Science.gov

Sample records for small deflection energy

  1. Small Deflection Energy Analyzer for Energy and Angular Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of the Small Deflection Energy Analyzer (SDEA) charged-particle spectrometer for energy and angle distributions responds to a longstanding need to measure the wind velocity vector in Earth s thermosphere, and to obtain the ion-drift vector in the ionosphere. The air and ions above 120 km are endowed with bulk velocities and temperatures just like air near the ground, but with separate spatial and temporal variations. It is important to understand these not only for study of the physics and chemistry of the Sun-Earth connection, but also for spacecraft orbit predictions, and communications through the ionosphere. The SDEA consists of a pair of parallel conducting plates separated by a small distance, with an entrance slit on one end, and an exit slit on the other. A voltage applied to these plates develops an electric field between the plates, and this field deflects ions passing through it. If an ion has too little energy, it will strike one of the plates. If it has too much, it will strike the back wall. An ion with the amount of energy being searched for will have its trajectory bent just enough to exit the back slit. The SDEA units are compact, rectangular, and operate with low voltages. The units can be built up into small arrays. These arrays could be used either to widen the field of view or to sharpen an existing one. This approach can also be used to obtain angular distributions in two planes simultaneously, thus cutting down the ion source power requirements in half. This geometry has enabled a new mass-spectrometer concept that can provide miniaturized mass spectrometers for use in industrial plants, air-pollution monitoring, and noxious-gas detection.

  2. Crossed, Small-Deflection Energy Analyzer for Wind/Temperature Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A.; Finne, Theodore T.

    2010-01-01

    Determination of neutral winds and ion drifts in low-Earth-orbit missions requires measurements of the angular and energy distributions of the flux of neutrals and ions entering the satellite from the ram direction. The magnitude and direction of the neutral-wind (or ion-drift) determine the location of the maximum in the angular distribution of the flux. Knowledge of the angle of maximum flux with respect to satellite coordinates (pointing) is essential to determine the wind (or ion-drift) vector. The crossed Small-Deflection Energy Analyzer (SDEA) spectrometer (see Figure 1) occupies minimal volume and consumes minimal power. Designed for upper atmosphere/ionosphere investigations at Earth altitudes above 100 km, the spectrometer operates by detecting the angular and energy distributions of neutral atoms/molecules and ions in two mutually perpendicular planes. In this configuration, the two detection planes actually cross at the spectrometer center. It is possible to merge two SDEAs so they share a common optical axis and alternate measurements between two perpendicular planes, and reduce the number of ion sources from two to one. This minimizes the volume and footprint significantly and reduces the ion source power by a factor of two. The area of the entrance aperture affects the number of ions detected/second and also determines the energy resolution. Thermionic emitters require heater power of about 100 mW to produce 1 mA of electron beam current. Typically, electron energy is about 100 eV and requires a 100-V supply for electron acceleration to supply an additional 100 mW of power. Thus, ion source power is at most 200 mW. If two ion sources were to be used, the ion source power would be, at most, 400 mW. Detector power, deflection voltage power, and microcontroller and other functions require less than 150 mW. A WTS (wind/ temperature spectrometer) with two separate optical axes would consume about 650 mW, while the crossed SDEA described here consumes about

  3. Guide Vanes for Deflecting Fluid Currents with Small Loss of Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krober, G

    1933-01-01

    The transverse momentum of the deflected air stream to be absorbed is divided between the intermediate and outside walls, so that the pressure increase on each wall is much smaller and the danger of separation is diminished. The formation of secondary vortices is also diminished. By taking as the basis profiles with high c(sub a), such as have proved practically favorable, it is not possible to find a satisfactory form of grid simply on the assumption that the flow is potential. The requirements called for the most uniform possible velocity distribution behind the bend and the smallest possible losses.

  4. Directed energy deflection laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brashears, Travis; Lubin, Phillip; Hughes, Gary B.; Meinhold, Peter; Suen, Jonathan; Batliner, Payton; Motta, Caio; Griswold, Janelle; Kangas, Miikka; Johansson, Isbella; Alnawakhtha, Yusuf; Prater, Kenyon; Lang, Alex; Madajian, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    We report on laboratory studies of the effectiveness of directed energy planetary defense as a part of the DESTAR (Directed Energy System for Targeting of Asteroids and exploRation) program. DE-STAR [1][5][6] and DE-STARLITE [2][5][6] are directed energy "stand-off" and "stand-on" programs, respectively. These systems consist of a modular array of kilowatt-class lasers powered by photovoltaics, and are capable of heating a spot on the surface of an asteroid to the point of vaporization. Mass ejection, as a plume of evaporated material, creates a reactionary thrust capable of diverting the asteroid's orbit. In a series of papers, we have developed a theoretical basis and described numerical simulations for determining the thrust produced by material evaporating from the surface of an asteroid [1][2][3][4][5][6]. In the DE-STAR concept, the asteroid itself is used as the deflection "propellant". This study presents results of experiments designed to measure the thrust created by evaporation from a laser directed energy spot. We constructed a vacuum chamber to simulate space conditions, and installed a torsion balance that holds an "asteroid" sample. The sample is illuminated with a fiber array laser with flux levels up to 60 MW/m2 which allows us to simulate a mission level flux but on a small scale. We use a separate laser as well as a position sensitive centroid detector to readout the angular motion of the torsion balance and can thus determine the thrust. We compare the measured thrust to the models. Our theoretical models indicate a coupling coefficient well in excess of 100 μN/Woptical, though we assume a more conservative value of 80 μN/Woptical and then degrade this with an optical "encircled energy" efficiency of 0.75 to 60 μN/Woptical in our deflection modeling. Our measurements discussed here yield about 45 μN/Wabsorbed as a reasonable lower limit to the thrust per optical watt absorbed.

  5. Large and small deflections of a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beléndez, Tarsicio; Neipp, Cristian; Beléndez, Augusto

    2002-05-01

    The classical problem of the deflection of a cantilever beam of linear elastic material, under the action of an external vertical concentrated load at the free end, is analysed. We present the differential equation governing the behaviour of this physical system and show that this equation, although straightforward in appearance, is in fact rather difficult to solve due to the presence of a non-linear term. In this sense, this system is similar to another well known physical system: the simple pendulum. An approximation of the behaviour of a cantilever beam for small deflections was obtained from the equation for large deflections, and we present various numerical results for both cases. Finally, we compare the theoretical results with the experimental results obtained in the laboratory.

  6. A small-gap electrostatic micro-actuator for large deflections

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Holger; Schenk, Harald; Kaiser, Bert; Langa, Sergiu; Gaudet, Matthieu; Schimmanz, Klaus; Stolz, Michael; Lenz, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Common quasi-static electrostatic micro actuators have significant limitations in deflection due to electrode separation and unstable drive regions. State-of-the-art electrostatic actuators achieve maximum deflections of approximately one third of the electrode separation. Large electrode separation and high driving voltages are normally required to achieve large actuator movements. Here we report on an electrostatic actuator class, fabricated in a CMOS-compatible process, which allows high deflections with small electrode separation. The concept presented makes the huge electrostatic forces within nanometre small electrode separation accessible for large deflections. Electrostatic actuations that are larger than the electrode separation were measured. An analytical theory is compared with measurement and simulation results and enables closer understanding of these actuators. The scaling behaviour discussed indicates significant future improvement on actuator deflection. The presented driving concept enables the investigation and development of novel micro systems with a high potential for improved device and system performance. PMID:26655557

  7. Effects of asteroid rotation on directed energy deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Isabella E.; Tsareva, Tatiana; Griswold, Janelle; Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; O'Neill, Hugh; Meinhold, Peter; Suen, Jonathan; Zhang, Qicheng; Riley, Jordan; Melis, Carl; Walsh, Kevin; Brashears, Travis; Bollag, Justin; Mathew, Shana; Bible, Johanna

    2014-09-01

    Asteroids that threaten Earth could be deflected from their orbits using laser directed energy or concentrated solar energy to vaporize the surface; the ejected plume would create a reaction thrust that pushes the object away from its collision course with Earth. One concern regarding directed energy deflection approaches is that asteroids rotate as they orbit the Sun. Asteroid rotation reduces the average thrust and changes the thrust vector imparting a time profile to the thrust. A directed energy system must deliver sufficient flux to evaporate surface material even when the asteroid is rotating. Required flux levels depend on surface material composition and albedo, thermal and bulk mechanical properties of the asteroid, and asteroid rotation rate. In the present work we present results of simulations for directed energy ejecta-plume asteroid threat mitigation. We use the observed distribution of asteroid rotational rates, along with a range of material and mechanical properties, as input to a thermal-physical model of plume generation. We calculate the expected thrust profile for rotating objects. Standoff directed energy schemes that deliver at least 10 MW/m2 generate significant thrust for all but the highest conceivable rotation rates.

  8. Kidnapping small icy asteroids in Earth near encounter to harbour life and to deflect trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The inter-planetary flight for human being is under danger because of unscreened and lethal solar flare radioactive showers. The screening of the astronauts by huge superconducting magnetic fields is unrealistic by many reasons. On the contrary the ability to reach nearby icy asteroids, to harbour there a complete undergound room where ecological life systems are first set, this goal may offer a later natural and safe currier for future human stations and enterprise. The need to deflect such a small size (a few thousands tons objects) maybe achieved by micro nuclear engines able to dig the asteroid icy skin, to heat and propel the soil by a synchronous jet engine array, bending and driving it to any desired trajectories. The need for such a wide collection of icy asteroid stations, often in a robotic ibernated state, it will offer the safe help station, raft in the wide space sea, where to collect material or energy in long human planetary travels.

  9. High-efficiency deflection of high energy protons due to channeling along the <110> axis of a bent silicon crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandale, W.; Arduini, G.; Butcher, M.; Cerutti, F.; Garattini, M.; Gilardoni, S.; Lechner, A.; Masi, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Montesano, S.; Redaelli, S.; Rossi, R.; Smirnov, G.; Breton, D.; Burmistrov, L.; Chaumat, V.; Dubos, S.; Maalmi, J.; Puill, V.; Stocchi, A.; Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Germogli, G.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Dabagov, S.; Murtas, F.; Addesa, F.; Cavoto, G.; Iacoangeli, F.; Galluccio, F.; Afonin, A. G.; Chesnokov, Yu. A.; Durum, A. A.; Maisheev, V. A.; Sandomirskiy, Yu. E.; Yanovich, A. A.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Taratin, A. M.; Denisov, A. S.; Gavrikov, Yu. A.; Ivanov, Yu. M.; Lapina, L. P.; Malyarenko, L. G.; Skorobogatov, V. V.; James, T.; Hall, G.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, M.

    2016-09-01

    A deflection efficiency of about 61% was observed for 400 GeV/c protons due to channeling, most strongly along the <110> axis of a bent silicon crystal. It is comparable with the deflection efficiency in planar channeling and considerably larger than in the case of the <111> axis. The measured probability of inelastic nuclear interactions of protons in channeling along the <110> axis is only about 10% of its amorphous level whereas in channeling along the (110) planes it is about 25%. High efficiency deflection and small beam losses make this axial orientation of a silicon crystal a useful tool for the beam steering of high energy charged particles.

  10. Optimization of Deflection of a Big NEO through Impact with a Small One

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kaijian; Huang, Weiping; Wang, Yuncai; Niu, Wei; Wu, Gongyou

    2014-01-01

    Using a small near-Earth object (NEO) to impact a larger and potentially threatening NEO has been suggested as an effective method to avert a collision with Earth. This paper develops a procedure for analysis of the technique for specific NEOs. First, an optimization method is used to select a proper small body from the database. Some principles of optimality are achieved with the optimization process. Then, the orbit of the small body is changed to guarantee that it flies toward and impacts the big threatening NEO. Kinetic impact by a spacecraft is chosen as the strategy of deflecting the small body. The efficiency of this method is compared with that of a direct kinetic impact to the big NEO by a spacecraft. Finally, a case study is performed for the deflection of the Apophis NEO, and the efficiency of the method is assessed. PMID:25525627

  11. Transverse deflection and dissipation of small plasma beams and clouds in magnetized media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Andrew F.

    1987-01-01

    Propagation of a quasi-neutral plasma beam or cloud across a magnetic field is considered for the case where the transverse dimension of the beam or cloud is sufficiently small compared to ion gyroradii. This situation commonly arises for active experiments in near-earth space. Two mechanisms are presented for transverse deflection of a beam or cloud in the -v0 x B0 direction where v0 is the velocity relative to the ambient medium. In the first, asymmetric escape of ions from an electrically polarized beam or cloud causes transverse deflection by means of a rocket effect. The transverse deflection distance is estimated to be a few times the initial transverse dimension of the beam or cloud. Dissipation occurs within a few times the thermal ion transverse crossing time. In the second mechanism, asymmetric charging results from localized accumulation of incident ions from the ambient medium. This excess positive charge distorts electric equipotentials and drives electron Hall currents that maintain an asymmetric compressed magnetic field region. The asymmetry of the magnetic stress contributes to transverse deflection with the same sign as the rocket effect. The asymmetric magnetic field also focuses incident ions to yield the localized charge accumulation. These ideas are qualitatively consistent with observations of the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers artificial comet releases.

  12. On the possibility of using small asteroids for deflecting near-Earth asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Yuki; Bando, Mai; Hokamoto, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the trajectory design and analysis of the near-Earth asteroid (NEA) deflection mission enabled by a kinetic impact of an intermediate asteroid. The sequential transfer trajectory is designed by solving two Lambert's problems that yield a chain collision between a spacecraft and an intermediate asteroid, followed by a collision between the intermediate asteroid and an NEA. The characteristics of the low-cost trajectories are then identified with respect to the optimal collision point. We show that the feasibility of the mission depends on the existence of an intermediate asteroid with small minimum orbit interception distance (MOID) with the NEA. Moreover the selection strategy of an intermediate asteroid that makes the mission feasible is discussed. We show that several asteroids exist that allow a 10 ton spacecraft with limited ΔV to be launched and impact the NEA 99442 Apophis allowing a deflection given several years warning time.

  13. Small-angle optical deflection from collinear configuration for sensitive detection in microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Li, Xiangtang; Li, Jing; Yuan, Hongyan; Zhao, Shulin; Xiao, Dan

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes a novel detection system based on small-angle optical deflection from the collinear configuration of a microfluidic chip. In this system, the incident light beam was focused on the microchannel through the edge of a lens, resulting in a small deflection angle that deviated 20° from the collinear configuration. The emitted fluorescence was collected through the center of the same lens and delivered to a photomultiplier tube in the vertical direction; the reflection light of the chip plate was kept away from the detector. In contrast to traditional confocal and nonconfocal laser-induced fluorescence detection systems, background levels resulting from scattered excitation light, reflection and refraction from the microchip was significantly eliminated. Significant enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio was obtained by shaping a laser beam that combined an attenuator with a spectral filter to optimize laser power and the dimensions of the laser beam. FITC and FITC-labeled amino acid were used as model analytes to demonstrate the performance sensitivity, separation efficiency, and reproducibility of this detection system by using a hybrid polydimethylsiloxane/glass microfluidic device. The limit of detection of FITC was estimated to be 2 pM (0.55 zmol) (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the single cell analysis for the determination of intracellular glutathione in a single 3T3 mouse fibroblast cell was demonstrated. The results suggest that the proposed optical arrangements will be promising for development of sensitive, low-cost microfluidic systems. PMID:22806465

  14. Small-body deflection techniques using spacecraft: Techniques in simulating the fate of ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Stephen R.; Yu, Yang; Michel, Patrick; Jutzi, Martin

    2016-04-01

    We define a set of procedures to numerically study the fate of ejecta produced by the impact of an artificial projectile with the aim of deflecting an asteroid. Here we develop a simplified, idealized model of impact conditions that can be adapted to fit the details of specific deflection-test scenarios, such as what is being proposed for the AIDA project. Ongoing studies based upon the methodology described here can be used to inform observational strategies and safety conditions for an observing spacecraft. To account for ejecta evolution, the numerical strategies we are employing are varied and include a large N-Body component, a smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) component, and an application of impactor scaling laws. Simulations that use SPH-derived initial conditions show high-speed ejecta escaping at low angles of inclination, and very slowly moving ejecta lofting off the surface at higher inclination angles, some of which reimpacts the small-body surface. We are currently investigating the realism of this and other models' behaviors. Next steps will include the addition of solar perturbations to the model and applying the protocol developed here directly to specific potential mission concepts such as the proposed AIDA scenario.

  15. UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing for Wind Energy Cost Reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Franek, Ondrej; Eggers, Patrick C F; Olesen, Kim; Byskov, Claus; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2015-01-01

    A new application of utilizing ultra-wideband (UWB) technology to sense wind turbine blade deflections is introduced in this paper for wind energy cost reduction. The lower UWB band of 3.1-5.3 GHz is applied. On each blade, there will be one UWB blade deflection sensing system, which consists of two UWB antennas at the blade root and one UWB antenna at the blade tip. The detailed topology and challenges of this deflection sensing system are addressed. Due to the complexity of the problem, this paper will first realize the on-blade UWB radio link in the simplest case, where the tip antenna is situated outside (and on the surface of) a blade tip. To investigate this case, full-blade time-domain measurements are designed and conducted under different deflections. The detailed measurement setups and results are provided. If the root and tip antenna locations are properly selected, the first pulse is always of sufficient quality for accurate estimations under different deflections. The measured results reveal that the blade tip-root distance and blade deflection can be accurately estimated in the complicated and lossy wireless channels around a wind turbine blade. Some future research topics on this application are listed finally. PMID:26274964

  16. UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing for Wind Energy Cost Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuai; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Franek, Ondrej; Eggers, Patrick C. F.; Olesen, Kim; Byskov, Claus; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2015-01-01

    A new application of utilizing ultra-wideband (UWB) technology to sense wind turbine blade deflections is introduced in this paper for wind energy cost reduction. The lower UWB band of 3.1–5.3 GHz is applied. On each blade, there will be one UWB blade deflection sensing system, which consists of two UWB antennas at the blade root and one UWB antenna at the blade tip. The detailed topology and challenges of this deflection sensing system are addressed. Due to the complexity of the problem, this paper will first realize the on-blade UWB radio link in the simplest case, where the tip antenna is situated outside (and on the surface of) a blade tip. To investigate this case, full-blade time-domain measurements are designed and conducted under different deflections. The detailed measurement setups and results are provided. If the root and tip antenna locations are properly selected, the first pulse is always of sufficient quality for accurate estimations under different deflections. The measured results reveal that the blade tip-root distance and blade deflection can be accurately estimated in the complicated and lossy wireless channels around a wind turbine blade. Some future research topics on this application are listed finally. PMID:26274964

  17. Two-Screen Method for Determining Electron Beam Energy and Deflection from Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, B B; Ross, J S; Tynan, G R; Divol, L; Glenzer, S H; Leurent, V; Palastro, J P; Ralph, J E; Froula, D H; Clayton, C E; Marsh, K A; Pak, A E; Wang, T L; Joshi, C

    2009-04-24

    Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) experiments have been performed at the Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In order to unambiguously determine the output electron beam energy and deflection angle at the plasma exit, we have implemented a two-screen electron spectrometer. This system is comprised of a dipole magnet followed by two image plates. By measuring the electron beam deviation from the laser axis on each plate, both the energy and deflection angle at the plasma exit are determined through the relativistic equation of motion.

  18. On the correlation between minimum thickness and central deflection during small punch test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Chattopadhyay, J.; Dutta, B. K.

    2016-07-01

    Present paper deals with a detailed study on the correlation between minimum thickness (t/t0) and central deflection (δ/t0). Such data are obtained during the deformation of a small punch test of miniaturized specimen. Finite element studies have been carried out to investigate the effect of various parameters which are expected to influence this correlation. The parameters under consideration are material hardening, material yield stress, coefficient of friction and initial thickness of the specimen. It is shown that the correlation remains unaffected with respect to change in material parameters. Similarly, the coefficient of friction beyond 0.2 also does not affect the correlation. However, change in thickness has significant effect on the correlation. A modification has been suggested in the existing correlation to consider the influence of thickness change. The modified correlation is then used to calculate fracture toughness using the experimental results quoted in the literature. It is shown that the modified correlation improves the fracture toughness prediction considerably.

  19. Small deflection of a class of clamped thin plates using collocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worley, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    Equations are given for the optimization of a class of two-and three-dimensional structures. The application of existing analytical techniques to the response of thin clamped plates is described. The ratios of deflections to plate thickness are given for uniform transverse loads as well as for uniform plus linearly varying transverse loads. Deflections are presented at angular increments of 5 degrees and at radial increments of 0.1 of the radius.

  20. Effect of finite width on deflection and energy release rate of an orthotropic double cantilever specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schapery, R. A.; Davidson, B. D.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of an orthotropic cantilevered plate subjected to a uniformly distributed end load is solved by the Rayleigh-Ritz energy method. The result is applied to laminated composite, double cantilevered specimens to estimate the effect of crack tip constraint on the transverse curvature, deflection and energy release rate. The solution is also utilized to determined finite width correction factors for fracture energy characterization tests in which neither plane stress nor plane strain conditions apply.

  1. Deflecting Shearpin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Peyton B.

    1993-01-01

    Spring loading helps prevent permanent deformation of adjacent bearing surfaces. Shearpin deflects as load compresses inner spring. Maximum deflection determined by gap between halves of capture ring. Beyond deflection, pin acts as standard shearpin.

  2. Measurement of ultra-low ion energy of decelerated ion beam using a deflecting electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    In investigation on ultra-low-energy ion bombardment effect on DNA, an ion beam deceleration lens was developed for high-quality ultra-low-energy ion beam. Measurement of the ion energy after deceleration was necessary to confirm the ion beam really decelerated as theoretically predicted. In contrast to conventional methods, this work used a simple deflecting electrostatic field after the deceleration lens to bend the ion beam. The beam bending distance depended on the ion energy and was described and simulated. A system for the measurement of the ion beam energy was constructed. It consisted of a pair of parallel electrode plates to generate the deflecting electrical field, a copper rod measurement piece to detect ion beam current, a vernier caliper to mark the beam position, a stepping motor to translate the measurement rod, and a webcam-camera to read the beam bending distance. The entire system was installed after the ion-beam deceleration lens inside the large chamber of the bioengineering vertical ion beam line. Moving the measurement rod across the decelerated ion beam enabled to obtain beam profiles, from which the beam bending distance could be known and the ion beam energy could be calculated. The measurement results were in good agreement with theoretical and simulated results.

  3. Microwave Deflection Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shores, Paul; Kobayashi, Herb; Ngo, Phong; Lichtenberg, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    Doppler-radar instrument measures small deflections or vibrations of reflecting surface. Acting as interferometric micrometer, instrument includes combination of analog and digital circuits measuring change in phase of radar return due to movement of reflecting surface along signal-propagation path. Includes homodyne Doppler-radar transceiver and digital signal-processing circuitry to measure change in phase shift as target deflects.

  4. Magnetic deflections of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keivani, Azadeh; Farrar, Glennys R.; Sutherland, Michael

    2015-02-01

    We present the results of a study that simulates trajectories of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from Centaurus A to Earth, for particle rigidities from E / Z = 2 EV to 100 EV, i.e., covering the possibility of primary particles as heavy as Fe nuclei with energies exceeding 50 EeV. The Galactic magnetic field is modeled using the recent work of Jansson and Farrar (JF12) which fitted its parameters to match extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and WMAP7 synchrotron emission maps. We include the random component of the GMF using the JF12 3D model for Brand (r →) and explore the impact of different random realizations, coherence length and other features on cosmic ray deflections. Gross aspects of the arrival direction distribution such as mean deflection and the RMS dispersion depend mainly on rigidity and differ relatively little from one realization to another. However different realizations exhibit non-trivial substructure whose specific features vary considerably from one realization to another, especially for lower rigidities. At the lowest rigidity of 2 EV, the distribution is broad enough that it might be compatible with a scenario in which Cen A is the principle source of all UHECRs. No attempt is made here to formulate a robust test of this possibility, although some challenges to such a scenario are noted.

  5. Full sky harmonic analysis hints at large ultra-high energy cosmic ray deflections

    SciTech Connect

    Tinyakov, P. G. Urban, F. R.

    2015-03-15

    The full-sky multipole coefficients of the ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) flux have been measured for the first time by the Pierre Auger and Telescope Array collaborations using a joint data set with E > 10 EeV. We calculate these harmonic coefficients in the model where UHECR are protons and sources trace the local matter distribution, and compare our results with observations. We find that the expected power for low multipoles (dipole and quadrupole, in particular) is sytematically higher than in the data: the observed flux is too isotropic. We then investigate to which degree our predictions are influenced by UHECR deflections in the regular Galactic magnetic field. It turns out that the UHECR power spectrum coefficients C{sub l} are quite insensitive to the effects of the Galactic magnetic field, so it is unlikely that the discordance can be reconciled by tuning the Galactic magnetic field model. On the contrary, a sizeable fraction of uniformly distributed flux (representing for instance an admixture of heavy nuclei with considerably larger deflections) can bring simulations and observations to an accord.

  6. The stress-energy tensor and the deflection of light in 6-dimensional general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocke, W. J.

    1996-03-01

    We find the stress-energy tensor of a perfect fluid in the 6-dimensional spacetime proposed by Cole. Using the weak-field Newtonian approximation of general relativity gives a constant of proportionality in Einstein's field equations that differs by a factor of 4/6 from the usual one and shows that Cole's extension of the Schwarzschild metric to 6 dimensions is not valid for a gravitating mass of “ordinary” matter. A subsequent evaluation of the deflection of starlight for the 6-d spacetime gives a result that is 4/6 of the 4-d result. We conclude that if spacetime is 6-dimensional, one must find a different way to deal with gravity.

