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Sample records for small medical cyclotron

  1. Cyclotron Production of Medical Radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Avila-Rodriguez, M. A.; Zarate-Morales, A.; Flores-Moreno, A.

    2010-08-04

    The cyclotron production of radioisotopes for medical applications is gaining increased significance in diagnostic molecular imaging techniques such as PET and SPECT. In this regard, radioisotope production has never been easier or more convenient until de introduction of compact medical cyclotrons in the last few decades, which allowed the use of short-lived radioisotopes in in vivo nuclear medicine studies on a routine basis. This review outlines some general considerations about the production of radioisotopes using charged particle accelerators.

  2. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Johnson, Richard R.; Gelbart, W. Z.

    2013-04-19

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 {mu}A to 1000 {mu}A, depending on the cyclotron energy and application.

  3. Direct Production of 99mTc via 100Mo(p,2n) on Small Medical Cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, P.; Bénard, F.; Bernstein, A.; Buckley, K.; Celler, A.; Cockburn, N.; Corsaut, J.; Dodd, M.; Economou, C.; Eriksson, T.; Frontera, M.; Hanemaayer, V.; Hook, B.; Klug, J.; Kovacs, M.; Prato, F. S.; McDiarmid, S.; Ruth, T. J.; Shanks, C.; Valliant, J. F.; Zeisler, S.; Zetterberg, U.; Zavodszky, P. A.

    From the efforts of a number of Canadian institutions and private industry collaborations, direct production of 99mTc using medical cyclotrons has recently been advanced from a 1970's academic exercise to a commercial, economically viable solution for regional production. Using GE PETtrace 880 machines our team has established preliminary saturated yields of 2.7 GBq/?A, translating to approximately 174 GBq after a 6 hour irradiation. The team is in the process of assessing the accuracy and reliability of this production value with a goal of optimizing yields by up to 50%.

  4. Development of a Medical Cyclotron Production Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Danny R.

    2003-08-01

    Development of a Cyclotron manufacturing facility begins with a business plan. Geographics, the size and activity of the medical community, the growth potential of the modality being served, and other business connections are all considered. This business used the customer base established by NuTech, Inc., an independent centralized nuclear pharmacy founded by Danny Allen. With two pharmacies in operation in Tyler and College Station and a customer base of 47 hospitals and clinics the existing delivery system and pharmacist staff is used for the cyclotron facility. We then added cyclotron products to contracts with these customers to guarantee a supply. We partnered with a company in the process of developing PET imaging centers. We then built an independent imaging center attached to the cyclotron facility to allow for the use of short-lived isotopes.

  5. Rotatable superconducting cyclotron adapted for medical use

    DOEpatents

    Blosser, Henry G. (East Lansing, MI); Johnson, David A. (Williamston, MI); Riedel, Jack (East Lansing, MI); Burleigh, Richard J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A superconducting cyclotron (10) rotatable on a support structure (11) in an arc of about 180.degree. around a pivot axis (A--A) and particularly adapted for medical use is described. The rotatable support structure (13, 15) is balanced by being counterweighted (14) so as to allow rotation of the cyclotron and a beam (12), such as a subparticle (neutron) or atomic particle beam, from the cyclotron in the arc around a patient. Flexible hose (25) is moveably attached to the support structure for providing a liquified gas which is supercooled to near 0.degree. K. to an inlet means (122) to a chamber (105) around superconducting coils (101, 102). The liquid (34) level in the cyclotron is maintained approximately half full so that rotation of the support structure and cyclotron through the 180.degree. can be accomplished without spilling the liquid from the cyclotron. With the coils vertically oriented, each turn of the winding is approximately half immersed in liquid (34) and half exposed to cold gas and adequate cooling to maintain superconducting temperatures in the section of coil above the liquid level is provided by the combination of cold gas/vapor and by the conductive flow of heat along each turn of the winding from the half above the liquid to the half below.

  6. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, XianLu Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-15

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H? ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 ?A/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H? ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H? ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H? beam with emittance of 0.3??mm?mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 ?A was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  7. A small low energy cyclotron for radioisotope measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, K.J.

    1989-11-01

    Direct detection of {sup 14}C by accelerator mass spectrometry has proved to be a much more sensitive method for radiocarbon dating than the decay counting method invented earlier by Libby. A small cyclotron (the cyclotrino'') was proposed for direct detection of radiocarbon in 1980. This combined the suppression of background through the use of negative ions, which had been used effectively in tandem accelerators, with the high intrinsic mass resolution of a cyclotron. Development of a small electrostatically-focused cyclotron for use as a mass spectrometer was previously reported but the sensitivity needed for detection of {sup 14}C at natural abundance was not achieved. The major contributions of this work are the integration of a high current external ion source with a small flat-field, electrostatically-focused cyclotron to comprise a system capable of measuring {sup 14}C at natural levels, and the analysis of ion motion in such a cyclotron, including a detailed analysis of phase bunching and its effect on mass resolution. A high current cesium sputter negative ion source generates a beam of carbon ions which is pre-separated with a Wien filter and is transported to the cyclotron via a series of electrostatic lenses. Beam is injected radially into the cyclotron using electrostatic deflectors and an electrostatic mirror. Axial focusing is entirely electrostatic. A microchannel plate detector is used with a phase-grated output. In its present form the system is capable of improving the sensitivity of detecting {sup 14}C in some biomedical experiments by a factor of 10{sup 4}. Modifications are discussed which could bring about an additional factor of 100 in sensitivity, which is important for archaeological and geological applications. Possibilities for measurements of other isotopes, such as {sup 3}H, and {sup 10}Be, and {sup 26}Al, are discussed. 70 refs.

