurs at the surface of the spheroid while a limited absorption occurs in the central region around the major axis. This result is of particular importance in hyperthermia, where extensive efforts are being directed toward achieving deep-tissue heating by a coaxial coil carrying RF power at about 27 MHz.

  6. Integrating databases for research on health and performance in small animals and horses in the Nordic countries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In a world of limited resources, using existing databases in research is a potentially cost-effective way to increase knowledge, given that correct and meaningful results are gained. Nordic examples of the use of secondary small animal and equine databases include studies based on data from tumour registries, breeding registries, young horse quality contest results, competition data, insurance databases, clinic data, prescription data and hunting ability tests. In spite of this extensive use of secondary databases, integration between databases is less common. The aim of this presentation is to briefly review key papers that exemplify different ways of utilizing data from multiple sources, to highlight the benefits and limitations of the approaches, to discuss key issues/challenges that must be addressed when integrating data and to suggest future directions. Data from pedigree databases have been individually merged with competition data and young horse quality contest data, and true integration has also been done with canine insurance data and with equine clinical data. Data have also been merged on postal code level; i.e. insurance data were merged to a digitized map of Sweden and additional meteorological information added. In addition to all the data quality and validity issues inherent in the use of a single database, additional obstacles arise when combining information from several databases. Loss of individuals due to incorrect or mismatched identifying information can be considerable. If there are any possible biases affecting whether or not individuals can be properly linked, misinformation may result in a further reduction in power. Issues of confidentiality may be more difficult to address across multiple databases. For example, human identity information must be protected, but may be required to ensure valid merging of data. There is a great potential to better address complex issues of health and disease in companion animals and horses by integrating

  7. Diffusion Tensor and Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Measures as Biomarkers of Brain Damage in a Small Animal Model of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Margaret R.; Peterson, Kristin L.; Ibrahim, Wael G.; Lee, Dianne E.; Sarlls, Joelle; Lizak, Martin J.; Maric, Dragan; Reid, William C.; Hammoud, Dima A.

    2014-01-01

    Background There are currently no widely accepted neuro-HIV small animal models. We wanted to validate the HIV-1 Transgenic rat (Tg) as an appropriate neuro-HIV model and then establish in vivo imaging biomarkers of neuropathology, within this model, using MR structural and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods Young and middle-aged Tg and control rats were imaged using MRI. A subset of middle-aged animals underwent longitudinal repeat imaging six months later. Total brain volume (TBV), ventricular volume (VV) and parenchymal volume (PV = TBV–VV) were measured. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values of the corpus callosum (CC) were calculated from DTI data. Results TBV and PV were smaller in Tg compared to control rats in young and middle-aged cohorts (p<0.0001). VV increased significantly (p = 0.005) over time in the longitudinal Tg cohort. There were lower FA (p<0.002) and higher MD (p<0.003) values in the CC of middle-aged Tg rats compared to age-matched controls. Longitudinally, MD significantly decreased over time in Tg rats (p<0.03) while it did not change significantly in the control cohort over the same period of time (p>0.05). Conclusions We detected brain volume loss in the Tg rat, probably due to astrocytic dysfunction/loss, loss of structural/axonal matrix and striatal neuronal loss as suggested by immunofluorescence. Increased MD and decreased FA in the CC probably reflect microstructural differences between the Tg and Control rats which could include increased extracellular space between white matter tracts, demyelination and axonal degeneration, among other pathologies. We believe that the Tg rat is an adequate model of neuropathology in HIV and that volumetric MR and DTI measures can be potentially used as biomarkers of disease progression. PMID:25144656

  8. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott; Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W.; Sloan, Andrew

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A

  9. [Evaluation of a modified exogenous creatinine clearance as a suitable renal function test for the small animal practice].

