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Sample records for small consanguineous families

  1. New mutations in BBS genes in small consanguineous families with Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Detection of candidate regions by homozygosity mapping

    PubMed Central

    Pereiro, Ines; Piñeiro-Gallego, Teresa; Baiget, Montserrat; Borrego, Salud; Ayuso, Carmen; Searby, Charles; Nishimura, Darryl

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS, OMIM 209900) is a rare multi-organ disorder in which BBS patients manifest a variable phenotype that includes retinal dystrophy, polydactyly, mental delay, obesity, and also reproductive tract and renal abnormalities. Mutations in 14 genes (BBS1–BBS14) are found in 70% of the patients, indicating that additional mutations in known and new BBS genes remain to be identified. Therefore, the molecular diagnosis of this complex disorder is a challenging task. Methods In this study we show the use of the genome-wide homozygosity mapping strategy in the mutation detection of nine Caucasian BBS families, eight of them consanguineous and one from the same geographic area with no proven consanguinity. Results We identified the disease-causing mutation in six of the families studied, five of which had novel sequence variants in BBS3, BBS6, and BBS12. This is the first null mutation reported in BBS3. Furthermore, this approach defined homozygous candidate regions that could harbor potential candidate genes for BBS in three of the families. Conclusions These findings further underline the importance of homozygosity mapping as a useful technology for diagnosis in small consanguineous families with a complex disease like BBS. PMID:20142850

  2. Benign muscular dystrophy: risk calculation in families with consanguinity.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, G; Müller, C R; Grimm, T

    1989-01-01

    This report concerns two families in which the index patients are sporadic cases of a benign form of muscular dystrophy. In both families the sisters of the patients have married a close relative. The respective risks for a child of these consanguineous marriages being affected with either X linked Becker muscular dystrophy or autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy is calculated using pedigree information, results of serum creatine kinase determinations, and also, in one family, results of DNA typing using RFLPs from the short arm of the X chromosome. PMID:2732990

  3. Mutations in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta from consanguineous Indian families.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Joshi; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Dalal, Ashwin; Shukla, Anju; Shah, Hitesh; Srivastava, Priyanka; Kornak, Uwe; Phadke, Shubha R

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a spectrum of genetic disorders with decreased bone density and bone fragility. Most of the cases of OI are inherited in autosomal dominant fashion with mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2 genes. Over last few years, twelve genes for autosomal recessive OI have been identified. In this study we have evaluated seven patients with OI from consanguineous Indian families. Homozygosity mapping using SNP microarray was done and selected candidate genes were sequenced. Candidate genes were identified in four out of seven patients studied. Four mutations, namely; a homozygous non-sense (p.Q178*) and a deletion (p.F277del) mutations in SERPINF1 gene, a missense mutation (p.M101K) in PPIB gene and a nonsense mutation (p.E45*) in CRTAP gene were identified. In three patients for whom the regions of homozygosity did not reveal any known autosomal recessive OI genes, exome sequencing was performed and we identified a known missense mutation (p.G1012S) in COL1A2 gene in one of the patients. As WNT1 gene was not properly covered in exome sequencing in one patient, the gene was sequenced and a homozygous in-frame deletion of four amino acids (p.Phe176_Leu179del) was identified. In one of the three cases the exome sequencing did not reveal a mutation in any known OI genes, suggesting the possibility of mutations in an unidentified gene. The phenotypes of all the cases are described. This work proves the power of homozygosity mapping followed by candidate gene sequencing approach for clinical application in consanguineous families. PMID:25450603

  4. Genetic analysis of consanguineous families presenting with congenital ocular defects.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ehsan; Nadeem Saqib, Muhammad Arif; Sajid, Sundus; Shah, Neelam; Zubair, Muhammad; Khan, Muzammil Ahmad; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Ali, Ghazanfar; Dutta, Atanu Kumar; Danda, Sumita; Lao, Richard; Ling-Fung Tang, Paul; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Ansar, Muhammad; Slavotinek, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Anophthalmia and microphthalmia (A/M) are a group of rare developmental disorders that affect the size of the ocular globe. A/M may present as the sole clinical feature, but are also frequently found in a variety of syndromes. A/M is genetically heterogeneous and can be caused by chromosomal aberrations, copy number variations and single gene mutations. To date, A/M has been caused by mutations in at least 20 genes that show different modes of inheritance. In this study, we enrolled eight consanguineous families with A/M, including seven from Pakistan and one from India. Sanger and exome sequencing of DNA samples from these families identified three novel mutations including two mutations in the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1 Family Member A3 (ALDH1A3) gene, [c.1310_1311delAT; p.(Tyr437Trpfs*44) and c.964G > A; p.(Val322Met)] and a single missense mutation in Forkhead Box E3 (FOXE3) gene, [c.289A > G p.(Ile97Val)]. Additionally two previously reported mutations were identified in FOXE3 and in Visual System Homeobox 2 (VSX2). This is the first comprehensive study on families with A/M from the Indian subcontinent which provides further evidence for the involvement of known genes with novel and recurrent mutations. PMID:26995144

  5. Loss of function mutations in RP1 are responsible for retinitis pigmentosa in consanguineous familial cases

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Firoz; Ullah, Inayat; Ali, Shahbaz; Gottsch, Alexander D.H.; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Assir, Muhammad Zaman; Khan, Shaheen N.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to identify causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in consanguineous families. Methods Large consanguineous families were ascertained from the Punjab province of Pakistan. An ophthalmic examination consisting of a fundus evaluation and electroretinography (ERG) was completed, and small aliquots of blood were collected from all participating individuals. Genomic DNA was extracted from white blood cells, and a genome-wide linkage or a locus-specific exclusion analysis was completed with polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs). Two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated, and all coding exons and exon–intron boundaries of RP1 were sequenced to identify the causal mutation. Results The ophthalmic examination showed that affected individuals in all families manifest cardinal symptoms of RP. Genome-wide scans localized the disease phenotype to chromosome 8q, a region harboring RP1, a gene previously implicated in the pathogenesis of RP. Sanger sequencing identified a homozygous single base deletion in exon 4: c.3697delT (p.S1233Pfs22*), a single base substitution in intron 3: c.787+1G>A (p.I263Nfs8*), a 2 bp duplication in exon 2: c.551_552dupTA (p.Q185Yfs4*) and an 11,117 bp deletion that removes all three coding exons of RP1. These variations segregated with the disease phenotype within the respective families and were not present in ethnically matched control samples. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that these mutations in RP1 are responsible for the retinal phenotype in affected individuals of all four consanguineous families. PMID:27307693

  6. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Arrays and Unexpected Consanguinity: Considerations for Clinicians When Returning Results to Families

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Fernanda; Tabor, Holly K.; Chow, Penny M.; Conta, Jessie H.; Feldman, Kenneth W.; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Beck, Anita E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The broad use of SNP microarrays has increased identification of unexpected consanguinity. Therefore, guidelines to address reporting of consanguinity have been published for clinical laboratories. Because no such guidelines exist for clinicians, we describe a case and present recommendations for clinicians to disclose unexpected consanguinity to families. Methods In a boy with multiple endocrine abnormalities and structural birth defects, SNP array analysis revealed ~23% autosomal homozygosity suggestive of a 1st-degree parental relationship. We assembled an interdisciplinary healthcare team, planned the most appropriate way to discuss results of the SNP array with the adult mother including the possibility of multiple autosomal recessive disorders in her child, and finally met with her as a team. Results From these discussions, we developed four major considerations for clinicians returning results of unexpected consanguinity, all guided by the child’s best interests: 1) ethical and legal obligations for reporting possible abuse, 2) preservation of the clinical relationship, 3) attention to justice and psychosocial challenges, and 4) utilization of the SNP array results to guide further testing. Conclusion As SNP arrays become a common clinical diagnostic tool, clinicians can use this framework to return results of unexpected consanguinity to families in a supportive and productive manner. PMID:25232848

  7. Consanguinity and mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, T; Narayan, J

    1991-04-01

    Consanguinity among parents as a cause of mental retardation in their children is debatable. The present study was conducted to find out the effect of consanguinity on mental retardation where the causative factor is not established. A total of 517 mentally retarded persons and their families were studied out of which 160 were born of consanguineous marriage and 357 were of non-consanguineous marriage. The results indicated that, when there is a history of mental retardation in the family and if the parents are consanguineously married, the risk of mental retardation in the offspring is significantly high (chi 2 = 11.52; P less than 0.001). Among the consanguineously married families, the blood relationship of uncle-niece seems to have the highest risk of affecting the offsprings. The implications are discussed in detail. PMID:2072392

  8. Whole exome sequencing unravels disease-causing genes in consanguineous families in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Fahiminiya, S; Almuriekhi, M; Nawaz, Z; Staffa, A; Lepage, P; Ali, R; Hashim, L; Schwartzentruber, J; Abu Khadija, K; Zaineddin, S; Gamal, H; Majewski, J; Ben-Omran, T

    2014-08-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) has greatly facilitated the identification of causal mutations for diverse human genetic disorders. We applied WES as a molecular diagnostic tool to identify disease-causing genes in consanguineous families in Qatar. Seventeen consanguineous families with diverse disorders were recruited. Initial mutation screening of known genes related to the clinical diagnoses did not reveal the causative mutations. Using WES approach, we identified the definitive disease-causing mutations in four families: (i) a novel nonsense homozygous (c.1034C>G) in PHKG2 causing glycogen storage disease type 9C (GSD9C) in a male with initial diagnosis of GSD3; (ii) a novel homozygous 1-bp deletion (c.915del) in NSUN2 in a male proband with Noonan-like syndrome; (iii) a homozygous SNV (c.1598C>G) in exon 11 of IDUA causing Hurler syndrome in a female proband with unknown clinical diagnosis; (iv) a de novo known splicing mutation (c.1645+1G>A) in PHEX in a female proband with initial diagnosis of autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets. Applying WES as a diagnostic tool led to the unambiguous identification of disease-causing mutations in phenotypically complex disorders or correction of the initial clinical diagnosis in ˜25% of our cases. PMID:24102521

  9. Mutations in GRM6 identified in consanguineous Pakistani families with congenital stationary night blindness

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Gottsch, Alexander D. H.; Ullah, Inayat; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Butt, Nadeem H.; Qazi, Zaheeruddin A.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to investigate the causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) in consanguineous Pakistani families. Methods Two consanguineous families with multiple individuals manifesting symptoms of stationary night blindness were recruited. Affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological examination, including fundus examination and electroretinography. Blood samples were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Exclusion analyses were completed by genotyping closely spaced microsatellite markers, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. All coding exons, along with the exon–intron boundaries of GRM6, were sequenced bidirectionally. Results According to the medical history available to us, affected individuals in both families had experienced night blindness from the early years of their lives. Fundus photographs of affected individuals in both the families appeared normal, with no signs of attenuated arteries or bone spicule pigmentation. The scotopic electroretinogram (ERG) response were absent in all of the affected individuals, while the photopic measurements show reduced b-waves. During exclusion analyses, both families localized to a region on chromosome 5q that harbors GRM6, a gene previously associated with autosomal recessive CSNB. Bidirectional sequencing of GRM6 identified homozygous single base pair changes, specifically c.1336C>T (p.R446X) and c.2267G>A (p.G756D) in families PKRP170 and PKRP172, respectively. Conclusions We identified a novel nonsense and a previously reported missense mutation in GRM6 that were responsible for autosomal recessive CSNB in patients of Pakistani decent. PMID:26628857

  10. Genetic dissection of two Pakistani families with consanguineous localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis (LAH)

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Seyyedha; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Khan, Shakir; Yousaf, Muhammad Jawad; Azeem, Zahid; Razak, Suhail; Qaiser, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Genetic analysis of two consanguineous Pakistani families with localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis was performed with the goal to establish genotype-phenotype correlation. Materials and Methods: Genomic DNA extraction had been done from peripheral blood samples. Extracted DNA was then subjected to PCR (polymerase chain reaction) for amplification. Linkage analysis was performed using 8% polyacrylamide gel. Candidate gene was sequenced after gene linkage supported at highly polymorphic microsatellite markers of the diseased region. Results: Both families were initially tested for linkage to known genes, which were involved in human hereditary hypotrichosis, by genotyping Highly polymorphic microsatellite markers. Family B showed partial linkage at P2RY5 gene on chromosome 13q14.11-q21.32; hence, all exonic regions and their introns boundaries were subjected to DNA sequencing for any pathogenic mutation. Conclusion: Both families were tested for linkage by genotyping polymorphic microsatellite markers linked to known alopecia loci. Family A excluded all known diseased regions that is suggestive of some novel chromosomal disorder. However, sequencing of P2RY5 gene in family B showed no pathogenic mutation. PMID:25429336

  11. Pathogenic mutations in TULP1 responsible for retinitis pigmentosa identified in consanguineous familial cases

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Inayat; Kabir, Firoz; Iqbal, Muhammad; Gottsch, Clare Brooks S.; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Assir, Muhammad Zaman; Khan, Shaheen N.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify pathogenic mutations responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in consanguineous familial cases. Methods Seven large familial cases with multiple individuals diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa were included in the study. Affected individuals in these families underwent ophthalmic examinations to document the symptoms and confirm the initial diagnosis. Blood samples were collected from all participating members, and genomic DNA was extracted. An exclusion analysis with microsatellite markers spanning the TULP1 locus on chromosome 6p was performed, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. All coding exons along with the exon–intron boundaries of TULP1 were sequenced bidirectionally. We constructed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype for the four familial cases harboring the K489R allele and estimated the likelihood of a founder effect. Results The ophthalmic examinations of the affected individuals in these familial cases were suggestive of RP. Exclusion analyses confirmed linkage to chromosome 6p harboring TULP1 with positive two-point LOD scores. Subsequent Sanger sequencing identified the single base pair substitution in exon14, c.1466A>G (p.K489R), in four families. Additionally, we identified a two-base deletion in exon 4, c.286_287delGA (p.E96Gfs77*); a homozygous splice site variant in intron 14, c.1495+4A>C; and a novel missense variation in exon 15, c.1561C>T (p.P521S). All mutations segregated with the disease phenotype in the respective families and were absent in ethnically matched control chromosomes. Haplotype analysis suggested (p<10−6) that affected individuals inherited the causal mutation from a common ancestor. Conclusions Pathogenic mutations in TULP1 are responsible for the RP phenotype in seven familial cases with a common ancestral mutation responsible for the disease phenotype in four of the seven families. PMID:27440997

  12. Homozygous sequence variants in the FKBP10 gene underlie osteogenesis imperfecta in consanguineous families.

    PubMed

    Umair, Muhammad; Hassan, Annum; Jan, Abid; Ahmad, Farooq; Imran, Muhammad; Samman, Muhammad I; Basit, Sulman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI, MIM 610968) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by bone fragility. It is one of the rare forms of skeletal deformity caused by sequence variants in at least 14 different genes, including FKBP10 (MIM 607063) encoding protein FKBP65. Here we present three consanguineous families of Pakistani origin segregating OI in an autosomal-recessive pattern. Genotyping using either single-nucleotide polymorphism markers by Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 250K Nsp array or polymorphic microsatellite markers revealed a homozygous region, containing a candidate gene FKBP10, among affected members on chromosome 17q21.2. Sequencing the FKBP10 gene revealed a homozygous novel nonsense variant (c.1490G>A, p.Trp497*) in the family A and two previously reported variants, including a missense (c.344G>A, p.Arg115Gln), in the family B and duplication of a nucleotide C (c.831dupC, p.Gly278ArgfsX295) in the family C. Our findings further extend the body of evidence that supports the importance of FKBP10 gene in the development of skeletal system. PMID:26538303

  13. A Common Ancestral Mutation in CRYBB3 Identified in Multiple Consanguineous Families with Congenital Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Irum, Bushra; Khan, Arif O.; Wang, Qiwei; Li, David; Khan, Asma A.; Husnain, Tayyab; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to investigate the genetic determinants of autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in large consanguineous families. Methods Affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological examination and slit-lamp photographs of the cataractous lenses were obtained. An aliquot of blood was collected from all participating family members and genomic DNA was extracted from white blood cells. Initially, a genome-wide scan was performed with genomic DNAs of family PKCC025 followed by exclusion analysis of our familial cohort of congenital cataracts. Protein-coding exons of CRYBB1, CRYBB2, CRYBB3, and CRYBA4 were sequenced bidirectionally. A haplotype was constructed with SNPs flanking the causal mutation for affected individuals in all four families, while the probability that the four familial cases have a common founder was estimated using EM and CHM-based algorithms. The expression of Crybb3 in the developing murine lens was investigated using TaqMan assays. Results The clinical and ophthalmological examinations suggested that all affected individuals had nuclear cataracts. Genome-wide linkage analysis localized the causal phenotype in family PKCC025 to chromosome 22q with statistically significant two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores. Subsequently, we localized three additional families, PKCC063, PKCC131, and PKCC168 to chromosome 22q. Bidirectional Sanger sequencing identified a missense variation: c.493G>C (p.Gly165Arg) in CRYBB3 that segregated with the disease phenotype in all four familial cases. This variation was not found in ethnically matched control chromosomes, the NHLBI exome variant server, or the 1000 Genomes or dbSNP databases. Interestingly, all four families harbor a unique disease haplotype that strongly suggests a common founder of the causal mutation (p<1.64E-10). We observed expression of Crybb3 in the mouse lens as early as embryonic day 15 (E15), and expression remained relatively steady throughout

  14. A novel homozygous ISPD gene mutation causing phenotype variability in a consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Baranello, Giovanni; Saredi, Simona; Sansanelli, Serena; Savadori, Paolo; Canioni, Eleonora; Chiapparini, Luisa; Balestri, Paolo; Malandrini, Alessandro; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Morandi, Lucia; Mora, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Within the group of muscular dystrophies, dystroglycanopathies represent an important subgroup of recessively inherited disorders. Their severity varies from the relatively mild forms of adult-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD), to the severe congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) with cerebral and ocular involvement. We describe 2 consanguineous children of Pakistani origin, carrying a new homozygous missense mutation c.367G>A (p.Gly123Arg) in the ISPD gene. Mutations in this gene have been recently reported as a common cause of congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Patient 1 is an 8-year-old female with an intermediate phenotype between CMD and early LGMD; patient 2 is a 20-month-old male and second cousin of patient 1, showing a CMD phenotype. Cognitive development, brain MRI, eye examination, electrocardiogram and echocardiogram were normal in both patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the co-occurrence of both a CMD/early LGMD intermediate phenotype and a CMD within the same family carrying a homozygous ISPD mutation. PMID:25444434

  15. Novel mutations in WWOX, RARS2, and C10orf2 genes in consanguineous Arab families with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Asem M; Aburahma, Samah K; Habbab, Wesal; Thompson, I Richard

    2016-08-01

    Intellectual disability is a heterogeneous disease with many genes and mutations influencing the phenotype. Consanguineous families constitute a rich resource for the identification of rare variants causing autosomal recessive disease, due to the effects of inbreeding. Here, we examine three consanguineous Arab families, recruited in a quest to identify novel genes/mutations. All the families had multiple offspring with non-specific intellectual disability. We identified homozygosity (autozygosity) intervals in those families through SNP genotyping and whole exome sequencing, with variants filtered using Ingenuity Variant Analysis (IVA) software. The families showed heterogeneity and novel mutations in three different genes known to be associated with intellectual disability. These mutations were not found in 514 ethnically matched control chromosomes. p.G410C in WWOX, p.H530Y in RARS2, and p.I69F in C10orf2 are novel changes that affect protein function and could give new insights into the development and function of the central nervous system. PMID:27121845

  16. Practice of Consanguinity and Unusual Cases of Inherited Familial Chromosome Abnormalities: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Debarshi; Bhairi, Vidya; S Kadandale, Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    We present 2 cases of likely rare event. In case 1, 3(rd) degree consanguineous marriage revealed inv(6) with same break points in parents who were found to be phenotypically normal. The same inv(6) being inherited in progeny but presented with low AMH (anti Mullerian hormone) and high level of FSH (follicular stimulating hormone) leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome/premature ovarian failure. In case 2, a couple was presented with 2(nd) degree consanguineous marriage and referred for 2 recurrent/ missed abortions. The amounts of shared genes are suggestive of more lethal genetic outcomes and inferred endogamy is a major driver to reproductive fiascoes, the ancestries of which are deeply tied at the meiotic level. PMID:27386439

  17. Practice of Consanguinity and Unusual Cases of Inherited Familial Chromosome Abnormalities: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Debarshi; Bhairi, Vidya; S Kadandale, Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    We present 2 cases of likely rare event. In case 1, 3rd degree consanguineous marriage revealed inv(6) with same break points in parents who were found to be phenotypically normal. The same inv(6) being inherited in progeny but presented with low AMH (anti Mullerian hormone) and high level of FSH (follicular stimulating hormone) leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome/premature ovarian failure. In case 2, a couple was presented with 2nd degree consanguineous marriage and referred for 2 recurrent/ missed abortions. The amounts of shared genes are suggestive of more lethal genetic outcomes and inferred endogamy is a major driver to reproductive fiascoes, the ancestries of which are deeply tied at the meiotic level.

  18. Splice-site mutations identified in PDE6A responsible for retinitis pigmentosa in consanguineous Pakistani families

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahid Y.; Ali, Shahbaz; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Butt, Nadeem H.; Qazi, Zaheeruddin A.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to localize and identify causal mutations associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in consanguineous familial cases of Pakistani origin. Methods Ophthalmic examinations that included funduscopy and electroretinography (ERG) were performed to confirm the affectation status. Blood samples were collected from all participating individuals, and genomic DNA was extracted. A genome-wide scan was performed, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. Sanger sequencing was performed to identify the causative variants. Subsequently, we performed whole exome sequencing to rule out the possibility of a second causal variant within the linkage interval. Sequence conservation was performed with alignment analyses of PDE6A orthologs, and in silico splicing analysis was completed with Human Splicing Finder version 2.4.1. Results A large multigenerational consanguineous family diagnosed with early-onset RP was ascertained. An ophthalmic clinical examination consisting of fundus photography and electroretinography confirmed the diagnosis of RP. A genome-wide scan was performed, and suggestive two-point LOD scores were observed with markers on chromosome 5q. Haplotype analyses identified the region; however, the region did not segregate with the disease phenotype in the family. Subsequently, we performed a second genome-wide scan that excluded the entire genome except the chromosome 5q region harboring PDE6A. Next-generation whole exome sequencing identified a splice acceptor site mutation in intron 16: c.2028–1G>A, which was completely conserved in PDE6A orthologs and was absent in ethnically matched 350 control chromosomes, the 1000 Genomes database, and the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project. Subsequently, we investigated our entire cohort of RP familial cases and identified a second family who harbored a splice acceptor site mutation in intron 10: c.1408–2A>G. In silico analysis suggested that these

  19. Wolcott-Rallison Syndrome Is the Most Common Genetic Cause of Permanent Neonatal Diabetes in Consanguineous Families

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Patch, Ann-Marie; Minton, Jayne A. L.; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Edghill, Emma L.; Hussain, Khalid; Balafrej, Amina; Deeb, Asma; Buchanan, Charles R.; Jefferson, Ian G.; Mutair, Angham; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Ellard, Sian

    2009-01-01

    Context and Objective: Mutations in EIF2AK3 cause Wolcott-Rallison syndrome (WRS), a rare recessive disorder characterized by early-onset diabetes, skeletal abnormalities, and liver dysfunction. Although early diagnosis is important for clinical management, genetic testing is generally performed after the full clinical picture develops. We aimed to identify patients with WRS before any other abnormalities apart from diabetes are present and study the overall frequency of WRS among patients with permanent neonatal diabetes. Research Design and Methods: The coding regions of EIF2AK3 were sequenced in 34 probands with infancy-onset diabetes with a clinical phenotype suggestive of WRS (n = 28) or homozygosity at the WRS locus (n = 6). Results: Twenty-five probands (73.5%) were homozygous or compound heterozygous for mutations in EIF2AK3. Twenty of the 26 mutations identified were novel. Whereas a diagnosis of WRS was suspected before genetic testing in 22 probands, three patients with apparently isolated diabetes were diagnosed after identifying a large homozygous region encompassing EIF2AK3. In contrast to nonconsanguineous pedigrees, mutations in EIF2AK3 are the most common known genetic cause of diabetes among patients born to consanguineous parents (24 vs. < 2%). Age at diabetes onset and birth weight might be used to prioritize genetic testing in the latter group. Conclusions: WRS is the most common cause of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus in consanguineous pedigrees. In addition to testing patients with a definite clinical diagnosis, EIF2AK3 should be tested in patients with isolated neonatal diabetes diagnosed after 3 wk of age from known consanguineous families, isolated populations, or countries in which inbreeding is frequent. PMID:19837917

  20. Pitfalls of homozygosity mapping: an extended consanguineous Bardet-Biedl syndrome family with two mutant genes (BBS2, BBS10), three mutations, but no triallelism.

    PubMed

    Laurier, Virginie; Stoetzel, Corinne; Muller, Jean; Thibault, Christelle; Corbani, Sandra; Jalkh, Nadine; Salem, Nabiha; Chouery, Eliane; Poch, Olivier; Licaire, Serge; Danse, Jean-Marc; Amati-Bonneau, Patricia; Bonneau, Dominique; Mégarbané, André; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Dollfus, Hélène

    2006-11-01

    The extensive genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is documented by the identification, by classical linkage analysis complemented recently by comparative genomic approaches, of nine genes (BBS1-9) that account cumulatively for about 50% of patients. The BBS genes appear implicated in cilia and basal body assembly or function. In order to find new BBS genes, we performed SNP homozygosity mapping analysis in an extended consanguineous family living in a small Lebanese village. This uncovered an unexpectedly complex pattern of mutations, and led us to identify a novel BBS gene (BBS10). In one sibship of the pedigree, a BBS2 homozygous mutation was identified, while in three other sibships, a homozygous missense mutation was identified in a gene encoding a vertebrate-specific chaperonine-like protein (BBS10). The single patient in the last sibship was a compound heterozygote for the above BBS10 mutation and another one in the same gene. Although triallelism (three deleterious alleles in the same patient) has been described in some BBS families, we have to date no evidence that this is the case in the present family. The analysis of this family challenged linkage analysis based on the expectation of a single locus and mutation. The very high informativeness of SNP arrays was instrumental in elucidating this case, which illustrates possible pitfalls of homozygosity mapping in extended families, and that can be explained by the rather high prevalence of heterozygous carriers of BBS mutations (estimated at one in 50 in Europeans). PMID:16823392

  1. Identification of two novel mutations in CDHR1 in consanguineous Spanish families with autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Avila-Fernandez, Almudena; Corton, Marta; Lopez-Molina, Maria Isabel; Perez-Carro, Raquel; Bontadelli, Lara; Di Gioia, Silvio Alessandro; Zurita, Olga; Garcia-Sandoval, Blanca; Rivolta, Carlo; Ayuso, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies present extensive phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity, posing a challenge for patients’ molecular and clinical diagnoses. In this study, we wanted to clinically characterize and investigate the molecular etiology of an atypical form of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy in two consanguineous Spanish families. Affected members of the respective families exhibited an array of clinical features including reduced visual acuity, photophobia, defective color vision, reduced or absent ERG responses, macular atrophy and pigmentary deposits in the peripheral retina. Genetic investigation included autozygosity mapping coupled with exome sequencing in the first family, whereas autozygome-guided candidate gene screening was performed by means of Sanger DNA sequencing in the second family. Our approach revealed nucleotide changes in CDHR1; a homozygous missense variant (c.1720C > G, p.P574A) and a homozygous single base transition (c.1485 + 2T > C) affecting the canonical 5’ splice site of intron 13, respectively. Both changes co-segregated with the disease and were absent among cohorts of unrelated control individuals. To date, only five mutations in CDHR1 have been identified, all resulting in premature stop codons leading to mRNA nonsense mediated decay. Our work reports two previously unidentified homozygous mutations in CDHR1 further expanding the mutational spectrum of this gene. PMID:26350383

  2. Exome sequencing identified a novel de novo OPA1 mutation in a consanguineous family presenting with optic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lior; Tzur, Shay; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Bormans, Concetta; Behar, Doron M; Reinstein, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    Inherited optic neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by mild to severe visual loss, colour vision deficit, central or paracentral visual field defects and optic disc pallor. Optic atrophies can be classified into isolated or non-syndromic and syndromic forms. While multiple modes of inheritance have been reported, autosomal dominant optic atrophy and mitochondrial inherited Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy are the most common forms. Optic atrophy type 1, caused by mutations in the OPA1 gene is believed to be the most common hereditary optic neuropathy, and most patients inherit a mutation from an affected parent. In this study we used whole-exome sequencing to investigate the genetic aetiology in a patient affected with isolated optic atrophy. Since the proband was the only affected individual in his extended family, and was a product of consanguineous marriage, homozygosity mapping followed by whole-exome sequencing were pursued. Exome results identified a novel de novo OPA1 mutation in the proband. We conclude, that though de novo OPA1 mutations are uncommon, testing of common optic atrophy-associated genes such as mitochondrial mutations and OPA1 gene sequencing should be performed first in single individuals presenting with optic neuropathy, even when dominant inheritance is not apparent. PMID:27265430

  3. Accelerating novel candidate gene discovery in neurogenetic disorders via whole-exome sequencing of prescreened multiplex consanguineous families.

    PubMed

    Alazami, Anas M; Patel, Nisha; Shamseldin, Hanan E; Anazi, Shamsa; Al-Dosari, Mohammed S; Alzahrani, Fatema; Hijazi, Hadia; Alshammari, Muneera; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Salih, Mustafa A; Faqeih, Eissa; Alhashem, Amal; Bashiri, Fahad A; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Kentab, Amal Y; Sogaty, Sameera; Al Tala, Saeed; Temsah, Mohamad-Hani; Tulbah, Maha; Aljelaify, Rasha F; Alshahwan, Saad A; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Alhadid, Adnan A; Aldhalaan, Hesham; AlQallaf, Fatema; Kurdi, Wesam; Alfadhel, Majid; Babay, Zainab; Alsogheer, Mohammad; Kaya, Namik; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Al-Sannaa, Nouriya; Al Mutairi, Fuad; El Khashab, Heba Y; Bohlega, Saeed; Jia, Xiaofei; Nguyen, Henry C; Hammami, Rakad; Adly, Nouran; Mohamed, Jawahir Y; Abdulwahab, Firdous; Ibrahim, Niema; Naim, Ewa A; Al-Younes, Banan; Meyer, Brian F; Hashem, Mais; Shaheen, Ranad; Xiong, Yong; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Aldeeri, Abdulrahman A; Monies, Dorota M; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2015-01-13

    Our knowledge of disease genes in neurological disorders is incomplete. With the aim of closing this gap, we performed whole-exome sequencing on 143 multiplex consanguineous families in whom known disease genes had been excluded by autozygosity mapping and candidate gene analysis. This prescreening step led to the identification of 69 recessive genes not previously associated with disease, of which 33 are here described (SPDL1, TUBA3E, INO80, NID1, TSEN15, DMBX1, CLHC1, C12orf4, WDR93, ST7, MATN4, SEC24D, PCDHB4, PTPN23, TAF6, TBCK, FAM177A1, KIAA1109, MTSS1L, XIRP1, KCTD3, CHAF1B, ARV1, ISCA2, PTRH2, GEMIN4, MYOCD, PDPR, DPH1, NUP107, TMEM92, EPB41L4A, and FAM120AOS). We also encountered instances in which the phenotype departed significantly from the established clinical presentation of a known disease gene. Overall, a likely causal mutation was identified in >73% of our cases. This study contributes to the global effort toward a full compendium of disease genes affecting brain function. PMID:25558065

  4. Increased Probability of Co-Occurrence of Two Rare Diseases in Consanguineous Families and Resolution of a Complex Phenotype by Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Dennis; Neubauer, Bernd A.; Toliat, Mohammad R.; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Kamrath, Clemens; Schänzer, Anne; Sander, Thomas; Hahn, Andreas; Nothnagel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing of whole genomes and exomes has facilitated a direct assessment of causative genetic variation, now enabling the identification of genetic factors involved in rare diseases (RD) with Mendelian inheritance patterns on an almost routine basis. Here, we describe the illustrative case of a single consanguineous family where this strategy suffered from the difficulty to distinguish between two etiologically distinct disorders, namely the co-occurrence of hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets (HRR) and congenital myopathies (CM), by their phenotypic manifestation alone. We used parametric linkage analysis, homozygosity mapping and whole exome-sequencing to identify mutations underlying HRR and CM. We also present an approximate approach for assessing the probability of co-occurrence of two unlinked recessive RD in a single family as a function of the degree of consanguinity and the frequency of the disease-causing alleles. Linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping yielded elusive results when assuming a single RD, but whole-exome sequencing helped to identify two mutations in two genes, namely SLC34A3 and SEPN1, that segregated independently in this family and that have previously been linked to two etiologically different diseases. We assess the increase in chance co-occurrence of rare diseases due to consanguinity, i.e. under circumstances that generally favor linkage mapping of recessive disease, and show that this probability can increase by several orders of magnitudes. We conclude that such potential co-occurrence represents an underestimated risk when analyzing rare or undefined diseases in consanguineous families and should be given more consideration in the clinical and genetic evaluation. PMID:26789268

  5. Increased Probability of Co-Occurrence of Two Rare Diseases in Consanguineous Families and Resolution of a Complex Phenotype by Next Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lal, Dennis; Neubauer, Bernd A; Toliat, Mohammad R; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Kamrath, Clemens; Schänzer, Anne; Sander, Thomas; Hahn, Andreas; Nothnagel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing of whole genomes and exomes has facilitated a direct assessment of causative genetic variation, now enabling the identification of genetic factors involved in rare diseases (RD) with Mendelian inheritance patterns on an almost routine basis. Here, we describe the illustrative case of a single consanguineous family where this strategy suffered from the difficulty to distinguish between two etiologically distinct disorders, namely the co-occurrence of hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets (HRR) and congenital myopathies (CM), by their phenotypic manifestation alone. We used parametric linkage analysis, homozygosity mapping and whole exome-sequencing to identify mutations underlying HRR and CM. We also present an approximate approach for assessing the probability of co-occurrence of two unlinked recessive RD in a single family as a function of the degree of consanguinity and the frequency of the disease-causing alleles. Linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping yielded elusive results when assuming a single RD, but whole-exome sequencing helped to identify two mutations in two genes, namely SLC34A3 and SEPN1, that segregated independently in this family and that have previously been linked to two etiologically different diseases. We assess the increase in chance co-occurrence of rare diseases due to consanguinity, i.e. under circumstances that generally favor linkage mapping of recessive disease, and show that this probability can increase by several orders of magnitudes. We conclude that such potential co-occurrence represents an underestimated risk when analyzing rare or undefined diseases in consanguineous families and should be given more consideration in the clinical and genetic evaluation. PMID:26789268

  6. Nonsense mutation in MERTK causes autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in a consanguineous Pakistani family

    PubMed Central

    Shahzadi, Amber; Riazuddin, S Amer; Ali, Shahbaz; Li, David; Khan, Shaheen N; Husnain, Tayyab; Akram, Javed; Sieving, Paul A; Hejtmancik, J Fielding; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2012-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is one of the most common ophthalmic disorders affecting one in approximately 5000 people worldwide. A nuclear family was recruited from the Punjab province of Pakistan to study the genetic basis of autosomal recessive RP. Methods All affected individuals underwent a thorough ophthalmic examination and the disease was characterised based upon results for fundus photographs and electroretinogram recordings. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leucocytes. Exclusion studies were performed with short tandem repeat (STR) markers flanking reported autosomal recessive RP loci. Haplotypes were constructed and results were statistically evaluated. Results The results of exclusion analyses suggested that family PKRP173 was linked to chromosome 2q harbouring mer tyrosine kinase protooncogene (MERTK), a gene previously associated with autosomal recessive RP. Additional STR markers refined the critical interval and placed it in a 13.4 cM (17 Mb) region flanked by D2S293 proximally and D2S347 distally. Significant logarithm of odds (LOD) scores of 3.2, 3.25 and 3.18 at θ=0 were obtained with markers D2S1896, D2S2269 and D2S160. Sequencing of the coding exons of MERTK identified a mutation, c.718G→T in exon 4, which results in a premature termination of p.E240X that segregates with the disease phenotype in the family. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that the nonsense mutation in MERTK, leading to premature termination of the protein, is responsible for RP phenotype in the affected individuals of the Pakistani family. PMID:20538656

  7. A clinical variant in SCN1A inherited from a mosaic father cosegregates with a novel variant to cause Dravet syndrome in a consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Feyza N; Gormez, Zeliha; Calik, Mustafa; Altiokka Uzun, Gunes; Sagiroglu, Mahmut S; Yuceturk, Betul; Yuksel, Bayram; Baykan, Betul; Bebek, Nerses; Iscan, Akin; Ugur Iseri, Sibel A; Ozbek, Ugur

    2015-07-01

    A consanguineous family from Turkey having two children with intellectual disability exhibiting myoclonic, febrile and other generalized seizures was recruited to identify the genetic origin of these phenotypes. A combined approach of SNP genotyping and exome sequencing was employed both to screen genes associated with Dravet syndrome and to detect homozygous variants. Analysis of exome data was extended further to identify compound heterozygosity. Herein, we report identification of two paternally inherited genetic variants in SCN1A (rs121917918; p.R101Q and p.I1576T), one of which was previously implicated in Dravet syndrome. Interestingly, the previously reported clinical variant (rs121917918; p.R101Q) displayed mosaicism in the blood and saliva of the father. The study supported the genetic diagnosis of affected children as Dravet syndrome possibly due to the combined effect of one clinically associated (rs121917918; p.R101Q) and one novel (p.I1576T) variants in SCN1A gene. This finding is important given that heterozygous variants may be overlooked in standard exome scans of consanguineous families. Thus, we are presenting an interesting example, where the inheritance of the condition may be misinterpreted as recessive and identical by descent due to consanguinity and mosaicism in one of the parents. PMID:25986186

  8. In silico analysis of a disease-causing mutation in PCDH15 gene in a consanguineous Pakistani family with Usher phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Saleha, Shamim; Ajmal, Muhammad; Jamil, Muhammad; Nasir, Muhammad; Hameed, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    AIM To map Usher phenotype in a consanguineous Pakistani family and identify disease-associated mutation in a causative gene to establish phenotype-genotype correlation. METHODS A consanguineous Pakistani family in which Usher phenotype was segregating as an autosomal recessive trait was ascertained. On the basis of results of clinical investigations of affected members of this family disease was diagnosed as Usher syndrome (USH). To identify the locus responsible for the Usher phenotype in this family, genomic DNA from blood sample of each individual was genotyped using microsatellite Short Tandem Repeat (STR) markers for the known Usher syndrome loci. Then direct sequencing was performed to find out disease associated mutations in the candidate gene. RESULTS By genetic linkage analysis, the USH phenotype of this family was mapped to PCDH15 locus on chromosome 10q21.1. Three different point mutations in exon 11 of PCDH15 were identified and one of them, c.1304A>C was found to be segregating with the disease phenotype in Pakistani family with Usher phenotype. This, c.1304A>C transversion mutation predicts an amino-acid substitution of aspartic acid with an alanine at residue number 435 (p.D435A) of its protein product. Moreover, in silico analysis revealed conservation of aspartic acid at position 435 and predicated this change as pathogenic. CONCLUSION The identification of c.1304A>C pathogenic mutation in PCDH15 gene and its association with Usher syndrome in a consanguineous Pakistani family is the first example of a missense mutation of PCDH15 causing USH1 phenotype. In previous reports, it was hypothesized that severe mutations such as truncated protein of PCDH15 led to the Usher I phenotype and that missense variants are mainly responsible for non-syndromic hearing impairment. PMID:27275418

  9. Consanguinity among the Saudi Arabian population.

    PubMed Central

    el-Hazmi, M A; al-Swailem, A R; Warsy, A S; al-Swailem, A M; Sulaimani, R; al-Meshari, A A

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted on 3212 Saudi families to investigate the prevalence of consanguineous marriages. The families were interviewed and the information on the relationship between the husband and wife was obtained. The overall rate of consanguinity shows that 57.7% of the families screened were consanguineous. The most frequent were first cousin marriages (28.4%) followed by distant relative marriages (15.2%) and second cousin marriages (14.6%). The families were grouped according to the province of their origin and the consanguinity rates were calculated accordingly. There were slight differences in the consanguinity rates in the five provinces, which ranged from 52.1% to 67.7%. In each province first cousin marriages were the most frequently encountered pattern, ranging from 17.9% to 40.9%. The inbreeding coefficient (F) was calculated for each province and ranged from 0.020 to 0.030. Within each province, there were several significant differences among the populations in the different areas. The highest rate of consanguinity was 80.6% in Samtah and the lowest rate was around 34% in Abha in the South Western province. These results place Saudi Arabia among the countries of the world with a high rate of consanguinity. The possible consequences of increased consanguinity are presented and discussed. PMID:7473654

  10. A Homozygous TPO Gene Duplication (c.1184_1187dup4) Causes Congenital Hypothyroidism in Three Siblings Born to a Consanguineous Family.

    PubMed

    Cangul, Hakan; Aydin, Banu K; Bas, Firdevs

    2015-12-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the most common neonatal endocrine disease, and germ-line mutations in the TPO gene cause the inherited form of the disease. Our aim in this study was to determine the genetic basis of congenital hypothyroidism in three affected children coming from a consanguineous Turkish family. Because CH is usually inherited in autosomal recessive manner in consanguineous/multicase families, we adopted a two-stage strategy of genetic linkage studies and targeted sequencing of the candidate genes. First, we investigated the potential genetic linkage of the family to any known CH locus, using microsatellite markers, and then screened for mutations in linked-gene by conventional sequencing. The family showed potential linkage to the TPO gene and we detected a homozygous duplication (c.1184_1187dup4) in all cases. The mutation segregated with disease status in the family. This study confirms the pathogenicity of the c.1184_1187dup4 mutation in the TPO gene and helps establish a genotype/phenotype correlation associated with this mutation. It also highlights the importance of molecular genetic studies in the definitive diagnosis and accurate classification of CH. PMID:27617131

  11. Homozygosity mapping in consanguineous families reveals extreme heterogeneity of non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation and identifies 8 novel gene loci.

    PubMed

    Najmabadi, Hossein; Motazacker, Mohammad Mahdi; Garshasbi, Masoud; Kahrizi, Kimia; Tzschach, Andreas; Chen, Wei; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Hadavi, Valeh; Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Vazifehmand, Reza; Firouzabadi, Saghar Ghasemi; Jamali, Payman; Falah, Masoumeh; Seifati, Seyed Morteza; Grüters, Annette; Lenzner, Steffen; Jensen, Lars R; Rüschendorf, Franz; Kuss, Andreas W; Ropers, H Hilger

    2007-03-01

    Autosomal recessive gene defects are arguably the most important, but least studied genetic causes of severe cognitive dysfunction. Homozygosity mapping in 78 consanguineous Iranian families with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation (NS-ARMR) has enabled us to determine the chromosomal localization of at least 8 novel gene loci for this condition. Our data suggest that in the Iranian population NS-ARMR is very heterogeneous, and they argue against the existence of frequent gene defects that account for more than a few percent of the cases. PMID:17120046

  12. Consanguinity, human evolution, and complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bittles, A. H.; Black, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    There is little information on inbreeding during the critical early years of human existence. However, given the small founding group sizes and restricted mate choices it seems inevitable that intrafamilial reproduction occurred and the resultant levels of inbreeding would have been substantial. Currently, couples related as second cousins or closer (F ≥ 0.0156) and their progeny account for an estimated 10.4% of the global population. The highest rates of consanguineous marriage occur in north and sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and west, central, and south Asia. In these regions even couples who regard themselves as unrelated may exhibit high levels of homozygosity, because marriage within clan, tribe, caste, or biraderi boundaries has been a long-established tradition. Mortality in first-cousin progeny is ≈3.5% higher than in nonconsanguineous offspring, although demographic, social, and economic factors can significantly influence the outcome. Improving socioeconomic conditions and better access to health care will impact the effects of consanguinity, with a shift from infant and childhood mortality to extended morbidity. At the same time, a range of primarily social factors, including urbanization, improved female education, and smaller family sizes indicate that the global prevalence of consanguineous unions will decline. This shift in marriage patterns will initially result in decreased homozygosity, accompanied by a reduction in the expression of recessive single-gene disorders. Although the roles of common and rare gene variants in the etiology of complex disease remain contentious, it would be expected that declining consanguinity would also be reflected in reduced prevalence of complex diseases, especially in population isolates. PMID:19805052

  13. The Use of High-Density SNP Array to Map Homozygosity in Consanguineous Families to Efficiently Identify Candidate Genes: Application to Woodhouse-Sakati Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Molly B.; Wohler, Elizabeth; Batista, Denise A. S.; Applegate, Carolyn; Hoover-Fong, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Two consanguineous Qatari siblings presented for evaluation: a 17-4/12-year-old male with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, alopecia, intellectual disability, and microcephaly and his 19-year-old sister with primary amenorrhea, alopecia, and normal cognition. Both required hormone treatment to produce secondary sex characteristics and pubertal development beyond Tanner 1. SNP array analysis of both probands was performed to detect shared regions of homozygosity which may harbor homozygous mutations in a gene causing their common features of abnormal pubertal development, alopecia, and variable cognitive delay. Our patients shared multiple homozygous genomic regions; ten shared regions were >1 Mb in length and constituted 0.99% of the genome. DCAF17, encoding a transmembrane nuclear protein of uncertain function, was the only gene identified in a homozygous region known to cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. DCAF17 mutations are associated with Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome, a rare disorder characterized by alopecia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, sensorineural hearing loss, diabetes mellitus, and extrapyramidal movements. Sequencing of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions of DCAF17 in the proband revealed homozygosity for a previously described founder mutation (c.436delC). Targeted DCAF17 sequencing of his affected sibling revealed the same homozygous mutation. This family illustrates the utility of SNP array testing in consanguineous families to efficiently and inexpensively identify regions of genomic homozygosity in which genetic candidates for recessive conditions can be identified. PMID:26664771

  14. A novel DFNB31 mutation associated with Usher type 2 syndrome showing variable degrees of auditory loss in a consanguineous Portuguese family.

    PubMed Central

    Bujakowska, Kinga; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Tronche, Sophie; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Antonio, Aline; Germain, Aurore; Lonjou, Christine; Carpentier, Wassila; Sahel, José-Alain; Bhattacharya, Shomi; Zeitz, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To identify the genetic defect of a consanguineous Portuguese family with rod-cone dystrophy and varying degrees of decreased audition. Methods A detailed ophthalmic and auditory examination was performed on a Portuguese patient with severe autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy. Known genetic defects were excluded by performing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) genotyping microarray analysis and by Sanger sequencing of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions of eyes shut homolog–drosophila (EYS) and chromosome 2 open reading frame 71 (C2orf71). Subsequently, genome-wide homozygosity mapping was performed in DNA samples from available family members using a 700K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray. Candidate genes present in the significantly large homozygous regions were screened for mutations using Sanger sequencing. Results The largest homozygous region (~11 Mb) in the affected family members was mapped to chromosome 9, which harbors deafness, autosomal recessive 31 (DFNB31; a gene previously associated with Usher syndrome). Mutation analysis of DFNB31 in the index patient identified a novel one-base-pair deletion (c.737delC), which is predicted to lead to a truncated protein (p.Pro246HisfsX13) and co-segregated with the disease in the family. Ophthalmic examination of the index patient and the affected siblings showed severe rod-cone dystrophy. Pure tone audiometry revealed a moderate hearing loss in the index patient, whereas the affected siblings were reported with more profound and early onset hearing impairment. Conclusions We report a novel truncating mutation in DFNB31 associated with severe rod-cone dystrophy and varying degrees of hearing impairment in a consanguineous family of Portuguese origin. This is the second report of DFNB31 implication in Usher type 2. PMID:21738389

  15. Exome sequencing in a consanguineous family clinically diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease identifies a homozygous CTSF mutation.

    PubMed

    Bras, Jose; Djaldetti, Ruth; Alves, Ana Margarida; Mead, Simon; Darwent, Lee; Lleo, Alberto; Molinuevo, Jose Luis; Blesa, Rafael; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Clarimon, Jordi; Guerreiro, Rita

    2016-10-01

    We have previously reported the whole genome genotyping analysis of 2 consanguineous siblings clinically diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this analysis, we identified several large regions of homozygosity shared between both affected siblings, which we suggested could be candidate loci for a recessive genetic lesion underlying the early onset AD in these cases. We have now performed exome sequencing in one of these siblings and identified the potential cause of disease: the CTSF c.1243G>A:p.Gly415Arg mutation in homozygosity. Biallelic mutations in this gene have been shown to cause Type B Kufs disease, an adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis with some cases resembling the impairment seen in AD. PMID:27524508

  16. The alkylglycerol monooxygenase (AGMO) gene previously involved in autism also causes a novel syndromic form of primary microcephaly in a consanguineous Saudi family.

    PubMed

    Alrayes, Nuha; Mohamoud, Hussein Sheikh Ali; Ahmed, Saleem; Almramhi, Mona Mohammad; Shuaib, Taghreed Mohammad; Wang, Jun; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Everett, Kate; Nasir, Jamal; Jelani, Musharraf

    2016-04-15

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) refers to a genetically heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders in which patients exhibit a marked decrease in occipitofrontal head circumference at birth and a variable degree of intellectual disability. To date, 18 genes have been reported for MCPH worldwide. We enrolled a consanguineous family from Saudi Arabia presenting with primary microcephaly, developmental delay, short stature and intellectual disability. Whole exome sequencing (WES) with 100× coverage was performed on two affected siblings after defining common regions of homozygosity through genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray genotyping. WES data analysis, confirmed by subsequent Sanger sequence validation, identified a novel homozygous deletion mutation (c.967delA; p.Glu324Lysfs12*) in exon 10 of the alkylglycerol monooxygenase (AGMO) gene on chromosome 7p21.2. Population screening of 178 ethnically matched control chromosomes and consultation of the Exome Aggregation Consortium database, containing 60,706 individuals' exomes worldwide, confirmed that this mutation was not present outside the family. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first evidence of an AGMO mutation underlying primary microcephaly and intellectual disability in humans. Our findings further expand the genetic heterogeneity of MCPH in familial cases. PMID:27000257

  17. Whole exome sequencing identifies causative mutations in the majority of consanguineous or familial cases with childhood-onset increased renal echogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Halbritter, Jan; Gee, Heon Yung; Porath, Jonathan D.; Lawson, Jennifer A.; Airik, Rannar; Shril, Shirlee; Allen, Susan J.; Stein, Deborah; Al Kindy, Adila; Beck, Bodo B.; Cengiz, Nurcan; Moorani, Khemchand N.; Ozaltin, Fatih; Hashmi, Seema; Sayer, John A.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Soliman, Neveen A.; Otto, Edgar A.; Lifton, Richard P.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    Chronically increased echogenicity on renal ultrasound is a sensitive early finding of chronic kidney disease that can be detected before manifestation of other symptoms. Increased echogenicity, however, is not specific for a certain etiology of chronic kidney disease. Here, we performed whole exome sequencing in 79 consanguineous or familial cases of suspected nephronophthisis in order to determine the underlying molecular disease cause. In 50 cases, there was a causative mutation in a known monogenic disease gene. In 32 of these cases whole exome sequencing confirmed the diagnosis of a nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy. In 8 cases it revealed the diagnosis of a renal tubulopathy. The remaining 10 cases were identified as Alport syndrome (4), autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease (2), congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (3), and APECED syndrome (1). In 5 families, in whom mutations in known monogenic genes were excluded, we applied homozygosity mapping for variant filtering, and identified 5 novel candidate genes (RBM48, FAM186B, PIAS1, INCENP, and RCOR1) for renal ciliopathies. Thus, whole exome sequencing allows the detection of the causative mutation in 2/3 of affected individuals, thereby presenting the etiologic diagnosis and allows identification of novel candidate genes. PMID:26489029

  18. Whole exome sequencing identifies causative mutations in the majority of consanguineous or familial cases with childhood-onset increased renal echogenicity.

    PubMed

    Braun, Daniela A; Schueler, Markus; Halbritter, Jan; Gee, Heon Yung; Porath, Jonathan D; Lawson, Jennifer A; Airik, Rannar; Shril, Shirlee; Allen, Susan J; Stein, Deborah; Al Kindy, Adila; Beck, Bodo B; Cengiz, Nurcan; Moorani, Khemchand N; Ozaltin, Fatih; Hashmi, Seema; Sayer, John A; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Soliman, Neveen A; Otto, Edgar A; Lifton, Richard P; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2016-02-01

    Chronically increased echogenicity on renal ultrasound is a sensitive early finding of chronic kidney disease that can be detected before manifestation of other symptoms. Increased echogenicity, however, is not specific for a certain etiology of chronic kidney disease. Here, we performed whole exome sequencing in 79 consanguineous or familial cases of suspected nephronophthisis in order to determine the underlying molecular disease cause. In 50 cases, there was a causative mutation in a known monogenic disease gene. In 32 of these cases whole exome sequencing confirmed the diagnosis of a nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy. In 8 cases it revealed the diagnosis of a renal tubulopathy. The remaining 10 cases were identified as Alport syndrome (4), autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease (2), congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (3), and APECED syndrome (1). In 5 families, in whom mutations in known monogenic genes were excluded, we applied homozygosity mapping for variant filtering and identified 5 novel candidate genes (RBM48, FAM186B, PIAS1, INCENP, and RCOR1) for renal ciliopathies. Thus, whole exome sequencing allows the detection of the causative mutation in 2/3 of affected individuals, thereby presenting the etiologic diagnosis, and allows identification of novel candidate genes. PMID:26489029

  19. Novel SIL1 nonstop mutation in a Chinese consanguineous family with Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome and Dandy-Walker syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gai, Nan; Jiang, Chen; Zou, Yong-Yi; Zheng, Yu; Liang, De-Sheng; Wu, Ling-Qian

    2016-07-01

    Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, which is characterized by congenital cataracts, cerebellar ataxia, progressive muscle weakness, and delayed psychomotor development. SIL1, which is located at 5q31.2, is the only gene known to cause MSS. Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is defined by hypoplasia, upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis, and cystic dilation of the fourth ventricle; however, its genetic pathogeny remains unclear. Here, we report a Chinese consanguineous family with MSS and DWS. Whole exome sequencing identified a novel nonstop mutation in SIL1. Sanger sequencing revealed that the mutation was segregated in this family according to a recessive mode of inheritance. We found that the mutation changed a stop codon (TGA) to an arginine codon (CGA), and no in-frame termination codon in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of SIL1 could be found. The mRNA levels of SIL1 were decreased by 56.6% and 37.5% in immortalized lymphoblasts of the patients respectively; the protein levels of SIL1 were substantially decreased. This case study is the first report on Chinese MSS patients, MSS complicated by DWS, and a nonstop mutation in SIL1. Our findings imply the pathogenetic association between DWS and MSS. PMID:27106665

  20. In silico analysis of SIGMAR1 variant (rs4879809) segregating in a consanguineous Pakistani family showing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis without frontotemporal lobar dementia.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Muhammad Ikram; Ahmad, Arsalan; Raza, Syed Irfan; Amar, Ali; Ali, Amjad; Bhatti, Attya; John, Peter; Mohyuddin, Aisha; Ahmad, Wasim; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad

    2015-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper motor neurons in the brain and lower motor neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord, resulting in fatal paralysis. It has been found to be associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). In the present study, we have described homozygosity mapping and gene sequencing in a consanguineous autosomal recessive Pakistani family showing non-juvenile ALS without signs of FTLD. Gene mapping was carried out in all recruited family members using microsatellite markers, and linkage was established with sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1) gene at chromosome 9p13.2. Gene sequencing of SIGMAR1 revealed a novel 3'-UTR nucleotide variation c.672*31A>G (rs4879809) segregating with disease in this family. The C9ORF72 repeat region in intron 1, previously implicated in a related phenotype, was excluded through linkage, and further confirmation of exclusion was obtained by amplifying intron 1 of C9ORF72 with multiple primers in affected individuals and controls. In silico analysis was carried out to explore the possible role of 3'-UTR variant of SIGMAR1 in ALS. The Regulatory RNA motif and Element Finder program revealed disturbance in miRNA (hsa-miR-1205) binding site due to this variation. ESEFinder analysis showed new SRSF1 and SRSF1-IgM-BRCA1 binding sites with significant scores due to this variation. Our results indicate that the 3'-UTR SIGMAR1 variant c.672*31A>G may have a role in the pathogenesis of ALS in this family. PMID:26205306

  1. A missense mutation in the PISA domain of HsSAS-6 causes autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in a large consanguineous Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muzammil A; Rupp, Verena M; Orpinell, Meritxell; Hussain, Muhammad S; Altmüller, Janine; Steinmetz, Michel O; Enzinger, Christian; Thiele, Holger; Höhne, Wolfgang; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Baig, Shahid M; Ansar, Muhammad; Nürnberg, Peter; Vincent, John B; Speicher, Michael R; Gönczy, Pierre; Windpassinger, Christian

    2014-11-15

    Asymmetric cell division is essential for normal human brain development. Mutations in several genes encoding centrosomal proteins that participate in accurate cell division have been reported to cause autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH). By homozygosity mapping including three affected individuals from a consanguineous MCPH family from Pakistan, we delineated a critical region of 18.53 Mb on Chromosome 1p21.3-1p13.1. This region contains the gene encoding HsSAS-6, a centrosomal protein primordial for seeding the formation of new centrioles during the cell cycle. Both next-generation and Sanger sequencing revealed a homozygous c.185T>C missense mutation in the HsSAS-6 gene, resulting in a p.Ile62Thr substitution within a highly conserved region of the PISA domain of HsSAS-6. This variant is neither present in any single-nucleotide polymorphism or exome sequencing databases nor in a Pakistani control cohort. Experiments in tissue culture cells revealed that the Ile62Thr mutant of HsSAS-6 is substantially less efficient than the wild-type protein in sustaining centriole formation. Together, our findings demonstrate a dramatic impact of the mutation p.Ile62Thr on HsSAS-6 function and add this component to the list of genes mutated in primary microcephaly. PMID:24951542

  2. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I: phenotypic variability within a large consanguineous Bedouin family associated with a novel FKRP mutation.