  7. Maps of CMB lensing deflection from N-body simulations in Coupled Dark Energy Cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Carmelita; Baldi, Marco; Baccigalupi, Carlo E-mail: marco.baldi5@unibo.it E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2013-09-01

    We produce lensing potential and deflection-angle maps in order to simulate the weak gravitational lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) via ray-tracing through the COupled Dark Energy Cosmological Simulations (CoDECS), the largest suite of N-body simulations to date for interacting Dark Energy cosmologies. The constructed maps faithfully reflect the N-body cosmic structures on a range of scales going from the arcminute to the degree scale, limited only by the resolution and extension of the simulations. We investigate the variation of the lensing pattern due to the underlying Dark Energy (DE) dynamics, characterised by different background and perturbation behaviours as a consequence of the interaction between the DE field and Cold Dark Matter (CDM). In particular, we study in detail the results from three cosmological models differing in the background and perturbations evolution at the epoch in which the lensing cross section is most effective, corresponding to a redshift of ∼ 1, with the purpose to isolate their imprints in the lensing observables, regardless of the compatibility of these models with present constraints. The scenarios investigated here include a reference ΛCDM cosmology, a standard coupled DE (cDE) scenario, and a ''bouncing'' cDE scenario. For the standard cDE scenario, we find that typical differences in the lensing potential result from two effects: the enhanced growth of linear CDM density fluctuations with respect to the ΛCDM case, and the modified nonlinear dynamics of collapsed structures induced by the DE-CDM interaction. As a consequence, CMB lensing highlights the DE impact in the cosmological expansion, even in the degenerate case where the amplitude of the linear matter density perturbations, parametrised through σ{sub 8}, is the same in both the standard cDE and ΛCDM cosmologies. For the ''bouncing'' scenario, we find that the two opposite behaviours of the lens density contrast and of the matter abundance lead to

  8. Orbital simulations on the deflection of Near Earth Objects by directed energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qicheng; Walsh, Kevin J.; Melis, Carl; Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip M.

    2015-09-01

    Laser ablation of a Near Earth Object (NEO) on a collision course with Earth produces a cloud of ejecta which exerts a thrust on the asteroid, deflecting it from its original trajectory. The DE-STAR system provides such a thrust by illuminating an Earth-targeting asteroid or comet from afar with a stand-off system consisting of a large phased-array laser in Earth orbit. A much smaller version of the same system called DE-STARLITE travels alongside the target, operating in a stand-on mode, slowly deflecting it over a long period. Such a stand-on system would also permit directing the thrust in any desired direction through careful positioning of the laser relative to the asteroid. We present orbital simulations comparing the effectiveness of both systems across a range of laser and asteroid parameters. Simulated parameters include magnitude, duration and, for the stand-on system, direction of the thrust, as well as the size and orbital characteristics of the target asteroid. These simulations indicate that deflection distance is, in general, proportional to the magnitude of thrust, proportional to the square of the laser on time, and inversely proportional to the mass. Furthermore, deflection distance shows strong dependence on thrust direction with optimal direction varying with the asteroid's orbital eccentricity. As one example, we consider a 325 m asteroid in an orbit of eccentricity e=0.2; given 15 years of warning, a force of just 2 N from a stand-on DE-STARLITE system is sufficient to deflect the asteroid by 2 Earth radii. We discuss numerous scenarios and discuss a practical implementation of such a system consistent with current launch vehicle capabilities.

  9. Orbital Simulations on Deflecting Near-Earth Objects by Directed Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qicheng; Walsh, Kevin J.; Melis, Carl; Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip M.

    2016-04-01

    Laser ablation of a near-Earth object (NEO) on a collision course with Earth produces a cloud of ejecta that exerts a thrust on the NEO, deflecting it from its original trajectory. Ablation may be performed from afar by illuminating an Earth-targeting asteroid or comet with a stand-off “DE-STAR” system consisting of a large phased-array laser in Earth orbit. Alternatively, a much smaller stand-on “DE-STARLITE” system may travel alongside the target, slowly deflecting it from nearby over a long period. This paper presents orbital simulations comparing the effectiveness of both systems across a range of laser and NEO parameters. Simulated parameters include magnitude, duration and, for the stand-on system, direction of the thrust, as well as the type, size, and orbital characteristics of the target NEO. These simulations indicate that deflection distance is approximately proportional to the magnitude of thrust and to the square of the duration of ablation, and is inversely proportional to the mass. Furthermore, deflection distance shows strong dependence on thrust direction with the optimal direction of thrust varying with the duration of laser activity. As one example, consider a typical 325 m asteroid: beginning 15 years in advance, just 2 N of thrust from a ∼20 kW stand-on DE-STARLITE system is sufficient to deflect the asteroid by 2 {R}\\oplus . Numerous scenarios are discussed as is a practical implementation of such a system consistent with current launch vehicle capabilities.

  10. Solar Sailing Kinetic Energy Interceptor (KEI) Mission for Impacting/Deflecting Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Bong

    2005-01-01

    A solar sailing mission architecture, which requires a t least ten 160-m, 300-kg solar sail spacecraft with a characteristic acceleration of 0.5 mm/sqs, is proposed as a realistic near- term option for mitigating the threat posed by near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Its mission feasibility is demonstrated for a fictional asteroid mitigation problem created by AIAA. This problem assumes that a 200-m asteroid, designated 2004WR, was detected on July 4, 2004, and that the expected impact will occur on January 14, 2015. The solar sailing phase of the proposed mission for the AIAA asteroid mitigation problem is comprised of the initial cruise phase from 1 AU t o 0.25 AU (1.5 years), the cranking orbit phase (3.5 years), and the retrograde orbit phase (1 year) prior to impacting the target asteroid at its perihelion (0.75 AU from the sun) on January 1, 2012. The proposed mission will require at least ten kinetic energy interceptor (KEI) solar sail spacecraft. Each KEI sailcraft consists of a 160- m, 150-kg solar sail and a 150-kg microsatellite impactor. The impactor is to be separated from a large solar sail prior to impacting the 200-m target asteroid at its perihelion. Each 150-kg microsatellite impactor, with a relative impact velocity of at least 70 km/s, will cause a conservatively estimated AV of 0.3 cm/s in the trajectory of the 200-m target asteroid, due largely to the impulsive effect of material ejected from the newly-formed crater. The deflection caused by a single impactor will increase the Earth-miss-distance by 0.45Re (where Re denotes the Earth radius of 6,378 km). Therefore, at least ten KEI sailcraft will be required for consecutive impacts, but probably without causing fragmentation, to increase the total Earth-miss-distance by 4.5Re. This miss-distance increase of 29,000 km is outside of a typical uncertainty/error of about 10,000 km in predicting the Earth-miss- distance. A conventional Delta I1 2925 launch vehicle is capable of injecting at least two KEI

  11. Electric Solar Wind Sail Kinetic Energy Impactor for Asteroid Deflection Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Kouhei; Yamakawa, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    An electric solar wind sail uses the natural solar wind stream to produce low but continuous thrust by interacting with a number of long thin charged tethers. It allows a spacecraft to generate a thrust without consuming any reaction mass. The aim of this paper is to investigate the use of a spacecraft with such a propulsion system to deflect an asteroid with a high relative velocity away from an Earth collision trajectory. To this end, we formulate a simulation model for the electric solar wind sail. By summing thrust vectors exerted on each tether, a dynamic model which gives the relation between the thrust and sail attitude is proposed. Orbital maneuvering by fixing the sail's attitude and changing tether voltage is considered. A detailed study of the deflection of fictional asteroids, which are assumed to be identified 15 years before Earth impact, is also presented. Assuming a spacecraft characteristic acceleration of 0.5 mm/s 2, and a projectile mass of 1,000 kg, we show that the trajectory of asteroids with one million tons can be changed enough to avoid a collision with the Earth. Finally, the effectiveness of using this method of propulsion in an asteroid deflection mission is evaluated in comparison with using flat photonic solar sails.

  12. Individual Beam Size And Length Measurements at the SLC Interaction Point Derived From the Beam Energy Loss During a Beam Beam Deflection Scan

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Field, R.Clive; Phinney, N.; Ross, M.C.; Slaton, T.; Traller, R.; /SLAC

    2011-08-26

    At the Interaction Point (IP) of the SLC Final Focus, beam-beam deflection scans routinely provide a measurement of the sum in quadrature of the electron and positron transverse beam sizes, but no information on the individual beam sizes. During the 1996 SLC run, an upgrade to the Final Focus beam position monitor system allowed a first measurement of the absolute beam energy loss of both beams on each step of the deflection scan. A fit to the energy loss distributions of the two beams provides a measurement not only of the individual transverse beam sizes at the IP but also of the individual bunch lengths.

  13. A Computational Investigation on Bending Deformation Behavior at Various Deflection Rates for Enhancement of Absorbable Energy in TRIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hang Thi; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2016-05-01

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel might have a high energy-absorption characteristic because it could possibly consume impact energy by not only plastic deformation but also strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during deformation. Therefore, TRIP steel is considered to be suitable for automotive structures from the viewpoint of safety. Bending deformation due to buckling is one of the major collapse modes of automotive structures. Thus, an investigation on the bending deformation behavior and energy-absorption characteristic in TRIP steel at high deformation rate is indispensable to clarify the mechanism of better performance. Some past studies have focused on the improvement of mechanical properties by means of SIMT; however, the mechanism through which the energy-absorption characteristic in steel can be improved is still unclear. In this study, the three-point bending deformation behavior of a beam specimen made of type-304 austenitic stainless steel, a kind of TRIP steel, is investigated at various deflection rates by experiments and finite-element simulations based on a constitutive model proposed by one of the authors. After confirming the validity of the computation, the rate-sensitivity of energy absorption from the viewpoint of hardening behavior is examined and the improvement of the energy-absorption characteristic in TRIP steel including its mechanism is discussed.

  14. A Computational Investigation on Bending Deformation Behavior at Various Deflection Rates for Enhancement of Absorbable Energy in TRIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hang Thi; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel might have a high energy-absorption characteristic because it could possibly consume impact energy by not only plastic deformation but also strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during deformation. Therefore, TRIP steel is considered to be suitable for automotive structures from the viewpoint of safety. Bending deformation due to buckling is one of the major collapse modes of automotive structures. Thus, an investigation on the bending deformation behavior and energy-absorption characteristic in TRIP steel at high deformation rate is indispensable to clarify the mechanism of better performance. Some past studies have focused on the improvement of mechanical properties by means of SIMT; however, the mechanism through which the energy-absorption characteristic in steel can be improved is still unclear. In this study, the three-point bending deformation behavior of a beam specimen made of type-304 austenitic stainless steel, a kind of TRIP steel, is investigated at various deflection rates by experiments and finite-element simulations based on a constitutive model proposed by one of the authors. After confirming the validity of the computation, the rate-sensitivity of energy absorption from the viewpoint of hardening behavior is examined and the improvement of the energy-absorption characteristic in TRIP steel including its mechanism is discussed.

  15. Mass spectrometers with energy focusing: Combinations of magnetic and electric sector fields whose mean planes of deflection are tilted with respect to each other

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrich, H.; Ewald, H.

    1988-01-01

    First a combination of two sector fields is considered, for instance a homogeneous magnetic field followed by an electric cylinder condenser. The mean planes of deflection of the fields are tilted with respect to each other by an oblique angle. Such a combination has astigmatic focusing properties for paraxial rays of ions of certain mass and energy coming from an object point assumed at a certain distance before the first field on the incoming central ray. At different distances from the field combination are formed. calculated in first order, two real or virtual straight astigmatic focusing lines which are perpendicular to each other and to the outgoing central ray. By proper assumptions of the dimensions of the combination it can be arranged that its first order energy dispersion and one real of its astigmatic focusing lines have exactly the same direction. Then by addition of a third sector field (again a homogeneous magnetic field) it can be achieved that the astigmatic focusing will be changed into a stigmatic one while at the same time the energy dispersion can be reduced to small values. The mass dispersion of this three field combination in the given numerical example is about perpendicular to the direction of the energy dispersion.

  16. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  17. Laser deflection of space objects -- An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-04-01

    Lasers provide the two major attributes required for effective deflection of space objects: agility and efficiency. Lasers act instantaneously over long distances with little losses, but deliver energy at modest power levels. Material interceptors provide large impulses, but deliver only a fraction of the mass launched into space at low speeds. The two deflection concepts are compared, as are some important additional applications.

  18. Energy Conservation in Small Schools. Small Schools Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardener, Clark

    Information concerning methods and available materials for conserving energy is needed by small, rural schools to offset continued increasing energy costs and lack of financial support and technical assistance. The first step in developing an energy conservation policy is to obtain school board commitment and to establish an energy saving policy.…

  19. Matter Wave Deflection through a Light Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronan, Joseph; Cronin, Alexander; Holmgren, William; Hromada, Ivan; Trubko, Raisa

    2011-10-01

    In optics, it is a well-known fact that a glass prism will bend a light beam incident on its surface. We present an atom optics experiment analogous to this phenomenon, but instead we use a light prism to deflect a beam of potassium atoms. We use a Mach-Zehnder atom interferometer to precisely measure atom beam deflections of as small as 5 nm. Through studying the beam deflection, we are able to investigate the dynamic polarizability and the magic zero wavelength of potassium.

  20. Miniaturization of flight deflection measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodale, Robert (Inventor); Hampton, Herbert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A flight deflection measurement system is disclosed including a hybrid microchip of a receiver/decoder. The hybrid microchip decoder is mounted piggy back on the miniaturized receiver and forms an integral unit therewith. The flight deflection measurement system employing the miniaturized receiver/decoder can be used in a wind tunnel. In particular, the miniaturized receiver/decoder can be employed in a spin measurement system due to its small size and can retain already established control surface actuation functions.

  1. Damping of unwanted modes in SRF deflecting/crabbing cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, Graeme; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-01-01

    As deflecting and crab cavities do not use the fundamental acceleration mode for their operation, the spectrum of unwanted modes is significantly different from that of accelerating cavities. The fundamental acceleration mode is now unwanted and can cause energy spread in the beam; in addition this mode frequency is often close to or lower than that of the deflecting mode, making it difficult to damp. This is made more complex in some of the compact crab cavities as there small beampipes often attenuate the fields very sharply. In addition in some crab cavities there can be an orthogonal transverse mode similar to the deflecting mode, known as the same order mode. The degeneracy of these modes must be split by polarising the cavity and if the polarisation is not large enough, dampers should be placed at either an electric or magnetic field null of the crabbing mode to effectively damp the unwanted polarisation. Various concepts for dealing with unwanted modes in various SRF deflecting cavities will be reviewed.

  2. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilan, N.; Antoni, V.; De Lorenzi, A.; Chitarin, G.; Veltri, P.; Sartori, E.

    2016-02-01

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF6 instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming.

  3. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices.

    PubMed

    Pilan, N; Antoni, V; De Lorenzi, A; Chitarin, G; Veltri, P; Sartori, E

    2016-02-01

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF6 instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming. PMID:26932053

  4. Dynamic pavement deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, D. W.; Jacobs, K. M.

    1981-06-01

    Dynamic pavement deflection measurements for bituminous concrete pavements of two and three-quarter, five and seven-eights, and seven and one-half inches in thickness under moving axle loads of 15,000, 18,000, and 22,000 pounds were obtained at speeds of 10, 25 and 45 miles per hour. The results were analyzed and compared to Benkelman beam measurements. The data indicate that slow moving loads have greater adverse effect (larger deflections) on the pavement than the high speed loads. The results also show that the bituminous pavement undergoes numerous vertical fluctuations and bending as the front and rear axles approached the point of measurement. The magnitude of the vertical displacement was measured via the means of an accelerometer and double integrator. When values of the dynamic deflections were in the magnitude of 0.07 through 0.10 inches, there was evidence of pavement failure. When the deflection values were above 0.10 inches pavement failures were distinct.

  5. An analytical solution to proton Bragg peak deflection in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Russell; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    The role of MR imaging for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is becoming more and more important thanks to the excellent soft tissue contrast offered by MRI. Hybrid therapy devices with integrated MRI scanners are under active development for x-ray therapy. The combination of proton therapy with MRI imaging has only been investigated at the theoretical or conceptual level. Of concern is the deflection of the proton beam in the homogeneous magnetic field. A previous publication has come to the conclusion that the impact of a 0.5 T magnetic field on the dose distribution for proton therapy is very small and lateral deflections stay well below 2 mm. The purpose of this study is to provide new insights into the effects of magnetic fields on a proton beam coming to rest in a patient. We performed an analytical calculation of the lateral deflection of protons with initial energies between 50 MeV and 250 MeV, perpendicular to the beam direction and the magnetic field. We used a power-law range-energy relationship and the Lorentz force in both relativistic and non-relativistic conditions. Calculations were done for protons coming to rest in water or soft tissue, and generalized to other uniform and non-uniform media. Results were verified by comparisons with numerical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. A key result of our calculations is that the maximum lateral deflection at the end of range is proportional to the third power of the initial energy. Accordingly, due to the strong dependence on the energy, even a relatively small magnetic field of 0.5 T will cause a deflection of the proton beam by 1 cm at the end of range of a 200 MeV beam. The maximum deflection at 200 MeV is more than 10 times larger than that of a 90 MeV beam. Relativistic corrections of the deflection are generally small but they can become non-negligible at higher energies around 200 MeV and above. Contrary to previous findings, the lateral deflection of a proton beam can be significant (1

  6. An analytical solution to proton Bragg peak deflection in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Russell; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    The role of MR imaging for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is becoming more and more important thanks to the excellent soft tissue contrast offered by MRI. Hybrid therapy devices with integrated MRI scanners are under active development for x-ray therapy. The combination of proton therapy with MRI imaging has only been investigated at the theoretical or conceptual level. Of concern is the deflection of the proton beam in the homogeneous magnetic field. A previous publication has come to the conclusion that the impact of a 0.5 T magnetic field on the dose distribution for proton therapy is very small and lateral deflections stay well below 2 mm. The purpose of this study is to provide new insights into the effects of magnetic fields on a proton beam coming to rest in a patient. We performed an analytical calculation of the lateral deflection of protons with initial energies between 50 MeV and 250 MeV, perpendicular to the beam direction and the magnetic field. We used a power-law range-energy relationship and the Lorentz force in both relativistic and non-relativistic conditions. Calculations were done for protons coming to rest in water or soft tissue, and generalized to other uniform and non-uniform media. Results were verified by comparisons with numerical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. A key result of our calculations is that the maximum lateral deflection at the end of range is proportional to the third power of the initial energy. Accordingly, due to the strong dependence on the energy, even a relatively small magnetic field of 0.5 T will cause a deflection of the proton beam by 1 cm at the end of range of a 200 MeV beam. The maximum deflection at 200 MeV is more than 10 times larger than that of a 90 MeV beam. Relativistic corrections of the deflection are generally small but they can become non-negligible at higher energies around 200 MeV and above. Contrary to previous findings, the lateral deflection of a proton beam can be significant (1

  7. Conductors with small Fermi energies and small gap energies

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, R.J.

    1993-09-01

    If the Fermi energy is of the order of meV`s, the usual treatment of the density of free electrons is not valid, but use can be made of an averaged density of states that depends weakly on temperature, so that the temperature variation of the conductivity can be expressed by the equation: {sigma} {congruent} CT{sup (1-s)} 1n{l_brace}[(exp({beta}E{sub f}) + 1)/2][exp({minus}{beta}(E{sub g} {minus} E{sub f})) + 1)]{r_brace} in which E{sub f} is the Fermi energy, E{sub g} is the top of the energy gap for thermal activation, s is the exponent of the temperature-dependent scattering. This equation serves to define a class of solids consisting of a microcomposite with a narrow conduction band for which E{sub f} of the order of ceV`s or less and a thermal activated conduction for which E{sub g} is of the order of ceV`s. It describes quantitatively the conductivity, {sigma}(T;{Delta}, for YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{Delta}} and {sigma}(T;p) as the hydrostatic pressure p is varied for {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}CuN(CN){sub 2}Br.

  8. OTV bearing deflection investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, B. L.; Diepenbrock, R. T.; Millis, M. G.

    1993-04-01

    The primary goal of the Bearing Deflectometer Investigation was to gain experience in the use of fiber optic displacement probe technology for bearing health monitoring in a liquid hydrogen turbo pump. The work specified in this Task Order was conducted in conjunction with Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory Contract F04611-86-C-0010. APD conducted the analysis and design coordination to provide a displacement probe design compatible with the XLR-134 liquid hydrogen turbo pump assembly (TPA). Specifications and requirements of the bearing deflectometer were established working with Mechanical Technology Instruments, Inc. (MTI). The TPA design accommodated positioning of the probe to measure outer race cyclic deflections of the pump inlet bearing. The fiber optic sensor was installed as required in the TPA and sensor output was recorded during the TPA testing. Data review indicated that no bearing deflection signature could be differentiated from the inherent system noise. Alternate sensor installations were not investigated, but might yield different results.

  9. Deflection of large near-earth objects

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1999-01-11

    The Earth is periodically hit by near Earth objects (NEOs) ranging in size from dust to mountains. The small ones are a useful source of information, but those larger than about 1 km can cause global damage. The requirements for the deflection of NEOs with significant material strength are known reasonably well; however, the strength of large NEOs is not known, so those requirements may not apply. Meteor impacts on the Earth`s atmosphere give some information on strength as a function of object size and composition. This information is used here to show that large, weak objects could also be deflected efficiently, if addressed properly.

  10. Correct light deflection in Weyl conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattani, Carlo; Scalia, Massimo; Laserra, Ettore; Bochicchio, Ivana; Nandi, Kamal K.

    2013-02-01

    The conformal gravity fit to observed galactic rotation curves requires γ>0. On the other hand, the conventional method for light deflection by galaxies gives a negative contribution to the Schwarzschild value for γ>0, which is contrary to observation. Thus, it is very important that the contribution to bending should in principle be positive, no matter how small its magnitude is. Here we show that the Rindler-Ishak method gives a positive contribution to Schwarzschild deflection for γ>0, as desired. We also obtain the exact local coupling term derived earlier by Sereno. These results indicate that conformal gravity can potentially test well against all astrophysical observations to date.

  11. Nonlinear large-deflection analysis of orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kazuo; Araki, Yoshima; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2004-02-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to measure the nonlinear force-deflection behavior of selected orthodontic wires using a conventional tensile test, (2) to extend a mathematical model for simulating the force system produced by orthodontic wires based on the small-deflection linear theory to the large-deflection nonlinear theory, and (3) to examine the effects of the cross-section and mechanical properties of orthodontic wires on nonlinear characteristics. A method for extending a mathematical model for simulating the force system produced by orthodontic wires based on the small-deflection linear theory to the large-deflection nonlinear theory was established, and this can provide a clear view of the true nature of orthodontic wires. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that the nonlinear properties of orthodontic wires were affected more by the cross-sectional shape than by mechanical properties. PMID:15038499

  12. Photothermal deflection spectroscopy and detection

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, W. B.; Amer, Nabil M.; Boccara, A. C.; Fournier, D.

    1981-04-15

    The theory for a sensitive spectroscopy based on the photothermal deflection of a laser beam is developed. We consider cw and pulsed cases of both transverse and collinear photothermal deflection spectroscopy for solids, liquids, gases, and thin films. The predictions of the theory are experimentally verified, its implications for imaging and microscopy are given, and the sources of noise are analyzed. The sensitivity and versatility of photothermal deflection spectroscopy are compared with thermal lensing and photoacoustic spectroscopy.

  13. Asteroid Deflection: How, Where and When?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, D.

    2008-10-01

    To deflect impact-trajectory of massive and spinning km^3 asteroid by a few terrestrial radiuses one need a large momentum exchange. The dragging of huge spinning bodies in space by external engine seems difficult or impossible. Our solution is based on the landing of multi screw-rockets, powered by mini-nuclear engines, on the body, that dig a small fraction of the soil surface to use as an exhaust propeller, ejecting it vertically in phase among themselves. Such a mass ejection increases the momentum exchange, their number redundancy guarantees the stability of the system. The slow landing (below ≃ 40 cm s^{-1}) of each engine-unity at those very low gravity field, may be achieved by safe rolling and bouncing along the surface. The engine array tuned activity, overcomes the asteroid angular velocity. Coherent turning of the jet heads increases the deflection efficiency. A procession along its surface may compensate at best the asteroid spin. A small skin-mass (about 2×10^4 tons) may be ejected by mini-nuclear engines. Such prototypes may also build first safe galleries for humans on the Moon. Conclusive deflecting tests might be performed on remote asteroids. The incoming asteroid 99942 Apophis (just 2% of km^3) may be deflected safely a few Earth radiuses. Its encounter maybe not just a hazard but an opportunity, learning how to land, to dig, to build and also to nest safe human station inside. Asteroids amplified deflections by gravity swing may be driven into longest planetary journeys, beginning i.e. with the preliminary landing of future missions on Mars' moon-asteroid Phobos or Deimos.

  14. Applicability of moire deflection tomography for diagnosing arc plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yunyun; Song Yang; He Anzhi; Li Zhenhua

    2009-01-20

    The argon arc plasma whose central temperature, 1.90x10{sup 4} K, is used as a practical example for an experiment to research the applicability of moire deflection tomography in arc plasma flow-field diagnosis. The experimental result indicates that moire deflection of the measured argon arc plasma is very small, even smaller than that of a common flame with the maximal temperature of nearly 1.80x10{sup 3} K. The refractive-index gradient in moire deflection tomography mainly contributes to the temperature gradient in essence when the probe wavelength and pressure are certain in plasma diagnosis. The applicable temperature ranges of moire deflection tomography in the argon arc plasma diagnosis are given with the probe wavelength 532 nm at 1 atm in certain measuring error requirements. In a word, the applicable temperature range of moire deflection tomography for arc plasma diagnosis is intimately related to the probe wavelength and the practical measuring requirements.

  15. Deflection of a flexural cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherbourne, A. N.; Lu, F.

    The behavior of a flexural elastoplastic cantilever beam is investigated in which geometric nonlinearities are considered. The result of an elastica analysis by Frisch-Fay (1962) is extended to include postyield behavior. Although a closed-form solution is not possible, as in the elastic case, simple algebraic equations are derived involving only one unknown variable, which can also be expressed in the standard form of elliptic integrals if so desired. The results, in comparison with those of the small deflection analyses, indicate that large deflection analyses are necessary when the relative depth of the beam is very small over the length. The present exact solution can be used as a reference by those who resort to a finite element method for more complicated problems. It can also serve as a building block to other beam problems such as a simply supported beam or a beam with multiple loads.