  8. A new generation of medical cyclotrons for the 90`s

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, B.F.

    1995-08-01

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for use in radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicates a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper the authors will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Existing and potential markets for these cyclotrons will be presented. They will also discuss the possibility of systems capable of extracted energies up to 150 MeV and extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA.

  9. Solid targets for 99mTc production on medical cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanemaayer, V.; Zeisler, S. K.; Buckley, K. R.; Klug, J.; Kovacs, M.; Bérnard, F.; Ruth, T. J.; Schaffer, P.

    2012-12-01

    A method to produce solid 100Mo metal targets capable of withstanding proton irradiation with a power density of up to 1.1 kW/cm2 has been developed. The method of choice involves the electrodeposition of enriched 100Mo powder onto a tantalum backing, followed by high-temperature sintering in order to afford a coating that is sufficient to withstand bombardment for extended periods of time, yet reactive enough to allow for oxidative dissolution in seconds. This method is amenable to high-throughput techniques to allow for the production of 99mTc via the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction on small medical cyclotrons.

  10. Low current performance of the Bern medical cyclotron down to the pA range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M.; Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Nesteruk, K. P.; Scampoli, P.

    2015-09-01

    A medical cyclotron accelerating H- ions to 18 MeV is in operation at the Bern University Hospital (Inselspital). It is the commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker. This feature is unique for a hospital-based facility and makes it possible to conduct routine radioisotope production for PET diagnostics in parallel with multidisciplinary research activities, among which are novel particle detectors, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. Several of these activities, such as radiobiology experiments for example, require low current beams down to the pA range, while medical cyclotrons are designed for high current operation above 10 ?A. In this paper, we present the first results on the low current performance of a PET medical cyclotron obtained by ion source, radio-frequency and main coil tuning. With this method, stable beam currents down to (1.5+/- 0.5 ) pA were obtained and measured with a high-sensitivity Faraday cup located at the end of the beam transport line.

  11. Medical Waste Management Implications for Small Medical Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrns, George; Burke, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the Medical Waste Management Act of 1988 for small medical facilities, public health, and the environment. Reviews health and environmental risks associated with medical waste, current regulatory approaches, and classifications. Concludes that the health risk of medical wastes has been overestimated; makes…

  12. A real-time intercepting beam-profile monitor for a medical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriks, C.; Uittenbosch, T.; Cameron, D.; Kellogg, S.; Gray, D.; Buckley, K.; Schaffer, P.; Verzilov, V.; Hoehr, C.

    2013-11-15

    There is a lack of real-time continuous beam-diagnostic tools for medical cyclotrons due to high power deposition during proton irradiation. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a profile monitor that is capable of providing continuous feedback about beam shape and current in real time while it is inserted in the beam path. This enables users to optimize the beam profile and observe fluctuations in the beam over time with periodic insertion of the monitor.

  13. An analytical approach of thermodynamic behavior in a gas target system on a medical cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Jahangiri, Pouyan; Zacchia, Nicholas A; Buckley, Ken; Bénard, François; Schaffer, Paul; Martinez, D Mark; Hoehr, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed to study the thermo-mechanical behavior of gas targets used to produce medical isotopes, assuming that the system reaches steady-state. It is based on an integral analysis of the mass and energy balance of the gas-target system, the ideal gas law, and the deformation of the foil. The heat transfer coefficients for different target bodies and gases have been calculated. Excellent agreement is observed between experiments performed at TRIUMF's 13MeV cyclotron and the model. PMID:26562450

  14. A CYCLOTRON CONCEPT TO SUPPORT ISOTOPE PRODUCTION FOR SCIENCE AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Egle, Brian; Mirzadeh, Saed; Tatum, B Alan; Varma, Venugopal Koikal; Bradley, Eric Craig; Burgess, Thomas W; Aaron, W Scott; Binder, Jeffrey L; Beene, James R; Saltmarsh, Michael John

    2013-01-01

    In August of 2009, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) recommended a variable-energy, high-current multi-particle accelerator for the production of medical radioisotopes. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing a technical concept for a 70 MeV dual-extraction multi-particle cyclotron that will meet the needs identified in the NSAC report. The cyclotron, which will be located at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), will operate on a 24/7 basis and will provide approximately 6000 hours per year of quality beam time for both the production R&D and production of medical and industrial radioisotopes. The proposed cyclotron will be capable of accelerating dual beams of 30 to 70 MeV H at up to 750 A, and up to 50 A of 15-35 MeV D , 35 MeV H2, and 70 MeV -particles. In dual-extraction H mode, a total of 750 A of 70 MeV protons will be provided simultaneously to both HRIBF and Isotope Production Facility. The isotope facility will consist of two target stations: a 2 water-cooled station and a 4 water-cooled high-energy-beam research station. The multi-particle capability and high beam power will enable research into new regimes of accelerator-produced radioisotopes, such as 225Ac, 211At, 68Ge, and 7B. The capabilities of the accelerator will enable the measurement of excitation functions, thick target yield measurements, research in high-power-target design, and will support fundamental research in nuclear and radiochemistry.