    PubMed

    Harel, Tamar; Goldberg, Yael; Shalev, Stavit A; Chervinski, Ilana; Ofir, Rivka; Birk, Ohad S

    2004-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) represent a group of diseases characterized mainly by muscle wasting of the upper and lower limbs, with a wide range of clinical severity. The clinical heterogeneity is paralleled by molecular heterogeneity; each of the 10 forms of autosomal-recessive LGMD recognized to date is caused by mutations in a distinct gene. In a large consanguineous Bedouin tribe living in northern Israel, 15 individuals affected by LGMD demonstrate an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. A genome-wide screen followed by fine mapping in this family revealed linkage to a region on chromosome 19 harboring the fukutin-related protein gene (FKRP), with a maximal LOD score of 4.8 for D19S902. FKRP, encoding a putative glycosyltransferase, has been implicated in causing congenital muscular dystrophy 1C (MDC1C), and has recently been shown to be mutated in LGMD2I. We identified a novel missense mutation in exon 4 of the FKRP gene in all the patients studied. Although all affected individuals were homozygous for the same mutation, a marked phenotypic variability was apparent within the family. This finding may suggest a role of modifier genes and environmental factors in LGMD2I. Moreover, the demonstration that an identical, novel mutation in the FKRP gene can cause a muscle disease of either a congenital onset or of a later onset within a single family provides clinical support to the molecular evidence, suggesting that MDC1C and LGMD2I are overlapping ends of one and the same entity. PMID:14523375

  3. Integration of Sequence Data from a Consanguineous Family with Genetic Data from an Outbred Population Identifies PLB1 as a Candidate Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Gene

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothee; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Mouassess, Faten; Achkar, Walid A. L.; Fulton, Robert S.; Denny, Joshua C.; Gupta, Namrata; Mirel, Daniel; Gabriel, Stacy; Li, Gang; Kremer, Joel M.; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Carroll, Robert J.; Eyler, Anne E.; Trynka, Gosia; Stahl, Eli A.; Cui, Jing; Saxena, Richa; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Dieudé, Philippe; Mariette, Xavier; Barton, Anne; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João E.; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P.; Moreland, Larry W.; Bridges, S. Louis; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Choi, Hyon K.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Galan, Pilar; Lathrop, Mark; Raj, Towfique; De Jager, Philip L.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Worthington, Jane; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Arayssi, Thurayya; Kazkaz, Layla A.; Plenge, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Integrating genetic data from families with highly penetrant forms of disease together with genetic data from outbred populations represents a promising strategy to uncover the complete frequency spectrum of risk alleles for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we demonstrate that rare, low-frequency and common alleles at one gene locus, phospholipase B1 (PLB1), might contribute to risk of RA in a 4-generation consanguineous pedigree (Middle Eastern ancestry) and also in unrelated individuals from the general population (European ancestry). Through identity-by-descent (IBD) mapping and whole-exome sequencing, we identified a non-synonymous c.2263G>C (p.G755R) mutation at the PLB1 gene on 2q23, which significantly co-segregated with RA in family members with a dominant mode of inheritance (P = 0.009). We further evaluated PLB1 variants and risk of RA using a GWAS meta-analysis of 8,875 RA cases and 29,367 controls of European ancestry. We identified significant contributions of two independent non-coding variants near PLB1 with risk of RA (rs116018341 [MAF = 0.042] and rs116541814 [MAF = 0.021], combined P = 3.2×10−6). Finally, we performed deep exon sequencing of PLB1 in 1,088 RA cases and 1,088 controls (European ancestry), and identified suggestive dispersion of rare protein-coding variant frequencies between cases and controls (P = 0.049 for C-alpha test and P = 0.055 for SKAT). Together, these data suggest that PLB1 is a candidate risk gene for RA. Future studies to characterize the full spectrum of genetic risk in the PLB1 genetic locus are warranted. PMID:24520335

  4. Comments on "Consanguineous Marriages in Pakistan".

    PubMed

    Hakim, A

    1994-01-01

    Some critical comments are made on a paper entitled "Consanguineous Marriages in Pakistan." Most studies have considered early age at marriage, rural or extended family setup and low socioeconomic status when investigating the issue. The background demographic variables and behavioral aspects of consanguinity were studied only by a few, therefore a lack of data exists on pertinent social, cultural, and behavioral dynamics. In Pakistan over 60% of marriages are between first or second cousins. The highest rates of such marriages have been reported in rural areas, among individuals with low educational level, and among the poorest. However, cousin unions are also common among landowning families. In addition to socioeconomic reasons, these marriages are socially acceptable because they facilitate prenuptial negotiations and provide more compatibility between the husband and wife as well as the bride and the mother-in-law. The evidence on consanguinity and fertility is conflicting. The effect of inbreeding on fertility has been demonstrated by most studies. The effect of consanguinity on mortality is also wrought with ambiguities because of methodological flaws. Although the present authors used limited bivariate analysis, they could not account for increased fertility and mortality in consanguineous matings by examining socioeconomic differences and background demographic variables. There is a need to indicate clearly to what extent the genetic effect is responsible for the excess fertility and mortality after controlling for maternal, sociodemographic, and behavioral characteristics. The article made a contribution to elucidating the impact of cousin marriages, a well entrenched custom, on fertility, mortality, and the status of women. PMID:12346200

  5. Organ donation consanguinity or universality.

    PubMed

    Kishore, R R

    1996-01-01

    1. Neither the "Diseased Persons" nor the "Genetic Relations" provide an answer to "trading" in human body parts. 2. Live human body constitutes a vital source of supply of organs and tissues and the possibilities of optimum utilisation should be explored. 3. There is no scope for dogmatic postures and open-mindedness should be the approach while dealing with the issue of Organ Transplantation. 4. Society owes a duty to save the file of a dying man and in the event of failure to do so, it is absolutely immoral to interfere with his own arrangements by making unrealistic laws. No immorality is involved if an individual disposes of his spare body parts for a valid consideration to a needy person. 5. The scarcity needs to be urgently overcome otherwise unwarranted trade and crime are liable to thrive. 6. Families are not unconnected or antagonistic fragments of humanity. After thousands of years of continuous efforts the individuals on this earth have attained the stage of organic and functional integration. Atomisation of society on the basis of consanguineous proximities amounts to reversing this holistic trend. Organ transplantation is a functional expression of a highly evolved pursuit with inherent and intimate interaction in the form of organic exchange at the individual level, independent of consanguineous inducements or motivations. As such there is absolutely no scope for restricting organ donations by strangers. 7. Commercialisation should be curbed by making the enforcement agencies more efficient and not by depriving a needy person of his genuine requirements. Legislative craftsmanship lies in providing an answer without curtailing the freedom of the people. PMID:8692005

  6. An analysis of consanguineous marriage in the Muslim population of India at regional and state levels.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H; Hussain, R

    2000-01-01

    Consanguineous marriage is widely favoured in a large majority of the world's Islamic populations. According to recent estimates, the resident Muslim population of India is over 100 million. However, apart from a few numerically small or geographically defined surveys, little is known about their patterns of marriage preferences since partition of the Indian Subcontinent in 1947. This study seeks to determine the prevalence and patterns of consanguineous marriages contracted among Indian Muslims at regional and state levels during the last two generations. Data from the 1992/93 Indian National Family Health Survey (NFHS) were used in the analysis. The NFHS was a nationally-representative survey of ever-married women aged 13-49 years, conducted across 25 states of India. Of the initial 9845 respondents, 8436 were included in the final weighted analysis sample. Overall, 22.0% of marriages were found to be contracted between spouses related as second cousins or closer, ranging from 15.9% in the eastern states to 32.9% in the western states of India. In all parts of the country first cousin marriages were the preferred form of consanguineous union, and in four of the five regions paternal first cousin marriages predominated. Despite predictions to the contrary, there was no evidence of a significant change in the prevalence of consanguineous unions over the course of the study period, which extended from the late 1950s to the early 1990s. PMID:10768421

  7. Consanguinity and increased risk for schizophrenia in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Hader; Fathi, Warda; Klei, Lambertus; Wood, Joel; Chowdari, Kodavali; Watson, Annie; Eissa, Ahmed; Elassy, Mai; Ali, Ibtihal; Salah, Hala; Yassin, Amal; Tobar, Salwa; El-Boraie, Hala; Gaafar, Hanan; Ibrahim, Nahed E.; Kandil, Kareem; El-Bahaei, Wafaa; El-Boraie, Osama; Alatrouny, Mohamed; El-Chennawi, Farha; Devlin, Bernie; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Consanguinity has been suggested as a risk factor for psychsoses in some Middle Eastern countries, but adequate control data are unavailable. Our recent studies in Egypt have shown elevated parental consanguinity rates among patients with bipolar I disorder (BP1), compared with controls. We have now extended our analyses to Schizophrenia (SZ) in the same population. Methods A case-control study was conducted at Mansoura University Hospital, Mansoura, Egypt (SZ, n = 75; controls, n = 126, and their available parents). The prevalence of consanguinity was estimated from family history data (‘self report’), followed by DNA analysis using short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs, n = 63) (‘DNA-based’ rates). Results Self reported consanguinity was significantly elevated among the patients (SZ: 46.6%, controls: 19.8%, OR 3.53, 95% CI 1.88, 6.64; p = 0.000058, 1 d.f.). These differences were confirmed using DNA based estimates for coefficients of inbreeding (inbreeding coefficients as means ± standard error, cases: 0.058 ± 0.007, controls: 0.022 ± 0.003). Conclusions Consanguinity rates are signifcantly elevated among Egyptian SZ patients in the Nile delta region. The associations are similar to those observed with BP1 in our earlier study. If replicated, the substantial risk associated with consanguinity raises public health concerns. They may also pave the way for gene mapping studies. PMID:20435442

  8. Effects of parental consanguinity on mortality and reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Lindelius, R

    1980-01-01

    A study of consanguinity effects on mortality and fertility was performed. The original series consisted of families selected on the basis of the birth of at least one child with a congenital, monohybrid, autosomal recessive disease. Biologically related families were compared with unrelated ones, the latter group being used as a natural control group. The results are discussed. PMID:7358407

  9. Consanguinity Associated With Increased Risk for Bipolar I Disorder in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Hader; Klei, Lambertus; Wood, Joel; Talkowski, Michael; Chowdari, Kodavali; Fathi, Warda; Eissa, Ahmed; Yassin, Amal; Salah, Hala; Tobar, Salwa; El-Boraie, Hala; Gaafar, Hanan; Elassy, Mai; Ibrahim, Nahed E.; El-Bahaei, Wafaa; Elsayed, Mohamed; Shahda, Mohamed; Sheshtawy, Eman El; El-Boraie, Osama; El-Chennawi, Farha; Devlin, Bernie; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to contrast rates of consanguinity among patients with bipolar I disorder (BP1) and controls in a population with customary consanguineous marriages (i.e., marriage between related individuals). Consanguinity increases risk for numerous monogenic and polygenic diseases. Whether the risk for BP1 increases with consanguinity has not been investigated systematically. Two independent studies were conducted in Egypt: (1) Case–control study 93 patients with BP1, 90 screened adult control individuals, and available parents. The inbreeding coefficient/consanguinity rate was estimated in two ways: using 64 DNA polymorphisms (“DNA-based” rate); and from family history data (“self report”); (2) Epidemiological survey: total of 1,584 individuals were screened, from whom self-reported consanguinity data were obtained for identified BP1 cases (n=35) and 150 randomly selected, unaffected control individuals. DNA-based consanguinity rates showed significant case–control control differences (P=0.0039). Self-reported consanguinity rates were also elevated among BP1 patients in both samples (Study #1 OR=2.66, 95% confidence intervals, CI: 1.34, 5.29; Study #2: OR=4.64, 95% CI: 2.01, 10.34). In conclusion, two independent, systematic studies indicate increased consanguinity among Egyptian BP1 patients in the Nile delta region. Self-reported estimates of consanguinity are bolstered by DNA-based estimates, and both show significant case–control differences for BP1. PMID:19152378

  10. Association studies in consanguineous populations

    SciTech Connect

    Genin, E.; Clerget-Darpous, F.

    1996-04-01

    To study the genetic determinism of multifactorial diseases in large panmictic populations, a strategy consists in looking for an association with markers closely linked to candidate genes. A distribution of marker genotypes different in patients and controls may indicate that the candidate gene is involved in the disease. In panmictic populations, the power to detect the role of a candidate gene depends on the gametic disequilibrium with the marker locus. In consanguineous populations, we show that it depends on the inbreeding coefficient F as well. Inbreeding increases the power to detect the role of a recessive or quasi-recessive disease-susceptibility factor. The gain in power turns out to be greater for small values of the gametic disequilibrium. Moreover, even in the absence of gametic disequilibrium, the presence of inbreeding may allow to detect the role of a recessive factor. Ignoring inbreeding when it exists may lead to reject falsely a recessive model if the mode of inheritance is inferred on the distribution of genotypes among patients. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Missouri Small Farm Family Program. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enlow, George; And Others

    Records maintained by rural extension designees on the Missouri Small Farm Family Program, (initiated in 1972 by the cooperative extension service to help low income farm families learn to use available resources to improve their quality of life) provided data re: family characteristics, farm improvement progress, and improvement in the quality of…

  12. Nonsyndromic Early-Onset Cone-Rod Dystrophy and Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy in a Consanguineous Israeli Family are Caused by Two Independent yet Linked Mutations in ALMS1 and DYSF.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Csilla H; Kimchi, Adva; Namburi, Prasanthi; Mutsuddi, Mousumi; Zelinger, Lina; Beryozkin, Avigail; Ben-Simhon, Shiran; Obolensky, Alexey; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Argov, Zohar; Pikarsky, Eli; Fellig, Yakov; Marks-Ohana, Devorah; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Banin, Eyal; Sharon, Dror; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-09-01

    Genetic analysis of clinical phenotypes in consanguineous families is complicated by coinheritance of large DNA regions carrying independent variants. Here, we characterized a family with early onset cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) and muscular dystrophy. Homozygosity mapping (HM) followed by whole exome sequencing revealed a nonsense mutation, p.R270*, in ALMS1 and two novel potentially disease-causing missense variants, p.R1581C and p.Y2070C, in DYSF. ALMS1 and DYSF are genetically and physically linked on chromosome 2 in a genomic region suggested by HM and associated with Alström syndrome, which includes CRD, and with limb girdle muscular dystrophy, respectively. Affected family members lack additional systemic manifestations of Alström syndrome but exhibit mild muscular dystrophy. RNA-seq data did not reveal any significant variations in ALMS1 transcripts in the human retina. Our study thus implicates ALMS1 as a nonsyndromic retinal disease gene and suggests a potential role of variants in interacting cilia genes in modifying clinical phenotypes. PMID:26077327

  13. The Perils of SNP Microarray Testing: Uncovering Unexpected Consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Tarini, Beth A.; Konczal, Laura; Goldenberg, Aaron J.; Goldman, Edward B.; McCandless, Shawn E.

    2013-01-01

    Background While single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chromosomal microarrays identify areas of small genetic deletions/duplications, they can also reveal regions of homozygosity indicative of consanguinity. As more non-geneticists order SNP microarrays, they must prepare for the potential ethical, legal and social issues that result from revelation of unanticipated consanguinity. Patient An infant with multiple congenital anomalies underwent SNP microarray testing. Results The results of the SNP microarray revealed several large regions of homozygosity that indicated identity by descent most consistent with a second or third degree relative mating (e.g., uncle/ niece, half brother/sister, first cousins). Mother was not aware of the test's potential to reveal consanguinity. When informed of the test results, she reluctantly admitted to being raped by her half-brother around the time of conception. Conclusions During the pre-testing consent process, providers should inform parents that SNP microarray testing could reveal consanguinity. Providers must also understand the psychological implications, as well as the legal and moral obligations, that accompany SNP microarray results that indicate consanguinity. PMID:23827427

  14. Analysis of CYP7B1 in non-consanguineous cases of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Schüle, Rebecca; Brandt, Elisabeth; Karle, Kathrin N; Tsaousidou, Maria; Klebe, Stephan; Klimpe, Sven; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Crosby, Andrew H; Hübner, Christian A; Schöls, Ludger; Deufel, Thomas; Beetz, Christian

    2009-04-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a neurodegenerative condition defined clinically by lower limb spasticity and weakness. Homozygous mutations in CYP7B1 have been identified in several consanguineous families that represented HSP type 5 (SPG5), one of the many genetic forms of the disease. We used direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to screen for CYP7B1 alterations in apparently sporadic HSP patients (n = 12) as well as index patients from non-consanguineous families with recessive (n = 8) and dominant (n = 8) transmission of HSP. One sporadic patient showing HSP as well as optic atrophy carried a homozygous nonsense mutation. Compound heterozygosity was observed in a recessive family with a clinically pure phenotype. A heterozygous missense change segregated in a small dominant family. We also found a significant association of a known coding polymorphism with cerebellar signs complicating a primary HSP phenotype. Our findings suggest CYP7B1 alterations to represent a rather frequent cause of HSP that should be considered in patients with various clinical presentations. PMID:18855023

  15. Novel homozygous, heterozygous and hemizygous FRMD7 gene mutations segregated in the same consanguineous family with congenital X-linked nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishna, Uppala; Ratnamala, Uppala; Deutsch, Samuel; Bartoloni, Lucia; Kuracha, Murali R; Singh, Raminder; Banwait, Jasjit; Bastola, Dhundy K; Johar, Kaid; Nath, Swapan K; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2012-01-01

    Congenital nystagmus (NYS) is characterized by bilateral, spontaneous, and involuntary movements of the eyeballs that most commonly presents between 2 and 6 months of life. To date, 44 different FRMD7 gene mutations have been found to be etiological factors for the NYS1 locus at Xq26-q27. The aim of this study was to find the FRMD7 gene mutations in a large eleven-generation Indian pedigree with 71 members who are affected by NYS. Mutation analysis of the entire coding region and splice junctions of the FRMD7 gene revealed a novel missense mutation, c.A917G, predicts a substitution of Arg for Gln at codon 305 (Q305R) within exon 10 of FRMD7. The mutation was detected in hemizygous males, and in homozygous and heterozygous states in affected female members of the family. This mutation was not detected in unaffected members of the family or in 100 unrelated control subjects. This mutation was found to be at a highly conserved residue within the FERM-adjacent domain in affected members of the family. Structure prediction and energetic analysis of wild-type FRMD7 compared with mutant (Q305R) revealed that this change in amino acid led to a change in secondary structure predicted to be an energetically unstable protein. The present study represents the first confirmation of FRMD7 gene mutations in a multigenerational Indian family and expands the mutation spectrum for this locus. PMID:22490987

  16. Segregation of Incomplete Achromatopsia and Alopecia Due to PDE6H and LPAR6 Variants in a Consanguineous Family from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Pedurupillay, Christeen Ramane J; Landsend, Erlend Christoffer Sommer; Vigeland, Magnus Dehli; Ansar, Muhammad; Frengen, Eirik; Misceo, Doriana; Strømme, Petter

    2016-01-01

    We report on two brothers with visual impairment, and non-syndromic alopecia in the elder proband. The parents were first-degree Pakistani cousins. Whole exome sequencing of the elder brother and parents, followed by Sanger sequencing of all four family members, led to the identification of the variants responsible for the two phenotypes. One variant was a homozygous nonsense variant in the inhibitory subunit of the cone-specific cGMP phosphodiesterase gene, PDE6H:c.35C>G (p.Ser12*). PDE6H is expressed in the cones of the retina, which are involved in perception of color vision. This is the second report of a homozygous PDE6H:c.35C>G variant causing incomplete achromatopsia (OMIM 610024), thus strongly supporting the hypothesis that loss-of-function variants in PDE6H cause this visual deficiency phenotype. The second variant was a homozygous missense substitution in the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 6, LPAR6:c.188A>T (p.Asp63Val). LPAR6 acts as a G-protein-coupled receptor involved in hair growth. Biallelic loss-of-function variants in LPAR6 cause hypotrichosis type 8 (OMIM 278150), with or without woolly hair, a form of non-syndromic alopecia. Biallelic LPAR6:c.188A>T was previously described in five families from Pakistan. PMID:27472364

  17. Segregation of Incomplete Achromatopsia and Alopecia Due to PDE6H and LPAR6 Variants in a Consanguineous Family from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Pedurupillay, Christeen Ramane J.; Landsend, Erlend Christoffer Sommer; Vigeland, Magnus Dehli; Ansar, Muhammad; Frengen, Eirik; Misceo, Doriana; Strømme, Petter

    2016-01-01

    We report on two brothers with visual impairment, and non-syndromic alopecia in the elder proband. The parents were first-degree Pakistani cousins. Whole exome sequencing of the elder brother and parents, followed by Sanger sequencing of all four family members, led to the identification of the variants responsible for the two phenotypes. One variant was a homozygous nonsense variant in the inhibitory subunit of the cone-specific cGMP phosphodiesterase gene, PDE6H:c.35C>G (p.Ser12*). PDE6H is expressed in the cones of the retina, which are involved in perception of color vision. This is the second report of a homozygous PDE6H:c.35C>G variant causing incomplete achromatopsia (OMIM 610024), thus strongly supporting the hypothesis that loss-of-function variants in PDE6H cause this visual deficiency phenotype. The second variant was a homozygous missense substitution in the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 6, LPAR6:c.188A>T (p.Asp63Val). LPAR6 acts as a G-protein-coupled receptor involved in hair growth. Biallelic loss-of-function variants in LPAR6 cause hypotrichosis type 8 (OMIM 278150), with or without woolly hair, a form of non-syndromic alopecia. Biallelic LPAR6:c.188A>T was previously described in five families from Pakistan. PMID:27472364

  18. Consanguinity and Birth Defects in the Jerusalem Perinatal Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Harlap, S.; Kleinhaus, K.; Perrin, M.C.; Calderon-Margalit, R.; Paltiel, O.; Deutsch, L.; Manor, O.; Tiram, E.; Yanetz, R.; Friedlander, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Background While parental consanguinity is known to increase the risk of birth defects in offspring, it is hard to quantify this risk in populations where consanguinity is prevalent. Methods To support ongoing studies of cancer and of psychiatric disease, we studied relationships of consanguinity to 1,053 major birth defects in 29,815 offspring, born in 1964–1976. To adjust for confounding variables (geographic origin, social class and hospital), we constructed logistic regression models, using GEE to take into account correlations between sibs. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence limits were estimated in comparison to a reference group of offspring with grandfathers born in different countries. Results With 10.1% of offspring having consanguineous parents, the adjusted OR for major birth defect was 1.41 (1.12–1.74). Offspring of marriages between uncles-nieces, first cousins and more distant relatives showed adjusted ORs of 2.36 (0.98–5.68), 1.59 (1.22–2.07) and 1.20 (0.89–1.59) respectively. For descendents of grandfathers born in the same country, but not known to be related, the OR was 1.05 (0.91–1.21); these showed increased risk associated with ancestries in Western Asia (1.27, 1.04–1.55, p < 0.02) or Europe (1.13, 0.79–1.80). Conclusions A strong association of consanguinity with poverty and low education points to the need to avoid exposure to environmental hazards in these families. PMID:18493143

  19. Consanguineous marriage and reproductive risk: attitudes and understanding of ethnic groups practising consanguinity in Western society.

    PubMed

    Teeuw, Marieke E; Loukili, Ghariba; Bartels, Edien Ac; ten Kate, Leo P; Cornel, Martina C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2014-04-01

    Consanguineous couples should be adequately informed about their increased reproductive risk and possibilities for genetic counselling. Information may only be effective if it meets the needs of the target group. This study aimed to gain more insight into: (1) attitudes of people belonging to ethnic groups in Western society towards consanguinity and their understanding of risk for offspring; and (2) their attitudes regarding reproductive information targeted at consanguineous couples. Dutch Moroccans and Turks were invited to complete an online questionnaire by snowball sampling and by placing a link on two popular Dutch Moroccan/Turkish forum websites between September and October 2011. The questionnaire was completed by 201 individuals who were, on average, neither positive nor negative towards consanguinity. Respondents with a consanguineous partner were more positive, estimated the risk for the offspring lower and were less positive about the provision of risk information to consanguineous couples when compared with respondents without a consanguineous partner. Participants of Turkish origin had a more negative attitude towards consanguinity and estimated the reproductive risk higher than Moroccan participants. More than half of the respondents thought that information should be given before marriage, whereas only 10% thought it should never be provided. The general practitioner was most often mentioned (54%) as the designated professional to inform people. Information about genetic risks related to consanguinity should be offered early, preferably before marriage. The diversity of the target population requires various strategies to disseminate information and reach consanguineous couples with the offer of genetic counselling. PMID:23921534

  20. Effects of consanguineous marriage on reproductive outcome in an Arab community in Israel.

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, L; Merlob, P; Gabriel, R; Shohat, M

    1997-01-01

    Intrafamilial marriage is favoured by the Arab community in Israel, almost all of whom live in villages populated by a few (< 20) founding families. A previous study in Taibe, a large Arab village located 30 km from Tel Aviv, showed a significantly high malformation rate among infants of consanguineous parents. The present study examines the reproductive consequences of parental consanguinity in 610 families from the same village, selected retrospectively through infants routinely seen in the local well baby clinic. All mothers were interviewed with regard to previous pregnancy outcomes, including abortions, stillbirths, and neonatal or infant deaths, as well as the degree of consanguinity. In addition, we analysed the anthropometric measurements of the probands. The incidence of infant deaths was significantly higher in the inbred group (p < 0.001). No significant increase in fetal loss between the inbred and outbred groups was observed. There were no differences in anthropometric features, except for a lower birth weight in the consanguineous group (p < 0.035). This study, combined with our previous studies of the same population, indicates a prominent public health problem associated with consanguineous marriage in the Arab community and a need for specific genetic counselling. PMID:9429142

  1. A Small Library in Family Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc., New York, NY.

    This annotated listing of books is intended as a reference for anyone seeking an authoritative introduction to population and family planning information, as a world, family, or individual concern. For each entry, the International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is provided if available. The number preceding each reference represents the…

  2. Profiling β Thalassemia Mutations in Consanguinity and Nonconsanguinity for Prenatal Screening and Awareness Programme

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravindra; Arya, Vandana; Agarwal, Sarita

    2015-01-01

    Mutation spectrum varies significantly in different parts and different ethnic groups of India. Social factors such as preference to marry within the community and among 1st degree relatives (consanguinity) play an important role in impeding the gene pool of the disease within the community and so in society by and large. The present paper discusses the role of consanguinity in profiling of beta thalassemia mutation, and thus the approach for prenatal screening and prevention based awareness programme. Clinically diagnosed 516 cases of beta thalassemia were screened at molecular level. A detailed clinical Proforma was recorded with the information of origin of the family, ethnicity, and consanguinity. The present study reports that subjects originating from Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Bihar, and Jharkhand have c.92+5G>C and c.124_127delTTCT mutation as the commonest mutation compared to the subjects hailing from Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh and Nepal where sickle mutation was found more common. In 40 consanguineous unions more common and specific beta mutations with higher rate of homozygosity have been reported. This consanguinity-based data helps not only in deciding target oriented prenatal diagnostic strategies but also in objective based awareness programmes in prevention of thalassemia major birth. PMID:26576156

  3. Social structure and consanguinity in a French mountain Population (1550-1849).

    PubMed

    Rabino-Massa, Emma; Prost, Michel; Boëtsch, Gilles

    2005-04-01

    Sociocultural factors play a crucial role in the variation of consanguinity in a population. The choice of specific matrimonial strategies can favor the closure or opening of the group to the outside, whereas differential fertility affects the gene flow from one generation to another. In the present study we analyzed the role of socioprofessional groups in the maintenance of endogamy and consanguinity in a French Alpine valley: Vallouise in the Briançon area. In mountain environments, where the reproductive space is limited and quickly saturated, the autochthonous families adopt diversified matrimonial strategies. These marriage practices tend to prevent fragmentation of agricultural property. We analyzed the matrimonial behavior in the two main social groups of this population (décideurs and farmers) from 1550 to 1849. To better understand the behavior of the two social groups, we considered the two components of consanguinity, close and distant. Our study showed that the two groups had similar behavior regarding consanguinity. The way to prevent fragmentation of the patrimony was to choose a consanguineous spouse. This type of strategy inevitably leads to a high percentage of endogamy, which in this region of the Alps exceeded 90% through many centuries. PMID:16201137

  4. Profiling β Thalassemia Mutations in Consanguinity and Nonconsanguinity for Prenatal Screening and Awareness Programme.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravindra; Arya, Vandana; Agarwal, Sarita

    2015-01-01

    Mutation spectrum varies significantly in different parts and different ethnic groups of India. Social factors such as preference to marry within the community and among 1st degree relatives (consanguinity) play an important role in impeding the gene pool of the disease within the community and so in society by and large. The present paper discusses the role of consanguinity in profiling of beta thalassemia mutation, and thus the approach for prenatal screening and prevention based awareness programme. Clinically diagnosed 516 cases of beta thalassemia were screened at molecular level. A detailed clinical Proforma was recorded with the information of origin of the family, ethnicity, and consanguinity. The present study reports that subjects originating from Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Bihar, and Jharkhand have c.92+5G>C and c.124_127delTTCT mutation as the commonest mutation compared to the subjects hailing from Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh and Nepal where sickle mutation was found more common. In 40 consanguineous unions more common and specific beta mutations with higher rate of homozygosity have been reported. This consanguinity-based data helps not only in deciding target oriented prenatal diagnostic strategies but also in objective based awareness programmes in prevention of thalassemia major birth. PMID:26576156

  5. THE PREVALENCE OF CONSANGUINEOUS MARRIAGES AND AFFECTING FACTORS IN TURKEY: A NATIONAL SURVEY.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Sena; Pinar, Gul; Kaplan, Bekir; Aslantekin, Filiz; Karabulut, Erdem; Ayar, Banu; Dilmen, Ugur

    2016-09-01

    This study was carried out by the Turkish Republic Ministry of Health to determine the prevalence of consanguineous marriage and its correlates with socio-demographic and obstetric risk factors in women in Turkey. The cross-sectional, national-level study was carried out from October to December 2013. The study population was composed of women between the ages of 15 and 65 years living in Turkey. The sample size was calculated as 9290 houses within Turkey's 81 provinces so as to improve the Turkish rural-urban expectations by means of systematic stack sampling according to the Turkish Statistical Institute's address-based vital statistics system. The target sample size was 6364, but only eligible 4913 women, who had been married, were included in the study. The consanguineous marriage frequency in the sample was found to be 18.5%, and of these 57.8% were first cousin marriages. Women living in an extended family and whose education level and first marriage ages were low, and whose perceived economic status was poor, had higher frequencies of consanguineous marriage (p<0.001). Consanguineous marriage frequencies were higher (p<0.001) for women who had spontaneous abortions and stillbirths or who had given birth to infants with a congenital abnormality. In this context, it is important to develop national policies and strategies to prevent consanguineous marriages in Turkey. PMID:26892044

  6. Importance of Genetic Studies in Consanguineous Populations for the Characterization of Novel Human Gene Functions

    PubMed Central

    Shihab, Hashem A.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Gaunt, Tom R.; Day, Ian N.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Consanguineous offspring have elevated levels of homozygosity. Autozygous stretches within their genome are likely to harbour loss of function (LoF) mutations which will lead to complete inactivation or dysfunction of genes. Studying consanguineous offspring with clinical phenotypes has been very useful for identifying disease causal mutations. However, at present, most of the genes in the human genome have no disorder associated with them or have unknown function. This is presumably mostly due to the fact that homozygous LoF variants are not observed in outbred populations which are the main focus of large sequencing projects. However, another reason may be that many genes in the genome—even when completely “knocked out,” do not cause a distinct or defined phenotype. Here, we discuss the benefits and implications of studying consanguineous populations, as opposed to the traditional approach of analysing a subset of consanguineous families or individuals with disease. We suggest that studying consanguineous populations “as a whole” can speed up the characterisation of novel gene functions as well as indicating nonessential genes and/or regions in the human genome. We also suggest designing a single nucleotide variant (SNV) array to make the process more efficient. PMID:27000383

  7. Attitude of Saudi Arabian adults towards consanguineous marriage

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Omar A.; Al-Shaia, Walaa A.; Al-Hamam, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Marzoug, Hala M.; Ahmed, Anwar E.; Bagha, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research on the attitudes of Saudi adults towards consanguinity is scarce. The study aimed to explore the attitudes towards consanguinity and its associations with socio-demographic characteristics in a sample of Saudi adults. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 386 outpatient waiting-area attendees at King Abdul-Aziz Medical City-Riyadh were included. Participants were asked about their socio-demographic characteristics, attitude towards consanguinity and the reasons behind this. Results: The positive attitude towards consanguinity among the study respondents was 48.1% with 95% confidence interval (42.91–53.33%). Social and traditional culture (59.9%) were found to be the predominant reasons for favoring consanguinity in Saudi Arabia. Evidence against a positive attitude towards consanguinity was noted in respondents who received medical information about consanguinity versus those who had not received medical information (42.3% vs. 57%, p-value = 0.008). According to the multivariate logistic model, the odds of a positive attitude towards consanguinity were 2 times higher for males (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.147, 4.290) and 4.1 times higher in respondents in consanguineous marriages (aOR: 4.1; 95% CI: 2.350, 7.156). The odds of a positive attitude towards consanguinity were 50% less in respondents who received health information on consanguinity compared to those who had not received health information about consanguinity (aOR: 0.50; 95% CI: 0.253, 0.863). Conclusion: One in every two Saudi adults favors consanguinity however, Saudi men and women differ in their attitudes towards consanguinity. Receiving health information on consanguinity was associated with a negative attitude towards this practice. PMID:26835408

  8. Consanguinity and hereditary hearing loss in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Girotto, Giorgia; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Abdulhadi, Khalid; Vuckovic, Dragana; Vozzi, Diego; Khalifa Alkowari, Moza; Gasparini, Paolo; Badii, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Qatar is a sovereign state located on the Eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula in the Persian Gulf. Its native population consists of 3 major subgroups: people of Arabian origin or Bedouins, those from an Eastern or Persian ancestry and individuals with African admixture. Historically, all types of consanguineous marriages have been and still are common in the Qatari population, particularly among first and double-first cousins. Thus, there is a higher risk for most inherited diseases including hereditary hearing loss (HHL). In particular, a hearing loss prevalence of 5.2% has been reported in Qatar, with parental consanguinity being more common among affected individuals as compared with unaffected ones. Our recent molecular results confirm a high homogeneity and level of inbreeding in Qatari HHL patients. Among all HHL genes, GJB2, the major player worldwide, accounts for a minor proportion of cases and at least 3 additional genes have been found to be mutated in Qatari patients. Interestingly, one gene, BDP1, has been described to cause HHL only in this country. These results point towards an unexpected level of genetic heterogeneity despite the high level of inbreeding. This review provides an up-to-date picture of HHL in Qatar and of the impact of consanguinity on this disease. PMID:25060281

  9. IFT27, encoding a small GTPase component of IFT particles, is mutated in a consanguineous family with Bardet–Biedl syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aldahmesh, Mohammed A.; Li, Yuanyuan; Alhashem, Amal; Anazi, Shams; Alkuraya, Hisham; Hashem, Mais; Awaji, Ali A.; Sogaty, Sameera; Alkharashi, Abdullah; Alzahrani, Saeed; Al Hazzaa, Selwa A.; Xiong, Yong; Kong, Shanshan; Sun, Zhaoxia; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2014-01-01

    Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal recessive ciliopathy with multisystem involvement. So far, 18 BBS genes have been identified and the majority of them are essential for the function of BBSome, a protein complex involved in transporting membrane proteins into and from cilia. Yet defects in the identified genes cannot account for all the BBS cases. The genetic heterogeneity of this disease poses significant challenge to the identification of additional BBS genes. In this study, we coupled human genetics with functional validation in zebrafish and identified IFT27 as a novel BBS gene (BBS19). This is the first time an intraflagellar transport (IFT) gene is implicated in the pathogenesis of BBS, highlighting the genetic complexity of this disease. PMID:24488770

  10. Spectra of small Koronis family members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Rivkin, A.; Trilling, D.; Moskovitz, N.

    2014-07-01

    The space-weathering process and its implications for the relationships between S- and Q-type asteroids and ordinary chondrite meteorites are long-standing problems in asteroid science. Although the visible and near-infrared spectra of S- and Q-type objects qualitatively show the same absorption features and quantitatively show evidence of the same minerals, the S types display increased spectral slopes and muted absorption features compared to the Q types. This spectral mismatch is consistent with the effects of the space weathering process. Binzel et al. provided the missing link between Q- and S-type bodies in near-Earth space by showing a reddening of spectral slope in objects from 0.1 to 5 km that corresponded to the transition from Q- to S-type spectra. This result implied that size, and therefore age, is related to the relationship between Q- and S-type. The existence of Q-type objects in the main belt was not confirmed until Mothe-Diniz and Nesvorny (2008) found them in young S-type clusters. To investigate the trend from Q to S in the main belt, we examined space weathering within the old main-belt Koronis family using a spectrophotometric survey (Rivkin et al. 2011, Thomas et al. 2011). Rivkin et al. (2011) identified several potential Q-type objects within the Koronis family. Our Q-type candidates were identified using broad-band spectrophotometry and could not be taxonomically classified on that basis alone. We obtained follow-up visible and near-infrared spectral observations of our potential Q-type objects, (26970) Elias, (45610) 2000 DJ_{48}, and (37411) 2001 XF_{152}, using Gemini and Magellan. We will present the results of these spectral follow-up observations. Observations of (26970) Elias demonstrate that the object is more consistent with the average Q-type spectrum than the average S-type spectrum.

  11. Addressing key issues in the consanguinity-related risk of autosomal recessive disorders in consanguineous communities: lessons from a qualitative study of British Pakistanis.

    PubMed

    Darr, A; Small, N; Ahmad, W I U; Atkin, K; Corry, P; Modell, B

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no consensus regarding services required to help families with consanguineous marriages manage their increased genetic reproductive risk. Genetic services for communities with a preference for consanguineous marriage in the UK remain patchy, often poor. Receiving two disparate explanations of the cause of recessive disorders (cousin marriage and recessive inheritance) leads to confusion among families. Further, the realisation that couples in non-consanguineous relationships have affected children leads to mistrust of professional advice. British Pakistani families at-risk for recessive disorders lack an understanding of recessive disorders and their inheritance. Such an understanding is empowering and can be shared within the extended family to enable informed choice. In a three-site qualitative study of British Pakistanis, we explored family and health professional perspectives on recessively inherited conditions. Our findings suggest, firstly, that family networks hold strong potential for cascading genetic information, making the adoption of a family-centred approach an efficient strategy for this community. However, this is dependent on provision of high-quality and timely information from health care providers. Secondly, families' experience was of ill-coordinated and time-starved services, with few having access to specialist provision from Regional Genetics Services; these perspectives were consistent with health professionals' views of services. Thirdly, we confirm previous findings that genetic information is difficult to communicate and comprehend, further complicated by the need to communicate the relationship between cousin marriage and recessive disorders. A communication tool we developed and piloted is described and offered as a useful resource for communicating complex genetic information. PMID:26363620

  12. The small heat shock proteins family: the long forgotten chaperones.

    PubMed

    Garrido, C; Paul, C; Seigneuric, R; Kampinga, H H

    2012-10-01

    Small heat shock proteins are a rather heterogeneous family of ATP-independent chaperones, some of which have been proven to block protein aggregation and help the cells to survive stressful conditions. Although much less studied than high molecular weight HSPs like HSP70/HSPA or HSP90/HSPC, their implication in physio-pathological processes and human diseases is now well evidenced, as it will be discussed in the different reviews of this special issue. In this mini-review we will just present a general introduction about the small heat shock proteins family. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Small HSPs in physiology and pathology. PMID:22449631

  13. Training and HRD Strategies in Family and Non-Family Owned Small Businesses: A Comparative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matlay, Harry

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 6,000 British small businesses, 600 interviews, and 120 case studies found that 70-80% were family owned; most favored informal management styles. In family-owned businesses, training of nonfamily employees was considered less crucial; investments in the latter were related to long-term business strategies and potential succession.…

  14. Chromosome abnormality rate among Iranian patients with idiopathic mental retardation from consanguineous marriages

    PubMed Central

    Behjati, Farkhondeh; Ghasemi Firouzabadi, Saghar; Kahrizi, Kimia; Kariminejad, Roxana; Bagherizadeh, Iman; Ansari, Javad; Fallah, Masoumeh; Mojtahedi, Forough; Darvish, Hossein; Bahrami Monajemi, Gholamreza; Abedini, S. Sedigheh; Jamali, Payman; Mojahedi, Faezeh; Zadeh-Vakili, Azita; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Mental retardation (MR) has heterogeneous aetiology mostly with genetic causes. Chromosomal aberrations are one of the most common causes of MR. Reports on chromosome abnormality rate among consanguineous families are sparse. In order to identify the chromosome abnormality rate in idiopathic mental retardation from consanguineous marriages, a total of 322 Iranian families with positive family history for MR were investigated in the Genetics Research Center. Material and methods In the majority of families (92%) at least two sibs were affected with MR and none had specific chromosomal syndromes such as Down syndrome. Standard cytogenetic techniques using high resolution GTG banding were carried out on all the patients. Results The overall chromosome abnormality rate contributing to mental retardation was 1.24% (4 cases), which comprised 46,XY,der(18)t(4;18)(q31.1;q23)mat; 45,XY,-21,-22,+der(22)t(21;22)(q21.1;q13.33)mat; 46,XY,rec(2)dup(2p)inv(2)(p25.1q37.3)pat, and 46,XY,der(11)t(10;11)(q25.2;q25)pat. Conclusions Although the most likely genetic cause of mental retardation in patients with consanguineous parents is autosomal recessive, the fact that 1.24% of our patients had chromosomal abnormalities emphasizes the importance of cytogenetic investigation as the first laboratory genetic tests for all MR patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the rate of chromosome abnormality among patients with idiopathic mental retardation from consanguineous marriages. PMID:22291774

  15. Small Family, Smart Family? Family Size and the IQ Scores of Young Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Sandra E.; Devereux, Paul J.; Salvanes, Kjell G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses Norwegian data to estimate the effect of family size on IQ scores of men. Instrumental variables (IV) estimates using sex composition as an instrument show no significant negative effect of family size; however, IV estimates using twins imply that family size has a negative effect on IQ scores. Our results suggest that the effect…

  16. Genetic Counseling and Screening of Consanguineous Couples and Their Offspring: Recommendations of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Robin L; Motulsky, Arno G; Bittles, Alan; Hudgins, Louanne; Uhrich, Stefanie; Doyle, Debra Lochner; Silvey, Kerry; Scott, C Ronald; Cheng, Edith; McGillivray, Barbara; Steiner, Robert D; Olson, Debra

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this document is to provide recommendations for genetic counseling and screening for consanguineous couples (related as second cousins or closer) and their offspring with the goals of1. providing preconception reproductive options2. improving pregnancy outcome and identifying reproductive choices3. reducing morbidity and mortality in the 1st years of life, and4. respecting psychosocial and multicultural issues.The recommendations are the opinions of a multicenter working group (the Consanguinity Working Group (CWG)) with expertise in genetic counseling, medical genetics, biochemical genetics, genetic epidemiology, pediatrics, perinatology, and public health genetics, which was convened by the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC). The consensus of the CWG and NSGC reviewers is that beyond a thorough medical family history with follow-up of significant findings, no additional preconception screening is recommended for consanguineous couples. Consanguineous couples should be offered similar genetic screening as suggested for any couple of their ethnic group. During pregnancy, consanguineous couples should be offered maternal-fetal serum marker screening and high-resolution fetal ultrasonography. Newborns should be screened for impaired hearing and detection of treatable inborn errors of metabolism. These recommendations should not be construed as dictating an exclusive course of management, nor does use of such recommendations guarantee a particular outcome. The professional judgment of a health care provider, familiar with the facts and circumstances of a specific case, will always supersede these recommendations. PMID:26141656

  17. Consanguineous marriages in the province of Antalya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Alper, O M; Erengin, H; Manguoğlu, A E; Bilgen, T; Cetin, Z; Dedeoğlu, N; Lüleci, G

    2004-01-01

    To assess the trends in the frequency and the medical effects of consanguinity in the south coast of Turkish population using local and national data in the last 11 years. This cross-sectional study was carried out in Manavgat province, which is a major tourism center on the Mediterranean coast of Turkey. The authors studied consanguineous marriages in rural and urban population in the Mediterranean coast, Manavgat province, Turkey, via a 1500 random survey sample of married couples. There has been a significant increase in the incidence of consanguineous marriages in rural areas (40.7%) since 1989 in the southern population of Turkey. The results showed that the most frequent type of marriage was between the first cousins. It is found that there is no statistically significant difference between the consanguineous and non-consanguineous marriages in the different age groups. The results were discussed on the basis of educational status, reasons for having consanguineous marriages and the general medical effects as well as with the relation of congenital malformations. The custom of consanguineous unions in the Mediterranean population of Turkey is still extremely high, and preventive measures should be done to decrease its frequency and associated complications. PMID:15183745

  18. Genetics of consanguineous marriage: Impact and importance of counseling

    PubMed Central

    Akrami, Seyed Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Consanguineous marriage, marriage between close biological kin, especially that between first cousins, is socially favored in some parts of North Africa, the Middle East and Asia. An increased rate of congenital anomalies and autosomal recessive disorders are significantly associated with such practice. In such communities, misunderstanding and external attempts to discourage such marriage without proper genetic counseling seem to be inappropriate and unsuccessful. Update in knowledge of clinicians especially pediatricians is the aim of this paper regarding importance and issues behind consanguineous marriage.

  19. Ras Family Small GTPase-mediated Neuroprotective Signaling in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Geng-Xian; Andres, Douglas A.; Cai, Weikang

    2012-01-01

    Selective neuronal cell death is one of the major causes of neuronal damage following stroke, and cerebral cells naturally mobilize diverse survival signaling pathways to protect against ischemia. Importantly, therapeutic strategies designed to improve endogenous anti-apoptotic signaling appear to hold great promise in stroke treatment. While a variety of complex mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of stroke, the overall mechanisms governing the balance between cell survival and death are not well-defined. Ras family small GTPases are activated following ischemic insults, and in turn, serve as intrinsic switches to regulate neuronal survival and regeneration. Their ability to integrate diverse intracellular signal transduction pathways makes them critical regulators and potential therapeutic targets for neuronal recovery after stroke. This article highlights the contribution of Ras family GTPases to neuroprotective signaling cascades, including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family protein kinase- and AKT/PKB-dependent signaling pathways as well as the regulation of cAMP response element binding (CREB), Forkhead box O (FoxO) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1(HIF1) transcription factors, in stroke. PMID:21521171

  20. Genetic risks and familial associations of small bowel carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of small intestines (SBA) is a relatively rare malignancy with poor outcomes due to delayed diagnosis. Fifty percent of patients have metastases on presentation and therefore early detection and treatment offers the best long term outcomes. Certain genetic polyposis syndromes and familial diseases are associated with increased risks for SBA. These include familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), Lynch syndromes (LS), Juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Crohn’s disease (CD) and celiac disease. Mutations in APC gene, Mismatch repair genes, STK11 gene, and SMAD4 gene have been implicated for the genetic diseases respectively. While there are no specific inherited genetic mutations for CD, genome-wide association studies have established over 140 loci associated with CD. CpG island mutations with defects in mismatch repair genes have been identified in celiac disease. Significant diagnostic advances have occurred in the past decade and intuitively, it would seem beneficial to use these advanced modalities for surveillance of these patients. At present it is debatable and no clear data exists to support this approach except for established guidelines to diagnose duodenal polyps in FAP, and LS. Here we discuss the genetic alterations, cancer risks, signaling mechanisms and briefly touch the surveillance modalities available for these genetic and clinical syndromes. English language articles from PubMed/Medline and Embase was searched were collected using the phrases “small-bowel adenocarcinoma, genetics, surveillance, familial adenomatous polyposis, lynch syndromes, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenile polyposis syndrome, CD and celiac disease”. Figures, tables and schematic diagram to illustrate pathways are included in the review. PMID:27326320

  1. Genetic risks and familial associations of small bowel carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Santosh

    2016-06-15

    Adenocarcinoma of small intestines (SBA) is a relatively rare malignancy with poor outcomes due to delayed diagnosis. Fifty percent of patients have metastases on presentation and therefore early detection and treatment offers the best long term outcomes. Certain genetic polyposis syndromes and familial diseases are associated with increased risks for SBA. These include familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), Lynch syndromes (LS), Juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Crohn's disease (CD) and celiac disease. Mutations in APC gene, Mismatch repair genes, STK11 gene, and SMAD4 gene have been implicated for the genetic diseases respectively. While there are no specific inherited genetic mutations for CD, genome-wide association studies have established over 140 loci associated with CD. CpG island mutations with defects in mismatch repair genes have been identified in celiac disease. Significant diagnostic advances have occurred in the past decade and intuitively, it would seem beneficial to use these advanced modalities for surveillance of these patients. At present it is debatable and no clear data exists to support this approach except for established guidelines to diagnose duodenal polyps in FAP, and LS. Here we discuss the genetic alterations, cancer risks, signaling mechanisms and briefly touch the surveillance modalities available for these genetic and clinical syndromes. English language articles from PubMed/Medline and Embase was searched were collected using the phrases "small-bowel adenocarcinoma, genetics, surveillance, familial adenomatous polyposis, lynch syndromes, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenile polyposis syndrome, CD and celiac disease". Figures, tables and schematic diagram to illustrate pathways are included in the review. PMID:27326320

  2. Tuberous sclerosis complex: neonatal deaths in three of four children of consanguineous, non-expressing parents.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, M; Carbonara, C; Magro, G; Migone, N; Grasso, S; Tinè, A; Pavone, L; Gomez, M R

    1997-03-01

    We describe here four sibs, born to consanguineous, healthy, asymptomatic parents. Three of these infants had a rapidly fatal course in the neonatal period; death was attributed to congestive heart failure with radiographic evidence of cardiomegaly in all of them. Necropsy was done in only one of them and showed the typical findings of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in the central nervous system (CNS), kidneys, heart, and liver. The fourth sib, currently 2 years old, also has typical signs of TSC, namely hypomelanotic skin macules and calcified subependymal nodules. Both parents and a living maternal grandmother had appropriate examination, which included skin inspection under Wood's lamp, dental examination, fundoscopy, echocardiography, abdominal and renal ultrasound, and head CT and MRI scans, and no signs of TSC were found in either parent or in the only living grandmother. By history alone there is no other relative with signs or symptoms suggestive of TSC. Linkage analysis and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) investigations on a variety of lesions obtained from postmortem and tissue or blood specimens from all available family members studied failed to identify a microdeletion in the chromosomal regions where TSC genes are located. It is very unusual that in a single TSC family there were three consecutive neonatal deaths, and very likely that all had cardiac rhabdomyomas. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of TSC families with more than one affected sib, unusually severe manifestations of the disease, and completely normal, consanguineous parents. PMID:9132502

  3. Consanguinity and susceptibility to infectious diseases in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Emily J.; Frodsham, Angela J.; Zhang, Lyna; Hill, Adrian V.S.; Amos, William

    2009-01-01

    Studies of animal populations suggest that low genetic heterozygosity is an important risk factor for infection by a diverse range of pathogens, but relatively little research has looked to see whether similar patterns exist in humans. We have used microsatellite genome screen data for tuberculosis (TB), hepatitis and leprosy to test the hypothesis that inbreeding depression increases risk of infection. Our results indicate that inbred individuals are more common among our infected cases for TB and hepatitis, but only in populations where consanguineous marriages are common. No effect was found either for leprosy, which is thought to be oligogenic, or for hepatitis in Italy where consanguineous marriages are rare. Our results suggest that consanguinity is an important risk factor in susceptibility to infectious diseases in humans. PMID:19324620

  4. Is Small Beautiful? Work-Family Tension, Work Condition, and Organizational Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDermid, Shelley M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined relationships among work-family tension and work conditions. Hypothesized that links between work-family tension and work conditions would be stronger in small than in large workplaces. Results indicated that some perceptions of work conditions differed between small and large workplaces, and that connections between work-family tension…

  5. Family Portrait of the Small Inner Satellites of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These images, taken by Galileo's solid state imaging system between November 1996 and June 1997, provide the first ever 'family portrait' of the four small, irregularly shaped moons that orbit Jupiter in the zone between the planet's ring and the larger Galilean satellites. The moons are shown in their correct relative sizes, with north approximately up in all cases. From left to right, arranged in order of increasing distance from Jupiter, are Metis (longest dimension is approximately 60 kilometers or 37 miles across), Adrastea (20 kilometers or 12 miles across), Amalthea (247 kilometers or 154 miles across), and Thebe (116 kilometers or 72 miles across). While Amalthea, the largest of these four tiny moons, was imaged by NASA's two Voyager spacecraft in 1979 with a resolution comparable to what is shown here, the new Galileo observations represent the first time that Metis, Adrastea, and Thebe have been seen as more than points of light.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  6. Consanguinity and genetic diseases in North Africa and immigrants to Europe.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Wagida A; Khyatti, Meriem; Hemminki, Kari

    2014-08-01

    Endemic diseases are caused by environmental and genetic factors. While in this special issue several chapters deal with environmental factors, including infections, the present focus is on genetic causes of disease clustering due to inbreeding and recessive disease mechanisms. Consanguinity is implying sharing of genetic heritage because of marriage between close relatives originating from a common ancestor. With limited natural selection, recessive genes may become more frequent in an inbred compared with an outbred population. Consanguinity is common in North Africa (NA), and the estimates range from 40 to 49% of all marriages in Tunisia and 29-33% in Morocco. As a consequence, recessive disorders are common in the NA region, and we give some examples. Thalassaemia and sickle cell disease/anaemia constitute the most common inherited recessive disorders globally and they are common in NA, but with immigration they have spread to Europe and to other parts of the world. Another example is familial Mediterranean fever, which is common in the Eastern Mediterranean area. With immigrantion from that area to Sweden, it has become the most common hereditary autoinflammatory disease in that country, and there is no evidence that any native Swede would have been diagnosed with this disease. The examples discussed in this chapter show that the historic movement of populations and current immigration are influencing the concept of 'endemic' disease. PMID:25107999

  7. Establishing Order. Small Girls Write about Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallden, Gunilla

    1994-01-01

    Analyzes children's own descriptions and interpretations of what family life is like or could be like. The research was designed to determine the children's perspective on childhood and parenthood. The article focuses on four girls and discusses their narratives using concepts from literary theory. The woman in control of family life is the…

  8. CONSANGUINITY AND INBREEDING COEFFICIENT IN TRIBAL PASHTUNS INHABITING THE TURBULENT AND WAR-AFFECTED TERRITORY OF BAJAUR AGENCY, NORTH-WEST PAKISTAN.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Bashir; Rehman, Atta Ur; Malik, Sajid

    2016-01-01

    The north-western populations of Pakistan in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) adjoining the Pakistan-Afghanistan border are an amalgamation of native and migrated Pashtun tribes. These tribal populations are in transition due to war conditions and geo-political turmoil on both sides of the border since the Soviet invasion in 1979. Bio-demographic and epidemiological data for these tribes are scarce. A prospective cross-sectional sample of 967 males was selected from a representative Pashtun population of Bajaur Agency, and information obtained on bio-demographic variables and marital union types. Analysis of these data revealed that consanguinity was 22.34% and the inbreeding coefficient F was calculated to be 0.0134. The inbreeding coefficient was observed to be higher in subjects who were illiterate, had unskilled jobs and who belonged to younger age categories, extended families and the Tarkalani tribe. Further analyses with respect to temporal variables like subject's age, year of marriage and age at marriage revealed that after a transition in marital union types in the early 80s, there has been a declining trend in the rate of consanguineous unions. Further, consanguineous unions in the parental generation were only 5%, but parental marriage types were predictors of subjects' marital union types. The data further establish that, contrary to a general notion about a high consanguinity rate in Pakistan, consanguineous unions are not common in Bajaur Agency and first cousin marriage is not the preferred type. Furthermore, this research shows that there is a great regional variation in the pattern of consanguinity in Pakistan that needs to be documented in order to draw a more comprehensive picture of the inbreeding coefficient in the country. PMID:26627887

  9. The Family Farm in California. Final Report of the Small Farm Viability Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Office of Economic Development, Sacramento. Community Services Administration.

    Most of California's farms are relatively small, family run operations, and their future has been called into question by current agricultural trends. The Small Farm Viability Planning Project was initiated to identify obstacles to small farm economic viability and make recommendations to the state on policies and actions that might reduce these…

  10. Effect of consanguinity on Argentinean Angus beef DNA traceability.

    PubMed

    Baldo, A; Rogberg-Muñoz, A; Prando, A; Mello Cesar, A S; Lirón, J P; Sorarrain, N; Ramelli, P; Posik, D M; Pofcher, E; Ripoli, M V; Beretta, E; Peral-García, P; Vaca, R; Mariani, P; Giovambattista, G

    2010-08-01

    Since the 1990s several authors have envisaged the use of DNA to certify meat origin. Two major parameters must be assessed before a DNA based traceability protocol can be implemented in the food chain: (i) the information content of a DNA marker set in a specific livestock breed or group of breeds; (ii) the minimum number of DNA markers needed to obtain a statistically acceptable match probability. The objective of the present work was to establish the effect of different levels of inbreeding in the matching efficiency, and the minimum number of microsatellite markers needed, in a DNA based meat traceability program, starting from an 11-microsatellite marker panel. Samples were obtained from beef production farms in South America, where animals are typically bred under pasture-based extensive conditions. Three groups of animals with different consanguinity rates were sampled. Exclusion power (Q) was higher than 0.999998 and match probability lower than 3.01E-08, for the whole set of markers within each group. Both values were affected by consanguinity. To reach a two mismatch criteria exclusion power (Q(2)) of 99.99, six markers were needed in unrelated animals whereas seven markers were needed in related animals. To reach Q(2)=99.9999, 8 and 10 microsatellite markers, respectively, were needed. In general, one or two more microsatellite markers were needed to identify consanguineous animals. This study proved the DNA marker set used to be suitable for the identification of the meat from all slaughtered animals in Argentina, per week, month, and year. PMID:20416796

  11. Promoting Population Stabilization: Incentives for Small Families. Worldwatch Paper 54.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Judith

    A wide variety of incentive and disincentive programs are presented in an effort to stabilize the population and prevent bankruptcy of physical, economic, and social resources, particularly in countries like India and China. Following an introduction, the document discusses several programs, including (1) the use of small one-time payments for…

  12. Consanguinity profile in the Gaza Strip of Palestine: large-scale community-based study.

    PubMed

    Sirdah, Mahmoud M

    2014-02-01

    Consanguineous marriages which have been practiced throughout history continue to be practiced within different ethnic, religious and social groups to varying degrees with highest prevalences in North Africa, Middle East and central and south Asia. In the Gaza Strip of Palestine, little is known about the consanguinity profile, so the present large-scale study aims to explore the consanguinity profile of two generations using data from the β-thalassemia premarital screening program. Sociodemographic data analysis included 156,635 (141,200 males and 15,435 females) persons and their parents, representing 141,200 couples who were referred to the Thalassemia and Hemophilia Center for premarital testing. In addition, the consanguinity characteristics of parents of 217 transfusion-dependent β-thalassemic non-sibling patients were analyzed. Results revealed a significant decrease in the overall prevalence of consanguineous (first- and second-cousin) marriages between the previous (fathers') generation (45.2%) and the current (groom/bride) generation (39.9%). Among the five governorates of the Gaza Strip, records of Gaza Governorate revealed the lowest occurrence (36.9% current generation and 42.1% previous generation) of consanguineous marriages, as compared to all others. Consanguineous marriages are significantly higher in semi-urban areas (41.6%) than in urban areas (39.1%) in the current generation (previous generation, 46.4% vs 44.7%, respectively). Compound consanguinity (two generation) and a single level of consanguinity were seen in 20.7% and 43.7%, respectively, of the cases. The average age of those with first-cousin marriages is significantly lower (22.4±4.4 years) than those with second-cousin marriages (24.3±6.1 years) and the non-consanguineous (26.5±8.2 years). The rate of consanguineous marriages among never married people (42.2%) is significantly much higher than the rate of people with multiple marriages (18.1%). About 74.7% of the non

  13. Development of a Family Resource Directory for Employees of a Small Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wanda

    Driven by a competitive environment with other employers to maintain a quality workforce, businesses are increasingly becoming aware of the necessity to assist employees with programs and services regarding family needs. Unfortunately, most small to medium size companies are either ignorant of the necessity for family friendly services or lack the…

  14. Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Homeless Children and Families in Small-Town America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vissing, Yvonne M.