    PubMed

    Höchel, Joachim; Finnah, Anke; Velde, Karsten; Hartmann, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    A suitable method in the routine veterinary practice for the quantitative determination of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in dogs and cats has not been available until to date. Therefore, we modified the known plasma clearance model (=P-CL). The resulting P-CLterminal was assessed concerning its diagnostic value. P-CL of exogenous creatinine (P-CLcrea) and of inulin were determined in dogs (n=12, Beagle, 6 months of age) and cats (n=11, Domestic Short Hair, 14 months of age). The marker substances were administered as a bolus injection. In fasted dogs, P-CLcrea was 84.3 +/- 14.85 ml/min/m2 after a creatinine dose of 2.4 g/m2. An electrolyte infusion during the clearance determination did not alter the resulting values (p>0.05). In fasted cats, P-CLcrea was 54.7 +/- 5.8 ml/min/m2 (creatinine dose 2.0 g/m2). The inulin clearance, determined at the same time, was 104.5 +/- 19.81 ml/min/m2. Feeding the cats just before and during the test increased P-CL of both markers significantly (p<0.05). In order to adapt the clearance method for diagnostic assessment of GFR in the small animal practice, we aimed at minimizing the number of required blood samples (3 instead of 7 or more) and introduced the modified exogenous creatinine clearance (P-CLterminal). These values determined were 108.4 +/- 20.81 ml/min/m2 in fasted dogs and 66.3 +/- 11.81 ml/min/m2 in fasted cats. An electrolyte infusion (dogs) and feeding (cats) had the same effect on P-CLterminal values as described above for P-CL. In conclusion,the modified exogenous creatinine clearance is a suitable renal function test for the early diagnosis of renal disease in dogs and cats presented in small animal practices. PMID:15495934

  10. SU-E-T-376: 3-D Commissioning for An Image-Guided Small Animal Micro- Irradiation Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, X; Wuu, C; Admovics, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A 3-D radiochromic plastic dosimeter has been used to cross-test the isocentricity of a high resolution image-guided small animal microirradiation platform. In this platform, the mouse stage rotating for cone beam CT imaging is perpendicular to the gantry rotation for sub-millimeter radiation delivery. A 3-D dosimeter can be used to verify both imaging and irradiation coordinates. Methods: A 3-D dosimeter and optical CT scanner were used in this study. In the platform, both mouse stage and gantry can rotate 360° with rotation axis perpendicular to each other. Isocentricity and coincidence of mouse stage and gantry rotations were evaluated using star patterns. A 3-D dosimeter was placed on mouse stage with center at platform isocenter approximately. For CBCT isocentricity, with gantry moved to 90°, the mouse stage rotated horizontally while the x-ray was delivered to the dosimeter at certain angles. For irradiation isocentricity, the gantry rotated 360° to deliver beams to the dosimeter at certain angles for star patterns. The uncertainties and agreement of both CBCT and irradiation isocenters can be determined from the star patterns. Both procedures were repeated 3 times using 3 dosimeters to determine short-term reproducibility. Finally, dosimeters were scanned using optical CT scanner to obtain the results. Results: The gantry isocentricity is 0.9 ± 0.1 mm and mouse stage rotation isocentricity is about 0.91 ± 0.11 mm. Agreement between the measured isocenters of irradiation and imaging coordinates was determined. The short-term reproducibility test yielded 0.5 ± 0.1 mm between the imaging isocenter and the irradiation isocenter, with a maximum displacement of 0.7 ± 0.1 mm. Conclusion: The 3-D dosimeter can be very useful in precise verification of targeting for a small animal irradiation research. In addition, a single 3-D dosimeter can provide information in both geometric and dosimetric uncertainty, which is crucial for translational studies.