  15. Evaluating secondary neutron doses of a refined shielded design for a medical cyclotron using the TLD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jye-Bin; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Liu, Wen-Shan; Lin, Ding-Bang; Hsieh, Teng-San; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2013-11-01

    An increasing number of cyclotrons at medical centers in Taiwan have been installed to generate radiopharmaceutical products. An operating cyclotron generates immense amounts of secondary neutrons from reactions such the 18O(p, n)18F, used in the production of FDG. This intense radiation can be hazardous to public health, particularly to medical personnel. To increase the yield of 18F-FDG from 4200 GBq in 2005 to 48,600 GBq in 2011, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital (CSMUH) has prolonged irradiation time without changing the target or target current to meet requirements regarding the production 18F. The CSMUH has redesigned the CTI Radioisotope Delivery System shield. The lack of data for a possible secondary neutron doses has increased due to newly designed cyclotron rooms. This work aims to evaluate secondary neutron doses at a CTI cyclotron center using a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD-600). Two-dimensional neutron doses were mapped and indicated that neutron doses were high as neutrons leaked through self-shielded blocks and through the L-shaped concrete shield in vault rooms. These neutron doses varied markedly among locations close to the H218O target. The Monte Carlo simulation and minimum detectable dose are also discussed and demonstrated the reliability of using the TLD-600 approach. Findings can be adopted by medical centers to identify radioactive hot spots and develop radiation protection.

  16. [Emergency medical care in small urban regions] .

    PubMed

    Hasanicevi?, E

    2000-01-01

    Emergency medical care is a health care segment which is essential one both in large and in small urban places. To be effective it is necessary to be well organised, and also technically equipped and properly staffed. Concerning the situation in this field, conclusions are very often made on the basis of large and very well organised units. Current legislation gave it a pretty significant place. In practice it was proven as an indispensable part of system that provides medical care for suddenly ill or injured patients, both in war and peacetime. During the war, out of total number of admissions, 5231 injured patients were treated (including cases of death), out of which 36% had just that treatment as a definite one while the rest had to be treated in hospital. In the post-war period (1996, 1997, 1998, and 1999), out of total number of 95.000 treated patients, 848 was injured in car accidents and 52% of them got a final treatment on the level of emergency medical service. However, medical amateurs but medical professionals as well put emergency medical care on a margin of evaluation. Certain number of patients is coming to emergency medical service to get prescription, be directed to specialist or simply they don't want to waist their time while waiting in the crowded surgery of general practitioner. The management does not give enough attention to staff, facilities or technical equipment of emergency medical service. Only by properly established emergency medical service we would have better and more effective subsequent stages in the treatment of suddenly ill and injured persons in large but even more in small urban places. PMID:11117028

  17. Selected Reference Aids for Small Medical Libraries *

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Howertine Farrell

    1970-01-01

    This annotated list of 178 items is compiled as a guide to the development of the reference collection in a small medical library. Arrangement, following the pattern of the previous revision, is by broad subject groups. Titles are chiefly in English. Textbooks in subject fields have been omitted since these are covered adequately in several comprehensive guides to the literature. PMID:5439904

  18. Reclassification in a small decentralized medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Tong, J G; Brennen, P W; Byrd, G D

    1977-01-01

    This study describes procedures and indentifies problems in the reclassification of a small medical school library collection that is decentralized into five locations in three different communities. A total of 9,915 monographic titles (14,911 volumes) were reclassified in a nine-month period. The reclassification staff consisted of one professional, two nonprofessionals, and one partime student assistant. PMID:884347

  19. Basic Reference Aids for Small Medical Libraries *

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Edith D.

    1967-01-01

    Selected primarily for the small medical library, this list is compiled to serve as a practical guide for the librarian in developing and utilizing an effective reference collection. Arrangement is by broad subject groups; titles chosen are chiefly in English with geographic coverage limited to the United States and Canada. Texts in subject fields have been omitted since these are adequately covered in several comprehensive guides to the literature. PMID:6041827

  20. Analysis of radionuclide concentration in air released through the stack of a radiopharmaceutical production facility based on a medical cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardina, M.; Tomarchio, E.; Greco, D.

    2015-11-01

    Positron emitting radionuclides are increasingly used in medical diagnostics and the number of radiopharmaceutical production facilities have been estimated to be growing worldwide. During the process of production and/or patient administration of radiopharmaceuticals, an amount of these radionuclides might become airborne and escape into the environment. Therefore, the analysis of radionuclide concentration in the air released to the stack is a very important issue to evaluate the dose to the population living around the plant. To this end, sampling and measurement of radionuclide concentration in air released through the stack of a Nuclear Medicine Center (NMC), provided with a cyclotron for radiopharmaceuticals production, must be routinely carried out with an automatic measurement system. In this work is presented the air monitoring system realized at "San Gaetano" NMC at Bagheria (Italy) besides the analysis of the recorded stack relesead air concentration data. Sampling of air was carried out continuously and gamma-ray spectrometric measurement are made on-line and for a short time by using a shielded Marinelli beaker filled with sampled air and a gamma detector. The use of this system allows to have 1440 values of air concentration per day from 2002, year of the start of operation with the cyclotron. Therefore, the concentration values are very many and an analysis software is needed to determine the dose to the population. A comparison with the results of a simulation code based on a Gaussian Plume air dispersion modelling allow us to confirm the no-radiological significance of the stack effluent releases in terms of dose to population and to evaluate possible improvements in the plant devices to reduce the air concentration at stack.