    Homelessness in small towns and rural areas is on the rise, and a substantial portion of the rural homeless consists of families with children. This book draws on interviews and case studies of over 300 homeless children and their families, primarily in New Hampshire, and on supporting statistics to provide individual and sociological perspectives…

  15. Unexpected genetic heterogeneity in a large consanguineous Brazilian pedigree presenting deafness.

    PubMed

    Lezirovitz, Karina; Pardono, Eliete; de Mello Auricchio, Maria T B; de Carvalho E Silva, Fernando L; Lopes, Juliana J; Abreu-Silva, Ronaldo S; Romanos, Jihane; Batissoco, Ana C; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C

    2008-01-01

    Nonsyndromic autosomal recessive deafness accounts for 80% of hereditary deafness. To date, 52 loci responsible for autosomal recessive deafness have been mapped and 24 genes identified. Here, we report a large inbred Brazilian pedigree with 26 subjects affected by prelingual deafness. Given the extensive consanguinity found in this pedigree, the most probable pattern of inheritance is autosomal recessive. However, our linkage and mutational analysis revealed, instead of an expected homozygous mutation in a single gene, two different mutant alleles and a possible third undetected mutant allele in the MYO15A gene (DFNB3 locus), as well as evidence for other causes for deafness in the same pedigree. Among the 26 affected subjects, 15 were homozygous for the novel c.10573delA mutation in the MYO15A gene, 5 were compound heterozygous for the mutation c.10573delA and the novel deletion c.9957_9960delTGAC and one inherited only a single c.10573delA mutant allele, while the other one could not be identified. Given the extensive consanguinity of the pedigree, there might be at least one more deafness locus segregating to explain the condition in some of the subjects whose deafness is not clearly associated with MYO15A mutations, although overlooked environmental causes could not be ruled out. Our findings illustrate a high level of etiological heterogeneity for deafness in the family and highlight some of the pitfalls of genetic analysis of large genes in extended pedigrees, when homozygosity for a single mutant allele is expected. PMID:17851452

  16. A novel family of small proteins that affect plant development

    SciTech Connect

    John Charles Walker

    2011-04-29

    The DVL genes represent a new group of plant proteins that influence plant growth and development. Overexpression of DVL1, and other members of the DVL family, causes striking phenotypic changes. The DVL proteins share sequence homology in their C-terminal half. Point mutations in the C-terminal domain show it is necessary and deletion studies demonstrate the C-terminal domain is sufficient to confer the overexpression phenotypes. The phenotypes observed, and the conservation of the protein sequence in the plant kingdom, does suggest the DVL proteins have a role in modulating plant growth and development. Our working hypothesis is the DVL proteins function as regulators of cellular signaling pathways that control growth and development.

  17. Small families mean better health for mothers and kids.

    PubMed

    Mugumya, E

    1994-01-01

    The practice of family planning (FP) has been used since time immemorial to solve community, individual, and familial problems. There are Biblical references to incest being used to ensure the conception of children and to coitus interruptus being used to prevent conception. Pastoralists used cessation of breastfeeding of male calves to promote the conception and birth of more desirable female calves. The condom has ancient precursors made of animal intestines, and the IUD has a prototype in the stone commonly inserted in the uterus of a camel during long journeys to prevent conception. The issues of effectiveness, safety, and convenience that led to these ancient activities also inform the development and use of modern contraception. FP incorporates fertility control, both treatment for infertility and contraception; abortion is regarded as an indicator of a need for FP, not as part of FP. FP is justified on the grounds of human rights, because it allows an individual to choose whether or not to have a child; on the grounds of health, because maternal age and parity affect the health of the mother and child; on socioeconomic grounds, because overpopulation creates drains on already decreasing resources and because birth to unwed mothers creates difficulties for the children and for society; and on the grounds of improving the status of women because unwanted pregnancy causes women to abandon educational and employment opportunities. The maternal and child health and FP services in Uganda provide immunization, nutrition, prenatal and postpartum care, young child clinic services, school health education, and FP services. PMID:12318959

  18. Orissa women want small families - but the system fails them.

    PubMed

    Jena, M

    1998-01-01

    A 1996 survey conducted in Orissa by the British Council for the British Overseas Development Administration (ODA) on opportunities and barriers to contraceptive uptake found that while women are aware of the health and financial benefits of child spacing, attitudinal and economic obstacles interfere with their ability to act upon that awareness. 3360 women and 840 men from 28 urban and periurban neighborhoods of 14 towns in 8 districts were sampled in the survey. The survey also found that men and women held similar desires with regard to birth spacing patterns; more than 50% wanted to have no additional children and 63% wanted to wait at least 2 years between births. However, despite the considerable observed interest in birth spacing and birth limiting, 78.4% of the women who expressed the desire to use modern methods of contraception were not doing so. While some couples in Orissa practice traditional methods of family planning, the current extent of such use is inadequate. Furthermore, while women in Orissa are overwhelmingly relegated the responsibility for contracepting, and the age at marriage remains approximately 22 years, most women are ignorant about contraceptive methods and their side effects. PMID:12293802

  19. A Mitochondrial DNA A8701G Mutation Associated with Maternally Inherited Hypertension and Dilated Cardiomyopathy in a Chinese Pedigree of a Consanguineous Marriage

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ye; Gu, Xiang; Xu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases, including dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and hypertension, are the leading cause of death worldwide. The role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the pathogenesis of these diseases has not been completely clarified. In this study, we evaluate whether A8701G mutation is associated with maternally inherited hypertension and DCM in a Chinese pedigree of a consanguineous marriage. Methods: Fourteen subjects in a three-generation Han Chinese family with hypertension and DCM, in which consanguineous marriage was present in the parental generation, were interviewed. We divided all the family members into case (7 maternal members) and control group (7 nonmaternal members) for comparison. Clinical evaluations and sequence analysis of mtDNA were obtained from all participants. Frequency differences between maternal and nonmaternal members were tested to locate the disease-associated mutations. Results: The majority of the family members presented with a maternal inheritance of hypertension and DCM. Sequence analysis of mtDNA in this pedigree identified eight mtDNA mutations. Among the mutations identified, there was only one significant mutation: A8701G (P = 0.005), which is a homoplasmic mitochondrial missense mutation in all the matrilineal relatives. There was no clear evidence for any synergistic effects between A8701G and other mutations. Conclusions: A8701G mutation may act as an inherited risk factor for the matrilineal transmission of hypertension and DCM in conjunction with genetic disorders caused by consanguineous marriage. PMID:26831225

  20. The frequency of consanguinity in Konya, Turkey, and its medical effects.

    PubMed

    Demirel, S; Kaplanoğlu, N; Acar, A; Bodur, S; Paydak, F

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted in the town of Konya, Turkey, on 1120 randomly selected women to find out the overall rate of consanguineous marriages among couples. The frequency of consanguineous marriages was found to be 23.2%. It was found that 14.6% of this figure was first cousin marriages and the rest was 8.6%. Consanguineous marriages were higher among women born in villages compared to those born in provinces and the town center. Based on the findings, it was not too difficult to say: the higher the level of education of women, the lower the rate of consanguineous marriages. The number of children with an abnormality was high in consanguineous marriages, while the frequency of spontaneous abortion, still-birth and infant death remained the same. PMID:9457498

  1. An ABCD1 Mutation (c.253dupC) Caused Diverse Phenotypes of Adrenoleukodystrophy in an Iranian Consanguineous Pedigree

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Gohari, Faeze; Dizaji, Majid Zaki; Ahani, Ali; Malicdan, May Christine V.; Behnam, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Current study was the first to report a consanguineous Iranian pedigree with ABCD1 mutation. Methods Targeted molecular analysis was initially performed in three affected individuals in one family suspected to have X-ALD due to chronic progressive spasticity. Upon confirmation of genetic diagnosis, further neurologic and genetic evaluation of all family members was done. Results A mutation in ABCD1 was identified in 35 affected individuals (out 96 pedigree members). The c. 253dup, in exon 1, leads to a frame shift and a premature stop codon at amino acid position 194 (p.Arg85Profs*110). Surprisingly, affected individuals in our cohort show some variability in phenotype, including childhood cerebral ALD, adrenomyeloneuropathy, and addison-only disease phenotypes, expanding the phenotype of X-ALD with p.Arg85Profs*110. Conclusion This report characterizes the clinical spectrum of an expanded Iranian pedigree with X-ALD due to an ABCD1 mutation. Given a high frequency of carriers in this region, we expect the prevalence of X-ALD to be higher, underscoring the importance of genetic counseling through reliable identification of heterozygous as well as homozygote females in consanguineous communities. PMID:27489563

  2. Pentalogy of Cantrell: report of a case with consanguineous parents.

    PubMed

    Pachajoa, Harry; Barragán, Arelis; Potes, Angela; Torres, Javier; Isaza, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Pentalogy of Cantrell is a syndrome evidencing five anomalies: a midline, upper abdominal wall abnormality; lower sternal defect; anterior diaphragmatic defect; diaphragmatic pericardial defect, and congenital abnormalities of the heart. Its prevalence is one in every 65,000 live births and a survival rate that is low if the fall the five defects are present or the gravity of the cardiac anomalies. It may be diagnosed during the first trimester obstetric ultrasound. For postnatal care, emission-computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is recommended for a clear definition of the extent of the defect and to design a course of corrective surgery. Herein, a case of pentology of Cantrell is reported for a child offspring of consanguineous parents. PMID:21713350

  3. The first case of CDK5RAP2-related primary microcephaly in a non-consanguineous patient identified by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Christopher A; Topper, Scott; Ward Melver, Catherine; Stein, Jennifer; Reeder, Amanda; Arndt, Kelly; Das, Soma

    2014-04-01

    Primary autosomal recessive microcephaly (MCPH) is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by congenital microcephaly and intellectual disability. To date, 10 MCPH loci have been identified and due to the genetic heterogeneity of this condition, molecular testing for MCPH can be complicated. Our methods involved employing a next generation sequencing panel of MCPH-related genes allowing for the evaluation of multiple disease loci simultaneously. Next generation sequencing analysis of a 6 year old female with primary microcephaly identified novel compound heterozygous mutations (c.524_528del and c.4005-1G>A) in the CDK5RAP2 gene. A review of the published literature to date reveals that only three mutations have been previously reported in the CDK5RAP2 gene in the homozygous state in three Northern Pakistani and one Somali consanguineous MCPH families. Our patient represents the first non-consanguineous Caucasian individual to have been identified with CDK5RAP2-related MCPH. As only a handful of patients have been reported in the literature with CDK5RAP2-related MCPH, we anticipate the identification of individuals with CDK5RAP2 mutations from all ethnic backgrounds will continue. Our patient contributes to the ethnic and genotypic spectrum of CDK5RAP2-related MCPH and supports the occurrence of this genetic condition beyond that of consanguineous families of certain ethnic populations. Our results also highlight the utility of multi-gene sequencing panels to elucidate the etiology of genetically heterogeneous conditions. PMID:23726037

  4. Association among Education Level, Occupation Status, and Consanguinity in Tunisia and Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Kerkeni, Emna; Monastiri, Kamel; Saket, Besma; Rudan, Diana; Zgaga, Lina; Ben Cheikh, Hassen

    2006-01-01

    Aim To investigate the association between education level, occupation status (a proxy for socio-economic status), and consanguinity in 2 large data sets from Tunisia and Croatia countries with different attitudes toward consanguinity. Methods The sample of 1016 students, attending 5 university institutions in Monastir, Tunisia, were interviewed about the educational level and occupation status of their parents and the degree of parental relatedness. In Croatia, a sample of 1001 examinees from 9 isolated island populations was interviewed about their own educational level, occupation status, and consanguinity. Results Prevalence of consanguinity (offspring of second cousins or closer) among 1016 Tunisian students was 20.1%, and 9.3% among 1001 Croatian isolates. In Tunisia, the association between consanguinity and both parental degree of education and parental occupation status was highly significant in women (P<0.001), but not significant in men. In Croatia, no statistically significant associations were noted, although there was a consistent trend of increased prevalence of consanguinity with lower education level or occupation status in both genders, but more pronounced in women. Conclusion Association between education level, socio-economic status, and consanguinity needs to be taken into account in inbreeding studies in human populations. The relationship may be specific for each studied population and highly dependent on the cultural context. It is generally more pronounced among women in most settings. PMID:16912991

  5. Consanguinity as a determinant of reproductive behaviour and mortality in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H; Grant, J C; Shami, S A

    1993-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of consanguineous marriages and estimate the effects of consanguinity on reproductive behaviour and mortality, household and hospital-based surveys were conducted in 11 cities in the Pakistan province of Punjab between 1979 and 1985. The 9520 women interviewed reported 44,474 pregnancies, with data collected on maternal and paternal ages at marriage, abortions/miscarriages, stillbirths and deaths in the first month, at 2-12 months and 2-8/10 years. Six categories of consanguineous marriage were included: double first cousin, first cousin, first cousin once removed/double second cousin, second cousin, bradari (brotherhood) and non-consanguineous. Marriages contracted between spouses related as second cousins or closer accounted for 50.3% of the total, equivalent to an average coefficient of kinship (alpha = sigma piFi) of 0.0280. Unions between close biological relatives were characterized by younger maternal and paternal ages at marriage and reduced spousal age difference, but a longer time to first delivery. Overall, they exhibited greater fertility than non-consanguineous couples. Antenatal and postnatal mortality were assessed by consanguinity and age interval. Consanguinity-associated deaths were consistently higher in the neonatal, infant and childhood periods. The consequences of these outcomes on the health of the present and future generations is assessed. PMID:8359962

  6. Effects of consanguineous marriages on fertility among three endogamous groups of Andhra Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P G

    1987-01-01

    To assess interrelationships between consanguineous marriage and fertility, 3 caste groups in Andhra Pradesh--the Desuri Kapu, an affluent agricultural caste; the Devanga, an artisan caste in the middle range of the hierarchy; and the Mala, a scheduled caste at the bottom--were selected for field study. Consanguineous marriages are an essential part of the social structure in this area of southern India. A total of 2524 marriages were analyzed, of which 46% were consanguineous. 19% of consanguineous marriages were between uncle and niece, 22% were between 1st cousins, and 5% were between more distant cousins. The Devanga had the highest rate of related marriages (48%), followed by the Desuri Kapu (47%) and the Mala (41%). Higher caste individuals, and wealthier persons within each caste, are more likely to marry relatives so they can avoid splitting their properties through dowry of bride price. The consanguineous unions as a whole were significantly more fertile than nonconsanguineous unions. The mean number of pregnancies, live births, and surviving offspring was 4.85, 4.44, and 2.99, respectively, among consanguineous couples compared with 3.41, 3.32, and 2.87, respectively, among nonconsanguineous couples. Although the number of pregnancies and live births was significantly higher among consanguineous couples in all 3 castes compared with nonconsanguineous couples, the difference in the number of surviving children between consanguineous and nonconsanguineous unions was not significant among the wealthier castes. This suggests that child mortality is higher among the offspring of consanguineous unions, despite their greater wealth. PMID:3686072

  7. Effect of parental consanguinity on anthropometric measurements among the Sheikh Sunni Muslim boys of Delhi.

    PubMed

    Krishan, G

    1986-05-01

    The study of consanguineous marriage is an efficient way to elucidate the genetic structure of human populations. Such matings give an opportunity for recessive genes to manifest themselves by becoming homozygous. The present attempt examines the effects of parental consanguinity on various anthropometric measurements among the Sheikh Sunni Muslim boys of old Delhi between the ages of 11 and 16 years. A slight inbreeding depression has been observed for all eight anthropometric measurements, i.e., stature, span, sitting height, head length, head circumference, chest girth, and calf circumference. The results support earlier studies in regard to the effect of consanguinity on anthropometric measurements. PMID:3728657

  8. Consanguinity related prenatal and postnatal mortality of the populations of seven Pakistani Punjab cities.

    PubMed Central

    Shami, S A; Schmitt, L H; Bittles, A H

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted on prenatal and postnatal mortality among the populations of seven cities in the Pakistani province of Punjab. Consanguineous marriages were strongly favoured and the coefficients of inbreeding (F) for the present generation in each locality ranged from 0.0236 to 0.0286. There was a highly significant relationship between the degree of inbreeding and mortality, with most consanguinity related deaths reported in the neonatal, infantile, and childhood periods. The findings strongly suggest that consanguinity may play a major role in the high rates of postnatal mortality observed in Pakistani communities now resident in the United Kingdom. PMID:2716036

  9. Small Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... on just one child, parents easily can become overprotective and indulgent without even realizing it. The child ... just one or two children, you may become overprotective and overly attentive. This may make your child ...

  10. Female-Headed Families: An Ecological Model of Residential Concentration in a Small City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Roncek, Dennis W.

    1980-01-01

    Proposed an ecological model to explain the concentration of female-headed families in a small city. Data for city blocks provided patterns of concentration. Of the physical variables, only historical development of the city and market decisions by nonresidential consumers were important predictors of concentration; spatial concentration was not…

  11. Consanguinity and recurrence risk of stillbirth and infant death.

    PubMed Central

    Stoltenberg, C; Magnus, P; Skrondal, A; Lie, R T

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to estimate the recurrence risk for stillbirth and infant death and compare results for offspring of first-cousin parents with results for offspring of unrelated parents. METHODS: The study population consisted of all single births with a previous sibling born in Norway between 1967 and 1994. Altogether, 629,888 births were to unrelated parents, and 3466 births were to parents who were first cousins. The risk of stillbirth and infant death was estimated for subsequent siblings contingent on parental consanguinity and survival of the previous sibling. RESULTS: For unrelated parents, the risk of early death (stillbirth plus infant death) for the subsequent sibling was 17 of 1000 if the previous child survived and 67 of 1000 if the previous child died before 1 year of age. For parents who were first cousins, the risk of early death for the subsequent sibling was 29 of 1000 if the previous child survived and 116 of 1000 if the previous child died. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of recurrence of stillbirth and infant death is higher for offspring of first-cousin parents compared with offspring of unrelated parents. PMID:10191794

  12. Vici syndrome in siblings born to consanguineous parents.

    PubMed

    Tasdemir, Sener; Sahin, Ibrahim; Cayır, Atilla; Yuce, Ihsan; Ceylaner, Serdar; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2016-01-01

    Vici syndrome (OMIM 242840) is a rare syndrome and since its initial description by Vici et al. [1988], only 29 cases have been reported. We describe two brothers from healthy consanguineous Turkish parents with psychomotor delay, congenital bilateral cataracts, high palate, long philtrum, micrognathia, fair hair, and skin. They both had general hypotonia and elevated muscle enzymes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain confirmed agenesis of corpus callosum in both patients. Secundum type atrial septal defect (in Patient 1) and mild mitral, tricuspid, and pulmonary insufficiency (in Patient 2) were detected by echocardiographic examination. Immunological studies were normal, as were chromosome karyotype analyses (46, XY). Both children had bilateral cutaneous syndactyly between second and third toes and also bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Patient 1 had poor feeding and regurgitation necessitating a feeding tube; mild laryngomalacia was subsequently detected by bronchoscopy. Mutation analysis in patient 2 showed a homozygous p.R2483* (c.7447C > T) mutation in EPG5 gene. We report a summary of the clinical findings in our patients and 29 cases from the literature. PMID:26395118

  13. Comparison of Consanguinity between Parents of Hearing Impaired and Public School Children with Estimation of Risk.

    PubMed

    Sattar, M A; Sultana, M T

    2015-10-01

    Deafness is the hidden disability and the most common human sensory defects which lead to poor educational and employment prospects of childhood. Is there any association of consanguinity and hearing loss or are there any difference of association of consanguinity and hearing loss in specialized and public school children and how much risk is associated?--were the research questions of this study. Total 428 participants have been selected randomly. Hearing impaired were 186 participants and 242 participants were normal hearing school boy. This was a case control, analytical, hypotheses testing study. In normal public school children group, consanguinity was present in 2.5% parents. The rest were married with non relatives. In parents of hearing impaired children group, consanguinity was very high (17.2%). Pearson chi-square test and Odds ratio analysis was done. The value was less than 0.05 and ratio was 8.173. The 'p' value of Pearson chi-square test was less than 0.05. So, the test was highly significant at 95% confidence interval. Odds ratio showed that the risk of profound sensorineural hearing loss in the baby of parents of consanguineous marriages 8.173 times higher than that of non consanguineous marriages. PMID:26620013

  14. Bombay blood group: Is prevalence decreasing with urbanization and the decreasing rate of consanguineous marriage

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Sujata; Kotasthane, Dhananjay S.; Chowdhury, Puskar S.; Sarkar, Sonali

    2015-01-01

    Context: Bombay blood group although rare is found to be more prevalent in the Western and Southern states of India, believed to be associated with consanguineous marriage. Aims: To estimate the prevalence of the Bombay blood group (Oh) in the urban population of Puducherry. To find the effect of urbanization on consanguineous marriage and to establish whether consanguinity plays a part in the prevalence of Oh group. To compare Oh group prevalence with that of other neighboring states, where population is not predominantly urban. Settings and Design: This is a descriptive study in a tertiary care hospital in Puducherry, over a period of 6 years. Materials and Methods: All blood samples showing ‘O’ group were tested with anti-H lectin. Specialized tests like Adsorption Elution Technique, inhibition assay for determination of secretor status were performed on Oh positive cases. Any history of consanguineous marriage was recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: All variables were categorical variable and percentage and proportions were calculated manually. Results: Analysis of the results of 35,497 study subjects showed that the most common group was ‘O’ group constituting 14,164 (39.90%) of subjects. Only three “Oh” that is, Bombay phenotype (0.008%) were detected. Consanguinity was observed in two cases (66.66%). Conclusions: This study shows the prevalence of Bombay blood group representing the urban population of Puducherry, to be high (0.008%) and associated with consanguineous marriage (66.66%). Thus, consanguinity is still an important risk factor present, even in an urban population in Southern India. PMID:26420929

  15. Investigation of current university research concerning energy conversion and conservation in small single-family dwellings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, G. R.; Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was made of university research concerning energy conversion and conservation techniques which may be applied in small single-family residences. Information was accumulated through published papers, progress reports, telephone conversations, and personal interviews. A synopsis of each pertinent investigation is given. Finally, a discussion of the synopses is presented and recommendations are made concerning the applicability of concepts for the design and construction of NASA-Langley Research Center's proposed Technology Utilization House in Hampton, Virginia.

  16. The changing pattern of consanguinity in a selected region of the Israeli Arab community.

    PubMed

    Sharkia, Rajach; Zaid, Muhamad; Athamna, Abed; Cohen, Dani; Azem, Abdussalam; Zalan, Abdelnaser

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of consanguinity within the Israeli Arab community is relatively high, and is associated with high rates of inherited disorders that lead to a high frequency of morbidity and mortality. Data on consanguinity between couples were recorded during two periods (1980-1985 and 2000-2004) in relation to socioeconomic status of 4 selected villages. Two of the villages (A and B) are known to have high socioeconomic status, and the other two (C and D) are known to have low socioeconomic status. The average incidence of consanguineous marriages has slightly decreased from 33.1% in the first period to 25.9% in the second period (P = 0.0218) in all of the 4 villages. Marriages between first cousins showed a more significant decrease, from 23.9% in the first period to 13.6% in the second period (P < 0.0001). The average consanguinity rates of villages A and B were found to decrease from 22.3 to 16.2% respectively (P < 0.001) between the two observation periods, whereas those of villages C and D were found to decrease from 42.3 to 37.2%, (P < 0.001) during the same two periods. Thus, there has been a change in the pattern of consanguinity within the selected Israeli Arab villages, between the two study periods. This change seems to correlate with the sociodemographic status of the villages. Therefore, improving the socioeconomic status of the villages, as well as implementation of proper health education programs, is expected to have a positive effect in reducing consanguinity. PMID:17941037

  17. Campanulaceae: a family with small seeds that require light for germination

    PubMed Central

    Koutsovoulou, Katerina; Daws, Matthew I.; Thanos, Costas A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The Campanulaceae is a large cosmopolitan family, but is understudied in terms of germination, and seed biology in general. Small seed mass (usually in the range 10–200 µg) is a noteworthy trait of the family, and having small seeds is commonly associated with a light requirement. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of light on germination in 131 taxa of the Campanulaceae family, from all five continents of its distribution. Methods For all taxa, seed germination was tested in light (8 or 12 h photoperiod) and continuous darkness under constant and alternating temperatures. For four taxa, the effect of light on germination was examined over a wide range of temperatures on a thermogradient plate, and the possible substitution of the light requirement by gibberellic acid and nitrate was examined in ten taxa. Key Results For all 131 taxa, seed germination was higher in light than in darkness for every temperature tested. Across species, the light requirement decreased significantly with increasing seed mass. For larger seeded species, germination in the dark reached higher levels under alternating than under constant temperatures. Gibberellic acid promoted germination in darkness whereas nitrates partially substituted for a light requirement only in species showing some dark germination. Conclusions A light requirement for germination, observed in virtually all taxa examined, constitutes a collective characteristic of the family. It is postulated that smaller seeded taxa might germinate only on the soil surface or at shallow depths, while larger seeded species might additionally germinate when buried in the soil if cued to do so by fluctuating temperatures. PMID:24232382

  18. GASA4, One of the 14-Member Arabidopsis GASA Family of Small Polypeptides, Regulates Flowering and Seed Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the plant-specific gibberellic acid-stimulated Arabidopsis (GASA) gene family play roles in hormone response, defense and development. We have identified six new Arabidopsis GASA genes, bringing the total number of family members to 14. Here we show that these genes all encode small polyp...

  19. How a Small Family Run Business Adopted Critical Reflection Action Learning Using Hand Drawn Images to Initiate Organisational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Gary

    2016-01-01

    In this account of practice I would like to share my experiences of facilitating a Critical Reflection Action Learning (CRAL) set with a small family run business, struggling to make change and expand their services due to the problems they encountered in separating their business lives from their family lives. The account I present here is based…

  20. Small Science: Infants and Toddlers Experiencing Science in Everyday Family Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikder, Shukla; Fleer, Marilyn

    2015-06-01

    Vygotsky (1987) stated that the restructured form of everyday concepts learned at home and in the community interact with scientific concepts introduced in formal school settings, leading to a higher level of scientific thinking for school-aged children. But, what does this mean for the scientific learning of infants and toddlers? What kinds of science learning are afforded at home during this early period of life? The study reported in this paper sought to investigate the scientific development of infants-toddlers (10 to 36 months) growing up in Bangladeshi families living in Australia and Singapore. Four families were studied over 2 years. Digital video observations were made of everyday family life and analysed using Vygotsky's theoretical framework of everyday concepts and scientific concepts (51 h of digital observations). While there are many possibilities for developing scientific concepts in infants-toddlers' everyday life, our study found four categories of what we have called small science: multiple possibilities for science; discrete science; embedded science and counter intuitive science. The findings of this study contribute to the almost non-existent literature into infants and toddlers' scientific development and advance new understandings of early childhood science education.

  1. Small Science: Infants and Toddlers Experiencing Science in Everyday Family Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikder, Shukla; Fleer, Marilyn

    2014-09-01

    Vygotsky (1987) stated that the restructured form of everyday concepts learned at home and in the community interact with scientific concepts introduced in formal school settings, leading to a higher level of scientific thinking for school-aged children. But, what does this mean for the scientific learning of infants and toddlers? What kinds of science learning are afforded at home during this early period of life? The study reported in this paper sought to investigate the scientific development of infants-toddlers (10 to 36 months) growing up in Bangladeshi families living in Australia and Singapore. Four families were studied over 2 years. Digital video observations were made of everyday family life and analysed using Vygotsky's theoretical framework of everyday concepts and scientific concepts (51 h of digital observations). While there are many possibilities for developing scientific concepts in infants-toddlers' everyday life, our study found four categories of what we have called small science: multiple possibilities for science; discrete science; embedded science and counter intuitive science. The findings of this study contribute to the almost non-existent literature into infants and toddlers' scientific development and advance new understandings of early childhood science education.

  2. A Small Family of Chloroplast Atypical Thioredoxins1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Dangoor, Inbal; Peled-Zehavi, Hadas; Levitan, Alexander; Pasand, Ohad; Danon, Avihai

    2009-01-01

    The reduction and the formation of regulatory disulfide bonds serve as a key signaling element in chloroplasts. Members of the thioredoxin (Trx) superfamily of oxidoreductases play a major role in these processes. We have characterized a small family of plant-specific Trxs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that are rich in cysteine and histidine residues and are typified by a variable noncanonical redox active site. We found that the redox midpoint potential of three selected family members is significantly less reducing than that of the classic Trxs. Assays of subcellular localization demonstrated that all proteins are localized to the chloroplast. Selected members showed high activity, contingent on a dithiol electron donor, toward the chloroplast 2-cysteine peroxiredoxin A and poor activity toward the chloroplast NADP-malate dehydrogenase. The expression profile of the family members suggests that they have distinct roles. The intermediate redox midpoint potential value of the atypical Trxs might imply adaptability to function in modulating the redox state of chloroplast proteins with regulatory disulfides. PMID:19109414

  3. Endoscopic Findings of Small-Bowel Lesions in Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Kensuke; Yanai, Shunichi; Nakamura, Shotaro; Kawaski1, Keisuke; Eizuka, Makoto; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Sugai, Tamotsu; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Yamashita, Taro; Ando, Yukio; Matsumoto, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is an autosomal dominant disease associated with the mutations in the transthyretin gene. To date, the endoscopic findings of the small-bowel lesions of FAP have never been described. We report a rare case of FAP with gastrointestinal involvement. A 71-year-old woman complaining of refractory diarrhea for 1 year was referred to our institution. She had sensory disturbance, movement disorder due to muscle weakness, and autonomic nervous system disorders including orthostatic hypotension and dysuria. Her eldest sister had cardiac amyloidosis. Small-bowel radiography and retrograde double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) revealed that fine granular protrusions were diffusely observed both in the jejunum and ileum. Histologic examination of the biopsy specimens obtained from the small bowel revealed perivascular amyloid deposits mainly in the muscularis mucosae and submucosa, which were immunoreactive with transthyretin antibodies. Analysis of the genomic DNA showed a heterozygous Gly47Val mutation in the transthyretin gene. Thus a diagnosis of FAP was established. Diffuse fine granular protrusions in the jejunum and the ileum visualized by small-bowel radiography and DBE may be characteristic of FAP. Multiple biopsies from the gastrointestinal mucosa are recommended for the definitive histologic diagnosis of FAP. PMID:26986100

  4. Discovery and characterization of small molecule inhibitors of the BET family bromodomains.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chun-Wa; Coste, Herve; White, Julia H; Mirguet, Olivier; Wilde, Jonathan; Gosmini, Romain L; Delves, Chris; Magny, Sylvie M; Woodward, Robert; Hughes, Stephen A; Boursier, Eric V; Flynn, Helen; Bouillot, Anne M; Bamborough, Paul; Brusq, Jean-Marie G; Gellibert, Francoise J; Jones, Emma J; Riou, Alizon M; Homes, Paul; Martin, Sandrine L; Uings, Iain J; Toum, Jerome; Clement, Catherine A; Boullay, Anne-Benedicte; Grimley, Rachel L; Blandel, Florence M; Prinjha, Rab K; Lee, Kevin; Kirilovsky, Jorge; Nicodeme, Edwige

    2011-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation have a profound role in normal development and disease processes. An integral part of this mechanism occurs through lysine acetylation of histone tails which are recognized by bromodomains. While the biological and structural characterization of many bromodomain containing proteins has advanced considerably, the therapeutic tractability of this protein family is only now becoming understood. This paper describes the discovery and molecular characterization of potent (nM) small molecule inhibitors that disrupt the function of the BET family of bromodomains (Brd2, Brd3, and Brd4). By using a combination of phenotypic screening, chemoproteomics, and biophysical studies, we have discovered that the protein-protein interactions between bromodomains and acetylated histones can be antagonized by selective small molecules that bind at the acetylated lysine recognition pocket. X-ray crystal structures of compounds bound into bromodomains of Brd2 and Brd4 elucidate the molecular interactions of binding and explain the precisely defined stereochemistry required for activity. PMID:21568322

  5. National impacts of the Weatherization Assistance Program in single-family and small multifamily dwellings

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Balzer, R.A.; Faby, E.

    1993-05-01

    Since 1976, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has operated one of the largest energy conservation programs in the nation -- the low-income Weatherization Assistance Program. The program strives to increase the energy efficiency of dwellings occupied by low-income persons in order to reduce their energy consumption, lower their fuel bills, increase the comfort of their homes, and safeguard their health. It targets vulnerable groups including the elderly, people with disabilities, and families with children. The most recent national evaluation of the impacts of the Program was completed in 1984 based on energy consumption data for households weatherized in 1981. DOE Program regulations and operations have changed substantially since then: new funding sources, management principles, diagnostic procedures, and weatherization technologies have been incorporated. Many of these new features have been studied in isolation or at a local level; however, no recent evaluation has assessed their combined, nationwide impacts to date or their potential for the future. In 1990, DOE initiated such an evaluation. This evaluation is comprised of three ``impact`` studies (the Single-Family Study, High-Density Multifamily Study, and Fuel-Oil Study) and two ``policy`` studies. Altogether, these five studies will provide a comprehensive national assessment of the Weatherization Assistance Program as it existed in the 1989 Program Year (PY 1989). This report presents the results of the first phase of the Single-Family Study. It evaluates the energy savings and cost effectiveness of the Program as it has been applied to the largest portion of its client base -- low-income households that occupy single-family dwellings, mobile homes, and small (2- to 4-unit) multifamily dwellings. It is based upon a representative national sample that covers the full range of conditions under which the program was implemented in PY 1989.

  6. Consanguinity: A Risk Factor for Preterm Birth at Less Than 33 Weeks’ Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Ghina; Nassar, Anwar H.; Mahfoud, Ziyad; El-Khamra, Akaber; Al-Choueiri, Nathalie; Adra, Abdallah; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Zalloua, Pierre; Yunis, Khalid A.

    2010-01-01

    Consanguinity promotes homozygosity of recessive susceptibility gene variants and can be used to investigate a recessive component in diseases whose inheritance is uncertain. The objective of this study was to assess the association between consanguinity and preterm birth (PTB), stratified by gestational age and clinical presentation (spontaneous vs. medically indicated). Data were collected on 39,745 singleton livebirths without major birth defects, admitted to 19 hospitals in Lebanon, from September 2003 to December 2007. Deliveries before completed 33 weeks’ gestation and deliveries at 33–36 weeks’ gestation were compared, with respect to cousin marriage, with those after completed 36 weeks’ gestation by using multinomial multiple logistic regression. Overall, infants of consanguineous parents had a statistically significant 1.6-fold net increased risk of being born at less than 33 weeks’ gestation compared with infants of unrelated parents. This association was statistically significant only with spontaneous PTB. There was no increased risk of being born at 33–36 weeks’ gestation associated with consanguinity for both clinical presentations of PTB. Our findings support a genetic contribution to early onset PTB and suggest that early PTB should be targeted in future genetic studies rather than the classic lumping of all births less than 37 weeks’ gestation. PMID:20978088

  7. The Effect of Consanguineous Marriage on Reading Disability in the Arab Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Rabia, Salim; Maroun, Lateefeh

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of consanguineous marriage in the Arab community on reading disabilities of offspring. It examined whether the rate of reading disabilities was higher among offspring of first-cousin parents than offspring of unrelated parents; and whether reading-disabled children of first-cousin parents were more disabled in…

  8. Homozygosity mapping and targeted genomic sequencing reveal the gene responsible for cerebellar hypoplasia and quadrupedal locomotion in a consanguineous kindred

    PubMed Central

    Gulsuner, Suleyman; Tekinay, Ayse Begum; Doerschner, Katja; Boyaci, Huseyin; Bilguvar, Kaya; Unal, Hilal; Ors, Aslihan; Onat, O. Emre; Atalar, Ergin; Basak, A. Nazli; Topaloglu, Haluk; Kansu, Tulay; Tan, Meliha; Tan, Uner; Gunel, Murat; Ozcelik, Tayfun

    2011-01-01

    The biological basis for the development of the cerebro-cerebellar structures required for posture and gait in humans is poorly understood. We investigated a large consanguineous family from Turkey exhibiting an extremely rare phenotype associated with quadrupedal locomotion, mental retardation, and cerebro-cerebellar hypoplasia, linked to a 7.1-Mb region of homozygosity on chromosome 17p13.1–13.3. Diffusion weighted imaging and fiber tractography of the patients' brains revealed morphological abnormalities in the cerebellum and corpus callosum, in particular atrophy of superior, middle, and inferior peduncles of the cerebellum. Structural magnetic resonance imaging showed additional morphometric abnormalities in several cortical areas, including the corpus callosum, precentral gyrus, and Brodmann areas BA6, BA44, and BA45. Targeted sequencing of the entire homozygous region in three affected individuals and two obligate carriers uncovered a private missense mutation, WDR81 p.P856L, which cosegregated with the condition in the extended family. The mutation lies in a highly conserved region of WDR81, flanked by an N-terminal BEACH domain and C-terminal WD40 beta-propeller domains. WDR81 is predicted to be a transmembrane protein. It is highly expressed in the cerebellum and corpus callosum, in particular in the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. WDR81 represents the third gene, after VLDLR and CA8, implicated in quadrupedal locomotion in humans. PMID:21885617

  9. Frequent detection of parental consanguinity in children with developmental disorders by a combined CGH and SNP microarray

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genomic microarrays have been used as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders and/or multiple congenital anomalies. The use of SNP arrays has revealed regions of homozygosity in the genome which can lead to identification of uniparental disomy and parental consanguinity in addition to copy number variations. Consanguinity is associated with an increased risk of birth defects and autosomal recessive disorders. However, the frequency of parental consanguinity in children with developmental disabilities is unknown, and consanguineous couples may not be identified during doctor’s visit or genetic counseling without microarray. Results We studied 607 proband pediatric patients referred for developmental disorders using a 4 × 180 K array containing both CGH and SNP probes. Using 720, 360, 180, and 90 Mb as the expected sizes of homozygosity for an estimated coefficient of inbreeding (F) 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, parental consanguinity was detected in 21cases (3.46%). Conclusion Parental consanguinity is not uncommon in children with developmental problems in our study population, and can be identified by use of a combined CGH and SNP chromosome microarray. Identification of parental consanguinity in such cases can be important for further diagnostic testing. PMID:24053112

  10. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase (Hipk) phosphorylates the small SPOC family protein Spenito.

    PubMed

    Dewald, D N; Steinmetz, E L; Walldorf, U

    2014-12-01

    The Drosophila homeodomain-interacting protein kinase (Hipk) is a versatile regulator involved in a variety of pathways, such as Notch and Wingless signalling, thereby acting in processes including the promotion of eye development or control of cell numbers in the nervous system. In vertebrates, extensive studies have related its homologue HIPK2 to important roles in the control of p53-mediated apoptosis and tumour suppression. Spenito (Nito) belongs to the group of small SPOC family proteins and has a role, amongst others, as a regulator of Wingless signalling downstream of Armadillo. In the present study, we show that both proteins have an enzyme-substrate relationship, adding a new interesting component to the broad range of Hipk interactions, and we map several phosphorylation sites of Nito. Furthermore, we were able to define a preliminary consensus motif for Hipk target sites, which will simplify the identification of new substrates of this kinase. PMID:25040100

  11. Characterization of a small family (CAIII) of microsatellite-containing sequences with X-Y homology.

    PubMed

    Malaspina, P; Ciminelli, B M; Viggiano, L; Jodice, C; Cruciani, F; Santolamazza, P; Sellitto, D; Scozzari, R; Terrenato, L; Rocchi, M; Novelletto, A

    1997-06-01

    Four X-linked loci showing homology with a previously described Y-linked polymorphic locus (DYS413) were identified and characterized. By fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), somatic cell hybrids, and YAC screening, the X-linked members of this small family of sequences (CAIII) all map in Xp22, while the Y members map in Yq11. These loci contribute to the overall similarity of the two genomic regions. All of the CAIII loci contain an internal microsatellite of the (CA)n type. The microsatellites display extensive length polymorphism in two of the X-linked members as well as in the Y members. In addition, common sequence variants are found in the portions flanking the microsatellites in two of the X-linked members. Our results indicate that, during the evolution of this family, length variation on the Y chromosome was accumulated at a rate not slower than that on the X chromosome. Finally, these sequences represent a model system with which to analyze human populations for similar X- and Y-linked polymorphisms. PMID:9169558

  12. BH3 Response Profiles From Neuroblastoma Mitochondria Predict Activity of Small Molecule Bcl-2 Family Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Kelly C.; Lestini, Brian J.; Gross, Michelle; Ip, Laura; Bhumbla, Ashish; Zhang, Xuemei; Zhao, Huaqing; Liu, Xueyuan; Hogarty, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Bcl-2 family proteins regulate mitochondrial apoptosis downstream of diverse stressors. Cancer cells frequently deregulate Bcl-2 proteins leading to chemoresistance. We have optimized a platform for solid tumors in which Bcl-2 family resistance patterns are inferred. Functional mitochondria were isolated from neuroblastoma cell lines, exposed to distinct BH3-domain peptides, and assayed for cytochrome c release. Such BH3 profiles revealed three patterns of cytochrome c response. A subset had a dominant NoxaBH3 response implying Mcl1-dependence. These cells were more sensitive to small molecules that antagonize Mcl1 (AT-101) than those that antagonize Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w (ABT-737). A second subset had a dominant BikBH3 response, implying a Bcl-xL/-w dependence, and was exquisitely sensitive to ABT-737 (IC50 <200 nM). Finally, most neuroblastoma cell lines derived at relapse were relatively resistant to pro-death BH3 peptides and Bcl-2 antagonists. Our findings define heterogeneity for apoptosis resistance in neuroblastoma, help triage emerging Bcl-2 antagonists for clinical use, and provide a platform for studies to characterize post-therapy resistance mechanisms for neuroblastoma and other solid tumors. PMID:19893570

  13. Small Molecule Inhibition of the TNF Family Cytokine CD40 Ligand Through a Subunit Fracture Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    L Silvian; J Friedman; K Strauch; T Cachero; E Day; F Qian; B Cunningham; A Fung; L Sun; et al.

    2011-12-31

    BIO8898 is one of several synthetic organic molecules that have recently been reported to inhibit receptor binding and function of the constitutively trimeric tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family cytokine CD40 ligand (CD40L, aka CD154). Small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interfaces are relatively rare, and their discovery is often very challenging. Therefore, to understand how BIO8898 achieves this feat, we characterized its mechanism of action using biochemical assays and X-ray crystallography. BIO8898 inhibited soluble CD40L binding to CD40-Ig with a potency of IC{sub 50} = 25 {mu}M and inhibited CD40L-dependent apoptosis in a cellular assay. A co-crystal structure of BIO8898 with CD40L revealed that one inhibitor molecule binds per protein trimer. Surprisingly, the compound binds not at the surface of the protein but by intercalating deeply between two subunits of the homotrimeric cytokine, disrupting a constitutive protein-protein interface and breaking the protein's 3-fold symmetry. The compound forms several hydrogen bonds with the protein, within an otherwise hydrophobic binding pocket. In addition to the translational splitting of the trimer, binding of BIO8898 was accompanied by additional local and longer-range conformational perturbations of the protein, both in the core and in a surface loop. Binding of BIO8898 is reversible, and the resulting complex is stable and does not lead to detectable dissociation of the protein trimer. Our results suggest that a set of core aromatic residues that are conserved across a subset of TNF family cytokines might represent a generic hot-spot for the induced-fit binding of trimer-disrupting small molecules.

  14. Consanguineous Marital Union Resulting in a Progeny of Whistling-face Syndrome and Hemophilia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, Vivek; Gurjar, Minal

    2015-04-01

    Many different types of genetic disorders are noted to be prevalent among consanguineous progeny. Although the most common type of consanguineous union in all major societies is between first cousins, the importance of customary influences is apparent from variations in the specific types of first-cousin marriages contracted. Epidemiological data for the prevalence of whistling-face syndrome (WFS) are not available, but less than a hundred cases reported in the literature are noted. We are presenting a case where a consanguineous marriage resulted in two of their children presenting with WFS and one with hemophilia. PMID:25954077

  15. Familial recurrence of heart defects in subjects with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries.

    PubMed

    Piacentini, Gerardo; Digilio, M Cristina; Capolino, Rossella; Zorzi, Andrea De; Toscano, Alessandra; Sarkozy, Anna; D'Agostino, Rita; Marasini, Maurizio; Russo, M Giovanna; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Marino, Bruno

    2005-08-30

    Familial recurrence of congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA) is considered uncommon. Most of the previous familial studies involved a small number of patients and referred to all situs and looping anomalies including single ventricle, heterotaxia, and other cardiac defects different from CCTGA. We performed a large, consecutive clinical case series study in order to detect the recurrence of congenital heart defects in families of children with the classic form of CCTGA. From January 1997 through December 2004, 102 consecutive patients with CCTGA were evaluated in four institutions. There were 59 male (57.8%) and 43 female (42.2%). Mean age was 8.6 +/- 7.8 years. Eighty-eight patients (86.3%) had situs solitus of the atria, 14 (13.7%) situs inversus. The cardiac and extracardiac anomalies among relatives and the patterns of familial recurrence were investigated. Relatives with congenital heart defects were found in 16/102 families (15.7%). Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) was the most common recurrent defect (6/102 families). Consanguinity was identified in the parents of three probands. Six probands had an unaffected twin-sib. Recurrence risks for congenital heart defects were calculated at 5.2% (6/116) for siblings. In conclusion, CCTGA is not always sporadic in families. The pattern of inheritance, the presence of consanguinity among parents and the recurrence of situs inversus could suggest, in some families, an autosomal recessive mechanism with similarities with that occurring in some pedigrees with heterotaxia. The recurrence of TGA and CCTGA in the same family suggests a pathogenetic link between these two anatomically different malformations. PMID:16059940

  16. Novel Small Molecule Activators of the Trk Family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Obianyo, Obiamaka; Ye, Keqiang

    2012-01-01

    The Tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors are a subset of the receptor tyrosine kinase family with an important functionality in the regulation of neurotrophic signaling in the peripheral and central nervous system. As the receptors are able to mediate neuronal survival by associating with their respective neurotrophin ligands, many studies have focused on the therapeutic potential of generating small-molecule mimetic compounds that elicit agonistic effects similar to those of the natural protein ligands. To this end, various structure-based studies have led to the generation of bivalent peptide-based agonists and antibodies that selectively initiate Trk receptor signaling; however, these compounds do not possess the ideal characteristics of a potential drug. Additionally, the reliance of structure-based data to generate the compound libraries, limits the potential identification of novel chemical structures with desirable activity. Therefore, subsequent investigations utilized a cell-based apoptotic screen to facilitate the analysis of large, diverse chemical libraries of small molecules and quickly identify compounds with Trk-dependent antiapoptotic activity. Herein, we describe the Trk agonists that have been identified by this screening methodology and summarize their in vitro and in vivo neurotrophic activity as well as their efficacy in various neurological disease models, implicating their future utility as therapeutic compounds. PMID:22982231

  17. Institutional protocol to manage consanguinity detected by genetic testing in pregnancy in a minor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Laura P; Beck, Anita E; Tsuchiya, Karen D; Chow, Penny M; Mirzaa, Ghayda M; Wiester, Rebecca T; Feldman, Kenneth W

    2015-03-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays and other types of genetic tests have the potential to detect first-degree consanguinity and uncover parental rape in cases of minor teenage pregnancy. We present 2 cases in which genetic testing identified parental rape of a minor teenager. In case 1, single-nucleotide polymorphism array in a patient with multiple developmental abnormalities demonstrated multiple long stretches of homozygosity, revealing parental rape of a teenage mother. In case 2, a vague maternal sexual assault history and diagnosis of Pompe disease by direct gene sequencing identified parental rape of a minor. Given the medical, legal, and ethical implications of such revelations, a protocol was developed at our institution to manage consanguinity identified via genetic testing. PMID:25687148

  18. Institutional Protocol to Manage Consanguinity Detected by Genetic Testing in Pregnancy in a Minor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Laura P.; Beck, Anita E.; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Chow, Penny M.; Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Wiester, Rebecca T.

    2015-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays and other types of genetic tests have the potential to detect first-degree consanguinity and uncover parental rape in cases of minor teenage pregnancy. We present 2 cases in which genetic testing identified parental rape of a minor teenager. In case 1, single-nucleotide polymorphism array in a patient with multiple developmental abnormalities demonstrated multiple long stretches of homozygosity, revealing parental rape of a teenage mother. In case 2, a vague maternal sexual assault history and diagnosis of Pompe disease by direct gene sequencing identified parental rape of a minor. Given the medical, legal, and ethical implications of such revelations, a protocol was developed at our institution to manage consanguinity identified via genetic testing. PMID:25687148

  19. Novel homozygous PANK2 mutation identified in a consanguineous Chinese pedigree with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Fang; Li, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Wu, Ji-Min

    2016-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder resulting from pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) gene mutations. It is clinically characterized by early onset of extrapyramidal symptoms, with or without pigmentary retinopathy, optic atrophy and acanthocytosis. The specific radiographic appearance of PKAN is the eye-of-the-tiger sign. However, there are few studies regarding PKAN patients of Chinese Han ancestry. In the present study, a Chinese 20-year-old female with an 8-year history of unsteady walking and involuntary movements is described. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed eye-of-the-tiger sign. Following sequencing of PANK2, a novel homozygous c.863C>T (p.P288L) mutation was identified in the patient and heterozygous c.863C>T was identified in her consanguineous parents. The absence of this mutation in the 1000 Genomes database, The Exome Aggregation Consortium, and 200 controls demonstrated that this mutation was probably pathogenic for PKAN in this family. In addition, the PANK2 c.863C>T mutation was predicted to be deleterious by SIFT, disease causing by Mutation Taster and probably damaging by PolyPhen2. PMID:27446545

  20. A resonant family of dynamically cold small bodies in the near-Earth asteroid belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2013-07-01

    Near-Earth objects (NEOs) moving in resonant, Earth-like orbits are potentially important. On the positive side, they are the ideal targets for robotic and human low-cost sample return missions and a much cheaper alternative to using the Moon as an astronomical observatory. On the negative side and even if small in size (2-50 m), they have an enhanced probability of colliding with the Earth causing local but still significant property damage and loss of life. Here, we show that the recently discovered asteroid 2013 BS45 is an Earth co-orbital, the sixth horseshoe librator to our planet. In contrast with other Earth's co-orbitals, its orbit is strikingly similar to that of the Earth yet at an absolute magnitude of 25.8, an artificial origin seems implausible. The study of the dynamics of 2013 BS45 coupled with the analysis of NEO data show that it is one of the largest and most stable members of a previously undiscussed dynamically cold group of small NEOs experiencing repeated trappings in the 1:1 commensurability with the Earth. This new resonant family is well constrained in orbital parameter space and it includes at least 10 other transient members: 2003 YN107, 2006 JY26, 2009 SH2 and 2012 FC71 among them. 2012 FC71 represents the best of both worlds as it is locked in a Kozai resonance and is unlikely to impact the Earth. These objects are not primordial and may have originated within the Venus-Earth-Mars region or in the main-belt, then transition to Amor-class asteroid before entering Earth's co-orbital region. Objects in this group could be responsible for the production of Earth's transient irregular natural satellites.

  1. Consistent Small-Sample Variances for Six Gamma-Family Measures of Ordinal Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-family measures are bivariate ordinal correlation measures that form a family because they all reduce to Goodman and Kruskal's gamma in the absence of ties (1954). For several gamma-family indices, more than one variance estimator has been introduced. In previous research, the "consistent" variance estimator described by Cliff and colleagues…

  2. Service Family Support -- A Small-Scale Project of Educational Psychologists Working with Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogg, Jane; Hart, Anne; Collins, Zoe V.

    2014-01-01

    Being in a Service family can be a difficult position for children and parents alike due to high levels of mobility, parental separation, and the remaining parent's stress and emotional well-being. A Service family is defined as a family with one or both parents employed by the Ministry of Defence (MOD). The current project looked at the…

  3. Moxidectin and the avermectins: Consanguinity but not identity

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, Roger; Ménez, Cécile; Lespine, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The avermectins and milbemycins contain a common macrocyclic lactone (ML) ring, but are fermentation products of different organisms. The principal structural difference is that avermectins have sugar groups at C13 of the macrocyclic ring, whereas the milbemycins are protonated at C13. Moxidectin (MOX), belonging to the milbemycin family, has other differences, including a methoxime at C23. The avermectins and MOX have broad-spectrum activity against nematodes and arthropods. They have similar but not identical, spectral ranges of activity and some avermectins and MOX have diverse formulations for great user flexibility. The longer half-life of MOX and its safety profile, allow MOX to be used in long-acting formulations. Some important differences between MOX and avermectins in interaction with various invertebrate ligand-gated ion channels are known and could be the basis of different efficacy and safety profiles. Modelling of IVM interaction with glutamate-gated ion channels suggest different interactions will occur with MOX. Similarly, profound differences between MOX and the avermectins are seen in interactions with ABC transporters in mammals and nematodes. These differences are important for pharmacokinetics, toxicity in animals with defective transporter expression, and probable mechanisms of resistance. Resistance to the avermectins has become widespread in parasites of some hosts and MOX resistance also exists and is increasing. There is some degree of cross-resistance between the avermectins and MOX, but avermectin resistance and MOX resistance are not identical. In many cases when resistance to avermectins is noticed, MOX produces a higher efficacy and quite often is fully effective at recommended dose rates. These similarities and differences should be appreciated for optimal decisions about parasite control, delaying, managing or reversing resistances, and also for appropriate anthelmintic combination. PMID:24533275

  4. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal.

    PubMed

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2016-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  5. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C.; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2015-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  6. Mean first-passage time on a family of small-world treelike networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Sun, Weigang; Wang, Guixiang; Xu, Guanghui

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we obtain exact scalings of mean first-passage time (MFPT) of random walks on a family of small-world treelike networks formed by two parameters, which includes three kinds. First, we determine the MFPT for a trapping problem with an immobile trap located at the initial node, which is defined as the average of the first-passage times (FPTs) to the trap node over all possible starting nodes, and it scales linearly with network size N in large networks. We then analytically obtain the partial MFPT (PMFPT) which is the mean of FPTs from the trap node to all other nodes and show that it increases with N as N ln N. Finally we establish the global MFPT (GMFPT), which is the average of FPTs over all pairs of nodes. It also grows with N as N ln N in the large limit of N. For these three kinds of random walks, we all obtain the analytical expressions of the MFPT and they all increase with network parameters. In addition, our method for calculating the MFPT is based on the self-similar structure of the considered networks and avoids the calculations of the Laplacian spectra.

  7. Myocilin variations and familial glaucoma in Taxiarchis, a small Greek village

    PubMed Central

    Konstas, Anastasios G. P.; Samples, John R.; Kaltsos, Kostantinos; Economou, Athanasios; Dimopoulos, Antonios; Georgiadou, Irene; Petersen, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To initiate a prospective study of glaucoma in a Greek village reported over 30 years ago to have several large families with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods A random group of 126 villagers from Taxiarchis, Greece was examined in the village community center. The detailed evaluation included ophthalmic and general history, measurement of blood pressure, intraocular pressure (IOP), and central corneal thickness (CCT) as well as evaluation of the optic nerve status. Results The incidence of glaucoma approached 18% in this small isolated village. Myocilin variants were present in almost half of the individuals screened with Arg76Lys and Thr377Met being the most common finding (25% and 17%, respectively). Over half of the individuals with the Thr377Met mutation were diagnosed with glaucoma. Two of these patients were homozygous for the Thr377Met mutation. Three individuals with the Arg76Lys polymorphism had glaucoma; however, two of these individuals also had the Thr377Met mutation. Only two patients with pseudoexfoliation were identified. Conclusions The incidence of glaucoma and the Thr377Met MYOC mutation in this population is much higher than that reported for other European populations. PMID:18449353

  8. Consanguinity Mapping of Congenital Heart Disease in a South Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Tracy L.; Misri, Amit; Bartlett, Jackie; Orabona, Guilherme; Friedman, Richard D.; Sexton, David; Maheshwari, Sunita; Morgan, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Parental consanguinity is a risk factor for congenital heart disease (CHD) worldwide, suggesting that a recessive inheritance model may contribute substantially to CHD. In Bangalore, India, uncle-niece and first cousin marriages are common, presenting the opportunity for an international study involving consanguinity mapping of structural CHD. We sought to explore the recessive model of CHD by conducting a genome-wide linkage analysis utilizing high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and enrolling 83 CHD probands born to unaffected consanguineous parents. Methodology/Principal Findings In this linkage scan involving single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, the threshold for genome-wide statistical significance was set at the standard log-of-odds (LOD) score threshold of 3.3, corresponding to 1995∶1 odds in favor of linkage. We identified a maximal single-point LOD score of 3.76 (5754∶1 odds) implicating linkage of CHD with the major allele (G) of rs1055061 on chromosome 14 in the HOMEZ gene, a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor containing leucine zipper as well as zinc finger motifs. Re-sequencing of HOMEZ exons did not reveal causative mutations in Indian probands. In addition, genotyping of the linked allele (G) in 325 U.S. CHD cases revealed neither genotypic nor allele frequency differences in varied CHD cases compared to 605 non-CHD controls. Conclusions/Significance Despite the statistical power of the consanguinity mapping approach, no single gene of major effect could be convincingly identified in a clinically heterogeneous sample of Indian CHD cases born to consanguineous parents. However, we are unable to exclude the possibility that noncoding regions of HOMEZ may harbor recessive mutations leading to CHD in the Indian population. Further research involving large multinational cohorts of patients with specific subtypes of CHD is needed to attempt replication of the observed linkage peak on chromosome 14. In addition, we

  9. Expression and strain variation of the novel “Small Open Reading Frame” 3 (smorf) multigene family in Babesia bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small open reading frame (smorf) genes comprise the second largest Babesia bovis multigene family. All known 44 variant smorf genes are located in close chromosomal proximity to ves1 genes, which encode proteins that mediate cytoadhesion and contribute to immune evasion. In this study, we characte...

