Science.gov

Sample records for small direct effect

  1. Overcoming barriers to effective pain management: the use of professionally directed small group discussions.

    PubMed

    Lewis, C Preston; Corley, Donna J; Lake, Norma; Brockopp, Dorothy; Moe, Krista

    2015-04-01

    Inadequate assessment and management of pain among critical care patients can lead to ineffective care delivery and an increased length of stay. Nurses' lack of knowledge regarding appropriate assessment and treatment, as well as negative biases toward specific patient populations, can lead to poor pain control. Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of professionally directed small group discussions on critical care nurses' knowledge and biases related to pain management. A quasi-experiment was conducted at a 383-bed Magnet(®) redesignated hospital in the southeastern United States. Critical care nurses (N = 32) participated in the study. A modified Brockopp and Warden Pain Knowledge Questionnaire was administered before and after the small group sessions. These sessions were 45 minutes in length, consisted of two to six nurses per group, and focused on effective pain management strategies. Results indicated that mean knowledge scores differed significantly and in a positive direction after intervention [preintervention mean = 18.28, standard deviation = 2.33; postintervention mean = 22.16, standard deviation = 1.70; t(31) = -8.87, p < .001]. Post-bias scores (amount of time and energy nurses would spend attending to patients' pain) were significantly higher for 6 of 15 patient populations. The strongest bias against treating patients' pain was toward unconscious and mechanically ventilated individuals. After the implementation of professionally directed small group discussions with critical care nurses, knowledge levels related to pain management increased and biases toward specific patient populations decreased. PMID:25439127

  2. GeSe monolayer semiconductor with tunable direct band gap and small carrier effective mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yonghong; Zhang, Shengli; Sun, Shaofa; Xie, Meiqiu; Cai, Bo; Zeng, Haibo

    2015-09-01

    Two dimensional materials, befitting nanoscale electronics, can benefit strain-tunable applications due to their ultrathin and flexible nature. Based on the first-principles calculations within the generalized gradient approximation, GeSe monolayer with a distorted NaCl-type structure is predicted. The GeSe monolayer is found to be a direct semiconductor with a band gap of (1.16 0.13) eV against the bulk counterpart. The electronic responses of the GeSe monolayer to strain are found to be sensitive and anisotropic, and the transitions between direct and indirect band gap are repeatedly met in the course of energy engineering by uniaxial and biaxial strains. The direct band gap of the GeSe monolayer is tunable by small strain within a large energy range (0.95-1.48 eV). The carrier effective masses in the GeSe monolayer are also tunable by strain in a low mass range (0.03-0.61 m0 ). These intriguing properties make GeSe monolayer a promising two-dimensional material for nanomechanics, thermoelectrics, and optoelectronics.

  3. Direct and Propagated Effects of Small Molecules on Protein–Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cesa, Laura C.; Mapp, Anna K.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Networks of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) link all aspects of cellular biology. Dysfunction in the assembly or dynamics of PPI networks is a hallmark of human disease, and as such, there is growing interest in the discovery of small molecules that either promote or inhibit PPIs. PPIs were once considered undruggable because of their relatively large buried surface areas and difficult topologies. Despite these challenges, recent advances in chemical screening methodologies, combined with improvements in structural and computational biology have made some of these targets more tractable. In this review, we highlight developments that have opened the door to potent chemical modulators. We focus on how allostery is being used to produce surprisingly robust changes in PPIs, even for the most challenging targets. We also discuss how interfering with one PPI can propagate changes through the broader web of interactions. Through this analysis, it is becoming clear that a combination of direct and propagated effects on PPI networks is ultimately how small molecules re-shape biology. PMID:26380257

  4. Direct and Propagated Effects of Small Molecules on Protein-Protein Interaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Cesa, Laura C; Mapp, Anna K; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2015-01-01

    Networks of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) link all aspects of cellular biology. Dysfunction in the assembly or dynamics of PPI networks is a hallmark of human disease, and as such, there is growing interest in the discovery of small molecules that either promote or inhibit PPIs. PPIs were once considered undruggable because of their relatively large buried surface areas and difficult topologies. Despite these challenges, recent advances in chemical screening methodologies, combined with improvements in structural and computational biology have made some of these targets more tractable. In this review, we highlight developments that have opened the door to potent chemical modulators. We focus on how allostery is being used to produce surprisingly robust changes in PPIs, even for the most challenging targets. We also discuss how interfering with one PPI can propagate changes through the broader web of interactions. Through this analysis, it is becoming clear that a combination of direct and propagated effects on PPI networks is ultimately how small molecules re-shape biology. PMID:26380257

  5. Effect of Stepwise Pressure Change on Porosity Evolution during Directional Solidification in Small Cylindrical Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R.N.; Lee, C.P.; Cox, M.C.; Blandford, B.T.; Anilkumar, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    Controlled directional solidification experiments were performed in capillary channels, using nitrogen-saturated succinonitrile, to examine the effect of an in-situ stepwise processing pressure increase on an isolated pore evolution. Two experiments were performed using different processing pressure input profiles. The results indicate that a processing pressure increase has a transient effect on pore growth geometry characterized by an initial phase of decreasing pore diameter, followed by a recovery phase of increasing pore diameter. The experimental results also show that processing pressure can be used as a control parameter to either increase or terminate porosity formation. A theoretical model is introduced which indicates that the pore formation process is limited by the diffusion of solute-gas through the melt, and that the observed response toa pressure increase is attributed to the re-equilibration of solute concentration in the melt associated with the increased melt pressure.

  6. Effect of Processing Pressure on Isolated Pore Formation during Controlled Directional Solidification in Small Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Matthew C.; Anilkumar, Amrutur V.; Grugel, RIchard N.; Lee, Chun P.

    2008-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments were performed, using succinonitrile saturated with nitrogen gas, to examine the effects of in-situ processing pressure changes on the formation growth, and evolution of an isolated, cylindrical gaseous pore. A novel solidification facility, capable of processing thin cylindrical samples (I.D. < 1.0 mm), under controlled pressure conditions, was used for the experiments. A new experimental method for growing the isolated pore from a seed bubble is introduced. The experimental results indicate that an in-situ processing pressure change will result in either a transient change in pore diameter or a complete termination of pore growth, indicating that pressure changes can be used as a control parameter to terminate bubble growth. A simple analytical model has been introduced to explain the experimental observations.

  7. Small-signal modeling with direct parameter extraction for impact ionization effect in high-electron-mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, He; Lv, Hongliang; Guo, Hui; Zhang, Yuming

    2015-11-01

    Impact ionization affects the radio-frequency (RF) behavior of high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs), which have narrow-bandgap semiconductor channels, and this necessitates complex parameter extraction procedures for HEMT modeling. In this paper, an enhanced small-signal equivalent circuit model is developed to investigate the impact ionization, and an improved method is presented in detail for direct extraction of intrinsic parameters using two-step measurements in low-frequency and high-frequency regimes. The practicability of the enhanced model and the proposed direct parameter extraction method are verified by comparing the simulated S-parameters with published experimental data from an InAs/AlSb HEMT operating over a wide frequency range. The results demonstrate that the enhanced model with optimal intrinsic parameter values that were obtained by the direct extraction approach can effectively characterize the effects of impact ionization on the RF performance of HEMTs.

  8. Multidirectional sprints and small-sided games training effect on agility and change of direction abilities in youth soccer.

    PubMed

    Chaouachi, Anis; Chtara, Moktar; Hammami, Raouf; Chtara, Hichem; Turki, Olfa; Castagna, Carlo

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the training effects of a small-sided game (SSG) and multidirectional sprint intervention on agility and change of direction (COD) ability in young male soccer players. Thirty-six soccer players (age: 14.2 0.9 years; height: 167.2 5.7 cm; body mass: 54.1 6.3 kg, body fat: 12.5 2.2%) participated in a short-term (6 weeks) randomized parallel fully controlled training study, with pre-to-post measurements. Players were randomly assigned to 2 experimental groups: training with preplanned COD drills (CODG, n = 12) or using SSGs (SSGG, n = 12) and to a control group (CONG, n = 12). Pre- and post-training players completed a test battery involving linear sprinting (15- and 30-m sprint), COD sprinting (COD: 15 m, ball: 15 m, 10-8-8-10 m, zigzag: 20 m), reactive agility test (RAT, RAT-ball), and vertical and horizontal jumping (countermovement jump and 5-jump, respectively). A significant (p ? 0.05) group time effect was detected for all variables in CODG and SSGG. Improvements in sprint, agility without ball, COD, and jumping performances, were higher in CODG than in the other groups. The SSGG improved significantly more (p ? 0.05) than other groups in agility tests with the ball. The CONG showed significant improvements (p ? 0.05) on linear sprinting over a distance longer than 10 m and in all the agility and COD tests used in this study. It is concluded that in young male soccer players, agility can be improved either using purpose-built SSG or preplanned COD sprints. However, the use of specifically designed SSG may provide superior results in match-relevant variables. PMID:25148467

  9. The direct and indirect effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide and nutrients on Chironomidae (Diptera) emerging from small wetlands.

    PubMed

    Baker, Leanne F; Mudge, Joseph F; Houlahan, Jeff E; Thompson, Dean G; Kidd, Karen A

    2014-09-01

    Laboratory and mesocosm experiments have demonstrated that some glyphosate-based herbicides can have negative effects on benthic invertebrate species. Although these herbicides are among the most widely used in agriculture, there have been few multiple-stressor, natural system-based investigations of the impacts of glyphosate-based herbicides in combination with fertilizers on the emergence patterns of chironomids from wetlands. Using a replicated, split-wetland experiment, the authors examined the effects of 2 nominal concentrations (2.88 mg acid equivalents/L and 0.21 mg acid equivalents/L) of the glyphosate herbicide Roundup WeatherMax, alone or in combination with nutrient additions, on the emergence of Chironomidae (Diptera) before and after herbicide-induced damage to macrophytes. There were no direct effects of treatment on the structure of the Chironomidae community or on the overall emergence rates. However, after macrophyte cover declined as a result of herbicide application, there were statistically significant increases in emergence in all but the highest herbicide treatment, which had also received no nutrients. There was a negative relationship between chironomid abundance and macrophyte cover on the treated sides of wetlands. Fertilizer application did not appear to compound the effects of the herbicide treatments. Although direct toxicity of Roundup WeatherMax was not apparent, the authors observed longer-term impacts, suggesting that the indirect effects of this herbicide deserve more consideration when assessing the ecological risk of using herbicides in proximity to wetlands. PMID:24899169

  10. The persistence of directivity in small earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, J.

    2007-01-01

    We derive a simple inversion of peak ground acceleration (PGA) or peak ground velocity (PGV) for rupture direction and rupture velocity and then test this inversion on the peak motions obtained from seven 3.5 ??? M ??? 4.1 earthquakes that occurred in two clusters in November 2002 and February 2003 near San Ramon, California. These clusters were located on two orthogonal strike-slip faults so that the events share the same approximate focal mechanism but not the same fault plane. Three earthquakes exhibit strong directivity, but the other four earthquakes exhibit relatively weak directivity. We use the residual PGAs and PGVs from the other six events to determine station corrections for each earthquake. The inferred rupture directions unambiguously identify the fault plane for the three earthquakes with strong directivity and for three of the four earthquakes with weak directivity. The events with strong directivity have fast rupture velocities (0.63????? v ??? 0.87??); the events with weak directivity either rupture more slowly (0.17????? v ???0.35??) or bilaterally. The simple unilateral inversion cannot distinguish between slow and bilateral ruptures: adding a bilateral rupture component degrades the fit of the rupture directions to the fault planes. By comparing PGAs from the events with strong and weak directivity, we show how an up-dip rupture in small events can distort the attenuation of peak ground motion with distance. When we compare the rupture directions of the earthquakes to the location of aftershocks in the two clusters, we find than almost all the aftershocks of the three earthquakes with strong directivity occur within 70?? of the direction of rupture.

  11. Antiviral Immunity Directed by Small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shou-Wei; Voinnet, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Plants and invertebrates can protect themselves from viral infection through RNA silencing. This antiviral immunity involves production of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (viRNAs) and results in specific silencing of viruses by viRNA-guided effector complexes. The proteins required for viRNA production as well as several key downstream components of the antiviral immunity pathway have been identified in plants, flies, and worms. Meanwhile, viral mechanisms to suppress this small RNA-directed immunity by viruses are being elucidated, thereby illuminating an ongoing molecular arms race that likely impacts the evolution of both viral and host genomes. PMID:17693253

  12. Direct Modulation of Small GTPase Activity and Function.

    PubMed

    Cromm, Philipp M; Spiegel, Jochen; Grossmann, Tom N; Waldmann, Herbert

    2015-11-01

    Small GTPases are a family of GDP-/GTP-binding proteins that serve as biomolecular switches inside cells to control a variety of essential cellular processes. Aberrant function and regulation of small GTPases is associated with a variety of human diseases, thus rendering these proteins highly interesting targets in drug discovery. However, this class of proteins has been considered "undruggable", as intensive decade-long efforts did not yield clinically relevant direct modulators of small GTPases. Recently, the targeting of small GTPases has gained fresh impetus through the discovery of novel transient cavities on the protein surfaces and the application of new targeting strategies. Besides Ras proteins, other small GTPases have attracted increased attention since improved biological insight in combination with novel targeting strategies identified them as promising targets in drug discovery. This Review gives an overview of relevant aspects of the superfamily of small GTPases and summarizes recent progress and perspectives for the direct modulation of these challenging targets. PMID:26470842

  13. 75 FR 15756 - Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... Phase II award threshold amount from $750,000 to $1,000,000 (FR 48004). Congress established the current... (67 FR 6008, Sept. 24, 2002). SBA has determined that to restore the average economic value of the... ADMINISTRATION RIN 3244-AF61 Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive AGENCY: U.S....

  14. 77 FR 46855 - Small Business Technology Transfer Program Policy Directive

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ... SBIR and STTR Programs as a result of certain provisions of the Reauthorization Act (see 77 FR 30227... Federal Register, 77 FR 16313, on March 20, 2012, explaining this data collection and seeking comments... ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Chapter I RIN 3245-AF45 Small Business Technology Transfer Program Policy Directive...

  15. Innovative biomechanics for directional hearing in small flies.

    PubMed

    Robert, D

    2001-04-01

    In humans and animals alike, the localization of sound constitutes a fundamental processing task of the auditory system. Directional hearing relies on acoustic cues such as the interaural amplitude and time differences and also, sometimes, the signal spectral composition. In small animals, such as insects, the auditory receptors are forcibly set close together, a design constraint imposing very short interaural distances. Due to the physics of sound propagation, the close proximity of the sound receivers results in vanishingly small amplitude and time cues. Yet, because of their directionality, small auditory systems embed original and innovative solutions that can be of inspirational value to some acute problems of technological miniaturization. Such ears are found in a parasitoid fly that acoustically locates its singing cricket host. Anatomically rather unconventional, the fly's auditory system is endowed with a directional sensitivity that is based on the mechanical coupling between its two hemilateral tympanal membranes. The functional principle permitting this directionality may be of particular relevance for technological applications necessitating sensors that are low cost, low weight, and low energy. Based on silicon-etching technology, early prototypes of sub-millimeter acoustic sensors provide evidence for directional mechanical responses. Further developments hold the promise of applications in hearing aid technology, vibration sensors, and miniature video-acoustic surveillance systems. PMID:11341582

  16. The Problems with Access to Compulsory Education in China and the Effects of the Policy of Direct Subsidies to Students: An Empirical Study Based on a Small Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanqing, Ding

    2012-01-01

    After a brief review of the achievements and the problems in compulsory education enrollment in the thirty years since the reform and opening up, this study analyzes the current compulsory education enrollment and dropout rates in China's least-developed regions and the factors affecting school enrollment based on survey data from a small sample

  17. The Problems with Access to Compulsory Education in China and the Effects of the Policy of Direct Subsidies to Students: An Empirical Study Based on a Small Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanqing, Ding

    2012-01-01

    After a brief review of the achievements and the problems in compulsory education enrollment in the thirty years since the reform and opening up, this study analyzes the current compulsory education enrollment and dropout rates in China's least-developed regions and the factors affecting school enrollment based on survey data from a small sample…

  18. Directional Solidification and Convection in Small Diameter Crucibles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Sung, P. K.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.; DeGroh, H. C., III

    2003-01-01

    Pb-2.2 wt% Sb alloy was directionally solidified in 1, 2, 3 and 7 mm diameter crucibles. Pb-Sb alloy presents a solutally unstable case. Under plane-front conditions, the resulting macrosegregation along the solidified length indicates that convection persists even in the 1 mm diameter crucible. Al-2 wt% Cu alloy was directionally solidified because this alloy was expected to be stable with respect to convection. Nevertheless, the resulting macrosegregation pattern and the microstructure in solidified examples indicated the presence of convection. Simulations performed for both alloys show that convection persists for crucibles as small as 0.6 mm of diameter. For the solutally stable alloy, Al-2 wt% Cu, the simulations indicate that the convection arises from a lateral temperature gradient.

  19. An Automated Directed Spectral Search Methodology for Small Target Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Stanley I.

    Much of the current efforts in remote sensing tackle macro-level problems such as determining the extent of wheat in a field, the general health of vegetation or the extent of mineral deposits in an area. However, for many of the remaining remote sensing challenges being studied currently, such as border protection, drug smuggling, treaty verification, and the war on terror, most targets are very small in nature - a vehicle or even a person. While in typical macro-level problems the objective vegetation is in the scene, for small target detection problems it is not usually known if the desired small target even exists in the scene, never mind finding it in abundance. The ability to find specific small targets, such as vehicles, typifies this problem. Complicating the analyst's life, the growing number of available sensors is generating mountains of imagery outstripping the analysts' ability to visually peruse them. This work presents the important factors influencing spectral exploitation using multispectral data and suggests a different approach to small target detection. The methodology of directed search is presented, including the use of scene-modeled spectral libraries, various search algorithms, and traditional statistical and ROC curve analysis. The work suggests a new metric to calibrate analysis labeled the analytic sweet spot as well as an estimation method for identifying the sweet spot threshold for an image. It also suggests a new visualization aid for highlighting the target in its entirety called nearest neighbor inflation (NNI). It brings these all together to propose that these additions to the target detection arena allow for the construction of a fully automated target detection scheme. This dissertation next details experiments to support the hypothesis that the optimum detection threshold is the analytic sweet spot and that the estimation method adequately predicts it. Experimental results and analysis are presented for the proposed directed search techniques of spectral image based small target detection. It offers evidence of the functionality of the NNI visualization and also provides evidence that the increased spectral dimensionality of the 8-band Worldview-2 datasets provides noteworthy improvement in results over traditional 4-band multispectral datasets. The final experiment presents the results from a prototype fully automated target detection scheme in support of the overarching premise. This work establishes the analytic sweet spot as the optimum threshold defined as the point where error detection rate curves -- false detections vs. missing detections -- cross. At this point the errors are minimized while the detection rate is maximized. It then demonstrates that taking the first moment statistic of the histogram of calculated target detection values from a detection search with test threshold set arbitrarily high will estimate the analytic sweet spot for that image. It also demonstrates that directed search techniques -- when utilized with appropriate scene-specific modeled signatures and atmospheric compensations -- perform at least as well as in-scene search techniques 88% of the time and grossly under-performing only 11% of the time; the in-scene only performs as well or better 50% of the time. It further demonstrates the clear advantage increased multispectral dimensionality brings to detection searches improving performance in 50% of the cases while performing at least as well 72% of the time. Lastly, it presents evidence that a fully automated prototype performs as anticipated laying the groundwork for further research into fully automated processes for small target detection.

  20. Making the Most of Small Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ross A.

    2009-01-01

    The idea that classroom social ecologies are shaped by the aggregate effects of peers' prior care experiences is provocative, even though the evidence is weak that this explains the small and diminishing effect of childcare experience in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development study. Small effects may indeed be small effects,…

  1. EFFECTIVE FILTRATION METHODS FOR SMALL WATER SUPPLIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 2-year study was conducted of various simple water filtration systems potentially appropriate for high-quality surface waters serving small systems. A slow sand filter without coagulant and a direct, rapid filter with coagulant were operated in parallel. Direct filtration with ...

  2. 77 FR 46805 - Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ... SBIR and STTR Programs as a result of certain provisions of the Reauthorization Act (see 77 FR 30227.... SBA published a notice in the Federal Register, 77 FR 16313, on March 20, 2012 explaining this data... August 6, 2012 Part II Small Business Administration 13 CFR Chapter I Small Business Innovation...

  3. Using response-prompting procedures during small-group direct instruction: outcomes and procedural variations.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Jennifer R; Lane, Justin D; Elam, Katherine L; Wolery, Mark

    2012-09-01

    Research was reviewed on small-group instruction for learners with disabilities. The review was conducted for articles published between 1990 and 2010 on the application of small-group direct instruction to teach discrete skills using prompting procedures. A total of 47 articles with 197 participants and 687 replications of effects was located. Small-group instruction was effective for 195 of 197 participants and across variations in implementation and contexts. Implementers were primarily special education personnel, and instruction typically occurred in special education settings. Rigorous designs were used in all studies, and fidelity was assessed in 46 of 47 studies and was uniformly high. Students consistently reached criterion on their own target behaviors, generalized those behaviors, maintained them, and learned the behaviors taught to their peers (when this was measured, which occurred in a majority of the studies). Future research should examine comparisons of procedural variables and promoting social behaviors between group mates. PMID:22998488

  4. EFFECTS OF WATERSHED DISTURBANCE ON SMALL STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents the effects of watershed disturbance on small streams. The South Fork Broad River Watershed was studied to evaluate the use of landscape indicators to predict pollutant loading at small spatial scales and to develop indicators of pollutants. Also studie...

  5. Direct oxide reduction demonstration, small-scale studies

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.L.; Santi, D.J.; Fisher, D.C.; Humiston, T.J.

    1991-12-09

    This project was initiated to provide process design information to the Plutonium Recovery Project (PRP). Although direct oxide reduction (DOR) has been operated in a production mode both at the Rocky Flats Plant (now operated by EG&G, Inc.) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, many aspects of the process are ill-defined. Because the PRP plans include significant DOR capability, a well-defined process should minimize capital cost and maximize productivity. Reduced radiation exposure may also be realized. A detailed, statistically valid investigation of the direct oxide reduction process was carried out utilizing 100 grams or less of plutonium dioxide per experiment. Conditions were established for obtaining 95% + yields. Conclusions drawn from the results of the experimental work were utilized to make recommendations for future large-scale investigative and confirmative work as well large-scale production demonstration work. 4 refs., 5 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. Direct observation of small cluster mobility and ripening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.

    1976-01-01

    Direct evidence is reported for the simultaneous occurrence of Ostwald ripening and short-distance cluster mobility during annealing of discontinuous metal films on clean amorphous substrates. The annealing characteristics of very thin particulate deposits of silver on amorphized clean surfaces of single-crystalline thin graphite substrates have been studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) under controlled environmental conditions in the temperature range from 25 to 450 C. It was possible to monitor all stages of the experiments by TEM observation of the same specimen area. Slow Ostwald ripening was found to occur over the entire temperature range, but the overriding surface transport mechanism was short-distance cluster mobility. This was concluded from in situ observations of individual particles during annealing and from measurements of cluster size distributions, cluster number densities, area coverages, and mean cluster diameters.

  7. Note: Direct piezoelectric effect microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mori, T J A; Stamenov, P; Dorneles, L S

    2015-07-01

    An alternative method for investigating piezoelectric surfaces is suggested, exploiting the direct piezoeffect. The technique relies on acoustic (ultrasonic) excitation of the imaged surface and mapping of the resulting oscillatory electric potential. The main advantages arise from the spatial resolution of the conductive scanning probe microscopy in combination with the relatively large magnitude of the forward piezo signal Upf, which can be of the order of tens of mV even for non-ferroelectric piezoelectric materials. The potency of this experimental strategy is illustrated with measurements on well-crystallized quartz surfaces, where Upf ? 50 mV, for a piezoelectric coefficient of d33 = - 2.27? ?10(-12) m/V, and applied stress of about T3 ? 5.7 kPa. PMID:26233416

  8. Are Teacher Effects Larger in Small Classes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konstantopoulos, Spyros; Sun, Min

    2014-01-01

    Teachers spend most of their time in school in classrooms, and their instruction and teaching practices may be affected by classroom context such as class size. We examine whether teacher effects interact with classroom context such as class size. Specifically, we seek to determine whether teacher effects are more pronounced in small classes than…

  9. Direct connections assist neurons to detect correlation in small amplitude noises

    PubMed Central

    Bolhasani, E.; Azizi, Y.; Valizadeh, A.

    2013-01-01

    We address a question on the effect of common stochastic inputs on the correlation of the spike trains of two neurons when they are coupled through direct connections. We show that the change in the correlation of small amplitude stochastic inputs can be better detected when the neurons are connected by direct excitatory couplings. Depending on whether intrinsic firing rate of the neurons is identical or slightly different, symmetric or asymmetric connections can increase the sensitivity of the system to the input correlation by changing the mean slope of the correlation transfer function over a given range of input correlation. In either case, there is also an optimum value for synaptic strength which maximizes the sensitivity of the system to the changes in input correlation. PMID:23966940

  10. Small Class Size and Its Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, Bruce J.; Berliner, David C.

    2002-01-01

    Describes several prominent early grades small-class-size projects and their effects on student achievement: Indiana's Project Prime Time, Tennessee's Project STAR (Student/Teacher Achievement Ratio), Wisconsin's SAGE (Student Achievement Guarantee in Education) Program, and the California class-size-reduction program. Lists several conclusions,

  11. Direct Instruction News: Effective School Practices, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarver, Sara G., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    The mission of the Association for Direct Instruction is to promote the improvement of effective educational methods. This journal, "Direct Instruction News," is their publication. The Spring 2003 (Volume 3, Number 1) contains the following articles: "Implementing DI Successfully" (Sara G. Tarver); "Textbooks: What?" (Bob Dixon); "Introduction to

  12. Direct Instruction News: Effective School Practices, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarver, Sara G., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    The mission of the Association for Direct Instruction is to promote the improvement of effective educational methods. This journal, "Direct Instruction News," is their publication. The Spring 2002 issue (Volume 2, Number 1) contains the following articles: "Same? Different? Both Same and Different" (Sara G. Tarver); "Cookie Cutter Curricula" (Bob

  13. Process Evaluation Results from the Healthy Directions-Small Business Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Mary K.; Barbeau, Elizabeth M.; Lederman, Ruth; Stoddard, Anne M.; Chetkovich, Carol; Goldman, Roberta; Wallace, Lorraine; Sorensen, Glorian

    2007-01-01

    The Healthy Directions-Small Business randomized, controlled study aimed to reduce cancer risk among multiethnic workers in small manufacturing businesses by increasing fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, and daily multivitamin in take and decreasing consumption of red meat. The intervention incorporated participatory strategies

  14. Effects of roads on small mammals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, L.W.; Geis, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    (1) The study was designed to determine the effects of roads on the diversity, spatial distribution, and density of small mammals. (2) Forty species of small mammal (5859 individuals) were snap-trapped in the study. Data resulted from 144 360 trap-nights of effort for an average of 4.06 captures per 100 trap-nights. (3) Small mammal community structure and density were both influenced by roads. Community structure in right-of-way (ROW) habitat was different from that in adjacent habitat. Five species did not prefer ROW habitat: the golden mouse, dusky-footed woodrat, brush mouse, pinon mouse, and California red-backed vole. However, there were more species present in ROW habitat than in adjacent habitat. Grassland species generally preferred ROW habitat and many less habitat-specific species were distributed in ROW and adjacent habitat. (4) Small mammal density (all species combined) was greater in interstate ROW habitat than in adjacent habitat. This was also true individually for the eastern harvest mouse, white-footed mouse, meadow vole, prairie vole, vagrant shrew. Townsend's vole, and California vole. Small mammal density was less in county road ROWs than in adjacent habitat, probably because of the small size of these areas. The data indicate that ROW habitat and its accompanying edge are attractive no: only to grassland species but also to many less habitat-specific species that make use of the ROW-edge-adjacent habitat complex. (5) Mortality on interstate highways was greatest for those species with highest densities in ROW habitat, and did not appear to be detrimental to populations of these species.

  15. Eye-position effects in directional hearing.

    PubMed

    Lewald, J

    1997-08-01

    The influence of gaze direction on azimuthal sound localization was investigated by presenting free-field acoustical stimuli in combination with a visual fixation task. In Experiment 1, a two-alternative forced-choice method was employed. While fixating visual targets, subjects judged whether noise bursts, presented from various directions, were perceived as being on the left or right of either a visual reference indicating straight ahead or the subjective straight-ahead direction. The psychometric functions measured with the first task shifted consistently opposite to the direction of eccentric gaze, i.e., the location of the auditory stimulus was perceived as shifted toward the direction of gaze. The mean magnitude of the shift was 4.7 degrees over a range of fixation angles up to 45 degrees on either side. Without an external reference indicating straight ahead, shifts of sound localization were inconsistent, either opposite or toward the direction of fixation in individual subjects. In Experiment 2, subjects orientated their head toward sound stimuli while fixating visual targets in various directions. As in Experiment 1, head position as a measure of sound localization shifted significantly toward the direction of eccentric gaze when a visual reference of the head median plane was present, and the results were inconsistent across subjects when it was absent. The results indicate a significant effect of gaze direction on the spatial agreement of auditory and visual perception which may be based on the superposition of distinct auditory and visual eye-position effects. The effect is in agreement with previous neurophysiological results that have suggested an incomplete neural transformation of auditory spatial coordinates from a craniocentric into an oculocentric frame of reference. PMID:9331472

  16. Power generation performance of direct flame fuel cell (DFFC) impinged by small jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yuji; Endo, Shota

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigated the effect of cell temperature and product species concentration induced by a small jet flame on the power generation performance of a direct flame fuel cell (DFFC). The cell is placed above the small-scale jet flame and the heated product’s gases are impinged toward it. This system is considered to be the simplest and smallest unit of such power generation devices to have been developed. Methane is used as fuel and an equivalence ratio (φ ) of the mixture (with oxygen) and the distance between the cell and the burner surface (d) are considered as the experimental parameters. It turns out that open circuit voltage increases linearly with the increase of temperature in a wide range of equivalence ratios. However, it increases drastically to the point at which the equivalence ratio becomes small enough (φ   ⩽  2.0 in the present study) within the specific distance range to bring about the appearance of an inner flame. This could provide sufficient heat and oxygen for the anode, contributing to the generation of the cell’s high electric potential. It is also noted that the appearance of the inner flame does not promise to better the performance unless the preferred conditions (high temperature, low oxygen, rich fuel) near the cell are achieved. The Nernst equation works well for predicting the open circuit voltage under the conditions studied. Systematic design of the entire power generation system is preferable when a miniaturized power generation system is considered by applying DFFC.

  17. The Effect on the Sperry Directional Gyro in Turning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    RosselliDelTurco, Rossello

    1946-01-01

    The present report is concerned with an analytical treatment of the effects of the transverse inclination of an airplane in a turn on the indication of the directional gyro. It is found that the extreme inclinations which the airplane must necessarily assume for a correct turn in the approaches executed at high speed and small radius of curvature, renders the indications of the instrument worthless during such maneuvers.

  18. Nonequilibrium phase transition in directed small-world-Voronoi-Delaunay random lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    2016-01-01

    On directed small-world-Voronoi-Delaunay random lattices in two dimensions with quenched connectivity disorder we study the critical properties of the dynamics evolution of public opinion in social influence networks using a simple spin-like model. The system is treated by applying Monte Carlo simulations. We show that directed links on these random lattices may lead to phase diagram with first- and second-order social phase transitions out of equilibrium.

  19. A Small Modular Laboratory Hall Effect Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ty Davis

    Electric propulsion technologies promise to revolutionize access to space, opening the door for mission concepts unfeasible by traditional propulsion methods alone. The Hall effect thruster is a relatively high thrust, moderate specific impulse electric propulsion device that belongs to the class of electrostatic thrusters. Hall effect thrusters benefit from an extensive flight history, and offer significant performance and cost advantages when compared to other forms of electric propulsion. Ongoing research on these devices includes the investigation of mechanisms that tend to decrease overall thruster efficiency, as well as the development of new techniques to extend operational lifetimes. This thesis is primarily concerned with the design and construction of a Small Modular Laboratory Hall Effect Thruster (SMLHET), and its operation on argon propellant gas. Particular attention was addressed at low-cost, modular design principles, that would facilitate simple replacement and modification of key thruster parts such as the magnetic circuit and discharge channel. This capability is intended to facilitate future studies of device physics such as anomalous electron transport and magnetic shielding of the channel walls, that have an impact on thruster performance and life. Preliminary results demonstrate SMLHET running on argon in a manner characteristic of Hall effect thrusters, additionally a power balance method was utilized to estimate thruster performance. It is expected that future thruster studies utilizing heavier though more expensive gases like xenon or krypton, will observe increased efficiency and stability.

  20. Analytical fuel property effects--small combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, R. D.; Troth, D. L.; Miles, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The consequences of using broad-property fuels in both conventional and advanced state-of-the-art small gas turbine combustors are assessed. Eight combustor concepts were selected for initial screening, of these, four final combustor concepts were chosen for further detailed analysis. These included the dual orifice injector baseline combustor (a current production 250-C30 engine combustor) two baseline airblast injected modifications, short and piloted prechamber combustors, and an advanced airblast injected, variable geometry air staged combustor. Final predictions employed the use of the STAC-I computer code. This quasi 2-D model includes real fuel properties, effects of injector type on atomization, detailed droplet dynamics, and multistep chemical kinetics. In general, fuel property effects on various combustor concepts can be classified as chemical or physical in nature. Predictions indicate that fuel chemistry has a significant effect on flame radiation, liner wall temperature, and smoke emission. Fuel physical properties that govern atomization quality and evaporation rates are predicted to affect ignition and lean-blowout limits, combustion efficiency, unburned hydrocarbon, and carbon monoxide emissions.

  1. Laser direct synthesis of silicon nanowire field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Woongsik; Mitchell, James I.; Ye, Peide D.; Xu, Xianfan

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate a single-step, laser-based technique to fabricate silicon nanowire field effect transistors. Boron-doped silicon nanowires are synthesized using a laser-direct-write chemical vapor deposition process, which can produce nanowires as small as 60 nm, far below the diffraction limit of the laser wavelength of 395 nm. In addition, the method has the advantages of in situ doping, catalyst-free growth, and precise control of nanowire position, orientation, and length. Silicon nanowires are directly fabricated on an insulating surface and ready for subsequent device fabrication without the need for transfer and alignment, thus greatly simplifying device fabrication processes. Schottky barrier nanowire field effect transistors with a back-gate configuration are fabricated from the laser-direct-written Si nanowires and electrically characterized.

  2. 77 FR 53769 - Receipts-Based, Small Business Size Standard; Confirmation of Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... the direct final rule that appeared in the Federal Register of July 3, 2012 (77 FR 39385). This direct... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On July 3, 2012 (77 FR 39385), the NRC published in the Federal Register a direct... and 171 RIN 3150-AJ14 Receipts-Based, Small Business Size Standard; Confirmation of Effective...

  3. A complex task? Direct modulation of transcription factors with small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Angela N.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors with aberrant activity in disease are promising yet untested targets for therapeutic development, particularly in oncology. Directly inhibiting or activating the function of a transcription factor requires specific disruption or recruitment of protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. The discovery or design of small molecules that specifically modulate these interactions has thus far proven to be a significant challenge and the protein class is often perceived to be ‘undruggable.’ This review will summarize recent progress in the development of small-molecule probes of transcription factors and provide evidence to challenge the notion that this important protein class is chemically intractable. PMID:20395165

  4. Direct Observation Of Nanoparticle-Surfactant Interactions Using Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.

    2010-12-01

    Interactions of anionic silica nanoparticles with anionic, cationic and nonionic surfactants have directly been studied by contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements are performed on 1 wt% of both silica nanoparticles and surfactants of anionic sodium dodecyle sulphate (SDS), cationic dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) and non-ionic polyoxyethylene 10 lauryl ether (C12E10) in aqueous solution. We show that there is no direct interaction in the case of SDS with silica particles, whereas strong interaction for DTAB leads to the aggregation of silica particles. The interaction of C12E10 is found through the micelles adsorbed on the silica particles.

  5. Effects of Small Oscillations on the Effective Area

    SciTech Connect

    Cotroneo, V.; Conconi, P.; Pareschi, G.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2009-05-11

    We analyze the effective area of the Simbol-X mirrors as a function of the off-axis angle for small oscillations. A reduction is expected due to: 1) geometrical effects, because some of the photons miss the secondary mirror surface; 2) reflectivity effects, caused by the variation of the coating reflectivity with the incidence angle. The former are related to the length of the two mirror surfaces, and can be reduced by making the secondary mirror longer. The second ones are energy-dependent, and strongly related to the characteristics of the reflecting coating. These effects are analyzed by means of ray-tracing simulations in order to optimize the mirror and coating design, aiming to improve the effective area stability.

  6. Effects of tillage practices and carbofuran exposure on small mammals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, P.H.; Linder, G.; Nichols, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    We compared population estimates, body mass, movement, and blood chemistry of small mammals between conventionally tilled and no-till cornfields in Maryland and Pennsylvania to evaluate the effects of tillage practices and carbofuran exposure on small mammals.

  7. An incrementally non-linear model for clays with directional stiffness and a small strain emphasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Xuxin

    In response to construction activities and loads from permanent structures, soil generally is subjected to a variety of loading modes varying both in time and location. It also has been increasingly appreciated that the strains around well-designed foundations, excavations and tunnels are mostly small, with soil responses at this strain level generally being non-linear and anisotropic. To make accurate prediction of the performance of a geo-system, it is highly desirable to understand soil behavior at small strains along multiple loading directions, and accordingly to incorporate these responses in an appropriate constitutive model implemented in a finite element analysis. This dissertation presents a model based on a series of stress probe tests with small strain measurements performed on compressible Chicago glacial clays. The proposed model is formulated in an original constitutive framework, in which the tangent stiffness matrix is constructed in accordance with the mechanical nature of frictional materials and the tangent moduli therein are described explicitly. The stiffness description includes evolution relations with regard to length of stress path, and directionality relations in terms of stress path direction. The former relations provide distinctive definitions for small-strain and large-strain behaviors, and distinguish soil responses in shearing and compression. The latter relations make this model incrementally non-linear and thus capable of modeling inelastic behavior. A new algorithm based on a classical substepping scheme is developed to numerically integrate this model. A consistent tangent matrix is derived for the proposed model with the upgraded substepping scheme. The code is written in FORTRAN and implemented in FEM via UMAT of ABAQUS. The model is exercised in a variety of applications ranging from oedometer, triaxial and biaxial test simulations to a C-class prediction for a well-instrumented excavation. The computed results indicate that this model is successful in reproducing soil responses in both laboratory and field situations.

  8. Effectiveness of stents in small coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Kinsara, Abdulhalim Jamaluddeen; Niazi, Khusrow; Patel, Ishfaq; Amoudi, Osama

    2003-09-01

    This study was prospectively randomized to assess the efficacy and safety of Jo heparin-coated stent deployment in small vessels compared with balloon angioplasty. In 202 patients, restenosis in balloon and stent arms was 49% and 30%, respectively. PMID:12943880

  9. Thermal effects on chaotic directed transport.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Gabriel G; Spina, Mara E

    2009-02-01

    We study a chaotic ratchet system under the influence of a thermal environment. By direct integration of the Lindblad equation we are able to analyze its behavior for a wide range of couplings with the environment, and for different finite temperatures. We observe that the enhancement of the classical and quantum currents due to temperature depend strongly on the specific properties of the system. This makes it difficult to extract universal behaviors. We have also found that there is an analogy between the effects of the classical thermal noise and those of the finite h size. These results open many possibilities for their testing and implementation in kicked Bose-Einstein condensates and cold atoms experiments. PMID:19391825

  10. Capturing the complexity of first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N J; Brennan, M L; Cobb, M; Dean, R S

    2015-01-10

    Various different methods are currently being used to capture data from small animal consultations. The aim of this study was to develop a tool to record detailed data from consultations by direct observation. A second aim was to investigate the complexity of the consultation by examining the number of problems discussed per patient. A data collection tool was developed and used during direct observation of small animal consultations in eight practices. Data were recorded on consultation type, patient signalment and number of problems discussed. During 16?weeks of data collection, 1901 patients were presented. Up to eight problems were discussed for some patients; more problems were discussed during preventive medicine consultations than during first consultations (P<0.001) or revisits (P<0.001). Fewer problems were discussed for rabbits than cats (P<0.001) or dogs (P<0.001). Age was positively correlated with discussion of specific health problems and negatively correlated with discussion of preventive medicine. Consultations are complex with multiple problems frequently discussed, suggesting comorbidity may be common. Future research utilising practice data should consider how much of this complexity needs to be captured, and use appropriate methods accordingly. The findings here have implications for directing research and education as well as application in veterinary practice. PMID:25262057

  11. Capturing the complexity of first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, N. J.; Brennan, M. L.; Cobb, M.; Dean, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Various different methods are currently being used to capture data from small animal consultations. The aim of this study was to develop a tool to record detailed data from consultations by direct observation. A second aim was to investigate the complexity of the consultation by examining the number of problems discussed per patient. A data collection tool was developed and used during direct observation of small animal consultations in eight practices. Data were recorded on consultation type, patient signalment and number of problems discussed. During 16?weeks of data collection, 1901 patients were presented. Up to eight problems were discussed for some patients; more problems were discussed during preventive medicine consultations than during first consultations (P<0.001) or revisits (P<0.001). Fewer problems were discussed for rabbits than cats (P<0.001) or dogs (P<0.001). Age was positively correlated with discussion of specific health problems and negatively correlated with discussion of preventive medicine. Consultations are complex with multiple problems frequently discussed, suggesting comorbidity may be common. Future research utilising practice data should consider how much of this complexity needs to be captured, and use appropriate methods accordingly. The findings here have implications for directing research and education as well as application in veterinary practice. PMID:25262057

  12. Efficient Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Technique Identifies Direct Interaction of Small Molecule Inhibitors with the Target Protein.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Bloch, Itai; Shechter, Nelia; Romanenko, Olga; Shir, Ofer M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play a critical role in regulating many cellular processes. Finding novel PPI inhibitors that interfere with specific binding of two proteins is considered a great challenge, mainly due to the complexity involved in characterizing multi-molecular systems and limited understanding of the physical principles governing PPIs. Here we show that the combination of virtual screening techniques, which are capable of filtering a large library of potential small molecule inhibitors, and a unique secondary screening by isothermal titration calorimetry, a label-free method capable of observing direct interactions, is an efficient tool for finding such an inhibitor. In this study we applied this strategy in a search for a small molecule capable of interfering with the interaction of the tumor-suppressor p53 and the E3-ligase MDM2. We virtually screened a library of 15 million small molecules that were filtered to a final set of 80 virtual hits. Our in vitro experimental assay, designed to validate the activity of mixtures of compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry, was used to identify an active molecule against MDM2. At the end of the process the small molecule (4S,7R)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)-4,6,7,8 tetrahydrIoquinoline-3-carboxamide was found to bind MDM2 with a dissociation constant of ~2 M. Following the identification of this single bioactive compound, spectroscopic measurements were used to further characterize the interaction of the small molecule with the target protein. 2D NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding region of the small molecule, and fluorescence polarization measurement confirmed that it indeed competes with p53. PMID:26632443

  13. Target RNA-directed trimming and tailing of small silencing RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ameres, Stefan L.; Horwich, Michael D.; Hung, Jui-Hung; Xu, Jia; Ghildiyal, Megha; Weng, Zhiping; Zamore, Phillip D.

    2010-01-01

    In Drosophila, microRNAs (miRNAs) typically guide Argonaute1 to repress mRNA, whereas small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) guide Argonaute2 to destroy viral and transposon RNA. Unlike siRNAs, miRNAs rarely base pair extensively to the mRNAs they regulate. We find that extensive complementarity between a target RNA and an Argonaute1-bound miRNA triggers miRNA tailing and 3′-to-5′ trimming. In flies, Argonaute2-bound small RNAs—but not those bound to Argonaute1—bear a 2′-O-methyl group at their 3′ ends. This modification blocks target-directed small RNA remodeling: in flies lacking Hen1, the enzyme that adds the 2′-O-methyl group, Argonaute2-associated siRNAs are tailed and trimmed. Target-complementarity also affects small RNA stability in human cells. These results provide an explanation for the partial complementarity between animal miRNAs and their targets. PMID:20558712

  14. Small Impacts on Mars: Atmospheric Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Nemtchinov, Ivan V.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation were to study the interaction of the atmosphere with the surface of Mars through the impact of small objects that would generate dust and set the dust into motion in the atmosphere. The approach involved numerical simulations of impacts and experiments under controlled conditions. Attachment: Atmospheric disturbances and radiation impulses caused by large-meteoroid impact in the surface of Mars.

  15. Hydrogen bonding directed self-assembly of small-molecule amphiphiles in water.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiang-Fei; Niu, Li-Ya; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2014-08-01

    Compounds comprising one or two quadruply hydrogen bonding units, 2-ureido-4[1H]-pyrimidinone (UPy) and tris(tetraethylene glycol monomethyl ether) moieties, were reported to form highly stable hydrogen-bonded assemblies in water. Compound 1, containing one UPy, assembles into vesicles, and compound 2, containing two UPy units, forms micelles. The aggregates disassemble reversibly when the solution pH is raised to 9.0 or above. The results demonstrate the utility of hydrogen bonding to direct the self-assembly of small-molecule building blocks in aqueous media. PMID:25035966

  16. Development of a Direct Drive Permanent Magnet Generator for Small Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Chertok, Allan; Hablanian, David; McTaggart, Paul; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2004-11-16

    In this program, TIAX performed the conceptual design and analysis of an innovative, modular, direct-drive permanent magnet generator (PMG) for use in small wind turbines that range in power rating from 25 kW to 100 kW. TIAX adapted an approach that has been successfully demonstrated in high volume consumer products such as direct-drive washing machines and portable generators. An electromagnetic model was created and the modular PMG design was compared to an illustrative non-modular design. The resulting projections show that the modular design can achieve significant reductions in size, weight, and manufacturing cost without compromising efficiency. Reducing generator size and weight can also lower the size and weight of other wind turbine components and hence their manufacturing cost.

  17. Direct Conversion of Normal and Alzheimer's Disease Human Fibroblasts into Neuronal Cells by Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenxiang; Qiu, Binlong; Guan, Wuqiang; Wang, Qinying; Wang, Min; Li, Wei; Gao, Longfei; Shen, Lu; Huang, Yin; Xie, Gangcai; Zhao, Hanzhi; Jin, Ying; Tang, Beisha; Yu, Yongchun; Zhao, Jian; Pei, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Neuronal conversion from human fibroblasts can be induced by lineage-specific transcription factors; however, the introduction of ectopic genes limits the therapeutic applications of such induced neurons (iNs). Here, we report that human fibroblasts can be directly converted into neuronal cells by a chemical cocktail of seven small molecules, bypassing a neural progenitor stage. These human chemical-induced neuronal cells (hciNs) resembled hiPSC-derived neurons and human iNs (hiNs) with respect to morphology, gene expression profiles, and electrophysiological properties. This approach was further applied to generate hciNs from familial Alzheimer's disease patients. Taken together, our transgene-free and chemical-only approach for direct reprogramming of human fibroblasts into neurons provides an alternative strategy for modeling neurological diseases and for regenerative medicine. PMID:26253202

  18. Determination of small-scale flow directions and velocities in the hyporheic interstitial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angermann, L.; Fleckenstein, J.; Ntzmann, G.; Lewandowski, J.

    2009-04-01

    The hyporheic interstitial is a hydraulically dynamic and biogeochemical active interface between surface water and groundwater. Depending on the hydraulic boundary conditions and the connectivity with the adjacent aquifer, infiltrating and exfiltrating water pass through it. In addition to those larger scale flow patterns flow at the centimetre scale is influenced by streambed morphology, such as pool-ripple sequences, boulders and woody debris, and the hydrodynamics in the flowing water resulting in a very heterogeneous pattern of flow in the shallow sediment. Patterns of exchange at this scale control the supply of oxygen and nutrients to the sediments and are in turn crucial for biogeochemical turnover. To investigate flow velocity and flow direction in the hyporheic interstitial in situ, a method employing heat as a tracer was developed. The method was tested in a low gradient stream (mean slope of 1.8 0/00), with sandy streambed in Brandenburg, Germany (river Schlaube). The movement of a heat pulse emitted by a small point source is detected by temperature sensors attached to four rods (four sensors on each rod) that are vertically driven into the sediment in a concentric circle with a radius of 3 to 4.5 cm around the heat source. The resulting breakthrough-curves give evidence of flow velocities and flow directions in three dimensions, accounting for the local heterogeneities of the sediment. Patterns of flow direction were found to be quite heterogeneous even on small scales of a few decimetres. Interestingly at several locations flow in the sediment was directed opposite to surface flow. Measured flow velocities of up to 1.75 cm min-1 are several orders of magnitude larger than values previously reported in the literature. As this method is non-destructive it allows repetition of measurements and long-term investigations to assess the variability in time. Furthermore it is well suited for a combined application with sampling devices such as pore water peepers.

  19. Effects of direct radiation on deoxyribonucleic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullis, P. M.; Symons, M. C. R.

    It is argued that effects of ionizing radiation on DNA in cell nuclei may frequently be direct in the sense that many electron-gain and electron-loss centres become localised within the DNA molecules. The water of solvation that would also be present in the cell is presumed to pass on holes and electrons prior to the formation of OH radicals and solvated electrons since these are not detected by ESR of in vitro model systems. Furthermore, a case is made that this direct damage may be particularly significant in that the cationic and anionic centres (G + and T - according to ESR results) are thought to be formed close enough together to lead, ultimately, to double strand breaks. Evidence that both G + and T - can lead to strand breaks is discussed. The presence of histone proteins modifies the yields of G + and T - to a significant extent. The effects of various additives are discussed. Oxygen has been shown by ESR spectroscopy to scavenge electrons in competition with DNA and also to react to form RO 2 radicals that are located on the DNA. It has been shown that this is accompanied by a significant enhancement of strand breaks. Nitroimidazoles act as efficient electron scavengers, their anions being clearly detected by ESR studies. The yield of T - is consequently reduced and that of the protonated form, TH, falls to zero. However, the initial yields of G + are not greatly affected. This results in a reduction in the yield of single strand breaks and a proportionately greater decrease in the yield of double-strand breaks due to scavenging of only one of the radical centres. The origin of this is discussed in terms of a proposal for the mechanism of double-strand-break formation. Thus, at the molecular level these drugs protect the DNA against strand sission, in marked contrast with their radiosensitisation in vivo, particularly of hypoxic cells. Other additives studied include hydrogen peroxide and iodoacetamide. The studies on hydrogen peroxide have allowed us to assess the role of OH radicals under the conditions used for ESR studies. Iodoacetamide gives CH 2CONH 2 radicals which are detected by ESR and, on annealing, these apparently attack the DNA to give species thought to be sugar radicals. This is associated with a significant increase in the yields of strand breaks. The ESR features assigned to sugar radicals have been shown to decay at temperatures below which the DNA radicals G + and T - are normally lost. This provides a good explanation of our failure to detect sugar radical intermediates by ESR spectroscopy on annealing samples in the absence of additives.

  20. Pulsed Direct Current Electrospray: Enabling Systematic Analysis of Small Volume Sample by Boosting Sample Economy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhenwei; Xiong, Xingchuang; Guo, Chengan; Si, Xingyu; Zhao, Yaoyao; He, Muyi; Yang, Chengdui; Xu, Wei; Tang, Fei; Fang, Xiang; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-11-17

    We had developed pulsed direct current electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (pulsed-dc-ESI-MS) for systematically profiling and determining components in small volume sample. Pulsed-dc-ESI utilized constant high voltage to induce the generation of single polarity pulsed electrospray remotely. This method had significantly boosted the sample economy, so as to obtain several minutes MS signal duration from merely picoliter volume sample. The elongated MS signal duration enable us to collect abundant MS(2) information on interested components in a small volume sample for systematical analysis. This method had been successfully applied for single cell metabolomics analysis. We had obtained 2-D profile of metabolites (including exact mass and MS(2) data) from single plant and mammalian cell, concerning 1034 components and 656 components for Allium cepa and HeLa cells, respectively. Further identification had found 162 compounds and 28 different modification groups of 141 saccharides in a single Allium cepa cell, indicating pulsed-dc-ESI a powerful tool for small volume sample systematical analysis. PMID:26488206

  1. Small-angle scattering gives direct structural information about a membrane protein inside a lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Kynde, Sren A R; Skar-Gislinge, Nicholas; Pedersen, Martin Cramer; Midtgaard, Sren Roi; Simonsen, Jens Baek; Schweins, Ralf; Mortensen, Kell; Arleth, Lise

    2014-02-01

    Monomeric bacteriorhodopsin (bR) reconstituted into POPC/POPG-containing nanodiscs was investigated by combined small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering. A novel hybrid approach to small-angle scattering data analysis was developed. In combination, these provided direct structural insight into membrane-protein localization in the nanodisc and into the protein-lipid interactions. It was found that bR is laterally decentred in the plane of the disc and is slightly tilted in the phospholipid bilayer. The thickness of the bilayer is reduced in response to the incorporation of bR. The observed tilt of bR is in good accordance with previously performed theoretical predictions and computer simulations based on the bR crystal structure. The result is a significant and essential step on the way to developing a general small-angle scattering-based method for determining the low-resolution structures of membrane proteins in physiologically relevant environments. PMID:24531471

  2. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, N. J.; Dean, R. S.; Cobb, M.; Brennan, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research. PMID:25564472

  3. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N J; Dean, R S; Cobb, M; Brennan, M L

    2015-05-01

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research. PMID:25564472

  4. Duty cycle effects on small engine emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Gabele, P.

    1998-12-31

    The paper presents emissions data obtained from seven lawn mower engines that were tested using three duty cycles: a six mode steady-state test, a quasi-steady-state test, and a transient test. A comparison of emissions from the three duty cycles is made for non-methane organic gases, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, detailed hydrocarbons (percent of total organic emissions that are paraffin, olefin, aromatic, or acetylene), and toxic compounds (benzene, 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde). Differences in ozone potential are also determined and reported for each duty cycle. The study includes both regulated and unregulated (not certified to any emission standard) test engines that have a wide range of emission rates. Results indicate that regulated emission rate differences due to duty cycle are fairly small (less than ten percent on the average). For over half of the regulated emissions data, there is no significant difference in emission rates between data obtained using the steady-state and the transient duty cycle. Emission comparisons are even better between the quasi-steady-state and steady-state data. Ozone potential and toxic emissions are ten to twenty percent higher with the transient test cycle and organic composition appears unaffected by duty cycle selection.

  5. Duty cycle effects on small engine emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Gabele, P.

    1998-06-01

    The paper presents emissions data obtained from seven lawn mower engines that were tested using three duty cycles: a six mode steady-state test, a quasi-steady-state test, and a transient test. A comparison of emissions from the three duty cycles is made for non-methane organic gases, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, detailed hydrocarbons (percent of total organic emissions that are paraffin, olefin, aromatic, or acetylene), and toxic compounds (benzene, 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde). Dufferences in ozone potential are also determined and reported for each duty cycle. The study includes both regulated and unregulated (not certified to any emission standard) test engines that have a wide range of emission rates. Results indicate that regulated emission rate differences due to duty cycle are fairly small (less than ten percent on the average). For over half of the regulated emission data, there is no significant difference in emission rates between data obtained using the steady-state and transient duty cycle. Emission comparisons are even better between the quasi-steady-state and steady-state data.

  6. Detection thresholds for small haptic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosher, Jesse A.; Hannaford, Blake

    2002-02-01

    We are interested in finding out whether or not haptic interfaces will be useful in portable and hand held devices. Such systems will have severe constraints on force output. Our first step is to investigate the lower limits at which haptic effects can be perceived. In this paper we report on experiments studying the effects of varying the amplitude, size, shape, and pulse-duration of a haptic feature. Using a specific haptic device we measure the smallest detectable haptics effects, with active exploration of saw-tooth shaped icons sized 3, 4 and 5 mm, a sine-shaped icon 5 mm wide, and static pulses 50, 100, and 150 ms in width. Smooth shaped icons resulted in a detection threshold of approximately 55 mN, almost twice that of saw-tooth shaped icons which had a threshold of 31 mN.

  7. Vegetated treatment area effectiveness at reducing nutrient runoff from small swine operations in central Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous modeling and field studies have evaluated the effectiveness of vegetative treatment systems in treating runoff from animal feeding operations; however, none have evaluated the effectiveness of vegetative treatment areas (VTAs) receiving direct runoff from small swine operations during natu...

  8. Validation of the ultrastable low-noise current amplifier as travelling standard for small direct currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drung, D.; Krause, C.; Giblin, S. P.; Djordjevic, S.; Piquemal, F.; Séron, O.; Rengnez, F.; Götz, M.; Pesel, E.; Scherer, H.

    2015-12-01

    An interlaboratory comparison of small-current generation and measurement capability is presented with the ultrastable low-noise current amplifier (ULCA) acting as travelling standard. Various measurements at direct currents between 0.16 nA and 13 nA were performed to verify the degree of agreement between the three national metrology institutes involved in the study. Consistency well within one part per million (ppm) was found. Due to harsh environmental conditions during shipment, the ULCA’s transfer accuracy had been limited to about  ±0.4 ppm. Supplemental measurements performed at PTB indicate that further improvements in accuracy are possible. Relative uncertainties of 0.1 ppm are achieved by applying on-site calibration of the ULCA with a suitable cryogenic current comparator.

  9. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Abigail T.; St. James, Sara; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning. PMID:26147335

  10. FY 2011 4th Quarter Metric: Estimate of Future Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, D

    2011-09-21

    The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects, relative to 1850 conditions, estimated from CESM simulations are 0.02 W m-2 and -0.39 W m-2, respectively, for emissions in year 2100 under the IPCC RCP8.5 scenario. The indirect effect is much smaller than that for 2000 emissions because of much smaller SO2 emissions in 2100; the direct effects are small due to compensation between warming by black carbon and cooling by sulfate.

  11. Two Years of Industrial Experience in the Use of a Small, Direct Field Acoustic Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggini, Nicola; Di Pietro, Vincenzo; Poulain, Nicolas; Herzog, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Within Thales Alenia Space - Italy small satellite Assembly Integration and Test (AIT) plant, the need to develop a suitable facility for spacecraft acoustic noise test has arisen, with additional constraints posed by the necessity of a low impact on the existing building layout, low cost of procurement and operations, while maintaining a high reliability of the system for a theoretical maximum throughput of one test per week over an extended period of time, e.g. six months. The needs have been answered by developing a small (~40 m3 test volume), direct field (DF A T) acoustic test chamber, christened Alpha Cabin, where noise generation is achieved by means of commercial audio drivers equipped with custom enclosures. The paper starts with a brief presentation of the main characteristics of the system, but then concentrates on the lessons learnt and return of experience from the tests conducted in more than two years of continuous use. Starting from test article structural responses and their comparison with reverberant chambers, properties of the acoustic field and their implications on the former are analyzed.

  12. Gravitational maneuvers as a way to direct small asteroids to trajectory of a rendezvous with dangerous near-Earth objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazirov, R. R.; Eismont, N. A.

    2010-10-01

    A possibility to prevent collisions with the Earth of dangerous celestial bodies by directing at them small asteroids is considered. It is proposed to solve this problem using a gravitational maneuver near the Earth.

  13. Photodynamic Therapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. Narrative Review and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Shafirstein, Gal; Battoo, Athar; Harris, Kassem; Baumann, Heinz; Gollnick, Sandra O; Lindenmann, Joerg; Nwogu, Chukwumere E

    2016-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established treatment modality for non-small cell lung cancer. Phototoxicity, the primary adverse event, is expected to be minimized with the introduction of new photosensitizers that have shown promising results in phase I and II clinical studies. Early-stage and superficial endobronchial lesions less than 1 cm in thickness can be effectively treated with external light sources. Thicker lesions and peripheral lesions may be amenable to interstitial PDT, where the light is delivered intratumorally. The addition of PDT to standard-of-care surgery and chemotherapy can improve survival and outcomes in patients with pleural disease. Intraoperative PDT has shown promise in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with pleural spread. Recent preclinical and clinical data suggest that PDT can increase antitumor immunity. Crosslinking of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 molecules is a reliable biomarker to quantify the photoreaction induced by PDT. Randomized studies are required to test the prognosis value of this biomarker, obtain approval for the new photosensitizers, and test the potential efficacy of interstitial and intraoperative PDT in the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:26646726

  14. Effectiveness of Small Group Social Skills Lessons with Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chupp, Amy I.; Boes, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    This action research study (ARS) describes the effectiveness of small group social skills lessons with elementary students, using "Too Good for Violence: A Curriculum for Non-violent Living" by the Mendez Foundation. The school counselor and school social worker taught the curriculum in a structured small group of 4th grade students in 8 weekly

  15. Effects of Directional Exercise on Lingual Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heather M.; O'Brien, Katy; Calleja, Aimee; Corrie, Sarah Newcomb

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the application of known muscle training principles to tongue strengthening exercises and to answer the following research questions: (a) Did lingual strength increase following 9 weeks of training? (b) Did training conducted using an exercise moving the tongue in one direction result in strength changes for tongue movements in

  16. Effects of Directional Exercise on Lingual Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heather M.; O'Brien, Katy; Calleja, Aimee; Corrie, Sarah Newcomb

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the application of known muscle training principles to tongue strengthening exercises and to answer the following research questions: (a) Did lingual strength increase following 9 weeks of training? (b) Did training conducted using an exercise moving the tongue in one direction result in strength changes for tongue movements in…

  17. Small animals in the study of pathological effects of asbestos

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Paul F.

    1974-01-01

    The main pathological effects attributed to asbestos are carcinogenesis and fibrogenesis. Statistical studies have shown that asbestos workers may expect a higher morbidity not only from cancer of the lung and mesothelioma but also from cancer at other sites. Carcinomas have been reported in animals following the injection of asbestos, but the production of carcinomas by inhaled asbestos is less easy to demonstrate; most examples of experimental carcinogenesis with asbestos have been produced in rats. Rats and man react differently to asbestos in that rats do not produce asbestos bodies. The fibrosis that follows inhalation of asbestos has been frequently described, but studies with specific pathogen free animals have shown that, like the fibrosis that may follow the inhalation of silica dust, gross fibrosis involving the production of abnormal amount of collagen probably requires the intervention of infection as well as asbestos. Because of the difficulties encountered in the direct investigation of carcinogenesis and fibrogenesis resulting from the inhalation of asbestos, attention has been directed to the mechanisms by which the lung is able to protect itself against these fibrous dusts. While non-fibrous dusts and short fibers can be ingested by macrophages and removed via the bronchus, the long fibers that may also reach the alveolar regions may not be removed by this mechanism. The probability that a fiber may reach the alveoli depends largely on the fiber diameter and only to a small extent on the fiber length, so that, for example, fibers 100 ?m long may reach the alveoli of a guinea pig. These long fibers may become coated with a ferroprotein derived from hemoglobin to form an asbestos body and, after morphological changes, the asbestos body may be broken up, the fragments ingested by macrophages and dissolved. The lung is thus cleared of asbestos. In the guinea pig lung, consolidated areas from which the asbestos has disappeared shows signs of return to normal. This clearance mechanism is inhibited by other factors: quartz dust may almost completely inhibit asbestos body formation; tobacco smoke has a considerable effect, and even very heavy loads of carbon may act similarly. The normal lung appears able to efficiently eliminate small loads of both nonfibrous and fibrous dust, including the carcinogenic asbestos fibers. The capacity is not unlimited, however, and when the load is heavy there is a much greater probability that fibers will not be detoxicated. In addition, other factors such as silica dust and tobacco smoke may remove the protective mechanism in the lungs. ImagesFIGURE 1.FIGURE 2.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 4.FIGURE 5. PMID:4377872

  18. Radial vibration of ultra-small nanoparticles with surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianbiao; Gao, Yuanwen; Ng, Ming-Yaw; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2015-10-01

    An elastic model to predict radial vibration of ultra-small nanoparticles is proposed and the main reason of frequency shifts (comparing with classical elastic model) in ultra-small nanoparticles is interpreted. Taking the curvature-dependent surface theory into account, the effects of surface on the radial vibrations of nanoparticles are investigated with our new model. Both the atomic and the present models are calculated and their results agree well. It argues that the surface effects are remarkable on the radial vibrations of ultra-small nanoparticles and surface elasticity plays the main role rather than surface stress which is the previous understanding. The curvature-dependence of surface effects cannot be ignored when the particle is small enough. For the low-order radial vibration, the surface effects are more noteworthy.

