Science.gov

Sample records for small coupling behaviour

  1. Bursting behaviour in coupled Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongray, Thotreithem; Balakrishnan, J.; Dana, Syamal K.

    2015-12-01

    We report an interesting bow-tie shaped bursting behaviour in a certain parameter regime of two resistive-capacitative shunted Josephson junctions, one in the oscillatory and the other in the excitable mode and coupled together resistively. The burst emerges in both the junctions and they show near-complete synchronization for strong enough couplings. We discuss a possible bifurcation scenario to explain the origin of the burst. An exhaustive study on the parameter space of the system is performed, demarcating the regions of bursting from other solutions.

  2. Bursting behaviour in coupled Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Hongray, Thotreithem; Balakrishnan, J; Dana, Syamal K

    2015-12-01

    We report an interesting bow-tie shaped bursting behaviour in a certain parameter regime of two resistive-capacitative shunted Josephson junctions, one in the oscillatory and the other in the excitable mode and coupled together resistively. The burst emerges in both the junctions and they show near-complete synchronization for strong enough couplings. We discuss a possible bifurcation scenario to explain the origin of the burst. An exhaustive study on the parameter space of the system is performed, demarcating the regions of bursting from other solutions. PMID:26723143

  3. SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR AND DYSFUNCTION IN DIVORCE SEEKING COUPLES

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Shiv; Batra, Lalit

    1996-01-01

    50 divorce seeking couples, when compared with 30 well adjusted couples, showed that sex-related factors and sexual dysfunctions were related to divorce seeking behaviour. A significantly high number of couples in the study group, reported a bad honeymoon, unsatisfactory coital experience, lack of cooperation from the spouse and variant sexual habits. The findings emphasis the importance of imparting adequate knowledge about sex and management of sexual dysfunctions, as part of marital therapy. PMID:21584156

  4. Slime mould foraging behaviour as optically coupled logical operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayne, R.; Adamatzky, A.

    2015-04-01

    Physarum polycephalum is a macroscopic plasmodial slime mould whose apparently 'intelligent' behaviour patterns may be interpreted as computation. We employ plasmodial phototactic responses to construct laboratory prototypes of NOT and NAND logical gates with electrical inputs/outputs and optical coupling in which the slime mould plays dual roles of computing device and electrical conductor. Slime mould logical gates are fault tolerant and resettable. The results presented here demonstrate the malleability and resilience of biological systems and highlight how the innate behaviour patterns of living substrates may be used to implement useful computation.

  5. Small quantum absorption refrigerator with reversed couplings.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ralph; Skrzypczyk, Paul; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Small quantum absorption refrigerators have recently attracted renewed attention. Here we present a missing design of a two-qubit fridge, the main feature of which is that one of the two machine qubits is itself maintained at a temperature colder than the cold bath. This is achieved by "reversing" the couplings to the baths compared to previous designs, where only a transition is maintained cold. We characterize the working regime and the efficiency of the fridge. We demonstrate the soundness of the model by deriving and solving a master equation. Finally, we discuss the performance of the fridge, in particular the heat current extracted from the cold bath. We show that our model performs comparably to the standard three-level quantum fridge and thus appears appealing for possible implementations of nanoscale thermal machines. PMID:26274153

  6. Small quantum absorption refrigerator with reversed couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ralph; Skrzypczyk, Paul; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Small quantum absorption refrigerators have recently attracted renewed attention. Here we present a missing design of a two-qubit fridge, the main feature of which is that one of the two machine qubits is itself maintained at a temperature colder than the cold bath. This is achieved by "reversing" the couplings to the baths compared to previous designs, where only a transition is maintained cold. We characterize the working regime and the efficiency of the fridge. We demonstrate the soundness of the model by deriving and solving a master equation. Finally, we discuss the performance of the fridge, in particular the heat current extracted from the cold bath. We show that our model performs comparably to the standard three-level quantum fridge and thus appears appealing for possible implementations of nanoscale thermal machines.

  7. Small hive beetles survive in honeybee prisons by behavioural mimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, J. D.; Pirk, C. W. W.; Hepburn, H. R.; Kastberger, G.; Elzen, P. J.

    2002-05-01

    We report the results of a simple experiment to determine whether honeybees feed their small hive beetle nest parasites. Honeybees incarcerate the beetles in cells constructed of plant resins and continually guard them. The longevity of incarcerated beetles greatly exceeds their metabolic reserves. We show that survival of small hive beetles derives from behavioural mimicry by which the beetles induce the bees to feed them trophallactically. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer LINK server located at htpp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00114-002-0326-y.

  8. Small hive beetles survive in honeybee prisons by behavioural mimicry.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J D; Pirk, C W W; Hepburn, H R; Kastberger, G; Elzen, P J

    2002-07-01

    We report the results of a simple experiment to determine whether honeybees feed their small hive beetle nest parasites. Honeybees incarcerate the beetles in cells constructed of plant resins and continually guard them. The longevity of incarcerated beetles greatly exceeds their metabolic reserves. We show that survival of small hive beetles derives from behavioural mimicry by which the beetles induce the bees to feed them trophallactically. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer LINK server located at htpp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00114-002-0326-y. PMID:12216866

  9. Age and aggregation trigger mating behaviour in the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida (Nitidulidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Sandra G.; Spooner-Hart, Robert; Duncan, Michael; Pettis, Jeffery S.; Steidle, Johannes L. M.; Rosenkranz, Peter

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the poorly documented reproductive behaviour of the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida (Nitidulidae), a honey bee ( Apis mellifera) parasite. We described the mating behaviour in detail and tested the hypothesis that beetle aggregation plays a vital role in mating in this species. Gender preference was examined in the context of age-dependency and possible chemical communication. Beetles started mating at a high frequency 18 days after emergence from the soil but only if they were aggregated ( p < 0.001); mating was infrequent when beetles were paired. Males in aggregation also tried to copulate with males and only copulated more frequently with females at 18 days after emergence from soil ( p < 0.001) in contrast to newly emerged, 7-day-old and 60-day-old beetles. Males and females spent more time in social contact with the opposite sex ( p < 0.01) when they were 18 days old in contrast to 7-day-old beetles. Filter papers which had been in contact with 21-day-old beetles were highly attractive to similar-aged beetles of the opposite sex ( p < 0.01). This suggests that chemical substances produced by the beetles themselves play a role in mating. Mating behaviour was characterised by a short pre-copulation courtship and female aggression towards other females and copulating couples. Both behaviours may be indicative of cryptic female choice. Delayed onset of reproductive behaviour is typical of many polygamous species, whilst the indispensability of aggregation for onset of sexual behaviour seems to be a feature unique to A. tumida. Both strategies support mass reproduction in this parasitic species, enabling A. tumida to overcome its honey bee host colony, and are probably triggered by chemotactic cues.

  10. Age and aggregation trigger mating behaviour in the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida (Nitidulidae).

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Sandra G; Spooner-Hart, Robert; Duncan, Michael; Pettis, Jeffery S; Steidle, Johannes L M; Rosenkranz, Peter

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the poorly documented reproductive behaviour of the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida (Nitidulidae), a honey bee (Apis mellifera) parasite. We described the mating behaviour in detail and tested the hypothesis that beetle aggregation plays a vital role in mating in this species. Gender preference was examined in the context of age-dependency and possible chemical communication. Beetles started mating at a high frequency 18 days after emergence from the soil but only if they were aggregated (p < 0.001); mating was infrequent when beetles were paired. Males in aggregation also tried to copulate with males and only copulated more frequently with females at 18 days after emergence from soil (p < 0.001) in contrast to newly emerged, 7-day-old and 60-day-old beetles. Males and females spent more time in social contact with the opposite sex (p < 0.01) when they were 18 days old in contrast to 7-day-old beetles. Filter papers which had been in contact with 21-day-old beetles were highly attractive to similar-aged beetles of the opposite sex (p < 0.01). This suggests that chemical substances produced by the beetles themselves play a role in mating. Mating behaviour was characterised by a short pre-copulation courtship and female aggression towards other females and copulating couples. Both behaviours may be indicative of cryptic female choice. Delayed onset of reproductive behaviour is typical of many polygamous species, whilst the indispensability of aggregation for onset of sexual behaviour seems to be a feature unique to A. tumida. Both strategies support mass reproduction in this parasitic species, enabling A. tumida to overcome its honey bee host colony, and are probably triggered by chemotactic cues.. PMID:26286322

  11. Coherence Resonance of Small World Networks with Adaptive Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    The phenomenon of coherence resonance (CR) in small world networks with adaptive coupling is investigated by modeling a real experimental situation with a photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. We show that both spatial synchronization and temporal coherence of noise-induced firings can be considerably improved by adjusting control parameters, such as the degree of connectivity and the coupling strength. A small fraction of possible long-range connections is enough to obtain a great enhancement in CR.

  12. Synchronization of Coupled Oscillators on Newman Watts Small-World Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jian-Yue; Xu, Xin-Jian; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Wang, Ying-Hai

    2006-06-01

    We investigate the collection behaviour of coupled phase oscillators on Newman-Watts small-world networks in one and two dimensions. Each component of the network is assumed as an oscillator and each interacts with the others following the Kuramoto model. We then study the onset of global synchronization of phases and frequencies based on dynamic simulations and finite-size scaling. Both the phase and frequency synchronization are observed to emerge in the presence of a tiny fraction of shortcuts and enhanced with the increases of nearest neighbours and lattice dimensions.

  13. Coupling behaviour of tapered highly multimodal dielectric waveguides as part of PCB-level optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soenmez, Yasin; Mrozynski, Gerd; Schrage, Juergen

    2010-05-01

    Optical interconnects replace electrical links increasingly at shorter distances. At printed circuit board (PCB) level highly multimodal polymer channel waveguides are the chosen approach to meet bandwidth-length and bandwidth-density requirements. One important challenge of board integrated waveguides is the coupling problem. The manufacturing process of PCBs leads to relatively high placement tolerances which cause poor optical coupling efficiency due to mechanical misalignment between separate components, e.g.: 1) Coupling between a VCSEL and the board integrated waveguides; 2) Coupling between waveguides in two separate boards. This paper deals with the deployment of tapered dielectric multimode waveguides for increasing the optical coupling robustness towards mechanical misalignments in these two coupling applications. A coupled mode approach for calculation of the mode coupling and power loss in a taper with decreasing width has been presented before [5]. In [6], the two above mentioned coupling applications for tapered dielectric waveguides have been dealt with, but only the coupling efficiency in case of longitudinal misalignment has been calculated. In this paper, results of advanced analysis of the two applications are presented. The coupling efficiency in case of transverse misalignment is simulated by a ray-optical approach. Furthermore the results of measurements of the coupling behaviour of board integrated tapered waveguides are presented. The results show that tapered multimodal dielectric waveguides have the capability to increase the coupling efficiency significantly if some conditions are fulfilled.

  14. Experimental multistable states for small network of coupled pendula.

    PubMed

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Grabski, Juliusz; Wojewoda, Jerzy; Perlikowski, Przemyslaw; Maistrenko, Yuri; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Chimera states are dynamical patterns emerging in populations of coupled identical oscillators where different groups of oscillators exhibit coexisting synchronous and incoherent behaviors despite homogeneous coupling. Although these states are typically observed in the large ensembles of oscillators, recently it has been shown that so-called weak chimera states may occur in the systems with small numbers of oscillators. Here, we show that similar multistable states demonstrating partial frequency synchronization, can be observed in simple experiments with identical mechanical oscillators, namely pendula. The mathematical model of our experiment shows that the observed multistable states are controlled by elementary dynamical equations, derived from Newton's laws that are ubiquitous in many physical and engineering systems. Our finding suggests that multistable chimera-like states are observable in small networks relevant to various real-world systems. PMID:27445038

  15. Experimental multistable states for small network of coupled pendula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Grabski, Juliusz; Wojewoda, Jerzy; Perlikowski, Przemyslaw; Maistrenko, Yuri; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2016-07-01

    Chimera states are dynamical patterns emerging in populations of coupled identical oscillators where different groups of oscillators exhibit coexisting synchronous and incoherent behaviors despite homogeneous coupling. Although these states are typically observed in the large ensembles of oscillators, recently it has been shown that so-called weak chimera states may occur in the systems with small numbers of oscillators. Here, we show that similar multistable states demonstrating partial frequency synchronization, can be observed in simple experiments with identical mechanical oscillators, namely pendula. The mathematical model of our experiment shows that the observed multistable states are controlled by elementary dynamical equations, derived from Newton’s laws that are ubiquitous in many physical and engineering systems. Our finding suggests that multistable chimera-like states are observable in small networks relevant to various real-world systems.

  16. Experimental multistable states for small network of coupled pendula

    PubMed Central

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Grabski, Juliusz; Wojewoda, Jerzy; Perlikowski, Przemyslaw; Maistrenko, Yuri; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Chimera states are dynamical patterns emerging in populations of coupled identical oscillators where different groups of oscillators exhibit coexisting synchronous and incoherent behaviors despite homogeneous coupling. Although these states are typically observed in the large ensembles of oscillators, recently it has been shown that so-called weak chimera states may occur in the systems with small numbers of oscillators. Here, we show that similar multistable states demonstrating partial frequency synchronization, can be observed in simple experiments with identical mechanical oscillators, namely pendula. The mathematical model of our experiment shows that the observed multistable states are controlled by elementary dynamical equations, derived from Newton’s laws that are ubiquitous in many physical and engineering systems. Our finding suggests that multistable chimera-like states are observable in small networks relevant to various real-world systems. PMID:27445038

  17. Insights into collective cell behaviour from populations of coupled chemical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Annette F; Tinsley, Mark R; Showalter, Kenneth

    2015-08-21

    Biological systems such as yeast show coordinated activity driven by chemical communication between cells. Here, we show how experiments with coupled chemical oscillators can provide insights into collective behaviour in cellular systems. Two methods of coupling the oscillators are described: exchange of chemical species with the surrounding solution and computer-controlled illumination of a light-sensitive catalyst. The collective behaviour observed includes synchronisation, dynamical quorum sensing (a density dependent transition to population-wide oscillations), and chimera states, where oscillators spontaneously split into coherent and incoherent groups. At the core of the different types of behaviour lies an intracellular autocatalytic signal and an intercellular communication mechanism that influences the autocatalytic growth. PMID:26195263

  18. Hidden from view: coupled dark sector physics and small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elahi, Pascal J.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Power, Chris; Carlesi, Edoardo; Knebe, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    We study cluster mass dark matter (DM) haloes, their progenitors and surroundings in a coupled dark matter-dark energy (DE) model and compare it to quintessence and Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) models with adiabatic zoom simulations. When comparing cosmologies with different expansions histories, growth functions and power spectra, care must be taken to identify unambiguous signatures of alternative cosmologies. Shared cosmological parameters, such as σ8, need not be the same for optimal fits to observational data. We choose to set our parameters to ΛCDM z = 0 values. We find that in coupled models, where DM decays into DE, haloes appear remarkably similar to ΛCDM haloes despite DM experiencing an additional frictional force. Density profiles are not systematically different and the subhalo populations have similar mass, spin, and spatial distributions, although (sub)haloes are less concentrated on average in coupled cosmologies. However, given the scatter in related observables (V_max,R_{V_max}), this difference is unlikely to distinguish between coupled and uncoupled DM. Observations of satellites of Milky Way and M31 indicate a significant subpopulation reside in a plane. Coupled models do produce planar arrangements of satellites of higher statistical significance than ΛCDM models; however, in all models these planes are dynamically unstable. In general, the non-linear dynamics within and near large haloes masks the effects of a coupled dark sector. The sole environmental signature we find is that small haloes residing in the outskirts are more deficient in baryons than their ΛCDM counterparts. The lack of a pronounced signal for a coupled dark sector strongly suggests that such a phenomena would be effectively hidden from view.

  19. Laboratory Investigations of the Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Coupling Behaviour of Sandstone in CO2 Storage in Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hui; Hu, Dawei; Zhang, Fan; Shao, Jianfu; Feng, Xiating

    2016-02-01

    This paper is devoted to experimental investigations of the hydro-mechanical-chemical coupling behaviour of sandstone in the context of CO2 storage in aquifers. We focused on the evolution of creep strain, the transport properties and the elastic modulus of sandstone under the effect of CO2-brine or CO2 alone. A summary of previous laboratory results is first presented, including mechanical, poromechanical and hydro-mechanical-chemical coupling properties. Tests were then performed to investigate the evolution of the creep strain and permeability during the injection of CO2-brine or CO2 alone. After the injection of CO2-brine or CO2 alone, an instantaneous volumetric dilatancy was observed due to the decrease in the effective confining stress. However, CO2 alone had a significant influence on the creep strain and permeability compared to the small influence of CO2-brine. This phenomenon can be attributed to the acceleration of the CO2-brine-rock reaction by the generation of carbonic acid induced by the dissolution of CO2 into the brine. The original indentation tests on samples after the CO2-brine-rock reaction were also performed and indicated that the elastic modulus decreased with an increasing reaction time. The present laboratory results can advance our knowledge of the hydro-mechanical-chemical coupling behaviour of sandstone in CO2 storage in aquifers.

  20. Changing the Environmental Behaviour of Small Business Owners: The Business Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Beth; Redmond, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The importance of the environment is something of a cracked record to many small business owners, as historically any calls to business to change or improve their practices or behaviours were from the "environmental" or "green" perspective, rather than from a business perspective. As a consequence, many small businesses have…

  1. Small core fiber coupled 60-W laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernie, Douglas P.; Mannonen, Ilkka; Raven, Anthony L.

    1995-05-01

    Semiconductor laser diodes are compact, efficient and reliable sources of laser light and 25 W fiber coupled systems developed by Diomed have been in clinical use for over three years. For certain applications, particularly in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and flexible endoscopy, higher powers are desirable. In these applications the use of flexible optical fibers of no more than 600 micrometers core diameter is essential for compatibility with most commercial delivery fibers and instrumentation. A high power 60 W diode laser system for driving these small core fibers has been developed. The design requirements for medical applications are analyzed and system performance and results of use in gastroenterology and urology with small core fibers will be presented.

  2. Sports teams as complex adaptive systems: manipulating player numbers shapes behaviours during football small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro; Vilar, Luís; Davids, Keith; Araújo, Duarte; Garganta, Júlio

    2016-01-01

    Small-sided and conditioned games (SSCGs) in sport have been modelled as complex adaptive systems. Research has shown that the relative space per player (RSP) formulated in SSCGs can impact on emergent tactical behaviours. In this study we adopted a systems orientation to analyse how different RSP values, obtained through manipulations of player numbers, influenced four measures of interpersonal coordination observed during performance in SSCGs. For this purpose we calculated positional data (GPS 15 Hz) from ten U-15 football players performing in three SSCGs varying in player numbers (3v3, 4v4 and 5v5). Key measures of SSCG system behaviours included values of (1) players' dispersion, (2) teams' separateness, (3) coupling strength and time delays between participants' emerging movements, respectively. Results showed that values of participants' dispersion increased, but the teams' separateness remained identical across treatments. Coupling strength and time delay also showed consistent values across SSCGs. These results exemplified how complex adaptive systems, like football teams, can harness inherent degeneracy to maintain similar team spatial-temporal relations with opponents through changes in inter-individual coordination modes (i.e., players' dispersion). The results imply that different team behaviours might emerge at different ratios of field dimension/player numbers. Therefore, sport pedagogists should carefully evaluate the effects of changing RSP in SSCGs as a way of promoting increased or decreased pressure on players. PMID:27026887

  3. Experiments with a small behaviour controlled planetary rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David P.; Desai, Rajiv S.; Gat, Erann; Ivlev, Robert; Loch, John

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments that were performed on the Rocky 3 robot is described. Rocky 3 is a small autonomous rover capable of navigating through rough outdoor terrain to a predesignated area, searching that area for soft soil, acquiring a soil sample, and depositing the sample in a container at its home base. The robot is programmed according to a reactive behavior control paradigm using the ALFA programming language. This style of programming produces robust autonomous performance while requiring significantly less computational resources than more traditional mobile robot control systems. The code for Rocky 3 runs on an eight bit processor and uses about ten k of memory.

  4. Coupling tendencies during exploratory behaviours of competing players in rugby union dyads.

    PubMed

    Correia, Vanda; Passos, Pedro; Araújo, Duarte; Davids, Keith; Diniz, Ana; Kelso, J A Scott

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated interpersonal coordination tendencies in 1vs.1 dyads in rugby union, here expressed by participants' movement velocity towards or away from the sideline as they competed to score or prevent a try. We examined whether coupling tendencies of members of each dyad shaped key performance outcomes (try or successful tackle). Data on movement displacement trajectories of eight male rugby union players (aged 11-12 years) were analysed during performance in 47 trials. To assess coordination tendencies during exploratory behaviours in the dyads, analyses of performance time series data were undertaken using variable time graphs, running correlations and cross-correlations. Results revealed distinct coupling patterns characterised by shifts between synchronous coordination and asynchronous coordination tendencies and uncoordinated actions. Observed behaviours were interpreted as attempts of competing participants to create and perceive possibilities for action while seeking to achieve specific performance goals. Findings also revealed that a variety of patterned relations between participants resulted in different performance outcomes. PMID:24814417

  5. Timescales for exploratory tactical behaviour in football small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Ric, Angel; Hristovski, Robert; Gonçalves, Bruno; Torres, Lorena; Sampaio, Jaime; Torrents, Carlota

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the dynamics of tactical behaviour emerging on different timescales in football small-sided games and to quantify short- and long-term exploratory behaviour according to the number of opponents. Two teams of four professional male footballers played small-sided games against two different teams with a variable number of opponents (3, 5 and 7). Data were collected using a combination of systematic observation and a non-differential global positioning system (15 Hz). The temporal diversity and structural flexibility of the players were determined by calculating the dynamic overlap order parameter q, entropy and trapping strength. Analysis of the exploratory dynamics revealed two different timescales, forming a different metastable landscape of action for each constraint. Fast dynamics lasted on average a few seconds and consisted of changes in tactical patterns. The long timescale corresponded to the shared tasks of offence and defence lasting tens of seconds. The players' tactical diversity decreased with an increasing number of opponents, especially in defence. Manipulating numerical imbalance is likely to promote changes in the diversity, unpredictability and flexibility of tactical solutions. The fact that the temporally nested structure of constraints shaped the emergence of tactical behaviour provides a new rationale for practice task design. The manipulation of numerical imbalance on the timescale of a few tens of seconds, on which the exploratory behaviour of players saturates, may help coaches to optimise the exploratory efficiency of the small-sided games. PMID:26758958

  6. Exploring Early Angiosperm Fire Feedbacks using Coupled Experiments and Modelling Approaches to Estimate Cretaceous Palaeofire Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, Claire; Hudpsith, Victoria

    2016-04-01

    Using the fossil record we are typically limited to exploring linkages between palaeoecological changes and palaeofire activity by assessing the abundance of charcoals preserved in sediments. However, it is the behaviour of fires that primarily governs their ecological effects. Therefore, the ability to estimate variations in aspects of palaeofire behaviour such as palaeofire intensity and rate of spread would be of key benefit toward understanding the coupled evolutionary history of ecosystems and fire. The Cretaceous Period saw major diversification in land plants. Previously, conifers (gymnosperms) and ferns (pteridophytes) dominated Earth's ecosystems until flowering plants (angiosperms) appear in the fossil record of the Early Cretaceous (~135Ma). We have created surface fire behaviour estimates for a variety of angiosperm invasion scenarios and explored the influence of Cretaceous superambient atmospheric oxygen levels on the fire behaviour occurring in these new Cretaceous ecosystems. These estimates are then used to explore the hypothesis that the early spread of the angiosperms was promoted by the novel fire regimes that they created. In order to achieve this we tested the flammability of Mesozoic analogue fuel types in controlled laboratory experiments using an iCone calorimeter, which measured the ignitability as well as the effective heat of combustion of the fuels. We then used the BehavePlus fire behaviour modelling system to scale up our laboratory results to the ecosystem scale. Our results suggest that fire-angiosperm feedbacks may have occurred in two phases: The first phase being a result of weedy angiosperms providing an additional easily ignitable fuel that enhanced both the seasonality and frequency of surface fires. In the second phase, the addition of shrubby understory fuels likely expanded the number of ecosystems experiencing more intense surface fires, resulting in enhanced mortality and suppressed post-fire recruitment of gymnosperms

  7. Scattering in one dimension: The coupled Schrödinger equation, threshold behaviour and Levinson's theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiers, K. A.; van Dijk, W.

    1996-12-01

    We formulate scattering in one dimension due to the coupled Schrödinger equation in terms of the S matrix, the unitarity of which leads to constraints on the scattering amplitudes. Levinson's theorem is seen to have the form η(0)=π(nb+1/2n-1/2N), where η(0) is the phase of the S matrix at zero energy, nb the number of bound states with nonzero binding energy, n the number of half-bound states, and N the number of coupled equations. In view of the effects due to the half-bound states, the threshold behaviour of the scattering amplitudes is investigated in general, and is also illustrated by means of particular potential models.

  8. Small spatial and fast temporal ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hua

    2000-09-01

    I have developed a two-dimensional, three-fluid model (electrons, ions and neutrals) to simulate small-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. The code includes ionization and recombination processes, the Hall term in Ohm's law, and various heat sources in the energy equations. The electro-dynamic response and the evolution of the collision frequencies are treated self- consistently in a height resolved ionosphere. The model allows for the propagation of Alfvén waves. The simulation is particularly suited for fast temporal variations and small spatial scale ionospheric structures associated with filamentary aurora and ionospheric heating experiments (e.g. HAARP). I have investigated the evolution of field-aligned currents in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system and found several notable effects-ion heating due to plasma- neutral friction, electron heating resulting from energetic particle precipitation and ohmic dissipation by strong field-aligned currents. The simulation of plasma. heating in the ionosphere is motivated by a specific auroral event that was simultaneously observed with optical and radar instruments. The results indicate that a consistent explanation of this event requires ohmic heating of electrons in a strong field-aligned electric current layer. They suggest strongly that the observed sequence of events can be explained only if spatial structure is present in the ionosphere so that it requires at least a two-dimensional model. Electron heating in strong field-aligned currents also provides a mechanism to deposit energy in the F-region of ionosphere and thus can explain the formation of tall auroral arcs. The simulation of the formation of field-aligned currents shows a strong plasma density depletion in the region of downward field-aligned current layer. The depletion is due to the divergent flow of the plasma. Similarly, the plasma density increases in the region of upward field- aligned current because of the convergent plasma motion

  9. Pen size and parity effects on maternal behaviour of Small-Tail Han sheep.

    PubMed

    Lv, S-J; Yang, Y; Dwyer, C M; Li, F-K

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this experiment was to study the effects of pen size and parity on maternal behaviour of twin-bearing Small-Tail Han ewes. A total of 24 ewes were allocated to a 2×2 design (six per pen), with parity (primiparous or multiparous) and pen size (large: 6.0×3.0 m; small: 6.0×1.5 m) as main effects at Linyi University, Shandong Province, China. Behaviour was observed from after parturition until weaning. All ewes were observed for 6 h every 5 days from 0700 to1000 h and from 1400 to 1700 h. Continuous focal animal sampling was used to quantify the duration of maternal behaviours: sucking, grooming and following as well as the frequency of udder accepting, udder refusing and low-pitched bleating. Oestradiol and cortisol concentrations in the faeces (collected in the morning every 5 days) were detected using EIA kits. All lambs were weighed 24 h after parturition and again at weaning at 35 days of age. The small pen size significantly reduced following (P<0.005), grooming (P<0.001) and suckling durations (P<0.05), as well as the frequency of udder refusals (P<0.001). However, there was a significant interaction with ewe parity, with decreased grooming and suckling in the small pen largely seen in the multiparous ewes (P<0.001). Independent of pen size, multiparous ewes accepted more sucking attempts by their lambs (P<0.05) and made more low-pitched bleats than primiparous ewes (P<0.001). Multiparous ewes had higher faecal oestradiol concentrations than primiparous ewes (P<0.001), and ewes in small pens had higher faecal cortisol levels compared with ewes in larger pens (P<0.001). As lambs increased in age, the duration of maternal grooming, following and suckling as well as frequency of udder acceptance and low-pitched bleating all declined, and the frequency of udder refusing increased (P<0.001 for all). Ewe parity, but not pen size, affected lamb weight gain during the period of observation (P<0.001). This is the first study to show that pen size

  10. Large- and small-size advantages in sneaking behaviour in the dusky frillgoby Bathygobius fuscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegaki, Takeshi; Kaneko, Takashi; Matsumoto, Yukio

    2012-04-01

    Sneaking tactic, a male alternative reproductive tactic involving sperm competition, is generally adopted by small individuals because of its inconspicuousness. However, large size has an advantage when competition occurs between sneakers for fertilization of eggs. Here, we suggest that both large- and small-size advantages of sneaker males are present within the same species. Large sneaker males of the dusky frillgoby Bathygobius fuscus showed a high success rate in intruding into spawning nests because of their advantage in competition among sneaker males in keeping a suitable position to sneak, whereas small sneakers had few chances to sneak. However, small sneaker males were able to stay in the nests longer than large sneaker males when they succeeded in sneak intrusion. This suggests the possibility of an increase in their paternity. The findings of these size-specific behavioural advantages may be important in considering the evolution of size-related reproductive traits.

  11. Ordinary and Extraordinary Movement Behaviour of Small Resident Fish within a Mediterranean Marine Protected Area

    PubMed Central

    Aspillaga, Eneko; Bartumeus, Frederic; Linares, Cristina; Starr, Richard M.; López-Sanz, Àngel; Díaz, David; Zabala, Mikel; Hereu, Bernat

    2016-01-01

    It is important to account for the movement behaviour of fishes when designing effective marine protected areas (MPAs). Fish movements occur across different spatial and temporal scales and understanding the variety of movements is essential to make correct management decisions. This study describes in detail the movement patterns of an economically and commercially important species, Diplodus sargus, within a well-enforced Mediterranean MPA. We monitored horizontal and vertical movements of 41 adult individuals using passive acoustic telemetry for up to one year. We applied novel analysis and visualization techniques to get a comprehensive view of a wide range of movements. D. sargus individuals were highly territorial, moving within small home ranges (< 1 km2), inside which they displayed repetitive diel activity patterns. Extraordinary movements beyond the ordinary home range were observed under two specific conditions. First, during stormy events D. sargus presented a sheltering behaviour, moving to more protected places to avoid the disturbance. Second, during the spawning season they made excursions to deep areas (> 50 m), where they aggregated to spawn. This study advances our understanding about the functioning of an established MPA and provides important insights into the biology and management of a small sedentary species, suggesting the relevance of rare but important fish behaviours. PMID:27437692

  12. An experimental evaluation of the fully coupled hysteretic electro-mechanical behaviour of piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Mark; Davino, Daniele; Giustiniani, Alessandro; Masi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Piezoelectrics are the most commonly used of the multifunctional smart materials in industrial applications, because of their relatively low cost and ease of use in electric and electronic oriented applications. Nevertheless, while datasheets usually give just small signal quasi-static parameters, their full potential can only be exploited only if a full characterization is available because the maximum stroke or the higher piezo coupling coefficients are available at different electro-mechanical biases, where often small signal analysis is not valid. In this paper a method to get the quasi-static fully coupled characterization is presented. The method is tested on a commercial piezo actuator but can be extended to similar devices.

  13. Prison construction and guarding behaviour by European honeybees is dependent on inmate small hive beetle density.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J D; Hepburn, H R; Ellis, A M; Elzen, P J

    2003-08-01

    Increasing small hive beetle (Aethina tumida Murray) density changes prison construction and guarding behaviour in European honeybees (Apis mellifera L.). These changes include more guard bees per imprisoned beetle and the construction of more beetle prisons at the higher beetle density. Despite this, the number of beetles per prison (inmate density) did not change. Beetles solicited food more actively at the higher density and at night. In response, guard bees increased their aggressive behaviour towards beetle prisoners but did not feed beetles more at the higher density. Only 5% of all beetles were found among the combs at the low density but this percentage increased five-fold at the higher one. Successful comb infiltration (and thus reproduction) by beetles is a possible explanation for the significant damage beetles cause to European honeybee colonies in the USA. PMID:12955230

  14. Coupling submesoscale physics to seabirds behaviour at the ocean-atmosphere interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Monte, S.; Cotté, C.; d'Ovidio, F.; Lévy, M.; Le Corre, M.; Weimerskirch, H.

    2012-04-01

    During their journeys, seabirds are faced to environmental heterogeneity of the scale of tens of Kms in extension and of days in duration, that are induced in the open ocean by mesoscale and submesoscale turbulence. We combine tracking of frigatebirds in the Mozambique channel - available for the first time with 3-D resolution - and multisatellite-based nonlinear diagnostics to inquire how birds respond to the coupled ocean-atmosphere physics. Birds behaviour along their flight trajectory are categorized in 5 classes of vertical displacement, e.g. slow or fast descents, and are superimposed with the submesoscale structures obtained by a Lagrangian reanalysis or remote-sensing measures. We show that frigatebirds modify their behaviour at such scale over and outside transport and thermal fronts. We suggest that birds colocalization with structures generated by horizontal transport is a consequence of their quest for food (preferentially located on thermal fronts) but also for upward vertical wind. Our multidisciplinary method can be applied to forthcoming high-resolution animal tracking data and contribute to elucidate the response of marine ecosystems to environmental change.

  15. Predictors of physical activity among rural and small town breast cancer survivors: an application of the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Vallance, Jeff K; Lavallee, Celeste; Culos-Reed, Nicole S; Trudeau, Marc G

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the utility of the two-component theory of planned behaviour (TPB) in understanding physical activity intentions and behaviour in rural and small town breast cancer survivors. The secondary objective was to elicit the most common behavioural, normative and control beliefs of rural and small town survivors regarding physical activity. Using a cross-sectional survey design, 524 rural and small town breast cancer survivors completed a mailed survey that assessed physical activity and TPB variables. Physical activity intention explained 12% of the variance in physical activity behaviour (p < 0.01) while the TPB constructs together explained 43% of the variance in physical activity intention (p < 0.01). Unique behavioural, normative and control beliefs were elicited from the sample. The two-component TPB framework appears to be a suitable model to initiate an understanding of physical activity determinants among rural and small town breast cancer survivors. These data can be used in the development and establishment of physical activity behaviour interventions and health promotion materials designed to facilitate physical activity behaviour among rural and small town breast cancer survivors. PMID:22409699

  16. Optimizing information flow in small genetic networks. IV. Spatial coupling.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Thomas R; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-06-01

    We typically think of cells as responding to external signals independently by regulating their gene expression levels, yet they often locally exchange information and coordinate. Can such spatial coupling be of benefit for conveying signals subject to gene regulatory noise? Here we extend our information-theoretic framework for gene regulation to spatially extended systems. As an example, we consider a lattice of nuclei responding to a concentration field of a transcriptional regulator (the input) by expressing a single diffusible target gene. When input concentrations are low, diffusive coupling markedly improves information transmission; optimal gene activation functions also systematically change. A qualitatively different regulatory strategy emerges where individual cells respond to the input in a nearly steplike fashion that is subsequently averaged out by strong diffusion. While motivated by early patterning events in the Drosophila embryo, our framework is generically applicable to spatially coupled stochastic gene expression models. PMID:26172739

  17. Optimizing information flow in small genetic networks. IV. Spatial coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Thomas R.; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-06-01

    We typically think of cells as responding to external signals independently by regulating their gene expression levels, yet they often locally exchange information and coordinate. Can such spatial coupling be of benefit for conveying signals subject to gene regulatory noise? Here we extend our information-theoretic framework for gene regulation to spatially extended systems. As an example, we consider a lattice of nuclei responding to a concentration field of a transcriptional regulator (the input) by expressing a single diffusible target gene. When input concentrations are low, diffusive coupling markedly improves information transmission; optimal gene activation functions also systematically change. A qualitatively different regulatory strategy emerges where individual cells respond to the input in a nearly steplike fashion that is subsequently averaged out by strong diffusion. While motivated by early patterning events in the Drosophila embryo, our framework is generically applicable to spatially coupled stochastic gene expression models.