  10. Contribution of family labour to the profitability and competitiveness of small-scale dairy production systems in central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Posadas-Domínguez, Rodolfo Rogelio; Arriaga-Jordán, Carlos Manuel; Martínez-Castañeda, Francisco Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the effect of family labour on the profitability and competitiveness of small-scale dairy farms in the highlands of Central Mexico. Economic data from 37 farms were analysed from a stratified statistical sampling with a Neyman assignment. Three strata were defined taking herd size as criterion. Stratum 1: herds from 3 to 9 cows plus replacements, Stratum 2: herds from 10 to 19 cows and Stratum 3: herds from 20 to 30 cows. The policy analysis matrix was used as the method to determine profitability and competitiveness. The coefficient of private profitability (CPP) when the economic cost of family labour is included in the cost structure was 8.0 %, 31.0 % and 46.0 %. When the economic cost of family labour is not included, CPP increase to 47.0 %, 57.0 % and 66.0 % for each strata, respectively. The private cost ratio (PCR) when family labour is included was 0.79, 0.51 and 0.42 for strata 1, 2 and 3, respectively. When family labour is not included, the PCR was 0.07, 0.25 and 0.26. Net profit per litre of milk including family labour was US$0.03 l(-1) for Stratum 1, US$0.09 for Stratum 2 and US$0.12 l(-1) for Stratum 3; but increased to $0.12, 0.14 and 0.15, respectively, when the economic cost of family labour is not included. It is concluded that family labour is a crucial factor in the profitability and competitiveness of small-scale dairy production. PMID:24097246

  11. Molecular characterisation of congenital glaucoma in a consanguineous Canadian community: a step towards preventing glaucoma related blindness.

    PubMed

    Martin, S N; Sutherland, J; Levin, A V; Klose, R; Priston, M; Héon, E

    2000-06-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in Canada. Congenital glaucoma usually manifests during the first years of life and is characterised by severe visual loss and autosomal recessive inheritance. Two disease loci, on chromosomes 1p36 and 2p21, have been associated with various forms of congenital glaucoma. A branch of a large six generation family from a consanguineous Amish community in south western Ontario was affected with congenital glaucoma and was studied by linkage and mutational analysis to identify the glaucoma related genetic defects. Linkage analysis using the MLINK component of the LINKAGE package (v 5.1) showed evidence of linkage to the 2p21 region (Zmax=3.34, theta=0, D2S1348 and D2S1346). Mutational analysis of the primary candidate gene, CYP1B1, was done by direct cycle sequencing, dideoxy fingerprinting analysis, and fragment analysis. Two different disease causing mutations in exon 3, 1410del13 and 1505G-->A, both segregated with the disease phenotype. The two different combinations of these alleles appeared to result in a variable expressivity of the phenotype. The compound heterozygote appeared to have a milder phenotype when compared to the homozygotes for the 13 bp deletion. The congenital glaucoma phenotype for this large inbred Amish family is the result of mutations in CYP1B1 (2p21). The molecular information derived from this study will be used to help identify carriers of the CYP1B1 mutation in this community and optimise the management of those at risk of developing glaucoma. PMID:10851252

  12. Conserved small RNAs govern replication and incompatibility of a diverse new plasmid family from marine bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Le Roux, Frédérique; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmids are autonomously replicating extrachromosomal DNA molecules that often impart key phenotypes to their bacterial hosts. Plasmids are abundant in marine bacteria, but there is scant knowledge of the mechanisms that control their replication in these hosts. Here, we identified and characterized the factors governing replication of a new family of plasmids from marine bacteria, typified by the virulence-linked plasmid pB1067 of Vibrio nigripulchritudo. Members of this family are prevalent among, yet restricted to, the Vibrionaceae. Unlike almost all plasmid families characterized to date, the ori regions of these plasmids do not encode a Rep protein to initiate DNA replication; instead, the ori regions encode two partially complementary RNAs. The smaller, termed RNA I, is ∼68-nt long and functions as a negative regulator and the key determinant of plasmid incompatibility. This Marine RNA-based (MRB) plasmid family is the first characterized family of replicons derived from marine bacteria. Only one other plasmid family (the ColE1 family) has previously been reported to rely on RNA-mediated replication initiation. However, since the sequences and structures of MRB RNA I transcripts are not related to those of ColE1 replicons, these two families of RNA-dependent replicons likely arose by convergent evolution. PMID:20923782

  13. Familial nephropathy associated with hepatic type of glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Sonobe, H; Ogawa, K; Takahashi, I

    1976-11-01

    The female patient was diagnosed as having Von Gierke's disease at 14 years of age, based on clinical manifestations, laboratory examination and liver biopsy. At 19 years of age she had uremia and died from its deterioration at 24 years of age. The parents were consanguineous, and a 27-year-old sister is presently hospitalized for renal insufficiency with hepatomegaly. On autopsy, the patient's kidneys were highly contracted and contained a number of small cysts, mainly in the medulla. Histological examination indicated periglomerular fibrosis, glomerular hyalinization, tubular atrophy or cystic dilatation and intersitial fibrosis with round cell infiltration. These findings correspond to Fanconi's familial juvenile nephronophthisis, except for age. The liver was markedly enlarged and indicated severe, glycogen deposits, but the kidney did not contain glycogen deposits. It can, therefore, be presumed that the renal lesions were not a secondary consequence of long-term glycogen deposits but that renal and hepatic lesions were associated with each other. PMID:1070908

  14. The microRNA-200 family: small molecules with novel roles in cancer development, progression and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Brock; Yang, Chengfeng

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a large family of small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate protein-coding gene expression post-transcriptionally via base pairing between the 5′ seed region of a miRNA and the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of a messenger RNA (mRNA). Recent evidence has supported the critical role that miRNAs play in many diseases including cancer. The miR-200 family consisting of 5 members (miR-200a, -200b, -200c, -141, -429) is an emerging miRNA family that has been shown to play crucial roles in cancer initiation and metastasis, and potentially be important for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. While miR-200s were found to be critically involved in the metastatic colonization to the lungs in mouse mammary xenograft tumor models, a large number of studies demonstrated their strong suppressive effects on cell transformation, cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion, tumor growth and metastasis. This review aims to discuss research findings about the role of the miR-200 family in cancer initiation, each step of cancer metastatic cascade, cancer diagnosis and treatment. A comprehensive summary of currently validated miR-200 targets is also presented. It is concluded that miR-200 family may serve as novel targets for the therapy of multiple types of cancer. PMID:25762624

  15. Therapeutic Trial for Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumor and Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone or Soft Tissue; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  16. Family Involvement in Creative Teaching Practices for All in Small Rural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigo Arrazola, Begoña; Soriano Bozalongo, Juana

    2015-01-01

    Parental involvement is interpreted as a key form of support that can contribute to the establishment of inclusive practices in schools, but this can be difficult in sparsely populated areas. Using ethnographic methods of participant observation, informal conversations and document analysis, this article therefore focuses on family involvement…

  17. The peach dehydrin family is small relative to all other sequenced plant genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in genomic sequencing technology have allowed the addition of a number of crops to the growing list of completely sequenced genomes. We have analyzed the peach genome for the dehydrin gene family and compared its members to the genomes of Arabidopsis, poplar, apple and rice. This c...

  18. Linking Roles of Education Assistants in the Missouri Small Farm Family Program at the University Resource Subsystem Client Social System Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lionberger, Herbert F.; Wong, Tso Sang

    Growing concern that the Cooperative Extension Service was failing to adequately reach small farmers with education materials through regular extension channels led to the implementation of Missouri's Small Farm Family Program. In this program, education assistants, many of whom are small farmers themselves, link the educational resources of the…

  19. Information Developer-User System Linking Roles of Education Assistants in the Missouri Small Farm Family Program. Research Bulletin No. 1042.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lionberger, Herbert F.; Wong, Tso Sang

    A 1977 study of education assistants' linking role in the University of Missouri's Small Farm Family Program (intended to favor small farmers in providing extension information) focused on conditions influencing ability of education assistants to serve as University information-user system linkers on behalf of small farmers. All Missouri education…

  20. Classic Case Report of Donohue Syndrome (Leprechaunism; OMIM *246200): The Impact of Consanguineous Mating.

    PubMed

    Nijim, Yousif; Awni, Youssef; Adawi, Amin; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2016-02-01

    Donohue syndrome ([DS]; leprechaunism) describes a genetic autosomal recessive disorder that results from the presence of homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the insulin receptor gene (INSR; 19p13.3-p13.2).Donohue syndrome is associated with a fatal congenital form of dwarfism with features of intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, exaggerated hyperglycemia with hyperinsulinism and dysmorphic abnormalities.We present a case of DS owing to the rarity of this syndrome (1 case in every million births). We discuss how the disease presents, its genetic underpinning, and its prevention.The case was encountered in an Arab male born on 1 September, 2014, for consanguineous parents. The delivery was via cesarean section at 37 weeks gestation due to severe intrauterine growth restriction and nonprogress labor term. The patient was admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit due to infection, and jaundice. Dysmorphic features, abnormalities of the craniofacial region, low birth weight, skin abnormalities, abdominal distension and hypertrichosis were observed. Laboratory examinations showed, hyperinsulinism, increased C-peptide, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, and anemia.The diagnosis of DS was done based on the combinations of typical dysmorphic characteristics, clinical evaluation, supported by genetic analysis and exaggerated biochemical results. Genetic diagnosis of DS was performed through analysis of DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A qualitative real-time PCR was used, to monitor the amplification of a targeted DNA molecule during the PCR. Other technique using sequencing of the INSR gene, which permits genetic diagnosis, counseling, and antenatal diagnoses in subsequent pregnancies, were also performed.Treatment of DS is supportive and requires the combined efforts of a multidisciplinary team, which include pediatricians, endocrinologists, dermatologists, and other health care professionals. Currently, treatment with recombinant insulin

  1. Expansion of the residential conservation service program to multi-family and small commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    Alternative regulatory provisions are considered which might permit achievement of the building energy conservation regulatory goals at a lower cost. Major issues, regulatory and legislative options, and cost-benefit analyses are discussed for multi-family and commercial buildings. The following are presented: related government programs, urban and community impact analysis, institutional impacts, energy cost, Residential Conservation Service coverage, methods of analysis, and regional studies. (MHR)

  2. Only a Touch of the Flu? The Simultaneous Manifestation of Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy in Two Consanguineous Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, C.; Suter, B.; Fischmann, A.; Gensicke, H.; Rüegg, S.; Weisser, M.

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the simultaneous manifestation of acute necrotizing encephalopathy in 2 consanguineous patients after infection with influenza B based on the autosomal dominant missense mutation of the RANBP2-gene. Differential diagnosis of acute encephalopathy, clinical and radiological clues, and treatment strategies are outlined. PMID:26110162

  3. Working Families at the Margins: The Uncertain Future of America's Small Towns. Hearing Before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    Poverty affects many rural two-parent families, even with one or both parents working. High suicide rates, increased violence, families separated in order to find work, homelessness, and hunger afflict the rural and small town poor. This document contains testimony from poor and homeless rural people; the director of the Center on Budget and…

  4. State-of-the-art of small molecule inhibitors of the TAM family: the point of view of the chemist.

    PubMed

    Baladi, Tom; Abet, Valentina; Piguel, Sandrine

    2015-11-13

    The TAM family of tyrosine kinases receptors (Tyro3, Axl and Mer) is implicated in cancer development, autoimmune reactions and viral infection and is therefore emerging as an effective and attractive therapeutic target. To date, only a few small molecules have been intentionally designed to block the TAM kinases, while most of the inhibitors were developed for blocking different protein kinases and then identified through selectivity profile studies. This minireview will examine in terms of chemical structure the different compounds able to act on either one, two or three TAM kinases with details about structure-activity relationships, drug-metabolism and pharmacokinetics properties where they exist. PMID:26498569

  5. Syndrome Keratitis-Ichtyosis-Deafness (KID) chez un enfant togolais issu d'un mariage consanguin

    PubMed Central

    Kombaté, Koussak; Saka, Bayaki; Landoh, Dadja Essoya; Mouhari-Toure, Abass; Akakpo, Séfako; Belei, Eric; Gnassingbé, Wanguena; Djibril, Mohaman Awalou; Tchangaï-Walla, Kissem; Pitché, Palokinam

    2015-01-01

    Le syndrome KID est une affection génétique rare associant kératite, ichtyose et surdité. Nous rapportons un cas dont la surdité s'est compliquée de mutisme chez un enfant togolais issu d'un mariage consanguin.Il s'agissait d'une fillette de 9 ans admise en dermatologie pour une peau sèche et une kératodermie palmoplantaire évoluant depuis l'enfance, une surdité sévère et un mutisme total évoluant depuis la naissance. Il n'y avait pas d'histoire familiale connue de syndrome KID. Les parents de cet enfant sont des cousins germains. A l'examen, on notait une kératodermie palmoplantaire typique en cuir grossier, une peau sèche ichtyosiforme finement squameuse avec un aspect pachydermique aux genoux et un aspect arlequin aux jambes. L'examen ophtalmologique avait noté une blépharo-conjonctivite, une xérophtalmie, une photophobie et une absence de sourcils. L'examen ORL avait objectivé une hypotrophie des pavillons des oreilles, une surdité sévère et un mutisme total. La particularité de cette observation réside dans la sévérité de l'atteinte auditive qui s'est compliquée de mutisme. Notre enfant étant née de parents consanguins sains, sans histoire familiale de KID, nous pensons que le mode de transmission est probablement sporadique. Une étude moléculaire du cas index et de ses parents, non réalisée à cause de notre plateau technique limité aurait pu le confirmer. PMID:26664520

  6. New Opportunitie s for Small Satellite Programs Provided by the Falcon Family of Launch Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinardi, A.; Bjelde, B.; Insprucker, J.

    2008-08-01

    The Falcon family of launch vehicles, developed by Space Exploration Technologies Corporation (SpaceX), are designed to provide the world's lowest cost access to orbit. Highly reliable, low cost launch services offer considerable opportunities for risk reduction throughout the life cycle of satellite programs. The significantly lower costs of Falcon 1 and Falcon 9 as compared with other similar-class launch vehicles results in a number of new business case opportunities; which in turn presents the possibility for a paradigm shift in how the satellite industry thinks about launch services.

  7. EJ SMALL GRANT: PESTICIDE RESEARCH PROJECT TO DETERMINE EXPOSURE AMONG WASHINGTON COUNTY, OREGON FARMWORKERS AND FAMILIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    CREATE (Creating Roads to Empowerent and Advancement through Education) has received an EJ Small Grant to implement a plan of reseaarch and evaluation of specific health outcomes associated with pesticide exposure in both workers and their children by identifying specific pestici...

  8. Intra-family differences in efficacy of inactivation of small, non-enveloped viruses.

    PubMed

    Nims, Raymond W; Zhou, S Steve

    2016-09-01

    The use of specific model viruses for validating viral purification process steps and for assessing the efficacies of viral disinfectants is based, in part, on the assumption that viral susceptibilities to such treatments will be similar for different members, including different genera, within a given viral family. This assumption is useful in cases where cell-based infectivity assays or laboratory strains for the specific viruses of interest might not exist. There are some documented cases, however, where exceptions to this assumption exist. In this paper, we discuss some of the more striking cases of intra-family differences in susceptibilities to inactivation steps used for downstream viral purification steps in biologics manufacture (e.g. heat inactivation, low pH, and guanidinium hydrochloride inactivation) and to specific viral disinfectants (e.g. alcohols, hydrogen peroxide, and quaternary ammonium-containing disinfectants) that might be employed for facility/equipment disinfection. The results suggest that care should be taken when extrapolating viral inactivation susceptibilities from specific model viruses to different genera or even to different members of the same genus. This should be taken into consideration by regulatory agencies and biologics manufacturers designing viral clearance and facility disinfection validation studies, and developers and evaluators of viral disinfectants. PMID:27473770

  9. Expression and strain variation of the novel “small open reading frame” (smorf) multigene family in Babesia bovis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreri, Lucas M.; Brayton, Kelly A.; Sondgeroth, Kerry S.; Lau, Audrey O.T.; Suarez, Carlos E.; McElwain, Terry F.

    2012-01-01

    Small open reading frame (smorf) genes comprise the second largest Babesia bovis multigene family. All known 44 variant smorf genes are located in close chromosomal proximity to ves1 genes, which encode proteins that mediate cytoadhesion and contribute to immune evasion. In this study, we characterised the general topology of smorf genes and investigated the gene repertoire, transcriptional profile and SMORF expression in two distinct strains, T2Bo and Mo7. Sequence analysis using degenerate primers identified additional smorf genes in each strain and demonstrated that the smorf gene repertoire varies between strains, with conserved and unique genes in both. Smorf genes have multiple semi-conserved and variable blocks, and a large hypervariable insertion in 20 of the 44 genes defines two major branches of the family, termed smorf A and smorf B. A total of 32 smorf genes are simultaneously transcribed in T2Bo strain B. bovis merozoites obtained from deep brain tissue of an acutely infected animal. SMORF peptide-specific antiserum bound in immunoblots to multiple proteins with a range of sizes predicted by smorf genes, confirming translation of smorf gene products from these transcripts. These results indicate that the smorf multigene family is larger than previously described and demonstrate that smorf genes are expressed and are undergoing variation, both within strains and in a lineage-specific pattern independent of strain specificity. The function of these novel proteins is unknown. PMID:22138017

  10. Age distribution of human gene families shows significant roles of both large- and small-scale duplications in vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xun; Wang, Yufeng; Gu, Jianying

    2002-06-01

    The classical (two-round) hypothesis of vertebrate genome duplication proposes two successive whole-genome duplication(s) (polyploidizations) predating the origin of fishes, a view now being seriously challenged. As the debate largely concerns the relative merits of the 'big-bang mode' theory (large-scale duplication) and the 'continuous mode' theory (constant creation by small-scale duplications), we tested whether a significant proportion of paralogous genes in the contemporary human genome was indeed generated in the early stage of vertebrate evolution. After an extensive search of major databases, we dated 1,739 gene duplication events from the phylogenetic analysis of 749 vertebrate gene families. We found a pattern characterized by two waves (I, II) and an ancient component. Wave I represents a recent gene family expansion by tandem or segmental duplications, whereas wave II, a rapid paralogous gene increase in the early stage of vertebrate evolution, supports the idea of genome duplication(s) (the big-bang mode). Further analysis indicated that large- and small-scale gene duplications both make a significant contribution during the early stage of vertebrate evolution to build the current hierarchy of the human proteome. PMID:12032571

  11. Label-based routing for a family of small-world Farey graphs.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yinhu; Wang, Yinhe

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an informative labelling method for vertices in a family of Farey graphs, and deduce a routing algorithm on all the shortest paths between any two vertices in Farey graphs. The label of a vertex is composed of the precise locating position in graphs and the exact time linking to graphs. All the shortest paths routing between any pair of vertices, which number is exactly the product of two Fibonacci numbers, are determined only by their labels, and the time complexity of the algorithm is O(n). It is the first algorithm to figure out all the shortest paths between any pair of vertices in a kind of deterministic graphs. For Farey networks, the existence of an efficient routing protocol is of interest to design practical communication algorithms in relation to dynamical processes (including synchronization and structural controllability) and also to understand the underlying mechanisms that have shaped their particular structure. PMID:27167605

  12. Label-based routing for a family of small-world Farey graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yinhu; Wang, Yinhe

    2016-05-01

    We introduce an informative labelling method for vertices in a family of Farey graphs, and deduce a routing algorithm on all the shortest paths between any two vertices in Farey graphs. The label of a vertex is composed of the precise locating position in graphs and the exact time linking to graphs. All the shortest paths routing between any pair of vertices, which number is exactly the product of two Fibonacci numbers, are determined only by their labels, and the time complexity of the algorithm is O(n). It is the first algorithm to figure out all the shortest paths between any pair of vertices in a kind of deterministic graphs. For Farey networks, the existence of an efficient routing protocol is of interest to design practical communication algorithms in relation to dynamical processes (including synchronization and structural controllability) and also to understand the underlying mechanisms that have shaped their particular structure.

  13. Gamma Convergence of a Family of Surface-Director Bending Energies with Small Tilt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussardi, Luca; Röger, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    We prove a Gamma-convergence result for a family of bending energies defined on smooth surfaces in R^3 equipped with a director field. The energies strongly penalize the deviation of the director from the surface unit normal and control the derivatives of the director. Such types of energies arise, for example, in a model for bilayer membranes introduced by Peletier and Röger (Arch Ration Mech Anal 193(3), 475-537, 2009). Here we prove in three space dimensions in the vanishing-tilt limit a Gamma-liminf estimate with respect to a specific curvature energy. In order to obtain appropriate compactness and lower semi-continuity properties we use tools from geometric measure theory, in particular the concept of generalized Gauss graphs and curvature varifolds.

  14. Label-based routing for a family of small-world Farey graphs

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Yinhu; Wang, Yinhe

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an informative labelling method for vertices in a family of Farey graphs, and deduce a routing algorithm on all the shortest paths between any two vertices in Farey graphs. The label of a vertex is composed of the precise locating position in graphs and the exact time linking to graphs. All the shortest paths routing between any pair of vertices, which number is exactly the product of two Fibonacci numbers, are determined only by their labels, and the time complexity of the algorithm is O(n). It is the first algorithm to figure out all the shortest paths between any pair of vertices in a kind of deterministic graphs. For Farey networks, the existence of an efficient routing protocol is of interest to design practical communication algorithms in relation to dynamical processes (including synchronization and structural controllability) and also to understand the underlying mechanisms that have shaped their particular structure. PMID:27167605

  15. Studying p53 family proteins in yeast: Induction of autophagic cell death and modulation by interactors and small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Leão, Mariana; Gomes, Sara; Bessa, Cláudia; Soares, Joana; Raimundo, Liliana; Monti, Paola; Fronza, Gilberto; Pereira, Clara; Saraiva, Lucília

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to individually study human p53, p63 (full length and truncated forms) and p73. Using this cell system, the effect of these proteins on cell proliferation and death, and the influence of MDM2 and MDMX on their activities were analyzed. When expressed in yeast, wild-type p53, TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 induced growth inhibition associated with S-phase cell cycle arrest. This growth inhibition was accompanied by reactive oxygen species production and autophagic cell death. Furthermore, they stimulated rapamycin-induced autophagy. On the contrary, none of the tested p53 family members induced apoptosis either per se or after apoptotic stimuli. As previously reported for p53, also TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 increased actin expression levels and its depolarization, suggesting that ACT1 is also a p63 and p73 putative yeast target gene. Additionally, MDM2 and MDMX inhibited the activity of all tested p53 family members in yeast, although the effect was weaker on TAp63. Moreover, Nutlin-3a and SJ-172550 were identified as potential inhibitors of the p73 interaction with MDM2 and MDMX, respectively. Altogether, the yeast-based assays herein developed can be envisaged as a simplified cell system to study the involvement of p53 family members in autophagy, the modulation of their activities by specific interactors (MDM2 and MDMX), and the potential of new small molecules to modulate these interactions. - Highlights: • p53, p63 and p73 are individually studied in the yeast S. cerevisiae. • p53 family members induce ROS production, cell cycle arrest and autophagy in yeast. • p53 family members increase actin depolarization and expression levels in yeast. • MDM2 and MDMX inhibit the activity of p53 family members in yeast. • Yeast can be a useful tool to study the biology and drugability of p53, p63 and p73.

  16. Methylation of sulfhydryl groups: a new function for a family of small molecule plant O-methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Coiner, Heather; Schröder, Gudrun; Wehinger, Elke; Liu, Chang-Jun; Noel, Joseph P.; Schwab, Wilfried; Schröder, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Summary In plants, type I and II S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent O-methyltransferases (OMTs) catalyze most hydroxyl group methylations of small molecules. A homology-based RT-PCR strategy using Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle) RNA previously identified six new type I plant OMT family members. We now describe the molecular and biochemical characterization of a seventh protein. It shares 56–58% identity with caffeic acid OMTs (COMTs), but it failed to methylate COMT substrates, and had no activity with flavonoids. However, the in vitro incubations revealed unusually high background levels without added substrates. A search for the responsible component revealed that the enzyme methylated dithiothreitol (DTT), the reducing agent added for enzyme stabilization. Unexpectedly, product analysis revealed that the methylation occurred on a sulfhydryl moiety, not on a hydroxyl group. Analysis of 34 compounds indicated a broad substrate range, with a preference for small hydrophobic molecules. Benzene thiol (Km 220 μM) and furfuryl thiol (Km 60 μM) were the best substrates (6–7-fold better than DTT). Small isosteric hydrophobic substrates with hydroxyl groups, like phenol and guaiacol, were also methylated, but the activities were at least 5-fold lower than with thiols. The enzyme was named C. roseus S-methyltransferase 1 (CrSMT1). Models based on the COMT crystal structure suggest that S-methylation is mechanistically identical to O-methylation. CrSMT1 so far is the only recognized example of an S-methyltransferase in this protein family. Its properties indicate that a few changes in key residues are sufficient to convert an OMT into a S-methyltransferase (SMT). Future functional investigations of plant methyltransferases should consider the possibility that the enzymes may direct methylation at sulfhydryl groups. PMID:16623883

  17. Rapid multipoint linkage analysis of recessive traits in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglyak, L.; Daly, M.J.; Lander, E.S. |

    1995-02-01

    Homozygosity mapping is a powerful strategy for mapping rare recessive traits in children of consanguineous marriages. Practical applications of this strategy are currently limited by the inability of conventional linkage analysis software to compute, in reasonable time, multipoint LOD scores for pedigrees with inbreeding loops. We have developed a new algorithm for rapid multipoint likelihood calculations in small pedigrees, including those with inbreeding loops. The running time of the algorithm grows, at most, linearly with the number of loci considered simultaneously. The running time is not sensitive to the presence of inbreeding loops, missing genotype information, and highly polymorphic loci. We have incorporated this algorithm into a software package, MAPMAKER/HOMOZ, that allows very rapid multipoint mapping of disease genes in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping. Multipoint analysis with dozens of markers can be carried out in minutes on a personal workstation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Evaluation of a Teaching Kit for Family and Consumer Science Classrooms: Motivating Students to Use a Food Thermometer with Small Cuts of Meat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Zena; Edlefsen, Miriam; Hillers, Virginia; McCurdy, Sandra M.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Dept. of Agriculture recommends use of food thermometers to safely cook small cuts of meat, yet most consumers do not use them. Consumers lack knowledge about how and why to use food thermometers with small cuts of meat. Opportunities exist for family and consumer science classes to provide education about thermometers to adolescents, who…

  19. Molecular characterization and evolution of the SPRR family of keratinocyte differentiation markers encoding small proline-rich proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.; Fijneman, R.; Wiegant, J.; Van De Putte, P.; Backendorf, C. ); Van Kessel, A.D. )

    1993-06-01

    SPRR genes (formerly SPR) encode a novel class of polypeptides (small proline rich proteins) that are strongly induced during differentiation of human epidermal keratinocytes in vitro and in vivo. Recently the authors found that the N- and C-terminal domains of these proteins show strong sequence homology to loricrin and involucrin, suggesting that SPRR proteins constitute a new class of cornified envelope precursor proteins. Here they show that SPRR proteins are encoded by closely related members of a gene family, consisting of two genes for SPRR1, approximately seven genes for SPRR2, and a single gene for SPRR3. All SPRR genes are closely linked within a 300-kb DNA segment on human chromosome 1 band q21-q22, a region where the related loricrin and involucrin genes have also been mapped. The most characteristic feature of the SPRR gene family resides in the structure of the central segments of the encoded polypeptides that are built up from tandemly repeated units of either eight (SPRR1 and SPRR3) or nine (SPRR2) amino acids with the general consensus *K*PEP**. Sequencing data of the different members, together with their clustered chromosomal organization, strongly suggest that this gene family has evolved from a single progenitor gene by multiple intra- and intergenic duplications. Analysis of the different SPRR subfamilies reveals a gene-specific bias to either intra- or intergenic duplication. The authors propose that a process of homogenization has acted on the different members of one subfamily, whereas the different subfamilies appear to have diverged from each other, at the levels of both protein structure and gene regulation. 25 refs., 7 figs., 2 tab.

  20. Structural Insights into the Activation of Human Relaxin Family Peptide Receptor 1 by Small-Molecule Agonists.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Myhr, Courtney; Huang, Zaohua; Xiao, Jingbo; Barnaeva, Elena; Ho, Brian A; Agoulnik, Irina U; Ferrer, Marc; Marugan, Juan J; Southall, Noel; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2016-03-29

    The GPCR relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) mediates the action of relaxin peptide hormone, including its tissue remodeling and antifibrotic effects. The peptide has a short half-life in plasma, limiting its therapeutic utility. However, small-molecule agonists of human RXFP1 can overcome this limitation and may provide a useful therapeutic approach, especially for chronic diseases such as heart failure and fibrosis. The first small-molecule agonists of RXFP1 were recently identified from a high-throughput screening, using a homogeneous cell-based cAMP assay. Optimization of the hit compounds resulted in a series of highly potent and RXFP1 selective agonists with low cytotoxicity, and excellent in vitro ADME and pharmacokinetic properties. Here, we undertook extensive site-directed mutagenesis studies in combination with computational modeling analysis to probe the molecular basis of the small-molecule binding to RXFP1. The results showed that the agonists bind to an allosteric site of RXFP1 in a manner that closely interacts with the seventh transmembrane domain (TM7) and the third extracellular loop (ECL3). Several residues were determined to play an important role in the agonist binding and receptor activation, including a hydrophobic region at TM7 consisting of W664, F668, and L670. The G659/T660 motif within ECL3 is crucial to the observed species selectivity of the agonists for RXFP1. The receptor binding and activation effects by the small molecule ML290 were compared with the cognate ligand, relaxin, providing valuable insights on the structural basis and molecular mechanism of receptor activation and selectivity for RXFP1. PMID:26866459

  1. The impact of a small steady stream of income for women on family health and economic well-being.

    PubMed

    Katz, J; West, K P; Pradhan, E K; LeClerq, S C; Khatry, S K; Shrestha, S Ram

    2007-01-01

    Our primary aim to evaluate the impact of a small steady stream of income on family health and well-being among rural women employed part-time in a health project in Sarlahi district, Nepal. All 870 women applying for the job of distributing nutritional supplements in their villages completed a questionnaire prior to selection for employment, 350 of whom were hired and 520 who were not. A total of 736 women completed a second questionnaire 2 years later, 341 (97.4%) of whom had been continuously employed during this period, and 395 (76.0%) who had never been employed by the project. Changes in health and well-being over 2 years were compared between women who were and were not hired. Women who were hired were younger and better educated, but were similar in other regards. After adjusting for selection differences, employed women were more likely to save cash, buy jewellery, and buy certain discretionary household goods over 2 years than those who were not hired. Expenditures on children's clothing increased more for employed women, and their children were more likely to be in private schools at follow-up, but there was no impact on health and survival of children. Women with a small steady stream of income did improve their personal economic situation by savings and increased expenditures for children and the household. Longer follow-up may reveal impacts on health access and expenditures, although these were not evident in 2 years of employment. PMID:19280386

  2. Expression of the small heat shock protein family in the mouse CNS: differential anatomical and biochemical compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Quraishe, S; Asuni, A; Boelens, W C; O'Connor, V; Wyttenbach, A

    2008-05-01

    The small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are a family of molecular chaperones defined by an alpha-crystallin domain that is important for sHsps oligomerization and chaperone activity. sHsps perform many physiological functions including the maintenance of the cellular cytoskeleton, the regulation of protein aggregation and modulate cell survival in a number of cell types including glial and neuronal cells. Many of these functions have been implicated in disease processes in the CNS and indeed sHsps are considered targets for disease therapy. Despite this, there is no study that systematically and comparatively characterized sHsps expression in the CNS. In the present study we have analyzed the expression of this gene family in the mouse brain by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), in situ hybridization and Western blotting. Gene expression analysis of the 10 known members of mammalian sHsps confirms the presence of 5 sHsps in the CNS. A distinct white matter specific expression pattern for HspB5 and overlapping expression of HspB1 and HspB8 in the lateral and dorsal ventricles of the brain is observed. We confirm protein expression of HspB1, HspB5, HspB6 and HspB8 in the brain. Further subcellular fractionation of brain and synaptosomes details a distinct subcompartment-specific association and detergent solubility of sHsps. This biochemical signature is indicative of an association with synaptic and other neural specializations. This observation will help one understand the functional role played by sHsps during physiology and pathology in the CNS. PMID:18384969

  3. The effect of consanguineous marriage on reading disability in the Arab community.

    PubMed

    Abu-Rabia, Salim; Maroun, Lateefeh

    2005-02-01

    The present study examined the effect of consanguineous marriage in the Arab community on reading disabilities of offspring. It examined whether the rate of reading disabilities was higher among offspring of first-cousin parents than offspring of unrelated parents; and whether reading-disabled children of first-cousin parents were more disabled in phonological awareness and phonological decoding than reading-disabled children of unrelated parents and normally reading younger children. These questions were investigated among 814 pupils of the 4th, 5th, and 6th grades, using word recognition and reading comprehension tests. Two experimental groups were chosen from this population. These were a reading-disabled group of 22 pupils who were children of first-cousin marriages and 21 pupils who were children of unrelated parents. A control group was also selected, consisting of 21 younger normally reading pupils at the same reading level. All the groups were tested on non-words, real words, phonological, orthographic and working memory measures. The results indicated that the rate of reading disabilities among children of first-cousin parents was higher than that of with children of second-cousin parents, distantly related parents, or unrelated parents. Further, no differences were found in phonological awareness and decoding between the two reading-disabled groups. Moreover, the results indicate a significant advantage of the younger normal readers over the reading-disabled children in the measures of phonological awareness, decoding, and orthographical knowledge that requires spelling. However, in reading common words and choosing words in context, the performance of the reading-disabled groups and the normally reading group were similar. It has been suggested that further research is needed to evaluate the role of intelligence, nevertheless our results provide new evidence for a genetic basis to reading disabilities. PMID:15747804

  4. Responding to the increased genetic risk associated with customary consanguineous marriage among minority ethnic populations: lessons from local innovations in England.

    PubMed

    Salway, Sarah; Ali, Parveen; Ratcliffe, Giles; Such, Elizabeth; Khan, Nasaim; Kingston, Helen; Quarrell, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Populations practising customary consanguineous marriage have a higher incidence of autosomal recessive genetic disorders than those in which reproductive partners are usually unrelated. In the absence of any national-level response, English service developments to address the additional needs of families living with or at risk of such disorders have been locally led. These interventions remain in their infancy here, as elsewhere in Europe, and important questions remain regarding how appropriate, effective and sustainable responses can be operationalised in practice. This formative service review employed four local case studies together with wider consultation exercises over a 4-year period (2011-2015) to document recent responses to this area of need, issues arising and lessons to inform future work. Service components included the following: enhancements to genetic services to provide family-centred, culturally competent approaches to counselling and testing; community genetic literacy approaches; and capacity development among health professionals. Local approaches were, however, very varied in their detail, scope, level of investment and longevity. The provisions of culturally competent genetic counselling services and community-level genetic literacy interventions were generally well received by those who accessed them. Coordinated action across all service components appeared important for an effective service, but healthcare professionals, particularly general practitioners, were often difficult to engage in this agenda. An evaluative culture and engagement in a wider community of practice had supported service development across sites. However, sustaining investment was challenging, particularly where new services were not well integrated into core provision and where commissioning was driven by expectations of short-term reductions in infant mortality and disability. PMID:27311843

  5. [Familial syndrome combining short small intestine, intestinal malrotation, pyloric hypertrophy and brain malformation. 3 anatomoclinical case reports].

    PubMed

    Nezelof, C; Jaubert, F; Lyon, G

    1976-01-01

    Anatomoclinical study of 3 cases of an exceptional malformative condition characterized by: --extreme shortness of the small intestine, --mesenterium commune, --hypertrophic pylorus, --malformation of the central nervous system (heterotopia, absence of operculum temporale). Clinically this malformative condition is characterized by failure and inertia of the intestinal peristalsis producing at intervals of 10-15 days episodes of subocclusion, the repetition of which causes death. The syndrome is familial and seems to be of autosomal recessive inheritance. The absence of mechanical obstruction, the repeated failure of colostomy and ileostomy, the normal aspect of the myenteric plexuses verified by cytoenzymatic and silver stains allow to individualize this anatomoclinical syndrome and to rule out the hypothesis of Hirschsprung's disease, Chagas' disease, idiopathic megacolon or hypoplasia of the myenteric plexuses. The association of cerebral malformations leads to consider the responsibility of a lack of synthesis of a same specific intermediate factor which is up to now poorly determined, implicated in the neuronal migration and neuromuscular transmission. PMID:1023783

  6. Identification of a small, very acidic constitutive nucleolar protein (NO29) as a member of the nucleoplasmin family

    PubMed Central

    Zirwes, Rudolf F.; Schmidt-Zachmann, Marion S.; Franke, Werner W.

    1997-01-01

    We report the discovery and molecular characterization of a small and very acidic nucleolar protein of an SDS/PAGE mobility corresponding to Mr 29,000 (NO29). The cDNA-deduced sequence of the Xenopus laevis protein defines a polypeptide of a calculated molecular mass of 20,121 and a pI of 3.75, with an extended acidic region near its C terminus, and is related to the major nucleolar protein, NO38, and the histone-binding protein, nucleoplasmin. This member of the nucleoplasmin family of proteins was immunolocalized to nucleoli in Xenopus oocytes and diverse somatic cells. Protein NO29 is associated with nuclear particles from Xenopus oocytes, partly complexed with protein NO38, and occurs in preribosomes but not in mature ribosomes. The location and the enormously high content of negatively charged amino acids lead to the hypothesis that NO29 might be involved in the nuclear and nucleolar accumulation of ribosomal proteins and the coordinated assembly of pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:9326619

  7. The Quality of Teachers' Interactive Conversations with Preschool Children from Low-Income Families during Small-Group and Large-Group Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jennifer J.; de Groot Kim, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the quality of preschool teachers' interactive conversations with three- and four-year-olds in two Head Start classrooms serving children from low-income families in the United States. Over a period of 20?weeks, 10 bi-weekly observations of conversations (totaling 15?h per classroom) were conducted in one small-group (Play…

  8. SNP Analysis and Whole Exome Sequencing: Their Application in the Analysis of a Consanguineous Pedigree Segregating Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Sarah L.; Marquis-Nicholson, Renate; Claxton, Karen; Ashton, Fern; Leong, Ivone U. S.; Prosser, Debra O.; Love, Jennifer M.; George, Alice M.; Taylor, Graham; Wilson, Callum; McKinlay Gardner, R. J.; Love, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia encompasses a large and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. We employed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis and whole exome sequencing to investigate a consanguineous Maori pedigree segregating ataxia. We identified a novel mutation in exon 10 of the SACS gene: c.7962T>G p.(Tyr2654*), establishing the diagnosis of autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS). Our findings expand both the genetic and phenotypic spectrum of this rare disorder, and highlight the value of high-density SNP analysis and whole exome sequencing as powerful and cost-effective tools in the diagnosis of genetically heterogeneous disorders such as the hereditary ataxias.

  9. Diagnostic Yield of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in a Cohort of Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders from a Highly Consanguineous Population.

    PubMed

    Al-Mamari, Watfa; Al-Saegh, Abeer; Al-Kindy, Adila; Bruwer, Zandre; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Al-Thihli, Khalid

    2015-08-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders are a complicated group of disorders characterized with heterogeneous genetic etiologies. The genetic investigations for this group of disorders have expanded considerably over the past decade. In our study we designed a tired approach and studied the diagnostic yield of chromosomal microarray analysis on patients referred to the Genetic and Developmental Medicine clinic in Sultan Qaboos University in Oman for autism spectrum disorders in a highly consanguineous population. Copy number variants were seen in 27% of our studied cohort of patients and it was strongly associated with dysmorphic features and congenital anomalies. PMID:25703031

  10. Familial chondrocalcinosis in the Chiloe Islands, Chile.

    PubMed Central

    Reginato, A J; Hollander, J L; Martinez, V; Valenzuela, F; Schiapachasse, V; Covarrubias, E; Jacobelli, S; Arinoviche, R; Silcox, D; Ruiz, F

    1975-01-01

    Studies about chondrocalcinosis in the Chiloe Islands (Chile) showed the high frequency of the disease there and how most of it is aggregated in a few highly involved families. Pedigrees and the high degree of consanguinity among parents of index cases pointed to a recessive inheritance. The presence of common Caucasian anthropological features of genetic value in the patients and the lack of Indian mixture in three of the involved families, documented back to 1600, suggest a Caucasian origin of the mutation. Biochemical studies of the patients' synovial fluid showed a significant rise in pyrophosphate concentration. Calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase concentrations were not different from a control group. PMID:168817

  11. Consanguinity and founder effect for Gaucher disease mutation G377S in a population from Tabuleiro do Norte, Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chaves, R G; Pereira, L da Veiga; de Araújo, F T; Rozenberg, R; Carvalho, M D F; Coelho, J C; Michelin-Tirelli, K; Chaves, M de Freitas; Cavalcanti, G B

    2015-10-01

    Gaucher's disease (GD) is caused by a β-glucocerebrosidase deficiency, leading to the accumulation of glucocerebroside in the reticuloendothelial system. The prevalence of GD in Tabuleiro do Norte (TN) (1:4000) is the highest in Brazil. The purpose of this study was to present evidence of consanguinity and founder effect for the G377S mutation (c.1246G>A) among GD patients in TN based on enzyme, molecular and genealogical studies. Between March 2009 and December 2010, 131 subjects at risk for GD (GC in dried blood ≤2.19 nmol/h/ml) and 5 confirmed GD patients from the same community were submitted for molecular analysis to characterize the genetic profile of the population. Based on the enzymatic and molecular analysis, the subjects were classified into three categories: affected (n = 5), carrier (n = 20) and non-carrier (n = 111). All carriers were (G377S/wt). Affected subjects were homozygous (G377S/G377S). The identification of a single mutation in carriers and homozygotes from different generations, the history of the community and the genealogy study suggest that the high prevalence of GD in this population may be due to a combination of consanguinity and founder effect for the G377S mutation. PMID:25287185

  12. Activation of Relaxin Family Receptor 1 from Different Mammalian Species by Relaxin Peptide and Small-Molecule Agonist ML290

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zaohua; Myhr, Courtney; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Ho, Brian A.; Bueno, Amaya; Hu, Xin; Xiao, Jingbo; Southall, Noel; Barnaeva, Elena; Agoulnik, Irina U.; Marugan, Juan J.; Ferrer, Marc; Agoulnik, Alexander I.

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin peptide (RLN), which signals through the relaxin family peptide 1 (RXFP1) GPCR receptor, has shown therapeutic effects in an acute heart failure clinical trial. We have identified a small-molecule agonist of human RXFP1, ML290; however, it does not activate the mouse receptor. To find a suitable animal model for ML290 testing and to gain mechanistic insights into the interaction of various ligands with RXFP1, we have cloned rhesus macaque, pig, rabbit, and guinea pig RXFP1s and analyzed their activation by RLN and ML290. HEK293T cells expressing macaque or pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin and ML290 treatment as measured by an increase of cAMP production. Guinea pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin but had very low response to ML290 treatment only at highest concentrations used. The rabbit RXFP1 amino acid sequence was the most divergent, with a number of unique substitutions within the ectodomain and the seven-transmembrane domain (7TM). Two splice variants of rabbit RXFP1 derived through alternative splicing of the fourth exon were identified. In contrast to the other species, rabbit RXFP1s were activated by ML290, but not with human, pig, mouse, or rabbit RLNs. Using FLAG-tagged constructs, we have shown that both rabbit RXFP1 variants are expressed on the cell surface. No binding of human Eu-labeled RLN to rabbit RXFP1 was detected, suggesting that in this species, RXFP1 might be non-functional. We used chimeric rabbit–human and guinea pig–human constructs to identify regions important for RLN or ML290 receptor activation. Chimeras with the human ectodomain and rabbit 7TM domain were activated by RLN, whereas substitution of part of the guinea pig 7TM domain with the human sequence only partially restored ML290 activation, confirming the allosteric mode of action for the two ligands. Our data demonstrate that macaque and pig models can be used for ML290 testing. PMID:26347712

  13. Activation of Relaxin Family Receptor 1 from Different Mammalian Species by Relaxin Peptide and Small-Molecule Agonist ML290.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zaohua; Myhr, Courtney; Bathgate, Ross A D; Ho, Brian A; Bueno, Amaya; Hu, Xin; Xiao, Jingbo; Southall, Noel; Barnaeva, Elena; Agoulnik, Irina U; Marugan, Juan J; Ferrer, Marc; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin peptide (RLN), which signals through the relaxin family peptide 1 (RXFP1) GPCR receptor, has shown therapeutic effects in an acute heart failure clinical trial. We have identified a small-molecule agonist of human RXFP1, ML290; however, it does not activate the mouse receptor. To find a suitable animal model for ML290 testing and to gain mechanistic insights into the interaction of various ligands with RXFP1, we have cloned rhesus macaque, pig, rabbit, and guinea pig RXFP1s and analyzed their activation by RLN and ML290. HEK293T cells expressing macaque or pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin and ML290 treatment as measured by an increase of cAMP production. Guinea pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin but had very low response to ML290 treatment only at highest concentrations used. The rabbit RXFP1 amino acid sequence was the most divergent, with a number of unique substitutions within the ectodomain and the seven-transmembrane domain (7TM). Two splice variants of rabbit RXFP1 derived through alternative splicing of the fourth exon were identified. In contrast to the other species, rabbit RXFP1s were activated by ML290, but not with human, pig, mouse, or rabbit RLNs. Using FLAG-tagged constructs, we have shown that both rabbit RXFP1 variants are expressed on the cell surface. No binding of human Eu-labeled RLN to rabbit RXFP1 was detected, suggesting that in this species, RXFP1 might be non-functional. We used chimeric rabbit-human and guinea pig-human constructs to identify regions important for RLN or ML290 receptor activation. Chimeras with the human ectodomain and rabbit 7TM domain were activated by RLN, whereas substitution of part of the guinea pig 7TM domain with the human sequence only partially restored ML290 activation, confirming the allosteric mode of action for the two ligands. Our data demonstrate that macaque and pig models can be used for ML290 testing. PMID:26347712

  14. From "New Genetics" to Everyday Knowledge: Ideas about How Genetic Diseases Are Transmitted in Two Large Brazilian Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Silvana; Bizzo, Nelio

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on everyday or lay understandings of inheritance. In the northeastern Brazil, 100 individuals were interviewed in order to describe how they explain the origin of genetic disorders affecting their relatives for several generations. There were involved 60 individuals from a large consanguineous family with many members affected…

  15. Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in two Saudi siblings

    PubMed Central

    Abbaker, Abdelakarim Ibrahim; Dammas, Ali Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Primary familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH; or familial erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis [FEL]) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder more prevalent with parental consanguinity. There is aggressive proliferation of activated macrophages and histiocytes, which phagocytose red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), and platelets, leading to anemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. The exaggerated response of immune system in familial HLH can occur in the absence of infection. We report on two Saudi siblings with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. The first case was diagnosed and started on treatment but died after ten days of treatment while the second one was referred to a higher centre for treatment but died before commencing chemotherapy treatment. This rare inherited aggressive disease needs high index of suspicion and early treatment. Anti-inflammatory therapy consisting of steroids, etoposide or antithymocyte globulin (ATG), should be instituted promptly, followed by curative hematopoietic cell transplantation to get a better outcome. Without treatment, most patients with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis survive only a few months. PMID:27493422

  16. Hurler-Scheie phenotype with parental consanguinity. Report of an additional case supporting the concept of genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Kaibara, N; Katsuki, I; Hotokebuchi, T; Takagishi, K; Kure, T

    1983-05-01

    The Hurler-Scheie phenotype in a 27-year-old woman of first-cousin parentage is possibly the first reported in the orthopedic literature. The patient exhibited short stature, coarse facies, corneal clouding, multiple stiff joints, normal intelligence, and a long history of bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, which has not been relieved after operation. The irreversible nerve damage was apparently produced by the marked thickening of the transverse carpal ligament. Surgical findings in this case and data from published reports emphasize the need for early surgical treatment of the associated carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with the Hurler-Scheie phenotype. Parental consanguinity present in this patient is further evidence supporting the concept of a third mutant allele different from both the Hurler gene and the Scheie gene. PMID:6404579

  17. Familial Gigantiform Cementoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chunyue; Wang, Hongwei; He, Guang; Qin, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Familial gigantiform cementoma is an exceedingly rare but distinct subtype of cemento-osseous-fibrous lesion. Undocumented radiographic changes and related bone metabolism disorder are herein hypothesized and discussed. We present an adolescent case with recurrent familial gigantiform cementoma who received surgical intervention in our hospital. Apart from typical multiquadrant and expansile abnormalies involving both jaws, he also suffered from several times of fractures in lower extremity. Furthermore, radiographic examinations of calvaria, pelvis, femoris, tibia, and fibula all revealed radiolucent areas signifying diffuse osteopenic bone losses. Some of his consanguineous relatives bore the same burden of fractures during pubertal period. Considering these polyostotic conditions, a correlation of congenital bone metabolism disorder in cases with familial gigantiform cementoma, named “calcium steal disorder,” was thus proposed. Familial gigantiform cementoma is closely associated with “calcium steal disorder.” Whole-body dual-energy absorptiometry should be considered as a routine examination for fracture-related risk prediction. PMID:26945411

  18. Economic Openness and the Marginalization of Small Family Farmers: Aligning Curriculum To Meet the Needs of Rural Adolescents in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Audrey-Marie Schuh

    Economic liberalization and the rise of global competition have increased the importance of agricultural, technical, and business skills for small farmers in Brazil. However, many rural farmers are unable to attend agricultural technical schools due to low educational attainment. The first section of this paper discusses the impact that…

  19. Consanguinity in Centre d'Étude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Eric L; Heckenberg, Greg; Baugher, Joseph D; Roberson, Elisha DO; Downey, Thomas J; Pevsner, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    A set of Centre d'Étude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) cell lines serves as a large reference collection that has been widely used as a benchmark for allele frequencies in the analysis of genetic variants, to create linkage maps of the human genome, to study the genetics of gene expression, to provide samples to the HapMap and 1000 Genomes projects, and for a variety of other applications. An explicit feature of the CEPH collection is that these multigenerational families represent reference panels of known relatedness, consisting mostly of three-generation pedigrees with large sibships, two parents, and grandparents. We applied identity-by-state (IBS) and identity-by-descent (IBD) methods to high-density genotype data from 186 CEPH individuals in 13 families. We identified unexpected relatedness between nominally unrelated grandparents both within and between pedigrees. For one pair, the estimated Cotterman coefficient of relatedness k1 exceeded 0.2, consistent with one-eighth sharing (eg, first-cousins). Unexpectedly, significant IBD2 values were discovered in both second-degree and parent–child relationships. These were accompanied by regions of homozygosity in the offspring, which corresponded to blocks lacking IBS0 in purportedly unrelated parents, consistent with inbreeding. Our findings support and extend a 1999 report, based on the use of short tandem-repeat polymorphisms, that several CEPH families had regions of homozygosity consistent with autozygosity. We benchmarked our IBD approach (called kcoeff) against both RELPAIR and PREST software packages. Our findings may affect the interpretation of previous studies and the design of future studies that rely on the CEPH resource. PMID:22274586

  20. Mechanism for attenuation of DNA binding by MarR family transcriptional regulators by small molecule ligands.

    PubMed

    Perera, Inoka C; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Wilkinson, Steven P; Grove, Anne

    2009-07-31

    Members of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family control gene expression in a variety of metabolic processes in bacteria and archaea. Hypothetical uricase regulator (HucR), which belongs to the ligand-responsive branch of the MarR family, regulates uricase expression in Deinococcus radiodurans by binding a shared promoter region between uricase and HucR genes. We show here that HucR responds only to urate and, to a lesser extent, to xanthine by attenuated DNA binding, compared to other intermediates of purine degradation. Using molecular-dynamics-guided mutational analysis, we identified the ligand-binding site in HucR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and intrinsic Trp fluorescence have identified W20 from the N-terminal helix and R80 from helix 3, which serves as a scaffold for the DNA recognition helix, as being essential for ligand binding. Using structural data combined with in silico and in vitro analyses, we propose a mechanism for the attenuation of DNA binding in which a conformational change initiated by charge repulsion due to a bound ligand propagates to DNA recognition helices. This mechanism may apply generally to MarR homologs that bind anionic phenolic ligands. PMID:19501097

  1. Boiling Points of the Family of Small Molecules CHwFxClyBrz: How Are They Related to Molecular Mass?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, Michael

    2001-11-01

    A plot of boiling point versus molecular mass for the family of tetrahedral molecular compounds CHw Fx Cly Brz is not linear, but yields a two-dimensional array with the data for molecules of similar formulae lying on straight lines. A plot of boiling point versus molar refraction (polarizability) of the compounds gives three near-parallel straight lines. The highest is for the family of compounds CH2XY; the lowest is for the all-halogen compounds CFxCyBrz; the compounds CHXxYyZz and CH3X lie intermediate. The boiling points of the compounds containing hydrogen are enhanced relative to what their molecular refraction suggests (excepting CH4). Boiling point is related to the macroscopic properties of refractive index and density of the liquid and to the molecular properties of molar refraction and dipole moment. These are connected by the molecular mass, which, with the density, determines the molar volume and thus the polarizability.

    See Letter re: this article.

    See Second Letter re: this article.

  2. Respiratory Protection Behavior and Respiratory Indices among Poultry House Workers on Small, Family-Owned Farms in North Carolina: A Pilot Project.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Gregory D; Gallagher, Barbara; Shaw, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate respiratory behavior and respiratory indices of poultry workers on family-owned, poultry farms with 10 or less employees in North Carolina. A field study was conducted to collect data on participants (N = 24) using spirometry, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (Feno), and an interviewer-administered questionnaire. The majority of workers (76%) ranked respiratory protection as being important, yet 48% reported never or rarely wearing respiratory protection when working in dusty conditions. A large percent of workers reported eye (55%) and nasal (50%) irritation and dry cough (50%). On average, pulmonary lung function and Feno tests were normal among nonsmokers. In bivariate analysis, significant associations were identified between working 7 days on the farm (P = .01), with eye irritation, and working 5 or fewer years in poultry farming (P = .01). Poultry workers on family-owned farms spend a considerable amount of work time in poultry houses and report acute respiratory-related health symptoms. Administrative controls among small, family-owned poultry farms are necessary to improve and promote safety and health to its employees. PMID:26788985

  3. Two novel members of the LhrC family of small RNAs in Listeria monocytogenes with overlapping regulatory functions but distinctive expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Mollerup, Maria Storm; Ross, Joseph Andrew; Helfer, Anne-Catherine; Meistrup, Kristine; Romby, Pascale; Kallipolitis, Birgitte Haahr

    2016-09-01

    Multicopy small RNAs (sRNAs) have gained recognition as an important feature of bacterial gene regulation. In the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, 5 homologous sRNAs, called LhrC1-5, control gene expression by base pairing to target mRNAs though 3 conserved UCCC motifs common to all 5 LhrCs. We show here that the sRNAs Rli22 and Rli33-1 are structurally and functionally related to LhrC1-5, expanding the LhrC family to 7 members, which makes it the largest multicopy sRNA family reported so far. Rli22 and Rli33-1 both contain 2 UCCC motifs important for post-transcriptional repression of 3 LhrC target genes. One such target, oppA, encodes a virulence-associated oligo-peptide binding protein. Like LhrC1-5, Rli22 and Rli33-1 employ their UCCC motifs to recognize the Shine-Dalgarno region of oppA mRNA and prevent formation of the ribosomal complex, demonstrating that the 7 sRNAs act in a functionally redundant manner. However, differential expression profiles of the sRNAs under infection-relevant conditions suggest that they might also possess non-overlapping functions. Collectively, this makes the LhrC family a unique case for studying the purpose of sRNA multiplicity in the context of bacterial virulence. PMID:27400116

  4. Selective inhibition of the K(ir)2 family of inward rectifier potassium channels by a small molecule probe: the discovery, SAR, and pharmacological characterization of ML133.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao-Ran; Wu, Meng; Yu, Haibo; Long, Shunyou; Stevens, Amy; Engers, Darren W; Sackin, Henry; Daniels, J Scott; Dawson, Eric S; Hopkins, Corey R; Lindsley, Craig W; Li, Min; McManus, Owen B

    2011-08-19

    The K(ir) inward rectifying potassium channels have a broad tissue distribution and are implicated in a variety of functional roles. At least seven classes (K(ir)1-K(ir)7) of structurally related inward rectifier potassium channels are known, and there are no selective small molecule tools to study their function. In an effort to develop selective K(ir)2.1 inhibitors, we performed a high-throughput screen (HTS) of more than 300,000 small molecules within the MLPCN for modulators of K(ir)2.1 function. Here we report one potent K(ir)2.1 inhibitor, ML133, which inhibits K(ir)2.1 with an IC(50) of 1.8 μM at pH 7.4 and 290 nM at pH 8.5 but exhibits little selectivity against other members of Kir2.x family channels. However, ML133 has no effect on K(ir)1.1 (IC(50) > 300 μM) and displays weak activity for K(ir)4.1 (76 μM) and K(ir)7.1 (33 μM), making ML133 the most selective small molecule inhibitor of the K(ir) family reported to date. Because of the high homology within the K(ir)2 family-the channels share a common design of a pore region flanked by two transmembrane domains-identification of site(s) critical for isoform specificity would be an important basis for future development of more specific and potent K(ir) inhibitors. Using chimeric channels between K(ir)2.1 and K(ir)1.1 and site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified D172 and I176 within M2 segment of K(ir)2.1 as molecular determinants critical for the potency of ML133 mediated inhibition. Double mutation of the corresponding residues of K(ir)1.1 to those of K(ir)2.1 (N171D and C175I) transplants ML133 inhibition to K(ir)1.1. Together, the combination of a potent, K(ir)2 family selective inhibitor and identification of molecular determinants for the specificity provides both a tool and a model system to enable further mechanistic studies of modulation of K(ir)2 inward rectifier potassium channels. PMID:21615117

  5. Selective inhibition of the Kir2 family of inward rectifier potassium channels by a small molecule probe: the discovery, SAR and pharmacological characterization of ML133

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao-Ran; Wu, Meng; Yu, Haibo; Long, Shunyou; Stevens, Amy; Engers, Darren W.; Sackin, Henry; Daniels, J. Scott; Dawson, Eric S.; Hopkins, Corey R.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Li, Min; McManus, Owen B

    2011-01-01

    The Kir inward rectifying potassium channels have a broad tissue distribution and are implicated in a variety of functional roles. At least seven classes (Kir1 – Kir7) of structurally related inward rectifier potassium channels are known, and there are no selective small molecule tools to study their function. In an effort to develop selective Kir2.1 inhibitors, we performed a high-throughput screen (HTS) of more than 300,000 small molecules within the MLPCN for modulators of Kir2.1 function. Here we report one potent Kir2.1 inhibitor, ML133, which inhibits Kir2.1 with IC50 of 1.8 μM at pH 7.4 and 290 nM at pH 8.5, but exhibits little selectivity against other members of Kir2.x family channels. However, ML133 has no effect on Kir1.1 (IC50 > 300 μM), and displays weak activity for Kir4.1 (76 μM) and Kir7.1 (33 μM), making ML133 the most selective small molecule inhibitor of the Kir family reported to date. Due to the high homology within the Kir family, the channels share a common design of a pore region flanked by two transmembrane domains, identification of site(s) critical for isoform specificity would be an important basis for future development of more specific and potent Kir inhibitors. Using chimeric channels between Kir2.1 and Kir1.1 and site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified D172 and I176 within M2 segment of Kir2.1 as molecular determinants critical for the potency of ML133 mediated inhibition. Double mutation of the corresponding residues of Kir1.1 to those of Kir2.1 (N171D and C175I) transplants ML133 inhibition to Kir1.1. Together, the combination of a potent, Kir2 family selective inhibitor and identification of molecular determinants for the specificity provides both a tool and a model system to enable further mechanistic studies of modulation of Kir2 inward rectifier potassium channels. PMID:21615117

  6. Catastrophic disruption in the solar system - Asteroid collisional history, origin of Hirayama families and disruption of small satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    The process of collisional catastrophic disruption has played a significantly role in structuring the solar system. Diverse populations of bodies such as the asteroid belt, small satellites of Jupiter and Saturn and perhaps even the rings of Saturn have been created or substantially changed by catastrophic distruption. Understanding the outcome of large scale impacts is essential to learning about the early history of the solar system in the asteroid zone and the reason why a planet failed to form there.