  11. SemiSPECT: A small-animal SPECT imager based on eight cadmium zinc tellurium detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunki

    We have completed a new small-animal imaging system, called SemiSPECT, based on eight pixellated cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) gamma-ray detector arrays. The detector is a 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm x 0.15 cm slab having a 64 x 64 pixel array. A read-out application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is attached onto the detector via indium-bump bonding, and a -180 V bias is applied onto the detector surface to transport electron-hole pairs generated by gamma-ray interaction. Eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. An eight-pinhole aperture is placed at the center of the ring, and an object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole. The object can be rotated about a vertical axis to attain sufficient angular projections for tomographic reconstruction. The whole system gantry is compact enough to be placed onto a desktop-sized optical breadboard. Eight front-end boards were developed to detect events, generate list-mode data arrays, and send them to back-end boards. Four back-end boards are utilized to hold the list-mode data arrays and transfer them to a host computer. Eight clock-and-bias boards provide clock and bias signals to the eight ASICs. Eight control-and-bias boards were developed to monitor and control the temperatures on the eight detectors, analog and digital currents supplied to the eight ASICs, and -180 V biases applied to the eight detector surfaces. The spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, estimated both based on the system geometry and via the Fourier crosstalk approach, is about 1˜2 mm. The system sensitivity measured with a point source is about 1.53 x 10-4, and the estimated one from the system geometry is about 1.41 x 10-4. The energy resolution acquired by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 x 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum for 140 keV gamma rays. The detectabilities for multiple signal spheres simulating various lesions or organs in a small animal are presented and discussed. A line

  12. NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY (NRAD) REACTOR 64-ELEMENT CORE UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2014-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA (registered) (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The interim critical configuration developed during the core upgrade, which contains only 62 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The final 64-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (approximately +/-1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  13. Scattering corrections in neutron radiography using point scattered functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardjilov, N.; de Beer, F.; Hassanein, R.; Lehmann, E.; Vontobel, P.

    2005-04-01

    Scattered neutrons cause distortions and blurring in neutron radiography pictures taken at small distances between the investigated object and the detector. This defines one of the most significant problems in quantitative neutron radiography. The quantification of strong scattering materials such as hydrogenous materials—water, oil, plastic, etc.—with a high precision is very difficult due to the scattering effect in the radiography images. The scattering contribution in liquid test samples (H 2O, D 2O and a special type oil ISOPAR L) at different distances between the samples and the detector, the so-called Point Scattered Function (PScF), was calculated with the help of MCNP-4C Monte Carlo code. Corrections of real experimental data were performed using the calculated PScF. Some of the results as well as the correction algorithm will be presented.

  14. Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Upper GI Tract Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography or ... X-ray? What is Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract Radiography? Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography, also called an upper ...

  15. Comparative efficacy and the window of radioprotection for adrenergic and serotoninergic agents and aminothiols in experiments with small and large animals

    PubMed Central

    Vasin, Mikhail V.; Ushakov, Igor B.

    2015-01-01

    This review gives a comparative evaluation of the radioprotective properties and the therapeutic index (TI) of radioprotectors from various pharmacological group in experiments on both small and large animals. It presents a hypothesis explaining the decrease in the TI of cystamine and 5-methoxytryptamine (mexamine), and the retention of that of α1-adrenomimetic indralin, and also compares the effects on large and small animals. The considerable differences in the therapeutic indices of catecholamines, serotonin and cystamine are a consequence of specific features of their mechanisms of radioprotective action. Radioprotectors acting via receptor mediation tend to provide a more expanded window of protection. The reduction in the TI of cystamine in larger animals, such as dogs, may be caused by the greater increase in toxicity of aminothiols in relation to the decrease in their optimal doses for radioprotective effect in going from mice to dogs, which is a consequence of the slower metabolic processes in larger animals. The somatogenic phase of intoxication by cystamine is significantly longer than the duration of its radioprotective effect, and increases with irradiation. The decrease in the radioprotective effect and the TI of mexamine in experiments with dogs may be caused by their lower sensitivity to the acute hypoxia induced by the mexamine. This is because of lower gradient in oxygen tension between tissue cells and blood capillaries under acute hypoxia that is determined by lower initial oxygen consumption in a large animal as compared with a small animal. Indralin likely provides optimal radioprotective effects and a higher TI for large animals via the increased specificity of its adrenergic effect on tissue respiration, which supports the development of acute hypoxia in the radiosensitive tissues of large animals. The stimulatory effect of indralin on early post-irradiation haematopoietic recovery cannot provide a high level of radioprotective action for

  16. Comparative efficacy and the window of radioprotection for adrenergic and serotoninergic agents and aminothiols in experiments with small and large animals.