  18. Diffraction aperture non-ideal behaviour of air coupled transducers array elements designed for NDT.

    PubMed

    Prego Borges, J L; Montero de Espinosa, F; Salazar, J; Garcia-Alvarez, J; Chávez, J A; Turó, A; Garcia-Hernandez, M J

    2006-12-22

    Air coupled piezoelectric ultrasonic array transducers are a novel tool that could lead to interesting advances in the area of non-contact laminar material testing using Lamb wave's propagation techniques. A key issue on the development of such transducers is their efficient coupling to air media (impedance mismatch between the piezoelectric material and air is 90 dB or more). Adaptation layers are used in order to attain good matching and avoid possible serious signal degradation. However, the introduction of these matching layers modify the transducer surface behaviour and, consequently, radiation characteristics are altered, making the usual idealization criteria (of uniform surface movement) adopted for field simulation purposes inaccurate. In our system, we have a concave linear-array transducer of 64 elements (electrically coupled by pairs) working at 0.8 MHz made of PZ27 rectangular piezoceramics (15 mm x 0.3 mm) with two matching layers made of polyurethane and porous cellulose bonded on them. Experimental measurements of the acoustic aperture of single excited array elements have shown an increment on the geometrical dimensions of its active surface. A sub-millimeter vibrometer laser scan has revealed an extension of the aperture beyond the supposed physical single array element dimensions. Non-uniform symmetric apodized velocity surface vibration amplitude profile with a concave delay contour indicates the presumed existence of travelling wave phenomena over the surface of the outer array matching layer. Also, asymptotic propagation velocities around 2500 m/s and attenuation coefficient between 15 and 20 dB/mm has been determined for the travelling waves showing clear tendencies. Further comparisons between the experimental measurements of single array element field radiation diagram and simulated equivalent aperture counterpart reveal good agreement versus the ideal (uniform displaced) rectangular aperture. For this purpose an Impulse Response Method

  19. Static and dynamic strain coupling behaviour of ferroic and multiferroic perovskites from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) provides a window on the pervasive influence of strain coupling at phase transitions in perovskites through determination of elastic and anelastic relaxations across wide temperature intervals and with the application of external fields. In particular, large variations of elastic constants occur at structural, ferroelectric and electronic transitions and, because of the relatively long interaction length provided by strain fields in a crystal, Landau theory provides an effective formal framework for characterizing their form and magnitude. At the same time, the Debye equations provide a robust description of dynamic relaxational processes involving the mobility of defects which are coupled with strain. Improper ferroelastic transitions driven by octahedral tilting in KMnF3, LaAlO3, (Ca,Sr)TiO3, Sr(Ti,Zr)O3 and BaCeO3 are accompanied by elastic softening of tens of % and characteristic patterns of acoustic loss due to the mobility of twin walls. RUS data for ferroelectrics and ferroelectric relaxors, including BaTiO3, (K,Na)NbO3,Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN), Pb(Sc1/2Ta1/2)O3 (PST), (Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3)0.955(PbTiO3)0.045 (PZN-PT) and (Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3)0.26(Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3)0.44(PbTiO3)0.30 (PIN-PMN-PT) show similar patterns of softening and attenuation but also have precursor softening associated with the development of polar nano regions. Defect-induced ferroelectricity occurs in KTaO3, without the development of long range ordering. By way of contrast, spin-lattice coupling is much more variable in strength, as reflected in a greater range of softening behaviour for Pr0.48Ca0.52MnO3 and Sm0.6Y0.4MnO3 as well as for the multiferroic perovskites EuTiO3,BiFeO3, Bi0.9Sm0.1FeO3, Bi0.9Nd0.1FeO3, (BiFeO3)0.64(CaFeO2.5)0.36, (Pb(Fe0.5Ti0.5)O3)0.4(Pb(Zr0.53Ti0.47)O3)0.6. A characteristic feature of transitions in which there is a significant Jahn-Teller component is softening as the transition point is approached from above, as illustrated by

  20. Static and dynamic strain coupling behaviour of ferroic and multiferroic perovskites from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, M A

    2015-07-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) provides a window on the pervasive influence of strain coupling at phase transitions in perovskites through determination of elastic and anelastic relaxations across wide temperature intervals and with the application of external fields. In particular, large variations of elastic constants occur at structural, ferroelectric and electronic transitions and, because of the relatively long interaction length provided by strain fields in a crystal, Landau theory provides an effective formal framework for characterizing their form and magnitude. At the same time, the Debye equations provide a robust description of dynamic relaxational processes involving the mobility of defects which are coupled with strain. Improper ferroelastic transitions driven by octahedral tilting in KMnF3, LaAlO3, (Ca,Sr)TiO3, Sr(Ti,Zr)O3 and BaCeO3 are accompanied by elastic softening of tens of % and characteristic patterns of acoustic loss due to the mobility of twin walls. RUS data for ferroelectrics and ferroelectric relaxors, including BaTiO3, (K,Na)NbO3,Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN), Pb(Sc1/2Ta1/2)O3 (PST), (Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3)0.955(PbTiO3)0.045 (PZN-PT) and (Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3)0.26(Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3)0.44(PbTiO3)0.30 (PIN-PMN-PT) show similar patterns of softening and attenuation but also have precursor softening associated with the development of polar nano regions. Defect-induced ferroelectricity occurs in KTaO3, without the development of long range ordering. By way of contrast, spin-lattice coupling is much more variable in strength, as reflected in a greater range of softening behaviour for Pr0.48Ca0.52MnO3 and Sm0.6Y0.4MnO3 as well as for the multiferroic perovskites EuTiO3,BiFeO3, Bi0.9Sm0.1FeO3, Bi0.9Nd0.1FeO3, (BiFeO3)0.64(CaFeO2.5)0.36, (Pb(Fe0.5Ti0.5)O3)0.4(Pb(Zr0.53Ti0.47)O3)0.6. A characteristic feature of transitions in which there is a significant Jahn-Teller component is softening as the transition point is approached from above, as illustrated by

  1. The asymptotic behaviour of the solution to a system of differential equations with a small parameter and singular initial point

    SciTech Connect

    Il'in, Arlen M; Khachay, Oleg Yu; Leonychev, Yurii A

    2010-02-28

    The initial value problem for a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations with a small parameter multiplying the highest derivative is investigated. In a neighbourhood of the initial point the asymptotic behaviour of the solution has quite a complicated structure. A uniform asymptotic approximation to the solution up to an arbitrary power of the small parameter is constructed and substantiated. Bibliography: 3 titles.

  2. Effects of emphasising opposition and cooperation on collective movement behaviour during football small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, B; Marcelino, R; Torres-Ronda, L; Torrents, C; Sampaio, J

    2016-07-01

    Optimizing collective behaviour helps to increase performance in mutual tasks. In team sports settings, the small-sided games (SSG) have been used as key context tools to stress out the players' awareness about their in-game required behaviours. Research has mostly described these behaviours when confronting teams have the same number of players, disregarding the frequent situations of low and high inequality. This study compared the players' positioning dynamics when manipulating the number of opponents and teammates during professional and amateur football SSG. The participants played 4v3, 4v5 and 4v7 games, where one team was confronted with low-superiority, low- and high-inferiority situations, and their opponents with low-, medium- and high-cooperation situations. Positional data were used to calculate effective playing space and distances from each player to team centroid, opponent team centroid and nearest opponent. Outcomes suggested that increasing the number of opponents in professional teams resulted in moderate/large decrease in approximate entropy (ApEn) values to both distance to team and opponent team centroid (i.e., the variables present higher regularity/predictability pattern). In low-cooperation game scenarios, the ApEn in amateurs' tactical variables presented a moderate/large increase. The professional teams presented an increase in the distance to nearest opponent with the increase of the cooperation level. Increasing the number of opponents was effective to overemphasise the need to use local information in the positioning decision-making process from professionals. Conversely, amateur still rely on external informational feedback. Increasing the cooperation promoted more regularity in spatial organisation in amateurs and emphasise their players' local perceptions. PMID:26928336

  3. Physiological and behavioural responses of a small heterothermic mammal to fire stimuli.

    PubMed

    Stawski, Clare; Matthews, Jaya K; Körtner, Gerhard; Geiser, Fritz

    2015-11-01

    The predicted increase of the frequency and intensity of wildfires as a result of climate change could have a devastating impact on many species and ecosystems. However, the particular physiological and behavioural adaptions of animals to survive fires are poorly understood. We aimed to provide the first quantitative data on physiological and behavioural mechanisms used by a small heterothermic marsupial mammal, the fat-tailed dunnart (Sminthopsis crassicaudata), that may be crucial for survival during and immediately after a fire. Specifically, we aimed to determine (i) whether captive torpid animals are able to respond to fire stimuli and (ii) which energy saving mechanisms are used in response to fires. The initial response of torpid dunnarts to smoke exposure was to arouse immediately and therefore express shorter and shallower torpor bouts. Dunnarts also increased activity after smoke exposure when food was provided, but not when food was withheld. A charcoal/ash substrate, imitating post-fire conditions, resulted in a decrease in torpor use and activity, but only when food was available. Our novel data suggests that heterothermic mammals are able to respond to fire stimuli, such as smoke, to arouse from torpor as an initial response to fire and adjust torpor use and activity levels according to food availability modulated by fire cues. PMID:26343772

  4. Effect of Couples Counselling on Reported HIV Risk Behaviour among HIV Serodiscordant Couples by ART Use, HIV Status and Gender in Rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    King, Rachel; Min, Jeong; Birungi, Josephine; Nyonyintono, Maureen; Muldoon, Katherine A.; Khanakwa, Sarah; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Moore, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined several measures of self-reported HIV risk behaviour in mutually disclosed sero-discordant couples over time to see if a couples counselling intervention was associated with changes in these behaviors. Methods We analysed data from a prospective cohort study of HIV sero-discordant couples in Jinja, Uganda collected between June 2009 and December 2011. Participants received couples counselling, at 3-monthly intervals. We examined trends in reported condom-use, number of concurrent sexual partners, knowledge of HIV serostatus of concurrent partners and condom use of concurrent partners using Generalized Estimating Equation models, comparing responses at study enrollment with responses at six, 12 18 and 24 months of follow-up. Results A total of 586 couples were enrolled and the female member was HIV positive in 255 (44%) of them. The median age for female participants was 35 years and 42 years for men. Reported condom use at last sex with spouse increased over time (p<0.001) with the largest increases found among couples where the positive participant never received ART during the study(an increase from 68.8% at enrollment to 97.1% at 24 months). Male participants reported reductions in the number of concurrent sexual partners (p<0.001), increase in the knowledge of the HIV serostatus of these partners (p = 0.001) and a trend towards improved condom-use among non-primary partners (p = 0.070). Reported reduced risky behaviors did not wane over the study period. Conclusion Couples counselling resulted in increased condom use among all participants and among men the intervention resulted in reductions in risk behaviour with concurrent sexual partners. Routine counselling for serodiscordant couples should be integrated in routine ART care programs. PMID:26384103

  5. Energy conserving coupling through small apertures in an infinite perfect conducting screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, J.; Tkachenko, S.; Vick, R.

    2015-11-01

    Apertures in shielding enclosures are an important issue for determining shielding efficiencies. Various mathematical procedures and theories were employed to describe the coupling between the regions connected via an aperture in a well conducting plane. Bethe's theory describes the coupling via the equivalent problem of field excited dipole moments at the location of the aperture. This approach neglects the reaction of the dipole moments on the exciting field and therefore violates energy conservation. This work emphasizes an analytical approach for coupling between half-spaces through small apertures, inspired by the so called method of small antenna, which allows an understandable generalization of Bethe's theory.

  6. Self-Organized Criticality, Plasticity and Sensorimotor Coupling. Explorations with a Neurorobotic Model in a Behavioural Preference Task

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Miguel; Barandiaran, Xabier E.; Bedia, Manuel G.; Seron, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    During the last two decades, analysis of 1/ƒ noise in cognitive science has led to a considerable progress in the way we understand the organization of our mental life. However, there is still a lack of specific models providing explanations of how 1/ƒ noise is generated in coupled brain-body-environment systems, since existing models and experiments typically target either externally observable behaviour or isolated neuronal systems but do not address the interplay between neuronal mechanisms and sensorimotor dynamics. We present a conceptual model of a minimal neurorobotic agent solving a behavioural task that makes it possible to relate mechanistic (neurodynamic) and behavioural levels of description. The model consists of a simulated robot controlled by a network of Kuramoto oscillators with homeostatic plasticity and the ability to develop behavioural preferences mediated by sensorimotor patterns. With only three oscillators, this simple model displays self-organized criticality in the form of robust 1/ƒ noise and a wide multifractal spectrum. We show that the emergence of self-organized criticality and 1/ƒ noise in our model is the result of three simultaneous conditions: a) non-linear interaction dynamics capable of generating stable collective patterns, b) internal plastic mechanisms modulating the sensorimotor flows, and c) strong sensorimotor coupling with the environment that induces transient metastable neurodynamic regimes. We carry out a number of experiments to show that both synaptic plasticity and strong sensorimotor coupling play a necessary role, as constituents of self-organized criticality, in the generation of 1/ƒ noise. The experiments also shown to be useful to test the robustness of 1/ƒ scaling comparing the results of different techniques. We finally discuss the role of conceptual models as mediators between nomothetic and mechanistic models and how they can inform future experimental research where self-organized critically includes

  7. Self-organized criticality, plasticity and sensorimotor coupling. Explorations with a neurorobotic model in a behavioural preference task.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Miguel; Barandiaran, Xabier E; Bedia, Manuel G; Seron, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    During the last two decades, analysis of 1/ƒ noise in cognitive science has led to a considerable progress in the way we understand the organization of our mental life. However, there is still a lack of specific models providing explanations of how 1/ƒ noise is generated in coupled brain-body-environment systems, since existing models and experiments typically target either externally observable behaviour or isolated neuronal systems but do not address the interplay between neuronal mechanisms and sensorimotor dynamics. We present a conceptual model of a minimal neurorobotic agent solving a behavioural task that makes it possible to relate mechanistic (neurodynamic) and behavioural levels of description. The model consists of a simulated robot controlled by a network of Kuramoto oscillators with homeostatic plasticity and the ability to develop behavioural preferences mediated by sensorimotor patterns. With only three oscillators, this simple model displays self-organized criticality in the form of robust 1/ƒ noise and a wide multifractal spectrum. We show that the emergence of self-organized criticality and 1/ƒ noise in our model is the result of three simultaneous conditions: a) non-linear interaction dynamics capable of generating stable collective patterns, b) internal plastic mechanisms modulating the sensorimotor flows, and c) strong sensorimotor coupling with the environment that induces transient metastable neurodynamic regimes. We carry out a number of experiments to show that both synaptic plasticity and strong sensorimotor coupling play a necessary role, as constituents of self-organized criticality, in the generation of 1/ƒ noise. The experiments also shown to be useful to test the robustness of 1/ƒ scaling comparing the results of different techniques. We finally discuss the role of conceptual models as mediators between nomothetic and mechanistic models and how they can inform future experimental research where self-organized critically includes

  8. Why small males have big sperm: dimorphic squid sperm linked to alternative mating behaviours

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sperm cells are the target of strong sexual selection that may drive changes in sperm structure and function to maximize fertilisation success. Sperm evolution is regarded to be one of the major consequences of sperm competition in polyandrous species, however it can also be driven by adaptation to the environmental conditions at the site of fertilization. Strong stabilizing selection limits intra-specific variation, and therefore polymorphism, among fertile sperm (eusperm). Here we analyzed reproductive morphology differences among males employing characteristic alternative mating behaviours, and so potentially different conditions of sperm competition and fertilization environment, in the squid Loligo bleekeri. Results Large consort males transfer smaller (average total length = 73 μm) sperm to a female's internal sperm storage location, inside the oviduct; whereas small sneaker males transfer larger (99 μm) sperm to an external location around the seminal receptacle near the mouth. No significant difference in swimming speed was observed between consort and sneaker sperm. Furthermore, sperm precedence in the seminal receptacle was not biased toward longer sperm, suggesting no evidence for large sperm being favoured in competition for space in the sperm storage organ among sneaker males. Conclusions Here we report the first case, in the squid Loligo bleekeri, where distinctly dimorphic eusperm are produced by different sized males that employ alternative mating behaviours. Our results found no evidence that the distinct sperm dimorphism was driven by between- and within-tactic sperm competition. We propose that presence of alternative fertilization environments with distinct characteristics (i.e. internal or external), whether or not in combination with the effects of sperm competition, can drive the disruptive evolution of sperm size. PMID:21831296

  9. Small Body Size at Birth and Behavioural Symptoms of ADHD in Children Aged Five to Six Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahti, J.; Raikkonen, K.; Kajantie, E.; Heinonen, K.; Pesonen, A.-K.; Jarvenpaa, A.-L.; Strandberg, T.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Behavioural disorders with a neurodevelopmental background, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), have been associated with a non-optimal foetal environment, reflected in small body size at birth. However, the evidence stems from highly selected groups with birth outcomes biased towards the extreme low end of the…

  10. Effects of small particle numbers on long-term behaviour in discrete biochemical systems

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Bashar; Dittrich, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The functioning of many biological processes depends on the appearance of only a small number of a single molecular species. Additionally, the observation of molecular crowding leads to the insight that even a high number of copies of species do not guarantee their interaction. How single particles contribute to stabilizing biological systems is not well understood yet. Hence, we aim at determining the influence of single molecules on the long-term behaviour of biological systems, i.e. whether they can reach a steady state. Results: We provide theoretical considerations and a tool to analyse Systems Biology Markup Language models for the possibility to stabilize because of the described effects. The theory is an extension of chemical organization theory, which we called discrete chemical organization theory. Furthermore we scanned the BioModels Database for the occurrence of discrete chemical organizations. To exemplify our method, we describe an application to the Template model of the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint mechanism. Availability and implementation: http://www.biosys.uni-jena.de/Services.html. Contact: bashar.ibrahim@uni-jena.de or dittrich@minet.uni-jena.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25161236

  11. Gpr176 is a Gz-linked orphan G-protein-coupled receptor that sets the pace of circadian behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Masao; Murai, Iori; Kunisue, Sumihiro; Setsu, Genzui; Uchio, Naohiro; Tanaka, Rina; Kobayashi, Sakurako; Shimatani, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Hida; Chao, Hsu-Wen; Nakagawa, Yuuki; Takahashi, Yukari; Hotta, Yunhong; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Matsuoka, Masao; Hastings, Michael H.; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) participate in a broad range of physiological functions. A priority for fundamental and clinical research, therefore, is to decipher the function of over 140 remaining orphan GPCRs. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the brain's circadian pacemaker, governs daily rhythms in behaviour and physiology. Here we launch the SCN orphan GPCR project to (i) search for murine orphan GPCRs with enriched expression in the SCN, (ii) generate mutant animals deficient in candidate GPCRs, and (iii) analyse the impact on circadian rhythms. We thereby identify Gpr176 as an SCN-enriched orphan GPCR that sets the pace of circadian behaviour. Gpr176 is expressed in a circadian manner by SCN neurons, and molecular characterization reveals that it represses cAMP signalling in an agonist-independent manner. Gpr176 acts independently of, and in parallel to, the Vipr2 GPCR, not through the canonical Gi, but via the unique G-protein subclass Gz. PMID:26882873

  12. How do couples influence each other’s physical activity behaviours in retirement? An exploratory qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical activity patterns have been shown to change significantly across the transition to retirement. As most older adults approach retirement as part of a couple, a better understanding of how spousal pairs influence each other’s physical activity behaviour in retirement may help inform more effective interventions to promote physical activity in older age. This qualitative study aimed to explore and describe how couples influence each other’s physical activity behaviour in retirement. Methods A qualitative descriptive study that used purposive sampling to recruit seven spousal pairs with at least one partner of each pair recruited from the existing EPIC-Norfolk study cohort in the east of England, aged between 63 and 70 years and recently retired (within 2-6 years). Semi-structured interviews with couples were performed, audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using data-driven content analysis. Results Three themes emerged: spousal attitude towards physical activity, spouses’ physical activity behaviour and spousal support. While spouses’ attitudes towards an active retirement were concordant, attitudes towards regular exercise diverged, were acquired across the life course and were not altered in the transition to retirement. Shared participation in physical activity was rare and regular exercise was largely an individual and independent habit. Spousal support was perceived as important for initiation and maintenance of regular exercise. Conclusions Interventions should aim to create supportive spousal environments for physical activity in which spouses encourage each other to pursue their preferred forms of physical activity; should address gender-specific needs and preferences, such as chances for socialising and relaxation for women and opportunities for personal challenges for men; and rather than solely focusing on promoting structured exercise, should also encourage everyday physical activity such as walking for transport

  13. H+-coupled nutrient, micronutrient and drug transporters in the mammalian small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, David T.; Anderson, Catriona M.H.

    2009-01-01

    The H+-electrochemical gradient was originally considered as a driving force for solute transport only across cellular membranes of bacteria, plants and yeast. However, in the mammalian small intestine a H+electrochemical gradient is present at the epithelial brush-border membrane in the form of an acid microclimate. Over recent years a large number of H+-coupled cotransport mechanisms have been identified at the luminal membrane of the mammalian small intestine. These transporters are responsible for the initial stage in absorption of a remarkable variety of essential and non-essential nutrients and micronutrients including protein digestion products (di/tripeptides and amino acids), vitamins, short-chain fatty acids and divalent metal ions. Proton-coupled cotransporters expressed at the mammalian small intestinal brush-border membrane include: the di/tripeptide transporter PepT1 (SLC15A1); the proton-coupled amino-acid transporter PAT1 (SLC36A1); the divalent metal transporter DMT1 (SLC11A2); the organic anion transporting polypeptide OATP2B1 (SLC02B1); the monocarboxylate transporter MCT1 (SLC16A1); the proton-coupled folate transporter PCFT (SLC46A1); the sodium-glucose linked cotransporter SGLT1 (SLC5A1); and the excitatory amino acid carrier EAAC1 (SLC1A1). Emerging research demonstrates that the optimal intestinal absorptive capacity of certain H+-coupled cotransporters (PepT1 and PAT1) is dependent upon function of the brush-border Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3 (SLC9A3). The high oral bioavailability of a large number of pharmaceutical compounds is due, in part, to absorptive transport via these same H+-coupled cotransporters. Drugs undergoing H+-coupled cotransport across the intestinal brush-border membrane include those used to treat bacterial infections, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension, hyperglycaemia, viral infections, allergies, epilepsy, schizophrenia, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. PMID:17468205

  14. H+-coupled nutrient, micronutrient and drug transporters in the mammalian small intestine.

    PubMed

    Thwaites, David T; Anderson, Catriona M H

    2007-07-01

    The H(+)-electrochemical gradient was originally considered as a driving force for solute transport only across cellular membranes of bacteria, plants and yeast. However, in the mammalian small intestine, a H(+)-electrochemical gradient is present at the epithelial brush-border membrane in the form of an acid microclimate. Over recent years, a large number of H(+)-coupled cotransport mechanisms have been identified at the luminal membrane of the mammalian small intestine. These transporters are responsible for the initial stage in absorption of a remarkable variety of essential and non-essential nutrients and micronutrients, including protein digestion products (di/tripeptides and amino acids), vitamins, short-chain fatty acids and divalent metal ions. Proton-coupled cotransporters expressed at the mammalian small intestinal brush-border membrane include: the di/tripeptide transporter PepT1 (SLC15A1); the proton-coupled amino-acid transporter PAT1 (SLC36A1); the divalent metal transporter DMT1 (SLC11A2); the organic anion transporting polypeptide OATP2B1 (SLC02B1); the monocarboxylate transporter MCT1 (SLC16A1); the proton-coupled folate transporter PCFT (SLC46A1); the sodium-glucose linked cotransporter SGLT1 (SLC5A1); and the excitatory amino acid carrier EAAC1 (SLC1A1). Emerging research demonstrates that the optimal intestinal absorptive capacity of certain H(+)-coupled cotransporters (PepT1 and PAT1) is dependent upon function of the brush-border Na(+)-H(+) exchanger NHE3 (SLC9A3). The high oral bioavailability of a large number of pharmaceutical compounds results, in part, from absorptive transport via the same H(+)-coupled cotransporters. Drugs undergoing H(+)-coupled cotransport across the intestinal brush-border membrane include those used to treat bacterial infections, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension, hyperglycaemia, viral infections, allergies, epilepsy, schizophrenia, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. PMID:17468205

  15. Coupled orbit-attitude dynamics and relative state estimation of spacecraft near small Solar System bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Gaurav; Izadi, Maziar; Sanyal, Amit; Scheeres, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The effects of dynamical coupling between the rotational (attitude) and translational (orbital) motion of spacecraft near small Solar System bodies is investigated. This coupling arises due to the weak gravity of these bodies, as well as solar radiation pressure. The traditional approach assumes a point-mass spacecraft model to describe the translational motion of the spacecraft, while the attitude motion is considered to be completely decoupled from the translational motion. The model used here to describe the rigid-body spacecraft dynamics includes the non-uniform rotating gravity field of the small body up to second degree and order along with the attitude dependent terms, solar tide, and solar radiation pressure. This model shows that the second degree and order gravity terms due to the small body affect the dynamics of the spacecraft to the same extent as the orbit-attitude coupling due to the primary gravity (zeroth order) term. Variational integrators are used to simulate the dynamics of both the rigid spacecraft and the point mass. The small bodies considered here are modeled after Near-Earth Objects (NEO) 101955 Bennu, and 25143 Itokawa, and are assumed to be triaxial ellipsoids with uniform density. Differences in the numerically obtained trajectories of a rigid spacecraft and a point mass are then compared, to illustrate the impact of the orbit-attitude coupling on spacecraft dynamics in proximity of small bodies. Possible implications on the performance of model-based spacecraft control and on the station-keeping budget, if the orbit-attitude coupling is not accounted for in the model of the dynamics, are also discussed. An almost globally asymptotically stable motion estimation scheme based solely on visual/optical feedback that estimates the relative motion of the asteroid with respect to the spacecraft is also obtained. This estimation scheme does not require a model of the dynamics of the asteroid, which makes it perfectly suited for asteroids whose

  16. Model coupling methodology for thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical numerical simulations in integrated assessment of long-term site behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; De Lucia, Marco; Kühn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The integrated assessment of long-term site behaviour taking into account a high spatial resolution at reservoir scale requires a sophisticated methodology to represent coupled thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical processes of relevance. Our coupling methodology considers the time-dependent occurrence and significance of multi-phase flow processes, mechanical effects and geochemical reactions (Kempka et al., 2014). Hereby, a simplified hydro-chemical coupling procedure was developed (Klein et al., 2013) and validated against fully coupled hydro-chemical simulations (De Lucia et al., 2015). The numerical simulation results elaborated for the pilot site Ketzin demonstrate that mechanical reservoir, caprock and fault integrity are maintained during the time of operation and that after 10,000 years CO2 dissolution is the dominating trapping mechanism and mineralization occurs on the order of 10 % to 25 % with negligible changes to porosity and permeability. De Lucia, M., Kempka, T., Kühn, M. A coupling alternative to reactive transport simulations for long-term prediction of chemical reactions in heterogeneous CO2 storage systems (2014) Geosci Model Dev Discuss 7:6217-6261. doi:10.5194/gmdd-7-6217-2014. Kempka, T., De Lucia, M., Kühn, M. Geomechanical integrity verification and mineral trapping quantification for the Ketzin CO2 storage pilot site by coupled numerical simulations (2014) Energy Procedia 63:3330-3338, doi:10.1016/j.egypro.2014.11.361. Klein E, De Lucia M, Kempka T, Kühn M. Evaluation of longterm mineral trapping at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage: an integrative approach using geo-chemical modelling and reservoir simulation. Int J Greenh Gas Con 2013; 19:720-730. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2013.05.014.

  17. Development of very small-diameter, inductively coupled magnetized plasma device.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, D; Mishio, A; Nakagawa, T; Shinohara, S

    2013-10-01

    In order to miniaturize a high-density, inductively coupled magnetized plasma or helicon plasma to be applied to, e.g., an industrial application and an electric propulsion field, small helicon device has been developed. The specifications of this device along with the experimental results are described. We have succeeded in generating high-density (~10(19) m(-3)) plasmas using quartz tubes with very small diameters of 10 and 20 mm, with a radio frequency power ~1200 and 700 W, respectively, in the presence of the magnetic field less than 1 kG. PMID:24182105

  18. Behaviour of Plate Anchorage in Plate-Reinforced Composite Coupling Beams

    PubMed Central

    Lam, W. Y.; Li, Lingzhi; Su, R. K. L.; Pam, H. J.

    2013-01-01

    As a new alternative design, plate-reinforced composite (PRC) coupling beam achieves enhanced strength and ductility by embedding a vertical steel plate into a conventionally reinforced concrete (RC) coupling beam. Based on a nonlinear finite element model developed in the authors' previous study, a parametric study presented in this paper has been carried out to investigate the influence of several key parameters on the overall performance of PRC coupling beams. The effects of steel plate geometry, span-to-depth ratio of beams, and steel reinforcement ratios at beam spans and in wall regions are quantified. It is found that the anchorage length of the steel plate is primarily controlled by the span-to-depth ratio of the beam. Based on the numerical results, a design curve is proposed for determining the anchorage length of the steel plate. The load-carrying capacity of short PRC coupling beams with high steel ratio is found to be controlled by the steel ratio of wall piers. The maximum shear stress of PRC coupling beams should be limited to 15 MPa. PMID:24288465

  19. Experimental and Mathematical Evaluation of Dynamic Behaviour of AN Oil-Air Coupling Shock Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PING, Y.

    2003-11-01

    The physical mechanism of the actual shock absorber with multi-types of damping and non-linear stiffness through coupling the oil, air, rubber and spring by ingenious devices is systematically investigated. The experimental results of the key-model machine in multi-parameter coupling dynamic test show complex non-linearity dynamic characteristics. Based on this, the non-linear dynamic model for the shock absorber is presented by analysing the internal fluid dynamic phenomenon with respect to the shock absorber. Comparisons with experimental data confirm the validity of the model. Using the model, it is possible to evaluate the importance of different factors for designing the shock absorber.

  20. Teachers' and Students' Verbal Behaviours during Cooperative and Small-Group Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillies, Robyn M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Teachers play a critical role in promoting interactions between students and engaging them in the learning process. This study builds on a study by Hertz-Lazarowitz and Shachar (1990) who found that during cooperative learning teachers' verbal behaviours were more helpful to and encouraging of their students' efforts while during…

  1. Modelling of the evaporation behaviour of particulate material for slurry nebulization inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, D.; Heitland, P.; Broekaert, J. A. C.

    1997-11-01

    This paper is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta, Part B (SAB). This hardcopy text, comprising the main body and an appendix, is accompanied by a disk with programs, data files and a brief manual. The main body discusses purpose, design principle and usage of the computer software for modelling the evaporation behaviour of particles in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Computer software has been developed in FORTRAN 77 language in order to simulate the evaporation behaviour of particles of refractory materials such as encountered in the analysis of advanced ceramic powders by slurry nebulization inductively coupled argon plasma atomic spectrometry. The program simulates the evaporation of single particles in the inductively coupled plasma and also enable it to calculate on the base of a given particle size distribution the evaporation behaviour of all the particles contained in a sample. In a so-called "intensity concept", the intensity is calculated as a function of the observation height in order to determine recovery rates for slurries compared with aqueous solutions. This yields a quick insight whether a calibration with aqueous solutions can be used for analysis of slurries of a given powder by slurry nebulization ICP-AES and also is a help in determining the optimal parameters for analyses of powders by means of slurry nebulization ICP-AES. Applications for the evaporation of Al 2O 3 and SiC powders document the usefulness of the model for the case of a 1.5 kW argon ICP of which the temperature at 8 mm above the load coil has been determined to be 6100 K. The model predicts the maximum particle size for SiC and Al 2O 3 that can be transported (10-15 μm) and evaporated for a given efficiency under given experimental conditions. For both Al 2O 3 and SiC, two ceramic powders of different grain size were investigated. The median particle sizes cover

  2. Small Worlds, Lifeworlds, and Information: The Ramifications of the Information Behaviour of Social Groups in Public Policy and the Public Sphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Gary; Jaeger, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: This paper attempts to build bridges between two sets of theoretical concepts related to information behaviour: the macro-level concepts of Jurgen Habermas related to lifeworlds and the micro-level concepts of Elfreda Chatman related to small worlds. Argument: Habermas and Chatman explored similar issues of information behaviour at…

  3. Whole ecosystem approaches for assessing the coupling of N and P cycles in small streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, J. D.; Thomas, S. A.; Seybold, E. C.; Drake, T.; Lewis, K.; MacNeill, K.; Zimov, N.

    2010-12-01

    The most pressing environmental problems faced by society are manifestations of changes in biogeochemical cycles. The urgency of mitigating these problems has brought into sharp focus the need for a stronger mechanistic understanding of the factors that control biogeochemical cycles and how these factors affect multiple elements. Our overarching goal is to assess the strength of coupling between carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in small headwater streams, including streams draining small watersheds in Northern California and the East Siberian Arctic. We have used a range of whole ecosystem approaches, rooted in nutrient spiraling theory, including plateau and pulsed nutrient enrichment experiments at a range of N:P ratios in heterotrophic and autotrophic streams. We use these experiments to calculate changes in nutrient spiraling metrics in response to changes in absolute and relative supply of N and P, and we use these results to infer the strength of the linkage between N and P cycles. In all California study streams, ecological processes are N limited, and we have observed significant changes in the strength of N and P coupling depending on position along the stream network. In small heterotrophic streams, addition of N caused significant increases in P uptake, while P had little influence on N. In larger autotrophic streams, N and P were only weakly coupled, which we attributed to a shift towards dominance of uptake by algae rather than heterotrophic bacteria, which is associated with differences in cellular structures. In addition, we have observed a small but consistent reduction in P uptake at high N:P of supply in autotrophic streams, which we speculate may indicate a suppression of N fixers at high N supply. In the Arctic, we have observed less consistency in the response of streams to nutrient enrichment, with some streams showing very little change in N or P uptake with changes in supply N:P, and others showing a decrease in N uptake in response

  4. Ultra-small single-negative electric metamaterials for electromagnetic coupling reduction of microstrip antenna array.

    PubMed

    Xu, He-Xiu; Wang, Guang-Ming; Qi, Mei-Qing; Zeng, Hui-Yong

    2012-09-24

    We report initially the design, fabrication and measurement of using waveguided electric metamaterials (MTM) in the design of closely-spaced microtrip antenna arrays with mutual coupling reduction. The complementary spiral ring resonators (CSRs) which exhibit single negative resonant permittivity around 3.5GHz are used as the basic electric MTM element. For verification, two CSRs with two and three concentric rings are considered, respectively. By properly arranging these well engineered waveguided MTMs between two H-plane coupled patch antennas, both numerical and measured results indicate that more than 8.4 dB mutual coupling reduction is obtained. The mechanism has been studied from a physical insight. The electric MTM element is electrically small, enabling the resultant antenna array to exhibit a small separation (λo/8 at the operating wavelength) and thus a high directivity. The proposed strategy opens an avenue to new types of antenna with super performances and can be generalized for other electric resonators. PMID:23037347

  5. Experiments on the magnetic coupling in a small scale counter rotating marine current turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. C.; Lee, N. J.; Wata, J.; Hyun, B. S.; Lee, Y. H.

    2016-05-01

    Modern economies are dependent on energy consumption to ensure growth or sustainable development. Renewable energy sources provide a source of energy that can provide energy security and is renewable. Tidal energy is more predictable than other sources or renewable energy like the sun or wind. Horizontal axis marine current turbines are currently the most advanced and commercially feasible option for tidal current convertors. A dual rotor turbine is theoretically able to produce more power than a single rotor turbine at the same fluid velocity. Previous experiments for a counter rotating dual rotor horizontal axis marine current turbine used a mechanical oil seal coupling that caused mechanical losses when water entered through small gaps at the shaft. A new magnetic coupling assembly eliminates the need for a shaft to connect physically with the internal mechanisms and is water tight. This reduces mechanical losses in the system and the effect on the dual rotor performance is presented in this paper.

  6. Magnetism behaviours dominated by the interplay of magnetic anisotropy and exchange coupling in local Co discs.

    PubMed

    Yang, En-Cui; Liu, Zhong-Yi; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Na; Zhao, Xiao-Jun

    2016-05-10

    Disc-like Co core-derived (4,4)- and (3,6)-connected layers, {[Co7(C2H5OH)1.5(H2O)0.5(Hdatrz)2(μ3-OH)4(ip)5]·2.5H2O·C2H5OH}n () and [Co7(H2O)4(ade)2(μ3-OH)6(sip)2]n () (Hdatrz = 3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole, ade(-) = adeninate, ip(2-) = isophthalate and sip(3-) = 5-sulfoisophthalate) were solvothermally generated and structurally and magnetically characterized. The effect of magnetic anisotropy and exchange coupling from the local Co cores on the resulting magnetism properties are discussed. A crystallographically asymmetric Co core in exhibited an unusual single-molecule magnet (SMM)-like response under zero dc field resulting from strong anisotropy generated by two different types of Co(II) polyhedra and highly anisotropic exchange interactions. By contrast, a highly symmetric Co disc in belonging to the C2h point group showed only strong ferromagnetic exchange, to lead to an overall ST = 7/2 spin ground-state at low temperature. Thus, the interplay of magnetic anisotropy and exchange coupling has a great and complicated influence on the overall magnetic phenomena, which should be fully considered for the design and preparation of new Co(II)-SMMs. PMID:27089955

  7. The Interdependence of Adult Relationship Quality and Parenting Behaviours among African American and European Couples in Rural, Low-Income Communities

    PubMed Central

    Zvara, Bharathi J.; Mills-Koonce, W. Roger; Heilbron, Nicole; Clincy, Amanda; Cox, Martha J.