  16. Philippines: Small-scale renewable energy update

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This paper gives an overview of the application of small scale renewable energy sources in the Philippines. Sources looked at include solar, biomass, micro-hydroelectric, mini-hydroelectric, wind, mini-geothermal, and hybrid. A small power utilities group is being spun off the major utility, to provide a structure for developing rural electrification programs. In some instances, private companies have stepped forward, avoiding what is perceived as overwhelming beaurocracy, and installed systems with private financing. The paper provides information on survey work which has been done on resources, and the status of cooperative programs to develop renewable systems in the nation.

  17. Improved laser ablation model for asteroid deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Massimiliano; Gibbings, Alison; Watson, Ian; Hopkins, John-Mark

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents an improved laser ablation model and compares the performance - momentum coupling and deflection system mass - of laser ablation against contactless deflection methods based on ion-propulsion. The deflection of an asteroid through laser ablation is achieved by illuminating the surface of the asteroid with high intensity laser light. The absorbed energy induces the sublimation of the surface material and the generation of a plume of gas and ejecta. Similar to a rocket engine, the flow of expelled material produces a continuous and controllable thrust that could be used to modify the trajectory and tumbling motion of the asteroid. Recent results gained from a series of laser ablation experiments were used to improve the sublimation and deflection models. In each experiment a terrestrial olivine sample was ablated, under vacuum, with a 90 W continuous wave laser. The paper presents a model that better fits the outcomes of the experimental campaign, in particular in terms of mass flow rate and spot temperature.

  18. Large beam deflection using cascaded prism array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Tsui, Chi-Leung

    2012-04-01

    Endoscopes have been utilize in the medical field to observe the internals of the human body to assist the diagnosis of diseases, such as breathing disorders, internal bleeding, stomach ulcers, and urinary tract infections. Endoscopy is also utilized in the procedure of biopsy for the diagnosis of cancer. Conventional endoscopes suffer from the compromise between overall size and image quality due to the required size of the sensor for acceptable image quality. To overcome the size constraint while maintaining the capture image quality, we propose an electro-optic beam steering device based on thermal-plastic polymer, which has a small foot-print (~5mmx5mm), and can be easily fabricated using conventional hot-embossing and micro-fabrication techniques. The proposed device can be implemented as an imaging device inside endoscopes to allow reduction in the overall system size. In our previous work, a single prism design has been used to amplify the deflection generated by the index change of the thermal-plastic polymer when a voltage is applied; it yields a result of 5.6° deflection. To further amplify the deflection, a new design utilizing a cascading three-prism array has been implemented and a deflection angle to 29.2° is observed. The new design amplifies the beam deflection, while keeping the advantage of simple fabrication made possible by thermal-plastic polymer. Also, a photo-resist based collimator lens array has been added to reduce and provide collimation of the beam for high quality imaging purposes. The collimator is able to collimate the exiting beam at 4 μm diameter for up to 25mm, which potentially allows high resolution image capturing.

  19. Deflection of uncooperative targets using laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiry, Nicolas; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2015-09-01

    Owing to their ability to move a target in space without requiring propellant, laser-based deflection methods have gained attention among the research community in the recent years. With laser ablation, the vaporized material is used to push the target itself allowing for a significant reduction in the mass requirement for a space mission. Specifically, this paper addresses two important issues which are thought to limit seriously the potential efficiency of a laser-deflection method: the impact of the tumbling motion of the target as well as the impact of the finite thickness of the material ablated in the case of a space debris. In this paper, we developed a steady-state analytical model based on energetic considerations in order to predict the efficiency range theoretically allowed by a laser deflection system in absence of the two aforementioned issues. A numerical model was then implemented to solve the transient heat equation in presence of vaporization and melting and account for the tumbling rate of the target. This model was also translated to the case where the target is a space debris by considering material properties of an aluminium 6061-T6 alloy and adapting at every time-step the size of the computational domain along with the recession speed of the interface in order to account for the finite thickness of the debris component. The comparison between the numerical results and the analytical predictions allow us to draw interesting conclusions regarding the momentum coupling achievable by a given laser deflection system both for asteroids and space debris in function of the flux, the rotation rate of the target and its material properties. In the last section of this paper, we show how a reasonably small spacecraft could deflect a 56m asteroid with a laser system requiring less than 5kW of input power.

  20. Ultrasensitive Beam Deflection Measurement via Interferometric Weak Value Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, P. Ben; Starling, David J.; Jordan, Andrew N.; Howell, John C.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the use of an interferometric weak value technique to amplify very small transverse deflections of an optical beam. By entangling the beam's transverse degrees of freedom with the which-path states of a Sagnac interferometer, it is possible to realize an optical amplifier for polarization independent deflections. The theory for the interferometric weak value amplification method is presented along with the experimental results, which are in good agreement. Of particular interest, we measured the angular deflection of a mirror down to 400{+-}200 frad and the linear travel of a piezo actuator down to 14{+-}7 fm.

  1. 13 CFR 101.500 - Small Business Energy Efficiency Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Small Business Energy Efficiency... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Energy Efficiency § 101.500 Small Business Energy Efficiency Program. (a) The... becoming more energy efficient, understanding the cost savings from improved energy efficiency,...

  2. 13 CFR 101.500 - Small Business Energy Efficiency Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Small Business Energy Efficiency... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Energy Efficiency § 101.500 Small Business Energy Efficiency Program. (a) The... becoming more energy efficient, understanding the cost savings from improved energy efficiency,...

  3. 13 CFR 101.500 - Small Business Energy Efficiency Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Small Business Energy Efficiency... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Energy Efficiency § 101.500 Small Business Energy Efficiency Program. (a) The... becoming more energy efficient, understanding the cost savings from improved energy efficiency,...

  4. 13 CFR 101.500 - Small Business Energy Efficiency Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Small Business Energy Efficiency... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Energy Efficiency § 101.500 Small Business Energy Efficiency Program. (a) The... becoming more energy efficient, understanding the cost savings from improved energy efficiency,...

  5. Coupler induced monopole component and its minimization in deflecting cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambattu, P. K.; Burt, G.; Grudiev, A.; Dolgashev, V.; Dexter, A.

    2013-06-01

    Deflecting cavities are used in particle accelerators for the manipulation of charged particles by deflecting or crabbing (rotating) them. For short deflectors, the effect of the power coupler on the deflecting field can become significant. The particular power coupler type can introduce multipole rf field components and coupler-specific wakefields. Coupler types that would normally be considered like standard on-cell coupler, waveguide coupler, or mode-launcher coupler could have one or two rf feeds. The major advantage of a dual-feed coupler is the absence of monopole and quadrupole rf field components in the deflecting structure. However, a dual-feed coupler is mechanically more complex than a typical single-feed coupler and needs a splitter. For most applications, deflecting structures are placed in regions where there is small space hence reducing the size of the structure is very desirable. This paper investigates the multipole field components of the deflecting mode in single-feed couplers and ways to overcome the effect of the monopole component on the beam. Significant advances in performance have been demonstrated. Additionally, a novel coupler design is introduced which has no monopole field component to the deflecting mode and is more compact than the conventional dual-feed coupler.

  6. 13 CFR 101.500 - Small Business Energy Efficiency Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Small Business Energy Efficiency Program. 101.500 Section 101.500 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATION Small Business Energy Efficiency § 101.500 Small Business Energy Efficiency Program. (a) The Administration has developed and coordinated...

  7. Polyhedron tracking and gravity tractor asteroid deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummen, N.; Lappas, V.

    2014-11-01

    In the wake of the Chelyabinsk airburst, the defense against hazardous asteroids is becoming a topic of high interest. This work improves the gravity tractor asteroid deflection approach by tracking realistic small body shapes with tilted ion engines. An algorithm for polyhedron tracking was evaluated in a fictitious impact scenario. The simulations suggest a capability increase up to 38.2% with such improved tilting strategies. The long- and short-term effects within polyhedron tracking are illustrated. In particular, the orbital reorientation effect is influential when realistic asteroid shapes and rotations are accounted for. Also analyzed is the subject of altitude profiles, a way to tailor the gravity tractor performance, and to achieve a steering ability within the B-plane. A novel analytical solution for the classic gravity tractor is derived. It removes the simulation need for classic tractor designs to obtain comparable two body model Δv figures. This paper corroborates that the asteroid shape can be exploited for maximum performance. Even a single engine tilt adjustment at the beginning of deflection operations yields more deflection than a fixed preset tilt.

  8. High bandwidth deflection readout for atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Steininger, Juergen; Bibl, Matthias; Yoo, Han Woong; Schitter, Georg

    2015-10-01

    This contribution presents the systematic design of a high bandwidth deflection readout mechanism for atomic force microscopes. The widely used optical beam deflection method is revised by adding a focusing lens between the cantilever and the quadrant photodetector (QPD). This allows the utilization of QPDs with a small active area resulting in an increased detection bandwidth due to the reduced junction capacitance. Furthermore the additional lens can compensate a cross talk between a compensating z-movement of the cantilever and the deflection readout. Scaling effects are analyzed to get the optimal spot size for the given geometry of the QPD. The laser power is tuned to maximize the signal to noise ratio without limiting the bandwidth by local saturation effects. The systematic approach results in a measured -3 dB detection bandwidth of 64.5 MHz at a deflection noise density of 62fm/√Hz. PMID:26520960

  9. High bandwidth deflection readout for atomic force microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steininger, Juergen; Bibl, Matthias; Yoo, Han Woong; Schitter, Georg

    2015-10-01

    This contribution presents the systematic design of a high bandwidth deflection readout mechanism for atomic force microscopes. The widely used optical beam deflection method is revised by adding a focusing lens between the cantilever and the quadrant photodetector (QPD). This allows the utilization of QPDs with a small active area resulting in an increased detection bandwidth due to the reduced junction capacitance. Furthermore the additional lens can compensate a cross talk between a compensating z-movement of the cantilever and the deflection readout. Scaling effects are analyzed to get the optimal spot size for the given geometry of the QPD. The laser power is tuned to maximize the signal to noise ratio without limiting the bandwidth by local saturation effects. The systematic approach results in a measured -3 dB detection bandwidth of 64.5 MHz at a deflection noise density of 62 fm / √{ Hz } .

  10. Limitation of linear colliders from transverse rf deflections

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Offaxis beam trajectories in a linear collider produce transverse wakefield and chromatic effects which cause emittance enlargement. One cause for non-centered trajectories in the accelerating structures is radial rf fields which produce transverse deflections. Static deflections can be compensated by static dipole magnetic fields. However, fluctuations of the rf fields cause variations in the deflections which must be managed or limited. Given the level of fluctuation of the phase and amplitude of an rf system, a limit on the allowable rf deflection can be calculated. Parameters, such as the beam emittance, lattice design, rf wavelength and the initial and final beam energies, influence the tolerances. Two tolerances are calculated: (1) one assumes that the wakefields are completely controlled, and that chromatic effects are the only enlarging mechanism (optimistic), and (2) the other assumes the limit is due to transverse wakefields without the aid of Landau damping (pessimistic).

  11. Noncontact measurement of angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Technique for measuring instantaneous angular deflection of object requires no physical contact. Technique utilizes two flat refractors, converging lens, and different photocell. Distinction of method is its combination of optical and electromechanical components into feedback system in which measurement error is made to approach zero. Application is foreseen in measurement of torsional strain.

  12. Small Buildings = Big Opportunity for Energy Savings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-09-01

    This fact sheet describes the Small Buildings and Small Portfolios roadmap, which outlines approaches and strategic priorities for the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies Office to pursue over the next three to five years that will support the implementation of high-potential energy efficiency opportunities for small business and building owners and operators.

  13. AIDA: Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, A. F.; Galvez, A.; Carnelli, I.; Michel, P.; Rivkin, A.; Reed, C.

    2012-12-01

    To protect the Earth from a hazardous asteroid impact, various mitigation methods have been proposed, including deflection of the asteroid by a spacecraft impact. AIDA, consisting of two mission elements, the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) and the Asteroid Impact Monitoring (AIM) mission, is a demonstration of asteroid deflection. To date, there has been no such demonstration, and there is major uncertainty in the result of a spacecraft impact onto an asteroid, that is, the amount of deflection produced by a given momentum input from the impact. This uncertainty is in part due to unknown physical properties of the asteroid surface, such as porosity and strength, and in part due to poorly understood impact physics such that the momentum carried off by ejecta is highly uncertain. A first mission to demonstrate asteroid deflection would not only be a major step towards gaining the capability to mitigate an asteroid hazard, but in addition it would return unique information on an asteroid's strength, other surface properties, and internal structure. This information return would be highly relevant to future human exploration of asteroids. We report initial results of the AIDA joint mission concept study undertaken by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and ESA with support from NASA centers including Goddard, Johnson and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. For AIDA, the DART spacecraft impactor study is coordinated with an ESA study of the AIM mission, which would rendezvous with the same asteroid to measure effects of the impact. Unlike the previous Don Quijote mission study performed by ESA in 2005-2007, DART envisions an impactor spacecraft to intercept the secondary member of a binary near-Earth asteroid. DART includes ground-based observations to measure the deflection independently of the rendezvous spacecraft observations from AIM, which also measures deflection and provides detailed characterization of the target asteroid. The joint mission AIDA

  14. Theory of using magnetic deflections to combine charged particle beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Steckbeck, Mackenzie K.

    2014-09-01

    Several radiation effects projects in the Ion Beam Lab (IBL) have recently required two disparate charged particle beams to simultaneously strike a single sample through a single port of the target chamber. Because these beams have vastly different mass- energy products (MEP), the low MEP beam requires a large angle of deflection toward the sample by a bending electromagnet. A second electromagnet located further upstream provides a means to compensate for the small angle deflection experienced by the high MEP beam during its path through the bending magnet. This paper derives the equations used to select the magnetic fields required by these two magnets to achieve uniting both beams at the target sample. A simple result was obtained when the separation of the two magnets was equivalent to the distance from the bending magnet to the sample, and the equations is given by: , 1 2 c s c s r B B r where and are the magnetic fields in the steering and bending magnet and is s B c B c s r r the ratio of the radii of the bending magnet to that of the steering magnet. This result is not dependent upon the parameters of the high MEP beam, i.e. energy, mass, charge state. Therefore, once the field of the bending magnet is set for the low MEP beam, and the field in the steering magnet is set as indicted in the equation, the trajectory path of any high MEP beam will be directed into the sample. (page intentionally left blank)

  15. Elevator deflections on the icing process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Randall K.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of elevator deflection of the horizontal stabilizer for certain icing parameters is investigated. Elevator deflection can severely change the lower and upper leading-edge impingement limits, and ice can accrete on the elevator itself. Also, elevator deflection had practically no effect on the maximum local collection efficiency. It is shown that for severe icing conditions (large water droplets), elevator deflections that increase the projected height of the airfoil can significantly increase the total collection efficiency of the airfoil.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of CME Deflections in the Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Bin; Shen, Chenglong; Wang, Yuming; Ye, Pinzhong; Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Shui; Zhao, Xuepu

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, ten CME events viewed by the STEREO twin spacecraft are analyzed to study the deflections of CMEs during their propagation in the corona. Based on the three-dimensional information of the CMEs derived by the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model (Thernisien, Howard, and Vourlidas in Astrophys. J. 652, 1305, 2006), it is found that the propagation directions of eight CMEs had changed. By applying the theoretical method proposed by Shen et al. ( Solar Phys. 269, 389, 2011) to all the CMEs, we found that the deflections are consistent, in strength and direction, with the gradient of the magnetic energy density. There is a positive correlation between the deflection rate and the strength of the magnetic energy density gradient and a weak anti-correlation between the deflection rate and the CME speed. Our results suggest that the deflections of CMEs are mainly controlled by the background magnetic field and can be quantitatively described by the magnetic energy density gradient (MEDG) model.

  17. Small Buildings = Big Opportunity for Energy Savings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    Small buildings have a big impact on energy use. In the United States, 44.6 million small buildings consume 44% of the overall energy used in buildings, presenting an enormous opportunity to cut costs, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions.

  18. The Seven Habits of Highly Deflective Colleagues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Michelle; Chaddock, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    The authors define deflection as a strategy to bounce action or responsibility away from oneself and toward another person, time, or place. Although they contend that deflection occurs in all areas of personal and professional life, the authors limit their focus to the deflective colleague ("collega deflectivus") in academe. In this article, the…

  19. Subminiature deflection circuit operates integrated sweep circuits in TV camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaff, F. L.

    1967-01-01

    Small magnetic sweep deflection circuits operate a hand-held lunar television camera. They convert timing signals from the synchronizer into waveforms that provide a raster on the vidicon target. Raster size remains constant and linear during wide voltage and temperature fluctuations.

  20. Small Island States Green Energy Initiative. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Khattak, Nasir

    1999-10-15

    This report covers the activities carried out during a one year period from 7/15/99 to 7/15/00 as part of the Small Islands Green Energy Initiative. The three activities were: 1) Energy Ministerial conference in the Caribbean; 2) Training session on renewable energy for utility engineers; and 3) Case studies compilation on renewable energy in the Caribbean.

  1. Small Business Innovation Research Award Success Story: Proton Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-01

    This success story describes Proton Energy Systems, a small business that designs and manufactures proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis sytems to produce hydrogen from water. The U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program has supported much of Proton's technology development through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Awards and other non-SBIR funding.

  2. 75 FR 17036 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Small Electric Motors; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Part 431 RIN 1904-AB70 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Small Electric... rule regarding the energy conservation standards for small electric motors, which was published on... energy conservation standards for small electric motors. Due to a drafting error, an incorrect...

  3. Small School Creates Large Energy Savings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Wally

    1978-01-01

    The Folsom Cordova Unified School District decided to make a model energy-saver out of its Cordova Villa-Reymouth complex, a combined preschool, development center, and K-6 school for 300 students. Particular emphasis was given to cutting unnecessary lighting. Graphs of energy consumption and dollar savings are provided. (SJL)

  4. Deflected Propagation ---- A Factor Deciding the Geoeffectiveness of A CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shen, C.; Liu, J.; Gui, B.; Wang, S.

    2010-12-01

    To answer the question if a CME can cause a significant change of the states of geo-space, the first issue we have to address is whether or not the CME will intersect with the Earth or what the trajectory of the CME is. From several observational cases and statistical studies, we show that the deflected propagations of CMEs are a common phenomenon. The amount of the deflection could be as large as several tens degrees in either latitude, longitude or both. Thus, an on-disk CME may not necessarily encounter the Earth, while a limb CME may be able to hit the Earth. Roughly, the CMEs' deflections can be classified as two different kinds. One is the deflection occurring in the corona, in which the CME's trajectory is controled by the distribution of the energy density of undisturbed coronal magnetic field. The other is that happenning in the IP space and in the ecliptic plane, in which the direction of the CME's propagation will be changed by the preceding or trailing background solar wind plasma depending on the velocity difference between the CME and ambient solar wind. Two models are proposed to describe the two different CME deflection behaviors, respectively. By applying the models to several cases, we may show that the trajectories of these CMEs predicted by the models match the observations fairly well.

  5. A 3-dimensional time-resolved photothermal deflection ``Mirage'' method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrath, N. G. C.; Malacarne, L. C.; Lukasievicz, G. V. B.; Bernabe, H. S.; Rohling, J. H.; Baesso, M. L.; Shen, J.; Bialkowski, S. E.

    2012-02-01

    A three-dimensional time-resolved theory and experiment for photothermal deflection spectroscopy is developed. The heat conduction equations for two semi-infinite media consisting of an opaque sample and a fluid are solved considering temperature and energy flux balance conditions for a Gaussian heat source. The time dependent perpendicular deflection signal is calculated and compared to experimental measurements on glassy carbon and copper samples. Excellent agreement with literature values for thermal diffusivity of the samples is found. The transient behavior is analyzed for different coupling fluids.

  6. High energy density propulsion systems and small engine dynamometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Scope and Method of Study. This study investigates all possible methods of powering small unmanned vehicles, provides reasoning for the propulsion system down select, and covers in detail the design and production of a dynamometer to confirm theoretical energy density calculations for small engines. Initial energy density calculations are based upon manufacturer data, pressure vessel theory, and ideal thermodynamic cycle efficiencies. Engine tests are conducted with a braking type dynamometer for constant load energy density tests, and show true energy densities in excess of 1400 WH/lb of fuel. Findings and Conclusions. Theory predicts lithium polymer, the present unmanned system energy storage device of choice, to have much lower energy densities than other conversion energy sources. Small engines designed for efficiency, instead of maximum power, would provide the most advantageous method for powering small unmanned vehicles because these engines have widely variable power output, loss of mass during flight, and generate rotational power directly. Theoretical predictions for the energy density of small engines has been verified through testing. Tested values up to 1400 WH/lb can be seen under proper operating conditions. The implementation of such a high energy density system will require a significant amount of follow-on design work to enable the engines to tolerate the higher temperatures of lean operation. Suggestions are proposed to enable a reliable, small-engine propulsion system in future work. Performance calculations show that a mature system is capable of month long flight times, and unrefueled circumnavigation of the globe.

  7. Mechanistic interpretation of nondestructive pavement testing deflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, M. S.

    1980-06-01

    A method is proposed for the backcalculation of material properties in flexible pavements based on the interpretation of surface deflection measurements. ILLI-PAVE, a stress dependent finite element pavement model, was used to generate data for developing algorithms and nomographs for deflection basin interpretation. Over 11,000 deflection measurements for 24 different flexible pavement sections were collected and analyzed. Deflections were measured using the Benkelman Beam, the IDOT Road Rater, the Falling Weight Deflectometer, and an accelerometer to measure deflections under moving trucks. Loading mode effects on pavement response were investigated using dynamic and viscous pavement models. The factors controlling the pavement response to different loading modes were explained and identified. Correlations between different devices were developed. The proposed evaluation procedure is illustrated for three different flexible pavements using deflection data collected on several testing dates.

  8. Measurement of Deflection Line on Bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Rudolf; Štroner, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Prestressed concrete bridges are very sensitive to the increase in long-term deflections. Reliable forecasts of deflections of bridge structures during construction and durability are crucial for achieving good durability. The main results of measurements are the changes of the deflection line of the bridge structures, which places special demands on the measurement procedure. Results from measurements are very useful for the improvement of mathematical prediction methods of behaviour of long span prestressed concrete structures.

  9. Energy Distributions in Small Populations: Pascal versus Boltzmann

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kugel, Roger W.; Weiner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical distributions of a limited amount of energy among small numbers of particles with discrete, evenly-spaced quantum levels are examined systematically. The average populations of energy states reveal the pattern of Pascal's triangle. An exact formula for the probability that a particle will be in any given energy state is derived.…

  10. Energy conservation in small meat, poultry and dairy processing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hausen, C.L.; Fields, E.L.; Huff, R.C.

    1983-06-01

    Energy audits were performed in twenty-three small (generally under 50 employees) meat, poultry and dairy processing plants. Energy conservation opportunities with the greatest potential for net gain in a plant are listed and discussed. Relationships between product throughput and energy consumption are reported.

  11. Selected Energy Management Options for Small Business and Local Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wert, Jonathan M.; Worthington, Barry K.

    This document is a checklist of 257 energy management options for small business and local government. The energy management options are categorized under: (1) Energy management strategies; (2) Buildings; (3) Lighting; (4) Water; (5) Waste operations; (6) Equipment; (7) Transportation; and (8) Food preparation. To select options for…

  12. Small School District Saves Money with Energy Grant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kussmaul, Donald L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes how the small Tiskilwa (Illinois) school district used a United States Department of Energy grant to replace and block windows and insulate the attic in the elementary school. Describes savings in dollars and energy resulting from the energy audit and technical assistance phases of the project. (SB)

  13. AIDA: the Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-07-01

    The Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission is a joint cooperation between European and US space agencies that consists of two separate and independent spacecraft that will be launched to a binary asteroid system, the near-Earth asteroid Didymos, to assess the possibility of deflecting an asteroid trajectory by using a kinetic impactor. The European Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) is under Phase A/B1 study at ESA from March 2015 until summer 2016. AIM is set to rendez-vous with the asteroid system a few months prior to the impact by the US Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) spacecraft to fully characterize the smaller of the two binary components. AIM is a unique mission as it will be the first time that a spacecraft will investigate the surface, subsurface, and internal properties of a small binary near Earth asteroid. In addition it will perform various important technology demonstrations that can serve other space missions: AIM will release a set of CubeSats in deep space and a lander on the surface of the smaller asteroid and for the first time, deep-space inter-satellite linking will be demonstrated between the main spacecraft, the CubeSats, and the lander, and data will also be transmitted from interplanetary space to Earth by a laser communication system. The knowledge obtained by this mission will have great implications for our understanding of the history of the Solar System. Small asteroids are believed to result from collisions and other processes (e.g., spinup, shaking) that made them what they are now. Having direct information on their surface and internal properties will allow us to understand how these processes work and transform these small bodies as well as, for this particular case, how a binary system forms. So far, our understanding of the collisional process and the validation of numerical simulations of the impact process rely on impact experiments at laboratory scales. With DART, thanks to the characterization of the

  14. Industrial Assessment Centers - Small Manufacturers Reduce Energy & Increase Productivity

    SciTech Connect

    2015-11-06

    Since 1976, the Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), administered by the US Department of Energy, have supported small and medium-sized American manufacturers to reduce energy use and increase their productivity and competitiveness. The 24 IACs, located at premier engineering universities around the country (see below), send faculty and engineering students to local small and medium-sized manufacturers to provide no-cost assessments of energy use, process performance and waste and water flows. Under the direction of experienced professors, IAC engineering students analyze the manufacturer’s facilities, energy bills and energy, waste and water systems, including compressed air, motors/pumps, lighting, process heat and steam. The IACs then follow up with written energy-saving and productivity improvement recommendations, with estimates of related costs and payback periods.

  15. Focused ion beam induced deflections of freestanding thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.-R.; Chen, P.; Aziz, M. J.; Branton, D.; Vlassak, J. J.

    2006-11-01

    Prominent deflections are shown to occur in freestanding silicon nitride thin membranes when exposed to a 50keV gallium focused ion beam for ion doses between 1014 and 1017ions/cm2. Atomic force microscope topographs were used to quantify elevations on the irradiated side and corresponding depressions of comparable magnitude on the back side, thus indicating that what at first appeared to be protrusions are actually the result of membrane deflections. The shape in high-stress silicon nitride is remarkably flat-topped and differs from that in low-stress silicon nitride. Ion beam induced biaxial compressive stress generation, which is a known deformation mechanism for other amorphous materials at higher ion energies, is hypothesized to be the origin of the deflection. A continuum mechanical model based on this assumption convincingly reproduces the profiles for both low-stress and high-stress membranes and provides a family of unusual shapes that can be created by deflection of freestanding thin films under beam irradiation.