  7. Small-molecule inhibitors that target protein-protein interactions in the RAD51 family of recombinases.

    PubMed

    Scott, Duncan E; Coyne, Anthony G; Venkitaraman, Ashok; Blundell, Tom L; Abell, Chris; Hyvönen, Marko

    2015-02-01

    The development of small molecules that inhibit protein-protein interactions continues to be a challenge in chemical biology and drug discovery. Herein we report the development of indole-based fragments that bind in a shallow surface pocket of a humanised surrogate of RAD51. RAD51 is an ATP-dependent recombinase that plays a key role in the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. It both self-associates, forming filament structures with DNA, and interacts with the BRCA2 protein through a common "FxxA" tetrapeptide motif. We elaborated previously identified fragment hits that target the FxxA motif site and developed small-molecule inhibitors that are approximately 500-fold more potent than the initial fragments. The lead compounds were shown to compete with the BRCA2-derived Ac-FHTA-NH2 peptide and the self-association peptide of RAD51, but they had no effect on ATP binding. This study is the first reported elaboration of small-molecular-weight fragments against this challenging target. PMID:25470112

  8. Small-Molecule Inhibitors That Target Protein–Protein Interactions in the RAD51 Family of Recombinases

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Duncan E; Coyne, Anthony G; Venkitaraman, Ashok; Blundell, Tom L; Abell, Chris; Hyvönen, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The development of small molecules that inhibit protein–protein interactions continues to be a challenge in chemical biology and drug discovery. Herein we report the development of indole-based fragments that bind in a shallow surface pocket of a humanised surrogate of RAD51. RAD51 is an ATP-dependent recombinase that plays a key role in the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. It both self-associates, forming filament structures with DNA, and interacts with the BRCA2 protein through a common “FxxA” tetrapeptide motif. We elaborated previously identified fragment hits that target the FxxA motif site and developed small-molecule inhibitors that are approximately 500-fold more potent than the initial fragments. The lead compounds were shown to compete with the BRCA2-derived Ac-FHTA-NH2 peptide and the self-association peptide of RAD51, but they had no effect on ATP binding. This study is the first reported elaboration of small-molecular-weight fragments against this challenging target. PMID:25470112

  9. The significance of PIWI family expression in human lung embryogenesis and non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Alfons; Tejero, Rut; Viñolas, Nuria; Cordeiro, Anna; Marrades, Ramon M.; Fuster, Dolors; Caritg, Oriol; Moises, Jorge; Muñoz, Carmen; Molins, Laureano; Ramirez, Josep; Monzo, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The expression of Piwi-interacting RNAs, small RNAs that bind to PIWI proteins, was until recently believed to be limited to germinal stem cells. We have studied the expression of PIWI genes during human lung embryogenesis and in paired tumor and normal tissue prospectively collected from 71 resected non-small-cell lung cancer patients. The mRNA expression analysis showed that PIWIL1 was highly expressed in 7-week embryos and downregulated during the subsequent weeks of development. PIWIL1 was expressed in 11 of the tumor samples but in none of the normal tissue samples. These results were validated by immunohistochemistry, showing faint cytoplasmic reactivity in the PIWIL1-positive samples. Interestingly, the patients expressing PIWIL1 had a shorter time to relapse (TTR) (p = 0.006) and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.0076) than those without PIWIL1 expression. PIWIL2 and 4 were downregulated in tumor tissue in comparison to the normal tissue (p < 0.001) and the patients with lower levels of PIWIL4 had shorter TTR (p = 0.048) and OS (p = 0.033). In the multivariate analysis, PIWIL1 expression emerged as an independent prognostic marker. Using 5-Aza-dC treatment and bisulfite sequencing, we observed that PIWIL1 expression could be regulated in part by methylation. Finally, an in silico study identified a stem-cell expression signature associated with PIWIL1 expression. PMID:25742785

  10. A small molecule inhibitor of SRC family kinases promotes simple epithelial differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xiaojun; Selekman, Joshua; Bao, Xiaoping; Hsiao, Cheston; Zhu, Kexian; Palecek, Sean P

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide unprecedented opportunities to study the earliest stages of human development in vitro and have the potential to provide unlimited new sources of cells for regenerative medicine. Although previous studies have reported cytokeratin 14+/p63+ keratinocyte generation from hPSCs, the multipotent progenitors of epithelial lineages have not been described and the developmental pathways regulating epithelial commitment remain largely unknown. Here we report membrane localization of β-catenin during retinoic acid (RA)--induced epithelial differentiation. In addition hPSC treatment with the Src family kinase inhibitor SU6656 modulated β-catenin localization and produced an enriched population of simple epithelial cells under defined culture conditions. SU6656 strongly upregulated expression of cytokeratins 18 and 8 (K18/K8), which are expressed in simple epithelial cells, while repressing expression of the pluripotency gene Oct4. This homogeneous population of K18+K8+Oct4- simple epithelial precursor cells can further differentiate into cells expressing keratinocyte or corneal-specific markers. These enriched hPSC-derived simple epithelial cells may provide a ready source for development and toxicology cell models and may serve as a progenitor for epithelial cell transplantation applications. PMID:23527294

  11. The production of Multiple Small Peptaibol Families by Single 14-Module Peptide Synthetases in Trichoderma/Hypocrea

    SciTech Connect

    Degenkolb, Thomas; Aghchehb, Razieh Karimi; Dieckmann, Ralf; Neuhof, Torsten; Baker, Scott E.; Druzhinina, Irina S.; Kubicek, Christian P.; Brückner, Hans; von Dohren, Hans

    2012-03-01

    The most common peptaibibiotic structures are 11-residue peptaibols found widely distributed in the genus Trichoderma/Hypocrea. Frequently associated are 14-residue peptaibols sharing partial sequence identity. Genome sequencing projects of 3 Trichoderma strains of the major clades reveal the presence of up to 3 types of nonribosomal peptide synthetases with 7, 14, or 18-20 amino acid adding modules. We here provide evidence that the 14-module NRPS type found in T. virens, T. reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina) and T. atroviride produces both 11- and 14- residue peptaibols based on the disruption of the respective NRPS gene of T. reesei, and bioinformatic analysis of their amino acid activating domains and modules. The structures of these peptides may be predicted from the gene structures and have been confirmed by analysis of families of 11- and 14-residue peptaibols from the strain 618, termed hypojecorins A (23 sequences determined, 4 new) and B (3 new sequences), and the recently established trichovirins A from T. virens. The distribution of 11- and 14-residue products is strain-specific and depends on growth conditions as well. Possible mechanisms of module skipping are discussed.

  12. The PIM family of oncoproteins: Small kinases with huge implications in myeloid leukemogenesis and as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Parag P.; Mims, Alice S.; Lockwood, William W.; Kraft, Andrew S.; Beverly, Levi J.

    2014-01-01

    PIM kinases are a family of serine/threonine kinases involved in cell survival and proliferation. There is significant structural similarity between the three PIM kinases (PIM1, PIM2 and PIM3) and few amino acid differences. Although, several studies have specifically monitored the role of PIM1 in tumorigenesis, much less is known about PIM2 and PIM3. Therefore, in this study we have used in vitro cell culture models and in vivo bone marrow infection/transplantation to assess the comparative signaling and oncogenic potential of each of the three PIM kinases. All three PIM kinases were able to protect FL5.12 cells from IL-3 withdrawal induced death. Interestingly, the downstream signaling cascades were indistinguishable between the three kinases. Transplantation of murine bone marrow co-expressing MYC and PIM1, PIM2 or PIM3 caused rapid and uniformly lethal myeloid leukemia. De-induction of MYC 18 days following transplantation significantly increased the survival of mice, even with continual expression of PIM kinases. Alternatively, mice treated at the pre-leukemic stage with a PIM kinase inhibitor increased the lifespan of the mice, even with continual expression of the MYC transgene. These data demonstrate the role of PIM kinases in driving myeloid leukemia, and as candidate molecules for therapy against human malignancies. PMID:25238262

  13. The bldC Developmental Locus of Streptomyces coelicolor Encodes a Member of a Family of Small DNA-Binding Proteins Related to the DNA-Binding Domains of the MerR Family

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Alison C.; Servín-González, Luis; Kelemen, Gabriella H.; Buttner, Mark J.

    2005-01-01

    The bldC locus, required for formation of aerial hyphae in Streptomyces coelicolor, was localized by map-based cloning to the overlap between cosmids D17 and D25 of a minimal ordered library. Subcloning and sequencing showed that bldC encodes a member of a previously unrecognized family of small (58- to 78-residue) DNA-binding proteins, related to the DNA-binding domains of the MerR family of transcriptional activators. BldC family members are found in a wide range of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Constructed ΔbldC mutants were defective in differentiation and antibiotic production. They failed to form an aerial mycelium on minimal medium and showed severe delays in aerial mycelium formation on rich medium. In addition, they failed to produce the polyketide antibiotic actinorhodin, and bldC was shown to be required for normal and sustained transcription of the pathway-specific activator gene actII-orf4. Although ΔbldC mutants produced the tripyrrole antibiotic undecylprodigiosin, transcripts of the pathway-specific activator gene (redD) were reduced to almost undetectable levels after 48 h in the bldC mutant, in contrast to the bldC+ parent strain in which redD transcription continued during aerial mycelium formation and sporulation. This suggests that bldC may be required for maintenance of redD transcription during differentiation. bldC is expressed from a single promoter. S1 nuclease protection assays and immunoblotting showed that bldC is constitutively expressed and that transcription of bldC does not depend on any of the other known bld genes. The bldC18 mutation that originally defined the locus causes a Y49C substitution that results in instability of the protein. PMID:15629942

  14. A syndrome of insulin resistance resembling leprechaunism in five sibs of consanguineous parents.

    PubMed Central

    al-Gazali, L I; Khalil, M; Devadas, K

    1993-01-01

    Leprechaunism is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with extreme insulin resistance with paradoxical hypo-glycaemia. It is characterised by prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, reduced subcutaneous tissue, coarse features, acanthosis nigricans, enlarged genitalia, and death in the first year of life. Defects in both the insulin receptor and postreceptor steps of the insulin action pathway have been reported. At the molecular level, several mutations have been described. The patients reported here are from a Yemeni family with a syndrome of insulin resistance similar to leprechaunism in which the parents are second cousins and five of their eight children are affected. However, the phenotypes seem to be less severe than the classical leprechaunism previously described. All the children are alive (oldest 11 years), there is normal subcutaneous tissue, and a normal growth pattern in some of them. It may be that this is a milder type of leprechaunism with a better prognosis, perhaps caused by a different type of mutation from those previously described. Images PMID:8326490

  15. Identification of small-molecule agonists of human relaxin family receptor 1 (RXFP1) by using a homogenous cell-based cAMP assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Catherine Z; Southall, Noel; Xiao, Jingbo; Marugan, Juan J; Ferrer, Marc; Hu, Xin; Jones, Raisa E; Feng, Shu; Agoulnik, Irina U; Zheng, Wei; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2013-07-01

    The relaxin hormone is involved in a variety of biological functions, including female reproduction and parturition, as well as regulation of cardiovascular, renal, pulmonary, and hepatic functions. It regulates extracellular matrix remodeling, cell invasiveness, proliferation, differentiation, and overall tissue homeostasis. The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) relaxin family receptor 1 (RXFP1) is a cognate relaxin receptor that mainly signals through cyclic AMP second messenger. Although agonists of the receptor could have a wide range of pharmacologic utility, until now there have been no reported small-molecule agonists for relaxin receptors. Here, we report the development of a quantitative high-throughput platform for an RXFP1 agonist screen based on homogenous cell-based HTRF cyclic AMP (cAMP) assay technology. Two small molecules of similar structure were independently identified from a screen of more than 365 677 compounds. Neither compound showed activity in a counterscreen with HEK293T cells transfected with an unrelated GPCR vasopressin 1b receptor. These small-molecule agonists also demonstrated selectivity against the RXFP2 receptor, providing a basis for future medicinal chemistry optimization of selective relaxin receptor agonists. PMID:23212924

  16. Identification of small molecule agonists of human relaxin family receptor 1 (RXFP1) by utilizing a homogenous cell-based cAMP assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Catherine Z.; Southall, Noel; Xiao, Jingbo; Marugan, Juan J.; Ferrer, Marc; Hu, Xin; Jones, Raisa E.; Feng, Shu; Agoulnik, Irina U.

    2016-01-01

    The relaxin hormone is involved in a variety of biological functions including female reproduction and parturition, regulation of cardiovascular, renal, pulmonary, and hepatic functions. It regulates extracellular matrix remodeling, cell invasiveness, proliferation, differentiation, and overall tissue homeostasis. The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) RXFP1, relaxin family receptor 1, is a cognate relaxin receptor that mainly signals through cyclic AMP second messenger. While agonists of the receptor could have a wide range of pharmacological utility, up to date, there are no reported small molecule agonists for relaxin receptors. Here, we report the development of quantitative high-throughput platform for RXFP1 agonist screen based on homogenous cell-based HTRF cAMP assay technology. Two small molecules of similar structure were independently identified from a screen of more than 365,677 compounds. Neither compound showed activity in a counter screen with HEK293T cells transfected with an unrelated GPCR vasopressin 1b receptor. These small molecule agonists also demonstrated selectivity against the RXFP2 receptor, providing a basis for future medicinal chemistry optimization of selective relaxin receptor agonists. PMID:23212924

  17. Rem2, a member of the RGK family of small GTPases, is enriched in nuclei of the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Liput, Daniel J; Lu, Van B; Davis, Margaret I; Puhl, Henry L; Ikeda, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Rem2 is a member of the RGK subfamily of RAS small GTPases. Rem2 inhibits high voltage activated calcium channels, is involved in synaptogenesis, and regulates dendritic morphology. Rem2 is the primary RGK protein expressed in the nervous system, but to date, the precise expression patterns of this protein are unknown. In this study, we characterized Rem2 expression in the mouse nervous system. In the CNS, Rem2 mRNA was detected in all regions examined, but was enriched in the striatum. An antibody specific for Rem2 was validated using a Rem2 knockout mouse model and used to show abundant expression in striatonigral and striatopallidal medium spiny neurons but not in several interneuron populations. In the PNS, Rem2 was abundant in a subpopulation of neurons in the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia, but was absent in sympathetic neurons of superior cervical ganglia. Under basal conditions, Rem2 was subject to post-translational phosphorylation, likely at multiple residues. Further, Rem2 mRNA and protein expression peaked at postnatal week two, which corresponds to the period of robust neuronal maturation in rodents. This study will be useful for elucidating the functions of Rem2 in basal ganglia physiology. PMID:27118437

  18. Genome-wide survey and characterization of the small heat shock protein gene family in Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Li, Danlei; Chen, Qiaoli; Ma, Ling

    2016-04-01

    Temperatures directly influence the distribution and intensity of pine wilt disease, which is caused by the pine wood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are molecular chaperones that contribute to nematode survival during the stress response to high temperatures. Seven B. xylophilus sHSPs (Bx-sHSPs) were identified and studied in a whole-genome shotgun project. The replacement of aromatic amino acids with aliphatic amino acids in motifs was the most significant difference between Bx-sHSPs and Caenorhabditis elegans sHSPs (Ce-sHSPs). In Bx-sHSPs, two motifs showed consensus sequences similar to the known palindromic nGAAn sequence or variants of this sequence. A phylogenetic tree of Bx-sHSPs and corresponding Ce-sHSPs suggests the existence of a one-to-one orthologous relationship for all sHSPs. Gene evolution patterns corresponding to both purifying selection and positive selection were found in orthologous pairs of Ce-sHSPs and Bx-sHSPs. The upregulation of Bx-sHSPs in response to heat stress (30°C) suggests that these proteins play a role in thermoregulation. PMID:26723508

  19. Rem2, a member of the RGK family of small GTPases, is enriched in nuclei of the basal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Liput, Daniel J.; Lu, Van B.; Davis, Margaret I.; Puhl, Henry L.; Ikeda, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Rem2 is a member of the RGK subfamily of RAS small GTPases. Rem2 inhibits high voltage activated calcium channels, is involved in synaptogenesis, and regulates dendritic morphology. Rem2 is the primary RGK protein expressed in the nervous system, but to date, the precise expression patterns of this protein are unknown. In this study, we characterized Rem2 expression in the mouse nervous system. In the CNS, Rem2 mRNA was detected in all regions examined, but was enriched in the striatum. An antibody specific for Rem2 was validated using a Rem2 knockout mouse model and used to show abundant expression in striatonigral and striatopallidal medium spiny neurons but not in several interneuron populations. In the PNS, Rem2 was abundant in a subpopulation of neurons in the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia, but was absent in sympathetic neurons of superior cervical ganglia. Under basal conditions, Rem2 was subject to post-translational phosphorylation, likely at multiple residues. Further, Rem2 mRNA and protein expression peaked at postnatal week two, which corresponds to the period of robust neuronal maturation in rodents. This study will be useful for elucidating the functions of Rem2 in basal ganglia physiology. PMID:27118437

  20. An annotated catalogue of the gamasid mites associated with small mammals in Asiatic Russia. The family Laelapidae s. str. (Acari: Mesostigmata: Gamasina).

    PubMed

    Vinarski, Maxim V; Korallo-Vinarskaya, Natalia P

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-nine species of mites of the family Laelapidae s. str. have been recorded as associated with small mammals (rodents, insectivores) in Asiatic Russia (Siberia and the Russian Far East). These species belong to two subfamilies (Laelapinae, Myonyssinae) and six genera: Androlaelaps Berlese, 1903, Dipolaelaps Zemskaya & Piontkovskaya, 1960, Laelaps C.L. Koch, 1836, Hyperlaelaps Zakhvatkin, 1948, Myonyssus Tiraboschi, 1904, Oryctolaelaps Lange, 1955. A list of the species, with data on synonymy, geographic ranges, and relationships with mammal hosts is provided. Some considerations concerning patterns of distribution of the parasitic Laelaptidae of Asiatic Russia are presented as well as their classifications from the point of view of known host association records. PMID:27395087

  1. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Yolanda; Blair, Aaron; Vermeulen, Roel; Cerhan, James R.; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Monnereau, Alain; Nieters, Alexandra; Clavel, Jacqueline; Call, Timothy G.; Maynadié, Marc; Lan, Qing; Clarke, Christina A.; Lightfoot, Tracy; Norman, Aaron D.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Casabonne, Delphine; Cocco, Pierluigi; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) are two subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A number of studies have evaluated associations between risk factors and CLL/SLL risk. However, these associations remain inconsistent or lacked confirmation. This may be due, in part, to the inadequate sample size of CLL/SLL cases. Methods We performed a pooled analysis of 2440 CLL/SLL cases and 15186 controls from 13 case-control studies from Europe, North America, and Australia. We evaluated associations of medical history, family history, lifestyle, and occupational risk factors with CLL/SLL risk. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results We confirmed prior inverse associations with any atopic condition and recreational sun exposure. We also confirmed prior elevated associations with usual adult height, hepatitis C virus seropositivity, living or working on a farm, and family history of any hematological malignancy. Novel associations were identified with hairdresser occupation (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.98) and blood transfusion history (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.66 to 0.94). We also found smoking to have modest protective effect (OR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.99). All exposures showed evidence of independent effects. Conclusions We have identified or confirmed several independent risk factors for CLL/SLL supporting a role for genetics (through family history), immune function (through allergy and sun), infection (through hepatitis C virus), and height, and other pathways of immune response. Given that CLL/SLL has more than 30 susceptibility loci identified to date, studies evaluating the interaction among genetic and nongenetic factors are warranted. PMID:25174025

  2. Dandy–Walker Malformation, Genitourinary Abnormalities, and Intellectual Disability in Two Families

    PubMed Central

    Gregor, Anne; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    We report on two families, each with documented consanguinity and two affected with overlapping features of Dandy-Walker malformation, genitourinary abnormalities, intellectual disability, and hearing deficit. This phenotype shares similar findings with many well-known syndromes. However, the clinical findings of this syndrome categorize this as a new syndrome as compared with the phenotype of already established syndromes. Due to parental consanguinity, occurrence in siblings of both genders and the absence of manifestations in obligate carrier parents, an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance is more likely. The authors believe that these families suggest a novel autosomal recessive cerebello–genital syndrome. Array CGH analyses of an affected did not show pathological deletions or duplications. PMID:26109232

  3. Consanguinity and the sib-pair method: An approach using identity by descent between and within individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Genin, E.; Clerget-Darpoux, F.

    1996-11-01

    To test for linkage between a trait and a marker, one can consider identical marker alleles in related individuals, for instance, sibs. For recessive diseases, it has been shown that some information may be gained from the identity by descent (IBD) of the two alleles of an affected inbred individual at the marker locus. The aim of this paper is to extend the sib-pair method of linkage analysis to the situation of sib pairs sampled from consanguineous populations. This extension takes maximum advantage of the information provided by both the IBD pattern between sibs and allelic identity within each sib of the pair. This is possible through the use of the condensed identity coefficients. Here, we propose a new test of linkage based on a {Chi}{sup 2}. We compare the performance of this test with that of the classical {Chi}{sup 2} test based on the distribution of sib pairs sharing 0, 1, or 2 alleles IBD. For sib pairs from first-cousin matings, the proposed test can better detect the role of a disease-susceptibility (DS) locus. Its power is shown to be greater than that of the classical test, especially for models where the DS allele may be common and incompletely penetrant; that is to say for situations that may be encountered in multifactorial diseases. A study of the impact of inbreeding on the expected proportions of sib pairs sharing 0, 1, or 2 alleles IBD is also performed here. Ignoring inbreeding, when in fact inbreeding exists, increases the rate of type I errors in tests of linkage. 21 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. Rapidly expanding genetic diversity and host range of the Circoviridae viral family and other Rep encoding small circular ssDNA genomes.

    PubMed

    Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin

    2012-03-01

    The genomes of numerous circoviruses and distantly related circular ssDNA viruses encoding a rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep) have been characterized from the tissues of mammals, fish, insects, plants (geminivirus and nanovirus), in human and animal feces, in an algae cell, and in diverse environmental samples. We review the genome organization, phylogenetic relationships and initial prevalence studies of cycloviruses, a proposed new genus in the Circoviridae family. Viral fossil rep sequences were also recently identified integrated on the chromosomes of mammals, frogs, lancelets, crustaceans, mites, gastropods, roundworms, placozoans, hydrozoans, protozoans, land plants, fungi, algae, and phytoplasma bacterias and their plasmids, reflecting the very wide past host range of rep bearing viruses. An ancient origin for viruses with Rep-encoding small circular ssDNA genomes, predating the diversification of eukaryotes, is discussed. The cellular hosts and pathogenicity of many recently described rep-containing circular ssDNA genomes remain to be determined. Future studies of the virome of single cell and multi-cellular eukaryotes are likely to further extend the known diversity and host-range of small rep-containing circular ssDNA viral genomes. PMID:22155583

  5. Rapidly expanding genetic diversity and host range of the Circoviridae viral family and other Rep encoding small circular ssDNA genomes

    PubMed Central

    Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin

    2011-01-01

    The genomes of numerous circoviruses and distantly related circular DNA viruses encoding a rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep) have been characterized from the tissues of mammals, fish, insects, and plants (geminivirus and nanovirus), human and animal feces, in an algae cell, and in diverse environmental samples. We review the genome organization, phylogenetic relationships and initial prevalence studies of cycloviruses, a proposed new genus in the Circoviridae family. Viral fossil rep sequences were also identified integrated on the chromosomes of mammals, frogs, lancelets, crustaceans, mites, gastropods, roundworms, placozoans, hydrozoans, protozoans, land plants, fungi, algae, and phytoplasma bacterias and their plasmids, reflecting their past host range. An ancient origin for viruses with rep-encoding single stranded small circular genomes, predating the diversification of eukaryotes, is discussed. The cellular hosts and pathogenicity of many recently described rep-containing circular genomes remain to be determined. Future studies of the virome of single cell and multi-cellular eukaryotes are likely to further extend the known diversity and host-range of small rep-containing circular viral genomes. PMID:22155583

  6. Discovery of four recessive developmental disorders using probabilistic genotype and phenotype matching among 4,125 families.

    PubMed

    Akawi, Nadia; McRae, Jeremy; Ansari, Morad; Balasubramanian, Meena; Blyth, Moira; Brady, Angela F; Clayton, Stephen; Cole, Trevor; Deshpande, Charu; Fitzgerald, Tomas W; Foulds, Nicola; Francis, Richard; Gabriel, George; Gerety, Sebastian S; Goodship, Judith; Hobson, Emma; Jones, Wendy D; Joss, Shelagh; King, Daniel; Klena, Nikolai; Kumar, Ajith; Lees, Melissa; Lelliott, Chris; Lord, Jenny; McMullan, Dominic; O'Regan, Mary; Osio, Deborah; Piombo, Virginia; Prigmore, Elena; Rajan, Diana; Rosser, Elisabeth; Sifrim, Alejandro; Smith, Audrey; Swaminathan, Ganesh J; Turnpenny, Peter; Whitworth, James; Wright, Caroline F; Firth, Helen V; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Lo, Cecilia W; FitzPatrick, David R; Hurles, Matthew E

    2015-11-01

    Discovery of most autosomal recessive disease-associated genes has involved analysis of large, often consanguineous multiplex families or small cohorts of unrelated individuals with a well-defined clinical condition. Discovery of new dominant causes of rare, genetically heterogeneous developmental disorders has been revolutionized by exome analysis of large cohorts of phenotypically diverse parent-offspring trios. Here we analyzed 4,125 families with diverse, rare and genetically heterogeneous developmental disorders and identified four new autosomal recessive disorders. These four disorders were identified by integrating Mendelian filtering (selecting probands with rare, biallelic and putatively damaging variants in the same gene) with statistical assessments of (i) the likelihood of sampling the observed genotypes from the general population and (ii) the phenotypic similarity of patients with recessive variants in the same candidate gene. This new paradigm promises to catalyze the discovery of novel recessive disorders, especially those with less consistent or nonspecific clinical presentations and those caused predominantly by compound heterozygous genotypes. PMID:26437029

  7. Suppression of Wnt signaling by the miR-29 family is mediated by demethylation of WIF-1 in non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Min; Wu, Junjie; Cai, Yong

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Dnmt3A and Dnmt3B are involved in the down-regulation of WIF-1 expression in non-small-cell lung cancer. •MiR-29 family members could restore WIF-1 expression through demethylation. •MiR-29s suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and inhibit tumor growth. •The expression of miR-29a and miR-29b could be regulated partially in a positive feedback loop. -- Abstract: Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1) silencing induced by promoter hypermethylation is a common mechanism of aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the activity of regulators associated with the methylation of the WIF-1 gene remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of three DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B) in the expression of WIF-1. The three DNMTs were up-regulated in NSCLC tumor tissues and suppression of DNMT3A and DNMT3B restored the expression of WIF-1 in NSCLC cells. The miR-29 family (miR-29a, -29b, and -29c), which negatively regulates DNMT3A and DNMT3B, was examined in association with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. A positive correlation between the expression of WIF-1 and that of MiR-29s was observed in NSCLC tissues. Methylation-specific PCR and Western blotting indicated that miR-29s positively regulate WIF-1 expression by inhibiting the methylation of its promoter. Furthermore, miR-29 overexpression downregulated β-catenin expression, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. The expression of miR-29a and miR-29b was partially regulated by DNMT3A and DNMT3B in a positive feedback loop. Taken together, our findings show that miR-29s suppress the Wnt signaling pathway through demethylation of WIF-1 in NSCLC.

  8. Family with sequence similarity member 20C is the primary but not the only kinase for the small-integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins in bone.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiudong; Yan, Wenjuan; Tian, Ye; Ma, Pan; Opperman, Lynne A; Wang, Xiaofang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have identified family with sequence similarity member 20C (FAM20C) as a kinase that phosphorylates the Ser in Ser-X-Glu/phospho-Ser (pSer) motifs in the small-integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs). There is no in vivo evidence that validates this finding, and it is unclear whether FAM20C is the only kinase for SIBLINGs. We extracted bone noncollagenous proteins (NCPs) from Fam20C-knockout (KO) mice and analyzed the phosphorylation levels. The total NCPs were separated into osteopontin-, bone sialoprotein-, and dentin matrix protein-1-enriched fractions by anion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by SDS-PAGE, native PAGE, and Western immunoblot analysis. The NCP phosphorylation level in the KO mice was lower than that in the wild-type (WT). On the native gel, the SIBLINGs from KO mice showed a lower migration rate (Mr) than those from the WT. Calf intestine phosphatase treatment shifted SIBLINGs from the WT mice to the level adjacent to the KO, but failed to shift the latter, suggesting a phosphorylation loss of SIBLINGs in the KO mice. Mass spectrometry identified less pSers in the SIBLINGs from the KO mice [including the region of the acidic Ser- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM) peptides]. In an intriguing finding, several pSers in the Ser-X-Glu motifs in the KO mice maintained their phosphorylation, whereas several others in non-Ser-X-Glu motifs did not. Phospho-Tyrs and phospho-Thrs in the SIBLINGs did not appear to be associated with FAM20C. Our results indicate that FAM20C is the primary, but not the only, kinase for the SIBLINGs.-Yang, X., Yan, W., Tian, Y., Ma, P., Opperman, L. A., Wang, X. Family with sequence similarity member 20C is the primary but not the only kinase for the small-integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins in bone. PMID:26324849

  9. A 5-year survey of biopsy proven kidney diseases in Lebanon: significant variation in prevalence of primary glomerular diseases by age, population structure and consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Karnib, Hussein H.; Gharavi, Ali G.; Aftimos, Georges; Mahfoud, Ziyad; Saad, Reem; Gemayel, Elias; Masri, Badiaa; Assaad, Shafika; Badr, Kamal F.; Ziyadeh, Fuad N.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Differences in epidemiology of kidney disease across the Middle East may arise from variations in indication for biopsy, environmental exposure and socio-economic status. The Lebanese population is composed of different ethnicities, with distinct ancestry and religion, enabling comparison of their effect on the prevalence of kidney disease within a confined geographic setting and uniform practices. Here we report 5 years’ detailed epidemiology of renal diseases, based on histological diagnosis, in a sample from three large pathology centres in Lebanon. Methods. Records of renal biopsies analysed at the American University of Beirut Medical Center, Hotel Dieu de France Hospital and the Institut National de Pathologie from January 2003 till December 2007 were retrospectively examined. We recorded the following data for each patient: age, gender, indication for renal biopsy and histopathological diagnosis. Religious affiliation and parents’ consanguinity were recorded when feasible. Results. The mean age at renal biopsy was 36.76 ± 20 years (range 1–84). The most common diagnosis was mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis (GN; 20%), followed by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (13.2%). While there were no differences in age, gender or indications for biopsy among different religious affiliations, mesangioproliferative GN was significantly more frequent among Muslims (P = 0.039) and offspring of consanguineous unions (P = 0.036). On the other hand, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was most prevalent in Christians (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Variation in the distribution of diagnoses between Muslim and Christian groups likely reflects differences in population structure and ancestry. In particular, the increased prevalence of mesangioproliferative GN among offspring of consanguineous unions in Muslims suggests a recessive genetic component to this disease which may be identified via homozygosity mapping. These findings have important

  10. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  11. Deletion of the gene family of small chlorophyll-binding proteins (ScpABCDE) offsets C/N homeostasis in Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Tibiletti, Tania; Hernández-Prieto, Miguel A; Matthijs, Hans C P; Niyogi, Krishna K; Funk, Christiane

    2016-04-01

    In the family of chlorophyll binding proteins, single helix small CAB-like proteins (SCPs) are found in all organisms performing oxygenic photosynthesis. Here, we investigated the function of these stress-inducible proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We compared physiological, proteome and transcriptome traits of a Photosystem I (PSI) deletion strain, which constitutively induces SCPs, and a PSI-less/ScpABCDE(-) without SCPs. The SCP mutant cells were larger in size, showed irregular thylakoid structure and differed in cell-surface morphology. Deletion of scp genes strongly affected the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) balance, resulting in accumulation of carbohydrates and a decrease in N-rich compounds (proteins and chlorophyll). Data from transcriptomic and metabolomic experiments revealed a role of SCPs in the control of chlorophyll biosynthesis. Additionally, SCPs diminished formation of reactive oxygen species, thereby preventing damage within Photosystem II. We conclude that the lack of SCP-function to remove free chlorophyll under stress conditions has a large impact on the metabolism of the entire cell. PMID:26646103

  12. The pan-HER family tyrosine kinase inhibitor afatinib overcomes HER3 ligand heregulin-mediated resistance to EGFR inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yonesaka, Kimio; Kudo, Keita; Nishida, Satomi; Takahama, Takayuki; Iwasa, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kaoru; Takeda, Masayuki; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Okamoto, Isamu; Nishio, Kazuto; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Afatinib is a second generation epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) characterized as an irreversible pan-human EGFR (HER) family inhibitor. Afatinib remains effective for a subpopulation of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with acquired resistance to first generation EGFF-TKIs such as erlotinib. Heregulin activates HER3 in an autocrine fashion and causes erlotinib resistance in NSCLC. Here we examine whether afatinib is effective against heregulin-overexpressing NSCLCs harboring EGFR activating mutations. Afatinib but not erlotinib decreased EGFR mutant NSCLC PC9HRG cell proliferation in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Afatinib inhibited phosphorylation of the cell signaling pathway proteins HER3, EGFR, HER2, and HER4, likely by prevention of trans-phosphorylation as HER3 kinase activity is inadequate for auto-phosphorylation. Afatinib, unlike erlotinib, inhibited AKT activation, resulting in elevated apoptosis in PC9HRG cells. Clinically, a subpopulation of 33 patients with EGFR mutations and NSCLC who had received first generation EGFR-TKIs exhibited elevated plasma heregulin levels compared to healthy volunteers; one of these achieved a response with afatinib therapy despite having previously developed erlotinib resistance. Afatinib can overcome heregulin-mediated resistance to erlotinib in EGFR mutant NSCLC. Further studies are necessary to determine whether heregulin can predict afatinib efficacy after development offirst generation EGFR-TKI resistance. PMID:26418897

  13. The p53 family member p73 modulates the proproliferative role of IGFBP3 in short children born small for gestational age

    PubMed Central

    Marzano, Flaviana; Ventura, Annamaria; Francesco Caratozzolo, Mariano; Aiello, Italia; Mastropasqua, Francesca; Brunetti, Giacomina; Cavallo, Luciano; Sbisà, Elisabetta; Faienza, Maria Felicia; Tullo, Apollonia

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of insulin-like growth factor–binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) gene expression is complex, because it can be induced by agents that both stimulate and inhibit the proliferation. The principal aim of this study was to investigate whether p73, a member of the p53 gene family, has a role in the regulation of the IGFBP3 expression and whether this regulation occurs in a context of cell survival or death. We demonstrate that IGFBP3 is a direct TAp73α (the p73 isoform that contains the trans-activation domain) target gene and activates the expression of IGFBP3 in actively proliferating cells. As IGFBP3 plays a key role in regulating the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor type 1 (GH/IGF1) axis, whose alterations in gene expression appear to have a role in the growth failure of children born small for gestational age (SGA), we measured the mRNA expression levels of p73 and IGFBP3 in a group of SGA children. We found that mRNA expression levels of p73 and IGFBP3 are significantly lower in SGA children compared with controls and, in particular, p73 mRNA expression is significantly lower in SGA children with respect to height. Our results shed light on the intricate GH/IGF pathway, suggesting p73 as a good biomarker of the clinical risk for SGA children to remain short in adulthood. PMID:26063735

  14. Knockdown of Tubulin Polymerization Promoting Protein Family Member 3 Suppresses Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yintao; Xu, Yali; Ye, Kuanping; Wu, Nan; Li, Junfeng; Liu, Naijia; He, Min; Lu, Bin; Zhou, Wenbai; Hu, Renming

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that depletion of tubulin polymerization promoting protein family member 3 (TPPP3) inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of HeLa cells. However, the expression and roles of TPPP3 in cancers remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of TPPP3 in clinicopathological correlations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples by immunohistochemistry. TPPP3 expression was significantly upregulated in NSCLC tissues, and high TPPP3 expression was positively associated with tumor size, lymph node metastasis, clinical stage, and poor survival. Furthermore, knockdown of TPPP3 by shRNA significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in vitro. In addition, depletion of TPPP3 inhibited lung cancer growth in vivo in the xenografts of H1299 cells; this effect was accompanied by the suppression of Ki67 expression. Our data suggested that TPPP3 might act as an oncogene in NSCLC. TPPP3 warrants consideration as a therapeutic candidate with anti-tumor potential. PMID:27390593

  15. New Perspectives on the Rural Economy. Hearing on New Perspectives on the Rural Economy before the Subcommittee on Rural Economy and Family Farming of the Committee on Small Business. United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Small Business.

    Testimony and prepared statements presented at a hearing before the Senate Subcommittee on Rural Economy and Family Farming focused on the concerns of rural small business. Witnesses included Senators from Montana, Illinois, New York, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa, and nine representatives of business, state government,…

  16. Family Preservation & Family Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCroskey, Jacquelyn; Meezan, William

    This book reports a study of the outcomes of home-based family preservation services for abusive and neglectful families in Los Angeles County. Using the Family Assessment Form, the research project evaluated services provided by two voluntary agencies, and focused on changes in family functioning between the opening and closing of services during…

  17. Small interfering RNA targeting of Recepteur d'Origine Nantais induces apoptosis via modulation of nuclear factor-kappaB and Bcl-2 family in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Sun; Park, Ji Hye; Lee, Soong; Joo, Young Eun; Jung, Young Do

    2010-09-01

    The abnormal accumulation and activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase, Recepteur d'Origine Nantais (RON), has been implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis in epithelial tumors including gastric cancer. This study examined whether the sequence-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) suppression of the RON expression could induce apoptotic cell death, and investigated the involved molecular mechanisms. Sequence-specific siRNA effectively suppressed the RON expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Silencing of the RON expression significantly inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in a time-dependent manner. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed by the ladder-patterned DNA fragmentation, the presence of cleaved and condensed nuclear chromatin and the increased number of annexin V-positive cells. RON-targeted siRNA effectively inhibited the constitutive nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation as revealed by an altered electrophoretic mobility shift. In agreement with this, silencing of the RON expression resulted in a decrease in the nuclear level of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. The transfection of siRNA, which blocked the RON expression, also caused a change in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 in a manner that favored apoptosis. The siRNA silencing of RON induced cytochrome c release and the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-9. These results indicate that RON-targeted siRNA could be therapeutically efficacious by inducing cell apoptosis through the modulation of the NF-kappaB and Bcl-2 family in gastric cancer cells. PMID:20664977

  18. Suppression of Wnt signaling by the miR-29 family is mediated by demethylation of WIF-1 in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Min; Wu, Junjie; Cai, Yong

    2013-09-01

    Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1) silencing induced by promoter hypermethylation is a common mechanism of aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the activity of regulators associated with the methylation of the WIF-1 gene remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of three DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B) in the expression of WIF-1. The three DNMTs were up-regulated in NSCLC tumor tissues and suppression of DNMT3A and DNMT3B restored the expression of WIF-1 in NSCLC cells. The miR-29 family (miR-29a, -29b, and -29c), which negatively regulates DNMT3A and DNMT3B, was examined in association with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. A positive correlation between the expression of WIF-1 and that of MiR-29s was observed in NSCLC tissues. Methylation-specific PCR and Western blotting indicated that miR-29s positively regulate WIF-1 expression by inhibiting the methylation of its promoter. Furthermore, miR-29 overexpression downregulated β-catenin expression, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. The expression of miR-29a and miR-29b was partially regulated by DNMT3A and DNMT3B in a positive feedback loop. Taken together, our findings show that miR-29s suppress the Wnt signaling pathway through demethylation of WIF-1 in NSCLC. PMID:23939044

  19. [A 73-year-old woman with familial Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Takanashi, M; Urabe, T; Ohta, S; Hamano, Y; Mori, H; Shirai, T; Kondo, T; Mizuno, Y

    1999-12-01

    We report a 73-year-old Japanese woman with familial Parkinson's disease. The patient was well until her 67 years of the age, when she noted rest tremor in her right hand. Soon after her gait became short stepped. She visited our clinic on October 6, 1992 when she was 68 years old. She was alert and well oriented without dementia. She showed masked face, small voice, small stepped gait, retropulsion, resting tremor in her right hand, rigidity in the neck, and bradykinesia. She was treated with 400 mg/day of levodopa-carbidopa, which improved her symptoms, however, she developed wearing off phenomenon 3 years after the initiation of levodopa treatment. On August 26, 1998, she developed abdominal pain, diarrhea, and vomiting. She was admitted to another hospital, where abdominal plain x-ray revealed an evidence of intestinal obstruction (ileus). She was treated with nasogastric suction and intravenous fluid. Her condition did not improve and she was transferred to our hospital on August 29, 1998. Her family history revealed no consanguineous marriage. She had two elder brothers and three elder sisters. One of her brothers had been diagnosed as Parkinson's disease. Her husband also suffered from Parkinson's disease, however, her parents apparently did not have Parkinson's disease. On admission, she appeared to be drowsy. Her blood pressure was 102/70 mmHg, body temperature 36.2 degrees C. The lungs were clear and no cardiac murmur was present. Abdomen was flat and bowel sound was audible. No abnormal mass was palpable. Neurologic examination revealed mild consciousness disturbance, masked face, and small voice. No motor paralysis was noted. Muscle tone was hypotonic. No abnormal involuntary movement was noted. Abnormal laboratory findings on admission were as follows; WBC 11,300/microliter, amylase 1,373 IU/l, CK 446 IU/l, BUN 50 mg/dl, creatinine 1.17 mg/dl, CRP 22.7 mg/ dl, Na 134 mEq/l, K 3.1 mEq/l, and Cl 81 mEq/l. A chest x-ray film revealed pneumonic shadows in

  20. Microcephaly, dysmorphic features, corneal dystrophy, hairy nipples, underdeveloped labioscrotal folds, and small cerebellum in four patients.

    PubMed

    Kayserili, Hülya; Altunoglu, Umut; Yesil, Gozde; Rosti, Rasim Özgür

    2016-06-01

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) can occur as an isolated entity or part of a syndrome. PCH has been reported with facial dysmorphism, ocular anomalies, and genital anomalies, but the co-occurrence of all four has not been previously described. We report on four patients, born to two consanguineous families that are not related to one another, with distinctive facial features (short forehead, laterally extended, medially flared eyebrows), corneal dystrophy, underdevelopment of labioscrotal folds, and nonprogressive PCH. In addition, the patients show hair extruding from the lactiferous ducts, which to our knowledge has not been described before. The parental consanguinity, affected siblings of both genders, and absent manifestations in parents, indicate an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance as most likely. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27075597

  1. Family welfare.

    PubMed

    Sinha, N K

    1992-01-01

    Between 1901-1921, India gained 12.9 million people because mortality remained high. The death rate fell between 1921-1951, but birth rates remained the same. Therefore 110 million people were added--2 times the population increase between 1891-1921. Between 1951-1981, the population increased to 324 million. Socioeconomic development was responsible for most of the downward trend in the birth rate during the 20th century. Even though large families were the norm in early India, religious leaders encouraged small family size. The 1st government family planning clinics in the world opened in Mysore and Bangalore in 1930. Right before Independence, the Bhore Committee made recommendations to reduce population growth such as increasing the age of marriage for girls. Since 1951 there has been a change in measures and policies geared towards population growth with each of the 7 5-Year Plans because policy makers applied what they learned from each previous plan. The 1st 5-Year Plan emphasized the need to understand what factors contribute to population growth. It also integrated family planning services into health services of hospitals and health centers. The government was over zealous in its implementation of the sterilization program (2nd 5-Year Plan, 1956-1961), however, which hurt family planning programs for many years. As of early 1992, sterilization, especially tubectomy, remained the most popular family planning method, however. The 7th 5-Year Plan changed its target of reaching a Net Reproductive Rate of 1 by 2001 to 2006-2011. It set a goal of 100% immunization coverage by 1990 but it did not occur. In 1986, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare planned to make free contraceptives available in urban and rural areas and to involve voluntary organizations. The government needs to instill measures to increase women's status, women's literacy, and age of marriage as well as to eliminate poverty, ensure old age security, and ensure child survival and

  2. From new genetics to everyday knowledge: Ideas about how genetic diseases are transmitted in two large Brazilian families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Silvana; Bizzo, Nelio

    2005-07-01

    This study focuses on everyday or lay understandings of inheritance. In the northeastern Brazil, 100 individuals were interviewed in order to describe how they explain the origin of genetic disorders affecting their relatives for several generations. There were involved 60 individuals from a large consanguineous family with many members affected with a neurodegenerative disorder, SPOAN syndrome (spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy and neuropathy), and 40 individuals of another family living with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The results indicate that families here studied have built narratives to explain the origin of genetic diseases, saying that an ancestor infected with syphilis gave rise to disorders and birthmarks transmitted to descendents.

  3. Identification and Clinical Implications of Novel MYO15A Mutations in a Non-consanguineous Korean Family by Targeted Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mun Young; Kim, Ah Reum; Kim, Nayoung K.D.; Lee, Chung; Lee, Kyoung Yeul; Jeon, Woo-Sung; Koo, Ja-Won; Oh, Seung Ha; Park, Woong-Yang; Kim, Dongsup; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of MYO15A are generally known to cause severe to profound hearing loss throughout all frequencies. Here, we found two novel MYO15A mutations, c.3871C>T (p.L1291F) and c.5835T>G (p.Y1945X) in an affected individual carrying congenital profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) through targeted resequencing of 134 known deafness genes. The variant, p.L1291F and p.Y1945X, resided in the myosin motor and IQ2 domains, respectively. The p.L1291F variant was predicted to affect the structure of the actin-binding site from three-dimensional protein modeling, thereby interfering with the correct interaction between actin and myosin. From the literature analysis, mutations in the N-terminal domain were more frequently associated with residual hearing at low frequencies than mutations in the other regions of this gene. Therefore we suggest a hypothetical genotype-phenotype correlation whereby MYO15A mutations that affect domains other than the N-terminal domain, lead to profound SNHL throughout all frequencies and mutations that affect the N-terminal domain, result in residual hearing at low frequencies. This genotype-phenotype correlation suggests that preservation of residual hearing during auditory rehabilitation like cochlear implantation should be intended for those who carry mutations in the N-terminal domain and that individuals with mutations elsewhere in MYO15A require early cochlear implantation to timely initiate speech development. PMID:26242193

  4. An unusual case of familial hyperlipidaemia.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Renu; Arora, Uma

    2008-07-01

    A 40 days old male baby born to a consanguineous couple was found to have highly viscous and milky serum with caking of chylomicrons on refrigeration of serum. Cholesterol was 889.5 mg/dl (23.04mmol/L) and Triglycerides 12881 mg/dl (141.69mmol/L). He was active and did not have any hepatospleenomegaly, xanthomas or dysmorphic features. Thyroid functions were normal. Lipid electrophoresis showed thick chylomicron band. There was positive family history of hypertriglyceridemia in a first cousin. Both siblings and both parents of the index case had normal lipid profiles. This child was referred to higher centre where he was put on Lipid lowering drugs (Gemfibrozil), Iron drops and special formula for feeding containing medium chain fatty acids. PMID:23105777

  5. Description of Eurystomatella sinica n. gen., n. sp., with establishment of a new family Eurystomatellidae n. fam. (Protista, Ciliophora, Scuticociliatia) and analyses of its phylogeny inferred from sequences of the small-subunit rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Miao, Miao; Wang, Yangang; Song, Weibo; Clamp, John C; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S

    2010-02-01

    Recently, an undescribed marine ciliate was isolated from China. Investigation of its morphology and infraciliature revealed it as an undescribed species representing a new genus, Eurystomatella n. gen., the type of the new family Eurystomatellidae n. fam. The new family is defined by close-set, apically positioned oral membranelles and a dominant buccal field that is surrounded by an almost completely circular paroral membrane. The new genus is defined by having a small oral membranelle 1 (M1), bipartite M2 and well-developed M3, a body surface faintly sculptured with a silverline system in a quadrangular, reticulate pattern and a cytostome located at the anterior third of a large buccal field. The type species of the new genus, Eurystomatella sinica n. sp., is a morphologically unique form that is defined mainly by the combination of a conspicuously flattened body, several caudal cilia, extremely long cilia associated with the buccal apparatus and a contractile vacuole located subcaudally. According to phylogenetic analyses of small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences, Eurystomatella clusters with the genus Cyclidium, as a sister group to the family Pleuronematidae. The great divergence in both buccal and somatic ciliature between Eurystomatella and all other known scuticociliates supports the establishment of a new family for Eurystomatella. PMID:19651734

  6. Role of family susceptibility, occupational and family histories and individuals' blood groups in the development of silicosis.

    PubMed

    Noweir, M H; Moselhi, M; Amine, E K

    1980-11-01

    A previous investigation has shown that family susceptibility and occupational and family histories have a decisive role in the development of byssinosis among workers exposed to flax dust. Results of investigation of silicosis in 814 male workers exposed to silica-bearing dust showed that family susceptibility has an important role in the development of silicosis among examined workers, and workers whose fathers had an occupational history of exposure to silica-bearing dust were more resistant to the development of the disease than those with non-exposed fathers. The degree of consanguinity of parents and individuals' blood groups, also, have a role. Workers with cousin parents were relatively highly susceptible to the development of silicosis as well as workers with blood groups "O" or "AB". It has been concluded that the investigated factors might have a role in the development of other occupational diseases and further investigations are indicated. PMID:6255981

  7. Changes in American Family Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Arthur J.; Glick, Paul C.

    1976-01-01

    This article attempts to provide a factual, historical perspective on the current family situation of American children. Demographic statistics from recent decades are given which show trends toward small family size, nuclear families, one-parent families, and a higher level of education among parents. (MS)

  8. FAMILY BOMBYLIIDAE.

    PubMed

    Lamas, Carlos José Einicker; Evenhuis, Neal L

    2016-01-01

    Bombyliidae is one of the largest Diptera families with more than 4,500 recognized species worldwide. Their species vary from robust to thin, and may be small to large (2-20mm) and looks like bees or wasps. They also present great variation in color. Adults can often be seen either resting and sunning themselves on trails, rocks or twigs or feeding on flowering plants as they are nectar feeders. All reared bee flies are predators or parasitoids of arthropods. The Colombian fauna of bombyliids comprises at the moment 22 species, and 12 genera, of which, six are endemic species. Nonetheless, this number may be much higher, as Colombia is a megadiverse country and there are not many specimens of this family deposited in collections all over the world. PMID:27395279

  9. FAMILY MYCETOPHILIDAE.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira; Amorim, Dalton De Souza

    2016-01-01

    The Mycetophilidae include small fungus-gnats which life cycle is associated with fungi, especially of the larvae. The known diversity of the family in the Neotropical region is 1,145 species, but only some very few papers have been published on the Colombian species of Mycetophilidae, with records for the genera Docosia Winnertz, Paraleia Tonnoir, and Dziedzickia Johannsen. This catalogue gathers the information available on mycetophilids from Colombia, including genera and some species that for the first time are mentioned to occur in the country-as Leiella unicincta Edwards and Leiella zonalis Edwards. PMID:27395261

  10. FAMILY ANISOPODIDAE.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Dalton De Souza; Falaschi, Rafaela Lopes; Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira

    2016-01-01

    This considerably small family is poorly known in Colombia, with only two species reported for the genus Sylvicola Harris (1776) so far. We synonymize Neomesochria Amorim & Tozoni (1994) to Mycetobia Meigen (1818), hence transferring the Dominican amber species Neomesochria antillea (Grimaldi 1991) and N. cryptambra (Grimaldi 1991), and the recent Neotropical species N. limanda (Stone 1966) and N. stonei (Lane & d'Andretta 1958) back to the genus Mycetobia. This paper provides new records for Mycetobia and Olbiogaster Osten-Sacken (1886) for Colombia. PMID:27395252

  11. The Australian Middle Class and Education: A Small-Scale Study of the School Choice Experience as Framed by "My School" within Inner City Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Emma E.; Windle, Joel

    2012-01-01

    With the launch of the "My School" website in 2010, Australia became a relative latecomer to the publication of national school performance comparisons. This paper primarily seeks to explore the school choice experience as framed by "My School" website, for participating middle-class families. We will draw on Bourdieusian theory of cultural…

  12. A Case of Nasu-Hakola Disease without Fractures or Consanguinity Diagnosed Using Exome Sequencing and Treated with Sodium Valproate

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Kiyohiro; Yoshino, Yuta; Mori, Yoko; Ochi, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Taku; Ishimaru, Takashi; Ueno, Shu-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Nasu-Hakola disease (NHD) is a rare autosomal recessive neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by bone cysts, fractures, and cognitive impairment. Two genes are responsible for the development of NHD; TYROBP and TREM2. Although it presents with typical signs and symptoms, diagnosing this disease remains difficult. This case report describes a male with NHD with no family or past history of bone fractures who was diagnosed using exome sequencing. His frontal lobe psychiatric symptoms recovered partially following treatment with sodium valproate, but not with an antipsychotic. PMID:26598595

  13. Heterogeneity of the cystic fibrosis phenotype in a large kindred family in Qatar with cystic fibrosis mutation (I1234V).