    PubMed

    Vasin, Mikhail V; Ushakov, Igor B

    2015-01-01

    This review gives a comparative evaluation of the radioprotective properties and the therapeutic index (TI) of radioprotectors from various pharmacological group in experiments on both small and large animals. It presents a hypothesis explaining the decrease in the TI of cystamine and 5-methoxytryptamine (mexamine), and the retention of that of α1-adrenomimetic indralin, and also compares the effects on large and small animals. The considerable differences in the therapeutic indices of catecholamines, serotonin and cystamine are a consequence of specific features of their mechanisms of radioprotective action. Radioprotectors acting via receptor mediation tend to provide a more expanded window of protection. The reduction in the TI of cystamine in larger animals, such as dogs, may be caused by the greater increase in toxicity of aminothiols in relation to the decrease in their optimal doses for radioprotective effect in going from mice to dogs, which is a consequence of the slower metabolic processes in larger animals. The somatogenic phase of intoxication by cystamine is significantly longer than the duration of its radioprotective effect, and increases with irradiation. The decrease in the radioprotective effect and the TI of mexamine in experiments with dogs may be caused by their lower sensitivity to the acute hypoxia induced by the mexamine. This is because of lower gradient in oxygen tension between tissue cells and blood capillaries under acute hypoxia that is determined by lower initial oxygen consumption in a large animal as compared with a small animal. Indralin likely provides optimal radioprotective effects and a higher TI for large animals via the increased specificity of its adrenergic effect on tissue respiration, which supports the development of acute hypoxia in the radiosensitive tissues of large animals. The stimulatory effect of indralin on early post-irradiation haematopoietic recovery cannot provide a high level of radioprotective action for

  17. Angular signal radiography.

    PubMed

    Li, Panyun; Zhang, Kai; Bao, Yuan; Ren, Yuqi; Ju, Zaiqiang; Wang, Yan; He, Qili; Zhu, Zhongzhu; Huang, Wanxia; Yuan, Qingxi; Zhu, Peiping

    2016-03-21

    Microscopy techniques using visible photons, x-rays, neutrons, and electrons have made remarkable impact in many scientific disciplines. The microscopic data can often be expressed as the convolution of the spatial distribution of certain properties of the specimens and the inherent response function of the imaging system. The x-ray grating interferometer (XGI), which is sensitive to the deviation angle of the incoming x-rays, has attracted significant attention in the past years due to its capability in achieving x-ray phase contrast imaging with low brilliance source. However, the comprehensive and analytical theoretical framework is yet to be presented. Herein, we propose a theoretical framework termed angular signal radiography (ASR) to describe the imaging process of the XGI system in a classical, comprehensive and analytical manner. We demonstrated, by means of theoretical deduction and synchrotron based experiments, that the spatial distribution of specimens' physical properties, including absorption, refraction and scattering, can be extracted by ASR in XGI. Implementation of ASR in XGI offers advantages such as simplified phase retrieval algorithm, reduced overall radiation dose, and improved image acquisition speed. These advantages, as well as the limitations of the proposed method, are systematically investigated in this paper. PMID:27136780