    2015-01-01

    The present study extends the spillover and crossover hypotheses to more carefully model the potential interdependence between parent–parent interaction quality and parent–child interaction quality in family systems. Using propensity score matching, the present study attempted to isolate family processes that are unique across African American and European American couples that are independent of other socio-demographic factors to further clarify how interparental relationships may be related to parenting in a rural, low-income sample. The Actor–Partner Interdependence Model (APIM), a statistical analysis technique that accounts for the interdependence of relationship data, was used with a sample of married and non-married cohabiting African American and European American couples (n = 82 dyads) to evaluate whether mothers' and fathers' observed parenting behaviours are related to their behaviours and their partner's behaviours observed in a couple problem-solving interaction. Findings revealed that interparental withdrawal behaviour, but not conflict behaviour, was associated with less optimal parenting for fathers but not mothers, and specifically so for African American fathers. Our findings support the notion of interdependence across subsystems within the family and suggest that African American fathers may be specifically responsive to variations in interparental relationship quality. PMID:26430390

  8. Small Cages with Insect Couples Provide a Simple Method for a Preliminary Assessment of Mating Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Briand, Françoise; Guerin, Patrick M.; Charmillot, Pierre-Joseph; Kehrli, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Mating disruption by sex pheromones is a sustainable, effective and widely used pest management scheme. A drawback of this technique is its challenging assessment of effectiveness in the field (e.g., spatial scale, pest density). The aim of this work was to facilitate the evaluation of field-deployed pheromone dispensers. We tested the suitability of small insect field cages for a pre-evaluation of the impact of sex pheromones on mating using the grape moths Eupoecilia ambiguella and Lobesia botrana, two major pests in vineyards. Cages consisted of a cubic metal frame of 35 cm sides, which was covered with a mosquito net of 1500 μm mesh size. Cages were installed in the centre of pheromone-treated and untreated vineyards. In several trials, 1 to 20 couples of grape moths per cage were released for one to three nights. The proportion of mated females was between 15 to 70% lower in pheromone-treated compared to untreated vineyards. Overall, the exposure of eight couples for one night was adequate for comparing different control schemes. Small cages may therefore provide a fast and cheap method to compare the effectiveness of pheromone dispensers under standardised semi-field conditions and may help predict the value of setting-up large-scale field trials. PMID:22645483

  9. Small cages with insect couples provide a simple method for a preliminary assessment of mating disruption.

    PubMed

    Briand, Françoise; Guerin, Patrick M; Charmillot, Pierre-Joseph; Kehrli, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Mating disruption by sex pheromones is a sustainable, effective and widely used pest management scheme. A drawback of this technique is its challenging assessment of effectiveness in the field (e.g., spatial scale, pest density). The aim of this work was to facilitate the evaluation of field-deployed pheromone dispensers. We tested the suitability of small insect field cages for a pre-evaluation of the impact of sex pheromones on mating using the grape moths Eupoecilia ambiguella and Lobesia botrana, two major pests in vineyards. Cages consisted of a cubic metal frame of 35 cm sides, which was covered with a mosquito net of 1500 μm mesh size. Cages were installed in the centre of pheromone-treated and untreated vineyards. In several trials, 1 to 20 couples of grape moths per cage were released for one to three nights. The proportion of mated females was between 15 to 70% lower in pheromone-treated compared to untreated vineyards. Overall, the exposure of eight couples for one night was adequate for comparing different control schemes. Small cages may therefore provide a fast and cheap method to compare the effectiveness of pheromone dispensers under standardised semi-field conditions and may help predict the value of setting-up large-scale field trials. PMID:22645483

  10. Technique for Extension of Small Antenna Array Mutual-Coupling Data to Larger Antenna Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    A technique is presented whereby the mutual interaction between a small number of elements in a planar array can be interpolated and extrapolated to accurately predict the combined interactions in a much larger array of many elements. An approximate series expression is developed, based upon knowledge of the analytical characteristic behavior of the mutual admittance between small aperture antenna elements in a conducting ground plane. This expression is utilized to analytically extend known values for a few spacings and orientations to other element configurations, thus eliminating the need to numerically integrate a large number of highly oscillating and slowly converging functions. This paper shows that the technique can predict very accurately the mutual coupling between elements in a very large planar array with a knowledge of the self-admittance of an isolated element and the coupling between only two-elements arranged in eight different pair combinations. These eight pair combinations do not necessarily have to correspond to pairs in the large array, although all of the individual elements must be identical.

  11. Molecular Evidence for Gender Differences in the Migratory Behaviour of a Small Seabird

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Renata J.; King, R. Andrew; Symondson, William O. C.; Cadiou, Bernard; Zonfrillo, Bernard; Bolton, Mark; Morton, Rab; Howell, Stephen; Clinton, Anthony; Felgueiras, Marcial; Thomas, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular sexing revealed an unexpectedly strong female bias in the sex ratio of pre-breeding European Storm Petrels (Hydrobates pelagicus), attracted to playback of conspecific calls during their northwards migration past SW Europe. This bias was consistent across seven years, ranging from 80.8% to 89.7% female (mean annual sex ratio ± SD = 85.5% female ±4.1%). The sex ratio did not differ significantly from unity (i.e., 50% female) among (i) Storm Petrel chicks at a breeding colony in NW France, (ii) adults found dead on beaches in Southern Portugal, (iii) breeding birds attending nest burrows in the UK, captured by hand, and (iv) adults captured near a breeding colony in the UK using copies of the same sound recordings as used in Southern Europe, indicating that females are not inherently more strongly attracted to playback calls than males. A morphological discriminant function analysis failed to provide a good separation of the sexes, showing the importance of molecular sexing for this species. We found no sex difference in the seasonal or nocturnal timing of migration past Southern Europe, but there was a significant tendency for birds to be caught in sex-specific aggregations. The preponderance of females captured in Southern Europe suggests that the sexes may differ in migration route or in their colony-prospecting behaviour during migration, at sites far away from their natal colonies. Such differences in migration behaviour between males and females are poorly understood but have implications for the vulnerability of seabirds to pollution and environmental change at sea during the non-breeding season. PMID:23029481

  12. Molecular evidence for gender differences in the migratory behaviour of a small seabird.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Renata J; King, R Andrew; Symondson, William O C; Cadiou, Bernard; Zonfrillo, Bernard; Bolton, Mark; Morton, Rab; Howell, Stephen; Clinton, Anthony; Felgueiras, Marcial; Thomas, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Molecular sexing revealed an unexpectedly strong female bias in the sex ratio of pre-breeding European Storm Petrels (Hydrobates pelagicus), attracted to playback of conspecific calls during their northwards migration past SW Europe. This bias was consistent across seven years, ranging from 80.8% to 89.7% female (mean annual sex ratio ± SD = 85.5% female ±4.1%). The sex ratio did not differ significantly from unity (i.e., 50% female) among (i) Storm Petrel chicks at a breeding colony in NW France, (ii) adults found dead on beaches in Southern Portugal, (iii) breeding birds attending nest burrows in the UK, captured by hand, and (iv) adults captured near a breeding colony in the UK using copies of the same sound recordings as used in Southern Europe, indicating that females are not inherently more strongly attracted to playback calls than males. A morphological discriminant function analysis failed to provide a good separation of the sexes, showing the importance of molecular sexing for this species. We found no sex difference in the seasonal or nocturnal timing of migration past Southern Europe, but there was a significant tendency for birds to be caught in sex-specific aggregations. The preponderance of females captured in Southern Europe suggests that the sexes may differ in migration route or in their colony-prospecting behaviour during migration, at sites far away from their natal colonies. Such differences in migration behaviour between males and females are poorly understood but have implications for the vulnerability of seabirds to pollution and environmental change at sea during the non-breeding season. PMID:23029481

  13. Small-area fiber-coupled scintillation camera for imaging beta-ray distributions intraoperatively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, L. R.; Tornai, Martin P.; Levin, C. S.; Park, J.; Atac, Muzaffer; Cline, David B.; Hoffman, Eric G.

    1995-09-01

    A small area, imaging, scintillation probe is being developed for locating small amounts of radio-labeled malignant tissue during surgery. Preliminary in brain surgery, avoiding the removal of excess tissue is a priority. It is possible to locate the main body of a brain tumor both before and during surgery, but once the bulk of the tumor is excised the identification of residual malignant tissue is difficult. A probe that covers an area of 1-2 cm(superscript 2) with an intrinsic resolution of 1-2 mm could locate small tumor masses that pose a threat of recurrence of the disease, and prevent removal of healthy tissue. A pre-operative injection of tumor seeking, beta emitting radiopharmaceutical (e.g. (superscript 18)fluorodeoxyuridine-FDUR-) will label the tumor. The limited range of beta-rays ensures proximity upon successful detection. Plastic scintillators are used for beta detection, and visible light photon counters (VLPCs) detect the scintillation light. For maneuverability in and around the surgical cavity, the scintillators are coupled to the VLPCs via 2 m of optical fiber. An imaging device can cover the tissue bed in a time compatible with surgery, as opposed to a single element detector on the order of 1-2 mm in size with comparable resolution. An imager also distinguishes high background rates (such as from annihilation gammas in FDUR) and concentrations of activity.

  14. Closed set of the uniqueness conditions and bifurcation criteria in generalized coupled thermoplasticity for small deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śloderbach, Zdzisław

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of a study into global and local conditions of uniqueness and the criteria excluding the possibility of bifurcation of the equilibrium state for small strains. The conditions and criteria are derived on the basis of an analysis of the problem of uniqueness of a solution involving the basic incremental boundary problem of coupled generalized thermo-elasto-plasticity. This work forms a follow-up of previous research (Śloderbach in Bifurcations criteria for equilibrium states in generalized thermoplasticity, IFTR Reports, 1980, Arch Mech 3(35):337-349, 351-367, 1983), but contains a new derivation of global and local criteria excluding a possibility of bifurcation of an equilibrium state regarding a comparison body dependent on the admissible fields of stress rate. The thermal elasto-plastic coupling effects, non-associated laws of plastic flow and influence of plastic strains on thermoplastic properties of a body were taken into account in this work. Thus, the mathematical problem considered here is not a self-conjugated problem.

  15. Time dependent quantum thermodynamics of a coupled quantum oscillator system in a small thermal environment

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, George L.; Kellman, Michael E.

    2013-12-07

    Simulations are performed of a small quantum system interacting with a quantum environment. The system consists of various initial states of two harmonic oscillators coupled to give normal modes. The environment is “designed” by its level pattern to have a thermodynamic temperature. A random coupling causes the system and environment to become entangled in the course of time evolution. The approach to a Boltzmann distribution is observed, and effective fitted temperatures close to the designed temperature are obtained. All initial pure states of the system are driven to equilibrium at very similar rates, with quick loss of memory of the initial state. The time evolution of the von Neumann entropy is calculated as a measure of equilibration and of quantum coherence. It is pointed out using spatial density distribution plots that quantum interference is eliminated only with maximal entropy, which corresponds thermally to infinite temperature. Implications of our results for the notion of “classicalizing” behavior in the approach to thermal equilibrium are briefly considered.

  16. Time dependent quantum thermodynamics of a coupled quantum oscillator system in a small thermal environment.

    PubMed

    Barnes, George L; Kellman, Michael E

    2013-12-01

    Simulations are performed of a small quantum system interacting with a quantum environment. The system consists of various initial states of two harmonic oscillators coupled to give normal modes. The environment is "designed" by its level pattern to have a thermodynamic temperature. A random coupling causes the system and environment to become entangled in the course of time evolution. The approach to a Boltzmann distribution is observed, and effective fitted temperatures close to the designed temperature are obtained. All initial pure states of the system are driven to equilibrium at very similar rates, with quick loss of memory of the initial state. The time evolution of the von Neumann entropy is calculated as a measure of equilibration and of quantum coherence. It is pointed out using spatial density distribution plots that quantum interference is eliminated only with maximal entropy, which corresponds thermally to infinite temperature. Implications of our results for the notion of "classicalizing" behavior in the approach to thermal equilibrium are briefly considered. PMID:24320365

  17. Aerodynamic Modeling of Transonic Aircraft Using Vortex Lattice Coupled with Transonic Small Disturbance for Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaparro, Daniel; Fujiwara, Gustavo E. C.; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan

    2016-01-01

    The need to rapidly scan large design spaces during conceptual design calls for computationally inexpensive tools such as the vortex lattice method (VLM). Although some VLM tools, such as Vorview have been extended to model fully-supersonic flow, VLM solutions are typically limited to inviscid, subcritical flow regimes. Many transport aircraft operate at transonic speeds, which limits the applicability of VLM for such applications. This paper presents a novel approach to correct three-dimensional VLM through coupling of two-dimensional transonic small disturbance (TSD) solutions along the span of an aircraft wing in order to accurately predict transonic aerodynamic loading and wave drag for transport aircraft. The approach is extended to predict flow separation and capture the attenuation of aerodynamic forces due to boundary layer viscosity by coupling the TSD solver with an integral boundary layer (IBL) model. The modeling framework is applied to the NASA General Transport Model (GTM) integrated with a novel control surface known as the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF).

  18. Closed set of the uniqueness conditions and bifurcation criteria in generalized coupled thermoplasticity for small deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śloderbach, Zdzisław

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports the results of a study into global and local conditions of uniqueness and the criteria excluding the possibility of bifurcation of the equilibrium state for small strains. The conditions and criteria are derived on the basis of an analysis of the problem of uniqueness of a solution involving the basic incremental boundary problem of coupled generalized thermo-elasto-plasticity. This work forms a follow-up of previous research (Śloderbach in Bifurcations criteria for equilibrium states in generalized thermoplasticity, IFTR Reports, 1980, Arch Mech 3(35):337-349, 351-367, 1983), but contains a new derivation of global and local criteria excluding a possibility of bifurcation of an equilibrium state regarding a comparison body dependent on the admissible fields of stress rate. The thermal elasto-plastic coupling effects, non-associated laws of plastic flow and influence of plastic strains on thermoplastic properties of a body were taken into account in this work. Thus, the mathematical problem considered here is not a self-conjugated problem.

  19. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, B.C.

    1963-02-26

    This patent relates to a releasable coupling connecting a control rod to a control rod drive. This remotely operable coupling mechanism can connect two elements which are laterally and angviarly misaligned, and provides a means for sensing the locked condition of the elements. The coupling utilizes a spherical bayonet joint which is locked against rotation by a ball detent lock. (AEC)

  20. Optimal Gradient Estimates and Asymptotic Behaviour for the Vlasov-Poisson System with Small Initial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyung Ju; Rendall, Alan D.; Velázquez, Juan J. L.

    2011-04-01

    The Vlasov-Poisson system describes interacting systems of collisionless particles. For solutions with small initial data in three dimensions it is known that the spatial density of particles decays as t -3 at late times. In this paper this statement is refined to show that each derivative of the density which is taken leads to an extra power of decay, so that in N dimensions for {N ≥q 3} the derivative of the density of order k decays as t - N- k . An asymptotic formula for the solution at late times is also obtained.

  1. Heterogeneity and nearest-neighbor coupling can explain small-worldness and wave properties in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Cappon, Giacomo; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2016-05-01

    Many multicellular systems consist of coupled cells that work as a syncytium. The pancreatic islet of Langerhans is a well-studied example of such a microorgan. The islets are responsible for secretion of glucose-regulating hormones, mainly glucagon and insulin, which are released in distinct pulses. In order to observe pulsatile insulin secretion from the β-cells within the islets, the cellular responses must be synchronized. It is now well established that gap junctions provide the electrical nearest-neighbor coupling that allows excitation waves to spread across islets to synchronize the β-cell population. Surprisingly, functional coupling analysis of calcium responses in β-cells shows small-world properties, i.e., a high degree of local coupling with a few long-range "short-cut" connections that reduce the average path-length greatly. Here, we investigate how such long-range functional coupling can appear as a result of heterogeneity, nearest-neighbor coupling, and wave propagation. Heterogeneity is also able to explain a set of experimentally observed synchronization and wave properties without introducing all-or-none cell coupling and percolation theory. Our theoretical results highlight how local biological coupling can give rise to functional small-world properties via heterogeneity and wave propagation. PMID:27249943

  2. Heterogeneity and nearest-neighbor coupling can explain small-worldness and wave properties in pancreatic islets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappon, Giacomo; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2016-05-01

    Many multicellular systems consist of coupled cells that work as a syncytium. The pancreatic islet of Langerhans is a well-studied example of such a microorgan. The islets are responsible for secretion of glucose-regulating hormones, mainly glucagon and insulin, which are released in distinct pulses. In order to observe pulsatile insulin secretion from the β-cells within the islets, the cellular responses must be synchronized. It is now well established that gap junctions provide the electrical nearest-neighbor coupling that allows excitation waves to spread across islets to synchronize the β-cell population. Surprisingly, functional coupling analysis of calcium responses in β-cells shows small-world properties, i.e., a high degree of local coupling with a few long-range "short-cut" connections that reduce the average path-length greatly. Here, we investigate how such long-range functional coupling can appear as a result of heterogeneity, nearest-neighbor coupling, and wave propagation. Heterogeneity is also able to explain a set of experimentally observed synchronization and wave properties without introducing all-or-none cell coupling and percolation theory. Our theoretical results highlight how local biological coupling can give rise to functional small-world properties via heterogeneity and wave propagation.

  3. Breakdown of Bragg-Gray behaviour for low-density detectors under electronic disequilibrium conditions in small megavoltage photon fields.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Fenwick, John D; Underwood, Tracy S A; Deshpande, Deepak D; Scott, Alison J D; Nahum, Alan E

    2015-10-21

    In small photon fields ionisation chambers can exhibit large deviations from Bragg-Gray behaviour; the EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code system has been employed to investigate this 'Bragg-Gray breakdown'. The total electron (+positron) fluence in small water and air cavities in a water phantom has been computed for a full linac beam model as well as for a point source spectrum for 6 MV and 15 MV qualities for field sizes from 0.25  ×  0.25 cm(2) to 10  ×  10 cm(2). A water-to-air perturbation factor has been derived as the ratio of total electron (+positron) fluence, integrated over all energies, in a tiny water volume to that in a 'PinPoint 3D-chamber-like' air cavity; for the 0.25  ×  0.25 cm(2) field size the perturbation factors are 1.323 and 2.139 for 6 MV and 15 MV full linac geometries respectively. For the 15 MV full linac geometry for field sizes of 1  ×  1 cm(2) and smaller not only the absolute magnitude but also the 'shape' of the total electron fluence spectrum in the air cavity is significantly different to that in the water 'cavity'. The physics of this 'Bragg-Gray breakdown' is fully explained, making reference to the Fano theorem. For the 15 MV full linac geometry in the 0.25  ×  0.25 cm(2) field the directly computed MC dose ratio, water-to-air, differs by 5% from the product of the Spencer-Attix stopping-power ratio (SPR) and the perturbation factor; this 'difference' is explained by the difference in the shapes of the fluence spectra and is also formulated theoretically. We show that the dimensions of an air-cavity with a perturbation factor within 5% of unity would have to be impractically small in these highly non-equilibrium photon fields. In contrast the dose to water in a 0.25  ×  0.25 cm(2) field derived by multiplying the dose in the single-crystal diamond dosimeter (SCDDo) by the Spencer-Attix ratio is within 2.9% of the dose computed directly in the water voxel for full linac

  4. Study on small-strain behaviours of methane hydrate sandy sediments using discrete element method

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yanxin; Cheng Yipik; Xu Xiaomin; Soga, Kenichi

    2013-06-18

    Methane hydrate bearing soil has attracted increasing interest as a potential energy resource where methane gas can be extracted from dissociating hydrate-bearing sediments. Seismic testing techniques have been applied extensively and in various ways, to detect the presence of hydrates, due to the fact that hydrates increase the stiffness of hydrate-bearing sediments. With the recognition of the limitations of laboratory and field tests, wave propagation modelling using Discrete Element Method (DEM) was conducted in this study in order to provide some particle-scale insights on the hydrate-bearing sandy sediment models with pore-filling and cementation hydrate distributions. The relationship between shear wave velocity and hydrate saturation was established by both DEM simulations and analytical solutions. Obvious differences were observed in the dependence of wave velocity on hydrate saturation for these two cases. From the shear wave velocity measurement and particle-scale analysis, it was found that the small-strain mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sandy sediments are governed by both the hydrate distribution patterns and hydrate saturation.

  5. Hydrological behaviour of a small catchment in the dehesa landuse system (Extremadura, SW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, Antonio; Schnabel, Susanne

    1998-09-01

    Investigations of the hydrological processes operating in a small experimental catchment representative of the dehesa ecosystem were carried out. The dehesa constitutes a system of agro-silvo-pastoral landuse, which is characterized by a Mediterranean, semi-arid climate. The study includes an analysis of the relationships between rainfall, soil water content and discharge, as well as the establishment of the annual water budget. The results demonstrate a complex hydrological response. The relationships between the factors involved and the operating processes are difficult to explain because of the decisive role played by the valley bottoms. These areas typically possess a sediment fill, and contrast with the shallow soils developed on the hillslopes. Genesis and quantity of runoff (Hortonian or saturation) measured at the outlet depend on the antecedent moisture conditions of the valley bottoms because of their water-retention capacity. Annual runoff coefficients are similar to those reported from other semi-arid areas. The analysis of the annual water budget shows that rainfall is positively related with both actual evapotranspiration and discharge.

  6. The asymptotic behaviour of parton distributions at small and large x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Nocera, Emanuele R.; Rojo, Juan

    2016-07-01

    It has been argued from the earliest days of quantum chromodynamics that at asymptotically small values of x the parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton behave as x^α , where the values of α can be deduced from Regge theory, while at asymptotically large values of x the PDFs behave as (1-x)^β , where the values of β can be deduced from the Brodsky-Farrar quark counting rules. We critically examine these claims by extracting the exponents α and β from various global fits of parton distributions, analysing their scale dependence, and comparing their values to the naive expectations. We find that for valence distributions both Regge theory and counting rules are confirmed, at least within uncertainties, while for sea quarks and gluons the results are less conclusive. We also compare results from various PDF fits for the structure function ratio F_2^n/F_2^p at large x, and caution against unrealistic uncertainty estimates due to overconstrained parametrisations.

  7. Ensemble Activation of G-Protein -Coupled Receptors Revealed by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang; Perera, Suchithranga; Shrestha, Utsab; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein -coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in visual light perception and occurs naturally in a membrane lipid environment. Rhodopsin photoactivation yields cis-trans isomerization of retinal giving equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. Does photoactivation lead to a single Meta-II conformation, or do substates exist as described by an ensemble-activation mechanism (EAM)? We use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to investigate conformational changes in rhodopsin-detergent and rhodopsin-lipid complexes upon photoactivation. Meta-I state is stabilized in CHAPS-solubilized rhodopsin, while Meta-II is trapped in DDM-solubilized rhodopsin. SANS data are acquired from 80% D2O solutions and at contrast-matching points for both DDM and CHAPS samples. Our experiments demonstrate that for detergent-solubilized rhodopsin, SANS with contrast variation can detect structural differences between the rhodopsin dark-state, Meta-I, Meta-II, and ligand-free opsin states. Dark-state rhodopsin has more conformational flexibility in DDM micelles compared to CHAPS, which is consistent with an ensemble of activated Meta-II states. Furthermore, time-resolved SANS enables study of the time-dependent structural transitions between Meta-I and Meta-II, which is crucial to understanding the ensemble-based activation.

  8. Enhancing Social Integration of Immigrant Pupils at Risk for Social, Emotional and/or Behavioural Difficulties: The Outcomes of a Small-Scale Social-Emotional Learning Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doikou-Avlidou, Maro; Dadatsi, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the outcomes of a small-scale social and emotional learning (SEL) intervention programme regarding the social behaviour and the social position of pupils from culturally diverse backgrounds. Seven primary and secondary education teachers participated in the study along with the pupils attending their classes;…

  9. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  10. Dihydromunduletone Is a Small-Molecule Selective Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Stoveken, Hannah M; Bahr, Laura L; Anders, M W; Wojtovich, Andrew P; Smrcka, Alan V; Tall, Gregory G

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) have emerging roles in development and tissue maintenance and is the most prevalent GPCR subclass mutated in human cancers, but to date, no drugs have been developed to target them in any disease. aGPCR extracellular domains contain a conserved subdomain that mediates self-cleavage proximal to the start of the 7-transmembrane domain (7TM). The two receptor protomers, extracellular domain and amino terminal fragment (NTF), and the 7TM or C-terminal fragment remain noncovalently bound at the plasma membrane in a low-activity state. We recently demonstrated that NTF dissociation liberates the 7TM N-terminal stalk, which acts as a tethered-peptide agonist permitting receptor-dependent heterotrimeric G protein activation. In many cases, natural aGPCR ligands are extracellular matrix proteins that dissociate the NTF to reveal the tethered agonist. Given the perceived difficulty in modifying extracellular matrix proteins to create aGPCR probes, we developed a serum response element (SRE)-luciferase-based screening approach to identify GPR56/ADGRG1 small-molecule inhibitors. A 2000-compound library comprising known drugs and natural products was screened for GPR56-dependent SRE activation inhibitors that did not inhibit constitutively active Gα13-dependent SRE activation. Dihydromunduletone (DHM), a rotenoid derivative, was validated using cell-free aGPCR/heterotrimeric G protein guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding reconstitution assays. DHM inhibited GPR56 and GPR114/ADGRG5, which have similar tethered agonists, but not the aGPCR GPR110/ADGRF1, M3 muscarinic acetylcholine, or β2 adrenergic GPCRs. DHM inhibited tethered peptide agonist-stimulated and synthetic peptide agonist-stimulated GPR56 but did not inhibit basal activity, demonstrating that it antagonizes the peptide agonist. DHM is a novel aGPCR antagonist and potentially useful chemical probe that may be developed as a future aGPCR therapeutic. PMID:27338081

  11. Breakdown of Bragg-Gray behaviour for low-density detectors under electronic disequilibrium conditions in small megavoltage photon fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Fenwick, John D.; Underwood, Tracy S. A.; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Scott, Alison J. D.; Nahum, Alan E.

    2015-10-01

    In small photon fields ionisation chambers can exhibit large deviations from Bragg-Gray behaviour; the EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code system has been employed to investigate this ‘Bragg-Gray breakdown’. The total electron (+positron) fluence in small water and air cavities in a water phantom has been computed for a full linac beam model as well as for a point source spectrum for 6 MV and 15 MV qualities for field sizes from 0.25  ×  0.25 cm2 to 10  ×  10 cm2. A water-to-air perturbation factor has been derived as the ratio of total electron (+positron) fluence, integrated over all energies, in a tiny water volume to that in a ‘PinPoint 3D-chamber-like’ air cavity; for the 0.25  ×  0.25 cm2 field size the perturbation factors are 1.323 and 2.139 for 6 MV and 15 MV full linac geometries respectively. For the 15 MV full linac geometry for field sizes of 1  ×  1 cm2 and smaller not only the absolute magnitude but also the ‘shape’ of the total electron fluence spectrum in the air cavity is significantly different to that in the water ‘cavity’. The physics of this ‘Bragg-Gray breakdown’ is fully explained, making reference to the Fano theorem. For the 15 MV full linac geometry in the 0.25  ×  0.25 cm2 field the directly computed MC dose ratio, water-to-air, differs by 5% from the product of the Spencer-Attix stopping-power ratio (SPR) and the perturbation factor; this ‘difference’ is explained by the difference in the shapes of the fluence spectra and is also formulated theoretically. We show that the dimensions of an air-cavity with a perturbation factor within 5% of unity would have to be impractically small in these highly non-equilibrium photon fields. In contrast the dose to water in a 0.25  ×  0.25 cm2 field derived by multiplying the dose in the single-crystal diamond dosimeter (SCDDo) by the Spencer-Attix ratio is within 2.9% of the dose computed directly in the water voxel

  12. A simple behaviour provides accuracy and flexibility in odour plume tracking--the robotic control of sensory-motor coupling in silkmoths.

    PubMed

    Ando, Noriyasu; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2015-12-01

    Odour plume tracking is an essential behaviour for animal survival. A fundamental strategy for this is to move upstream and then across-stream. Male silkmoths, Bombyx mori, display this strategy as a pre-programmed sequential behaviour. They walk forward (surge) in response to the female sex pheromone and perform a zigzagging 'mating dance'. Though pre-programmed, the surge direction is modulated by bilateral olfactory input and optic flow. However, the nature of the interaction between these two sensory modalities and contribution of the resultant motor command to localizing an odour source are still unknown. We evaluated the ability of the silkmoth to localize an odour source under conditions of disturbed sensory-motor coupling, using a silkmoth-driven mobile robot. The significance of the bilateral olfaction of the moth was confirmed by inverting the olfactory input to the antennae, or its motor output. Inversion of the motor output induced consecutive circling, which was inhibited by covering the visual field of the moth. This suggests that the corollary discharge from the motor command and the reafference of self-generated optic flow generate compensatory signals to guide the surge accurately. Additionally, after inverting the olfactory input, the robot successfully tracked the odour plume by using a combination of behaviours. These results indicate that accurate guidance of the reflexive surge by integrating bilateral olfactory and visual information with innate pre-programmed behaviours increases the flexibility to track an odour plume even under disturbed circumstances. PMID:26486361

  13. SOPPA and CCSD vibrational corrections to NMR indirect spin-spin coupling constants of small hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, Rasmus; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-31

    We present zero-point vibrational corrections to the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in ethyne, ethene, cyclopropene and allene. The calculations have been carried out both at the level of the second order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) employing a new implementation in the DALTON program, at the density functional theory level with the B3LYP functional employing also the Dalton program and at the level of coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) theory employing the implementation in the CFOUR program. Specialized coupling constant basis sets, aug-cc-pVTZ-J, have been employed in the calculations. We find that on average the SOPPA results for both the equilibrium geometry values and the zero-point vibrational corrections are in better agreement with the CCSD results than the corresponding B3LYP results. Furthermore we observed that the vibrational corrections are in the order of 5 Hz for the one-bond carbon-hydrogen couplings and about 1 Hz or smaller for the other couplings apart from the one-bond carbon-carbon coupling (11 Hz) and the two-bond carbon-hydrogen coupling (4 Hz) in ethyne. However, not for all couplings lead the inclusion of zero-point vibrational corrections to better agreement with experiment.

  14. SOPPA and CCSD vibrational corrections to NMR indirect spin-spin coupling constants of small hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Rasmus; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present zero-point vibrational corrections to the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in ethyne, ethene, cyclopropene and allene. The calculations have been carried out both at the level of the second order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) employing a new implementation in the DALTON program, at the density functional theory level with the B3LYP functional employing also the Dalton program and at the level of coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) theory employing the implementation in the CFOUR program. Specialized coupling constant basis sets, aug-cc-pVTZ-J, have been employed in the calculations. We find that on average the SOPPA results for both the equilibrium geometry values and the zero-point vibrational corrections are in better agreement with the CCSD results than the corresponding B3LYP results. Furthermore we observed that the vibrational corrections are in the order of 5 Hz for the one-bond carbon-hydrogen couplings and about 1 Hz or smaller for the other couplings apart from the one-bond carbon-carbon coupling (11 Hz) and the two-bond carbon-hydrogen coupling (4 Hz) in ethyne. However, not for all couplings lead the inclusion of zero-point vibrational corrections to better agreement with experiment.

  15. Behavioural variation in 172 small-scale societies indicates that social learning is the main mode of human adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Sarah; Perreault, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The behavioural variation among human societies is vast and unmatched in the animal world. It is unclear whether this variation is due to variation in the ecological environment or to differences in cultural traditions. Underlying this debate is a more fundamental question: is the richness of humans’ behavioural repertoire due to non-cultural mechanisms, such as causal reasoning, inventiveness, reaction norms, trial-and-error learning and evoked culture, or is it due to the population-level dynamics of cultural transmission? Here, we measure the relative contribution of environment and cultural history in explaining the behavioural variation of 172 Native American tribes at the time of European contact. We find that the effect of cultural history is typically larger than that of environment. Behaviours also persist over millennia within cultural lineages. This indicates that human behaviour is not predominantly determined by single-generation adaptive responses, contra theories that emphasize non-cultural mechanisms as determinants of human behaviour. Rather, the main mode of human adaptation is social learning mechanisms that operate over multiple generations. PMID:26085589

  16. Behavioural variation in 172 small-scale societies indicates that social learning is the main mode of human adaptation.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Sarah; Perreault, Charles

    2015-07-01

    The behavioural variation among human societies is vast and unmatched in the animal world. It is unclear whether this variation is due to variation in the ecological environment or to differences in cultural traditions. Underlying this debate is a more fundamental question: is the richness of humans' behavioural repertoire due to non-cultural mechanisms, such as causal reasoning, inventiveness, reaction norms, trial-and-error learning and evoked culture, or is it due to the population-level dynamics of cultural transmission? Here, we measure the relative contribution of environment and cultural history in explaining the behavioural variation of 172 Native American tribes at the time of European contact. We find that the effect of cultural history is typically larger than that of environment. Behaviours also persist over millennia within cultural lineages. This indicates that human behaviour is not predominantly determined by single-generation adaptive responses, contra theories that emphasize non-cultural mechanisms as determinants of human behaviour. Rather, the main mode of human adaptation is social learning mechanisms that operate over multiple generations. PMID:26085589

  17. Small Variations in Early-Life Environment Can Affect Coping Behaviour in Response to Foraging Challenge in the Three-Spined Stickleback

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Context An increasing concern in the face of human expansion throughout natural habitats is whether animal populations can respond adaptively when confronted with challenges like environmental change and novelty. Behavioural flexibility is an important factor in estimating the adaptive potential of both individuals and populations, and predicting the degree to which they can cope with change. Study Design This study on the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) is an empiric illustration of the degree of behavioural variation that can emerge between semi-natural systems within only a single generation. Wild-caught adult sticklebacks (P, N = 400) were randomly distributed in equal densities over 20 standardized semi-natural environments (ponds), and one year later offspring (F1, N = 652) were presented with repeated behavioural assays. Individuals were challenged to reach a food source through a novel transparent obstacle, during which exploration, activity, foraging, sociability and wall-biting behaviours were recorded through video observation. We found that coping responses of individuals from the first generation to this unfamiliar foraging challenge were related to even relatively small, naturally diversified variation in developmental environment. All measured behaviours were correlated with each other. Especially exploration, sociability and wall-biting were found to differ significantly between ponds. These differences could not be explained by stickleback density or the turbidity of the water. Findings Our findings show that a) differences in early-life environment appear to affect stickleback feeding behaviour later in life; b) this is the case even when the environmental differences are only small, within natural parameters and diversified gradually; and c) effects are present despite semi-natural conditions that fluctuate during the year. Therefore, in behaviourally plastic animals like the stickleback, the adaptive response to human

  18. Transmon-based simulator of nonlocal electron-phonon coupling: A platform for observing sharp small-polaron transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojanović, Vladimir M.; Vanević, Mihajlo; Demler, Eugene; Tian, Lin

    2014-04-01

    We propose an analog superconducting quantum simulator for a one-dimensional model featuring momentum-dependent (nonlocal) electron-phonon couplings of Su-Schrieffer-Heeger and "breathing-mode" types. Because its corresponding coupling vertex function depends on both the electron and phonon quasimomenta, this model does not belong to the realm of validity of the Gerlach-Löwen theorem that rules out any nonanalyticities in single-particle properties. The superconducting circuit behind the proposed simulator entails an array of transmon qubits and microwave resonators. By applying microwave driving fields to the qubits, a small-polaron Bloch state with an arbitrary quasimomentum can be prepared in this system within times several orders of magnitude shorter than the typical qubit decoherence times. We demonstrate that—by varying the externally tunable parameters—one can readily reach the critical coupling strength required for observing the sharp transition from a nondegenerate (single-particle) ground state corresponding to zero quasimomentum (Kgs=0) to a twofold-degenerate small-polaron ground state at nonzero quasimomenta Kgs and -Kgs. Through exact numerical diagonalization of our effective Hamiltonian, we show how this nonanalyticity is reflected in the relevant single-particle properties (ground-state energy, quasiparticle residue, average number of phonons). We also show that the proposed setup provides an ideal testbed for studying the nonequilibrium dynamics of small-polaron formation in the presence of strongly momentum-dependent electron-phonon interactions.