  16. Planetary Defense From Space: Part 2 (Simple) Asteroid Deflection Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2006-06-01

    A system of two space bases housing missiles for an efficient Planetary Defense of the Earth from asteroids and comets was firstly proposed by this author in 2002. It was then shown that the five Lagrangian points of the Earth Moon system lead naturally to only two unmistakable locations of these two space bases within the sphere of influence of the Earth. These locations are the two Lagrangian points L1 (in between the Earth and the Moon) and L3 (in the direction opposite to the Moon from the Earth). In fact, placing missiles based at L1 and L3 would enable the missiles to deflect the trajectory of incoming asteroids by hitting them orthogonally to their impact trajectory toward the Earth, thus maximizing the deflection at best. It was also shown that confocal conics are the only class of missile trajectories fulfilling this “best orthogonal deflection” requirement. The mathematical theory developed by the author in the years 2002 2004 was just the beginning of a more expanded research program about the Planetary Defense. In fact, while those papers developed the formal Keplerian theory of the Optimal Planetary Defense achievable from the Earth Moon Lagrangian points L1 and L3, this paper is devoted to the proof of a simple “(small) asteroid deflection law” relating directly the following variables to each other:the speed of the arriving asteroid with respect to the Earth (known from the astrometric observations);the asteroid's size and density (also supposed to be known from astronomical observations of various types);the “security radius” of the Earth, that is, the minimal sphere around the Earth outside which we must force the asteroid to fly if we want to be safe on Earth. Typically, we assume the security radius to equal about 10,000 km from the Earth center, but this number might be changed by more refined analyses, especially in the case of “rubble pile” asteroids;the distance from the Earth of the two Lagrangian points L1 and L3 where the

  17. ForeCAT - A Model for Magnetic Deflections of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Christina; Opher, Merav

    2016-05-01

    Accurate space weather forecasting requires knowledge of the trajectory of CMEs. Decades of observations show that CMEs can deflect from a purely radial trajectory, however, no consensus exists as to the cause of these deflections. We developed a model for CME deflection and rotation from magnetic forces, called Forecasting a CME’s Altered Trajectory (ForeCAT). ForeCAT has been designed to run fast enough for large parameter phase space studies, and potentially real-time predictions.ForeCAT reproduces the general trends seen in observed CME deflections. In particular, CMEs deflect toward regions of minimum magnetic energy - frequently the Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS) on global scales. The background magnetic forces decrease rapidly with distance and quickly become negligible. Most deflections and rotations can be well-described by assuming constant angular momentum beyond 10 Rs.ForeCAT also reproduces individual observed CME deflections - the 2008 December 12, 2008 April 08, and 2010 July 12 CMEs. By determining the reduced chi-squared best fit between the ForeCAT results and the observations we constrain parameters related to the CME and the background solar wind. Additionally, we constrain whether different models for the low corona magnetic backgrounds can produce the observed CME deflection.

  18. Deflection of a hyperbaric plasma arc in a transverse magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, I.M.

    1993-12-31

    Results are presented concerning the influence of operating parameters on the susceptibility of the plasma arc to deflection by an externally generated transverse magnetic field. Arc deflection susceptibility is found to increase rapidly with rising ambient pressure and is significantly greater for the free burning TIG arc compared with the weakly constricted (soft) plasma arc. In agreement with previously published work, it has been shown that for small amplitude deflections the arc column behaves in a manner analogous to a solid body. However, above a critical field strength the structure of the column undergoes a significant change characterized by a rapid deterioration in stability; mechanisms for this behavior are discussed.

  19. Throat Flow Modelling of Expansion Deflection Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. V.; Hempsell, C. M.

    Modelling of the supersonic flow within a rocket nozzle of both conventional and expansion deflection (ED) design is well handled by Method of Characteristics based algorithms. This approach provides both a predic- tion of the flowfield, and allows efficient optimisation of nozzle shape with respect to length. However, the Method of Characteristics requires a solution of the transonic flow through the nozzle throat to provide initial conditions, and the accuracy of the description of the transonic flow will clearly affect the overall accuracy of the complete nozzle flow calculation. However, it is relatively simple to show that conventional analytical methods for this process break down when applied to the more complex throat geometry of ED nozzles. This requires the use of a time marching solution method, which allows the analysis of the flow within this region even on such advanced configurations. This paper demonstrates this capability, outlines a general method for ED nozzle throat geometric definition, and examines the effect of various throat parameters on the permissible range of ED contours. It is found that the design of length optimised ED nozzles is highly sensitive to small changes in these parameters, and hence they must be selected with care.

  20. Small Town Energy Program (STEP) Final Report revised

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Charles T.

    2014-01-02

    University Park, Maryland (“UP”) is a small town of 2,540 residents, 919 homes, 2 churches, 1 school, 1 town hall, and 1 breakthrough community energy efficiency initiative: the Small Town Energy Program (“STEP”). STEP was developed with a mission to “create a model community energy transformation program that serves as a roadmap for other small towns across the U.S.” STEP first launched in January 2011 in UP and expanded in July 2012 to the neighboring communities of Hyattsville, Riverdale Park, and College Heights Estates, MD. STEP, which concluded in July 2013, was generously supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The STEP model was designed for replication in other resource-constrained small towns similar to University Park - a sector largely neglected to date in federal and state energy efficiency programs. STEP provided a full suite of activities for replication, including: energy audits and retrofits for residential buildings, financial incentives, a community-based social marketing backbone and local community delivery partners. STEP also included the highly innovative use of an “Energy Coach” who worked one-on-one with clients throughout the program. Please see www.smalltownenergy.org for more information. In less than three years, STEP achieved the following results in University Park: • 30% of community households participated voluntarily in STEP; • 25% of homes received a Home Performance with ENERGY STAR assessment; • 16% of households made energy efficiency improvements to their home; • 64% of households proceeded with an upgrade after their assessment; • 9 Full Time Equivalent jobs were created or retained, and 39 contractors worked on STEP over the course of the project. Estimated Energy Savings - Program Totals kWh Electricity 204,407 Therms Natural Gas 24,800 Gallons of Oil 2,581 Total Estimated MMBTU Saved (Source Energy) 5,474 Total Estimated Annual Energy Cost Savings $61,343 STEP clients who

  1. Deflected Mirage Mediation: A Framework for Generalized Supersymmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ian-Woo

    2008-11-23

    We present a model of supersymmetry breaking in which the contributions from gravity/modulus, anomaly, and gauge mediation are all comparable. We term this scenario 'deflected mirage mediation', which is a generalization of the KKLT-motivated mirage mediation scenario to include gauge mediated contributions. These contributions deflect the gaugino mass unification scale and alter the pattern of soft parameters at low energies. Competitive gauge-mediated terms can naturally appear within phenomenological models based on the KKLT setup by the stabilization of the gauge singlet field responsible for the masses of the messenger fields. We analyze the renormalization group evolution of the supersymmetry breaking terms and the resulting low energy mass spectra.

  2. Jet Deflection by Very Weak Guide Fields during Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Che, H.; Lapenta, G.; Markidis, S.

    2011-09-23

    Previous 2D simulations of reconnection using a standard model of initially antiparallel magnetic fields have detected electron jets outflowing from the x point into the ion outflow exhausts. Associated with these jets are extended ''outer electron diffusion regions.'' New PIC simulations with an ion to electron mass ratio as large as 1836 (an H{sup +} plasma) now show that the jets are strongly deflected and the outer electron diffusion region is broken up by a very weak out-of-plane magnetic guide field, even though the diffusion rate itself is unchanged. Jet outflow and deflection are interpreted in terms of electron dynamics and are compared to recent measurements of jets in the presence of a small guide field in Earth's magnetosheath.

  3. MOSFET-Embedded microcantilevers for measuring deflection in biomolecular sensors.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Gajendra; Tark, Soo-Hyun; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2006-03-17

    A promising approach for detecting biomolecules follows their binding to immobilized probe molecules on microfabricated cantilevers; binding causes surface stresses that bend the cantilever. We measured this deflection, which is on the order of tens of nanometers, by embedding a metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) into the base of the cantilever and recording decreases in drain current with deflections as small as 5 nanometers. The gate region of the MOSFET responds to surface stresses and thus is embedded in silicon nitride so as to avoid direct contact with the sample solution. This approach, which offers low noise, high sensitivity, and direct readout, was used to detect specific binding events with biotin and antibodies. PMID:16456038

  4. Microcomputers for energy conservation in homes and other small buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrick, A S

    1980-01-01

    Low cost microcomputers and related microelectric devices now make it practical to apply additional energy conserving control strategies in single-family homes and other small buildings. These conservation measures can make significant contributions toward attainment of national energy conservation objectives. Applications in space conditioning (heating, cooling, ventilation), lighting, electric demand limiting, metering of energy in various forms and for status displays are outlined. Examples of currently operating installations are described. Available equipment (such as personal computers, A/D converters, sensors, actuators, etc.) is discussed. Efforts at standard interface development and system integration are summarized. Statistics on the numbers of various building types, HVAC system types, energy consumption and energy conservation potential are presented. The structure of the HVAC controls industry is outlined. The US Department of Energy program of research, development and demonstration projects addressing efficient use of energy in buildings with new control systems is described.

  5. Small and Shaping the Future Energy Eco-house System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Ryuzo; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Sato, Yoshinori; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Isu, Norifumi; Ohtsuka, Masuo; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this research is to develop the elemental technology of the small and thin energy collection system from water, wind, and others in the house, and examine them at the eco-house which will be built at Tohoku University on March 2010. This small energy storage system will contribute to reduce 10% of greenhouse gas emission from household electricity. This project is done by three following groups. 1st group (NEC-Tokin Co. Ltd.) will develop the technologies on the accumulation of electric power pressured from low electric power in which electricity is generated and on the cooperation with AC power supply used for domestic use for this eco-house system. 2nd group (INAX Co. Ltd.) will develop the elemental technology of the slight energy collection system from tap water in the home using a small hydroelectric generator for this eco-house system. 3rd group (Shoei Co. Ltd.) will develop the technologies on existent magnetic gear device, health appliances (Exercise bike), wind power generator, for this eco-house system. Tokoku University compiles these groups. Furthermore, I develop a search of unused small energy and the use technology, and propose a new energy supply system using solar cell and Li ion secondary battery.

  6. Optical measurement of unducted fan blade deflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, Anatole P.

    1988-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical method for measuring unducted fan (or propeller) blade deflections is described and evaluated. The measurement does not depend on blade surface reflectivity. Deflection of a point at the leading edge and a point at the trailing edge in a plane nearly perpendicular to the pitch axis is obtained with a single light beam generated by a low-power, helium-neon laser. Quantitiative analyses are performed from taped signals on a digital computer. Averaging techniques are employed to reduce random errors. Measured static deflections from a series of high-speed wind tunnel tests of a counterrotating unducted fan model are compared with available, predicted deflections, which are also used to evaluate systematic errors.

  7. Noncontacting method for measuring angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus is described for indicating the instantaneous angular deflection of an object about a selected axis without mechanical contact with the object. Light from a light source is transmitted through a flat refractor to a converging lens which focuses the light through another flat refractor onto a differential photocell. The first flat refractor is attached to the object such that when the object is deflected about the selected axis the refractor is also deflected about that axis. The two flat refractors are identical and they are placed an equal distance from the converging lens as are the light source and the photocell. The output of the photocell which is a function of image displacement is fed to a high gain amplifier that drives a galvanometer which rotates the second flat refractor. The second refractor is rotated so that the image displacement is very nearly zero making the galvanometer current a measure of the deflection of the object about the selected axis.

  8. Optical measurement of propeller blade deflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, Anatole P.

    1988-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical method for measurement of propeller blade deflections is described and evaluated. It does not depend on the reflectivity of the blade surface but only on its opaqueness. Deflection of a point at the leading edge and a point at the trailing edge in a plane nearly perpendicular to the pitch axis is obtained using a single light beam generated by a low-power helium-neon laser. Quantitative analyses are performed from taped signals on a digital computer. Averaging techniques are employed to reduce random errors. Measured deflections from a static and a high-speed test are compared with available predicted deflections which are also used to evaluate systematic errors.

  9. Shielded serpentine traveling wave tube deflection structure

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, C.L.; Spector, J.

    1994-12-27

    A shielded serpentine slow wave deflection structure is disclosed having a serpentine signal conductor within a channel groove. The channel groove is formed by a serpentine channel in a trough plate and a ground plane. The serpentine signal conductor is supported at its ends by coaxial feed through connectors. A beam interaction trough intersects the channel groove to form a plurality of beam interaction regions wherein an electron beam may be deflected relative to the serpentine signal conductor. 4 figures.

  10. Hybrid energy systems (HESs) using small modular reactors (SMRs)

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bragg-Sitton

    2014-10-01

    Large-scale nuclear reactors are traditionally operated for a singular purpose: steady-state production of dispatchable baseload electricity that is distributed broadly on the electric grid. While this implementation is key to a sustainable, reliable energy grid, small modular reactors (SMRs) offer new opportunities for increased use of clean nuclear energy for both electric and thermal ap plications in more locations – while still accommodating the desire to support renewable production sources.

  11. Deflection Sensors Utilizing Optical Multi-Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehadeh, Shadi H.; Cada, Michael; Qasymeh, Montasir; Ma, Yuan

    2010-06-01

    Deflection sensors have attracted significant attention due to their wide application in pressure and temperature measurements in practical systems. Several techniques have been proposed, studied, and tested to realize optical deflection sensor elements, including Mach-Zehnder (MZI), and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In this work, a novel optical deflection sensor that is comprised of two cascaded optical resonators is proposed and analyzed. The proposed structure is designed to operate in the multi-stable (input to output) regime. As the first resonator is equipped with a movable mirror, which is connected to a diaphragm in order to sense changes in deflection, the second resonator is filled with non-linear material. It is demonstrated that such a structure has a novel memory property, aside from having the ability to yield instant deflection measurements. This novel property is attributed to the non-linear refractive index of the medium of the second resonator. Furthermore, the sensor sensitivity (which is the ratio of the change in the output light intensity to the change in the induced deflection) is enhanced due to the input-output multi-stable behavior of the proposed structure. This device possesses a promising potential for applications in future smart sensors.

  12. The deflection of 2008 December 12 CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C.; Wang, Y.; Liu, J.; Ye, P.; Wang, S.

    2010-12-01

    The deflection of CME, which would significant influence the CME's geoeffectiveness, is an important topic of space weather study. In this work, the deflection of 2008 December 12 CME during it propagated from the Sun to Earth will be detailed studied based on the combination of remote and in situ observations. First, the 3-dimensions parameters reconstructed by Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) model based on the STEREO observations were used to study the propagation direction evolution of this CME during it propagated in near solar space. During this phase, this CME deflect from high latitude region to equator in meridian plane but propagated almost along the longitude of W7 in ecliptic plane. Further, whether this CME deflected during it propagated in interplanetary space has also been checked. Based on the remote observations, if this CME propagated radially during it propagated in interplanetary space, it may arrived the Earth and then hit the STEREO A rather than hit STEREO B. But, the in situ observations show contrary results that this CME arrived the Earth and hit the STEREO B but missed STEREO A. This result show direct evidence that this CME deflected to east in ecliptic plane during it propagated in interplanetary space. The kinematic deflection model developed by Wang et. al (2004) has been applied on this CME. The calculation results of this model correspond well with the observational results.

  13. Environmentally Sound Small-Scale Energy Projects. Guidelines for Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassan, Elizabeth Ann; Wood, Timothy S., Ed.

    This manual is the fourth volume in a series of publications that provide information for the planning of environmentally sound small-scale projects. Programs that aim to protect the renewable natural resources that supply most of the energy used in developing nations are suggested. Considerations are made for physical environmental factors as…

  14. Simultaneous distribution between the deflection angle and the lateral displacement under the Molière theory of multiple scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, Takao; Okei, Kazuhide; Iyono, Atsushi; Bielajew, Alex F.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous distribution between the deflection angle and the lateral displacement of fast charged particles traversing through matter is derived by applying numerical inverse Fourier transforms on the Fourier spectral density solved analytically under the Molière theory of multiple scattering, taking account of ionization loss. Our results show the simultaneous Gaussian distribution at the region of both small deflection angle and lateral displacement, though they show the characteristic contour patterns of probability density specific to the single and the double scatterings at the regions of large deflection angle and/or lateral displacement. The influences of ionization loss on the distribution are also investigated. An exact simultaneous distribution is derived under the fixed energy condition based on a well-known model of screened single scattering, which indicates the limit of validity of the Molière theory applied to the simultaneous distribution. The simultaneous distribution will be valuable for improving the accuracy and the efficiency of experimental analyses and simulation studies relating to charged particle transports.

  15. Pulsed photothermal deflection spectroscopy in fluid media - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R.

    The fundamental principles, apparatus, and applications of photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PTDS) using pulsed lasers are examined, summarizing the results of recent theoretical and experimental investigations. The governing equations are presented and discussed, and diagrams, drawings, and graphs of typical results are provided. In one set of PTDS experiments, a flashlamp-pumped dye laser producing 1-microsec pulses of energy 2 mJ is used to pump NO2 molecules in an open N2 jet or a closed cell containing N2, and the deflection of an 800-microW HeNe laser probe beam by the pump-induced refractive-index changes is measured. The PTDS method permits determination of majority and minority species concentrations, relaxation rates, and temperature, as well as flow velocity in the case of a jet or flame.

  16. Energy Efficiency in Small Server Rooms: Field Surveys and Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Iris; Greenberg, Steve; Mahdavi, Roozbeh; Brown, Richard; Tschudi, William

    2014-08-11

    Fifty-seven percent of US servers are housed in server closets, server rooms, and localized data centers, in what are commonly referred to as small server rooms, which comprise 99percent of all server spaces in the US. While many mid-tier and enterprise-class data centers are owned by large corporations that consider energy efficiency a goal to minimize business operating costs, small server rooms typically are not similarly motivated. They are characterized by decentralized ownership and management and come in many configurations, which creates a unique set of efficiency challenges. To develop energy efficiency strategies for these spaces, we surveyed 30 small server rooms across eight institutions, and selected four of them for detailed assessments. The four rooms had Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) values ranging from 1.5 to 2.1. Energy saving opportunities ranged from no- to low-cost measures such as raising cooling set points and better airflow management, to more involved but cost-effective measures including server consolidation and virtualization, and dedicated cooling with economizers. We found that inefficiencies mainly resulted from organizational rather than technical issues. Because of the inherent space and resource limitations, the most effective measure is to operate servers through energy-efficient cloud-based services or well-managed larger data centers, rather than server rooms. Backup power requirement, and IT and cooling efficiency should be evaluated to minimize energy waste in the server space. Utility programs are instrumental in raising awareness and spreading technical knowledge on server operation, and the implementation of energy efficiency measures in small server rooms.

  17. Bio-mimetic optical sensor for structural deflection measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Streeter, Robert W.; Khan, Md. A.; Barrett, Steven F.

    2014-03-01

    Reducing the environmental impact of aviation is a primary goal of NASA aeronautics research. One approach to achieve this goal is to build lighter weight aircraft, which presents complex challenges due to a corresponding increase in structural flexibility. Wing flexibility can adversely affect aircraft performance from the perspective of aerodynamic efficiency and safety. Knowledge of the wing position during flight can aid active control methods designed to mitigate problems due to increased wing flexibility. Current approaches to measuring wing deflection, including strain measurement devices, accelerometers, or GPS solutions, and new technologies such as fiber optic strain sensors, have limitations for their practical application to flexible aircraft control. Hence, it was proposed to use a bio-mimetic optical sensor based on the fly-eye to track wing deflection in real-time. The fly-eye sensor has several advantages over conventional sensors used for this application, including light weight, low power requirements, fast computation, and a small form factor. This paper reports on the fly-eye sensor development and its application to real-time wing deflection measurement.

  18. Isotope separation by selective charge conversion and field deflection

    DOEpatents

    Hickman, Robert G.

    1978-01-01

    A deuterium-tritium separation system wherein a source beam comprised of positively ionized deuterium (D.sup.+) and tritium (T.sup.+) is converted at different charge-exchange cell sections of the system to negatively ionized deuterium (D.sup.-) and tritium (T.sup.-). First, energy is added to the beam to accelerate the D.sup.+ ions to the velocity that is optimum for conversion of the D.sup.+ ions to D.sup.- ions in a charge-exchange cell. The T.sup.+ ions are accelerated at the same time, but not to the optimum velocity since they are heavier than the D.sup.+ ions. The T.sup.+ ions are, therefore, not converted to T.sup.- ions when the D.sup.+ ions are converted to D.sup.- ions. This enables effective separation of the beam by deflection of the isotopes with an electrostatic field, the D.sup.- ions being deflected in one direction and the T.sup.+ ions being deflected in the opposite direction. Next, more energy is added to the deflected beam of T.sup.+ ions to bring the T.sup.+ ions to the optimum velocity for their conversion to T.sup.- ions. In a particular use of the invention, the beams of D.sup.- and T.sup.- ions are separately further accelerated and then converted to energetic neutral particles for injection as fuel into a thermonuclear reactor. The reactor exhaust of D.sup.+ and T.sup.+ and the D.sup.+ and T.sup.+ that was not converted in the respective sections is combined with the source beam and recycled through the system to increase the efficiency of the system.

  19. The use of a deflectable nose on a missile as a control device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, K. D.

    1981-05-01

    Wind tunnel tests have been carried out on a blunted ogive-cylinder with a deflectable nose at Mach numbers between 0.8 and 2.0. Although the results are subject to scale effects, it appears that the deflectable nose could find use as a missile control method. The results have been applied to two missile configurations. For a long slender missile the deflectable nose produces non-linear trim curves at subsonic speeds, approaching linearity at supersonic Mach numbers. Nevertheless, worth-while trimmed incidences can be achieved. Although a deflectable nose on a 105 mm shell at subsonic speeds produces only relatively small normal force coefficients at trim, the trim curves are linear. Furthermore, it appears that when used for terminal control significant deviations in shell impact point are attainable.

  20. Energy loss and small angle scattering of swift protons passing through liquid ethanol target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, M.; Sato, S.; Shimizu, M.; He, Z.; Ishii, K.; Tsuchida, H.; Itoh, A.

    2007-03-01

    We have measured energy and angular distributions of fast protons passing through an ethanol liquid jet target. By applying the Moliére's theory of multiple scattering, we reproduced successfully our experimental results of energy and angular distributions and found that the Moliére's theory is useful for the prediction of energetic proton and heavy ion deflection in liquid materials. Moreover, we compared stopping powers obtained from our experiment with SRIM2003 and found an about 10% discrepancy between them. The present method can become a powerful tool for the measurement of particle stopping in liquids and the other collision interactions.

  1. Application of small-signal fusion energy gain

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.

    1986-11-01

    The measured burnup fraction of the 1-MeV tritons produced in a deuterium tokamak plasma, multiplied by 17.5, is essentially the small-signal fusion energy gain g/sub T/ for an ideal 1-MeV triton beam injected into the deuterium plasma. The measured g/sub T/ can be converted directly into the two-component fusion energy gain that would be realized if a lower energy tritium beam were injected into the plasma, or if a deuterium beam were injected into a tritium target plasma having the same parameters as the acutal deuterium plasma. Under certain conditions, g/sub T/ greater than or equal to 1 can be obtained by injection of a low-current 225-keV tritium beam into a hot deuterium plasma, thereby verifying that the plasma has the essential characteristics needed for achieving macroscopic fusion energy ''break-even.''

  2. Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings for Small Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Brian A.; Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Lane, Michael D.; Liu, Bing

    2010-04-30

    The Technical Support Document (TSD) for 50% energy savings in small office buildings documents the analysis and results for a recommended package of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) referred to as the advanced EEMs. These are changes to a building design that will reduce energy usage. The package of advanced EEMs achieves a minimum of 50% energy savings and a construction area weighted average energy savings of 56.6% over the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 for 16 cities which represent the full range of climate zones in the United States. The 50% goal is for site energy usage reduction. The weighted average is based on data on the building area of construction in the various climate locations. Cost-effectiveness of the EEMs is determined showing an average simple payback of 6.7 years for all 16 climate locations. An alternative set of results is provided which includes a variable air volume HVAC system that achieves at least 50% energy savings in 7 of the 16 climate zones with a construction area weighted average savings of 48.5%. Other packages of EEMs may also achieve 50% energy savings; this report does not consider all alternatives but rather presents at least one way to reach the goal. Design teams using this TSD should follow an integrated design approach and utilize additional analysis to evaluate the specific conditions of a project.

  3. Laser Energy Transmission to a Small-Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuya; Kawashima, Nobuki; Yabe, Kyoichi

    A laser energy transmission system for a small-unmanned airplane(Kite-plane) has been developed and a long-time flight demonstration was done successfully in Osaka dome stadium (baseball stadium) at an altitude of 50 m. This test flight shows that it can be practically applied for the surveillance flight in natural disaster such as earthquakes, floods etc. In order to increase the horizontal range keeping the low altitude, an application to a helicopter flight is undertaken.

  4. Transit time spreads in biased paracentric hemispherical deflection analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sise, Omer; Zouros, Theo J. M.

    2016-02-01

    The biased paracentric hemispherical deflection analyzers (HDAs) are an alternative to conventional (centric) HDAs maintaining greater dispersion, lower angular aberrations, and hence better energy resolution without the use of any additional fringing field correctors. In the present work, the transit time spread of the biased paracentric HDA is computed over a wide range of analyzer parameters. The combination of high energy resolution with good time resolution and simplicity of design makes the biased paracentric analyzers very promising for both coincidence and singles spectroscopy applications.