  1. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating of plasma with small impurity production

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro (La Jolla, CA)

    1987-01-01

    Plasma including plasma ions is magnetically confined by a magnetic field. The plasma has a defined outer surface and is intersected by resonance surfaces of respective common ion cyclotron frequency of a predetermined species of plasma ions moving in the magnetic field. A radio frequency source provides radio frequency power at a radio frequency corresponding to the ion cyclotron frequency of the predetermined species of plasma ions moving in the field at a respective said resonance surface. RF launchers coupled to the radio frequency source radiate radio frequency energy at the resonance frequency onto the respective resonance surface within the plasma from a plurality of locations located outside the plasma at such respective distances from the intersections of the respective resonance surface and the defined outer surface and at such relative phases that the resulting interference pattern provides substantially null net radio frequency energy over regions near and including substantial portions of the intersections relative to the radio frequency energy provided thereby at other portions of the respective resonance surface within the plasma.

  2. Low-background-rate detector for ions in the 5- to 50-keV energy range to be used for radioisotope dating with a small cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry in tandem Van de Graaff accelerators has proven successful for radioisotope dating small samples. Small, inexpensive cyclotrons serving this purpose would make the technique accessible to more researchers and inexpensive enough to compare many small samples. To this end, VC Berkeley is developing a 20-cm-diameter, 30- to 40-keV cyclotron dedicated to high-sensitivity radioisotope dating, initially for /sup 14/C. At this energy, range and dE/dx methods of particle identification are impossible. Thus arises the difficult problem of reliably detecting 30- to 40-keV /sup 14/C at 10/sup -1/ counts/sec in the high-background environment of the cyclotron, where lower energy ions, electrons, and photons bombard the detector at much higher rates. To meet this challenge, an inexpensive, generally useful ion detector was developed that allows dark-count rates below 10/sup -4/ counts/sec and excellent background suppression. With the cyclotron tuned near the /sup 13/CH background peak, to the frequency for /sup 14/C, the detector suppresses the background to 6 x 10/sup -4/ counts/sec. For each /sup 14/C ion, the detector's grazing-incidence Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ conversion dynode emits about 20 secondary electrons, which are independently multiplied in separate pores of a microchannel plate. The output signal is proportional to the number of secondary electrons, allowing pulse-height discrimination of background.

  3. Medical savings accounts (MSAs)--big benefits for small business.

    PubMed

    Stevens, S M

    1997-06-01

    The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, passed by Congress last year, implemented a four-year pilot project that allows employees of small businesses to set up tax-free interest-bearing medical savings accounts. These accounts offer advantages for both employees and employers PMID:10168417

  4. Analysis of induced radionuclides in replacement parts and liquid wastes in a medical cyclotron solely used for production of 18F for [18F]FDG.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, S; Ishigure, N; Ogata, Y; Kobayashi, T

    2013-04-01

    Radioactivities produced in replacement parts and liquid wastes in a medical cyclotron used to produce (18)F for [(18)F]FDG with 10MeV protons were analyzed. Nineteen radionuclides were found in the replacement parts and liquid wastes. Among them, long-lived (56)Co in the Havar foils is critical in terms of radioactive waste management. The estimated dose level of exposure for the operating staff during the replacement of parts was around 310?Sv/y, which is smaller than the recommended dose limit for workers. PMID:23419430

  5. New considerations for compact cyclotrons

    E-print Network

    Marshall, Eric S. (Eric Scott)

    2012-01-01

    A compact cyclotron built with superconducting magnets could be a transformative solution to many scientific problems facing the defense, medical, and energy industries today. This thesis discusses three potential applications ...

  6. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  7. Assessment of medical management outcomes in small populations.

    PubMed

    Fetterolf, Donald; Tucker, Travis L

    2008-10-01

    Small sample size represents a vexing problem in evaluating medical management programs. Physician practices may have panel sizes of only 1000 total patients, disease management programs may enroll only several hundred patients, and hospitals may see only several dozen of a particular type of case per year. Given the high variation that occurs in the presentation, severity, and cost of medical conditions, estimation of either quality impact or economic return on investment can be difficult or impossible. This paper seeks to describe common approaches to this issue that are in practice within the industry today and to discuss limitations, alternative strategies, and consequences of method choices. A number of strategies exist to deal with this situation, but ongoing recognition of this issue in the planning phases of initiatives remains problematic. Significant linkage of financial rewards or penalties to poorly evaluated programs carries significant liabilities for the unsophisticated developers of such systems. PMID:18942914