  18. SU-C-BRE-01: 3D Conformal Micro Irradiation Results of Four Treatment Sites for Preclinical Small Animal and Clinical Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S; Yaddanapudi, S; Rangaraj, D; Izaguirre, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Small animal irradiation can provide preclinical insights necessary for clinical advancement. In order to provide clinically relevant data, these small animal irradiations must be designed such that the treatment methods and results are comparable to clinical protocols, regardless of variations in treatment size and modality. Methods: Small animal treatments for four treatment sites (brain, liver, lung and spine) were investigated, accounting for change in treatment energy and target size. Up to five orthovoltage (300kVp) beams were used in the preclinical treatments, using circular, square, and conformal tungsten apertures, based on the treatment site. Treatments were delivered using the image guided micro irradiator (microIGRT). The plans were delivered to a mouse sized phantom and dose measurements in axial and coronal planes were performed using radiochromic film. The results of the clinical and preclinical protocols were characterized in terms of conformality number, CTV coverage, dose nonuniformity ratio, and organ at risk sparing. Results: Preclinical small animal treatment conformality was within 1–16% of clinical results for all treatment sites. The volume of the CTV receiving 100% of the prescription dose was typically within 10% of clinical values. The dose non-uniformity was consistently higher for preclinical treatments compared to clinical treatments, indicating hot spots in the target. The ratios of the mean dose in the target to the mean dose in an organ at risk were comparable if not better for preclinical versus clinical treatments. Finally, QUANTEC dose constraints were applied and the recommended morbidity limits were satisfied in each small animal treatment site. Conclusion: We have shown that for four treatment sites, preclinical 3D conformal small animal treatments can be clinically comparable if clinical protocols are followed. Using clinical protocols as the standard, preclinical irradiation methods can be altered and iteratively

  19. Longitudinal in vivo transcutaneous observation of Raman signals from breast cancer during chemotherapy in small animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Myeongsu; Myoung, NoSoung; Yim, Sang-Youp; Kim, Jae G.

    2015-02-01

    Because mammography, the gold standard of breast cancer screening and monitoring treatment efficacy, has limitations, there is a necessity to have a new method for breast cancer patients. Raman spectroscopy is considered as one of the best alternative approaches due to its ability of visualizing (bio)chemical information of a matter. In this study, we hypothesized that the change of biochemical composition occurs earlier than morphological change in breast cancer during chemotherapy, and attempted to prove it by employing fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy for longitudinal Raman measurement in small animal breast cancer model. To confirm the hypothesis, we measured Raman spectra of a tumor breast and the contralateral breast during chemotherapy for 4 fisher 344 female rats longitudinally. Principal component analysis and Raman spectral differences between breast tumor and contralateral normal breast did not show a clear difference between them which may have been caused by interference from skin. Thus, spatially-offset Raman spectroscopy will be employed in order to acquire the Raman signal directly from tumor while suppressing Raman signal from skin for the future study.

  20. Preliminary assessment of the imaging capability of the YAP (S)PET small animal scanner in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, Antonietta; Belcari, Nicola; Stark, Daniela; Höhnemann, Sabine; Piel, Markus; Jennewein, Marc; Schmitt, Ulrich; Tillmanns, Julia; Thews, Oliver; Hiemke, Christoph; Roesch, Frank; Del Guerra, Alberto

    2006-12-01

    The new and fully engineered version of the YAP-(S)PET small animal scanner has been tested at the University of Mainz for preliminary assessment of its imaging capability for studies related to neuropharmacology and psychiatry. The main feature of the scanner is the capability to combine PET and SPECT techniques. It allows the development of new and interesting protocols for the investigation of many biological phenomena, more effectively than with PET or SPECT modalities alone. The scanner is made up of four detector heads, each one composed of a 4×4 cm 2 of YAlO 3:Ce (or YAP:Ce) matrix, and has a field of view (FOV) of 4 cm axially×4 cm ∅ transaxially. In PET mode, the volume resolution is less than 8 mm 3 and is nearly constant over the whole FOV, while the sensitivity is about 2%. The SPECT performance is not so good, due to the presence of the multi-hole lead collimator in front of each head. Nevertheless, the YAP-PET scanner offers excellent resolution and sensitivity for performing on the availability of D2-like dopamine receptors on mice and rats in both PET and SPECT modalities.