  19. Negative Effects of an Exotic Grass Invasion on Small-Mammal Communities

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Eric D.; Sharp, Tiffanny R.; Larsen, Randy T.; Knight, Robert N.; Slater, Steven J.; McMillan, Brock R.

    2014-01-01

    Exotic invasive species can directly and indirectly influence natural ecological communities. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) is non-native to the western United States and has invaded large areas of the Great Basin. Changes to the structure and composition of plant communities invaded by cheatgrass likely have effects at higher trophic levels. As a keystone guild in North American deserts, granivorous small mammals drive and maintain plant diversity. Our objective was to assess potential effects of invasion by cheatgrass on small-mammal communities. We sampled small-mammal and plant communities at 70 sites (Great Basin, Utah). We assessed abundance and diversity of the small-mammal community, diversity of the plant community, and the percentage of cheatgrass cover and shrub species. Abundance and diversity of the small-mammal community decreased with increasing abundance of cheatgrass. Similarly, cover of cheatgrass remained a significant predictor of small-mammal abundance even after accounting for the loss of the shrub layer and plant diversity, suggesting that there are direct and indirect effects of cheatgrass. The change in the small-mammal communities associated with invasion of cheatgrass likely has effects through higher and lower trophic levels and has the potential to cause major changes in ecosystem structure and function. PMID:25269073

  20. Effective direct methods for aerodynamic shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraiko, A. A.; P'yankov, K. S.

    2010-09-01

    A direct method for aerodynamic shape optimization based on the use of Bzier spline approximation is proposed. The method is tested as applied to the optimization of the supersonic part of an axisymmetric de Laval nozzle. The optimization results are compared with the exact solution obtained by the control contour method (variational nozzle) and with nozzles constructed using another direct method, namely, local linearization. It is shown that both direct optimization methods can be used on rather coarse grids without degrading the accuracy of the solution. The optimization procedure involves the isoperimetric condition that the surface area of the nozzle is given and fixed, which prevents the use of the control contour method. Optimization with allowance for viscosity is performed using the method. For fairly short maximum possible nozzle lengths in the range of Reynolds numbers under consideration, it is shown that allowance for viscosity does not improve the nozzle shape produced by optimization based on the Euler equations. The role of viscosity is reduced to the determination of an optimal length.

  1. Direct formation of small Cu2O nanocubes, octahedra, and octapods for efficient synthesis of triazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ya-Huei; Chanda, Kaushik; Chu, Yi-Ting; Chiu, Chun-Ya; Huang, Michael H.

    2014-07-01

    In most studies describing the preparation of Cu2O crystals of various morphologies, the particle sizes are normally hundreds of nanometers to micrometers due to rapid particle growth, so they are not exactly nanocrystals. Here we report surfactant-free formation of sub-100 nm Cu2O nanocrystals with systematic shape evolution from cubic to octahedral structures by preparing an aqueous mixture of Cu(OAc)2, NaOH, and N2H4 solution. Adjustment of the hydrazine volume enables the particle shape control. Uniform nanocubes and octahedra were synthesized with edge lengths of 37 and 67 nm, respectively. Novel Cu2O octapods with an edge length of 135 nm were also produced by mixing CuCl2 solution, SDS surfactant, NaOH solution, and NH2OH.HCl reductant solution. All of them are nearly the smallest Cu2O nanocrystals of the same shapes ever reported. These small cubes, octahedra, and octapods were employed as catalysts in the direct synthesis of 1,2,3-triazoles from the reaction of alkynes, organic halides, and NaN3 at 55 C. All of them displayed high product yields in short reaction times. The octahedra enclosed by the {111} facets are the best catalysts, and can catalyze this cycloaddition reaction with high yields in just 2 h when different alkynes were used to make diverse triazole products. Hence, the small Cu2O particles provide time-saving, energy-efficient, and high product yield benefits to organocatalysis.In most studies describing the preparation of Cu2O crystals of various morphologies, the particle sizes are normally hundreds of nanometers to micrometers due to rapid particle growth, so they are not exactly nanocrystals. Here we report surfactant-free formation of sub-100 nm Cu2O nanocrystals with systematic shape evolution from cubic to octahedral structures by preparing an aqueous mixture of Cu(OAc)2, NaOH, and N2H4 solution. Adjustment of the hydrazine volume enables the particle shape control. Uniform nanocubes and octahedra were synthesized with edge lengths of 37 and 67 nm, respectively. Novel Cu2O octapods with an edge length of 135 nm were also produced by mixing CuCl2 solution, SDS surfactant, NaOH solution, and NH2OH.HCl reductant solution. All of them are nearly the smallest Cu2O nanocrystals of the same shapes ever reported. These small cubes, octahedra, and octapods were employed as catalysts in the direct synthesis of 1,2,3-triazoles from the reaction of alkynes, organic halides, and NaN3 at 55 C. All of them displayed high product yields in short reaction times. The octahedra enclosed by the {111} facets are the best catalysts, and can catalyze this cycloaddition reaction with high yields in just 2 h when different alkynes were used to make diverse triazole products. Hence, the small Cu2O particles provide time-saving, energy-efficient, and high product yield benefits to organocatalysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM images of Cu2O nanocrystals with shape evolution, XRD patterns, calculations for the determination of volumes needed for the catalysis experiment, spectral characterization of the triazole products synthesized and their NMR spectra. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02076f

  2. Road zone effects in small-mammal communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bissonette, J.A.; Rosa, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Our study focused on the putative effects of roads on small-mammal communities in a high desert region of southern Utah. Specifically, we tested whether or not roads create adjacent zones characterized by lower small- mammal densities, abundance, and diversity. We sampled abundance of small mammals at increasing distances from Interstate 15 during two summers. We recorded 11 genera and 13 species. We detected no clear abundance, density, or diversity effects relative to distance from the road. Only two of 13 species were never captured near roads. The abundance of the remaining 11 small mammal species was either similar at different distances from the road or higher closer to the road. We conclude that although roads may act as barriers and possible sources of mortality, adjacent zones of vegetation often provide favorable microhabitat in the desert landscape for many small mammals. ?? 2009 by the author(s).

  3. Wong's equations and the small x effective action in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Jeon, Sangyong; Venugopalan, Raju

    2000-07-13

    We propose a new form for the small x effective action in QCD. This form of the effective action is motivated by Wong's equations for classical, colored particles in non-Abelian background fields. We show that the BFKL equation, which sums leading logarithms in x, is efficiently reproduced with this form of the action. We argue that this form of the action may be particularly useful in computing next-to-leading-order results in QCD at small x.

  4. A super multi-view display with small viewing zone tracking using directional backlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Jin; Yendo, Tomohiro

    2015-03-01

    A super multi-view display provides smooth motion parallax without special glasses, and it is expected that the observer is free from the visual fatigue caused by the accommodation-vergence conflict. However, a huge number of pixels are required on a display device because high-density rays are required for good quality images and each ray needs corresponding pixel. We have proposed a method to reduce the required number of pixels by limiting rays emitted to only around observer's pupils. The display is based on the lenticular method. As stated above, the rays should be shot out to only around observer's pupils. To do this, the lenticular lens of which viewing zone angle is narrowed is used and the lenticular lens is illuminated by directional light to suppress side lobes. The direction of directional light is changed to follow the observer's pupil. In this paper, we constructed a prototype display and conducted an experiment. The experimental result confirmed that we could see image corresponding from each viewpoint by the change of the photographing images. In addition, it confirmed suppression of the side lobes by couldn't see the image outside the viewing zone. By these results, we showed the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Cooperation in the snowdrift game on directed small-world networks under self-questioning and noisy conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tian; Hadzibeganovic, Tarik; Chen, Guang; Zhong, Li-Xin; Wu, Xiao-Run

    2010-12-01

    Cooperation in the evolutionary snowdrift game with a self-questioning updating mechanism is studied on annealed and quenched small-world networks with directed couplings. Around the payoff parameter value r=0.5, we find a size-invariant symmetrical cooperation effect. While generally suppressing cooperation for r>0.5 payoffs, rewired networks facilitated cooperative behavior for r<0.5. Fair amounts of noise were found to break the observed symmetry and further weaken cooperation at relatively large values of r. However, in the absence of noise, the self-questioning mechanism recovers symmetrical behavior and elevates altruism even under large-reward conditions. Our results suggest that an updating mechanism of this type is necessary to stabilize cooperation in a spatially structured environment which is otherwise detrimental to cooperative behavior, especially at high cost-to-benefit ratios. Additionally, we employ component and local stability analyses to better understand the nature of the manifested dynamics.

  6. Electrical response of an electrolytic cell submitted to a small direct current electric field when the electrodes are ohmic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Giovanni; da Silva, Jonatan Joo; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio Martins

    2007-06-01

    We theoretically investigate the influence of the ohmic character of the electrodes on the direct current (dc) response and on the ionic relaxation time of an electrolytic cell, in the shape of a slab. The analysis is performed by assuming that the fundamental equations of the problem can be linearized. This implies that, for monovalent ions, the applied difference of potential is smaller than 25 mV. We show that the finite ohmic conductivity of the electrodes is responsible for a reduction of the relaxation time. An explicit expression for the relaxation time, valid when the Debye length is very small with respect to the thickness of the sample is deduced. The analysis of the dc current allows us to determine the contribution of the electrodes to the effective electrical resistance. We show also that the equivalent circuit relevant to the present problem cannot be used to evaluate the relaxation time of the cell.

  7. Small Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Schnitzler

    2012-01-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests requires high performance propulsion systems to support missions beyond low Earth orbit. A robust space exploration program will include robotic outer planet and crewed missions to a variety of destinations including the moon, near Earth objects, and eventually Mars. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. In NASA's recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option for the human exploration of Mars because of its high thrust and high specific impulse ({approx}900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. The recently announced national space policy2 supports the development and use of space nuclear power systems where such systems safely enable or significantly enhance space exploration or operational capabilities. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted under the Rover/NERVA, GE-710 and ANL nuclear rocket programs (1955-1973). Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. The primary and significantly larger Rover/NERVA program focused on graphite type fuels. Research, development, and testing of high temperature graphite fuels was conducted. Reactors and engines employing these fuels were designed, built, and ground tested. The GE-710 and ANL programs focused on an alternative ceramic-metallic 'cermet' fuel type consisting of UO2 (or UN) fuel embedded in a refractory metal matrix such as tungsten. The General Electric program examined closed loop concepts for space or terrestrial applications as well as open loop systems for direct nuclear thermal propulsion. Although a number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion were proposed and designed, none were built. This report summarizes status results of evaluations of small nuclear reactor designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion.

  8. An interface for the direct coupling of small liquid samples to AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ognibene, T. J.; Thomas, A. T.; Daley, P. F.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K. W.

    2015-10-01

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Discrete samples containing at least a few 10 s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol 14C can be measured with a 3-5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targets for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of 14C. Liquid sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible.

  9. Neurochemically similar myenteric and submucous neurons directly traced to the mucosa of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Furness, J B; Costa, M; Gibbins, I L; Llewellyn-Smith, I J; Oliver, J R

    1985-01-01

    Antisera to neuropeptide Y (NPY) gave an intense immunohistochemical reaction of certain nerve cells in the myenteric and submucous plexuses of the guinea-pig small intestine. Each nerve cell had up to 20 branching, tapering processes that were less than approximately 50 micron long and a long process that could be followed for a considerable distance. This morphology corresponds to that of the type-III cells of Dogiel. The long process of each myenteric cell ran through the circular muscle to the submucosa, and in most cases the process could be traced to the mucosa. The submucous nerve cell bodies also had processes that extended to the mucosa. These cell bodies, in both plexuses, also stained with antisera raised against calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), cholecystokinin (CCK), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and somatostatin (SOM), but did not stain with antibodies against enkephalin, substance P or vasoactive intestinal peptide. Thus, it has been possible for the first time to trace the processes of chemically specified neurons through the layers of the intestinal wall and to show by a direct method that CGRP/CCK/ChAT/NPY/SOM myenteric and submucous nerves cells provide terminals in the mucosa. PMID:3839715

  10. Dietary Fatty Acids Directly Impact Central Nervous System Autoimmunity via the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Haghikia, Aiden; Jörg, Stefanie; Duscha, Alexander; Berg, Johannes; Manzel, Arndt; Waschbisch, Anne; Hammer, Anna; Lee, De-Hyung; May, Caroline; Wilck, Nicola; Balogh, Andras; Ostermann, Annika I; Schebb, Nils Helge; Akkad, Denis A; Grohme, Diana A; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Kempa, Stefan; Thöne, Jan; Demir, Seray; Müller, Dominik N; Gold, Ralf; Linker, Ralf A

    2015-10-20

    Growing empirical evidence suggests that nutrition and bacterial metabolites might impact the systemic immune response in the context of disease and autoimmunity. We report that long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) enhanced differentiation and proliferation of T helper 1 (Th1) and/or Th17 cells and impaired their intestinal sequestration via p38-MAPK pathway. Alternatively, dietary short-chain FAs (SCFAs) expanded gut T regulatory (Treg) cells by suppression of the JNK1 and p38 pathway. We used experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a model of T cell-mediated autoimmunity to show that LCFAs consistently decreased SCFAs in the gut and exacerbated disease by expanding pathogenic Th1 and/or Th17 cell populations in the small intestine. Treatment with SCFAs ameliorated EAE and reduced axonal damage via long-lasting imprinting on lamina-propria-derived Treg cells. These data demonstrate a direct dietary impact on intestinal-specific, and subsequently central nervous system-specific, Th cell responses in autoimmunity, and thus might have therapeutic implications for autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:26488817

  11. Small-angle light scattering to detect strain-directed collagen degradation in native tissue

    PubMed Central

    Robitaille, Michael C.; Zareian, Ramin; DiMarzio, Charles A.; Wan, Kai-Tak; Ruberti, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that there is a mechanochemical relationship between collagen and collagenolytic enzymes such that increased tensile mechanical strain reduces the enzymatic cutting rate. This mechanochemical relationship has the potential to permit directed remodelling of tissue-engineered constructs in vitro and to shed light on the generation of load-adapted collagen-based connective tissue. In this investigation, we demonstrate that small-angle light scattering (SALS) has the sensitivity to dynamically detect the preferential enzymatic degradation of a subset of unloaded collagen fibrils within differentially loaded native tissue. Detection of the difference in the relative degradation rate of unloaded fibrils versus loaded fibrils was manifested through changes in the spatial distribution of the SALS signal. Specifically, we found a linear increase in the eccentricity of the SALS data that was consistent with preferential retention of the collagen fibrils aligned with the applied tensile strain. We conclude that SALS is simple, inexpensive and may provide a useful optical screening method permitting real-time monitoring of strain-controlled tissue and construct remodelling. PMID:23050081

  12. Directed Self-Assembly of Ultra-Small Ge Quantum Dots on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guise, Olivier; Marbach, Hubertus; Yates, J. R.; Levy, Jeremy; Ahner, Joachim; Vaithyanathan, Venu; Schlom, Darrell

    2004-03-01

    For quantum computing applications involving germanium quantum dots on Si(100), it is important to control both the lateral size and placement of the dots on the substrate. We describe efforts to produce controlled arrays of small Ge quantum dots by directed self-assembly. By pre-adsorption of carbon on Si(100), we demonstrate that Ge islands can be grown at desired locations. Arrays of carbon-containing dots are produced by electron-beam induced deposition of adsorbed hydrocarbons using a high-resolution SEM and a high-throughput pattern generator system. Carbon dots arrays were investigated by HR-SEM and AFM. UHV-studies by AES, XPS and TPD show evidence of formation of SiC dots at high temperatures, making them highly stable on the silicon surface. Samples are transferred to an MBE chamber in which Ge is deposited. We have investigated the Ge dot growth as a function of carbon dot spacing, e-beam exposure time, Ge coverage and deposition temperature. Investigation by AFM and HR-SEM reveals a "depletion layer" of Ge around some carbon arrays, implying that carbon regions attract Ge. This work was supported by DARPA QuIST through ARO contract number DAAD-19-01-1-0650.

  13. Small Volume Flow Probe for Automated Direct-Injection NMR Analysis: Design and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haner, Ronald L.; Llanos, William; Mueller, Luciano

    2000-03-01

    A detailed characterization of an NMR flow probe for use in direct-injection sample analysis is presented. A 600-MHz, indirect detection NMR flow probe with a 120-μl active volume is evaluated in two configurations: first as a stand-alone small volume probe for the analysis of static, nonflowing solutions, and second as a component in an integrated liquids-handling system used for high-throughput NMR analysis. In the stand-alone mode, 1H lineshape, sensitivity, radiofrequency (RF) homogeneity, and heat transfer characteristics are measured and compared to conventional-format NMR probes of related design. Commonly used descriptive terminology for the hardware, sample regions, and RF coils are reviewed or defined, and test procedures developed for flow probes are described. The flow probe displayed general performance that is competitive with standard probes. Key advantages of the flow probe include high molar sensitivity, ease of use in an automation setup, and superior reproducibility of magnetic field homogeneity which enables the practical implementation of 1D T2-edited analysis of protein-ligand interactions.

  14. Direct Simulation of the Self-Assembly of a Small DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Snodin, Benedict E K; Romano, Flavio; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Ouldridge, Thomas E; Louis, Ard A; Doye, Jonathan P K

    2016-02-23

    By using oxDNA, a coarse-grained nucleotide-level model of DNA, we are able to directly simulate the self-assembly of a small 384-base-pair origami from single-stranded scaffold and staple strands in solution. In general, we see attachment of new staple strands occurring in parallel, but with cooperativity evident for the binding of the second domain of a staple if the adjacent junction is already partially formed. For a system with exactly one copy of each staple strand, we observe a complete assembly pathway in an intermediate temperature window; at low temperatures successful assembly is prevented by misbonding while at higher temperature the free-energy barriers to assembly become too large for assembly on our simulation time scales. For high-concentration systems involving a large staple strand excess, we never see complete assembly because there are invariably instances where two copies of the same staple both bind to the scaffold, creating a kinetic trap that prevents the complete binding of either staple. This mutual staple blocking could also lead to aggregates of partially formed origamis in real systems, and helps to rationalize certain successful origami design strategies. PMID:26766072

  15. The study of the interaction between small-scale turbulence and internal gravity waves by direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, Oleg; Ostrovsky, Lev

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between small-scale turbulence and internal gravity waves (IWs) plays an important role in the processes of mixing which have direct impact on the dynamics of seasonal pycnocline in the ocean. Among many interesting and practically important aspects of this interaction are the effects of damping of IWs by turbulence on the one hand, and the possibility of the enhancement of turbulence by IWs on the other hand. Previously these effects were studied mostly in laboratory experiments. The present study presents the results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the IW-turbulence interaction. We perform DNS of the dynamics of small-scale turbulence near a pycnocline in the presence of monochromatic internal gravity wave propagating along a pycnocline. Small-scale turbulence is induced in a horizontal layer at some distance above the pycnocline. The velocity and density fields of IW propagating in the pycnocline are also prescribed as initial condition, and the IW wavelength is considered to be by the order of magnitude larger as compared to the initial turbulence integral length scale. Stratification in the pycnocline is considered to be sufficiently strong so that the effects of turbulent mixing remain negligible. In order to study the effect of damping of IW by turbulence, we firstly consider a stationary forced turbulence. The DNS results show that the observed IW damping rate is well predicted by a theory based on the semi-empirical approach, but only in the case where turbulence is sufficiently strong to be only weakly perturbed by the internal wave. However, the theory overestimates the damping rate almost by the order of magnitude if IW amplitude is of the order or larger as compared to the turbulence amplitude. The effect of the IW on the turbulence dynamics is further studied in the case where IW amplitude is of the order of the initial turbulence amplitude. In this case, turbulence is not supported by additional forcing and the effect of damping of IW by turbulence remains negligible. The DNS results show that in the absence of IW turbulence decays, but its decay rate is reduced in the vicinity of the pycnocline where stratification effects are significant. In this case, at sufficiently late times most of turbulent energy is located in a layer close to the pycnocline center. Here turbulent eddies are collapsed in the vertical direction and acquire the "pancake" shape. IW modifies turbulence dynamics, in that the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is significantly enhanced as compared to the TKE in the absence of IW. As in the case without IW, most of turbulent energy is localized in the vicinity of the pycnocline center. Here the TKE spectrum is considerably enhanced in the entire wavenumber range as compared to the TKE spectrum in the absence of IW. This work was supported by RFBR (project No. 14-05-00367).

  16. E-Mentoring for Small Business: An Examination of Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickard, Kim; Rickard, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: While information and communications technology provides new opportunities for supporting mentoring, there is a need to explore how effectively these potential benefits are being realized. This paper seeks to evaluate the effectiveness of a program in the small business context as a basis for proposing determinants of e-mentoring

  17. E-Mentoring for Small Business: An Examination of Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickard, Kim; Rickard, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: While information and communications technology provides new opportunities for supporting mentoring, there is a need to explore how effectively these potential benefits are being realized. This paper seeks to evaluate the effectiveness of a program in the small business context as a basis for proposing determinants of e-mentoring…

  18. Reversible effects of photodamage directed toward mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kessel, David

    2014-01-01

    When the initial effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves mitochondrial photodamage, an early effect is loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential (??m ). Using murine hepatoma 1c1c7 cells and a photosensitizing agent known to target mitochondria, we examined loss of ??m , initiation of apoptosis and loss of viability as a function of time and light dose. There was a correlation between loss of viability and the rapid disappearance of ??m, as detected by the potential-sensitive probe Mitotracker Orange (MTO). Loss of ??m was, however, reversible even with a substantial loss of viability. Unless there was a supralethal level of photodamage, 1c1c7 cells recovered their mitochondrial membrane potential, even if the cell population was on the pathway to apoptosis and cell death. These results indicate that when mitochondria are the initial PDT target, a qualitative estimate of photokilling can be provided by assessing the initial loss of ??m. PMID:24762128

  19. Future directions in training of veterinarians for small exotic mammal medicine: expectations, potential, opportunities, and mandates.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Small exotic mammals have been companions to people for almost as long as dogs and cats have been. The challenge for veterinary medicine today is to decipher the tea leaves and determine whether small mammals are fad or transient pets or whether they will still be popular in 20 years. This article focuses on pet small-mammal medicine, as the concerns of the laboratory animal are better known and may differ profoundly from those of a pet. Dozens of species of small exotic mammals are kept as pets. These pet small-mammal species have historically served human purposes other than companionship: for hunting, for their pelts, or for meat. Now, they are common pets. At present, most veterinary schools lack courses in the medical care of these animals. Veterinary students need at least one required class to introduce them to these pets. Currently, there are no small-mammal-only residency programs. This does not correspond with current needs. The only way to judge current needs is by assessing what employers are looking for. In a recent JAVMA classified section, almost 30% of small-animal practices in suburban/urban areas were hiring veterinarians with knowledge of exotic pets. All veterinarians must recognize that pet exotic small mammals have changed the landscape of small-animal medicine. It is a reality that, today, many small-animal practices see pet exotic small mammals on a daily basis. PMID:17035210

  20. Measuring Bi-Directional Reflectance with a Constellation of SmallSats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, S.; Gatebe, C. K.; Wiscombe, W. J.; de Weck, O. L.

    2013-12-01

    : The "missing carbon" problem has plagued the carbon cycle field for over 30 years. A newly proposed constellation of satellites promises to finally close the gap and find the missing carbon. This constellation would measure vegetation from multiple angles at solar wavelengths, essentially measuring the bidirectional reflectance (BRDF), and from this retrieve the Gross Primary Productivity, something that has eluded space remote sensing up until now. The science value of such an approach is demonstrated by using multi-angle, multi-spectral measurements from various deployments of the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) as the 'gold standard' data for BRDF estimation. CAR is an airborne instrument operated by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. CAR data are used to estimate the parameters of the widely-used Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete (RPV) and RossThin-LiSparseReciprocal (RTnLS) BRDF models. While CAR reflectance data is obtained at 360 view-azimuth directions and 90 view-zenith directions, satellite clusters will be able to sample only a part of this angular space. To make best use of the satellite-cluster BRDF data, a heuristic optimization method is used to find the best angular sub-sampling. Also, different closed loop formation-flying geometries are considered. We will show the effect of these formation-flying architectures on BRDF estimation errors and identify an optimal baseline architecture that will reduce errors when compared to existing spaceborne instruments like MODIS and MISR.

  1. Subcortical effects of transcranial direct current stimulation in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Bolzoni, F; B?czyk, M; Jankowska, E

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) affects neurons at both cortical and subcortical levels. The subcortical effects involve several descending motor systems but appeared to be relatively weak, as only small increases in the amplitude of subcortically initiated descending volleys and a minute shortening of latencies of these volleys were found. The aim of the present study was therefore to evaluate the consequences of facilitation of these volleys on the ensuing muscle activation. The experiments were carried out on deeply anaesthetized rats without neuromuscular blockade. Effects of tDCS were tested on EMG potentials recorded from neck muscles evoked by weak (2060 ?A) single, double or triple stimuli applied in the medial longitudinal fascicle (MLF) or in the red nucleus (RN). Short latencies of these potentials were compatible with monosynaptic or disynaptic actions of reticulospinal and disynaptic or trisynaptic actions of rubrospinal neurons on neck motoneurons. Despite only weak effects on indirect descending volleys, the EMG responses from both the MLF and the RN were potently facilitated by cathodal tDCS and depressed by anodal tDCS. Both the facilitation and the depression developed relatively rapidly (within the first minute) but both outlasted tDCS and were present for up to 1 h after tDCS. The study thus demonstrates long-lasting effects of tDCS on subcortical neurons in the rat, albeit evoked by an opposite polarity of tDCS to that found to be effective on subcortical neurons in the cat investigated in the preceding study, or for cortical neurons in the humans. PMID:23774279

  2. The effect of beam directivity on the inspection of anisotropic materials using ultrasonic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, C. J. L.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2012-05-01

    The beam directivity from an ultrasonic transducer in isotropic materials is well documented. However, beam directivities in elastically anisotropic materials and their effect on ultrasonic NDE inspection has been investigated far less extensively. In this paper, analytical and numerical finite element models are developed to predict the beam directivity in a single crystal nickel-based superalloy. This material is highly anisotropic and is used widely in the gas-turbine industry. The developed models are used to investigate the effect of the crystallographic orientation on the beam directivity. In turn, the effect of beam directivity on defect detection sensitivity and characterization capability using an ultrasonic array is demonstrated. It is shown that the effect is particularly important for the accurate sizing of small defects.

  3. Synopsis of Direct and Indirect Lightning Effects on Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Tony

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program funded a study on electromagnetic environmental effect issues of composite materials used by the aerospace industry. The results of which are published by Ross Evans, Tec-Masters Inc., in NASA-CR-4783, "Test Report - Direct and Indirect Lightning Effects on Composite Materials." Indirect effects include the electric and magnetic field shielding provided by a composite material illuminated by a near or direct lightning strike. Direct effects includes the physical damage of composites and/or assembly joint with a direct strike injection. This paper provides a synopsis of NASA-CR-4783. A short description is provided of the direct and indirect tests performed during the sturdy. General results and design guidelines are discussed.

  4. Derivative expansion at small mass for the spinor effective action

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, Gerald V.; Huet, Adolfo; Hur, Jin; Min, Hyunsoo

    2011-05-15

    We study the small-mass limit of the one-loop spinor effective action, comparing the derivative expansion approximation with exact numerical results that are obtained from an extension to spinor theories of the partial-wave cutoff method. In this approach, one can compute numerically the renormalized one-loop effective action for radially separable gauge field background fields in spinor QED. We highlight an important difference between the small-mass limit of the derivative expansion for spinor and scalar theories.

  5. Effect of small bowel preparation with simethicone on capsule endoscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Fang, You-hong; Chen, Chun-xiao; Zhang, Bing-ling

    2009-01-01

    Background: Capsule endoscopy is a novel non-invasive method for visualization of the entire small bowel. The diagnostic yield of capsule endoscopy depends on the quality of visualization of the small bowel mucosa and its complete passage through the small bowel. To date, there is no standardized protocol for bowel preparation before capsule endoscopy. The addition of simethicone in the bowel preparation for the purpose of reducing air bubbles in the intestinal lumen had only been studied by a few investigators. Methods: Sixty-four participants were randomly divided into two groups to receive a bowel preparation of polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution (Group 1) and both PEG solution and simethicone (Group 2). The PEG solution and simethicone were taken the night before and 20 min prior to capsule endoscopy, respectively. Frames taken in the small intestine were examined and scored for luminal bubbles by two professional capsule endoscopists. Gastric emptying time and small bowel transit time were also recorded. Results: Simethicone significantly reduced luminal bubbles both in the proximal and distal small intestines. The mean time proportions with slight bubbles in the proximal and distal intestines in Group 2 were 97.1% and 99.0%, respectively, compared with 67.2% (P<0.001) and 68.8% (P<0.001) in Group 1. Simethicone had no effect on mean gastric emptying time, 32.08 min in Group 2 compared with 30.88 min in Group 1 (P=0.868), but it did increase mean small intestinal transit time from 227.28 to 281.84 min (P=0.003). Conclusion: Bowel preparation with both PEG and simethicone significantly reduced bubbles in the intestinal lumen and improved the visualization of the small bowel by capsule endoscopy without any side effects observed. PMID:19198022

  6. Antidiabetic effects of glucokinase regulatory protein small-molecule disruptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, David J.; St Jean, David J.; Kurzeja, Robert J. M.; Wahl, Robert C.; Michelsen, Klaus; Cupples, Rod; Chen, Michelle; Wu, John; Sivits, Glenn; Helmering, Joan; Komorowski, Renée; Ashton, Kate S.; Pennington, Lewis D.; Fotsch, Christopher; Vazir, Mukta; Chen, Kui; Chmait, Samer; Zhang, Jiandong; Liu, Longbin; Norman, Mark H.; Andrews, Kristin L.; Bartberger, Michael D.; van, Gwyneth; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Wang, Minghan; Jordan, Steven R.; Véniant, Murielle M.; Hale, Clarence

    2013-12-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a vital and complex process, and its disruption can cause hyperglycaemia and type II diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK), a key enzyme that regulates glucose homeostasis, converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, specific hypothalamic neurons, and gut enterocytes. In hepatocytes, GK regulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suppresses glucose production, and is subject to the endogenous inhibitor GK regulatory protein (GKRP). During fasting, GKRP binds, inactivates and sequesters GK in the nucleus, which removes GK from the gluconeogenic process and prevents a futile cycle of glucose phosphorylation. Compounds that directly hyperactivate GK (GK activators) lower blood glucose levels and are being evaluated clinically as potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. However, initial reports indicate that an increased risk of hypoglycaemia is associated with some GK activators. To mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia, we sought to increase GK activity by blocking GKRP. Here we describe the identification of two potent small-molecule GK-GKRP disruptors (AMG-1694 and AMG-3969) that normalized blood glucose levels in several rodent models of diabetes. These compounds potently reversed the inhibitory effect of GKRP on GK activity and promoted GK translocation both in vitro (isolated hepatocytes) and in vivo (liver). A co-crystal structure of full-length human GKRP in complex with AMG-1694 revealed a previously unknown binding pocket in GKRP distinct from that of the phosphofructose-binding site. Furthermore, with AMG-1694 and AMG-3969 (but not GK activators), blood glucose lowering was restricted to diabetic and not normoglycaemic animals. These findings exploit a new cellular mechanism for lowering blood glucose levels with reduced potential for hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

  7. Effects of saltcedar invasion and biological control on small mammals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of invasive saltcedars (Tamarix spp.) on bird populations and communities have received considerable interest, but impacts on other vertebrate taxa have received less attention. Moreover, only one published study examined effects on vertebrates of biological control efforts directed at saltc...

  8. Using the sensitive dependence of chaos (the butterfly effect'') to direct trajectories in an experimental chaotic system

    SciTech Connect

    Shinbrot, T.; Ditto, W.; Grebogi, C.; Ott, E.; Spano, M.; Yorke, J.A. Department of Physics, The College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio 44691 Naval Surface Warfare Center, Silver Spring, Maryland 20902 )

    1992-05-11

    In this paper we present the first experimental verification that the sensitivity of a chaotic system to small perturbations (the butterfly effect'') can be used to rapidly direct orbits from an arbitrary initial state to an arbitrary accessible desired state.

  9. Colloidal Graphite-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization MS and MSn of Small Molecules. 2. Direct Profiling and MS Imaging of Small Metabolites from Fruits

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Zhang; Sangwon Cha; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-09-01

    Due to a high background in the low-mass region, conventional MALDI is not as useful for detecting small molecules (molecular masses <500 Da) as it is for large ones. Also, spatial inhomogeneity that is inherent to crystalline matrixes can degrade resolution in imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). In this study, colloidal graphite was investigated as an alternative matrix for laser desorption/ionization (GALDI) in IMS. We demonstrate its advantages over conventional MALDI in the detection of small molecules such as organic acids, flavonoids, and oligosaccharides. GALDI provides good sensitivity for such small molecules. The detection limit of fatty acids and flavonoids in the negative-ion mode are in the low-femtomole range. Molecules were detected directly and identified by comparing the MS and MS/MS spectra with those of standards. Various fruits were chosen to evaluate the practical utility of GALDI since many types of small molecules are present in them. Distribution of these small molecules in the fruit was investigated by using IMS and IMS/MS.

  10. Size extensivity of the direct optimized effective potential method.

    PubMed

    Heaton-Burgess, Tim; Cohen, Aron J; Yang, Weitao; Davidson, Ernest R

    2008-03-21

    We investigate the size extensivity of the direct optimized effective potential procedure of Yang and Wu [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 143002 (2002)]. The choice of reference potential within the finite basis construction of the local Kohn-Sham potential can lead to a method that is not size extensive. Such a situation is encountered when one employs the Fermi-Amaldi potential, which is often used to enforce the correct asymptotic behavior of the exact exchange-correlation potential. The size extensivity error with the Fermi-Amaldi reference potential is shown to behave linearly with the number of electrons in the limit of an infinite number of well separated monomers. In practice, the error tends to be rather small and rapidly approaches the limiting linear behavior. Moreover, with a flexible enough potential basis set, the error can be decreased significantly. We also consider one possible reference potential, constructed from the van Leeuwen-Baerends potential, which provides a size extensive implementation while also enforcing the correct asymptotic behavior. PMID:18361596

  11. Measuring Bi-Directional Reflectance for Gross Primary Productivity with a Constellation of SmallSats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, S.; Gatebe, C. K.; Hilker, T.; Hall, F. G.; de Weck, O. L.

    2014-12-01

    The "missing carbon" problem has plagued the carbon cycle field for over 30 years. A newly proposed constellation of satellites promises to finally close the gap and find the missing carbon. This constellation would measure vegetation from multiple angles at solar wavelengths, essentially measuring the bidirectional reflectance (BRDF), and from this retrieve the Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), something that has eluded space remote sensing community up until now, showing up to 40% uncertainty. The science value of such a BRDF retrieval approach has been demonstrated using multi-angle, multi-spectral measurements from various deployments of the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) as the "gold standard" data for BRDF estimation. CAR is an airborne instrument operated by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Initial observing system simulations (OSSE) with four satellites launched as secondary payloads and operating in different imaging modes show BRDF error estimates of less than 12% when compared to CAR measurements, a 50% improvement to the worst case BRDF error produced by corresponding monoliths. However, GPP products require estimating the BRDF of photochemical reflectance index (PRI), which needs angular measurements at the xanthophyll sensitive band (533nm) - unavailable in CAR. The satellite OSSEs will be repeated using AMPSEC tower measurements. AMPSEC is a Unispec-DC (PP Systems, Amesbury,MA, USA) spectroradiometer with 256 contiguous bands with a nominal band spacing of 3 nm and a nominal range of operation between 350 and 1200 nm. The data will be used to estimate parameters of the widely-used Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete (RPV) and RossThin-LiSparseReciprocal (RTnLS) BRDF models. Since AMPSEC reflectance data is obtained at 360 view-azimuth directions and 90 view-zenith directions, satellite clusters will be able to sample only a part of this angular space. To make best use of the satellite-cluster BRDF data, a heuristic optimization method is used to find the best angular sub-sampling. Also, different closed loop formation-flying geometries are considered. We will show the effect of these formation-flying architectures on BRDF, PRI and GPP estimation errors and identify an optimal baseline architecture that will reduce errors when compared to existing spaceborne instruments such as MODIS and MISR.

  12. Radiotherapy in Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Lessons Learned and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2011-03-15

    Although chemotherapy is an essential component in the treatment of small-cell lung cancer, improvements in survival in the past two decades have been mainly achieved by the appropriate application of radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to review the key developments in thoracic radiotherapy and prophylactic cranial radiotherapy and to discuss the rationale behind key ongoing studies in small-cell lung cancer.

  13. Directional Site Amplification Effect on Tarzana Hill, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graizer, V.; Shakal, A.

    2003-12-01

    Significantly amplified ground accelerations at the Tarzana Hill station were recorded during the 1987 Mw 5.9 Whittier Narrows and the 1994 Mw 6.7 Northridge earthquakes. Peak horizontal ground acceleration at the Tarzana station during the 1999 Mw 7.1 Hector Mine earthquake was almost twice as large as the accelerations recorded at nearby stations. The Tarzana site was drilled to a depth of 100 m. A low shear-wave velocity near the surface of 100 m/sec increasing to near 750 m/sec at 100 m depth was measured. The 20 m high hill was found to be well drained with a water table near 17 m. Modelo formation (extremely weathered at the surface to fresh at depth) underlies the hill. The subsurface geology and velocities obtained allow classification of this location as a soft-rock site. After the Northridge earthquake the California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program significantly increased instrumentation at Tarzana to study the unusual site amplification effect. Current instrumentation at Tarzana consists of an accelerograph at the top of Tarzana hill (Tarzana - Cedar Hill B), a downhole instrument at 60 m depth, and an accelerograph at the foot of the hill (Tarzana - Clubhouse), 180 m from the Cedar Hill B station. The original station, Tarzana - Cedar Hill Nursery A, was lost in 1999 due to construction. More than twenty events, including the Hector Mine earthquake, were recorded by all these instruments at Tarzana. Comparison of recordings and response spectra demonstrates strong directional resonance on the top of the hill in a direction perpendicular to the strike of the hill in the period range from 0.04 to 0.8 sec (1.2 to 25 Hz). There is practically no amplification from the bottom to the top of the hill for the component parallel to the strike of the hill. In contrast to accelerations recorded during the Hector Mine earthquake (high frequency part of seismic signal), displacements (relatively low frequency part of seismic signal) demonstrate almost no site amplification from the bottom of the hole to the surface at periods greater than 1.5 sec, in either direction. The directional effect at Tarzana hill seems to be azimuth dependent. Relatively higher amplification at the perpendicular component is produced for the earthquake sources located north of the station. We were not able to see any differences in hill response before and after development (a relatively small part of the hill was developed). The source of the site amplification that produces large motions at Tarzana is still under investigation with "the usual suspects" like topography and shear wave velocity profile not providing the explanation. New data recorded at Tarzana in recent years clearly show that the Tarzana effect is a very localized high-frequency effect observed only at the top of the hill. Drilling at Tarzana was co-funded by CSMIP and by the National Science Foundation through the Resolution of Site Response Issues from the Northridge Earthquake Project (ROSRINE).

  14. Effective Practice in the Design of Directed Independent Learning Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Liz; Jones, Robert; Ottaway, James

    2015-01-01

    This study, commissioned by the HEA and the QAA focuses on directed independent learning practices in UK higher education. It investigates what stakeholders (including academic staff and students) have found to be the most effective practices in the inception, design, quality assurance and enhancement of directed independent learning and explores…

  15. Effective Practice in the Design of Directed Independent Learning Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Liz; Jones, Robert; Ottaway, James

    2015-01-01

    This study, commissioned by the HEA and the QAA focuses on directed independent learning practices in UK higher education. It investigates what stakeholders (including academic staff and students) have found to be the most effective practices in the inception, design, quality assurance and enhancement of directed independent learning and explores

  16. Empirical Analysis of Effects of Bank Mergers and Acquisitions on Small Business Lending in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ita, Asuquo Akabom

    2012-11-01

    Mergers and acquisitions are the major instruments of the recent banking reforms in Nigeria.The effects and the implications of the reforms on the lending practices of merged banks to small businesses were considered in this study. These effects were divided into static and dynamic effects (restructuring, direct and external). Data were collected by cross-sectional research design and were subsequently analyzed by the ordinary least square (OLS) method.The analyses show that bank size, financial characteristics and deposit of non-merged banks are positively related to small business lending. While for the merged banks, the reverse is the case. From the above result, it is evident that merger and acquisition have not only static effect on small business lending but also dynamic effect, therefore, given the central position of small businesses in the current government policy on industrialization in Nigeria, policy makers in Nigeria, should consider both the static and dynamic effects of merger and acquisition on small business lending in their policy thrust.

  17. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2012-01-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine operations and the engine and stage design were constrained to fit within the payload volume of the then planned space shuttle. The SNRE core design utilized hexagonal fuel elements and hexagonal structural support elements. The total number of elements can be varied to achieve engine designs of higher or lower thrust levels. Some variation in the ratio of fuel elements to structural elements is also possible. Options for SNRE-based engine designs in the 25,000-lbf thrust range were described in a recent (2010) Joint Propulsion Conference paper. The reported designs met or exceeded the performance characteristics baselined in the DRA 5.0 Study. Lower thrust SNRE-based designs were also described in a recent (2011) Joint Propulsion Conference paper. Recent activities have included parallel evaluation and design efforts on fast spectrum engines employing refractory metal alloy fuels. These efforts include evaluation of both heritage designs from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and General Electric Company GE-710 Programs as well as more recent designs. Results are presented for a number of not-yet optimized fast spectrum engine options.

  18. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine operations and the engine and stage design were constrained to fit within the payload volume of the then planned space shuttle. The SNRE core design utilized hexagonal fuel elements and hexagonal structural support elements. The total number of elements can be varied to achieve engine designs of higher or lower thrust levels. Some variation in the ratio of fuel elements to structural elements is also possible. Options for SNRE-based engine designs in the 25,000-lbf thrust range were described in a recent (2010) Joint Propulsion Conference paper. The reported designs met or exceeded the performance characteristics baselined in the DRA 5.0 Study. Lower thrust SNRE-based designs were also described in a recent (2011) Joint Propulsion Conference paper. Recent activities have included parallel evaluation and design efforts on fast spectrum engines employing refractory metal alloy fuels. These efforts include evaluation of both heritage designs from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and General Electric Company GE-710 Programs as well as more recent designs. Results are presented for a number of not-yet optimized fast spectrum engine options.

  19. Effects of small halocarbon molecules on reverse osmosis membrane performance

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.C.; Glater, J.; Neethling, J.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The reverse osmosis (RO) membrane industry has long been concerned with problems of performance decline due to fouling. Colloidal and biological fouling have been discussed to some extent in the literature but little is known about the effect of small organic molecules on membrane performance. The work reported in this paper involved controlled laboratory experiments with three small halocarbons and three different types of commercial RO membranes. The compounds used were CHCl{sub 3}, CHBr{sub 3} and CCl{sub 4}. The first two represent typical small and large THM's. Carbon tetrachloride was selected as a non-polar model compound. Membranes representing three different polymer systems were provided by E. I. du Pont Inc.

  20. Direct radiative effect by multicomponent aerosol over China

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Song, Yu; Zhao, Chun; Cai, Xuhui; Zhang, Hongsheng; Zhu, Tong

    2015-05-01

    The direct radiative effect (DRE) of multiple aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and mineral aerosol) and their spatiotemporal variations over China were investigated using a fully coupled meteorology–chemistry model (WRF-Chem) for the entire year of 2006. We made modifications to improve model performance, including updating land surface parameters, improving the calculation of transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of SO2, and adding in heterogeneous reactions between mineral aerosol and acid gases. The modified model well reproduced the magnitude, seasonal pattern, and spatial distribution of the measured meteorological conditions, concentrations of PM10 and its components, and aerosol optical depth (AOD). A diagnostic iteration method was used to estimate the overall DRE of aerosols and contributions from different components. At the land surface, all kinds of aerosol species reduced the incident net radiation flux with a total DRE of 10.2 W m-2 over China. Aerosols significantly warm the atmosphere with the national mean DRE of +10.8 W m-2. BC was the leading radiative-heating component (+8.7 W m-2), followed by mineral aerosol (+1.1 W m-2). At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), BC introduced the largest radiative perturbation (+4.5 W m-2), followed by sulfate (-1.4 W m-2). The overall perturbation of aerosols on radiation transfer is quite small over China, demonstrating the counterbalancing effect between scattering and adsorbing aerosols. Aerosol DRE at the TOA had distinct seasonality, generally with a summer maximum and winter minimum, mainly determined by mass loadings, hygroscopic growth, and incident radiation flux.

  1. Comparison of the directional characteristics of swift ion excitation for two small biomolecules: glycine and alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruun-Ghalbia, S.; Sauer, S. P. A.; Oddershede, J.; Sabin, J. R.

    2010-10-01

    The dependence of the damage caused to biomolecules by a swift ion beam on the target molecules orientation with respect to the beam has implications for radiation protection and therapy. At the most basic level, it is first necessary to understand energy deposition in these systems. As the material constants describing energy deposition are the target mean excitation energies (I0) we report here the directional components of the mean excitation energies of the two simplest amino acids, glycine and alanine. It is found that the directional components of the mean excitation energies are similar in the two amino acids, and that both have a preferred direction for energy absorption.

  2. A small molecule inhibitor of tropomyosin dissociates actin binding from tropomyosin-directed regulation of actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Teresa T.; Janco, Miro; Hook, Jeff; Byun, Alex; Appaduray, Mark; Dedova, Irina; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah; Hardeman, Edna C.; Stehn, Justine R.; Böcking, Till; Gunning, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    The tropomyosin family of proteins form end-to-end polymers along the actin filament. Tumour cells rely on specific tropomyosin-containing actin filament populations for growth and survival. To dissect out the role of tropomyosin in actin filament regulation we use the small molecule TR100 directed against the C terminus of the tropomyosin isoform Tpm3.1. TR100 nullifies the effect of Tpm3.1 on actin depolymerisation but surprisingly Tpm3.1 retains the capacity to bind F-actin in a cooperative manner. In vivo analysis also confirms that, in the presence of TR100, fluorescently tagged Tpm3.1 recovers normally into stress fibers. Assembling end-to-end along the actin filament is thereby not sufficient for tropomyosin to fulfil its function. Rather, regulation of F-actin stability by tropomyosin requires fidelity of information communicated at the barbed end of the actin filament. This distinction has significant implications for perturbing tropomyosin-dependent actin filament function in the context of anti-cancer drug development. PMID:26804624

  3. Aspirin Induced Adverse Effects on the Small and Large Intestine.

    PubMed

    Pavlidis, Polychronis; Bjarnason, Ingvar

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin is in many ways a non- steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) prototype. Similar to conventional NSAIDs the gastric side effects of aspirin are well studied. However its potential adverse effects on the small and large intestine are less well known and under- researched. Experimental studies support a pathogenic pathway leading to NSAID enteropathy involving the topical effects on the intestinal barrier (mucous layer, enterocytes) that lead to dysfunction and increased intestinal permeability followed by increased exposure to luminal triggers and acute inflammation. Although aspirin has a toxic effect in vitro, enteral or parenteral administration in vivo, in animal models, did not result to intestinal injury. In man, experimental studies have revealed changes in intestinal permeability similar to conventional NSAIDs but of lesser magnitude. The clinical implication of these changes though is not known. Population studies have associated aspirin use with occult gastrointestinal bleeding from the small or large bowel although the magnitude of this risk is difficult to estimate but certainly small. Associations to colitis flare-ups have been made in case reports and retrospective cohort studies but low dose aspirin appears safe. Complications of diverticular disease may also be more frequent with aspirin use. PMID:26369683

  4. A Direct, Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) as a Quantitative Technique for Small Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jennifer L.; Rippe, Karen Duda; Imarhia, Kelly; Swift, Aileen; Scholten, Melanie; Islam, Naina

    2012-01-01

    ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) is a widely used technique with applications in disease diagnosis, detection of contaminated foods, and screening for drugs of abuse or environmental contaminants. However, published protocols with a focus on quantitative detection of small molecules designed for teaching laboratories are limited. A…

  5. A Direct, Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) as a Quantitative Technique for Small Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jennifer L.; Rippe, Karen Duda; Imarhia, Kelly; Swift, Aileen; Scholten, Melanie; Islam, Naina

    2012-01-01

    ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) is a widely used technique with applications in disease diagnosis, detection of contaminated foods, and screening for drugs of abuse or environmental contaminants. However, published protocols with a focus on quantitative detection of small molecules designed for teaching laboratories are limited. A

  6. A study of some effects of urbanization on storm runoff from a small watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Espey, William Howard, Jr.; Morgan, Carl W.; Masch, Frank D.

    1966-01-01

    The evaluation of the effects of urbanization on the runoff characteristics of a small watershed is a problem that can be studied by either a short-range or a long-range investigation. Because the long-range type of investigation would require several years for hydrologic data accumulation, it cannot provide any immediate information on the changes in watershed behavior arising as a result of urbanization. A short-range investigation, however, based on synthetic evaluation of present data would provide immediate answers. It is in the realm of this short-range objective that this study of a small urban watershed is directed.

  7. Direct Kerr electro-optic effect in noncentrosymmetric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Melnichuk, Mike; Wood, Lowell T.

    2010-07-15

    In materials lacking inversion symmetry, both Pockels and Kerr electro-optic effects are simultaneously present, with the former effect generally dominating the latter one. The theoretical findings of this article provide the crystal physics community with concrete tabulated evidence showing that it is possible in principle to selectively bypass contributions from the linear effect(s) and directly obtain information only about the genuine (Kerr-like) quadratic effects in 90% of the noncentrosymmetric point groups. The general idea and treatment used for the electro-optic effect can be extended and adapted to other optical or non-optical (phenomenological) purely quadratic effects in media lacking inversion symmetry.

  8. Stimulus characteristics within directives: effects on accuracy of task completion.

    PubMed Central

    Richman, D M; Wacker, D P; Cooper-Brown, L J; Kayser, K; Crosland, K; Stephens, T J; Asmus, J

    2001-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted in an outpatient setting with young children who had been referred for treatment of noncompliant behavior and who had coexisting receptive language or receptive vocabulary difficulties. Experiment 1 studied differential responding of the participants to a brief hierarchical directive analysis (least-to-most complex stimulus prompts) to identify directives that functioned as discriminative stimuli for accurate responding. Experiment 1 identified distinct patterns of accurate responding relative to manipulation of directive stimulus characteristics. Experiment 2 demonstrated that directives identified as effective or ineffective in obtaining stimulus control of accurate responding during Experiment 1 continued to control accurate responding across play activities and academic tasks. Experiment 3 probed effects of the interaction between the type of directive (effective vs. ineffective) and the reinforcement contingency (differential reinforcement for attempts vs. differential reinforcement for accurate responses) on accurate task completion and disruptive behavior. Results suggested that behavioral escalation from inaccurate responding to disruptive behavior occurred only when ineffective directives were combined with differential reinforcement for accurate task completion. The overall results are discussed in terms of developing a methodology for identifying stimulus characteristics of directives that affect accurate responding. PMID:11678525

  9. Direct Reprogramming of Mouse Fibroblasts to Neural Stem Cells by Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yan-Chuang; Lim, Yoon; Duffieldl, Michael D.; Li, Hua; Liu, Jia; Abdul Manaph, Nimshitha Pavathuparambil; Yang, Miao; Keating, Damien J.; Zhou, Xin-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Although it is possible to generate neural stem cells (NSC) from somatic cells by reprogramming technologies with transcription factors, clinical utilization of patient-specific NSC for the treatment of human diseases remains elusive. The risk hurdles are associated with viral transduction vectors induced mutagenesis, tumor formation from undifferentiated stem cells, and transcription factors-induced genomic instability. Here we describe a viral vector-free and more efficient method to induce mouse fibroblasts into NSC using small molecules. The small molecule-induced neural stem (SMINS) cells closely resemble NSC in morphology, gene expression patterns, self-renewal, excitability, and multipotency. Furthermore, the SMINS cells are able to differentiate into astrocytes, functional neurons, and oligodendrocytes in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we have established a novel way to efficiently induce neural stem cells (iNSC) from fibroblasts using only small molecules without altering the genome. Such chemical induction removes the risks associated with current techniques such as the use of viral vectors or the induction of oncogenic factors. This technique may, therefore, enable NSC to be utilized in various applications within clinical medicine. PMID:26788068

  10. Direct Reprogramming of Mouse Fibroblasts to Neural Stem Cells by Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Han, Yan-Chuang; Lim, Yoon; Duffieldl, Michael D; Li, Hua; Liu, Jia; Abdul Manaph, Nimshitha Pavathuparambil; Yang, Miao; Keating, Damien J; Zhou, Xin-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Although it is possible to generate neural stem cells (NSC) from somatic cells by reprogramming technologies with transcription factors, clinical utilization of patient-specific NSC for the treatment of human diseases remains elusive. The risk hurdles are associated with viral transduction vectors induced mutagenesis, tumor formation from undifferentiated stem cells, and transcription factors-induced genomic instability. Here we describe a viral vector-free and more efficient method to induce mouse fibroblasts into NSC using small molecules. The small molecule-induced neural stem (SMINS) cells closely resemble NSC in morphology, gene expression patterns, self-renewal, excitability, and multipotency. Furthermore, the SMINS cells are able to differentiate into astrocytes, functional neurons, and oligodendrocytes in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we have established a novel way to efficiently induce neural stem cells (iNSC) from fibroblasts using only small molecules without altering the genome. Such chemical induction removes the risks associated with current techniques such as the use of viral vectors or the induction of oncogenic factors. This technique may, therefore, enable NSC to be utilized in various applications within clinical medicine. PMID:26788068

  11. Outward Foreign Direct Investment and Human Capital Development: A Small Country Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the pattern of outward foreign direct investment (FDI) by Irish MNCs, and more specifically, to investigate their approach to human capital development and how these correspond to foreign MNCs in Ireland. In particular, it seeks to investigate training and development expenditure, adoption of…

  12. Small omni-directional antenna development for Mars Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, V.; Huang, J.; Endler, H.; Manshadi, F.

    2001-01-01

    This work addresses the design, analysis and test of omni-directional antennas at 401.5 MHz and 437.1 MHz frequencies, on Mars Orbital Sample (OS) return canisters, which are part of a Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission.

  13. Student Interaction and Learning in Small Self-Directed College Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Les

    There is growing evidence of the special benefits to be derived from self-directed learning groups, in which students operate without an instructor, determining for themselves the rate and manner in which to study course material and to evaluate their performance. At Hope College, 54 students enrolled in a social psychology course in Fall 1966

  14. Outward Foreign Direct Investment and Human Capital Development: A Small Country Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the pattern of outward foreign direct investment (FDI) by Irish MNCs, and more specifically, to investigate their approach to human capital development and how these correspond to foreign MNCs in Ireland. In particular, it seeks to investigate training and development expenditure, adoption of

  15. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct profiling and imaging of small molecules from raw biological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Sangwon

    2008-05-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization(MALDI) mass spectrometry(MS) has been widely used for analysis of biological molecules, especially macromolecules such as proteins. However, MALDI MS has a problem in small molecule (less than 1 kDa) analysis because of the signal saturation by organic matrixes in the low mass region. In imaging MS (IMS), inhomogeneous surface formation due to the co-crystallization process by organic MALDI matrixes limits the spatial resolution of the mass spectral image. Therefore, to make laser desorption/ionization (LDI) MS more suitable for mass spectral profiling and imaging of small molecules directly from raw biological tissues, LDI MS protocols with various alternative assisting materials were developed and applied to many biological systems of interest. Colloidal graphite was used as a matrix for IMS of small molecules for the first time and methodologies for analyses of small metabolites in rat brain tissues, fruits, and plant tissues were developed. With rat brain tissues, the signal enhancement for cerebroside species by colloidal graphite was observed and images of cerebrosides were successfully generated by IMS. In addition, separation of isobaric lipid ions was performed by imaging tandem MS. Directly from Arabidopsis flowers, flavonoids were successfully profiled and heterogeneous distribution of flavonoids in petals was observed for the first time by graphite-assisted LDI(GALDI) IMS.

  16. Design of Small MEMS Microphone Array Systems for Direction Finding of Outdoors Moving Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Huang, Jingchang; Song, Enliang; Liu, Huawei; Li, Baoqing; Yuan, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a MEMS microphone array system scheme is proposed which implements real-time direction of arrival (DOA) estimation for moving vehicles. Wind noise is the primary source of unwanted noise on microphones outdoors. A multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm is used in this paper for direction finding associated with spatial coherence to discriminate between the wind noise and the acoustic signals of a vehicle. The method is implemented in a SHARC DSP processor and the real-time estimated DOA is uploaded through Bluetooth or a UART module. Experimental results in different places show the validity of the system and the deviation is no bigger than 6 in the presence of wind noise. PMID:24603636

  17. Development of CNG direct injection (CNGDI) clean fuel system for extra power in small engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Yusoff; Shamsudeen, Azhari; Abdullah, Shahrir; Mahmood, Wan Mohd Faizal Wan

    2012-06-01

    A new design of fuel system for CNG engine with direct injection (CNGDI) was developed for a demonstration project. The development of the fuel system was done on the engine with cylinder head modifications, for fuel injector and spark plug openings included in the new cylinder head. The piston was also redesigned for higher compression ratio. The fuel rails and the regulators are also designed for the direct injection system operating at higher pressure about 2.0 MPa. The control of the injection timing for the direct injectors are also controlled by the Electronic Control Unit specially designed for DI by another group project. The injectors are selected after testing with the various injection pressures and spray angles. For the best performance of the high-pressure system, selection is made from the tests on single cylinder research engine (SCRE). The components in the fuel system have to be of higher quality and complied with codes and standards to secure the safety of engine for high-pressure operation. The results of the CNGDI have shown that better power output is produced and better emissions were achieved compared to the aspirated CNG engine.

  18. A small molecule directly inhibits the p53 transactivation domain from binding to replication protein A

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Jason G.; Carnes, Katie A.; Soto, Patricia; Liu, Shengqin; Parkhurst, Lawrence J.; Oakley, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), essential for DNA replication, repair and DNA damage signalling, possesses six ssDNA-binding domains (DBDs), including DBD-F on the N-terminus of the largest subunit, RPA70. This domain functions as a binding site for p53 and other DNA damage and repair proteins that contain amphipathic alpha helical domains. Here, we demonstrate direct binding of both ssDNA and the transactivation domain 2 of p53 (p53TAD2) to DBD-F, as well as DBD-F-directed dsDNA strand separation by RPA, all of which are inhibited by fumaropimaric acid (FPA). FPA binds directly to RPA, resulting in a conformational shift as determined through quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in full length RPA. Structural analogues of FPA provide insight on chemical properties that are required for inhibition. Finally, we confirm the inability of RPA possessing R41E and R43E mutations to bind to p53, destabilize dsDNA and quench tryptophan fluorescence by FPA, suggesting that protein binding, DNA modulation and inhibitor binding all occur within the same site on DBD-F. The disruption of p53RPA interactions by FPA may disturb the regulatory functions of p53 and RPA, thereby inhibiting cellular pathways that control the cell cycle and maintain the integrity of the human genome. PMID:23267009

  19. Direction of movement effects under transformed visual/motor mappings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, H. A.; Pavel, M.

    1989-01-01

    Performance in a discrete aiming task was compared under several transformed visual/motor mappings: rotations by 45, 90, 135, and 180 deg and reflections about the horizontal and the vertical midlines. Eight aiming targets were used, corresponding to eight directions of movement: up, down, right, left, up-right, down-left, up-left, and down-right. Direction of movements were characterized in terms of separable visual and motor components, and two kinds of direction of movement effects were considered. First, a direction of movement effect paralleling that seen in rapid aiming under the usual nontransformed mapping. Second, because rotations, but not reflections, are physically realizable 2-D transformations, a visual/motor control system which is sensitive to physical constraints should perform reflections, but not rotations, in a piecemeal fashion. Results supported the hypothesis that a motor factor having to do with complexity of limb movement accounts for differences in movement accuracy between right and left oblique directions. Direction of movement effects were more evident in reflections than in rotations, and were consistent with the hypothesis that the visual/motor-control system seeks a physically realizable 2-D rotation solution to reflections. Results also suggested that reversal of two orthogonal basis dimensions is far less difficult than reversing only one and leaving the other intact.

  20. Early season spring small grains direct proportion estimation - Development and evaluation of a Landsat based methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, D. E.; Trichel, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    The Inventory Technology Development (ITD) project of the Agriculture and Resources Inventory Surveys Through Aerospace Remote Sensing (AgRISTARS) program has developed an accurate, automated technology for early season estimation of spring small grains areal proportion from Landsat MSS data. The design criteria for an early season procedure included estimates available within the first 30 days of the growing season, low data processing/preprocessing requirements and no need for scene-to-scene registration. The prototype estimator which meets the design goals is based on a constrained linear model in which the observed spectral response of an entire scene is modeled as a linear combination of the major constituent elements in the scene. The procedure was evaluated over 100 sample segments collected for crop years 1976 through 1979 in the U.S. Northern Great Plains. Analysis of the test results indicated accuracy that compare favorably with both the automated at-harvest technologies tested during the FY81-82 AgRISTARS Spring Small Grains Pilot experiments and earlier analyst-intensive at-harvest technologies.