  8. Transforming Medical Care: Case Study of an Exemplary, Small Medical Group

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Leif I.; Hroscikoski, Mary C.; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M.; Harper, Peter G.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE Most published descriptions of organizations providing or improving quality of care concern large medical groups or systems; however, 90% of the medical care in the United States is provided by groups of no more than 20 physicians. We studied one such group to determine the organizational and cultural attributes that seem related to its achievements in care quality. METHODS A 15–family physician medical group was identified from comparative public performance scores of 27 medical groups providing most of the primary care in our metropolitan area. Semistructured interviews were conducted with diverse personnel in this group, operations were observed, and written documents were reviewed. Four primary care physician researchers and a consultant then reviewed transcriptions, field notes, and materials during semistructured sessions to identify the main attributes of this group and their probable origins. RESULTS This medical group ranked first in a composite measure of preventive services and fourth and sixth, respectively, in composite scores for coronary artery disease and diabetes care. Our analysis identified 12 attributes of this group that seemed to be associated with its good care quality, with patient-centeredness being the foundational attribute for most of the others. Historical factors important to most of these attributes included small size, physician ownership, and a high value on practice consistency among the clinicians in the group. CONCLUSIONS The identified 12 attributes of this medical group seem to be associated with its superior care quality, and most of them might be replicable by other small groups if they choose to work toward that end. PMID:16569713

  9. Behavior of Small-Scale Density Fluctuations in Discharges with Off-Axis Electron-Cyclotron Resonance Heating in the T-10 Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Shelukhin, D.A.; Vershkov, V.A.; Razumova, K.A.

    2005-12-15

    In experiments on off-axis electron-cyclotron resonance heating in the T-10 tokamak, a steep gradient of the electron temperature was observed to form for a short time at a relative radius of {rho} {approx_equal} 0.25 after the heating power was switched off. Small-scale fluctuations of the electron density were studied with the help of correlation reflectometry. It was found that, in a narrow region near {rho} {approx_equal} 0.25, the amplitude of the density fluctuations was two times lower than that in the ohmic heating phase. Quasi-coherent fluctuations were suppressed over a period of time during which the steep temperature gradient existed. Measurements of the poloidal rotation velocity of turbulent fluctuations show that there is no velocity shear after the heating is switched off. An analysis of the linear growth rates of instabilities shows that the ion-temperature-gradient mode is unstable at {rho} {approx_equal} 0.25 throughout the entire discharge phase. The effect observed can be explained by an increase in the distance between the rational surfaces near the radius at which the safety factor is q = 1 due to the temporary flattening of the q profile after the off-axis electron-cyclotron resonance heating is switched off.

  10. Comparison of short-lived medical isotopes activation by laser thin target induced protons and conventional cyclotron proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Joseph; Dudnikova, Galina; Liu, Tung-Chang; Papadopoulos, Dennis; Sagdeev, Roald; Su, J. J.; UMD MicroPET Team

    2014-10-01

    Production diagnostic or therapeutic nuclear medicines are either by nuclear reactors or by ion accelerators. In general, diagnostic nuclear radioisotopes have a very short half-life varying from tens of minutes for PET tracers and few hours for SPECT tracers. Thus supplies of PET and SPECT radiotracers are limited by regional production facilities. For example 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is the most desired tracer for positron emission tomography because its 110 minutes half-life is sufficient long for transport from production facilities to nearby users. From nuclear activation to completing image taking must be done within 4 hours. Decentralized production of diagnostic radioisotopes will be idea to make high specific activity radiotracers available to researches and clinicians. 11 C, 13 N, 15 O and 18 F can be produced in the energy range from 10-20 MeV by protons. Protons of energies up to tens of MeV generated by intense laser interacting with hydrogen containing targets have been demonstrated by many groups in the past decade. We use 2D PIC code for proton acceleration, Geant4 Monte Carlo code for nuclei activation to compare the yields and specific activities of short-lived isotopes produced by cyclotron proton beams and laser driven protons.

  11. A low background-rate detector for ions in the 5 to 50 keV energy range to be used for radioisotope dating with a small cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, P.G.

    1986-11-25

    Accelerator mass spectrometry in tandem Van de Graaff accelerators has proven successful for radioisotope dating small samples. We are developing a 20 cm diameter 30 to 40 keV cyclotron dedicated to high-sensitivity radioisotope dating, initially for /sup 14/C. At this energy, range and dE/dx methods of particle identification are impossible. Thus arises the difficult problem of reliably detecting 30 to 40 keV /sup 14/C at 10/sup -2/ counts/sec in the high background environment of the cyclotron, where lower energy ions, electrons, and photons bombard the detector at much higher rates. We have developed and tested an inexpensive, generally useful ion detector that allows dark-count rates below 10/sup -4/ counts/sec and excellent background suppression. With the cyclotron tuned near the /sup 13/CH background peak, to the frequency for /sup 14/C, the detector suppresses the background to 6 x 10/sup -4/ counts/sec. For each /sup 14/C ion the detectors grazing-incidence Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ conversion dynode emits about 20 secondary electrons, which are independently multiplied in separate pores of a microchannel plate. The output signal is proportional to the number of secondary electrons, allowing pulse-height discrimination of background. We have successfully tested the detector with positive /sup 12/C, /sup 23/Na, /sup 39/K, /sup 41/K, /sup 85/Rb, /sup 87/Rb, and /sup 133/Cs at 5 to 40 keV, and with 36 keV negative /sup 12/C and /sup 13/CH. It should detect ions and neutrals of all species, at energies above 5 keV, with good efficiency and excellent background discrimination. Counting efficiency and background discrimination improve with higher ion energy. The detector can be operated at least up to 2 x 10/sup -7/ Torr and be repeatedly exposed to air. The maximum rate is 10/sup 6.4/ ions/sec in pulse counting mode and 10/sup 9.7/ ions/sec in current integrating mode.