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, A; Al Thani, G; Dawod, S T; Kambouris, M; Al Hamed, M

    2001-04-01

    Twenty-nine subjects (17 families) with cystic fibrosis belonging to the same Bedouin tribe were screened for cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene mutations (CFTR). Homozygous I1234V mutation in exon 19 was identified in all families with a relatively high rate of consanguinity (96.6 per cent). The homozygous I1234V mutation tended to present with a variable degree of pulmonary disease, pancreatic insufficiency and electrolyte imbalance. Homozygous I1234V was found to be a common mutation in the studied Bedouin tribe in Qatar. PMID:11336127

  14. Challenges and solutions for gene identification in the presence of familial locus heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Atteeq U; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Drummond, Meghan C; Shahzad, Mohsin; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Morell, Robert J; Ansar, Muhammad; Jan, Abid; Wang, Xin; Aziz, Abdul; Riazuddin, Saima; Smith, Joshua D; Wang, Gao T; Ahmed, Zubair M; Gul, Khitab; Shearer, A Eliot; Smith, Richard J H; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Hinnant, John; Khan, Shaheen N; Fisher, Rachel A; Ahmad, Wasim; Friderici, Karen H; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B; Wilch, Ellen S; Leal, Suzanne M

    2015-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of exomes and genomes has accelerated the identification of genes involved in Mendelian phenotypes. However, many NGS studies fall short of identifying causal variants, with estimates for success rates as low as 25% for uncovering the pathological variant underlying disease etiology. An important reason for such failures is familial locus heterogeneity, where within a single pedigree causal variants in two or more genes underlie Mendelian trait etiology. As examples of intra- and inter-sibship familial locus heterogeneity, we present 10 consanguineous Pakistani families segregating hearing impairment due to homozygous variants in two different hearing impairment genes and a European-American pedigree in which hearing impairment is caused by four variants in three different genes. We have identified 41 additional pedigrees with syndromic and nonsyndromic hearing impairment for which a single previously reported hearing impairment gene has been identified but only segregates with the phenotype in a subset of affected pedigree members. We estimate that locus heterogeneity occurs in 15.3% (95% confidence interval: 11.9%, 19.9%) of the families in our collection. We demonstrate novel approaches to apply linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping (for autosomal recessive consanguineous pedigrees), which can be used to detect locus heterogeneity using either NGS or SNP array data. Results from linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping can also be used to group sibships or individuals most likely to be segregating the same causal variants and thereby increase the success rate of gene identification. PMID:25491636

  15. Challenges and solutions for gene identification in the presence of familial locus heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Atteeq U; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Drummond, Meghan C; Shahzad, Mohsin; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Morell, Robert J; Ansar, Muhammad; Jan, Abid; Wang, Xin; Aziz, Abdul; Riazuddin, Saima; Smith, Joshua D; Wang, Gao T; Ahmed, Zubair M; Gul, Khitab; Shearer, A Eliot; Smith, Richard J H; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Hinnant, John; Khan, Shaheen N; Fisher, Rachel A; Ahmad, Wasim; Friderici, Karen H; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B; Wilch, Ellen S; Leal, Suzanne M

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of exomes and genomes has accelerated the identification of genes involved in Mendelian phenotypes. However, many NGS studies fall short of identifying causal variants, with estimates for success rates as low as 25% for uncovering the pathological variant underlying disease etiology. An important reason for such failures is familial locus heterogeneity, where within a single pedigree causal variants in two or more genes underlie Mendelian trait etiology. As examples of intra- and inter-sibship familial locus heterogeneity, we present 10 consanguineous Pakistani families segregating hearing impairment due to homozygous variants in two different hearing impairment genes and a European-American pedigree in which hearing impairment is caused by four variants in three different genes. We have identified 41 additional pedigrees with syndromic and nonsyndromic hearing impairment for which a single previously reported hearing impairment gene has been identified but only segregates with the phenotype in a subset of affected pedigree members. We estimate that locus heterogeneity occurs in 15.3% (95% confidence interval: 11.9%, 19.9%) of the families in our collection. We demonstrate novel approaches to apply linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping (for autosomal recessive consanguineous pedigrees), which can be used to detect locus heterogeneity using either NGS or SNP array data. Results from linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping can also be used to group sibships or individuals most likely to be segregating the same causal variants and thereby increase the success rate of gene identification. PMID:25491636

  16. A tomato xylem sap protein represents a new family of small cysteine-rich proteins with structural similarity to lipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Rep, Martijn; Dekker, Henk L; Vossen, Jack H; de Boer, Albert D; Houterman, Petra M; de Koster, Chris G; Cornelissen, Ben J C

    2003-01-16

    The coding sequence of a major xylem sap protein of tomato was identified with the aid of mass spectrometry. The protein, XSP10, represents a novel family of extracellular plant proteins with structural similarity to plant lipid transfer proteins. The XSP10 gene is constitutively expressed in roots and lower stems. The decline of XSP10 protein levels in tomato infected with a fungal vascular pathogen may reflect breakdown or modification by the pathogen. PMID:12527365

  17. Homozygosity Mapping in Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa in South Indian Families

    PubMed Central

    Srilekha, Sundaramurthy; Arokiasamy, Tharigopala; Srikrupa, Natarajan N.; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Meenakshi, Swaminathan; Sen, Parveen; Kapur, Suman; Soumittra, Nagasamy

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are retinal degenerative diseases which cause severe retinal dystrophy affecting the photoreceptors. LCA is predominantly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and contributes to 5% of all retinal dystrophies; whereas RP is inherited by all the Mendelian pattern of inheritance and both are leading causes of visual impairment in children and young adults. Homozygosity mapping is an efficient strategy for mapping both known and novel disease loci in recessive conditions, especially in a consanguineous mating, exploiting the fact that the regions adjacent to the disease locus will also be homozygous by descent in such inbred children. Here we have studied eleven consanguineous LCA and one autosomal recessive RP (arRP) south Indian families to know the prevalence of mutations in known genes and also to know the involvement of novel loci, if any. Complete ophthalmic examination was done for all the affected individuals including electroretinogram, fundus photograph, fundus autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomography. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 250K HMA GeneChip on eleven LCA families followed by screening of candidate gene(s) in the homozygous block identified mutations in ten families; AIPL1 – 3 families, RPE65- 2 families, GUCY2D, CRB1, RDH12, IQCB1 and SPATA7 in one family each, respectively. Six of the ten (60%) mutations identified are novel. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 10K HMA GeneChip on the arRP family identified a novel nonsense mutation in MERTK. The mutations segregated within the family and was absent in 200 control chromosomes screened. In one of the eleven LCA families, the causative gene/mutation was not identified but many homozygous blocks were noted indicating that a possible novel locus/gene might be involved. The genotype and phenotype features, especially the fundus changes for AIPL1, RPE65, CRB1, RDH12 genes were as reported earlier. PMID:26147992

  18. A Brazilian family with Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome with autosomal recessive inheritance.

    PubMed

    Malheiros, José Augusto; Camargos, Sarah Teixeira; Oliveira, José Teotonio de; Cardoso, Francisco E C

    2007-03-01

    We report the first Brazilian family with Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome. The presence of consanguineous marriages and illness affecting three sisters and one niece support an autosomal recessive transmission. The age at onset of the illness ranged from 12 to 20 years old. The time interval between hearing loss and involvement of other cranial nerves varied from 3 to 12 years. MRI demonstrated bulbar atrophy and also high intensity signal at T2 weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences. PMID:17420823

  19. Probable autosomal recessive inheritance of polysplenia, situs inversus and cardiac defects in an Amish family.

    PubMed

    Arnold, G L; Bixler, D; Girod, D

    1983-09-01

    We report on an Amish family with five individuals in two generations with complex congenital heart disease. Autopsy findings in one and clinical examination in the others support the diagnosis of polysplenia "syndrome." In a mouse model, this spectrum of situs abnormalities and cardiovascular defects shows recessive inheritance with homozygotes having either situs solitus or situs inversus or ambiguous situs. The parents of the four affected sibs are fourth cousins. We think that the father of these four children is an affected but clinically normal homozygote, that his deceased sister was an affected homozygote, and it seems likely that they too had consanguinous parents. PMID:6638068

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of XAC1151, a small heat-shock protein from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri belonging to the α-crystallin family

    SciTech Connect

    Hilario, Eduardo; Teixeira, Elaine Cristina; Pedroso, Gisele Audrei; Bertolini, Maria Célia; Medrano, Francisco Javier

    2006-05-01

    XAC1151, a small heat-shock protein from X. axonopodis pv. citri belonging to the α-crystallin family, was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of ammonium phosphate. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.65 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The hspA gene (XAC1151) from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri encodes a protein of 158 amino acids that belongs to the small heat-shock protein (sHSP) family of proteins. These proteins function as molecular chaperones by preventing protein aggregation. The protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of ammonium phosphate. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.65 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystal belongs to the rhombohedral space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 128.7, c = 55.3 Å. The crystal structure was solved by molecular-replacement methods. Structure refinement is in progress.

  1. Not Your Family Farm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol; Baker, Gayle; Grogg, Jill E.

    2007-01-01

    The information industry continues to consolidate, just as agribusiness has consolidated and now dominates farming. Both the family farm and the small information company still exist but are becoming rarer in an age of mergers, acquisitions, and increased economies of scale. Small companies distinguish themselves by high quality, special themes,…

  2. Molecular analysis of Hurler syndrome in Druze and Muslim Arab patients in Israel: Multiple allelic mutations of the IDUA gene in a small geographic area

    SciTech Connect

    Bach, G. ); Moskowitz, S.M.; Tieu, P.T.; Matynia, A.; Neufeld, E.F. )

    1993-08-01

    The mutations underlying Hurler syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IH) in Druze and Muslim Israeli Arab patients have been characterized. Four alleles were identified, using a combination of (a) PCR amplification of reverse-transcribed RNA or genomic DNA segments, (b) cycle sequencing of PCR products, and (c) restriction-enzyme analysis. One allele has two amino acid substitutions, Gly[sub 409][yields]Arg in exon 9 and Ter[yields]Cys in exon 14. The other three alleles have mutations in exon 2 (Tyr[sub 64][yields]Ter), exon 7 (Gln[sub 310][yields]Ter), or exon 8 (Thr[sub 366][yields]Pro). Transfection of mutagenized cDNAs into Cos-1 cells showed that two missense mutations, Thr[sub 366][yields]Pro and Ter[yields]Cys, permitted the expression of only trace amounts of [alpha]-L-iduronidase activity, whereas Gly[sub 409][yields]Arg permitted the expression of 60% as much enzyme as did the normal cDNA. The nonsense mutations were associated with abnormalities of RNA processing: (1) both a very low level of mRNA and skipping of exon 2 for Tyr[sub 64][yields]Ter and (2) utilization of a cryptic splice site for Gln[sub 310][yields]Ter. In all instances, the probands were found homozygous, and the parents heterozygous, for the mutant alleles, as anticipated from the consanguinity in each family. The two-mutation allele was identified in a family from Gaza; the other three alleles were found in seven families, five of them Druze, residing in a very small area of northern Israel. Since such clustering suggests a classic founder effect, the presence of three mutant alleles of the IDUA gene was unexpected. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Molecular analysis of Hurler syndrome in Druze and Muslim Arab patients in Israel: multiple allelic mutations of the IDUA gene in a small geographic area.

    PubMed Central

    Bach, G; Moskowitz, S M; Tieu, P T; Matynia, A; Neufeld, E F

    1993-01-01

    The mutations underlying Hurler syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IH) in Druze and Muslim Israeli Arab patients have been characterized. Four alleles were identified, using a combination of (a) PCR amplification of reverse-transcribed RNA or genomic DNA segments, (b) cycle sequencing of PCR products, and (c) restriction-enzyme analysis. One allele has two amino acid substitutions, Gly409-->Arg in exon 9 and Ter-->Cys in exon 14. The other three alleles have mutations in exon 2 (Tyr64-->Ter), exon 7 (Gln310-->Ter), or exon 8 (Thr366-->Pro). Transfection of mutagenized cDNAs into Cos-1 cells showed that two missense mutations, Thr366-->Pro and Ter-->Cys, permitted the expression of only trace amounts of alpha-L-iduronidase activity, whereas Gly409-->Arg permitted the expression of 60% as much enzyme as did the normal cDNA. The nonsense mutations were associated with abnormalities of RNA processing: (1) both a very low level of mRNA and skipping of exon 2 for Tyr64-->Ter and (2) utilization of a cryptic splice site for Gln310-->Ter. In all instances, the probands were found homozygous, and the parents heterozygous, for the mutant alleles, as anticipated from the consanguinity in each family. The two-mutation allele was identified in a family from Gaza; the other three alleles were found in seven families, five of them Druze, residing in a very small area of northern Israel. Since such clustering suggests a classic founder effect, the presence of three mutant alleles of the IDUA gene was unexpected. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8328452

  4. A non-sense MCM9 mutation in a familial case of primary ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Fauchereau, F; Shalev, S; Chervinsky, E; Beck-Fruchter, R; Legois, B; Fellous, M; Caburet, S; Veitia, R A

    2016-05-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) results in an early loss of ovarian function, and remains idiopathic in about 80% of cases. Here, we have performed a complete genetic study of a consanguineous family with two POI cases. Linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping identified 12 homozygous regions with linkage, totalling 84 Mb. Whole-exome sequencing of the two patients and a non-affected sister allowed us to detect a homozygous causal variant in the MCM9 gene. The variant c.1483G>T [p.E495*], confirmed using Sanger sequencing, introduced a premature stop codon in coding exon 8 and is expected to lead to the loss of a functional protein. MCM9 belongs to a complex required for DNA repair by homologous recombination, and its impairment in mouse is known to induce meiotic recombination defects and oocyte degeneration. A previous study recently described two consanguineous families in which homozygous mutations of MCM9 were responsible for POI and short stature. Interestingly, the affected sisters in the family described here had a normal height. Altogether, our results provide the confirmation of the implication of MCM9 variants in POI and expand their phenotypic spectrum. PMID:26771056

  5. Family Meals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Family Meals KidsHealth > For Parents > Family Meals Print A ... even more important as kids get older. Making Family Meals Happen It can be a big challenge ...

  6. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  7. Family Arguments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...

  8. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Family Health History Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Family Health History The Basics Family Health History & Chronic Disease Planning ...

  9. Family Folklore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotkin, Amy J.; Baker, Holly C.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the Family Folklore Program of the Smithsonian Institution's annual Festival of American Folklife, in which the whole family can be involved in tracing family history through story telling, photographs, etc. (MS)

  10. Structure, expression, and phylogenetic relationships of a family of ypt genes encoding small G-proteins in the green alga Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Fabry, S; Jacobsen, A; Huber, H; Palme, K; Schmitt, R

    1993-09-01

    In addition to the previously described gene yptV1 encoding a small G-protein we have now identified and sequenced four more ras-related ypt genes (yptV2-yptV5) from the green alga Volvox carteri. The four new genes encode polypeptides consisting of 203 to 217 amino-acid residues that contain the typical sequence elements (GTP-binding domains, effector domain) of the ypt/rab subgroup of the Ras superfamily. Comparison of the derived amino-acid sequences from the V. carteri ypt gene products and their Ypt homologs from other species revealed similarity values ranging from 60% to 85%, whereas intraspecies similarities were found to approach only 55%. The coding sequences are interrupted by 5-7 introns of variable size (70-1000 nucleotides) occupying different positions in the genes. Reverse-transcribed samples of stage-specific RNAs were PCR-amplified with primers specific to yptV1, yptV3, yptV4, and yptV5 to determine if yptV transcription might be restricted to either cell type or to a specific stage of the life cycle. These experiments demonstrated that each of these genes is expressed throughout the entire Volvox life cycle and in both the somatic and the reproductive cells of the alga. The transcription start sites of yptV1 and yptV5 were mapped by primer extension. Expression of recombinant yptV cDNA in E. coli yielded recombinant proteins that bound GTP specifically, demonstrating a property which is typical for small G-proteins. The derived YptV polypeptide sequences were used to group them into four distinct classes of Ras-like proteins. These are the first proteins of the Ras superfamily to be identified in a green alga. We discuss the possible role of the YptV-proteins in the intracellular vesicle transport of Volvox. PMID:8221932

  11. Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  12. Phase I study of obatoclax mesylate (GX15-070), a small molecule pan–Bcl-2 family antagonist, in patients with advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Claxton, David F.; Crump, Michael; Faderl, Stefan; Kipps, Thomas; Keating, Michael J.; Viallet, Jean; Cheson, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    Obatoclax mesylate is a small molecule pan–Bcl-2 antagonist with in vitro activity against chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. Obatoclax was administered to patients with advanced CLL at doses ranging from 3.5 to 14 mg/m2 as a 1-hour infusion and from 20 to 40 mg/m2 as a 3-hour infusion every 3 weeks. Twenty-six patients received a total of 74 cycles. Dose-limiting reactions were neurologic (somnolence, euphoria, ataxia) and associated with the infusion. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was 28 mg/m2 over 3 hours every 3 weeks. One (4%) of 26 patients achieved a partial response. Patients with anemia (3/11) or thrombocytopenia (4/14) experienced improvements in hemoglobin and platelet counts. Circulating lymphocyte counts were reduced in 18 of 26 patients with a median reduction of 24%. Overall, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) values of obatoclax were dose proportional. Activation of Bax and Bak was demonstrated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and induction of apoptosis was related to overall obatoclax exposure, as monitored by the plasma concentration of oligonucleosomal DNA/histone complexes. Obatoclax mesylate has biologic activity and modest single-agent activity in heavily pretreated patients with advanced CLL. Further evaluation in less heavily pretreated patients and in combination with other therapeutic agents is warranted. This trial has been registered with http://clinicaltrials.gov under identifier NCT00600964. PMID:18931344

  13. Cystic fibrosis in a large kindred family in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, A; Dawod, S T; al Thani, G

    2000-09-01

    We describe 45 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), diagnosed between June 1987 and May 1999, seen at the Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar in the Arabian Gulf. Twenty-six of 32 families in the study were related and belonged to the same Bedouin tribe. The parents of 98% of these cases were consanguineous. Metabolic alkalosis and/or hypo-electrolytaemia were found in a large proportion of infants with CF. Cystic fibrosis in Qatari children is phenotypically variable with mild to moderate respiratory symptoms, and none of them died during this study. Among the non-Arabic-Asian patients, pulmonary symptoms were more severe, Pseudomonas colonization was earlier, pancreatic insufficiency occurred in infancy and four died in early life. PMID:11064773

  14. Cancer, Families, and Family Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Maureen; Gillig, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Examines the role of the family counselor in working with cancer patients and their families. Suggests ways in which the family counselor can work proactively with families in the area of cancer prevention and helping them cope more effectively with its impact on their lives. Uses a clinical case example to illustrate intervention with cancer…

  15. Family therapy by family doctors

    PubMed Central

    Neighbour, R.

    1982-01-01

    The experiences of a group of general practitioners learning and attempting family therapy are described. Three principles for working with whole families — facilitation, formulation and focussing — are illustrated by case histories. Family therapy in general practice can be effective for patients and worthwhile for family doctors. PMID:7153974

  16. Homozygosity mapping reveals novel and known mutations in Pakistani families with inherited retinal dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Saqib, Muhammad Arif Nadeem; Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Ullah, Ehsan; Sher Khan, Falak; Iqbal, Jamila; Bibi, Rabia; Jarral, Afeefa; Sajid, Sundus; Nishiguchi, Koji M.; Venturini, Giulia; Ansar, Muhammad; Rivolta, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous. This extensive heterogeneity poses a challenge when performing molecular diagnosis of patients, especially in developing countries. In this study, we applied homozygosity mapping as a tool to reduce the complexity given by genetic heterogeneity and identify disease-causing variants in consanguineous Pakistani pedigrees. DNA samples from eight families with autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies were subjected to genome wide homozygosity mapping (seven by SNP arrays and one by STR markers) and genes comprised within the detected homozygous regions were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. All families displayed consistent autozygous genomic regions. Sequence analysis of candidate genes identified four previously-reported mutations in CNGB3, CNGA3, RHO, and PDE6A, as well as three novel mutations: c.2656C > T (p.L886F) in RPGRIP1, c.991G > C (p.G331R) in CNGA3, and c.413-1G > A (IVS6-1G > A) in CNGB1. This latter mutation impacted pre-mRNA splicing of CNGB1 by creating a -1 frameshift leading to a premature termination codon. In addition to better delineating the genetic landscape of inherited retinal dystrophies in Pakistan, our data confirm that combining homozygosity mapping and candidate gene sequencing is a powerful approach for mutation identification in populations where consanguineous unions are common. PMID:25943428

  17. FAMILIAL SUICIDE

    PubMed Central

    Unni, K.E. Sadanaandan

    1996-01-01

    Seven completed suicides in a family of lower socioeconomic status and suburban domicile in Pondicherry are reported. The presence of bipolar affective disorder in the family members and the absence of exogenous factors are illustrated by utilising both family history method and family study method. The details collected formed the basis for the terminology ‘familial suicide’. The management of the index case, one of the only three surviving male members of the family, who presented with suicidal ruminations and depressive features, is described. PMID:21584122

  18. Cancerous leptomeningitis and familial congenital hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Vujovic, S; Vujosevic, S; Kavaric, S; Sopta, J; Ivovic, M; Saveanu, A; Brue, T; Korbonits, M; Popovic, V

    2016-05-01

    People are at higher risk of cancer as they get older or have a strong family history of cancer. The potential influence of environmental and behavioral factors remains poorly understood. Earlier population and case control studies reported that upper quartile of circulating IGF-I is associated with a higher risk of developing cancer suggesting possible involvement of the growth hormone (GH)/IGF system in initiation or progression of cancer. Since GH therapy increases IGF-1 levels, there have been concerns that GH therapy in hypopituitarism might increase the risk of cancer. We report a 42-year-old female patient who presented with subacute onset of symptoms of meningitis and with the absence of fever which resulted in death 70 days after the onset of symptoms. The patient together with her younger brother was diagnosed at the age of 5 years with familial congenital hypopituitarism, due to homozygous mutation c.150delA in PROP1 gene. Due to evolving hypopituitarism, she was replaced with thyroxine (from age 5), hydrocortisone (from age 13), GH (from age 13 until 17), and sex steroids in adolescence and adulthood. Her consanguineous family has a prominent history of malignant diseases. Six close relatives had malignant disease including her late maternal aunt with breast cancer. BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutational analysis in the patient's mother was negative. Histology after autopsy disclosed advanced ovarian cancer with multiple metastases to the brain, leptomeninges, lungs, heart, and adrenals. Low circulating IGF-1 did not seem to protect this patient from cancer initiation and progression in the context of strong family history of malignancies. PMID:26886902

  19. Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen, Ed.; McBride, Marijo, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "Feature Issue" of the quarterly journal "Impact" presents 19 brief articles on family support systems in the United States for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. Emphasis is on provisions of Public Law 99-457. Articles include: "Family Support in the United States: Setting a Course for the 1990s" (James Knoll);…

  20. Family Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainor, Peggy

    2001-01-01

    Describes a Kellogg Family Collaborative project that involves the University of Montana and four tribal colleges in a family-strengths approach to improving student retention and achievement. States that the project is grounded in social work theory and research that recognize and reinforce family and student resilience through promotion of…

  1. Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This "special focus" journal issue consists of 13 individual articles on the theme of rural family programs relating to school, health services, church, and other institutions. It includes: (1) "Towards a Rural Family Policy" (Judith K. Chynoweth and Michael D. Campbell); (2) "Montana: Council for Families Collaborates for Prevention (Jean…

  2. Mariage consanguin et morbi-mortalité, courte revue de la littérature à partir d'une association exceptionnelle: syndrome de Usher et Neurofibromatose de Von Recklinghausen

    PubMed Central

    Atipo-Tsiba, Pépin-Williams

    2016-01-01

    Le syndrome de Usher est défini par l'association d'une surdité de perception congénitale de sévérité variable évolutive ou non et d'une rétinopathie pigmentaire progressivement cécitante. La Neurofibromatose de Von Recklinghausen ou Neurofibromatose de type I est la principale forme clinique des neurofibromatoses avec environ 90% des cas. Ces deux maladies sont d'origine génétique avec des prévalences très basses. La probabilité pour qu'un seul et même individu souffre à la fois de ces maladies est exceptionnelle. Comme toutes les maladies génétiques, la consanguinité augmente de façon assez sensible la probabilité de leur apparition. Le mariage consanguin est encore largement répondu au Maghreb et dans certaines régions d'Afrique de l'Ouest. Cette observation rapporte un cas exceptionnel de cette association chez un homme de 40 ans originaire de la Mauritanie né d'une union consanguine. PMID:27231508

  3. Recurrent infections in partial complement factor I deficiency: evaluation of three generations of a Brazilian family

    PubMed Central

    Grumach, A S; Leitão, M F; Arruk, V G; Kirschfink, M; Condino-Neto, A

    2006-01-01

    We report here on the evaluation of a factor I-deficient Brazilian family (three generations, 39 members) with strong consanguinity. The complete factor I-deficient patients (n = 3) presented recurrent respiratory infections, skin infections and meningitis; one of them died after sepsis. They presented an impaired total haemolytic activity (CH50), low C3, low factor H and undetectable C3dg/C3d. Partial factor I deficiency was detected in 16 family members (normal low cut-off value was 25 µg/ml). Respiratory infections were the most common clinical occurrence among partial factor I-deficient relatives. Two of them were submitted to nephrectomy following recurrent urinary tract infections. An additional two heterozygous relatives presented with arthritis and rheumatic fever. Apparently, patients with partial factor I deficiency are also at higher risk for recurrent infections. Vaccination against capsulated bacteria and the eventual use of prophylactic antibiotics should be considered individually in this patient group. PMID:16412054

  4. Exploring the genetic basis of 3MC syndrome: Findings in 12 further families.

    PubMed

    Urquhart, Jill; Roberts, Rebecca; de Silva, Deepthi; Shalev, Stavit; Chervinsky, Elena; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Sznajer, Yves; Revencu, Nicole; Gunasekera, Romesh; Suri, Mohnish; Ellingford, Jamie; Williams, Simon; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Clayton-Smith, Jill

    2016-05-01

    The 3MC syndromes are a group of rare autosomal recessive disorders where the main clinical features are cleft lip and palate, hypertelorism, highly arched eyebrows, caudal appendage, postnatal growth deficiency, and genitourinary tract anomalies. Ophthalmological abnormalities, most notably anterior chamber defects may also be seen. We describe the clinical and molecular findings in 13 individuals with suspected 3MC syndrome from 12 previously unreported families. The exclusion of the MASP1 and COLEC11 Loci in two individuals from different consanguineous families and the absence of mutations in four further individuals sequenced for both genes raises the possibility that that there is further genetic heterogeneity of 3MC syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26789649

  5. Association of XRCC3 and XRCC4 gene polymorphisms, family history of cancer and tobacco smoking with non-small-cell lung cancer in a Chinese population: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    He, Fei; Chang, Shen-Chih; Wallar, Gina Maria; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Cai, Lin

    2013-10-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of DNA repair genes have been reported to modify cancer risk. This study aimed to determine SNPs of the DNA repair genes X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) and X-ray cross-complementing group 4 (XRCC4) and their association with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) susceptibility in a Chinese population. A total of 507 NSCLC patients and 662 healthy controls were recruited for genotyping. Epidemiological and clinical data were also collected for association studies. The data showed that the rs1799794 G allele in the XRCC3 gene and minor allele carriers of XRCC4, including rs1056503 and rs9293337, were inversely associated with NSCLC risk (GG vs homozygote AA), whereas the rs861537 AG or AA genotype and XRCC4 rs6869366 had a significantly increased NSCLC risk. Furthermore, tobacco smoking over 26 pack-years, a family history of lung cancer, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and negative mental status were risk factors for developing NSCLC. This study suggests that SNPs of XRCC3 and XRCC4 and other environmental factors are risk factors for developing NSCLC in this Chinese Han population. PMID:23924833

  6. The Family FIRO Model: The Integration of Group Theory and Family Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colangelo, Nicholas; Doherty, William J.

    1988-01-01

    Presents the Family Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation (Family FIRO) Model, an integration of small-group theory and family therapy. The model is offered as a framework for organizing family issues. Discusses three fundamental issues of human relatedness and their applicability to group dynamics. (Author/NB)

  7. FAMILY LYGISTORRHINIDAE.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira; Amorim, Dalton De Souza

    2016-01-01

    The Lygistorrhinidae are a family belonging to the suborder Bibionomorpha, with no previous record from Colombia. This paper refers for the first time to the occurrence of the family in the country, an undetermined species of the genus Lygistorrhina (Probolaeus) Williston. PMID:27395260

  8. Family Potyviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses potyvirus study group has revised the description of the family Potyviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 9th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of viral sp...

  9. Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on various aspects of mammal family life ranging from ways different species are born to how different mammals are raised. Learning activities include making butter from cream, creating birth announcements for mammals, and playing a password game on family life. (ML)

  10. Family Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This feature issue of IMPACT focuses on the empowerment of families with a member who has a developmental disability. It presents strategies and models for a collaborative, respectful approach to service provision, and presents the experiences of families in seeking support and assistance. Feature articles include "Two Generations of Disability: A…

  11. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  12. Family intervention for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pharoah, Fiona; Mari, Jair; Rathbone, John; Wong, Winson

    2014-01-01

    Background People with schizophrenia from families that express high levels of criticism, hostility, or over involvement, have more frequent relapses than people with similar problems from families that tend to be less expressive of emotions. Forms of psychosocial intervention, designed to reduce these levels of expressed emotions within families, are now widely used. Objectives To estimate the effects of family psychosocial interventions in community settings for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like conditions compared with standard care. Search strategy We updated previous searches by searching the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (September 2008). Selection criteria We selected randomised or quasi-randomised studies focusing primarily on families of people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder that compared community-orientated family-based psychosocial intervention with standard care. Data collection and analysis We independently extracted data and calculated fixed-effect relative risk (RR), the 95% confidence intervals (CI) for binary data, and, where appropriate, the number needed to treat (NNT) on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD). Main results This 2009-10 update adds 21 additional studies, with a total of 53 randomised controlled trials included. Family intervention may decrease the frequency of relapse (n = 2981, 32 RCTs, RR 0.55 CI 0.5 to 0.6, NNT 7 CI 6 to 8), although some small but negative studies might not have been identified by the search. Family intervention may also reduce hospital admission (n = 481, 8 RCTs, RR 0.78 CI 0.6 to 1.0, NNT 8 CI 6 to 13) and encourage compliance with medication (n = 695, 10 RCTs, RR 0.60 CI 0.5 to 0.7, NNT 6 CI 5 to 9) but it does not obviously affect the tendency of individuals/families to leave care (n = 733, 10 RCTs, RR 0.74 CI 0.5 to 1.0). Family intervention also seems to improve general social impairment and the levels of

  13. The sodium-phosphate co-transporter SLC34A2, and pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: Presentation of an inbred family and a novel truncating mutation in exon 3

    PubMed Central

    Vismara, Marco Favio Michele; Colao, Emma; Fabiani, Fernanda; Bombardiere, Francesco; Tamburrini, Oscar; Alessio, Caterina; Manti, Francesco; Pelaia, Gerolamo; Romeo, Pasquale; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Perrotti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a disorder in which many tiny fragments (microliths) of calcium phosphate gradually accumulate in alveoli. Loss of function mutations in the gene SLC34A2 coding for the sodium phosphate co-transporter (NaPi-IIb) are responsible for genetic forms of alveolar microlithiasis. We now report a consanguineous Italian family from Calabria with two affected members segregating alveolar microlithiasis in a recessive fashion. We describe, for the first time, a novel loss of function mutation in the gene coding for NaPi-IIb. A careful description of the clinical phenotype is provided together with technical details for direct sequencing of the gene. PMID:26744662

  14. [Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus: clinical and genetic analysis of three Serbian families].

    PubMed

    Ristić, Aleksandar J; Janković, Slavko; Annesi, Grazzia; Carrideo, Sara; Annesi, Ferdinanda; Gambardella, Antonio; Maksimović, Goran; Gnjatović, Brankica; Petrović, Igor; Vojvodić, Nikola; Sokić, Dragoslav

    2005-01-01

    The results of clinical and genetic analysis of three Serbian families (pedigrees) with autosomal dominant inheritance, incomplete penetrance and phenotypic features of GEFS+ are presented in this study. Mutation analysis of the SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2 genes was performed in all affected and some unaffected members of these three families. Twenty-six exons of SCN1A, five exons of SCN1B and nine exons of GABRG2 were individually amplified using primers based on intronic sequence. PCR products were sequenced in both forward and reverse directions. Subsequently, the samples were run and analyzed using 377 DNA automated sequencer. No consanguinity was noticed. The MM and OM family members live in Republic of Srpska while KS family originates from the central Serbia. No mutations of the exons of SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2 genes were found in tested subjects. Obligate carriers in MM family (III-1, III-2, and III-4) exhibit variable expressivity or incomplete penetrance rather than proof of polygenetic inheritance. OM pedigree follows autosomal dominant pattern despite reduced penetrance. Bilinear transmission may assume the possibility of multigenetic mode of inheritance in KS family. The fact that all affected members in three Serbian families were negative for mutations in SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2 genes strongly supports the hypothesis of significant genetic heterogeneity of GEFS+. Recognizing GEFS+ on clinical grounds contributes to more precise integration of this syndrome into already existing classification of epileptic syndromes. PMID:16053169

  15. Family Health and Family Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This document is made up of a selection of some of the papers distributed to participants in courses on "Family Health and Family Planning" which have been organized each year since 1973 by the International Children's Center and the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. Six courses, held between 1973 and 1978, brought together a…

  16. Crucial Role of Rapgef2 and Rapgef6, a Family of Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors for Rap1 Small GTPase, in Formation of Apical Surface Adherens Junctions and Neural Progenitor Development in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Maeta, Kazuhiro; Edamatsu, Hironori; Nishihara, Kaori; Ikutomo, Junji; Bilasy, Shymaa E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebral neocortex development in mammals requires highly orchestrated events involving proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neural progenitors and neurons. Rapgef2 and Rapgef6 constitute a unique family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rap1 small GTPase, which is known to play crucial roles in migration of postmitotic neurons. We previously reported that conditional knockout of Rapgef2 in dorsal telencephalon (Rapgef2-cKO) resulted in the formation of an ectopic cortical mass (ECM) resembling that of subcortical band heterotopia. Here we show that double knockout of Rapgef6 in Rapgef2-cKO mice (Rapgef2/6-dKO) results in marked enlargement of the ECM. While Rapgef2-cKO affects late-born neurons only, Rapgef2/6-dKO affects both early-born and late-born neurons. The Rapgef2-cKO cortex at embryonic day (E) 15.5, and the Rapgef2/6-dKO cortex at E13.5 and E15.5 show disruption of the adherens junctions (AJs) on the apical surface, detachment of radial glial cells (RGCs) from the apical surface and disorganization of the radial glial fiber system, which are accompanied by aberrant distribution of RGCs and intermediate progenitors, normally located in the ventricular zone and the subventricular zone, respectively, over the entire cerebral cortex. Moreover, intrauterine transduction of Cre recombinase into the Rapgef2flox/flox brains also results in the apical surface AJ disruption and the RGC detachment from the apical surface, both of which are effectively suppressed by cotransduction of the constitutively active Rap1 mutant Rap1G12V. These results demonstrate a cell-autonomous role of the Rapgef2/6-Rap1 pathway in maintaining the apical surface AJ structures, which is necessary for the proper development of neural progenitor cells. PMID:27390776

  17. Unusual families.

    PubMed

    Golombok, Susan

    2005-03-01

    The introduction of assisted reproduction has led to unusual forms of procreation. This article describes the social consequences of lesbian motherhood and of families headed by single heterosexual mothers. PMID:15819999

  18. FAMILY RHAGIONIDAE.

    PubMed

    Santos, Charles Morphy D; Carmo, Daniel D D

    2016-01-01

    The family Rhagionidae is one of the oldest Brachyeran lineages. Its monophyly is still uncertain. There are four rhagionid genera distributed in Neotropical Region but only three species of Chrysopilus are found in Colombia. PMID:27395270

  19. FAMILY BIBIONIDAE.

    PubMed

    Falaschi, Rafaela Lopes; Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira; Amorim, Dalton De Souza

    2016-01-01

    The Bibionidae are a family belonging to the suborder Bibionomorpha with four genera and 17 species known from Colombia. This work expands the distribution of these species to other localities in the country. PMID:27395253

  20. Tomorrow's Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickett, Robert S.

    1977-01-01

    Author states that "...the traditional form of family which has been the norm in recent times in the West will persist, but will be forced to "move over" to accommodate other forms of domestic life." (Author)

  1. Family Issues

    MedlinePlus

    ... not mean that everyone gets along all the time. Conflicts are a part of family life. Many things can lead to conflict, such as illness, disability, addiction, job loss, school problems, and marital issues. Listening to ...

  2. Identification of recurrent and novel mutations in TULP1 in Pakistani families with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ajmal, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Micheal, Shazia; Ahmed, Waqas; Shah, Ashfa; Venselaar, Hanka; Bokhari, Habib; Azam, Aisha; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Collin, Rob W.J.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Qamar, Raheel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To identify the genetic defects underlying retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in Pakistani families. Methods Genome-wide high-density single-nucleotide-polymorphism microarray analysis was performed using the DNA of nine affected individuals from two large families with multiple consanguineous marriages. Data were analyzed to identify homozygous regions that are shared by affected sibs in each family. Sanger sequencing was performed for genes previously implicated in autosomal recessive RP and allied retinal dystrophies that resided in the identified homozygous regions. Probands from both families underwent fundus examination and electroretinogram measurements. Results The tubby-like protein 1 gene (TULP1) was present in the largest homozygous region in both families. Sequence analysis identified a previously reported mutation (c.1138A>G; p.Thr380Ala) in one family and a novel pathogenic variant (c.1445G>A; p.Arg482Gln) in the other family. Both variants were found to be present in a homozygous state in all affected individuals, were heterozygous present in the unaffected parents, and heterozygous present or absent in normal individuals. Affected individuals of both families showed an early-onset form of RP. Conclusions Homozygosity mapping, combined with candidate-gene analysis, successfully identified genetic defects in TULP1 in two large Pakistani families with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:22665969

  3. Family Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert

    1966-01-01

    Dr Robert Smith surveys the history of birth control and sounds a warning for the future of mankind, if the population explosion is allowed to continue unchecked. He stresses the importance of the role of the general practitioner in the limitation of births. Sir Theodore Fox describes the work of the Family Planning Association and stresses that, increasingly, this is a specialist service covering all aspects of fertility. He also feels that the general practitioner has a role in family planning. PMID:5954261

  4. The Family Child Care Licensing Study, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings of the 1999 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 1998 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized in 22 categories: (1) number of regulated homes; (2)…

  5. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Nia, Comp.

    This report presents the findings of the 2000 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 1999 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized in 23 categories: (1) number of regulated homes; (2)…

  6. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings of the 2002 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 2001 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized into the following 23 categories: (1) number of regulated…

  7. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings of the 2001 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 2000 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized into the following 23 categories: (1) number of regulated…

  8. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollestelle, Kay; Koch, Pauline D.

    This report presents the findings of the 2003 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 2002 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized into the following 23 categories: (1) number of regulated…

  9. IRAS asteroid families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Williams, J. G.; Tedesco, E. F.; Matson, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) sampled the entire asteroid population at wavelengths from 12 to 100 microns during its 1983 all sky survey. The IRAS Minor Planet Survey (IMPS) includes updated results for more recently numbered as well as other additional asteroids with reliable orbital elements. Albedos and diameters were derived from the observed thermal emission and assumed absolute visual magnitudes and then entered into the IMPS database at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) for members of the Themis, Eos, Koronis and Maria asteroid families and compared with their visual colors. The IMPS results for the small (down to about 20 km) asteroids within these major families confirm trends previously noted for their larger members. Each of these dynamical families which are defined by their similar proper elements appears to have homogeneous physical properties.

  10. Surviving Small-Town Practice

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Merv

    1987-01-01

    To cope and to survive family medicine in a small town has been, and continues to be, a problem. This article presents one physician's means and methods of staying in a difficult, but extremely exciting, profession. PMID:21263791

  11. Waardenburg syndrome type I: Dental phenotypes and genetic analysis of an extended family

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, Sibele-Nascimento; Paranaíba, Lívia-Maris-R.; Gomes, Andreia; dos-Santos-Neto, Pedro; Coletta, Ricardo-D.; Cardoso, Aline-Francoise; Frota, Ana-Cláudia; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of inheritance and the clinical features in a large family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1), detailing the dental abnormalities and screening for PAX3 mutations. Material and Methods To characterize the pattern of inheritance and clinical features, 29 family members were evaluated by dermatologic, ophthalmologic, otorhinolaryngologic and orofacial examination. Molecular analysis of the PAX3 gene was performed. Results The pedigree of the family,including the last four generations, was constructed and revealed non-consanguineous marriages. Out of 29 descendants, 16 family members showed features of WS1, with 9 members showing two major criteria indicative of WS1. Five patients showed white forelock and iris hypopigmentation, and four showed dystopia canthorum and iris hypopigmentation. Two patients had hearing loss. Dental abnormalities were identified in three family members, including dental agenesis, conical teeth and taurodontism. Sequencing analysis failed to identify mutations in the PAX3 gene. Conclusions These results confirm that WS1 was transmitted in this family in an autosomal dominant pattern with variable expressivity and high penetrance. The presence of dental manifestations, especially tooth agenesis and conical teeth which resulted in considerable aesthetic impact on affected individuals was a major clinical feature. Clinical relevance: This article reveals the presence of well-defined dental changes associated with WS1 and tries to establish a possible association between these two entities showing a new spectrum of WS1. Key words:Waardenburg syndrome, hearing loss, oral manifestations, mutation. PMID:27031059

  12. AMH gene mutations in two Egyptian families with persistent müllerian duct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mazen, Inas; Abdel Hamid, M S; El-Gammal, M; Aref, A; Amr, K

    2011-01-01

    The anti-müllerian hormone (AMH) is responsible for regression of müllerian ducts during male sexual differentiation. Mutations in the AMH gene or its type II receptor gene AMHR2 lead to persistence of the uterus and fallopian tubes in male children, i.e. persistent müllerian duct syndrome (PMDS). Both conditions are transmitted according to an autosomal recessive pattern and are symptomatic only in males. We report on 2 unrelated Egyptian consanguineous families with PMDS. The first family comprised 3 affected prepubertal sibs complaining of undescended testes. Pelvic exploration and laparotomy revealed müllerian duct derivatives. The other family was presenting with an adolescent male with impalpable left testis, and pelvic exploration showed remnants of fallopian tubes and rudimentary uterus. AMH levels were very low and almost undetectable in all affected patients in both families. Direct sequencing of the coding region of the AMH gene identified 2 homozygous mutations in exon 1, R95X in the first family and V12G in the second family. These data confirmed the autosomal recessive type of PMDS. Molecular investigation of this rare disorder in a larger number of cases with undescended testes in Egypt is warranted for proper diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:22188863

  13. Familial pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Vandeva, S; Vasilev, V; Vroonen, L; Naves, L; Jaffrain-Rea, M-L; Daly, A F; Zacharieva, S; Beckers, A

    2010-12-01

    Pituitary adenomas are benign intracranial neoplasms that present a major clinical concern because of hormonal overproduction or compression symptoms of adjacent structures. Most arise in a sporadic setting with a small percentage developing as a part of familial syndromes such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), Carney complex (CNC), and the recently described familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and MEN-4. While the genetic alterations responsible for the formation of sporadic adenomas remain largely unknown, considerable advances have been made in defining culprit genes in these familial syndromes. Mutations in MEN1 and PRKAR1A genes are found in the majority of MEN1 and CNC patients, respectively. About 15% of FIPA kindreds present with mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene. Mutations in the CDKN1B gene, encoding p27(Kip)¹ were identified in MEN4 cases. Familial tumours appear to differ from their sporadic counterparts not only in genetic basis but also in clinical characteristics. Evidence suggests that, especially in MEN1 and FIPA, they are more aggressive and affect patients at younger age, therefore justifying the importance of early diagnosis. In this review, we summarize the genetic and clinical characteristics of these familial pituitary adenomas. PMID:20961530

  14. Homozygosity Mapping and Targeted Sanger Sequencing Reveal Genetic Defects Underlying Inherited Retinal Disease in Families from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani; Mustafa, Bilal; Ayub, Humaira; Ali, Liaqat; Ahmad, Shakeel; Micheal, Shazia; Hussain, Alamdar; Shah, Syed Tahir Abbas; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Ahmed, Waqas; Khan, Yar Muhammad; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Collin, Rob W. J.; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Qamar, Raheel; Cremers, Frans P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Homozygosity mapping has facilitated the identification of the genetic causes underlying inherited diseases, particularly in consanguineous families with multiple affected individuals. This knowledge has also resulted in a mutation dataset that can be used in a cost and time effective manner to screen frequent population-specific genetic variations associated with diseases such as inherited retinal disease (IRD). Methods We genetically screened 13 families from a cohort of 81 Pakistani IRD families diagnosed with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), or cone dystrophy (CD). We employed genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis to identify homozygous regions shared by affected individuals and performed Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes located in the sizeable homozygous regions. In addition, based on population specific mutation data we performed targeted Sanger sequencing (TSS) of frequent variants in AIPL1, CEP290, CRB1, GUCY2D, LCA5, RPGRIP1 and TULP1, in probands from 28 LCA families. Results Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes revealed the underlying mutations in 10 families. TSS revealed causative variants in three families. In these 13 families four novel mutations were identified in CNGA1, CNGB1, GUCY2D, and RPGRIP1. Conclusions Homozygosity mapping and TSS revealed the underlying genetic cause in 13 IRD families, which is useful for genetic counseling as well as therapeutic interventions that are likely to become available in the near future. PMID:25775262

  15. Co-expression of pregnane X receptor and ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1 in peripheral blood: A prospective indicator for drug resistance prediction in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    KONG, QINGNUAN; HAN, ZENGLEI; ZUO, XIAOLI; WEI, HONGJUN; HUANG, WEIQING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protein expression profiling of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1 (ABCB1; also known as MDR1 or P-gp), present in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and cancerous tissues of cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Furthermore, the study aimed to assess the feasibility of predicting drug resistance through the medium of PBMCs. Of the subjects included in the study, 37 were histopathologically diagnosed with NSCLC and 17 were control patients without cancer. ThinPrep liquid-based smears with cytosine were applied in the examination of the PBMCs and proved quite effective in preserving the morphology and surface antigens of the lymphocytes. Measurements of expression levels in the PBMCs and cancerous tissues were obtained by immunohistochemical means. The results showed that, with the exception of the selective PXR expression in the normal lung tissues, the two types of proteins existed extensively throughout the PBMCs, normal tissues and tumors. Among the cancer patients, prior to chemotherapy, a significant rise in ABCB1 expression could be observed in the PBMCs, together with a similar rise in ABCB1 and PXR expression in the tumor specimens. Marked upregulation of the two proteins was detected in the PBMCs following 1 cycle of first-line chemotherapy. ABCB1 expression, correlated with PXR, persisted mostly in the PBMCs and tissue samples. When bound to and activated by ligands, PXR translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of the cells. PXR subsequently binds to its DNA response elements as a heterodimer with the retinoid X receptor. A PXR translocation of moderate or low differentiation was identified in 3 cases of adenocarcinoma, which were co-expressing the two genes in the PBMCs prior to chemotherapy. During follow-up visits, tumor recurrence was observed within 3 months in 5 cases, which were characterized by PXR translocation. These findings

  16. Woodhouse-Sakati Syndrome: Report of the First Tunisian Family with the C2orf37 Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hdiji, Olfa; Turki, Emna; Bouzidi, Nouha; Bouchhima, Imen; Damak, Mariem; Bohlega, Saeed; Mhiri, Chokri

    2016-01-01

    Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome (WSS) is an infrequent autosomal recessive condition characterized by progressive extrapyramidal signs, mental retardation, hypogonadism, alopecia, and diabetes mellitus. This syndrome belongs to a heterogeneous group of inherited neurodegenerative disorders characterized iron accumulation in the brain, and it is caused by mutations of the C2orf37 gene. We report the first Tunisian family with two affected sisters presenting with a phenotype suggestive of WSS. We examined the index patient presenting with movement disorders and mental retardation and then searched for similar cases in her family, which identified a sister with similar signs. We performed a genetic study that confirmed the diagnosis and revealed a c.436delC mutation of the C2orf37 gene. Therefore, WSS is an important consideration in patients presenting with movement disorders and intellectual disability. A high consanguinity contributes to the clustering of such rare autosomal recessive syndromes. PMID:27240811

  17. Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Bouhairie, Victoria Enchia; Goldberg, Anne Carol

    2016-03-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common, inherited disorder of cholesterol metabolism that leads to early cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Statins, ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, lomitapide, mipomersen, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis are treatments that can lower LDL cholesterol levels. Early treatment can lead to substantial reduction of cardiovascular events and death in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. It is important to increase awareness of this disorder in physicians and patients to reduce the burden of this disorder. PMID:26892994

  18. FAMILY STRATIOMYIDAE.

    PubMed

    Fachin, Diego Aguilar; De Assis-Pujol, Cristiane Vieira

    2016-01-01

    The family Stratiomyidae has more than 2,800 described species, of which 1001 species belongs to the Neotropics. This catalog for Colombia presents 87 species distributed in 32 genera, and ten subfamilies. Merosargus gracilis and the genus Microchrysa, with a single species M. bicolor are recorded for the first time to Colombia. The fauna is very expressive but still poorly known, representing nearly one tenth of the Neotropical diversity of the family in numbers of species, and one fifth of generic diversity. PMID:27395274

  19. Family-Centered Child Care. Families Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, M. Elena; Dorros, Sybilla

    The Families Matter series of papers from the Harvard Family Research Project advances the concept of family-centered child care, advocating an approach to early childhood education that addresses the development of the child and family together. Grounded in family support principles, which build on family strengths and work from a community's…

  20. Income and Family Events: Family Income, Family Size, and Consumption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutright, Phillips

    1971-01-01

    This paper considers the structure of family income, examines some factors affecting family size, reviews alternative definitions of an adequate income for families with varying numbers, and presents data on actual consumption, according to family income and family size. A model depicting the causal relations among factors affecting consumption is…

  1. Pigmentary degenerative maculopathy as prominent phenotype in an Italian SPG56/CYP2U1 family.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Luca; Ziccardi, Lucia; Marcotulli, Christian; Rubegni, Anna; Longobardi, Antonino; Serrao, Mariano; Storti, Eugenia; Pierelli, Francesco; Tessa, Alessandra; Parisi, Vincenzo; Santorelli, Filippo M; Carlo, Casali

    2016-04-01

    SPG56 is an autosomal recessive form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) associated with mutations in CYP2U1. There is no clear documentation of visual impairment in the few reported cases of SPG56, although this form is complex on clinical ground and visual deficit are extremely frequent in complicated HSP. We report three patients in a consanguineous family harboring the novel homozygous c.1168C>T (p.R390*) in SPG56/CYP2U1, and showing a pigmentary degenerative maculopathy associated with progressive spastic paraplegia. Furthermore, we characterized precisely the ophthalmologic phenotype through indirect ophthalmoscopy, retinal optical coherence tomography and visual evoked potentials. This is the first formal report of pigmentary degenerative maculopathy associated with a CYP2U1 homozygous mutation. PMID:26914923

  2. A novel CHSY1 gene mutation underlies Temtamy preaxial brachydactyly syndrome in a Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Sher, Gulab; Naeem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Temtamy preaxial brachydactyly syndrome (TPBS) is an autosomal recessive rare disorder characterized by hyperphalangism of digits, facial dysmorphism, dental anomalies, sensorineural hearing loss, delayed motor and mental development, and growth retardation. Loss of function mutations have been recently reported in the CHSY1 gene to cause the TPBS. Here, we report a novel missense mutation (c.1897 G > A) in the CHSY1 gene in two TPBS patients from a consanguineous Pakistani family. The mutation predicted substitution of a highly conserved aspartate amino acid residue to asparagine at position 633 in the protein (D633N). Polyphen analysis supported the pathogenicity of D36N mutation. Our finding extends the body of recent evidence that supports the role of CHSY1 as a potential mediator of BMP signaling. PMID:24269551

  3. Familial hyperaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Stowasser, M; Gordon, R D

    2001-09-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PAL) may be as much as ten times more common than has been traditionally thought, with most patients normokalemic. The study of familial varieties has facilitated a fuller appreciation of the nature and diversity of its clinical, biochemical, morphological and molecular aspects. In familial hyperaldosteronism type I (FH-I), glucocorticoid-remediable PAL is caused by inheritance of an ACTH-regulated, hybrid CYP11B1/CYP11B2 gene. Genetic testing has greatly facilitated diagnosis. Hypertension severity varies widely, demonstrating relationships with gender, affected parent's gender, urinary kallikrein level, degree of biochemical disturbance and hybrid gene crossover point position. Analyses of aldosterone/PRA/cortisol 'day-curves' have revealed that (1) the hybrid gene dominates over wild type CYP11B2 in terms of aldosterone regulation and (2) correction of hypertension in FH-I requires only partial suppression of ACTH, and much smaller glucocorticoid doses than those previously recommended. Familial hyperaldosteronism type II is not glucocorticoid-remediable, and is clinically, biochemically and morphologically indistinguishable from apparently sporadic PAL. In one informative family available for linkage analysis, FH-II does not segregate with either the CYP11B2, AT1 or MEN1 genes, but a genome-wide search has revealed linkage with a locus in chromosome 7. As has already occurred in FH-I, elucidation of causative mutations is likely to facilitate earlier detection of PAL and other curable or specifically treatable forms of hypertension. PMID:11595502

  4. FAMILY SCIARIDAE.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Fernandes, Sheila Patrícia

    2016-01-01

    Sciaridae are a widely distributed family with high number of species. They are known as black fungus gnats due to their dark color and feeding activity. This catalogue presents 17 species from Colombia distributed in eight genera, and for each species the geographical distribution is provided. PMID:27395255

  5. FAMILY CECIDOMYIIDAE.

    PubMed

    Maia, Valéria Cid

    2016-01-01

    This large family is poorly known in Colombia, where only 44 species have been recorded in 20 genera. All of them are included in Cecidomyiinae, which is the most diverse subfamily of gall midges in number of species and feeding habits, including phytophagous, predaceous and fungivorous species. Most of them are galler. The other subfamilies have never been recorded in this country. PMID:27395254

  6. Familial hyperamylasemia.

    PubMed

    Koda, Yu Kar Ling; Vidolin, Eliana

    2002-01-01

    A 7-year-old white boy was referred to us with a history of 3 attacks of hypogastric pain over the previous 2 years and persistently elevated serum amylase concentrations. At physical examination, he was well with no evidence of clinical abnormalities. His weight and height were normal. Laboratory diagnostic investigations were all normal except for the presence of Ascaris lumbricoides in the feces and persistently elevated serum amylase levels. Serum amylase determinations in the family members were normal in his father and maternal grandmother but elevated in his mother, sister, maternal aunt, and uncle, all of whom asymptomatic. Macroamylasemia was excluded in the child and in the mother. The finding of persistently elevated amylasemia in the child and in the other family members spanning 3 generations, and the exclusion of diseases that lead to hyperamilasemia are consistent with the diagnosis of familial hyperamylasemia. Until now, only 1 similar case has been reported. Familial hyperamylasemia must be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperamylasemias in childhood. PMID:11981589

  7. Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorgen, Carol, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This quarterly publication, issued by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), contains articles dealing with family violence and alcohol abuse, children of alcoholic parents, training programs for counselors, and confidentiality of client records. The three articles on alcohol abuse suggest that: (1) there is a clear…

  8. Family Hypnotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araoz, Daniel L.; Negley-Parker, Esther

    1985-01-01

    A therapeutic model to help families activate experiential and right hemispheric functioning through hypnosis is presented in detail, together with a clinical illustration. Different situations in which this model is effective are mentioned and one such set of circumstances is described. (Author)

  9. FAMILY TYMOVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article provides a brief review of the taxonomic structure, virion properties, genome organization and replication strategy, antigenic properties, and biological properties of viruses in the family Tymoviridae. Criteria for demarcation of genus and species are provided. A brief review of each...

  10. FAMILY ASILIDAE.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Marta; Lamas, Carlos José Einicker

    2016-01-01

    Asilidae is one of the largest Diptera families with more than 7,000 recognized species worldwide. All their species are predators on arthropods, mainly insects. This catalogue presents 71 species distributed in 26 genera, ten tribes or generic groups and four subfamilies. For each species we present the available geographical information and relevant references. PMID:27395278

  11. Serving Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Geoffrey; Beggs, Marjorie; Seiderman, Ethel

    Parent Services Project (PSP), the first comprehensive program of resources and mental health activities for parents offered at child care centers in the San Francisco Bay Area (California), has expanded to centers in six states, serving over 19,000 families. This report describes the program's history, aims, and achievements, along with specific…

  12. Family Disruptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Returns Do you or your spouse frequently travel on business? These can be disruptive times for your child and for the family as ... these out-of-town trips. Spend as much time as it takes to explain where you are ... before and during your travels. You need to acknowledge and accept her feelings: " ...

  13. Skeletal dysplasia in a consanguineous clan from the island of Nias/Indonesia is caused by a novel mutation in B3GAT3.

    PubMed

    Budde, Birgit S; Mizumoto, Shuji; Kogawa, Ryo; Becker, Christian; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Rüschendorf, Franz; Toliat, Mohammad R; Kaleschke, Gerrit; Hämmerle, Johannes M; Höhne, Wolfgang; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Nürnberg, Peter; Kennerknecht, Ingo

    2015-07-01

    We describe a large family with disproportionate short stature and bone dysplasia from Nias in which we observed differences in severity when comparing the phenotypes of affected individuals from two remote branches. We conducted a linkage scan in the more severely affected family branch and determined a critical interval of 4.7 cM on chromosome 11. Sequencing of the primary candidate gene TBX10 did not reveal a disease-causing variant. When performing whole exome sequencing we noticed a homozygous missense variant in B3GAT3, c.419C>T [p.(Pro140Leu)]. B3GAT3 encodes β-1,3-glucuronyltransferase-I (GlcAT-I). GlcAT-I catalyzes an initial step of proteoglycan synthesis and the mutation p. (Pro140Leu) lies within the donor substrate-binding subdomain of the catalytic domain. In contrast to the previously published mutation in B3GAT3, c.830G>A [p.(Arg277Gln)], no heart phenotype could be detected in our family. Functional studies revealed a markedly reduced GlcAT-I activity in lymphoblastoid cells from patients when compared to matched controls. Moreover, relative numbers of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains were decreased in patient cells. We found that Pro140Leu-mutant GlcAT-I cannot efficiently transfer GlcA to the linker region trisaccharide. This failure results in a partial deficiency of both chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate chains. Since the phenotype of the Nias patients differs from the Larsen-like syndrome described for patients with mutation p.(Arg277Gln), we suggest mutation B3GAT3:p.(Pro140Leu) to cause a different type of GAG linkeropathy showing no involvement of the heart. PMID:25893793

  14. Family Structure and Family Processes in Mexican American Families

    PubMed Central

    Zeiders, Katharine H.; Roosa, Mark W.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2010-01-01

    Despite increases in single-parent families among Mexican Americans (MA), few studies have examined the association of family structure and family adjustment. Utilizing a diverse sample of 738 Mexican American families (21.7% single parent), the current study examined differences across family structure on early adolescent outcomes, family functioning, and parent-child relationship variables. Results revealed that early adolescents in single parent families reported greater school misconduct, CD/ODD and MDD symptoms, and greater parent-child conflict than their counterparts in two parent families. Single parent mothers reported greater economic hardship, depression and family stress. Family stress and parent-child conflict emerged as significant mediators of the association between family structure and early adolescent outcomes, suggesting important processes linking MA single parent families and adolescent adjustment. PMID:21361925

  15. Family Therapy and Disturbed Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H., Ed.; Boszormenyi-Nagy, Ivan, Ed.