  1. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Human Small Artery Function

    PubMed Central

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Greenstein, Adam S.; Yadav, Rahul; Jeziorska, Maria; Hama, Salam; Soltani, Fardad; Pemberton, Phil W.; Ammori, Basil; Malik, Rayaz A.; Soran, Handrean; Heagerty, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of bariatric surgery on small artery function and the mechanisms underlying this. Background In lean healthy humans, perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) exerts an anticontractile effect on adjacent small arteries, but this is lost in obesity-associated conditions such as the metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes where there is evidence of adipocyte inflammation and increased oxidative stress. Methods Segments of small subcutaneous artery and perivascular fat were harvested from severely obese individuals before (n= 20) and 6 months after bariatric surgery (n= 15). Small artery contractile function was examined invitro with wire myography, and perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) morphology was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Results The anticontractile activity of PVAT was lost in obese patients before surgery when compared with healthy volunteers and was restored 6 months after bariatric surgery. Invitro protocols with superoxide dismutase and catalase rescued PVAT anticontractile function in tissue from obese individuals before surgery. The improvement in anticontractile function after surgery was accompanied by improvements in insulin sensitivity, serum glycemic indexes, inflammatory cytokines, adipokine profile, and systolic blood pressure together with increased PVAT adiponectin and nitric oxide bioavailability and reduced macrophage infiltration and inflammation. These changes were observed despite the patients remaining severely obese. Conclusions Bariatric surgery and its attendant improvements in weight, blood pressure, inflammation, and metabolism collectively reverse the obesity-induced alteration to PVAT anticontractile function. This reversal is attributable toreductions in local adipose inflammation and oxidative stress with improved adiponectin and nitric oxide bioavailability. PMID:23665100

  2. The effect of truncation on very small cardiac SPECT camerasystems

    SciTech Connect

    Rohmer, Damien; Eisner, Robert L.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-08-01

    Background: The limited transaxial field-of-view (FOV) of avery small cardiac SPECT camera system causes view-dependent truncationof the projection of structures exterior to, but near the heart. Basictomographic principles suggest that the reconstruction of non-attenuatedtruncated data gives a distortion-free image in the interior of thetruncated region, but the DC term of the Fourier spectrum of thereconstructed image is incorrect, meaning that the intensity scale of thereconstruction is inaccurate. The purpose of this study was tocharacterize the reconstructed image artifacts from truncated data, andto quantify their effects on the measurement of tracer uptake in themyocardial. Particular attention was given to instances where the heartwall is close to hot structures (structures of high activity uptake).Methods: The MCAT phantom was used to simulate a 2D slice of the heartregion. Truncated and non-truncated projections were formed both with andwithout attenuation. The reconstructions were analyzed for artifacts inthe myocardium caused by truncation, and for the effect that attenuationhas relative to increasing those artifacts. Results: The inaccuracy dueto truncation is primarily caused by an incorrect DC component. Forvisualizing theleft ventricular wall, this error is not worse than theeffect of attenuation. The addition of a small hot bowel-like structurenear the left ventricle causes few changes in counts on the wall. Largerartifacts due to the truncation are located at the boundary of thetruncation and can be eliminated by sinogram interpolation. Finally,algebraic reconstruction methods are shown to give better reconstructionresults than an analytical filtered back-projection reconstructionalgorithm. Conclusion: Small inaccuracies in reconstructed images fromsmall FOV camera systems should have little effect on clinicalinterpretation. However, changes in the degree of inaccuracy in countsfrom slice toslice are due to changes in the truncated structures. Thesecan result in a visual 3-dimensional distortion. As with conventionallarge FOV systems attenuation effects have a much more significant effecton image accuracy.

  3. Cost-Effective Icy Bodies Exploration using Small Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Jonas; Mauro, David; Stupl, Jan; Nayak, Michael; Aziz, Jonathan; Cohen, Aaron; Colaprete, Anthony; Dono-Perez, Andres; Frost, Chad; Klamm, Benjamin; McCafferty, Julian; McKay, Chris; Sears, Derek; Soulage, Michael; Swenson, Jason; Weston, Sasha; Yang Yang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that Saturn's moon Enceladus is expelling water-rich plumes into space, providing passing spacecraft with a window into what is hidden underneath its frozen crust. Recent discoveries indicate that similar events could also occur on other bodies in the solar system, such as Jupiter's moon Europa and the dwarf planet Ceres in the asteroid belt. These plumes provide a possible giant leap forward in the search for organics and assessing habitability beyond Earth, stepping stones toward the long-term goal of finding extraterrestrial life. The United States Congress recently requested mission designs to Europa, to fit within a cost cap of $1B, much less than previous mission designs' estimates. Here, innovative cost-effective small spacecraft designs for the deep-space exploration of these icy worlds, using new and emerging enabling technologies, and how to explore the outer solar system on a budget below the cost horizon of a flagship mission, are investigated. Science requirements, instruments selection, rendezvous trajectories, and spacecraft designs are some topics detailed. The mission concepts revolve around a comparably small-sized and low-cost Plume Chaser spacecraft, instrumented to characterize the vapor constituents encountered on its trajectory. In the event that a plume is not encountered, an ejecta plume can be artificially created by a companion spacecraft, the Plume Maker, on the target body at a location timed with the passage of the Plume Chaser spacecraft. Especially in the case of Ceres, such a mission could be a great complimentary mission to Dawn, as well as a possible future Europa Clipper mission. The comparably small volume of the spacecraft enables a launch to GTO as a secondary payload, providing multiple launch opportunities per year. Plume Maker's design is nearly identical to the Plume Chaser, and fits within the constraints for a secondary payload launch. The cost-effectiveness of small spacecraft missions enables the exploration of multiple solar system bodies in reasonable timeframes despite budgetary constraints, with only minor adaptations. The work presented here is a summary of concepts targeting icy bodies, such as Europa and Ceres, which have been developed over the last year at NASA Ames Research Center's Mission Design Division. The platforms detailed in this work are also applicable to the cost-effective exploration of many other small icy bodies in the solar system.

  4. Changing effects of direct-to-consumer broadcast drug advertising information sources on prescription drug requests.

    PubMed

    Lee, Annisa Lai

    2009-06-01

    This study tracks the changes of the effects of 4 information sources for direct-to-consumer drug advertising on patients' requests for prescription drugs from physicians since the inception of the "Guidance for Industry about Consumer-directed Broadcast Advertisements." The Guidance advises pharmaceuticals to use four information sources for consumers to seek further information to supplement broadcast drug advertisements: small-print information, the Internet, a toll-free number, and health-care providers (nurses, doctors, and pharmacists). Logistic models were created by using survey data collected by the Food and Drug Administration in 1999 and 2002. Results show that throughout the years, health-care providers remain the most used and strongest means associated with patients' direct requests for nonspecific and specific prescription drugs from doctors. The small-print information source gains power and changes from an indirect means associated with patients' discussing drugs with health-care providers to a direct means associated with patients' asking about nonspecific and specific drugs from their doctors. The Internet is not directly related to drug requests, but the effect of its association with patients seeking information from health-care providers grew 11-fold over the course of the study. The toll-free number lost its power altogether for both direct request for a prescription drug and further discussion with health-care providers. Patient demographics will be considered for specific policy implications. PMID:19499430

  5. Towards Small-Sized Long Tail Business with the Dual-Directed Recommendation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masakazu; Yamada, Takashi; Tsuda, Kazuhiko; Terano, Takao

    This paper describes a novel architecture to promote retail businesses using information recommendation systems. The main features of the architecture are 1) Dual-directed Recommendation system, 2) Portal site for three kinds of users: Producers, Retailers, and Consumers, which are considered to be Prosumers, and 3) Agent-based implementation. We have developed a web-based system DAIKOC (Dynamic Advisor for Information and Knowledge Oriented Communities) with the above architecture. In this paper, we focus on the recommendation functions to extract the items that will achieve the large sales in the future from the ID (IDentification)-POS (Point-Of-Sales) data.

  6. Analytical fuel property effects: Small combustors, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, T. G.; Monty, J. D.; Morton, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of non-standard aviation fuels on a typical small gas turbine combustor were studied and the effectiveness of design changes intended to counter the effects of these fuels was evaluated. The T700/CT7 turboprop engine family was chosen as being representative of the class of aircraft power plants desired for this study. Fuel properties, as specified by NASA, are characterized by low hydrogen content and high aromatics levels. No. 2 diesel fuel was also evaluated in this program. Results demonstrated the anticipated higher than normal smoke output and flame radiation intensity with resulting increased metal temperatures on the baseline T700 combustor. Three new designs were evaluated using the non standard fuels. The three designs incorporated enhanced cooling features and smoke reduction features. All three designs, when burning the broad specification fuels, exhibited metal temperatures at or below the baseline combustor temperatures on JP-5. Smoke levels were acceptable but higher than predicted.

  7. Measurement of illite particle thickness using a direct Fourier transform of small-angle X-ray scattering data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shang, C.; Rice, J.A.; Eberl, D.D.; Lin, S.-J.

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that interstratified illite-smectite (I-S) minerals are composed of aggregates of fundamental particles. Many attempts have been made to measure the thickness of such fundamental particles, but each of the methods used suffers from its own limitations and uncertainties. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can be used to measure the thickness of particles that scatter X-rays coherently. We used SAXS to study suspensions of Na-rectorite and other illites with varying proportions of smectite. The scattering intensity (I) was recorded as a function of the scattering vector, q = (4 ??/??) sin(??/2), where ?? is the X-ray wavelength and ?? is the scattering angle. The experimental data were treated with a direct Fourier transform to obtain the pair distance distribution function (PDDF) that was then used to determine the thickness of illite particles. The Guinier and Porod extrapolation were used to obtain the scattering intensity beyond the experimental q, and the effects of such extrapolations on the PDDF were examined. The thickness of independent rectorite particles (used as a reference mineral) is 18.3 A??. The SAXS results are compared with those obtained by X-ray diffraction peak broadening methods. It was found that the power-law exponent (??) obtained by fitting the data in the region of q = 0.1 -0.6 nm-1 to the power law (I = Ioq-??) is a linear function of illite particle thickness. Therefore, illite particle thickness could be predicted by the linear relationship as long as the thickness is within the limit where ?? <4.0.

  8. The effect of jump-landing directions on dynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kathy; Heise, Gary D

    2013-10-01

    Dynamic stability is often measured by time to stabilization (TTS), which is calculated from the dwindling fluctuations of ground reaction force (GRF) components over time. Common protocols of dynamic stability research have involved forward or vertical jumps, neglecting different jump-landing directions. Therefore, the purpose of the present investigation was to examine the influence of different jump-landing directions on TTS. Twenty healthy participants (9 male, 11 female; age = 28 ± 4 y; body mass = 73.3 ± 21.5 kg; body height = 173.4 ± 10.5 cm) completed the Multi-Directional Dynamic Stability Protocol hopping tasks from four different directions--forward, lateral, medial, and backward--landing single-legged onto the force plate. TTS was calculated for each component of the GRF (ap = anterior-posterior; ml = medial-lateral; v = vertical) and was based on a sequential averaging technique. All TTS measures showed a statistically significant main effect for jump-landing direction. TTSml showed significantly longer times for landings from the medial and lateral directions (medial: 4.10 ± 0.21 s, lateral: 4.24 ± 0.15 s, forward: 1.48 ± 0.59 s, backward: 1.42 ± 0.37 s), whereas TTSap showed significantly longer times for landings from the forward and backward directions (forward: 4.53 ± 0.17 s, backward: 4.34 0.35 s, medial: 1.18 ± 0.49 s, lateral: 1.11 ± 0.43 s). TTSv showed a significantly shorter time for the forward direction compared with all other landing directions (forward: 2.62 ± 0.31 s, backward: 2.82 ± 0.29 s, medial: 2.91 ± 0.31 s, lateral: 2.86 ± 0.32 s). Based on these results, multiple jump-landing directions should be considered when assessing dynamic stability. PMID:23182979

  9. Why is the electrocaloric effect so small in ferroelectrics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Verri, Gian G.; Littlewood, Peter B.

    2015-03-01

    Ferroelectrics are attractive candidate materials for environmentally friendly solid state refrigeration free of greenhouse gases. Their thermal response upon variations of external electric fields is largest in the vicinity of their phase transitions, which may occur near room temperature. The magnitude of the effect, however, is too small for useful cooling applications even when they are driven close to dielectric breakdown. Insight from microscopic theory is therefore needed to characterize materials and provide guiding principles to search for new ones with enhanced electrocaloric performance. Here, we present meaningful figures of merit derived from well-known microscopic models of ferroelectricity which provide insight into the relation between the strength of the effect and the characteristic interactions of ferroelectrics such as dipole forces. We find that the long range nature of these interactions results in a small effect. A strategy is proposed to make it larger by shortening the correlation lengths of fluctuations of polarization. Work at Argonne is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  10. Small sample inference for fixed effects from restricted maximum likelihood.

    PubMed

    Kenward, M G; Roger, J H

    1997-09-01

    Restricted maximum likelihood (REML) is now well established as a method for estimating the parameters of the general Gaussian linear model with a structured covariance matrix, in particular for mixed linear models. Conventionally, estimates of precision and inference for fixed effects are based on their asymptotic distribution, which is known to be inadequate for some small-sample problems. In this paper, we present a scaled Wald statistic, together with an F approximation to its sampling distribution, that is shown to perform well in a range of small sample settings. The statistic uses an adjusted estimator of the covariance matrix that has reduced small sample bias. This approach has the advantage that it reproduces both the statistics and F distributions in those settings where the latter is exact, namely for Hotelling T2 type statistics and for analysis of variance F-ratios. The performance of the modified statistics is assessed through simulation studies of four different REML analyses and the methods are illustrated using three examples. PMID:9333350

  11. Effects of 2D small-scale sedimentary basins on strong ground motion characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahedasl, R.; Ghayamghamian, M. R.

    2015-08-01

    A lot of research on the 2D or 3D effects of large-scale basins (within several kilometers depth) have been conducted in the past. However, different 2D aspects of small-scale sedimentary basins (within tens of meters depth) remain in the developing stage. Here, an attempt is made to analyze different aspects of small-scale basins using both numerical and empirical investigations. In the first step, the 2D effects of small-scale basins on strong motion characteristics are numerically examined both in the time and frequency domains. In addition, the effects of input motion are also explained by the results of model excitation in different orthogonal directions. Then, the numerical outcomes are verified by the analysis of actual earthquake data recorded at a downhole array in the Fujisawa small basin, Japan. In the second step, since available recorded earthquake data in small basins with a clear understanding of subsurface geology are very limited, different 2D aspects of the small basin are parametrically investigated. For this purpose, extensive parametrical studies are carried out on the main features of a small basin such as slope angle, shape, infill soil properties, and basin thickness by using the finite difference numerical method. The horizontal and vertical peak ground accelerations of 2D with respect to 1D ones are defined as the horizontal and vertical aggravation factors (AGH and AGV). The AGH and AGV factors show large sensitivity to infill soil properties, shape and thickness, and small sensitivity to slope angle. The values of AGH and AGV factors vary in the range of 0.5-2 with large variations around small basin edges due to wave coupling, conversion, scattering and focusing in the vicinity of small basin edges. These cause a complicated pattern of 2D de-amplification and amplification, which mostly affect the motion in the high frequency range (>1?Hz). Finally, the outcomes provide numerical and field evidence on the 2D effects of small basins, and give some recommendations for design codes.

  12. Potent Host-Directed Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Myxovirus RNA-Dependent RNA-Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Stefanie A.; Ndungu, J. Maina; Yoon, Jeong-Joong; Dochow, Melanie; Sun, Aiming; Natchus, Michael; Snyder, James P.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of host cell factors required for virus replication rather than of pathogen components opens new perspectives to counteract virus infections. Anticipated advantages of this approach include a heightened barrier against the development of viral resistance and a broadened pathogen target spectrum. Myxoviruses are predominantly associated with acute disease and thus are particularly attractive for this approach since treatment time can be kept limited. To identify inhibitor candidates, we have analyzed hit compounds that emerged from a large-scale high-throughput screen for their ability to block replication of members of both the orthomyxovirus and paramyxovirus families. This has returned a compound class with broad anti-viral activity including potent inhibition of different influenza virus and paramyxovirus strains. After hit-to-lead chemistry, inhibitory concentrations are in the nanomolar range in the context of immortalized cell lines and human PBMCs. The compound shows high metabolic stability when exposed to human S-9 hepatocyte subcellular fractions. Antiviral activity is host-cell species specific and most pronounced in cells of higher mammalian origin, supporting a host-cell target. While the compound induces a temporary cell cycle arrest, host mRNA and protein biosynthesis are largely unaffected and treated cells maintain full metabolic activity. Viral replication is blocked at a post-entry step and resembles the inhibition profile of a known inhibitor of viral RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp) activity. Direct assessment of RdRp activity in the presence of the reagent reveals strong inhibition both in the context of viral infection and in reporter-based minireplicon assays. In toto, we have identified a compound class with broad viral target range that blocks host factors required for viral RdRp activity. Viral adaptation attempts did not induce resistance after prolonged exposure, in contrast to rapid adaptation to a pathogen-directed inhibitor of RdRp activity. PMID:21603574

  13. Effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gun-Sun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to provide comparative measurements of the effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units according to phantoms and exposure parameters. Materials and Methods Dose measurements were carried out using a head phantom representing an average man (175 cm tall, 73.5 kg male) and a limbless whole body phantom representing an average woman (155 cm tall, 50 kg female). Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were used for the dosimeter. Two direct and 2 indirect digital panoramic units were evaluated in this study. Effective doses were derived using 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations. Results The effective doses of the 4 digital panoramic units ranged between 8.9 µSv and 37.8 µSv. By using the head phantom, the effective doses from the direct digital panoramic units (37.8 µSv, 27.6 µSv) were higher than those from the indirect units (8.9 µSv, 15.9 µSv). The same panoramic unit showed the difference in effective doses according to the gender of the phantom, numbers and locations of TLDs, and kVp. Conclusion To reasonably assess the radiation risk from various dental radiographic units, the effective doses should be obtained with the same numbers and locations of TLDs, and with standard hospital exposure. After that, it is necessary to survey the effective doses from various dental radiographic units according to the gender with the corresponding phantom. PMID:23807930

  14. Small-molecule-directed, efficient generation of retinal pigment epithelium from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Maruotti, Julien; Sripathi, Srinivas R; Bharti, Kapil; Fuller, John; Wahlin, Karl J; Ranganathan, Vinod; Sluch, Valentin M; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Davis, Janine; Kim, Catherine; Zhao, Lijun; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Corneo, Barbara; Temple, Sally; Dubey, Ramin; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z; Bhutto, Imran; Lutty, Gerard A; Zack, Donald J

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with dysfunction and death of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Cell-based approaches using RPE-like cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are being developed for AMD treatment. However, most efficient RPE differentiation protocols rely on complex, stepwise treatments and addition of growth factors, whereas small-molecule-only approaches developed to date display reduced yields. To identify new compounds that promote RPE differentiation, we developed and performed a high-throughput quantitative PCR screen complemented by a novel orthogonal human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-based RPE reporter assay. Chetomin, an inhibitor of hypoxia-inducible factors, was found to strongly increase RPE differentiation; combination with nicotinamide resulted in conversion of over one-half of the differentiating cells into RPE. Single passage of the whole culture yielded a highly pure hPSC-RPE cell population that displayed many of the morphological, molecular, and functional characteristics of native RPE. PMID:26269569

  15. Adjuvant therapy in non-small cell lung cancer: current and future directions.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Randeep; Price, Julie; Butts, Charles A

    2010-01-01

    The cornerstone of treatment for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has long been surgical resection. Over the past few years, there has been a paradigm shift to provide adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy for patients with completely resected stage II-IIIA NSCLC founded on large randomized clinical trials demonstrating longer overall survival with this treatment. Reassuringly, the National Cancer Institute of Canada Cancer Therapeutics Group JBR.10 trial recently reported a continued survival advantage for patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy after >9 years of median follow-up. In contrast, the gains from using this approach for stage IB disease are less clear, although data from an unplanned subgroup analysis suggest benefit for patients with tumors > or = 4 cm. Herein, we review the evidence supporting adjuvant therapy in early-stage NSCLC patients before discussing key mitigating factors in providing treatment, such as stage of disease and the impact of the new seventh edition of the tumor-node-metastasis classification system. Criteria such as patient age and performance status, as well as the value of appropriate chemotherapy selection, are highlighted as measures to help guide management. The role of postoperative radiotherapy and the future landscape of early-stage NSCLC research are also explored; namely, therapeutic strategies exploiting pharmacogenomic and gene-expression profiling, in an attempt to personalize care, and the integration of novel targeted therapies into adjuvant clinical trials. PMID:20682608

  16. Greenhouse Gas Sensing Using Small Unmanned Aerial Systems - Field Experiment Results and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrey, A. D.; Christensen, L. E.; Brockers, R.; Thompson, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Requirements for greenhouse gas point source detection and quantification often require high spatial resolution on the order of meters. These applications, which help close the gap in emissions estimate uncertainties, also demand sensing with high sensitivity and in a fashion that accounts for spatiotemporal variability on the order of seconds to minutes. Low-cost vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) provide a means to detect and identify the location of point source gas emissions while offering ease of deployment and high maneuverability. Our current fielded gas sensing sUAS platforms are able to provide instantaneous in situ concentration measurements at locations within line of sight of the operator. Recent results from field experiments demonstrating methane detection and plume characterization will be discussed here, including performance assessment conducted via a controlled release experiment in 2013. The logical extension of sUAS gas concentration measurement is quantification of flux rate. We will discuss the preliminary strategy for quantitative flux determination, including intrinsic challenges and heritage from airborne science campaigns, associated with this point source flux quantification. This system approach forms the basis for intelligent autonomous quantitative characterization of gas plumes, which holds great value for applications in commercial, regulatory, and safety environments.

  17. Pilot opinions of sampling effects in lateral-directional control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, R. F.; Miller, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    Flight experiments with a microprocessor control system were conducted to determine the effects of variations in sampling parameters on several pilots' opinions of lateral-directional flying qualities. Princeton's variable-response research aircraft (VRA), which is equipped with a microprocessor based digital flight control system (Micro-DFCS), was the test vehicle. Two U.S. Navy pilots evaluated the effects of sampling rate, quantization, and pure time delay during tracking, approach, and landing. Aircraft carrier approach tasks were conducted using a Navy approach mirror. Acquisition and tracking of fixed objects on the ground provided additional information related to the Navy misson. The longitudinal controls were implemented with analog electronics, while the lateral-directional pilot inputs (stick and rudder) were fed to the Micro-DFCS, which commanded the ailerons and rudder. The conceptual relationship between the evaluation pilot's lateral-directional inputs, the flight computer, and the aircraft are illustrated.

  18. Measurement of plasma momentum exerted on target by a small helicon plasma thruster and comparison with direct thrust measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Komuro, Atsushi; Ando, Akira

    2015-02-01

    Momentum, i.e., force, exerted from a small helicon plasma thruster to a target plate is measured simultaneously with a direct thrust measurement using a thrust balance. The calibration coefficient relating a target displacement to a steady-state force is obtained by supplying a dc to a calibration coil mounted on the target, where a force acting to a small permanent magnet located near the coil is directly measured by using a load cell. As the force exerted by the plasma flow to the target plate is in good agreement with the directly measured thrust, the validity of the target technique is demonstrated under the present operating conditions, where the thruster is operated in steady-state. Furthermore, a calibration coefficient relating a swing amplitude of the target to an impulse bit is also obtained by pulsing the calibration coil current. The force exerted by the pulsed plasma, which is estimated from the measured impulse bit and the pulse width, is also in good agreement with that obtained for the steady-state operation; hence, the thrust assessment of the helicon plasma thruster by the target is validated for both the steady-state and pulsed operations.

  19. Non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, JiJi; Wang, Lian-Tao; Reece, Matthew E-mail: mreece@princeton.edu

    2010-11-01

    Dark matter direct detection searches for signals coming from dark matter scattering against nuclei at a very low recoil energy scale ? 10 keV. In this paper, a simple non-relativistic effective theory is constructed to describe interactions between dark matter and nuclei without referring to any underlying high energy models. It contains the minimal set of operators that will be tested by direct detection. The effective theory approach highlights the set of distinguishable recoil spectra that could arise from different theoretical models. If dark matter is discovered in the near future in direct detection experiments, a measurement of the shape of the recoil spectrum will provide valuable information on the underlying dynamics. We bound the coefficients of the operators in our non-relativistic effective theory by the null results of current dark matter direct detection experiments. We also discuss the mapping between the non-relativistic effective theory and field theory models or operators, including aspects of the matching of quark and gluon operators to nuclear form factors.

  20. Directions of Effects between Adolescent Psychopathic Traits and Parental Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salihovic, Selma; Kerr, Margaret; Ozdemir, Metin; Pakalniskiene, Vilmante

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the directions of effects between adolescent psychopathic traits and parental behaviors. The data are from a community-based cohort-sequential study. Data were collected annually over 4 years. Participants were 875 adolescents, aged 13-15 at Time 1, and we analyzed their reports of negative and positive parental

  1. Changing Directions: Young People and Effective Work against Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Paul; Henri, Tom

    2011-01-01

    This article explores effective approaches against racism in work with young people, and the relevance of new policy agendas in the UK. Since the 2001 disturbances, the UK has controversially prioritised "Community Cohesion", with the accusation that this new direction represents the "death of multiculturalism". Drawing on empirical evidence from

  2. Computational approaches to study the effects of small genomic variations.

    PubMed

    Khafizov, Kamil; Ivanov, Maxim V; Glazova, Olga V; Kovalenko, Sergei P

    2015-10-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have led to an avalanche-like increase in the number of gene sequences deposited in public databases over the last decade as well as the detection of an enormous number of previously unseen nucleotide variants therein. Given the size and complex nature of the genome-wide sequence variation data, as well as the rate of data generation, experimental characterization of the disease association of each of these variations or their effects on protein structure/function would be costly, laborious, time-consuming, and essentially impossible. Thus, in silico methods to predict the functional effects of sequence variations are constantly being developed. In this review, we summarize the major computational approaches and tools that are aimed at the prediction of the functional effect of mutations, and describe the state-of-the-art databases that can be used to obtain information about mutation significance. We also discuss future directions in this highly competitive field. PMID:26350246

  3. Direct Observations of Magnetic Reconnection Outflow and CME Triggering in a Small Erupting Solar Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Katharine K.; McCauley, Patrick I.; Tian, Hui

    2015-07-01

    We examine a small prominence eruption that occurred on 2014 May 1 at 01:35 UT and was observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Pre- and post-eruption images were taken by the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode. Pre-eruption, a dome-like structure exists above the prominence, as demarcated by coronal rain. As the eruption progresses, we find evidence for reconnection between the prominence magnetic field and the overlying field. Fast flows are seen in AIA and IRIS, indicating reconnection outflows. Plane-of-sky flows of 300 km s-1 are observed in the AIA 171 A channel along a potentially reconnected field line. IRIS detects intermittent fast line of sight flows of 200 km s-1 coincident with the AIA flows. Differential emission measure calculations show heating at the origin of the fast flows. Post-eruption XRT images show hot loops probably due to reconfiguration of magnetic fields during the eruption and subsequent heating of plasma in these loops. Although there is evidence for reconnection above the prominence during the eruption, high spatial resolution images from IRIS reveal potential reconnection sites below the prominence. A height-time analysis of the erupting prominence shows a slow initial rise with a velocity of 0.4 km s-1 followed by a rapid acceleration with a final velocity of 250 km s-1. Brightenings in IRIS during the transition between these two phases indicate the eruption trigger for the fast part of the eruption is likely a tether-cutting mechanism rather than a break-out mechanism.

  4. New multi-target-directed small molecules against Alzheimer's disease: a combination of resveratrol and clioquinol.

    PubMed

    Mao, Fei; Yan, Jun; Li, Jianheng; Jia, Xian; Miao, Hui; Sun, Yang; Huang, Ling; Li, Xingshu

    2014-08-21

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is currently one of the most difficult and challenging diseases to treat. Based on the ‘multi-target-directed ligands’ (MTDLs) strategy, we designed and synthesised a series of new compounds against AD by combining the pharmacophores of resveratrol and clioquinol. The results of biological activity tests showed that the hybrids exhibited excellent MTDL properties: a significant ability to inhibit self-induced β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation and copper(II)-induced Aβ aggregation, potential antioxidant behaviour (ORAC-FL value of 0.9–3.2 Trolox equivalents) and biometal chelation. Among these compounds, (E)-5-(4-hydroxystyryl)quinoline-8-ol (10c) showed the most potent ability to inhibit self-induced Aβ aggregation (IC50 = 8.50 μM) and copper(II)-induced Aβ aggregation and to disassemble the well-structured Aβ fibrils generated by self- and copper(II)-induced Aβ aggregation. Note that 10c could also control Cu(I/II)-triggered hydroxyl radical (OH˙) production by halting copper redox cycling via metal complexation, as confirmed by a Cu–ascorbate redox system assay. Importantly, 10c did not show acute toxicity in mice at doses of up to 2000 mg kg−1 and was able to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB), according to a parallel artificial membrane permeation assay. These results indicate that compound 10c is a promising multifunctional compound for the development of novel drugs for AD. PMID:24986600

  5. Direct methanol fuel-cell combined with a small back-up battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jaesung; Park, Eun-Sung

    A description is given of a fuel-cell power-supply for mobile phones that operates at room temperature and ambient pressure using liquid methanol and ambient air. The unit is a hybrid system in which a direct methanol fuel-cell (DMFC) and a back-up battery are connected in parallel to meet the power requirements of mobile phones. Electrochemical catalysts for the anode and the cathode of the DMFC are synthesized and Nafion-115 is used as the electrolyte. A 2 M methanol solution is filled in the feed reservoir, and the cathode is exposed to ambient air. Eight unit cells, each having 9 cm 2 of active area, are connected in series in order to raise the output voltage to 2.5-3.9 V, which is the typical voltage range for most mobile phones. Also, to simulate the practical application, an electric circuit is included to increase the output voltage of the back-up battery to repeat the charge-discharge cycle. During talk mode, the DMFC supplies 10-50% of the required power and the back-up battery supplies the remainder. In standby mode, the DMFC covers 100% of the required power and charges the back-up battery.

  6. Synthesis of stable ultra-small Cu nanoparticles for direct writing flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Chen, Minfang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, pure Cu nanoparticles (NPs) have been successfully synthesized and the Cu nano-ink was prepared for direct writing on photo paper using a roller pen. The tri-sodium citrate was used as initial reducing-cum-surfactant agent followed by hydrazine as a second massive reducing agent and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as extra surfactant agent. From the XRD, TEM, and HR-TEM analyses, the synthesized particles are confirmed to be Cu in spherical shape with sizes range of 2.5 ± 1.0 nm. By analyzing the FT-IR spectroscopy and TGA curves, it was found that the obtained particles capped with tri-sodium citrate and CTAB layers are stable to oxidation up to the temperature 228 °C. The reduced size and enhanced air-stability of the Cu NPs result in an improved particle density upon sintering, which is mainly responsible for the increased conductivity of the Cu patterns. The resistivity of Cu patterns sintered in Ar at 160 °C for 2 h is 7.2 ± 0.6 μΩ cm, which is 4.40 times the bulk Cu resistivity. The drawn Cu lines exhibited excellent integrity and good conductivity, which were experimentally tested. Moreover, a Cu electrode and a sample RFID antenna were successfully made.

  7. 7SK small nuclear RNA directly affects HMGA1 function in transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Eilebrecht, Sebastian; Brysbaert, Guillaume; Wegert, Thomas; Urlaub, Henning; Benecke, Bernd-Joachim; Benecke, Arndt

    2011-03-01

    Non-coding (nc) RNAs are increasingly recognized to play important regulatory roles in eukaryotic gene expression. The highly abundant and essential 7SK ncRNA has been shown to negatively regulate RNA Polymerase II transcription by inactivating the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) in cellular and Tat-dependent HIV transcription. Here, we identify a more general, P-TEFb-independent role of 7SK RNA in directly affecting the function of the architectural transcription factor and chromatin regulator HMGA1. An important regulatory role of 7SK RNA in HMGA1-dependent cell differentiation and proliferation regulation is uncovered with the identification of over 1500 7SK-responsive HMGA1 target genes. Elevated HMGA1 expression is observed in nearly every type of cancer making the use of a 7SK substructure in the inhibition of HMGA1 activity, as pioneered here, potentially useful in therapy. The 7SK-HMGA1 interaction not only adds an essential facet to the comprehension of transcriptional plasticity at the coupling of initiation and elongation, but also might provide a molecular link between HIV reprogramming of cellular gene expression-associated oncogenesis. PMID:21087998

  8. Direct observation of small cluster mobility and ripening. [during annealing of metal films on amorphous substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.

    1975-01-01

    Direct evidence is reported for the simultaneous occurrence of Ostwald ripening and short-distance cluster mobility during annealing of discontinuous metal films on clean amorphous substrates. The annealing characteristics of very thin particulate deposits of silver on amorphized clean surfaces of single crystalline thin graphite substrates were studied by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) under controlled environmental conditions (residual gas pressure of 10 to the minus 9th power torr) in the temperature range from 25 to 450 C. Sputter cleaning of the substrate surface, metal deposition, and annealing were monitored by TEM observation. Pseudostereographic presentation of micrographs in different annealing stages, the observation of the annealing behavior at cast shadow edges, and measurements with an electronic image analyzing system were employed to aid the visual perception and the analysis of changes in deposit structure recorded during annealing. Slow Ostwald ripening was found to occur in the entire temperature range, but the overriding surface transport mechanism was short-distance cluster mobility.

  9. A rapid, quantitative assay for direct detection of microRNAs and other small RNAs using splinted ligation

    PubMed Central

    Maroney, Patricia A.; Chamnongpol, Sangpen; Souret, Frdric; Nilsen, Timothy W.

    2007-01-01

    The discovery and characterization of microRNAs (miRNAs) and other families of short RNAs has led to a rapid expansion of research directed at elucidating their expression patterns and regulatory functions. Here, we describe a convenient, sensitive, and straightforward method to detect and quantitate specific miRNA levels in unfractionated total RNA samples. The method, based on splinted ligation, does not require specialized equipment or any amplification step, and is significantly faster and more sensitive than Northern blotting. We demonstrate that the method can be used to detect various classes of small regulatory RNAs from different organisms. PMID:17456563

  10. Allosteric Communication in Myosin V: From Small Conformational Changes to Large Directed Movements

    PubMed Central

    Cecchini, M.; Houdusse, A.; Karplus, M.

    2008-01-01

    The rigor to post-rigor transition in myosin, a consequence of ATP binding, plays an essential role in the LymnTaylor functional cycle because it results in the dissociation of the actomyosin complex after the powerstroke. On the basis of the X-ray structures of myosin V, we have developed a new normal mode superposition model for the transition path between the two states. Rigid-body motions of the various subdomains and specific residues at the subdomain interfaces are key elements in the transition. The allosteric communication between the nucleotide binding site and the U50/L50 cleft is shown to result from local changes due to ATP binding, which induce large amplitude motions that are encoded in the structure of the protein. The triggering event is the change in the interaction of switch I and the P-loop, which is stabilized by ATP binding. The motion of switch I, which is a relatively rigid element of the U50 subdomain, leads directly to a partial opening of the U50/L50 cleft; the latter is expected to weaken the binding of myosin to actin. The calculated transition path demonstrates the nature of the subdomain coupling and offers an explanation for the mutual exclusion of ATP and actin binding. The mechanism of the uncoupling of the converter from the motor head, an essential part of the transition, is elucidated. The origin of the partial untwisting of the central ?-sheet in the rigor to post-rigor transition is described. PMID:18704171

  11. Direct experimental determination of the anisotropic magnetoresistive effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, P.; Maccariello, D.; Rodrigo, C.; Cuado, J. L. F.; Muoz, M.; Prieto, J. L.; Nio, M. A.; Bollero, A.; Camarero, J.; Miranda, R.

    2014-05-01

    We present an experimental study devoted to determine the magnetoresistive signals as imposed by the system magnetic anisotropy and applied current direction in a model ferromagnetic system. By having direct experimental access to the magnetization vector during the reversal (measured through angular- and field-dependent vectorial-resolved magnetization loops), we can predict both longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistive signals, i.e., anisotropic magnetoresistance and planar Hall effect. This has been done by experimentally disclosing the resistance changes occurring during (and simultaneously to) the magnetization reversal processes.

  12. Aerosol direct radiative effect over China estimated with visibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, K.; Lin, J.

    2012-12-01

    As a short-lived climate forcer, aerosols exhibit strong radiative effects that vary significantly across the space and time. Current understanding of the long-term variability of aerosol climate forcings is however very poor due to lack of relevant atmospheric measurements. Historic records for visibility measurements from thousands of ground meteorological stations offer a plausible tool to study the decadal and multi-decadal variability of aerosol radiative effects. As a first step, this study presents a method to estimate aerosol direct radiative effect over China based on visibility data for 2006. Visibility data from about 400 ground stations are converted to near-surface aerosol extinction coefficients, which are converted then to aerosol optical depth (AOD) based on spatially and temporally varying vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties simulated by the widely used chemical transport model GEOS-Chem. The resulting AOD data are consistent with direct measurements from the China Aerosol Remote Sensing Network (CARSNET) and the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) in regions where visibility and AOD measurement sites are close in distance. Next, the visibility-derived AOD data are combined with other aerosol optical properties adopted from GEOS-Chem, cloud data from ground stations and surface albedo data from moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) to derive the direct radiative effect, by employing the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer model (SBDART). Spatial and monthly variations of aerosol radiative effects are examined.

  13. Parent socialization effects in different cultures: significance of directive parenting.

    PubMed

    Sorkhabi, Nadia

    2012-06-01

    In this article, the controversy of divergent findings in research on parental socialization effects in different cultures is addressed. Three explanations intended to address divergent findings of socialization effects in different cultures, as advanced by researchers who emphasize cultural differences, are discussed. These include cultural differences in socialization values and goals of parents, parental emotional and cognitive characteristics associated with parenting styles, and adolescents' interpretations or evaluations of their parents' parenting styles. The empirical evidence for and against each of these arguments is examined and an alternative paradigm for understanding and empirical study of developmental outcomes associated with parenting styles in different cultures is suggested. Baumrind's directive parenting style is presented as an alternative to the authoritarian parenting style in understanding the positive developmental effects associated with "strict" parenting in cultures said to have a collectivist orientation. Directions for research on the three explanations are mentioned. PMID:22897089

  14. Radiation Synovectomy: an effective alternative treatment for inflamed small joints

    PubMed Central

    Karavida, N; Notopoulos, A

    2010-01-01

    An inflamed painful joint is one of the most common indications for the patient to be referred to a rheumatologist or an orthopedician. In relation to the aetiology, the therapeutic approach might be systemic, local or a combination of them in some cases, always with the thought of balancing risk with benefit for the patient. In all cases, independently of the cause, the goal of therapy is to improve the quality of life through the reduction of pain, improvement of mobility and preservation of function. Nuclear Medicine has to offer Radiosynoviorthesis, an effective alternative procedure for treating inflamed small joints. Various radionuclides are available for radiosynoviorthesis. Their selection depends on the size of the joint to be treated. Small joints are mainly treated with [169Er] erbium under a fluoroscopic or sonographic guidance, usually with a simultaneous instillation of a corticoid. Candidates for radiosynoviorthesis should have been under a six-month systemic treatment without encouraging results or should have undergone at least one unsuccessful intra-articular injection of a long acting glucocorticoid. Since 1973, when [169Er] erbium was firstly suggested as a therapeutic agent for radiosynoviorthesis of the finger joints, there has been quite enough experience in its' application. It has been found to be cost effective in providing long term relief of pain and deformity of the inflamed joints in comparison to other therapeutic approaches. Additionally, there is no radiation risk and can be performed on an out patient basis. Therefore it can stand as an effective alternative procedure for treating early stages of chronic synovitis in RA (rheumatoid arthritis) patients, with minor damage of the cartilage and the adjacent bones, and for synovitis secondary to inflammatory arthropathies. PMID:20411055

  15. Effects of directed and kinetic energy weapons on spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Fraas, A P

    1986-12-01

    The characteristics of the various directed energy beams are reviewed, and their damaging effects on typical materials are examined for a wide range of energy pulse intensities and durations. Representative cases are surveyed, and charts are presented to indicate regions in which damage to spacecraft structures, particularly radiators for power plants, would be likely. The effects of kinetic energy weapons, such as bird-shot, are similarly examined. The charts are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of various measures designed to reduce the vulnerability of spacecraft components, particularly nuclear electric power plants.

  16. Relaxant effects of hexosamines on isolated small human placental arteries.

    PubMed

    Uldbjerg, N; Allen, J; Maigaard, S; Forman, A

    1987-01-01

    Wharton's jelly contains large amounts of hyaluronic acid, and glucosamine is an important constituent of this macromolecule. In order to evaluate the placental vascular effects of this aminosugar, small chorionic and stem villous arteries were dissected from placental specimens obtained at normal term vaginal deliveries (n = 15). Ring preparations were mounted in organ baths, and isometric wall tensions were measured. Glucosamine and its epimer galactosamine (5 X 10(-4) to 10(-2) M) produced marked relaxation of contractions induced by PGF2 alpha (10(-5) M) in both chorionic and stem villous arteries. The effect was unchanged after pretreatment with atropin, propranolol and indomethacin. The relaxant effect of the neutral sugar mannose was less pronounced compared with that of the hexosamines. Total tissue concentrations of placental hexosamines have been reported within the range needed to produce placental vascular relaxation in the present study. However, the major part of these compounds is integrated in macromolecules, and the tissue level of free hexosamine is probably far below the total concentrations. Accordingly, the effects of hexosamines demonstrated in the present study might not be of physiological importance in the regulation of fetal placental medial smooth muscle tension. PMID:3684970

  17. Sequence-Defined Peptidocopolymers: The Effect of Small Molecular Linkers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yijiang; Kang, Yu; Wang, Jue; Wang, Zheyu; Chen, Guosong; Jiang, Ming

    2015-12-14

    In this paper, the contribution of nonpeptido small molecular linkers to the properties of sequence-defined peptidocopolymers was investigated. We synthesized four novel bioinspired peptidocopolymers (P1-P4) based on elastin motif pentapeptide (Gly-Pro-Gly-Gly-Ala) by step growth polymerization. Small molecular linkers, including tetraethylene glycol (M1), adipic acid (M2), isophthalic acid (M3), and terephthalic acid (M4) with different length and flexibility are employed to tune the conformation, physical, and mechanical properties of the corresponding peptidocopolymers P1-P4 respectively. Raman spectroscopy, solid state NMR, and circular dichroism spectroscopy were used to characterize the conformation of the four peptidocopolymers. The experimental results were further confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation of typical P2 and P4 with different repeating units. High ratio of ?-turn conformation was observed in P2 due to flexible linker M2; while affected by the hydrophobic and rigid M4 linker, P4 retained less ?-turn conformation and showed drastic difference on macroscopic properties. These simple step growth synthesis techniques provide an efficient approach toward a broad range of bioinspired peptidocopolymers, which takes a further insight into the significant effect of nonpeptido linkages toward chemical-synthesized peptidocopolymers. PMID:26538230

  18. Global observations of the spectrally resolved direct effect of aerosols over clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, M.; Tilstra, G.; Stammes, P.

    2011-12-01

    The direct radiative effect of absorbing aerosols in cloudy scenes is currently not well constrained. The simultaneous observation of both clouds and aerosols is seriously limited due to their heterogeneous distribution in both space and time. Space-based observations have the potential of monitoring cloud and aerosol distributions on a daily basis, but most current satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms rely on cloud screening before retrieving aerosol information. Furthermore, results often depend strongly on aerosol micro-physical property assumptions. With the space-borne spectrometer ENVISAT/SCIAMACHY, that measures 92% of the solar energy spectrum incident on the Earth's atmosphere, the aerosol direct effect can be quantified directly, avoiding most of these limitations. The absorption of radiation by small, absorbing aerosols is large in the ultraviolet (UV), and can be detected using UV-reflectance measurements, even in the presence of clouds. The aerosol absorption decreases quickly with increasing wavelength and cloud optical thickness and cloud droplet size can be retrieved in the near-infrared, where aerosol effects are sufficiently small. These retrieved cloud parameters can be used to find a modelled unpolluted cloud reflectance spectrum for the scene (with the aerosols removed), using pre-computed data bases from a radiative transfer model. In this way, cloud and aerosol effects can be separated for the polluted cloud scene. The spectrally resolved direct effect can be determined by comparison of the measured polluted scene reflectance spectrum and the modelled clean cloud reflectance spectrum. Aerosol micro-physical property assumptions are avoided through the modelling of pure cloud spectra only. Although the global coverage of SCIAMACHY is only once every six days, over 8 years of global reflectance spectra and direct effect of aerosols over clouds data are available from this method, which will be presented here.

  19. Directional effect on post-stroke motor overflow characteristics.

    PubMed

    Tung, Li-Cheng; Yang, Jeng-Feng; Wang, Chun-Hou; Hwang, Ing-Shiou

    2011-12-31

    Motor overflow (MO) is an involuntary muscle activation associated with strenuous contralateral movement and may become manifested after stroke. The study was undertaken to investigate physiological correlation underlying atypical directional effect of joint movement on post-stroke MO in the affected upper limb. Thirty patients with unilateral post-stroke hemiparesis and fifteen age-matched healthy controls participated in this study. According to motor function assessed with the Fugl-Meyer arm scale, the patients were categorized into two groups of equal number with better (CVA_G; n = 15) or poorer motor functions (CVA_P; n = 15). Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record irradiated muscle activation from eight muscles of the affected upper limb when the subjects performed maximal isometric contractions in different directions with the unaffected shoulder, elbow and wrist joints. The results showed that only MO amplitude of the CVA_G and the control groups was more sensitive to variations in direction of joint movement in the unaffected arm than the CVA_P group. The CVA_G group exhibited larger amplitudes of MO than the control analog, whereas this tendency was reversed for the CVA_P group. In terms of EMG polar plots, spatial representations of post-stroke MO were insensitive to direction of contralateral movement. The spatial representations of the CVA_G and CVA_P groups were predominated by potent flexion-abduction synergy, contrary to the typical extension adduction synergy seen in the control analog. In conclusion, post-stroke MO amplitude was subject to contralateral movement direction for healthy controls and stroke patients with better motor recovery. However, alterations in MO spatial pattern due to directional effect were not strictly related to the degree of motor deficits of the stroke victims. PMID:22229506

  20. Analytical fuel property effects, small combustors, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of nonstandard aviation fuels on a typical small gas turbine combustor was analyzed. The T700/CT7 engine family was chosen as being representative of the class of aircraft power plants desired. Fuel properties, as specified by NASA, are characterized by low hydrogen content and high aromatics levels. Higher than normal smoke output and flame radiation intensity for the current T700 combustor which serves as a baseline were anticipated. It is, therefore, predicted that out of specification smoke visibility and higher than normal shell temperatures will exist when using NASA ERBS fuels with a consequence of severe reduction in cyclic life. Three new designs are proposed to compensate for the deficiencies expected with the existing design. They have emerged as the best of the eight originally proposed redesigns or combinations thereof. After the five choices that were originally made by NASA on the basis of competing performance factors, General Electric narrowed the field to the three proposed.

  1. Triggering memory recovery: effects of direct and incidental cuing.

    PubMed

    Handy, Justin D; Smith, Steven M

    2012-12-01

    The present study examined forgetting and recovery of narrative passages varying in emotional intensity, using what we refer to as the "dropout" method. Previous studies of this dropout procedure have used word lists as to-be-remembered material, but the present experiments used brief story vignettes with one-word titles (e.g., "Torture", "Insects"). These vignettes showed a strong dropout forgetting effect in free recall. Both text and picture cues from the vignettes eliminated the forgetting effect on a subsequent cued recall test. Vignette-related pictures in an incidental picture naming task, however, triggered little recovery of initially forgotten vignettes, as shown on a post-test. The results extend findings of large forgetting and memory recovery effects to materials that are more naturalistic than word lists. The findings also show that picture cues, which trigger strong memory recovery effects on a direct test of memory, had little effect on recovery when cues were encountered incidentally. PMID:23123684

  2. Using network meta-analysis to evaluate the existence of small-study effects in a network of interventions.

    PubMed

    Chaimani, Anna; Salanti, Georgia

    2012-06-01

    Suggested methods for exploring the presence of small-study effects in a meta-analysis and the possibility of publication bias are associated with important limitations. When a meta-analysis comprises only a few studies, funnel plots are difficult to interpret, and regression-based approaches to test and account for small-study effects have low power. Assuming that the cause of funnel plot asymmetry is likely to affect an entire research field rather than only a particular comparison of interventions, we suggest that network meta-regression is employed to account for small-study effects in a set of related meta-analyses. We present several possible models for the direction and distribution of small-study effects and we describe the methods by re-analysing two published networks. Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26062088

  3. Macroscopic Voids in Small Asteroids: Effects of Cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, A. F.

    2004-03-01

    Can low asteroid densities be explained by empty fractures? Even small cohesion, much less than for lunar fines, can prevent fines from draining into cracks on small asteroids. When the MUSES-C mission visits the small asteroid Itokawa, will it find a low density and empty fractures?

  4. Effect of Speed (Centrifugal Load) on Gear Crack Propagation Direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of rotational speed (centrifugal force) on gear crack propagation direction was explored. Gears were analyzed using finite element analysis and linear elastic fracture mechanics. The analysis was validated with crack propagation experiments performed in a spur gear fatigue rig. The effects of speed, rim thickness, and initial crack location on gear crack propagation direction were investigated. Crack paths from the finite element method correlated well with those deduced from gear experiments. For the test gear with a backup ratio (rim thickness divided by tooth height) of nib = 0.5, cracks initiating in the tooth fillet propagated to rim fractures when run at a speed of 10,000 rpm and became tooth fractures for speeds slower than 10,000 rpm for both the experiments and anal sis. From additional analysis, speed had little effect on crack propagation direction except when initial crack locations were near the tooth/rim fracture transition point for a given backup ratio. When at that point, higher speeds tended to promote rim fracture while lower speeds (or neglecting centrifugal force) produced tooth fractures.

  5. Direct mapping of nuclear shell effects in the heaviest elements.

    PubMed

    Minaya Ramirez, E; Ackermann, D; Blaum, K; Block, M; Droese, C; Dllmann, Ch E; Dworschak, M; Eibach, M; Eliseev, S; Haettner, E; Herfurth, F; Heberger, F P; Hofmann, S; Ketelaer, J; Marx, G; Mazzocco, M; Nesterenko, D; Novikov, Yu N; Pla, W R; Rodrguez, D; Scheidenberger, C; Schweikhard, L; Thirolf, P G; Weber, C

    2012-09-01

    Quantum-mechanical shell effects are expected to strongly enhance nuclear binding on an "island of stability" of superheavy elements. The predicted center at proton number Z = 114, 120, or 126 and neutron number N = 184 has been substantiated by the recent synthesis of new elements up to Z = 118. However, the location of the center and the extension of the island of stability remain vague. High-precision mass spectrometry allows the direct measurement of nuclear binding energies and thus the determination of the strength of shell effects. Here, we present such measurements for nobelium and lawrencium isotopes, which also pin down the deformed shell gap at N = 152. PMID:22878498

  6. Direct evidence of "washing out" of nuclear shell effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, A.; Ghosh, T. K.; Banerjee, K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Bhattacharya, C.; Kundu, S.; Meena, J. K.; Mukherjee, G.; Pandey, R.; Rana, T. K.; Roy, P.; Roy, T.; Srivastava, V.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2015-04-01

    Constraining the excitation energy at which the nuclear shell effect washes out has important implications on the production of superheavy elements and many other fields of nuclear physics research. We report the fission fragment mass distribution in α induced reaction on an actinide target for wide excitation range in close energy interval and show direct evidence that the nuclear shell effect washes out at excitation energy ˜40 MeV. The calculation shows that the second peak of the fission barrier also vanishes around similar excitation energy.

  7. An effective method for small event detection: match and locate (M&L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Miao; Wen, Lianxing

    2015-03-01

    Detection of low magnitude event is critical and challenging in seismology. We develop a new method, named the match and locate (M&L) method, for small event detection. The M&L method employs some template events and detects small events through stacking cross-correlograms between waveforms of the template events and potential small event signals in the continuous waveforms over multiple stations and components, but the stacking is performed after making relative traveltime corrections based on the relative locations of the template event and potential small event scanning through a 3-D region around the template. Compared to the current methods of small event detection, the M&L method places event detection to a lower magnitude level and extends the capability of detecting small events that have large distance separations from the template. The method has little dependence on the accuracy of the velocity models used, and, at the same time, provides high-precision location information of the detected small-magnitude events. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the M&L method and its advantage over the matched filter method using examples of scaled-down earthquakes occurring in the Japan Island and foreshock detection before the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake. In the foreshock detection, the M&L method detects four times more events (1427) than the templates and 9 per cent (134) more than the matched filter under the same detection threshold. Up to 41 per cent (580) of the detected events are not located at the template locations with the largest separation of 9.4 km. Based on the identified foreshocks, we observe five sequences of foreshock migration along the trench-parallel direction toward the epicentre of the Mw 9.0 main shock.

  8. Direct and indirect effects of southern flounder predation on a spot population: Experimental and model analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Crowder, L.B.; Wright, R.A.; Martin, T.H.; Rice, J.A.; Rose, K.A.

    1992-12-31

    We have previously shown that southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma Jordan and Gilbert) influence the survival and size-distribution of spot (Leiostomus xanthurus Lafayette) and other small estuarine fishes in experimental ponds. In this paper, we seek to determine whether these of effects can be accounted for by direct size-dependent predation or if there is also evidence for indirect behavioral effects on spot foraging which might alter their survival or population size structure. In our experiment, spot were allowed to grow in the presence and absence of southern flounder in an experimental estuarine pond for 101 days. Each treatment was replicated three times. We also apply a recently published simulation model of the flounder-spot interaction to this experiment to independently test the model and to estimate the direct effects of flounder predation on spot survival and size structure.

  9. Direct and indirect effects of southern flounder predation on a spot population: Experimental and model analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Crowder, L.B.; Wright, R.A.; Martin, T.H.; Rice, J.A. . Dept. of Zoology); Rose, K.A. )

    1992-01-01

    We have previously shown that southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma Jordan and Gilbert) influence the survival and size-distribution of spot (Leiostomus xanthurus Lafayette) and other small estuarine fishes in experimental ponds. In this paper, we seek to determine whether these of effects can be accounted for by direct size-dependent predation or if there is also evidence for indirect behavioral effects on spot foraging which might alter their survival or population size structure. In our experiment, spot were allowed to grow in the presence and absence of southern flounder in an experimental estuarine pond for 101 days. Each treatment was replicated three times. We also apply a recently published simulation model of the flounder-spot interaction to this experiment to independently test the model and to estimate the direct effects of flounder predation on spot survival and size structure.

  10. Effects of air pollution on passerine birds and small mammals.

    PubMed

    Llacuna, S; Gorriz, A; Durfort, M; Nadal, J

    1993-01-01

    The effects produced by emissions from coal-fired power plants, including mainly SO2, NOx and particulates, on natural populations and caged specimens of birds and small mammals were studied. The field-captured species used to evaluate these effects were passerine birds: Parus major (coal tit) and Emberiza cia (rock bunting), and the rodent Apodemus sylvaticus (wood mouse). In parallel to this study on animals captured in the field, we used other animals, Mus musculus (house mouse) and Carduelis carduelis (goldfinch) which were placed in cages near the source of pollution. Some of the animals were killed and their tracheas were removed and prepared for conventional optic studies (1000x) and electron microscopy (TEM and SEM). The results show that atmospheric air pollutants from coal-fired power plants produce alterations in the tracheal epithelium. In passerine birds, an increase in the mucus which covers the tracheal epithelium, shortening of the cilia, and increase in the number of secretory granules and vesicles were observed. In mammals, variation of the uniformity of the pseudostratified epithelium with a wide stratum of mucus, shortening of the cilia, and increase in the number of secretory granules were observed. PMID:8466292

  11. Direct and indirect effects of the glyphosate formulation Glifosato Atanor on freshwater microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Vera, Mara Solange; Di Fiori, Eugenia; Lagomarsino, Leonardo; Sinistro, Rodrigo; Escaray, Roberto; Iummato, Mara Mercedes; Jurez, Angela; Ros de Molina, Mara del Carmen; Tell, Guillermo; Pizarro, Hayde

    2012-10-01

    Glyphosate-based formulations are among the most widely used herbicides in the world. The effect of the formulation Glifosato Atanor() on freshwater microbial communities (phytoplankton, bacterioplankton, periphyton and zooplankton) was assessed through a manipulative experiment using six small outdoor microcosms of small volume. Three of the microcosms were added with 3.5 mg l(-1) of glyphosate whereas the other three were left as controls without the herbicide. The treated microcosms showed a significant increase in total phosphorus, not fully explained by the glyphosate present in the Glifosato Atanor(). Therefore, part of the phosphorus should have come from the surfactants of the formulation. The results showed significant direct and indirect effects of Glifosato Atanor() on the microbial communities. A single application of the herbicide caused a fast increase both in the abundance of bacterioplankton and planktonic picocyanobacteria and in chlorophyll a concentration in the water column. Although metabolic alterations related to oxidative stress were induced in the periphyton community, the herbicide favored its development, with a large contribution of filamentous algae typical of nutrient-rich systems, with shallow and calm waters. An indirect effect of the herbicide on the zooplankton was observed due to the increase in the abundance of the rotifer Lecane spp. as a consequence of the improved food availability given by picocyanobacteria and bacteria. The formulation affected directly a fraction of copepods as a target. It was concluded that the Glifosato Atanor() accelerates the deterioration of the water quality, especially when considering small-volume water systems. PMID:22539117

  12. Comparative Effectiveness and Implementation Research: Directions for Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Vickrey, Barbara G.; Hirtz, Deborah; Waddy, Salina; Cheng, Eric M.; Johnston, S. Claiborne

    2013-01-01

    There is an enormous unmet need for knowledge about how new insights from discovery and translational research can yield measurable, population-level improvements in health and reduction in mortality among those having or at risk for neurological disease. Once several, well-conducted randomized controlled trials establish the efficacy of a given therapy, implementation research can generate new knowledge about barriers to uptake of the therapy into widespread clinical care, and what strategies are effective in overcoming those barriers and in addressing health disparities. Comparative effectiveness research aims to elucidate the relative value (including clinical benefit, clinical harms, and/or costs) of alternative efficacious management approaches to a neurological disorder, generally through direct comparisons, and may include comparisons of methodologies for implementation. Congress has recently appropriated resources and established an institute to prioritize funding for such research. Neurologists and neuroscientists should understand the scope and objectives of comparative effectiveness and implementation research, their range of methodological approaches (formal literature syntheses, randomized trials, observational studies, modeling), and existing research resources (centers for literature synthesis, registries, practice networks) relevant to research for neurological conditions, in order to close the well-documented evidence-to-practice gap. Future directions include building this research resource capacity, producing scientists trained to conduct rigorous comparative effectiveness and implementation research, and embracing innovative strategies to set research priorities in these areas. PMID:22718542

  13. Why do pitched horizontal lines have such a small effect on visually perceived eye level?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, R. B.; Welch, R. B.; Clark, V. D.

    2000-01-01

    In two experiments, visually perceived eye level (VPEL) was measured while subjects viewed two-dimensional displays that were either upright or pitched 20 degrees top-toward or 20 degrees top-away from them. In Experiment 1, it was demonstrated that binocular exposure to a pair of pitched vertical lines or to a pitched random dot pattern caused a substantial upward VPEL shift for the top-toward pitched array and a similarly large downward shift for the top-away array. On the other hand, the same pitches of a pair of horizontal lines (viewed binocularly or monocularly) produced much smaller VPEL shifts. Because the perceived pitch of the pitched horizontal line display was nearly the same as the perceived pitch of the pitched vertical line and dot array, the relatively small influence of pitched horizontal lines on VPEL cannot be attributed simply to an underestimation of their pitch. In Experiment 2, the effects of pitched vertical lines, dots, and horizontal lines on VPEL were again measured, together with their effects on resting gaze direction (in the vertical dimension). As in Experiment 1, vertical lines and dots caused much larger VPEL shifts than did horizontal lines. The effects of the displays on resting gaze direction were highly similar to their effects on VPEL. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that VPEL shifts caused by pitched visual arrays are due to the direct influence of these arrays on the oculomotor system and are not mediated by perceived pitch.

  14. Direct and semi-direct radiative effects of absorbing aerosols in Europe: Results from a regional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, J.; Tegen, I.; Heinold, B.; Wolke, R.

    2012-12-01

    The regional transport model COSMO-MUSCAT (COSMO: Consortium for Small-scale Modeling, MUSCAT: MultiScale Atmospheric Transport Model) is used to perform simulations of the absorbing aerosol within Europe for a summer (19-26 July 2006) and for a winter (16-26 February 2007) period. The summer period is characterized by high accumulation of particles within the atmosphere due to dry weather conditions and low wind speeds during that time. In contrast, the winter period is dominated by several precipitation events causing considerable removal of the particles from the atmosphere. At each model grid cell the simulated aerosol is categorized either as urban or as continental aerosol type. Both aerosol types are important for the European domain. The differentiation between urban and continental aerosol types is based on the fraction of elemental carbon (EC) of the particle mass up to 2.5 ?m (PM2.5), whereby the EC fraction > 20% characterizes urban and EC fraction < 20% characterizes continental aerosol. The different aerosol types influence the radiation fluxes in the model differently because of their different optical properties. Three different model setups are used to analyze these radiative effects. In the first, the simulated urban and continental aerosol interacts with the solar radiation simulated in the model thus also influencing the atmospheric dynamics. In the second model setup, the simulated aerosol fields do not interact with radiation in the model. Finally, in the third setup, the radiation routine is called twice in the model, such that urban and continental aerosol influence the solar radiation only but does not further influence atmospheric dynamics. Calculating the differences of the solar fluxes between the results of these individual model setups leads to information regarding the (1) radiative effect (RE; includes the direct radiative effect of the aerosol and the effect of changes due to the impact of the direct forcing), the (2) direct radiative forcing (DRF; effect of aerosols on the radiation fluxes without including effects of changed atmospheric dynamics) and the (3) semi-direct radiative effect (SRE; the radiative effect of changes on atmospheric dynamics without considering the aerosol DRF). Due to the existence of absorbing aerosol an average solar heating rate for the summer case of 1.2-1.3 Kd-1 is calculated between surface and 2 km altitude. Due to the heating by absorbing particles an average decrease of the total cloud cover (summer: 1.0%, winter: 0.7%) is found. This SRE causes mainly positive forcing near the surface and at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) over the European land regions. The SRE is also positive near the surface (summer: 2.6 Wm-2, winter: 0.7 Wm-2). Significant negative correlations (summer: -0.7, winter: -0.4) between the aerosol optical depth and the DRF are found at the surface. Here, the DRF represents a distinct attenuation of the solar flux of -16.3 Wm-2 during summer and of -6.3 Wm-2 during winter. At the TOA the DRF pattern is influenced by the surface albedo and the cloud fraction. A general decrease of 2m temperatures is simulated when calculating the solar radiative effects of the aerosol distribution compared to the model setup without considering aerosol forcing (summer: -0.14 K, winter: -0.10 K) over land surface.