  12. Factors Influencing Electronic Clinical Information Exchange in Small Medical Group Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralewski, John E.; Zink, Therese; Boyle, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the organizational factors that influence electronic health information exchange (HIE) by medical group practices in rural areas. Methods: A purposive sample of 8 small medical group practices in 3 experimental HIE regions were interviewed to determine the extent of clinical information exchange…

  13. JSW's baby cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Toda, Y.; Kaneda, Y.; Satoh, Y.; Suzukawa, I.; Yamada, T.

    1983-04-01

    Designed by The Japan Steel Works, Ltd., specially for installation in a hospital's medical department and nuclear research laboratory, '' JSW BABY CYCLOTRON '' has been developed to produce short-lived radioisotopes such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F. JSW's Baby Cyclotron has some design features. 1) Fixed energy and four sector azimuthally varying field. 2) Compact figure desired for hospital's nuclear medical department 3) A bitter type magnet yoke shielding activity 4) Simple control and operation 5) Easy maintenance without skilled personnel. Type BC105 (P:10MeV, d:5MeV), BC107 (P:10MeV, d:7MeV), BC168 (P:16MeV, d:8MeV) and BC1710 (P:17MeV, d:10MeV) are available according to required amount of radioisotopes. In our radioisotope production test, yield and purity of 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F are usable to clinical diagnosis.

  14. The Use of Small Group Tutorials as an Educational Strategy in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Small group tutorials are an educational strategy that is growing in popularity in medical education. This is indicative of the movement from a traditional teacher centred approach to more student-centred learning, which is characterised by active participation and autonomous learning (Hedge et al, 2011). However, small group teaching is one of…

  15. Development of a high current H(-) ion source for cyclotrons.

    PubMed

    Etoh, H; Aoki, Y; Mitsubori, H; Arakawa, Y; Mitsumoto, T; Yajima, S; Sakuraba, J; Kato, T; Okumura, Y

    2014-02-01

    A multi-cusp DC H(-) ion source has been designed and fabricated for medical applications of cyclotrons. Optimization of the ion source is in progress, such as the improvement of the filament configuration, magnetic filter strength, extraction electrode's shape, configuration of electron suppression magnets, and plasma electrode material. A small quantity of Cs has been introduced into the ion source to enhance the negative ion beam current. The ion source produced 16 mA of DC H(-) ion beam with the Cs-seeded operation at a low arc discharge power of 2.8 kW. PMID:24593547

  16. PET - radiopharmaceutical facilities at Washington University Medical School - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Dence, C.S.; Welch, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    The PET program at Washington University has evolved over more than three decades of research and development in the use of positron-emitting isotopes in medicine and biology. In 1962 the installation of the first hospital cyclotron in the USA was accomplished. This first machine was an Allis Chalmers (AC) cyclotron and it was operated until July, 1990. Simultaneously with this cyclotron the authors also ran a Cyclotron Corporation (TCC) CS-15 cyclotron that was purchased in 1977. Both of these cyclotrons were maintained in-house and operated with a relatively small downtime (approximately 3.5%). After the dismantling of the AC machine in 1990, a Japanese Steel Works 16/8 (JSW-16/8) cyclotron was installed in the vault. Whereas the AC cyclotron could only accelerate deuterons (6.2 MeV), the JSW - 16/8 machine can accelerate both protons and deuterons, so all of the radiopharmaceuticals can be produced on either of the two presently owned accelerators. At the end of May 1993, the medical school installed the first clinical Tandem Cascade Accelerator (TCA) a collaboration with Science Research Laboratories (SRL) of Somerville, MA. Preliminary target testing, design and development are presently under way. In 1973, the University installed the first operational PETT device in the country, and at present there is a large basic science and clinical research program involving more than a hundred staff in nuclear medicine, radiation sciences, neurology, neurosurgery, psychiatry, cardiology, pulmonary medicine, oncology, and surgery.

  17. Teaching ultrasound in developing countries: issues to consider when working in small medical facilities.

    PubMed

    Brown, Douglas L

    2014-03-01

    The author provides some suggestions for those considering travel to developing countries to provide training in ultrasound at small medical facilities. Issues discussed will include planning before the trip, personal safety and health while there, as well as equipment and travel issues. PMID:24901780

  18. Comparing Two Cooperative Small Group Formats Used with Physical Therapy and Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Eon, Marcel; Proctor, Peggy; Reeder, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    This study compared "Structured Controversy" (a semi-formal debate like small group activity) with a traditional open discussion format for medical and physical therapy students. We found that those students who had participated in Structured Controversy changed their personal opinion on the topic more than those who were in the Open Discussion…

  19. Selected List of Books and Journals for the Small Medical Library

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Alfred N.

    1965-01-01

    This list of 358 books and 123 journals is intended as a selection aid for the small library of a hospital, medical society, clinic, or similar organization. Books and journals are arranged by subject, with the books followed by an author index, and the journals by an alphabetical title listing. PMID:14308899

  20. Selected List of Books and Journals for the Small Medical Library *

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Alfred N.