  5. Brachytherapy needle deflection evaluation and correction

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Gang; Wei Zhouping; Gardi, Lori; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron

    2005-04-01

    In prostate brachytherapy, an 18-gauge needle is used to implant radioactive seeds. This thin needle can be deflected from the preplanned trajectory in the prostate, potentially resulting in a suboptimum dose pattern and at times requiring repeated needle insertion to achieve optimal dosimetry. In this paper, we report on the evaluation of brachytherapy needle deflection and bending in test phantoms and two approaches to overcome the problem. First we tested the relationship between needle deflection and insertion depth as well as whether needle bending occurred. Targeting accuracy was tested by inserting a brachytherapy needle to target 16 points in chicken tissue phantoms. By implanting dummy seeds into chicken tissue phantoms under 3D ultrasound guidance, the overall accuracy of seed implantation was determined. We evaluated methods to overcome brachytherapy needle deflection with three different insertion methods: constant orientation, constant rotation, and orientation reversal at half of the insertion depth. Our results showed that needle deflection is linear with needle insertion depth, and that no noticeable bending occurs with needle insertion into the tissue and agar phantoms. A 3D principal component analysis was performed to obtain the population distribution of needle tip and seed position relative to the target positions. Our results showed that with the constant orientation insertion method, the mean needle targeting error was 2.8 mm and the mean seed implantation error was 2.9 mm. Using the constant rotation and orientation reversal at half insertion depth methods, the deflection error was reduced. The mean needle targeting errors were 0.8 and 1.2 mm for the constant rotation and orientation reversal methods, respectively, and the seed implantation errors were 0.9 and 1.5 mm for constant rotation insertion and orientation reversal methods, respectively.

  6. Transverse photothermal beam deflection within a solid

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, J.D.; Russo, R.E. )

    1991-07-15

    The mirage effect within a transparent solid substrate was used for monitoring optical absorption of a thin film. Refractive index gradients, which accompany thermal gradients below the film-coated surface, cause a probe laser beam to be deflected. The spectrum of copper, deposited onto a piece of clear acrylic, was recorded by this method of photothermal deflection. The influence of thermally induced mechanical stresses can alter the effective value of the thermo-optic coefficient of the solid, {ital dn}/{ital dT}.

  7. Light deflection in gadolinium molybdate ferroelastic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniorowski, Piotr; Bornarel, Jean

    2000-02-01

    The deflection of a He-Ne light beam by polydomain gadolinium molybdate (GMO) crystals has been studied with respect to incidence angle icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> i on the sample at room temperature. The A and B deflected beams do not cross each other during the icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> i variation, in contrast to results and calculations previously published. The model using the Fresnel equation confirms this result. The model presented is more accurate for numerical calculation than that using the Huygens construction.

  8. Lateral-deflection-controlled friction force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Kenji; Hamaoka, Satoshi; Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Itoh, Shintaro; Zhang, Hedong

    2014-08-01

    Lateral-deflection-controlled dual-axis friction force microscopy (FFM) is presented. In this method, an electrostatic force generated with a probe-incorporated micro-actuator compensates for friction force in real time during probe scanning using feedback control. This equivalently large rigidity can eliminate apparent boundary width and lateral snap-in, which are caused by lateral probe deflection. The method can evolve FFM as a method for quantifying local frictional properties on the micro/nanometer-scale by overcoming essential problems to dual-axis FFM.

  9. Shielded serpentine traveling wave tube deflection structure

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, Charles L.; Spector, Jerome

    1994-01-01

    A shielded serpentine slow wave deflection structure (10) having a serpene signal conductor (12) within a channel groove (46). The channel groove (46) is formed by a serpentine channel (20) in a trough plate (18) and a ground plane (14). The serpentine signal conductor (12) is supported at its ends by coaxial feed through connectors 28. A beam interaction trough (22) intersects the channel groove (46) to form a plurality of beam interaction regions (56) wherein an electron beam (54) may be deflected relative to the serpentine signal conductor (12).

  10. Deflection of slow light by magneto-optically controlled atomic media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, D. L.; Wang, R. Q.; Zhou, Lan; Yi, S.; Sun, C. P.

    2007-11-15

    We present a semiclassical theory for light deflection by a coherent {lambda}-type three-level atomic medium in an inhomogeneous magnetic field or an inhomogeneous control laser. When the atomic energy levels (or the Rabi coupling by the control laser) are position-dependent due to the Zeeman effect caused by the inhomogeneous magnetic field (or due to inhomogeneity of the control field profile), the spatial dependence of the refraction index of the atomic medium will result in an observable deflection of slow signal light when the electromagnetically induced transparency cancels medium absorption. Our theoretical approach based on Fermat's principle in geometrical optics not only provides a consistent explanation for the most recent experiment in a straightforward way, but also predicts the two-photon detuning dependent behaviors and larger deflection angles by three orders of magnitude for the slow signal light deflection by the atomic media in an inhomogeneous off-resonant control laser field.

  11. Large deflection and rotation of Timoshenko beams with frictional end supports under three-point bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dao-Kui; Li, Xian-Fang

    2016-08-01

    Three-point bending of a beam is studied based on the Timoshenko beam theory. Large deflection and large rotation of a beam resting on simple supports with friction are calculated for a concentrated force acting at the midspan. Using the Lagrangian kinematic relations, a system of non-linear differential equations are obtained for a prismatic shear-deformable Timoshenko beam. Exact solutions for the deflection, horizontal displacement, and rotation of cross-section are derived analytically. Two deflections of small and large scale exist under three-point bending. The solutions corresponding to linearized model coincide with the well-known solutions to the classical Timoshenko beams. Numerical calculations are carried out to show the effect of the important parameters such as shear rigidity of the beam and the coefficient of friction at the contact position between the beam and supports on the deflection. The load-deflection curves are graphically presented. A comparison of large deflections and large rotations with their classical counterparts and with experimental data is made. The obtained results are useful in safety design of linear and non-linear beams subject to three-point bending.

  12. Using dark energy to suppress power at small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Martin; Nesseris, Savvas; Sawicki, Ignacy

    2015-09-01

    The latest Planck results reconfirm the existence of a slight but chronic tension between the best-fit cosmic microwave background (CMB) and low-redshift observables: power seems to be consistently lacking in the late universe across a range of observables (e.g. weak lensing, cluster counts). We propose a two-parameter model for dark energy where the dark energy is sufficiently like dark matter at large scales to keep the CMB unchanged but where it does not cluster at small scales, preventing concordance collapse and erasing power. We thus exploit the generic scale-dependence of dark energy instead of the more usual time-dependence to address the tension in the data. The combination of CMB, distance and weak lensing data somewhat prefer our model to Λ CDM , at Δ χ2=2.4 . Moreover, this improved solution has σ8=0.79 ±0.02 , consistent with the value implied by cluster counts.

  13. High-resolution and high-stability electromagnetic-deflection control system for EB lithography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Okumura, Masahide; Maio, Kenji; Fujii, Akira; Andoh, Hisashi; Morimura, Toshiyuki; Hayakawa, Hajime

    2001-08-01

    A stable high-resolution electromagnetic deflection control circuit for an electron-beam lithography (EBL) system has been developed. This deflection control circuit has enabled an EBL system to deal with a wide deflection area of 2.5-mm square having fine address units for a pattern placement of 1.25 nm. The deflection-control circuit consists of a new digital to analog converter (DAC) circuit, whose resolution is 21 bits, and a low-drift current-amplifier circuit. To achieve such high-stability and high-resolution, we had to develop a low noise-current cell structure for the new DAC circuit, because the output-signal noise of the DAC circuit is a major source of interference at the desired resolution. A local temperature control technique has been incorporated into the circuit to reduce fluctuations of the deflection control signal caused by ambient thermal variations. The low noise-current cell structure, which consists of multiple current buffers and low-pass filters, is placed between a constant current source circuit and a differential-switch circuit for each bit of the DAC circuit. The simulation results of the DAC circuit showed that the output-signal noise of the DAC circuit could be reduced to less than 0.4 nm rms, which is small enough to achieve the desired resolution. As the results of the experimentally evaluation of the deflection control circuit show, the total noise of the deflection-control signal obtained was less than 0.6 nm rms and the signal stability obtained was better than 0.3 nm rms. An evaluation of the performance of the new EBL system to which the new deflection control circuit was applied, showed that the critical-dimension accuracy obtained was better than 5 nm (3sigma) and the positioning accuracy obtained was better than 10 nm (3sigma) for the area controlled by electromagnetic deflector.

  14. Measuring Deflections Of Propeller And Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, Anatole P.

    1993-01-01

    Method based on measurement of interruptions of laser beam provides information on deflections of blades of airplane propeller or unducted turbofan. Bends and twists deduced from timing of laser-beam shadows. Provides for nonintrusive measurement in wind tunnel or on open test stand.

  15. Impeller deflection and modal finite element analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Nathan A.

    2013-10-01

    Deflections of an impeller due to centripetal forces are calculated using finite element analysis. The lateral, or out of plane, deflections are an important design consideration for this particular impeller because it incorporates an air bearing with critical gap tolerances. The target gap distance is approximately 10 microns at a rotational velocity of 2500 rpm. The centripetal forces acting on the impeller cause it deflect in a concave fashion, decreasing the initial gap distance as a function of radial position. This deflection is characterized for a previous and updated impeller design for comparative purposes. The impact of design options such as material selection, geometry dimensions, and operating rotational velocity are also explored, followed by a sensitivity study with these parameters bounded by specific design values. A modal analysis is also performed to calculate the impeller's natural frequencies which are desired to be avoided during operation. The finite element modeling techniques continue to be exercised by the impeller design team to address specific questions and evaluate conceptual designs, some of which are included in the Appendix.

  16. AIDA: The Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, A.; Carnelli, I.; Michel, P.; Cheng, A. F.; Reed, C.; Ulamec, S.; Biele, J.; Abell, P.; Landis, R.

    2013-09-01

    The Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission, a joint effort of ESA, JHU/APL, NASA, OCA, and DLR, is the first demonstration of asteroid deflection and assessment via kinetic impact. AIDA consists of two independent but mutually supporting mission elements, one of which is the asteroid kinetic impactor and the other is the characterization spacecraft. These two missions are, respectively, JHU/APL's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) and the European Space Agency's Asteroid Investigation Mission (AIM) missions. As in the separate DART and AIM studies, the target of this mission is the binary asteroid [65803] Didymos in October, 2022. For a successful joint mission, one spacecraft, DART, would impact the secondary of the Didymos system while AIM would observe and measure any change in the relative orbit. AIM will be the first probe to characterise a binary asteroid, especially from the dynamical point of view, but also considering its interior and subsurface composition. The mission concept focuses on the monitoring aspects i.e., the capability to determine in-situ the key physical properties of a binary asteroid playing a role in the system's dynamic behavior. DART will be the first ever space mission to deflect the trajectory of an asteroid in a measurable way.- It is expected that the deflection can be measured as a change in the relative orbit period with a precision better than 10%. The joint AIDA mission will return vital data to determine the momentum transfer efficiency of the kinetic impact [1,2].

  17. Rural Youth and Anticipatory Goal Deflection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Evans W.; And Others

    Race, sex, community size, occupation of major wage earner, father's education, mother's education, and certainty of expectations were the variables used in this study to determine the "anticipatory occupational goal deflection" (AOGD) of urban and rural youth (blacks and whites) in Louisiana. Least squares analysis of variance and other…

  18. Laboratory experiments on arc deflection and instability

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.; Karasik, M.

    2000-03-21

    This article describes experiments on arc deflection instability carried out during the past few years at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The approach has been that of plasma physicists interested in arcs, but they believe these results may be useful to engineers who are responsible for controlling arc behavior in large electric steel furnaces.

  19. Simplified deflection-coil linearity testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, G. P.

    1976-01-01

    Mask placed over face of image-dissecting photomultiplier tube has precision array of pinholes that permit light to impinge on tube at known points. Signals are fed to deflection coil which sweeps beam across each point without complex operator procedures.

  20. Particle beam and crabbing and deflecting structure

    DOEpatents

    Delayen, Jean

    2011-02-08

    A new type of structure for the deflection and crabbing of particle bunches in particle accelerators comprising a number of parallel transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-resonant) lines operating in opposite phase from each other. Such a structure is significantly more compact than conventional crabbing cavities operating the transverse magnetic TM mode, thus allowing low frequency designs.

  1. Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment mission: Kinetic impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, A. F.; Michel, P.; Jutzi, M.; Rivkin, A. S.; Stickle, A.; Barnouin, O.; Ernst, C.; Atchison, J.; Pravec, P.; Richardson, D. C.

    2016-02-01

    The Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission will be the first space experiment to demonstrate asteroid impact hazard mitigation by using a kinetic impactor to deflect an asteroid. AIDA is an international cooperation, consisting of two mission elements: the NASA Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission and the ESA Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) rendezvous mission. The primary goals of AIDA are (i) to test our ability to perform a spacecraft impact on a potentially hazardous near-Earth asteroid and (ii) to measure and characterize the deflection caused by the impact. The AIDA target will be the binary near-Earth asteroid (65803) Didymos, with the deflection experiment to occur in late September, 2022. The DART impact on the secondary member of the binary at ~7 km/s is expected to alter the binary orbit period by about 4 minutes, assuming a simple transfer of momentum to the target, and this period change will be measured by Earth-based observatories. The AIM spacecraft will characterize the asteroid target and monitor results of the impact in situ at Didymos. The DART mission is a full-scale kinetic impact to deflect a 150 m diameter asteroid, with known impactor conditions and with target physical properties characterized by the AIM mission. Predictions for the momentum transfer efficiency of kinetic impacts are given for several possible target types of different porosities, using Housen and Holsapple (2011) crater scaling model for impact ejecta mass and velocity distributions. Results are compared to numerical simulation results using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code of Jutzi and Michel (2014) with good agreement. The model also predicts that the ejecta from the DART impact may make Didymos into an active asteroid, forming an ejecta coma that may be observable from Earth-based telescopes. The measurements from AIDA of the momentum transfer from the DART impact, the crater size and morphology, and the evolution of an ejecta coma will

  2. Evaluating angular deflections from the digital gradient sensing method with rigid-motion deleted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The digital gradient sensing method is used for measuring small angular deflections of light rays due to local stresses in transparent planar solids. The method is based on two-dimensional (2D) digital image correlation (DIC) to measure the angular deflection of light rays; however, when a specimen is subjected to loading, deformation measurement from DIC is not perfect because of the existence of small in-plane and out-of-plane motions of the test sample surface that occurred after loading. These disadvantages will lead to errors in the measured angular deflections. The influence of unavoidable in-plane and out-of-plane motions was discussed, and a method to eliminate the influence to show the pure stress gradient of polymethy methacrylate is demonstrated.

  3. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy Conservation Standards § 431.446 Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. (a)...

  4. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy Conservation Standards § 431.446 Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates....

  5. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy Conservation Standards § 431.446 Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. (a)...

  6. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy Conservation Standards § 431.446 Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. (a)...

  7. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy Conservation Standards § 431.446 Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. (a)...

  8. Small Beneficial Effect of Caffeinated Energy Drink Ingestion on Strength.

    PubMed

    Collier, Nora B; Hardy, Michelle A; Millard-Stafford, Mindy L; Warren, Gordon L

    2016-07-01

    Collier, NB, Hardy, MA, Millard-Stafford, ML, and Warren, GL. Small beneficial effect of caffeinated energy drink ingestion on strength. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1862-1870, 2016-Because caffeine ingestion has been found to increase muscle strength, our aim was to determine whether caffeine when combined with other potential ergogenic ingredients, such as those in commercial energy drinks, would have a similar effect. Fifteen young healthy subjects were used in a double-blind, repeated-measures experimental design. Each subject performed 3 trials, ingesting either a caffeinated energy drink, an uncaffeinated version of the drink, or a placebo drink. The interpolated twitch procedure was used to assess maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) strength, electrically evoked strength, and percent muscle activation during MVIC of the knee extensors both before and after drink ingestion, and after a fatiguing bout of contractions; electromyographic (EMG) amplitude of the knee extensors during MVIC was also assessed. The mean (±SE) change in MVIC strength from before to after drink ingestion was significantly greater for the caffeinated energy drink compared with placebo [+5.0 (±1.7) vs. -0.5 (±1.5)%] and the difference between the drinks remained after fatigue (p = 0.015); the strength changes for the uncaffeinated energy drink were not significantly different from those of the other 2 drinks at any time. There was no significant effect of drink type on the changes in electrically evoked strength, percent muscle activation, and EMG from before to after drink ingestion. This study indicates that a caffeinated energy drink can increase MVIC strength but the effect is modest and the strength increase cannot be attributed to increased muscle activation. Whether the efficacy of energy drinks can be attributed solely to caffeine remains unclear. PMID:26670991

  9. Energy audit in small wastewater treatment plants: methodology, energy consumption indicators, and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Foladori, P; Vaccari, M; Vitali, F

    2015-01-01

    Energy audits in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) reveal large differences in the energy consumption in the various stages, depending also on the indicators used in the audits. This work is aimed at formulating a suitable methodology to perform audits in WWTPs and identifying the most suitable key energy consumption indicators for comparison among different plants and benchmarking. Hydraulic-based stages, stages based on chemical oxygen demand, sludge-based stages and building stages were distinguished in WWTPs and analysed with different energy indicators. Detailed energy audits were carried out on five small WWTPs treating less than 10,000 population equivalent and using continuous data for 2 years. The plants have in common a low designed capacity utilization (52% on average) and equipment oversizing which leads to waste of energy in the absence of controls and inverters (a common situation in small plants). The study confirms that there are several opportunities for reducing energy consumption in small WWTPs: in addition to the pumping of influent wastewater and aeration, small plants demonstrate low energy efficiency in recirculation of settled sludge and in aerobic stabilization. Denitrification above 75% is ensured through intermittent aeration and without recirculation of mixed liquor. Automation in place of manual controls is mandatory in illumination and electrical heating. PMID:26360762

  10. Dark matter prospects in deflected mirage mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Michael; Nelson, Brent D.

    2009-07-01

    The recently introduced deflected mirage mediation (DMM) model is a string-motivated paradigm in which all three of the major supersymmetry-breaking transmission mechanisms are operative. We begin a systematic exploration of the parameter space of this rich model context, paying special attention to the pattern of gaugino masses which arise. In this work we focus on the dark matter phenomenology of the DMM model as such signals are the least influenced by the model-dependent scalar masses. We find that a large portion of the parameter space in which the three mediation mechanisms have a similar effective mass scale of 1 TeV or less will be probed by future direct and indirect detection experiments. Distinguishing deflected mirage mediation from the mirage model without gauge mediation will prove difficult without collider input, though we indicate how gamma ray signals may provide an opportunity for distinguishing between the two paradigms.

  11. AIDA: Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; Cheng, A.; Galvez, A.; Reed, C.; Carnelli, I.; Abell, P.; Ulamec, S.; Rivkin, A.; Biele, J.; Murdoch, N.

    2015-03-01

    AIDA (Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment) is a project of a joint mission demonstration of asteroid deflection and characterisation of the kinetic impact effects. It involves the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (with support from members of NASA centers including Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory), and the European Space Agency (with support from members of the french CNRS/Cte dAzur Observatory and the german DLR). This assessment will be done using a binary asteroid target. AIDA consists of two independent but mutually supporting mission concepts, one of which is the asteroid kinetic impactor and the other is the characterisation spacecraft. The objective and status of the project will be presented.

  12. Deflection evaluation using time-resolved radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, D.A.; Lucero, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Time-resolved radiography is the creation of an x-ray image for which both the start-exposure and stop-exposure times are known with respect to the event under study. The combination of image and timing are used to derive information about the event. We have applied time-resolved radiography to evaluate motions of explosive-driven events. In the particular application discussed here, our intent is to measure maximum deflections of the components involved. Exposures are made during the time just before to just after the event of interest occurs. A smear or blur of motion out to its furthest extent is recorded on the image. Comparison of the dynamic images with static images allows deflection measurements to be made. 2 figs.

  13. Compact Superconducting Crabbing and Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika

    2012-09-01

    Recently, new geometries for superconducting crabbing and deflecting cavities have been developed that have significantly improved properties over those the standard TM{sub 110} cavities. They are smaller, have low surface fields, high shunt impedance and, more importantly for some of them, no lower-order-mode with a well-separated fundamental mode. This talk will present the status of the development of these cavities.

  14. Asymptotic behavior of the vacuum energy for small Skyrmions

    SciTech Connect

    Zuk, J.A. )

    1990-09-20

    Various schemes for deriving effective Lagrangians, involving both quark and meson degrees of freedom, which are intermediate between QCD and low-energy pion dynamics have been proposed. While integration over the fermion fields within the framework of renormalized field theory leads to a vacuum instability, physically reasonable results are obtained for the theory taken with finite cut-off. In principle, properties of the nucleon, such as its mass, can be obtained from a self-consistent calculation in the Skyrmion sector. This procedure can be simplified by implementing a analytical approximation for the fermion vacuum energy which plays a central role. The authors discuss such an approximation, and use it to calculate exactly the asymptotic behaviour of the vacuum energy for small Skyrmions. It is found that, unlike in the renormalized theory, its functional dependence on the Skyrmion radius in this limit depends on the characteristics of the Skyrmion profile and choice of regularization scheme; however, the cut-off field theory exhibits no vacuum instability.

  15. Large deflections and vibration of a tapered cantilever pulled at its tip by a cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, David B.; Virgin, Lawrence N.; Plaut, Raymond H.

    2008-02-01

    The behavior of a slender, tapered, cantilever beam loaded through a cable attached to its free end is described. Large static deflections are computed (based on an elastica description) together with natural frequencies and mode shapes for small-amplitude vibrations about equilibrium. Experimental results exhibit good agreement with the theoretical results.

  16. Siting handbook for small wind energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wegley, H.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Orgill, M.M.; Drake, R.L.

    1980-03-01

    This handbook was written to serve as a siting guide for individuals wishing to install small wind energy conversion systems (WECS); that is, machines having a rated capacity of less than 100 kilowatts. It incorporates half a century of siting experience gained by WECS owners and manufacturers, as well as recently developed siting techniques. The user needs no technical background in meteorology or engineering to understand and apply the siting principles discussed; he needs only a knowledge of basic arithmetic and the ability to understand simple graphs and tables. By properly using the siting techniques, an owner can select a site that will yield the most power at the least installation cost, the least maintenance cost, and the least risk of damage or accidental injury.

  17. Effect of Flap Deflection on Section Characteristics of S813 Airfoil; Period of Performance: 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of small deflections of a 30% chord, simple flap on the section characteristics of a tip airfoil, the S813, designed for 20- to 30-meter, stall-regulated, horizontal-axis wind turbines has been evaluated theoretically. The decrease in maximum lift coefficient due to leading-edge roughness increases in magnitude with increasing, positive flap deflection and with decreasing Reynolds number.

  18. Phosphate binding energy and catalysis by small and large molecules.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Janet R; Amyes, Tina L; Richard, John P

    2008-04-01

    Catalysis is an important process in chemistry and enzymology. The rate acceleration for any catalyzed reaction is the difference between the activation barriers for the uncatalyzed (Delta G(HO)(#)) and catalyzed (Delta G(Me)(#)) reactions, which corresponds to the binding energy (Delta G(S)(#) = Delta G(Me)(#)-Delta G(HO)(#)) for transfer of the reaction transition state from solution to the catalyst. This transition state binding energy is a fundamental descriptor of catalyzed reactions, and its evaluation is necessary for an understanding of any and all catalytic processes. We have evaluated the transition state binding energies obtained from interactions between low molecular weight metal ion complexes or high molecular weight protein catalysts and the phosphate group of bound substrate. Work on catalysis by small molecules is exemplified by studies on the mechanism of action of Zn2(1)(H2O). A binding energy of Delta G(S)(#) = -9.6 kcal/mol was determined for Zn2(1)(H2O)-catalyzed cleavage of the RNA analogue HpPNP. The pH-rate profile for this cleavage reaction showed that there is optimal catalytic activity at high pH, where the catalyst is in the basic form [Zn2(1)(HO-)]. However, it was also shown that the active form of the catalyst is Zn2(1)(H2O) and that this recognizes the C2-oxygen-ionized substrate in the cleavage reaction. The active catalyst Zn2(1)(H2O) shows a high affinity for oxyphosphorane transition state dianions and a stable methyl phosphate transition state analogue, compared with the affinity for phosphate monoanion substrates. The transition state binding energies, Delta G(S)(#), for cleavage of HpPNP catalyzed by a variety of Zn2+ and Eu3+ metal ion complexes reflect the increase in the catalytic activity with increasing total positive charge at the catalyst. These values of Delta G(S)(#) are affected by interactions between the metal ion and its ligands, but these effects are small in comparison with Delta G(S)(#) observed for catalysis

  19. ForeCAT - A model for magnetic deflections of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Christina D.

    2016-01-01

    Frequently, the Sun explosively releases bubbles of magnetized plasma known as coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which can produce adverse space weather effects at Earth. Accurate space weather forecasting requires knowledge of the trajectory of CMEs. Decades of observations show that CMEs can deflect from a purely radial trajectory, however, no consensus exists as to the cause of these deflections. We developed a model for CME deflection and rotation from magnetic forces, called Forecasting a CME's Altered Trajectory (ForeCAT). ForeCAT has been designed to run fast enough for large parameter phase space studies, and potentially real-time predictions. ForeCAT reproduces the general trends seen in observed CME deflections. In particular, CMEs deflect toward regions of minimum magnetic energy - frequently the Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS) on global scales. The background magnetic forces decrease rapidly with distance and quickly become negligible. Most deflections and rotations can be well-described by assuming constant angular momentum beyond 10 Rs. ForeCAT also reproduces individual observed CME deflections - the 2008 December 12, 2008 April 08, and 2010 July 12 CMEs. By determining the reduced chi-squared best fit between the ForeCAT results and the observations we constrain parameters related to the CME and the background solar wind. Additionally, we constrain whether different models for the low corona magnetic backgrounds can produce the observed CME deflection. We explore the space weather of cool M dwarfs (dMs) with surface magnetic field strengths of order kG. dMs have extreme CMEs and flares and close-in habitable zones. We use ForeCAT to explore the deflections corresponding to the range of plausible CME masses and speeds for the dM V374 Peg. The deflection of the dM CMEs exceeds their solar counterparts, and the strong magnetic gradients surrounding the dM's Astrospheric Current Sheet (ACS, analogous to the Sun's HCS) can trap the CMEs that reach it

  20. Applicability of moiré deflection tomography for diagnosing arc plasmas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-yun; Song, Yang; He, An-zhi; Li, Zhen-hua

    2009-01-20

    The argon arc plasma whose central temperature, 1.90x10(4) K, is used as a practical example for an experiment to research the applicability of moiré deflection tomography in arc plasma flow-field diagnosis. The experimental result indicates that moiré deflection of the measured argon arc plasma is very small, even smaller than that of a common flame with the maximal temperature of nearly 1.80x10(3) K. The refractive-index gradient in moiré deflection tomography mainly contributes to the temperature gradient in essence when the probe wavelength and pressure are certain in plasma diagnosis. The applicable temperature ranges of moiré deflection tomography in the argon arc plasma diagnosis are given with the probe wavelength 532 nm at 1 atm in certain measuring error requirements. In a word, the applicable temperature range of moiré deflection tomography for arc plasma diagnosis is intimately related to the probe wavelength and the practical measuring requirements. PMID:19151817

  1. Axial flow effects on robustness of vortical structures about actively deflected wings in flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Albert; Kweon, Jihoon; Choi, Haecheon; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2012-11-01

    Flapping wing flight has garnered much attention in the past decade driven by our desire to understand capabilities observed in nature and to develop agile small-scale aerial vehicles. Nature has demonstrated the breadth of maneuverability achievable by flapping wing flight. However, despite recent advances the role of wing flexibility remains poorly understood. In an effort to develop a deeper understanding of wing deflection effects and to explore novel approaches to increasing leading-edge vortex robustness, this three-dimensional computational study explores the aerodynamics of low aspect ratio plates, in hovering kinematics, with isolated flexion lines undergoing prescribed deflection. Major flexion lines, recognized as the primary avenue for deflection in biological fliers, are isolated here in two distinct configurations, resulting in deflection about the wing root and the wing tip, respectively. Of interest is the interaction between axial flow along the span and the vortical structures about the wing. It is proposed that the modes of deflection explored may provide a means of axial flow control for favorably promoting LEV robustness over a broad range of flapping conditions, and provide insight into the nature of flexibility in flapping wing flight. National Science Foundation, National Research Foundation of Korea.