  19. Ligand coupling symmetry correlates with thermopower enhancement in small-molecule/nanocrystal hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Jared; Kotiuga, Michele; Doan-Nguyen, Vicky V T; Queen, Wendy L; Forster, Jason D; Schlitz, Ruth A; Murray, Christopher B; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Chabinyc, Michael L; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2014-10-28

    We investigate the impact of the coupling symmetry and chemical nature of organic-inorganic interfaces on thermoelectric transport in Cu2-xSe nanocrystal thin films. By coupling ligand-exchange techniques with layer-by-layer assembly methods, we are able to systematically vary nanocrystal-organic linker interfaces, demonstrating how the functionality of the polar headgroup and the coupling symmetry of the organic linkers can change the power factor (S(2)σ) by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. Remarkably, we observe that ligand-coupling symmetry has a profound effect on thermoelectric transport in these hybrid materials. We shed light on these results using intuition from a simplified model for interparticle charge transport via tunneling through the frontier orbital of a bound ligand. Our analysis indicates that ligand-coupling symmetry and binding mechanisms correlate with enhanced conductivity approaching 2000 S/cm, and we employ this concept to demonstrate among the highest power factors measured for quantum-dot based thermoelectric inorganic-organic composite materials of ∼ 30 μW/m · K(2). PMID:25211028

  20. Using Haines Index coupled with fire weather model predicted from high resolution LAM forecasts to asses wildfire extreme behaviour in Southern Europe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetani, Francesco; Baptiste Filippi, Jean; Simeoni, Albert; D'Andrea, Mirko

    2010-05-01

    Haines Index (HI) was developed by USDA Forest Service to measure the atmosphere's contribution to the growth potential of a wildfire. The Haines Index combines two atmospheric factors that are known to have an effect on wildfires: Stability and Dryness. As operational tools, HI proved its ability to predict plume dominated high intensity wildfires. However, since HI does not take into account the fuel continuity, composition and moisture conditions and the effects of wind and topography on fire behaviour, its use as forecasting tool should be carefully considered. In this work we propose the use of HI, predicted from HR Limited Area Model forecasts, coupled with a Fire Weather model (i.e., RISICO system) fully operational in Italy since 2003. RISICO is based on dynamic models able to represent in space and in time the effects that environment and vegetal physiology have on fuels and, in turn, on the potential behaviour of wildfires. The system automatically acquires from remote databases a thorough data-set of input information both of in situ and spatial nature. Meteorological observations, radar data, Limited Area Model weather forecasts, EO data, and fuel data are managed by a Unified Interface able to process a wide set of different data. Specific semi-physical models are used in the system to simulate the dynamics of the fuels (load and moisture contents of dead and live fuel) and the potential fire behaviour (rate of spread and linear intensity). A preliminary validation of this approach will be provided with reference to Sardinia and Corsica Islands, two major islands of the Mediterranean See frequently affected by extreme plume dominated wildfires. A time series of about 3000 wildfires burnt in Sardinia and Corsica in 2007 and 2008 will be used to evaluate the capability of HI coupled with the outputs of the Fire Weather model to forecast the actual risk in time and in space.

  1. Network topology and Turing instabilities in small arrays of diffusively coupled reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsthemke, Werner; Lam, Kwan; Moore, Peter K.

    2004-08-01

    We study the effect of the network structure on the diffusion-induced instability to nonuniform steady states in arrays of diffusively coupled reactors. The kinetics is given by the Lengyel-Epstein model, and we derive the conditions for Turing instabilities in all arrays of two, three, and four reactors.

  2. Design and baseline characteristics of the 10 Small Steps Study: a randomised controlled trial of an intervention to promote healthy behaviour using a lifestyle score and personalised feedback

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading causes of death globally and are associated with a limited set of common, modifiable health behaviours: tobacco use, physical inactivity, harmful use of alcohol and unhealthy diet. General practice offers an ideal avenue for addressing such health behaviours on a population-wide basis. This paper describes the protocol of a multiple health behaviour change intervention designed for implementation in general practice and summarises the baseline characteristics of its participants. Method/Design The 10 Small Steps (10SS) study, a randomised controlled trial, involved 4,678 adult general practice patients in Queensland, Australia. Self-reported data were collected to establish the proportion of participants meeting recommended guidelines for ten health behaviours: physical activity, body mass index, alcohol, smoking and six dietary behaviours. Participants were randomised to four groups: contact at baseline only ('single intervention' and corresponding control group) and contact at baseline and 3 months ('dual intervention' and corresponding control group). At each contact the participants received a computer-tailored feedback and one page information sheet according to their allocation to intervention or control groups. Change in the intervention group compared to the control group was assessed at 3 and12 months after baseline data collection. Responses were summed to calculate an individual lifestyle score (the Prudence Score), which ranged from 0 to 10. The baseline response was 56.5% (4678 of 8343 invited participants) and the study sample was primarily female (68.7%) with an average age of 47 years. The mean Prudence Score was 5.8 (95%CI 5.75-5.85). Discussion Baseline data from the 10SS study show that nearly all participants engage in some health behaviours but relatively few adhere simultaneously to a core set of dietary and lifestyle behaviours associated with risk of NCDs. Ample scope exists to

  3. Communication: Relativistic Fock-space coupled cluster study of small building blocks of larger uranium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tecmer, Paweł Visscher, Lucas; Severo Pereira Gomes, André; Knecht, Stefan

    2014-07-28

    We present a study of the electronic structure of the [UO{sub 2}]{sup +}, [UO{sub 2}]{sup 2} {sup +}, [UO{sub 2}]{sup 3} {sup +}, NUO, [NUO]{sup +}, [NUO]{sup 2} {sup +}, [NUN]{sup −}, NUN, and [NUN]{sup +} molecules with the intermediate Hamiltonian Fock-space coupled cluster method. The accuracy of mean-field approaches based on the eXact-2-Component Hamiltonian to incorporate spin–orbit coupling and Gaunt interactions are compared to results obtained with the Dirac–Coulomb Hamiltonian. Furthermore, we assess the reliability of calculations employing approximate density functionals in describing electronic spectra and quantities useful in rationalizing Uranium (VI) species reactivity (hardness, electronegativity, and electrophilicity)

  4. Title: Chimeras in small, globally coupled networks: Experiments and stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Joseph D.; Bansal, Kanika; Murphy, Thomas E.; Roy, Rajarshi

    Since the initial observation of chimera states, there has been much discussion of the conditions under which these states emerge. The emphasis thus far has mainly been to analyze large networks of coupled oscillators; however, recent studies have begun to focus on the opposite limit: what is the smallest system of coupled oscillators in which chimeras can exist? We experimentally observe chimeras and other partially synchronous patterns in a network of four globally-coupled chaotic opto-electronic oscillators. By examining the equations of motion, we demonstrate that symmetries in the network topology allow a variety of synchronous states to exist, including cluster synchronous states and a chimera state. Using the group theoretical approach recently developed for analyzing cluster synchronization, we show how to derive the variational equations for these synchronous patterns and calculate their linear stability. The stability analysis gives good agreement with our experimental results. Both experiments and simulations suggest that these chimera states often appear in regions of multistability between global, cluster, and desynchronized states.

  5. Performance analysis of small capacity liquid nitrogen generator based on Joule-Thomson refrigerator coupled with air separation membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowska-Hajnus, Agnieszka; Chorowski, Maciej

    2012-06-01

    Joule - Thomson small capacity refrigerators supplied with gas mixture are studied theoretically and experimentally for a variety of applications. They can be especially promising when coupled with membrane air separators. We present liquid nitrogen generation system based on Joule - Thomson cooler joined with air separation membrane. Hollow fiber membrane is used for nitrogen separation from compressed and purified atmospheric air. Joule-Thomson refrigerator operates with a dedicated nitrogen - hydrocarbons mixture and provides a cooling power used for the separated nitrogen liquefaction. Special attention has been paid to a heat exchanger coupling the Joule- Thomson refrigerator with the membrane air separator. This paper describes the system design, the procedure of its working parameters optimization and tests results.

  6. Effects of acoustic alarms, designed to reduce small cetacean bycatch in gillnet fisheries, on the behaviour of North Sea fish species in a large tank.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; van der Heul, Sander; van der Veen, Jan; Verboom, Willem C; Jennings, Nancy; de Haan, Dick; Reijnders, Peter J H

    2007-08-01

    World-wide many cetaceans drown incidentally in fishing nets. To reduce the unwanted bycatch in gillnets, pingers (acoustic alarms) have been developed that are attached to the nets. In the European Union, pingers will be made compulsory in some areas in 2005 and in others in 2007. However, pingers may effect non-target marine fauna such as fish. Therefore in this study, the effects of seven commercially-available pingers on the behaviour of five North Sea fish species in a large tank were quantified. The species tested were: sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), pout (Trisopterus luscus), thicklip mullet (Chelon labrosus), herring (Clupea harengus), and cod (Gadus morhua). The fish were housed as single-species schools of 9-13 individuals in a tank. The behaviour of fish in quiet periods was compared with their behaviour during periods with active pingers. The results varied both between pingers and between fish species. Sea bass decreased their speed in response to one pinger and swam closer to the surface in response to another. Thicklip mullet swam closer to the bottom in response to two pingers and increased their swimming speed in response to one pinger. Herring swam faster in response to one pinger, and pout and cod (close relatives) showed no behavioural responses to any of the pingers. Of the seven pingers tested, four elicited responses in at least one fish species, and three elicited no responses. Whether similar responses would be elicited in these fish species in the wild, and if so, whether such responses would influence the catch rate of fisheries, cannot be derived from the results of this study. However, the results indicate the need for field studies with pingers and fish. Based on the small number of fish species tested, the present study suggests that the higher the frequency of a pinger, the less likely it is to affect the behaviour of marine fish. PMID:17316783

  7. Effects of gap junction inhibition on contraction waves in the murine small intestine in relation to coupled oscillator theory

    PubMed Central

    Huizinga, Jan D.

    2014-01-01

    Waves of contraction in the small intestine correlate with slow waves generated by the myenteric network of interstitial cells of Cajal. Coupled oscillator theory has been used to explain steplike gradients in the frequency (frequency plateaux) of contraction waves along the length of the small intestine. Inhibition of gap junction coupling between oscillators should lead to predictable effects on these plateaux and the wave dislocation (wave drop) phenomena associated with their boundaries. It is these predictions that we wished to test. We used a novel multicamera diameter-mapping system to measure contraction along 25- to 30-cm lengths of murine small intestine. There were typically two to three plateaux per length of intestine. Dislocations could be limited to the wavefronts immediately about the terminated wave, giving the appearance of a three-pronged fork, i.e., a fork dislocation; additionally, localized decreases in velocity developed across a number of wavefronts, ending with the terminated wave, which could appear as a fork, i.e., slip dislocations. The gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone increased the number of plateaux and dislocations and decreased contraction wave velocity. In some cases, the usual frequency gradient was reversed, with a plateau at a higher frequency than its proximal neighbor; thus fork dislocations were inverted, and the direction of propagation was reversed. Heptanol had no effect on the frequency or velocity of contractions but did reduce their amplitude. To understand intestinal motor patterns, the pacemaker network of the interstitial cells of Cajal is best evaluated as a system of coupled oscillators. PMID:25501550

  8. Small coupling limit and multiple solutions to the Dirichlet problem for Yang-Mills connections in four dimensions. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Takeshi; Marini, Antonella

    2012-06-01

    In this paper and its sequel (Part II), we analyze the space of solutions to the ɛ-Dirichlet problem for the Yang-Mills equations on the four-dimensional disk, for small values of the coupling constant ɛ. These are in 1-1 correspondence with solutions to the Dirichlet problem for Yang-Mills, for small boundary data ɛA0. We establish a Morse theory for this non-compact variational problem and prove the existence of multiple solutions, and, also, non minimal ones. Here, we describe the problem, state the main theorems and do the first part of the proof. This consists in making the problem finite dimensional, by seeking solutions approximated by the connected sum of a minimal solution with an instanton, plus a correction term due to the boundary. By introducing an auxiliary equation, we solve the problem orthogonally to the space of the approximate solutions.

  9. Age-related effects of practice experience on collective behaviours of football players in small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Barnabé, Luís; Volossovitch, Anna; Duarte, Ricardo; Ferreira, António Paulo; Davids, Keith

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether offensive and defensive collective behaviours emerging in six-a-side football games (GK+5 vs. 5+GK) varied according to age-related practice experience of young, male players (U16, U17 and U19yrs). Players' were not instructed to implement specific tactical plans and their movement trajectories (2D analyses) were recorded using 10 GPS units. Four common measures of team dispersion investigated in previous research (surface area, stretch index, length and width of a team) were used to analyse team performance behaviours. After recording these collective variables, we used sample entropy (SampEn) and cross-sample entropy (Cross-SampEn) measures to assess the regularity and synchronization of participant actions in teams. Results demonstrated clear age-related variations in effects on the collective performance measures analysed. In attacking phases, older and more experienced players occupied a greater surface area and displayed higher values of team width and stretch index. In defensive phases, significant differences were observed in team length and stretch index. Cross-SampEn analysis demonstrated a greater synchronization between offensive and defensive surface areas and team width in older age groups (U17 and U19yrs). Data suggest how coaches can manipulate practice task constraints to enhance development of team tactical performance behaviours in developing footballers between 16 and 19yrs of age. PMID:27132155

  10. Guidelines for the Synthesis of Small-Molecule Irreversible Probes Targeting G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Jörg, Manuela; Scammells, Peter J

    2016-07-19

    Irreversible probes have been proven to be useful pharmacological tools in the study of structural and functional features in drug receptor pharmacology. They have been demonstrated to be particularly valuable for the isolation and purification of receptors. Furthermore, irreversible probes are helpful tools for the identification and characterization of binding sites, thereby supporting the advancement of rational drug design. In this Minireview, we provide insight into universal strategies and guidelines to successfully synthesize irreversible probes that target G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We provide an overview of commonly used chemoreactive and photoreactive groups, and make a comparison of their properties and potential applications. Furthermore, there is a particular focus on synthetic approaches to introduce these reactive groups based on commercially available reagents. PMID:27347648

  11. Transmon-based simulator of nonlocal electron-phonon coupling: a platform for observing sharp small-polaron transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojanovic, Vladimir; Demler, Eugene; Vanevic, Mihajlo; Tian, Lin

    2014-03-01

    We propose an analog simulator for a one-dimensional model with momentum-dependent (nonlocal) electron-phonon couplings of Su-Schrieffer-Heeger and ``breathing-mode'' types. The superconducting circuit behind this simulator entails an array of transmon qubits and microwave resonators. Using a microwave-driving based protocol, small-polaron Bloch states with arbitrary quasimomentum can be prepared in this system within times several orders of magnitude shorter than the qubit decoherence time. We show that - by varying the circuit parameters - one can readily reach the critical coupling strength for observing the sharp transition from a nondegenerate single-particle ground state at zero quasimomentum (Kgs = 0) to a twofold degenerate small-polaron ground state corresponding to equal and opposite (nonzero) quasimomenta Kgs and -Kgs . Through exact diagonalization of our effective model, we show how this nonanalyticity is reflected in the relevant single-particle properties (ground-state energy, quasiparticle residue, average number of phonons). Our work paves the way for understanding the physical implications of strongly momentum-dependent electron-phonon interactions. Supported by the SNSF.

  12. Reproductive behaviour of couples at risk for sickle cell disease in Cuba: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Dorticós-Balea, A; Martin-Ruiz, M; Hechevarria-Fernández, P; Robaina-Castellanos, M S; Rodriguez-Blanco, M; Moras-Bracero, F; Granda Ibarra, H

    1997-08-01

    Three hundred and forty-three Cuban women at risk of having children with sickle cell anaemia or sickle cell-haemoglobin C disease were interviewed 2-8 years after the index pregnancy (that in which their risk was detected). The aim was to collect information on their attitude towards prenatal diagnosis in subsequent pregnancies. Twenty-two per cent (75/343) had dissolved their marriage and 9 per cent of these (7/75) considered that their at-risk status had influenced the separation. Sixty-three per cent of stable couples at risk (168/268) had decided to have no further children; 27 per cent of these (45/168) were afraid of having an affected child and 4 per cent (7/168) were afraid of the obstetric procedure. Nineteen per cent of the stable couples at risk (52/268) had had at least one further child or pregnancy. Of these, 44 per cent (23/52) requested prenatal diagnosis early and spontaneously, and a further 44 per cent (23/52) requested prenatal diagnosis but after re-identification by screening and recounselling. Only 12 per cent (6/52) did not request prenatal diagnosis. Attitude towards prenatal diagnosis was most positive among more educated women. The general perception of the prevention programme was good. PMID:9267897

  13. Influence of gate metal engineering on small-signal and noise behaviour of silicon nanowire MOSFET for low-noise amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neha; Chaujar, Rishu

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the small-signal behaviour and RF noise performance of gate electrode workfunction engineered (GEWE) silicon nanowire (SiNW) MOSFET, and the results so obtained are simultaneously compared with SiNW and conventional MOSFET at THz frequency range. This work examines reflection and transmission coefficients, noise conductance, minimum noise figure and cross-correlation factor. Results reveal significant reduction in input/output reflection coefficient and an increase in forward/reverse transmission coefficient owing to improved transconductance in GEWE-SiNW in comparison with conventional counterparts. It is also observed that minimum noise figure and noise conductance of GEWE-SiNW is reduced by 17.4 and 31.2 %, respectively, in comparison with SiNW, thus fortifying its potential application for low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) at radio frequencies. Moreover, the efficacy of gate metal workfunction engineering is also studied and the results validate that tuning of workfunction difference results further improvement in device small-signal behaviour and noise performance.

  14. Metabolic coupling of two small-molecule thiols programs the biosynthesis of lincomycin A.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qunfei; Wang, Min; Xu, Dongxiao; Zhang, Qinglin; Liu, Wen

    2015-02-01

    Low-molecular-mass thiols in organisms are well known for their redox-relevant role in protection against various endogenous and exogenous stresses. In eukaryotes and Gram-negative bacteria, the primary thiol is glutathione (GSH), a cysteinyl-containing tripeptide. In contrast, mycothiol (MSH), a cysteinyl pseudo-disaccharide, is dominant in Gram-positive actinobacteria, including antibiotic-producing actinomycetes and pathogenic mycobacteria. MSH is equivalent to GSH, either as a cofactor or as a substrate, in numerous biochemical processes, most of which have not been characterized, largely due to the dearth of information concerning MSH-dependent proteins. Actinomycetes are able to produce another thiol, ergothioneine (EGT), a histidine betaine derivative that is widely assimilated by plants and animals for variable physiological activities. The involvement of EGT in enzymatic reactions, however, lacks any precedent. Here we report that the unprecedented coupling of two bacterial thiols, MSH and EGT, has a constructive role in the biosynthesis of lincomycin A, a sulfur-containing lincosamide (C8 sugar) antibiotic that has been widely used for half a century to treat Gram-positive bacterial infections. EGT acts as a carrier to template the molecular assembly, and MSH is the sulfur donor for lincomycin maturation after thiol exchange. These thiols function through two unusual S-glycosylations that program lincosamide transfer, activation and modification, providing the first paradigm for EGT-associated biochemical processes and for the poorly understood MSH-dependent biotransformations, a newly described model that is potentially common in the incorporation of sulfur, an element essential for life and ubiquitous in living systems. PMID:25607359

  15. An interface for the direct coupling of small liquid samples to AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ognibene, T. J.; Thomas, A. T.; Daley, P. F.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K. W.

    2015-10-01

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Discrete samples containing at least a few 10 s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol 14C can be measured with a 3-5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targets for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of 14C. Liquid sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible.

  16. Understanding Small-Molecule Interactions in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Coupling Experiment with Theory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason S; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Britt, David K; Brown, Craig M; Haranczyk, Maciej; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Smit, Berend; Long, Jeffrey R; Queen, Wendy L

    2015-10-14

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have gained much attention as next-generation porous media for various applications, especially gas separation/storage, and catalysis. New MOFs are regularly reported; however, to develop better materials in a timely manner for specific applications, the interactions between guest molecules and the internal surface of the framework must first be understood. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is presented, which proves essential for the elucidation of small-molecule interactions in a model MOF system known as M2 (dobdc) (dobdc(4-) = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate; M = Mg, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, or Zn), a material whose adsorption properties can be readily tuned via chemical substitution. It is additionally shown that the study of extensive families like this one can provide a platform to test the efficacy and accuracy of developing computational methodologies in slightly varying chemical environments, a task that is necessary for their evolution into viable, robust tools for screening large numbers of materials. PMID:26033176

  17. An interface for the direct coupling of small liquid samples to AMS

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ognibene, T. J.; Thomas, A. T.; Daley, P. F.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K. W.

    2015-05-28

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL’s Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Discrete samples containing at least a few 10 s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol 14C can be measured with a 3–5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targetsmore » for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of 14C. As a result, liquid sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible.« less

  18. An interface for the direct coupling of small liquid samples to AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, T. J.; Thomas, A. T.; Daley, P. F.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K. W.

    2015-05-28

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL’s Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Discrete samples containing at least a few 10 s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol 14C can be measured with a 3–5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targets for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of 14C. As a result, liquid sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible.

  19. Target delivery of small interfering RNAs with vitamin E-coupled nanoparticles for treating hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liang; Yan, Yan; Liu, Jingyi; Wang, Bo; Li, Pu; Hu, Qin; Chen, Weixian

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) represents a promising strategy for the treatment of HCV infection. However, the development of an effective system for in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to target organ remains a formidable challenge. Here, we develop a unique nanoparticle platform (VE-DC) composed of α-tocopherol (vitamin E) and cholesterol-based cationic liposomes (DOTAP-Chol) for systemic delivery of siRNAs to the liver. A HCV-replicable cell line, Huh7.5.1-HCV, and a transient HCV core expressing cell line, Huh7.5.1-Core, were constructed and used to assess the in vitro anti-HCV activity of VE-DC/siRNAs. A transient in vivo HCV model was also constructed by hydrodynamic injection of pCDNA3.1(+)-3FLAG-Core (pCore-3FLAG) plasmid expressing core protein or pGL3-5'UTR-luciferase (pGL3-5'UTR-luc) plasmid expressing luciferase driven by HCV 5'UTR. Nanoscale VE-DC/siRNA was intravenously injected to assess the liver-targeting property as well as antiviral activity. The nanoscale VE-DC effectively exerted an anti-HCV activity in the in vitro cell models. Post-administration of VE-DC/siRNAs also effectively delivered siRNAs to the liver, suppressing core protein production and firefly luciferase activity, without inducing an innate immunity response or off-target and toxicity effects. The VE-DC platform has high potential as a vehicle for delivery of siRNAs to the liver for gene therapy for targeting hepatitis C. PMID:27113197

  20. Target delivery of small interfering RNAs with vitamin E-coupled nanoparticles for treating hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Liang; Yan, Yan; Liu, Jingyi; Wang, Bo; Li, Pu; Hu, Qin; Chen, Weixian

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) represents a promising strategy for the treatment of HCV infection. However, the development of an effective system for in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to target organ remains a formidable challenge. Here, we develop a unique nanoparticle platform (VE-DC) composed of α-tocopherol (vitamin E) and cholesterol-based cationic liposomes (DOTAP-Chol) for systemic delivery of siRNAs to the liver. A HCV-replicable cell line, Huh7.5.1-HCV, and a transient HCV core expressing cell line, Huh7.5.1-Core, were constructed and used to assess the in vitro anti-HCV activity of VE-DC/siRNAs. A transient in vivo HCV model was also constructed by hydrodynamic injection of pCDNA3.1(+)-3FLAG-Core (pCore-3FLAG) plasmid expressing core protein or pGL3-5′UTR-luciferase (pGL3-5′UTR-luc) plasmid expressing luciferase driven by HCV 5′UTR. Nanoscale VE-DC/siRNA was intravenously injected to assess the liver-targeting property as well as antiviral activity. The nanoscale VE-DC effectively exerted an anti-HCV activity in the in vitro cell models. Post-administration of VE-DC/siRNAs also effectively delivered siRNAs to the liver, suppressing core protein production and firefly luciferase activity, without inducing an innate immunity response or off-target and toxicity effects. The VE-DC platform has high potential as a vehicle for delivery of siRNAs to the liver for gene therapy for targeting hepatitis C. PMID:27113197

  1. Irregular macroscopic dynamics due to chimera states in small-world networks of pulse-coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothkegel, A.; Lehnertz, K.

    2014-05-01

    We study the collective dynamics of excitatory integrate-and-fire-like oscillators interacting via δ-pulses on a small-world network. The oscillators are endowed with refractory periods and time delays. For weak coupling strengths, the network self-organizes into synchronous and asynchronous regions. Such chimera states allow for two separate routes to synchrony/asynchrony. In addition to the loss of stability of either synchronous or asynchronous regions mediated by long-ranged connections, regions may grow or shrink mediated by the lattice structure. The interplay between these behaviors leads to controlled total sizes of asynchronous regions or to an alternation of synchronization and desynchronization phenomena with irregular macroscopic observables.

  2. Examination of evaporative fraction diurnal behaviour using a soil-vegetation model coupled with a mixed-layer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhomme, J.-P.; Elguero, E.

    In many experimental conditions, the evaporative fraction, defined as the ratio between evaporation and available energy, has been found stable during daylight hours. This constancy is investigated over fully covering vegetation by means of a land surface scheme coupled with a mixed-layer model, which accounts for entrainment of overlying air. The evaporation rate follows the Penman-Monteith equation and the surface resistance is given by a Jarvis type parameterization involving solar radiation, saturation deficit and leaf water potential. The diurnal course of the evaporative fraction is examined, together with the influence of environmental factors (soil water availability, solar radiation input, wind velocity, saturation deficit above the well-mixed layer). In conditions of fair weather, the curves representing the diurnal course of the evaporative fraction have a typical concave-up shape. Around midday (solar time) these curves appear as relatively constant, but always lower that the daytime mean value. Evaporative fraction decreases when soil water decreases or when solar energy increases. An increment of saturation deficit above the mixed-layer provokes only a slight increase of evaporative fraction, and wind velocity has almost no effect. The possibility of estimation daytime evaporation from daytime available energy multiplied by the evaporative fraction at a single time of the day is also investigated. It appears that it is possible to obtain fairly good estimates of daytime evaporation by choosing adequately the time of the measurement of the evaporative fraction. The central hours of the day, and preferably about 3 hr before or after noon, are the most appropriate to provide good estimates. The estimation appears also to be much better when soil water availability (or evaporation) is high than when it is low.

  3. Four-way coupled simulations of small particles in turbulent channel flow: The effects of particle shape and Stokes number

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, F.; Wachem, B. G. M. van; George, W. K.

    2015-08-15

    This paper investigates the effects of particle shape and Stokes number on the behaviour of non-spherical particles in turbulent channel flow. Although there are a number of studies concerning spherical particles in turbulent flows, most important applications occurring in process, energy, and pharmaceutical industries deal with non-spherical particles. The computation employs a unique and novel four-way coupling with the Lagrangian point-particle approach. The fluid phase at low Reynolds number (Re{sub τ} = 150) is modelled by direct numerical simulation, while particles are tracked individually. Inter-particle and particle-wall collisions are also taken into account. To explore the effects of particles on the flow turbulence, the statistics of the fluid flow such as the fluid velocity, the terms in the turbulence kinetic energy equation, the slip velocity between the two phases and velocity correlations are analysed considering ellipsoidal particles with different inertia and aspect ratio. The results of the simulations show that the turbulence is considerably attenuated, even in the very dilute regime. The reduction of the turbulence intensity is predominant near the turbulence kinetic energy peak in the near wall region, where particles preferentially accumulate. Moreover, the elongated shape of ellipsoids strengthens the turbulence attenuation. In simulations with ellipsoidal particles, the fluid-particle interactions strongly depend on the orientation of the ellipsoids. In the near wall region, ellipsoids tend to align predominantly within the streamwise (x) and wall-normal (y) planes and perpendicular to the span-wise direction, whereas no preferential orientation in the central region of the channel is observed. Important conclusions from this work include the effective viscosity of the flow is not affected, the direct dissipation by the particles is negligible, and the primary mechanism by which the particles affect the flow is by altering the turbulence

  4. Four-way coupled simulations of small particles in turbulent channel flow: The effects of particle shape and Stokes number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, F.; George, W. K.; van Wachem, B. G. M.

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of particle shape and Stokes number on the behaviour of non-spherical particles in turbulent channel flow. Although there are a number of studies concerning spherical particles in turbulent flows, most important applications occurring in process, energy, and pharmaceutical industries deal with non-spherical particles. The computation employs a unique and novel four-way coupling with the Lagrangian point-particle approach. The fluid phase at low Reynolds number (Reτ = 150) is modelled by direct numerical simulation, while particles are tracked individually. Inter-particle and particle-wall collisions are also taken into account. To explore the effects of particles on the flow turbulence, the statistics of the fluid flow such as the fluid velocity, the terms in the turbulence kinetic energy equation, the slip velocity between the two phases and velocity correlations are analysed considering ellipsoidal particles with different inertia and aspect ratio. The results of the simulations show that the turbulence is considerably attenuated, even in the very dilute regime. The reduction of the turbulence intensity is predominant near the turbulence kinetic energy peak in the near wall region, where particles preferentially accumulate. Moreover, the elongated shape of ellipsoids strengthens the turbulence attenuation. In simulations with ellipsoidal particles, the fluid-particle interactions strongly depend on the orientation of the ellipsoids. In the near wall region, ellipsoids tend to align predominantly within the streamwise (x) and wall-normal (y) planes and perpendicular to the span-wise direction, whereas no preferential orientation in the central region of the channel is observed. Important conclusions from this work include the effective viscosity of the flow is not affected, the direct dissipation by the particles is negligible, and the primary mechanism by which the particles affect the flow is by altering the turbulence

  5. Small coupling limit and multiple solutions to the Dirichlet problem for Yang-Mills connections in four dimensions. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Takeshi; Marini, Antonella

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we complete the proof of the existence of multiple solutions (and, in particular, non minimal ones), to the ɛ-Dirichlet problem obtained as a variational problem for the SU(2)ɛ-Yang-Mills functional. This is equivalent to proving the existence of multiple solutions to the Dirichlet problem for the SU(2)-Yang-Mills functional with small boundary data. In the first paper of this series this non-compact variational problem is transformed into the finite-dimensional problem of finding the critical points of the function J_{ɛ }({q}), which is essentially the Yang-Mills functional evaluated on the approximate solutions, constructed via a gluing technique. In the present paper, we establish a Morse theory for J_{ɛ }({q}), by means of Ljusternik-Schnirelmann theory, thus complete the proofs of Theorems 1-3 given by Isobe and Marini ["Small coupling limit and multiple solutions to the Dirichlet Problem for Yang-Mills connections in 4 dimensions - Part I," J. Math. Phys. 53, 063706 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4728211.

  6. Direct coupling of annexin A5 to VSOP yields small, protein-covered nanoprobes for MR imaging of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Figge, Lena; Appler, Franziska; Chen, Howard H; Sosnovik, David E; Schnorr, Jörg; Seitz, Oliver; Taupitz, Matthias; Hamm, Bernd; Schellenberger, Eyk

    2014-01-01

    Annexin A5 (Anx) has been extensively used for imaging apoptosis by single-photon emission computed tomography, positron emission tomography, optical imaging and MRI. Recently we introduced ultrasmall Anx-VSOP (very small iron oxide particles)--the smallest high-relaxivity probe for MRI of apoptosis. Here we present a simplified method for the direct coupling of Anx to VSOP, which resulted in nanoparticles that are nearly completely covered with human Anx. These superparamagnetic nanoparticles are only 14.4 ± 2.3 nm in diameter and have higher T2* relaxivity. Compared with existing probes, the small size and the Anx shielding provide prerequisites for good biocompatibility and bioavailability in target tissues. In vitro characterization showed specific binding of Anx-VSOP to apoptotic cells, which led to a signal loss in T2*-weighted MR measurements, while control probe M1324-VSOP produced no such change. Exploratory MRI was done in vivo in a cardiac model of ischemia-reperfusion damage illustrating the potential of the probe for future studies. PMID:24706613

  7. In vivo gene silencing of CD81 by lentiviral expression of small interference RNAs suppresses cocaine-induced behaviour.

    PubMed

    Bahi, Amine; Boyer, Frederic; Kolira, Manoj; Dreyer, Jean-Luc

    2005-03-01

    The tetraspanin CD81 is induced in the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway after cocaine administration. To further investigate its role, a regulatable lentivirus (Lenti-CD81) bearing the CD81 gene under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter and lentiviruses expressing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeted against CD81 (Lenti-CD81-shRNAs) have been prepared. Infection of HEK293T cells in vitro with Lenti-CD81-shRNAs resulted in 96.5% gene silencing (from quantitative real-time PCR(qRT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry). In vivo delivery of Lenti-CD81-shRNA into the nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmental area resulted in 91.3 and 94% silencing of endogenous CD81, respectively. Stereotaxic injection of Lenti-CD81 into these regions, resulting in CD81 overexpression, induced a four- to fivefold increase in locomotor activity after chronic cocaine administration, which returned to basal levels when Lenti-CD81-shRNA had been coinjected or when CD81 expression was blocked by doxycycline. Furthermore, silencing endogenous CD81 in vivo resulted in a significant decrease in locomotor activity over controls, again suppressing cocaine-induced behaviour. PMID:15715673

  8. The footprints of typhoons on seismic records and their implications on small-scale coupling mechanisms in South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Xue, M.; Yang, T.; Liu, C.; Hua, Q.; Xia, S.; Huang, H.; Le, B. M.; Huo, D.; Pan, M.; Li, L.

    2015-12-01

    By investigating the footprints of typhoons on seismic records, we can understand their contributions to seismic noises as well as to small-scale coupling mechanisms of typhoon-land and typhoon-ocean-land. We analyze the signatures of typhoon KAI-TAK and BOPHA using seismic data from the ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) deployed in the central basin of South China Sea by Tongji University in 2012 as well as seismic stations (IC.QIZ,HK.HKPS and RM.SZP) on lands.Our preliminary results show that typhoons mainly enhance microseisms at the frequency band of ~0.1-0.5 Hz, including both long period double frequency (LPDF) and short period double frequency (SPDF) microseisms. A positive correlation observed between the amplitude of microseisms and the height of local ocean waves. Because OBSs are deployed at the bottom of ocean, single frequency (SF) microseisms are not prominent on them due to their fast attenuation with depth. During the typhoon KAI-TAK, the increase of LPDF energy is very small in OBSs while that is very high on land stations, indicating that LPDF microseisms are generated at nearby shorelines and can propagate towards the sea through the solid earth. However, the increase of SPDF energy is almost the same level for both OBSs and land stations indicating that the generation of SPDF is probably local.However, we also observe a small amount of energy arrives before the increases of the wave heights at the land station HK.HKPS. We derive that this energy may from a source that is not local: while LPDF can be generated at nearby shorelines and SPDF can be generated everywhere locally, they can both transmit through the solid part of the Earth to a station some distance away, i.e. HK.HKPS. In addition, we find that typhoons enhance not only the microseisms as expected but also the seismic energy from higher frequency bands. The spectrum amplitude during Typhoon periods, normalized by that of no-storm periods, shows that land stations produce stronger higher

  9. Coupled Spin and Shape Evolution of Small Rubble-pile Asteroids: Self-limitation of the YORP Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desireé; Statler, Thomas S.; Richardson, Derek C.; Tanga, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    We present the first self-consistent simulations of the coupled spin-shape evolution of small gravitational aggregates under the influence of the YORP effect. Because of YORP’s sensitivity to surface topography, even small centrifugally driven reconfigurations of aggregates can alter the YORP torque dramatically, resulting in spin evolution that can differ qualitatively from the rigid-body prediction. One-third of our simulations follow a simple evolution described as a modified YORP cycle. Two-thirds exhibit one or more of three distinct behaviors—stochastic YORP, self-governed YORP, and stagnating YORP—which together result in YORP self-limitation. Self-limitation confines rotation rates of evolving aggregates to far narrower ranges than those expected in the classical YORP cycle, greatly prolonging the times over which objects can preserve their sense of rotation. Simulated objects are initially randomly packed, disordered aggregates of identical spheres in rotating equilibrium, with low internal angles of friction. Their shape evolution is characterized by rearrangement of the entire body, including the deep interior. They do not evolve to axisymmetric top shapes with equatorial ridges. Mass loss occurs in one-third of the simulations, typically in small amounts from the ends of a prolate-triaxial body. We conjecture that YORP self-limitation may inhibit formation of top-shapes, binaries, or both, by restricting the amount of angular momentum that can be imparted to a deformable body. Stochastic YORP, in particular, will affect the evolution of collisional families whose orbits drift apart under the influence of Yarkovsky forces, in observable ways.