    1967-01-01

    This updated list of 388 books and 140 journals is intended as a selection aid for the small library of a hospital, medical society, clinic, or similar organization. Books and journals are arranged by subject, with the books followed by an author index, and the journals by an alphabetical title listing. PMID:6041826

  1. New solid and gas phase targets for the CTI RDS 111 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, J. P.; Van Brocklin, H. F.

    1999-06-10

    Low energy (<12 MeV protons) cyclotrons are playing an increasingly important role in isotope production especially the production of short-lived medical isotopes for positron emission tomography (PET). Several new target systems have been designed for the negative ion 11 MeV proton only CTI RDS 111 medical cyclotron. These targets have been developed for the turret target changer system which can hold up to eight small targets that are rotated into the beam strike for irradiation. We report here the development and testing of a high pressure [{sup 18}F]F{sub 2} gas target, the performance of an OEM (CTI) high pressure [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} gas target and the design and irradiation of the first RDS 111 solid target for the production of {sup 7}Be.

  2. New solid and gas phase targets for the CTI RDS 111 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    ONeil, J.P.; VanBrocklin, H.F.

    1999-06-01

    Low energy ({lt}12 MeV protons) cyclotrons are playing an increasingly important role in isotope production especially the production of short-lived medical isotopes for positron emission tomography (PET). Several new target systems have been designed for the negative ion 11 MeV proton only CTI RDS 111 medical cyclotron. These targets have been developed for the turret target changer system which can hold up to eight small targets that are rotated into the beam strike for irradiation. We report here the development and testing of a high pressure [{sup 18}F]F{sub 2} gas target, the performance of an OEM (CTI) high pressure [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} gas target and the design and irradiation of the first RDS 111 solid target for the production of {sup 7}Be. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Are Risks From Medical Imaging Still too Small to Be Observed or Nonexistent?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several radiation-related professional societies have concluded that carcinogenic risks associated with doses below 50-100 mSv are either too small to be detected, or are nonexistent. This is especially important in the context of doses from medical imaging. Radiation exposure to the public from medical imaging procedures is rising around the world, primarily due to increased utilization of computed tomography. Professional societies and advisory bodies consistently recommend against multiplying small doses by large populations to predict excess radiation-induced cancers, in large part because of the potential for sensational claims of health impacts which do not adequately take the associated uncertainties into account. Nonetheless, numerous articles have predicted thousands of future cancers as a result of CT scanning, and this has generated considerable concern among patients and parents. In addition, some authors claim that we now have direct epidemiological evidence of carcinogenic risks from medical imaging. This paper critically examines such claims, and concludes that the evidence cited does not provide direct evidence of low-dose carcinogenicity. These claims themselves have adverse public health impacts by frightening the public away from medically justified exams. It is time for the medical and scientific communities to be more assertive in responding to sensational claims of health risks. PMID:26673121

  4. Selected List of Books and Journals for the Small Medical Library *

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Alfred N.

    1971-01-01

    This updated list of 389 books and 135 journals is intended as a selection aid for the small library of a hospital, medical society, clinic, or similar organization. Books and journals are arranged by subject, with the books followed by an author index, and the journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for first purchase by smaller libraries are noted by an asterisk. PMID:5582092

  5. Selected List of Books and Journals for the Small Medical Library *

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Alfred N.

    1969-01-01

    This updated list of 398 books and 141 journals is intended as a selection aid for the small library of a hospital, medical society, clinic, or similar organization. Books and journals are arranged by subject, with the books followed by an author index, and the journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for first purchase by smaller libraries are noted by an asterisk. PMID:4888285

  6. Selected list of books and journals for the small medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1981-01-01

    This revised list of 539 books and 136 journals is intended as a selection guide for small or medium-sized hospital libraries or for small medical libraries in comparable health care facilities. It can also be used as a core list by consortia of small hospital libraries. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author index and the list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase by smaller libraries, 137 books and 54 journals, are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for annual subscriptions to all the journals would require an expenditure of about $30,000. The cost of only the asterisked items, which are recommended for first purchase, totals approximately $8,900. PMID:7225656

  7. Selected list of books and journals for the small medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N

    1977-01-01

    This revised list of 472 books and 138 journals is intended as a selection guide for small or medium-sized hospital libraries or for the small medical library serving a specified clientele. It can also be used as a core list by small hospital library consortia. Books and journals are categorized by subject, with the books being followed by an author index and the journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase by smaller libraries are indicated by an asterisk. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for annual subscriptions to all the journals would require an expenditure of about $18,200. The cost of only the asterisked items recommended for first purchase totals approximately $4,500. PMID:321057

  8. Selected list of books and journals for the small medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1979-01-01

    This revised list of 492 books and 138 journals is intended as a selection guide for small or medium-sized hospital libraries or for the small medical library serving a specified clientele. It can also be used as a core list by small hospital library consortia. Books and journals are categorized by subject, with the books being followed by an author index and the journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase by smaller libraries are indicated by an asterisk. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for annual subscriptions to all the journals would require an expenditure of about $22,500. The cost of only the asterisked items, recommended for first purchase, totals approximately $6,100. PMID:380695

  9. 76 FR 80982 - International Cyclotron, Inc., Hato Rey, Puerto Rico; Order Suspending Licensed Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... possess and use radioactive material of half-life greater than 120 days and in quantities exceeding 10 \\5... Cyclotron, Inc. (International Cyclotron; Licensee) is the holder of Byproduct Materials License Nos. 52... medical and non-medical use and the possession and storage of byproduct materials incidental...