  1. Full fabrication and packaging of an implantable multi-panel device for monitoring of metabolites in small animals.

    PubMed

    Baj-Rossi, Camilla; Kilinc, Enver G; Ghoreishizadeh, Sara S; Casarino, Daniele; Jost, Tanja Rezzonico; Dehollain, Catherine; Grassi, Fabio; Pastorino, Laura; De Micheli, Giovanni; Carrara, Sandro

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we show the realization of a fully-implantable device for monitoring free-moving small animals. The device integrates a microfabricated sensing platform, a coil for power and data transmission and two custom designed integrated circuits. The device is intended to be implanted in mice, free to move in a cage, to monitor the concentration of metabolites. We show the system level design of each block of the device, and we present the fabrication of the passive sensing platform and its employment for the electrochemical detection of endogenous and exogenous metabolites. Moreover, we describe the assembly of the device to test the biocompatibility of the materials used for the microfabrication. To ensure biocompatibility, an epoxy enhanced polyurethane membrane was used to cover the device. We proved through an in-vitro characterization that the membrane was capable to retain enzyme activity up to 35 days. After 30 days of implant in mice, in-vivo experiments proved that the membrane promotes the integration of the sensor with the surrounding tissue, as demonstrated by the low inflammation level at the implant site. PMID:25314709

  2. Re-Evaluate the Effect of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Cancer - A Preclinical Therapeutic Small Animal Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Sneha; Sengupta, Amit; Srivastava, Anurag; Gude, Rajiv P.; Ingle, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a known driver of angiogenesis that also facilitates tumor growth. Moreover, poorly oxygenated central tumor area remains relatively radio or chemo resistant. HBO therapy is known to elevate the levels of dissolved oxygen and eliminates tumor hypoxia. It has been one of the modalities in cancer treatment; therefore its optimization is important. In this experimental study, no cancer enhancing effect was seen during the course of HBO therapy; however, post therapy there was an accelerated growth and progression of tumor. HBO treated mice lived shorter and the response to therapy was dose & tumor volume dependent. HBO therapy probably exert its effect on the cancer proliferating cells through multiple pathways such as increased DNA damage, apoptosis & geno-toxicity leading to slow cancer progression while post therapy tumorigenic effect could be due to impaired DNA repair mechanism, mutagenic effect & aneuploidy as well as altered blood supply & nutrients. Tumor growth reached plateau with time and this finding validated theoretical model predicting tumor reaching an asymptotic limit. While, marked asymmetry observed in tumor volume progression or cancer cell proliferation rate in each of the experimental C3H mouse suggested a need for an alternate small animal pre-clinical cancer therapeutic model. PMID:23144880

  3. Performance investigation of SP3 and diffusion approximation for three-dimensional whole-body optical imaging of small animals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Defu; Chen, Xueli; Cao, Xu; Wang, Jing; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2015-09-01

    The third-order simplified harmonic spherical approximation (SP3) and diffusion approximation (DA) equations have been widely used in the three-dimensional (3D) whole-body optical imaging of small animals. With different types of tissues, which were classified by the ratio of µ s'/µ ɑ, the two equations have their own application scopes. However, the classification criterion was blurring and unreasonable, and the scope has not been systematically investigated until now. In this study, a new criterion for classifying tissues was established based on the absolute value of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients. Using the newly defined classification criterion, the performance and applicability of the SP3 and DA equations were evaluated with a series of investigation experiments. Extensive investigation results showed that the SP3 equation exhibited a better performance and wider applicability than the DA one in most of the observed cases, especially in tissues of low-scattering-low-absorption and low-scattering-high-absorption range. For the case of tissues with the high-scattering-low-absorption properties, a similar performance was observed for both the SP3 and the DA equations, in which case the DA was the preferred option for 3D whole-body optical imaging. Results of this study would provide significant reference for the study of hybrid light transport models. PMID:25850985

  4. Design considerations for a C-shaped PET system, dedicated to small animal brain imaging, using GATE Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthimiou, N.; Papadimitroulas, P.; Kostou, T.; Loudos, G.