  15. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  16. Direction Dependent Effects In Widefield Wideband Full Stokes Radio Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, Preshanth; Bhatnagar, Sanjay; Rau, Urvashi; Taylor, Russ

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis imaging in radio astronomy is affected by instrumental and atmospheric effects which introduce direction dependent gains.The antenna power pattern varies both as a function of time and frequency. The broad band time varying nature of the antenna power pattern when not corrected leads to gross errors in full stokes imaging and flux estimation. In this poster we explore the errors that arise in image deconvolution while not accounting for the time and frequency dependence of the antenna power pattern. Simulations were conducted with the wideband full stokes power pattern of the Very Large Array(VLA) antennas to demonstrate the level of errors arising from direction-dependent gains. Our estimate is that these errors will be significant in wide-band full-pol mosaic imaging as well and algorithms to correct these errors will be crucial for many up-coming large area surveys (e.g. VLASS)

  17. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, W.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective eld theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering or current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral di*erences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  18. Differential strengths of positive selection revealed by hitchhiking effects at small physical scales in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuh Chwen G; Langley, Charles H; Begun, David J

    2014-04-01

    The long time scale of adaptive evolution makes it difficult to directly observe the spread of most beneficial mutations through natural populations. Therefore, inferring attributes of beneficial mutations by studying the genomic signals left by directional selection is an important component of population genetics research. One kind of signal is a trough in nearby neutral genetic variation due to selective fixation of initially rare alleles, a phenomenon known as "genetic hitchhiking." Accumulated evidence suggests that a considerable fraction of substitutions in the Drosophila genome results from positive selection, most of which are expected to have small selection coefficients and influence the population genetics of sites in the immediate vicinity. Using Drosophila melanogaster population genomic data, we found that the heterogeneity in synonymous polymorphism surrounding different categories of coding fixations is readily observable even within 25 bp of focal substitutions, which we interpret as the result of small-scale hitchhiking effects. The strength of natural selection on different sites appears to be quite heterogeneous. Particularly, neighboring fixations that changed amino acid polarities in a way that maintained the overall polarities of a protein were under stronger selection than other categories of fixations. Interestingly, we found that substitutions in slow-evolving genes are associated with stronger hitchhiking effects. This is consistent with the idea that adaptive evolution may involve few substitutions with large effects or many substitutions with small effects. Because our approach only weakly depends on the numbers of recent nonsynonymous substitutions, it can provide a complimentary view to the adaptive evolution inferred by other divergence-based evolutionary genetic methods. PMID:24361994

  19. A small direct tandem duplication of the myelin protein zero gene in a patient with Dejerine-Sottas disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tachi, N; Kozuka, N; Ohya, K; Chiba, S; Yamashita, S

    1998-04-01

    We present a male patient with Dejerine-Sottas disease phenotype, who had a small direct tandem duplication of the Po gene. The pathology of the sural nerve showed hypomyelinated fibers with absence of active demyelination and onion-bulb formations composed of two parallel layers of basement membrane, consistent with congenital hypomyelination neuropathy (CHN). However, his clinical features were more severe than those of previously reported CHN patients. A GGCA insertion was identified at the position of nucleotide 560 in the myelin protein zero (Po) gene. This insertional mutation was located in exon 4 coding for the transmembrane domain of the Po gene and caused a shift of reading frame, creating a stop codon. The mutation of the transmembrane domain probably has the largest impact on Po function. The mutation was not identified in both parents. PMID:9588852

  20. The study of effects of small perturbations on chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grebogi, C. . Lab. for Plasma Research); Yorke, J.A. . Inst. for Physical Science and Technology)

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics on small perturbations on chaotic systems: controlling chaos; shadowing and noise reduction; chaotic scattering; random maps; magnetic dynamo; and aids transmission. (LSP)

  1. Effective hydrogen generator testing for on-site small engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaiwongsa, Praitoon; Pornsuwancharoen, Nithiroth; Yupapin, Preecha P.

    2009-07-01

    We propose a new concept of hydrogen generator testing for on-site small engine. In general, there is a trade-off between simpler vehicle design and infrastructure issues, for instance, liquid fuels such as gasoline and methanol for small engine use. In this article we compare the hydrogen gases combination the gasoline between normal systems (gasoline only) for small engine. The advantage of the hydrogen combines gasoline for small engine saving the gasoline 25%. Furthermore, the new concept of hydrogen combination for diesel engine, bio-diesel engine, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), natural gas vehicle (NGV), which is discussed in details.

  2. Identifying the direct risk source to contain epidemics more effectively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhijun; Huang, He; Chen, Yahong; Pan, Yaohui

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the impact of people's perceptions regarding the risk of an epidemic by analyzing the differences between local and global risk perceptions on affecting the epidemic threshold. Three issues are introduced to explain such differences: the indirect risk source, the heterogeneous global risk, and heterogeneity in individuals' intrinsic susceptibilities. When the direct risk source is completely undetected, the local risk perception tends to have no effect on the epidemic threshold, and the effect of the local risk is nearly equivalent to that of the global risk perception, thereby also suggesting a reason why global risk perception cannot affect the epidemic threshold. However, there is a surprising effect of the global risk perception: When its heterogeneity is sufficiently high, an increased epidemic threshold value sometimes may lead to a greater infected ratio.

  3. The effect of directivity in a PSHA framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnuolo, E.; Herrero, A.; Cultrera, G.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a method to introduce a refined representation of the ground motion in the framework of the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA). This study is especially oriented to the incorporation of a priori information about source parameters, by focusing on the directivity effect and its influence on seismic hazard maps. Two strategies have been followed. One considers the seismic source as an extended source, and it is valid when the PSHA seismogenetic sources are represented as fault segments. We show that the incorporation of variables related to the directivity effect can lead to variations up to 20 per cent of the hazard level in case of dip-slip faults with uniform distribution of hypocentre location, in terms of spectral acceleration response at 5 s, exceeding probability of 10 per cent in 50 yr. The second one concerns the more general problem of the seismogenetic areas, where each point is a seismogenetic source having the same chance of enucleate a seismic event. In our proposition the point source is associated to the rupture-related parameters, defined using a statistical description. As an example, we consider a source point of an area characterized by strike-slip faulting style. With the introduction of the directivity correction the modulation of the hazard map reaches values up to 100 per cent (for strike-slip, unilateral faults). The introduction of directivity does not increase uniformly the hazard level, but acts more like a redistribution of the estimation that is consistent with the fault orientation. A general increase appears only when no a priori information is available. However, nowadays good a priori knowledge exists on style of faulting, dip and orientation of faults associated to the majority of the seismogenetic zones of the present seismic hazard maps. The percentage of variation obtained is strongly dependent on the type of model chosen to represent analytically the directivity effect. Therefore, it is our aim to emphasize more on the methodology following which, all the information collected may be easily converted to obtain a more comprehensive and meaningful probabilistic seismic hazard formulation.

  4. Stochastic Control Problems where Small Intervention Costs Have Big Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Oksendal, B.

    1999-11-15

    We study an impulse control problem where the cost of interfering in a stochastic system with an impulse of size {zeta} element of R is given by c+{lambda} vertical bar {zeta} vertical bar , where c and {lambda} are positive constants. We call {lambda} the proportional cost coefficient and c the intervention cost . We find the value/cost function V{sub c} for this problem for each c>0 and we show that lim{sub c{sup yields}{sub 0}+}V{sub c}=W , where W is the value function for the corresponding singular stochastic control problem. Our main result is that dV{sub c}/dc = {infinity} at c=0. This illustrates that the introduction of an intervention cost c>0 , however small, into a system can have a big effect on the value function: the increase in the value function is in no proportion to the increase in c (from c=0 )

  5. Opinion dynamics within a virtual small group: the stubbornness effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzini, Andrea; Cini, Alessandro; Bagnoli, Franco; Ramasco, José

    2015-09-01

    The modeling of opinion dynamics is social systems has attracted a good deal of attention in the last decade. Even though based on intuition and observation, the mechanisms behind many of these models need solid empirical grounding. In this work, we investigate the relation among subjective variables (such as the personality), the dynamics of the affinity network dynamics, the communication patterns emerging throughout the social interactions and the opinions dynamics in a series of experiments with five small groups of ten people each. In order to ignite the discussion, the polemic topic of animal experimentation was proposed. The groups essentially polarized in two factions with a set of stubborn individuals (those not changing their opinions in time) playing the role of anchors. Our results suggest that the different layers present in the group dynamics (i.e., individual level, group dynamics and meso-communication) are deeply intermingled, specifically the stubbornness effect appears to be related to the dynamical features of the network topologies, and only in an undirected way to the personality of the participants.

  6. The effects of pharmaceutical excipients on small intestinal transit.

    PubMed Central

    Adkin, D A; Davis, S S; Sparrow, R A; Huckle, P D; Phillips, A J; Wilding, I R

    1995-01-01

    1. The effect of three iso-osmotic pharmaceutical excipient solutions on gastrointestinal transit were investigated in eight healthy male volunteers. Each subject received 200 ml radiolabelled purified water, or a 200 ml solution of sodium acid pyrophosphate ((SAPP) 1.1 g/200 ml), mannitol (2.264 g/200 ml) or sucrose (4.08 g/200 ml) in a four way cross over design. On each of the study days the volunteers also received five 6 mm diameter non-disintegrating tablets. Dual isotope gamma scintigraphy was used to assess the transit behaviour of the tablets and solutions. 2. There were no significant differences between the gastric emptying times of the four solution formulations. Rapid gastric emptying was observed in all cases (mean t 50% varied from 11-14 min). 3. Small intestinal transit (SIT) times for the SAPP and mannitol solutions were reduced by 39 and 34%, respectively, when compared with the control solution (purified water = 240 min; SAPP = 147 min; mannitol = 158 min). The 95% confidence limits for the mean differences in SIT time between the control and SAPP solutions was 39-94-149 min, and 40-82-124 min between the mannitol and the control. Intestinal transit for the sucrose solution was similar to that for the control solution (sucrose = 229 min). 4. There were no significant differences in the transit times of the non-disintegrating tablet preparations, when co-administered with each solution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7640144

  7. Effects of specimen width and rolling direction on the mechanical properties of beryllium copper alloy C17200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. C.; Liu, Z. R.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the research was to study the effects of specimen width and rolling direction of beryllium copper alloy, C17200, on the mechanical properties of yield strength and Young's modulus. The experimental results showed that the reduction of the specimen width from 12.5 mm to 2.5 mm did not affect the yield strength but reduced the Young's modulus by 4%. Also, the change of rolling direction affected both the yield strength and the Young's modulus. When the tension direction is parallel to the rolling direction, the maximum yield strength was obtained. The results can help predict the behavior of small-scale beryllium copper products more accurately.

  8. Direct Pro-Inflammatory Effects of Prorenin on Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Peng; Grobe, Justin L.; Desland, Fiona A.; Zhou, Guannan; Shen, Xiao Z.; Shan, Zhiying; Liu, Meng; Raizada, Mohan K.; Sumners, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation has been implicated in hypertension, and microglia have been proposed to play an important role in the progression of this disease. Here, we have studied whether microglia are activated within cardiovascular regulatory area(s) of the brain during hypertension, especially in high blood pressure that is associated with chronic activation of the renin-angiotensin-system. In addition, we determined whether prorenin, an essential component of the renin-angiotensin-system, exerts direct pro-inflammatory effects on these microglia. Our data indicate that two rodent models which display neurogenic hypertension and over activation of the renin-angiotensin-system in the brain (sRA mice and spontaneously hypertensive rats) exhibit microglial activation, and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, an area crucial for regulation of sympathetic outflow. Further, the renin-angiotensin-system component prorenin elicits direct activation of hypothalamic microglia in culture and induction of pro-inflammatory mechanisms in these cells, effects that involve prorenin receptor-induced NFκB activation. In addition, the prorenin-elicited increases in cytokine expression were fully abolished by microglial inhibitor minocycline, and were potentiated by pre-treatment of cells with angiotensin II. Taken together with our previous data which indicate that pro-inflammatory processes in the paraventricular nucleus are involved in the hypertensive action of renin-angiotensin-system, the novel discovery that prorenin exerts direct stimulatory effects on microglial activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production provides support for the idea that renin-angiotensin-system -induced neurogenic hypertension is not restricted to actions of angiotensin II alone. PMID:25302502

  9. [Effects of food on motility of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Ducrott, P; Denis, P; Colin, R

    1989-02-15

    It is now well-known that feeding suppresses the phase 3 propagated waves for 2.30 to 10 hours in the small intestine. This finding can be influenced by subject's age, ingestion time and nature of food. The influence of extraluminal factors, i.e. nervous or hormonal, is probable. First, a reduction of jejunal contractions frequency without alteration of their amplitude can be found in the elderly. Second, a late dinner can shorten by 50 per cent the duration of the post-prandial motor profile, which is followed by an irregular activity normally nearly absent and without reappearance of a reduced periodicity of phase 3. In man as in animal, the duration of the post-prandial inhibition is correlated with the caloric content of the meal. At equal colonic content a lipidic meal induces a stronger effect than a glucidic meal which has itself a stronger effect than a protidic one. Fibres eventually increase by 40 to 50 per cent the duration of the post-prandial continuous motor activity in the duodenum, and have, depending on their nature, a variable effect on the jejunum. Digestion and absorption of nutrients also appear to be involved through probable nervous and/or hormonal pathways. In animals, an increased absorption of lipids by addition of bile lengthens the inhibition duration; in man intravenous infusion of a lipidic emulsion can induce a typical post-prandial motor profile. Clinical implications of these results involve at the moment a hypothesis on the physiopathology of diarrhea and artificial, enteral or parenteral, nutrition. On the model of vagotomised patients, it was shown that diarrheic patients exhibited a shorter post-prandial activity. Enteral feeding can interrupt phase 3 on the one hand temporarily and on the other under the conditions of a minimal caloric flow and molecular weight of peptides in case of protidic infusion. Preliminary results with parenteral alimentation were found to be similar, with in particular a strong inhibitory effect of perfusion of lipids. PMID:2522222

  10. Brisk and Effective Fluency Instruction for Small Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Judith K.

    2012-01-01

    Fluency is known as the bridge between phonics and comprehension. Teachers of reading provide high-quality instruction in phonics and decoding strategies, usually in a small-group format, but may be unsure how to insert fluency instruction into the small-group lesson. This article presents key concepts in fluency instruction and a description of

  11. Brisk and Effective Fluency Instruction for Small Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Judith K.

    2012-01-01

    Fluency is known as the bridge between phonics and comprehension. Teachers of reading provide high-quality instruction in phonics and decoding strategies, usually in a small-group format, but may be unsure how to insert fluency instruction into the small-group lesson. This article presents key concepts in fluency instruction and a description of…

  12. Can "Twinning" Be Applied Effectively to Small Library Associations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amenu-Kpodo, Norma

    Based on an informal survey of 26 small national library associations, this paper examines "twinning" (i.e., a formal substantive collaboration between two organizations) between library associations in general and with particular emphasis on the small associations' experience. It examines their characteristics and discusses the perceived benefits

  13. Effects of desert wildfires on desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and other small vertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esque, T.C.; Schwalbe, C.R.; DeFalco, L.A.; Duncan, R.B.; Hughes, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of standardized surveys to determine the effects of wildfires on desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) and their habitats in the northeastern Mojave Desert and northeastern Sonoran Desert. Portions of 6 burned areas (118 to 1,750 ha) were examined for signs of mortality of vertebrates. Direct effects of fire in desert habitats included animal mortality and loss of vegetation cover. A range of 0 to 7 tortoises was encountered during surveys, and live tortoises were found on all transects. In addition to desert tortoises, only small (<1 kg) mammals and reptiles (11 taxa) were found dead on the study areas. We hypothesize that indirect effects of fire on desert habitats might result in changes in the composition of diets and loss of vegetation cover, resulting in an increase in predation and loss of protection from temperature extremes. These changes in habitat also might cause changes in vertebrate communities in burned areas.

  14. Scanner effects on directed self-assembly patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renwick, Stephen P.

    2014-03-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) of various polymers is a potential next-generation lithography component. Lithographers can use an ArF scanner to print guide structures with pitches accessible with current technology. The DSA materials, in a non-exposure step, perform pitch multiplication of 1-D and 2-D guide structures. While research has investigated defects inherent to the DSA material, ArF scanner effects have received little attention. This work uses DSA models and scanner models to assess requirements for ArF immersion scanners for DSA complimentary lithography.

  15. Direct measurement of effective electro conductivity of turbulent liquid metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, P.; Denisov, S.; Noskov, V.; Stepanov, R.

    2008-09-01

    Direct measurement of effective electro conductivity are performed in a nonstationary turbulent flow of liquid gallium, generated in a closed toroidal channel. The peak level of the Reynolds number reached Re ? 106, what corresponds to the magnetic Reynolds number Rm ? 1. The conductivity of the liquid metal was determined measuring the phase shift between sinusoidal voltage and current in the RLC-circuit, the inductance of which was made by the toroidal coil embracing the channel. The maximal deviation of electrical conductivity from its ohmic value reaches about 1%.

  16. Direct effects of increasing carbon dioxide on vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, B R; Cure, J D

    1985-12-01

    CO/sub 2/ is an essential environmental resource. It is required as a raw material of the orderly development of all green plants. As the availability of CO/sub 2/ increases, perhaps reaching two or three times the concentration prevailing in preindustrial times, plants and all other organisms dependent on them for food will be affected. Humans are releasing a gaseous fertilizer into the global atmosphere in quantities sufficient to affect all life. This volume considers the direct effects of global CO/sub 2/ fertilization on plants and thus on all other life. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  17. A Flexible Stent with Small Intestinal Submucosa Covering for Direct Intrahepatic Portocaval Shunt: Experimental Pilot Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Niyyati, Mahtab; Petersen, Bryan D.; Pavcnik, Dusan Uchida, Barry T.; Timmermans, Hans A.; Hiraki, Takao; Wu Renghong; Brountzos, Elias; Keller, Frederick S.; Roesch, Josef

    2005-04-15

    The suitability of the flexible sandwich Zilver stent-graft (SZSG) with a biologically active tissue layer (small intestinal submucosa) for creation of the intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided direct intrahepatic portocaval shunt (DIPS) was explored in six young swine in a search for a flexible system to replace the rigid polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) stent originally used by this group with limited success. The portal vein was punctured from the inferior vena cava through the caudate lobe of the liver using IVUS guidance. After balloon dilation of the puncture tract, DIPS was successfully created in all animals with use of an SZSG 9 mm in diameter and 6 cm or 8 cm long. Only one DIPS remained well patent at 14 days when the animal had to be killed because of encephalopathy. DIPS in the other five animals were found to be either severely stenosed (3 animals) or occluded (2 animals) at 4 weeks due to accelerated formation of neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) in the liver parenchymal portion of the shunt and superimposed thrombosis. The lack of high pressure in the portal system contributed to early endograft closure. The flexible stent and the covering fail badly. The reason for this could be due to either component. More work is required to find a reliable flexible system with long-term patency. Exploration of the IVUS-guided direct extrahepatic portocaval shunt is suggested.

  18. Direct effects of hepatitis C virus on the lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yasuteru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-11-28

    It has been reported that the direct binding of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and/or the replication of HCV in the extrahepatic organs and, especially, lymphoid cells, might affect the pathogenesis of extrahepatic diseases with HCV infection. More than one decade ago, several reports described the existence of HCV-RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Moreover, many reports describing the existence of HCV in B lymphocytes and B cell lymphoma have been published. In addition to B lymphocytes, it was reported that HCV replication could be detected in T lymphocytes and T cell lines. Among the extrahepatic diseases with HCV infection, mixed cryoglobulinemia-related diseases and autoimmune-related diseases are important for understanding the immunopathogensis of HCV persistent infection. Moreover, HCV persistent infection can cause malignant lymphoma. The biological significance of lymphotropic HCV has not yet become clear. However, several candidates have been considered for a long time. One is that lymphotropic HCV is an HCV reservoir that might contribute to the recurrence of HCV infection and difficult-to-treat disease status. The other important issue is the carcinogenesis of the lymphoid cells and disturbances of the immune responses. Therefore, the extrahepatic diseases might be induced by direct interaction between HCV and lymphoid cells. In this article, we summarize various studies showing the direct effect of HCV on lymphoid cells and discuss the biological significance of lymphotropic HCV. PMID:24307783

  19. Direct effects of hepatitis C virus on the lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Yasuteru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that the direct binding of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and/or the replication of HCV in the extrahepatic organs and, especially, lymphoid cells, might affect the pathogenesis of extrahepatic diseases with HCV infection. More than one decade ago, several reports described the existence of HCV-RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Moreover, many reports describing the existence of HCV in B lymphocytes and B cell lymphoma have been published. In addition to B lymphocytes, it was reported that HCV replication could be detected in T lymphocytes and T cell lines. Among the extrahepatic diseases with HCV infection, mixed cryoglobulinemia-related diseases and autoimmune-related diseases are important for understanding the immunopathogensis of HCV persistent infection. Moreover, HCV persistent infection can cause malignant lymphoma. The biological significance of lymphotropic HCV has not yet become clear. However, several candidates have been considered for a long time. One is that lymphotropic HCV is an HCV reservoir that might contribute to the recurrence of HCV infection and difficult-to-treat disease status. The other important issue is the carcinogenesis of the lymphoid cells and disturbances of the immune responses. Therefore, the extrahepatic diseases might be induced by direct interaction between HCV and lymphoid cells. In this article, we summarize various studies showing the direct effect of HCV on lymphoid cells and discuss the biological significance of lymphotropic HCV. PMID:24307783

  20. Direct-current bactericidal effect on intact skin.

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, L; Foleno, B; Means, B; Petrucelli, S

    1980-01-01

    Positive carbon-containing electrodes conveying 5 or more microA of constant direct current per cm2 showed bactericidal activity on intact back skin of 13 human subjects. This effect increased with the duration of stimulation up to a total surface bacterial kill at 20 h. When total current and current density were varied independently on 16 sites on the backs of eight subjects, the effect was dependent on current density, not on total current. Electrodes driven by similar voltages but which removed the electrochemical reaction from inoculated sites on the backs of three subjects failed to reduce the numbers of colony-forming units as compared with those sampled from control sites. This showed the bactericidal effect to be electrochemical in origin, probably mediated by local acidity generated at the surface of the positive carbon-containing electrodes. With an adhesive tape stripping technique on three sites on each of six subjects, it was determined that the effect extended into the epidermis of the human back. No effect was observed beneath negative or control electrodes under the same conditions. PMID:7416740

  1. The direct magnetoelectric effect in ferroelectric-ferromagnetic epitaxial heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Fina, I; Dix, N; Rebled, J M; Gemeiner, P; Mart, X; Peir, F; Dkhil, B; Snchez, F; Fbrega, L; Fontcuberta, J

    2013-09-01

    Ferroelectric (FE) and ferromagnetic (FM) materials engineered in horizontal heterostructures allow interface-mediated magnetoelectric coupling. The so-called converse magnetoelectric effect (CME) has been already demonstrated by electric-field poling of the ferroelectric layers and subsequent modification of the magnetic state of adjacent ferromagnetic layers by strain effects and/or free-carrier density tuning. Here we focus on the direct magnetoelectric effect (DME) where the dielectric state of a ferroelectric thin film is modified by a magnetic field. Ferroelectric BaTiO3 (BTO) and ferromagnetic CoFe2O4 (CFO) oxide thin films have been used to create epitaxial FE/FM and FM/FE heterostructures on SrTiO3(001) substrates buffered with metallic SrRuO3. It will be shown that large ferroelectric polarization and DME can be obtained by appropriate selection of the stacking order of the FE and FM films and their relative thicknesses. The dielectric permittivity, at the structural transitions of BTO, is strongly modified (up to 36%) when measurements are performed under a magnetic field. Due to the insulating nature of the ferromagnetic layer and the concomitant absence of the electric-field effect, the observed DME effect solely results from the magnetostrictive response of CFO elastically coupled to the BTO layer. These findings show that appropriate architecture and materials selection allow overcoming substrate-induced clamping in multiferroic multi-layered films. PMID:23872985

  2. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Effects on Saccade Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    van der Geest, Jos N.; Kengne Kamga, Sandra; Verhage, M. Claire; Donchin, Opher; Frens, Maarten A.

    2015-01-01

    Saccade adaptation is a cerebellar-mediated type of motor learning in which the oculomotor system is exposed to repetitive errors. Different types of saccade adaptations are thought to involve distinct underlying cerebellar mechanisms. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) induces changes in neuronal excitability in a polarity-specific manner and offers a modulatory, noninvasive, functional insight into the learning aspects of different brain regions. We aimed to modulate the cerebellar influence on saccade gains during adaptation using tDCS. Subjects performed an inward (n = 10) or outward (n = 10) saccade adaptation experiment (25% intrasaccadic target step) while receiving 1.5?mA of anodal cerebellar tDCS delivered by a small contact electrode. Compared to sham stimulation, tDCS increased learning of saccadic inward adaptation but did not affect learning of outward adaptation. This may imply that plasticity mechanisms in the cerebellum are different between inward and outward adaptation. TDCS could have influenced specific cerebellar areas that contribute to inward but not outward adaptation. We conclude that tDCS can be used as a neuromodulatory technique to alter cerebellar oculomotor output, arguably by engaging wider cerebellar areas and increasing the available resources for learning. PMID:25821604

  3. Direct effect of bevacizumab on glioblastoma cell lines in vitro.

    PubMed

    Simon, Thomas; Coquerel, Brnice; Petit, Alexandre; Kassim, Yusra; Demange, Elise; Le Cerf, Didier; Perrot, Valrie; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the pro-angiogenic factor vascular and endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) used in the treatment of glioblastomas. Although most patients respond initially to this treatment, studies have shown that glioblastomas eventually recur. Several non-mutually exclusive theories based on the anti-angiogenic effect of bevacizumab have been proposed to explain these mechanisms of resistance. In this report, we studied whether bevacizumab can act directly on malignant glioblastoma cells. We observe changes in the expression profiles of components of the VEGF/VEGF-R pathway and in the response to a VEGF-A stimulus following bevacizumab treatment. In addition, we show that bevacizumab itself acts on glioblastoma cells by activating the Akt and Erks survival signaling pathways. Bevacizumab also enhances proliferation and invasiveness of glioblastoma cells in hyaluronic acid hydrogel. We propose that the paradoxical effect of bevacizumab on glioblastoma cells could be due to changes in the VEGF-A-dependent autocrine loop as well as in the intracellular survival pathways, leading to the enhancement of tumor aggressiveness. Investigation of how bevacizumab interacts with glioblastoma cells and the resulting downstream signaling pathways will help targeting populations of resistant glioblastoma cells. PMID:25113866

  4. Direct and Indirect Effects of Leptin on Adipocyte Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Ruth B.S.

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is hypothesized to function as a negative feedback signal in the regulation of energy balance. It is produced primarily by adipose tissue and circulating concentrations correlate with the size of body fat stores. Administration of exogenous leptin to normal weight, leptin responsive animals inhibits food intake and reduces the size of body fat stores whereas mice that are deficient in either leptin or functional leptin receptors are hyperphagic and obese, consistent with a role for leptin in the control of body weight. This review discusses the effect of leptin on adipocyte metabolism. Because adipocytes express leptin receptors there is the potential for leptin to influence adipocyte metabolism directly. Adipocytes also are insulin responsive and receive sympathetic innervation, therefore leptin can also modify adipocyte metabolism indirectly. Studies published to date suggest that direct activation of adipocyte leptin receptors has little effect on cell metabolism in vivo, but that leptin modifies adipocyte sensitivity to insulin to inhibit lipid accumulation. In vivo administration of leptin leads to a suppression of lipogenesis, an increase in triglyceride hydrolysis and an increase in fatty acid and glucose oxidation. Activation of central leptin receptors also contributes to the development of a catabolic state in adipocytes, but this may vary between different fat depots. Leptin reduces the size of white fat depots by inhibiting cell proliferation both through induction of inhibitory circulating factors and by contributing to sympathetic tone which suppresses adipocyte proliferation. PMID:23685313

  5. Small scale variability of benthic assemblages: biogenic neighborhood effects.

    PubMed

    Wahl, M

    2001-03-30

    In this study, patterns of community development were investigated within vs. outside 'habitats'. These habitats represented five different monospecific assemblages of one of the following species: the brown alga Fucus serratus, the red alga Delesseria sanguinea, the green alga Enteromorpha intestinalis, the seagrass Zostera marina and the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Natural assemblages were allowed to develop on paired artificial substrata-separated by ca. 1 m-within (treatment) vs. outside (control) of habitats. The same colonizer species settled on treatment and control substrata for given habitats. However, after 5 months of settlement and post-settlement dynamics, their proportional abundance and the structure of treatment and control assemblages differed in many instances. Variability among replicates of a given treatment, seperated by up to 50 m, was large, indicating a patchy spatial distribution of organisms. Despite this spatial heterogeneity among within-treatment replicates, analysis of similarity revealed that in most instances significantly different assemblages developed between treatments on a small spatial scale depending on whether substrata were positioned within as compared to outside a given habitat.Consequently, the algae, seagrass or mussels constituting a habitat seem to control the structure of the benthic assemblage developing in their vicinity by one or more possible mechanisms: reduction of larval advection, exudation of metabolites that influence settlement and/or post-settlement survival, and/or-in the case of mussel assemblages-predation on larvae.In addition to spatial variability in larval supply, stochasticity in succession, substratum heterogeneity, competition and predation effects, this investigation reveals the potential of a further assemblage structuring factor: the impact of neighboring organisms. PMID:11239628

  6. Geometric Effects When Measuring Small Holes With Micro Contact Probes

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jack; Muralikrishnan, Bala; Sahay, Chittaranjan

    2011-01-01

    A coordinate measuring machine with a suitably small probe can be used to measure micro-features such as the diameter and form of small holes (often about 100 μm in diameter). When measuring small holes, the clearance between the probe tip and the part is sometimes nearly as small as other characteristic lengths (such as probe deflection or form errors) associated with the measurement. Under these circumstances, the basic geometry of the measurement is much different than it is for the measurement of a macroscopic object. Various geometric errors are greatly magnified, and consequently sources of error that are totally irrelevant when measuring macroscopic artifacts can become important. In this article we discuss errors associated with misalignment or non-orthogonality of the probe axes, probe-tip radius compensation, and mechanical filtering.

  7. 26 CFR 1.1202-2 - Qualified small business stock; effect of redemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Qualified small business stock; effect of... Qualified small business stock; effect of redemptions. (a) Redemptions from taxpayer or related person(1) In general. Stock acquired by a taxpayer is not qualified small business stock if, in one or...

  8. 26 CFR 1.1202-2 - Qualified small business stock; effect of redemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Qualified small business stock; effect of... Qualified small business stock; effect of redemptions. (a) Redemptions from taxpayer or related person(1) In general. Stock acquired by a taxpayer is not qualified small business stock if, in one or...

  9. 26 CFR 1.1202-2 - Qualified small business stock; effect of redemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Qualified small business stock; effect of... Qualified small business stock; effect of redemptions. (a) Redemptions from taxpayer or related person(1) In general. Stock acquired by a taxpayer is not qualified small business stock if, in one or...

  10. 26 CFR 1.1202-2 - Qualified small business stock; effect of redemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Qualified small business stock; effect of... Qualified small business stock; effect of redemptions. (a) Redemptions from taxpayer or related person(1) In general. Stock acquired by a taxpayer is not qualified small business stock if, in one or...

  11. Effect of occlusion, directionality and age on horizontal localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alworth, Lynzee Nicole

    Localization acuity of a given listener is dependent upon the ability discriminate between interaural time and level disparities. Interaural time differences are encoded by low frequency information whereas interaural level differences are encoded by high frequency information. Much research has examined effects of hearing aid microphone technologies and occlusion separately and prior studies have not evaluated age as a factor in localization acuity. Open-fit hearing instruments provide new earmold technologies and varying microphone capabilities; however, these instruments have yet to be evaluated with regard to horizontal localization acuity. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the effects of microphone configuration, type of dome in open-fit hearing instruments, and age on the horizontal localization ability of a given listener. Thirty adults participated in this study and were grouped based upon hearing sensitivity and age (young normal hearing, >50 years normal hearing, >50 hearing impaired). Each normal hearing participant completed one localization experiment (unaided/unamplified) where they listened to the stimulus "Baseball" and selected the point of origin. Hearing impaired listeners were fit with the same two receiver-in-the-ear hearing aids and same dome types, thus controlling for microphone technologies, type of dome, and fitting between trials. Hearing impaired listeners completed a total of 7 localization experiments (unaided/unamplified; open dome: omnidirectional, adaptive directional, fixed directional; micromold: omnidirectional, adaptive directional, fixed directional). Overall, results of this study indicate that age significantly affects horizontal localization ability as younger adult listeners with normal hearing made significantly fewer localization errors than older adult listeners with normal hearing. Also, results revealed a significant difference in performance between dome type; however, upon further examination was not significant. Therefore, results examining type of dome should be viewed with caution. Results examining microphone configuration and microphone configuration by dome type were not significant. Moreover, results evaluating performance relative to unaided (unamplified) were not significant. Taken together, these results suggest open-fit hearing instruments, regardless of microphone or dome type, do not degrade horizontal localization acuity within a given listener relative to their 'older aged' normal hearing counterparts in quiet environments.

  12. Direct evidence for kinetic effects associated with solar wind reconnection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Wang, Yi; Wei, Fengsi; Feng, Xueshang; Deng, Xiaohua; Ma, Yonghui; Zhou, Meng; Pang, Ye; Wong, Hon-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic effects resulting from the two-fluid physics play a crucial role in the fast collisionless reconnection, which is a process to explosively release massive energy stored in magnetic fields in space and astrophysical plasmas. In-situ observations in the Earth's magnetosphere provide solid consistence with theoretical models on the point that kinetic effects are required in the collisionless reconnection. However, all the observations associated with solar wind reconnection have been analyzed in the context of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) although a lot of solar wind reconnection exhausts have been reported. Because of the absence of kinetic effects and substantial heating, whether the reconnections are still ongoing when they are detected in the solar wind remains unknown. Here, by dual-spacecraft observations, we report a solar wind reconnection with clear Hall magnetic fields. Its corresponding Alfvenic electron outflow jet, derived from the decouple between ions and electrons, is identified, showing direct evidence for kinetic effects that dominate the collisionless reconnection. The turbulence associated with the exhaust is a kind of background solar wind turbulence, implying that the reconnection generated turbulence has not much developed. PMID:25628139

  13. Direct evidence for kinetic effects associated with solar wind reconnection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojun; Wang, Yi; Wei, Fengsi; Feng, Xueshang; Deng, Xiaohua; Ma, Yonghui; Zhou, Meng; Pang, Ye; Wong, Hon-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic effects resulting from the two-fluid physics play a crucial role in the fast collisionless reconnection, which is a process to explosively release massive energy stored in magnetic fields in space and astrophysical plasmas. In-situ observations in the Earth's magnetosphere provide solid consistence with theoretical models on the point that kinetic effects are required in the collisionless reconnection. However, all the observations associated with solar wind reconnection have been analyzed in the context of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) although a lot of solar wind reconnection exhausts have been reported. Because of the absence of kinetic effects and substantial heating, whether the reconnections are still ongoing when they are detected in the solar wind remains unknown. Here, by dual-spacecraft observations, we report a solar wind reconnection with clear Hall magnetic fields. Its corresponding Alfvenic electron outflow jet, derived from the decouple between ions and electrons, is identified, showing direct evidence for kinetic effects that dominate the collisionless reconnection. The turbulence associated with the exhaust is a kind of background solar wind turbulence, implying that the reconnection generated turbulence has not much developed. PMID:25628139

  14. Neurobiological Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; de Souza, Izabel Cristina Custodio; Vidor, Liliane Pinto; de Souza, Andressa; Deitos, Alícia; Volz, Magdalena Sarah; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei; Torres, Iraci L. S.

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that is affordable and easy to operate compared to other neuromodulation techniques. Anodal stimulation increases cortical excitability, while the cathodal stimulation decreases it. Although tDCS is a promising treatment approach for chronic pain as well as for neuropsychiatric diseases and other neurological disorders, several complex neurobiological mechanisms that are not well understood are involved in its effect. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding the neurobiological mechanisms involved in the effects of tDCS. The initial search resulted in 171 articles. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, we screened 32 full-text articles to extract findings about the neurobiology of tDCS effects including investigation of cortical excitability parameters. Overall, these findings show that tDCS involves a cascade of events at the cellular and molecular levels. Moreover, tDCS is associated with glutamatergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic, and cholinergic activity modulation. Though these studies provide important advancements toward the understanding of mechanisms underlying tDCS effects, further studies are needed to integrate these mechanisms as to optimize clinical development of tDCS. PMID:23293607

  15. First Isolation and Direct Evidence for the Existence of Large Small-Mammal Reservoirs of Leptospira sp. in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Rahelinirina, Soanandrasana; Léon, Albertine; Harstskeerl, Rudy A.; Sertour, Natacha; Ahmed, Ahmed; Raharimanana, Claudine; Ferquel, Elisabeth; Garnier, Martine; Chartier, Loïc; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Rahalison, Lila; Cornet, Muriel

    2010-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis has long been a major public health concern in the southwestern Indian Ocean. However, in Madagascar, only a few, old studies have provided indirect serological evidence of the disease in humans or animals. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a large animal study focusing on small-mammal populations. Five field trapping surveys were carried out at five sites, from April 2008 to August 2009. Captures consisted of Rattus norvegicus (35.8%), R. rattus (35.1%), Mus musculus (20.5%) and Suncus murinus (8.6%). We used microbiological culture, serodiagnosis tests (MAT) and real-time PCR to assess Leptospira infection. Leptospira carriage was detected by PCR in 91 (33.9%) of the 268 small mammals, by MAT in 17 of the 151 (11.3%) animals for which serum samples were available and by culture in 9 of the 268 animals (3.3%). Rates of infection based on positive PCR results were significantly higher in Moramanga (54%), Toliara (48%) and Mahajanga (47.4%) than in Antsiranana (8.5%) and Toamasina (14%) (p = 0.001). The prevalence of Leptospira carriage was significantly higher in R. norvegicus (48.9%), S. murinus (43.5%) and R. rattus (30.8%) than in M. musculus (9.1%) (p<0.001). The MAT detected antibodies against the serogroups Canicola and Icterohaemorrhagiae. Isolates were characterized by serology, secY sequence-based phylogeny, partial sequencing of rrs, multi-locus VNTR analysis and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The 10 isolates obtained from nine rats were all identified as species L. interrogans serogroup Canicola serovar Kuwait and all had identical partial rrs and secY sequences. Conclusions/Significance We present here the first direct evidence of widespread leptospiral carriage in small mammals in Madagascar. Our results strongly suggest a high level of environmental contamination, consistent with probable transmission of the infection to humans. This first isolation of pathogenic Leptospira strains in this country may significantly improve the detection of specific antibodies in human cases. PMID:21124843

  16. Edge Effects in Four Point Direct Current Potential Drop Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi; Bowler, John R.; Zhang, Chongxue; Bowler, Nicola

    2009-03-01

    The four point direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique is used to measure electrical conductivity and crack depth. It is also used, together with Hall voltage measurements, to evaluate carrier concentration and mobility in semiconductors. Here the theory of DCPD is studied for planar structures in which edge effects may have to be taken into account and correction made to ensure accuracy. The current injected at a point on the surface of an infinite plate of finite thickness gives rise to a field that can be expressed as a summation derived using image theory. Because the images are periodic in the direction perpendicular to the plate surface, the field can also be conveniently expressed in the form of a Fourier series. The two basic formulas; image summation and Fourier series, can be modified for the case where the probe points are near the edge of a plate by further applying image theory and summing image/Fourier terms in two dimensions. Both of these approaches agree with measurement results very well.

  17. The direct magnetoelectric effect in ferroelectric-ferromagnetic epitaxial heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fina, I.; Dix, N.; Rebled, J. M.; Gemeiner, P.; Mart, X.; Peir, F.; Dkhil, B.; Snchez, F.; Fbrega, L.; Fontcuberta, J.

    2013-08-01

    Ferroelectric (FE) and ferromagnetic (FM) materials engineered in horizontal heterostructures allow interface-mediated magnetoelectric coupling. The so-called converse magnetoelectric effect (CME) has been already demonstrated by electric-field poling of the ferroelectric layers and subsequent modification of the magnetic state of adjacent ferromagnetic layers by strain effects and/or free-carrier density tuning. Here we focus on the direct magnetoelectric effect (DME) where the dielectric state of a ferroelectric thin film is modified by a magnetic field. Ferroelectric BaTiO3 (BTO) and ferromagnetic CoFe2O4 (CFO) oxide thin films have been used to create epitaxial FE/FM and FM/FE heterostructures on SrTiO3(001) substrates buffered with metallic SrRuO3. It will be shown that large ferroelectric polarization and DME can be obtained by appropriate selection of the stacking order of the FE and FM films and their relative thicknesses. The dielectric permittivity, at the structural transitions of BTO, is strongly modified (up to 36%) when measurements are performed under a magnetic field. Due to the insulating nature of the ferromagnetic layer and the concomitant absence of the electric-field effect, the observed DME effect solely results from the magnetostrictive response of CFO elastically coupled to the BTO layer. These findings show that appropriate architecture and materials selection allow overcoming substrate-induced clamping in multiferroic multi-layered films.Ferroelectric (FE) and ferromagnetic (FM) materials engineered in horizontal heterostructures allow interface-mediated magnetoelectric coupling. The so-called converse magnetoelectric effect (CME) has been already demonstrated by electric-field poling of the ferroelectric layers and subsequent modification of the magnetic state of adjacent ferromagnetic layers by strain effects and/or free-carrier density tuning. Here we focus on the direct magnetoelectric effect (DME) where the dielectric state of a ferroelectric thin film is modified by a magnetic field. Ferroelectric BaTiO3 (BTO) and ferromagnetic CoFe2O4 (CFO) oxide thin films have been used to create epitaxial FE/FM and FM/FE heterostructures on SrTiO3(001) substrates buffered with metallic SrRuO3. It will be shown that large ferroelectric polarization and DME can be obtained by appropriate selection of the stacking order of the FE and FM films and their relative thicknesses. The dielectric permittivity, at the structural transitions of BTO, is strongly modified (up to 36%) when measurements are performed under a magnetic field. Due to the insulating nature of the ferromagnetic layer and the concomitant absence of the electric-field effect, the observed DME effect solely results from the magnetostrictive response of CFO elastically coupled to the BTO layer. These findings show that appropriate architecture and materials selection allow overcoming substrate-induced clamping in multiferroic multi-layered films. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01011b

  18. Direct and indirect cellular effects of aspartame on the brain.

    PubMed

    Humphries, P; Pretorius, E; Naudé, H

    2008-04-01

    The use of the artificial sweetener, aspartame, has long been contemplated and studied by various researchers, and people are concerned about its negative effects. Aspartame is composed of phenylalanine (50%), aspartic acid (40%) and methanol (10%). Phenylalanine plays an important role in neurotransmitter regulation, whereas aspartic acid is also thought to play a role as an excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Glutamate, asparagines and glutamine are formed from their precursor, aspartic acid. Methanol, which forms 10% of the broken down product, is converted in the body to formate, which can either be excreted or can give rise to formaldehyde, diketopiperazine (a carcinogen) and a number of other highly toxic derivatives. Previously, it has been reported that consumption of aspartame could cause neurological and behavioural disturbances in sensitive individuals. Headaches, insomnia and seizures are also some of the neurological effects that have been encountered, and these may be accredited to changes in regional brain concentrations of catecholamines, which include norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine. The aim of this study was to discuss the direct and indirect cellular effects of aspartame on the brain, and we propose that excessive aspartame ingestion might be involved in the pathogenesis of certain mental disorders (DSM-IV-TR 2000) and also in compromised learning and emotional functioning. PMID:17684524

  19. Direct and indirect aerosol effect implications for atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tost, Holger; Jckel, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol particles influence the chemical composition in manifold ways. First of all, for multiple chemical compounds a partial partitioning into the aerosol phase reduces gas phase concentrations and hence gaseous reaction pathways. Furthermore, the scattering and absorbing properties of aerosol properties - which depend themselves on their chemical composition and water uptake efficiency - influence both the radiation budget and hence the atmospheric circulation and subsequently transport pathways. These overall affect the chemical composition of the atmosphere. Finally, aerosol particles modify the microphysical and hydrological properties of clouds, which implies feedbacks on dissolution of chemical compounds into the cloud and precipitation phase and subsequent wet deposition as well as modifications of the atmospheric circulation due to changes in radiative cloud properties. This study presents model simulation results from the ESCiMo (Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling) project, a consortial modelling initiative using the EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry) model. We analyse the effects of aerosols in general and the feedbacks of aerosol particles on the climate system with a focus on the chemical composition of the atmosphere. Separated simulations of the atmospheric aerosol with and without feedback via clouds and radiation will be presented to separate the effects of gas aerosol partitioning and heterogeneous chemistry from the feedbacks originating from the direct and indirect aerosol effects. The focus of the presentation will be set to inorganic species such as nitrogen and oxidised sulphur compounds in gas and aerosol phase and the impacts on tropospheric ozone.

  20. Differential effects of dopamine-directed treatments on cognition

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, F Gregory; Valentin, Vivian V; von Meer, Stella S

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine, a prominent neuromodulator, is implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. It has wide-ranging effects on both cortical and subcortical brain regions and on many types of cognitive tasks that rely on a variety of different learning and memory systems. As neuroscience and behavioral evidence for the existence of multiple memory systems and their corresponding neural networks accumulated, so did the notion that dopamine’s role is markedly different depending on which memory system is engaged. As a result, dopamine-directed treatments will have different effects on different types of cognitive behaviors. To predict what these effects will be, it is critical to understand: which memory system is mediating the behavior; the neural basis of the mediating memory system; the nature of the dopamine projections into that system; and the time course of dopamine after its release into the relevant brain regions. Consideration of these questions leads to different predictions for how changes in brain dopamine levels will affect automatic behaviors and behaviors mediated by declarative, procedural, and perceptual representation memory systems. PMID:26251602

  1. The AMRDEC Process for Analyzing Initiation Effectiveness Against Explosive Filled Small Arms Threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Dedra

    2011-06-01

    The mortar threats, due to their small size and robust structure, present difficult challenges to new and existing systems for acquisition, tracking, intercept and defeat. Defeat must come through either the fuze or detonation of the explosive. Direct detonation of the explosive payload at the point of intercept via fragment or direct missile impact is considered a more achievable alternative. A pre-detonation of the fuze due to impact can produce similar results. However, fuzes can be a small percentage of the target area. Another possible outcome is the fuze would simply be duded. However, a dudded mortar can be indistinguishable from a non-dudded mortar until it strikes the ground. A robust process must have the capability of analyzing multiple solution types. An extensive database of single fragment impacts against threats with high explosive payloads was utilized to develop and modify models to predict explosive reaction. The goal was to create models or equations that could be incorporated into fast running simulation tools to access potential lethal mechanisms over a wide range of battlespace conditions quickly. A methodology to ascertain impact effectiveness on a typical generic threat fuze was also developed separately to be included in the simulation tools. Computational efforts and trade studies can be conducted with fast running simulation tools whose accuracy had been validated with significant test data.

  2. Strong surface effect on direct bulk flexoelectric response in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkov, A. S.; Tagantsev, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of a continuum theory, it is shown that the direct bulk flexoelectric response of a finite sample essentially depends on the surface polarization energy, even in the thermodynamic limit where the body size tends to infinity. It is found that a modification of the surface energy can lead to a change in the polarization response by a factor of two. The origin of the effect is an electric field produced by surface dipoles induced by the strain gradient. The unexpected sensitivity of the polarization response to the surface energy in the thermodynamic limit is conditioned by the fact that the moments of the surface dipoles may scale as the body size.

  3. Direct and indirect effects of UVA on skin vessel leakiness

    SciTech Connect

    Staberg, B.; Worm, A.M.; Brodthagen, H.; Rossing, N.

    1982-12-01

    By using the suction blister technique we have investigated the leakiness of skin vessels in healthy volunteers after whole-body suberythemogenic doses of UVA radiation (a quadrant on one side of the abdominal skin was shielded with lead-rubber). The accumulation of intravenously injected labeled albumin in blister fluid was slightly elevated 1 day after irradiation and increased significantly 2 days later. The blister concentrations of 4 endogenous plasma proteins (albumin, transferrin, IgG, and alpha 2-macroglobulin) were elevated 1 day after radiation exposure and normalized 2 days later. All changes were equal on irradiated and nonirradiated skin. It is concluded that UVA radiation can induce a continued or biphasic increased leakage of plasma proteins in the skin vessels, due to a humoral rather than to a direct physical effect of the radiation on the vessel walls. It is suggested that an increased microvascular leakiness in organs other than the skin might be present.

  4. Direct and indirect effects of climate change on amphibian populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blaustein, Andrew R.; Walls, Susan C.; Bancroft, Betsy A.; Lawler, Joshua J.; Searle, Catherine L.; Gervasi, Stephanie S.

    2010-01-01

    As part of an overall decline in biodiversity, populations of many organisms are declining and species are being lost at unprecedented rates around the world. This includes many populations and species of amphibians. Although numerous factors are affecting amphibian populations, we show potential direct and indirect effects of climate change on amphibians at the individual, population and community level. Shifts in amphibian ranges are predicted. Changes in climate may affect survival, growth, reproduction and dispersal capabilities. Moreover, climate change can alter amphibian habitats including vegetation, soil, and hydrology. Climate change can influence food availability, predator-prey relationships and competitive interactions which can alter community structure. Climate change can also alter pathogen-host dynamics and greatly influence how diseases are manifested. Changes in climate can interact with other stressors such as UV-B radiation and contaminants. The interactions among all these factors are complex and are probably driving some amphibian population declines and extinctions.

  5. Wave and Wind Direction Effects on SFMR Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbach, Heather; Uhlhorn, Eric; Bourassa, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Surface winds in a tropical cyclone are essential for determining its strength. Currently the Stepped-Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) dropwindsondes are the main instruments used for obtaining in situ surface wind measurements. The platforms for these instruments are the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) P-3 and Air Force C-130J hurricane hunter aircraft. The SFMR measures sea surface microwave brightness temperatures at six frequencies ranging from 4.7 to 7.2 GHz. Surface wind speed estimates are obtained from these brightness temperatures by using a retrieval algorithm that employs a geophysical model function relating surface emissivity and wind speed. The SFMR is designed to obtain a single nadir track of surface wind speeds directly beneath the aircraft during level flight and not when turning because of the complexity of the wave field and foam distribution when the SFMR views the surface off-nadir or during aircraft rolls. However, the effects of the wave field on the measurements can be investigated using measurements obtained during the 2008 and 2014 Atlantic hurricane seasons. An SFMR module was flown in precipitation-free regions of the tropical cyclones to collect data at specified roll angles of 15, 30, 45, and 60 in some cases. Excess brightness temperatures are then calculated with respect to zero wind speed values and independent of wind direction. An asymmetry is found in the resulting excess brightness temperatures. It is hypothesized that this asymmetry is caused by the direction of wave propagation and the angle at which the wave field is viewed by the SFMR. Wind direction may also play a role in the asymmetry. To analyze the asymmetry further measurement from WindSat will be used. Once the relationship is determined between surface wind speed, brightness temperature, and incidence angle a technique will be developed to obtain a surface wind speed when the aircraft is turning. This will begin to improve the spatial coverage of measurements of the tropical cyclone wind field to try to increase the probability that the maximum sustained wind speed within the tropical cyclone will be measured during the flight.

  6. Gas exchange dependency on diffusion coefficient: direct /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He comparisons in a small lake

    SciTech Connect

    Torgersen, T.; Mathieu, G.; Hesslein, R.H.; Broecker, W.S.

    1982-01-20

    A direct field comparison was conducted to determine the dependency of gas exchange coefficient (k/sub x/) on the diffusion coefficient (D/sub x/). The study also sought to confirm the enhanced vertical exchange properties of limnocorrals and similar enclosures. Gas exchange coefficients for /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He were determined in a small northern Ontario lake, using a /sup 226/Ra and /sup 3/H spike to gain the necessary precision. The results indicate that the gas exchange coefficient is functionally dependent on the diffusion coefficient raised to the 1.22/sub -35//sup + > 12/ power (k/sub x/ = f(D/sub x//sup 1.22)), clearly supporting the stagnant film model of gas exchange. Limnocorrals were found to have gas exchange rates up to 1.7 times higher than the whole lake in spite of the observation of more calm surface conditions in the corral than in the open lake. 33 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  7. Direct Determination of a Small-Molecule Drug, Valproic Acid, by an Electrically-Detected Microcantilever Biosensor for Personalized Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Long-Sun; Gunawan, Christian; Yen, Yi-Kuang; Chang, Kai-Fung

    2015-01-01

    Direct, small-molecule determination of the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid, was investigated by a label-free, nanomechanical biosensor. Valproic acid has long been used as an antiepileptic medication, which is administered through therapeutic drug monitoring and has a narrow therapeutic dosage range of 50100 ?gmL?1 in blood or serum. Unlike labeled and clinically-used measurement techniques, the label-free, electrical detection microcantilever biosensor can be miniaturized and simplified for use in portable or hand-held point-of-care platforms or personal diagnostic tools. A micromachined microcantilever sensor was packaged into the micro-channel of a fluidic system. The measurement of the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid, in phosphate-buffered saline and serum used a single free-standing, piezoresistive microcantilever biosensor in a thermally-controlled system. The measured surface stresses showed a profile over a concentration range of 50500 ?gmL?1, which covered the clinically therapeutic range of 50100 ?gmL?1. The estimated limit of detection (LOD) was calculated to be 45 ?gmL?1, and the binding affinity between the drug and the antibody was measured at around 90 21 ?gmL?1. Lastly, the results of the proposed device showed a similar profile in valproic acid drug detection with those of the clinically-used fluorescence polarization immunoassay. PMID:25632826

  8. Apparatus and method for making a security hologram with multi-images in different viewing direction on a small area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ying Tsung; Chi, Sien

    2000-04-01

    The prior artwork for a Dot-matrix hologram is always animated by a computer instead of a man made sculptured model. For a computer graphic software, it is very easy to interlace several bitmap graphics ona small area. So, if we generate an interlaced graphic and transfer the bitmaps to corresponding gratings which diffract the illumination light to a specific direction with respect to each individual graphic, then it will have several viewing images in different view angles. Hologram has special light characteristics that are difficult to duplicate, so it has intrinsic advantage for anti-counterfeiting application. For more guarantee of security to protect the value paper from the fraud activity. We use a more complex and delicate multi-image hologram to hold back the ambition of copycat. In this paper, will describe how to transfer the images that generated by computer to a hologram. The concept for interlace graphics, and the apparatus that is easy to generate the dot grating with respect to each bitmap in the image, and the practical samples that made by this technology for anti-counterfeiting purpose.

  9. Polydopamine-coated magnetic nanoparticles for enrichment and direct detection of small molecule pollutants coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-rong; Zhang, Xiao-le; Zeng, Tao; Cao, Dong; Zhou, Zhen; Li, Wen-hui; Niu, Hongyun; Cai, Ya-qi

    2013-02-01

    Polydopamine-coated Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs) were synthesized and applied as matrix for the detection of pollutants by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The synthesis of Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs was accomplished in 30 min by in situ polymerization of dopamine without any toxic reagent. Using Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs as matrix of MALDI-TOF, eleven small molecule pollutants (molecular weight from 251.6 to 499.3), including Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), three perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), and seven antibiotics, were successfully detected in either positive or negative reflection mode without background interference. Furthermore, the Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs can also enrich trace amounts of hydrophobic target, such as BaP, from solution to nanoparticles surface. Then the Fe(3)O(4)@PDA-BaP can be isolated through magnetic sedimentation step and directly spotted on the stainless steel plate for MALDI measurement. With Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs as adsorbent and matrix, we also realized the analysis of BaP in tap water and lake water samples. Thus, a magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE)-MALDI-TOF-MS method was established for the measurement of BaP. PMID:23301525

  10. Evaluating the Effect of Information Technology in Small Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Information technology (IT) has become a strategic vehicle for small businesses to achieve and sustain their competitive advantage. Prior research has suggested that information technology plays an important role in the decision-making process. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between organizational IT performance and

  11. Evaluating the Effect of Information Technology in Small Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Information technology (IT) has become a strategic vehicle for small businesses to achieve and sustain their competitive advantage. Prior research has suggested that information technology plays an important role in the decision-making process. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between organizational IT performance and…

  12. Facilitating Effective Small Group Discussions of Controversial Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Jon R.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes four components of a packet of materials designed for small-group discussions on alphafetoprotein (AFP) screening for neural tube defects. Components consist of instructional guidelines for group leader, informational packet on AFP, list of specific discussion questions, and student evaluation form. Copies of these materials are

  13. Structure function F2: higher twist effects at small x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illarionov, A. Yu.; Kotikov, A. V.; Parente, G.

    2005-09-01

    Higher twist corrections to F2 at small x are studied for the case of a flat initial condition for the twist-two QCD evolution at next-to-leading order approximation. We report about an analytical parameterization of the contributions from the twist-two and higher twist operators of the Wilson operator product expansion.

  14. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Stecca, Laura; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca

    2015-06-01

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO2) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO2 NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO2 NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO2 NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm2 levels of TiO2 NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO2 NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  15. Small-crack effects in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Wu, X. R.; Venneri, S. L.; Li, C. G.

    1994-05-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Chinese Aeronautical Establishment participated in a Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Cooperative Program. The program objectives were to identify and characterize crack initiation and growth of small cracks (10 microns to 2 mm long) in commonly used US and PRC aluminum alloys, to improve fracture mechanics analyses of surface- and corner-crack configurations, and to develop improved life-prediction methods. Fatigue and small-crack tests were performed on single-edgenotch tension (SENT) specimens and large-crack tests were conducted on center-crack tension specimens for constant-amplitude (stress ratios of -1, 0, and 0.5) and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading. The plastic replica method was used to monitor the initiation and growth of small fatigue cracks at the semicircular notch. Crack growth results from each laboratory on 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad aluminum alloys agreed well and showed that fatigue life was mostly crack propagation from a material defect (inclusion particles or void) or from the cladding layer. Finite-element and weight-function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors for surface and corner cracks in the SENT specimens. Equations were then developed and used in a crack growth and crack-closure model to correlate small- and large-crack data and to make life predictions for various load histories. The cooperative program produced useful experimental data and efficient analysis methods for improving life predictions. The results should ultimately improve aircraft structural reliability and safety.

  16. Small-crack effects in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Wu, X. R.; Venneri, S. L.; Li, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Chinese Aeronautical Establishment participated in a Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Cooperative Program. The program objectives were to identify and characterize crack initiation and growth of small cracks (10 microns to 2 mm long) in commonly used US and PRC aluminum alloys, to improve fracture mechanics analyses of surface- and corner-crack configurations, and to develop improved life-prediction methods. Fatigue and small-crack tests were performed on single-edgenotch tension (SENT) specimens and large-crack tests were conducted on center-crack tension specimens for constant-amplitude (stress ratios of -1, 0, and 0.5) and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading. The plastic replica method was used to monitor the initiation and growth of small fatigue cracks at the semicircular notch. Crack growth results from each laboratory on 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad aluminum alloys agreed well and showed that fatigue life was mostly crack propagation from a material defect (inclusion particles or void) or from the cladding layer. Finite-element and weight-function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors for surface and corner cracks in the SENT specimens. Equations were then developed and used in a crack growth and crack-closure model to correlate small- and large-crack data and to make life predictions for various load histories. The cooperative program produced useful experimental data and efficient analysis methods for improving life predictions. The results should ultimately improve aircraft structural reliability and safety.

  17. An effective plasma membrane proteomics approach for small tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Smolders, Katrien; Lombaert, Nathalie; Valkenborg, Dirk; Baggerman, Geert; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2015-01-01

    Advancing the quest for new drug targets demands the development of innovative plasma membrane proteome research strategies applicable to small, functionally defined tissue samples. Biotinylation of acute tissue slices and streptavidin pull-down followed by shotgun proteomics allowed the selective extraction and identification of >1,600 proteins of which >60% are associated with the plasma membrane, including (G-protein coupled) receptors, ion channels and transporters, and this from mm3-scale tissue. PMID:26047021

  18. Small nucleolar RNA host genes and long non-coding RNA responses in directly irradiated and bystander cells.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, M Ahmad

    2014-04-01

    The irradiated cells communicate with unirradiated cells and induce changes in them through a phenomenon known as the bystander effect. The nature of the bystander signal and how it impacts unirradiated cells remains to be discovered. Examination of molecular changes could lead to the identification of pathways underlying the bystander effect. Apart from microRNAs, little is known about the regulation of other non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) in irradiated or bystander cells. In this study we monitored the transcriptional changes of several small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) host genes and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) that are known to participate in a variety of cellular functions, in irradiated and bystander cells to gain insight into the molecular pathways affected in these cells. We used human lymphoblasts TK6 cells in a medium exchanged bystander effect model system to examine ncRNA expression alterations. The snoRNA host genes SNHG1 and SNHG4 were upregulated in irradiated TK6 cells but were repressed in bystander cells. The SNHG5 and SNHG11 were downregulated in irradiated and bystander cells and the expression levels of these ncRNA were significantly lower in bystander cells. The lncRNA MALAT1, MATR3, SRA1, and SOX2OT were induced in irradiated TK6 cells and their expression levels were repressed in bystander cells. The lncRNA RMST was induced in both irradiated and bystander cells. Taken together, these results indicate that expression levels of ncRNA are modulated in irradiated and bystander cells and these transcriptional changes could be associated with the bystander effect. PMID:24502193

  19. 26 CFR 1.1202-2 - Qualified small business stock; effect of redemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Qualified small business stock; effect of.... Stock acquired by a taxpayer is not qualified small business stock if, in one or more purchases during.... Stock is not qualified small business stock if, in one or more purchases during the 2-year...

  20. Episodic acidification of small streams in the northeastern united states: Effects on fish populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, J.P.; Van Sickle, J.; Gagen, C.J.; DeWalle, D.R.; Sharpe, W.E.; Carline, R.F.; Baldigo, B.P.; Murdoch, P.S.; Bath, D.W.; Kretser, W.A.; Simonin, H.A.; Wigington, P.J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the Episodic Response Project (ERP), we studied the effects of episodic acidification on fish in 13 small streams in the northeastern United States: four streams in the Adirondack region of New York, four streams in the Catskills, New York, and five streams in the northern Appalachian Plateau, Pennsylvania. In situ bioassays with brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and a forage fish species (blacknose dace (Rhinichthys atratulus], mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdi), or slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus), depending on the region) measured direct toxicity. Movements of individual brook trout, in relation to stream chemistry, were monitored using radiotelemetry. Electrofishing surveys assessed fish community status and the density and biomass of brook trout in each stream. During low flow, all streams except one had chemical conditions considered suitable for the survival and reproduction of most fish species (median pH 6.0-7.2 during low flow; inorganic Al 100-200 ??g/L. We conclude that episodic acidification can have long-term effects on fish communities in small streams.