  10. LRRTM1-deficient mice show a rare phenotype of avoiding small enclosures—A tentative mouse model for claustrophobia-like behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Laakso, T.; Lauren, J.; Strittmatter, S.M.; Airaksinen, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    The LRRTM family proteins have been shown to act as synaptogenic cell adhesion molecules via interaction with presynaptic neurexins and are associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. LRRTM1-knockout mice have subtle morphological deficits in excitatory hippocampal synapses and were suggested to have impaired cognitive function. Here we report that LRRTM1-knockout mice exhibit an extraordinary phenotype of avoiding small enclosures. In the light–dark box, the knockout mice escape to dark through a standard opening as quickly as wild-type littermates but avoid escaping through a small doorway. While all wild-type mice spontaneously enter a small tube, most knockout mice do not. This apparent aversion to enter narrow space may explain other abnormalities such as increased time in open arms in the elevated plus maze and less visits through a tunnel in the IntelliCage. Moreover, LRRTM1-knockout mice show increased social interaction, reduced nest building and MK801-induced locomotion, and slower swim speed but normal water maze learning. Since LRRTM1 is predominantly expressed in thalamus, hippocampus and limbic cortex, specific synaptic defects in those areas presumably cause these behavioural abnormalities. PMID:23089646

  11. Prion Protein—Antibody Complexes Characterized by Chromatography-Coupled Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lester; Kim, Seung Joong; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Stöhr, Jan; Poncet-Montange, Guillaume; Weiss, Thomas M.; Tsuruta, Hiro; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Sali, Andrej

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant self-assembly, induced by structural misfolding of the prion proteins, leads to a number of neurodegenerative disorders. In particular, misfolding of the mostly α-helical cellular prion protein (PrPC) into a β-sheet-rich disease-causing isoform (PrPSc) is the key molecular event in the formation of PrPSc aggregates. The molecular mechanisms underlying the PrPC-to-PrPSc conversion and subsequent aggregation remain to be elucidated. However, in persistently prion-infected cell-culture models, it was shown that treatment with monoclonal antibodies against defined regions of the prion protein (PrP) led to the clearing of PrPSc in cultured cells. To gain more insight into this process, we characterized PrP-antibody complexes in solution using a fast protein liquid chromatography coupled with small-angle x-ray scattering (FPLC-SAXS) procedure. High-quality SAXS data were collected for full-length recombinant mouse PrP [denoted recPrP(23–230)] and N-terminally truncated recPrP(89–230), as well as their complexes with each of two Fab fragments (HuM-P and HuM-R1), which recognize N- and C-terminal epitopes of PrP, respectively. In-line measurements by fast protein liquid chromatography coupled with SAXS minimized data artifacts caused by a non-monodispersed sample, allowing structural analysis of PrP alone and in complex with Fab antibodies. The resulting structural models suggest two mechanisms for how these Fabs may prevent the conversion of PrPC into PrPSc. PMID:26287631

  12. Application of a convergent, composite coupled cluster approach to bound state, adiabatic electron affinities in atoms and small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, David

    2016-01-01

    Benchmark quality adiabatic electron affinities for a collection of atoms and small molecules were obtained with the Feller-Peterson-Dixon composite coupled cluster theory method. Prior applications of this method demonstrated its ability to accurately predict atomization energies/heats of formation for more than 170 molecules. In the current work, the 1-particle expansion involved very large correlation consistent basis sets, ranging up to aug-cc-pV9Z (aug-cc-pV10Z for H and H2), with the goal of minimizing the residual basis set truncation error that must otherwise be approximated with extrapolation formulas. The n-particle expansion begins with coupled cluster calculations through iterative single and double excitations plus a quasiperturbative treatment of "connected" triple excitations (CCSD(T)) pushed to the complete basis set limit followed by CCSDT, CCSDTQ, or CCSDTQ5 corrections. Due to the small size of the systems examined here, it was possible in many cases to extend the n-particle expansion to the full configuration interaction wave function limit. Additional, smaller corrections associated with core/valence correlation, scalar relativity, anharmonic zero point vibrational energies, and non-adiabatic effects were also included. The overall root mean square (RMS) deviation was 0.005 eV (0.12 kcal/mol). This level of agreement was comparable to what was found with molecular heats of formation. A 95% confidence level corresponds to roughly twice the RMS value or 0.01 eV. While the atomic electron affinities are known experimentally to high accuracy, the molecular values are less certain. This contributes to the difficulty of gauging the accuracy of the theoretical results. A limited number of electron affinities were determined with the explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12b method. After extending the VnZ-F12 orbital basis sets with additional diffuse functions, the F12b method was found to accurately reproduce the best F/F- value obtained with standard

  13. Application of a convergent, composite coupled cluster approach to bound state, adiabatic electron affinities in atoms and small molecules.

    PubMed

    Feller, David

    2016-01-01

    Benchmark quality adiabatic electron affinities for a collection of atoms and small molecules were obtained with the Feller-Peterson-Dixon composite coupled cluster theory method. Prior applications of this method demonstrated its ability to accurately predict atomization energies/heats of formation for more than 170 molecules. In the current work, the 1-particle expansion involved very large correlation consistent basis sets, ranging up to aug-cc-pV9Z (aug-cc-pV10Z for H and H2), with the goal of minimizing the residual basis set truncation error that must otherwise be approximated with extrapolation formulas. The n-particle expansion begins with coupled cluster calculations through iterative single and double excitations plus a quasiperturbative treatment of "connected" triple excitations (CCSD(T)) pushed to the complete basis set limit followed by CCSDT, CCSDTQ, or CCSDTQ5 corrections. Due to the small size of the systems examined here, it was possible in many cases to extend the n-particle expansion to the full configuration interaction wave function limit. Additional, smaller corrections associated with core/valence correlation, scalar relativity, anharmonic zero point vibrational energies, and non-adiabatic effects were also included. The overall root mean square (RMS) deviation was 0.005 eV (0.12 kcal/mol). This level of agreement was comparable to what was found with molecular heats of formation. A 95% confidence level corresponds to roughly twice the RMS value or 0.01 eV. While the atomic electron affinities are known experimentally to high accuracy, the molecular values are less certain. This contributes to the difficulty of gauging the accuracy of the theoretical results. A limited number of electron affinities were determined with the explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12b method. After extending the VnZ-F12 orbital basis sets with additional diffuse functions, the F12b method was found to accurately reproduce the best F/F(-) value obtained with standard

  14. Monitoring of coupling distribution and small Short-term SSEs in southwest Japan based on GEONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, A.; Ikuta, R.; Satomura, M.; Shimada, S.; Kato, T.

    2011-12-01

    In the south-western part of Japan, there occur episodic tremor and slip beneath Nankai trough. These short-term slow slip events (S-SSEs) especially in Tokai region are known to be very small and hard to detect by GPS. Our study is a trial for monitoring these S-SSEs by GPS data. We applied geodetic inversion to three dimensional daily GPS positioning data for 15 years from 1996 to 2010 which were provided by Geospatial Information Authority (GSI) to detect inter-plate slip as follows: 1. Correction of offsets in the GPS time series by antennae maintenance and earthquakes. 2. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the time series to remove common mode error between all the sites. 3. Taking difference between a couple of every 10 days-long averages with a gap of 1 week. 4. Adopted Bayesian inversion method proposed by Yabuki and Matsuura [1992] to the above data. Solving this inverse problem, we adopted a priori information which suppressed the slips on the fault surface without enough solvability. The slip axis was limited in the direction of the plate convergence of N45W but both polarities were arrowed. Estimated zero-slip means a stable slip of the plate boundary by rigid plate convergent rate. Positive slip means drug of hanging plate by the subducting plate and negative slip means that the velocity of the reverse faulting exceeds that of the plate convergence. After-slip and slow slips are two examples of negative slip. The results of the analysis showed following facts. S-SSEs should have occurred without tremors in the region beneath Kii-channel where no tremor or long-term SSE has been reported. S-SSEs seem to have occurred on the down-dip extension of the tremor in east side of Kii-channel. The region of strong inter-plate coupling has activity of deep low-frequency tremors on the down dip extension. The temporal as well as the spatial relations between S-SSEs and tremors should be analyzed to understand the mechanism of their occurrence. Moreover, the

  15. LDV measurement of small nonlinearities in flat and curved membranes. A model for eardrum nonlinear acoustic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Gladiné; Pieter, Muyshondt; Joris, Dirckx

    2016-06-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry is an intrinsic highly linear measurement technique which makes it a great tool to measure extremely small nonlinearities in the vibration response of a system. Although the measurement technique is highly linear, other components in the experimental setup may introduce nonlinearities. An important source of artificially introduced nonlinearities is the speaker, which generates the stimulus. In this work, two correction methods to remove the effects of stimulus nonlinearity are investigated. Both correction methods were found to give similar results but have different pros and cons. The aim of this work is to investigate the importance of the conical shape of the eardrum as a source of nonlinearity in hearing. We present measurements on flat and indented membranes. The data shows that the curved membrane exhibit slightly higher levels of nonlinearity compared to the flat membrane.

  16. Spin-orbit coupling calculations with the two-component normalized elimination of the small component method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Michael; Zou, Wenli; Cremer, Dieter

    2013-07-01

    A new algorithm for the two-component Normalized Elimination of the Small Component (2cNESC) method is presented and tested in the calculation of spin-orbit (SO) splittings for a series of heavy atoms and their molecules. The 2cNESC is a Dirac-exact method that employs the exact two-component one-electron Hamiltonian and thus leads to exact Dirac SO splittings for one-electron atoms. For many-electron atoms and molecules, the effect of the two-electron SO interaction is modeled by a screened nucleus potential using effective nuclear charges as proposed by Boettger [Phys. Rev. B 62, 7809 (2000), 10.1103/PhysRevB.62.7809]. The use of the screened nucleus potential for the two-electron SO interaction leads to accurate spinor energy splittings, for which the deviations from the accurate Dirac Fock-Coulomb values are on the average far below the deviations observed for other effective one-electron SO operators. For hydrogen halides HX (X = F, Cl, Br, I, At, and Uus) and mercury dihalides HgX2 (X = F, Cl, Br, I) trends in spinor energies and SO splittings as obtained with the 2cNESC method are analyzed and discussed on the basis of coupling schemes and the electronegativity of X.

  17. Analysis of hyperbolic signatures from small discontinuities using an UWB ground-coupled radar: FDTD simulations and field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnard, Florence; Tebchrany, Elias; Baltazart, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a well-known non-destructive technique based on electromagnetic wave propagation that is able to detect by reflection or scattering of waves dielectric discontinuities in the underground. Our application is mainly concerned with civil engineering to perform supervision, inventory, and soil characterization. Because the air-coupled radar suffers from a significant reflection at the ground interface that reduces energy transfer of electromagnetic radiation in the sub-surface and penetration depth, we have developed an ultra-wide band (UWB) ground-coupled radar made of a pair of partially shielded compact planar bowtie slot antennas. As the antenna dimension (36*23 cm2) is close to the A4 sheet size, the maturity of the microstrip technology has allowed to design a particular geometry on the FR4 substrate (h=1.5 mm) which is able to operate at frequencies from 460 MHz to beyond 4 GHz in air. Contrary to a commercial GPR where details on antenna design are not available, it appears here possible to know and control the radiation characteristics and develop full-wave FDTD modeling that can represent field experiments for comparisons and analyses. The objective of this work is to improve, by means of a parametric study, the knowledge of physical phenomena involved in dielectric polarization when waves interact with buried discontinuities and particularly cracks, pipes, delaminations that can be distinguished by their shape, size, dielectric contrast with the surrounding medium, orientation relative to the electric field… Thus, we have first characterized by FDTD modeling and field measurements in a wet sand the radar link in two perpendicular polarizations (parallel and mirror) in the presence of a common soil (epsilon'=5.5, sigma=0.01 S/m) considering variable offsets. Afterwards, we have studied and analyzed the hyperbola signatures generated by the presence of buried canonical objects (pipes, strips) with several dielectric

  18. Working With What We've Got: Perceptions of Barriers and Supports Among Small-Metropolitan Same-Sex Adopting Couples.

    PubMed

    Kinkler, Lori A; Goldberg, Abbie E

    2011-10-01

    In seeking to adopt, lesbians and gay men may confront various barriers and obstacles. Ideally they have access to a variety of support resources that can help to buffer the negative effects of these barriers. However, lesbians and gay men living in small-metropolitan communities may have limited access to support resources. The current qualitative study examined the perceptions of 37 same-sex couples who were pursuing adoption while living outside of large metropolitan cities, with attention to the barriers these couples encountered during the adoption process, and the resources they drew upon to cope with such challenges. Findings indicated that same sex couples living in small-metropolitan areas confronted several major barriers in the adoption process, such as a lack of geographically accessible gay-friendly adoption agencies. Despite limited access to support, participants showed evidence of notable resourcefulness. For example, participants with limited access to formal support groups sought out informal supports instead. PMID:21949461

  19. Working With What We’ve Got: Perceptions of Barriers and Supports Among Small-Metropolitan Same-Sex Adopting Couples

    PubMed Central

    Kinkler, Lori A.; Goldberg, Abbie E.

    2011-01-01

    In seeking to adopt, lesbians and gay men may confront various barriers and obstacles. Ideally they have access to a variety of support resources that can help to buffer the negative effects of these barriers. However, lesbians and gay men living in small-metropolitan communities may have limited access to support resources. The current qualitative study examined the perceptions of 37 same-sex couples who were pursuing adoption while living outside of large metropolitan cities, with attention to the barriers these couples encountered during the adoption process, and the resources they drew upon to cope with such challenges. Findings indicated that same sex couples living in small-metropolitan areas confronted several major barriers in the adoption process, such as a lack of geographically accessible gay-friendly adoption agencies. Despite limited access to support, participants showed evidence of notable resourcefulness. For example, participants with limited access to formal support groups sought out informal supports instead. PMID:21949461

  20. Current-voltage relations of sodium-coupled sugar transport across the apical membrane of Necturus small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, J Y; Hudson, R L; Schultz, S G

    1986-01-01

    The current-voltage (I-V) relations of the rheogenic Na-sugar cotransport mechanism at the apical membrane of Necturus small intestine were determined from the relations between the electrical potential difference across the apical membrane, psi mc, and that across the entire epithelium, psi ms, when the latter was varied over the range +/- 200 mV, under steady conditions in the presence of galactose and after the current across the apical membrane carried by the cotransporter, ImSNa, is blocked by the addition of phloridzin to the mucosal solution. ImSNa was found to be strongly dependent upon psi mc over the range -50 mV less than psi mc less than EmSNa where EmSNa is the "zero current" or "reversal" potential. Over the range of values of psi mc encountered under physiological conditions the cotransporter may be modeled as a conductance in series with an electromotive force so that ImSNa = gmSNa (EmSNa - psi mc) where gmSNa is the contribution of this mechanism to the conductance of the apical membrane and is "near constant." In several instances ImSNa "saturated" at large hyperpolarizing or depolarizing values of psi mc. The values of EmSNa determined in the presence of 1, 5, and 15 mM galactose strongly suggest that if the Na-galactose cotransporters are kinetically homogeneous, the stoichiometry of this coupled process is unity. Finally, the shapes of the observed I-V relations are consistent with the predictions of a simple kinetic model which conforms with current notions regarding the mechanico-kinetic properties of this cotransport process. PMID:3820278

  1. Comparison of light out-coupling enhancements in single-layer blue-phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes using small-molecule or polymer hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yung-Ting; Liu, Shun-Wei; Yuan, Chih-Hsien; Lee, Chih-Chien; Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Wei, Pei-Kuen; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Lee, Yi-Ting; Wu, Min-Fei; Chen, Chin-Ti E-mail: chihiwu@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw; Wu, Chih-I E-mail: chihiwu@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw

    2013-11-07

    Single-layer blue phosphorescence organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with either small-molecule or polymer hosts are fabricated using solution process and the performances of devices with different hosts are investigated. The small-molecule device exhibits luminous efficiency of 14.7 cd/A and maximum power efficiency of 8.39 lm/W, which is the highest among blue phosphorescence OLEDs with single-layer solution process and small molecular hosts. Using the same solution process for all devices, comparison of light out-coupling enhancement, with brightness enhancement film (BEF), between small-molecule and polymer based OLEDs is realized. Due to different dipole orientation and anisotropic refractive index, polymer-based OLEDs would trap less light than small molecule-based OLEDs internally, about 37% better based simulation results. In spite of better electrical and spectroscopic characteristics, including ambipolar characteristics, higher carrier mobility, higher photoluminescence quantum yield, and larger triplet state energy, the overall light out-coupling efficiency of small molecule-based devices is worse than that of polymer-based devices without BEF. However, with BEF for light out-coupling enhancement, the improved ratio in luminous flux and luminous efficiency for small molecule based device is 1.64 and 1.57, respectively, which are significantly better than those of PVK (poly-9-vinylcarbazole) devices. In addition to the theoretical optical simulation, the experimental data also confirm the origins of differential light-outcoupling enhancement. The maximum luminous efficiency and power efficiency are enhanced from 14.7 cd/A and 8.39 lm/W to 23 cd/A and 13.2 lm/W, respectively, with laminated BEF, which are both the highest so far for single-layer solution-process blue phosphorescence OLEDs with small molecule hosts.

  2. Combining density functional theory (DFT) and collision cross-section (CCS) calculations to analyze the gas-phase behaviour of small molecules and their protonation site isomers.

    PubMed

    Boschmans, Jasper; Jacobs, Sam; Williams, Jonathan P; Palmer, Martin; Richardson, Keith; Giles, Kevin; Lapthorn, Cris; Herrebout, Wouter A; Lemière, Filip; Sobott, Frank

    2016-06-20

    Electrospray ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) data show that for some small molecules, two (or even more) ions with identical sum formula and mass, but distinct drift times are observed. In spite of showing their own unique and characteristic fragmentation spectra in MS/MS, no configurational or constitutional isomers are found to be present in solution. Instead the observation and separation of such ions appears to be inherent to their gas-phase behaviour during ion mobility experiments. The origin of multiple drift times is thought to be the result of protonation site isomers ('protomers'). Although some important properties of protomers have been highlighted by other studies, correlating the experimental collision cross-sections (CCSs) with calculated values has proven to be a major difficulty. As a model, this study uses the pharmaceutical compound melphalan and a number of related molecules with alternative (gas-phase) protonation sites. Our study combines density functional theory (DFT) calculations with modified MobCal methods (e.g. nitrogen-based Trajectory Method algorithm) for the calculation of theoretical CCS values. Calculated structures can be linked to experimentally observed signals, and a strong correlation is found between the difference of the calculated dipole moments of the protomer pairs and their experimental CCS separation. PMID:27264846

  3. Use of novel fibre-coupled radioluminescence and RADPOS dosimetry systems for total scatter factor measurements in small fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploquin, N.; Kertzscher, G.; Vandervoort, E.; Cygler, J. E.; Andersen, C. E.; Francescon, P.

    2015-01-01

    A dosimetry system based on Al2O3:C radioluminescence (RL), and RADPOS, a novel 4D dosimetry system using microMOSFETs, were used to measure total scatter factors, ≤ft({{S}c,p}\\right)\\text{det}{{f\\text{clin}}}, for the CyberKnife robotic radiosugery system. New Monte Carlo calculated correction factors are presented and applied for the RL detector response for the 5, 7.5 and 10 mm collimators in order to correct for the detector geometry and increased photoelectric cross section of Al2O3:C relative to water. For comparison, measurements were also carried out using a micro MOSFET, PTW60012 diode and GAFCHROMIC® film (EBT and EBT2). Uncorrected ≤ft({{S}c,p}\\right)\\text{det}{{f\\text{clin}}}, were obtained by taking the ratio of the detector response for each collimator to that for the 60 mm diameter reference field. Published Monte Carlo calculated correction factors were applied to the RADPOS, microMOSFET and diode detector measurements to yield corrected field factors, Ω {{Q\\text{clin}},{{Q}\\text{msr}}}{{f\\text{clin}},{{f}\\text{msr}}}, following the terminology of a recent formalism introduced for small and composite field relative dosimetry. With corrections, the RL measured Ω {{Q\\text{clin}},{{Q}\\text{msr}}}{{f\\text{clin}},{{f}\\text{msr}}}, were 0.656  ±  0.002, 0.815  ±  0.002 and 0.865  ±  0.003 for the 5, 7.5 and 10 mm collimators, respectively. This was in good agreement with RADPOS corrected field factors of 0.650  ±  0.010, 0.816  ±  0.024 and 0.867  ±  0.010 for the 5, 7.5 and 10 mm collimators, respectively. Both RL and RADPOS total scatter factors agreed within approximately two standard deviations of the GAFCHROMIC film values (average of EBT and EBT2) of 0.640  ±  0.006, 0.806  ±  0.007 and 0.859  ±  0.09. Corrected total scatter factors for all dosimetry systems agreed within one standard deviation for collimator sizes 10-60 mm. Our study suggests that the micro

  4. How does Australia's largest dolphin-watching industry affect the behaviour of a small and resident population of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins?

    PubMed

    Steckenreuter, Andre; Möller, Luciana; Harcourt, Robert

    2012-04-30

    The small, genetically distinct population of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) in Port Stephens, New South Wales (NSW), is the target of the largest dolphin-watching industry in Australia and is located within the Port Stephens - Great Lakes Marine Park that was created in 2005. The effects of this industry have been identified as of significant management importance by the Marine Parks Authority NSW. Accordingly, the impact of commercial dolphin-watching boats was investigated from boat-based surveys from August 2008 to August 2009. Presence of dolphin-watching boats altered both the dolphins' behavioural states and activity budgets. Dolphins spent 66.5% less time feeding and 44.2% less time socialising, spent four times more milling, and were never observed to rest in the presence of dolphin-watching boats. Moreover, dolphin groups were more cohesive during dolphin-watching boat encounters and dolphins tended to avoid tour boats. These effects were exacerbated as the number of boats increased and the distance from boats decreased. The rate of approach was high with boats approaching each dolphin group three times per day in winter and six times in summer. Moreover, groups of dolphins with newborns were approached closer than state regulated minimum approach distances in nine out of ten encounters. Globally, dolphin-watching industries frequent small resident groups of coastal dolphins and effects are likely to be similar. We suggest that existing controls are inadequate and that these together with additional regulations be enforced by a regular presence of authorities. We suggest no more than one dolphin-watching boat within 50 m of a group of dolphins, or 100 m if calves are present. Operating times of dolphin-watching boats should be restricted in numbers after 1 pm, i.e., during preferred foraging times for dolphins. Additionally, exclusion zones should be considered to reduce pressure on dolphins undertaking critical activities such as

  5. Fano-like resonance emerging from magnetic and electric plasmon mode coupling in small arrays of gold particles.

    PubMed

    Bakhti, Saïd; Tishchenko, Alexandre V; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Bonod, Nicolas; Dhuey, Scott D; Schuck, P James; Cabrini, Stefano; Alayoglu, Selim; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    In this work we theoretically and experimentally analyze the resonant behavior of individual 3 × 3 gold particle oligomers illuminated under normal and oblique incidence. While this structure hosts both dipolar and quadrupolar electric and magnetic delocalized modes, only dipolar electric and quadrupolar magnetic modes remain at normal incidence. These modes couple into a strongly asymmetric spectral response typical of a Fano-like resonance. In the basis of the coupled mode theory, an analytical representation of the optical extinction in terms of singular functions is used to identify the hybrid modes emerging from the electric and magnetic mode coupling and to interpret the asymmetric line profiles. Especially, we demonstrate that the characteristic Fano line shape results from the spectral interference of a broad hybrid mode with a sharp one. This structure presents a special feature in which the electric field intensity is confined on different lines of the oligomer depending on the illumination wavelength relative to the Fano dip. This Fano-type resonance is experimentally observed performing extinction cross section measurements on arrays of gold nano-disks. The vanishing of the Fano dip when increasing the incidence angle is also experimentally observed in accordance with numerical simulations. PMID:27580515

  6. Fano-like resonance emerging from magnetic and electric plasmon mode coupling in small arrays of gold particles

    PubMed Central

    Bakhti, Saïd; Tishchenko, Alexandre V.; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Bonod, Nicolas; Dhuey, Scott D.; Schuck, P. James; Cabrini, Stefano; Alayoglu, Selim; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    In this work we theoretically and experimentally analyze the resonant behavior of individual 3 × 3 gold particle oligomers illuminated under normal and oblique incidence. While this structure hosts both dipolar and quadrupolar electric and magnetic delocalized modes, only dipolar electric and quadrupolar magnetic modes remain at normal incidence. These modes couple into a strongly asymmetric spectral response typical of a Fano-like resonance. In the basis of the coupled mode theory, an analytical representation of the optical extinction in terms of singular functions is used to identify the hybrid modes emerging from the electric and magnetic mode coupling and to interpret the asymmetric line profiles. Especially, we demonstrate that the characteristic Fano line shape results from the spectral interference of a broad hybrid mode with a sharp one. This structure presents a special feature in which the electric field intensity is confined on different lines of the oligomer depending on the illumination wavelength relative to the Fano dip. This Fano-type resonance is experimentally observed performing extinction cross section measurements on arrays of gold nano-disks. The vanishing of the Fano dip when increasing the incidence angle is also experimentally observed in accordance with numerical simulations. PMID:27580515

  7. Effect of adding small amount of inductive fields to O2, Ar/O2 capacitively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min-Hyong; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2012-05-01

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) of low pressure O2 plasma were measured by adding small amount of coil power in a capacitive discharge. When the plasma was generated by bias power only, the measured EEDF showed a bi-Maxwellian distribution. However, when a very small coil power (a few Watts) was added, the EEDF evolved abruptly into a Maxwellian distribution, while the electron density was decreased. In an Ar/O2 mixture discharge, this EEDF evolution to the Maxwellian was also observed at a relatively higher coil power. This abrupt change in EEDFs with a very small coil power appears to be attributed to a combined effect of collisionless heating by capacitive and induced electric fields.

  8. First-principles investigation of the dissociation and coupling of methane on small copper clusters: Interplay of collision dynamics and geometric and electronic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Jithin J.; Mushrif, Samir H.

    2015-05-01

    Small metal clusters exhibit unique size and morphology dependent catalytic activity. The search for alternate minimum energy pathways and catalysts to transform methane to more useful chemicals and carbon nanomaterials led us to investigate collision induced dissociation of methane on small Cu clusters. We report here for the first time, the free energy barriers for the collision induced activation, dissociation, and coupling of methane on small Cu clusters (Cun where n = 2-12) using ab initio molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The collision induced activation of the stretching and bending vibrations of methane significantly reduces the free energy barrier for its dissociation. Increase in the cluster size reduces the barrier for dissociation of methane due to the corresponding increase in delocalisation of electron density within the cluster, as demonstrated using the electron localisation function topology analysis. This enables higher probability of favourable alignment of the C-H stretching vibration of methane towards regions of high electron density within the cluster and makes higher number of sites available for the chemisorption of CH3 and H upon dissociation. These characteristics contribute in lowering the barrier for dissociation of methane. Distortion and reorganisation of cluster geometry due to high temperature collision dynamics disturb electron delocalisation within them and increase the barrier for dissociation. Coupling reactions of CHx (x = 1-3) species and recombination of H with CHx have free energy barriers significantly lower than complete dehydrogenation of methane to carbon. Thus, competition favours the former reactions at high hydrogen saturation on the clusters.

  9. The coupling of runoff and dissolved organic matter transport: Insights from in situ fluorescence measurements in small streams and large rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, B. A.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Downing, B. D.; Saraceno, J.; Shanley, J. B.; Aiken, G.; Murdoch, P. S.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding dissolved organic matter (DOM) dynamics in streams and rivers can help characterize mercury transport, assess causes of drinking water issues, and lead to improved understanding of watershed source areas and carbon loads to downstream ecosystems. However, traditional sampling approaches that collect discrete concentration data at weekly to monthly intervals often fail to adequately capture hydrological pulses ranging from early snowmelt periods to short-duration rainfall events. Continuous measurements of chromophoric dissolved organic matter fluorescence (FDOM) in rivers and streams now provide an opportunity to more accurately quantify DOM loads and processes in aquatic ecosystems at a range of scales. In this study, we used continuous FDOM data from in situ sensors along with discharge data to assess the coupling of FDOM transport and runoff in small streams and large rivers. Results from headwater catchments in New England and California show that FDOM is tightly coupled with runoff, supporting strong linkages between watershed flow paths and DOM concentrations in streams. Results also show that the magnitude of FDOM response relative to runoff varies seasonally, with highest concentrations during autumn rainfall events (after leaf fall) and lower concentrations during peak snowmelt for equivalent runoff. In large river basins, FDOM dynamics are also coupled with runoff and exhibit the same seasonal variability in the magnitude of FDOM response relative to discharge. However, the peaks in FDOM typically lag runoff by several days, reflecting the influence of a variety of factors such as water residence times, reservoir releases, and connectivity to organic matter-rich riparian floodplains and wetlands. Our results show that in situ FDOM data will be important for understanding the coupling of runoff and DOM across multiple scales and could serve a critical role in monitoring, assessment and decision-making in both small and large watersheds.

  10. Modal analysis and efficient coupling of TE₀₁ mode in small-core THz Bragg fibers.

    PubMed

    Yao, H Y; Jiang, J Y; Cheng, Y S; Chen, Z Y; Her, T H; Chang, T H

    2015-10-19

    We report a design of low-loss THz Bragg fibers with a core size on the order of wavelength that operates near the cutoff frequency of its TE01 mode. We also propose a broadband Y-type mode converter based on branched rectangular metallic waveguides to facilitate coupling between the TE01 mode of the Bragg fiber and the TEM mode in free space with 60% efficiency. Our fiber holds strong promise to facilitate beam-wave interaction in gyrotron for high-efficiency THz generation. PMID:26480387

  11. Alcohol, cannabis, and methamphetamine use and other risk behaviours among Black and Coloured South African women: A small randomized trial in the Western Cape

    PubMed Central

    Wechsberg, Wendee M.; Luseno, Winnie K.; Karg, Rhonda S.; Young, Siobhan; Rodman, Nat; Myers, Bronwyn; Parry, Charles D. H.

    2008-01-01

    Background There is a pressing need for brief behavioural interventions to address the intersection of high HIV prevalence, increasing substance use, and high-risk sex practices among South African women. The primary aim of this pilot, randomized trial was to examine whether an adapted evidence-based intervention would be equally, more, or less effective at reducing HIV risk behaviours when delivered using an individual or group format. The secondary aim was to examine differences between Black and Coloured South African women across pre- and post-intervention measures of alcohol and illicit drug use and sex risk behaviours. Methods The Cape Town Women’s Health CoOp was adapted from an evidence-based intervention known as the Women’s CoOp._Study participants included Black (n=60) and Coloured (n=52) women living in the township communities of Cape Town, South Africa, who reported using illicit drugs and alcohol. Results Coloured women reported greater methamphetamine use (13 days in the past 30 days) and Black women reported mostly cannabis use (27days in the past 30 days). Although both groups reported having unprotected sex under the influence of alcohol and/or other drugs, Black women reported greater condom use and having one partner; Coloured women reported having more than one sex partner. One-month post-intervention assessments indicated significant reductions in substance use and sex risk behaviours. After controlling for baseline measures, there were no significant differences between the two intervention conditions. Conclusion Significant differences in risk behaviours were observed between Black and Coloured South African women. However, both ethnic groups were responsive to the adapted intervention and no differences were found by intervention assignment. These findings support the assertion that group interventions may be more cost-effective in reaching at-risk women in resource-scarce environments. Larger studies are needed to show efficacy and

  12. In situ response of bay productivity to nutrient loading from a small tributary: The Delaware Bay-Murderkill Estuary tidally-coupled biogeochemical reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voynova, Yoana G.; Lebaron, Karine C.; Barnes, Rebecca T.; Ullman, William J.

    2015-07-01

    A small, turbid and nutrient-rich tributary, the Murderkill Estuary, and a large estuarine ecosystem, the Delaware Bay, are tightly linked and form an efficient, tidally-coupled biogeochemical reactor during the summer. Nitrate loading from the Murderkill Estuary generates an instantaneous increase in biological oxygen production in the adjacent Delaware Bay. We are able to capture this primary production response with continuous hourly measurements of dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, and nitrate. The nitrate influxes from the Murderkill support primary production rates in the Delaware Bay margins that are twice as high as the average production rates measured in the central Bay regions. This elevates chlorophyll in the Bay margins in the summer and fuels metabolism. Tidal transport of the newly produced autochthonous chlorophyll particles from the Bay into the Estuary could also provide a source of labile material to the marshes surrounding the Murderkill, thus perhaps fueling marsh respiration. As a consequence of the tidal coupling between Delaware Bay and the Murderkill Estuary, ecosystem productivity and metabolism in the Bay and Estuary are linked, generating an ecosystem feedback mechanism. Storms modulate this tidally-coupled biogeochemical reactor, by generating significant nitrate and salinity changes. Depending on their magnitude and duration, storms induce large phytoplankton blooms in the Delaware Bay. Such large phytoplankton blooms may occur more often with climate change, since century-long discharge records document an increase in storm frequency.

  13. Sedentary behaviour in youth.

    PubMed

    Pate, Russell R; Mitchell, Jonathan A; Byun, Wonwoo; Dowda, Marsha

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the amount of time children spend in sedentary behaviour and to determine if there are specific factors that associate with sedentary behaviour in children. The following search terms were used to identify relevant articles: sedentary behaviour, inactivity, television, computer, video games, small screen, sitting, prevalence, patterns, correlates, factors and determinants. The databases used to conduct the search included PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC (Education Resources Information Center) and Academic Search Premier. The studies reviewed were limited to those that sampled children (2-18 years), were written in English and used a measure of sedentary behaviour as the dependent variable. Several studies reported the time spent watching television or the proportion of children at or above a threshold for television viewing (eg, ≥3 h/day). Among the accelerometer studies included, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey is the largest and reported ∼6.1, 7.5 and 8.0 h/day mean sedentary time in children 6-11, 12-15 and 16-19 years old, respectively. Taken together, the existing literature across the world indicates a slightly higher level of sedentary behaviour in older children. Higher levels of sedentary behaviour were also reported in non-white children, children from lower socioeconomic status background and children from households with more access to televisions/computers. Lower levels of sedentary behaviour were reported in children whose parents have rules/limitations on screen time. PMID:21836174

  14. Small RNAs prevent transcription-coupled loss of histone H3 lysine 9 methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Enke, Raymond A; Dong, Zhicheng; Bender, Judith

    2011-10-01

    In eukaryotes, histone H3 lysine 9 methylation (H3K9me) mediates silencing of invasive sequences to prevent deleterious consequences including the expression of aberrant gene products and mobilization of transposons. In Arabidopsis thaliana, H3K9me maintained by SUVH histone methyltransferases (MTases) is associated with cytosine methylation (5meC) maintained by the CMT3 cytosine MTase. The SUVHs contain a 5meC binding domain and CMT3 contains an H3K9me binding domain, suggesting that the SUVH/CMT3 pathway involves an amplification loop between H3K9me and 5meC. However, at loci subject to read-through transcription, the stability of the H3K9me/5meC loop requires a mechanism to counteract transcription-coupled loss of H3K9me. Here we use the duplicated PAI genes, which stably maintain SUVH-dependent H3K9me and CMT3-dependent 5meC despite read-through transcription, to show that when PAI sRNAs are depleted by dicer ribonuclease mutations, PAI H3K9me and 5meC levels are reduced and remaining PAI 5meC is destabilized upon inbreeding. The dicer mutations confer weaker reductions in PAI 5meC levels but similar or stronger reductions in PAI H3K9me levels compared to a cmt3 mutation. This comparison indicates a connection between sRNAs and maintenance of H3K9me independent of CMT3 function. The dicer mutations reduce PAI H3K9me and 5meC levels through a distinct mechanism from the known role of dicer-dependent sRNAs in guiding the DRM2 cytosine MTase because the PAI genes maintain H3K9me and 5meC at levels similar to wild type in a drm2 mutant. Our results support a new role for sRNAs in plants to prevent transcription-coupled loss of H3K9me. PMID:22046144

  15. Small wind turbine performance evaluation using field test data and a coupled aero-electro-mechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Brian D.