    2015-09-01

    Commercial clinical and preclinical PET scanners rely on the full cylindrical geometry for whole body scans as well as for dedicated organs. In this study we propose the construction of a low cost dual-head C-shaped PET system dedicated for small animal brain imaging. Monte Carlo simulation studies were performed using GATE toolkit to evaluate the optimum design in terms of sensitivity, distortions in the FOV and spatial resolution. The PET model is based on SiPMs and BGO pixelated arrays. Four different configurations with C- angle 0°, 15°, 30° and 45° within the modules, were considered. Geometrical phantoms were used for the evaluation process. STIR software, extended by an efficient multi-threaded ray tracing technique, was used for the image reconstruction. The algorithm automatically adjusts the size of the FOV according to the shape of the detector's geometry. The results showed improvement in sensitivity of ∼15% in case of 45° C-angle compared to the 0° case. The spatial resolution was found 2 mm for 45° C-angle.

  5. An MRI-compatible three-axis focused ultrasound system for performing drug delivery studies in small animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Chau, Anthony; Kukic, Aleksandra; Chopra, Rajiv; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this work was to develop an MRI-compatible focused-ultrasound system for preclinical research in small animal models capable of delivering exposures with high spatial precision in a closed-bore clinical imager. A computer-controlled, non-magnetic, 3-axis positioning system was developed using ceramic actuators and linear encoders to position a focused-ultrasound transducer within a clinical MR scanner. Registration between ultrasound and MRI coordinates involves sonicating a tissue-mimicking ultrasound phantom and measuring the centroid of the thermal focal zone with MR thermometry. Linear distances of 5 cm with a positioning resolution of 0.1 mm were achieved for each axis. The system was operated successfully in MR imagers from different vendors at both 1.5 and 3.0 T, and simultaneous motion and imaging was possible without any mutual interference or imaging artifacts. Initial experiments involving opening of the blood-brain barrier at specific targets within the brain suggest a targeting accuracy of 0.4 mm.

  6. Design and performance tests of the calorimetric tract of a Compton Camera for small-animals imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Baldazzi, G.; Battistella, A.; Bello, M.; Bollini, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Fontana, C. L.; Gennaro, G.; Moschini, G.; Navarria, F.; Rashevsky, A.; Uzunov, N.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Vacchi, A.

    2011-02-01

    The bio-distribution and targeting capability of pharmaceuticals may be assessed in small animals by imaging gamma-rays emitted from radio-isotope markers. Detectors that exploit the Compton concept allow higher gamma-ray efficiency compared to conventional Anger cameras employing collimators, and feature sub-millimeter spatial resolution and compact geometry. We are developing a Compton Camera that has to address several requirements: the high rates typical of the Compton concept; detection of gamma-rays of different energies that may range from 140 keV ( 99 mTc) to 511 keV ( β+ emitters); presence of gamma and beta radiation with energies up to 2 MeV in case of 188Re. The camera consists of a thin position-sensitive Tracker that scatters the gamma ray, and a second position-sensitive detection system to totally absorb the energy of the scattered photons (Calorimeter). In this paper we present the design and discuss the realization of the calorimetric tract, including the choice of scintillator crystal, pixel size, and detector geometry. Simulations of the gamma-ray trajectories from source to detectors have helped to assess the accuracy of the system and decide on camera design. Crystals of different materials, such as LaBr 3 GSO and YAP, and of different size, in continuous or segmented geometry, have been optically coupled to a multi-anode Hamamatsu H8500 detector, allowing measurements of spatial resolution and efficiency.

  7. Characteristics of a multichannel low-noise front-end ASIC for CZT-based small animal PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, W.; Liu, H.; Gan, B.; Hu, Y.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present the design and characteristics of a novel low-noise front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit dedicated to CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for a small animal PET imaging system. A low-noise readout method based on the charge integration and the delayed peak detection is proposed. An eight-channel front-end readout prototype chip is designed and implemented in a 0.35 μm CMOS process. The die size is 2.3 mm ×2.3 mm. The prototype chip is tested in different methods including electronic test, energy spectrum test and irradiation test. The input range of the ASIC is from 2000e- to 180,000e-, reflecting the energy of the gamma ray from 11.2 keV to 1 MeV. The gain of the readout channel is 65 mV/fC at the shaping time of 1 μs. The best test result of the equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 58.9 e- at zero farad plus 5.4 e- per picofarad. The nonlinearity and the crosstalk are less than 3% and less than 2%, respectively, at the room temperature. The static power dissipation is about 3 mW/channel.