  1. Fast-forward generation of effective artificial small RNAs for enhanced antiviral defense in plants

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Alberto; Carrington, James C.; Dars, Jos-Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Artificial small RNAs (sRNAs) are short ?21-nt non-coding RNAs engineered to inactivate sequence complementary RNAs. In plants, they have been extensively used to silence cellular transcripts in gene function analyses and to target invading RNA viruses to induce resistance. Current artificial sRNA-based antiviral resistance in plants is mainly limited to a single virus, and is jeopardized by the emergence of mutations in the artificial sRNA target site or by the presence of co-infecting viruses. Hence, there is a need to further develop the artificial sRNA approach to generate more broad and durable antiviral resistance in plants. A recently developed toolbox allows for the time and cost-effective large-scale production of artificial sRNA constructs in plants. The toolbox includes the P-SAMS web tool for the automated design of artificial sRNAs, and a new generation of artificial microRNA and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNA (syn-tasiRNA) vectors for direct cloning and high expression of artificial sRNAs. Here we describe how the simplicity and high-throughput capability of these new technologies should accelerate the study of artificial sRNA-based antiviral resistance in plants. In particular, we discuss the potential of the syn-tasiRNA approach as a promising strategy for developing more effective, durable and broad antiviral resistance in plants. PMID:26925463

  2. Biochemical studies of the multicopper oxidase (small laccase) from Streptomyces coelicolor using bioactive phytochemicals and site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Mohammed; Waung, Debbie; Korbeci, Bihter; Mavisakalyan, Valentina; Flick, Robert; Brown, Greg; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; Yakunin, Alexander F; Master, Emma R

    2013-01-01

    Summary Multicopper oxidases can act on a broad spectrum of phenolic and non-phenolic compounds. These enzymes include laccases, which are widely distributed in plants and fungi, and were more recently identified in bacteria. Here, we present the results of biochemical and mutational studies of small laccase (SLAC), a multicopper oxidase from Streptomyces coelicolor (SCO6712). In addition to typical laccase substrates, SLAC was tested using phenolic compounds that exhibit antioxidant activity. SLAC showed oxidase activity against 12 of 23 substrates tested, including caffeic acid, ferulic acid, resveratrol, quercetin, morin, kaempferol and myricetin. The kinetic parameters of SLAC were determined for 2,2?-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid), 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, quercetin, morin and myricetin, and maximum reaction rates were observed with myricetin, where kcat and Km values at 60C were 8.1 (?0.8) s?1 and 0.9 (?0.3) mM respectively. SLAC had a broad pH optimum for activity (between pH?4 and 8) and temperature optimum at 6070C. It demonstrated remarkable thermostability with a half-life of over 10?h at 80C and over 7?h at 90C. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed 17 amino acid residues important for SLAC activity including the 10 His residues involved in copper coordination. Most notably, the Y229A and Y230A mutant proteins showed over 10-fold increase in activity compared with the wild-type SLAC, which was correlated to higher copper incorporation, while kinetic analyses with S929A predicts localization of this residue near the meta-position of aromatic substrates. Funding Information Funding for this research was provided by the Government of Ontario for the project FFABnet: Functionalized Fibre and Biochemicals (ORF-RE-05-005), and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. PMID:23815400

  3. Small Molecule Wnt Inhibitors Enhance the Efficiency of BMP-4-Directed Cardiac Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yongming; Lee, Min Young; Schliffke, Simon; Paavola, Jere; Amos, Peter J.; Ge, Xin; Ye, Mingyu; Zhu, Shenjun; Senyei, Grant; Lum, Lawrence; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Qyang, Yibing

    2012-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells potentially provide a unique resource for generating patient-specific cardiomyocytes to study cardiac disease mechanisms and treatments. However, existing approaches to cardiomyocyte production from human iPS cells are inefficient, limiting the application of iPS cells in basic and translational cardiac research. Furthermore, strategies to accurately record changes in iPS cell-derived cardiomyocyte action potential duration (APD) are needed to monitor APD-related cardiac disease and for rapid drug screening. We examined whether modulation of the bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) and Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathways could induce efficient cardiac differentiation of human iPS cells. We found that early treatment of human iPS cells with BMP-4 followed by late treatment with small molecule Wnt inhibitors led to a marked increase in production of cardiomyocytes compared to existing differentiation strategies. Using immunocytochemical staining and real-time intracellular calcium imaging, we showed that these induced cardiomyocytes expressed typical sarcomeric markers, exhibited normal rhythmic Ca2+ transients, and responded to both ?-adrenergic and electric stimulation. Furthermore, human iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes demonstrated characteristic changes in action potential duration in response to cardioactive drugs procainamide and verapamil using voltage-sensitive dye-based optical recording. Thus, modulation of the BMP-4 and Wnt signaling pathways in human iPS cells leads to highly efficient production of cardiomyocytes with typical electrophysiological function and pharmacologic responsiveness. The use of human iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes and the application of calcium- and voltage-sensitive dyes for the direct, rapid measurement of iPS cell-derived cardiomyocyte activity promise to offer attractive platforms for studying cardiac disease mechanisms and therapeutics. PMID:21569778

  4. Rice Stripe Tenuivirus Nonstructural Protein 3 Hijacks the 26S Proteasome of the Small Brown Planthopper via Direct Interaction with Regulatory Particle Non-ATPase Subunit 3

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Wu, Jianxiang; Fu, Shuai; Li, Chenyang; Zhu, Zeng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system plays a vital role in regulating host defenses against pathogens. Previous studies have highlighted different roles for the ubiquitin/26S proteasome in defense during virus infection in both mammals and plants, but their role in the vectors that transmit those viruses is still unclear. In this study, we determined that the 26S proteasome is present in the small brown planthopper (SBPH) (Laodelphgax striatellus) and has components similar to those in plants and mammals. There was an increase in the accumulation of Rice stripe virus (RSV) in the transmitting vector SBPH after disrupting the 26S proteasome, indicating that the SBPH 26S proteasome plays a role in defense against RSV infection by regulating RSV accumulation. Yeast two-hybrid analysis determined that a subunit of the 26S proteasome, named RPN3, could interact with RSV NS3. Transient overexpression of RPN3 had no effect on the RNA silencing suppressor activity of RSV NS3. However, NS3 could inhibit the ability of SBPH rpn3 to complement an rpn3 mutation in yeast. Our findings also indicate that the direct interaction between RPN3 and NS3 was responsible for inhibiting the complementation ability of RPN3. In vivo, we found an accumulation of ubiquitinated protein in SBPH tissues where the RSV titer was high, and silencing of rpn3 resulted in malfunction of the SBPH proteasome-mediated proteolysis. Consequently, viruliferous SBPH in which RPN3 was repressed transmitted the virus more effectively as a result of higher accumulation of RSV. Our results suggest that the RSV NS3 protein is able to hijack the 26S proteasome in SBPH via a direct interaction with the RPN3 subunit to attenuate the host defense response. IMPORTANCE We show, for the first time, that the 26S proteasome components are present in the small brown planthopper and play a role in defense against its vectored plant virus (RSV). In turn, RSV encodes a protein that subverts the SBPH 26S proteasome via direct interaction with the 26S proteasome subunit RPN3. Our results imply that the molecular arms race observed in plant hosts can be extended to the insect vector that transmits those viruses. PMID:25653432

  5. Metastable structures and size effects in small group dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lauro Grotto, Rosapia; Guazzini, Andrea; Bagnoli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    In his seminal works on group dynamics Bion defined a specific therapeutic setting allowing psychoanalytic observations on group phenomena. In describing the setting he proposed that the group was where his voice arrived. This physical limit was later made operative by assuming that the natural dimension of a therapeutic group is around 12 people. Bion introduced a theory of the group aspects of the mind in which proto-mental individual states spontaneously evolve into shared psychological states that are characterized by a series of features: (1) they emerge as a consequence of the natural tendency of (both conscious and unconscious) emotions to combine into structured group patterns; (2) they have a certain degree of stability in time; (3) they tend to alternate so that the dissolution of one is rapidly followed by the emergence of another; (4) they can be described in qualitative terms according to the nature of the emotional mix that dominates the state, in structural terms by a kind of typical "leadership" pattern, and in "cognitive" terms by a set of implicit expectations that are helpful in explaining the group behavior (i.e., the group behaves "as if" it was assuming that). Here we adopt a formal approach derived from Socio-physics in order to explore some of the structural and dynamic properties of this small group dynamics. We will described data from an analytic DS model simulating small group interactions of agents endowed with a very simplified emotional and cognitive dynamic in order to assess the following main points: (1) are metastable collective states allowed to emerge in the model and if so, under which conditions in the parameter space? (2) can these states be differentiated in structural terms? (3) to what extent are the emergent dynamic features of the systems dependent of the system size? We will finally discuss possible future applications of the quantitative descriptions of the interaction structure in the small group clinical setting. PMID:25071665

  6. Metastable structures and size effects in small group dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lauro Grotto, Rosapia; Guazzini, Andrea; Bagnoli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    In his seminal works on group dynamics Bion defined a specific therapeutic setting allowing psychoanalytic observations on group phenomena. In describing the setting he proposed that the group was where his voice arrived. This physical limit was later made operative by assuming that the natural dimension of a therapeutic group is around 12 people. Bion introduced a theory of the group aspects of the mind in which proto-mental individual states spontaneously evolve into shared psychological states that are characterized by a series of features: (1) they emerge as a consequence of the natural tendency of (both conscious and unconscious) emotions to combine into structured group patterns; (2) they have a certain degree of stability in time; (3) they tend to alternate so that the dissolution of one is rapidly followed by the emergence of another; (4) they can be described in qualitative terms according to the nature of the emotional mix that dominates the state, in structural terms by a kind of typical “leadership” pattern, and in “cognitive” terms by a set of implicit expectations that are helpful in explaining the group behavior (i.e., the group behaves “as if” it was assuming that). Here we adopt a formal approach derived from Socio-physics in order to explore some of the structural and dynamic properties of this small group dynamics. We will described data from an analytic DS model simulating small group interactions of agents endowed with a very simplified emotional and cognitive dynamic in order to assess the following main points: (1) are metastable collective states allowed to emerge in the model and if so, under which conditions in the parameter space? (2) can these states be differentiated in structural terms? (3) to what extent are the emergent dynamic features of the systems dependent of the system size? We will finally discuss possible future applications of the quantitative descriptions of the interaction structure in the small group clinical setting. PMID:25071665

  7. Health and environmental effects document for direct coal liquefaction - 1981.

    SciTech Connect

    Mellinger, P.J.; Wilson, B.W.; Mahlum, D.D.; Sever, L.E.; Olsen, A.R.

    1982-09-01

    This document presents initial estimates of potential human health effects from inhalation of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) that may be released from a future hypothetical industry producing about 600,000 bb1/day of synthetic fuel by direct liquefaction of coal. The assessment approach starts wth general assumptions that are then refined in a tiered sequence that considers available epidemiological, environmental and chemical data. The uncertainties involved in such an evaluation have been quantified where possible at this early stage of health risk analysis. Many surrogate data bases were considered for application to coal liquefaction including coke oven, British gas retort, roofing tar and asphalts, and cigarette smoke. The coke oven data base was selected for this assessment because the chemical and physical nature of coke oven emissions are judged to more closely approximate potential coal liquefaction emissions. Utilizing the extensive epidemiological data base for coke oven workers as a surrogate model, health effects from release of coal liquefaction NMHC may be quantified. This method results in estimates of about 1 x 10/sup -3/ excess cancer deaths/yr to an industrial work force of 7800 persons and 5 x 10/sup -2/ excess cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole from NMHC that boil above 600/sup 0/F. Sources of uncertainty in the estimates are listed. Using these uncertainties, it is estimated that from 2 x 10/sup -4/ to 5 x 10/sup -3/ lung cancer deaths/yr may occur in the industrial work force and from 1 x 10/sup -2/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -1/ lung cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole. On an individual basis, the excess lifetime risk to occupationally exposed workers is estimated to be 500 times greater than to members of the U.S. public.

  8. Direct simulation of concentrated fiber suspensions subjected to bending effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezher, R.; Abisset-Chavanne, E.; Férec, J.; Ausias, G.; Chinesta, F.

    2015-07-01

    When fiber suspensions become concentrated, standard mesoscale theories do not allow a precise description of the fine physics involved at the microscopic level. Thus one way of studying the kinematics and the rheological effects of such suspensions is to make a direct numerical simulation (or DNS for abbreviation). In previous works authors proposed DNS for these types of suspensions. However when it was carried out the elasticity associated with fibers was not introduced in the suspensions; fibers were considered purely rigid and free of bending when they were subjected to interaction forces. In this work a DNS of fiber suspensions in transient and steady shear flows is presented. The suspensions are considered along with interactions between fibers and the statistical evolutions of a population of fibers (such as orientation components and number of interactions between fibers) have been described. Then in the frame of a beam theory approach, the elasticity of the suspensions is introduced by considering that the forces acting of each fiber lead to the bending of the fibers. Thus this bending results in a physical elastic behavior illustrated quantitatively by an elastic energy stored within the suspensions. These added aspects on the DNS of concentrated fiber suspensions constitute the main originality of this paper.

  9. Directed Assembly of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Penzo, Erika; Palma, Matteo; Chenet, Daniel A; Ao, Geyou; Zheng, Ming; Hone, James C; Wind, Shalom J

    2016-02-23

    The outstanding electronic properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have made them prime candidates for future nanoelectronics technologies. One of the main obstacles to the implementation of advanced SWCNT electronics to date is the inability to arrange them in a manner suitable for complex circuits. Directed assembly of SWCNT segments onto lithographically patterned and chemically functionalized substrates is a promising way to organize SWCNTs in topologies that are amenable to integration for advanced applications, but the placement and orientational control required have not yet been demonstrated. We have developed a technique for assembling length sorted and chirality monodisperse DNA-wrapped SWCNT segments on hydrophilic lines patterned on a passivated oxidized silicon substrate. Placement of individual SWCNT segments at predetermined locations was achieved with nanometer accuracy. Three terminal electronic devices, consisting of a single SWCNT segment placed either beneath or on top of metallic source/drain electrodes were fabricated. Devices made with semiconducting nanotubes behaved as typical p-type field effect transistors (FETs), whereas devices made with metallic nanotubes had a finite resistance with little or no gate modulation. This scalable, high resolution approach represents an important step forward toward the potential implementation of complex SWCNT devices and circuits. PMID:26807948

  10. DNADNA Interactions in Tight Supercoils Are Described by a Small Effective Charge Density

    PubMed Central

    Maffeo, Cristopher; Schpflin, Robert; Brutzer, Hergen; Stehr, Ren; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Wedemann, Gero; Seidel, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    DNA-DNA interactions are important for the assembly of DNA nanostructures and during biological processes such as genome compaction and transcription regulation. In studies of these complex processes, DNA is commonly modeled as a homogeneously charged cylinder and its electrostatic interactions are calculated within the framework of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. Commonly, a charge adaptation factor is used to address limitations of this theoretical approach. Despite considerable theoretical and experimental efforts, a rigorous quantitative assessment of this parameter is lacking. Here, we comprehensively characterized DNA-DNA interactions in the presence of monovalent ions by analyzing the supercoiling behavior of single DNA molecules held under constant tension. Both a theoretical model and coarse-grained simulations of this process revealed a surprisingly small effective DNA charge of 40% of the nominal charge density. These findings were directly supported by atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations that determined the effective force between two DNA molecules. Our new parameterization has direct impact on many physical models involving DNA-DNA interactions. PMID:21230940

  11. Direct measurement of Lorentz transformation with Doppler effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    For space science and astronomy the fundamentality of one-way velocity of light (OWVL) is selfevident. The measurement of OWVL (distance/interval) and the clock synchronization with light-signal transfer make a logical circulation. This means that OWVL could not be directly measured but only come indirectly from astronomical method (Romer's Io eclipse and Bradley's sidereal aberration), furthermore, the light-year by definitional OWVL and the trigonometry distance with AU are also un-measurable. For to solve this problem two methods of clock synchronization were proposed: The direct method is that at one end of dual-speed transmissionline with single clock measure the arriving-time difference of longitudinal wave and transverse wave or ordinary light and extraordinary light, again to calculate the collective sending-time of two wave with Yang's /shear elastic-modulus ratio (E/k) or extraordinary/ordinary light refractive-index ratio (ne/no), which work as one earthquake-station with single clock measures first-shake time and the distance to epicenter; The indirect method is that the one-way wavelength l is measured by dual-counters Ca and Cb and computer's real-time operation of reading difference (Nb - Na) of two counters, the frequency f is also simultaneously measured, then l f is just OWVL. Therefore, with classical Newtonian mechanics and ether wave optics, OWVL can be measured in the Galileo coordinate system with an isotropic length unit (1889 international meter definition). Without any hypotheses special relativity can entirely establish on the metrical results. When a certain wavelength l is defined as length unit, foregoing measurement of one-way wavelength l will become as the measurement of rod's length. Let a rigidity-rod connecting Ca and Cb moves relative to lamp-house with velocity v, rod's length L = (Nb - Na) l will change follow v by known Doppler effect, i.e., L(q) =L0 (1+ (v/c) cos q), where L0 is the proper length when v= 0, v• r = v cos q, r is the unit vector from lamphouse point to counters. Or: L (0) L (pi) =L0 (1+(v/c)) L0 (1 - (v/c)) =L0 2 y2 =L2 Or: L ≡ [L(0)L(pi)]1/2 =L0 y , which y ≡ (1 - (v/c)2 )1/2 is just Fitzgerald-Lorentzian contraction-factor. Also, when a light-wave period p is defined as time unit, from Doppler's frequency-shift the count N with p of one period T of moving-clock is: T(q) = N(q) p = T0 /(1+(v/c) cos q) Or: T ≡ (T(0) T(pi))1/2 = T 0 /y , where T0 is the proper period when v = 0, which is just the moving-clock-slower effect. Let r from clock point to lamp-house ((v/c) symbol reverse), Doppler formula in the usual form is: f (q) = 1/T(q) = f0 (1 - (v/c) cos q). Therefore, Lorentz transformation is the square root average of positive and negative directions twice metrical results of Doppler's frequency-shift, which Doppler's once items ( positive and negative v/c ) are counteract only residual twice item (v/c)2 (relativity-factor). Then Lorentz transformation can be directly measured by Doppler's frequency-shift method. The half-life of moving mu-meson is statistical average of many particles, the usual explanation using relativity-factor y is correct. An airship moving simultaneously along contrary directions is impossible, which makes that the relativity-factor y and the twin-paradox are inexistent in the macroscopical movement. Thereby, in the navigations of airship or satellite only use the measurement of Doppler's frequency-shift but have no use for Lorentz transformation.

  12. Directionality and maneuvering effects on a surface ship underwater acoustic signature.

    PubMed

    Trevorrow, Mark V; Vasiliev, Boris; Vagle, Svein

    2008-08-01

    This work examines underwater source spectra of a small (560 tons, 40 m length), single-screw oceanographic vessel, focusing on directionality and effects of maneuvers. The measurements utilized a set of four, self-contained buoys with GPS positioning, each recording two calibrated hydrophones with effective acoustic bandwidth from 150 Hz to 5 kHz. In straight, constant-speed runs at speeds up to 6.2 m s(-1), the ship source spectra showed spectral levels in reasonable agreement with reference spectra. The broadband source level was observed to increase as approximately speed to the fourth power over the range of 2.6-6.1 m s(-1), partially biased at low speeds by nonpropulsion machinery signals. Source directionality patterns were extracted from variations in source spectra while the ship transited past the buoy field. The observed spectral source levels exhibited a broadside maximum, with bow and stern aspect reduced by approximately 12-9 dB, respectively, independent of frequency. An empirical model is proposed assuming that spectral source levels exhibit simultaneous variations in aspect angle, speed, and turn rate. After correction for source directionality and speed during turning maneuvers, an excess of up to 18 dB in one-third octave source levels was observed. PMID:18681569

  13. A review of the direct and indirect effects of neonicotinoids and fipronil on vertebrate wildlife.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, David; Morrissey, Christy; Mineau, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Concerns over the role of pesticides affecting vertebrate wildlife populations have recently focussed on systemic products which exert broad-spectrum toxicity. Given that the neonicotinoids have become the fastest-growing class of insecticides globally, we review here 150 studies of their direct (toxic) and indirect (e.g. food chain) effects on vertebrate wildlife--mammals, birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles. We focus on two neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and clothianidin, and a third insecticide, fipronil, which also acts in the same systemic manner. Imidacloprid and fipronil were found to be toxic to many birds and most fish, respectively. All three insecticides exert sub-lethal effects, ranging from genotoxic and cytotoxic effects, and impaired immune function, to reduced growth and reproductive success, often at concentrations well below those associated with mortality. Use of imidacloprid and clothianidin as seed treatments on some crops poses risks to small birds, and ingestion of even a few treated seeds could cause mortality or reproductive impairment to sensitive bird species. In contrast, environmental concentrations of imidacloprid and clothianidin appear to be at levels below those which will cause mortality to freshwater vertebrates, although sub-lethal effects may occur. Some recorded environmental concentrations of fipronil, however, may be sufficiently high to harm fish. Indirect effects are rarely considered in risk assessment processes and there is a paucity of data, despite the potential to exert population-level effects. Our research revealed two field case studies of indirect effects. In one, reductions in invertebrate prey from both imidacloprid and fipronil uses led to impaired growth in a fish species, and in another, reductions in populations in two lizard species were linked to effects of fipronil on termite prey. Evidence presented here suggests that the systemic insecticides, neonicotinoids and fipronil, are capable of exerting direct and indirect effects on terrestrial and aquatic vertebrate wildlife, thus warranting further review of their environmental safety. PMID:24938819

  14. Direct observation of finite size effects in chains of antiferromagnetically coupled spins

    PubMed Central

    Guidi, T.; Gillon, B.; Mason, S. A.; Garlatti, E.; Carretta, S.; Santini, P.; Stunault, A.; Caciuffo, R.; van Slageren, J.; Klemke, B.; Cousson, A.; Timco, G. A.; Winpenny, R. E. P.

    2015-01-01

    Finite spin chains made of few magnetic ions are the ultimate-size structures that can be engineered to perform spin manipulations for quantum information devices. Their spin structure is expected to show finite size effects and its knowledge is of great importance both for fundamental physics and applications. Until now a direct and quantitative measurement of the spatial distribution of the magnetization of such small structures has not been achieved even with the most advanced microscopic techniques. Here we present measurements of the spin density distribution of a finite chain of eight spin-3/2 ions using polarized neutron diffraction. The data reveal edge effects that are a consequence of the finite size and of the parity of the chain and indicate a noncollinear spin arrangement. This is in contrast with the uniform spin distribution observed in the parent closed chain and the collinear arrangement in odd-open chains. PMID:25952539

  15. Effect of reabsorbed recombination radiation on the saturation current of direct gap p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.; Mavromatis, H.

    1984-01-01

    The application of the radiative transfer theory for semiconductors to p-n homojunctions subject to low level injection conditions is discussed. By virtue of the interaction of the radiation field with free carriers across the depletion layer, the saturation current density in Shockley's expression for the diode current is reduced at high doping levels. The reduction, due to self-induced photon generation, is noticeable for n-type material owing to the small electron effective mass in direct band-gap III-V compounds. The effect is insignificant in p-type material. At an equilibrium electron concentration of 2 x 10 to the 18th/cu cm in GaAs, a reduction of the saturation current density by 15 percent is predicted. It is concluded that realistic GaAs p-n junctions possess a finite thickness.

  16. Effect of intestinal resection on human small bowel motility.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, T; Pfeiffer, A; Hackelsberger, N; Widmer, R; Meisel, C; Kaess, H

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few data are available on adaptive changes of human small bowel motility after intestinal resection. AIM: To characterise jejunal motility after extensive and limited distal intestinal resection. METHODS: Seven patients with a short bowel syndrome after total ileal and partial jejunal resection (residual jejunal segments between 60 and 100 cm) and six patients with limited distal ileal resection (resected segment between 30 and 70 cm) underwent ambulatory 24 hour jejunal manometry 15 (6-24) months after the operation. Normal values were obtained from 50 healthy subjects. Fasting motility and the motor response to a 600 kcal solid meal were analysed visually and by a computer program. RESULTS: Limited ileal resection did not result in changed jejunal motility. After extensive distal resection, patients had a significantly shorter migrating motor complex (MMC) cycle and a significantly shorter duration of the postprandial motor response compared with controls (p < 0.005). Intestinal resection had no influence on jejunal contraction frequency and amplitude and did not lead to any abnormal motor pattern. CONCLUSION: Extensive distal resection of the small intestine produces distinct abnormalities of fasting and postprandial motility in the intestinal remnant. The shortening of digestive motility and the increased frequency of MMC cycling could contribute to malabsorption and diarrhoea in the short bowel syndrome. PMID:8984024

  17. Direct and Indirect Effects of UV-B Exposure on Litter Decomposition: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xinzhang; Peng, Changhui; Jiang, Hong; Zhu, Qiuan; Wang, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure in the course of litter decomposition may have a direct effect on decomposition rates via changing states of photodegradation or decomposer constitution in litter while UV-B exposure during growth periods may alter chemical compositions and physical properties of plants. Consequently, these changes will indirectly affect subsequent litter decomposition processes in soil. Although studies are available on both the positive and negative effects (including no observable effects) of UV-B exposure on litter decomposition, a comprehensive analysis leading to an adequate understanding remains unresolved. Using data from 93 studies across six biomes, this introductory meta-analysis found that elevated UV-B directly increased litter decomposition rates by 7% and indirectly by 12% while attenuated UV-B directly decreased litter decomposition rates by 23% and indirectly increased litter decomposition rates by 7%. However, neither positive nor negative effects were statistically significant. Woody plant litter decomposition seemed more sensitive to UV-B than herbaceous plant litter except under conditions of indirect effects of elevated UV-B. Furthermore, levels of UV-B intensity significantly affected litter decomposition response to UV-B (P<0.05). UV-B effects on litter decomposition were to a large degree compounded by climatic factors (e.g., MAP and MAT) (P<0.05) and litter chemistry (e.g., lignin content) (P<0.01). Results suggest these factors likely have a bearing on masking the important role of UV-B on litter decomposition. No significant differences in UV-B effects on litter decomposition were found between study types (field experiment vs. laboratory incubation), litter forms (leaf vs. needle), and decay duration. Indirect effects of elevated UV-B on litter decomposition significantly increased with decay duration (P<0.001). Additionally, relatively small changes in UV-B exposure intensity (30%) had significant direct effects on litter decomposition (P<0.05). The intent of this meta-analysis was to improve our understanding of the overall effects of UV-B on litter decomposition. PMID:23818993

  18. Effect of longer battery life on small bowel capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ou, George; Shahidi, Neal; Galorport, Cherry; Takach, Oliver; Lee, Terry; Enns, Robert

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine if longer battery life improves capsule endoscopy (CE) completion rates. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed at a tertiary, university-affiliated hospital in Vancouver, Canada. Patients who underwent CE with either PillCam SB2 or SB2U between 01/2010 and 12/2013 were considered for inclusion. SB2 and SB2U share identical physical dimensions but differ in their battery lives (8 h vs 12 h). Exclusion criteria included history of gastric or small bowel surgery, endoscopic placement of CE, interrupted view of major landmarks due to technical difficulty or significant amount of debris, and repeat CE using same system. Basic demographics, comorbidities, medications, baseline bowel habits, and previous surgeries were reviewed. Timing of major landmarks in CE were recorded, and used to calculate gastric transit time, small bowel transit time, and total recording time. A complete CE study was defined as visualization of cecum. Transit times and completion rates were compared. RESULTS: Four hundred and eight patients, including 208 (51.0%) males, were included for analysis. The mean age was 55.5 19.3 years. The most common indication for CE was gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 254, 62.3%), followed by inflammatory bowel disease (n = 86, 21.1%). There was no difference in gastric transit times (group difference 0.90, 95%CI: 0.72-1.13, P = 0.352) and small bowel transit times (group difference 1.07, 95%CI: 0.95-1.19, P = 0.261) between SB2U and SB2, but total recording time was about 14% longer in the SB2U group (95%CI: 10%-18%, P < 0.001) and there was a corresponding trend toward higher completion rate (88.2% vs 93.2%, OR = 1.78, 95%CI 0.88-3.63, P = 0.111). There was no statistically significant difference in the rates of positive findings (OR = 0.98, 95%CI: 0.64-1.51, P = 0.918). CONCLUSION: Extending the operating time of CE may be a simple method to improve completion rate although it does not affect the rate of positive findings. PMID:25759536

  19. Template-directed synthesis of a small molecule-antisense conjugate targeting an mRNA structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Rodriguez, Lilia; Wolfe, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    The targeting of structural features in mRNA with specificity remains a great chemical challenge. A hairpin structure near exon 10 in the pre-mRNA encoding the tau protein controls its splicing, and dementia-causing mutations that disrupt this structure increase exon 10 splicing. We previously reported the discovery of small molecules, mitoxantrone (MTX) and analogs, which bind to the tau RNA hairpin structure and the design of bipartite antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that simultaneously bind to the discontinuous sequences that flank this hairpin. Herein we report the synthesis of a bipartite ASO conjugated to MTX using the tau RNA hairpin and flanking sequences as a template. A set of six MTX analogs, each containing a linker-azide, and a set of ten bipartite ASOs, each containing a branched linker-alkyne, were synthesized and tested in combinatorial fashion for their ability to conjugate in the presence or absence of template RNA. A single template-dependent MTXASO conjugate was identified from among the 60 reaction mixtures, demonstrating that the MTX and ASO precursors could simultaneously bind the RNA template and allow proper positioning of azide and alkyne for 1,3-cycloaddition. While the MTXASO conjugate proved too cytotoxic for cell-based assays, the conjugate inhibited tau exon 10 splicing under cell-free conditions more effectively than MTX or bipartite ASO alone. PMID:24691171

  20. Effects of the magnetic field direction and anisotropy on the interband light absorption of an asymmetric quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khordad, R.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, the direct interband transition and the threshold frequency of absorption in a two-dimensional anisotropic quantum dot are studied under the influence of a tilted external magnetic field. We first calculate the analytical wave functions and energy levels using a transformation to simplify the Hamiltonian of the system. Then, we obtain the analytical expressions for the light interband absorption coefficient and the threshold frequency of absorption as a function of the magnetic field, magnetic field direction, and anisotropy of the system. According to the results obtained from the present work, we find that (i) the absorption threshold frequency (ATF) increases when the magnetic field increases for all directions. (ii) When anisotropy is increased, ATF increases. (iii) At small anisotropy, the magnetic field direction has no important effect on the ATF. In brief, the magnetic field, magnetic field direction, and anisotropy play important roles in the ATF and absorption coefficient.

  1. Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Small-Scale Geothermal Power Plant and Direct-Use Geothermal Application at AmeriCulture Inc., Cotton City, NM

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-08-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an Environmental Assessment (EA) of the Small-Scale Power Plant and Direct-Use Application at AmeriCulture, Inc. to evaluate potential impacts of construction and operations that would be funded in part by DOE. Small geothermal power plants have the potential for widespread application, but achieving cost-effectiveness in small plant sizes presents a number of challenges. To address these challenges, DOE is supporting the small-scale field verification projects to (1) determine and validate the economics, performance, and operational characteristics of small-scale geothermal electric power plants in different regions. and (2) determine their ability to provide distributed power in order to facilitate their increased use in the western United States. Through the Geothermal Energy Program, DOE is considering providing financial assistance to Exergy, Inc., of Hayward, California, for the development and field verification of a small-scale, approximately 1 megawatt (MVV), geothermal power plant. The proposed power plant would be located upstream of an existing geothermally-heated fish hatchery owned by AmeriCulture, Inc., of Cotton City, NM. DOE is also considering partially funding AmeriCulture, Inc., for a direct-use geothermal application using fluid discharged from the proposed power plant to heat water for the hatchery. The EA addresses the construction and operation of the small-scale, geothermal power plant and the direct use of geothermal fluid exhausted from the geothermal power plant as a heating source for the hatchery. Two system concepts were investigated. The preferred concept involves cascading the spent geothermal fluid from the proposed geothermal power plant to various thermal processes used for fish production. In the second concept, the proposed power plant would not be built, and the fluid from the existing geothermal well would be used for all direct-use operations associated with the project. DOE/NREL will take this opportunity to monitor and evaluate the technical and economic performance of the proposed power plant and the direct-use project. This information will be used to advance the design and use of small-scale geothermal technologies. The funding decision of the DOE is whether or not to partially fund the Proposed Action. The proposed power plant project would be administered and managed by the DOE Golden Field Office. Partial funding for the direct-use application project would be provided through a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract with AmeriCulture, Inc. The direct-use application would be managed by NREL.

  2. DNA damage induced by the direct effect of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoya, A.; Shikazono, N.; Fujii, K.; Urushibara, A.; Akamatsu, K.; Watanabe, R.

    2008-10-01

    We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced by the direct effect of radiation. The yields of single- (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DSB), base lesions and clustered damage were measured using the agarose gel electrophoresis method after exposing to various kinds of radiations to a simple model DNA molecule, fully hydrated closed-circular plasmid DNA (pUC18). The yield of SSB does not show significant dependence on linear energy transfer (LET) values. On the other hand, the yields of base lesions revealed by enzymatic probes, endonuclease III (Nth) and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg), which excise base lesions and leave a nick at the damage site, strongly depend on LET values. Soft X-ray photon (150 kVp) irradiation gives a maximum yield of the base lesions detected by the enzymatic probes as SSB and clustered damage, which is composed of one base lesion and proximate other base lesions or SSBs. The clustered damage is visualized as an enzymatically induced DSB. The yields of the enzymatically additional damages strikingly decrease with increasing levels of LET. These results suggest that in higher LET regions, the repair enzymes used as probes are compromised because of the dense damage clustering. The studies using simple plasmid DNA as a irradiation sample, however, have a technical difficulty to detect multiple SSBs in a plasmid DNA. To detect the additional SSBs induced in opposite strand of the first SSB, we have also developed a novel technique of DNA-denaturation assay. This allows us to detect multiply induced SSBs in both strand of DNA, but not induced DSB.

  3. Experimental examination of the direct damaging effects of Giardia lamblia on intestinal mucosal scrapings of mice.

    PubMed

    Anand, B S; Chaudhary, R; Jyothi, A; Yadev, R S; Baveja, U K

    1985-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is known to produce functional and structural derangement of the small intestine but the pathogenesis of this defect is not clear. To examine this, mucosal scrapings from the small intestine of mice were incubated with human G. lamblia trophozoites. The integrity of the mucosal cells was assessed by their ability to exclude trypan blue, and by the levels of brush border lactase, sucrase and maltase. As judged by the trypan blue test, more mucosal cells incubated with G. lamblia were found to be damaged than were in the control groups I (mucosal cells alone) and III (mucosal cells plus Giardia culture media). Similar results were obtained with disaccharidases where again the mucosal cells incubated with G. lamblia showed a statistically significant reduction in the activity of lactase, sucrase and maltase compared to that in the control groups. These findings suggest that G. lamblia causes direct damage to the small intestinal epithelial cells and that this effect is not mediated through factors such as bacterial proliferation, bile salt deconjugation and immunological reactions. PMID:3938087

  4. Investigating preventive-medicine consultations in first-opinion small-animal practice in the United Kingdom using direct observation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N J; Brennan, M L; Cobb, M; Dean, R S

    2016-02-01

    Preventive-medicine consultations account for a large proportion of the veterinary caseload and previous research has suggested these consultations are fundamentally different from those in which the animal is presented for a specific health problem. There has been recent controversy around some aspects of preventive medicine for cats and dogs, and the full health benefits of the preventive-medicine consultation remain unclear. The aim of this study was to compare characteristics of the consultation and the problems discussed during the consultation between preventive-medicine consultations and other types of consultations. Data were gathered during direct observation of small-animal consultations in seven first-opinion practices in the United Kingdom. Data collected included type of clinical examination performed, patient signalment, and details of all problems discussed (including whether the problem was presenting or non-presenting, new or pre-existing, who had raised the problem, body system affected and whether an action was taken). A two-level multivariable logistic-regression model was developed, with canine and feline patients at Level 1 nested within consulting veterinary surgeons at Level 2, and a binary outcome variable of preventive-medicine consultation versus specific health-problem consultation. A total of 1807 patients were presented, of which 690 (38.2%) presented for a preventive-medicine consultation. Dogs were the most frequently presented species (n=1168; 64.6%) followed by cats (n=510; 28.2%), rabbits (n=86; 4.8%) and patients of other species (n=43; 2.4%). The five variables remaining in the multi-level model were whether multiple patients were presented, patient age, clinical examination type, weighing and number of problems discussed. Species, breed, sex, neutering status and practice did not remain in the final model. Many non-presenting problems, including both preventive-medicine problems and specific-health problems, were discussed and acted upon during all types of consultations. Dental and behavioural non-presenting problems were discussed more frequently during preventive-medicine consultations compared with specific health-problem consultations. Preventive-medicine consultations represent an opportunity for veterinary surgeons to discuss other aspects of preventive medicine, and to detect and manage new and ongoing health problems. A greater evidence base is needed to understand whether detecting and managing underlying disease during the preventive-medicine consultation has a positive impact on lifelong patient health and welfare. PMID:26775818

  5. 76 FR 26948 - Small Business Jobs Act Tour: Selected Provisions Having an Effect on Government Contracting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... an Effect on Government Contracting AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) ACTION: Notice... Provisions Having an Effect on Government that announced a series of public meetings on the implementation of... Event Information table. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard L. Miller, Small Business Job's...

  6. Effects of Small-Group Learning on Transfer: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pai, Hui-Hua; Sears, David A.; Maeda, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the potential benefit of small-group learning on transfer performance using the method of meta-analysis. Results showed positive support for the hypothesis that small-group learning can increase students' transfer performance (average effect size of 0.30). Unlike reviews of effects of cooperation on learning, this

  7. Impact of Mineral Dust Direct Radiative Effect on Mediterranean Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agacayak, Tugba; Kindap, Tayfun; Unal, Alper; Pozzoli, Luca; Mallet, Marc; Bozkurt, Deniz; Solmon, Fabien; Dulac, Francois; Karaca, Mehmet

    2014-05-01

    Saharan desert is an important component of the Mediterranean climate system. Meteorological conditions are the driving factor of the emissions and transport of dust from Sahara, so that climate change can affect the mineral dust sources and its transport pathways. Dust also affects the Mediterranean climate by modifying its radiative budget at regional scale. In this study, the effect of a future climate projection on radiative effect in the Mediterranean is analyzed. Three 10-year time periods (1991-2000, 2041-2050, and 2091-2100) were simulated with the regional climate model RegCM-4.1.1 in order to quantify the changes in direct radiative forcing and related impacts on temperature and precipitations. The model domain covers the entire Mediterranean Basin. The horizontal resolution is 27x27 km2 and grid number is 128x256 with 18 vertical layers from surface to10 hPa. Initial and boundary conditions were obtained from ECHAM5 simulations of the A1B scenario. Two sets of simulations were performed, with and without mineral dust. Monthly average precipitation and temperature data over 10 years are analyzed on both seasonal and annual time averages. Taylor diagrams (Taylor 2001) that compute the root mean square difference (RMSD), variability and pattern correlation between the model outputs of no-dust simulations and gridded datasets of Climate Research Unit (CRU) observations, allow us to assess the overall model performance. Short wave net radiation at surface is decreasing up to 20 W/m2 over the source regions and 8 W/m2 over Mediterranean Sea and South Europe and 3 W/m2 over the source region at the top of atmosphere since mineral dust has scattering feature. Also dust causes a decrease in mean temperature around 0.2 C over Europe and 0.5 C over the African continent for the period 1991-2000. A similar impact is found also for the 2041-2050. Smaller temperature changes are simulated for the end of the 21st century. Finally, our results suggest that precipitations are not changing significantly for the 3 periods.

  8. Living on the edge: roads and edge effects on small mammal populations.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Montemayor, Elisa; Cuarn, Alfredo D; Vzquez-Domnguez, Ella; Bentez-Malvido, Julieta; Valenzuela-Galvn, David; Andresen, Ellen

    2009-07-01

    1. Roads may affect wildlife populations through habitat loss and disturbances, as they create an abrupt linear edge, increasing the proportion of edge exposed to a different habitat. Three types of edge effects have been recognized: abiotic, direct biotic, and indirect biotic. 2. We explored the direct biotic edge effects of 3- to 4-m wide roads, and also a previously unrecognized type of edge effect: social. We live-trapped two threatened endemic rodents from Cozumel Island (Oryzomys couesi cozumelae and Reithrodontomys spectabilis) in 16 plots delimited by roads on two sides, to compare edge effects between two adjacent edges (corners), single-edge and interior forest, on life history and social variables. 3. No significant edge effects were observed on the life-history variables, with the exception of differences in body condition between males and females of O. c. cozumelae near edges. Both species showed significant and contrasting effects on their social variables. 4. O. c. cozumelae was distributed according to its age and sex: the proportion of adults and males was higher in interior than near edges, while juveniles and females were more abundant near edges. More nonreproductive females were present in corners than in single-edge and interior, while the opposite distribution was observed for nonreproductive males. 5. The distribution of R. spectabilis was related to its age and reproductive condition, but not to its sex. The proportion of adults was significantly higher in corners, while juveniles were only caught in single-edge and interior quadrants. The proportion of reproductive individuals was higher in edge than interior quadrants, while reproductive females were only present in edge quadrants. 6. We found significant differences between the quadrants with the greatest edge exposure in comparison with other quadrants. The social edge effects we identified complement the typology of edge effects recognized in ecological literature. Our study provides insight into the effects that sharp road edges have on biological and social characteristics of small mammal populations, highlighting how such effects vary among species. Our findings have important conservation implications for these threatened species, but are also applicable in a broader context wherever there are abrupt edges caused by linear landscape features. PMID:19426252

  9. Direct and residual effects of manure on soil chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastri, A.; Triberti, L.; Giordani, G.; Comellini, F.; Baldoni, G.

    2009-04-01

    The beneficial effects of manure recycling in cropland on soil fertility are well documented. Nowadays it can help sequestrate C in the soil organic matter, advocated to mitigate the atmospheric CO2 increase. Because of the gradual disappearance of conventional livestock farming in Western Europe, the study of the persistence of the positive effects of manuring after its interruption can be interesting. Any research on soil fertility dynamic, however, requires long-term experiments because it is quite slow and greatly influenced by weather. A field trial, started in 1966 and still in progress in the Experimental Farm of Bologna University, compares 5 crop rotations (a 9-year course: corn-wheat-corn-wheat-corn-wheat-alfalfa-alfalfa-alfalfa, corn-wheat and sugarbeet-wheat, continuous corn and continuous wheat), at 3 levels of cattle manure supply combined with 3 inorganic NP fertilizers rates in a split-split plot replicated twice. The soil is an alluvial silty loam, fertile but low in organic matter (13.3 g kg-1). Manure is spread before corn, sugarbeet and alfalfa, at a mean yearly rate of 0 (M0), 20 (M1) and 40 (M2) t ha-1 of fresh material. Since 1984 M2 has been interrupted to evaluate residual effects. Regarding mineral fertilizer rates, for this study we considered only the unfertilized control (N0P0) and N1P1 level, corresponding to a mean yearly application of 220 kg N ha-1 and 75 kg P2O5 ha-1. Each year, since 1972 till now, we have sampled soil in the ploughed layer (0-0.4 m) to assess its pH (in water) and its content of organic carbon (SOC, Lotti method), total nitrogen (TN, Kjeldahl) and available phosphorus (P2O5, Olsen). To reduce the influence of crops and weather, statistical analyses were conducted on the averages of data obtained in the 4-year periods at the end of four 9-year cycles (1972-75, 81-84, 90-93 and 99-02). In 30 years, the continuous M1 supply without any inorganic integration increased SOC, TN and P2O5 by +3.6 t ha-1 (+11%), +1.09 t ha-1 (+ 29%) and + 166 kg ha-1 (+107%), respectively, compared to the control. These significant increments were obtained linearly, at mean annual rates of: 0.15 t ha-1 year-1 for SOC, 20 kg ha-1 for TN and 4.18 kg ha-1 for P2O5. During the first 18 years, doubling the manure supply (M2) caused further increments (72%, 76% and 112% increases for SOC, TN and P2O5, respectively, compared to M1). The complete interruption of M2 application, from 1984 onward, gradually decreased the positive effects. In the 1990-93 period, no differences between M1 and M2 were detected. After 18 years all the amounts were lower in M2 than in M1. However, a residual effect of the double manuring was still evident: M2 plots had higher SOC, TN and P2O5, contents compared to the unfertilized control (+3.1 t ha-1, +0.21 t ha-1 and +88 kg ha-1, respectively). Inorganic fertilization, in the absence of manure, did not affect SOC dynamic, whereas it had significant cumulative effects on TN (+0.94 t ha-1 (+26%) increase in the '99-02 period compared to the initial contents) and P2O5, with 223 kg ha-1 (+160%) increment. Treatments slightly influenced pH (6.43, on average): compared to the unfertilized control, manure increased it a little (+2.7%), while mineral fertilization had an opposite effect (-2.7%). In conclusion, the direct influences of manure on main components of soil fertility appeared cumulative with time and proportional to the application rates, at least up to 40 t ha-1 year-1 of fresh material. Residual effects gradually disappeared, but at low speed, thus their study requires really long experiments, lasting more than 20-years. Inorganic fertilization could increase nitrogen and, even more, available phosphorus content in the soil, but, in our research where crop residues are always removed, it had a null effect on SOC.

  10. Learning for All: Giving Effective Directions and the Peg System of Memorization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stephen C.

    This paper examines two methods to help teachers accomplish learning for all in the classroom: giving effective directions and peg memorization. The paper asserts that giving effective directions may be the most important skill that can be taught to aspiring teachers, and when teachers give effective directions, they give all students a greater

  11. miR-215 functions as a tumor suppressor and directly targets ZEB2 in human non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    HOU, YAN; ZHEN, JUNWEN; XU, XIAODONG; ZHEN, KUN; ZHU, BIN; PAN, RUI; ZHAO, CHIDONG

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-215 (miR-215) has previously been demonstrated to be dysregulated in a number of human malignancies and to be correlated with tumor progression. However, the expression and function of miR-215 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has remained to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of miR-215 in NSCLC tumorigenesis and development. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate miR-215 expression in NSCLC cell lines and primary tumor tissues. The association between miR-215 expression and certain clinicopathological factors was also determined, and the effects of miR-215 on the biological behavior of NSCLC cells were investigated. In addition, the potential regulatory function of miR-215 on zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 2 (ZEB2) expression was examined. miR-215 expression was significantly downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and clinical specimens. Reduced miR-215 expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and advanced TNM stage. Overexpression of miR-215 inhibited NSCLC cell proliferation, invasion and migration, and promoted cell apoptosis in vitro, and suppressed tumorigenicity in vivo. Furthermore, luciferase reporter assay analysis identified ZEB2 as a direct target of miR-215. These findings indicated that miR-215 may act as a tumor suppressor in NSCLC and may serve as a novel therapeutic agent for miR-based therapy. PMID:26622784

  12. The direct way of indirect bonding--the combined effect.

    PubMed

    Gayake, Prasad Vinayakrao; Chitko, Shrikant S; Sutrave, Nagdeepak; Gaikwad, Pallavi M

    2013-01-01

    The placement of orthodontic bonded brackets may be accomplished by either a direct or indirect technique. Most orthodontists will agree that brackets can be positioned more accurately on study casts than directly on teeth in the mouth. And, also direct bonding is more demanding to the orthodontist. Yet, very few orthodontists routinely use an indirect bonding technique. The reasons commonly given for not using the indirect method are difficulty in achieving consistent and predictable adhesion to the teeth, excess of composite around the bracket margins, failure to get all the brackets to adhere to the teeth e the expense of the materials. These disadvantages can be overcome by a new simplified method of bonding outlined in this article; additionally it has advantages of direct bonding also. PMID:24358650

  13. Functional Nanostructures for Effective Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Cheol Am; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2014-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has proved to be a powerful tool for target-specific gene silencing via RNA interference (RNAi). Its ability to control targeted gene expression gives new hope to gene therapy as a treatment for cancers and genetic diseases. However, siRNA shows poor pharmacological properties, such as low serum stability, off-targeting, and innate immune responses, which present a significant challenge for clinical applications. In addition, siRNA cannot cross the cell membrane for RNAi activity because of its anionic property and stiff structure. Therefore, the development of a safe, stable, and efficient system for the delivery of siRNA therapeutics into the cytoplasm of targeted cells is crucial. Several nanoparticle platforms for siRNA delivery have been developed to overcome the major hurdles facing the therapeutic uses of siRNA. This review covers a broad spectrum of non-viral siRNA delivery systems developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and discusses their characteristics and opportunities for clinical applications of therapeutic siRNA. PMID:25285170

  14. Antiobesity Effect of a Small Molecule Repressor of ROR?

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mi Ra; He, Yuanjun; Khan, Tanya M.; Kuruvilla, Dana S.; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben; Corzo, Cesar A.; Unger, Thaddeus J.; White, David W.; Khan, Susan; Lin, Li; Cameron, Michael D.; Kamenecka, Theodore M.

    2015-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor ROR? is a key regulator for T helper 17 (TH17) cell differentiation, which regulates metabolic and circadian rhythm genes in peripheral tissues. Previously, it was shown that the small molecule inverse agonist of ROR? SR1555 [1-(4-((4?-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)-[1,1?-biphenyl]-4-yl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl) ethanone] suppressed TH17 differentiation and stimulated induced T regulatory (iTreg) cells. Here, we show that treatment of cultured pre-adipocyctes with SR1555 represses the expression of ROR? while leading to increased expression of FGF21 and adipoQ. Chronic administration of SR1555 to obese diabetic mice resulted in a modest reduction in food intake accompanied with significant reduction in fat mass, resulting in reduced body weight and improved insulin sensitivity. Analysis ex vivo of treated mice demonstrates that SR1555 induced expression of the thermogenic gene program in fat depots. Further studies in cultured cells showed that SR1555 inhibited activation of hormone-sensitive lipase and increased fatty acid oxidation. Combined, these results suggest that pharmacological repression of ROR? may represent a strategy for treatment of obesity by increasing thermogenesis and fatty acid oxidation, while inhibition of hormone-sensitive lipase activity results in a reduction of serum free fatty acids, leading to improved peripheral insulin sensitivity. PMID:25904554

  15. Effect of aerosol on small trade cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, H.; Feingold, G.; Koren, I.

    2009-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations of trade-wind cumulus clouds are conducted for clean and polluted aerosol conditions, and at two different grid-sizes to explore (i) the microphysical and morphological responses of fields of cumulus to aerosol perturbations, and (ii) the robustness of these responses to resolution. Cloud size distributions are shown to be well-approximated by a negative power-law function indicating that as resolution increases, more and more small clouds are resolved. Cloud fraction in the fine resolution simulations is 30 % higher than in the coarse resolution simulations. Polluted cloud populations contain higher numbers of smaller clouds than clean cloud populations. The polluted clouds also have higher cloud-averaged liquid water contents. It is hypothesized that these responses are a result of a chain reaction set off by stronger evaporation at cloud edges in the case of polluted clouds. The smallest clouds contribute significantly to cloud fraction and cloud reflectance. The response of cloud fraction and liquid water path to aerosol changes is strongly dependent on the definition of what constitutes a ``cloud'' suggesting that caution be exercised before parameterizing these responses.

  16. Intestinal hormones and growth factors: Effects on the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Drozdowski, Laurie; Thomson, Alan BR

    2009-01-01

    There are various hormones and growth factors which may modify the intestinal absorption of nutrients, and which might thereby be useful in a therapeutic setting, such as in persons with short bowel syndrome. In partI, we focus first on insulin-like growth factors, epidermal and transferring growth factors, thyroid hormones and glucocorticosteroids. Part II will detail the effects of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-2 on intestinal absorption and adaptation, and the potential for an additive effect of GLP2 plus steroids. PMID:19152442

  17. Microplasticity of surfaces and small volumes: Microstructural and environmental effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymiak, Natalia Igorivna

    The present study utilizes contact mechanics techniques to address several critical aspects of micro/nanotribology. An emphasis is placed on scale, structure and environmental effects. Scale effects refer to the earliest stages of plastic deformation where continuum laws are no longer applicable. Structure effects involve complex relationships between microstructure and mechanical behavior. Environmental effects are manifested in changes of deformation and fracture under exposure to aggressive environments. Scale effect studies involved evaluation of the plasticity initiation in MgO and W single crystal materials utilizing AE monitored nanoindentation. Newly developed AE sensors incorporated into indenter tips (Hysitron, Inc.) provided greatly enhanced resolution and sensitivity to localized plasticity and fracture events at submicron indentation depths. Based on the analysis of indentation curves and AE waveforms associated with the yield initiation events, new insights into yield point phenomenon were gained. Microstructure effects were addressed with a newly developed mechanical property evaluation method. With this method, mechanical properties of brittle porous nanocrystalline SiC film on Mo substrate were derived from the complex indentation response involving densification and fracture. Evaluation of environmental effects involved deformation and fracture of bulk materials and interfaces. Indentation curve analysis combined with the AFM imaging of tested areas provided quantitative measures of hydrogen induced hardening and plastic strain localization in 316 stainless steel. A newly developed indentation based experimental procedure allowed quantitative evaluation of hydrogen effects for Cu/SiO2 interfaces with and without several nm thick Ti interlayers. Up to 50% reduction of the apparent practical work of adhesion was observed in Cu/Ti/SiO 2 films as revealed by indentation testing immediately after hydrogen charging. Finally, a novel approach for the in-situ evaluation of passive film stresses and growth kinetics was developed. It was demonstrated that the evolution of passive films and the stress acting in these films can be followed using a depth sensing continuous indentation into surfaces under potentiostatic control. Based on the recorded indenter tip displacement, time-dependent passive film thickness and stress can be determined with the proposed theoretical model.

  18. Direct effects of phosphorylation on the preferred backbone conformation of peptides: a nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed Central

    Tholey, A; Lindemann, A; Kinzel, V; Reed, J

    1999-01-01

    Control of protein activity by phosphorylation appears to work principally by inducing conformational change, but the mechanisms so far reported are dependent on the structural context in which phosphorylation occurs. As the activity of many small peptides is also regulated by phosphorylation, we decided to investigate possible direct consequences of this on the preferred backbone conformation. We have performed 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with short model peptides of the pattern Gly-Ser-Xaa-Ser, where Xaa represents Ser, Thr, or Tyr in either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated form and with either free or blocked amino and carboxy termini. The chemical shifts of amide protons and the 3JNH-Halpha coupling constants were estimated from one-dimensional and two-dimensional scalar correlated spectroscopy (COSY) spectra at different pH values. The results clearly indicate a direct structural effect of serine and threonine phosphorylation on the preferred backbone dihedrals independent of the presence of charged groups in the surrounding sequence. Tyrosine phosphorylation does not induce such a charge-independent effect. Additionally, experiments with p-fluoro- and p-nitro-phenylalanine-containing peptides showed that the mere presence of an electronegative group on the aromatic ring of tyrosine does not produce direct structural effects. In the case of serine and threonine phosphorylation a strong dependence of the conformational shift on the protonation level of the phosphoryl group could be observed, showing that phosphorylation induces the strongest effect in its dianionic, i.e., physiological, form. The data reveal a hitherto unknown mechanism that may be added to the repertoire of conformational control of peptides and proteins by phosphorylation. PMID:9876124

  19. Effect of Health Literacy on the Utilization of Advance Directives Based on the Health Belief Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkelman, Wallace J.

    2010-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that only a small proportion of individuals in the United States complete advance directives as part of their planning for end-of-life care. This study sought to determine if health literacy is a significant factor in advance directive completion as has been posited by previous researchers. Analysis of the data collected

  20. Effect of Health Literacy on the Utilization of Advance Directives Based on the Health Belief Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkelman, Wallace J.

    2010-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that only a small proportion of individuals in the United States complete advance directives as part of their planning for end-of-life care. This study sought to determine if health literacy is a significant factor in advance directive completion as has been posited by previous researchers. Analysis of the data collected…

  1. Irrigated small grain residue management effects on soil properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of straw removal from fields under irrigated wheat and barley on soil properties has become a potential concern in Idaho. The demand of straw for animal bedding and feed, and the potential development of cellulosic ethanol production will likely increase in the future. This paper revie...

  2. Language Effects in Magnitude Comparison: Small, but Not Irrelevant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuerk, H.C.; Weger, U.; Willmes, K.

    2005-01-01

    It is assumed that number magnitude comparison is performed by assessing magnitude representation on a single analog mental number line. However, we have observed a unit-decade-compatibility effect in German which is inconsistent with this assumption (Nuerk, Weger, & Willmes, 2001). Incompatible magnitude comparisons in which decade and unit…

  3. Small power plants; Seminar on Small Power Plants - Technology and Cost Effectiveness, Technische Universitaet Wien, Vienna, Austria, January 15, 16, 1981, Reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, L.

    Progress in the production of small power plants is discussed. The topics considered include small power plants in Switzerland, the BRD, and Hungary, and the use of nontraditional energy sources in the USSR. The economic aspects of small power plants are examined, and direct and indirect means of producing solar energy are studied. The direct forms include the Austrian 10-kW plant, while the indirect forms discussed include water and wind power, biomass, hay, biogas, and wood. Unit power plants are discussed along with geothermal energy, heat pumps, the role of systems analysis, and the impact of energy production on the environment.

  4. Adaptive control of pulse front tilt, the quill effect, and directional ultrafast laser writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, P. S.; Simmonds, R. D.; Booth, M. J.

    2013-03-01

    The "quill effect" describes a directional phenomenon encountered during ultrafast laser fabrication. Even in homogeneous and isotropic materials, fabrication effects can depend on the direction of focus translation. The directionality has been attributed to pulse front tilt, leading to a spatiotemporal asymmetry in the focus. We use adaptive optics to control pulse front tilt and demonstrate controllable quill effect writing in fused silica using a femtosecond laser. Through adaptive control of the intensity profile, we also confirm that inhomogeneous pupil illumination causes similar directional effects. We show dynamic control of ultrashort pulses and directional effects during fabrication.

  5. Photoacoustic imaging of acupuncture effect in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Xu, Xueliang; Chen, Bingzhang; Rong, Jian; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture has been a powerful clinical tool for treating chronic diseases. However, there is currently no appropriate method to clarify the therapeutic effect of acupuncture. Here, we use photoacoustic tomography (PAT) to study the effect of acupuncture on mouse brain blood vessels. Ten healthy mice were stimulated with acupuncture needles on two acupoints. PAT images were obtained before and after acupuncture. We report that stimulation of certain acupoints resulted in changes in hemodynamics/blood flow at these points. The results demonstrate that PAT can non-invasively detect blood flow changes in mouse brain under acupuncture. This pilot study shows the potential of PAT as a visualization tool for illuminating the mechanism of acupuncture and promoting its clinical applications. PMID:25780734

  6. Dark matter directional detection in non-relativistic effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo

    2015-07-20

    We extend the formalism of dark matter directional detection to arbitrary one-body dark matter-nucleon interactions. The new theoretical framework generalizes the one currently used, which is based on 2 types of dark matter-nucleon interaction only. It includes 14 dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions, and the Radon transform of the first 2 moments of the dark matter velocity distribution. We calculate the recoil energy spectra at dark matter directional detectors made of CF{sub 4}, CS{sub 2} and {sup 3}He for the 14 dark matter-nucleon interactions, using nuclear response functions recently obtained through numerical nuclear structure calculations. We highlight the new features of the proposed theoretical framework, and present our results for a spherical dark matter halo and for a stream of dark matter particles. This study lays the foundations for model independent analyses of dark matter directional detection experiments.

  7. Dark matter directional detection in non-relativistic effective theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catena, Riccardo

    2015-07-01

    We extend the formalism of dark matter directional detection to arbitrary one-body dark matter-nucleon interactions. The new theoretical framework generalizes the one currently used, which is based on 2 types of dark matter-nucleon interaction only. It includes 14 dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions, and the Radon transform of the first 2 moments of the dark matter velocity distribution. We calculate the recoil energy spectra at dark matter directional detectors made of CF4, CS2 and 3He for the 14 dark matter-nucleon interactions, using nuclear response functions recently obtained through numerical nuclear structure calculations. We highlight the new features of the proposed theoretical framework, and present our results for a spherical dark matter halo and for a stream of dark matter particles. This study lays the foundations for model independent analyses of dark matter directional detection experiments.

  8. Direct effects of fatty meals and adiposity on oxidised low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Laguna-Camacho, Antonio; Alonso-Barreto, Arely S; Mendieta-Zern, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    High-fat intake and high adiposity contribute to hyperlipaemia. In a hyperlipaemic state, lipoproteins infiltrate arterial wall where they are modified and cause an immune response characteristic of atherosclerosis. A small fraction of modified lipoproteins including oxidised low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) returns to circulation. The present study tracked high-fat meals during four weeks as to find effects of sustained frequency change on adiposity and ox-LDL. The findings indicated that changes in frequency of consumption of high-fat eating episodes correlated directly with changes in adiposity and ox-LDL. Hence the number of fatty meals consumed by people with overweight or obesity in few weeks could affect the atherogenic process. PMID:25863985

  9. The effect of compositionally-generated elastic stresses on morphological instability during directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, B. J.; Voorhees, P. W.; Davis, S. H.; Mcfadden, G. B.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of compositionally-generated elastic stresses on the conditions for morphological instability during directional solidification of a dilute, ideal binary alloy is investigated using the Gibbs-Thomson equations for an elastically-stressed solid with zero surface stress in equilibrium with a liquid. It is found that these stresses lead to a small stabilization of the Mullins and Sekerka cellular mode of instability. The steady mode is stabilized by a stress-induced modification to the interfacial concentration of the solid, which in turn alters the amount of solute rejected to inhibit the growth of perturbations. The presence of elastic stresses could generate a new oscillatory instability which is most likely to be found in experiments near absolute stability for materials with segregation coefficients near unity and large solute expansion coefficients.

  10. Location and direction dependent effects in collider physics from noncommutativity

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighat, Mansour; Okada, Nobuchika; Stern, Allen

    2010-07-01

    We examine the leading order noncommutative corrections to the differential and total cross sections for e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}qq. After averaging over the Earth's rotation, the results depend on the latitude for the collider, as well as the direction of the incoming beam. They also depend on the scale and direction of the noncommutativity. Using data from LEP, we exclude regions in the parameter space spanned by the noncommutative scale and angle relative to the Earth's axis. We also investigate possible implications for phenomenology at the future International Linear Collider.

  11. Do small-scale exclosure/enclosure experiments predict the effects of large-scale extirpation of freshwater migratory fauna?

    PubMed

    Greathouse, Effie A; Pringle, Catherine M; McDowell, William H

    2006-10-01

    A variety of theoretical and empirical studies indicate that the abilities of small-scale experiments to predict responses to large-scale perturbations vary. Small-scale experiments often do not predict the directions of large-scale responses, and relatively few empirical studies have examined whether small-scale experiments predict the magnitudes of large-scale responses. Here we present an empirical example of small-scale manipulations predicting not only the directions but also the magnitudes of the effects of whole-catchment, decades-long decimation of migratory freshwater shrimp populations. In streams of Puerto Rico (USA), we used arena sizes of <2 m2 in 1- to 4-week exclosure/enclosure experiments. Effects of small-scale experiments largely matched those of large-scale shrimp loss above dams for a variety of response variables (abiotic and biotic factors including epilithic fine sediments, algae and organic matter, and invertebrate grazers, detritivores, and predators). The results of our extrapolation contrast with studies of small- versus large-scale perturbations in the temperate zone. Our findings are likely explained by: a set of response variables that are more dominated by within-patch processes than exchange processes, an experimental manipulation that encompassed the characteristic scales of response variables, our use of open arenas lacking cage artifacts, and/or our combination of two distinct experimental approaches (exclosures and enclosures). Based on our study design, we suggest that extrapolation across experimental scales can be greatly enhanced by embedding open arenas within large-scale conditions that represent all treatment levels. PMID:16823563

  12. Physical and chemical effects of direct aqueous advanced oxidation processing on green sand foundry mold materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clobes, Jason Kenneth

    Iron foundries using the common green sand molding process have increasingly been incorporating aqueous advanced oxidation (AO) systems to reduce the consumption of sand system bentonite clay and coal raw materials by and to decrease their volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. These AO systems typically use a combination of sonication, ozone aeration, and hydrogen peroxide to treat and recycle slurries of sand system baghouse dust, which is rich in clay and coal. While the overall effects of AO on raw material consumption and organic emissions are known, the mechanisms behind these effects are not well understood. This research examined the effects of bench-scale direct aqueous AO processing on green sand mold materials at the micro level. Bench-scale AO processing, including acoustic sonication, ozone/oxygen aeration, and hydrogen peroxide dramatically decreased the particle sizes of both western bentonite and foundry sand system baghouse dust. Bench-scale AO processing was shown to effectively separate the clay material from the larger silica and coal particles and to extensively break up the larger clay agglomerates. The acoustic sonication component of AO processing was the key contributor to enhanced clay recovery. Acoustic sonication alone was slightly more effective than combined component AO in reducing the particle sizes of the baghouse dust and in the recovery of clay yields in the supernatant during sedimentation experiments. Sedimentation separation results correlated well with the increase in small particle concentrations due to AO processing. Clay suspension viscosity decreased with AO processing due to enhanced dispersion of the particles. X-ray diffraction of freeze-dried baghouse dust indicated that AO processing does not rehydrate calcined montmorillonite and does not increase the level of interlayer water hydration in the dry clays. Zeta potential measurements indicated that AO processing also does not produce any large changes in the surface charge of the small clay particles upon AO treatment.