    A series of field tests and theoretical analyses were performed on various wind turbine rotor designs at two Penn State residential-scale wind-electric facilities. This work involved the prediction and experimental measurement of the electrical and aerodynamic performance of three wind turbines; a 3 kW rated Whisper 175, 2.4 kW rated Skystream 3.7, and the Penn State designed Carolus wind turbine. Both the Skystream and Whisper 175 wind turbines are OEM blades which were originally installed at the facilities. The Carolus rotor is a carbon-fiber composite 2-bladed machine, designed and assembled at Penn State, with the intent of replacing the Whisper 175 rotor at the off-grid system. Rotor aerodynamic performance is modeled using WT_Perf, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed Blade Element Momentum theory based performance prediction code. Steady-state power curves are predicted by coupling experimentally determined electrical characteristics with the aerodynamic performance of the rotor simulated with WT_Perf. A dynamometer test stand is used to establish the electromechanical efficiencies of the wind-electric system generator. Through the coupling of WT_Perf and dynamometer test results, an aero-electro-mechanical analysis procedure is developed and provides accurate predictions of wind system performance. The analysis of three different wind turbines gives a comprehensive assessment of the capability of the field test facilities and the accuracy of aero-electro-mechanical analysis procedures. Results from this study show that the Carolus and Whisper 175 rotors are running at higher tip-speed ratios than are optimum for power production. The aero-electro-mechanical analysis predicted the high operating tip-speed ratios of the rotors and was accurate at predicting output power for the systems. It is shown that the wind turbines operate at high tip-speeds because of a miss-match between the aerodynamic drive torque and the operating torque of the wind

  16. First-principles investigation of the dissociation and coupling of methane on small copper clusters: Interplay of collision dynamics and geometric and electronic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Varghese, Jithin J.; Mushrif, Samir H.

    2015-05-14

    Small metal clusters exhibit unique size and morphology dependent catalytic activity. The search for alternate minimum energy pathways and catalysts to transform methane to more useful chemicals and carbon nanomaterials led us to investigate collision induced dissociation of methane on small Cu clusters. We report here for the first time, the free energy barriers for the collision induced activation, dissociation, and coupling of methane on small Cu clusters (Cu{sub n} where n = 2–12) using ab initio molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The collision induced activation of the stretching and bending vibrations of methane significantly reduces the free energy barrier for its dissociation. Increase in the cluster size reduces the barrier for dissociation of methane due to the corresponding increase in delocalisation of electron density within the cluster, as demonstrated using the electron localisation function topology analysis. This enables higher probability of favourable alignment of the C–H stretching vibration of methane towards regions of high electron density within the cluster and makes higher number of sites available for the chemisorption of CH{sub 3} and H upon dissociation. These characteristics contribute in lowering the barrier for dissociation of methane. Distortion and reorganisation of cluster geometry due to high temperature collision dynamics disturb electron delocalisation within them and increase the barrier for dissociation. Coupling reactions of CH{sub x} (x = 1–3) species and recombination of H with CH{sub x} have free energy barriers significantly lower than complete dehydrogenation of methane to carbon. Thus, competition favours the former reactions at high hydrogen saturation on the clusters.

  17. Challenging Student Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Glyn; Philp, Clare

    2011-01-01

    The issue of poor student behaviour within higher education institutions (HEIs) has been well documented in recent years. Although the number of reported cases constitutes a very small percentage of the overall student population in the UK, the impact of student misconduct on the rest of the student body and staff in HEIs can be substantial. For…

  18. Stretched poly(methyl methacrylate) gel aligns small organic molecules in chloroform. stereochemical analysis and diastereotopic proton NMR assignment in ludartin using residual dipolar couplings and 3J coupling constant analysis.

    PubMed

    Gil, Roberto R; Gayathri, Chakicherla; Tsarevsky, Nicolay V; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2008-02-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) gels prepared by copolymerizing methyl methacrylate (MMA) and various amounts of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) in the presence of the radical initiator V-70 (2,2'-azobis(2,4-dimethyl-4-methoxyvaleronitrile)) can orient small organic molecules when swollen in NMR tubes with CDCl(3). The aligning properties of the stretched PMMA gels were evaluated by monitoring the quadrupolar splitting of the (2)H NMR signal of CDCl(3), and the aligning degree is proportional to the cross-linking density. Natural abundance one-bond (1)H-(13)C residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) for menthol measured in the gels depended on the cross-link density. The stereochemistry and assignment of the diastereotopic protons of the gastroprotective and nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor sesquiterpene lactone ludartin, isolated from Stevia yaconensis var. subeglandulosa, were unambiguously determined using a combination of natural abundance one-bond (1)H-(13)C RDCs measured in a PMMA gel and a (3)J coupling constant analysis. PMID:18177050

  19. Creep deformation behavior of Sn-3.5Ag solder/Cu couple at small length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, M.; Chawla, N

    2004-09-06

    In order to adequately characterize the behavior of solder balls in electronic devices, the mechanical behavior of solder joints needs to be studied at small length scales. The creep behavior of single solder ball Sn-Ag/Cu solder joints was studied in shear, at 25, 60, 95, and 130 deg. C, using a microforce testing system. A change in the creep stress exponent with increasing stress was observed and explained in terms of a threshold stress for bypass of Ag{sub 3}Sn particles by dislocations. The stress exponent was also temperature dependent, exhibiting an increase in exponent of two from lower to higher temperature. The activation energy for creep was found to be temperature dependant, correlating with self-diffusion of pure Sn at high temperatures, and dislocation core diffusion of pure Sn at lower temperatures. Normalizing the creep rate for activation energy and the temperature-dependence of shear modulus allowed for unification of the creep data. Microstructure characterization, including preliminary TEM analysis, and fractographic analysis were conducted in order to fully describe the creep behavior of the material.

  20. Small angle X-ray scattering coupled with in situ electromechanical probing of nanoparticle-based resistive strain gauges.

    PubMed

    Decorde, Nicolas; Sangeetha, Neralagatta M; Viallet, Benoit; Viau, Guillaume; Grisolia, Jérémie; Coati, Alessandro; Vlad, Alina; Garreau, Yves; Ressier, Laurence

    2014-12-21

    A comprehensive study on the electromechanical behavior of nanoparticle-based resistive strain gauges in action through normal and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/GISAXS) investigations is presented. The strain gauges were fabricated from arrays of colloidal gold nanoparticle (NP) wires assembled on flexible polyethylene terephthalate and polyimide substrates by convective self-assembly. Microstructural changes (mean interparticle distance variations) within these NP wires under uniaxial stretching estimated by SAXS/GISAXS are correlated to their macroscopic electrical resistance variations. SAXS measurements suggest a linear longitudinal extension and transversal contraction of the NP wires with applied strain (0 to ∼ 13%). The slope of this longitudinal variation is less than unity, implying a partial strain transfer from the substrate to the NP wires. The simultaneously measured electrical resistance of the strain gauges shows an exponential variation within the elastic domain of the substrate deformation, consistent with electron tunnelling through the interparticle gaps. A slower variation observed within the plastic domain suggests the formation of new electronic conduction pathways. Implications of transversal contraction of the NP wires on the directional sensitivities of strain gauges are evaluated by simulating electronic conduction in models mimicking a realistic NP arrangement. A loss of directionality of the NP-based strain gauges due to transversal current flow within the NP wires is deduced. PMID:25371292

  1. Coupling spindle position with mitotic exit in budding yeast: The multifaceted role of the small GTPase Tem1

    PubMed Central

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Piatti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast S. cerevisiae divides asymmetrically and is an excellent model system for asymmetric cell division. As for other asymmetrically dividing cells, proper spindle positioning along the mother-daughter polarity axis is crucial for balanced chromosome segregation. Thus, a surveillance mechanism named Spindle Position Checkpoint (SPOC) inhibits mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the mitotic spindle is properly oriented, thereby preventing the generation of cells with aberrant ploidies. The small GTPase Tem1 is required to trigger a Hippo-like protein kinase cascade, named Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), that is essential for mitotic exit and cytokinesis but also contributes to correct spindle alignment in metaphase. Importantly, Tem1 is the target of the SPOC, which relies on the activity of the GTPase-activating complex (GAP) Bub2-Bfa1 to keep Tem1 in the GDP-bound inactive form. Tem1 forms a hetero-trimeric complex with Bub2-Bfa1 at spindle poles (SPBs) that accumulates asymmetrically on the bud-directed spindle pole during mitosis when the spindle is properly positioned. In contrast, the complex remains symmetrically localized on both poles of misaligned spindles. We have recently shown that Tem1 residence at SPBs depends on its nucleotide state and, importantly, asymmetry of the Bub2-Bfa1-Tem1 complex does not promote mitotic exit but rather controls spindle positioning. PMID:26507466

  2. Power-law spectrum and small-world structure emerge from coupled evolution of neuronal activity and synaptic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hong-Li; Zhu, Chen-Ping; Guo, Yan-Dong; Teng, Ao; Jia, Jing; Kong, Hui; Zhou, Rui; Yang, Juan-Ping; Li, Su-Quan

    2015-04-01

    A co-evolutionary neuronal network model based on previous ones is proposed, and both functional and structural properties are numerically calculated. Recent experiments have revealed power-law behavior in electrocorticogram (ECoG) spectrum related with synaptic plasticity and reorganization. In the present neuronal network model, the network starts its evolution from the initial configuration of random network which is the least biased and without special structure, and the interaction rules among neurons are modified from both models by Bornholdt's and Arcangelis' groups to simulate the process of synaptic development and maturation. The system exhibits dynamic small-world structure which is the result of evolution instead of the assumption beforehand. Meanwhile, the power spectrum of electrical signals reproduces the power-law behavior with the exponent 2.0 just as what is experimentally measured in ECoG spectrum. Moreover, the power spectrum of the average degree per neuron over time also exhibits power-law behavior, with the exponent 2.0 again over more than 5 orders of magnitude. Different from previous results, our network exhibits assortative degree-degree correlation which is expected to be checked by experiments.

  3. Small angle X-ray scattering coupled with in situ electromechanical probing of nanoparticle-based resistive strain gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decorde, Nicolas; Sangeetha, Neralagatta M.; Viallet, Benoit; Viau, Guillaume; Grisolia, Jérémie; Coati, Alessandro; Vlad, Alina; Garreau, Yves; Ressier, Laurence

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive study on the electromechanical behavior of nanoparticle-based resistive strain gauges in action through normal and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/GISAXS) investigations is presented. The strain gauges were fabricated from arrays of colloidal gold nanoparticle (NP) wires assembled on flexible polyethylene terephthalate and polyimide substrates by convective self-assembly. Microstructural changes (mean interparticle distance variations) within these NP wires under uniaxial stretching estimated by SAXS/GISAXS are correlated to their macroscopic electrical resistance variations. SAXS measurements suggest a linear longitudinal extension and transversal contraction of the NP wires with applied strain (0 to ~13%). The slope of this longitudinal variation is less than unity, implying a partial strain transfer from the substrate to the NP wires. The simultaneously measured electrical resistance of the strain gauges shows an exponential variation within the elastic domain of the substrate deformation, consistent with electron tunnelling through the interparticle gaps. A slower variation observed within the plastic domain suggests the formation of new electronic conduction pathways. Implications of transversal contraction of the NP wires on the directional sensitivities of strain gauges are evaluated by simulating electronic conduction in models mimicking a realistic NP arrangement. A loss of directionality of the NP-based strain gauges due to transversal current flow within the NP wires is deduced.A comprehensive study on the electromechanical behavior of nanoparticle-based resistive strain gauges in action through normal and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/GISAXS) investigations is presented. The strain gauges were fabricated from arrays of colloidal gold nanoparticle (NP) wires assembled on flexible polyethylene terephthalate and polyimide substrates by convective self-assembly. Microstructural changes (mean

  4. Tamoxifen derivatives for delivery of the antitumoral (DACH)Pt group: selective synthesis by McMurry coupling, and biochemical behaviour.

    PubMed

    Top, Siden; Kaloun, El Bachir; Vessières, Anne; Leclercq, Guy; Laïos, Ioanna; Ourevitch, Michèle; Deuschel, Christine; McGlinchey, Michael J; Jaouen, Gérard

    2003-08-01

    The goal of our study was to potentiate the effects of the ((R,R)-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane)-platinum(II) fragment [(DACH)Pt], known for its cytotoxic properties, either with tamoxifen (Tam), the most widely used antiestrogen in the treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancers, or with its active metabolite hydroxytamoxifen (hydroxy-Tam). We coupled Tam or hydroxy-Tam derivatives bearing a malonato group at the para position of the beta aromatic ring with the (DACH)Pt fragment. The malonato-Tam and malonato-hydroxy-Tam compounds were prepared through McMurry coupling of the appropriate ketones. The presence of the malonate group resulted in a pronounced stereospecificity in the reaction, since malonato-Tam was obtained only as the Z isomer, while malonato-hydroxy-Tam was obtained as an 80/20 E/Z mixture. Attribution of the isomeric structures was achieved by 2D NMR spectroscopy. The platinum complexes (DACH)Pt-malonato-Tam and (DACH)Pt-malonato-hydroxy-Tam were then prepared by coupling the barium salts derived from the malonato-Tam and malonato-hydroxy-Tam with the nitrate derived from (DACH)PtCl(2). Study of the biochemical properties of these two platinum complexes showed that, while the hydroxy-Tam complex is satisfactorily recognized by the estrogen receptor (relative binding affinity, RBA=6.4 %), the Tam complex is less well recognized (RBA=0.5 %). The effects of these complexes on two hormone-dependent breast cancer cell lines (MCF7 and MVLN) were studied in vitro. Both complexes showed an antiproliferative effect on MCF7 cells, and an antiestrogenic effect on MVLN cells. The observed effects appear to be essentially antihormonal, since incorporation of the (DACH)Pt fragment into the tamoxifen skeleton did not cause an increase in the cytotoxicity of the complexes. PMID:12898627

  5. In situ location and U-Pb dating of small zircon grains in igneous rocks using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, Patrick J.; Berry, Ron F.; Meffre, Sebastien; Falloon, Trevor J.; Gemmell, J. Bruce; Friedman, Richard M.

    2011-05-01

    A new U-Pb zircon dating protocol for small (10-50 μm) zircons has been developed using an automated searching method to locate zircon grains in a polished rock mount. The scanning electron microscope-energy-dispersive X ray spectrum-based automated searching method can routinely find in situ zircon grains larger than 5 μm across. A selection of these grains was ablated using a 10 μm laser spot and analyzed in an inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-QMS). The technique has lower precision (˜6% uncertainty at 95% confidence on individual spot analyses) than typical laser ablation ICP-MS (˜2%), secondary ion mass spectrometry (<1%), and isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (˜0.4%) methods. However, it is accurate and has been used successfully on fine-grained lithologies, including mafic rocks from island arcs, ocean basins, and ophiolites, which have traditionally been considered devoid of dateable zircons. This technique is particularly well suited for medium- to fine-grained mafic volcanic rocks where zircon separation is challenging and can also be used to date rocks where only small amounts of sample are available (clasts, xenoliths, dredge rocks). The most significant problem with dating small in situ zircon grains is Pb loss. In our study, many of the small zircons analyzed have high U contents, and the isotopic compositions of these grains are consistent with Pb loss resulting from internal α radiation damage. This problem is not significant in very young rocks and can be minimized in older rocks by avoiding high-U zircon grains.

  6. Communication: dynamical embedding: correct quantum response from coupling TDDFT for a small cluster with classical near-field electrodynamics for an extended region.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2013-05-14

    We show how to obtain the correct electronic response of a large system by embedding; a small region is propagated by TDDFT (time-dependent density functional theory) simultaneously with a classical electrodynamics evolution using the Near-Field method over a larger external region. The propagations are coupled through a combined time-dependent density yielding a common Coulomb potential. We show that the embedding correctly describes the plasmonic response of a Mg(0001) slab and its influence on the dynamical charge transfer between an adsorbed H2O molecule and the substrate, giving the same spectral shape as full TDDFT (similar plasmon peak and molecular-dependent differential spectra) with much less computational effort. The results demonstrate that atomistic embedding electrodynamics is promising for nanoplasmonics and nanopolaritonics. PMID:23676021

  7. Communication: Dynamical embedding: Correct quantum response from coupling TDDFT for a small cluster with classical near-field electrodynamics for an extended region

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2013-05-14

    We show how to obtain the correct electronic response of a large system by embedding; a small region is propagated by TDDFT (time-dependent density functional theory) simultaneously with a classical electrodynamics evolution using the Near-Field method over a larger external region. The propagations are coupled through a combined time-dependent density yielding a common Coulomb potential. We show that the embedding correctly describes the plasmonic response of a Mg(0001) slab and its influence on the dynamical charge transfer between an adsorbed H{sub 2}O molecule and the substrate, giving the same spectral shape as full TDDFT (similar plasmon peak and molecular-dependent differential spectra) with much less computational effort. The results demonstrate that atomistic embedding electrodynamics is promising for nanoplasmonics and nanopolaritonics.

  8. Coupling Specificity of NOP Opioid Receptors to Pertussis-Toxin-Sensitive Gα Proteins in Adult Rat Stellate Ganglion Neurons Using Small Interference RNA

    PubMed Central

    Margas, Wojciech; Sedeek, Khaled; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2008-01-01

    The opioid receptor-like 1 (NOP or ORL1) receptor is a G-protein-coupled receptor the endogenous ligand of which is the heptadecapeptide, nociceptin (Noc). NOP receptors are known to modulate pain processing at spinal, supraspinal, and peripheral levels. Previous work has demonstrated that NOP receptors inhibit N-type Ca2+ channel currents in rat sympathetic stellate ganglion (SG) neurons via pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive Gαi/o subunits. However, the identification of the specific Gα subunit that mediates the Ca2+ current modulation is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to examine coupling specificity of Noc-activated NOP receptors to N-type Ca2+ channels in SG neurons. Small interference RNA (siRNA) transfection was employed to block the expression of PTX-sensitive Gα subunits. RT-PCR results showed that siRNA specifically decreased the expression of the intended Gα subunit. Evaluation of cell surface protein expression and Ca2+ channel modulation were assessed by immunofluorescence staining and electrophysiological recordings, respectively. Furthermore, the presence of mRNA of the intended siRNA target Gα protein was examined by RT-PCR experiments. Fluorescence imaging showed that Gαi1, Gαi3, and Gαo were expressed in SG neurons. The transfection of Gαi1-specific siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in Noc-mediated Ca2+ current inhibition, while silencing of either Gαi3 or Gαo was without effect. Taken together, these results suggest that in SG neurons Gαi1 subunits selectively couple NOP receptors to N-type Ca2+ channels. PMID:18562551

  9. Expression of G protein-coupled receptor 56 is associated with tumor progression in non-small-cell lung carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yanjie; Li, Aiqin; Zhang, Li; Duan, Lingling

    2016-01-01

    Background G protein-coupled receptor 56 (GPR56) is an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor with essential functions for cell physiology and survival, and its expression correlates with prognosis in a number of malignancies. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship of GPR56 expression with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Methods The levels of GPR56 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 157 NSCLC tissue samples. The association between GPR56 and clinicopathological parameters was evaluated by χ2 test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to demonstrate the prognosis role of GPR56. The function of GPR56 in NSCLC cell lines was also explored through overexpression and knockdown studies. Results The expression level of GPR56 in tumor tissues was significantly correlated with the TNM stage of NSCLC (P=0.005). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that GPR56 can act as an independent prognostic factor for overall survival. Furthermore, through overexpression and knockdown experiments, we confirmed that GPR56 can promote the proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cells. Conclusion GPR56 plays an important role in tumor development and may serve as a promising target for prognostic prediction in NSCLC. PMID:27462165

  10. Theoretical Investigation of Small Polyatomic Ions Observed in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: HxCO+ and HxN2+ (x = 1, 2, 3)

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, K.; Ferguson, J.; Dudley, T.; Houk, R.; Gordon, M.

    2008-03-01

    Two series of small polyatomic ions, H{sub x}CO{sup +} and H{sub x}N{sub 2}{sup +} (x = 1, 2, 3), were systematically characterized using three correlated theoretical techniques: density functional theory using the B3LYP functional, spin-restricted second-order perturbation theory, and singles + doubles coupled cluster theory with perturbative triples. On the basis of thermodynamic data, the existence of these ions in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) experiments is not surprising since the ions are predicted to be considerably more stable than their corresponding dissociation products (by 30-170 kcal/mol). While each pair of isoelectronic ions exhibit very similar thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics, there are significant differences within each series. While the mechanism for dissociation of the larger ions occurs through hydrogen abstraction, the triatomic ions (HCO{sup +} and HN{sub 2}{sup +}) appear to dissociate by proton abstraction. These differing mechanisms help to explain large differences in the abundances of HN{sub 2}{sup +} and HCO{sup +} observed in ICP-MS experiments.

  11. Structure-Function Analyses of the Interactions between Rab11 and Rab14 Small GTPases with Their Shared Effector Rab Coupling Protein (RCP)*

    PubMed Central

    Lall, Patrick; Lindsay, Andrew J.; Hanscom, Sara; Kecman, Tea; Taglauer, Elizabeth S.; McVeigh, Una M.; Franklin, Edward; McCaffrey, Mary W.; Khan, Amir R.

    2015-01-01

    Rab GTPases recruit effector proteins, via their GTP-dependent switch regions, to distinct subcellular compartments. Rab11 and Rab25 are closely related small GTPases that bind to common effectors termed the Rab11 family of interacting proteins (FIPs). The FIPs are organized into two subclasses (class I and class II) based on sequence and domain organization, and both subclasses contain a highly conserved Rab-binding domain at their C termini. Yeast two-hybrid and biochemical studies have revealed that the more distantly related Rab14 also interacts with class I FIPs. Here, we perform detailed structural, thermodynamic, and cellular analyses of the interactions between Rab14 and one of the class I FIPs, the Rab-coupling protein (RCP), to clarify the molecular aspects of the interaction. We find that Rab14 indeed binds to RCP, albeit with reduced affinity relative to conventional Rab11-FIP and Rab25-FIP complexes. However, in vivo, Rab11 recruits RCP onto biological membranes. Furthermore, biophysical analyses reveal a noncanonical 1:2 stoichiometry between Rab14-RCP in dilute solutions, in contrast to Rab11/25 complexes. The structure of Rab14-RCP reveals that Rab14 interacts with the canonical Rab-binding domain and also provides insight into the unusual properties of the complex. Finally, we show that both the Rab coupling protein and Rab14 function in neuritogenesis. PMID:26032412

  12. Applicability of the Joule-Thomson Cryocooler Coupled with Membrane-Based Purification System for Liquefaction of Natural Gas in Small Quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowska, A.; Chorowski, M.

    2008-03-01

    Joule-Thomson (J-T) cryocoolers using gas mixture have been studied theoretically and experimentally for a variety of applications. Gas separation technology using polymer membrane is emerging. In this paper the concept of coupling the J-T cooler with a hollow fiber membranes is presented. The apparatus can be used in many applications, like compressed natural gas (CNG) purification and condensation into LNG or separation and liquefaction of nitrogen from air. The paper describes the system and experimental dependence of the separated nitrogen purity on the membrane inlet air pressure. The Second Law of Thermodynamics is used to optimize the composition of the mixture for natural gas cooling and liquefaction. Possible applications of the system depend on membrane material. Membranes used in separation of N2/air or CO2/CH4 are now commercially available [2,6]. The combination of the J-T cooler with N2/air membrane enables the construction of the liquid nitrogen production system aimed at cryosurgical applications. Similarly, J-T cooler coupled with CO2/CH4 membrane can be used for purification and liquefaction of natural gas in small quantities e.g. satisfying future car refueling system needs.

  13. Structure-Function Analyses of the Interactions between Rab11 and Rab14 Small GTPases with Their Shared Effector Rab Coupling Protein (RCP).

    PubMed

    Lall, Patrick; Lindsay, Andrew J; Hanscom, Sara; Kecman, Tea; Taglauer, Elizabeth S; McVeigh, Una M; Franklin, Edward; McCaffrey, Mary W; Khan, Amir R

    2015-07-24

    Rab GTPases recruit effector proteins, via their GTP-dependent switch regions, to distinct subcellular compartments. Rab11 and Rab25 are closely related small GTPases that bind to common effectors termed the Rab11 family of interacting proteins (FIPs). The FIPs are organized into two subclasses (class I and class II) based on sequence and domain organization, and both subclasses contain a highly conserved Rab-binding domain at their C termini. Yeast two-hybrid and biochemical studies have revealed that the more distantly related Rab14 also interacts with class I FIPs. Here, we perform detailed structural, thermodynamic, and cellular analyses of the interactions between Rab14 and one of the class I FIPs, the Rab-coupling protein (RCP), to clarify the molecular aspects of the interaction. We find that Rab14 indeed binds to RCP, albeit with reduced affinity relative to conventional Rab11-FIP and Rab25-FIP complexes. However, in vivo, Rab11 recruits RCP onto biological membranes. Furthermore, biophysical analyses reveal a noncanonical 1:2 stoichiometry between Rab14-RCP in dilute solutions, in contrast to Rab11/25 complexes. The structure of Rab14-RCP reveals that Rab14 interacts with the canonical Rab-binding domain and also provides insight into the unusual properties of the complex. Finally, we show that both the Rab coupling protein and Rab14 function in neuritogenesis. PMID:26032412

  14. Rotor dynamic behaviour of a high-speed oil-free motor compressor with a rigid coupling supported on four radial magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmied, J.; Pradetto, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    The combination of a high-speed motor, dry gas seals, and magnetic bearings realized in this unit facilitates the elimination of oil. The motor is coupled with a quill shaft to the compressor. This yields higher natural frequencies of the rotor than with the use of a diaphragm coupling and helps to maintain a sufficient margin of the maximum speed to the frequency of the second compressor bending mode. However, the controller of each bearing then has to take the combined modes of both machines into account. The requirements for the controller to ensure stability and sufficient damping of all critical speeds are designed and compared with the implemented controller. The calculated closed loop behavior was confirmed experimentally, except the stability of some higher modes due to slight frequency deviations of the rotor model to the actual rotor. The influence of a mechanical damper as a device to provide additional damping to high models is demonstrated theoretically. After all, it was not necessary to install the damper, since all modes cold be stabilized by the controller.

  15. Predicting electrical and thermal abuse behaviours of practical lithium-ion cells from accelerating rate calorimeter studies on small samples in electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, M. N.; Dahn, J. R.

    An accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) is used to measure the thermal stability of de-intercalated Li 1+ xMn 2- xO 4 in LiPF 6 EC:DEC (33:67) electrolyte. Self-heating is detected well after the 80°C onset of self-heating measured for lithium intercalated mesocarbon microbead (MCMB) electrodes in LiPF 6 EC:DEC (33:67) electrolyte. As a result, the initial self-heating measured in a practical carbon/Li 1+ xMn 2- xO 4 lithium-ion cell is caused by reactions at the anode. In previous work, we have proposed a model for the reactions that cause self-heating in MCMB electrodes in electrolyte. By assuming that a cell self-heats only because reactions occur at the anode, the model can be used to predict the power generated by the amount of MCMB in practical cells with an inert cathode. The calculated chemically generated power can be combined with power loss measurements, due to the transfer of heat to the environment, to predict the short-circuit behaviour and the oven exposure behaviour for a cell containing an MCMB anode and an inert cathode. The results agree qualitatively with short-circuit and oven exposure results measured on NEC Moli energy 18650 cells containing an Li 1+ xMn 2- xO 4 cathode.

  16. Weight loss is coupled with improvements to affective state in obese participants engaged in behavior change therapy based on incremental, self-selected "small changes".

    PubMed

    Paxman, Jenny R; Hall, Anna C; Harden, Charlotte J; O'Keeffe, Jean; Simper, Trevor N

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a group behavior change intervention involving self-selected, contextualized, and mediated goal setting on anthropometric, affective, and dietary markers of health. It was hypothesized that the intervention would elicit changes consistent with accepted health recommendations for obese individuals. A rolling program of 12-week "Small Changes" interventions during 24 months recruited 71 participants; each program accommodated 10 to 13 adults (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30 kg/m²). Fifty-eight participants completed Small Changes. Repeated measures were made at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Anthropometric measures included height and weight (to calculate BMI), body composition, waist circumference, and blood pressure. Affective state was monitored using relevant validated questionnaires. Dietary assessment used 3-day household measures food diaries with Schofield equations to monitor underreporting. Relevant blood measures were recorded throughout. Across the measurement period, Small Changes elicited a significant reduction in body weight (baseline, 102.95 ± 15.47 vs 12 weeks 100.09 ± 16.01 kg, P < .0005), coupled with associated significant improvements in BMI, body fat percentage, and waist circumference measures. There were additional significant positive changes in measures of affective state including general well-being (baseline, 58.92 ± 21.22 vs 12 weeks 78.04 ± 14.60, P < .0005) and total mood disturbance (baseline, 31.19 ± 34.03 vs 12 weeks 2.67 ± 24.96, P < .0005). Dietary changes that occurred were largely consistent with evidenced-based recommendations for weight management and included significant reductions in total energy intake and in fat and saturated fat as a proportion of energy. The Small Changes approach can elicit a range of health-orientated benefits for obese participants, and although further work is needed to ascertain the longevity of such effects, the outcomes from Small Changes are

  17. Modelling real disease dynamics with behaviourally adaptive complex networks. Comment on "Coupled disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks: A review" by Z. Wang et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Mean field compartmental models of disease transmission have been successfully applied to a host of different scenarios, and the Kermack-McKendrick equations are now a staple of mathematical biology text books. In Susceptible-Infected-Removed format these equations provide three coupled first order ordinary differential equations with a very mild nonlinearity and they are very well understood. However, underpinning these equations are two important assumptions: that the population is (a) homogeneous, and (b) well-mixed. These assumptions become closest to being true for diseases infecting a large portion of the population for which inevitable individual effects can be averaged away. Emerging infectious disease (such as, in recent times, SARS, avian influenza, swine flu and ebola) typically does not conform to this scenario. Individual contacts and peculiarities of the transmission network play a vital role in understanding the dynamics of such relatively rare infections - particularly during the early stages of an outbreak.

  18. Small protein biomarkers of culture in Bacillus spores detected using capillary liquid chromatography coupled with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Wahl, Jon H.; Willse, Alan R.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2006-10-20

    Capillary liquid chromatography (cLC) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) was used to compare small proteins and peptides extracted from Bacillus subtilis spores grown on four different media. A single, efficient protein separation, compatible with MALDI-MS analysis, was employed to reduce competitive ionization between proteins, and thus interrogate more proteins than possible using direct MALDI-MS. The MALDI-MS data files for each fraction are assembled as two dimensional data sets of retention time and mass information. This method of visualizing small protein data required careful attention to background correction as well as mass and retention time variability. The resulting data sets were used to create comparative displays of differences in protein profiles between different spore preparations. Protein differences were found between two different solid media in both phase bright and phase dark conditions. The protein differences between two different liquid media were also examined. As an extension of this method, we have demonstrated that candidate protein biomarkers can be trypsin digested to provide identifying peptide fragment information following the cLC-MALDI experiment. We have demonstrated this method on two markers and utilized acid breakdown information to identify one additional marker for this organism. The resulting method can be used to identify discriminating proteins as potential biomarkers of growth media, which might ultimately be used for source attribution.

  19. Multisource Synergistic Electrocatalytic Oxidation Effect of Strongly Coupled PdM (M = Sn, Pb)/N-doped Graphene Nanocomposite on Small Organic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Huang, Yiyin; Kang, Longtian; Wu, Maoxiang; Wang, Yaobing

    2015-01-01

    A series of palladium-based catalysts of metal alloying (Sn, Pb) and/or (N-doped) graphene support with regular enhanced electrocatalytic activity were investigated. The peak current density (118.05 mA cm−2) of PdSn/NG is higher than the sum current density (45.63 + 47.59 mA cm−2) of Pd/NG and PdSn/G. It reveals a synergistic electrocatalytic oxidation effect in PdSn/N-doped graphene Nanocomposite. Extend experiments show this multisource synergetic catalytic effect of metal alloying and N-doped graphene support in one catalyst on small organic molecule (methanol, ethanol and Ethylene glycol) oxidation is universal in PdM(M = Sn, Pb)/NG catalysts. Further, The high dispersion of small nanoparticles, the altered electron structure and Pd(0)/Pd(II) ratio of Pd in catalysts induced by strong coupled the metal alloying and N-doped graphene are responsible for the multisource synergistic catalytic effect in PdM(M = Sn, Pb) /NG catalysts. Finally, the catalytic durability and stability are also greatly improved. PMID:26434949

  20. Coupling of background reduction with rolling circle amplification for highly sensitive protein detection via terminal protection of small molecule-linked DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Jiang, Bingying; Xie, Jiaqing; Xiang, Yun; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin

    2013-10-01

    In this work, by coupling background current reduction with rolling circle amplification (RCA), we describe the development of an ultrasensitive electrochemical sensing method for protein detection based on a small molecule-linked DNA terminal protection strategy. Our detection platform employs a typical streptavidin (STV)-biotin interaction system. Biotin-linked single-stranded DNA (SH-ssDNA-biotin) is self-assembled on a gold electrode to capture the target protein, STV. The binding of STV with the biotin small molecule recognition element protects the SH-ssDNA-biotin against hydrolysis by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the unbound SH-ssDNA-biotin is effectively hydrolyzed and removed from the electrode surface. The bound STV further interacts with long, RCA-amplified biotin DNAs to facilitate the adsorption of numerous electroactive reporters, hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (RuHex) via electrostatic interactions, which results in significantly amplified signals for the quantitative determination of STV. Moreover, the removal of the unbound SH-ssDNA-biotin probes from the sensing electrode obviates the accumulation of RuHex and leads to a highly minimized background current. The simultaneous RCA signal amplification and background current reduction is expected to significantly enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and to achieve ultrahigh sensitivity. The results reveal that the developed strategy provides a low detection limit of 0.4 pM with high selectivity. PMID:23907287

  1. Small protein biomarkers of culture in Bacillus spores detected using capillary liquid chromatography coupled with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wunschel, David; Wahl, Jon; Willse, Alan; Valentine, Nancy; Wahl, Karen

    2006-10-20

    Capillary liquid chromatography (cLC) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) was used to compare small proteins and peptides extracted from Bacillus subtilis spores grown on four different media. A single, efficient protein separation, compatible with MALDI-MS analysis, was employed to reduce competitive ionization between proteins, and thus interrogate more proteins than possible using direct MALDI-MS. The MALDI-MS data files for each fraction are assembled as two-dimensional data sets of retention time and mass information. This method of visualizing small protein data required careful attention to background correction as well as mass and retention time variability. The resulting data sets were used to create comparative displays of differences in protein profiles between different spore preparations. Protein differences were found between two different solid media in both phase bright and phase dark spore phenotype. The protein differences between two different liquid media were also examined. As an extension of this method, we have demonstrated that candidate protein biomarkers can be trypsin digested to provide identifying peptide fragment information following the cLC-MALDI experiment. We have demonstrated this method on two markers and utilized acid breakdown information to identify one additional marker for this organism. The resulting method can be used to identify discriminating proteins as potential biomarkers of growth media, which might ultimately be used for source attribution. PMID:16798120

  2. Multisource Synergistic Electrocatalytic Oxidation Effect of Strongly Coupled PdM (M = Sn, Pb)/N-doped Graphene Nanocomposite on Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Peng; Huang, Yiyin; Kang, Longtian; Wu, Maoxiang; Wang, Yaobing

    2015-10-01

    A series of palladium-based catalysts of metal alloying (Sn, Pb) and/or (N-doped) graphene support with regular enhanced electrocatalytic activity were investigated. The peak current density (118.05 mA cm-2) of PdSn/NG is higher than the sum current density (45.63 + 47.59 mA cm-2) of Pd/NG and PdSn/G. It reveals a synergistic electrocatalytic oxidation effect in PdSn/N-doped graphene Nanocomposite. Extend experiments show this multisource synergetic catalytic effect of metal alloying and N-doped graphene support in one catalyst on small organic molecule (methanol, ethanol and Ethylene glycol) oxidation is universal in PdM(M = Sn, Pb)/NG catalysts. Further, The high dispersion of small nanoparticles, the altered electron structure and Pd(0)/Pd(II) ratio of Pd in catalysts induced by strong coupled the metal alloying and N-doped graphene are responsible for the multisource synergistic catalytic effect in PdM(M = Sn, Pb) /NG catalysts. Finally, the catalytic durability and stability are also greatly improved.