  2. Designs of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities for Deflecting/Crabbing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J. R.; De Silva, S. U.

    2011-07-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties, compared to other conventional designs, that is currently being considered for a number of applications. The new parallel-bar design with curved loading elements and circular or elliptical outer conductors have improved properties compared to the designs with rectangular outer conductors. We present the designs proposed as deflecting cavities for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for Project-X and as crabbing cavities for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade and electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab.

  3. Force-noise spectroscopy by tunneling current deflection sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herz, Markus; Scheer, Elke

    2016-01-01

    An electro-mechanical setup for the measurement of force-noise properties in a low-temperature tunneling microscope has been utilized to enable extremely high resolution and acquire force-noise spectra as function of the applied voltage bias. The direct crosstalk of vibrations onto the tunneling current is used to measure the deflection of a force-sensing cantilever. We demonstrate its capability to measure the mechanical energy of the cantilever, caused by the noise of the force from vacuum tunneling between polycrystalline Iridium electrodes. We observe peak levels of the induced cantilever energy at polarity-symmetric voltages corresponding to dominant peaks of the phonon density of states, which suggests that inelastic transport processes contribute to force fluctuations.

  4. National Weatherization Assistance Program Impact Evaluation: Energy Impacts for Small Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Blasnik, Michael; Dalhoff, Greg; Carroll, David; ucar, Ferit

    2014-09-01

    This report estimates energy savings, energy cost savings, and cost effectiveness attributable to weatherizing small multifamily buildings under the auspices of the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program during Program Year 2008.

  5. Electroweak naturalness and deflected mirage mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Vernon; Everett, Lisa L.; Garon, Todd S.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the question of electroweak naturalness within the deflected mirage mediation (DMM) framework for supersymmetry breaking in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. The class of DMM models considered are nine-parameter theories that fall within the general classification of the 19-parameter phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model. Our results show that these DMM models have regions of parameter space with very low electroweak fine-tuning, at levels comparable to the phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model. These parameter regions should be probed extensively in the current LHC run.

  6. Dark matter signals in deflected mirage mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Michael

    2010-02-10

    We investigate the parameter space of a specific class of model within the deflected mirage mediation (DMM) scenario. We look at neutralino properties and compute the thermal relic density as well as interaction rates with xenon direct detection experiments. We find that there are portions of the parameter space which are in line with the current WMAP constraints. Further we find that none of the investigated parameter space is in conflict with current bounds from the Xenon10 experiment and that future large-scale liquid xenon experiments will probe a large portion of the model space.

  7. Deflection of Propeller Blades While Running

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzmayr, R

    1922-01-01

    The forces acting on the blades of a propeller proceed from the mass of the propeller and the resistance of the surrounding medium. The magnitude, direction and point of application of the resultant to the propeller blade is of prime importance for the strength calculation. Since it was obviously impracticable to bring any kind of testing device near the revolving propeller, not so much on account of the element of danger as on account of the resulting considerable disturbance of the air flow, the deflection in both cases was photographically recorded and subsequently measured at leisure.

  8. DEFLECTION MEASUREMENTS OF 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, C.

    1984-10-01

    This report is a summary of mechanical load-deflection tests performed on prototype collars. The individual collar plates were N.C. machined from 0.125 inch thick 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate. Inside corners were finished by EDM and outside corners and keyways were finished with an end milling operation. The last step was done with all the individual collar plates (98 pieces) assembled on pins to form the cross section shown in Fig. 1. Figure 1 also shows some of the basic collar dimensions.

  9. Real-Time Deflection Monitoring for Milling of a Thin-Walled Workpiece by Using PVDF Thin-Film Sensors with a Cantilevered Beam as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming; Liu, Dongsheng; Luo, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Thin-walled workpieces, such as aero-engine blisks and casings, are usually made of hard-to-cut materials. The wall thickness is very small and it is easy to deflect during milling process under dynamic cutting forces, leading to inaccurate workpiece dimensions and poor surface integrity. To understand the workpiece deflection behavior in a machining process, a new real-time nonintrusive method for deflection monitoring is presented, and a detailed analysis of workpiece deflection for different machining stages of the whole machining process is discussed. The thin-film polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensor is attached to the non-machining surface of the workpiece to copy the deflection excited by the dynamic cutting force. The relationship between the input deflection and the output voltage of the monitoring system is calibrated by testing. Monitored workpiece deflection results show that the workpiece experiences obvious vibration during the cutter entering the workpiece stage, and vibration during the machining process can be easily tracked by monitoring the deflection of the workpiece. During the cutter exiting the workpiece stage, the workpiece experiences forced vibration firstly, and free vibration exists until the amplitude reduces to zero after the cutter exits the workpiece. Machining results confirmed the suitability of the deflection monitoring system for machining thin-walled workpieces with the application of PVDF sensors. PMID:27626424

  10. Deflection and Stress Analysis of Thin Solid Wings of Arbitrary Plan Form with Particular Reference to Delta Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Manuel; Anderson, Edward; Hedgepeth, John M

    1953-01-01

    The structural analysis of arbitrary solid cantilever wings by small-deflection thin-plate theory is reduced to the solution of linear ordinary differential equations by the assumption that the chordwise deflections at any spanwise station may be expressed in the form of a power series in which the coefficients are functions of the spanwise coordinate. If the series is limited to the first two and three terms (that is, if linear and parabolic chordwise deflections, respectively, are assumed), the differential equations for the coefficients are solved exactly for uniformly loaded solid delta wings of constant thickness ratio. For cases for which exact solutions to the differential equations cannot be obtained, a numerical procedure is derived. Experimental deflection and stress data for constant-thickness delta-plate specimens of 45 degree and 60 degree sweep are presented and are found to compare favorably with the present theory.

  11. Structural analysis of tree trunks and branches: tapered cantilever beams subject to large deflections under complex loading.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J; Cannell, M G

    1987-12-01

    The dimensions, deflections and support costs of tree trunks and branches can be deduced using the structural theory for cantilever beams. However, elementary theory applies only as long as deflections are small, and complex analytical solutions are required to account for complex taper and patterns of loading. This paper describes a method that copes with large deflections, any patterns of taper, and any patterns of distributed loading, point loading or externally applied bending moments. A beam is considered to be composed of a series of short segments, such that each has only a small deflection, and each can have specified dimensions, Young's modulus and loading. The transport matrix method of structural analysis is used to determine the end conditions of each segment and of the whole beam. The method is verified by comparing predicted deflections with deflections (a) calculated using an analytical solution by Bisshopp and Drucker (1945), (b) calculated and measured for sapling tree trunks by Leiser and Kemper (1968), and (c) measured on tapered and untapered plastic rods. PMID:14975920

  12. Spatially-resolved investigation of transport in semiconductors: a photothermal deflection approach

    SciTech Connect

    Skumanich, A.; Fournier, D.; Boccara, A.C.; Amer, N.M.

    1985-06-01

    The unique ability of photothermal deflection spectroscopy to probe the local index of refraction of matter is exploited to investigate, in a spatially-resolved manner, thermal and electronic transport in semiconductors. An added advantage of this approach is that it is contactless; hence, it obviates the classical problems associated with electrodes and contacts. The basic premise of the technique is the use of the heat associated with non-radiative processes (e.g., recombination of carriers) to deflect a focussed laser probe beam (sub-gap energy) propagating through the semiconductor. The deflection of the probe beam is caused by a change in the refractive index of the sample which is in turn governed by carrier diffusion and recombination.

  13. 76 FR 647 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Electric Motors and Small Electric Motors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... FR 54114. After determining that energy conservation standards for small electric motors would be... of test procedures for certain small electric motors. 71 FR 38807 (July 10, 2006). Pursuant to... adopting test procedures for measuring the energy efficiency of small electric motors. 74 FR 32059....

  14. Relationship between frequency and deflection angle in the DNA prism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Dorfman, Kevin D

    2013-01-01

    The DNA prism is a modification of the standard pulsed-field electrophoresis protocol to provide a continuous separation, where the DNA are deflected at an angle that depends on their molecular weight. The standard switchback model for the DNA prism predicts a monotonic increase in the deflection angle as a function of the frequency for switching the field until a plateau regime is reached. However, experiments indicate that the deflection angle achieves a maximum value before decaying to a size-independent value at high frequencies. Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we show that the maximum in the deflection angle is related to the reorientation time for the DNA and the decay in deflection angle at high frequencies is due to inadequate stretching. The generic features of the dependence of the deflection angle on molecular weight, switching frequency, and electric field strength explain a number of experimental phenomena. PMID:23410375

  15. Small Business Innovation Research Award Success Story: FuelCell Energy Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    2011-08-31

    This success story describes FuelCell Energy Inc., a small business that manufactures stationary fuel cells. In collaboration with Sustainable Innovations LLC, and with support from a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Award from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program, FuelCell Energy Inc. has developed a highly efficient solid state electrochemical hydrogen compressor.

  16. Beam-beam deflection and signature curves for elliptic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, V.

    1990-10-22

    In this note we will present closed expressions for the beam-beam deflection angle for arbitrary elliptic beams including tilt. From these expressions signature curves, i.e., systematic deviations from the round beam deflection curve due to ellipticity or tilt are derived. In the course of the presentation we will prove that it is generally impossible to infer individual beam sizes from beam-beam deflection scans. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Big and small examples of National Energy Projects in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Hiroshi

    1998-07-01

    The author has an interest in a few energy projects of WENET (Hydrogen Combustion Gas Turbine), CAES (Underground Accumulation Gas Turbine), NITE (High Performance Industrial Furnace) and CREST (Zero Energy House). The former three projects are supported by NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) and the other one is supported by JST (Japan Science and Technology Corporation). These energy projects are evaluated from the standpoint of energy conservation and reduction of CO{sub 2} emission. The author presents these examples of National Energy Project for introduction and evaluation of their energy scheme.

  18. Small

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, Joseph

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Center on Nanostructuring for Efficient Energy Conversion (CNEEC), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE energy. The mission of CNEEC is to understand how nanostructuring can enhance efficiency for energy conversion and solve fundamental cross-cutting problems in advanced energy conversion and storage systems.

  19. Photothermal deflection spectroscopy investigations of uranium electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnicki, J.D.; Russo, R.E.

    1993-12-31

    Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) has been successfully applied successfully applied to the study of uranium oxide electrochemistry. A brief description of PDS and preliminary results that demonstrate the technique are presented. Concentration gradients formed at the electrode surface are measured by this technique. The gradients give insight into the reaction mechanisms. There is some evidence of the initiation of non-electrochemical dissolution of the uranium oxide. Optical absorption by the uranium oxide is measured by PDS and the first results indicate that the absorption of the surface does not change during electrochemical experiments. This result is contrary to literature measurements of bulk samples that indicate that the optical absorption should be strongly changing.

  20. Deflecting light into resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.

    1998-01-01

    Light is coupled into a cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) resonant cavity using an acousto-optic modulator. The AOM allows in-coupling efficiencies in excess of 40%, which is two to three orders of magnitude higher than in conventional systems using a cavity mirror for in-coupling. The AOM shutoff time is shorter than the roundtrip time of the cavity. The higher light intensities lead to a reduction in shot noise, and allow the use of relatively insensitive but fast-responding detectors such as photovoltaic detectors. Other deflection devices such as electro-optic modulators or elements used in conventional Q-switching may be used instead of the AOM. The method is particularly useful in the mid-infrared, far-infrared, and ultraviolet wavelength ranges, for which moderately reflecting input mirrors are not widely available.

  1. Deflecting light into resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.

    1998-09-29

    Light is coupled into a cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) resonant cavity using an acousto-optic modulator. The AOM allows in-coupling efficiencies in excess of 40%, which is two to three orders of magnitude higher than in conventional systems using a cavity mirror for in-coupling. The AOM shutoff time is shorter than the roundtrip time of the cavity. The higher light intensities lead to a reduction in shot noise, and allow the use of relatively insensitive but fast-responding detectors such as photovoltaic detectors. Other deflection devices such as electro-optic modulators or elements used in conventional Q-switching may be used instead of the AOM. The method is particularly useful in the mid-infrared, far-infrared, and ultraviolet wavelength ranges, for which moderately reflecting input mirrors are not widely available. 5 figs.

  2. Trace Explosive Detection using Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Adam R; Van Neste, Charles W; Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George; Finot, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Satisfying the conditions of high sensitivity and high selectivity using portable sensors that are also reversible is a challenge. Miniature sensors such as microcantilevers offer high sensitivity but suffer from poor selectivity due to the lack of sufficiently selective receptors. Although many of the mass deployable spectroscopic techniques provide high selectivity, they do not have high sensitivity. Here, we show that this challenge can be overcome by combining photothermal spectroscopy on a bimaterial microcantilever with the mass induced change in the cantilever's resonance frequency. Detection using adsorption-induced resonant frequency shift together with photothermal deflection spectroscopy shows extremely high selectivity with a subnanogram limit of detection for vapor phase adsorbed explosives, such as pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  3. ForeCAT: Using CME Deflections to Constrain their Mass and the Drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, C.; dos Santos, L. F. G.; Opher, M.

    2014-12-01

    Observations show that CMEs can deflect from a purely radial trajectory yet no consensus exists as to the cause of these deflections. The majority of the deflection motion occurs in the corona at distances where the magnetic energy dominates. Accordingly, many theories attribute the CME deflection to magnetic forces. In Kay et al. (2013) we presented ForeCAT, a model for CME deflections based on the magnetic forces (magnetic tension and magnetic pressure gradients). Kay et al. (2014) introduced an improved three-dimensional version of ForeCAT. Here we study the 2008 December 12 CME which occurred during solar minimum of Solar Cycle 24 (Byrne et al 2010, Gui et al. 2011, Liu et al 2010a,b). This CME erupted from high latitudes, and, despite the weak background magnetic field, deflected to the ecliptic, impacting Earth. From the observations, we are able to constrain all of the ForeCAT input parameters except for the CME mass and the drag coefficient that affects the CME motion. The reduced chi-square best fit to the observations constrains the CME mass range to 3e14 to 7e14 g and the drag coefficient range to 1.9 to 2.4. We explore the effects of a different magnetic background which decreases less rapidly than our standard Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model, as type II radio bursts suggest that the PFSS magnetic field decays too rapidly above active regions. For the case of the filament eruption of 2008 December 12 we find that the quiet sun coronal magnetic field should behave similar to the PFSS model. Finally, we present our current work exploring the case of the 2008 April 9 CME.

  4. Igniter adapter-to-igniter chamber deflection test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1990-01-01

    Testing was performed to determine the maximum RSRM igniter adapter-to-igniter chamber joint deflection at the crown of the inner joint primary seal. The deflection data was gathered to support igniter inner joint gasket resiliency predictions which led to launch commit criteria temperature determinations. The proximity (deflection) gage holes for the first test (Test No. 1) were incorrectly located; therefore, the test was declared a non-test. Prior to Test No. 2, test article configuration was modified with the correct proximity gage locations. Deflection data were successfully acquired during Test No. 2. However, the proximity gage deflection measurements were adversely affected by temperature increases. Deflections measured after the temperature rise at the proximity gages were considered unreliable. An analysis was performed to predict the maximum deflections based on the reliable data measured before the detectable temperature rise. Deflections to the primary seal crown location were adjusted to correspond to the time of maximum expected operating pressure (2,159 psi) to account for proximity gage bias, and to account for maximum attach and special bolt relaxation. The maximum joint deflection for the igniter inner joint at the crown of the primary seal, accounting for all significant correction factors, was 0.0031 in. (3.1 mil). Since the predicted (0.003 in.) and tested maximum deflection values were sufficiently close, the launch commit criteria was not changed as a result of this test. Data from this test should be used to determine if the igniter inner joint gasket seals are capable of maintaining sealing capability at a joint displacement of (1.4) x (0.0031 in.) = 0.00434 inches. Additional testing should be performed to increase the database on igniter deflections and address launch commit criteria temperatures.

  5. Small Wind Turbine Testing Results from the National Renewable Energy Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, A.; Huskey, A.; Link, H.; Sinclair, K.; Forsyth, T.; Jager, D.; van Dam, J.; Smith, J.

    2009-07-01

    The independent testing project was established at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion. Among these barriers is a lack of independent testing results for small turbines.

  6. Opportunities of energy supply of farm holdings on the basis of small-scale renewable energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efendiev, A. M.; Nikolaev, Yu. E.; Evstaf'ev, D. P.

    2016-02-01

    One of the major national economic problems of Russia is raising of agricultural production, which will provide strategic security and sustainable supply of the population with provisions. Creation of subsidiary small holdings, farm holdings, and peasant farm holdings will require addressing issues of energy supply. At considerable distance of small farms from centralized energy systems (by fuel, electricity and thermal energy) it is proposed to create a system of local energy networks on the basis of low-powered power plants using renewable energy sources (RES). There is economic unreasonableness of use of imported components of small power plants. Creation of new combined small power plants on renewable energy sources produced by domestic manufacturers is recommended. Schemes of arrangements of small power plants based on renewable energy sources are proposed, variants and characteristics of a basic source are provided—biogas plants developed by the authors. Calculations revealed that heat and power supply of self-contained farms distant from small power plants based on renewable energy sources is 2.5-2.6 times cheaper than from centralized networks. Production of biogas through anaerobic fermentation of organic waste of cattle complexes is considered as the basis. The analysis of biowaste output in various cattle farms is carried out, and the volume of biogas is determined to meet the requirements of these farms in electrical and thermal energy. The objective of the present article is to study the possibility of creating small combined power plants in Russia based on renewable sources of energy for independent consumers.

  7. Energy efficiency opportunities in China. Industrial equipment and small cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    A quick glance at comparative statistics on energy consumption per unit of industrial output reveals that China is one of the least energy efficient countries in the world. Energy waste not only impedes economic growth, but also creates pollution that threatens human health, regional ecosystems, and the global climate. China`s decision to pursue economic reform and encourage technology transfer from developed countries has created a window of opportunity for significant advances in energy efficiency. Policy changes, technical training, public education, and financing can help China realize its energy conservation potential.

  8. Teach Deflection Concepts with Hacksaw Blades and Rubber Bands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    Technology and engineering educators can use a simple hacksaw blade to help students learn about deflection, as that which occurs in a beam. Here the beam is fixed at one end and allowed to deflect in a manner that is easy to see and measure--the hacksaw blade represents a cantilever, an overhanging structure. This simple and very inexpensive…

  9. Nuclear Explosives for the Purpose of Deflecting Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Dave

    2001-06-01

    In order to deflect asteroids or comets having a diameter over 1 kilometer, it will be necessary to use nuclear explosives. Nuclear devices which deliver a large fraction of their total yield in the form of neutrons are considerably more effective for producing a velocity change in the target than devices which deliver x-rays or gamma rays. Typical megaton-range nuclear weapons currently deployed are a three-stage design (fission-fusion-fission) which emit most of their energy in the form of x-rays. Certain megaton-range nuclear weapons currently deployed are a two-stage design. These devices are often described as "tactical" or "clean" nuclear weapons. Because of the density of fusion fuel required to give an efficient burn, each neutron produced by the device experiences a large number of collisions before it is able to escape from the device. These collisions remove energy from the neutrons and cause most of the total device energy to be emitted as x-rays. (High-yield devices developed for military purposes have been optimized for maximum yield or for maximum yield subject to some limit on total radioactive isotope emissions. Those devices which have been optimized for radiation, known as "neutron bombs", are in the kiloton range, not the megaton range. If it is necessary to develop megaton-range nuclear explosives which have been optimized for total neutron energy output, then these devices should be developed while experienced bomb designers are still available.)

  10. Method and apparatus for measuring the momentum, energy, power, and power density profile of intense particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Gammel, George M.; Kugel, Henry W.

    1992-10-06

    A method and apparatus for determining the power, momentum, energy, and power density profile of high momentum mass flow. Small probe projectiles of appropriate size, shape and composition are propelled through an intense particle beam at equal intervals along an axis perpendicular to the beam direction. Probe projectiles are deflected by collisions with beam particles. The net beam-induced deflection of each projectile is measured after it passes through the intense particle beam into an array of suitable detectors.

  11. 77 FR 36532 - Review of Small Generator Interconnection Agreements and Procedures; Solar Energy Industries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ...-001; ER12-1855-000] Review of Small Generator Interconnection Agreements and Procedures; Solar Energy....gov/whats-new/registration/small-generator-7-17-12-form.asp . The purpose of this conference is to...: https://www.ferc.gov/whats-new/registration/small-generator-7-17-12-speaker-form.asp . Due to...

  12. A computational study of asymmetric glottal jet deflection during phonation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X; Mittal, R; Bielamowicz, S

    2011-04-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations are used to explore the mechanism for asymmetric deflection of the glottal jet during phonation. The model employs the full Navier-Stokes equations for the flow but a simple laryngeal geometry and vocal-fold motion. The study focuses on the effect of Reynolds number and glottal opening angle with a particular emphasis on examining the importance of the so-called "Coanda effect" in jet deflection. The study indicates that the glottal opening angle has no substantial effect on glottal jet deflection. Deflection in the glottal jet is always preceded by large-scale asymmetry in the downstream portion of the glottal jet. A detailed analysis of the velocity and vorticity fields shows that these downstream asymmetric vortex structures induce a flow at the glottal exit which is the primary driver for glottal jet deflection. PMID:21476669

  13. A computational study of asymmetric glottal jet deflection during phonation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X.; Mittal, R.; Bielamowicz, S.

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations are used to explore the mechanism for asymmetric deflection of the glottal jet during phonation. The model employs the full Navier–Stokes equations for the flow but a simple laryngeal geometry and vocal-fold motion. The study focuses on the effect of Reynolds number and glottal opening angle with a particular emphasis on examining the importance of the so-called “Coanda effect” in jet deflection. The study indicates that the glottal opening angle has no substantial effect on glottal jet deflection. Deflection in the glottal jet is always preceded by large-scale asymmetry in the downstream portion of the glottal jet. A detailed analysis of the velocity and vorticity fields shows that these downstream asymmetric vortex structures induce a flow at the glottal exit which is the primary driver for glottal jet deflection. PMID:21476669

  14. Intelligent deflection routing in buffer-less networks.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Soroush; Trajković, Ljiljana

    2015-02-01

    Deflection routing is employed to ameliorate packet loss caused by contention in buffer-less architectures such as optical burst-switched networks. The main goal of deflection routing is to successfully deflect a packet based only on a limited knowledge that network nodes possess about their environment. In this paper, we present a framework that introduces intelligence to deflection routing (iDef). iDef decouples the design of the signaling infrastructure from the underlying learning algorithm. It consists of a signaling and a decision-making module. Signaling module implements a feedback management protocol while the decision-making module implements a reinforcement learning algorithm. We also propose several learning-based deflection routing protocols, implement them in iDef using the ns-3 network simulator, and compare their performance. PMID:25532199

  15. Load Deflection Characteristics of Nickel Titanium Initial Archwires

    PubMed Central

    Aghili, Hossein; Yasssaei, Sogra; Ahmadabadi, Mahmoud Nilli

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the characteristics of commonly used initial archwires by their load deflection graphs. Materials and Methods: This study tested three wire designs namely copper nickel titanium (CNT), nickel titanium (NiTi), and multi-strand NiTi (MSNT) archwires engaged in passive self-ligating (PSL) brackets, active self-ligating (ASL) brackets or conventional brackets. To evaluate the mechanical characteristics of the specimens, a three-point bending test was performed. The testing machine vertically applied force on the midpoint of the wire between the central incisor and canine teeth to obtain 2 and 4mm of deflection. The force level at maximum deflection and characteristics of plateau (the average plateau load and the plateau length) were recorded. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used at P <0.05 level of significance. Results: Force level at maximum deflection and plateau length were significantly affected by the amount of deflection. The type of archwires and brackets had significant effects on force level at maximum deflection, and plateau length. However, the bracket type had no significant effect on the average plateau force. Conclusion: With any type of brackets in deflections of 2 and 4mm, MSNT wire exerted the lowest while NiTi wire exerted the highest force level at maximum deflection and plateau phase. The force level at maximum deflection and the plateau length increased with raising the amount of primary deflection; however the average plateau force did not change significantly. PMID:27148381

  16. Mission Designs for Demonstrating Gravity Tractor Asteroid Deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, M.; Faber, N.; Eggl, S.; Morrison, D.; Clark, A.; Frost, C.; Jaroux, B. A.; Khetawat, V.