  13. Effect of Directional Array Size on the Measurement of Airframe Noise Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the effects of overall size of directional (or phased) arrays on the measurement of aeroacoustic components. An airframe model was mounted in the potential core of an open-jet windtunnel, with the directional arrays located outside the flow in an anechoic environment. Two array systems were used; one with a solid measurement angle that encompasses 31.6 deg.of source directivity and a smaller one that encompasses 7.2 deg. The arrays, and sub-arrays of various sizes, measured noise from a calibrator source and flap edge model setups. In these cases, noise was emitted from relatively small, but finite size source regions, with intense levels compared to other sources. Although the larger arrays revealed much more source region detail, the measured source levels were substantially reduced due to finer resolution compared to that of the smaller arrays. To better understand the measurements quantitatively, an analytical model was used to define the basic relationships between array to source region sizes and measured output level. Also, the effect of noise scattering by shear layer turbulence was examined using the present data and those of previous studies. Taken together, the two effects were sufficient to explain spectral level differences between arrays of different sizes. An important result of this study is that total (integrated) noise source levels are retrievable and the levels are independent of the array size as long as certain experimental and processing criteria are met. The criteria for both open and closed tunnels are discussed. The success of special purpose diagonal-removal processing in obtaining integrated results is apparently dependent in part on source distribution. Also discussed is the fact that extended sources are subject to substantial measurement error, especially for large arrays.

  14. Direct Object Predictability: Effects on Young Children's Imitation of Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valian, Virginia; Prasada, Sandeep; Scarpa, Jodi

    2006-01-01

    We hypothesize that the conceptual relation between a verb and its direct object can make a sentence easier ("the cat is eating some food") or harder ("the cat is eating a sock") to parse and understand. If children's limited performance systems contribute to the ungrammatical brevity of their speech, they should perform better on sentences that

  15. Effects of propeller rotation direction on airplane interior noise levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, C. M.; Mayes, W. H.; Daniels, E. F.

    1985-01-01

    Interior noise measurements for upsweeping and downsweeping movement of the propeller blade tips past the fuselage were made on a twin-engine airplane and on two simplified fuselage models. Changes in interior noise levels of as much as 8 dB reversal of propeller rotation direction were measured for some configurations and test conditions.

  16. Goal Direction and Effectiveness, Emotional Maturity, and Nuclear Family Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klever, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Differentiation of self, a cornerstone concept in Bowen theory, has a profound influence over time on the functioning of the individual and his or her family unit. This 5-year longitudinal study tested this hypothesis with 50 developing nuclear families. The dimensions of differentiation of self that were examined were goal direction and…

  17. Goal Direction and Effectiveness, Emotional Maturity, and Nuclear Family Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klever, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Differentiation of self, a cornerstone concept in Bowen theory, has a profound influence over time on the functioning of the individual and his or her family unit. This 5-year longitudinal study tested this hypothesis with 50 developing nuclear families. The dimensions of differentiation of self that were examined were goal direction and

  18. New Small-Molecule Inhibitors Effectively Blocking Picornavirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Ford Siltz, Lauren A.; Viktorova, Ekaterina G.; Zhang, Ben; Kouiavskaia, Diana; Dragunsky, Eugenia; Chumakov, Konstantin; Isaacs, Lyle

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Few drugs targeting picornaviruses are available, making the discovery of antivirals a high priority. Here, we identified and characterized three compounds from a library of kinase inhibitors that block replication of poliovirus, coxsackievirus B3, and encephalomyocarditis virus. Using an in vitro translation-replication system, we showed that these drugs inhibit different stages of the poliovirus life cycle. A4(1) inhibited both the formation and functioning of the replication complexes, while E5(1) and E7(2) were most effective during the formation but not the functioning step. Neither of the compounds significantly inhibited VPg uridylylation. Poliovirus resistant to E7(2) had a G5318A mutation in the 3A protein. This mutation was previously found to confer resistance to enviroxime-like compounds, which target a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III? (PI4KIII?)-dependent step in viral replication. Analysis of host protein recruitment showed that E7(2) reduced the amount of GBF1 on the replication complexes; however, the level of PI4KIII? remained intact. E7(2) as well as another enviroxime-like compound, GW5074, interfered with viral polyprotein processing affecting both 3C- and 2A-dependent cleavages, and the resistant G5318A mutation partially rescued this defect. Moreover, E7(2) induced abnormal recruitment to membranes of the viral proteins; thus, enviroxime-like compounds likely severely compromise the interaction of the viral polyprotein with membranes. A4(1) demonstrated partial protection from paralysis in a murine model of poliomyelitis. Multiple attempts to isolate resistant mutants in the presence of A4(1) or E5(1) were unsuccessful, showing that effective broad-spectrum antivirals could be developed on the basis of these compounds. IMPORTANCE Diverse picornaviruses can trigger multiple human maladies, yet currently, only hepatitis A virus and poliovirus can be controlled with vaccination. The development of antipicornavirus therapeutics is also facing significant difficulties because these viruses readily generate resistance to compounds targeting either viral or cellular factors. Here, we describe three novel compounds that effectively block replication of distantly related picornaviruses with minimal toxicity to cells. The compounds prevent viral RNA replication after the synthesis of the uridylylated VPg primer. Importantly, two of the inhibitors are strongly refractory to the emergence of resistant mutants, making them promising candidates for further broad-spectrum therapeutic development. Evaluation of one of the compounds in an in vivo model of poliomyelitis demonstrated partial protection from the onset of paralysis. PMID:25008939

  19. Discrimination of mumps virus small hydrophobic gene deletion effects from gene translation effects on virus virulence.

    PubMed

    Malik, Tahir; Shegogue, Candie Wolbert; Werner, Kellie; Ngo, Laurie; Sauder, Christian; Zhang, Cheryl; Duprex, William Paul; Rubin, Steven

    2011-06-01

    Deletion of the small hydrophobic (SH) protein of certain paramyxoviruses has been found to result in attenuation, suggesting that the SH protein is a virulence factor. To investigate the role of the mumps virus (MuV) SH protein in virulence, multiple stop codons were introduced into the open reading frame (ORF) of a MuV molecular clone (r88-1961(SHstop)), preserving genome structure but precluding production of the SH protein. No differences in neurovirulence were seen between the wild-type and the SH(stop) viruses. In contrast, upon deletion of the SH gene, significant neuroattenuation was observed. These data indicate that the MuV SH protein is not a neurovirulence factor and highlight the importance of distinguishing gene deletion effects from protein-specific effects. PMID:21471236

  20. Dynamical effects of small-scale gravity waves of lower atmospheric origin on the equinoctial thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yigit, E.; Medvedev, A. S.; Aylward, A. D.; Ridley, A. J.; Harris, M. J.; Moldwin, M.; Hartogh, P.

    2011-12-01

    Small-scale internal gravity waves (GWs) propagating directly from the lower to upper atmosphere play a significant dynamical role for the general circulation of the thermosphere at solstice (Yigit et al., 2009). Using the extended spectral nonlinear gravity wave parameterization of Yigit et al. (2008) implemented into a 3-D coupled general circulation model, this work investigates the effects of a broad spectrum of small-scale GWs of lower atmospheric origin on the equinoctial thermosphere for the first time. GWs propagate to F region altitudes in both hemispheres, producing appreciable drag on the mean zonal wind. A modification of the two-cell equinoctial mean circulation by GWs is simulated. The mean zonal GW drag is comparable to the ion drag up to the middle thermosphere. While the mean dynamical effects of GWs is the deceleration of the mean flow, the instantaneous GW body force can have both signs. In the Southern Hemisphere high-latitude, GWs produce very large torque, the mechanism of which is investigated in detail. GW anisotropy plays a crucial role in offsetting and modulating wave filtering, introducing increased favorable propagation conditions for westerly harmonics in the high-latitudes. This leads to a very large localized eastward GW drag reaching a maximum in the upper thermosphere as a consequence of enhanced molecular viscosity, thermal conduction, and ion drag. Overall, this study highlights that in studies of the thermosphere at equinox, GWs should be taken into account. 1. Yigit, E., A. D. Aylward, A.S. Medvedev (2008), J. Geophys. Res., 113, D19106, doi:10.1029/2008JD010135. 2. Yigit, E., A. S. Medvedev, A. D. Aylward, P. Hartogh, and M. J. Harris (2009), J. Geophys. Res., 114, D07101, doi:10.1029/2008JD011132.

  1. Analysis of small latent transforming growth factor-beta complex formation and dissociation by surface plasmon resonance. Absence of direct interaction with thrombospondins.

    PubMed

    Bailly, S; Brand, C; Chambaz, E M; Feige, J J

    1997-06-27

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) is a pluripotent regulator of cell growth and differentiation. The growth factor is expressed as a latent complex that must be converted to an active form before interacting with its ubiquitous high affinity receptors. This conversion involves the release of the mature TGFbeta through disruption of the noncovalent interactions with its propeptide or latency associated protein (LAP). Complex formation or dissociation between LAP and TGFbeta plays a very important role in TGFbeta biological activity at different steps. To further characterize the kinetic parameters of this interaction, we have employed surface plasmon resonance biosensor methodology. Using this technique, we observed real time association of LAP with mature TGFbeta1. The complex formation showed an equilibrium Kd around 3-7 nM. Furthermore, we observed dissociation of the complex in the presence of extreme pH, chaotropic agents, or plasmin, confirming their effects on TGFbeta activation. The same approach was used to examine whether latent TGFbeta1 could interact with thrombospondins, previously described as activators of latent TGFbeta. Using this method, we could not detect any direct interaction of thrombospondins with either LAP alone, TGFbeta1 alone, or the small latent TGFbeta1 complex. This suggests that activation of latent TGFbeta1 complex by thrombospondins is through an indirect mechanism. PMID:9195938

  2. Effect of cholinergic agonists on muscular tonus of the lizard small intestine and esophagus.

    PubMed

    Wacyk, J; Fuenzalida, M; Morales, M; Acua, O; Lemus, D

    1999-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms of acetylcholine-induced intestinal relaxation in the lizard Liolaemus tenuis tenuis are still unknown. By using a classical model of intestinal recording of isometric contraction and relaxation in conjunction with specific pharmacological tools, this article studies the possible influence of EDRF/NO and nicotinic ganglionar receptors on the Ach-induced relaxation in an effort to elucidate the probable mechanisms involved in ACh effect. It was observed that the relaxation of the lizard intestine elicited by ACh (10(-7) - 4 x 10(-4) M) was not affected by hexametonium (5 x 10(-4) M) or tetrodotoxin (10(-6) M). Nicotine (10(-7) to 10(-4) M) induced relaxation was significantly antagonized by hexametonium; however, it was not influenced by tetrodotoxin. These results allow us to discard a neuronal pathway in cholinergic-induced relaxation, suggesting a more direct cholinergic effect on the smooth muscle, perhaps mediated by an unknown substance released by some specialized tissue. N-nitro-L-arginine, used to block NO-synthase and NO production, induced no changes in ACh-induced relaxation. Methylene blue, a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, induced no changes in ACh-induced relaxation. These results allow us to discard a probable role of EDRF/nitric oxide in the ACh-induced relaxation of lizard small intestine, providing evidence that this mechanism could be different from that reported in other species. PMID:10530339

  3. Effects of air flow directions on composting process temperature profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcu, Recep; Yaldiz, Osman

    2008-07-01

    In this study, chicken manure mixed with carnation wastes was composted by using three different air flow directions: R1-sucking (downward), R2-blowing (upward) and R3-mixed. The aim was to find out the most appropriate air flow direction type for composting to provide more homogenous temperature distribution in the reactors. The efficiency of each aeration method was evaluated by monitoring the evolution of parameters such as temperature, moisture content, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} ratio in the material and dry material losses. Aeration of the reactors was managed by radial fans. The results showed that R3 resulted in a more homogenous temperature distribution and high dry material loss throughout the composting process. The most heterogeneous temperature distribution and the lowest dry material loss were obtained in R2.

  4. Effects of air flow directions on composting process temperature profile.

    PubMed

    Kulcu, Recep; Yaldiz, Osman

    2008-01-01

    In this study, chicken manure mixed with carnation wastes was composted by using three different air flow directions: R1-sucking (downward), R2-blowing (upward) and R3-mixed. The aim was to find out the most appropriate air flow direction type for composting to provide more homogenous temperature distribution in the reactors. The efficiency of each aeration method was evaluated by monitoring the evolution of parameters such as temperature, moisture content, CO(2) and O(2) ratio in the material and dry material losses. Aeration of the reactors was managed by radial fans. The results showed that R3 resulted in a more homogenous temperature distribution and high dry material loss throughout the composting process. The most heterogeneous temperature distribution and the lowest dry material loss were obtained in R2. PMID:17888646

  5. COLONY INVASION OF SMALL HIVE BEETLES: THE EFFECTS OF HONEY BEE TYPE AND ENTRANCE REDUCERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Frake, A. M. & L. I. de Guzman COLONY INVASION OF SMALL HIVE BEETLES: THE EFFECTS OF HONEY BEE TYPE AND ENTRANCE REDUCERS - First detected in Florida in 1998, small hive beetles (SHB) are now found in at least 30 states. Although SHB can kill colonies (Elzen et al., 1999, Apidologie 30: 361-366...

  6. Relevant Prior Knowledge Moderates the Effect of Elaboration during Small Group Discussion on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Blankenstein, Floris M.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to test whether relevant prior knowledge would moderate a positive effect on academic achievement of elaboration during small-group discussion. In a 2 × 2 experimental design, 66 undergraduate students observed a video showing a small-group problem-based discussion about thunder and lightning. In the video, a teacher asked…

  7. Relevant Prior Knowledge Moderates the Effect of Elaboration during Small Group Discussion on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Blankenstein, Floris M.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to test whether relevant prior knowledge would moderate a positive effect on academic achievement of elaboration during small-group discussion. In a 2נ2 experimental design, 66 undergraduate students observed a video showing a small-group problem-based discussion about thunder and lightning. In the video, a teacher asked

  8. Effects of Group Size on Students Mathematics Achievement in Small Group Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enu, Justice; Danso, Paul Amoah; Awortwe, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    An ideal group size is hard to obtain in small group settings; hence there are groups with more members than others. The purpose of the study was to find out whether group size has any effects on students' mathematics achievement in small group settings. Two third year classes of the 2011/2012 academic year were selected from two schools in the

  9. The Effect of Small Group Discussion on Cutoff Scores during Standard Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deunk, Marjolein I.; van Kuijk, Mechteld F.; Bosker, Roel J.

    2014-01-01

    Standard setting methods, like the Bookmark procedure, are used to assist education experts in formulating performance standards. Small group discussion is meant to help these experts in setting more reliable and valid cutoff scores. This study is an analysis of 15 small group discussions during two standards setting trajectories and their effect

  10. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. 431.446 Section 431.446 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy...

  11. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. 431.446 Section 431.446 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy...

  12. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. 431.446 Section 431.446 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy...

  13. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. 431.446 Section 431.446 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy...

  14. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. 431.446 Section 431.446 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy...

  15. Assessing the Effects of Small School Size on Mathematics Achievement: A Propensity Score-Matching Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Keesler, Venessa; Schneider, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Background: Small schools have been promoted as an educational reform that is capable of improving student outcomes. However, a survey of the research on small schools indicates that much of the movement for decreasing school size is based primarily on correlational methods that do not control for selection effects in the data. In addition,

  16. The shielding effect of small-scale martian surface geometry on ultraviolet flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, J. E.; Smith, P. H.; Tanner, R.; Schuerger, A. C.; Venkateswaran, K. J.

    2007-12-01

    The atmosphere of Mars does little to attenuate incoming ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Large amounts of UV radiation sterilize the hardiest of terrestrial organisms within minutes, and chemically alter the soil such that organic molecules at or near the surface are rapidly destroyed. Thus the survival of any putative martian life near the surface depends to a large extent on how much UV radiation it receives. Variations in small-scale geometry of the surface such as pits, trenches, flat faces and overhangs can have a significant effect on the incident UV flux and may create "safe havens" for organisms and organic molecules. In order to examine this effect, a 1-D radiative transfer sky model with 836 meshed points (plus the Sun) was developed which includes both diffuse and direct components of the surface irradiance. This model derives the variation of UV flux with latitude and an object's Geometric Shielding Ratio (a ratio which describes the geometry of each situation). The best protection is offered by overhangs with flux reduced to a factor of 1.80.210 of the unprotected value, a reduction which does not vary significantly by latitude. Pits and cracks are less effective with a reduction in UV flux of only up to 4.50.510 for the modeled scenarios; however, they are more effective for the same geometric shielding ratio than overhangs at high latitudes due to the low height of the Sun in the sky. Lastly, polar faces of rocks have the least effective shielding geometry with at most a 1.10.110 reduction in UV flux. Polar faces of rocks are most effective at mid latitudes where the Sun is never directly overhead, as at tropical latitudes, and never exposes the back of the rock, as at polar latitudes. In the most favorable cases, UV flux is sufficiently reduced such that organic in-fall could accumulate beneath overhanging surfaces and in pits and cracks. As well, hardy terrestrial microorganisms such as Bacillus pumilus could persist for up to 100 sols on the outer surfaces of typical spacecraft or several tens of martian years in the most shielded surface niches.

  17. Directed cardiomyogenesis of human pluripotent stem cells by modulating Wnt/?-catenin and BMP signalling with small molecules.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Jose S; Begum, Aynun N; Alvarez, Jonathan; Zhang, Xiao-bing; Hong, Yiling; Hao, Jijun

    2015-07-15

    Cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are a potential cell source for regenerative medicine, disease modelling and drug development. However, current approaches for invitro cardiac differentiation of human PSCs are often time-consuming, heavily depend on expensive growth factors and involve the tedious formation of embryonic bodies whose signalling pathways are difficult to precisely modulate due to their complex microenvironments. In the present study, we report a new small molecule-based differentiation approach, which significantly promoted contracting cardiomyocytes in human PSCs in a monolayer format in as little as 7days, in contrast with most traditional differentiation methods that usually take up to 3weeks for cardiomyogenesis. This approach consists in activation of the Wnt/?-catenin signalling at day 0-1 with small molecule CHIR99021 (CH) followed by inhibition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling at day 1-4 with DMH1 [termed as CH(0-1)/DMH1(1-4) treatment], a selective small molecule BMP inhibitor reported by us previously. Our study further demonstrated that the CH(0-1)/DMH1(1-4) treatment significantly promotes cardiac formation via mesoderm and mesoderm-derived cardiac progenitor cells without impacts on either endoderm or ectoderm differentiation of human PSCs. This rapid, efficient and inexpensive small molecule-based cardiomyogenic method may potentially harness the use of human PSCs in regenerative medicine as well as other applications. PMID:26171831

  18. The Effect of Extra Small Group Session during PBL Implementation on Student's Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalil, Mahmoud Salah; Al Rukban, Mohammad Othman

    2010-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) started to spread in health professions in Saudi Arabia at the beginning of this century. There are several challenges facing its implementation such as defects on interpersonal communications and self-directed learning. These challenges would affect students' performance in small group discussions and their…

  19. The Effect of Extra Small Group Session during PBL Implementation on Student's Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalil, Mahmoud Salah; Al Rukban, Mohammad Othman

    2010-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) started to spread in health professions in Saudi Arabia at the beginning of this century. There are several challenges facing its implementation such as defects on interpersonal communications and self-directed learning. These challenges would affect students' performance in small group discussions and their

  20. Effective number of resolution bits in direct sensor-to-microcontroller interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverter, Ferran; Palls-Areny, Ramon

    2004-10-01

    Microcontrollers with embedded timers can directly measure resistive and capacitive sensors by determining the charging or discharging time of an RC circuit that includes the sensor. This time-to-digital conversion is affected by the quantization of the timer and the trigger noise, which limit the resolution to an effective number of bits (ENOB). This paper analyses the standard uncertainty and the ENOB of that time-to-digital conversion. When interfacing resistive sensors and the capacitor C is small, quantization effects predominate over trigger noise effects, and ENOB increases for increasing C. But, for capacitor values larger than a given C, trigger noise effects predominate and the ENOB remains constant regardless of C. Therefore, an optimal time constant yields the best speed-ENOB trade-off. This type of sensor interface was implemented by using an AVR microcontroller with an embedded 16-bit timer connected to a resistor simulating a Pt1000-type temperature sensor. The experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. If the time was determined from a single observation, the optimal time constant was about 2-3 ms and the ENOB was about 11.5 b, which corresponds to a 0.22 OHgr resolution. By averaging ten observations, that resolution improved to 13.5 b (0.05 OHgr).

  1. Cellular effects of acute direct current stimulation: somatic and synaptic terminal effects

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Asif; Reato, Davide; Arlotti, Mattia; Gasca, Fernando; Datta, Abhishek; Parra, Lucas C; Bikson, Marom

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique to modulate cortical excitability. Although increased/decreased excitability under the anode/cathode electrode is nominally associated with membrane depolarization/hyperpolarization, which cellular compartments (somas, dendrites, axons and their terminals) mediate changes in cortical excitability remains unaddressed. Here we consider the acute effects of DCS on excitatory synaptic efficacy. Using multi-scale computational models and rat cortical brain slices, we show the following. (1) Typical tDCS montages produce predominantly tangential (relative to the cortical surface) direction currents (4–12 times radial direction currents), even directly under electrodes. (2) Radial current flow (parallel to the somatodendritic axis) modulates synaptic efficacy consistent with somatic polarization, with depolarization facilitating synaptic efficacy. (3) Tangential current flow (perpendicular to the somatodendritic axis) modulates synaptic efficacy acutely (during stimulation) in an afferent pathway-specific manner that is consistent with terminal polarization, with hyperpolarization facilitating synaptic efficacy. (4) Maximal polarization during uniform DCS is expected at distal (the branch length is more than three times the membrane length constant) synaptic terminals, independent of and two–three times more susceptible than pyramidal neuron somas. We conclude that during acute DCS the cellular targets responsible for modulation of synaptic efficacy are concurrently somata and axon terminals, with the direction of cortical current flow determining the relative influence. PMID:23478132

  2. Effects of scatter modeling on time-activity curves estimated directly from dynamic SPECT projections

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, Bryan W.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2003-10-29

    Quantitative analysis of uptake and washout of cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiopharmaceuticals has the potential to provide better contrast between healthy and diseased tissue, compared to conventional reconstruction of static images. Previously, we used B-splines to model time-activity curves (TACs) for segmented volumes of interest and developed fast least-squares algorithms to estimate spline TAC coefficients and their statistical uncertainties directly from dynamic SPECT projection data. This previous work incorporated physical effects of attenuation and depth-dependent collimator response. In the present work, we incorporate scatter and use a computer simulation to study how scatter modeling affects directly estimated TACs and subsequent estimates of compartmental model parameters. An idealized single-slice emission phantom was used to simulate a 15 min dynamic {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime cardiac patient study in which 500,000 events containing scatter were detected from the slice. When scatter was modeled, unweighted least-squares estimates of TACs had root mean square (RMS) error that was less than 0.6% for normal left ventricular myocardium, blood pool, liver, and background tissue volumes and averaged 3% for two small myocardial defects. When scatter was not modeled, RMS error increased to average values of 16% for the four larger volumes and 35% for the small defects. Noise-to-signal ratios (NSRs) for TACs ranged between 1-18% for the larger volumes and averaged 110% for the small defects when scatter was modeled. When scatter was not modeled, NSR improved by average factors of 1.04 for the larger volumes and 1.25 for the small defects, as a result of the better-posed (though more biased) inverse problem. Weighted least-squares estimates of TACs had slightly better NSR and worse RMS error, compared to unweighted least-squares estimates. Compartmental model uptake and washout parameter estimates obtained from the TACs were less sensitive to whether or not scatter was modeled, compared to the TACs themselves.

  3. Analysis of small scale turbulent structures and the effect of spatial scales on gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnieders, Jana; Garbe, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The exchange of gases through the air-sea interface strongly depends on environmental conditions such as wind stress and waves which in turn generate near surface turbulence. Near surface turbulence is a main driver of surface divergence which has been shown to cause highly variable transfer rates on relatively small spatial scales. Due to the cool skin of the ocean, heat can be used as a tracer to detect areas of surface convergence and thus gather information about size and intensity of a turbulent process. We use infrared imagery to visualize near surface aqueous turbulence and determine the impact of turbulent scales on exchange rates. Through the high temporal and spatial resolution of these types of measurements spatial scales as well as surface dynamics can be captured. The surface heat pattern is formed by distinct structures on two scales - small-scale short lived structures termed fish scales and larger scale cold streaks that are consistent with the footprints of Langmuir Circulations. There are two key characteristics of the observed surface heat patterns: 1. The surface heat patterns show characteristic features of scales. 2. The structure of these patterns change with increasing wind stress and surface conditions. In [2] turbulent cell sizes have been shown to systematically decrease with increasing wind speed until a saturation at u* = 0.7 cm/s is reached. Results suggest a saturation in the tangential stress. Similar behaviour has been observed by [1] for gas transfer measurements at higher wind speeds. In this contribution a new model to estimate the heat flux is applied which is based on the measured turbulent cell size und surface velocities. This approach allows the direct comparison of the net effect on heat flux of eddies of different sizes and a comparison to gas transfer measurements. Linking transport models with thermographic measurements, transfer velocities can be computed. In this contribution, we will quantify the effect of small scale processes on interfacial transport and relate it to gas transfer. References [1] T. G. Bell, W. De Bruyn, S. D. Miller, B. Ward, K. Christensen, and E. S. Saltzman. Air-sea dimethylsulfide (DMS) gas transfer in the North Atlantic: evidence for limited interfacial gas exchange at high wind speed. Atmos. Chem. Phys. , 13:11073-11087, 2013. [2] J Schnieders, C. S. Garbe, W.L. Peirson, and C. J. Zappa. Analyzing the footprints of near surface aqueous turbulence - an image processing based approach. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, 2013.

  4. Are tropical small mammals physiologically vulnerable to Arrhenius effects and climate change?

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, Barry G; Canale, Cindy; Levesque, Danielle; Fluch, Gerhard; Reháková-Petrů, Milada; Ruf, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    There is some urgency in the necessity to incorporate physiological data into mechanistic, trait-based, demographic climate change models. Physiological responses at the individual level provide the mechanistic link between environmental changes and individual performances and hence population dynamics. Here we consider the causal relationship between ambient temperature (Ta) and metabolic rate (MR), namely, the Arrhenius effect, which is directly affected by global warming through increases in average global air temperatures and the increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme climate events. We measured and collated data for several small, free-ranging tropical arboreal mammals and evaluated their vulnerability to Arrhenius effects and putative heat stress associated with climate change. Skin temperatures (Tskin) were obtained from free-ranging tarsiers (Tarsius syrichta) on Bohol Island, Philippines. Core body temperature (Tb) was obtained from the greater hedgehog tenrec (Setifer setosus) and the gray brown mouse lemur (Microcebus ravelobensis) from Ankarafantsika, Madagascar. Tskin for another mouse lemur, Microcebus griseorufus, was obtained from the literature. All four species showed evidence of hyperthermia during the daytime rest phase in the form of either Tskin or Tb that was higher than the normothermic Tb during the nighttime active phase. Potentially, tropical arboreal mammals with the lowest MRs and Tb, such as tarsiers, are the most vulnerable to sustained heat stress because their Tb is already close to Ta. Climate change may involve increases in MRs due to Arrhenius effects, especially during the rest phase or during torpor and hibernation. The most likely outcome of increased Arrhenius effects with climate change will be an increase in energy expenditure at the expense of other critical functions such as reproduction or growth and will thus affect fitness. However, we propose that these hypothetical Arrhenius costs can be, and in some species probably are, offset by the use of hyperthermic daily torpor, that is, hypometabolism at high Ta. PMID:24457919

  5. Effective PSHE Education: Values, Purposes and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Ben; Clague, Lucy; Coldwell, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the perceived effectiveness of personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education in primary and secondary schools. It outlines the relationship between perceived effectiveness and a range of explanatory factors, linking these to the values and ethos of schools, differing views of the purposes of PSHE education, and

  6. Noise small-correlation-time effects on the dispersion of passive scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglione, P.; Mazzino, A.

    1998-09-01

    The effect of a small correlation time, ?, of the (colored-) small-scales noise on the effective diffusivities for the transport of passive scalars is investigated. It has recently been shown that the presence of ? makes the transport problem equivalent to the white-in-time case provided by a renormalized advecting velocity field. This equivalence is here exploited to investigate, both analytically and perturbatively in the Strouhal number of the advecting velocity field, the mechanism responsible for enhancement of transport.

  7. Synergistic effect of polymer and small molecules for high-performance ternary organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yajie; Deng, Dan; Lu, Kun; Zhang, Jianqi; Xia, Benzheng; Zhao, Yifan; Fang, Jin; Wei, Zhixiang

    2015-02-01

    A ternary blend system with two donors and one acceptor provides an effective route to improve the performance of organic solar cells. A synergistic effect of polymer and small molecules is observed in ternary solar cells, and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the ternary system (8.40%) is higher than those of binary systems based on small molecules (7.48%) or polymers (6.85%). PMID:25655181

  8. In vitro, antithrombotic and bleeding time studies of BMS-654457, a small-molecule, reversible and direct inhibitor of factor XIa.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pancras C; Quan, Mimi L; Watson, Carol A; Crain, Earl J; Harpel, Mark R; Rendina, Alan R; Luettgen, Joseph M; Wexler, Ruth R; Schumacher, William A; Seiffert, Dietmar A

    2015-11-01

    BMS-654457 ((+) 3'-(6-carbamimidoyl-4-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-quinolin-2-yl)-4-carbamoyl-5'-(3-methyl-butyrylamino)-biphenyl-2-carboxylic acid) is a small-molecule factor XIa (FXIa) inhibitor. We evaluated the in vitro properties of BMS-654457 and its in vivo activities in rabbit models of electrolytic-induced carotid arterial thrombosis and cuticle bleeding time (BT). Kinetic studies conducted in vitro with a chromogenic substrate demonstrated that BMS-654457 is a reversible and competitive inhibitor for FXIa. BMS-654457 increased activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) without changing prothrombin time. It was equipotent in prolonging the plasma aPTT in human and rabbit, and less potent in rat and dog. It did not alter platelet aggregation to ADP, arachidonic acid and collagen. In vivo, BMS-654457 or vehicle was given IV prior to initiation of thrombosis or cuticle transection. Preservation of integrated carotid blood flow over 90min (iCBF, % control) was used as a marker of antithrombotic efficacy. BMS-654457 at 0.37mg/kg+0.27mg/kg/h produced almost 90% preservation of iCBF compared to its vehicle (8710 and 163%, respectively, n=6 per group) and increased BT by 1.20.04-fold (P<0.05). At a higher dose (1.1mg/kg+0.8mg/kg/h), BMS-654457 increased BT by 1.330.08-fold. This compares favorably to equivalent antithrombotic doses of reference anticoagulants (warfarin and dabigatran) and antiplatelet agents (clopidogrel and prasugrel) which produced four- to six-fold BT increases in the same model. In summary, BMS-654457 was effective in the prevention of arterial thrombosis in rabbits with limited effects on BT. This study supports inhibition of FXIa, with a small-molecule, reversible and direct inhibitor as a promising antithrombotic therapy with a wide therapeutic window. PMID:26249722

  9. The achromatic locus: effect of navigation direction in color space.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Tushar; Perales, Esther; Xiao, Kaida; Hird, Emily; Karatzas, Dimosthenis; Wuerger, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    An achromatic stimulus is defined as a patch of light that is devoid of any hue. This is usually achieved by asking observers to adjust the stimulus such that it looks neither red nor green and at the same time neither yellow nor blue. Despite the theoretical and practical importance of the achromatic locus, little is known about the variability in these settings. The main purpose of the current study was to evaluate whether achromatic settings were dependent on the task of the observers, namely the navigation direction in color space. Observers could either adjust the test patch along the two chromatic axes in the CIE u*v* diagram or, alternatively, navigate along the unique-hue lines. Our main result is that the navigation method affects the reliability of these achromatic settings. Observers are able to make more reliable achromatic settings when adjusting the test patch along the directions defined by the four unique hues as opposed to navigating along the main axes in the commonly used CIE u*v* chromaticity plane. This result holds across different ambient viewing conditions (Dark, Daylight, Cool White Fluorescent) and different test luminance levels (5, 20, and 50 cd/m(2)). The reduced variability in the achromatic settings is consistent with the idea that internal color representations are more aligned with the unique-hue lines than the u* and v* axes. PMID:24464164

  10. Direct and indirect effects of acidic deposition on vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Linthurst, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Papers presented covered: ecosystems approach to the acid rain problem; characterization of injury to birch and bean leaves by simulated acid precipitation; effects of acid precipitation on plant diseases; effects of acidic deposition on forest vegetation: interaction with insect and microbial agents of stress; microbial response to acid deposition and effects of plant productivity; biogeochemical response of forest canopies to acid precipitation; assessing the possibility of a link between acid precipitation and decreased growth rates of trees; and use of forest site index for evaluating terrestrial resources at risk from acidic deposition.

  11. Direct Detections of the Yarkovsky Effect: Status and Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesley, Steven R.; Farnocchia, Davide; Pravec, Petr; Vokrouhlický, David

    2016-01-01

    We report the current results on a comprehensive scan of the near-Earth asteroid catalog for evidence of the Yarkovsky effect in the orbital motion of these bodies. While most objects do not have sufficient observational data to reveal such slight acceleration, we do identify 42 asteroids with a ``valid'' detection of the Yarkovsky effect, i.e., those with a signal at least 3 times greater than the formal uncertainty and a value compatible with the Yarkovsky mechanism. We also identify a special category of non-detection, which we refer to as ``weak signal,'' where the objects are of a size that would permit a clear detection if the Yarkovsky effect is maximized, and yet the orbit is clearly incompatible with such accelerations. The implication is that the Yarkovsky effect is reduced in these cases, presumably due to mid-range obliquity, but possibly also due to size, bulk density, thermal inertia, albedo, or spin rate markedly different from assumptions. Finally, there are a number of asteroids showing a significant signal for nongravitational acceleration, and yet with a magnitude too great to be attributed to the Yarkovsky effect. We term these ``spurious detections'' because most are due to erroneous optical astrometry, often involving a single isolated night from precovery observations. Some cases may be due to other nongravitational accelerations, such as outgassing, mass loss, or micro-meteoroid flux.

  12. Survival after total-body irradiation. I. Effects of partial small bowel shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Vigneulle, R.M.; Vriesendorp, H.M.; Taylor, P.; Burns, W.; Pelkey, T. )

    1989-08-01

    The small intestine of the rat was shielded during total-body irradiation (TBI) to evaluate the effects of radiation dose and length of intestine shielded on survival. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized in groups of 10. Using aseptic surgical procedures 80, 40, 20, or 10 cm, or none of the proximal or distal small intestine were temporarily exteriorized and shielded during irradiation with photons from an 18 MeV linear accelerator. Less than 17% of the dose was delivered to the shielded intestines. In unshielded animals deaths occurred from Days 4 to 6 with 13, 15, or 17 Gy and from Days 8 to 30 with 9, 11, and 12 Gy. However, in all animals exposed to 15 Gy with all or part of the small intestine shielded, survival was increased to between 5 and 9 days. Shielding of the distal small intestine was more effective in prolonging survival than shielding of the proximal small intestine. The previously identified target of radiation damage in the small intestine is the crypt stem cell. In this study, the analysis of histological specimens of shielded and irradiated small intestine suggested that humoral factors also influence intestinal histology and survival after irradiation. These humoral factors are thought to originate from the irradiated body tissues, the shielded proximal intestine, and the shielded distal intestine. Further studies are required to identify these factors and to determine their mode of action and their therapeutic potential after radiation damage to the small intestine.

  13. Direct and semi-direct aerosol radiative effect on the Mediterranean climate variability using a coupled regional climate system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabat, Pierre; Somot, Samuel; Mallet, Marc; Sevault, Florence; Chiacchio, Marc; Wild, Martin

    2015-02-01

    A fully coupled regional climate system model (CNRM-RCSM4) has been used over the Mediterranean region to investigate the direct and semi-direct effects of aerosols, but also their role in the radiation-atmosphere-ocean interactions through multi-annual ensemble simulations (2003-2009) with and without aerosols and ocean-atmosphere coupling. Aerosols have been taken into account in CNRM-RCSM4 through realistic interannual monthly AOD climatologies. An evaluation of the model has been achieved, against various observations for meteorological parameters, and has shown the ability of CNRM-RCSM4 to reproduce the main patterns of the Mediterranean climate despite some biases in sea surface temperature (SST), radiation and cloud cover. The results concerning the aerosol radiative effects show a negative surface forcing on average because of the absorption and scattering of the incident radiation. The SW surface direct effect is on average -20.9 Wm-2 over the Mediterranean Sea, -14.7 Wm-2 over Europe and -19.7 Wm-2 over northern Africa. The LW surface direct effect is weaker as only dust aerosols contribute (+4.8 Wm-2 over northern Africa). This direct effect is partly counterbalanced by a positive semi-direct radiative effect over the Mediterranean Sea (+5.7 Wm-2 on average) and Europe (+5.0 Wm-2) due to changes in cloud cover and atmospheric circulation. The total aerosol effect is consequently negative at the surface and responsible for a decrease in land (on average -0.4 °C over Europe, and -0.5 °C over northern Africa) and sea surface temperature (on average -0.5 °C for the Mediterranean SST). In addition, the latent heat loss is shown to be weaker (-11.0 Wm-2) in the presence of aerosols, resulting in a decrease in specific humidity in the lower troposphere, and a reduction in cloud cover and precipitation. Simulations also indicate that dust aerosols warm the troposphere by absorbing solar radiation, and prevent radiation from reaching the surface, thus stabilizing the troposphere. The comparison with the model response in atmosphere-only simulations shows that these feedbacks are attenuated if SST cannot be modified by aerosols, highlighting the importance of using coupled regional models over the Mediterranean. Oceanic convection is also strengthened by aerosols, which tends to reinforce the Mediterranean thermohaline circulation. In parallel, two case studies are presented to illustrate positive feedbacks between dust aerosols and regional climate. First, the eastern Mediterranean was subject to high dust aerosol loads in June 2007 which reduce land and sea surface temperature, as well as air-sea humidity fluxes. Because of northern wind over the eastern Mediterranean, drier and cooler air has been consequently advected from the sea to the African continent, reinforcing the direct dust effect over land. On the contrary, during the western European heat wave in June 2006, dust aerosols have contributed to reinforcing an important ridge responsible for dry and warm air advection over western Europe, and thus to increasing lower troposphere (+0.8 °C) and surface temperature (+0.5 °C), namely about 15 % of this heat wave.

  14. Direct estimation of the cost effectiveness of tornado shelters.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Kevin M; Sutter, Daniel

    2006-08-01

    This article estimates the cost effectiveness of tornado shelters using the annual probability of a tornado and new data on fatalities per building struck by a tornado. This approach differs from recent estimates of the cost effectiveness of tornado shelters in Reference 1 that use historical casualties. Historical casualties combine both tornado risk and resident action. If residents of tornado-prone states take greater precautions, observed fatalities might not be much higher than in states with lower risk. Estimation using the tornado probability avoids this potential bias. Despite the very different method used, the estimates are 68 million US dollars in permanent homes and 6.0 million US dollars in mobile homes in Oklahoma using a 3% real discount rate, within about 10% of estimates based on historical fatalities. The findings suggest that shelters provide cost-effective protection for mobile homes in the most tornado-prone states but not for permanent homes. PMID:16948687

  15. Oxygen in GaAs - Direct and indirect effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Skowronski, M.; Pawlowicz, L.; Lagowski, J.

    1984-01-01

    Oxygen has profound effects on the key electronic properties and point defects of GaAs crystals. Thus, when added in the growth system, it decreases the free electron concentration and enhances the concentration of deep donors in the resulting crystals. Both of these effects are highly beneficial for achieving semi-insulating material and have been utilized for that purpose. They have been attributed to the tendency of oxygen to getter silicon impurities during crystal growth. Only recently, it has been found that oxygen in GaAs introduces also a midgap level, ELO, with essentially the same activation energy as EL2 but with four times greater electron capture cross section. The present report reassesses the electrical and optical properties of the midgap levels in GaAs crystals grown by the horizontal Bridgman (HB) and the Czochralski-LEC techniques. Emphasis is placed on the identification of the specific effects of ELO.

  16. Direct method for detecting small quantities of hepatitis B virus DNA in serum and plasma using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Zeldis, J B; Lee, J H; Mamish, D; Finegold, D J; Sircar, R; Ling, Q; Knudsen, P J; Kuramoto, I K; Mimms, L T

    1989-01-01

    Serum components inhibit DNA polymerase, thereby obviating direct detection of serum viral DNA sequences by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This has necessitated extraction of nucleic acid from sera before performing PCR and has resulted in loss of sensitivity. By adsorbing virus to a solid surface (microcentrifuge tubes or antibody coated microparticles) followed by proteinase K digestion, as little as three viruses per 200 microliters serum may be directly detected by PCR without nucleic acid extraction. The sensitivity is dependent on the surface area of the adsorptive surface and is increased by having antibodies on the adsorptive surface. The nucleic acid sequence of the amplified DNA fragments may be directly determined by the dideoxy method. Of 24 plasma samples from HBsAg+ volunteer blood donors, HBV DNA was detected in 7 by dot blot assay, 7 by liquid hybridization, and 9 by PCR. PCR detected DNA in every sample that was positive by another assay. Analysis of serial samples of two patients with acute self-limited hepatitis B found detectable HBsAg and pre-S2 antigenemia before HBV DNA by the PCR method. These results suggest that surface antigenemia may precede viremia during acute hepatitis. Images PMID:2808703

  17. Small head movements that accompany goal-directed arm movements provide various useful cues about the target's distance.

    PubMed

    de la Malla, Cristina; Buiteman, Stijn; Otters, Wilmer; Smeets, Jeroen; Brenner, Eli

    2015-01-01

    How a static object's position and orientation relative to oneself change when one moves one's head can be used to judge the object's distance. There are three distance cues that change when moving one's head: the direction of gaze that is required to fixate the object, the orientation of the object with respect to such a direction of gaze, and the object's position relative to distant objects in the retinal image. They do so to an extent that depends on the object's distance and on the magnitude of the head movement. When making goal-directed arm movements we inevitably move our head to some extent. To find out which, if any, of the above-mentioned cues influence distance judgments under such circumstances, we conducted a study in which participants had to move their index finger to virtual objects in the dark. The objects' sizes and positions varied across trials, with pairs of trials in which the same object was presented at the same location, except that one or more of the three above-mentioned cues was artificially manipulated to indicate that the object was either nearer or further away. We found that all three cues influence the movement endpoints, but the magnitude of the influence shows that the cues only contribute a few percent to the judged distance. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326280

  18. Temperament, Hopelessness, and Attempted Suicide: Direct and Indirect Effects

    PubMed Central

    Rosellini, Anthony J.; Bagge, Courtney L.

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated if hopelessness mediated the relations between temperament and recent suicide attempter status in a psychiatric sample. Negative and positive temperament (particularly the positive temperament-positive emotionality subscale) uniquely predicted levels of hopelessness. Although these temperament constructs also demonstrated significant indirect effects on recent suicide attempter status, the effects were partially (for the broad temperament scales) or fully (for the positive emotionality subscale) mediated by levels of hopelessness. These findings indicate that a tendency to experience excessive negative emotions as well as a paucity of positive emotions may lead individuals to experience hopelessness. Although temperament may indirectly influence suicide attempter status, hopelessness mediates these relations. PMID:24494785

  19. Disentangling direct and indirect effects of experimental grassland management and plant functional-group manipulation on plant and leafhopper diversity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant biodiversity can affect trophic interactions in many ways, including direct bottom-up effects on insects, but is negatively affected by agricultural intensification. Grassland intensification promotes plant productivity, resulting in changes in plant community composition, and impacts on higher trophic levels. Here, we use a novel grassland management experiment combining manipulations of cutting and fertilization with experimental changes in plant functional group composition (independent of management effects) to disentangle the direct and indirect effects of agricultural management on insect herbivore diversity and abundance. We used leafhoppers as model organisms as they are a key insect taxon in grasslands and react rapidly to management changes. Leafhoppers were sampled between May and September 2010 using standardized sweep netting and pan traps. Results Plant diversity, functional group composition and management regime in grasslands affected leafhopper species richness and abundance. Higher cutting frequencies directly led to decreasing leafhopper species richness, presumably due to the higher disturbance frequency and the reduction in food-resource heterogeneity. In contrast, fertilizer application had only a small indirect negative effect via enhanced aboveground plant biomass, reduced plant diversity and changes in functional group composition. The manipulated increase in grass cover had contrasting direct and indirect effects on leafhopper species richness: grass cover directly increased leafhopper species richness, but negatively affected plant diversity, which in turn was positively related to leafhopper species richness. In conclusion, insect diversity is driven in complex direct and indirect ways by grassland management, including changes in functional group composition. Conclusions The availability of preferred food sources and the frequency of disturbance are important direct and indirect drivers of leafhopper species richness, interacting in complex ways with plant diversity and food resource heterogeneity. PMID:24438134

  20. Palms, peccaries and perturbations: widespread effects of small-scale disturbance in tropical forests

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Disturbance is an important process structuring ecosystems worldwide and has long been thought to be a significant driver of diversity and dynamics. In forests, most studies of disturbance have focused on large-scale disturbance such as hurricanes or tree-falls. However, smaller sub-canopy disturbances could also have significant impacts on community structure. One such sub-canopy disturbance in tropical forests is abscising leaves of large arborescent palm (Arececeae) trees. These leaves can weigh up to 15 kg and cause physical damage and mortality to juvenile plants. Previous studies examining this question suffered from the use of static data at small spatial scales. Here we use data from a large permanent forest plot combined with dynamic data on the survival and growth of > 66,000 individuals over a seven-year period to address whether falling palm fronds do impact neighboring seedling and sapling communities, or whether there is an interaction between the palms and peccaries rooting for fallen palm fruit in the same area as falling leaves. We tested the wider generalisation of these hypotheses by comparing seedling and sapling survival under fruiting and non-fruiting trees in another family, the Myristicaceae. Results We found a spatially-restricted but significant effect of large arborescent fruiting palms on the spatial structure, population dynamics and species diversity of neighbouring sapling and seedling communities. However, these effects were not found around slightly smaller non-fruiting palm trees, suggesting it is seed predators such as peccaries rather than falling leaves that impact on the communities around palm trees. Conversely, this hypothesis was not supported in data from other edible species, such as those in the family Myristicaceae. Conclusions Given the abundance of arborescent palm trees in Amazonian forests, it is reasonable to conclude that their presence does have a significant, if spatially-restricted, impact on juvenile plants, most likely on the survival and growth of seedlings and saplings damaged by foraging peccaries. Given the abundance of fruit produced by each palm, the widespread effects of these small-scale disturbances appear, over long time-scales, to cause directional changes in community structure at larger scales. PMID:22429883

  1. Pharmacodynamic effects of oral oxymorphone: abuse liability, analgesic profile and direct physiologic effects in humans.

    PubMed

    Babalonis, Shanna; Lofwall, Michelle R; Nuzzo, Paul A; Walsh, Sharon L

    2016-01-01

    Oxymorphone is a semisynthetic ?-opioid agonist, marketed as a prescription analgesic purported to be twice as potent as oxycodone for pain relief. Oral formulations of oxymorphone were reintroduced in the United States in 2006 and reports of abuse ensued; however, there are limited data available on its pharmacodynamic effects. The current study aimed to examine the direct physiologic effects, relative abuse liability, analgesic profile and overall pharmacodynamic potency of oxymorphone in comparison with identical doses of oxycodone. Healthy, non-dependent opioid abusers (n?=?9) were enrolled in this within-subject, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-week inpatient study. Seven experimental sessions (6.5 hours) were conducted, during which an oral dose of immediate-release formulations of oxymorphone (10, 20 and 40?mg), oxycodone (10, 20 and 40?mg) or placebo was administered. An array of physiologic, abuse liability and experimental pain measures was collected. At identical doses, oxymorphone produced approximately twofold less potent effects on miosis, compared with oxycodone. Oxymorphone also produced lesser magnitude effects on measures of respiratory depression, two experimental pain models and observer-rated agonist effects. However, 40?mg of oxymorphone was similar to 40?mg of oxycodone on several abuse-related subjective ratings. Formal relative potency analyses were largely invalid because of the substantially greater effects of oxycodone. Overall, oxymorphone is less potent on most pharmacodynamic measures, although at higher doses, its abuse liability is similar to oxycodone. These data suggest that the published clinical equianalgesic estimates may not be consistent with the observed direct physiologic effects of opioids, results of experimental pain models or abuse liability measures, as assessed in the human laboratory. PMID:25130052

  2. Effective Peer Assessment Processes: Research Findings and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zundert, Marjo; Sluijsmans, Dominique; van Merrienboer, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Despite the popularity of peer assessment (PA), gaps in the literature make it difficult to describe exactly what constitutes effective PA. In a literature review, we divided PA into variables and then investigated their interrelatedness. We found that (a) PA's psychometric qualities are improved by the training and experience of peer assessors;…

  3. Effectiveness of lethal, directed wolf-depredation control in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, E.K.; Paul, W.J.; Mech, L.D.; Weisberg, S.

    2008-01-01

    Wolf (Canis lupus) depredations on livestock in Minnesota, USA, are an economic problem for many livestock producers, and depredating wolves are lethally controlled. We sought to determine the effectiveness of lethal control through the analysis of data from 923 government-verified wolf depredations from 1979 to 1998. We analyzed the data by 1) assessing the correlations between the number of wolves killed in response to depredations with number of depredations the following year at state and local levels, and 2) the time to the next depredation. No analysis indicated that trapping wolves substantially reduced the following year's depredations at state or local levels. However, more specific analyses indicated that in certain situations, killing wolves was more effective than no action (i.e., not trapping). For example, trapping and killing adult males decreased the re-depredation risk. At sheep farms, killing wolves was generally effective. Attempting to trap, regardless of the results, seemed more effective at reducing depredations than not trapping, suggesting that mere human activity near depredation sites might deter future depredations.

  4. Effective Peer Assessment Processes: Research Findings and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zundert, Marjo; Sluijsmans, Dominique; van Merrienboer, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Despite the popularity of peer assessment (PA), gaps in the literature make it difficult to describe exactly what constitutes effective PA. In a literature review, we divided PA into variables and then investigated their interrelatedness. We found that (a) PA's psychometric qualities are improved by the training and experience of peer assessors;

  5. Acute Stressor Effects on Goal-Directed Action in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Stephanie; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Here we examined effects of acute stressors that involve either systemic coadministration of corticosterone/yohimbine (3 mg/kg each) to increase glucocorticoid/noradrenaline activity (denoted as "pharmacological" stressor) or one or several distinct restraint stressors (denoted as "single" vs. "multiple" stressor) on

  6. Acute Stressor Effects on Goal-Directed Action in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Stephanie; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Here we examined effects of acute stressors that involve either systemic coadministration of corticosterone/yohimbine (3 mg/kg each) to increase glucocorticoid/noradrenaline activity (denoted as "pharmacological" stressor) or one or several distinct restraint stressors (denoted as "single" vs. "multiple" stressor) on…

  7. Effects of entrance crossflow directions to film cooling holes.

    PubMed

    Saumweber, C; Schulz, A; Wittig, S; Gritsch, M

    2001-05-01

    Two-dimensional distributions of local adiabatic film cooling effectiveness as well as discharge coefficients have been measured to investigate the effect of different entrance crossflow orientations and magnitudes on film-cooling performance. Operating conditions have been varied in terms of hot gas Mach number (up to 0.6), coolant crossflow Mach number (up to 0.6), coolant crossflow orientation (perpendicular or parallel with respect to the mainflow), and blowing ratio (0.5-1.5). The temperature ratio of coolant and hot gas was kept constant at 0.56 for the effectiveness tests, leading to an enginelike density ratio of 1.8. Infrared thermography was applied to perform local measurements of the surface temperatures with high resolution. The results indicate that the impact of hot gas crossflow Mach number is not very pronounced within the range of Mach numbers investigated. In contrast to this finding, the effect of internal coolant crossflow is very pronounced and strongly depends on coolant crossflow orientation and the ejected mass flow rate. PMID:11460654

  8. Effects of Directed Written Disclosure on Grief and Distress Symptoms among Bereaved Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenthal, Wendy G.; Cruess, Dean G.

    2010-01-01

    Bereavement-specific written disclosure trials have generally demonstrated null effects, but these studies have not directed the focus of writing. This randomized controlled trial compared directed writing that focused on either sense-making or benefit-finding, both associated with adjustment to loss, to traditional, non-directed emotional

  9. Directional and polarimetric effects in the optical domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Leroy, M.

    1994-01-01

    Papers focused on land surface, atmospheric, and ocean properties are reported. Specific comments pertaining to polarization, models and inversion, and measurements, are given. Recommendations are: continued research into the application potential of the BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) and polarization properties of ground surface and atmospheric targets; three dimensional models, which account for the statistical behavior of remotely sensed data, should be extended and inverted in order to support analysis of data potentially covering rolling terrain such that pixels represent heterogeneous mixtures of surface cover types and project ground footprints with sizes between 10 to 6 km, the ground pixel sizes of planned future sensors; available reflectance models should be further validated by means of multi dimensional (directional, spectral, temporal) field data and existing models should be intercompared in more depth to evaluate their performance and limitations; existing methods for model inversion should be validated in more depth in order to quantify the practical limitations and the expected accuracy of the parameters retrieved and new approaches should be developed based upon apriori knowledge of plant canopy development and spectral BRDF properties; there is a need to establish a protocol of validation and intercomparison of the indices and compositing techniques which have been proposed during these last years.

  10. Effective Clipart Image Vectorization through Direct Optimization of Bezigons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Chao, Hongyang; Zhang, Chi; Guo, Jun; Yuan, Lu; Sun, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Bezigons, i.e., closed paths composed of Bzier curves, have been widely employed to describe shapes in image vectorization results. However, most existing vectorization techniques infer the bezigons by simply approximating an intermediate vector representation (such as polygons). Consequently, the resultant bezigons are sometimes imperfect due to accumulated errors, fitting ambiguities, and a lack of curve priors, especially for low-resolution images. In this paper, we describe a novel method for vectorizing clipart images. In contrast to previous methods, we directly optimize the bezigons rather than using other intermediate representations; therefore, the resultant bezigons are not only of higher fidelity compared with the original raster image but also more reasonable because they were traced by a proficient expert. To enable such optimization, we have overcome several challenges and have devised a differentiable data energy as well as several curve-based prior terms. To improve the efficiency of the optimization, we also take advantage of the local control property of bezigons and adopt an overlapped piecewise optimization strategy. The experimental results show that our method outperforms both the current state-of-the-art method and commonly used commercial software in terms of bezigon quality. PMID:26441421

  11. Directly Observable Behavioral Effects of Lorcaserin in Rats.

    PubMed

    Serafine, Katherine M; Rice, Kenner C; France, Charles P

    2015-12-01

    (1R)-8-chloro-1-methyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (lorcaserin) is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for treating obesity, and its therapeutic effects are thought to result from agonist activity at serotonin (5-HT)2C receptors. Lorcaserin has affinity for other 5-HT receptor subtypes, although its activity at those subtypes is not fully described. The current study compared the behavioral effects of lorcaserin (0.0032-32.0 mg/kg) to the effects of other 5-HT receptor selective agonists in rats (n = 8). The 5-HT2C receptor selective agonist 1-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazine (mCPP, 0.032-1.0 mg/kg) and lorcaserin induced yawning which was attenuated by the 5-HT2C receptor selective antagonist 6-chloro-5-methyl-N-(6-[(2-methylpyridin-3-yl)oxy]pydidin-3-yl)indoline-1-carboxamide (1.0 mg/kg). The 5-HT2A receptor selective agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (0.1-3.2 mg/kg) induced head twitching, which was attenuated by the 5-HT2A receptor selective antagonist R-(+)-2,3-dimethoxyphenyl-1-[2-(4-piperidine)-methanol] (MDL 100907, 0.01 mg/kg), lorcaserin (3.2 mg/kg), and mCPP (3.2 mg/kg). In rats pretreated with MDL 100907 (1.0 mg/kg), lorcaserin also induced head twitching. At larger doses, lorcaserin produced forepaw treading, which was attenuated by the 5-HT1A receptor selective antagonist N-(2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl)-N-(2-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (0.178 mg/kg). While the behavioral effects of lorcaserin in rats are consistent with it having agonist activity at 5-HT2C receptors, these data suggest that at larger doses it also has agonist activity at 5-HT2A and possibly 5-HT1A receptors. Mounting evidence suggests that 5-HT2C receptor agonists might be effective for treating drug abuse. A more complete description of the activity of lorcaserin at 5-HT receptor subtypes will facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms that mediate its therapeutic effects. PMID:26384326

  12. Directly Observable Behavioral Effects of Lorcaserin in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Serafine, Katherine M.; Rice, Kenner C.

    2015-01-01

    (1R)-8-chloro-1-methyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (lorcaserin) is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for treating obesity, and its therapeutic effects are thought to result from agonist activity at serotonin (5-HT)2C receptors. Lorcaserin has affinity for other 5-HT receptor subtypes, although its activity at those subtypes is not fully described. The current study compared the behavioral effects of lorcaserin (0.0032–32.0 mg/kg) to the effects of other 5-HT receptor selective agonists in rats (n = 8). The 5-HT2C receptor selective agonist 1-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazine (mCPP, 0.032–1.0 mg/kg) and lorcaserin induced yawning which was attenuated by the 5-HT2C receptor selective antagonist 6-chloro-5-methyl-N-(6-[(2-methylpyridin-3-yl)oxy]pydidin-3-yl)indoline-1-carboxamide (1.0 mg/kg). The 5-HT2A receptor selective agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (0.1–3.2 mg/kg) induced head twitching, which was attenuated by the 5-HT2A receptor selective antagonist R-(+)-2,3-dimethoxyphenyl-1-[2-(4-piperidine)-methanol] (MDL 100907, 0.01 mg/kg), lorcaserin (3.2 mg/kg), and mCPP (3.2 mg/kg). In rats pretreated with MDL 100907 (1.0 mg/kg), lorcaserin also induced head twitching. At larger doses, lorcaserin produced forepaw treading, which was attenuated by the 5-HT1A receptor selective antagonist N-(2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl)-N-(2-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (0.178 mg/kg). While the behavioral effects of lorcaserin in rats are consistent with it having agonist activity at 5-HT2C receptors, these data suggest that at larger doses it also has agonist activity at 5-HT2A and possibly 5-HT1A receptors. Mounting evidence suggests that 5-HT2C receptor agonists might be effective for treating drug abuse. A more complete description of the activity of lorcaserin at 5-HT receptor subtypes will facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms that mediate its therapeutic effects. PMID:26384326

  13. Propolis and its direct and indirect hypoglycemic effect

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hariri, Mohamed T.

    2011-01-01

    Propolis means a gum that is gathered by bees from various plants. It is strongly adhesive resinous substance, collected, transformed, and used by bees to seal holes in their honeycombs. Bees use it to seal holes in their honeycombs, smooth out internal walls, as well as to cover carcasses of intruders who died inside the hive in order to avoid their decomposition. Propolis also protects the colony from diseases because of its antiseptic efficacy and antimicrobial properties. It also has been reported to possess various biological activities, namely anticancer, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal, and hypolipidemic. The aim of this review is to evaluate the hypoglycemic effect of propolis since a little number of researches studied this effect when we compare with the huge number of papers that reported many other biological activities. PMID:22175043

  14. Propolis and its direct and indirect hypoglycemic effect.

    PubMed

    Al-Hariri, Mohamed T

    2011-09-01

    Propolis means a gum that is gathered by bees from various plants. It is strongly adhesive resinous substance, collected, transformed, and used by bees to seal holes in their honeycombs. Bees use it to seal holes in their honeycombs, smooth out internal walls, as well as to cover carcasses of intruders who died inside the hive in order to avoid their decomposition. Propolis also protects the colony from diseases because of its antiseptic efficacy and antimicrobial properties. It also has been reported to possess various biological activities, namely anticancer, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal, and hypolipidemic. The aim of this review is to evaluate the hypoglycemic effect of propolis since a little number of researches studied this effect when we compare with the huge number of papers that reported many other biological activities. PMID:22175043

  15. Direct visualization of memory effects in artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Ian; Chern, Gia-Wei; Fore, Bryce; Lao, Yuyang; Zhang, Sheng; Nisoli, Cristiano; Schiffer, Peter

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that arrays of interacting nanoscale ferromagnetic islands, known as artificial spin ice, develop reproducible microstates upon cycling an applied magnetic field. The onset of this memory effect is determined by the strength of the applied field relative to the array coercivity. Specifically, when the applied field strength is almost exactly equal to the array coercivity, several training cycles are required before the array achieves a nearly completely repeatable microstate, whereas when the applied field strength is stronger or weaker than the array coercivity, a repeatable microstate is achieved after the first minor loop. We show through experiment and simulation that this memory exhibited by artificial spin ice is due to a ratchet effect on interacting, magnetically charged defects in the island moment configuration and to the complexity of the network of strings of reversed moments that forms during magnetization reversal.

  16. Direct Production of 99mTc via 100Mo(p,2n) on Small Medical Cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, P.; Bnard, F.; Bernstein, A.; Buckley, K.; Celler, A.; Cockburn, N.; Corsaut, J.; Dodd, M.; Economou, C.; Eriksson, T.; Frontera, M.; Hanemaayer, V.; Hook, B.; Klug, J.; Kovacs, M.; Prato, F. S.; McDiarmid, S.; Ruth, T. J.; Shanks, C.; Valliant, J. F.; Zeisler, S.; Zetterberg, U.; Zavodszky, P. A.

    From the efforts of a number of Canadian institutions and private industry collaborations, direct production of 99mTc using medical cyclotrons has recently been advanced from a 1970's academic exercise to a commercial, economically viable solution for regional production. Using GE PETtrace 880 machines our team has established preliminary saturated yields of 2.7 GBq/?A, translating to approximately 174 GBq after a 6 hour irradiation. The team is in the process of assessing the accuracy and reliability of this production value with a goal of optimizing yields by up to 50%.