  3. Coupling the 3D hydro-morphodynamic model Telemac-3D-sisyphe and seismic measurements to estimate bedload transport rates in a small gravel-bed river.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostache, Renaud; Krein, Andreas; Barrière, Julien

    2014-05-01

    Coupling the 3D hydro-morphodynamic model Telemac-3D-sisyphe and seismic measurements to estimate bedload transport rates in a small gravel-bed river. Renaud Hostache, Andreas Krein, Julien Barrière During flood events, amounts of river bed material are transported via bedload. This causes problems, like the silting of reservoirs or the disturbance of biological habitats. Some current bedload measuring techniques have limited possibilities for studies in high temporal resolutions. Optical systems are usually not applicable because of high turbidity due to concentrated suspended sediment transported. Sediment traps or bedload samplers yield only summative information on bedload transport with low temporal resolution. An alternative bedload measuring technique is the use of seismological systems installed next to the rivers. The potential advantages are observations in real time and under undisturbed conditions. The study area is a 120 m long reach of River Colpach (21.5 km2), a small gravel bed river in Northern Luxembourg. A combined approach of hydro-climatological observations, hydraulic measurements, sediment sampling, and seismological measurements is used in order to investigate bedload transport phenomena. Information derived from seismic measurements and results from a 3-dimensional hydro-morphodynamic model are exemplarily discussed for a November 2013 flood event. The 3-dimensional hydro-morphodynamic model is based on the Telemac hydroinformatic system. This allows for dynamically coupling a 3D hydrodynamic model (Telemac-3D) and a morphodynamic model (Sisyphe). The coupling is dynamic as these models exchange their information during simulations. This is a main advantage as it allows for taking into account the effects of the morphologic changes of the riverbed on the water hydrodynamic and the bedload processes. The coupled model has been calibrated using time series of gauged water depths and time series of bed material collected sequentially (after

  4. Qualitative and quantitative characterization of the arsenic-binding behaviour of sulfur-containing peptides and proteins by the coupling of reversed phase liquid chromatography to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anne-Christine; Mickein, Kathleen

    2012-08-01

    Phenylarsenic-substituted cysteine-containing peptides and proteins were completely differentiated from their unbound original forms by the coupling of reversed phase liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The analysis of biomolecules possessing structure-stabilizing disulfide bridges after reduction provides new insights into requirements concerning the accessibility of cysteine residues for reducing agents as well as for arsenic compounds in a spatial protein structure. Complementary binding studies performed using direct ESI-MS without chromatographic coupling in different solvent systems demonstrated that more than one binding site were activated for aprotinin and lysozyme in denaturing solvents because of a stronger defolding. From the intensities of the different charge states occurring in the mass spectra as well as from the LC elution behaviour, it can be deduced that the folding state of the arsenic-bound protein species resembles the native, oxidized conformation. In contrast, although the milk protein α-lactalbumin has several disulfide bridges, only one phenylarsenic moiety was bound under strongly denaturing conditions. Because of the charge state distribution in the ESI mass spectra, a conformational change to a molten globule structure is assumed. For the second considered milk protein ß-lactoglobulin, a noncovalent interaction with phenylarsine oxide was detected. In general, smaller apparent binding constants for the condensation reactions of the biomolecules with phenylarsine oxide leading to covalent arsenic-sulfur bindings were determined from direct injection ESI-MS measurements than from LC-ESI-MS coupling. The following order of binding affinities for one phenylarsenic group can be assumed from both ESI-MS and LC-ESI-MS: nonapeptide vasopressin > nonapeptide vasotocin > lysozyme > aprotinin > α-lactalbumin > thioredoxin. Kinetic investigations by LC-ESI-MS yielded a partial reaction order

  5. Overexpression of G protein-coupled receptor 87 correlates with poorer tumor differentiation and higher tumor proliferation in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    NII, KAZUHITO; TOKUNAGA, YOSHIMASA; LIU, DAGE; ZHANG, XIA; NAKANO, JUN; ISHIKAWA, SHINYA; KAKEHI, YOSHIYUKI; HABA, REIJI; YOKOMISE, HIROYASU

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 87 (GPR87) is a newly deorphanized member of the transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor family. Recently, GPR87 was suggested to contribute to the viability of human tumor cells and overexpression of GPR87 mRNA was detected in a number of malignant tumors, including lung cancer. We performed a retrospective study of GPR87 expression in association with clinical characteristics and biological markers in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We investigated a total of 123 patients with NSCLC who underwent surgery between 1999 and 2004 (58 adenocarcinomas, 53 squamous cell carcinomas and 12 others). Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the intratumoral expression of GPR87 and the Ki-67 proliferation index. The TUNEL method was also used to investigate tumor apoptosis. A total of 63 tumors (51.2%) were found to be GPR87-positive. These tumors were more frequently encountered among squamous cell carcinomas rather than among adenocarcinomas (62.3 vs. 43.1%, respectively; P=0.044) and were significantly more frequently poorly and moderately differentiated rather than well differentiated (P=0.029). Moreover, the Ki-67 index was significantly higher in GPR87-positive compared to GPR87-negative tumors (57.0 vs. 40.0%, respectively; P=0.002). The overall survival was significantly worse for patients with GPR87-positive compared to those with GPR87-negative tumors (P=0.029). The Cox regression analyses also demonstrated that the GPR87 status was a significant prognostic factor for NSCLC patients [hazard ratio=2.053; P=0.018). The present study demonstrated that in NSCLC, the overexpression of GPR87 is significantly associated with poorer differentiation and higher proliferation. During the progression of NSCLC, GPR87 overexpression may be associated with the acquisition of a more aggressive phenotype and, therefore, is a potentially useful target for prognostication and treatment. PMID:24940491

  6. Flight destinations and foraging behaviour of northern gannets ( Sula bassana) preying on a small forage fish in a low-Arctic ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garthe, Stefan; Montevecchi, William A.; Davoren, Gail K.

    2007-02-01

    We applied data loggers (temperature-depth and GPS-temperature-depth) on individual birds in combination with dietary sampling and a vessel survey of prey availability to assess the foraging behaviour of northern gannets ( Sula bassana, Linnaeus 1758) in a low-Arctic ecosystem in the NW Atlantic. We demonstrate that the gannets foraged almost exclusively on inshore and coastal aggregations of capelin. There was a strong correspondence between the distributions of capelin and foraging gannets, and gannets exhibited persistence in successive foraging trips to the same foraging areas. The diving activity of gannets was highest during the early morning and evening, when capelin are known to be primarily available in the upper water column. Most of the gannets dive depths were less than 5 m. Flight speeds recorded by GPS were 9% higher than those estimated by previous methods and were shown to benefit from tail wind. This study shows how a combination of ship-based surveys and individually tagged birds can help understanding predator-prey intersection in a three-dimensional space in the marine environment.

  7. Behavioural and Cognitive-Behavioural Treatments of Parasomnias

    PubMed Central

    Galbiati, Andrea; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Giora, Enrico; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Marelli, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Parasomnias are unpleasant or undesirable behaviours or experiences that occur predominantly during or within close proximity to sleep. Pharmacological treatments of parasomnias are available, but their efficacy is established only for few disorders. Furthermore, most of these disorders tend spontaneously to remit with development. Nonpharmacological treatments therefore represent valid therapeutic choices. This paper reviews behavioural and cognitive-behavioural managements employed for parasomnias. Referring to the ICSD-3 nosology we consider, respectively, NREM parasomnias, REM parasomnias, and other parasomnias. Although the efficacy of some of these treatments is proved, in other cases their clinical evidence cannot be provided because of the small size of the samples. Due to the rarity of some parasomnias, further multicentric researches are needed in order to offer a more complete account of behavioural and cognitive-behavioural treatments efficacy. PMID:26101458

  8. Discovery and Characterization of a Novel Small-Molecule Agonist for Medium-Chain Free Fatty Acid Receptor G Protein-Coupled Receptor 84.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Yang, Hui; Li, Jing; Xie, Xin

    2016-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 84 (GPR84) is a free fatty acid receptor activated by medium-chain free fatty acids with 9-14 carbons. It is expressed mainly in the immune-related tissues, such as spleen, bone marrow, and peripheral blood leukocytes. GPR84 plays significant roles in inflammatory processes and may represent a novel drug target for the treatment of immune-mediated diseases. However, the lack of potent and specific ligands for GPR84 hindered the study of its functions and the development of potential clinical applications. Here, we report the screen of 160,000 small-molecule compounds with a calcium mobilization assay using a human embryonic kidney 293 cell line stably expressing GPR84 and Gα16, and the identification of 2-(hexylthio)pyrimidine-4,6-diol (ZQ-16) as a potent and selective agonist of GPR84 with a novel structure. ZQ-16 activates several GPR84-mediated signaling pathways, including calcium mobilization, inhibition of cAMP accumulation, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2, receptor desensitization and internalization, and receptor-β-arrestin interaction. This compound may be a useful tool to study the functions of GPR84 and a potential candidate for further structural optimization. PMID:26962172

  9. Domain Movements upon Activation of Phenylalanine Hydroxylase Characterized by Crystallography and Chromatography-Coupled Small-Angle X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Meisburger, Steve P; Taylor, Alexander B; Khan, Crystal A; Zhang, Shengnan; Fitzpatrick, Paul F; Ando, Nozomi

    2016-05-25

    Mammalian phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH) is an allosteric enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the catabolism of the amino acid phenylalanine. Following allosteric activation by high phenylalanine levels, the enzyme catalyzes the pterin-dependent conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine. Inability to control elevated phenylalanine levels in the blood leads to increased risk of mental disabilities commonly associated with the inherited metabolic disorder, phenylketonuria. Although extensively studied, structural changes associated with allosteric activation in mammalian PheH have been elusive. Here, we examine the complex allosteric mechanisms of rat PheH using X-ray crystallography, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). We describe crystal structures of the preactivated state of the PheH tetramer depicting the regulatory domains docked against the catalytic domains and preventing substrate binding. Using SAXS, we further describe the domain movements involved in allosteric activation of PheH in solution and present the first demonstration of chromatography-coupled SAXS with Evolving Factor Analysis (EFA), a powerful method for separating scattering components in a model-independent way. Together, these results support a model for allostery in PheH in which phenylalanine stabilizes the dimerization of the regulatory domains and exposes the active site for substrate binding and other structural changes needed for activity. PMID:27145334

  10. Development of double-layer coupled coil for improving S/N in 7 T small-animal MRI.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Seo, Jeung-Hoon; Han, Sang-Doc; Heo, Phil; Im, Geun Ho; Lee, Jung Hee

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new double-layer coupled (DLC) surface radiofrequency (RF) coil using a combination of single-layer planar (SLP) and single-layer circular (SLC) coils, for enhancement of magnetic flux (B1 ) sensitivity and RF penetration in 7 T rat-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proposed DLC surface coil was fabricated according to an electromagnetic (EM) simulation and validated based on the B1 distribution and bench measurements. The DLC coil performance was quantitatively evaluated based on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and coil-response signal intensity curves in phantom and in vivo rat-body images. In the computational EM calculation and 7 T in vivo experimental results, the DLC surface coil clearly showed an increased S/N and higher RF transmit (B1 (+) ) profiles, compared to those of the SLP and SLC coils. While all surface coils displayed a rapid decrease in the MR signal from the near-coil region to the subject, the results reveal that the DLC coil concept may be used to provide sufficient RF penetration and high S/N and degrees of freedom for use in partial body imaging for 7 T ultra-high-field small-animal MRI. PMID:25914270

  11. Development and implementation of a finite element solution of the coupled neutron transport and thermoelastic equations governing the behavior of small nuclear assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Stephen Christian

    Small, highly enriched reactors designed for weapons effects simulations undergo extreme thermal transients during pulsed operations. The primary shutdown mechanism of these reactors---thermal expansion of fuel material---experiences an inertial delay resulting in a different value for the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity during pulse operation as compared to the value appropriate for steady-state operation. The value appropriate for pulsed operation may further vary as a function of initial reactivity addition. Here we design and implement a finite element numerical method to predict the pulse operation behavior of Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR) II, SPR III, and a hypothetical spherical assembly with identical fuel properties without using operationally observed data in our model. These numerical results are compared to available SPR II and SPR III operational data. The numerical methods employed herein may be modified and expanded in functionality to provide both accurate characterization of the behavior of fast burst reactors of any common geometry or isotropic fuel material in the design phase, as well as a computational tool for general coupled thermomechanical-neutronics behavior in the solid state for any reactor type.

  12. Gold Nanoparticle Internal Structure and Symmetry Probed by Unified Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and X-ray Diffraction Coupled with Molecular Dynamics Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Blaise; Cortes-Huerto, Robinson; Taché, Olivier; Testard, Fabienne; Menguy, Nicolas; Spalla, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    Shape and size are known to determine a nanoparticle's properties. Hardly ever studied in synthesis, the internal crystal structure (i.e., particle defects, crystallinity, and symmetry) is just as critical as shape and size since it directly impacts catalytic efficiency, plasmon resonance, and orients anisotropic growth of metallic nanoparticles. Hence, its control cannot be ignored any longer in today's research and applications in nanotechnology. This study implemented an unprecedented reliable measurement combining these three structural aspects. The unified small-angle X-ray scattering and diffraction measurement (SAXS/XRD) was coupled with molecular dynamics to allow simultaneous determination of nanoparticles' shape, size, and crystallinity at the atomic scale. Symmetry distribution (icosahedra-Ih, decahedra-Dh, and truncated octahedra-TOh) of 2-6 nm colloidal gold nanoparticles synthesized in organic solvents was quantified. Nanoparticle number density showed the predominance of Ih, followed by Dh, and little, if any, TOh. This result contradicts some theoretical predictions and highlights the strong effect of the synthesis environment on structure stability. We foresee that this unified SAXS/XRD analysis, yielding both statistical and quantitative counts of nanoparticles' symmetry distribution, will provide new insights into nanoparticle formation, growth, and assembly. PMID:26263393

  13. Behaviour and stability of Trivelpiece-Gould modes in non-neutral plasma containing small density fraction of background gas ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeliseyev, Y. N.

    2013-03-19

    It is shown that the frequencies of Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) modes in non-neutral plasma can get into the low-frequency range due to the Doppler shift caused by plasma rotation in crossed fields. TG modes interact with the ion modes that leads to plasma instability. In paper the frequency spectrum of 'cold' electron plasma completely filling a waveguide and containing small density fraction of ions of background gas is determined numerically. For ions the kinetic description is used. Oscillations having azimuthal number m= 2 are considered. In this case both low- and upper-hybrid TG modes get into the low-frequency range. The spectrum consists of families of 'modified' ion cyclotron (MIC) modes and electron TG modes with the frequencies equal to hybrid frequencies with the Doppler shift. The growth rates of upper-hybrid modes are much faster than the growth rates of low-hybrid and MIC modes.

  14. Small molecular probes for G-protein-coupled C5a receptors: conformationally constrained antagonists derived from the C terminus of the human plasma protein C5a.

    PubMed

    Wong, A K; Finch, A M; Pierens, G K; Craik, D J; Taylor, S M; Fairlie, D P

    1998-08-27

    Activation of the human complement system of plasma proteins in response to infection or injury produces a 4-helix bundle glycoprotein (74 amino acids) known as C5a. C5a binds to G-protein-coupled receptors on cell surfaces triggering receptor-ligand internalization, signal transduction, and powerful inflammatory responses. Since excessive levels of C5a are associated with autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders, inhibitors of receptor activation may have therapeutic potential. We now report solution structures and receptor-binding and antagonist activities for some of the first small molecule antagonists of C5a derived from its hexapeptide C terminus. The antagonist NMe-Phe-Lys-Pro-D-Cha-Trp-D-Arg-CO2H (1) surprisingly shows an unusually well-defined solution structure as determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy. This is one of the smallest acyclic peptides found to possess a defined solution conformation, which can be explained by the constraining role of intramolecular hydrogen bonding. NOE and coupling constant data, slow deuterium exchange, and a low dependence on temperature for the chemical shift of the D-Cha-NH strongly indicate an inverse gamma turn stabilized by a D-Cha-NH. OC-Lys hydrogen bond. Smaller conformational populations are associated with a hydrogen bond between Trp-NH.OC-Lys, defining a type II beta turn distorted by the inverse gamma turn incorporated within it. An excellent correlation between receptor-affinity and antagonist activity is indicated for a limited set of synthetic peptides. Conversion of the C-terminal carboxylate of 1 to an amide decreases antagonist potency 5-fold, but potency is increased up to 10-fold over 1 if the amide bond is made between the C-terminal carboxylate and a Lys/Orn side chain to form a cyclic analogue. The solution structure of cycle 6 also shows gamma and beta turns; however, the latter occurs in a different position, and there are clear conformational changes in 6 vs 1 that result in enhanced activity

  15. Behaviour of radiocaesium in coastal rivers of the Fukushima Prefecture (Japan) during conditions of low flow and low turbidity--Insight on the possible role of small particles and detrital organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Eyrolle-Boyer, Frédérique; Boyer, Patrick; Garcia-Sanchez, Laurent; Métivier, Jean-Michel; Onda, Yuichi; De Vismes, Anne; Cagnat, Xavier; Boulet, Béatrice; Cossonnet, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    To investigate riverine transfers from contaminated soils of the Fukushima Prefecture in Japan to the marine environment, suspended sediments, filtered water, sediments and detrital organic macro debris deposited onto river beds were collected in November 2013 within small coastal rivers during conditions of low flow rates and low turbidity. River waters were directly filtered on the field and high efficiency well-type Ge detectors were used to analyse radiocaesium concentrations in very small quantities of suspended particles and filtered water (a few mg to a few g). For such base-flow conditions, our results show that the watersheds studied present similar hydro-sedimentary behaviours at their outlets and that the exports of dissolved and particulate radiocaesium are comparable. Moreover, the contribution of these rivers to the instantaneous export of radiocaesium to the ocean is similar to that of the Abukuma River. Our preliminary results indicate that, in the estuaries, radiocaesium concentrations in suspended sediments would be reduced by more than 80%, while radiocaesium concentration in filtered waters would be maintained. Significant correlations between radiocaesium concentrations and radiocaesium inventories in the soils of the catchments indicate that there was at that time little intra and inter-watershed variability in the transfer processes of radiocaesium from lands to rivers at this regional scale. The apparent liquid-solid partition coefficient (KD) values acquired for the lowest loads/finest particles complement the values acquired by using sediment traps and highlight the strong capacity of the smallest particles to transfer radiocaesium. Finally, but not least, our observations suggest that there could be a significant transfer of highly contaminated detrital biomass from forest litter to the downstream rivers in a rather conservative way. PMID:26588202

  16. Magnetoelectric coupling study in multiferroic Pb(Fe{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} ceramics through small and large electric signal standard measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Oscar; Siqueiros, Jesus M.; Font, Reynaldo; Portelles, Jorge

    2011-05-01

    Multifunctional multiferroic materials such as the single phase compound Pb(Fe{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} (PFN), where ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic order coexist, are very promising and have great interest from the academic and technological points of view. In this work, coupling of the ferroelectric and magnetic moments is reported. For this study, a combination of the small signal response using the impedance spectroscopy technique and the electromechanical resonance method with the large signal response through standard ferroelectric hysteresis measurement, has been used with and without an applied magnetic field. The measurements to determine the electrical properties of the ceramic were performed as functions of the bias and poling electric fields. A simultaneous analysis of the complex dielectric constant {epsilon}-tilde, impedance Z-tilde, electric modulus M-tilde, admittance Y-tilde, and the electromechanical parameters and coupling factors is presented. The results are correlated with a previous study of structural, morphological, small signal dielectric frequency-temperature response, and the ferroelectric hysteretic, magnetic and magnetodielectric behaviors. The observed shifts of the resonance and antiresonance frequency values can be associated with change of the ferroelectric domain size favored by the readjustment of the oxygen octahedron when the magnetic field is applied. From P-E hysteresis loops obtained without and with an external applied magnetic field, a dc magnetoelectric coupling effect with maximum value of 4 kV/cm T (400 mV/cm Oe) was obtained.

  17. Behaviour Recovery. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Bill

    2004-01-01

    This second edition of Behaviour Recovery puts emphasis on teaching behaviour concerning children with emotional and behavioural disorders (EBD). These children have many factors in their lives that affect their behaviour over which schools have limited control. This book acknowledges the challenge and explores the practical realities, options and…

  18. Small-dilution correction to the spin-wave dispersion in the Heisenberg ferromagnet with first-, second-, and third-neighbor exchange coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir-Kheli, R. A.

    1984-02-01

    An exact expression for the small-dilution correction to the long-wavelength spin-wave dispersion in Heisenberg ferromagnets at low temperatures is derived by the transcription of the analysis of the preceding paper. Numerical results to six decimal places are presented for a variety of exchange integrals extending up to the third-neighbor shell.

  19. Working with What We've Got: Perceptions of Barriers and Supports among Small-Metropolitan-Area Same-Sex Adopting Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinkler, Lori A.; Goldberg, Abbie E.

    2011-01-01

    In seeking to adopt, lesbians and gay men may confront various barriers and obstacles. Ideally, they have access to a variety of support resources that can help to buffer the negative effects of these barriers. Lesbians and gay men living in small metropolitan communities may have limited access to support resources, however. The current…

  20. Amplitudes of protein backbone dynamics and correlated motions in a small alpha/beta protein: correspondence of dipolar coupling and heteronuclear relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2004-08-24

    Backbone residual dipolar coupling (N-H, Calpha-Halpha, N-C', and Calpha-C') data collected in five different media on the B3 IgG binding domain of streptococcal protein G (GB3) have been analyzed by simultaneous refinement of the coordinates and optimization of the magnitudes and orientations of the alignment tensors using single and multiple structure representations. We show, using appropriate error analysis, that agreement between observed and calculated dipolar couplings at the level of experimental uncertainty is obtained with a two-structure (N(e) = 2) ensemble representation which represents the simplest equilibrium description of anisotropic motions. The data permit one to determine the magnitude of the anisotropic motions along the four different backbone bond vectors in terms of order parameters. The order parameters, , for the N-H bond vectors are in qualitative agreement with the generalized order parameters, S(2)NH(relaxation), derived from (15)N relaxation measurements, with a correlation coefficient of 0.84. S(2)NH(relaxation) can be regarded as the product of an anisotropic order parameter, corresponding to derived from the residual dipolar couplings, and an axially symmetric order parameter, S(2)NH(axial), corresponding to bond librations which are expected to be essentially uniform along the polypeptide chain. The current data indicate that the average value of S(2)NH(axial) is approximately 0.9. The close correspondence of and S(2)NH(relaxation) indicates that any large-scale displacements from the mean coordinate positions on time scales longer than the rotational correlation time are rare and hence do not perturb the observed dipolar couplings. Analysis of a set of 100 N(e) = 2 ensembles reveals the presence of some long-range correlated motions of N-H and Calpha-Halpha vectors involving residues far apart in the sequence but close together in space. In addition, direct evidence is

  1. Spin-orbit coupling and chaotic rotation for circumbinary bodies. Application to the small satellites of the Pluto-Charon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Alexandre C. M.; Leleu, Adrien; Rambaux, Nicolas; Robutel, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the resonant rotation of circumbinary bodies in planar quasi-circular orbits. Denoting nb and n the orbital mean motion of the inner binary and of the circumbinary body, respectively, we show that spin-orbit resonances exist at the frequencies n ± kν/2, where ν = nb - n, and k is an integer. Moreover, when the libration at natural frequency has the same magnitude as ν, the resonances overlap and the rotation becomes chaotic. We apply these results to the small satellites in the Pluto-Charon system, and conclude that their rotations are likely chaotic. However, the rotation can also be stable and not synchronous for small axial asymmetries. Figure 4 and Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Demonstration of a fully-coupled end-to-end model for small pelagic fish using sardine and anchovy in the California Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Kenneth A.; Fiechter, Jerome; Curchitser, Enrique N.; Hedstrom, Kate; Bernal, Miguel; Creekmore, Sean; Haynie, Alan; Ito, Shin-ichi; Lluch-Cota, Salvador; Megrey, Bernard A.; Edwards, Chris A.; Checkley, Dave; Koslow, Tony; McClatchie, Sam; Werner, Francisco; MacCall, Alec; Agostini, Vera

    2015-11-01

    We describe and document an end-to-end model of anchovy and sardine population dynamics in the California Current as a proof of principle that such coupled models can be developed and implemented. The end-to-end model is 3-dimensional, time-varying, and multispecies, and consists of four coupled submodels: hydrodynamics, Eulerian nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton (NPZ), an individual-based full life cycle anchovy and sardine submodel, and an agent-based fishing fleet submodel. A predator roughly mimicking albacore was included as individuals that consumed anchovy and sardine. All submodels were coded within the ROMS open-source community model, and used the same resolution spatial grid and were all solved simultaneously to allow for possible feedbacks among the submodels. We used a super-individual approach and solved the coupled models on a distributed memory parallel computer, both of which created challenging but resolvable bookkeeping challenges. The anchovy and sardine growth, mortality, reproduction, and movement, and the fishing fleet submodel, were each calibrated using simplified grids before being inserted into the full end-to-end model. An historical simulation of 1959-2008 was performed, and the latter 45 years analyzed. Sea surface height (SSH) and sea surface temperature (SST) for the historical simulation showed strong horizontal gradients and multi-year scale temporal oscillations related to various climate indices (PDO, NPGO), and both showed responses to ENSO variability. Simulated total phytoplankton was lower during strong El Nino events and higher for the strong 1999 La Nina event. The three zooplankton groups generally corresponded to the spatial and temporal variation in simulated total phytoplankton. Simulated biomasses of anchovy and sardine were within the historical range of observed biomasses but predicted biomasses showed much less inter-annual variation. Anomalies of annual biomasses of anchovy and sardine showed a switch in the mid

  3. Thermoacoustic couple

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-10-04

    An apparatus and method for determining acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor are disclosed. The preferred embodiment of the apparatus, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  4. Parasitic small-moment antiferromagnetism and nonlinear coupling of hidden order and antiferromagnetism in URu2Si2 observed by Larmor diffraction.

    PubMed

    Niklowitz, P G; Pfleiderer, C; Keller, T; Vojta, M; Huang, Y-K; Mydosh, J A

    2010-03-12

    We report for the first time simultaneous microscopic measurements of the lattice constants, the distribution of the lattice constants, and the antiferromagnetic moment in high-purity URu(2)Si(2), combining Larmor and conventional neutron diffraction at low temperatures and pressures up to 18 kbar. Our data demonstrate quantitatively that the small moment in the hidden order (HO) of URu(2)Si(2) is purely parasitic. The excellent experimental conditions we achieve allow us to resolve that the transition line between HO and large-moment antiferromagnetism (LMAF), which stabilizes under pressure, is intrinsically first order and ends in a bicritical point. Therefore, the HO and LMAF must have different symmetry, which supports exotic scenarios of the HO such as orbital currents, helicity order, or multipolar order. PMID:20366444

  5. Ray Tracing to Predict Optical Behaviour of Shock Compressed Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tear, Gareth R.; Proud, William G.

    2015-06-01

    In order to investigate the optical response of dielectric materials under shock compression, a characteristics model has been combined with a three dimensional optical ray tracing model. A general biaxial optical model is used along with a first order photoelastic model which couples the characteristics component to the optical component. This optical model is three dimensional and as such can be used to investigate small deviations from the perfect one dimensional shock wave which is typically assumed in plate impact experiments. A detailed description of the model will be presented, and comparison to available literature as well as recent experiments on the optical behaviour of shock compressed a-cut calcite and a-cut sapphire. The authors would like to thank Dr D E Eakins and Dr D J Chapman for fruitful discussions. The Institute of Shock Physics acknowledges the continued support of AWE and Imperial College London.

  6. The detection method for small molecules coupled with a molecularly imprinted polymer/quantum dot chip using a home-built optical system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixi; Wang, Yong; Liu, Le; He, Yonghong; He, Qinghua; Ji, Yanhong

    2016-07-01

    A method to detect small molecules with a molecularly imprinted polymer/quantum dot (MIP-QD) chip using a home-built optical fluidic system was first proposed in this study. Ractopamine (RAC) was used as the model molecule to demonstrate its feasibility. The sensing of the target molecule is based on the quenching amount of the quantum dots. The method is facile, cost-saving, easy for miniaturization and avoids the cumbersome steps that are needed to get the fluorescent quenching curve using a spectrofluorometer. Most importantly, more details and accurate response time can be obtained by use of this method. The experimental results show that the prepared chips with low cost are highly selective and the home-built detection system allows the fast binding kinetics. The recorded quenching process was used to study the kinetic uptake of RAC onto the MIP-QD chip and the specificity towards RAC. The system can further be utilized to study the effect of the solvent, pH and temperature on the selectivity of the prepared MIP. The methodology could be extended to other similar studies with different molecules. Graphical abstract Schematic illustration of the molecularly imprinted polymer/quantum dot chip capturing the target molecule. PMID:27235159

  7. A rapid procedure for the determination of thorium, uranium, cadmium and molybdenum in small sediment samples by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Application in Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zheng, Yen; Weinman, B.; Cronin, T.; Fleisher, M.Q.; Anderson, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid procedure that allows precise analysis of Mo, Cd, U and Th in sediment samples as small as 10 mg by using a novel approach that utilizes a "pseudo" isotope dilution for Th and conventional isotope dilution for Mo, Cd and U by ICP-MS. Long-term reproducibility of the method is between 2.5 and 5% with an advantage of rapid analysis on a single digestion of sediment sample and the potential of adding other elements of interest if so desired. Application of this method to two piston cores collected near the mouth of the Patuxent River in Chesapeake Bay showed that the accumulation of authigenic Mo and Cd varied in response to the changing bottom water redox conditions, with anoxia showing consistent oscillations throughout both pre-industrial and industrial times. Accumulation of authigenic U shows consistent oscillations as well, without any apparent increase in productivity related to anoxic trends. Degrees of Mo and Cd enrichment also inversely correlate to halophilic microfaunal assemblages already established as paleoclimate proxies within the bay indicating that bottom water anoxia is driven in part by the amount of freshwater discharge that the area receives. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Activation of EGFR by small compounds through coupling the generation of hydrogen peroxide to stable dimerization of Cu/Zn SOD1

    PubMed Central

    Sakanyan, Vehary; Hulin, Philippe; Alves de Sousa, Rodolphe; Silva, Viviane A. O.; Hambardzumyan, Artur; Nedellec, Steven; Tomasoni, Christophe; Logé, Cédric; Pineau, Charles; Roussakis, Christos; Fleury, Fabrice; Artaud, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Activation of cell signaling by reactive chemicals and pollutants is an important issue for human health. It has been shown that lipophilic nitro-benzoxadiazole (NBD) compounds rapidly move across the plasma membrane and enhance Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) tyrosine phosphorylation in cancer cells. Unlike ligand-dependent activation, the mechanism of this induction relies on the generation of hydrogen peroxide, which is involved in the activation of the catalytic site of the receptor and the inactivation of protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-1B. Production of H2O2 during redox transformation of NBD compounds is associated with the transition of a monomeric form of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) to stable dimers. The highly stable and functionally active SOD1 dimer, in the absence of adequate activities in downstream reactions, promotes the disproportionate production and accumulation of intracellular hydrogen peroxide shortly after exposure to NBD compounds. The intrinsic fluorescence of small compounds was used to demonstrate their binding to SOD1. Our data indicate that H2O2 and concomitantly generated electrophilic intermediates behave as independent entities, but all contribute to the biological reactivity of NBD compounds. This study opens a promising path to identify new biomarkers of oxidative/electrophilic stress in the progression of cancer and other diseases. PMID:26883293

  9. Distinctive profiles of small RNA couple inverted repeat-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing with endogenous RNA silencing pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Matvienko, Marta; Piskurewicz, Urszula; Xu, Huaqin; Martineau, Belinda; Wong, Joan; Govindarajulu, Manjula; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The experimental induction of RNA silencing in plants often involves expression of transgenes encoding inverted repeat (IR) sequences to produce abundant dsRNAs that are processed into small RNAs (sRNAs). These sRNAs are key mediators of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and determine its specificity. Despite its application in agriculture and broad utility in plant research, the mechanism of IR-PTGS is incompletely understood. We generated four sets of 60 Arabidopsis plants, each containing IR transgenes expressing different configurations of uidA and CHALCONE SYNTHASE (At-CHS) gene fragments. Levels of PTGS were found to depend on the orientation and position of the fragment in the IR construct. Deep sequencing and mapping of sRNAs to corresponding transgene-derived and endogenous transcripts identified distinctive patterns of differential sRNA accumulation that revealed similarities among sRNAs associated with IR-PTGS and endogenous sRNAs linked to uncapped mRNA decay. Detailed analyses of poly-A cleavage products from At-CHS mRNA confirmed this hypothesis. We also found unexpected associations between sRNA accumulation and the presence of predicted open reading frames in the trigger sequence. In addition, strong IR-PTGS affected the prevalence of endogenous sRNAs, which has implications for the use of PTGS for experimental or applied purposes. PMID:25344399

  10. Activation of EGFR by small compounds through coupling the generation of hydrogen peroxide to stable dimerization of Cu/Zn SOD1.

    PubMed

    Sakanyan, Vehary; Hulin, Philippe; Alves de Sousa, Rodolphe; Silva, Viviane A O; Hambardzumyan, Artur; Nedellec, Steven; Tomasoni, Christophe; Logé, Cédric; Pineau, Charles; Roussakis, Christos; Fleury, Fabrice; Artaud, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Activation of cell signaling by reactive chemicals and pollutants is an important issue for human health. It has been shown that lipophilic nitro-benzoxadiazole (NBD) compounds rapidly move across the plasma membrane and enhance Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) tyrosine phosphorylation in cancer cells. Unlike ligand-dependent activation, the mechanism of this induction relies on the generation of hydrogen peroxide, which is involved in the activation of the catalytic site of the receptor and the inactivation of protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-1B. Production of H2O2 during redox transformation of NBD compounds is associated with the transition of a monomeric form of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) to stable dimers. The highly stable and functionally active SOD1 dimer, in the absence of adequate activities in downstream reactions, promotes the disproportionate production and accumulation of intracellular hydrogen peroxide shortly after exposure to NBD compounds. The intrinsic fluorescence of small compounds was used to demonstrate their binding to SOD1. Our data indicate that H2O2 and concomitantly generated electrophilic intermediates behave as independent entities, but all contribute to the biological reactivity of NBD compounds. This study opens a promising path to identify new biomarkers of oxidative/electrophilic stress in the progression of cancer and other diseases. PMID:26883293

  11. Distinctive profiles of small RNA couple inverted repeat-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing with endogenous RNA silencing pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Matvienko, Marta; Piskurewicz, Urszula; Xu, Huaqin; Martineau, Belinda; Wong, Joan; Govindarajulu, Manjula; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W

    2014-12-01

    The experimental induction of RNA silencing in plants often involves expression of transgenes encoding inverted repeat (IR) sequences to produce abundant dsRNAs that are processed into small RNAs (sRNAs). These sRNAs are key mediators of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and determine its specificity. Despite its application in agriculture and broad utility in plant research, the mechanism of IR-PTGS is incompletely understood. We generated four sets of 60 Arabidopsis plants, each containing IR transgenes expressing different configurations of uidA and CHALCONE Synthase (At-CHS) gene fragments. Levels of PTGS were found to depend on the orientation and position of the fragment in the IR construct. Deep sequencing and mapping of sRNAs to corresponding transgene-derived and endogenous transcripts identified distinctive patterns of differential sRNA accumulation that revealed similarities among sRNAs associated with IR-PTGS and endogenous sRNAs linked to uncapped mRNA decay. Detailed analyses of poly-A cleavage products from At-CHS mRNA confirmed this hypothesis. We also found unexpected associations between sRNA accumulation and the presence of predicted open reading frames in the trigger sequence. In addition, strong IR-PTGS affected the prevalence of endogenous sRNAs, which has implications for the use of PTGS for experimental or applied purposes. PMID:25344399

  12. Principal Component Analysis Coupled with Artificial Neural Networks—A Combined Technique Classifying Small Molecular Structures Using a Concatenated Spectral Database

    PubMed Central

    Gosav, Steluţa; Praisler, Mirela; Birsa, Mihail Lucian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present several expert systems that predict the class identity of the modeled compounds, based on a preprocessed spectral database. The expert systems were built using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and are designed to predict if an unknown compound has the toxicological activity of amphetamines (stimulant and hallucinogen), or whether it is a nonamphetamine. In attempts to circumvent the laws controlling drugs of abuse, new chemical structures are very frequently introduced on the black market. They are obtained by slightly modifying the controlled molecular structures by adding or changing substituents at various positions on the banned molecules. As a result, no substance similar to those forming a prohibited class may be used nowadays, even if it has not been specifically listed. Therefore, reliable, fast and accessible systems capable of modeling and then identifying similarities at molecular level, are highly needed for epidemiological, clinical, and forensic purposes. In order to obtain the expert systems, we have preprocessed a concatenated spectral database, representing the GC-FTIR (gas chromatography-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry) and GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) spectra of 103 forensic compounds. The database was used as input for a Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The scores of the forensic compounds on the main principal components (PCs) were then used as inputs for the ANN systems. We have built eight PC-ANN systems (principal component analysis coupled with artificial neural network) with a different number of input variables: 15 PCs, 16 PCs, 17 PCs, 18 PCs, 19 PCs, 20 PCs, 21 PCs and 22 PCs. The best expert system was found to be the ANN network built with 18 PCs, which accounts for an explained variance of 77%. This expert system has the best sensitivity (a rate of classification C = 100% and a rate of true positives TP = 100%), as well as a good selectivity (a rate of true negatives TN = 92.77%). A

  13. Ultra-trace plutonium determination in small volume seawater by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with application to Fukushima seawater samples.