    2015-12-01

    Gravity tractor asteroid deflection relies on the gravitational attraction between the target and a nearby spacecraft; using low-thrust propulsion to change the target's trajectory slowly but continuously. Our team, based at the NASA Ames Mission Design Center, prepared designs for a Gravity Tractor Demonstration Mission (GTDM) for the European Commission's NEOShield initiative. We found five asteroids with well-known orbits and opportunities for efficient stand-alone demonstrations in the 2020s. We selected one object, 2000 FJ10, for a detailed design analysis. Our GTDM design has a 4 kW solar-electric propulsion system and launch mass of 1150 kg. For a nominal asteroid mass of 3 x 109 kg and diameter 150 m, and a hovering altitude 125 m above the asteroid's surface, GTDM would change FJ10's semi-major axis by 10 km over 2 years. To measure the deflection clearly and to permit safe hovering by the spacecraft, several months of survey and characterization are required prior to the active tractoring phase of the mission. Accurate tracking is also required after the tractoring phase, to ensure that the asteroid has indeed been deflected as intended. The GTDM design includes both spacecraft and Earth-based observations of FJ10 to verify the deflection. The estimated cost of GTDM is $280 million. Trajectory analysis for GTDM confirmed that the outcome of a deflection of any asteroid depends on when that deflection is performed. Compared to kinetic impactor deflection, the gradual deflection from a gravity tractor produces comparable results for a given total momentum transfer. However, a gravity tractor can have greater flexibility in the direction in which the target asteroid can be deflected. Asteroid deflection scenarios must be modeled carefully on a case-to-case basis. We will review implications of the results of the GTDM study to other proposed gravity tractor demonstrations, such as that included in NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission.

  17. The Impact Imperative: Laser Ablation for Deflecting Asteroids, Meteoroids, and Comets from Impacting the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W.; Phipps, Claude; Smalley, Larry; Reilly, James; Boccio, Dona

    2003-05-01

    Impacting at hypervelocity, an asteroid struck the Earth approximately 65 million years ago in the Yucatan Peninsula area. This triggered the extinction of almost 70% of the species of life on Earth including the dinosaurs. Other impacts prior to this one have caused even greater extinctions. Preventing collisions with the Earth by hypervelocity asteroids, meteoroids, and comets is the most important immediate space challenge facing human civilization. This is the Impact Imperative. We now believe that while there are about 2000 earth orbit crossing rocks greater than 1 kilometer in diameter, there may be as many as 200,000 or more objects in the 100 m size range. Can anything be done about this fundamental existence question facing our civilization? The answer is a resounding yes! By using an intelligent combination of Earth and space based sensors coupled with an infra-structure of high-energy laser stations and other secondary mitigation options, we can deflect inbound asteroids, meteoroids, and comets and prevent them from striking the Earth. This can be accomplished by irradiating the surface of an inbound rock with sufficiently intense pulses so that ablation occurs. This ablation acts as a small rocket incrementally changing the shape of the rock's orbit around the Sun. One-kilometer size rocks can be moved sufficiently in about a month while smaller rocks may be moved in a shorter time span.

  18. The Deflection Plate Analyzer: A Technique for Space Plasma Measurements Under Highly Disturbed Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Dutton, Ken; Martinez, Nelson; Smith, Dennis; Stone, Nobie H.

    2004-01-01

    A technique has been developed to measure the characteristics of space plasmas under highly disturbed conditions; e.g., non-Maxwellian plasmas with strong drifting populations and plasmas contaminated by spacecraft outgassing. The present method is an extension of the capabilities of the Differential Ion Flux Probe (DIFP) to include a mass measurement that does not include either high voltage or contamination sensitive devices such as channeltron electron multipliers or microchannel plates. This reduces the complexity and expense of instrument fabrication, testing, and integration of flight hardware as compared to classical mass analyzers. The new instrument design is called the Deflection Plate Analyzer (DPA) and can deconvolve multiple ion streams and analyze each stream for ion flux intensity (density), velocity (including direction of motion), mass, and temperature (or energy distribution). The basic functionality of the DPA is discussed. The performance characteristics of a flight instrument as built for an electrodynamic tether mission, the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS), and the instrument s role in measuring key experimental conditions are also discussed.

  19. The Deflection Plate Analyzer: A Technique for Space Plasma Measurements Under Highly Disturbed Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Dutton, Ken; Martinez, Nelson; Smith, Dennis; Stone, Nobie H.

    2003-01-01

    A technique has been developed to measure the characteristics of space plasmas under highly disturbed conditions; e.g., non-Maxwellian plasmas with strong drifting populations and plasmas contaminated by spacecraft outgassing. The present method is an extension of the capabilities of the Differential Ion Flux Probe (DIFP) to include a mass measurement that does not include either high voltage or contamination sensitive devices such as channeltron electron multipliers or microchannel plates. This reduces the complexity and expense of instrument fabrication, testing, and integration of flight hardware as compared to classical mass analyzers. The new instrument design is called the Deflection Plate Analyzer (DPA) and can deconvolve multiple ion streams and analyze each stream for ion flux intensity (density), velocity (including direction of motion), mass, and temperature (or energy distribution). The basic functionality of the DPA is discussed. The performance characteristics of a flight instrument as built for an electrodynamic tether mission, the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS), and the instrument s role in measuring key experimental conditions are also discussed.

  20. Finite-element stress and deflection analysis of CDF yoke and end plug

    SciTech Connect

    Wands, R.; Grimson, J.; Kephart, R.; Theriot, D.

    1982-05-24

    A large detector is being designed to study anti pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of up to 2000 GeV as part of the Fermilab Collider Detector Facility (CDF). The central detector of this facility consists of a solenoid, calorimeter yoke, and a variety of particle measurement devices. The yoke will be a large steel structure that will provide the magnetic flux return path as well as support structure for calorimetry and other instrumentation. It must resist both electromagnetic and gravitational loads while exhibiting only small elastic deformations. The instrumented endplugs of the yoke are subjected to large electromagnetic loads. Moreover, due to the presence of wire chambers within these plugs, they must also be particularly stiff. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a finite element stress and deflection analysis of these structures under various anticipated load conditions. The PATRAN-G finite element modeling program, installed on a CDF-VAX 11/780 and operating from a Ramtek 6212 colorgraphics terminal, was used to generate the analysis models. The actual finite element analysis was performed by the ANSYS general purpose finite element program, installed on the Fermilab Cyber 175's.

  1. Diameters and dry weights of tree shoots: effects of Young's modulus, taper, deflection and angle.

    PubMed

    Cannell, M G; Morgan, J; Murray, M B

    1988-09-01

    The structural theory for cantilever beams was used to calculate the diameters and dry weights of wood that unbranched shoots must produce to support their own weights. The study was done on Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr., Pinus contorta Dougl., Larix decidua Mill. and Betula pendula Roth. syn. verrucosa Ehrh. The weights of wood increased in a non-linear fashion with increase in shoot length. A large investment in wood (as measured by diameter and dry weight) was required to maintain a small endpoint deflection (1-5% of the length). By contrast, the degree of linear taper had only a small effect on support costs, as did the Young's modulus of the wood (over the range 1-4 GPa) and the angle of the shoot from the horizontal (over the range 0-45 degrees ). Current year's shoots on young trees of P. sitchensis and P. contorta incur a high support cost in order to maintain small (1-5%) deflections throughout the year: similar shoots of L. decidua and B. pendula have smaller support costs because they deflect by about 20% after leaf expansion in spring. PMID:14972812

  2. Effects of T-tabs and large deflections in double cantilever beam specimen tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Rajiv A.; Crews, John H., Jr.; Shivakumar, Kunigal N.

    1991-01-01

    A simple strength of materials analysis was developed for a double-cantilever beam (DCB) specimen to account for geometric nonlinearity effects due to large deflections and T-tabs. A new DCB data analysis procedure was developed to include the effects of these nonlinearities. The results of the analysis were evaluated by DCB tests performed for materials having a wide range of toughnesses. The materials used in the present study were T300/5208, IM7/8551-7, and AS4/PEEK. Based on the present analysis, for a typical deflection/crack length ratio of 0.3 (for AS4/PEEK), T-tabs and large deflections cause a 15 and 3 percent error, respectively, in the computer Mode I strain energy release rate. Design guidelines for DCB specimen thickness and T-tab height were also developed in order to keep errors due to these nonlinearities within 2 percent. Based on the test results, for both hinged and tabbed specimens, the effects of large deflection on the Mode I fracture toughness (G sub Ic) were almost negligible (less than 1 percent) in the case of T300/5208 and IM7/8551-7; however, AS4/PEEK showed a 2 to 3 percent effect. The effects of T-tabs G sub Ic were more significant for all the materials with T300/5208 showing a 5 percent error, IM7/8551-7 a 15 percent error, and, AS4/PEEK a 20 percent error.

  3. Effects of T-tabs and large deflections in DCB specimen tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, R. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A simple strength of materials analysis was developed for a double-cantilever beam (DCB) specimen to account for geometric nonlinearity effects due to large deflections and T-tabs. A new DCB data analysis procedure was developed to include the effects of these nonlinearities. The results of the analysis were evaluated by DCB tests performed for materials having a wide range of toughnesses. The materials used in the present study were T300/5208, IM7/8551-7, and AS4/PEEK. Based on the present analysis, for a typical deflection/crack length ratio of 0.3 (for AS4/PEEK), T-tabs and large deflections cause a 15 percent and 3 percent error, respectively, in the computer Mode 1 strain energy release rate. Design guidelines for DCB specimen thickness and T-tab height were also developed in order to keep errors due to these nonlinearities within 2 percent. Based on the test results, for both hinged and tabbed specimens, the effects of large deflection on the Mode 1 fracture toughness (G sub Ic) were almost negligible (less than 1 percent) in the case of T300/5208 and IM7/8551-7; however, AS4/PEEK showed a 2 to 3 percent effect. The effects of T-tabs G sub Ic were more significant for all the materials with T300/5208 showing a 5 percent error, IM7/8551-7 a 15 percent error, and, AS4/PEEK a 20 percent error.

  4. Deflection by Kinetic Impact or Nuclear Ablation: Sensitivity to Asteroid Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruck Syal, M.

    2015-12-01

    Impulsive deflection of a threatening asteroid can be achieved by deploying either a kinetic impactor or a standoff nuclear device to impart a modest velocity change to the body. Response to each of these methods is sensitive to the individual asteroid's characteristics, some of which may not be well constrained before an actual deflection mission. Numerical simulations of asteroid deflection, using both hypervelocity impacts and nuclear ablation of the asteroid's surface, provide detailed information on asteroid response under a range of initial conditions. Here we present numerical results for the deflection of asteroids by both kinetic and nuclear methods, focusing on the roles of target body composition, strength, porosity, rotational state, shape, and internal structure. These results provide a framework for evaluating the planetary defense-related value of future asteroid characterization missions and capture some of the uncertainty that may be present in a real threat scenario. Part of this work was funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 12-ERD-005, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675914.

  5. Deflection compensation for multiaperture negative ion beam extraction: analytical and numerical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavenago, M.; Veltri, P.

    2014-12-01

    Deflection of negative ion beamlets due to the magnets embedded in the first extraction electrode for the purpose of dumping the co-extracted electrons is a serious issue for multiaperture ion accelerators of neutral beam injectors. Several kinds of magnet arrays which offer the possibility of cancelling ion deflection, employing crossed rows of magnets or even more compact parallel row arrangements, are discussed. A general equation for beamlet deflection is presented here, and the interference of the magnetic deflection and the electrostatic lens steering is carefully calculated; this equation may also include beamlet-beamlet interactions and image charge effects. Analytical expressions are given for the field and the line integrals for the magnet arrays, and these are simplified for beam optics calculations, but still retain an excellent agreement with numerical values. Optimization formulas for the filling fraction xy of the magnets are given, for cancellation of deflection both after the first electrode or after the second accelerating electrode. The latter case is of direct interest for the design of small accelerators (e.g., NIO1), for which compact solutions are proposed, while the former case may approximate well the design of a large accelerator such as MITICA, with a predicted xy = 0.1015 against a numerical optimized value of 0.0975 ± 0.005 in normal conditions. The detailed comparison between simulation results and theory shows that thin lens models are suitable approximations for calculating beam steering. Stability of optimal xy prediction with respect to the first accelerating gap length is shown, and the variation of xy with the voltage is discussed.

  6. Photothermal deflection in a supercritical fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Matthew E.; Gammon, Robert W.

    1994-11-01

    The total losses due to absorption and scatter from the best optical coatings can be made as low as deflection apparatus. The noise floor in our surface-absorption measurements using supercritical xenon, Tc equals 16.7 degree(s)C, corresponds to an absorptance A equals Pabsorbed/Pincident equals 10-10 under illumination of 1 W. Bulk absorption measurements are similarly enhanced: the noise floor corresponds to an absorption coefficient of (alpha) equals 10-13 cm-1 for 1 W of illumination in a sample of length 1 cm. These levels are three orders of magnitude more sensitive than any previously reported. The enhancement is brought about by the divergence in the coefficient of thermal expansion of a fluid near the critical point. In attempting to use this sensitivity to measure the absorption in transmission of low-absorbing (

  7. Development of optical diaphragm deflection sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghering, W. L.; Varshneya, D.; Jeffers, L. A.; Bailey, R. T.; Berthold, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop high-temperature pressure sensors using non-metallic components and optical sensing methods. The sensors are to operate over a temperature range from room temperature approx. 20C to 540C, to respond to internal pressure up to 690 kPa, to respond to external pressure up to 690 kPa, and to withstand external overpressure of 2070 kPa. Project tasks include evaluating sensing techniques and sensor systems. These efforts include materials and sensing method selection, sensor design, sensor fabrication, and sensor testing. Sensors are tested as a function of temperature, pressure, overpressure, and vibration. The project results show that high-temperature pressure sensors based on glass components and optical sensing methods are feasible. The microbend optical diaphragm deflection sensor exhibits the required sensitivity and stability for use as a pressure sensor with temperature compensation. for the microbend sensor, the 95% confidence level deviation of input pressure from the pressure calculated from the overall temperature-compensated calibration equation is 3.7% of full scale. The limitations of the sensors evaluated are primarily due to the restricted temperature range of suitable commercially available optical fibers and the problems associated with glass-to-metal pressure sealing over the entire testing temperature range.

  8. Asteroid Deflection Mission Design Considering On-Ground Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, Clemens; Lewis, Hugh G.; Atkinson, Peter

    The deflection of an Earth-threatening asteroid requires high transparency of the mission design process. The goal of such a mission is to move the projected point of impact over the face of Earth until the asteroid is on a miss trajectory. During the course of deflection operations, the projected point of impact will match regions that were less affected before alteration of the asteroid’s trajectory. These regions are at risk of sustaining considerable damage if the deflecting spacecraft becomes non-operational. The projected impact point would remain where the deflection mission put it at the time of mission failure. Hence, all regions that are potentially affected by the deflection campaign need to be informed about this risk and should be involved in the mission design process. A mission design compromise will have to be found that is acceptable to all affected parties (Schweickart, 2004). A software tool that assesses the on-ground risk due to deflection missions is under development. It will allow to study the accumulated on-ground risk along the path of the projected impact point. The tool will help determine a deflection mission design that minimizes the on-ground casualty and damage risk due to deflection operations. Currently, the tool is capable of simulating asteroid trajectories through the solar system and considers gravitational forces between solar system bodies. A virtual asteroid may be placed at an arbitrary point in the simulation for analysis and manipulation. Furthermore, the tool determines the asteroid’s point of impact and provides an estimate of the population at risk. Validation has been conducted against the solar system ephemeris catalogue HORIZONS by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Asteroids that are propagated over a period of 15 years show typical position discrepancies of 0.05 Earth radii relative to HORIZONS’ output. Ultimately, results from this research will aid in the identification of requirements for

  9. a Small Low-Energy Cyclotron for Radioisotope Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsche, Kirk Joseph

    Direct detection of ^{14} C by accelerator mass spectrometry has proved to be a much more sensitive method for radiocarbon dating than the decay counting method invented earlier by Libby. A small cyclotron (the "cyclotron") was proposed for direct detection of radiocarbon in 1980. This combined the suppression of background through the use of negative ions, which had been used effectively in tandem accelerators, with the high intrinsic mass resolution of a cyclotron. Development of a small electrostatically-focused cyclotron for use as a mass spectrometer was previously reported but the sensitivity needed for detection of ^{14 }C at natural abundance was not achieved. The major contributions of this work are the integration of a high current external ion source with a small flat -field, electrostatically-focused cyclotron to comprise a system capable of measuring ^{14 }C at natural levels, and the analysis of ion motion in such a cyclotron, including a detailed analysis of phase bunching and its effect on mass resolution. A high current cesium sputter negative ion source generates a beam of carbon ions which is pre-separated with a Wien filter and is transported to the cyclotron via a series of electrostatic lenses. Beam is injected radially into the cyclotron using electrostatic deflectors and an electrostatic mirror. Axial focusing is entirely electrostatic. A microchannel plate detector is used with a phase-gated output. In its present form the system is capable of improving the sensitivity of detecting ^{14} C in some biomedical experiments by a factor of 10^4. Modifications are discussed which could bring about an additional factor of 100 in sensitivity, which is important for archaeological and geological applications. Possibilities for measurements of other isotopes, such as ^3H, and ^{10}Be, and ^{26}Al, are discussed.

  10. A small low energy cyclotron for radioisotope measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, K.J.

    1989-11-01

    Direct detection of {sup 14}C by accelerator mass spectrometry has proved to be a much more sensitive method for radiocarbon dating than the decay counting method invented earlier by Libby. A small cyclotron (the cyclotrino'') was proposed for direct detection of radiocarbon in 1980. This combined the suppression of background through the use of negative ions, which had been used effectively in tandem accelerators, with the high intrinsic mass resolution of a cyclotron. Development of a small electrostatically-focused cyclotron for use as a mass spectrometer was previously reported but the sensitivity needed for detection of {sup 14}C at natural abundance was not achieved. The major contributions of this work are the integration of a high current external ion source with a small flat-field, electrostatically-focused cyclotron to comprise a system capable of measuring {sup 14}C at natural levels, and the analysis of ion motion in such a cyclotron, including a detailed analysis of phase bunching and its effect on mass resolution. A high current cesium sputter negative ion source generates a beam of carbon ions which is pre-separated with a Wien filter and is transported to the cyclotron via a series of electrostatic lenses. Beam is injected radially into the cyclotron using electrostatic deflectors and an electrostatic mirror. Axial focusing is entirely electrostatic. A microchannel plate detector is used with a phase-grated output. In its present form the system is capable of improving the sensitivity of detecting {sup 14}C in some biomedical experiments by a factor of 10{sup 4}. Modifications are discussed which could bring about an additional factor of 100 in sensitivity, which is important for archaeological and geological applications. Possibilities for measurements of other isotopes, such as {sup 3}H, and {sup 10}Be, and {sup 26}Al, are discussed. 70 refs.

  11. Small integrated solar energy systems for developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreitmueller, K. R.

    1982-11-01

    Solar enegy applications in developing countries cover processing of food and other agricultural products, fresh water production, operation of cooling and freezing equipment, of water pumps and processing machinery. Evacuated tubular collectors turn out to be best suited for process heat generation; photovoltaic generators for electricity production. The Mexican fisher village of Las Barrancas gives a good example of an integrated solar energy system.

  12. String formulation of space charge forces in a deflecting bunch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard

    2004-10-01

    The force between two moving point charges, because of its inverse square law singularity, cannot be applied directly in the numerical simulation of bunch dynamics; radiative effects make this especially true for short bunches being deflected by magnets. This paper describes a formalism circumventing this restriction in which the basic ingredient is the total force on a point charge comoving with a longitudinally aligned, uniformly charged string. Bunch evolution can then be treated using direct particle-to-particle, intrabeam scattering, with no need for an intermediate, particle-in-cell, step. Electric and magnetic fields do not appear individually in the theory. Since the basic formulas are both exact (in paraxial approximation) and fully relativistic, they are applicable to beams of all particle types and all energies. But the theory is expected to be especially useful for calculating the emittance growth of the ultrashort electron bunches of current interest for energy recovery linacs and free-electron lasers. The theory subsumes coherent synchrotron radiation and centrifugal space charge force. Renormalized, on-axis, longitudinal field components are in excellent agreement with values from Saldin et al. [DESY Report No. DESY-TESLA-FEL-96-14, 1995;

    Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. ANIMAER0168-9002 417, 158 (1998).10.1016/S0168-9002(98)00623-8

  13. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings: student workbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This workbook parallels the basic manual, providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings consisting of three parts: understanding and practicing energy conservation in buildings; determining amount of energy lost or gained in a building; and determining which practices are most efficient and installing materials. A teacher guide is available to answer questions in the student workbook related to these subjects.

  14. New raster-based laser display with fast electro-optical deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohsbeck-Petermann, Ralf; Hinkov, Vladimir

    1997-02-01

    The market of television displays is an area of outstanding economical importance due to its annual production volume of more than 100 million TV tubes. Fifteen million TV sets were produced in Western Europe in 1993 alone. On the other hand the materials used in the tubes and the energy consumption for production and during operation are issues of great ecological importance. It is therefore of social and political interest to achieve simpler and ecologically compatible solutions through new technologies and innovative technical concepts. Displays with a diagonal of one meter or more for TV and computer monitor applications operating in accordance with HDTV or higher formats require technology that is either not available or too costly. Conventional television tubes would not only have to be very large, the high internal pressure would entail an extraordinary mechanical stability of the tube, resulting in a notable increase in weight. Flat LC-displays present another alternative. Today as in the near future, only high performance color LCDs with relatively small physical dimensions are produced due to the complex technology involved. Furthermore, there are technical inadequacies when it comes to brightness and contrast in daylight or under oblique viewing angles. There are no solutions in the offing for these problems. A third possibility is the enlarged projection of pictures produced either by LCDs or similar techniques. In this case daylight projection can also pose problems due to the lack in definition and brightness. The most promising technique for a high brightness, high definition and large area displays are based on the direct projection with laser beams. Presently unsatisfying solutions are available for 2 basic parts of this technique: the low-cost laser sources needed for a color TV projection and the simple deflection system delivering the required number of pixels. There is a world-wide effort concerning the development of suitable light sources. We

  15. Linear and non-linear deflection analysis of thick rectangular plates. 2: Numerical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencharif, N.; Ng, S. F.

    1994-03-01

    Variational methods are widely used for the solution of complex differential equations in mechanics for which exact solutions are not possible. The finite difference method, although well known as an efficient numerical method, was applied in the past only for the analysis of linear and non-linear thin plates. In this paper the suitability of the method for the analysis of non-linear deflection of thick plates is studied for the first time. While there are major differences between small deflection and large deflection plate theories, the former can be treated as a particular case of the latter, when the centre deflection of the plate is less than or equal to 0.2-0.25 of the thickness of the plate. The finite difference method as applied here is a modified finite difference approach to the ordinary finite difference method generally used for the solution of thin plate problems. In this analysis thin plates are treated as a particular case of the corresponding thick plate when the boundary conditions of the plates are taken into account. The method is first applied to investigate the deflection behaviour of clamped and simply supported square isotropic thick plates. After the validity of the method is established, it is then extended to the solution of rectangular thick plates of various aspect ratios and thicknesses. Generally, beginning with the use of a limited number of mesh sizes for a given plate aspect ratio and boundary conditions, a general solution of the problem including the investigation of accuracy and convergence was extended to rectangular thick plates by providing more detailed functions satisfying the rectangular mesh sizes generated automatically by the program. Whenever possible results obtained by the present method are compared with existing solutions in the technical literature obtained by much more laborious methods and close agreements are found. The significant number of results presented here are not currently available in the technical

  16. The complete process of large elastic-plastic deflection of a cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoqiang, Wu; Tongxi, Yu

    1986-11-01

    An extension of the Elastica theory is developed to study the large deflection of an elastic-perfectly plastic horizontal cantilever beam subjected to a vertical concentrated force at its tip. The entire process is divided into four stages: I.elastic in the whole cantilever; II.loading and developing of the plastic region; III.unloading in the plastic region; and IV.reverse loading. Solutions for stages I and II are presented in a closed form. A combination of closed-form solution and numerical integration is presented for stage III. Finally, stage IV is qualitatively studied. Computed results are given and compared with those from small-deflection theory and from the Elastica theory.

  17. Characterization of acoustic effects on flame structures by beam deflection technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bedat, B.; Kostiuk, L.W.; Cheng, R.K.

    1993-10-01

    This work shows that the acoustic effects are the causes of the small amplitude flame wrinkling and movements seen in all the different gravitational conditions. The comparison between the acoustic velocity and beam deflection spectra for the two conditions studied (glass beads and fiber glass) demonstrates clearly this flame/acoustic coupling. This acoustic study shows that the burner behaves like a Helmholtz resonator. The estimated resonance frequency corresponds well to the experimental measurements. The fiber glass damps the level of the resonance frequency and the flame motion. The changes shown in normalized beam deflection spectra give further support of this damping. This work demonstrates that the acoustics has a direct influence on flame structure in the laminar case and the preliminary results in turbulent case also show a strong coupling. The nature of this flame/acoustic coupling are still not well understood. Further investigation should include determining the frequency limits and the sensitivity of the flame to acoustic perturbations.

  18. Force modification and deflection loss compensation to the pilot's controls in an aircraft simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    Control loader systems are used widely in flight simulator cockpits so that pilots may experience the correct forces while manipulating the flight controls. Two simulators at Ames Research Center the Flight Simulator for Advanced Aircraft (FSAA) and the Moving Cab Transport Simulator (MCTS) - contain control loader systems that exhibit small control deflection losses at high forces. These losses make force calibration and documentation difficult and also may cause losses in control authority of the simulated aircraft. The study of the deflection losses indicates that the major cause is a structural or mechanical distortion that is linear with applied force. Thus, the phenomena may be modeled and, subsequently, compensation for the losses may be made in the associated simulation computer.