  17. Climate change and wildlife health: direct and indirect effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hofmeister, Erik; Rogall, Gail Moede; eWsenberg, Kathy; Abbott, Rachel; Work, Thierry; Schuler, Krysten; Sleeman, Jonathan; Winton, James

    2010-01-01

    Climate change will have significant effects on the health of wildlife, domestic animals, and humans, according to scientists. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change projects that unprecedented rates of climate change will result in increasing average global temperatures; rising sea levels; changing global precipitation patterns, including increasing amounts and variability; and increasing midcontinental summer drought (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2007). Increasing temperatures, combined with changes in rainfall and humidity, may have significant impacts on wildlife, domestic animal, and human health and diseases. When combined with expanding human populations, these changes could increase demand on limited water resources, lead to more habitat destruction, and provide yet more opportunities for infectious diseases to cross from one species to another. Awareness has been growing in recent years about zoonotic diseases— that is, diseases that are transmissible between animals and humans, such as Lyme disease and West Nile virus. The rise of such diseases results from closer relationships among wildlife, domestic animals, and people, allowing more contact with diseased animals, organisms that carry and transmit a disease from one animal to another (vectors), and people. Disease vectors include insects, such as mosquitoes, and arachnids, such as ticks. Thus, it is impossible to separate the effects of global warming on wildlife from its effects on the health of domestic animals or people. Climate change, habitat destruction and urbanization, the introduction of exotic and invasive species, and pollution—all affect ecosystem and human health. Climate change can also be viewed within the context of other physical and climate cycles, such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (El Niño), the North Atlantic Oscillation, and cycles in solar radiation that have profound effects on the Earth’s climate. The effects of climate change on wildlife disease are summarized in several areas of scientific study discussed briefly below: geographic range and distribution of wildlife diseases, plant and animal phenology (Walther and others, 2002), and patterns of wildlife disease, community and ecosystem composition, and habitat degradation.

  18. Effectiveness of the Directional Microphone in the Baha Divino

    PubMed Central

    Oeding, Kristi; Valente, Michael; Kerckhoff, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL) experience great difficulty listening to speech in noisy environments. A directional microphone (DM) could potentially improve speech recognition in this difficult listening environment. It is well known that DMs in behind-the-ear (BTE) and custom hearing aids can provide a greater signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in comparison to an omnidirectional microphone (OM) to improve speech recognition in noise for persons with hearing impairment. Studies examining the DM in bone anchored auditory osseointegrated implants (Baha), however, have been mixed, with little to no benefit reported for the DM compared to an OM. Purpose The primary purpose of this study was to determine if there are statistically significant differences in the mean reception threshold for sentences (RTS in dB) in noise between the OM and DM in the Baha Divino. The RTS of these two microphone modes was measured utilizing two loudspeaker arrays (speech from 0 and noise from 180 or a diffuse eight-loudspeaker array) and with the better ear open or closed with an earmold impression and noise attenuating earmuff. Subjective benefit was assessed using the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) to compare unaided and aided (Divino OM and DM combined) problem scores. Research Design A repeated measures design was utilized, with each subject counterbalanced to each of the eight treatment levels for three independent variables: (1) microphone (OM and DM), (2) loudspeaker array (180 and diffuse), and (3) better ear (open and closed). Study Sample Sixteen subjects with USNHL currently utilizing the Baha were recruited from Washington Universitys Center for Advanced Medicine and the surrounding area. Data Collection and Analysis Subjects were tested at the initial visit if they entered the study wearing the Divino or after at least four weeks of acclimatization to a loaner Divino. The RTS was determined utilizing Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) sentences in the R-Space system, and subjective benefit was determined utilizing the APHAB. A three-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a paired samples t-test were utilized to analyze results of the HINT and APHAB, respectively. Results Results revealed statistically significant differences within microphone (p < 0.001; directional advantage of 3.2 dB), loudspeaker array (p = 0.046; 180 advantage of 1.1 dB), and better ear conditions (p < 0.001; open ear advantage of 4.9 dB). Results from the APHAB revealed statistically and clinically significant benefit for the Divino relative to unaided on the subscales of Ease of Communication (EC) (p = 0.037), Background Noise (BN) (p < 0.001), and Reverberation (RV) (p = 0.005). Conclusions The Divinos DM provides a statistically significant improvement in speech recognition in noise compared to the OM for subjects with USNHL. Therefore, it is recommended that audiologists consider selecting a Baha with a DM to provide improved speech recognition performance in noisy listening environments. PMID:21034701

  19. A flexoelectricity effect-based sensor for direct torque measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuwen; Xu, Minglong; Liu, Kaiyuan; Shen, Shengping

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a direct torque sensor based on the flexoelectricity generated by un-polarized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) via electromechanical coupling is developed as a novel torque measurement mechanism that does not require external electric power excitation. The sensing method is developed based on the shear strain gradient and the shear flexoelectric response of PVDF. A theoretical analysis is primarily presented for the design of the sensing structure. Then the structure of the PVDF sensing module is discussed and designed. The radius ratio of the sensing module is defined and then discussed according to the load, the strain gradient, the electrode area and the general electric charge output. The finite element method is used to analyze the mechanical properties of the designed PVDF sensing module. Then the theoretical sensitivity of the sensor is predicated as 0.9441 pC Nm?1. The experiment system setup is developed, and the sensing properties of the measurement mechanism are tested at frequencies of 0.5 Hz, 1 Hz, 1.5 Hz and 2 Hz using identical modules. The measurement range of the designed sensor is 01.68 Nm and the average sensitivity is measured as 0.8950 pC Nm?1. The experimental results agree well with the theoretically predicted results. These results prove that the torque sensing method based on un-polarized PVDF is suitable for measurement of dynamic torque loads with a flexoelectricity-based mechanism. When using this method, external electric power excitation of the sensing module is no longer required.

  20. Direct in vivo observations of embolic events in the microcirculation distal to a small-vessel anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Acland, R D; Anderson, G; Siemionow, M; McCabe, S

    1989-08-01

    This study was done to determine whether microemboli are produced by an arterial anastomosis. Direct in vivo observations were made in an isolated microcirculatory bed lying directly downstream from a newly made anastomosis. The tissue used was the isolated rat cremaster muscle, a new experimental model. The vessel anastomosed was the external iliac artery. Following anastomosis, microemboli were clearly observed in eight of eight animals during the first 30 minutes after clamp release. Embolic events were sometimes of impressive magnitude and in one case were associated with cessation of blood flow throughout the preparation. No microemboli were observed in eight of eight animals subjected only to dissection of the cremaster, nor were any observed in eight of eight animals in which the isolated cremaster was subjected only to 2 hours of clamp ischemia. These findings may be significant in explaining perturbations to blood flow following free-tissue transfer and instances of partial tissue necrosis following apparently successful arterial repair. These findings also identify an important factor (microemboli) to be considered in research on reperfusion injury. PMID:2748741

  1. Retrieval of the aerosol direct radiative effect over clouds from spaceborne spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, M.; Tilstra, L. G.; Wang, P.; Stammes, P.

    2012-04-01

    The solar radiative absorption by an aerosol layer above clouds is quantified using passive satellite spectrometry from the ultraviolet (UV) to the shortwave infrared (SWIR). UV-absorbing aerosols have a strong signature that can be detected using UV reflectance measurements, even when above clouds. Since the aerosol extinction optical thickness decreases rapidly with increasing wavelength for biomass burning aerosols, the properties of the clouds below the aerosol layer can be retrieved in the SWIR, where aerosol extinction optical thickness is sufficiently small. Using radiative transfer computations, the contribution of the clouds to the reflected radiation can be modeled for the entire solar spectrum. In this way, cloud and aerosol effects can be separated for a scene with aerosols above clouds. Aerosol microphysical assumptions and retrievals are avoided by modeling only the pure (aerosol-free) cloud spectra. An algorithm was developed using the spaceborne spectrometer Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). The aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over clouds over the South Atlantic Ocean west of Africa, averaged through August 2006 was found to be 23 ± 8 Wm-2 with a mean variation over the region in this month of 22 Wm-2. The largest aerosol DRE over clouds found in that month was 132 ± 8 Wm-2. The algorithm can be applied to any instrument, or a combination of instruments, that measures UV, visible and SWIR reflectances at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) simultaneously.

  2. Radiation sensitivity of small oocytes in immature mice. effect of gonadotropin treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bager, S.

    1982-02-01

    The effect of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin on the survival of small oocytes of acutely irradiated immature mice was assessed by counting occytes on serial sections under the light microscope. Twenth-four hours after irradiation with 40 R the number of small oocytes was reduced to a few percent of that in unirradiated controls. The number of oocytes was a little higher in animals injected with gonadotropin before radiation exposure than in animals that were only irradiated. One week after radiation exposure very few small oocytes were seen in any of the irradiated ovaries regardless of treatment. Thus pregnant mare serum gonadotropin had no protective effect on the small oocytes of irradiated immature mice.

  3. Can One of Three Righthanded Neutrinos Be Light Enough to Produce a Small LSND Effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krolikowski, W.

    2004-09-01

    It is shown on the ground of a simple 6 6 neutrino mixing model that one of three conventional sterile (righthanded) neutrinos, if light enough, may be consistently used for explaining a small LSND effect. Then, it is still considerably heavier than the three active (lefthanded) neutrinos, so that a kind of soft seesaw mechanism can work. The usual condition that the Majorana lefthanded component of the overall 6 6 neutrino mass matrix ought to vanish, implies the smallness of active-neutrino masses versus sterile-neutrino masses, when three mixing angles between both sorts of neutrinos are small. In the presented model, the mass spectrum of active neutrinos comes out roughly degenerate, lying in the range (5-7.5) 10-2 eV, if there is a small LSND effect with the amplitude of the order 10-3 and with the mass-squared splitting 1 {eV}2.

  4. N2O - direct versus indirect effects on emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Kitzler, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    The concentration of N2O in the atmosphere is much lower than that of CO2, but it is an important GHG because on an equivalent mass basis, N2O has c. 300 times the global warming potential of CO2. In addition to being a strong GHG, N2O is the primary stratospheric ozone depleting substance. The dominant sources of N2O are closely related to microbial production processes in soils, sediments and water bodies. Agricultural emissions due to N fertilizer use and manure management (4.3-5.8 Tg N2O-N yr-1) and emissions from natural soils (6-7 Tg N2O-N yr-1) are already representing 56-70% of all global N2O sources. The main agricultural sources of nitrous oxide include emissions from soils after application of inorganic and organic forms of nitrogen (N) as synthetic fertilizers, crop residues, manures or composts. Livestock operations also result in emissions from urine and faeces deposited on soils during grazing. In addition to the direct sources of N2O, there are also indirect ones that include N deposited onto land surfaces following ammonia and NOx volatilization, and nitrate leached from agricultural land in drainage water which, on passing into aquifers or into surface waters and their sediments, can be partially transformed to N2O (Smith et al., 2012). For inventories a default emission factor (EF) of 1.0 % of N fertilizer application has been fixed. The default indirect EFs are 1.0 % of N deposited from the atmosphere, and 0.75 % of N lost to watercourses by leaching or runoff. Depending on fertilizer type and environmental conditions field measurements reveal emission factors which deviate largely from the theoretical values. As soil moisture and temperature are major drivers of N2O emissions, warming and precipitation changes strongly affect the emission of N2O. More difficult is the prediction of climate extremes and their feedback on N2O which may occur via soil processes as well as limitations for plant growth and N uptake. Based on examples of recent research dealing with landuse, N-deposition, forest and river management, drought and fire, we will sort out the importance and uncertainties of anticipated impacts of global change on future N2O fluxes.

  5. Heterogeneous Effects of Direct Hypoxia Pathway Activation in Kidney Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Rafik; Masson, Norma; Simpson, Peter; Sciesielski, Lina Katrin; Sun, Min; Tian, Ya-Min; Ratcliffe, Peter John; Mole, David Robert

    2015-01-01

    General activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathways is classically associated with adverse prognosis in cancer and has been proposed to contribute to oncogenic drive. In clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) HIF pathways are upregulated by inactivation of the von-Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor. However HIF-1α and HIF-2α have contrasting effects on experimental tumor progression. To better understand this paradox we examined pan-genomic patterns of HIF DNA binding and associated gene expression in response to manipulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α and related the findings to CCRC prognosis. Our findings reveal distinct pan-genomic organization of canonical and non-canonical HIF isoform-specific DNA binding at thousands of sites. Overall associations were observed between HIF-1α-specific binding, and genes associated with favorable prognosis and between HIF-2α-specific binding and adverse prognosis. However within each isoform-specific set, individual gene associations were heterogeneous in sign and magnitude, suggesting that activation of each HIF-α isoform contributes a highly complex mix of pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects. PMID:26262842

  6. Effects of a small seagull colony on trophic status and primary production in a Mediterranean coastal system (Marinello ponds, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signa, Geraldina; Mazzola, Antonio; Vizzini, Salvatrice

    2012-10-01

    Colonies of seabirds have been shown to influence nutrient cycling and primary production of coastal areas, but knowledge is still limited above all for smaller colonies. This study evaluates the influence of a small resident seagull colony (Larus michahellis Naumann, 1840) on a Mediterranean coastal system (Marinello ponds, Sicily, Italy). The presence of ornithogenic organic matter from seagull guano was first assessed at increasing distances from the colony using ?15N to indicate the effects of guano on the trophic status and primary production. The pond directly affected by guano deposition showed an anomalous water and sediment chemistry, especially regarding physico-chemical variables (pH), nitrogen isotopic signature, nutrient balance and phytoplankton biomass. These effects were not observed in the adjacent ponds, highlighting pronounced, small spatial-scale variability. Given the worldwide presence of seabird colonies and the scarcity of research on their effect on coastal marine areas, the study shows that seabird-mediated input may be important in influencing ecosystem dynamics of coastal areas, even where both the system in question and the colony are small.

  7. Small satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.; Dermott, S.

    1986-01-01

    Satellites smaller than Mimas (r = 195 km) are distinguished by irregular overall shapes and by rough limb topography. Material properties and impact cratering dominate the shaping of these objects. Long fragmentation histories can produce a variety of internal structures, but so far there is no direct evidence that any small satellite is an equilibrium ellipsoid made up of noncohesive gravitationally bound rubble. One many bodies that orbit close to their primary the tidal and rotational components of surface gravity strongly affect the directions of local g and thereby affect the redistribution of regolith by mass wasting. Downslope movement of regolith is extensive on Deimos, and is probably effective on many other small satellites. It is shown that in some cases observed patterns of downslope mass wasting cold produce useful constraints on the satellite's mean density. The diversity of features seen in the few high-resolution images of small satellites currently available suggests that these objects have undergone complex histories of cratering, fragmentation, and regolith evolution.

  8. The Effects of Small Classes on Academic Achievement: The Results of the Tennessee Class Size Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Barbara; Hedges, Larry V.; Konstantopoulos, Spyros

    2000-01-01

    Analyzed results from a 4-year large-scale randomized experiment on the effects of class size, project STAR in Tennessee. Analyses suggest class size effects that are large enough to be important for educational policy and that are quite consistent across schools. Small classes appear to benefit all kinds of students. (SLD)

  9. Are Effects of Small Classes Cumulative? Evidence from a Tennessee Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Barbara; Hedges, Larry V.; Konstantopoulos, Spyros

    2001-01-01

    Used data from Tennessee's Project STAR, a longitudinal class size experiment, to study the cumulative effects of reduced class size in the early grades on academic achievement. Results indicated that controlling for achievement in the previous year, small classes in grades 1-3 yielded statistically significant additional positive effects on

  10. Effects of Cocaine on Performance under Fixed-Interval Schedules with a Small Tandem Ratio Requirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Branch, Marc N.

    2004-01-01

    Daily administration of cocaine often results in the development of tolerance to its effects on responding maintained by fixed-ratio schedules. Such effects have been observed to be greater when the ratio value is small, whereas less or no tolerance has been observed at large ratio values. Similar schedule-parameter-dependent tolerance, however,…

  11. Effect of Small Transmission Delay on Human Behavior in Audio Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Hitoshi; Mochizuki, Kaname

    Transmission delay in audio communications is a well-known obstacle to achieving smooth communication. However, it is not known what kinds of effects are caused by small delays. We hypothesized that the small delay in the listener's responses disturbs the speaker's verbal conditioning, where the verbal behavior of the speaker varies in accordance with the listener's responses. We examined whether the small delays in the listener's responses disturb the speaker's verbal conditioning using an artificial-grammar learning task. The results suggested that a 300-ms delay disturbed the participants' verbal conditioning although they were not adequately aware of the delay.

  12. Effect of Court Dimensions on Players External and Internal Load during Small-Sided Handball Games

    PubMed Central

    Corvino, Matteo; Tessitore, Antonio; Minganti, Carlo; Sibila, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of three different court dimensions on the internal and external load during small-sided handball games. Six male amateur handball players took part in this study and participated in three different 8-min 3vs3 (plus goalkeepers) small-sided handball games (each repeated twice). The three court dimensions were 1224m, 3015m and 3216m. Through Global Positioning System devices (SPI pro elite 15Hz, GPSports) and video analysis, the following parameters were recorded: cyclic and acyclic movements (distance covered and number of technical actions executed), heart rate, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Total distance travelled increased with court dimensions (885.2m 66.6m in 2412m; 980.0m 73.4m in 3015m; 1095.0m 112.9m in 3216m, p < 0.05). The analysis of distance covered in the four speed zones (01.4 ms-1; 1.43.4 ms-1; 3.45.2 ms-1; >5.2 ms-1) highlighted substantial differences: playing with the 3015m court in comparison to the 2412m, the players covered less distance in the first speed zone (p = 0.012; ES = 0.70) and more distance in the second (p = 0.049; ES = 0.73) and third (p = 0.012; ES = 0.51) speed zones. Statistical differences were also found between the 2412m and 3216m courts: the players covered more distance in the second and third speed zones (p = 0.013, ES = 0.76; p = 0.023 ES = 0.69) with the 3216m court in comparison to the 2412m. There was no significant effect of court dimensions on the technical parameters (number of team actions, passes, piston movements toward goal and defensive activities), the number of specific handball jumps and changes of direction, and the time spent in the different heart rate zones. Considering the average data of all the experimental conditions together (2412m, 3015m, 3216m), a pronounced statistical difference was highlighted between the values in first two HR zones and the last two (p < 0.05; large ES). The rating of perceived exertion was significantly higher during the drill with the 3216m court compared with the 2412m one (p < 0.05; ES = 2.34). Our findings indicate that changing court dimensions during small-sided handball games can be used to manipulate both external and internal loads on the players. Key points To cover the specific game demands, more specific training methodologies have been developed in many sport games. Specific game exercises may provide a useful conditioning stimulus, together with technical and tactical training components. Changing court dimensions during small-sided handball games can be used to manipulate both external and internal loads on the players. The high ratio of cyclic activity per minute and the high HR values recorded during SSHGs make this type of drills extremely useful for aerobic power training. PMID:24790482

  13. Effect of Court Dimensions on Players' External and Internal Load during Small-Sided Handball Games.

    PubMed

    Corvino, Matteo; Tessitore, Antonio; Minganti, Carlo; Sibila, Marko

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of three different court dimensions on the internal and external load during small-sided handball games. Six male amateur handball players took part in this study and participated in three different 8-min 3vs3 (plus goalkeepers) small-sided handball games (each repeated twice). The three court dimensions were 1224m, 3015m and 3216m. Through Global Positioning System devices (SPI pro elite 15Hz, GPSports) and video analysis, the following parameters were recorded: cyclic and acyclic movements (distance covered and number of technical actions executed), heart rate, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Total distance travelled increased with court dimensions (885.2m 66.6m in 2412m; 980.0m 73.4m in 3015m; 1095.0m 112.9m in 3216m, p < 0.05). The analysis of distance covered in the four speed zones (0-1.4 ms(-1); 1.4-3.4 ms(-1); 3.4-5.2 ms(-1); >5.2 ms(-1)) highlighted substantial differences: playing with the 3015m court in comparison to the 2412m, the players covered less distance in the first speed zone (p = 0.012; ES = 0.70) and more distance in the second (p = 0.049; ES = 0.73) and third (p = 0.012; ES = 0.51) speed zones. Statistical differences were also found between the 2412m and 3216m courts: the players covered more distance in the second and third speed zones (p = 0.013, ES = 0.76; p = 0.023 ES = 0.69) with the 3216m court in comparison to the 2412m. There was no significant effect of court dimensions on the technical parameters (number of team actions, passes, piston movements toward goal and defensive activities), the number of specific handball jumps and changes of direction, and the time spent in the different heart rate zones. Considering the average data of all the experimental conditions together (2412m, 3015m, 3216m), a pronounced statistical difference was highlighted between the values in first two HR zones and the last two (p < 0.05; large ES). The rating of perceived exertion was significantly higher during the drill with the 3216m court compared with the 2412m one (p < 0.05; ES = 2.34). Our findings indicate that changing court dimensions during small-sided handball games can be used to manipulate both external and internal loads on the players. Key pointsTo cover the specific game demands, more specific training methodologies have been developed in many sport games.Specific game exercises may provide a useful conditioning stimulus, together with technical and tactical training components.Changing court dimensions during small-sided handball games can be used to manipulate both external and internal loads on the players.The high ratio of cyclic activity per minute and the high HR values recorded during SSHGs make this type of drills extremely useful for aerobic power training. PMID:24790482

  14. Massive Boson Production at Small qT in Soft-Collinear Effective Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becher, Thomas; Neubert, Matthias; Wilhelm, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We study the differential cross sections for electroweak gauge-boson and Higgs production at small and very small transverse-momentum qT. Large logarithms are resummed using soft-collinear effective theory. The collinear anomaly generates a non-perturbative scale q*, which protects the processes from receiving large long-distance hadronic contributions. A numerical comparison of our predictions with data on the transverse-momentum distribution in Z-boson production at the Tevatron and LHC is given.

  15. Understanding the Halogenation Effects in Diketopyrrolopyrrole-Based Small Molecule Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shi-Xin; Huo, Yong; Li, Miao-Miao; Hu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Zhang, You-Wen; Zhang, You-Dan; Chen, Xiao-Long; Shi, Zi-Fa; Gong, Xiong; Chen, Yongsheng; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2015-09-16

    Two molecules containing a central diketopyrrolopyrrole and two oligothiophene units have been designed and synthesized. Comparisons between the molecules containing terminal F (FDPP) and Cl (CDPP) atoms allowed us to evaluate the effects of halogenation on the photovoltaic properties of the small molecule organic solar cells (OSCs). The OSCs devices employing FDPP:PC71BM films showed power conversion efficiencies up to 4.32%, suggesting that fluorination is an efficient method for constructing small molecules for OSCs. PMID:26261995

  16. Functional copies of a human gene can be directly isolated by transformation-associated recombination cloning with a small 3? end target sequence

    PubMed Central

    Kouprina, Natalay; Annab, Lois; Graves, Joan; Afshari, Cynthia; Barrett, J. Carl; Resnick, Michael A.; Larionov, Vladimir

    1998-01-01

    Unique, small sequences (sequence tag sites) have been identified at the 3? ends of most human genes that serve as landmarks in genome mapping. We investigated whether a single copy gene could be isolated directly from total human DNA by transformation-associated recombination (TAR) cloning in yeast using a short, 3? unique target. A TAR cloning vector was constructed that, when linearized, contained a small amount (381 bp) of 3? hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) sequence at one end and an 189-bp Alu repeat at the other end. Transformation with this vector along with human DNA led to selective isolations of the entire HPRT gene as yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) that extended from the 3? end sequence to various Alu positions as much as 600 kb upstream. These YACs were retrofitted with a NeoR and a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequence to transfer the YACs to bacteria and subsequently the BACs to mouse cells by using a Neo selection. Most of the HPRT isolates were functional, demonstrating that TAR cloning retains the functional integrity of the isolated material. Thus, this modified version of TAR cloning, which we refer to as radial TAR cloning, can be used to isolate large segments of the human genome accurately and directly with only a small amount of sequence information. PMID:9539761

  17. Direct and generalized effects of food satiation in reducing rumination.

    PubMed

    Clauser, B; Scibak, J W

    1990-01-01

    The effects of food satiation on rumination and a collateral self-stimulatory behavior were examined in three profoundly retarded individuals. For all three individuals, the provision of unlimited quantities of cereal and milk during mealtime resulted in reductions in rumination. Decreases were also seen in collateral behaviors for all three subjects, although these responses were not specifically treated. Rumination and self-stimulation increased during a withdrawal condition for the three individuals, with experimental control being regained once the satiation procedure was re-instituted. Fading of the satiation procedure also was successful in the two participants with whom it was attempted, although the specific strategy differed for the two subjects. PMID:2300685

  18. Observation of small-scale anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of TeV cosmic rays with HAWC

    SciTech Connect

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Belmont, E.; Alvarez, C.; Arceo, R.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Cotti, U.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Barber, A. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Berley, D.; Braun, J.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Bonilla Rosales, M.; Carramiñana, A.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Castillo, M.; Cotzomi, J.; Collaboration: HAWC Collaboration; and others

    2014-12-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays and charged cosmic rays at TeV energies. The detector is still under construction, but data acquisition with the partially deployed detector started in 2013. An analysis of the cosmic-ray arrival direction distribution based on 4.9 × 10{sup 10} events recorded between 2013 June and 2014 February shows anisotropy at the 10{sup –4} level on angular scales of about 10°. The HAWC cosmic-ray sky map exhibits three regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux; two of these regions were first reported by the Milagro experiment. A third region coincides with an excess recently reported by the ARGO-YBJ experiment. An angular power spectrum analysis of the sky shows that all terms up to ℓ = 15 contribute significantly to the excesses.

  19. Direct detection of peptides and small proteins in fingermarks and determination of sex by MALDI mass spectrometry profiling.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Leesa Susanne; Wulfert, Florian; Wolstenholme, Rosalind; Fonville, Judith Marlou; Clench, Malcolm Ronald; Carolan, Vikki Amanda; Francese, Simona

    2012-10-21

    Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (MALDI MS) can detect and image a variety of endogenous and exogenous compounds from latent fingermarks. This opportunity potentially provides investigators with both an image for suspect identification and chemical information to be used as additional intelligence. The latter becomes particularly important when the fingermark is distorted or smudged or when the suspect is not a previously convicted offender and therefore their fingerprints are not present in the National Fingerprint Database. One of the desirable pieces of intelligence would be the sex of the suspect from the chemical composition of a fingermark. In this study we show that the direct detection of peptides and proteins from fingermarks by MALDI MS Profiling (MALDI MSP), along with the multivariate modeling of the spectra, enables the determination of sex with 85% accuracy. The chemical analysis of the fingermark composition is expected to additionally provide information on traits such as nutritional habits, drug use or hormonal status. PMID:22950080

  20. One big, and many small reasons that direct selection on offspring number is still open for discussion.

    PubMed

    Simons, A M

    2008-03-01

    In a recent paper, I proposed that natural selection should act to increase offspring number when diversification bet hedging is favoured. The simple underlying reasoning is that a target diversification strategy is more reliably generated with increasing sample size. The intention of opening a discussion has been realized; recent criticisms of the idea argue that selection does not act to increase offspring number when population size is large or infinite. Here I agree that criticisms have merit; indeed they are largely confined to the caveats discussed in my original paper. The critique, however, implies a verdict of outright rejection of the idea of selection on offspring number, which would be erroneous. Contrary to the assertions of the criticism, then, the importance of selection acting directly on offspring number remains an open question. PMID:18081743

  1. Target- and Effect-Directed Actions towards Temporal Goals: Similar Mechanisms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Andrea M.; Rieger, Martina

    2012-01-01

    The goal of an action can consist of generating a change in the environment (to produce an effect) or changing one's own situation in the environment (to move to a physical target). To investigate whether the mechanisms of effect-directed and target-directed action control are similar, participants performed continuous reversal movements. They…

  2. A Longitudinal Twin Study of the Direction of Effects between Psychopathic Personality and Antisocial Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsman, Mats; Lichtenstein, Paul; Andershed, Henrik; Larsson, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Background: Antisocial behaviour may partly develop as a consequence of psychopathic personality. However, neither the direction of effects nor the aetiology of the association has previously been clarified. The aim in this study was to investigate the direction of effects between psychopathic personality and antisocial behaviour, and to

  3. Directive Versus Participative Leadership: Two Complementary Approaches to Managing School Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somech, Anit

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The educational literature reflects the widely shared belief that participative leadership has an overwhelming advantage over the contrasting style of directive leadership in organizational and team effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative effect of a directive leadership approach as compared with a

  4. Academic Self-Concept and Learning Strategies: Direction of Effect on Student Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Dennis M.; Cheng, Rebecca Wing-yi; Mok, Magdalena Mo Ching; Lam, Amy Kwok Hap

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the prediction of academic self-concept (English and Mathematics) and learning strategies (deep and surface), and their direction of effect, on academic achievement (English and Mathematics) of 8,354 students from 16 secondary schools in Hong Kong. Two competing models were tested to ascertain the direction of effect: Model A

  5. High School Teachers with Significant Teaching Experience Support the Effectiveness of Direct Instructional Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolaros, John

    2014-01-01

    This research study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of direct instructional strategies regarding the achievement of students with ED. High school teachers with significant years of teaching experience in an urban setting support the effectiveness of direct instructional strategies. Teachers with 11-20 and 21-30 years of teaching

  6. A Longitudinal Twin Study of the Direction of Effects between Psychopathic Personality and Antisocial Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsman, Mats; Lichtenstein, Paul; Andershed, Henrik; Larsson, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Background: Antisocial behaviour may partly develop as a consequence of psychopathic personality. However, neither the direction of effects nor the aetiology of the association has previously been clarified. The aim in this study was to investigate the direction of effects between psychopathic personality and antisocial behaviour, and to…

  7. Directive Versus Participative Leadership: Two Complementary Approaches to Managing School Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somech, Anit

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The educational literature reflects the widely shared belief that participative leadership has an overwhelming advantage over the contrasting style of directive leadership in organizational and team effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative effect of a directive leadership approach as compared with a…

  8. Direct effects of energy-related air pollutants on plant sexual reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ragsdale, H.L.; Murdy, W.H.

    1987-12-08

    Our completed research program concentrated on the direct in vivo effects of energy-related air pollutants on plant sexual reproduction. Direct air pollution effects on plant sexual reproduction have been studied for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2}, two of the three major air pollutants.

  9. Microbiota-Independent Ameliorative Effects of Antibiotics on Spontaneous Th2-Associated Pathology of the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Han, Daehee; Walsh, Matthew C.; Kim, Kwang Soon; Hong, Sung-Wook; Lee, Junyoung; Yi, Jaeu; Rivas, Gloriany; Surh, Charles D.; Choi, Yongwon

    2015-01-01

    We have previously generated a mouse model of spontaneous Th2-associated disease of the small intestine called TRAF6ΔDC, in which dendritic cell (DC)-intrinsic expression of the signaling mediator TRAF6 is ablated. Interestingly, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment ameliorates TRAF6ΔDC disease, implying a role for commensal microbiota in disease development. However, the relationship between the drug effects and commensal microbiota status remains to be formally demonstrated. To directly assess this relationship, we have now generated TRAF6ΔDC bone marrow chimera mice under germ-free (GF) conditions lacking commensal microbiota, and found, unexpectedly, that Th2-associated disease is actually exacerbated in GF TRAF6ΔDC mice compared to specific pathogen-free (SPF) TRAF6ΔDC mice. At the same time, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment of GF TRAF6ΔDC mice has an ameliorative effect similar to that observed in antibiotics-treated SPF TRAF6ΔDC mice, implying a commensal microbiota-independent effect of broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. We further found that treatment of GF TRAF6ΔDC mice with broad-spectrum antibiotics increases Foxp3+ Treg populations in lymphoid organs and the small intestine, pointing to a possible mechanism by which treatment may directly exert an immunomodulatory effect. To investigate links between the exacerbated phenotype of the small intestines of GF TRAF6ΔDC mice and local microbiota, we performed microbiotic profiling of the luminal contents specifically within the small intestines of diseased TRAF6ΔDC mice, and, when compared to co-housed control mice, found significantly increased total bacterial content characterized by specific increases in Firmicutes Lactobacillus species. These data suggest a protective effect of Firmicutes Lactobacillus against the spontaneous Th2-related inflammation of the small intestine of the TRAF6ΔDC model, and may represent a potential mechanism for related disease phenotypes. PMID:25689829

  10. Small scale effects on the mechanical behaviors of protein microtubules based on the nonlocal elasticity theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yuanwen; Lei, Fang-Ming

    2009-09-25

    Based on the nonlocal elastic theory, small scale effects are considered in the investigation of the mechanical properties of protein microtubules. A new prediction formula for the persistence lengths of microtubules with the consideration of the small scale effect is presented. Subsequently, the buckling of microtubules is studied based on a nonlocal elastic beam model. The predicted results of our model indicate that the length-dependence of persistence length is related not only to the shear terms, but also to the small scale effect. The Eular beam model, which is always considered unable to explain the length-dependence of microtubules, can capture the length-dependence of the persistence length of microtubules with the consideration of the small scale effect. The elastic buckling behaviors of microtubules in viscoelastic surrounding cytoplasm are also considered using the nonlocal Timoshenko beam model in this paper, and the results indicate that the small scale effect of microtubules also plays an important role in the buckling of microtubules.

  11. Influence of Observed Diurnal Cycles of Aerosol Optical Depth on Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Eck, T. F.; Huttunen, J.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Lindfors, A. V.; Myhre, G.; Smirinov, A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Yu, H.

    2013-01-01

    The diurnal variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) can be significant, depending on location and dominant aerosol type. However, these diurnal cycles have rarely been taken into account in measurement-based estimates of aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) or aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE). The objective of our study was to estimate the influence of diurnal aerosol variability at the top of the atmosphere ADRE estimates. By including all the possible AERONET sites, we wanted to assess the influence on global ADRE estimates. While focusing also in more detail on some selected sites of strongest impact, our goal was to also see the possible impact regionally.We calculated ADRE with different assumptions about the daily AOD variability: taking the observed daily AOD cycle into account and assuming diurnally constant AOD. Moreover, we estimated the corresponding differences in ADREs, if the single AOD value for the daily mean was taken from the the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra or Aqua overpass times, instead of accounting for the true observed daily variability. The mean impact of diurnal AOD variability on 24 h ADRE estimates, averaged over all AERONET sites, was rather small and it was relatively small even for the cases when AOD was chosen to correspond to the Terra or Aqua overpass time. This was true on average over all AERONET sites, while clearly there can be much stronger impact in individual sites. Examples of some selected sites demonstrated that the strongest observed AOD variability (the strongest morning afternoon contrast) does not typically result in a significant impact on 24 h ADRE. In those cases, the morning and afternoon AOD patterns are opposite and thus the impact on 24 h ADRE, when integrated over all solar zenith angles, is reduced. The most significant effect on daily ADRE was induced by AOD cycles with either maximum or minimum AOD close to local noon. In these cases, the impact on 24 h ADRE was typically around 0.1-0.2W/sq m (both positive and negative) in absolute values, 5-10% in relative ones.

  12. Non-contact small animal fluorescence imaging system for simultaneous multi-directional angular-dependent data acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Keol; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Lee, Francis Young-In; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel non-contact small animal fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) imaging system. At the heart of the system is a new mirror-based imaging head that was designed to provide 360-degree measurement data from an entire animal surface in one step. This imaging head consists of two conical mirrors, which considerably reduce multiple back reflections between the animal and mirror surfaces. These back reflections are common in existing mirror-based imaging heads and tend to degrade the quality of raw measurement data. In addition, the introduction of a novel ray-transfer operator allows for the inclusion of the angular dependent data in the image reconstruction process, which results in higher image resolution. We describe in detail the system design and implementation of the hardware components as well as the transport-theory-based image reconstruction algorithm. Using numerical simulations, measurements on a well-defined phantom and a live animal, we evaluate the system performance and show the advantages of our approach. PMID:25071965

  13. Quantitative analysis of the direct effect of aerosols over decadal scale by using ECHAM6-standalone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, K.; Bott, A.; Hense, A.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of aerosols on climate is an important but still highly uncertain aspect in climate research. By using atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM6 our objective is to quantify the direct effect of aerosols over decadal time scale in comparison to the variability induced by the varying sea surface temperatures (SST) and sea ice concentrations (SIC) taken by the AMIP-II data base and the inevitable internal and unpredictable climate noise. We integrated the model with prescribed SST/SIC along with observed green house gases and aerosols concentrations for ten year period 1995-2004. Two ensembles with sample size ten, each have been created by starting the integrations on January 1st, 1995 with ten different initial conditions derived from two control runs over 15-years. These ensembles differ for tropospheric aerosols (TA): the non-aerosol case (NAC) is without any TA and aerosol case (AC) is utilizing a time variable data set of aerosols optical properties for input into the solar part of the ECHAM6 radiation code (Kinne et al, 2006). This set-up allows for a quantitative estimation and separation of the stationary and transient aerosol effects, the SST/SIC induced variability and the internal variability due to large scale atmospheric instabilities and non-linearities with the help of a two-way analysis of variance. We analyzed ensemble data for top of atmosphere (TOA) energy balance and temperature at 850 hPa. In the NAC, the ensemble exhibits a global and annual mean 3 W/m2 imbalance of the TOA radiation balance whereas the AC shows only 0.6 W/m2 being much closer in radiative balance over ten year period. The aerosols increase global planetary albedo from 0.29 (non-aerosol) to 0.30 for aerosol case. Extending the analysis to regional values of annual mean TOA radiation balance components, we find that the changes in TOA solar radiation budget are highly significant for static direct aerosol effect with local contributions to the total variability of up to 80% especially in North African-tropical Atlantic region. Transient aerosol and SST/SIC contributions to solar TOA radiative fluxes are of the order of 10%. Major contributor to the variability of TOA solar fluxes especially at mid-latitudes is internal variability also up to 80-90% outside the above mentioned regions. The results show that the direct effect of (prescribed) aerosols are clearly detectable even on a regional scale on decadal time scale if solar radiative fluxes are analyzed. The annual mean temperature at 850 hPa (dynamical variable) shows contrasting results. Major contributions of its variability at low latitudes come from SST (60-80% at tropical/subtropical latitudes) while the static aerosol effects are small (< 10% except in central equatorial Africa) and transient aerosol effects contribute up to 10% also at higher latitudes with the remaining part (locally 80-90%) coming from internal climate noise. In summary this analysis of variance of radiative fluxes and dynamical variables allows to draw objectively conclusions about the need to include (direct) aerosol effects into decadal climate forecasts. __________________________________________ Kinne. S and M. Schulz (2006). An AeroCom initial assessment-optical properties in aerosol component modules of global models: Atmos. Chem. Phys.,6,1815-1834

  14. The direct flexoelectric effect observed in polyvinylidene fluoride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan

    Piezoelectricity in Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) was observed long back and significant development has been made since its discovery. The theory on this property has predominantly revolved about the polymorphism and unique structure of PVDF. Of the four structures PVDF can be fabricated namely alpha, beta, gamma and delta, apart from the alpha phase the other 3 have piezoelectricity property in them. This thesis concentrates on the beta phase PVDF as they have the highest piezoelectric effect present due to non cancellation of dipoles. In the past, research in the beta phase PVDF was conducted in stretched films. This thesis concentrates on the film properties in the unstretched condition. Flexoelectricty is a property which was first observed in 1969 in crystalline dielectric materials. The extension of this phenomenon in PVDF films is discussed in the thesis. Flexoelectricity is more dominant in the micro and nano scale and it depends on the strain gradients induced in a material thus generating a polarization. Hence this property is present in all dielectric materials when subjected to strain gradients unlike piezoelectricity which corresponds to only a particular class of materials. The films are fabricated by solution polymerization and phase characterization is confirmed by x-ray diffraction. The experimental verification of flexoelectricty and piezoelectricity, and the calculation of coefficients are discussed in unstretched condition of films. The Young's Modulus for these films is also calculated experimentally. This value is necessary to compute the piezoelectric coefficient. Analyzing the result we notice that the negative value of the flexoelectric coefficient corresponds to the trend seen in paraelectric BST crystals. The hypothesis is that the randomness in the molecular arrangement in unstretched films is synonymous to paraelectric BST crystals. Based on the coefficients computed the flexoelectric coefficient seems to be more dominant in the films. This result seems interesting and encouraging and thus giving us an opportunity to utilize the shape dependent characteristics in sensor applications.

  15. High-throughput screening identifies small molecules that enhance the pharmacological effects of oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Yang, B.; Ming, X.; Cao, C.; Laing, B.; Yuan, A.; Porter, M. A.; Hull-Ryde, E. A.; Maddry, J.; Suto, M.; Janzen, W. P.; Juliano, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic use of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides has been constrained by the limited ability of these membrane-impermeable molecules to reach their intracellular sites of action. We sought to address this problem using small organic molecules to enhance the effects of oligonucleotides by modulating their intracellular trafficking and release from endosomes. A high-throughput screen of multiple small molecule libraries yielded several hits that markedly potentiated the actions of splice switching oligonucleotides in cell culture. These compounds also enhanced the effects of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides. The hit compounds preferentially caused release of fluorescent oligonucleotides from late endosomes rather than other intracellular compartments. Studies in a transgenic mouse model indicated that these compounds could enhance the in vivo effects of a splice-switching oligonucleotide without causing significant toxicity. These observations suggest that selected small molecule enhancers may eventually be of value in oligonucleotide-based therapeutics. PMID:25662226

  16. Recent Advances in the Discovery of Small Molecules Targeting Exchange Proteins Directly Activated by cAMP (EPAC)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Wild, Christopher; Zhou, Xiaobin; Ye, Na; Cheng, Xiaodong; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    cAMP is a pivotal second messenger that regulates numerous biological processes under physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer, diabetes, heart failure, inflammation and neurological disorders. In the past, all effects of cAMP were initially believed to be mediated by PKA and cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels. Since the discovery of EPAC proteins in 1998, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that the net cellular effects of cAMP are also regulated by EPAC. The pursuit of the biological functions of EPAC has benefited from the development and applications of a growing number of pharmacological probes targeting EPAC proteins. In this Perspective, we seek to provide a concise update on recent advances in the development of chemical entities including various membrane-permeable analogues of cAMP and newly discovered EPAC-specific ligands from high throughput assays and hit-to-lead optimizations. PMID:24256330

  17. Aerosol direct effect retrieval over clouds from space-borne passive hyperspectral measurements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, M.; Tilstra, L.; Stammes, P.

    2013-12-01

    A novel approach for the retrieval of the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over clouds will be presented, which is independent of aerosol parameters estimates. The direct effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) of aerosols over clouds can be estimated using hyperspectral reflectance measurements from space-borne spectrometers, when the equivalent aerosol-unpolluted cloud scene reflectance spectrum is known. For smoke over clouds the cloud parameters can be estimated from the shortwave infrared (SWIR), where the absorption of the small smoke particles becomes sufficiently small. Using precomputed tables of cloud reflectance spectra, the unpolluted cloud scene spectrum can then be simulated and compared to the real measured polluted cloud scene reflectance spectrum. The UV-radiation absorption by the smoke will lead to a difference between the measured and simulated spectra, which is proportional to the aerosol DRE at TOA. Aerosol microphysical assumptions and retrievals are avoided by modeling only the aerosol-free scene spectra, all the aerosol effects are in the reflectance measurements. The method works especially well for cloud scenes, which can be simulated relatively accurately. An algorithm was developed to derive the aerosol DRE over marine clouds, using the space-borne spectrometer SCIAMACHY, which produced shortwave reflectance spectra (from 240 to 1700 nm contiguously) from 2002 till 2012. These are ideally suited to study the effect of aerosols on the shortwave spectrum. However, since aerosols in general do not have high resolution spectral features, the algorithm can be adapted to suit data from any combination of instruments that measures UV, visible and SWIR reflectances simultaneously. Examples include OMI and MODIS, flying in the A-Train constellation, and TROPOMI, on the future Sentinel 5 precursor mission, combined with NOAA's NPP VIIRS. This would produce aerosol DRE estimates with unprecedented accuracy and spatial resolution. The aerosol DRE was studied over the southeast Atlantic Ocean (seAO), where smoke over clouds occurs during the dry season in southern Africa, one of the major sources for biomass burning aerosols. The smoke is episodically advected away from the continent in a westerly direction to the seAO, where it overlies a semi-permanent stratocumulus deck at altitudes between about 2 - 5 km, absorbing UV radiation. The aerosol DRE over clouds over the seAO averaged through August 2006 was found to be 23 × 8 Wm-2 with a mean variation over the region in this month of 22 Wm-2. Locally the aerosol DRE over clouds in that month was as high as 132 × 8 Wm-2, absorbing about 10% of the local incoming solar radiation. SCIAMACHY measured (black) and simulated aerosol-free cloud spectra for 10 Aug. 2006, 9:13:51 UTC over the southeast Atlantic

  18. Effect of diets containing genetically modified potatoes expressing Galanthus nivalis lectin on rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ewen, S W; Pusztai, A

    1999-10-16

    Diets containing genetically modified (GM) potatoes expressing the lectin Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) had variable effects on different parts of the rat gastrointestinal tract. Some effects, such as the proliferation of the gastric mucosa, were mainly due to the expression of the GNA transgene. However, other parts of the construct or the genetic transformation (or both) could also have contributed to the overall biological effects of the GNA-GM potatoes, particularly on the small intestine and caecum. PMID:10533866

  19. The effects of direction similarity in visual working memory: Behavioural and event-related potential studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Li, Shouxin; Wang, Xiusong; Che, Xiaowei

    2016-09-01

    Object similarity can improve visual working memory (VWM) performance in the change-detection task, but impair the recognition performance when it occurs at retrieval of VWM in the recognition task. The effect of direction similarity is an issue that has not been well resolved. Furthermore, electrophysiological evidence in support of the mechanisms that underlie the effects of similarity is still scarce. In the current study, we conducted three behavioural experiments to examine the effects of direction similarity on memory performance with regard to both the encoding and retrieval phases of VWM and one event-related potential (ERP) experiment to explore the neural signatures of direction similarity in VWM. Our behavioural studies indicated that direction similarity improved performance when it occurred at the encoding phase but impaired performance when it occurred at the retrieval phase. Moreover, the ERP experiment showed that the amplitude of the contralateral delay activity (CDA) increased with the increasing set size for similar but not dissimilar directions. In addition, the CDA amplitude for similar directions was lower than that for dissimilar directions at set size 2. Taken together, these findings suggest that direction similarity at encoding has a positive effect on VWM performance and at retrieval has a negative effect. Given that VWM capacity depends on information load and the number of objects, the positive effect of similarity may be attributed to reduced information load of memory objects. PMID:26443895

  20. Relative effects of environment and direct species interactions on the population growth rate of an exotic ascidian.

    PubMed

    Grey, Erin K

    2011-08-01

    The success of exotic species can be influenced by both the abiotic environment and species interactions. Many studies have demonstrated significant effects of either type of factor on aspects of exotic success, but few have considered their relative effects on population growth rate, a more holistic measure of success. To quantify the relative effects of environment and direct competition on an exotic ascidian, Botrylloides violaceus, I manipulated direct contact interactions at four sites with different abiotic environments and tracked individual colonies over 3 years. I tested site and contact treatment effects on survival, growth and fecundity, and then conducted a life table response experiment on a periodic, size-structured population matrix model to test their effects on population growth rate. Both site and contact interaction were important to explaining variation in survival and growth. Contact interactions decreased the survival and growth of larger colonies but unexpectedly increased the survival of small colonies at some sites, which led to relatively weaker and spatially variable effects on overall population growth rates. Site effects on population growth rates were an order of magnitude larger than contact effects, and site variation in winter vital rates made the largest contributions to changes in population growth rate. The results of this study suggest that the abiotic environment plays a larger role in the success of B. violaceus. Thus, environmental variables, such as temperature and salinity, could be used to predict this exotic species' success under different environmental scenarios, including global climate change. PMID:21344258

  1. Effects of corridors on home range sizes and interpatch movements of three small mammal species.

    SciTech Connect

    Mabry, Karen, E.; Barrett, Gary, W.

    2002-04-30

    Mabry, K.E., and G.W. Barrett. 2002. Effects of corridors on home range sizes and interpatch movements of three small mammal species. Landscape Ecol. 17:629-636. Corridors are predicted to benefit populations in patchy habitats by promoting movement, which should increase population densities, gene flow, and recolonization of extinct patch populations. However, few investigators have considered use of the total landscape, particularly the possibility of interpatch movement through matrix habitat, by small mammals. This study compares home range sizes of 3 species of small mammals, the cotton mouse, old field mouse and cotton rat between patches with and without corridors. Corridor presence did not have a statistically significant influence on average home range size. Habitat specialization and sex influenced the probability of an individual moving between 2 patches without corridors. The results of this study suggest that small mammals may be more capable of interpatch movement without corridors than is frequently assumed.

  2. Separation and measurement of direct and indirect effects of light on stomata

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, T.D.; Raschke, K.

    1981-07-01

    Conductance for water vapor, assimilation of CO/sub 2/, and intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentration of leaves of five species were determined at various irradiances and ambient CO/sub 2/ concentrations. Conductance and assimilation were then plotted as functions of irradiance and intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentration. On leaves of Xanthium strumarium L., Gossypium hirsutum L., Phaseolus vulgaris L., and Perilla frutescens (L.), Britt., the stomatal response to light was mainly a direct response to light and to a small extent only a response to changes in intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentration. This was also true for stomata of Zea mays L., except at irradiances <150 watts per square meter. Stomata responded to light even in leaves whose net exchange of CO/sub 2/ was reduced to zero. When leaves were inverted and irradiated on the abaxial surface, conductance decreased in the shaded and increased in the illuminated epidermis, indicating that the photoreceptor pigment(s) involved are located in the epidermis. In leaves of X. strumarium, the direct effect of light on conductance is primarily a response to blue light. Stomatal responses to CO/sub 2/ and to light opposed each other. In X. strumarium, stomatal opening in response to light was strongest in CO/sub 2/-free air and saturated at lower irradiances than in CO/sub 2/-containing air. Conversely, stomatal closure in response to CO/sub 2/ was strongest in darkness and it decreased as irradiance increased. In X. strumarium, P. vulgaris, and P. frutescens, an irradiance of 300 watts per square meter was sufficient to eliminate the stomatal response to CO/sub 2/ altogether. Application of abscisic acid, or an increase in vapor pressure deficit, or a decrease in leaf temperature reduced the stomatal conductance at light saturation.

  3. Treatment of high salinity brines by direct contact membrane distillation: Effect of membrane characteristics and salinity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Guan, Yunshan; Cheng, Fangqin; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) is one of the attractive technologies for high salinity brine treatment. In this study, four polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes were examined in treating highly concentrated salt solutions. Results showed that non-supported membranes generally have a higher overall mass transfer coefficient but porosity seems to be the most important parameter controlling membrane flux and thermal efficiency. Supported membranes with large thickness had relatively higher thermal efficiency than small thickness. This can be attributed to their reduced heat loss through heat condition. In addition, KCl, NaCl and MgCl2 solutions showed distinct trends over flux decline at high salt concentrations (⩾2.0M). The difference in flux was largely due to the discrepancy in water activities of these solutions (KCl>NaCl>MgCl2). However, the effect of viscosity on permeate flux could not be neglected for MgCl2 at high salt concentrations as the suddenly increased viscosity could lead to serious temperature polarization. This study indicates that membrane distillation is a promising technology for high salinity brine treatment. PMID:25563165

  4. Protective effect of vitamin E against ethanol-induced small intestine damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Shirpoor, Alireza; Barmaki, Hanieh; Khadem Ansari, Mohamadhasan; Lkhanizadeh, BehrouzI; Barmaki, Haleh

    2016-03-01

    The role of oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction has been reported in various ethanol-induced complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol-induced structural alteration, oxidative stress, and inflammatory reaction on the small intestine of rats, and plausible protective effect of vitamin E to determine whether it inhibits the abnormality induced by ethanol in the small intestine. Twenty-four male wistar rats were divided into three groups, namely: Control(©), ethanol, and vitamin E treated ethanol groups. After six weeks of treatment, the small intestine length, villus height, crypt depth and muscular layer thickness, oxidative stress, and inflammatory parameters showed significant changes in the ethanol treated group compared to the control group. Vitamin E consumption along with ethanol ameliorated structural alteration of the small intestine and reduced the elevated amount of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers such as protein carbonyl, OX-LDL, IL-6, Hcy, and TNF-α. Furthermore, their total antioxidant capacity was increased significantly compared to that of the ethanol group. These findings indicate that ethanol induces the small intestine abnormality by oxidative and inflammatory stress, and that these effects can be alleviated by using vitamin E as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory molecule. PMID:26898436

  5. Effect of experimental stress on the small bowel and colon in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, SE; Garsed, KC; Hoad, CL; Lingaya, M; Banwait, R; Thongborisute, W; Roberts, E; Costigan, C; Marciani, L; Gowland, PA; Spiller, RC

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are frequently reported to be exacerbated by stress. Animal studies suggest that corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) mediates the effect of stress on the bowel. We have shown that stressed IBS patients with diarrhea have constricted small bowels. We hypothesized that we could mimic this effect by applying experimental stress in the form of either hand immersion in ice water or CRH injection in healthy volunteers (HV). Methods The postprandial effect of the cold pressor test (repeated hand immersion in ice cold water) and injection of CRH, were assessed vs control in two groups of 18 HVs. Key Results CRH produced a significant rise from baseline salivary cortisol levels (p = 0.004) not seen with the cold pressor test. Small bowel water content (SBWC) fell postprandially on all four treatments. SBWC was significantly reduced by both stressors but CRH caused a greater effect (anova, p < 0.003 vs p = 0.02). Ascending colon (AC) volume was greater after CRH injection compared with saline (p = 0.002) but no differences were seen with the cold pressor test vs warm water. Postprandial increase in colon volume was also reduced by CRH which also increased the sensations of distension and bloating. Conclusions & Inferences Two experimental stressors were shown to constrict the small bowel, mimicking the effect previously seen in IBS-D patients. CRH increased the volume of the AC. We speculate that stress accelerates transfer of water from the small bowel to the AC. PMID:25703609

  6. Decadal trends in marine reserves reveal differential rates of change in direct and indirect effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Babcock, R.C.; Shears, N.T.; Alcala, A.C.; Barrett, N.S.; Edgar, G.J.; Lafferty, K.D.; McClanahan, T.R.; Russ, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    Decadal-scale observations of marine reserves suggest that indirect effects on taxa that occur through cascading trophic interactions take longer to develop than direct effects on target species. Combining and analyzing a unique set of long-term time series of ecologic data in and out of fisheries closures from disparate regions, we found that the time to initial detection of direct effects on target species (+ or -SE) was 5.13 + or - 1.9 years, whereas initial detection of indirect effects on other taxa, which were often trait mediated, took significantly longer (13.1 + or - 2.0 years). Most target species showed initial direct effects, but their trajectories over time were highly variable. Many target species continued to increase, some leveled off, and others decreased. Decreases were due to natural fluctuations, fishing impacts from outside reserves, or indirect effects from target species at higher trophic levels. The average duration of stable periods for direct effects was 6.2 + or - 1.2 years, even in studies of more than 15 years. For indirect effects, stable periods averaged 9.1 + or - 1.6 years, although this was not significantly different from direct effects. Populations of directly targeted species were more stable in reserves than in fished areas, suggesting increased ecologic resilience. This is an important benefit of marine reserves with respect to their function as a tool for conservation and restoration.

  7. Effect of Agricultural Practices on Hydrology and Water Chemistry in a Small Irrigated Catchment, Yakima River Basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Johnson, Henry M.

    2009-01-01

    The role of irrigation and artificial drainage in the hydrologic cycle and the transport of solutes in a small agricultural catchment in central Washington's Yakima Valley were explored using hydrologic, chemical, isotopic, age-dating, and mineralogical data from several environmental compartments, including stream water, ground water, overland flow, and streambed pore water. A conceptual understanding of catchment hydrology and solute transport was developed and an inverse end-member mixing analysis was used to further explore the effects of agriculture in this small catchment. The median concentrations of major solutes and nitrates were similar for the single field site and for the catchment outflow site, indicating that the net effects of transport processes for these constituents were similar at both scales. However, concentrations of nutrients were different at the two sites, suggesting that field-scale variations in agricultural practices as well as nearstream and instream biochemical processes are important components of agricultural chemical transformation and transport in this catchment. This work indicates that irrigation coupled with artificial drainage networks may exacerbate the ecological effects of agricultural runoff by increasing direct connectivity between fields and streams and minimizing potentially mitigating effects (denitrification and dilution, for example) of longer subsurface pathways.

  8. Temperature Effects on the Wind Direction Measurement of 2D Solid Thermal Wind Sensors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bei; Zhu, Yan-Qing; Yi, Zhenxiang; Qin, Ming; Huang, Qing-An

    2015-01-01

    For a two-dimensional solid silicon thermal wind sensor with symmetrical structure, the wind speed and direction information can be derived from the output voltages in two orthogonal directions, i.e., the north-south and east-west. However, the output voltages in these two directions will vary linearly with the ambient temperature. Therefore, in this paper, a temperature model to study the temperature effect on the wind direction measurement has been developed. A theoretical analysis has been presented first, and then Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations have been performed. It is found that due to symmetrical structure of the thermal wind sensor, the temperature effects on the output signals in the north-south and east-west directions are highly similar. As a result, the wind direction measurement of the thermal wind sensor is approximately independent of the ambient temperature. The experimental results fit the theoretical analysis and simulation results very well. PMID:26633398

  9. Direct and contextual effects of individual values on organizational citizenship behavior in teams.

    PubMed

    Arthaud-Day, Marne L; Rode, Joseph C; Turnley, William H

    2012-07-01

    The authors use Schwartz's values theory as an integrative framework for testing the relationship between individual values and peer-reported organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) in teams, controlling for sex, satisfaction, and personality traits. Using hierarchical linear modeling in a sample of 582 students distributed across 135 class project teams, the authors find positive, direct effects for achievement on citizenship behaviors directed toward individuals (OCB-I), for benevolence on citizenship behaviors directed toward the group (OCB-O), and for self-direction on both OCB-I and OCB-O. Applying relational demography techniques to test for contextual effects, the authors find that group mean power scores negatively moderate the relationship between individual power and OCB-I, whereas group mean self-direction scores positively moderate the relationship between self-direction and both OCB-I and OCB-O. PMID:22369271

  10. Temperature Effects on the Wind Direction Measurement of 2D Solid Thermal Wind Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bei; Zhu, Yan-Qing; Yi, Zhenxiang; Qin, Ming; Huang, Qing-An

    2015-01-01

    For a two-dimensional solid silicon thermal wind sensor with symmetrical structure, the wind speed and direction information can be derived from the output voltages in two orthogonal directions, i.e., the north-south and east-west. However, the output voltages in these two directions will vary linearly with the ambient temperature. Therefore, in this paper, a temperature model to study the temperature effect on the wind direction measurement has been developed. A theoretical analysis has been presented first, and then Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations have been performed. It is found that due to symmetrical structure of the thermal wind sensor, the temperature effects on the output signals in the north-south and east-west directions are highly similar. As a result, the wind direction measurement of the thermal wind sensor is approximately independent of the ambient temperature. The experimental results fit the theoretical analysis and simulation results very well. PMID:26633398

  11. On the properties and radiative effects of small convective clouds during the eastern Mediterranean summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Eitan; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Agassi, Eyal

    2015-04-01

    A ground-based field campaign was conducted over the summer of 2011 in Israel to measure the properties of small warm clouds. The horizontal size distribution for cloud sizes of 50-3000 m is presented, with a special focus on the properties of the smallest clouds (liquid water path <10 g m-2, cloud thickness < 50 m) and their estimated radiative effect. We show that these small clouds dominate the cloud radiative properties during the summer over the studied region. The average daily cloud cover of the small cloud subset throughout the field campaign was 81 21% (corresponding to 30 14.3% of the total measured time), and they contributed 83 19.4% of the clouds' reflectance. Their average daily radiative effect was estimated at -3.6 2.1 W m-2.

  12. Small-Scale Trial for Evaluating Directional Resolution of Single Spherical Biconcave Acoustic Lens in Designing of Ambient Noise Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Nakamura, Toshiaki

    2008-05-01

    Ambient noise imaging (ANI) is the revolutionary idea of detecting objects by using natural ocean background noise. From the analysis results obtained by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method in our previous studies, it was supposed that a spherical biconcave lens with an aperture diameter of 2.0 m has a sufficient directional resolution (for example, the beam width is 1 at 60 kHz) for realizing an ANI system. In this study, to confirm the analysis results, we performed a small-scale trial of one-fifth space in a water tank. The lens, made of acrylic resin, has an aperture diameter of 400 mm and a radius of curvature of 500 mm. A burst pulse of 25 cycles at 300 kHz, whose frequency increases 5 times, was radiated from the sound source. The sound pressure after passage through the acoustic lens was measured by moving the receiver around the image point. Results show that the shapes of -3 dB areas are similar to the FDTD analysis results at small incidence angles. It was verified that this lens has a sufficient directional resolution for use in the ANI system, because -3 dB areas do not overlap each other.

  13. Spectral effects on direct-insolation absorptance of five collector coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hotchkiss, G. B.; Simon, F. F.; Burmeister, L. C.

    1979-01-01

    Absorptances for direct insolation of black chrome, black nickel, copper oxide, and two black zinc conversion selective coatings were calculated for a number of typical solar spectrums. Measured spectral reflectances were used while the effects of atmospheric ozone density, turbidity, and air mass were incorporated in calculated direct solar spectrums. Absorptance variation for direct insolation was found to be of the order of 1 percent for a typical range of clear-sky atmospheric conditions.

  14. Effect of torch jet direction on combustion and performance of a prechamber spark-ignition engine

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, H.; Chtsu, A.; Asanuma, T.

    1987-01-01

    To examine the effect of torch jet direction on the combustion characteristics and engine performances, a spark-ignition engine with each divided chamber having a torch nozzle of different flow direction is used by changing the torch nozzle area, prechamber volume and air-fuel ratio, while keeping the engine speed of 1000 rpm. Typical pressure diagrams for different torch jet directions are analyzed to obtain such combustion characteristics as the crank angles of combustion start and finish, heat release rate and mass burned fraction. The engine performances, e.g. mean effective pressure and specific fuel consumption, are also measured. As a result, it can be made clear not only the effect of torch jet direction on the combustion characteristics, but also the relationship between the combustion characteristics and the engine performances for different torch jet directions.

  15. Alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic receptors are located prejunctionally in the Auerbach's plexus of the guinea pig small intestine: direct demonstration by radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Wikberg, J.E.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1982-12-20

    Direct evidence that alpha/sub 2/-receptors in the guinea pig small intestine are localized prejunctionally in neurons of the Auerbach's plexus is presented. The alpha/sub 2/-agonist ligand (/sup 3/H)clonidine bound to a single saturable class of sites with a K/sub d/ of 1-2 nM and a capacity of approximately 70 fmol/mg protein in membranes from the innervated longitudinal and circular muscle layers of the intestine. By a special dissection technique the Auerbach's plexus could be completely removed from the longitudinal muscle. In these denervated preparations the clonidine binding sites were virtually completed removed whereas the expected binding sites observed in innervated controls. The innervated preparations also contained a small number of alpha-receptors as revealed by binding with (/sup 3/H)prazosin (capacity approximately 18 fmol/mg protein with a K/sub d/ of 0.4-0.7 nM). Thus, the present study suggests that alpha/sub 2/-receptors ((/sup 3/H)clonidine binding sites) are localized in neurons (i.e., prejunctionally) in the Auerbach's plexus of the guinea pig small intestine.