    PubMed

    Bu, Wenting; Zheng, Jian; Guo, Qiuju; Aono, Tatsuo; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2014-04-11

    Long-term monitoring of Pu isotopes in seawater is required for assessing Pu contamination in the marine environment from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. In this study, we established an accurate and precise analytical method based on anion-exchange chromatography and SF-ICP-MS. This method was able to determine Pu isotopes in seawater samples with small volumes (20-60L). The U decontamination factor was 3×10(7)-1×10(8), which provided sufficient removal of interfering U from the seawater samples. The estimated limits of detection for (239)Pu and (240)Pu were 0.11fgmL(-1) and 0.08fgmL(-1), respectively, which corresponded to 0.01mBqm(-3) for (239)Pu and 0.03mBqm(-3) for (240)Pu when a 20L volume of seawater was measured. We achieved good precision (2.9%) and accuracy (0.8%) for measurement of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio in the standard Pu solution with a (239)Pu concentration of 11fgmL(-1) and (240)Pu concentration of 2.7fgmL(-1). Seawater reference materials were used for the method validation and both the (239+240)Pu activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios agreed well with the expected values. Surface and bottom seawater samples collected off Fukushima in the western North Pacific since March 2011 were analyzed. Our results suggested that there was no significant variation of the Pu distribution in seawater in the investigated areas compared to the distribution before the accident. PMID:24636561

  14. Dynamics of climate and ecosystem coupling: abrupt changes and multiple equilibria.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Paul A T; Mastrandrea, Michael D; Schneider, Stephen H

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between subunits of the global climate-biosphere system (e.g. atmosphere, ocean, biosphere and cryosphere) often lead to behaviour that is not evident when each subunit is viewed in isolation. This newly evident behaviour is an emergent property of the coupled subsystems. Interactions between thermohaline circulation and climate illustrate one emergent property of coupling ocean and atmospheric circulation. The multiple thermohaline circulation equilibria that result caused abrupt climate changes in the past and may cause abrupt climate changes in the future. Similarly, coupling between the climate system and ecosystem structure and function produces complex behaviour in certain regions. For example, atmosphere-biosphere interactions in the Sahel region of West Africa lead to multiple stable equilibria. Either wet or dry climate equilibria can occur under otherwise identical forcing conditions. The equilibrium reached is dependent on past history (i.e. initial conditions), and relatively small perturbations to either climate or vegetation can cause switching between the two equilibria. Both thermohaline circulation and the climate-vegetation system in the Sahel are prone to abrupt changes that may be irreversible. This complicates the relatively linear view of global changes held in many scientific and policy communities. Emergent properties of coupled socio-natural systems add yet another layer of complexity to the policy debate. As a result, the social and economic consequences of possible global changes are likely to be underestimated in most conventional analyses because these nonlinear, abrupt and irreversible responses are insufficiently considered. PMID:12079526

  15. Dynamics of climate and ecosystem coupling: abrupt changes and multiple equilibria.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Paul A T; Mastrandrea, Michael D; Schneider, Stephen H

    2002-05-29

    Interactions between subunits of the global climate-biosphere system (e.g. atmosphere, ocean, biosphere and cryosphere) often lead to behaviour that is not evident when each subunit is viewed in isolation. This newly evident behaviour is an emergent property of the coupled subsystems. Interactions between thermohaline circulation and climate illustrate one emergent property of coupling ocean and atmospheric circulation. The multiple thermohaline circulation equilibria that result caused abrupt climate changes in the past and may cause abrupt climate changes in the future. Similarly, coupling between the climate system and ecosystem structure and function produces complex behaviour in certain regions. For example, atmosphere-biosphere interactions in the Sahel region of West Africa lead to multiple stable equilibria. Either wet or dry climate equilibria can occur under otherwise identical forcing conditions. The equilibrium reached is dependent on past history (i.e. initial conditions), and relatively small perturbations to either climate or vegetation can cause switching between the two equilibria. Both thermohaline circulation and the climate-vegetation system in the Sahel are prone to abrupt changes that may be irreversible. This complicates the relatively linear view of global changes held in many scientific and policy communities. Emergent properties of coupled socio-natural systems add yet another layer of complexity to the policy debate. As a result, the social and economic consequences of possible global changes are likely to be underestimated in most conventional analyses because these nonlinear, abrupt and irreversible responses are insufficiently considered. PMID:12079526

  16. A meta-analysis of the effects of measuring theory of planned behaviour constructs on behaviour within prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Mankarious, Evon; Kothe, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Measurement reactivity effects, such as the mere measurement effect, have been proposed as a reason for behavioural changes in a number of theory of planned behaviour intervention studies. However, it is unclear whether such changes are the result of the mere measurement effect or of other artefacts of intervention study design. The aim of this study is to determine the size and direction of changes in health behaviours from baseline to follow-up in prospective studies using the theory of planned behaviour. Electronic databases were searched for the theory of planned behaviour studies which measured health behaviours at two or more time points. Change in behaviour was calculated for all studies. Sixty-six studies were included. Mean effect sizes across all studies were small and negative (d = -.03). Effect size was moderated by behaviour, behaviour type and follow-up length. Subgroup analyses showed significant decreases in socially undesirable behaviour (d = -.28), binge drinking (d = -.17), risk driving (d = -.20), sugar snack consumption (d = -.43) and sun-protective behaviour (d = -.18). Measurement of intention at baseline resulted in significant decreases in undesirable behaviour. Changes in undesirable behaviours reported in other studies may be the result of the mere measurement effect. PMID:26209208

  17. The influence of social norms on the dynamics of vaccinating behaviour for paediatric infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oraby, Tamer; Thampi, Vivek; Bauch, Chris T.

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models that couple disease dynamics and vaccinating behaviour often assume that the incentive to vaccinate disappears if disease prevalence is zero. Hence, they predict that vaccine refusal should be the rule, and elimination should be difficult or impossible. In reality, countries with non-mandatory vaccination policies have usually been able to maintain elimination or very low incidence of paediatric infectious diseases for long periods of time. Here, we show that including injunctive social norms can reconcile such behaviour-incidence models to observations. Adding social norms to a coupled behaviour-incidence model enables the model to better explain pertussis vaccine uptake and disease dynamics in the UK from 1967 to 2010, in both the vaccine-scare years and the years of high vaccine coverage. The model also illustrates how a vaccine scare can perpetuate suboptimal vaccine coverage long after perceived risk has returned to baseline, pre-vaccine-scare levels. However, at other model parameter values, social norms can perpetuate depressed vaccine coverage during a vaccine scare well beyond the time when the population's baseline vaccine risk perception returns to pre-scare levels. Social norms can strongly suppress vaccine uptake despite frequent outbreaks, as observed in some small communities. Significant portions of the parameter space also exhibit bistability, meaning long-term outcomes depend on the initial conditions. Depending on the context, social norms can either support or hinder immunization goals. PMID:24523276

  18. The influence of social norms on the dynamics of vaccinating behaviour for paediatric infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Oraby, Tamer; Thampi, Vivek; Bauch, Chris T

    2014-04-01

    Mathematical models that couple disease dynamics and vaccinating behaviour often assume that the incentive to vaccinate disappears if disease prevalence is zero. Hence, they predict that vaccine refusal should be the rule, and elimination should be difficult or impossible. In reality, countries with non-mandatory vaccination policies have usually been able to maintain elimination or very low incidence of paediatric infectious diseases for long periods of time. Here, we show that including injunctive social norms can reconcile such behaviour-incidence models to observations. Adding social norms to a coupled behaviour-incidence model enables the model to better explain pertussis vaccine uptake and disease dynamics in the UK from 1967 to 2010, in both the vaccine-scare years and the years of high vaccine coverage. The model also illustrates how a vaccine scare can perpetuate suboptimal vaccine coverage long after perceived risk has returned to baseline, pre-vaccine-scare levels. However, at other model parameter values, social norms can perpetuate depressed vaccine coverage during a vaccine scare well beyond the time when the population's baseline vaccine risk perception returns to pre-scare levels. Social norms can strongly suppress vaccine uptake despite frequent outbreaks, as observed in some small communities. Significant portions of the parameter space also exhibit bistability, meaning long-term outcomes depend on the initial conditions. Depending on the context, social norms can either support or hinder immunization goals. PMID:24523276

  19. Coupled transverse motion

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetic field in an accelerator or a storage ring is usually so designed that the horizontal (x) and the vertical (y) motions of an ion are uncoupled. However, because of imperfections in construction and alignment, some small coupling is unavoidable. In this lecture, we discuss in a general way what is known about the behaviors of coupled motions in two degrees-of-freedom. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Evolution of central pattern generators and rhythmic behaviours.

    PubMed

    Katz, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Comparisons of rhythmic movements and the central pattern generators (CPGs) that control them uncover principles about the evolution of behaviour and neural circuits. Over the course of evolutionary history, gradual evolution of behaviours and their neural circuitry within any lineage of animals has been a predominant occurrence. Small changes in gene regulation can lead to divergence of circuit organization and corresponding changes in behaviour. However, some behavioural divergence has resulted from large-scale rewiring of the neural network. Divergence of CPG circuits has also occurred without a corresponding change in behaviour. When analogous rhythmic behaviours have evolved independently, it has generally been with different neural mechanisms. Repeated evolution of particular rhythmic behaviours has occurred within some lineages due to parallel evolution or latent CPGs. Particular motor pattern generating mechanisms have also evolved independently in separate lineages. The evolution of CPGs and rhythmic behaviours shows that although most behaviours and neural circuits are highly conserved, the nature of the behaviour does not dictate the neural mechanism and that the presence of homologous neural components does not determine the behaviour. This suggests that although behaviour is generated by neural circuits, natural selection can act separately on these two levels of biological organization. PMID:26598733

  1. Social behaviour in mesopelagic jellyfish.

    PubMed

    Kaartvedt, Stein; Ugland, Karl I; Klevjer, Thor A; Røstad, Anders; Titelman, Josefin; Solberg, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Gelatinous organisms apparently play a central role in deep pelagic ecosystems, but lack of observational methodologies has restricted information on their behaviour. We made acoustic records of diel migrating jellyfish Periphylla periphylla forming small, ephemeral groups at the upper fringe of an acoustic scattering layer consisting of krill. Groups of P. periphylla were also documented photographically using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Although the adaptive value of group formation remains speculative, we clearly demonstrate the ability of these jellyfishes to locate and team up with each other. PMID:26065904

  2. Social behaviour in mesopelagic jellyfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaartvedt, Stein; Ugland, Karl I.; Klevjer, Thor A.; Røstad, Anders; Titelman, Josefin; Solberg, Ingrid

    2015-06-01

    Gelatinous organisms apparently play a central role in deep pelagic ecosystems, but lack of observational methodologies has restricted information on their behaviour. We made acoustic records of diel migrating jellyfish Periphylla periphylla forming small, ephemeral groups at the upper fringe of an acoustic scattering layer consisting of krill. Groups of P. periphylla were also documented photographically using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Although the adaptive value of group formation remains speculative, we clearly demonstrate the ability of these jellyfishes to locate and team up with each other.

  3. Social behaviour in mesopelagic jellyfish

    PubMed Central

    Kaartvedt, Stein; Ugland, Karl I.; Klevjer, Thor A.; Røstad, Anders; Titelman, Josefin; Solberg, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Gelatinous organisms apparently play a central role in deep pelagic ecosystems, but lack of observational methodologies has restricted information on their behaviour. We made acoustic records of diel migrating jellyfish Periphylla periphylla forming small, ephemeral groups at the upper fringe of an acoustic scattering layer consisting of krill. Groups of P. periphylla were also documented photographically using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Although the adaptive value of group formation remains speculative, we clearly demonstrate the ability of these jellyfishes to locate and team up with each other. PMID:26065904

  4. Time, Space and Gender: Understanding "Problem" Behaviour in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jane

    2007-01-01

    The following article reports on a small-scale, exploratory study of aggressive and "problem" behaviour in pre-school children. This project was conceived in the wider context of anxieties about childhood and New Labour's policy focus on "anti-social" behaviour in children. Based on interviews with nursery staff and parents in addition to…

  5. Behaviour Profile of Hungarian Adolescent Outpatients with a Dual Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinya, Elek; Csorba, Janos; Suli, Agota; Grosz, Zsofia

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour dimensions of 244 Hungarian adolescent psychiatric outpatients with a dual diagnosis (intellectual disability and psychiatric diagnosis) were examined by means of the adapted version of the Behaviour Problem Inventory (BPI, Rojahn, Matson, Lott, Esbensen, & Smalls, 2001). Four IQ subgroups were created: borderline, mild, moderate and…

  6. Changes in the acoustic environment alter the foraging and sheltering behaviour of the cichlid Amititlania nigrofasciata.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Kirsty Elizabeth; Kunc, Hansjoerg P

    2015-07-01

    Anthropogenic noise can affect behaviour across a wide range of species in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. However, behaviours might not be affected in isolation. Therefore, a more holistic approach investigating how environmental stressors, such as noise pollution, affect different behaviours in concert is necessary. Using tank-based noise exposure experiments, we tested how changes in the acoustic environment affect the behaviour of the cichlid Amatitlania nigrofasciata. We found that exposure to anthropogenic noise affected a couple of behaviours: an increase in sheltering was accompanied by a decrease in foraging. Our results highlight the multiple negative effects of an environmental stressor on an individual's behaviour. PMID:25937344

  7. Coexisting Problem Behaviour in Severe Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahle, Anne Elisabeth; Knivsberg, Ann-Mari; Andreassen, Anne Brit

    2011-01-01

    A small group of children and young adolescent with dyslexia has severely impaired reading skills despite prolonged special education. These are the students in focus. In dyslexia, problem behaviour, internalised as well as externalised, has previously been reported, so also for the participants with dyslexia in this study. The aim of the present…

  8. Genetics of impulsive behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as the tendency to act without foresight, comprises a multitude of constructs and is associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Dissecting different aspects of impulsive behaviour and relating these to specific neurobiological circuits would improve our understanding of the etiology of complex behaviours for which impulsivity is key, and advance genetic studies in this behavioural domain. In this review, we will discuss the heritability of some impulsivity constructs and their possible use as endophenotypes (heritable, disease-associated intermediate phenotypes). Several functional genetic variants associated with impulsive behaviour have been identified by the candidate gene approach and re-sequencing, and whole genome strategies can be implemented for discovery of novel rare and common alleles influencing impulsivity. Via deep sequencing an uncommon HTR2B stop codon, common in one population, was discovered, with implications for understanding impulsive behaviour in both humans and rodents and for future gene discovery. PMID:23440466

  9. Towards an integrated approach of pedestrian behaviour and exposure.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Eleonora

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an integrated methodology for the analysis of pedestrian behaviour and exposure is proposed, allowing to identify and quantify the effect of pedestrian behaviour, road and traffic characteristics on pedestrian risk exposure, for each pedestrian and for populations of pedestrians. The paper builds on existing research on pedestrian exposure, namely the Routledge microscopic indicator, proposes adjustments to take into account road, traffic and human factors and extends the use of this indicator on area-wide level. Moreover, this paper uses integrated choice and latent variables (ICLV) models of pedestrian behaviour, taking into account road, traffic and human factors. Finally, a methodology is proposed for the integrated estimation of pedestrian behaviour and exposure on the basis of road, traffic and human factors. The method is tested with data from a field survey in Athens, Greece, which used pedestrian behaviour observations as well as a questionnaire on human factors of pedestrian behaviour. The data were used (i) to develop ICLV models of pedestrian behaviour and (ii) to estimate the behaviour and exposure of pedestrians for different road, traffic and behavioural scenarios. The results suggest that both pedestrian behaviour and exposure are largely defined by a small number of factors: road type, traffic volume and pedestrian risk-taking. The probability for risk-taking behaviour and the related exposure decrease in less demanding road and traffic environments. A synthesis of the results allows to enhance the understanding of the interactions between behaviour and exposure of pedestrians and to identify conditions of increased risk exposure. These conditions include principal urban arterials (where risk-taking behaviour is low but the related exposure is very high) and minor arterials (where risk-taking behaviour is more frequent, and the related exposure is still high). A "paradox" of increased risk-taking behaviour of pedestrians with low

  10. Solution Structure of the 128 kDa Enzyme I Dimer from Escherichia coli and its 146 kDa Complex With HPr Using Residual Dipolar Couplings and Small and Wide Angle X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Schwieters, Charles D.; Suh, Jeong-Yong; Grishaev, Alexander; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Takayama, Yuki; Clore, G. Marius

    2010-01-01

    The solution structures of free Enzyme I (EI, ∼128 kDa, 575×2 residues), the first enzyme in the bacterial phosphotransferse system and its complex with HPr (∼146 kDa) have been solved using novel methodology that makes use of prior structural knowledge (namely, the structures of the dimeric EIC domain and the isolated EIN domain both free and complexed to HPr), combined with residual dipolar coupling (RDC), small (SAXS) and wide (WAXS) angle X-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) data. The calculational strategy employs conjoined rigid body/torsion/Cartesian simulated annealing, and incorporates improvements in calculating and refining against SAXS/WAXS data that take into account complex molecular shapes in the description of the solvent layer resulting in a better representation of the SAXS/WAXS data. The RDC data orient the symmetrically related EIN domains relative to the C2 symmetry axis of the EIC dimer, while translational, shape and size information is provided by SAXS/WAXS. The resulting structures are independently validated by SANS. Comparison of the structures of the free EI and the EI-HPr complex with that of the crystal structure of a trapped phosphorylated EI intermediate reveals large (∼70-90°) hinge body rotations of the two subdomains comprising the EIN domain, as well as of the EIN domain relative to the dimeric EIC domain. These large-scale interdomain motions shed light on the structural transitions that accompany the catalytic cycle of EI. PMID:20731394

  11. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1982-03-17

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the U sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  12. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, William S.

    1989-04-25

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the "U" sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  13. Understanding individual routing behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lima, Antonio; Stanojevic, Rade; Papagiannaki, Dina; Rodriguez, Pablo; González, Marta C

    2016-03-01

    Knowing how individuals move between places is fundamental to advance our understanding of human mobility (González et al. 2008 Nature 453, 779-782. (doi:10.1038/nature06958)), improve our urban infrastructure (Prato 2009 J. Choice Model. 2, 65-100. (doi:10.1016/S1755-5345(13)70005-8)) and drive the development of transportation systems. Current route-choice models that are used in transportation planning are based on the widely accepted assumption that people follow the minimum cost path (Wardrop 1952 Proc. Inst. Civ. Eng. 1, 325-362. (doi:10.1680/ipeds.1952.11362)), despite little empirical support. Fine-grained location traces collected by smart devices give us today an unprecedented opportunity to learn how citizens organize their travel plans into a set of routes, and how similar behaviour patterns emerge among distinct individual choices. Here we study 92 419 anonymized GPS trajectories describing the movement of personal cars over an 18-month period. We group user trips by origin-destination and we find that most drivers use a small number of routes for their routine journeys, and tend to have a preferred route for frequent trips. In contrast to the cost minimization assumption, we also find that a significant fraction of drivers' routes are not optimal. We present a spatial probability distribution that bounds the route selection space within an ellipse, having the origin and the destination as focal points, characterized by high eccentricity independent of the scale. While individual routing choices are not captured by path optimization, their spatial bounds are similar, even for trips performed by distinct individuals and at various scales. These basic discoveries can inform realistic route-choice models that are not based on optimization, having an impact on several applications, such as infrastructure planning, routing recommendation systems and new mobility solutions. PMID:26962031

  14. Applying One Health to behaviour.

    PubMed

    Bower, Caroline

    2014-11-01

    The British Veterinary Behaviour Association and the Association of Pet Behaviour Counsellors held a meeting last month to highlight the One Health principle with regard to the behaviour of people and animals, particularly pets. Caroline Bower reports. PMID:25377201

  15. Behavioural therapy of suicidality.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Barbara

    2012-11-01

    Suicidal behaviour is a serious public health issue. Suicidal behaviour includes completed suicide, suicide attempts, suicidal intent and/or plans and suicide ideation. Two prominent mechanisms, behavioural deficits, in particular poor problem-solving skills, and a certain cognitive style with overgeneralization, distortion and lack of positive expectations, have been identified in suicidal patients so far. Besides general therapy strategies, including the diagnostic process and a collaborative, confident relationship and strengthening of protective factors, specific behavioural strategies should aim at the modification of the behavioural repertoire and of cognitive strategies. The modification of the behavioural repertoire includes the direct modification of the behaviour, acquiring techniques for stress reduction and learning problem-solving strategies. Applied cognitive techniques comprise such as thought-stopping, examining options and alternatives, fantasizing consequences, externalizing inner voices, and reattribution. Psychotherapy with suicidal patients has a specific feature: It requires high activity of the therapist in terms of motivation and guidance of the patient. Regular assessment of the suicide risk at every session is a must. Nevertheless, the therapist should always be aware that it is impossible to prevent all suicidal acts. PMID:22926057

  16. Polyalkynylanthracenes--syntheses, structures and their behaviour towards UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Jan-Hendrik; Glatthor, Johanna; Weddeling, Jan-Henrik; Mix, Andreas; Chmiel, Jasmin; Neumann, Beate; Stammler, Hans-Georg; Mitzel, Norbert W

    2014-10-01

    A series of bis- and tris[(trimethylsilyl)ethynyl]anthracenes (1,5-, 1,8-, 9,10- and 1,8,10-) has been synthesised by multistep (cross coupling) reactions and the behaviour of the SiMe3-functionalised alkynylanthracene derivatives towards UV irradiation was qualitatively studied by NMR spectroscopy. In the case of 9,10-bis[(trimethylsilyl)ethynyl]anthracene we observed a photodimerisation upon UV irradiation; the third example was reported for a symmetrically 9,10-difunctionalised anthracene derivative, besides those with small fluorine- and methyl-substituents. The anthracene dimerisation is completely thermally reversible and the temperature dependence of the cycloelimination reaction was studied by (1)H VT-NMR experiments. The (deprotected) 1,5- and 1,8-diethynylanthracenes were converted with (dimethylamino)trimethylstannane to obtain the corresponding SnMe3-functionalised alkynes, potentially useful as highly conjugated building blocks in Stille cross coupling reactions. The new anthracene compounds were completely characterised by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, (high resolution) mass spectrometry and - in most cases - by X-ray diffraction experiments. PMID:25162922

  17. Strong coupling in the sub-wavelength limit using metamaterial nanocavities

    PubMed Central

    Benz, A.; Campione, S.; Liu, S.; Montaño, I.; Klem, J.F.; Allerman, A; Wendt, J.R.; Sinclair, M.B.; Capolino, F.; Brener, I.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between cavity modes and optical transitions leads to new coupled light-matter states in which the energy is periodically exchanged between the matter states and the optical mode. Here we present experimental evidence of optical strong coupling between modes of individual sub-wavelength metamaterial nanocavities and engineered optical transitions in semiconductor heterostructures. We show that this behaviour is generic by extending the results from the mid-infrared (~10 μm) to the near-infrared (~1.5 μm). Using mid-infrared structures, we demonstrate that the light-matter coupling occurs at the single resonator level and with extremely small interaction volumes. We calculate a mode volume of 4.9 × 10−4 (λ/n)3 from which we infer that only ~2,400 electrons per resonator participate in this energy exchange process. PMID:24287692

  18. Emergent patterns in space and time from daisyworld: a simple evolving coupled biosphere-climate model.

    PubMed

    Ackland, Graeme J; Wood, A Jamie

    2010-01-13

    We present a simplified model of a coupled planetary geosphere-biosphere, with two evolving species coupled through a single enviromental variable. The species do not compete directly, but instead compete through, and can evolve their effect on, this environmental parameter. The model produces an evolutionary arms race, with each species evolving extreme behaviour to counteract the other. The result is an apparently stable balance, with the planet supporting a maximum amount of life, in unusually patterned configurations. However, this balance is achieved by two countering effects and is susceptible to very large correlated fluctuations and extinction events if the balance is disturbed. This arms-race evolution is observed even for very small differences between the species: for a coupled evolving system, the 'neutral' theory of identical species is not the limiting case. PMID:19948549

  19. Optical Activity Enhanced by Strong Inter-molecular Coupling in Planar Chiral Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Teun-Teun; Oh, Sang Soon; Park, Hyun-Sung; Zhao, Rongkuo; Kim, Seong-Han; Choi, Wonjune; Min, Bumki; Hess, Ortwin

    2014-01-01

    The polarization of light can be rotated in materials with an absence of molecular or structural mirror symmetry. While this rotating ability is normally rather weak in naturally occurring chiral materials, artificial chiral metamaterials have demonstrated extraordinary rotational ability by engineering intra-molecular couplings. However, while in general, chiral metamaterials can exhibit strong rotatory power at or around resonances, they convert linearly polarized waves into elliptically polarized ones. Here, we demonstrate that strong inter-molecular coupling through a small gap between adjacent chiral metamolecules can lead to a broadband enhanced rotating ability with pure rotation of linearly polarized electromagnetic waves. Strong inter-molecular coupling leads to nearly identical behaviour in magnitude, but engenders substantial difference in phase between transmitted left and right-handed waves. PMID:25209452

  20. Oxidative stress, activity behaviour and body mass in captive parrots.

    PubMed

    Larcombe, S D; Tregaskes, C A; Coffey, J; Stevenson, A E; Alexander, L G; Arnold, K E

    2015-01-01

    Many parrot species are kept in captivity for conservation, but often show poor reproduction, health and survival. These traits are known to be influenced by oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability of antioxidant defences to ameliorate ROS damage. In humans, oxidative stress is linked with obesity, lack of exercise and poor nutrition, all of which are common in captive animals. Here, we tested whether small parrots (budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus) maintained in typical pet cages and on ad libitum food varied in oxidative profile, behaviour and body mass. Importantly, as with many birds held in captivity, they did not have enough space to engage in extensive free flight. Four types of oxidative damage, single-stranded DNA breaks (low-pH comet assay), alkali-labile sites in DNA (high-pH comet assay), sensitivity of DNA to ROS (H2O2-treated comet assay) and malondialdehyde (a byproduct of lipid peroxidation), were uncorrelated with each other and with plasma concentrations of dietary antioxidants. Without strenuous exercise over 28 days in a relatively small cage, more naturally 'active' individuals had more single-stranded DNA breaks than sedentary birds. High body mass at the start or end of the experiment, coupled with substantial mass gain, were all associated with raised sensitivity of DNA to ROS. Thus, high body mass in these captive birds was associated with oxidative damage. These birds were not lacking dietary antioxidants, because final body mass was positively related to plasma levels of retinol, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol. Individuals varied widely in activity levels, feeding behaviour, mass gain and oxidative profile despite standardized living conditions. DNA damage is often associated with poor immunocompetence, low fertility and faster ageing. Thus, we have candidate mechanisms for the limited lifespan and fecundity common to many birds kept for conservation purposes. PMID:27293729

  1. Oxidative stress, activity behaviour and body mass in captive parrots

    PubMed Central

    Larcombe, S. D.; Tregaskes, C. A.; Coffey, J.; Stevenson, A. E.; Alexander, L. G.; Arnold, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Many parrot species are kept in captivity for conservation, but often show poor reproduction, health and survival. These traits are known to be influenced by oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability of antioxidant defences to ameliorate ROS damage. In humans, oxidative stress is linked with obesity, lack of exercise and poor nutrition, all of which are common in captive animals. Here, we tested whether small parrots (budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus) maintained in typical pet cages and on ad libitum food varied in oxidative profile, behaviour and body mass. Importantly, as with many birds held in captivity, they did not have enough space to engage in extensive free flight. Four types of oxidative damage, single-stranded DNA breaks (low-pH comet assay), alkali-labile sites in DNA (high-pH comet assay), sensitivity of DNA to ROS (H2O2-treated comet assay) and malondialdehyde (a byproduct of lipid peroxidation), were uncorrelated with each other and with plasma concentrations of dietary antioxidants. Without strenuous exercise over 28 days in a relatively small cage, more naturally ‘active’ individuals had more single-stranded DNA breaks than sedentary birds. High body mass at the start or end of the experiment, coupled with substantial mass gain, were all associated with raised sensitivity of DNA to ROS. Thus, high body mass in these captive birds was associated with oxidative damage. These birds were not lacking dietary antioxidants, because final body mass was positively related to plasma levels of retinol, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol. Individuals varied widely in activity levels, feeding behaviour, mass gain and oxidative profile despite standardized living conditions. DNA damage is often associated with poor immunocompetence, low fertility and faster ageing. Thus, we have candidate mechanisms for the limited lifespan and fecundity common to many birds kept for conservation purposes. PMID

  2. Suicide and suicidal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Turecki, Gustavo; Brent, David A

    2016-03-19

    Suicide is a complex public health problem of global importance. Suicidal behaviour differs between sexes, age groups, geographic regions, and sociopolitical settings, and variably associates with different risk factors, suggesting aetiological heterogeneity. Although there is no effective algorithm to predict suicide in clinical practice, improved recognition and understanding of clinical, psychological, sociological, and biological factors might help the detection of high-risk individuals and assist in treatment selection. Psychotherapeutic, pharmacological, or neuromodulatory treatments of mental disorders can often prevent suicidal behaviour; additionally, regular follow-up of people who attempt suicide by mental health services is key to prevent future suicidal behaviour. PMID:26385066

  3. Cognitive science and behaviourism.

    PubMed

    Skinner, B F

    1985-08-01

    In this paper it is argued that cognitive scientists, claiming the support of brain science and computer simulation, have revived a traditional view that behaviour is initiated by an internal, autonomous mind. In doing so, they have misused the metaphor of storage and retrieval, given neurology a misleading assignment, frequently replaced controlled experimental conditions with mere descriptions of conditions and the assessment of behaviour with statements of expectations and intentions, given feelings and states of mind the status of causes of behaviour rather than the products of the causes, and failed to define many key terms in dimensions acceptable to science. PMID:4041702

  4. Early ant trajectories: spatial behaviour before behaviourism.

    PubMed

    Wehner, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    In the beginning of the twentieth century, when Jacques Loeb's and John Watson's mechanistic view of life started to dominate animal physiology and behavioural biology, several scientists with different academic backgrounds got engaged in studying the wayfinding behaviour of ants. Largely unaffected by the scientific spirit of the time, they worked independently of each other in different countries: in Algeria, Tunisia, Spain, Switzerland and the United States of America. In the current literature on spatial cognition these early ant researchers--Victor Cornetz, Felix Santschi, Charles Turner and Rudolf Brun--are barely mentioned. Moreover, it is virtually unknown that the great neuroanatomist Santiago Ramón y Cajal had also worked on spatial orientation in ants. This general neglect is certainly due to the fact that nearly all these ant researchers were scientific loners, who did their idiosyncratic investigations outside the realm of comparative physiology, neurobiology and the behavioural sciences of the time, and published their results in French, German, and Spanish at rather inaccessible places. Even though one might argue that much of their work resulted in mainly anecdotal evidence, the conceptual approaches of these early ant researchers preempt much of the present-day discussions on spatial representation in animals. PMID:26898725

  5. Measuring the Shear-Tension Coupling of Engineering Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdiwi, F.; Harrison, P.; Guo, Z.; Potluri, P.; Yu, W. R.

    2011-05-01

    Modelling the forming process of engineering fabrics and textile composites using a mechanical approach, such as FEM, requires characterisation of material behaviour. Using Picture Frame (PF) tests, several previous studies have reported a coupling between in-plane tension and fabric shear compliance. However, characterising this behaviour accurately has proven problematic due to the sensitivity of the PF test to small fabric misalignments in the test rig, prompting innovative solutions such as the use of load-cells mounted on the side bars of the PF rig to measure in-plane tension during testing. This paper focuses on an alternative testing technique, the Biaxial Bias Extension test, as a means to investigate this coupling. The approach has several benefits including simple equipment requirements, the ability to vary sample dimensions and boundary conditions. The main difficulty lies in extracting the material contribution to the recorded signal. To do this, an experimental method is demonstrated using two very different textiles; glass fabric and self-reinforced polypropylene both plain weaves. The latter is challenging to characterise and was chosen due to its high propensity to wrinkle at room temperature.

  6. Measuring the Shear-Tension Coupling of Engineering Fabrics

    SciTech Connect

    Abdiwi, F.; Harrison, P.; Guo, Z.; Yu, W. R.; Potluri, P.

    2011-05-04

    Modelling the forming process of engineering fabrics and textile composites using a mechanical approach, such as FEM, requires characterisation of material behaviour. Using Picture Frame (PF) tests, several previous studies have reported a coupling between in-plane tension and fabric shear compliance. However, characterising this behaviour accurately has proven problematic due to the sensitivity of the PF test to small fabric misalignments in the test rig, prompting innovative solutions such as the use of load-cells mounted on the side bars of the PF rig to measure in-plane tension during testing. This paper focuses on an alternative testing technique, the Biaxial Bias Extension test, as a means to investigate this coupling. The approach has several benefits including simple equipment requirements, the ability to vary sample dimensions and boundary conditions. The main difficulty lies in extracting the material contribution to the recorded signal. To do this, an experimental method is demonstrated using two very different textiles; glass fabric and self-reinforced polypropylene both plain weaves. The latter is challenging to characterise and was chosen due to its high propensity to wrinkle at room temperature.

  7. Psychology: Inducing green behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thøgersen, John

    2013-02-01

    Economic arguments, such as saving money, are often used to promote pro-environmental actions -- for example, reducing energy use. However, research shows that people's environmental motives are sometimes better drivers of behavioural change.

  8. Evanescent coupling between surface and linear-defect guided modes in phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicek, Ahmet; Salman, Aysevil; Adem Kaya, Olgun; Ulug, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Evanescent coupling between surface and linear-defect waveguide modes in a two-dimensional phononic crystal of steel cylinders in air is numerically demonstrated. When the ratio of scatterer radii to the lattice constant is set to 0.47 in the square phononic crystal, the two types of modes start interacting if there is one-row separation between the surface and waveguide. Supercell band structure computations through the Finite Element Method suggest that the waveguide band is displaced significantly, whereas the surface band remains almost intact when the waveguide and surface are in close proximity. The two resultant hybrid bands are such that the coupling length, which varies between 8 and 22 periods, initially changes linearly with frequency, while a much sharper variation is observed towards the top of the lower hybrid band. Such small values facilitate the design of compact devices based on heterogeneous coupling. Finite-element simulations demonstrate bilateral coupling behaviour, where waves incident from either the surface or waveguide can efficiently couple to the other side. The coupling lengths calculated from simulation results are in agreement with the values predicted from the supercell band structure. The possible utilisation of the coupling scheme in sensing applications, especially in acoustic Doppler velocimetry, is discussed.

  9. Auto-Graph: Considering the Utility of Student Behaviour Self-Monitoring for Inclusive Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jull, Stephen K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the outcomes of a small-scale exploratory study that examined the utility of a novel computer-supported student behaviour self-monitoring procedure called Auto-Graph. The Auto-Graph procedure is a universal classroom behaviour management strategy for responding to disruptive antisocial behaviours. It was designed to provide…

  10. Researching sexual and reproductive behaviour: a peer ethnographic approach.

    PubMed

    Price, Neil; Hawkins, Kirstan

    2002-10-01

    In recent years, ethnographic research has challenged the notion within demography that fertility-related behaviour is the outcome of individualistic calculations of the costs and benefits of having children. Anthropology has further criticised the abstraction in demographic analysis of sexual behaviour and fertility decision-making from the socio-cultural and political context in which the individual or couple is located. Within demography itself, institutional and political-economic analyses have argued strongly that sexual and reproductive behaviour must be understood within locally specific social, cultural, economic and political contexts. Positivist and empiricist research methods, such as the sample survey and focus groups, which continue to dominate demographic inquiry and applied research into sexual and reproductive behaviour, have been shown to be limited in their ability to inform about the process of behaviour change and contexts within which different behaviours occur. The article introduces a new methodology for researching sexual and reproductive behaviour, called the peer ethnographic approach, which the authors have developed in an attempt to address some of the limitations of the methods which currently dominate research into sexual and reproductive behaviour. The peer ethnographic methodology is discussed in detail and the results of recent field-testing are reported, which show that, although the approach has limitations, it also has the potential to make a significant contribution to our understanding of sexual and reproductive behaviour. PMID:12231012