    Presented at a conference at which authors represented major theoretical positions in the field, most of the papers use family therapy as an important source of observations or ideas, or as a means to pinpoint methodological problems. Papers are grouped in sections as follows: four which introduce the reader to the field of specialization, provide…

  16. Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Pejic, Rade N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant-inherited genetic disorder that leads to elevated blood cholesterol levels. FH may present as severely elevated total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels or as premature coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods This review presents information on the disease and on the effects of drug treatment and lifestyle changes. Results Routine lipid testing should identify most patients with FH. Once an index case is identified, testing should be offered to family members. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment with therapeutic lifestyle changes and statins can prevent premature CHD and other atherosclerotic sequelae in patients with FH. Conclusion Emerging therapies such as LDL apheresis and novel therapeutic agents may be useful in patients with homozygous FH or treatment-resistant FH. Liver transplantation is the only effective therapy for severe cases of homozygous FH. PMID:25598733

  17. Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Bouhairie, Victoria Enchia; Goldberg, Anne Carol

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common, inherited disorder of cholesterol metabolism that leads to early cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Statins, ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, lomitapide, mipomersen and LDL apheresis are treatments that can lower LDL cholesterol levels. Early treatment can lead to substantial reduction of cardiovascular events and death in patients with FH. It is important to increase awareness of this disorder in physicians and patients in order to reduce the burden of this disorder. PMID:25939291

  18. Familial hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Ricky D.; Barry, Arden R.; Pearson, Glen J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize the pathophysiology, epidemiology, screening, diagnosis, and treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Quality of evidence A PubMed search was conducted (inception to July 2014) for articles on pathophysiology, screening, diagnosis, and management of FH, supplemented with hand searches of bibliographies of guidelines and reviews. A supporting level of evidence for each recommendation was categorized as level I (randomized controlled trial or systematic review of randomized controlled trials), level II (observational study), or level III (expert opinion). The best available evidence is mostly level II or III. Main message Familial hypercholesterolemia affects 1 in 500 Canadians. Risk of a coronary event is high in these patients and is underestimated by risk calculators (eg, Framingham). Clinicians should screen patients according to guidelines and suspect FH in any patient with a premature cardiovascular event, physical stigmata of hypercholesterolemia, or an elevated plasma lipid level. Physicians should diagnose FH using either the Simon Broome or Dutch Lipid Network criteria. Management of heterozygous FH includes reducing low-density lipoprotein levels by 50% or more from baseline with high-dose statins and other lipid-lowering agents. Clinicians should refer any patient with homozygous FH to a specialized centre. Conclusion Familial hypercholesterolemia represents an important cause of premature cardiovascular disease in Canadians. Early identification and aggressive treatment of individuals with FH reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26796832

  19. Family affairs.

    PubMed

    Dupont, M

    1994-06-01

    It's no secret that your job is stressful, forcing you to deal with tragedy and death on a regular basis. You've become good at what you do because you pay attention to details and care about people. Most of the EMS providers I've known dedicate untold hours to their work, usually in addition to the regular jobs they hold. Their communities need them to be ready at a moment's notice when the pager sounds. Someone is in crisis. A life may hang in the balance-a life they may save. But what about the family that's left behind as you run out the door-yet again? How do your spouse/significant other and kids cope with whatever emotional state you're in when you return home? While your stress may be evident, their distress may be overlooked. What price do they pay to live with you? These questions were addressed during several workshops my colleagues and I conducted for EMS providers and their families. Many of the problems and frustrations identified in this article were shared by EMTs' family members who attended. PMID:10134394

  20. Family-centered rounds.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Vineeta

    2014-08-01

    Family-centered rounds (FCRs) are multidisciplinary rounds that involve medical teams partnering with patients and families in daily medical decision-making. Multiple FCR benefits have been identified including improving patient satisfaction, communication, discharge planning, medical education, and patient safety. Main barriers to FCRs are variability in attending rounding, duration of rounds, physical constrains of large teams and small rooms, specific and sensitive patient conditions, and lack of training of residents, students, and faculty on how to conduct effective and effecient FCRs. In the last decade, many programs have incorporated FCRs into daily practice due to their multiple perceived benefits. Future FCRs should focus on better operationalizing of FCRs and reporting on objective outcomes measures such as improved communication, coordination, and patient satisfaction that are crucial for healthcare. PMID:25084715

  1. [Family planning in Benin: what future?].

    PubMed

    Danlodji, R

    1993-01-01

    In Benin, family planning began in the late 1960s, but its activities were not clear or specific. It made small strides in private clinics until a family planning association was formed, later named the Beninese Association to Promote the Family (ABPF). Family planning promoters maintain that reduction in births per couple is necessary for economic development in Africa. Family planning detractors think that a child is a fruit of God and that family planning impedes his or her coming to the world. ABPF has worked much to promote Beninese families, but it is still not well known. Despite the associations efforts and those of many other institutions, contraceptive prevalence is low and the abortion rate and its risks remain high, namely, death, infertility, and contraction of various diseases. Thus, it is important to rethink family planning strategies. All intervening parties should coordinate activities to better reach urban and rural populations. Many rural inhabitants go to cities to escape poverty and the misery evoked by their family size and meager earnings only to find unemployment in the cities. In order for family planning to have an effect in Benin, it is important to begin working with youth. Any family planning strategy must consider their aspirations. The youth are inclined to be more receptive to family planning than the adults who do not want to give up old habits. Yet, contraceptive use in 14-20 year olds is low even though sexual activity is high. Since the youth want a small family size, a small plot of land, a care, and a successful life, it is important to give priority to jobs. We need to educate the youth so they can freely decide their family size. Socioeconomic reasons are the primary factor pushing people to accept family planning, followed by health reasons. Research is needed to learn why contraceptive prevalence is still low. PMID:12318558

  2. FAMILY SCIOMYZIDAE.

    PubMed

    Marinoni, Luciane; Murphy, William L

    2016-01-01

    The Sciomyzidae are a family of acalyptrate flies of worldwide distribution, with 543 extant species and 14 described subspecies in 63 genera. Although 274 species in 37 genera are found in the Western Hemisphere, the sciomyzid fauna of Central and South America remains relatively unknown, comprising 103 species in 25 genera, with only seven species in five genera having been recorded from Colombia: Dictya bergi Valley, Perilimnia albifacies Becker, Pherbellia guttata (Coquillett), Sepedomerus bipuncticeps (Malloch), S. macropus (Walker), Sepedonea guianica (Steyskal), and S. isthmi (Steyskal). PMID:27395301

  3. Familial Idiopathic Cranial Neuropathy in a Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Jianfeng; Yu, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    Cranial neuropathy is usually idiopathic and familial cases are uncommon. We describe a family with 5 members with cranial neuropathy over 3 generations. All affected patients were women, indicating an X-linked dominant or an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Our cases and a review of the literature suggest that familial idiopathic cranial neuropathy is a rare condition which may be related to autosomal dominant vascular disorders (e.g. vascular tortuosity, sclerosis, elongation or extension), small posterior cranial fossas, anatomical variations of the posterior circulation, hypersensitivity of cranial nerves and other abnormalities. Moreover, microvascular decompression is the treatment of choice because vascular compression is the main factor in the pathogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of familial cranial neuropathy in China. PMID:27161475

  4. Thyroid peroxidase gene mutations causing congenital hypothyroidism in three Turkish families.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Mehmet Nuri; Uslu, Abdi Burak; Onenli-Mungan, Neslihan; Yuksel, Bilgin; Pohlenz, Joachim; Topaloglu, Ali Kemal

    2009-11-01

    In Turkey congenital hypothyroidism (CH) occurs with a prevalence of one in 2,736 newborns while the worldwide incidence is one in 3,000-4,000 newborns. 85-90% of these cases are due to dysgenesis of the thyroid gland, whereas defects in thyroid hormone synthesis account for 10-15%. The majority of patients with dyshormonogenesis have a defect in thyroid peroxidase (TPO). To date, more than 60 different mutations have been described in the TPO gene, mostly single nucleotide substitutions. Five children from three consanguineous families were diagnosed with CH on the basis of clinical symptoms and signs--goiter, macroglossia and prolonged jaundice at newborn age. Two different mutations in the TPO gene were identified. Affected children in families I and II had a nonsense mutation in exon 10 (R540X). Genotyping of polymorphic markers within the TPO gene revealed that these families shared a common haplotype, suggesting a founder effect. In the third family, a novel mutation (G319R) in exon 8 was identified. PMID:20101889

  5. A Novel ABCA12 Mutation in Two Families with Congenital Ichthyosis

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, D. M.; Shah, S. H.; Simpson, M. A.; Morgan, N. V.; Khaliq, S.; Trembath, R. C.; Mehdi, S. Q.; Maher, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a rare genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by hyperkeratosis in addition to dry, scaly skin. There are six genes currently known to be associated with the disease. Exome sequencing data for two affected individuals with ichthyosis from two apparently unrelated consanguineous Pakistani families was analysed. Potential candidate mutations were analysed in additional family members to determine if the putative mutation segregated with disease status. A novel mutation (c.G4676T, p.Gly1559Val) in ABCA12 occurred at a highly conserved residue, segregated with disease status in both families, and was not detected in 143 control chromosomes. Genotyping with microsatellite markers demonstrated a partial common haplotype in the two families, and a common founder mutation could not be excluded. Comparison to previously reported cases was consistent with the hypothesis that severe loss of function ABCA12 mutations are associated with Harlequin Ichthyosis and missense mutations are preferentially associated with milder phenotypes. In addition to identifying a possible founder mutation, this paper illustrates how advances in genome sequencing technologies could be utilised to rapidly elucidate the molecular basis of inherited skin diseases which can be caused by mutations in multiple disease genes. PMID:24278723

  6. Mutations in WDR62 gene in Pakistani families with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly is a disorder of neurogenic mitosis that causes reduction in brain size. It is a rare heterogeneous condition with seven causative genes reported to date. Mutations in WD repeat protein 62 are associated with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly with cortical malformations. This study was initiated to screen WDR62 mutations in four consanguineous Pakistani families with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. Methods As part of a large study to detect the genetic basis of primary microcephaly in Pakistan, homozygosity mapping and DNA sequencing was used to explore the genetic basis of autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in four families. Results Four out of 100 families recruited in the study revealed linkage to the MCPH2 locus on chromosome 19, which harbor WDR62 gene. DNA sequencing in these MCPH2 linked families result in the identification of a novel nonsense mutation (p.Q648X) and three previously known mutations. Conclusion Our data indicate that WDR62 mutations cause about 4% of autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in Pakistan. PMID:21961505

  7. Family and family therapy in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Karin; Baars, Jan

    2012-04-01

    This article describes how families are functioning in the Netherlands, and how family therapy is used in mental healthcare. In the open Dutch society, new ideas are easily incorporated, as exemplified by the rapid introduction and growth of family therapy in the 1980s. In recent decades, however, family therapy has lost ground to other treatment models that are more individually orientated, and adhere to stricter protocols. This decline of family therapy has been exacerbated by recent budget cuts in mental healthcare. In regular healthcare institutes family therapy now has a marginal position at best, although family treatment models are used in specific areas such as forensic treatments. In addition, the higher trained family therapists have found their own niches to work with couples and families. We argue that a stronger position of family therapy would be beneficial for patients and for families, in order to counteract the strong individualization of Dutch society. PMID:22515464

  8. Multigene families in African swine fever virus: family 360.

    PubMed Central

    González, A; Calvo, V; Almazán, F; Almendral, J M; Ramírez, J C; de la Vega, I; Blasco, R; Viñuela, E

    1990-01-01

    A group of cross-hybridizing DNA segments contained within the restriction fragments RK', RL, RJ, and RD' of African swine fever virus DNA were mapped and sequenced. Analysis of these sequences revealed the presence of a family of homologous open reading frames in regions close to the DNA ends. The whole family is composed of six open reading frames with an average length of 360 coding triplets (multigene family 360), four of which are located in the left part of the genome and two of which are in the right terminal EcoRI fragment. In close proximity to the right terminal inverted repeat, we found an additional small open reading frame which was homologous to the 5'-terminal portion of the other open reading frames, suggesting that most of that open reading frame has been deleted. These repeated sequences account for the previously described inverted internal repetitions (J.M. Sogo, J.M. Almendral, A. Talavera, and E. Viñuela, Virology 133:271-275, 1984). Most of the genes of multigene family 360 are transcribed in African swine fever virus-infected cells. A comparison of the predicted protein sequences of family 360 indicated that several residues are conserved, suggesting that an overall structure is maintained for every member of the family. The transcription direction of each open reading frame, as well as the evolutionary relationships among the genes, suggests that the family originated by gene duplication and translocation of sequences between the DNA ends. Images PMID:2325203

  9. Roles within the Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Text Size Email Print Share Roles Within the Family Page Content Article Body Families are not democracies. ...

  10. National Military Family Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinton and Trump Stand Behind the Uniform? Military families have some questions... More Suicide Prevention Awareness Month ... quick fact sheet about this program. Operation Purple Family Retreats Operation Purple Family Retreats provide military families ...

  11. In Support of Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Albert T.

    1979-01-01

    The article discusses support services and sources for the families of handicapped children. Aspects covered include family involvement in early childhood education programs, emotional support, and family mental health. The characteristics of the "ideal" family are also discussed. (DLS)

  12. Homozygous 16p13.11 duplication associated with mild intellectual disability and urinary tract malformations in two siblings born from consanguineous parents.

    PubMed

    Houcinat, N; Llanas, B; Moutton, S; Toutain, J; Cailley, D; Arveiler, B; Combe, C; Lacombe, D; Rooryck, C

    2015-11-01

    The use of array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) in routine clinical work has allowed the identification of many new copy number variations (CNV). The 16p13.11 duplication has been implicated in various congenital anomalies and neurodevelopmental disorders, but it has also been identified in healthy individuals. We report a clinical observation of two brothers from related parents each carrying a homozygous 16p13.11 duplication. The propositus had mild intellectual disability and posterior urethral valves with chronic renal disease. His brother was considered a healthy child with only learning disabilities and poor academic performances. However, a routine medical examination at 25-years-old revealed a mild chronic renal disease and ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Furthermore, the father presented with a unilateral renal agenesis, thus it seemed that a "congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract" (CAKUT) phenotype segregated in this family. This may be related to the duplication, but we cannot exclude the involvement of additional genetic or non-genetic factors in the urological phenotype. Several cohort studies showed association between this chromosomal imbalance and different clinical manifestations, but rarely with CAKUT. The duplication reported here was similar to the larger one of 3.4 Mb previously described versus the more common of 1.6 Mb. It encompassed at least 11 known genes, including the five ohnologs previously identified. Our observation, in addition to expanding the clinical spectrum of the duplication provides further support to understanding the underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:26114937

  13. The AVIT protein family

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Alexandra; Winklmayr, Martina; Lepperdinger, Günther; Kreil, Günther

    2003-01-01

    Homologues of a protein originally isolated from snake venom and frog skin secretions are present in many vertebrate species. They contain 80–90 amino acids, 10 of which are cysteines with identical spacing. Various names have been given to these proteins, such as mamba intestinal protein 1 (MIT1), Bv8 (Bombina variegata molecular mass ∼8 kDa), prokineticins and endocrine-gland vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF). Their amino-terminal sequences are identical, and so we propose that the sequence of their first four residues, AVIT, is used as a name for this family. From a comparison of the sequences, two types of AVIT proteins can be discerned. These proteins seem to be distributed widely in mammalian tissues and are known to bind to G-protein-coupled receptors. Members of this family have been shown to stimulate contraction of the guinea pig ileum, to cause hyperalgesia after injection into rats and to be active as specific growth factors. Moreover, the messenger RNA level of one of these AVIT proteins changes rhythmically in the region of the brain known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This shows that members of this new family of small proteins are involved in diverse biological processes. PMID:12728244

  14. Transforming Training. Families Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gwen

    The Families Matter series of papers from the Harvard Family Research Project advances the concept of family-centered child care, advocating an approach to early childhood education that addresses the development of the child and family together. Grounded in family support principles, which build on family strengths and work from a community's…

  15. Credentialing Caregivers. Families Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Christiana

    The Families Matter series of papers from the Harvard Family Research Project advances the concept of family-centered child care, advocating an approach to early childhood education that addresses the development of the child and family together. Grounded in family support principles, which build on family strengths and work from a community's…

  16. Reclaiming Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John

    2012-01-01

    The pull for family is strong, almost primeval, most likely it is evolutionary, and for those lacking the benefit of family or Family Privilege, the loss of family is painful and profoundly sad. Young people who struggle to cope without stable family connections are profoundly aware of their lack of "Family Privilege." In this article, the author…

  17. IS4 family goes genomic

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Insertion sequences (ISs) are small, mobile DNA entities able to expand in prokaryotic genomes and trigger important rearrangements. To understand their role in evolution, accurate IS taxonomy is essential. The IS4 family is composed of ~70 elements and, like some other families, displays extremely elevated levels of internal divergence impeding its classification. The increasing availability of complete genome sequences provides a valuable source for the discovery of additional IS4 elements. In this study, this genomic database was used to update the structural and functional definition of the IS4 family. Results A total of 227 IS4-related sequences were collected among more than 500 sequenced bacterial and archaeal genomes, representing more than a three fold increase of the initial inventory. A clear division into seven coherent subgroups was discovered as well as three emerging families, which displayed distinct structural and functional properties. The IS4 family was sporadically present in 17 % of analyzed genomes, with most of them displaying single or a small number of IS4 elements. Significant expansions were detected only in some pathogens as well as among certain extremophiles, suggesting the probable involvement of some elements in bacterial and archaeal adaptation and/or evolution. Finally, it should be noted that some IS4 subgroups and two emerging families occurred preferentially in specific phyla or exclusively inside a specific genus. Conclusion The present taxonomic update of IS4 and emerging families will facilitate the classification of future elements as they arise from ongoing genome sequencing. Their narrow genomic impact and the existence of both IS-poor and IS-rich thriving prokaryotes suggested that these families, and probably ISs in general, are occasionally used as a tool for genome flexibility and evolution, rather than just representing self sustaining DNA entities. PMID:18215304

  18. Integrating Family Resilience and Family Stress Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Joan M.

    2002-01-01

    The construct, family resilience, is defined differently by practitioners and researchers. This study tries to clarify the concept of family resilience. The foundation is family stress and coping theory, particularly the stress models that emphasize adaptation processes in families exposed to major adversities. (JDM)

  19. Whole Family: Whole Child. Broken Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVaul, Sue; Davis, John U.

    A literature review on the family environments of gifted students found that gifted children are more likely to be living in intact families than in divorced families. Children of single parents were more likely to be low-achieving, tardy, absent, truant, discipline problems, suspended, expelled, and dropouts than students in two-parent families.…

  20. Family Law and Family Studies: Professor's Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Mary W.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The results of a survey of family studies faculty concerning the inclusion of family law topics in family studies courses are discussed. The professor's needs for training and resources in the area of family and the law are identified and recommendations for meeting these needs are suggested. (Author)

  1. The Family Hero in Black Alcoholism Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisbane, Francis L.

    1989-01-01

    Uses data from 20 case studies of Black adult female children of alcoholic parents to discuss Family Hero role often assumed by oldest or only female child in Black alcoholism families. Explains how female-dominated survival role of Family Hero in Black families is significantly more related to racial and cultural factors than numbers alone may…

  2. Family Psychology and Family Therapy in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kameguchi, Kenji; Murphy-Shigematsu, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the development of family psychology and family therapy in Japan, tracing the origins of these movements, explaining how these fields were activated by the problem of school refusal, and describing an approach to family therapy that has been developed to work with families confronting this problem, as well as preventive programs of family…

  3. A Lebanese family with autosomal recessive oculo-auriculo-vertebral (OAV) spectrum and review of the literature: is OAV a genetically heterogeneous disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Farra, Chantal; Yunis, Khaled; Yazbeck, Nadine; Majdalani, Marianne; Charafeddine, Lama; Wakim, Rima; Awwad, Johnny

    2011-01-01

    Oculo-auriculo-vertebral (OAV) spectrum summarizes a continuum of ocular, auricular, and vertebral anomalies. Goldenhar syndrome is a variant of this spectrum and is characterized by pre-auricular skin tags, microtia, facial asymmetry, ocular abnormalities, and vertebral anomalies of different sizes and shapes. Most cases are thought to be sporadic. However, a few families were reported to have an autosomal recessive inheritance and other families’ presentation of the syndrome strongly supported an autosomal dominant inheritance. We report OAV in a female infant presenting with tracheomalacia, diaphragmatic hernia, encephalomeningocele, sacral neural tube defect, and cardiac defect and her brother having no more than dysmorphic features. The mode of inheritance in this family supports an autosomal recessive inheritance where the transmission was from normal first-degree consanguineous parents to one of the sons and to the daughter. This report further broadens the clinical presentation and symptoms of OAV and supports the hypothesis advancing OAV as a genetically heterogeneous disorder. PMID:23776370

  4. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report details a survey of state child care regulatory agencies. Data on both small family child care homes (FCCH) and group or large family child care homes (LCCH or GCCH) are included and organized into 22 categories: (1) number of regulated homes; (2) definitions and regulatory requirements; (3) unannounced inspection procedure; (4)…

  5. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report details the findings of an annual survey of state child care regulatory agencies. The survey gathered data on both small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes in each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The report's introduction lists the survey categories and…

  6. Teaching English to Refugees: A Family Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andre, Elise; Brown, Dorothy S.

    The instructional program in English as a second language (ESL) followed by a family of 12 Hmong refugees in a small midwestern town is described. Eight of the younger members of the family met for one hour three times each week. Instruction was under the guidance of two teachers, thus allowing for individual help. Other volunteers assisted from…

  7. 76 FR 39115 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Transformation Initiative Family Self-Sufficiency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... Family Self-Sufficiency Demonstration Small Grants. Description of the need for information and proposed... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Transformation Initiative Family Self-Sufficiency Demonstration Small Grants AGENCY: Office of Policy Development and Research, HUD. ACTION:...

  8. Small Wins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhatigan, James J.; Schuh, John H.

    2003-01-01

    Examines how it easy for people to overlook small successes when they are overwhelmed by and preoccupied with large projects and goals. Explores the concept of "small wins" in organizational theory, which have the potential to become a prominent part of institutional culture and impact organizational behavior and change. (GCP)

  9. An Indian family of hereditary pituitary dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Havaldar, P V

    1991-01-01

    Three girls and one boy out of six siblings born to parents of consanguineous marriage presented with pituitary dwarfism. Their parents were of normal height. All the affected children had features of classical isolated growth hormone deficiency. No hypoglycaemic attacks were noted. Three of them attained puberty at the age of 16 years. PMID:1721794

  10. Familial Hypercholesterolaemia

    PubMed Central

    Marais, A David

    2004-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), defined as the heritable occurrence of severe hypercholesterolaemia with cholesterol deposits in tendons and premature heart disease, is caused by at least four genes in sterol and lipoprotein pathways and displays varying gene-dose effects. The genes are the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, apolipoprotein (apo) B, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9, and the autosomal recessive hypercholesterolaemia (ARH) adaptor protein. All of these disorders have in common defective clearance of LDL within a complex system of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and regulation. Normal cellular cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism is reviewed before describing the disorders, their metabolic derangements and their clinical effects. FH is classified as two simplified phenotypes of disease according to the severity of the metabolic derangement. The dominantly inherited heterozygous phenotype comprises defects in the LDL receptor, apoB100, and neural apoptosis regulatory cleavage protein. The homozygous phenotype is co-dominant in defects of the LDL receptor, and occurs also as the ARH of adapter protein mutations. Defective binding of apoB100 does not result in a significant gene dose effect, but enhances the severity of heterozygotes for LDL receptor mutations. The genetic diagnosis of FH has provided greater accuracy in definition and detection of disease and exposes information about migration of populations. All of these disorders pose a high risk of atherosclerosis, especially in the homozygous phenotype. Studies of influences on the phenotype and responses to treatment are also discussed in the context of the metabolic derangements. PMID:18516203

  11. Homozygous TREM2 mutation in a family with atypical frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bras, José; Camuzat, Agnès; Caroppo, Paola; Lattante, Serena; Couarch, Philippe; Kabashi, Edor; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Dubois, Bruno; Brice, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    TREM2 mutations were first identified in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent fractures because of bone cysts and presenile dementia. Recently, homozygous and compound heterozygous TREM2 mutations were identified in rare families with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) but without bone involvement. We identified a p.Thr66Met heterozygous mutation in a new consanguineous Italian family. Two sibs had early onset autosomal recessive FTLD without severe bone disorders. Atypical signs were present in this family: early parietal and hippocampus involvement, parkinsonism, epilepsy, and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. This study further demonstrates the implication of TREM2 mutations in FTLD phenotypes. It illustrates the variability of bone phenotype and underlines the frequency of atypical signs in TREM2 carriers. This and previous studies evidence that TREM2 mutation screening should be limited to autosomal recessive FTLD with atypical phenotypes characterized by: (1) a very young age at onset (20–50 years); (2) early parietal and hippocampal deficits; (3) the presence of seizures and parkinsonism; (4) suggestive extensive white matter lesions and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:24910390

  12. Homozygous TREM2 mutation in a family with atypical frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Le Ber, Isabelle; De Septenville, Anne; Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, José; Camuzat, Agnès; Caroppo, Paola; Lattante, Serena; Couarch, Philippe; Kabashi, Edor; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Dubois, Bruno; Brice, Alexis

    2014-10-01

    TREM2 mutations were first identified in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent fractures because of bone cysts and presenile dementia. Recently, homozygous and compound heterozygous TREM2 mutations were identified in rare families with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) but without bone involvement. We identified a p.Thr66Met heterozygous mutation in a new consanguineous Italian family. Two sibs had early onset autosomal recessive FTLD without severe bone disorders. Atypical signs were present in this family: early parietal and hippocampus involvement, parkinsonism, epilepsy, and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. This study further demonstrates the implication of TREM2 mutations in FTLD phenotypes. It illustrates the variability of bone phenotype and underlines the frequency of atypical signs in TREM2 carriers. This and previous studies evidence that TREM2 mutation screening should be limited to autosomal recessive FTLD with atypical phenotypes characterized by: (1) a very young age at onset (20-50 years); (2) early parietal and hippocampal deficits; (3) the presence of seizures and parkinsonism; (4) suggestive extensive white matter lesions and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:24910390

  13. A report of 8 cases with hemoglobin H disease in an Iranian family.

    PubMed

    Azarkeivan, Azita; Azita, Azarkeivan; Neishabury, Maryam; Hadavi, Valeh; Esteghamat, Fatemehsadat; Fatemehsadat, Esteghamat; Enrahimkhani, Saideh; Najmabadi, Hossein; Hossein, Najmabadi

    2010-08-01

    alpha-Thalassemia is a common genetic disorder in Iran. However, no comprehensive data on epidemiology of severe forms of alpha-thalassemia, including hemoglobin H (HbH) or hydrops fetalis, is available in this population. This is a first case report of an Iranian family with large number of HbH individuals. The proband is a 48-year-old woman, referred to our center with anemia and no history of previous blood transfusions. Similar clinical phenotype has been observed in all of her 5 siblings, 2 of her 4 children, and her granddaughter, whose parents are first cousins. A reverse hybridization assay covering 21 alpha globin mutations was performed to determine the genotype in 11 members of this family and a fetus. HbH genotype was identified in 9 individuals, representing 3 generations, including a fetus. The high prevalence of alpha-thalassemia carriers together with the high rate of consanguineous marriages could lead to a large number of individuals with HbH or even hydrops fetalis in Iranian families. Therefore, to avoid the risk of having affected offspring, carrier detection, genetic counseling, and prenatal diagnosis would be of vital importance for individuals with low red blood cell (RBC) indices, normal iron status, and normal HbA(2) level, who are suspected to be alpha-thalassemia carriers. PMID:20670167

  14. Genetic homogeneity in Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome: Linkage to chromosome 17p in families of different non-Swedish ethnic origins

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, G.R.; Lee, M.; Compton, J.G.

    1995-11-01

    Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by congenital ichthyosis, mental retardation, and spastic diplegia or tetraplegia. Three United States families, three Egyptian families, and one Israeli Arab family were investigated for linkage of the SLS gene to a region of chromosome 17. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis with nine markers mapped the SLS gene to the same region of the genome as that reported in Swedish SLS pedigrees. Examination of recombinants by haplotype analysis showed that the gene lies in the region containing the markers D17S953, D17S805, D17S689, and D17S842. D17S805 is pericentromeric on 17p. Patients in two consanguineous Egyptian families were homozygous at the nine marker loci tested, and another patient from a third family was homozygous for eight of the nine, suggesting that within each of these families the region of chromosome 17 carrying the SLS gene is identical by descent. Linkage of the SLS gene to chromosome 17p in families of Arabic, mixed European, Native American, and Swedish descent provides evidence for a single SLS locus and should prove useful for diagnosis and carrier detection in worldwide cases. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Mutations of the AMH type II receptor in two extended families with persistent Müllerian duct syndrome: lack of phenotype/genotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Mohammad; Taheini, Khalid; Picard, Jean-Yves; Cate, Richard L; Josso, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to compare phenotype and genotype in two extended Middle-Eastern families affected by persistent Müllerian duct syndrome due to mutations of the type II anti-Müllerian hormone receptor (AMHR-II). The first, consanguineous, family consisted of 6 boys and 2 girls, the second consisted of 4 girls and 2 boys. In family I, 4 boys and 1 girl were homozygous for a stop mutation in the 9th exon of AMHR-II, removing part of the intracellular domain of the protein. In family II, 1 girl and 1 boy were homozygous for a transversion changing conserved histidine 254 into a glutamine. Both homozygous girls were normal. In the homozygous males, the degree of development of Müllerian derivatives was variable. The uterus was well developed in 2 boys of family I and in the patient from family II; however, in 1 subject from family I, Müllerian derivatives were undetectable. Taken together, the diversity of clinical symptoms within the same sibship and the lack of correlation between the development of the Müllerian derivatives and the severity of the molecular defects suggest highly variable penetrance of the abnormal alleles and/or the existence of other genetic or epigenetic modifiers of gene expression. PMID:22584735

  16. MIR376 family and cancer.

    PubMed

    Tekirdag, Kumsal Ayse; Akkoc, Yunus; Kosar, Ali; Gozuacik, Devrim

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous non-coding small RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. They have been implicated in several fundamental biological processes including development, differentiation, apoptosis and stem cell maintenance. There is increasing evidence that microRNAs also play roles in cellular transformation and carcinogenesis by acting either as tumor suppressors or oncogenes. Recent studies introduced MIR376 as an important microRNA family for cancer formation and progression. The MIR376 family is located on human chromosome 14 and it has several members containing identical or similar seed sequences. Biological roles of family members were studied in different cancer settings, including gliomas, leukemia, breast and ovarian cancers. Furthermore, two MIR376 family members, namely MIR376A and MIR376B were implicated in the regulation of macroautophagy (autophagy herein). Since autophagy dysregulation underlies various diseases including cancer, it is essential to understand the role of the MIR376 family in this context. In this article, we summarize the miRNA-cancer connection, and review accumulating data about the involvement of the MIR376 family in cancer biology. PMID:26940843

  17. Family Reading Night

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Darcy; Greenfeld, Marsha; Epstein, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    This book offers clear and practical guidelines to help engage families in student success. It shows families how to conduct a successful Family Reading Night at their school. Family Night themes include Scary Stories, Books We Love, Reading Olympics, Dr. Seuss, and other themes. Family reading nights invite parents to come to school with their…

  18. Family Treatment Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawicki, Donna

    The document describes the Family Treatment Unit, a demonstration program to provide a variety of family treatment services to status offenders (11 to 17 years old) and their families. The goals of the program are: (1) to provide family services to families of status offenders; (2) to maintain status offenders in their natural homes by…

  19. The Changing Family Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter issue contains feature articles and short reports on how and why family structures are undergoing substantial change in many parts of the world. These articles include: (1) "The Changing Family Structure," a review of how families are changing and why; (2) "Peru: Families in the Andes"; (3) "Thailand: Families of the Garbage Dump";…

  20. Family Capital: Implications for Interventions with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcher, John R.; Peckuonis, Edward V.; Deforge, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Social capital has been extensively discussed in the literature as building blocks that individuals and communities utilize to leverage system resources. Similarly, some families also create capital, which can enable members of the family, such as children, to successfully negotiate the outside world. Families in poverty confront serious…

  1. Family Reunion Health Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Phone (Continued) 1. Send a Kidney Health Message Hi Family, I came across this information and thought ... mails to family members. Before the Reunion 1. Hi family! Taking care of your kidneys is important. ...

  2. Improving Family Communications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Improving Family Communications Page Content Article Body How can I ...

  3. Normal Functioning Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  4. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  5. Developing Strengths in Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Ted

    1976-01-01

    There are few descriptions of growth experiences for total families. This paper describes one such model. It expresses the conviction that families need opportunities to come together with other families to identify strengths, sharpen communication skills, and establish goals. (Author)

  6. Small ethics.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, ethics in the professions has focused on big problems that could be found on other peoples' back porches. Small, habitual, frequent, and personal lapses get little attention. In this essay, the literature on opportunism is applied to dentistry with a view toward bringing matters of "near ethics" within reach. Examples of small lapses are discussed under the headings of shirking, free riding, shrinkage, pressing, adverse selection, moral hazard, and risk shifting. The conditions that support opportunism include relationships with small numbers of transactions and uneven access to information. Practical limits on understanding all the consequences of agreements and the costs of supervising others and enforcing corrections of breaches are inescapable aspects of opportunism. Opportunism may not be accepted by all as the subject matter of ethical, but curbing it is a worthy goal and understanding the causes and management of opportunism casts some light on the ethical enterprise. Four suggestions are offered for addressing issue of opportunism. PMID:17691498

  7. The Clinical Features and Diagnosis of Adrenoleukodystrophy: A Case Series of Iranian Family

    PubMed Central

    KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh; JAFARI, Narjes; NEJAD BIGLARI, Habibe; JABBEHDARI, Sayena; ALIZADEH, Mehdi; ALIZADEH, Ghazal; NEJAD BIGLARI, Hamid; SANII, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objective Adrenoleukodystrophy disorder is one of the x-linked genetic disorders caused by the myelin sheath breakdown in the brain. In this study, we present 4 yr experience on this disorder. Materials & Methods The patients diagnosed as adrenoleukodystrophy in the Neurology Department of Mofid Children’s Hospital in Tehran, Iran from 2010 to 2014 were enrolled into the study. The disorder was confirmed by neuroimaging and clinical findings along with genetic and neurometabolic assessment at Reference Laboratory in Germany. We assessed age, gender, past medical history, developmental status, clinical manifestations, and neuroimaging findings of populous family with adrenoleukodystrophy. Results All of the patients were one populous family with high rate of consanguineous marriages. This disorder was confirmed by genetic assessment, VLCFA and brain MRI. c.253_254insC, p.R85Pfs112* was found in heterozygote state and the VLCFA assessment showed the typical pattern for adrenoleukodystrophy/ adrenomyeloneuropathy. This diagnosis was in agreement with the family history and the clinical history of the patient. Since there have been a number of cases in patient’s family in the past, so intensive follow-up on the family especially detection the female members of the family of childbearing age was recommended. The amount of C-26, C24/C22 and C26/C22 was elevated. All patients with the same genotype had wide ranges of clinical presentation. Conclusion Early diagnose of this disease might help us for early intervention and prenatal diagnosis for the disease in next siblings. PMID:27057190

  8. 26 CFR 1.1366-3 - Treatment of family groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Treatment of family groups. 1.1366-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Small Business Corporations and Their Shareholders § 1.1366-3 Treatment of family groups. (a) In general. Under section 1366(e), if an individual, who is a member of the family of one...

  9. Reading Parties: Helping Families Share the Joy of Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Zulmara

    2001-01-01

    Recognizes the critical role parents play in helping young children become successful readers and writers. Describes how the Even Start program encourages families to host a party for a small group of friends and family in their home to help families gain access to the knowledge, skills, and resources they need to create a literate environment in…

  10. Through a Rear-View Mirror: Families Look Back at a Family Literacy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Ann; Anderson, Jim; Teichert, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report on a study in which we interviewed working class families who were the first cohort in a family literacy program that had been locally developed and implemented in a small village in Canada more than two decades previously in response to community-identified needs. The study was framed by Tulving's concept of…

  11. Families and family therapy in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Tse, Samson; Ng, Roger M K; Tonsing, Kareen N; Ran, Maosheng

    2012-04-01

    Family therapy views humans not as separate entities, but as embedded in a network of relationships, highlighting the reciprocal influences of one's behaviours on one another. This article gives an overview of family demographics and the implementation of family therapy in Hong Kong. We start with a review of the family demographics in Hong Kong and brief notes on families in mainland China. Demographics show that the landscape has changed markedly in the past decade, with more cross-border marriages, an increased divorce rate, and an ageing overall population - all of which could mean that there is increasing demand for professional family therapy interventions. However, only a limited number of professionals are practising the systems-based approach in Hong Kong. Some possible reasons as to why family therapy is not well disseminated and practised are discussed. These reasons include a lack of mental health policy to support family therapy, a lack of systematic family therapy training, and a shortage of skilled professionals. Furthermore, challenges in applying the western model in Chinese culture are also outlined. We conclude that more future research is warranted to investigate how family therapy can be adapted for Chinese families. PMID:22515459

  12. Small Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhnke, Falko; Musmann, Gunter; Glassmeier, K. H.; Tsurutani, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Small, lightweight, low-power magnetometer measures three-dimensional magnetic field. Includes three toroidal cores - one for each dimension. Exhibits high sensitivity, low zero-point drift, and low noise. Magnetometer circuit includes driver circuit and three analog signal-processing circuits. Output of analog signal-processing circuit proportional to one of components of external magnetic field.

  13. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a culturally-adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9–12 year old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted with each family. Parental stress, parent-child dysfunctional relations, and child behavior problems were reduced in the families receiving the intervention; family hardiness and family attachment were improved. Findings contribute to the validation of the SFP with Latinos, and can be used to inform social work practice with Puerto Rican families. PMID:20871785

  14. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-Lom (HMSNL) in a Spanish family: clinical, electrophysiological, pathological and genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Colomer, J; Iturriaga, C; Kalaydjieva, L; Angelicheva, D; King, R H; Thomas, P K

    2000-12-01

    The clinical, electrophysiological, pathological and genetic findings are described in the first Spanish family diagnosed with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Lom (HMSNL) initially identified by Kalaydjeva et al. in 1996. The three affected patients belong to a non-consanguineous family with Gypsy background that were followed up over 10 years. Serial clinical and neurophysiological examinations and genetic analysis were undertaken in every patient. Sural nerve biopsy was performed in the oldest patient. The clinical features are similar to those previously described in HMSNL and all of them showed abnormal brain auditory evoked potentials. The oldest brother developed sensorineural deafness at the age of 20. Conduction velocities were unobtainable in all patients and nerves tested except for the median nerve in the youngest child in whom conduction was severely slowed. Neuropathological examination revealed a severely depleted nerve with very few surviving myelinated fibers which possessed thin myelin sheaths. Schwann cell processes were arranged in circular configurations without typical onion bulb configuration. Genetic analysis showed that the maternal chromosome inherited by all three affected siblings displayed a very unusual haplotype. Our patients show the characteristic clinical, electrophysiological and pathological findings described in HMSNL and represent the first reported Spanish family affected from the disease. The genetic findings in this family have contributed to refine the HMSNL critical linkage region. PMID:11053685

  15. Family self-tailoring: Applying a systems approach to improving family healthy living behaviors.

    PubMed

    Moore, Shirley M; Jones, Lenette; Alemi, Farrokh

    2016-01-01

    The adoption and maintenance of healthy living behaviors by individuals and families is a major challenge. We describe a new model of health behavior change, SystemCHANGE (SC), which focuses on the redesign of family daily routines using system improvement methods. In the SC intervention, families are taught a set of skills to engage in a series of small, family self-designed experiments to test ideas to change their daily routines. The family system-oriented changes brought about by these experiments build healthy living behaviors into family daily routines so that these new behaviors happen as a matter of course, despite wavering motivation, willpower, or personal effort on the part of individuals. Case stories of the use of SC to improve family healthy living behaviors are provided. Results of several pilot tests of SC indicate its potential effectiveness to change health living behaviors across numerous populations. PMID:27301950

  16. IDENTIFYING COLLISIONAL FAMILIES IN THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Robert A.; Ragozzine, Darin; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Holman, Matthew J.

    2011-05-20

    The identification and characterization of numerous collisional families-clusters of bodies with a common collisional origin-in the asteroid belt has added greatly to the understanding of asteroid belt formation and evolution. More recent study has also led to an appreciation of physical processes that had previously been neglected (e.g., the Yarkovsky effect). Collisions have certainly played an important role in the evolution of the Kuiper Belt as well, though only one collisional family has been identified in that region to date, around the dwarf planet Haumea. In this paper, we combine insights into collisional families from numerical simulations with the current observational constraints on the dynamical structure of the Kuiper Belt to investigate the ideal sizes and locations for identifying collisional families. We find that larger progenitors (r {approx} 500 km) result in more easily identifiable families, given the difficulty in identifying fragments of smaller progenitors in magnitude-limited surveys, despite their larger spread and less frequent occurrence. However, even these families do not stand out well from the background. Identifying families as statistical overdensities is much easier than characterizing families by distinguishing individual members from interlopers. Such identification seems promising, provided the background population is well known. In either case, families will also be much easier to study where the background population is small, i.e., at high inclinations. Overall, our results indicate that entirely different techniques for identifying families will be needed for the Kuiper Belt, and we provide some suggestions.

  17. Family science: What is it?

    SciTech Connect

    Whitlow, B.

    1994-12-31

    Family science is an informal science education program designed to teach science skills by having children and parents learn and enjoy science together. Aimed at addressing the underrepresentation of women and ethnic and racial minorities in science-based careers, FAMILY SCIENCE involves parents and children in kindergarten through eighth grade in science activities that demonstrate the role science plays in their daily life and future. Family involvement is the key to the program`s effectiveness. Family classes are usually offered in a series of one- to two-hour class meetings for parents and their children after school, evenings, and weekends. During classes, parents and children work in pairs and small groups to solve problems, work cooperatively, and talk science. The activities provide experiences for the entire family that build skills, confidence, and interest in science. In addition, guest speakers and career activities illustrate for parents in the workforce the significance of math and science in their own jobs, and for kids, it highlights the diversity of jobs and the relevance of math and science.

  18. Medicaid and Family Wealth Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinkook; Kim, Hyungsoo; Tanenbaum, Sandra

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines whether the relationship between making familial wealth transfers and becoming a Medicaid recipient sheds light on the current debate about Medicaid estate planning, whereby some elders transfer their assets to their families to qualify for Medicaid. Design and Methods: Using the Health and Retirement Study, we tracked a national sample of community-based elders who did not receive Medicaid at the 1993 baseline interview but became Medicaid recipients during a 10-year time period and examined wealth transfers for these new Medicaid beneficiaries. Results: Among elders aged 70 or older who did not receive Medicaid in 1993, 16.4% became Medicaid recipients over 10 years. Among these new Medicaid recipients, 17.9% transferred their wealth to family members before receiving Medicaid benefits, with an average transfer amount of $8,507 during the 2 years prior to receiving Medicaid benefits. In addition, 15.2% of community-residing elders entered a nursing home during the 10-year period, and 26.3% of these were covered by Medicaid. Of these new Medicaid recipients living in nursing homes, 12.6% transferred wealth to their families in the mean amount of $4,112. Implications: Familial wealth transfers do occur before changes in Medicaid eligibility in a small, but nontrivial, number of cases, but the amount transferred is modest, especially among nursing home residents. This finding implies that policies to reduce Medicaid long-term-care expenditures by limiting such transfers may not be very effective. PMID:16452279

  19. Small satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.; Dermott, S.

    1986-01-01

    Satellites smaller than Mimas (r = 195 km) are distinguished by irregular overall shapes and by rough limb topography. Material properties and impact cratering dominate the shaping of these objects. Long fragmentation histories can produce a variety of internal structures, but so far there is no direct evidence that any small satellite is an equilibrium ellipsoid made up of noncohesive gravitationally bound rubble. One many bodies that orbit close to their primary the tidal and rotational components of surface gravity strongly affect the directions of local g and thereby affect the redistribution of regolith by mass wasting. Downslope movement of regolith is extensive on Deimos, and is probably effective on many other small satellites. It is shown that in some cases observed patterns of downslope mass wasting cold produce useful constraints on the satellite's mean density. The diversity of features seen in the few high-resolution images of small satellites currently available suggests that these objects have undergone complex histories of cratering, fragmentation, and regolith evolution.

  20. Birth order, family environments, academic and affective outcomes.

    PubMed

    Marjoribanks, Kevin

    2003-06-01

    Relations were examined among birth order, family social status, family learning environments, and a set of affective and academic outcomes. Data were collected as part of an Australian longitudinal study (4,171 females and 3,718 males). Analysis suggested that birth order continued to have small but significant associations with adolescents' self-concept and educational aspirations and with young adults' educational attainment, after taking into account differences in family social status and family learning environments. PMID:12931949

  1. Dual-Income Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKitric, Eloise J.

    The impact of economic conditions on two-earner families was examined. Three family types were studied: (1) dual-career family--both the husband and wife are in the labor force but in occupations classified as professional-technical or managerial; (2) dual-earner--both the husband and wife are in the labor force; and (3) traditional family--the…

  2. Building Family Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Penny

    2007-01-01

    The family is centre stage of many current policy agendas and this is an exciting time to expand the understanding of the wider benefits of learning as a family and in a family. This article aims to open up new discussions and debate on using the concept of "family capital". The author states that as the debate on the social value of learning and…

  3. [Teaching about Family Law].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John Paul, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of "Focus on Law Studies""contains a special emphasis on teaching about law and the family", in the form of the following three articles: "Teaching Family Law: Growing Pains and All" (Susan Frelich Appleton); "The Family Goes to Court: Including Law in a Sociological Perspective on the Family" (Mary Ann Lamanna); and Michael Grossberg's…

  4. Families in Transition .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Michael L., Ed.; Gumaer, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on disrupted families and the role of the school counselor in helping children adjust. Describes characteristics of healthy families, and discusses the transition to the blended family, effects of divorce groups on children's classroom behavior, counseling children in stepfamilies, single-parent families, and parenting strengths of single…

  5. Black Families. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Harriette Pipes, Ed.

    The chapters of this collection explore the experiences of black families in the United States and Africa, today and in the past. They are: (1) "African American Families: A Historical Note" (John Hope Franklin); (2) "African American Families and Family Values" (Niara Sudarkasa); (3) "Old-Time Religion: Benches Can't Say 'Amen'" (William Harrison…

  6. Identification of Novel Gene Expression Targets for the Ras Association Domain Family 1 (RASSF1A) Tumor Suppressor Gene in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Neuroblastoma1

    PubMed Central

    Agathanggelou, Angelo; Bièche, Ivan; Ahmed-Choudhury, Jalal; Nicke, Barbara; Dammann, Reinhard; Baksh, Shairaz; Gao, Boning; Minna, John D.; Downward, Julian; Maher, Eamonn R.; Latif, Farida

    2012-01-01

    RASSF1A is a recently identified 3p21.3 tumor suppressor gene. The high frequency of epigenetic inactivation of this gene in a wide range of human sporadic cancers including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and neuroblastoma suggests that RASSF1A inactivation is important for tumor development. Although little is known about the function of RASSF1A, preliminary data suggests that it may have multiple functions. To gain insight into RASSF1A functions in an unbiased manner, we have characterized the expression profile of a lung cancer cell line (A549) transfected with RASSF1A. Initially we demonstrated that transient expression of RASSF1A into the NSCLC cell line A549 induced G1 cell cycle arrest, as measured by propidium iodide staining. Furthermore, an-nexin-V staining showed that RASSF1A-expressing cells had an increased sensitivity to staurosporine-induced apoptosis. We then screened a cDNA microarray containing more than 6000 probes to identify genes differentially regulated by RASSF1A. Sixty-six genes showed at least a 2-fold change in expression. Among these were many genes with relevance to tumorigenesis involved in transcription, cytoskeleton, signaling, cell cycle, cell adhesion, and apoptosis. For 22 genes we confirmed the microarray results by real-time RT-PCR and/or Northern blotting. In silico, we were able to confirm the majority of these genes in other NSCLC cell lines using published data on gene expression profiles. Furthermore, we confirmed 10 genes at the RNA level in two neuroblastoma cell lines, indicating that these RASSF1A target genes have relevance in non-lung cell backgrounds. Protein analysis of six genes (ETS2, Cyclin D3, CDH2, DAPK1, TXN, and CTSL) showed that the changes induced by RASSF1A at the RNA level correlated with changes in protein expression in both non-small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma cell lines. Finally, we have used a transient assay to demonstrate the induction of CDH2 and TGM2 by RASSF1A in NSCLC cell lines. We

  7. Familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lung, M S; Trainer, A H; Campbell, I; Lipton, L

    2015-05-01

    Identifying individuals with a genetic predisposition to developing familial colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial to the management of the affected individual and their family. In order to do so, the physician requires an understanding of the different gene mutations and clinical manifestations of familial CRC. This review summarises the genetics, clinical manifestations and management of the known familial CRC syndromes, specifically Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated neoplasia, juvenile polyposis syndrome and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. An individual suspected of having a familial CRC with an underlying genetic predisposition should be referred to a familial cancer centre to enable pre-test counselling and appropriate follow up. PMID:25955461

  8. Seven New Complete Plastome Sequences Reveal Rampant Independent Loss of the ndh Gene Family across Orchids and Associated Instability of the Inverted Repeat/Small Single-Copy Region Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael J.; Neubig, Kurt M.; Williams, Norris H.; Whitten, W. Mark; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Earlier research has revealed that the ndh loci have been pseudogenized, truncated, or deleted from most orchid plastomes sequenced to date, including in all available plastomes of the two most species-rich subfamilies, Orchidoideae and Epidendroideae. This study sought to resolve deeper-level phylogenetic relationships among major orchid groups and to refine the history of gene loss in the ndh loci across orchids. The complete plastomes of seven orchids, Oncidium sphacelatum (Epidendroideae), Masdevallia coccinea (Epidendroideae), Sobralia callosa (Epidendroideae), Sobralia aff. bouchei (Epidendroideae), Elleanthus sodiroi (Epidendroideae), Paphiopedilum armeniacum (Cypripedioideae), and Phragmipedium longifolium (Cypripedioideae) were sequenced and analyzed in conjunction with all other available orchid and monocot plastomes. Most ndh loci were found to be pseudogenized or lost in Oncidium, Paphiopedilum and Phragmipedium, but surprisingly, all ndh loci were found to retain full, intact reading frames in Sobralia, Elleanthus and Masdevallia. Character mapping suggests that the ndh genes were present in the common ancestor of orchids but have experienced independent, significant losses at least eight times across four subfamilies. In addition, ndhF gene loss was correlated with shifts in the position of the junction of the inverted repeat (IR) and small single-copy (SSC) regions. The Orchidaceae have unprecedented levels of homoplasy in ndh gene presence/absence, which may be correlated in part with the unusual life history of orchids. These results also suggest that ndhF plays a role in IR/SSC junction stability. PMID:26558895

  9. Discovery of a Promiscuous Non-Heme Iron Halogenase in Ambiguine Alkaloid Biogenesis: Implication for an Evolvable Enzyme Family for Late-Stage Halogenation of Aliphatic Carbons in Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Hillwig, Matthew L; Zhu, Qin; Ittiamornkul, Kuljira; Liu, Xinyu

    2016-05-01

    The elucidation of enigmatic enzymatic chlorination timing in ambiguine indole alkaloid biogenesis led to the discovery and characterization of AmbO5 protein as a promiscuous non-heme iron aliphatic halogenase. AmbO5 was shown capable of selectively modifying seven structurally distinct ambiguine, fischerindole and hapalindole alkaloids with chlorine via late-stage aliphatic C-H group functionalization. Cross-comparison of AmbO5 with a previously characterized aliphatic halogenase homolog WelO5 that has a restricted substrate scope led to the identification of a C-terminal sequence motif important for substrate tolerance and specificity. Mutagenesis of 18 residues of WelO5 within the identified sequence motif led to a functional mutant with an expanded substrate scope identical to AmbO5, but an altered substrate specificity from the wild-type enzymes. These observations collectively provide evidence on the evolvable nature of AmbO5/WelO5 enzyme duo in the context of hapalindole-type alkaloid biogenesis and implicate their promise for the future development of designer biocatalysis for the selective late-stage modification of unactivated aliphatic carbon centers in small molecules with halogens. PMID:27027281

  10. Familial transmission of schizophrenia in Palau: A 20-year genetic epidemiological study in three generations.

    PubMed

    Myles-Worsley, Marina; Tiobech, Josepha; Blailes, Francisca; Middleton, Frank A; Vinogradov, Sophia; Byerley, William; Faraone, Stephen V

    2011-04-01

    Our genetic epidemiological studies of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders (SCZ) in the isolated population of Palau have been ongoing for 20 years. Results from the first decade showed that Palau has an elevated prevalence of SCZ and that cases cluster in extended multigenerational pedigrees interconnected via complex genetic relationships after centuries of endogamous, but not consanguineous, marriages. The aim of our second decade of research, which extended data collection into a third generation of young, high-risk (HR) Palauans, was to identify significant predictors of intergenerational transmission of illness. Our findings revealed that degree of familial loading and gender effects on reproductive fitness are important modifiers of risk for transmission of SCZ. Among 45 distinct multiplex families, we identified 10 high-density (HD) Palauan families, each with 7-29 SCZ cases, which contain half of Palau's 260 SCZ cases and 80% of the 113 SCZ cases with one or more affected first-degree relatives, indicating that familial loading is a major risk factor for SCZ in Palau. Cases that belong to multiply affected sibships are more common than cases with an affected parent. Furthermore, only 6/38 multiply affected sibships have an affected parent, strong evidence that many unaffected parents are obligate carriers of susceptibility genes. Although reproductive fitness is dramatically reduced in affected males, the 30% minority who do become fathers are twice as likely as affected mothers to transmit SCZ to an offspring. As they evolve, these HD families can help to elucidate the genetic mechanisms that predict intergenerational transmission of SCZ. PMID:21294248

  11. Homozygosity mapping, to chromosome 11p, of the gene for familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.M.; Cote, G.J.; Hallman, D.M.; Mathew, P.M.

    1995-02-01

    Familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease of unregulated insulin secretion, defined by elevations in serum insulin despite severe hypoglycemia. We used the homozygosity gene-mapping strategy to localize this disorder to the region of chromosome 11p between markers D11S1334 and D11S899 (maximum LOD score 5.02 [{theta} = 0] at marker D11S926) in five consanguineous families of Saudi Arabian origin. These results extend those of a recent report that also placed PHHI on chromosome 11p, between markers D11S926 and D11S928. Comparison of the boundaries of these two overlapping regions allows the PHHI locus to be assigned to the 4-cM region between the markers D11S926 and D11S899. Identification of this gene may allow a better understanding of other disorders of glucose homeostasis, by providing insight into the regulation of insulin release. 37 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Attitudes toward family planning, marriage, and family size among unmarried women in Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, K Y

    1975-10-01

    Data from the 1973 National Fertility and Family Planning Survey show that young unmarried women aged 18-27 desire small families and support family planning. These women express a lower son preference than did young currently married women surveved in 1973 and earlier. A majority of the respondents approve of the "stop at two" slogen of the family planning association, and they want to obtain more information about contraception before marrying. Unfortunately, survey results show that present sources of contraceptive information, including the schools, have not proved adequate. PMID:1209695

  13. Sequence analysis and characterization of pOM1, a small cryptic plasmid from Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, and its use in construction of a new family of cloning vectors for Butyrivibrios.

    PubMed Central

    Hefford, M A; Kobayashi, Y; Allard, S E; Forster, R J; Teather, R M

    1997-01-01

    As a preliminary step in the development of vector systems, we have isolated and begun to characterize small, cryptic plasmids from several strains of the rumen bacterium Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens. We present here the complete nucleotide sequence of Butyrivibrio plasmid pOM1, which was isolated from B. fibrisolvens Bu49. While it is very similar in size to the previously characterized Butyrivibrio plasmids pRJF1 and pRJF2, pOM1 exhibits a restriction pattern which is quite distinct. Analysis of sequence data reveals that pOM1 contains only two open reading frames of significant length (ORF1 and ORF2), both of which are required for self-replication and maintenance. The protein encoded in ORF1 shows homologies with Pre (plasmid recombination enzyme) proteins encoded in plasmids from gram-positive organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Bacillus thuringiensis. The putative translation product of ORF2, on the other hand, resembles Rep (replication) proteins of a different group of gram-positive plasmids, for which the Staphylococcus plasmid pSN2 is a prototype. Unlike the other characterized-Butyrivibrio plasmids, pOM1 appears to replicate via a rolling-circle mechanism. Experimental evidence showing the presence of a single-stranded replication intermediate consistent with this mechanism is presented. pOM1 has been used in the construction of a new Escherichia coli-B. fibrisolvens shuttle vector, pSMerm1, which has been successfully used to introduce a cloned gene into B. fibrisolvens harboring the pRJF1 plasmid. PMID:9143105

  14. Efficacy of the Irreversible ErbB Family Blocker Afatinib in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI)–Pretreated Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Brain Metastases or Leptomeningeal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tufman, Amanda; Wehler, Thomas; Pelzer, Theo; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Schütz, Martin; Serke, Monika; Stöhlmacher-Williams, Jan; Märten, Angela; Maria Huber, Rudolf; Dickgreber, Nicolas J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Afatinib is an effective first-line treatment in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and has shown activity in patients progressing on EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). First-line afatinib is also effective in patients with central nervous system (CNS) metastasis. Here we report on outcomes of pretreated NSCLC patients with CNS metastasis who received afatinib within a compassionate use program. Methods: Patients with NSCLC progressing after at least one line of chemotherapy and one line of EGFR-TKI treatment received afatinib. Medical history, patient demographics, EGFR mutational status, and adverse events including tumor progression were documented. Results: From 2010 to 2013, 573 patients were enrolled and 541 treated with afatinib. One hundred patients (66% female; median age, 60 years) had brain metastases and/or leptomeningeal disease with 74% having documented EGFR mutation. Median time to treatment failure for patients with CNS metastasis was 3.6 months, and did not differ from a matched group of 100 patients without CNS metastasis. Thirty-five percent (11 of 31) of evaluable patients had a cerebral response, five (16%) responded exclusively in brain. Response duration (range) was 120 (21–395) days. Sixty-six percent (21 of 32) of patients had cerebral disease control on afatinib. Data from one patient with an impressive response showed an afatinib concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid of nearly 1 nMol. Conclusion: Afatinib appears to penetrate into the CNS with concentrations high enough to have clinical effect on CNS metastases. Afatinib may therefore be an effective treatment for heavily pretreated patients with EGFR-mutated or EGFR–TKI-sensitive NSCLC and CNS metastasis. PMID:25247337

  15. A Novel Syntaxin 11 Gene (STX11) Mutation c.650T>C, p.Leu217Pro, in a Korean Child With Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Sultanova, Ardak K.; Kim, Seong-koo; Lee, Jae Wook; Jang, Pil-Sang; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Cho, Bin; Park, Joonhong; Kim, Yonggoo

    2016-01-01

    We report the first Far Eastern case of a Korean child with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) caused by a novel syntaxin 11 (STX11) mutation. A 33-month-old boy born to non-consanguineous Korean parents was admitted for intermittent fever lasting one week, pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and HLH in the bone marrow. Under the impression of HLH, genetic study revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation of STX11: c.650T>C, p.Leu217Pro. Although no large deletion or allele drop was identified, genotype analysis demonstrated that the homozygous c.650T>C may have resulted from the duplication of a maternal (unimaternal) chromosomal region and concurrent loss of the other paternal allele, likely caused by meiotic errors such as two crossover events. A cumulative study of such novel mutations and their effects on specific protein interactions may deepen the understanding of how abnormal STX1 expression results in deficient cytotoxic function. PMID:26709266

  16. A novel mutation in the GAN gene causes an intermediate form of giant axonal neuropathy in an Arab-Israeli family.

    PubMed

    Abu-Rashid, M; Mahajnah, M; Jaber, L; Kornreich, L; Bar-On, E; Basel-Vanagaite, L; Soffer, D; Koenig, M; Straussberg, R

    2013-05-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy is a severe autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder of childhood that affects both the peripheral and central nervous systems. It is caused by mutations in the GAN gene linked to chromosome 16q24.1 At least 45 distinct disease-causing mutations have been identified throughout the gene in families of various ethnic origins, with different symptomatologies and different clinical courses. To date, no characteristic mutation or phenotype-genotype correlation has been established. We describe a novel missense mutation in four siblings born to consanguineous parents of Arab original with clinical and molecular features compatible with giant axonal neuropathy. The phenotype was characterized by a predominant motor and sensory peripheral neuropathies and severe skeletal deformities. PMID:23332420

  17. Nontraditional family romance.

    PubMed

    Corbett, K

    2001-07-01

    Family stories lie at the heart of psychoanalytic developmental theory and psychoanalytic clinical technique, but whose family? Increasingly, lesbian and gay families, multiparent families, and single-parent families are relying on modern reproductive technologies to form families. The contemplation of these nontraditional families and the vicissitudes of contemporary reproduction lead to an unknowing of what families are, including the ways in which psychoanalysts configure the family within developmental theory. This article focuses on the stories that families tell in order to account for their formation--stories that include narratives about parental union, parental sexuality, and conception. The author addresses three constructs that inform family stories and that require rethinking in light of the category crises posed by and for the nontraditional family: (1) normative logic, (2) family reverie and the construction of a family romance, and (3) the primal scene. These constructs are examined in tandem with detailed clinical material taken from the psychotherapy of a seven-year-old boy and his two mothers. PMID:11491437

  18. Family Therapy for the "Truncated" Nuclear Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H.

    1980-01-01

    The truncated nuclear family consists of a two-generation group in which conflict has produced a polarization of values. The single-parent family is at special risk. Go-between process enables the therapist to depolarize sharply conflicted values and reduce pathogenic relating. (Author)

  19. Conceptualising Family Life and Family Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Don

    The United Nations International Year of the Family 1994 will give policymakers the opportunity to bring together threads of social life that have previously been treated separately. The danger in talking about the concept of "the family" lies both in its abstractness and in its emotional, religious, and political overtones. To avoid this…

  20. Putting the "family" back into family therapy.

    PubMed

    Breunlin, Douglas C; Jacobsen, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    In this article, we examine the field of family therapy by drawing a distinction between two forms of practice: Whole Family Therapy (WFT), defined as treating the whole family, and Relational Family Therapy (RFT), defined as working with a subsystem of the family or an individual while retaining a systemic lens. Our thesis is that the practice of WFT has been in decline for some time and steps must be taken to keep it from becoming a defunct practice. We consider the trajectory of WFT and RFT throughout the development of family therapy through reference to the people, the literature, training, and practice patterns associated with family therapy. We remind the reader of the many benefits of WFT and suggest that today WFT is likely to be practiced in conjunction with RFT and individual therapy. Since training of family therapists today is largely located in degree-granting programs, we identify constraints to including WFT in such programs. We conclude by offering suggestions that can enhance a program's ability to train students in WFT. PMID:24948531

  1. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a culturally adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9- to 12-year-old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted…

  2. Families and Family Study in International Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Bert N.

    2004-01-01

    Many changes are occurring in the world's families. Some observers feel that the changes are destructive, whereas others see them as leading to new opportunities and understanding. Issues in international family studies include regional limitations and the various aspects of doing research cross-culturally. Knowledge regarding certain categories…

  3. Invest in Family*

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilesh; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The family is an integral part of one's life. It is very essential that every individual employed or unemployed invests time therein. The family is a source of support and growth for an individual, and the lack of family support or loneliness may be a causative factor in the genesis of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. In India, family plays a paramount role when it comes to mental health of the individual. Tips on how one should invest time in one's family along with the role of a family in one's personal and social structure are discussed. PMID:25838732

  4. The Influence of Family Size on Learning Readiness Patterns of Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Preschool Blacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Ralph; Kobes, David A.