  16. The Effect of Small Group Teaching on Acquisition and Transfer of Nonvisual Seriation Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Michael J.; Ollila, Lloyd

    The purposes of this study were to investigate: (1) effectiveness of three small group teaching methods on the acquisition and retention of seriation abilities; (2) transfer of seriation abilities using the three treatments; and (3) relationship between visual and nonvisual seriation abilities. One hundred twenty first grade Canadian students were

  17. Effect of Small-Group Teaching on Acquisition and Transfer of Nonvisual Seriation Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Michael J.; Ollila, Lloyd

    1980-01-01

    Determines the effectiveness of three small-group teaching methods on the acquisition and retention of seriation abilities, investigates transfer of seriation abilities relative to the treatments, and investigates the relationship between visual and nonvisual seriation abilities involving first graders (N=120). (CS)

  18. Suffering in Silence: The Effects of Fear of Talking on Small Group Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederman, Linda Costigan

    1982-01-01

    Examines effects of communication apprehension (fear of talking) on participation in small groups. Reviews literature on communication apprehension, presents information regarding high communication apprehension generated from three in-depth group interviews with identified high apprehensives, and discusses the implications and applications for

  19. Improving Performance in Very Small Firms through Effective Assessment and Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzet, Steven J.; Cook, Ronald G.; Ozeki, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to improve assessment and feedback processes in the training practices of very small firms, thereby improving the firms' human capital. Design/methodology/approach: The paper reviews research and practice on effective assessment and feedback. Findings: Based on this paper, human resources are increasingly seen…

  20. English Reading Effects of Small-Group Intensive Intervention in Spanish for K-1 English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Michael; Jimenez, Terese; Leafstedt, Jill; Villaruz, Jessica; Richards, Catherine; English, Judy

    2004-01-01

    In this article we report small, but statistically significant, effects of brief supplemental instruction on English reading by Spanish-speaking kindergartners (N=37) who performed poorly on a bilingual battery of phonological-processing tasks. Intervention design was compatible with the Reading First initiative and with research on use of

  1. The Entrance and Exit Effects in Small Electrochemical Filter-Press Reactors Used in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frias-Ferrer, Angel; Gonzalez-Garcia, Jose; Saez, Veronica; Exposito, Eduardo; Sanchez-Sanchez, Carlos M.; Mantiel, Vicente; Walsh, Frank C.; Aldaz, Antonio; Walsh, Frank C.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed to examine the entrance and exit effects in small electrochemical filter-press reactors used in the laboratory is presented. The single compartment of the filter-press reactor is filled with different turbulence promoters to study their influence as compared to the empty configuration.

  2. Effects of fire on small mammal communities in frequent-fire forests in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Susan L.; Kelt, Douglas A.; Van Wagtendonk, Jan W.; Miles, A. Keith; Meyer, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    Fire is a natural, dynamic process that is integral to maintaining ecosystem function. The reintroduction of fire (e.g., prescribed fire, managed wildfire) is a critical management tool for protecting many frequent-fire forests against stand-replacing fires while restoring an essential ecological process. Understanding the effects of fire on forests and wildlife communities is important in natural resource planning efforts. Small mammals are key components of forest food webs and essential to ecosystem function. To investigate the relationship of fire to small mammal assemblages, we live trapped small mammals in 10 burned and 10 unburned forests over 2 years in the central Sierra Nevada, California. Small mammal abundance was higher in unburned forests, largely reflecting the greater proportion of closed-canopy species such as Glaucomys sabrinus in unburned forests. The most abundant species across the entire study area was the highly adaptable generalist species, Peromyscus maniculatus. Species diversity was similar between burned and unburned forests, but burned forests were characterized by greater habitat heterogeneity and higher small mammal species evenness. The use and reintroduction of fire to maintain a matrix of burn severities, including large patches of unburned refugia, creates a heterogeneous and resilient landscape that allows for fire-sensitive species to proliferate and, as such, may help maintain key ecological functions and diverse small mammal assemblages.

  3. Small polaron effect on carrier recombination in perovskite manganite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G.-R.; Sasaki, M.; Isa, T.; Negishi, H.; Inoue, M.; Gao, W.-X.; Xiong, G.-C.

    2001-05-01

    Photoinduced 'transient thermoelectric effect (TTE)' in perovskite manganite La 0.6Ca 0.4MnO 3 thin film has been measured under magnetic fields. The fast decay process of TTE signals is due to a recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs through Mn 4+ ions as capture centers, whose evaluated cross section ? obeys the power law ?? T- n ( n=0.75) in the ferromagnetic phase far below Tc and in the paramagnetic phase. From the observed relaxation time ?1, we evaluated the parameter ? characterizing a small polaron effect and the effective mass m?; both are enhanced appreciably near Tc. Such anomaly is attributed to the change in the thermal velocity of diffusing holes with downspin due to a small polaron effect.

  4. Effects of Direct and Indirect Instruction on Fostering Decision-Making Competence in Socioscientific Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottcher, Florian; Meisert, Anke

    2013-01-01

    In this study the effects of different learning environments on the promotion of decision-making competence for the socioscientific issue of genetically modified crops is investigated. The comparison focuses on direct vs. indirect instructions. Therefore on the one hand a sophisticated decision-making strategy was presented to the directly

  5. EFFECTS OF MATHEMATICAL ABILITY, PRETRAINING, AND INTEREST ON SELF-DIRECTION IN PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAMPBELL, VINCENT N.; AND OTHERS

    THE HYPOTHESIS OF THIS EXPERIMENT WAS THAT SELF-DIRECTION WOULD BE MORE EFFECTIVE WITH STUDENTS OF HIGH RATHER THAN LOW ABILITY AND INTEREST PROVIDED THEY HAD HAD COACHED PRACTICE IN SELF-DIRECTED USE OF PROGRAMED MATERIALS. SUBJECTS WERE 34 GRADE 9 ALGEBRA STUDENTS. THEY COMPLETED PRE-EXPERIMENTAL ABILITY TESTS AND INTEREST QUESTIONNAIRES. HALF

  6. Effects of casing treatment on a small, transonic axial-flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, F. F.; Kidwell, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Improved axial compressor surge margin through effective rotor casing treatment has been identified from test results on large axial compressors. A modified scale of a large compressor was built and tested to determine if similar improvements in surge margin could be duplicated in small-size turbomachinery. In addition, the effects of rotor radial running clearance, both with and without casing treatment, were investigated and are discussed. Test results of the scale configuration are presented and compared to the parent compressor.

  7. Seagrass response to CO? contingent on epiphytic algae: indirect effects can overwhelm direct effects.

    PubMed

    Burnell, Owen W; Russell, Bayden D; Irving, Andrew D; Connell, Sean D

    2014-11-01

    Increased availability of dissolved CO2 in the ocean can enhance the productivity and growth of marine plants such as seagrasses and algae, but realised benefits may be contingent on additional conditions (e.g. light) that modify biotic interactions between these plant groups. The combined effects of future CO2 and differing light on the growth of seagrass and their algal epiphytes were tested by maintaining juvenile seagrasses Amphibolis antarctica under three different CO2 concentrations representing ambient, moderate future and high future forecasts (i.e. 390, 650 vs. 900 l l(-1)) and two light levels representing low and high PAR (i.e. 43 vs. 167 mol m(-2) s(-1)). Aboveground and belowground biomass, leaf growth, epiphyte cover, tissue chemistry and photosynthetic parameters of seagrasses were measured. At low light, there was a neutral to positive effect of elevated CO2 on seagrass biomass and growth; at high light, this effect of CO2 switched toward negative, as growth and biomass decreased at the highest CO2 level. These opposing responses to CO2 appeared to be closely linked to the overgrowth of seagrass by filamentous algal epiphytes when high light and CO2 were combined. Importantly, all seagrass plants maintained positive leaf growth throughout the experiment, indicating that growth was inhibited by some experimental conditions but not arrested entirely. Therefore, while greater light or elevated CO2 provided direct physiological benefits for seagrasses, such benefits were likely negated by overgrowth of epiphytic algae when greater light and CO2 were combined. This result demonstrates how indirect ecological effects from epiphytes can modify independent physiological predictions for seagrass associated with global change. PMID:25193313

  8. Edge effects in four-point direct current potential drop measurements on metal plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Bowler, N.; Bowler, J. R.; Huang, Y.

    2009-07-01

    Four-point direct current potential drop (DCPD) measurements are commonly used to measure the conductivity (or resistivity) of semiconductors and ferrous or non-ferrous metals. The measured electrical potential difference is often interpreted in terms of analytic expressions developed for large plates that are either 'thin' or 'thick' relative to the probe length. It is well known that the presence of the back surface of a plate leads to a solution expressed in terms of an infinite series representing the current source and its images. This approach can be generalized to account for multiple surfaces in order to obtain a solution for a finite plate, but convergence of the series is poor when the plate dimensions are similar to or smaller than the separation of the current injection and extraction points. Here, Fourier series representations of the infinite sums are obtained. It is shown that the Fourier series converge with many fewer terms than the series obtained from image theory, for plates with dimensions similar to or smaller than the separation of the current injection and extraction points. Comparing calculated results for the potential drop obtained by a four-point probe centred on finite plates of varying dimension, with those for a probe in contact with a large (laterally infinite) plate, estimates are given of the uncertainty due to edge effects in measurements on small plates interpreted using analytic formulae developed for large plates. It is also shown that these uncertainties due to edge effects are reduced, for a given plate size, if the probe pick-up points are moved closer to the current injection points, rather than adopting the common arrangement in which the four probe points are equally spaced. Calculated values of DCPD are compared with experimental data taken on aluminium and spring-steel plates of various sizes and excellent agreement is obtained.

  9. Direct investment by stepfathers can mitigate effects on educational outcomes but does not improve behavioural difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Emmott, Emily H.; Mace, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary developed populations, stepfather presence has been associated with detrimental effects on child development. However, the proximate mechanisms behind such effects are yet to be fully explored. From a behavioural ecological perspective, the negative effects associated with stepfathers may be due to the reduced quantity and quality of investments children receive within stepfather households. Here, we build on previous studies by investigating whether the effects of stepfather presence on child outcomes are driven by differences in maternal and partner (i.e., father or stepfather) direct investments. We use data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children to explore stepfather effects on childrens educational achievement and behavioural difficulties at age 7. Our results indicate that, for educational achievement, stepfather effects are due to the lower levels of direct investments children receive. For behavioural difficulty, stepfather effects are due to multiple factors whereby stepfather presence is associated with greater difficulties independent of investment levels, and direct investments from stepfathers are ineffective. Our results suggest that the negative effects of stepfathers on child outcomes can be explained, in part, by the reduced quantity and the ineffectiveness of direct investments children receive from stepfathers. Furthermore, the effects of stepfather direct investments seem to vary between child outcomes. PMID:25214758

  10. Arabidopsis RNASE THREE LIKE2 Modulates the Expression of Protein-Coding Genes via 24-Nucleotide Small Interfering RNA-Directed DNA Methylation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hachet, Mélanie; Comella, Pascale; Zytnicki, Matthias; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    RNaseIII enzymes catalyze the cleavage of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and have diverse functions in RNA maturation. Arabidopsis thaliana RNASE THREE LIKE2 (RTL2), which carries one RNaseIII and two dsRNA binding (DRB) domains, is a unique Arabidopsis RNaseIII enzyme resembling the budding yeast small interfering RNA (siRNA)-producing Dcr1 enzyme. Here, we show that RTL2 modulates the production of a subset of small RNAs and that this activity depends on both its RNaseIII and DRB domains. However, the mode of action of RTL2 differs from that of Dcr1. Whereas Dcr1 directly cleaves dsRNAs into 23-nucleotide siRNAs, RTL2 likely cleaves dsRNAs into longer molecules, which are subsequently processed into small RNAs by the DICER-LIKE enzymes. Depending on the dsRNA considered, RTL2-mediated maturation either improves (RTL2-dependent loci) or reduces (RTL2-sensitive loci) the production of small RNAs. Because the vast majority of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to transposons and intergenic regions producing 24-nucleotide siRNAs that guide DNA methylation, RTL2 depletion modifies DNA methylation in these regions. Nevertheless, 13% of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to protein-coding genes. We show that changes in 24-nucleotide siRNA levels also affect DNA methylation levels at such loci and inversely correlate with mRNA steady state levels, thus implicating RTL2 in the regulation of protein-coding gene expression. PMID:26764378

  11. Achieving Success in Small Business: A Self-Instruction Program for Small Business Owner-Managers. Improving Profits through Effective Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

    This self-instructional module on improving profits through effective management is the seventh in a set of twelve modules designed for small business owner-managers. Competencies for this module are (1) apply planning and organizing skills in the operation of a business and (2) implement effective time management practices. Provided are

  12. Effect of hypokinesia on invertase activity of the mucosa of the small intestine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdusattarov, A.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of prolonged hypokinesia on the enzyme activity of the middle portion of the small intestine was investigated. Eighty-four mongrel white male rats weighing 170-180 g were divided into two equal groups. The experimental group were maintained in single cages under 30 days of hypokinetic conditions and the control animals were maintained under ordinary laboratory conditions. It is concluded that rates of invertase formation and its inclusion in the composition if the cellular membrane, if judged by the enzyme activity studied in sections of the small intestine, are subject to phase changes in the course of prolonged hypokinesia.

  13. Mapping Small Effect Mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Impacts of Experimental Design and Mutational Properties

    PubMed Central

    Duveau, Fabien; Metzger, Brian P. H.; Gruber, Jonathan D.; Mack, Katya; Sood, Natasha; Brooks, Tiffany E.; Wittkopp, Patricia J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variants identified by mapping are biased toward large phenotypic effects because of methodologic challenges for detecting genetic variants with small phenotypic effects. Recently, bulk segregant analysis combined with next-generation sequencing (BSA-seq) was shown to be a powerful and cost-effective way to map small effect variants in natural populations. Here, we examine the power of BSA-seq for efficiently mapping small effect mutations isolated from a mutagenesis screen. Specifically, we determined the impact of segregant population size, intensity of phenotypic selection to collect segregants, number of mitotic generations between meiosis and sequencing, and average sequencing depth on power for mapping mutations with a range of effects on the phenotypic mean and standard deviation as well as relative fitness. We then used BSA-seq to map the mutations responsible for three ethyl methanesulfonate−induced mutant phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These mutants display small quantitative variation in the mean expression of a fluorescent reporter gene (−3%, +7%, and +10%). Using a genetic background with increased meiosis rate, a reliable mating type marker, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to efficiently score large segregating populations and isolate cells with extreme phenotypes, we successfully mapped and functionally confirmed a single point mutation responsible for the mutant phenotype in all three cases. Our simulations and experimental data show that the effects of a causative site not only on the mean phenotype, but also on its standard deviation and relative fitness should be considered when mapping genetic variants in microorganisms such as yeast that require population growth steps for BSA-seq. PMID:24789747

  14. Modelling Common Agricultural Policy-Water Framework Directive interactions and cost-effectiveness of measures to reduce nitrogen pollution.

    PubMed

    Mouratiadou, Ioanna; Russell, Graham; Topp, Cairistiona; Louhichi, Kamel; Moran, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    Selecting cost-effective measures to regulate agricultural water pollution to conform to the Water Framework Directive presents multiple challenges. A bio-economic modelling approach is presented that has been used to explore the water quality and economic effects of the 2003 Common Agricultural Policy Reform and to assess the cost-effectiveness of input quotas and emission standards against nitrate leaching, in a representative case study catchment in Scotland. The approach combines a biophysical model (NDICEA) with a mathematical programming model (FSSIM-MP). The results indicate only small changes due to the Reform, with the main changes in farmers' decision making and the associated economic and water quality indicators depending on crop price changes, and suggest the use of target fertilisation in relation to crop and soil requirements, as opposed to measures targeting farm total or average nitrogen use. PMID:20453343

  15. Effects of uniaxial strain on electron effective mass and tunneling capability of direct gap Ge1-xSnx alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Liang, Renrong; Wang, Jing; Xu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Direct gap Ge1-xSnx alloys under [100] and [110] uniaxial strain are comprehensively investigated by theoretical calculations using the nonlocal empirical pseudopotential method (EPM). It is shown that [100] uniaxial tensile strain aids indirect-to-direct gap transition in Ge1-xSnx alloys. The ? electron effective mass along the optimal direction under [110] uniaxial strain is smaller than those under [100] uniaxial strain and (001) biaxial strain. Additionally, the direct tunneling gap is smallest along the strain-perpendicular direction under [110] uniaxial tensile strain, resulting in a maximum direct band-to-band tunneling generation rate. An optimal [110] uniaxial tensile strain is favorable for high-performance direct gap Ge1-xSnx electronic devices.

  16. Effective Project Management of Small Satellite Projects from the System Engineer's Point of View, An Example of the Small Satellite Flying Laptop Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Toshinori; Falke, Albert; Rser, Hans-Peter

    The number of the small satellite projects is recently dramatically increasing and there are great demands for effective project management methods for them. The goal of this paper is to propose effective project management methods for small satellite projects, which are obtained through the real-life experience of the small satellite Flying Laptop project. The project management methods implemented in this project maximize the advantages of rapid and cost-effective small satellite approaches. The management of the project is based on project breakdown structures, which are derived from a combination of several existing standards and empirical methods. These management methods use a product tree as the backbone of the management architecture. The project management activities, such as the establishment of a work breakdown structure, drawing and documentation management structures, time scheduling, and cost management is described with real-life examples. Applications of project management tools, including open source software, which play important roles in cost-effective small satellite approaches, are also summarized and examples of them are illustrated. Finally, further possibilities of effective project management with up-coming new management tools are discussed.

  17. Effects of Edge Directions on the Structural Controllability of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yandong; Lao, Songyang; Hou, Lvlin; Small, Michael; Bai, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances indicate that assigning or reversing edge direction can significantly improve the structural controllability of complex networks. For directed networks, approaching the optimal structural controllability can be achieved by detecting and reversing certain “inappropriate” edge directions. However, the existence of multiple sets of “inappropriate” edge directions suggests that different edges have different effects on optimal controllability—that is, different combinations of edges can be reversed to achieve the same structural controllability. Therefore, we classify edges into three categories based on their direction: critical, redundant and intermittent. We then investigate the effects of changing these edge directions on network controllability, and demonstrate that the existence of more critical edge directions implies not only a lower cost of modifying inappropriate edges but also better controllability. Motivated by this finding, we present a simple edge orientation method aimed at producing more critical edge directions—utilizing only local information—which achieves near optimal controllability. Furthermore, we explore the effects of edge direction on the controllability of several real networks. PMID:26281042

  18. Unsteady transonic small-disturbance theory including entropy and vorticity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1988-01-01

    Modifications to unsteady transonic small disturbance theory to include entropy and vorticity effects are presented. The modifications were implemented in the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code. The code permits the aeroelastic analysis of complete aircraft configurations in the flutter critical transonic speed range. Entropy and vorticity effects were incorporated within the solution procedure to more accurately analyze flows with strong shock waves. The modified code includes these effects while retaining the relative simplicity and cost efficiency of the TSD formulation. Detailed descriptions are presented of the entropy and vorticity modifications along with calculated results and comparisons which assess the modified theory. These results are in good agreement with parallel Euler calculations and with experimental data. Therefore, the present method now provides the aeroelastician with an affordable capability to analyze relatively difficult transonic flows without having to solve the computationally more expensive Euler equations.

  19. Inhibitory effect of acetylcholine on muscular tonus of the small intestine of a lizard.

    PubMed

    Wacyk, J; Guerrero, S; Morello, A

    1984-05-01

    The present report concerns the effects of cholinergic agonists on the isometric tension of "in vitro" preparations of the esophagus and distal part of the small intestine of the lizard Liolaemus gravenhorsti. Acetylcholine (Ach) and carbachol elicited a dose-related increase of isometric tension in the esophagus, whereas the small intestine was slowly relaxed by these drugs. Eserine induced a synergistic action on the cholinergic responses of both organs, and atropine completely antagonized the respective effects. The esophagus and the intestine showed different thresholds for the cholinergic evoked responses, the former being about 30 times more sensitive than the intestine. Assessment of cholinesterase activity revealed that Ach is hydrolyzed at a significant lesser speed in the intestine than in the esophagus. The results do not provide information about the nature of the chemical mediator causing the inhibitory effect observed in the intestine. The eventual role of an adrenergic mechanism mediated by muscarinic receptors is under study in our laboratory. PMID:6736899

  20. Measurements of Siple transmitter signals on the DE 1 satellite - Wave normal direction and antenna effective length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonwalker, V. S.; Inan, U. S.

    1986-01-01

    A new experimental technique is developed to simultaneously measure the wave propagation direction and the effective length of a small (L value much smaller than wavelength) electric dipole antenna on a spin-stabilized satellite in the magnetosphere. The technique relies on the near simultaneous measurement of single components of the electric and magnetic fields of a coherent VLF signal injected into the medium from a ground-based source. The spin fading characteristics of the signal received by the electric dipole and the magnetic loop antenna permit the measurement of the wave normal direction assuming whistler-mode propagation. In-situ and remote measurements of the local cold plasma density are used to determine the refractive index. The wave electric field is then inferred from the wave magnetic field as measured on the loop antenna, the refractive index and the direction of propagation. Comparing this electric field with the measured voltage across the dipole antenna leads to the determination of the effective length of the receiving electric dipole. The technique is applied to data from the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite observations of whistler mode signals injected into the magnetosphere from the Siple, Antarctica, VLF transmitter. In one case, with the measured background cold plasma density being 15 el/cu cm, the effective length of the 200 m-long electric dipole antenna is found to be 222 + or - 56 m, i.e., about twice the conventional value.

  1. The effects of land use change and precipitation change on direct runoff in Wei River watershed, China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Leihua; Xiong, Lihua; Lall, Upmanu; Wang, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    The principles and degrees to which land use change and climate change affect direct runoff generation are distinctive. In this paper, based on the MODIS data of land use in 1992 and 2003, the impacts of land use and climate change are explored using the Soil Conservation Service Curve Number (SCS-CN) method under two defined scenarios. In the first scenario, the precipitation is assumed to be constant, and thus the consequence of land use change could be evaluated. In the second scenario, the condition of land use is assumed to be constant, so the influence only induced by climate change could be assessed. Combining the conclusions of two scenarios, the effects of land use and climate change on direct runoff volume can be separated. At last, it is concluded: for the study basin, the land use types which have the greatest effect on direct runoff generation are agricultural land and water body. For the big sub basins, the effect of land use change is generally larger than that of climate change; for middle and small sub basins, most of them suffer more from land use change than from climate change. PMID:25633954

  2. Theory of the Effects of Small Gravitational Levels on Droplet Gasification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beitelmal, A.; Shaw, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    A mathematical model taking into account small (and constant) gravitational levels is developed for vaporization of an isolated liquid droplet suspended in a stagnant atmosphere. A goal of the present analysis is to see how small gravitational levels affect droplet gasification characteristics. Attention is focused upon determining the effects on gas-phase phenomena. The conservation equations arc normalized and nondimensionalized, and a small parameter that accounts for the effects of gravity is identified. This parameter is the square of the inverse of a Froude number based on the gravitational acceleration, the droplet radius, and a characteristic gas-phase velocity at the droplet surface. Asymptotic analyses are developed in terms of this parameter. In the analyses, different spatial regions are identified. Near a droplet, gravitational effects are negligible in the first approximation, and the flowfield is spherically symmetric to the leading order. Analysis shows, however, that outer zones exist where gravitational effects cannot be neglected; it is expected that a stagnation point will be present in an outer zone that is not present when gravity is totally absent. The leading order and higher-order differential equations for each zone are derived and solved. The solutions allow the effects of gravity on vaporization rates and temperature, velocity and species fields to be determined.

  3. Comparative effects of avoidance and vaccination in disease spread on a dynamic small-world network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Thomas E.; Jones, Matthew M.; McKay, Susan R.

    2010-12-01

    Dynamic small-world contact networks have fixed short range links and time-varying stochastic long range links. They are used to model mobile populations or as minimal models for traditional small-world networks. Here we study the relative effects of vaccinations and avoidance of infected individuals in a susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) epidemic model on a dynamic small-world network. We derive the critical mobility required for an outbreak to occur as a function of the diseases infectivity, recovery rate, avoidance rate, and vaccination rate. We also derive an expression that allows us to calculate the amount of vaccination and/or avoidance necessary to prevent an epidemic. Calculated quantities show excellent agreement with simulations.

  4. Toxicological effects of particulate emissions - A comparison of oil and wood fuels in small- and medium-scale heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasurinen, Stefanie; Jalava, Pasi I.; Tapanainen, Maija; Uski, Oskari; Happo, Mikko S.; Mki-Paakkanen, Jorma; Lamberg, Heikki; Koponen, Hanna; Nuutinen, Ilpo; Kortelainen, Miika; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2015-02-01

    The use of wood instead of oil fuels in heating systems is strongly encouraged in many countries. Yet it is unknown to what extent such a large-scale change from oil to wood fuels in heating systems would contribute to any negative health effects from their emissions. We compared the toxicological properties of particulate matter (PM) emissions from wood and oil fuels from two small-scale and two medium-scale heating systems. To assess whether oil or wood combustion emissions cause adverse effects and which PM emissions' effects are more profound, we measured cell viability and proliferation, inflammatory markers, as well as DNA damage in RAW264.7 mouse macrophages. We found that the medium-scale oil-fueled heating system induced a dose-dependent increase of DNA damage, short-term cytotoxic effects, and a cell cycle arrest in the G2/M-phase. We did not detect an induction of DNA damage by the medium-scale wood-fired system. However, we detected significant short-term cytotoxicity. We found that both oil and wood combustion emission samples from the small-scale heating systems induced DNA damage. However, the short-term cytotoxic effects were greater for the PM emissions from the oil-fired heating system. PM mass emissions differed significantly between the tested heating systems. The lowest emissions, 0.1 mg/MJ, were produced by the small-scale oil-fired heating system; the highest emissions, 20.3 mg/MJ, by the medium-scale oil-fired heating system. The wood-fired heating systems' PM mass emissions were in between these concentrations, complicating the direct comparison of the emissions' health related toxic effects. Conclusively, our results indicate that the emissions from both the small- and the medium-scale wood-fueled heating systems cause overall less cytotoxicity and DNA damage in a cell model than the emissions from the corresponding oil-fueled heating systems. Hence, controlled wood-fueled heating systems may be good alternatives to heating systems fired with fuel oil.

  5. Effect of downed woody debris on small mammal anti-predator behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkleman, Travis, M.; Orrock, John, L.; Loeb, Susan, C.

    2011-10-01

    Anti-predator behavior can affect prey growth, reproduction, survival, and generate emergent effects in food webs. Small mammals often lower the cost of predation by altering their behavior in response to shrubs,but the importance of other microhabitat features, such as downed woody debris, for anti-predator behavior is unknown. We used givingup densities to quantify the degree to which downed woody debris alters perceived predation risk by small mammals in southeastern pineforests. We placed 14 foraging trays next to large downed woody debris,shrubs, and in open areas for 12 consecutive nights. Moon illumination, a common indicator of predation risk, led to a similar reduction in small mammal foraging in all three microhabitats (open, downed woody debris,and shrub). Small mammals perceived open microhabitats as riskier than shrub microhabitats, with downed woody debris habitats perceived as being of intermediate risk between shrub and open microhabitats. Despite the presumed benefits of the protective cover of downed woody debris, small mammals may perceive downed woody debris as a relatively risky foraging site in southeastern pine forests where the high diversity and abundance of rodent-eating snakes may provide a primary predatory threat.

  6. Small-bowel side-effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Aabakken, L

    1999-04-01

    The hitherto small number of reports of toxic effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to the small bowel may reflect primarily a lack of diagnostic tools. In fact, a host of small bowel manifestations have now been documented, ranging from strictures causing dramatic small-bowel obstruction and severe bleeding to low-grade NSAID 'enteropathy', a syndrome comprising increased intestinal permeability, low-grade inflammation with blood and protein loss. The enteropathy, although not dramatic, may add to existing complications, for example in rheumatic patients, and contribute to iron-deficiency anaemia or hypoalbuminaemia. Enteroscopy can be used to detect erosive or haemorrhagic lesions in a small number of patients, but, in general, functional methods are applied to detect the NSAID enteropathy. Permeability markers and white and red blood cell labelling have been successfully applied, and recently, calprotectin faecal shedding has been shown to detect early inflammatory changes in the gut. We still have insufficient knowledge about the pathogenic mechanism, but prostaglandin synthesis inhibition may be less vital than in the gastroduodenal mucosa, and local luminal aggressors may play a role. Apart from stopping or reducing the dose of the NSAID, we so far have few therapeutic alternatives for NSAID enteropathy. However, the ongoing research has brought us important new insight, and helped bring this prevalent problem in focus. PMID:10321753

  7. Reversed better-than-average effect in direct comparisons of nonsocial stimuli depends on the set size.

    PubMed

    Niewiarowski, Jakub; Kary?owski, Jerzy J; Szutkiewicz-Szekalska, Karolina; Cyprya?ska, Marzena

    2014-05-01

    Studies on direct comparative judgments typically show that, for items that are positively evaluated, a single item randomly drawn from a larger set of similar items tends to be judged as better than average (the BTA effect). However, Windschitl, Conybeare, and Krizan (2008) demonstrated that, under timing conditions that do not favor focusing attention on the single item, the reversal of the BTA effect occurs. We report two experiments showing that the magnitude of the reversed BTA effect increases as a function of the size of a multiitem referent with which a single item target is compared. Specifically, in direct comparative judgments of the attractiveness of positively evaluated objects (nice-looking cloth buttons, attractive buildings, or cupcakes), underestimation of the attractiveness of singletons, as compared with a multiitem set (reversed BTA effect), increased with the increased set size. Analysis of absolute judgments obtained for singletons and for small and large multiitem sets suggests that, for attractive stimuli, both the reversed BTA effect in comparative judgments and its sensitivity to set size occur as a result of a positive relationship between set size and perceived attractiveness in absolute judgments. PMID:24352697

  8. Advanced dynamical models for very well observed asteroids : perturbations from small bodies, relativity, non - gravitational effects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Fabrizio; Farnocchia, Davide; Milani, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    The availability of radar data and high precision optical observations has increased the number of objects with a very well constrained orbit, especially for those objects with a long observed arc. In these cases, the uncertainty of orbital predictions is often dominated by the inaccuracy of the dynamical model. However, the motion of small solar system bodies poses a serious challenge in modeling their dynamics. In particular, for those objects with a chaotic motion small differences in the model are amplified with propagation. Thus, we need to take into account small perturbations too, especially for long - term prediction. An improved dynamical model is relevant in several applications such as assessing the risk of an impact between an asteroid and the Earth. The N - body model describing the motion of a small solar system body includes the Newtonian attraction of the planets. The contribution o f other perturbing bodies has to be taken into account. We propose to include the Moon, two dwarf planets (Ceres and Pluto) and fifteen asteroids (Pallas, Vesta, Juno, Metis, Hygiea, Eunomia, Psyche, Amphitrite, Euphrosyne, Europa, Cybele, Sylvia, Davida, Herculina, Interamnia). The next step is the introduction of the relativity terms due to both the Sun and the planets . Despite their small magnitude, planetary relativistic terms turn out to be relevant for objects experiencing close approaches with a planet. Finally, we discuss non - gravitational effects such as solar radiation pressure and the Yarkovsky effect. In particular, the latter acts as a tiny but secular semimajor axis drift that may decisively drive long - term predictions. These non - gravitational effects are difficult to model as they depend on object s physical properties that are typically unknown. However, a very well observed object can have an orbit precise enough to allow the determination of the parameters defining a non - gravitational perturbation and thus the modeling of the corresponding acceleration.

  9. Effect of skin pressure by clothing on small bowel transit time.

    PubMed

    Takasu, N; Tsukamoto, M; Tokura, H; Sone, Y

    2001-11-01

    We examined the effect of increased skin pressure from tight clothing on small bowel transit time by means of the breath hydrogen test, using milk that contained lactulose as an additional indigestible disaccharide, which is used as a test meal after overnight fasting. In this experiment, we measured the small bowel transit time from 9 healthy and non-constipated female subjects with two different skin pressures that were applied by loose-fitting experimental garment or an additional tight-fitting girdle on two consecutive days. The skin pressure of the latter condition was 8-9 mmHg higher than that of the former one on the participants' waist, abdomen and hip region. The experimental order of the two skin pressure conditions was counterbalanced. As a result, the small bowel transit time obtained with and without girdle did not differ significantly (165.0 +/- 26.0 minutes for less skin pressure condition and 173.3 +/- 26.8 minutes for more skin pressure condition, n = 9, p = 0.43). This result indicated that the skin pressure from clothing has no effect on the passage rate of food through the small intestine. PMID:11840684

  10. A Review on the Effects of Soccer Small-Sided Games

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Marco; Botelho, Goreti; Lago, Carlos; Maas, Victor; Sampaio, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    Over the last years there has been a substantial growth in research related to specific training methods in soccer with a strong emphasis on the effects of small-sided games. The increase of research in this topic is coincident with the increase of popularity obtained by specific soccer conditioning, which involves training players to deal with soccer match situations. Given the limited time available for fitness training in soccer, the effectiveness of small-sided games as a conditioning stimulus needs to be optimized to allow players to compete at the highest level. Available studies indicate that physiological responses (e.g. heart rate, blood lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion), tactical and technical skill requirements can be modified during small-sided games by altering factors such as the number of players, the size of the pitch, the rules of the game, and coach encouragement. However, because of the lack of consistency in small-sided games design, player fitness, age, ability, level of coach encouragement, and playing rules in each of these studies, it is difficult to make accurate conclusions on the influence of each of these factors separately. PMID:23486554

  11. Pathology-Dependent Effects Linked to Small Heat Shock Proteins Expression: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Arrigo, A.-P.

    2012-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (small Hsps) are stress-induced molecular chaperones that act as holdases towards polypeptides that have lost their folding in stress conditions or consequently of mutations in their coding sequence. A cellular protection against the deleterious effects mediated by damaged proteins is thus provided to cells. These chaperones are also highly expressed in response to protein conformational and inflammatory diseases and cancer pathologies. Through specific and reversible modifications in their phospho-oligomeric organization, small Hsps can chaperone appropriate client proteins in order to provide cells with resistance to different types of injuries or pathological conditions. By helping cells to better cope with their pathological status, their expression can be either beneficial, such as in diseases characterized by pathological cell degeneration, or deleterious when they are required for tumor cell survival. Moreover, small Hsps are actively released by cells and can act as immunogenic molecules that have dual effects depending on the pathology. The cellular consequences linked to their expression levels and relationships with other Hsps as well as therapeutic strategies are discussed in view of their dynamic structural organization required to interact with specific client polypeptides. PMID:24278676

  12. Reliance on small samples, the wavy recency effect, and similarity-based learning.

    PubMed

    Plonsky, Ori; Teodorescu, Kinneret; Erev, Ido

    2015-10-01

    Many behavioral phenomena, including underweighting of rare events and probability matching, can be the product of a tendency to rely on small samples of experiences. Why would small samples be used, and which experiences are likely to be included in these samples? Previous studies suggest that a cognitively efficient reliance on the most recent experiences can be very effective. We explore a very different and more cognitively demanding process explaining the tendency to rely on small samples: exploitation of environmental regularities. The first part of our study shows that across wide classes of dynamic binary choice environments, focusing only on experiences that followed the same sequence of outcomes preceding the current task is more effective than focusing on the most recent experiences. The second part of our study examines the psychological significance of these sequence-based rules. It shows that these tractable rules reproduce well-known indications of sensitivity to sequences and predict a nontrivial wavy recency effect of rare events. Analysis of published data supports this wavy recency prediction, but suggests an even wavier effect than these sequence-based rules predict. This pattern, and the main behavioral phenomena documented in basic decisions from experience and probability learning tasks, can be captured with a similarity-based model assuming that people follow sequences of outcomes most of the time but sometimes respond to trends. We conclude with theoretical notes on similarity-based learning. PMID:26075914

  13. Direct, sequence-specific binding of the human U1-70K ribonucleoprotein antigen protein to loop I of U1 small nuclear RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Surowy, C S; van Santen, V L; Scheib-Wixted, S M; Spritz, R A

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the interaction of two of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP)-specific proteins, U1-70K and U1-A, with U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA). The U1-70K protein is a U1-specific RNA-binding protein. Deletion and mutation analyses of a beta-galactosidase/U1-70K partial fusion protein indicated that the central portion of the protein, including the RNP sequence domain, is both necessary and sufficient for specific U1 snRNA binding in vitro. The highly conserved eight-amino-acid RNP consensus sequence was found to be essential for binding. Deletion and mutation analyses of U1 snRNA showed that both the U1-70K fusion protein and the native HeLa U1-70K protein bound directly to loop I of U1 snRNA. Binding was sequence specific, requiring 8 of the 10 bases in the loop. The U1-A snRNP protein also interacted specifically with U1 snRNA, principally with stem-loop II. Images PMID:2531275

  14. Measurement of rainfall distribution on a small catchment for the evaluation of canopy interception effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Thomas; Schapp, Andrea; Bchner, Steffen; Menzel, Hannes; Hinz, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Variability of rainfall and throughfall is an essential characteristic of the water balance at spatial scales ranging from meters to hundreds of meters or even kilometers. The amount of throughfall is governed by the characteristics of the vegetation canopy and the involved interception and stemflow effects. In initial, developing ecosystems, distinct patterns of the growing vegetation (e.g. patchiness) supposedly govern the spatial distribution of water in the system, thereby initiating and supporting hydro-ecological feedback processes. Questions are i) is the spatial variability of vegetation relevant for the system as a whole, and ii) how does the distribution of the effective precipitation (i.e. the infiltration) change over time in dependency of vegetation succession? We present the first results of a spatially distributed measurement approach of surface-near precipitation on the constructed catchment "Hhnerwasser" ("Chicken Creek"). The 6-ha site is located in the recultivation area of the lignite open-cast mine "Welzow-Sd" in Lower Lusatia, Brandenburg, Germany. Here, the free development of an initial ecosystem is investigated since September 2005. After eight years of succession, the spatial distribution of plant species is highly heterogeneous, and gains increasing influence on throughfall patterns, thus impacting the distribution of soil humidity and possibly even surface runoff. For spatially distributed precipitation measurement, 47 tipping bucket rain gauges were installed in heights of 0.5 m and 1.0 m along two transects on the catchment. Rain gauge data were collected by a wireless sensor node network provided by the Sens4U joint research project. The transects run NW-SE and NE-SW and cover the range of plant communities presently existing in the ecosystem: locust copses, dense sallow thorn bushes and reeds, base herbaceous and medium-rise small-reed vegetation, and open areas covered by moss and lichens. The raw measurement data were temporally aggregated using a VBA script in order to characterize interception for various types of precipitation events on different time scales. First results from the measurement period 17th July - 3rd September 2013 widely exhibit a good accordance with reference data from on-site weather stations for sites on open ground, while canopy sites show more heterogeneous values, either due to interception or due to canopy collection effects. However, it was found that the explanation of the differences between comparable sites requires an additional inclusion of other relevant parameters, e.g. wind speed and direction, screening effects, and specific canopy characteristics. Moreover, extreme precipitation events sometimes seemed to lead to incorrect measurements either by the sensor and / or node, which required supplementary quality controls of equipment and data. Results from future long-term measurements on the "Hhnerwasser" catchment will be used to identify possible plant-soil feedback mechanisms and to parameterize models that simulate the behavior of initial eco-hydrological systems.

  15. Investigations of surface-tension effects due to small-scale complex boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiansheng

    In this Ph.D. dissertation, we have investigated some important surface-tension phenomena including capillarity, wetting, and wicking. We mainly focus on the geometric aspects of these problems, and to learn about how structures affect properties. . In the first project (Chapter 2), we used numerical simulations and experiments to study the meniscus of a fluid confined in capillaries with complicated cross-sectional geometries. In the simulations, we computed the three-dimensional shapes of the menisci formed in polygonal and star-shaped capillaries with sharp or rounded corners. Height variations across the menisci were used to quantify the effect of surface tension. Analytical solutions were derived for all the cases where the cross-sectional geometry was a regular polygon or a regular star-shape. Power indices that characterize the effects of corner rounding were extracted from simulation results. These findings can serve as guide for fabrications of unconventional three-dimensional structures in Capillary Force Lithography experiments. Experimental demonstrations of the working principle was also performed. Although quantitative matching between simulation and experimental results was not achieved due to the limitation of material properties, clear qualitative trends were observed and interesting three-dimensional nano-structures were produced. A second project (Chapter 3) focused on developing techniques to produce three-dimensional hierarchically structured superhydrophobic surfaces with high aspect ratios. We experimented with two different high-throughput electron-beam-lithography processes featuring single and dual electron-beam exposures. After a surface modification procedure with a hydrophobic silane, the structured surfaces exhibited two distinct superhydrophobic behaviors---high and low adhesion. While both types of superhydrophobic surfaces exhibited very high (approximately 160° water advancing contact angles, the water receding contact angles on these two different types of surfaces differed by about 50° ˜ 60°, with the low-adhesion surfaces at about 120° ˜ 130° and the high-adhesion surfaces at about 70° ˜ 80°. Characterizations of both the microscopic structures and macroscopic wetting properties of these product surfaces allowed us to pinpoint the structural features responsible for specific wetting properties. It is found that the advancing contact angle was mainly determined by the primary structures while the receding contact angle is largely affected by the side-wall slope of the secondary features. This study established a platform for further exploration of the structure aspects of surface wettability. In the third and final project (Chapter 4), we demonstrated a new type of microfluidic channel that enable asymmetric wicking of wetting fluids based on structure-induced direction-dependent surface-tension effect. By decorating the side-walls of open microfluidic channels with tilted fins, we were able to experimentally demonstrate preferential wicking behaviors of various IPA-water mixtures with a range of contact angles in these channels. A simplified 2D model was established to explain the wicking asymmetry, and a complete 3D model was developed to provide more accurate quantitative predictions. The design principles developed in this study provide an additional scheme for controlling the spreading of fluids. The research presented in this dissertation spreads out across a wide range of physical phenomena (wicking, wetting, and capillarity), and involves a number of computational and experimental techniques, yet all of these projects are intrinsically united under a common theme: we want to better understand how simple fluids respond to small-scale complex surface structures as manifestations of surface-tension effects. We hope our findings can serve as building blocks for a larger scale endeavor of scientific research and engineering development. After all, the pursue of knowledge is most meaningful if the results improve the well-being of the society and the advancement of humanity. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  16. Novel methods to optimize the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation: a systematic review of transcranial direct current stimulation patents.

    PubMed

    Malavera, Alejandra; Vasquez, Alejandra; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-11-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that has been extensively studied. While there have been initial positive results in some clinical trials, there is still variability in tDCS results. The aim of this article is to review and discuss patents assessing novel methods to optimize the use of tDCS. A systematic review was performed using Google patents database with tDCS as the main technique, with patents filling date between 2010 and 2015. Twenty-two patents met our inclusion criteria. These patents attempt to address current tDCS limitations. Only a few of them have been investigated in clinical trials (i.e., high-definition tDCS), and indeed most of them have not been tested before in human trials. Further clinical testing is required to assess which patents are more likely to optimize the effects of tDCS. We discuss the potential optimization of tDCS based on these patents and the current experience with standard tDCS. PMID:26415093

  17. Identification of a small molecule inhibitor of the hedgehog signaling pathway: Effects on basal cell carcinoma-like lesions

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Juliet A.; Guicherit, Oivin M.; Zaharian, Beatrice I.; Xu, Yin; Chai, Ling; Wichterle, Hynek; Kon, Charlene; Gatchalian, Christine; Porter, Jeffery A.; Rubin, Lee L.; Wang, Frank Y.

    2003-01-01

    The link between basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been well established in humans and in mouse models. Here we report the development of assays, including two novel in vitro BCC models, which allowed us to screen for Hh inhibitors and test their validity as potential treatments for BCC. We identified a novel small molecule Hh inhibitor (CUR61414) that can block elevated Hh signaling activity resulting from oncogenic mutations in Patched-1. Moreover, CUR61414 can suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis of basaloid nests in the BCC model systems, whereas having no effect on normal skin cells. These findings directly demonstrate that the use of Hh inhibitors could be a valid therapeutic approach for treating BCC. PMID:12679522

  18. Predicting use of effective vegetable parenting practices with the Model of Goal Directed Behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to model effective vegetable parenting practices using the Model of Goal Directed Vegetable Parenting Practices construct scales. An internet survey was conducted with 307 parents (mostly mothers) of preschoolers in Houston, Texas to assess their agreement with effective vegetable ...

  19. Influence of Exercise on Inflammation in Cancer: Direct Effect or Innocent Bystander?

    PubMed

    Murphy, E Angela; Enos, Reilly T; Velzquez, Kandy T

    2015-07-01

    We propose the hypothesis that the benefits of exercise on inflammation in cancer are a result of a direct effect on inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-?, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, that are critical for cancer growth as well as a bystander effect of the established relationship between exercise and cancer. PMID:25906430

  20. Comparing Direct versus Indirect Measures of the Pedagogical Effectiveness of Team Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    Direct measures (tests) of the pedagogical effectiveness of team testing and indirect measures (student surveys) of pedagogical effectiveness of team testing were collected in several sections of an undergraduate marketing course with varying levels of the use of team testing. The results indicate that although students perceived team testing to

  1. Interpersonal Attraction and Direct-Indirect Supervisor Influence as Predictors of Counselor Trainee Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodenhoff, Judith T.

    1981-01-01

    Trainees who were attracted to their supervisors were rated as more effective by supervisors, although attraction was not related to clients' perceptions of outcome. A direct style of supervision was related to trainee effectiveness, but on only one of three measures of the dependent variable. (Author)

  2. The Effect of Direct Instruction Model on Intermediate Class Achievement and Attitudes toward English Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kousar, Rubina

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the effect of the direct instruction model on intermediate class achievement and attitudes toward English grammar. It was an experimental study and the purpose was to explore the relative effectiveness of instructional methodology (independent variable) on students' achievement and attitude (dependent

  3. Home Influence on School Learning: Direct and Indirect Effects of Parental Involvement on High School Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehrmann, Paul G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Using the massive High School and Beyond data set, this study examined the direct effects of perceived parental involvement on grades and the indirect effect through television time and time spent on homework. Findings are given and conclusions discussed. (Author/MT)

  4. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Behaviour and Electrophysiology of Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Miranka; Rahman, Rasha Abdel; Kuenecke, Janina; Koenig, Thomas; Horn, Helge; Sommer, Werner; Dierks, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Excitatory anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (A-tDCS) over the left dorsal prefrontal cortex (DPFC) has been shown to improve language production. The present study examined neurophysiological underpinnings of this effect. In a single-blinded within-subject design, we traced effects of A-tDCS compared to sham stimulation over the left

  5. Lack of Direct Effects of Agrochemicals on Zoonotic Pathogens and Fecal Indicator Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Staley, Zachery R.; Senkbeil, Jacob K.; Rohr, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    Agrochemicals, fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), and pathogens frequently contaminate water simultaneously. No significant direct effects of fertilizer, atrazine, malathion, and chlorothalonil on the survival of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella enterica, human polyomaviruses, and adenovirus were detected, supporting the assertion that previously observed effects of agrochemicals on FIB were indirect. PMID:22961900

  6. Direct and Indirect Effects of Teenage Body Weight on Adult Wages. NBER Working Paper No. 15027

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Euna; Norton, Edward C.; Powell, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Previous estimates on the association between body weight and wages in the literature have been contingent on education and occupation. This paper examines the direct effect of BMI on wages and the indirect effects operating through education and occupation choice, particularly for late-teen BMI and adult wages. Using the National Longitudinal

  7. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Behaviour and Electrophysiology of Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Miranka; Rahman, Rasha Abdel; Kuenecke, Janina; Koenig, Thomas; Horn, Helge; Sommer, Werner; Dierks, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Excitatory anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (A-tDCS) over the left dorsal prefrontal cortex (DPFC) has been shown to improve language production. The present study examined neurophysiological underpinnings of this effect. In a single-blinded within-subject design, we traced effects of A-tDCS compared to sham stimulation over the left…

  8. Effect of cholera enterotoxin on carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and small intestinal mucosa of rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Vengrov, P.R.; Cherkasova, T.D.; Yurkiv, V.A.; Pokrovskii, V.I.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of cholera enterotoxin injected in vivo on glucose formation from alanine, and also on glucose-6-phosphatase activity in the liver and mucosa of the small intestine was studied. L-(2,3-/sup 3/H)-alanine was added to the incubation medium. Chromatograms were developed with 5% AgNO/sub 3/ with the addition of an aqueous solution of ammonia. The quantity of radioactive glucose was determined in a scintillation counter.

  9. Temperature effect on the small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration.

    PubMed

    Djikaev, Y S; Ruckenstein, E

    2013-11-14

    The thermodynamics of hydration is expected to change gradually from entropic for small solutes to enthalpic for large ones. The small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration depends on the thermodynamic conditions of the solvent such as temperature, pressure, presence of additives, etc. We attempt to shed some light on the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale by using a probabilistic approach to water hydrogen bonding that allows one to obtain an analytic expression for the number of bonds per water molecule as a function of both its distance to a solute and solute radius. Incorporating that approach into the density functional theory, one can examine the solute size effects on its hydration over the entire small-to-large lengthscale range at a series of different temperatures. Knowing the dependence of the hydration free energy on the temperature and solute size, one can also obtain its enthalpic and entropic contributions as functions of both temperature and solute size. These functions can provide some interesting insight into the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration. The model was applied to the hydration of spherical particles of various radii in water in the temperature range from T = 293.15 K to T = 333.15 K. The model predictions for the temperature dependence of the hydration free energy of small hydrophobes are consistent with the experimental and simulational data on the hydration of simple molecular solutes. Three alternative definitions for the small-to-large crossover length-scale of hydrophobic hydration are proposed, and their temperature dependence is obtained. Depending on the definition and temperature, the small-to-large crossover in the hydration mechanism is predicted to occur for hydrophobes of radii from one to several nanometers. Independent of its definition, the crossover length-scale is predicted to decrease with increasing temperature. PMID:24320293

  10. Temperature effect on the small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Djikaev, Y. S. Ruckenstein, E.

    2013-11-14

    The thermodynamics of hydration is expected to change gradually from entropic for small solutes to enthalpic for large ones. The small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration depends on the thermodynamic conditions of the solvent such as temperature, pressure, presence of additives, etc. We attempt to shed some light on the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale by using a probabilistic approach to water hydrogen bonding that allows one to obtain an analytic expression for the number of bonds per water molecule as a function of both its distance to a solute and solute radius. Incorporating that approach into the density functional theory, one can examine the solute size effects on its hydration over the entire small-to-large lengthscale range at a series of different temperatures. Knowing the dependence of the hydration free energy on the temperature and solute size, one can also obtain its enthalpic and entropic contributions as functions of both temperature and solute size. These functions can provide some interesting insight into the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration. The model was applied to the hydration of spherical particles of various radii in water in the temperature range from T = 293.15 K to T = 333.15 K. The model predictions for the temperature dependence of the hydration free energy of small hydrophobes are consistent with the experimental and simulational data on the hydration of simple molecular solutes. Three alternative definitions for the small-to-large crossover length-scale of hydrophobic hydration are proposed, and their temperature dependence is obtained. Depending on the definition and temperature, the small-to-large crossover in the hydration mechanism is predicted to occur for hydrophobes of radii from one to several nanometers. Independent of its definition, the crossover length-scale is predicted to decrease with increasing temperature.

  11. Temperature effect on the small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djikaev, Y. S.; Ruckenstein, E.

    2013-11-01

    The thermodynamics of hydration is expected to change gradually from entropic for small solutes to enthalpic for large ones. The small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration depends on the thermodynamic conditions of the solvent such as temperature, pressure, presence of additives, etc. We attempt to shed some light on the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale by using a probabilistic approach to water hydrogen bonding that allows one to obtain an analytic expression for the number of bonds per water molecule as a function of both its distance to a solute and solute radius. Incorporating that approach into the density functional theory, one can examine the solute size effects on its hydration over the entire small-to-large lengthscale range at a series of different temperatures. Knowing the dependence of the hydration free energy on the temperature and solute size, one can also obtain its enthalpic and entropic contributions as functions of both temperature and solute size. These functions can provide some interesting insight into the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration. The model was applied to the hydration of spherical particles of various radii in water in the temperature range from T = 293.15 K to T = 333.15 K. The model predictions for the temperature dependence of the hydration free energy of small hydrophobes are consistent with the experimental and simulational data on the hydration of simple molecular solutes. Three alternative definitions for the small-to-large crossover length-scale of hydrophobic hydration are proposed, and their temperature dependence is obtained. Depending on the definition and temperature, the small-to-large crossover in the hydration mechanism is predicted to occur for hydrophobes of radii from one to several nanometers. Independent of its definition, the crossover length-scale is predicted to decrease with increasing temperature.

  12. Analytical characterization of four wave mixing effect in direct-detection double-sideband OFDM optical transmission systems.

    PubMed

    Alves, Tiago M F; Cartaxo, Adolfo V T

    2014-04-01

    A closed-form expression for the variance of the four-wave mixing (FWM) induced in each subcarrier of a double sideband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) system employing direct detection is proposed and validated. Particularly, using a small signal analysis, equivalent transfer functions that characterize the frequency response of the FWM effect are derived taking into account the walkoff effect between the modulated pump waves and the FWM wave. The accuracy of the variance estimates provided by the closed-form expression is assessed for different sets of system parameters. The closed-form expression provides good variance estimates of the FWM-induced degradation caused by degenerate and nonsymmetric nondegenerate FWM components. For symmetric non-degenerate FWM components, the proposed expression provides reliable but pessimistic variance estimates, not exceeding the actual FWM variance in 1.5 dB for modulation indexes of interest. PMID:24718231

  13. Disentangle the Causes of the Road Barrier Effect in Small Mammals through Genetic Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Ascensão, Fernando; Mata, Cristina; Malo, Juan E.; Ruiz-Capillas, Pablo; Silva, Catarina; Silva, André P.; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Fernandes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Road barrier effect is among the foremost negative impacts of roads on wildlife. Knowledge of the factors responsible for the road barrier effect is crucial to understand and predict species’ responses to roads, and to improve mitigation measures in the context of management and conservation. We built a set of hypothesis aiming to infer the most probable cause of road barrier effect (traffic effect or road surface avoidance), while controlling for the potentially confounding effects road width, traffic volume and road age. The wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus was used as a model species of small and forest-dwelling mammals, which are more likely to be affected by gaps in cover such as those resulting from road construction. We confront genetic patterns from opposite and same roadsides from samples of three highways and used computer simulations to infer migration rates between opposite roadsides. Genetic patterns from 302 samples (ca. 100 per highway) suggest that the highway barrier effect for wood mouse is due to road surface avoidance. However, from the simulations we estimated a migration rate of about 5% between opposite roadsides, indicating that some limited gene flow across highways does occur. To reduce highway impact on population genetic diversity and structure, possible mitigation measures could include retrofitting of culverts and underpasses to increase their attractiveness and facilitate their use by wood mice and other species, and setting aside roadside strips without vegetation removal to facilitate establishment and dispersal of small mammals. PMID:26978779

  14. Disentangle the Causes of the Road Barrier Effect in Small Mammals through Genetic Patterns.

    PubMed

    Ascensão, Fernando; Mata, Cristina; Malo, Juan E; Ruiz-Capillas, Pablo; Silva, Catarina; Silva, André P; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Fernandes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Road barrier effect is among the foremost negative impacts of roads on wildlife. Knowledge of the factors responsible for the road barrier effect is crucial to understand and predict species' responses to roads, and to improve mitigation measures in the context of management and conservation. We built a set of hypothesis aiming to infer the most probable cause of road barrier effect (traffic effect or road surface avoidance), while controlling for the potentially confounding effects road width, traffic volume and road age. The wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus was used as a model species of small and forest-dwelling mammals, which are more likely to be affected by gaps in cover such as those resulting from road construction. We confront genetic patterns from opposite and same roadsides from samples of three highways and used computer simulations to infer migration rates between opposite roadsides. Genetic patterns from 302 samples (ca. 100 per highway) suggest that the highway barrier effect for wood mouse is due to road surface avoidance. However, from the simulations we estimated a migration rate of about 5% between opposite roadsides, indicating that some limited gene flow across highways does occur. To reduce highway impact on population genetic diversity and structure, possible mitigation measures could include retrofitting of culverts and underpasses to increase their attractiveness and facilitate their use by wood mice and other species, and setting aside roadside strips without vegetation removal to facilitate establishment and dispersal of small mammals. PMID:26978779

  15. Effective density and morphology of particles emitted from small-scale combustion of various wood fuels.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, Jani; Ihalainen, Mika; Torvela, Tiina; Kortelainen, Miika; Lamberg, Heikki; Tiitta, Petri; Jakobi, Gert; Grigonyte, Julija; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Sippula, Olli; Tissari, Jarkko; Virtanen, Annele; Zimmermann, Ralf; Jokiniemi, Jorma

    2014-11-18

    The effective density of fine particles emitted from small-scale wood combustion of various fuels were determined with a system consisting of an aerosol particle mass analyzer and a scanning mobility particle sizer (APM-SMPS). A novel sampling chamber was combined to the system to enable measurements of highly fluctuating combustion processes. In addition, mass-mobility exponents (relates mass and mobility size) were determined from the density data to describe the shape of the particles. Particle size, type of fuel, combustion phase, and combustion conditions were found to have an effect on the effective density and the particle shape. For example, steady combustion phase produced agglomerates with effective density of roughly 1 g cm(-3) for small particles, decreasing to 0.25 g cm(-3) for 400 nm particles. The effective density was higher for particles emitted from glowing embers phase (ca. 1-2 g cm(-3)), and a clear size dependency was not observed as the particles were nearly spherical in shape. This study shows that a single value cannot be used for the effective density of particles emitted from wood combustion. PMID:25365741

  16. Small amplitude solitons in a warm plasma with smaller and higher order relativistic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kalita, B. C.; Das, R.

    2007-07-15

    Solitons have been investigated in a warm plasma through the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, considering a smaller relativistic effect for {gamma}{approx_equal}O(v{sup 2}/c{sup 2}) and {gamma}{sub e}{approx_equal}O(u{sup 2}/c{sup 2}) and higher relativistic effects for {gamma}{approx_equal}O(v{sup 4}/c{sup 4}) and {gamma}{sub e}{approx_equal}O(u{sup 4/}c{sup 4}). Compressive fast ion-acoustic solitons are observed to exist in the entire range (u{sub 0}-v{sub 0}) subject to a suitable mathematical condition satisfied by the initial streaming velocities u{sub 0},v{sub 0} of the electrons and the ions, respectively, electron to ion mass ratio Q(=m{sub e}/m{sub i}) and ion to electron temperature ratio {sigma}(=T{sub i}/T{sub e}). Further, rarefactive solitons of pretty small amplitudes are observed in the small upper range of |u{sub 0}-v{sub 0}| for higher order relativistic effect which are found to change parabolically. It is essentially important to report in our model of plasma, that the higher order relativistic effect slows down the soliton speed to V{<=}0.10 for all temperature ratios {sigma} for small amplitude waves. On the other hand, the smaller order relativistic effect permits the soliton to exist even at a relatively much higher speed V<0.30. Solitons of high (negligible) amplitudes are found to generate at the smaller (greater) difference of initial streamings (u{sub 0}-v{sub 0}) corresponding to both the relativistic effects.

  17. Direct and indirect effects of warming on aphids, their predators, and ant mutualists.

    PubMed

    Barton, Brandon T; Ives, Anthony R

    2014-06-01

    Species exist within communities of other interacting species, so an exogenous force that directly affects one species can indirectly affect all other members of the community. In the case of climate change, many species may be affected directly and subsequently initiate numerous indirect effects that propagate throughout the community. Therefore, the net effect of climate change on any one species is a function of the direct and indirect effects. We investigated the direct and indirect effects of climate warming on corn leaf aphids, a pest of corn and other grasses, by performing an experimental manipulation of temperature, predators, and two common aphid-tending ants. Although warming had a positive direct effect on aphid population growth rate, warming reduced aphid abundance when ants and predators were present. This occurred because winter ants, which aggressively defend aphids from predators under control temperatures, were less aggressive toward predators and less abundant when temperatures were increased. In contrast, warming increased the abundance of cornfield ants, but they did not protect aphids from predators with the same vigor as winter ants. Thus, warming broke down the ant-aphid mutualism and counterintuitively reduced the abundance of this agricultural pest. PMID:25039213

  18. Opposing history effect of preceding decision and action in the free choice of saccade direction.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kei; Funahashi, Shintaro

    2014-08-15

    When we act voluntarily, we make a decision to do so prior to the actual execution. However, because of the strong tie between decision and action, it has been difficult to dissociate these two processes in an animal's free behavior. In the present study, we tried to characterize the differences in these processes on the basis of their unique history effect. Using simple eye movement tasks in which the direction of a saccade was either instructed by a computer or freely chosen by the subject, we found that the preceding decision and action had different effects on the animal's subsequent behavior. While choosing a direction (previous decision) produced a positive history effect that prompted the choice of the same saccade direction, making a saccadic response to a direction (previous action) produced a negative history effect that discouraged the monkey from choosing the same direction. This result suggests that the history effect in sequential behavior reported in previous studies was a mixture of these two different components. Future studies on decision-making need to consider the importance of the distinction between decision and action in animal behavior. PMID:24848475

  19. Effects of gap junction inhibition on contraction waves in the murine small intestine in relation to coupled oscillator theory.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sean P; Huizinga, Jan D

    2015-02-15

    Waves of contraction in the small intestine correlate with slow waves generated by the myenteric network of interstitial cells of Cajal. Coupled oscillator theory has been used to explain steplike gradients in the frequency (frequency plateaux) of contraction waves along the length of the small intestine. Inhibition of gap junction coupling between oscillators should lead to predictable effects on these plateaux and the wave dislocation (wave drop) phenomena associated with their boundaries. It is these predictions that we wished to test. We used a novel multicamera diameter-mapping system to measure contraction along 25- to 30-cm lengths of murine small intestine. There were typically two to three plateaux per length of intestine. Dislocations could be limited to the wavefronts immediately about the terminated wave, giving the appearance of a three-pronged fork, i.e., a fork dislocation; additionally, localized decreases in velocity developed across a number of wavefronts, ending with the terminated wave, which could appear as a fork, i.e., slip dislocations. The gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone increased the number of plateaux and dislocations and decreased contraction wave velocity. In some cases, the usual frequency gradient was reversed, with a plateau at a higher frequency than its proximal neighbor; thus fork dislocations were inverted, and the direction of propagation was reversed. Heptanol had no effect on the frequency or velocity of contractions but did reduce their amplitude. To understand intestinal motor patterns, the pacemaker network of the interstitial cells of Cajal is best evaluated as a system of coupled oscillators. PMID:25501550

  20. Dual-Route Model of the Effect of Head Orientation on Perceived Gaze Direction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on gaze perception have identified 2 opposing effects of head orientation on perceived gaze direction1 repulsive and the other attractive. However, the relationship between these 2 effects has remained unclear. By using a gaze categorization task, the current study examined the effect of head orientation on the perceived direction of gaze in a whole-head condition and an eye-region condition. We found that the perceived direction of gaze was generally biased in the opposite direction to head orientation (a repulsive effect). Importantly, the magnitude of the repulsive effect was more pronounced in the eye-region condition than in the whole-head condition. Based on these findings, we developed a dual-route model, which proposes that the 2 opposing effects of head orientation occur through 2 distinct routes. In the framework of this dual-route model, we explain and reconcile the findings from previous studies, and provide a functional account of attractive and repulsive effects and their interaction. PMID:24730742