  19. Large deflection random response of cross-ply laminated plates with elastically restrained edges and initial imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. B.; Mei, Chuh

    1988-01-01

    The large deflection random response of symmetrically laminated cross-ply rectangular thin plates subjected to random excitation is studied. The out-of-plane boundary conditions are such that all the edges are rigidly supported against translation, but elastically restrained against rotation. The plate is also assumed to have a small initial imperfection. The assumed membrane boundary conditions are such that all the edges are free from normal and tangential forces in the plane of the plate. Mean-square deflections and mean-square strains are determined for a three-layered cross-ply laminate.

  20. Energy dissipation in small-scale shape-change dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gammaitoni, L

    2012-02-01

    Shape is an important feature of physical systems, although very seldom is it addressed in the framework of a quantitative description approach. In this paper we propose to interpret the shape of things as a physical manifestation of the content of information associated with each thing and show that a change of shape in a physical system is necessarily connected with a change of its entropy and thus involves energy. We estimate the amount of energy dissipated during a shape change and propose experimental tests to be performed in nanoscale systems to verify this prediction by measuring the expected dissipation in a few simple cases. Relevant implications in the design of future zero-power logic switches are discussed. PMID:22463138

  1. Integrated alternative energy systems for use in small communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper summarizes the principles and conceptual design of an integrated alternative energy system for use in typical farming communities in developing countries. A system is described that, utilizing the Sun and methane produced from crop waste, would supply sufficient electric and thermal energy to meet the basic needs of villagers for water pumping, lighting, and cooking. The system is sized to supply enough pumping capacity to irrigate 101 ha (249 acres) sufficiently to optimize annual crop yields for the community. Three economic scenarios were developed, showing net benefits to the community of $3,578 to $15,547 anually, payback periods of 9.5 to 20 years, and benefit-to-cost ratios of 1.1 to 1.9.

  2. Feasibility of a small central cogenerated energy facility: Energy management memorandum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. N.

    1982-10-01

    The thermal economic feasibility of a small cogenerated energy facility designed to serve several industries in the Stockyards area was investigated. Cogeneration options included two dual fuel diesels and two gas turbines, all with waste heat boilers, and five fired boilers. Fuels included natural gas, and for the fired boiler cases, also low sulphur coal and municipal refuse. For coal and refuse, the option of steam only without cogeneration was also assessed. The fired boiler cogeneration systems employed back pressure steam turbines. The refuse fired cases utilized electrical capacities, 8500 to 52,400 lbm/hr and 0 to 9.9 MW (e), respectively. Deficient steam was assumed generated independently in existing equipment. Excess electrical power over that which was displaced was sold to Commonwealth Edison Company under PURPA (Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act). The facility was operated by a mutually owned corporation formed by the cogenerated power users.

  3. High energy physics - The large and the small

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, Alberto

    2012-09-24

    In this Sixth International School on Field Theory and Gravitation, I was invited to give this talk to the students and researchers of Field Theory mainly about LHC - The Large Hadron Collider and results. I will try to summarize the main daily life of the high energy physics and give an idea about the experiments and the expectations for the near future. I will comment the present results and the prospects to LHC/CMS.

  4. Design of a small fruit drier using geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1996-02-01

    A fruit drier was originally proposed for a project at the Los Azufres geothermal field in Mexico. Since the drier was to be used in a demonstration project to interest local fruit growers and processors, the size was minimal to expedite construction and minimize cost. The design was based on preliminary work reported by Herman Guillen. The design is described here, as it can be adapted to many small or experimental situations. The actual design will handle about 900 kg (2000 lbs) of fruit (wet) per drying cycle. Cutting, storing and packaging of the fruit should be done on site in a separate building. A cold-storage facility may be designed to keep fresh fruit when harvest exceeds the capacity of the drier.

  5. Comparing Server Energy Use and Efficiency Using Small Sample Sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, Henry C.; Qin, Yong; Price, Phillip N.

    2014-11-01

    This report documents a demonstration that compared the energy consumption and efficiency of a limited sample size of server-type IT equipment from different manufacturers by measuring power at the server power supply power cords. The results are specific to the equipment and methods used. However, it is hoped that those responsible for IT equipment selection can used the methods described to choose models that optimize energy use efficiency. The demonstration was conducted in a data center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. It was performed with five servers of similar mechanical and electronic specifications; three from Intel and one each from Dell and Supermicro. Server IT equipment is constructed using commodity components, server manufacturer-designed assemblies, and control systems. Server compute efficiency is constrained by the commodity component specifications and integration requirements. The design freedom, outside of the commodity component constraints, provides room for the manufacturer to offer a product with competitive efficiency that meets market needs at a compelling price. A goal of the demonstration was to compare and quantify the server efficiency for three different brands. The efficiency is defined as the average compute rate (computations per unit of time) divided by the average energy consumption rate. The research team used an industry standard benchmark software package to provide a repeatable software load to obtain the compute rate and provide a variety of power consumption levels. Energy use when the servers were in an idle state (not providing computing work) were also measured. At high server compute loads, all brands, using the same key components (processors and memory), had similar results; therefore, from these results, it could not be concluded that one brand is more efficient than the other brands. The test results show that the power consumption variability caused by the key components as a

  6. Ion Deflection for Final Optics In Laser Inertial Fusion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, R P; Latkowski, J F

    2006-11-17

    Left unprotected, both transmissive and reflective final optics in a laser inertial fusion power plant would quickly fail from melting, pulsed thermal stresses, or degradation of optical properties as a result of ion implantation. One potential option for mitigating this threat is to magnetically deflect the ions such that they are directed into a robust energy dump. In this paper we detail integrated studies that have been carried out to asses the viability of this approach for protecting final optics.

  7. Computer Use May Help Deflect Seniors' Memory Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... 157584.html Computer Use May Help Deflect Seniors' Memory Problems But, experts note that the study can' ... may help ward off age-related declines in memory and thinking, new research suggests. The study found ...

  8. Shielded helix traveling wave cathode ray tube deflection structure

    DOEpatents

    Norris, N.J.; Hudson, C.L.

    1992-12-15

    Various embodiments of a helical coil deflection structure of a CRT are described and illustrated which provide shielding between adjacent turns of the coil on either three or four sides of each turn in the coil. Threaded members formed with either male or female threads and having the same pitch as the deflection coil are utilized for shielding the deflection coil with each turn of the helical coil placed between adjacent threads which act to shield each coil turn from adjacent turns and to confine the field generated by the coil to prevent or inhibit cross-coupling between adjacent turns of the coil to thereby prevent generation of fast fields which might otherwise deflect the beam out of time synchronization with the electron beam pulse. 13 figs.

  9. Shielded helix traveling wave cathode ray tube deflection structure

    DOEpatents

    Norris, Neil J.; Hudson, Charles L.

    1992-01-01

    Various embodiments of a helical coil deflection structure of a CRT are described and illustrated which provide shielding between adjacent turns of the coil on either three or four sides of each turn in the coil. Threaded members formed with either male or female threads and having the same pitch as the deflection coil are utilized for shielding the deflection coil with each turn of the helical coil placed between adjacent threads which act to shield each coil turn from adjacent turns and to confine the field generated by the coil to prevent or inhibit cross-coupling between adjacent turns of the coil to thereby prevent generation of fast fields which might otherwise deflect the beam out of time synchronization with the electron beam pulse.

  10. Energy balance and ovulation: small cages versus natural habitats.

    PubMed

    Bronson, F H

    1998-01-01

    In the laboratory, ovulation is suppressed when a mammal is in negative energy balance whether that state is caused by inadequate food intake, excessive locomotor activity or heavy thermoregulatory costs. In this paper, knowledge generated in the laboratory about the link between ovulation and energy balance is examined in relation to the kinds of energetic challenges mammals actually face in natural habitats. When viewed in that context, several conclusions can be drawn. First, females ovulate whenever extant energetic conditions permit unless the process is blocked by non-metabolic stress, social cues or a predictive seasonal cue such as photoperiod. In the latter case, most mammals show at least a seasonal tendency in their reproduction and the majority do not use a predictive cue; they reproduce opportunistically in relation to seasonal variation in the energetic characteristics of their environment. Second, the widely held assumption that a female's fat reserves must exceed a critical level in order that she may ovulate finds no support in the literature dealing with natural populations. Third, the surprisingly rapid responsiveness of the gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generator to energetic manipulation probably reflects the study of animals that are in a pure survival mode. Fourth, the complexity of the energetic challenges mammals face in the wild suggests that there are probably multiple metabolic and neural pathways coupling ovulation to energy balance and that these pathways are probably characterized by considerable overlap and redundancy. Thus, fifth, to develop a more realistic overview of these pathways there is a need for experimental designs that present mammals with the kinds of complex challenges they actually face in the wild habitats in which they evolved. PMID:9801265

  11. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Estimates of the Deflections and Stresses of the Toshiba Cold Mass Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.P.; /Fermilab

    1995-11-22

    Tensile stresses in the Toshiba cold mass support links generated by the loadings the coil is subject to, and the deflections the coil experiences as a result of these loadings, are estimated. The axial links are conservatively designed and it should be reasonably easy to ensure that the three links at each end of the coil carry approximately equal loads. Small deviations from this ideal should not have great consequence as a system-of-three is somewhat forgiving in this regard. The use of preload makes the north operating deflection equal to the smaller south operating deflection, possibly a convenience when the nozzle design is contemplated. Toshiba has indicated they will establish the desired preload using strain gauges near the warm ends of the links.

  12. Double deflection system for an electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Norman W.; Golladay, Steven D.; Crewe, Albert V.

    1978-01-01

    A double deflection scanning system for electron beam instruments is provided embodying a means of correcting isotropic coma, and anisotropic coma aberrations induced by the magnetic lens of such an instrument. The scanning system deflects the beam prior to entry into the magnetic lens from the normal on-axis intersection of the beam with the lens according to predetermined formulas and thereby reduces the aberrations.

  13. Design of Superconducting Parallel Bar Deflecting and Crabbing rf Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Delayen, Haipeng Wang

    2009-05-01

    A new concept for a deflecting and crabbing rf structure based on half-wave resonant lines was introduced recently*. It offers significant advantages to existing designs and, because of it compactness, allows low frequency operation. This concept has been further refined and optimized for superconducting implementation. Results of this optimization and application to a 400 MHz crabbing cavity and a 499 MHz deflecting cavity are presented.

  14. A search for cosmic sources of high energy neutrinos with small underground detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berezinsky, V. S.; Castagnoli, C.; Galeotti, P.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of standard source calculations of high energy neutrino fluxes, some models of astrophysical object (single stars and binary systems) are discussed from which a detectable muon flux is expected in small underground detectors.

  15. Post mitigation impact risk analysis for asteroid deflection demonstration missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Hestroffer, Daniel; Thuillot, William; Bancelin, David; Cano, Juan L.; Cichocki, Filippo

    2015-08-01

    Even though mankind believes to have the capabilities to avert potentially disastrous asteroid impacts, only the realization of mitigation demonstration missions can validate this claim. Such a deflection demonstration attempt has to be cost effective, easy to validate, and safe in the sense that harmless asteroids must not be turned into potentially hazardous objects. Uncertainties in an asteroid's orbital and physical parameters as well as those additionally introduced during a mitigation attempt necessitate an in depth analysis of deflection mission designs in order to dispel planetary safety concerns. We present a post mitigation impact risk analysis of a list of potential kinetic impactor based deflection demonstration missions proposed in the framework of the NEOShield project. Our results confirm that mitigation induced uncertainties have a significant influence on the deflection outcome. Those cannot be neglected in post deflection impact risk studies. We show, furthermore, that deflection missions have to be assessed on an individual basis in order to ensure that asteroids are not inadvertently transported closer to the Earth at a later date. Finally, we present viable targets and mission designs for a kinetic impactor test to be launched between the years 2025 and 2032.

  16. Managing the Socioeconomic Impacts of Energy Development. A Guide for the Small Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armbrust, Roberta

    Decisions concerning large-scale energy development projects near small communities or in predominantly rural areas are usually complex, requiring cooperation of all levels of government, as well as the general public and the private sector. It is unrealistic to expect the typical small community to develop capabilities to independently evaluate a…

  17. Ultrahigh energy neutrino-nucleon scattering and parton distributions at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, Ernest M.; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal

    2006-05-01

    The cross section for ultrahigh energy neutrino-nucleon scattering is very sensitive to the parton distributions at very small values of Bjorken x (x{<=}10{sup -4}). We numerically investigate the effects of modifying the behavior of the gluon distribution function at very small x in the DGLAP evolution equation. We then use the Color Glass Condensate formalism to calculate the neutrino-nucleon cross section at ultrahigh energies and compare the result with those based on modification of DGLAP evolution equation.

  18. Optimization criteria for standing wave transverse magnetic deflection cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.

    1995-08-01

    An important linear accelerator requirement, in order to demonstrate narrow energy spectra, is the injection of electron bunches of narrow phase spread and negligible inter-bunch current. This can be achieved by r-f transverse modulation and clipping of the beam by an aperture prior to injection into the accelerator waveguide, i.e., chopper operation. By magnetically biasing the beam to one side of the centerline, it is possible to arrange for transmission into the accelerator at a time during each r-f cycle when the radial momentum imparted to the beam by the chopper cavity is passing through zero. The low efficiency of beam utilization normally associated with this type of operation, because of the high ratio of collected to transmitted current, can be considerably improved by combining the transverse chopping action with a suitably phased longitudinal velocity modulating field as obtained from a simple prebunching cavity. Transverse r-f deflection techniques also enable sub-harmonic bunch selection and injection into linear accelerators which are used as injectors for electron synchrotrons. This is achieved by driving the chopper cavity at the same frequency as the synchrotron r-f system (which is maintained at a precise sub-multiple of the linear accelerator fundamental frequency) and then prebunching the chopped beam at the fundamental frequency prior to injection into the linear accelerator.

  19. A simple damage detection indicator using operational deflection shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, R. P. C.; Maia, N. M. M.; Almeida, R. A. B.; Urgueira, A. P. V.

    2016-05-01

    Catastrophic structural failure of aircrafts, bridges, buildings and other structures in modern societies has always been of primary concern because of the loss of human lifes and of negative economic impact. The aging of the structures, the growing dependency on their role in our networks of transportation, energy and comunications, the smaller construction tolerances, the bigger power demanded and the media and society awardness to catastrophic events are sufficient motivations for the growing field of structural health monitoring, which aims at assessing the actual condition of a structure and to identify incipient damage. Damage identification can be considered as a two step process, the detection and the diagnosis. The former, and fundamental step, is the confirmation of an efective damage existence. When the response is affirmative, the latter step begins with the diagnosis, and then the questions are: where?, how much?, what type?, when will it fail? In this paper the authors propose a simple method to detect and relatively quantify structural damage by using measured vibrations data, specifically the operational deflections shapes. Numerical simulations and experimental tests are presented to validate the proposed method.

  20. Rosetta observations of solar wind deflection in the coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broiles, Thomas; Burch, James; Clark, George; Goldstein, Raymond; Koenders, Christoph; Mandt, Kathleen; Mokashi, Prachet; Samara, Marilia

    2015-04-01

    Until recently, study of the solar wind around comets was limited to remote observations and brief in-situ encounters. With the arrival of Rosetta at the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG), we have had near constant solar wind observations at the comet for over 6 months. This is an unprecedented opportunity to study this dynamic interaction over time. Neutral atoms produced by the comet become ionized through photoionization or charge-exchange with the solar wind. The freshly ionized particles experience v x B electric field and begin to gyrate around the interplanetary magnetic field. Currently, CG is ~2.6 AU from the Sun, and as of this writing, neutral production is still relatively low. Consequently, most pickup ions are produced locally (< few hundred kilometers), and a diamagnetic cavity may not exist. Moreover, neutral production is variable and changes over the comet's rotational period. We find the following: 1) The solar wind is heavily deflected near the comet (in some cases >45° away from the anti-sunward direction). 2) The solar wind helium experiences less deflection than the protons. 3) The periodicity of the deflection is highly variable, and can vary over minutes or hours. From these results, we conclude that the solar wind is deflected by a mechanism very close to the comet. We suggest the following possibilities: 1) The solar wind could be deflected by a Lorenz force in the opposite direction to that experienced by the pickup ions, which would also conserve the momentum of the two fluid system. This would explain why solar wind protons are more strongly deflected than the heavier alpha particles. Additionally, this would explain the periodicity of the deflections, which would react to changes in the interplanetary magnetic field. 2) The solar wind deflection might occur from strong charging of comet's nucleus. In which case, the nucleus may charge both positively or negatively. The nucleus could charge positively due photoionization of the surface

  1. Cosmic Magnetic Fields and Their Influence on Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigl, Günter; Miniati, Francesco; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2004-11-01

    We discuss the influence of large scale cosmic magnetic fields on the propagation of hadronic cosmic rays above 1019 eV based on large scale structure simulations. Our simulations suggest that rather substantial deflection up to several tens of degrees at 1020 eV are possible for nucleon primaries. Further, spectra and composition of cosmic rays from individual sources can depend on magnetic fields surrounding these sources in intrinsically unpredictable ways. This is true even if deflection from such individual sources is small. We conclude that the influence of large scale cosmic magnetic fields on ultra-high energy cosmic ray propagation is currently hard to quantify. We discuss possible reasons for discrepant results of simulations by Dolag et al. which predict deflections of at most a few degrees for nucleons. We finally point out that even in these latter simulations a possible heavy component would in general suffer substantial deflection.

  2. Relativistic free electrons in an intense laser field: Experimental observations of optically-induced deflection of an ultrashort electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Anthony R.

    We present experimental evidence of the deflection of electrons via the transfer of longitudinal momentum from an intense laser beam. The electrons are in the form of a narrow divergence beam created through self-modulated laser-wakefield acceleration with energies up to 6 MeV and an expected temporal duration of about 1 ps. A second laser pulse intersects the electron beam at an angle of 135° causing part of the beam to be deflected. The deflection is detected by using the scintillating plastic LANEX that provides spatial information of the electron beam. By taking column-wise and row-wise summations of the signal from the LANEX we examine how the beam profile changes with a change in the delay between the electron pulse and the secondary laser pulse. By using a set of metrics, we show how the beam is deflected and distorted. By measuring the time elapsed through the change in the electron beam, an estimate of the electron beam duration is given as less than 2 picoseconds. Inside of the 2 ps window, we show that different periods of deflection based on electron beam temperature can be explained by the laser sampling portions of the electron beam with different temperatures. It is also demonstrated in both theory and experiment that this process has no dependence on the polarization direction of the laser field. This physical process can be altered by changing the angle of incidence and laser intensity to examine deflection of different ranges of electron energies. This provides an important tool for the temporal measurement of ultrafast electron beams that can provide electron energy information.

  3. Multisubband transport and magnetic deflection of Fermi electron trajectories in three terminal junctions and rings.

    PubMed

    Poniedziałek, M R; Szafran, B

    2012-02-29

    We study the electron transport in three terminal junctions and quantum rings looking for the classical deflection of electron trajectories in the presence of intersubband scattering. We indicate that although the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and the Lorentz force effects co-exist in the low subband transport, for higher Fermi energies a simultaneous observation of both effects is difficult and calls for carefully formed structures. In particular, in quantum rings with channels wider than the input lead the Lorentz force is well resolved but the Aharonov-Bohm periodicity is lost in chaotic scattering events. In quantum rings with equal lengths of the channels and T-shaped junctions the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations are distinctly periodic but the Lorentz force effects are not well pronounced. We find that systems with wedge-shaped junctions allow for observation of both the periodic Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and the magnetic deflection. PMID:22277600

  4. Reliability and cost evaluation of small isolated power systems containing photovoltaic and wind energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Rajesh

    Renewable energy application in electric power systems is growing rapidly worldwide due to enhanced public concerns for adverse environmental impacts and escalation in energy costs associated with the use of conventional energy sources. Photovoltaics and wind energy sources are being increasingly recognized as cost effective generation sources. A comprehensive evaluation of reliability and cost is required to analyze the actual benefits of utilizing these energy sources. The reliability aspects of utilizing renewable energy sources have largely been ignored in the past due the relatively insignificant contribution of these sources in major power systems, and consequently due to the lack of appropriate techniques. Renewable energy sources have the potential to play a significant role in the electrical energy requirements of small isolated power systems which are primarily supplied by costly diesel fuel. A relatively high renewable energy penetration can significantly reduce the system fuel costs but can also have considerable impact on the system reliability. Small isolated systems routinely plan their generating facilities using deterministic adequacy methods that cannot incorporate the highly erratic behavior of renewable energy sources. The utilization of a single probabilistic risk index has not been generally accepted in small isolated system evaluation despite its utilization in most large power utilities. Deterministic and probabilistic techniques are combined in this thesis using a system well-being approach to provide useful adequacy indices for small isolated systems that include renewable energy. This thesis presents an evaluation model for small isolated systems containing renewable energy sources by integrating simulation models that generate appropriate atmospheric data, evaluate chronological renewable power outputs and combine total available energy and load to provide useful system indices. A software tool SIPSREL+ has been developed which generates

  5. Deflecting RF cavity design for a recirculating linac based facility for ultrafast X-ray science (LUX)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.N.

    2003-05-01

    We report on superconducting deflecting RF cavity designs for a Recirculating Linac Based Facility for Ultrafast X-ray Science (LUX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The deflecting cavities operate in the lowest dipole mode and are required to produce a temporal correlation within flat electron bunches, as needed for x-ray compression in crystal optics. Deflecting voltage of up to 8.5-MV is required at 3.9-GHz. We present a 7-cell cavity design in this paper. Seven such cavities are required to generate the 8.5 MV deflecting voltage. Longitudinal and transverse impedance from LOM (lower order mode) and HOM (higher order mode) are simulated using the MAFIA code. Short-range and long-range wakefield excited through these impedances are calculated. Beam loading effects of the deflecting mode and LOM modes are estimated. Q values of the LOM monopole modes in the cavity may need to be damped to be below 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} levels in order to maintain the required energy spread.

  6. Small-scale hydroelectric power in the Pacific Northwest: new impetus for an old energy source

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Energy supply is one of the most important issues facing Northwestern legislators today. To meet the challenge, state legislatures must address the development of alternative energy sources. The Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Policy Project of the National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL) was designed to assist state legislators in looking at the benefits of one alternative, small-scale hydro. Because of the need for state legislative support in the development of small-scale hydroelectric, NCSL, as part of its contract with the Department of Energy, conducted the following conference on small-scale hydro in the Pacific Northwest. The conference was designed to identify state obstacles to development and to explore options for change available to policymakers. A summary of the conference proceedings is presented.

  7. Energy Management in Small Commercial Buildings: A Look at How HVAC Contractors Can Deliver Energy Efficiency to this Segment

    SciTech Connect

    Hult, Erin; Granderson, Jessica; Mathew, Paul

    2014-07-01

    While buildings smaller than 50,000 sq ft account for nearly half of the energy used in US commercial buildings, energy efficiency programs to-date have primarily focused on larger buildings. Interviews with stakeholders and a review of the literature indicate interest in energy efficiency from the small commercial building sector, provided solutions are simple and low-cost. An approach to deliver energy management to small commercial buildings via HVAC contractors and preliminary demonstration findings are presented. The energy management package (EMP) developed includes five technical elements: benchmarking and analysis of monthly energy use; analysis of interval electricity data (if available), a one-hour onsite walkthrough, communication with the building owner, and checking of results. This data-driven approach tracks performance and identifies low-cost opportunities, using guidelines and worksheets for each element to streamline the delivery process and minimize the formal training required. This energy management approach is unique from, but often complementary to conventional quality maintenance or retrofit-focused programs targeting the small commercial segment. Because HVAC contractors already serve these clients, the transaction cost to market and deliver energy management services can be reduced to the order of hundreds of dollars per year. This business model, outlined briefly in this report, enables the offering to benefit the contractor and client even at the modest expected energy savings in small buildings. Results from a small-scale pilot of this approach validated that the EMP could be delivered by contractors in 4-8 hours per building per year, and that energy savings of 3-5percent are feasible through this approach.

  8. Deflection-Compensating Beam for use inside a Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Dwight; Myers, Neill; Herren, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    A design concept for a beam for a specific application permits variations and options for satisfying competing requirements to minimize certain deflections under load and to minimize the weight of the beam. In the specific application, the beam is required to serve as a motion-controlled structure for supporting a mirror for optical testing in the lower third portion of a horizontal, cylindrical vacuum chamber. The cylindrical shape of the chamber is fortuitous in that it can be (and is) utilized as an essential element of the deflection-minimizing design concept. The beam is, more precisely, a table-like structure comprising a nominally flat, horizontal portion with vertical legs at its ends. The weights of the beam and whatever components it supports are reacted by the contact forces between the lower ends of the legs and the inner cylindrical chamber wall. Whereas the bending moments arising from the weights contribute to a beam deflection that is concave with its lowest point at midlength, the bending moments generated by the contact forces acting on the legs contribute to a beam deflection that is convex with its highest point at midlength. In addition, the bending of the legs in response to the weights causes the lower ends of the legs to slide downward on the cylindrical wall. By taking the standard beam-deflection equations, combining them with the geometric relationships among the legs and the horizontal portion of the beam, and treating the sliding as a component of deflection, it is possible to write an equation for the net vertical deflection as a function of the load and of position along the beam. A summary of major conclusions drawn from the equation characterization is included.

  9. Principle of Equivalence and the Deflection of Light by the Sun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Robert P.; Lathrop, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Explains the discrepancy between the principle-of-equivalence and the general theory of relativity in calculating the deflection of light by the sun. Shows that the total deflection is the sum of the deflection given by the principle-of-equivalence, and the deflection of infinitely fast particles. ( GA)

  10. Effects of small scale energy injection on large scales in turbulent reaction flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Yuan

    2014-11-01

    Turbulence causes the generation of eddies of various length scales. In turbulent non-reacting flows, most of the kinetic energy is contained in large scale turbulent structures and dissipated at small scales. This energy cascade process from large scales to small scales provides the foundation of a lot of turbulence models, especially for Large Eddy Simulations. However, in turbulent reacting flows, chemical energy is converted locally to heat and therefore deploys energy at the smallest scales. As such, effects of small scale energy injection due to combustion on large scale turbulent motion may become important. These effects are investigated in the case of auto-ignition under homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Impact of small scale heat release is examined by comparing various turbulent statistics (e.g. energy spectrum, two-point correlation functions, and structure functions) in the reacting case to the non-reacting case. Emphasis is placed on the identification of the most relevant turbulent quantities in reflecting such small-large scale interactions.