    Preschool readiness measures were secured on 35 pairs of disadvantaged 2- to 3-year-old lower SES black children, representing large and small families, to determine the impact of family size on readiness profiles. The findings reveal that blacks from small families achieved significantly higher scores on 3 of the 9 skill areas: Visual Memory,…

  5. Familial spastic paraplegia with distal muscle wasting in the Old Order Amish; atypical Troyer syndrome or "new" syndrome.

    PubMed

    Neuhäuser, G; Wiffler, C; Opitz, J M

    1976-03-01

    The Troyer syndrome was found by Cross & McKusick (1967) in 20 members of 12 Old Order Amish families in Holmes County, Ohio; it is a form of hereditary spastic paraplegia combined with distal muscle wasting, i.e. signs of involvement of lower motor neurons. The condition usually begins at 1 to 2 years and progresses at variable rates. Further manifestations include growth retardation, delayed speech development with dysarthria and drooling, and cerebellar signs; mental functions are usually not affected but severe emotional lability is a common finding. Brothers in a Wisconsin Old Order Amish family are reported with spastic diplegia, mental retardation, behavioral disorder and shortness of stature; the condition apparently is not progressive, and may be a "new" syndrome but could also represent a variant of the Troyer syndrome. Autosomal recessive inheritance is most likely, although consanguinity of the parents could not be proven. Another child in this family suffers from focal scleroderma (morphea) which is not related to the neurological syndrome. PMID:1261070

  6. Identification of a Novel MYO15A Mutation in a Chinese Family with Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hong; Huang, Xiangjun; Guo, Yi; Hu, Pengzhi; He, Guangxiang; Deng, Xiong; Xu, Hongbo; Yang, Zhijian; Deng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) is a genetically heterogeneous sensorineural disorder, generally manifested with prelingual hearing loss and absence of other clinical manifestations. The aim of this study is to identify the pathogenic gene in a four-generation consanguineous Chinese family with ARNSHL. A novel homozygous variant, c.9316dupC (p.H3106Pfs*2), in the myoxin XVa gene (MYO15A) was identified by exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing. The homozygous MYO15A c.9316dupC variant co-segregated with the phenotypes in the ARNSHL family and was absent in two hundred normal controls. The variant was predicted to interfere with the formation of the Myosin XVa-whirlin-Eps8 complex at the tip of stereocilia, which is indispensable for stereocilia elongation. Our data suggest that the homozygous MYO15A c.9316dupC variant might be the pathogenic mutation, and exome sequencing is a powerful molecular diagnostic strategy for ARNSHL, an extremely heterogeneous disorder. Our findings extend the mutation spectrum of the MYO15A gene and have important implications for genetic counseling for the family. PMID:26308726

  7. Examining the family-centred approach to genetic testing and counselling among UK Pakistanis: a community perspective.

    PubMed

    Darr, A; Small, N; Ahmad, W I U; Atkin, K; Corry, P; Benson, J; Morton, R; Modell, B

    2013-01-01

    WHO advice suggests a family-centred approach for managing the elevated risk of recessively inherited disorders in consanguineous communities, whilst emerging policy recommends community engagement as an integral component of genetic service development. This paper explores the feasibility of the family-centred approach in the UK Pakistani origin community. The study took place within a context of debate in the media, professional and lay circles about cousin marriage causing disability in children. Using qualitative methods, a total of six single-sex focus group discussions (n = 50) were conducted in three UK cities with a high settlement of people of Pakistani origin. Tape-recorded transcripts were analysed using framework analysis. Kinship networks within Pakistani origin communities are being sustained and marriage between close blood relatives continues to take place alongside other marriage options. Study participants were critical of what was perceived as a prevalent notion that cousin marriage causes disability in children. They were willing to discuss cousin marriage and disability, share genetic information and engage with genetic issues. A desire for accurate information and a public informed about genetic issues was articulated whilst ineffective communication of genetic risk information undermined professionals in their support role. This study suggests a community that is embracing change, one in which kinship networks are still active and genetic information exchange is taking place. At the community level, these are conditions supportive of the family-centred approach to genetic testing and counselling. PMID:23086468

  8. Homozygous HOXB1 loss-of-function mutation in a large family with hereditary congenital facial paresis.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Markus; Velleuer, Eunike; Schmidt-Jiménez, Leon F; Mayatepek, Ertan; Borkhardt, Arndt; Alawi, Malik; Kutsche, Kerstin; Kortüm, Fanny

    2016-07-01

    Hereditary congenital facial paresis (HCFP) belongs to the congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders. HCFP is characterized by the isolated dysfunction of the seventh cranial nerve and can be associated with hearing loss, strabismus, and orofacial anomalies. Möbius syndrome shares facial palsy with HCFP, but is additionally characterized by limited abduction of the eye(s). Genetic heterogeneity has been documented for HCFP as one locus mapped to chromosome 3q21-q22 (HCFP1) and a second to 10q21.3-q22.1 (HCFP2). The only known causative gene for HCFP is HOXB1 (17q21; HCFP3), encoding a homeodomain-containing transcription factor of the HOX gene family, which are master regulators of early developmental processes. The previously reported HOXB1 mutations change arginine 207 to another residue in the homeodomain and alter binding capacity of HOXB1 for transcriptional co-regulators and DNA. We performed whole exome sequencing in HCFP-affected individuals of a large consanguineous Moroccan family. The homozygous nonsense variant c.66C>G/p.(Tyr22*) in HOXB1 was identified in the four patients with HCFP and ear malformations, while healthy family members carried the mutation in the heterozygous state. This is the first disease-associated HOXB1 mutation with a likely loss-of-function effect suggesting that all HOXB1 variants reported so far also have severe impact on activity of this transcriptional regulator. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27144914

  9. Novel mutation in TSPAN12 leads to autosomal recessive inheritance of congenital vitreoretinal disease with intra-familial phenotypic variability.

    PubMed

    Gal, Moran; Levanon, Erez Y; Hujeirat, Yasir; Khayat, Morad; Pe'er, Jacob; Shalev, Stavit

    2014-12-01

    Developmental malformations of the vitreoretinal vasculature are a heterogeneous group of conditions with various modes of inheritance, and include familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR), persistent fetal vasculature (PFV), and Norrie disease. We investigated a large consanguineous kindred with multiple affected individuals exhibiting variable phenotypes of abnormal vitreoretinal vasculature, consistent with the three above-mentioned conditions and compatible with autosomal recessive inheritance. Exome sequencing identified a novel c.542G > T (p.C181F) apparently mutation in the TSPAN12 gene that segregated with the ocular disease in the family. The TSPAN12 gene was previously reported to cause dominant and recessive FEVR, but has not yet been associated with other vitreoretinal manifestations. The intra-familial clinical variability caused by a single mutation in the TSPAN12 gene underscores the complicated phenotype-genotype correlation of mutations in this gene, and suggests that there are additional genetic and environmental factors involved in the complex process of ocular vascularization during embryonic development. Our study supports considering PFV, FEVR, and Norrie disease a spectrum of disorders, with clinical and genetic overlap, caused by mutations in distinct genes acting in the Norrin/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:25250762

  10. Homozygous single base deletion in TUSC3 causes intellectual disability with developmental delay in an Omani family.

    PubMed

    Al-Amri, Ahmed; Saegh, Abeer Al; Al-Mamari, Watfa; El-Asrag, Mohammed E; Ivorra, Jose L; Cardno, Alastair G; Inglehearn, Chris F; Clapcote, Steven J; Ali, Manir

    2016-07-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is the term used to describe a diverse group of neurological conditions with congenital or juvenile onset, characterized by an IQ score of less than 70 and difficulties associated with limitations in cognitive function and adaptive behavior. The condition can be inherited or caused by environmental factors. The genetic forms are heterogeneous, with mutations in over 500 known genes shown to cause the disorder. We report a consanguineous Omani family in which multiple individuals have ID and developmental delay together with some variably present features including short stature, microcephaly, moderate facial dysmorphism, and congenital malformations of the toes or hands. Homozygosity mapping combined with whole exome next generation sequencing identified a novel homozygous single base pair deletion in TUSC3, c.222delA, p.R74 fs. The mutation segregates with the disease phenotype in a recessive manner and is absent in 60,706 unrelated individuals from various disease-specific and population genetic studies. TUSC3 mutations have been previously identified as causing either syndromic or non-syndromic ID in patients from France, Italy, Iran and Pakistan. This paper supports the previous clinical descriptions of the condition caused by TUSC3 mutations and describes the seventh family with mutations in this gene, thus contributing to the genetic spectrum of mutations. This is the first report of a family from the Arabian peninsula with this form of ID. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27148795

  11. WES in a family trio suggests involvement of TECPR2 in a complex form of progressive motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Covone, A E; Fiorillo, C; Acquaviva, M; Trucco, F; Morana, G; Ravazzolo, R; Minetti, C

    2016-08-01

    We have performed whole-exome sequencing in a family trio with a 16-year-old girl suffering of progressive motor neuron disease. There was no family history of the disease and no parental consanguinity. Our exome analysis indicated the proband as a compound heterozygote for two missense variants in the TECPR2 gene according to a recessive mode of inheritance. The TECPR2 gene has been reported as a positive regulator of autophagy which is an essential mechanism for maintaining neuron homeostasis and survival and plays a key role in major adult and pediatric neurodegenerative diseases. Variants in this gene have been found responsible for a recently described form of hereditary spastic paraplegia called SPG49 in two previous reports. We propose that both variants causing amino acid substitution, p.Leu684Val and p.Thr903Met, inherited in trans-phase compound heterozygote form, can be responsible for the phenotype observed in our patient. We also consider the possible contribution of a heterozygous variant in the SPG7 gene. Sanger sequencing confirmed the segregation of variants within the family tree including the patient's unaffected brother. PMID:27406698

  12. The Changing American Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Pamela B.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews recent statistics which demonstrate how different modern families are from the stereotyped model American nuclear family. Provides suggestions for elementary social studies teachers and includes an annotated bibliography of instructional resources. (JDH)

  13. Familial Periodic Paralyses

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS NINDS Familial Periodic Paralyses Information Page Synonym(s): Periodic Paralyses Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What are Familial Periodic Paralyses? Is there any treatment? What is the ...

  14. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here: Health Information > Condition Information Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis: Overview When two or more members within the ... Associate Professor View full profile More Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Information Forms Causes Genetic Counseling Print Page Email ...

  15. Family Patterns in Dogmatism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesser, Harvey; Steininger, Marion

    1975-01-01

    Explored Rokeach's theory that dogmatism develops within the family. Subjects were college students and their parents who took the 40-item Dogmatism Scale. Results indicated that family experiences are one source of children's dogmatism but not the only source. (SDH)

  16. Importance of Family Routines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share The Importance of Family Routines Page Content ​Every family needs ... child to sleep. These rituals can include storytelling, reading aloud, conversation, and songs. Try to avoid exciting ...

  17. Familial multiple lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Dolph, J L; Demuth, R J; Miller, S H

    1980-10-01

    The literature on familial multiple lipomatosis is reviewed, and a striking case is described. The associated family history is outlined. Excisional biopsy is advocated when there is doubt in terms of diagnosis, pain, or functional impairment. PMID:7208678

  18. A Mass Media-Centered Approach to Teaching the Course in Family Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey-Kallis, Susan; Kirk-Elfenbein, Sharon

    Teaching family communication is unique. However, unlike courses in small group and interpersonal communication, which illustrates communication processes in experiential settings, family communication courses cannot create "families" in the classroom. As such, film and television depictions of the family become all the more important in their…

  19. A Homozygous CARD9 Mutation in a Family with Susceptibility to Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Glocker, Erik-Oliver; Hennigs, Andre; Nabavi, Mohammad; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Woellner, Cristina; Salzer, Ulrich; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Veelken, Hendrik; Warnatz, Klaus; Tahami, Fariba; Jamal, Sarah; Manguiat, Annabelle; Rezaei, Nima; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Plebani, Alessandro; Hannesschläger, Nicole; Gross, Olaf; Ruland, Jürgen; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis may be manifested as a primary immunodeficiency characterized by persistent or recurrent infections of the mucosa or the skin with candida species. Most cases are sporadic, but both autosomal dominant inheritance and autosomal recessive inheritance have been described. METHODS We performed genetic studies in 36 members of a large, consanguineous five-generation family, in which 4 members had recurrent fungal infections and an additional 3 members died during adolescence, 2 after invasive infection of the brain with candida species. All 36 family members were enrolled in the study, and 22 had blood samples taken for DNA analysis. Homozygosity mapping was used to locate the mutated gene. In the 4 affected family members (patients) and the 18 unaffected members we sequenced CARD9, the gene encoding the caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9, carried out T-cell phenotyping, and performed functional studies, with the use of either leukocytes from the patients or a reconstituted murine model of the genetic defect. RESULTS We found linkage (lod score, 3.6) to a genomic interval on chromosome 9q, including CARD9. All four patients had a homozygous point mutation in CARD9, resulting in a premature termination codon (Q295X). Healthy family members had wild-type expression of the CARD9 protein; the four patients lacked wild-type expression, which was associated with low numbers of Th17 cells (helper T cells producing interleukin-17). Functional studies based on genetic reconstitution of myeloid cells from Card9−/− mice showed that the Q295X mutation impairs innate signaling from the antifungal pattern-recognition receptor dectin-1. CONCLUSIONS An autosomal recessive form of susceptibility to chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis is associated with homozygous mutations in CARD9. PMID:19864672

  20. Homozygous carriers of APP A713T mutation in an autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease family

    PubMed Central

    Conidi, Maria E.; Bernardi, Livia; Puccio, Gianfranco; Smirne, Nicoletta; Muraca, Maria G.; Curcio, Sabrina A.M.; Colao, Rosanna; Piscopo, Paola; Gallo, Maura; Anfossi, Maria; Frangipane, Francesca; Clodomiro, Alessandra; Mirabelli, Maria; Vasso, Franca; Cupidi, Chiara; Torchia, Giusi; Di Lorenzo, Raffaele; Mandich, Paola; Confaloni, Annamaria; Maletta, Raffaele G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report, for the first time, a large autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (AD) family in which the APP A713T mutation is present in the homozygous and heterozygous state. To date, the mutation has been reported as dominant, and in the heterozygous state associated with familial AD and cerebrovascular lesions. Methods: The family described here has been genealogically reconstructed over 6 generations dating back to the 19th century. Plasma β-amyloid peptide was measured. Sequencing of causative AD genes was performed. Results: Twenty-one individuals, all but 1 born from 2 consanguineous unions, were studied: 8 were described as affected through history, 5 were studied clinically and genetically, and 8 were asymptomatic at-risk subjects. The A713T mutation was detected in the homozygous state in 3 patients and in the heterozygous state in 8 subjects (6 asymptomatic and 2 affected). Conclusions: Our findings, also supported by the β-amyloid plasma assay, confirm (1) the pathogenic role of the APP A713T mutation, (2) the specific phenotype (AD with cerebrovascular lesions) associated with this mutation, and (3) the large span of age at onset, not influenced by APOE, TOMM40, and TREM2 genes. No substantial differences concerning clinical phenotype were evidenced between heterozygous and homozygous patients, in line with the classic definition of dominance. Therefore, in this study, AD followed the classic definition of a dominant disease, contrary to that reported in a previously described AD family with recessive APP mutation. This confirms that genetic AD may be considered a disease with dominant and recessive traits of inheritance. PMID:25948718

  1. Assessment of DPY19L2 Deletion in Familial and Non-Familial Individuals with Globozoospermia and DPY19L2 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Modarres, Parastoo; Tanhaei, Somayeh; Tavalaee, Marziyeh; Ghaedi, Kamran; Deemeh, Mohammad Reza; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background Globozoospermia is a rare syndrome with an incidence of less than 0.1% among infertile men. Researchers have recently identified a large deletion, about 200 kbp, encompassing the whole length of DPY19L2 or mutations in SPATA16 and PICK1 genes associated with globozoospermia. The aim of this study was to analyze the DPY19L2 gene deletion using polymerase chain reaction technique for the exons 1, 48, 11 and 22 as well as break point (BP) “a” in globozoospermic men. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, genome samples were collected from 27 men with globozoospermia (cases) and 36 fertile individuals (controls), and genomic analysis was carried out on each sample. Results Deletion of DPY19L2 gene accounted for 74% of individuals with globozoospermia. DPY19L2 gene deletion was considered as the molecular pathogenic factor for the onset of globozoospermia in infertile men. By quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), we genotyped DPY19L2 deletion and identified carriers within the population. Conclusion This technique may be considered as a method for family counseling and has the potential to be used as a pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, especially in ethnic community with high rate of consanguineous marriages. PMID:27441053

  2. Strengthening America's Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Rose; Kumpfer, Karol

    2000-01-01

    Improving parenting practices and the family environment is the most effective, enduring strategy for combating juvenile delinquency. Describes the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's Strengthening America's Families Initiative. Highlights several family-focused prevention programs identified as exemplary, explaining how they…

  3. Families in Multicultural Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingoldsby, Bron B., Ed.; Smith, Suzanna, Ed.

    Covering contemporary Third World as well as Western families, this teaching text addresses topics essential for developing a multicultural perspective on the family. It is an ideal text for comparative family courses and includes exercises (as well as exercise guidelines for instructors) developed to challenge students' existing viewpoints and…

  4. Single Mothers "Do" Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Margaret K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores how single mothers both incorporate others into family life (e.g., when they ask others to care for their children) and simultaneously "do families" in a manner that holds out a vision of a "traditional" family structure. Drawing on research with White, rural single mothers, the author explores the manner in which these women…

  5. The Resiliency of Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, T. R.

    According to researchers, the family may be changing but it is still one of the central institutions in society. Studies report a shift in more than 20 attitudes and values, most of which relate to the context of family life. Specifically, these include attitudes toward marriage, divorce, childbearing, childrearing, working women, family violence,…

  6. The Family Leukemia Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, Eleanor

    1976-01-01

    An association of families of children with leukemia, the Family Leukemia Association (FLA), was recently established in Toronto. This paper discusses (a) philosophy of the FLA; (b) formative years of this organization; (c) problems encountered by leukemic children and their families; and (d) the FLA's past and future educational and social…

  7. Rape: A Family Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Priscilla N.; Rollins, Judith C.

    1981-01-01

    Rape is a crisis shared by the victim and her family. The family's reaction is influenced by cultural views such as viewing rape as sex rather than violence. Adaptive responses can be supported by open expression, education, and family, as well as individual counseling. (JAC)

  8. Family Violence: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (DHHS/OHDS), Washington, DC.

    Family violence is a widespread problem; research has shown multiple factors are associated with family violence. Types of family violence include spouse abuse; elder abuse and neglect; child abuse and neglect; parent abuse; and sibling abuse. There are three types of spouse abuse: physical abuse, sexual violence, and psychological/emotional…

  9. Fatherhood and Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    On the assumption that fathers have been relatively absent from family support programs, this publication of the Family Resource Coalition addresses the role of fathers in family support programs, examines the impact of fathers on their children, and describes programs involving fathers successfully. Articles include: (1) "What's Behind the…

  10. Families and Assisted Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaugler, Joseph E.; Kane, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Despite growing research on assisted living (AL) as a residential care option for older adults, the social ramifications of residents' transitions to AL are relatively unexplored. This article examines family involvement in AL, including family structures of residents, types of involvement from family members living outside the AL…

  11. Families for All Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoultz, Bonnie, Ed.; Kalyanpur, Maya, Ed.

    This bulletin reflects the commitment of Syracuse University's Center on Human Policy to the idea that children belong with families. The bulletin contains a policy statement which recommends; that all children, regardless of disability, belong with families and need enduring relationships with adults; that families with severely disabled children…

  12. Focus on the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, James M.

    This research attempts to evaluate the YMCA's program in terms of its effect upon the family members it serves. The study was designed to: (1) classify, by descriptive types, the various kinds of YMCA operations which serve the family, identifying their characteristic differences; (2) examine and describe operating practices of family YMCAs…

  13. Doing Better for Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    All OECD governments want to give parents more choice in their work and family decisions. This book looks at the different ways in which governments support families. It seeks to provide answers to questions like: Is spending on family benefits going up, and how does it vary by the age of the child? Has the crisis affected public support for…

  14. Launching Family Message Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wollman-Bonilla, Julie

    This lesson introduces Family Message Journals, a tool for encouraging family involvement and supporting writing to reflect and learn. First and second graders are led into composing through demonstration, guided writing, and finally independent writing of messages that they will bring home for family to read and write a reply. During the three…

  15. Family Life Education Transparencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This compilation of thirty-three transparencies, a supplement to the family life education curriculum guide (see related note), is designed for use by secondary education home economics teachers in teaching family life education classes. The transparencies, covering three areas in family life education, each consist of a captioned picture…

  16. Year of the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Agriculture, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This special issue focuses on problems and challenges confronting the California family and on research and extension efforts to provide at least partial answers. Research briefs by staff include "Challenges Confront the California Family" (state trends in poverty, divorce, single-parent families, child abuse, delinquency, teen births, limited…

  17. Family Customs and Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, Cynthia

    Recognizing the importance of maintaining open communication with immediate and extended family members, this book provides a compilation of ideas for family traditions and customs that are grounded in compassion and human kindness. The traditions were gathered from families in the United States and Canada who responded to advertisements in…

  18. Incarceration and Family Stress as Understood through the Family Process Theory: Evidence from Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chui, Wing Hong

    2016-01-01

    The myriad of negative effects brought about by the incarceration of a family member have consistently been demonstrated in research. However, previous works have tended to focus on the perspectives of family members separately, rather than exploring the dynamic relationships within the family as an entire unit. Moreover, such research is still limited in the Chinese cultural context. Thus, the current study aimed to examine the applicability of the Family Process Theory on a small sample of Chinese fathers who were imprisoned and have returned to their communities, conceptualizing the challenges faced by their families under the theoretical elements of rules of transformation, rituals, ambiguous loss, and boundary ambiguity. A total of 17 participants were recruited through the assistance of service organizations, and data were collected via semi-structured interviews. As congruent with the theory, inmates' families were found to come across problems particularly in the transitioning phase and establishment of new rituals, while ambiguity surrounding the incarceration and the blurred role of the father led to problems with fatherhood identity both during and after the incarceration. Recommendations are made, in line with these findings and the suggestions of ex-prisoners, for services to have more of a focus on preserving the integrity of inmates' families. Given the right circumstances, families can even serve as a motivator for incarcerated fathers to improve themselves and mature, leveraging the important supportive role of the family and the fear of again being separated from one's family as effective deterrents to recidivism. PMID:27378979

  19. Incarceration and Family Stress as Understood through the Family Process Theory: Evidence from Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Chui, Wing Hong

    2016-01-01

    The myriad of negative effects brought about by the incarceration of a family member have consistently been demonstrated in research. However, previous works have tended to focus on the perspectives of family members separately, rather than exploring the dynamic relationships within the family as an entire unit. Moreover, such research is still limited in the Chinese cultural context. Thus, the current study aimed to examine the applicability of the Family Process Theory on a small sample of Chinese fathers who were imprisoned and have returned to their communities, conceptualizing the challenges faced by their families under the theoretical elements of rules of transformation, rituals, ambiguous loss, and boundary ambiguity. A total of 17 participants were recruited through the assistance of service organizations, and data were collected via semi-structured interviews. As congruent with the theory, inmates’ families were found to come across problems particularly in the transitioning phase and establishment of new rituals, while ambiguity surrounding the incarceration and the blurred role of the father led to problems with fatherhood identity both during and after the incarceration. Recommendations are made, in line with these findings and the suggestions of ex-prisoners, for services to have more of a focus on preserving the integrity of inmates’ families. Given the right circumstances, families can even serve as a motivator for incarcerated fathers to improve themselves and mature, leveraging the important supportive role of the family and the fear of again being separated from one’s family as effective deterrents to recidivism. PMID:27378979

  20. Family Issues for the Nineties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirabelli, Alan

    This presentation reviews the characteristics of the Canadian family at present. Discussion focuses on divorce, family structure, reproductive technology, fertility, family size, family mobility, family support, government role, women's participation in the labor force, daily family routines, television viewing, work and the family, the need for…

  1. Families with familial combined hyperlipidemia and families enriched for coronary artery disease share genetic determinants for the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Allayee, H.; Aouizerat, B.E.; Lusis, A.J.; Cantor, R.M.; Lanning, C.D.; Rotter, J.I.; Dallinga-Thie, G.M.; Krauss, R.M.; Bruin, T.W.A. de

    1998-08-01

    Small, dense LDL particles consistently have been associated with hypertriglyceridemia, premature coronary artery disease (CAD), and familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH). Previously, the authors have observed linkage of LDL particle size with four separate candidate-gene loci in a study of families enriched for CAD. These loci contain the genes for manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), on chromosome 6q; for apolipoprotein AI-CIII-AIV, on chromosome 11q; for cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and lecithin:cholesterol acyl-transferase (LCAT), on chromosome 16q; and for the LDL receptor (LDLR), on chromosome 19p. The authors have now tested whether these loci also contribute to LDL particle size in families ascertained for FCH. The members of 18 families (481 individuals) were typed for genetic markers at the four loci, and linkage to LDL particle size was assessed by nonparametric sib-pair linkage analysis. The presence of small, dense LDL (pattern B) was much more frequent in the FCH probands than in the spouse controls. Evidence for linkage was observed at the MnSOD (P = .02), CETP/LCAT (P = .03), and apolipoprotein AI0CIII0AIV loci (P = .005) but not at the LDLR locus. The authors conclude that there is a genetically based association between FCH and small, dense LDL and that the genetic determinants for LDL particle size are shared, at least in part, among FCH families and the more general population at risk for CAD.

  2. [Family policy in Belgium].

    PubMed

    Dumon, W

    1987-01-01

    The development of family policy in Belgium since the end of World War I is described. Three periods are identified. The original objectives were to provide a basic income level for all families and to promote fertility. After World War II, measures were introduced to foster the physical and psychological health of the family, including the protection of women's rights. More recent policy trends have concentrated on family income and providing services at the family rather than the institutional level. (SUMMARY IN ENG AND FRE) PMID:12280764

  3. Family traditions and generations.

    PubMed

    Schneiderman, Gerald; Barrera, Maru

    2009-01-01

    Currently, traditional family values that have been passed down through generations appear to be at risk. This has significant implications for the stability and health of individuals, families, and communities. This article explores selected issues related to intergenerational transmission of family values and cultural beliefs, with particular reference to Western culture and values that are rooted in Jewish and Christian traditions. It also examines family values and parenting styles as they influence the developing perspective of children and the family's adaptation to a changing world. PMID:19752638

  4. Surgical Challenges of Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Bhoje, Amolkumar; Talwar, Sachin; Saxena, Rachit; Gharde, Parag; Choudhary, Shiv Kumar

    2016-06-01

    A 21-year-old patient with familial hypercholesterolemia presented with angina caused by ostial stenosis of the left internal mammary artery and severe calcific aortic stenosis with small aortic root 9 years after coronary revascularization. The ostium of the left internal mammary artery was enlarged using a saphenous vein patch through a left supraclavicular incision, which improved left ventricular function. Successful aortic valve replacement with posterior aortic root enlargement was subsequently performed. The surgical management of this condition is discussed briefly. PMID:27211947

  5. The Family as a Small Problem Solving Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallman, Irving

    1970-01-01

    Analyzes relationship between "open channels of communication" and "centralization of authority", and "cultural" variables in terms of their contributions to optimal problem solving structures and activities. (Author)

  6. Family SMEs in Ireland as Learning Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdthistle, Naomi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether small and medium-sized family businesses in Ireland have the potential to be classified as learning organizations. Design/methodology/approach: The research methodology adopted for this study is that of multiple-case studies. In this research, personal interviews were selected as the…

  7. Responding to Diversity? Refugee Families and Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Carol; Warren, Simon

    This paper reports on a small-scale, recently completed qualitative project conducted in the United Kingdom that focuses on links between refugee families and the schools their children attend. The project attempted to study the relationships between refugee parents and education professionals in order to identify factors that encourage or hinder…

  8. Genetics of familial intrahepatic cholestasis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    van Mil, S W C; Houwen, R; Klomp, L

    2005-01-01

    Bile acids and bile salts have essential functions in the liver and in the small intestine. Their synthesis in the liver provides a metabolic pathway for the catabolism of cholesterol and their detergent properties promote the solubilisation of essential nutrients and vitamins in the small intestine. Inherited conditions that prevent the synthesis of bile acids or their excretion cause cholestasis, or impaired bile flow. These disorders generally lead to severe human liver disease, underscoring the essential role of bile acids in metabolism. Recent advances in the elucidation of gene defects underlying familial cholestasis syndromes has greatly increased knowledge about the process of bile flow. The expression of key proteins involved in bile flow is tightly regulated by transcription factors of the nuclear hormone receptor family, which function as sensors of bile acids and cholesterol. Here we review the genetics of familial cholestasis disorders, the functions of the affected genes in bile flow, and their regulation by bile acids and cholesterol. PMID:15937079

  9. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by subtracting the amount of the housing assistance payment from the gross rent. (b) The family rent to owner...

  10. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by subtracting the amount of the housing assistance payment from the gross rent. (b) The family rent to owner...

  11. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by subtracting the amount of the housing assistance payment from the gross rent. (b) The family rent to owner...

  12. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by subtracting the amount of the housing assistance payment from the gross rent. (b) The family rent to owner...

  13. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by subtracting the amount of the housing assistance payment from the gross rent. (b) The family rent to owner...

  14. Creating a Family Health History

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health History? Click for more information A Family Tree for Health A family health history is a ... family members grew up. It's like a family tree for health. Click for more information What a ...

  15. Molecular study of the 5 {alpha}-reductase type 2 gene in three European families with 5 {alpha}-reductase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Boudon, C.; Lumbroso, S.; Lobaccaro, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    The molecular basis of 5{alpha}-reductase (5{alpha}R) deficiency was investigated in four patients from three European families. In the French family, the first patient was raised as a female, and gonadectomy was performed before puberty. The second sibling, also raised as female, differed in that gonadal removal was performed after the onset of pubertal masculinization. The other two patients, both from Polish families, developed masculinization of external genitalia during puberty. All patients developed a female sexual identity. In all cases, no known consanguinity or family history of 5{alpha}R deficiency was reported. The genomic DNAs of the patients were sequenced after polymerase chain reaction amplification of the five exons of the 5{alpha}R type 2 gene. We found two homozygous mutations responsible for gutamine to arginine and histidine to arginine substitution in families 1 and 3, respectively. In family 2, we found a heterozygous mutation responsible for an asparagine to serine substitution at position 193. The glutamine/arginine 126 mutation in the French family was previously reported in a Creole ethnic group, and the Polish histidine/arginine 231 mutation was previously reported in a patient from Chicago, Moreover, all of the mutations created new restriction sites, which were used to determine the kindred carrier status in the three families. Because 5{alpha}R deficiency is known to be heterogenous disease in terms of clinical and biochemical expression, our data suggest that molecular biology analysis of the type 2 gene could be an essential step in diagnosing 5{alpha}R deficiency. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Chronic and Invasive Fungal Infections in a Family with CARD9 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Alves de Medeiros, Ana Karina; Lodewick, Evelyn; Bogaert, Delfien J A; Haerynck, Filomeen; Van Daele, Sabine; Lambrecht, Bart; Bosma, Sara; Vanderdonckt, Laure; Lortholary, Olivier; Migaud, Mélanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne; Lanternier, Fanny; Lambert, Jo; Brochez, Lieve; Dullaers, Melissa

    2016-04-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous or invasive fungal infections are generally the result of primary or secondary immune dysfunction. Patients with autosomal recessive CARD9 mutations are also predisposed to recurrent mucocutaneous and invasive fungal infections with Candida spp., dermatophytes (e.g., Trichophyton spp.) and phaeohyphomycetes (Exophiala spp., Phialophora verrucosa). We study a consanguineous family of Turkish origin in which three members present with distinct clinical phenotypes of chronic mucocutaneous and invasive fungal infections, ranging from chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) in one patient, treatment-resistant cutaneous dermatophytosis and deep dermatophytosis in a second patient, to CMC with Candida encephalitis and endocrinopathy in a third patient. Two patients consented to genetic testing and were found to have a previously reported homozygous R70W CARD9 mutation. Circulating IL-17 and IL-22 producing T cells were decreased as was IL-6 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) secretion upon stimulation with Candida albicans. Patients with recurrent fungal infections in the absence of known immunodeficiencies should be analyzed for CARD9 gene mutations as the cause of fungal infection predisposition. PMID:26961233

  17. Refined mapping of the gene causing familial mediterranean fever, by linkage and homozygosity studies

    PubMed Central

    Aksentijevich, Ivona; Pras, Elon; Gruberg, Luis; Shen, Yang; Holman, Katherine; Helling, Sharon; Prosen, Leandrea; Sutherland, Grant R.; Richards, Robert I.; Ramsburg, Mark; Dean, Michael; Pras, Mordechai; Amos, Christopher I.; Kastner, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by attacks of fever and serosal inflammation; the biochemical basis is unknown. We recently reported linkage of the gene causing FMF (designated “MEF”) to two markers on chromosome 16p. To map MEF more precisely, we have now tested nine 16p markers. Two-point and multipoint linkage analysis, as well as a study of recombinant haplotypes, placed MEF between D16S94 and D16S80, a genetic interval of about 9 cM. We also examined rates of homozygosity for markers in this region, among offspring of consanguineous marriages. For eight of nine markers, the rate of homozygosity among 26 affected inbred individuals was higher than that among their 20 unaffected sibs. Localizing MEF more precisely on the basis of homozygosity rates alone would be difficult, for two reasons: First, the high FMF carrier frequency increases the chance that inbred offspring could have the disease without being homozygous by descent at MEF. Second, several of the markers in this region are relatively nonpolymorphic, with a high rate of homozygosity, regardless of their chromosomal location. PMID:8328461

  18. Deletion mutation in BSCL2 gene underlies congenital generalized lipodystrophy in a Pakistani family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) also known as Berardinelli-Seip Congenital Lipodystrophy (BSCL) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by loss of adipose tissues, Acanthosis nigricans, diabetes mellitus, muscular hypertrophy, hepatomegaly and hypertriglyceridemia. There are four subclinical phenotypes of CGL (CGL1-4) and mutations in four genes AGPAT2, BSCL2, CAV1 and PTRF have been assigned to each type. Methods The study included clinical and molecular investigations of CGL disease in a consanguineous Pakistani family. For mutation screening all the coding exons including splice junctions of AGPAT2, BSCL2, CAV1 and PTRF genes were PCR amplified and sequenced directly using an automated DNA sequencer ABI3730. Results Sequence analysis revealed a single base pair deletion mutation (c.636delC; p.Tyr213ThrfsX20) in exon 5 of BSCL2 gene causing a frame shift and premature termination codon. Conclusion Mutation identified here in BSCL2 gene causing congenital generalized lipodystrophy is the first report in Pakistani population. The patients exhibited characteristic features of generalized lipodystrophy, Acanthosis nigricans, diabetes mellitus and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1913913076864247. PMID:23659685

  19. Familial Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia Associated With Astrocyte-Predominant Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Isidre; Legati, Andrea; García-Monco, J. Carlos; Gomez-Beldarrain, Marian; Carmona, Margarita; Blanco, Rosa; Seeley, William W.; Coppola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    A familial behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia associated with astrocyte-predominant tauopathy is described in 2 sisters born from consanguineous parents. The neuropathological examination revealed massive accumulation of abnormally hyper-phosphorylated, conformational, truncated at aspartic acid 421, ubiquitinated, and nitrated tau at Tyr29 in cortical astrocyte (including their perivascular foot processes) and Bergmann glia. Smaller amounts of abnormal tau were observed in neurons and rarely in oligodendrocytes. There was decreased expression of glial glutamate transporter in the majority of tau-positive astrocytes. Gel electrophoresis of sarkosyl-insoluble fractions showed 2 bands of 64 and 60 kDa and a doublet of 67–70 kDa (which are different from those seen in Alzheimer disease and in typical 4R and 3R tauopathies) together with several bands of lower molecular weight indicative of truncated tau. Analysis of expression of MAPT isoforms further revealed altered splicing and representation of tau isoforms involving exons 2, 3 and 10. Genetic testing revealed no known mutations in PSEN1, PSEN2, APP, MAPT, GRN, FUS, and TARDBP, and no pathological expansion in C9ORF72. However, a novel rare heterozygous sequence variant (p.Q140H) of uncertain significance was identified in FUS in both siblings. PMID:25756587

  20. Detection of novel LAMA3 mutation in Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa in a Jordanian family.

    PubMed

    Badran, Eman F; Battah, Hamdi A; Akl, Kamal F; Khalil, Raida W; Al Amori, Iyad

    2013-08-01

    The Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa (H-JEB) subtype usually presents as a severe lethal inherited variant of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) caused by a homozygous mutation in the genes LAMA3, LMAB3, or LAMAC3. Each gene encodes one of the three chains of heterotrimer laminin-332 proteins (including the alpha-3 chain, beta-3 chain and gamma-2-chain) responsible for the adherence of the epidermis to the underlying dermis. The aim of this report is to add to the existing knowledge about EB by describing a novel mutation in a gene responsible for genodermatosis. A case of a Jordanian male neonate, born to healthy, first cousin consanguineous parents, who developed nonhealing blistering skin and mucous membrane lesions, crusted erosions with significant granulation tissue and dystrophic nails immediately after birth is described. The patient was diagnosed as having a novel LAMA3 mutation causing (H-JEB) by immunofluorescence mapping and molecular analysis. Both parents and this baby's sibling were shown to be heterozygous carriers of the same mutation. Pre-implantation diagnosis using molecular analysis for subsequent pregnancies in this family is crucial for managing any new pregnancy. PMID:22963541

  1. Familial Constitutional Rearrangement of Chromosomes 4 & 8: Phenotypically Normal Mother and Abnormal Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Kunwar, Fulesh

    2016-01-01

    Balanced chromosome translocations carriers mostly do not have recognizable phenotypic expression but may have more risk of recurrent spontaneous abortions &/or children with serious birth defects due to unbalanced chromosome complements. Unbalanced chromosomal rearrangements have variable clinical expression and are rare. We present here a case report of three siblings affected with intellectual disability and minor dysmorphic features of face and limbs, born to a non-consanguineous couple in which mother had 5 abortions. The constitutional chromosome analysis revealed balanced translocation t (4;8) in mother and all the three siblings were karyotypically normal. Chromosomal microarray in one of the probands revealed partial monosomy 8pter-p23 and a partial trisomy 4pter-p16. Phenotypic features were recorded in 3 probands using Human Phenotype Ontology terms to query web-based tool Phenomizer. The harmonized description using globally accepted ontology is very important especially in case of rare genetic conditions and the heterogeneous phenotypes which make it even more challenging. The prevalence of sub-microscopic unbalanced translocations may be under-reported due to lesser use of molecular genetic analysis. The familial expression of abnormal phenotypes including intellectual disability make the individuals candidate for molecular genetic analysis and phenotyping to help defer the status of idiopathic mental retardation and identify sub-entity of genetic condition. PMID:27190830

  2. Screening of nineteen unrelated families with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone for known point mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta gene and the detection of a new mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, K; Balzano, S; Sakurai, A; DeGroot, L J; Refetoff, S

    1991-01-01

    Generalized resistance to thyroid hormone (GRTH) is a syndrome characterized by impaired tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormone. Two distinct point mutations in the hormone binding domain of the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) beta have recently been identified in two unrelated families with GRTH. One, Mf, involves a replacement of the normal glycine-345 for arginine in exon 7 and another, Mh, replaces the normal proline-453 for histidine in exon 8. To probe for the presence of the Mf and Mh defect in 19 unrelated families with GRTH, we applied separate polymerase chain reactions using allele-specific oligonucleotide primers containing the normal and each of the two mutant nucleotides at the 3'-position. A total of 24 affected subjects and 13 normal family members were studied. The mode of inheritance was dominant in 13 families, was unknown in 5 families, and was clearly recessive in 1 family in which only the consanguineous subjects were affected. Primers containing the substitutions specific for Mf and Mh amplified exons 7 and 8, respectively, only in affected members of each of the two index families. Primers containing the normal sequences amplified exons 7 and 8 of the TR beta gene in all subjects except affected members of one family. In this family with recessively inherited GRTH, neither exon could be amplified using any combinations of primers and DNA blot revealed absence of all coding exons. These results indicate a major deletion of the TR beta gene, including both DNA and hormone binding domains. Since heterozygous members of this family are not affected, the presence of a single normal allele is sufficient for normal function of the TR beta. These data also support the hypothesis that in the dominant mode of GRTH inheritance the presence of an abnormal TR beta interferes with the function of the normal TR beta. Distinct mutations are probably responsible for GRTH in unrelated families. Images PMID:1991834

  3. Advancing family psychology.

    PubMed

    Fiese, Barbara H

    2016-02-01

    To realize the broad and complex nature of the field of family psychology, I have slightly revised the mission statement of the Journal of Family Psychology (JFP) to capture contemporary scholarship in family psychology and to advance systems perspectives in this top-tier scientific journal. Over the next 6 years, I hope that authors will consider JFP as an outlet for their best work in the following areas: (1) JFP addresses societal challenges faced by families today; (2) JFP publishes important studies on what makes couple and family relationships work; (3) JFP is a leader in publishing reports that use cutting-edge sophisticated approaches to research design and data analysis; and (4) JFP imparts knowledge about effective therapy and prevention programs relevant to couples and families. The journal is also expanding its publication rate to eight issues per year. PMID:26845635

  4. Patients and their families.

    PubMed

    Firth, P

    2006-01-01

    The focus of this chapter is on how clinicians can understand and communicate with the families of patients suffering from cancer. Most doctors and nurses do not have training in this area and are uncomfortable when conducting interviews with whole families. The need to extend our skills in the family context reflects the changes in the way care is provided to patients with a serious illness. We recognise the part families play in providing care and the subsequent effects on family life. The influence of systemic thinking and social construction theories has led to the acknowledgement that we are all part of systems which interact with each other and it is no longer appropriate to see the patient in isolation. The chapter will look at ideas from family therapy which can help us assess and intervene when necessary. The patient suffering from a life-threatening illness such as cancer looks to his family and friends for care and support. The management and course of the illness is affected by the involvement of the family and how they manage the stress and the effects of illness on a family member (Wright and Leahey 2000). Duhamel and Dupuis (2003) point out that there are three important factors in the management of the illness: the effects of family stress, the needs of the family as caregivers, and the effects of the role and how the family cope with the way the patient experiences his illness. This presents professionals working in the field with challenges they are often ill-equipped to deal with. Most healthcare workers have inadequate training in understanding family dynamics and even less knowledge about how to communicate effectively with whole families. Consequently, many healthcare professionals avoid couple and family interviews, feeling inadequate and helpless like the families themselves. I will address some of these issues in the chapter, firstly by examining what we now regard as the family and then by using ideas from systemic theory I will look at

  5. The Growth of a Family

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.; Biringer, Anne

    1991-01-01

    Caring for a family during pregnancy and birth is an ideal opportunity for family physicians to assess family functioning and help the family adjust to the birth of a new child. Stress and support systems can influence the course of pregnancy, including obstetric and perinatal outcomes. A family-centered approach can help patients during this critical stage of family development. PMID:21229107

  6. Putting 'family' back in family planning.

    PubMed

    Seifer, David B; Minkoff, Howard; Merhi, Zaher

    2015-01-01

    Family planning visits are designed to help women build families in a manner most compatible with their life goals. Women's knowledge regarding age-related fertility is suboptimal, and first wanted pregnancies are now occurring at older ages. Here we review the issue of diminishing chances of a pregnancy occurring in women over 30 years of age. A debate arises over whether to perform a standard fertility assessment at an age when, for example, oocyte freezing is still practical and feasible, knowing that the proven predictors in subfertile couples may be less informative, or even inappropriate, in women without complaints about fertility. Studies have demonstrated that if women knew that their fertility was diminishing, they might alter life plans, including having children sooner or considering oocyte preservation. Therefore, we argue that physicians need to make an effort to evaluate a woman's childbearing priorities, though not necessarily their fertility, during the initial family planning visit. PMID:25406182

  7. Lightcurves of the Karin family asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Fumi; Ito, Takashi; Dermawan, Budi; Nakamura, Tsuko; Takahashi, Shigeru; Ibrahimov, Mansur A.; Malhotra, Renu; Ip, Wing-Huen; Chen, Wen-Ping; Sawabe, Yu; Haji, Masashige; Saito, Ryoko; Hirai, Masanori

    2016-05-01

    The Karin family is a young asteroid family formed by an asteroid breakup 5.8 Myr ago. Since the members of this family probably have not experienced significant orbital or collisional evolution yet, it is possible that they still preserve properties of the original family-forming event in terms of their spin state. We carried out a series of photometric observations of the Karin family asteroids, and here we report on the analysis of the lightcurves including the rotation period of eleven members. The mean rotation rate of the Karin family members turned out to be much lower than those of near-Earth asteroids or small main belt asteroids (diameter D < 12 km), and even lower than that of large main belt asteroids (D > 130 km). We investigated a correlation between the peak-to-trough variation and the rotation period of the eleven Karin family asteroids, and found a possible trend that elongated members have lower spin rates, and less elongated members have higher spin rates. However, this trend has to be confirmed by another series of future observations.

  8. The Alba protein family: Structure and function.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Manish; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Nag, Shiladitya; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2016-05-01

    Alba family proteins are small, basic, dimeric nucleic acid-binding proteins, which are widely distributed in archaea and a number of eukaryotes. This family of proteins bears the distinct features of regulation through acetylation/deacetylation, hence named as acetylation lowers binding affinity (Alba). Alba family proteins bind DNA cooperatively with no apparent sequence specificity. Besides DNA, Alba proteins also interact with diverse RNA species and associate with ribonucleo-protein complexes. Initially, Alba proteins were recognized as chromosomal proteins and supposed to be involved in the maintenance of chromatin architecture and transcription repression. However, recent studies have shown increasing evidence of functional plasticity among Alba family of proteins that widely range from genome packaging and organization, transcriptional and translational regulation, RNA metabolism, and development and differentiation processes. In recent years, Alba family proteins have attracted growing interest due to their widespread occurrence in large number of organisms. Presence in multiple copies, functional crosstalk, differential binding affinity, and posttranslational modifications are some of the key factors that might regulate the biological functions of Alba family proteins. In this review article, we present an overview of the Alba family proteins, their salient features and emphasize their functional role in different organisms reported so far. PMID:26900088

  9. FAMILIES TIPULIDAE AND LIMONIIDAE.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Guilherme C; Santos, Daubian

    2016-01-01

    A catalogue of the Colombian crane flies (Tipulomorpha, families Tipulidae and Limoniidae) is provided, based on updated information from the Catalogue of the Crane flies of World, with additional data on the geographical distribution of the species in Colombia taken from the primary literature. A total of 131 valid species are recorded for Colombia, 38 in the family Tipulidae and 93 in the family Limoniidae. PMID:27395262

  10. The family lecture.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nancy E

    2002-10-01

    SUMMARY This paper describes a lecture about my extended family, in which I discuss a variety of configurations consisting of lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults, and our children. It raises an array of issues, including alternative insemination, biological and nonbiological parentage, donors and birthmothers, adoption, co-parenting and blended families, significant others, and gay marriage and domestic partnership. It helps many students obtain both a more expansive sense of family and adeeper understanding of homophobia. PMID:24804601

  11. IMPLICATIONS OF SPANISH-AMERICAN CULTURE ON FAMILY LIFE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VALDEZ, BERNARD

    FAMILY PATTERNS AND ROLES OF SPANISH-AMERICANS AND IMPLICATIONS OF TRANSFERENCE OF FOLK CULTURE TO AN URBAN SETTING ARE ANALYZED. STRONG FAMILY COHESIVENESS IS CREATED BY ISOLATION, LACK OF MOBILITY, AN AGRARIAN ECONOMY, AND THE PUEBLO INDIAN INFLUENCE OF SMALL VILLAGES. BLOOD KINSHIPS ARE SOUGHT OUT AND MAINTAINED, AND ARE EXTENDED BY A SYSTEM OF…

  12. Effects of a Preschool Bilingual Family Literacy Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Kath; Hannon, Peter; Nutbrown, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    This article reports a multi-method evaluation of a one-year small-scale preschool family literacy programme with bilingual Pakistani-origin families in the UK. The programme was implemented mostly through home visits and included provision of literacy resources, some postal communication and group meetings. The study was conducted in…

  13. Dentistry preventing family violence.

    PubMed

    Mouden, L D

    1996-01-01

    Dentistry has a long history of dealing with one form of family violence, child maltreatment. However, a recent national survey shows that dentists are not living up to their legal and ethical obligations to report suspected child victims. Dentistry needs to be equally concerned with adult victims of family violence--the victims of spousal abuse and elder abuse and neglect. Successful child abuse prevention programs need to expand to cover all of family violence. All health care professionals need education and awareness training to help develop the necessary attitudes to deal with all victims of family violence. PMID:9564320

  14. Family troubles - resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... abuse , incest, domestic violence, and family troubles: National Domestic Violence Hotline -- www.thehotline.org Prevent Child Abuse America -- www.preventchildabuse.org National Runaway Safeline -- ...

  15. A missense mutation (p.G274R) in gene ASPA causes Canavan disease in a Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rashida; Daud, Shakeela; Kakar, Naseebullah; Ahmad, Adeel; Baloch, Abdul Hameed; Tareen, Abdul Malik; Kakar, Muhammad Azam; Ahmad, Jamil

    2012-05-01

    Canavan disease (OMIM 271900) is an autosomal recessive lethal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by spongy degeneration of the brain. A highly consanguineous Pakistani family with Canavan disease was enrolled on the basis of diagnosis. All the affected individuals have mental retardation, megalocephaly and degradation of motor skills, poor head control, partial vision loss, weakness of the muscles and raised urinary concentration of N-acetyl aspartic acid in the urine. Blood samples were collected from affected as well as normal siblings and processed for DNA purification. Linkage analysis was performed by typing three short tandem repeat markers D17S1583 (7.19 cM), D17S1828 (10.02 cM) and D17S919 (14.69 cM) for an already-reported gene/locus ASPA at chromosome 17p13.2 causing Canavan disease. During linkage analysis, all the affected individuals were homozygous for short tandem repeat markers while the normal siblings were heterozygous showing co-segregation of the disease. Gene ASPA (NM_000049) was undertaken to sequence for mutation analysis. As a result of sequence analysis, we found missense substitution 740A→G (p.G274R) in exon 6 of gene ASPA. To our knowledge, this is the first report about Canavan disease on a Pakistani family. PMID:22219087

  16. Novel and recurrent mutations in the TAT gene in Tunisian families affected with Richner-Hanhart syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bouyacoub, Yosra; Zribi, Hela; Azzouz, Hatem; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Abdelaziz, Rim Ben; Kacem, Monia; Rekaya, Ben; Messaoud, Olfa; Romdhane, Lilia; Charfeddine, Cherine; Bouziri, Mustapha; Bouziri, Sonia; Tebib, Neji; Mokni, Mourad; Kaabachi, Naziha; Boubaker, Samir; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2013-10-15

    Tyrosinemia type II, also designated as oculocutaneous tyrosinemia or Richner-Hanhart syndrome (RHS), is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder. In the present study, we report clinical features and molecular genetic investigation of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene in two young patients, both born to consanguineous unions between first-degree cousins. These two unrelated families originated from Northern and Southern Tunisia. The clinical diagnosis was based on the observation of several complications related to Richner-Hanhart syndrome: recurrent eye redness, tearing and burning pain, photophobia, bilateral pseudodendritic keratitis, an erythematous and painful focal palmo-plantar hyperkeratosis and a mild delay of mental development. The diagnosis was confirmed by biochemical analysis. Sequencing of the TAT gene revealed the presence of a previously reported missense mutation (c.452G>A, p.Cys151Tyr) in a Tunisian family, and a novel G duplication (c.869dupG, p.Trp291Leufs 6). Early diagnosis of RHS and protein-restricted diet are crucial to reduce the risk and the severity of long-term complications of hypertyrosinemia such as intellectual disability. PMID:23954227

  17. Identification of mutation in GTPBP2 in patients of a family with neurodegeneration accompanied by iron deposition in the brain.

    PubMed

    Jaberi, Elham; Rohani, Mohammad; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Nafissi, Shahriar; Arefian, Ehsan; Soleimani, Masoud; Rasooli, Paniz; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Daftarian, Narsis; KaramiNejadRanjbar, Mohammad; Klotzle, Brandy; Fan, Jian-Bing; Turk, Casey; Steemers, Frank; Elahi, Elahe

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to identify the genetic cause of a neurologic disorder accompanied with mental deficiency in a consanguineous family with 3 affected siblings by linkage analysis and exome sequencing. Iron accumulation in the brain of the patients was a notable phenotypic feature. A full-field electroretinography revealed generalized dysfunction of photoreceptors, bipolar cells, and amacrine cells. A splice site mutation in GTPBP2 that encodes GTP-binding protein 2 was identified in the patients and considered possible cause of their disease. The mutation was empirically shown to cause deletion of exon 9 of the gene and result in production of a truncated protein-lacking conserved C-terminus domains. GTPBP2 is a member of the GTPase superfamily of proteins. A recent report of identification of another splice site mutation in GTPBP2 in mice that causes neurodegeneration, and retinal damage provides supportive evidence for our finding. The conditions in the affected individuals of the family studied may define a novel form of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, and GTPBP2 may be a novel neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation gene. PMID:26675814

  18. Family Language Policy: A Case Study of a Russian-Hebrew Bilingual Family--Toward a Theoretical Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopeliovich, Shulamit

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an in-depth, small-scale qualitative study of a Hebrew-Russian bilingual family with 8 children, and compares the parents' perspective on the family language policy with their children's evaluation of it. Spolsky's (2004, 2009) model of language policy enables tracing the development of the parents' language "ideology" and…

  19. Strengthening Families: Exploring the Impacts of Family Camp Experiences on Family Functioning and Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garst, Barry A.; Baughman, Sarah; Franz, Nancy K.; Seidel, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that family camp experiences can enhance family relationships. Families often participate in family camp experiences for a vacation, as part of a therapeutic and/or intervention strategy, or to gain general enrichment or engagement. To better understand the impacts of family camp experiences on family functioning, a mixed-methods…

  20. India: New family planning program direction outlined.

    PubMed

    1977-01-01

    The focus of the current Family Welfare Program in India is education and active community involvement rather than coercion and compulsion. The government is totally committed to the program and has indicated that it will spare no efforts to motivate people to voluntarily accept family planning. However, there is a need for family planning efforts to include all aspects of family welfare, particularly those designed to promote the health of mothers and children. All family planning methods will be made available, and the family will be free to choose the method they prefer. As part of the program, employees of the Union government, State governments, autonomous and local bodies are expected to set an example and adopt the small family norm. The policy statement made by Mr. Raj Narain, Minister of Health and Family Welfare, revealed the government's decision not to legislate, either at the national or the State level, for compulsory sterilization. Sterilization services will be available free of charge to those who voluntarily choose this method. A plan for training indigenous midwives will be implemented as part of the program in order that maternity services may be available to all expectant mothers. Additionally, in recognition of the direct correlation between illiteracy and fertility and between infant/maternal mortality and age at marriage, the government will introduce legislation to raise the minimum age at marriage to 18 years for girls and to 21 years for boys. The plan is for trade unions, Chambers of Commerce, cooperative societies, women's organizations, teachers' federation, district councils, and other voluntary institutions to be associated intimately with the educational campaign launching the Family Welfare Program. PMID:12260383