  8. [Digital subtraction radiography for the detection of periodontal bone changes].

    PubMed

    Mera, T

    1989-03-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of digital subtraction radiography in detecting alveolar bone changes. In order to test the sensitivity of quantitative evaluation by subtraction radiography, a copper equivalent thickness obtained from digitized radiographs was compared with the actual mineral content of bone phantoms with 15 different minerals and 25 bone specimens. Results demonstrated that the copper equivalent thickness correlated well with the actual mineral content (bone phantoms: gamma s = 1.0, bone specimens: gamma s = 0.985). In order to test the ability of digitized subtraction radiography in assessing alveolar bone changes in vivo, subtraction images were compared with histological features. The experimental angular bony defects were treated with conservative periodontal therapy in 3 monkeys. The standardized radiographs were taken longitudinally after therapy, and subtraction images were made from the sequentially obtained radiographs. In addition, for fluorescent histomorphometrical evaluations of new bone formations, the animals were dosed with oxytetracycline, calsein solution and arizarin complex solution. Radiographic and histological evaluations were scheduled to provide healing periods of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 9 weeks after periodontal therapy. Subtraction radiography offered an objective method to follow histological changes of alveolar bone, and the copper equivalent thickness obtained from subtraction radiographs correlated with the histometric bone volume (gamma s = 0.9023, p less than 0.01). The results of these studies indicated that subtraction radiography was useful in monitoring alveolar bone changes associated with periodontal disease and treatment and that the quanitative measurement of periodontal bone changes by subtraction radiography was feasible. PMID:2517790

  9. Un-collimated single-photon imaging system for high-sensitivity small animal and plant imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Katherine L.; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Cherry, Simon R.; Mitchell, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    In preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system development the primary objective has been to improve spatial resolution by using novel parallel-hole or multi-pinhole collimator geometries. However, such high-resolution systems have relatively poor sensitivity (typically 0.01-0.1%). In contrast, a system that does not use collimators can achieve very high-sensitivity. Here we present a high-sensitivity un-collimated detector single-photon imaging (UCD-SPI) system for the imaging of both small animals and plants. This scanner consists of two thin, closely spaced, pixelated scintillator detectors that use NaI(Tl), CsI(Na), or BGO. The performance of the system has been characterized by measuring sensitivity, spatial resolution, linearity, detection limits, and uniformity. With 99mTc (140 keV) at the center of the field of view (20 mm scintillator separation), the sensitivity was measured to be 31.8% using the NaI(Tl) detectors and 40.2% with CsI(Na). The best spatial resolution (FWHM when the image formed as the geometric mean of the two detector heads, 20 mm scintillator separation) was 19.0 mm for NaI(Tl) and 11.9 mm for CsI(Na) at 140 keV, and 19.5 mm for BGO at 1116 keV, which is somewhat degraded compared to the cm-scale resolution obtained with only one detector head and a close source. The quantitative accuracy of the system’s linearity is better than 2% with detection down to activity levels of 100 nCi. Two in vivo animal studies (a renal scan using 99mTc MAG-3 and a thyroid scan with 123I) and one plant study (a 99mTcO4- xylem transport study) highlight the unique capabilities of this UCD-SPI system. From the renal scan, we observe approximately a one thousand-fold increase in sensitivity compared to the Siemens Inveon SPECT/CT scanner. UCD-SPI is useful for many imaging tasks that do not require excellent spatial resolution, such as high-throughput screening applications, simple radiotracer uptake studies in tumor