  10. Ernest Orlando Lawrence (1901-1958), Cyclotron and Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, William T.

    2005-09-01

    On August 8, 2001, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory celebrated the centennial of the birth of its founder (and namesake), Ernest Orlando Lawrence. For the occasion, many speeches were given and old speeches were remembered. We recall the words of the late Luis Alvarez, a Nobel Laureate and one of the Lawrence's closest colleagues: ''Lawrence will always be remembered as the inventor of the cyclotron, but more importantly, he should be remembered as the inventor of the modern way of doing science''. J. L. Heilbron and R. W. Seidel, in the introduction of their book, ''Lawrence and His Laboratory'' stated, ''The motives and mechanisms that shaped the growth of the Laboratory helped to force deep changes in the scientific estate and in the wider society. In the entrepreneurship of its founder, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, these motives, mechanisms, and changes came together in a tight focus. He mobilized great and small philanthropists, state and local governments, corporations, and plutocrats, volunteers and virtuosos. The work they supported, from astrophysics and atomic bombs, from radiochemistry to nuclear medicine, shaped the way we observe, control, and manipulate our environment.'' Indeed, all over the civilized world, the ways we do science changed forever after Lawrence built his famed Radiation Laboratory. In this editorial, we epitomize his legacy of changing the way we do medicine, thereby affecting the health and well being of all humanity. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the invention of the cyclotron by Ernest Orlando Lawrence at the University of California at Berkeley. Lawrence conceived the idea of the cyclotron early in 1929 after reading an article by Rolf Wideroe on high-energy accelerators. In the spring of 1930 one of his students, Nels Edlefsen, constructed two crude models of a cyclotron. Later in the fall of the same year, another student, M. Stanley Livingston, constructed a 13-cm diameter model that had all the features of early cyclotrons, accelerating protons to 80,000 volts using less than 1,000 volts on a semi-circular accelerating electrode, now called the ''dee''. Following the discovery by J. D. Cockcroft and E. T. S. Walton of how to produce larger currents at higher voltages, Lawrence constructed the first two-dee 27-Inch (69-cm) Cyclotron, which produced protons and deuterons of 4.8 MeV. The 27-Inch Cyclotron was used extensively in early investigations of nuclear reactions involving neutrons and artificial radioactivity. In 1939, working with William Brobeck, Lawrence constructed the 60-Inch (150-cm) Cyclotron, which accelerated deuterons to 19 MeV. It was housed in the Crocker Laboratory, where scientists first made transmutations of some elements, discovered several transuranic elements, and created hundreds of radioisotopes of known elements. At the Crocker Laboratory the new medical modality called nuclear medicine was born, which used radioisotopes for diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. In 1939 Lawrence was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics, and later element 103 was named ''Lawrencium'' in his honor.

  11. Evaluation of small-group teaching in human gross anatomy in a Caribbean medical school.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lap Ki; Ganguly, Pallab K

    2008-01-01

    Although there are a number of medical schools in the Caribbean islands, very few reports have come out so far in the literature regarding the efficacy of small-group teaching in them. The introduction of small-group teaching in the gross anatomy laboratory one and a half years ago at St. Matthew's University (SMU) on Grand Cayman appears to have had a significant positive impact on the academic achievement of students in anatomy. This study surveyed the responses of the students to the small-group learning method in gross anatomy at SMU using a structured questionnaire. The results show that our students prefer this small-group learning method over a completely self-directed method in the gross anatomy lab because the study materials were carefully chosen and the study objectives were demonstrated by the resource person. However, teacher-centered teaching was deliberately avoided by fostering problem-solving skills in the anatomy lab sessions. Another aim of the small-group teaching at SMU was to develop the interpersonal and communication skills of the students, which are important in their later education and career. PMID:19177374

  12. Selected List of Books and Journals for the Small Medical Library *

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Alfred N.

    1973-01-01

    This updated list of 410 books and 136 journals is intended as a selection aid for the small library of a hospital, medical society, clinic, or similar organization. Books and journals are arranged by subject, with the books followed by an author index, and the journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for first purchase by smaller libraries are noted by an asterisk. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for the annual subscription costs of all the journals would require an expenditure of about $12,000. To acquire only those items suggested for first purchase, approximately $3,250 would be needed. PMID:4702804

  13. 88-Inch Cyclotron newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    Stokstad, R.

    1987-02-01

    Activities at the 88-Inch Cyclotron are discussed. Increased beam time demand and operation of the ECR source and cyclotron are reported. Experimental facility improvements are reported, including improvements to the High Energy Resolution Array and to the Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer, a new capture beamline, development of a low background counting facility. Other general improvements are reported that relate to the facility computer network and electronics pool. Approved heavy nuclei research is briefly highlighted. Also listed are the beams accelerated by the cyclotron. (LEW)

  14. Selected list of books and journals for the small medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1985-01-01

    The interrelationship of print and electronic media in the hospital library and the relevance of the "Selected List" in 1985 are discussed in the introduction to this revised list of 583 books and 138 journals. The list is meant to be a selection guide for the small or medium-size library in a hospital or comparable medical facility, or a core collection for a consortium of small hospital libraries. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase by smaller libraries are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for 1985 subscriptions to all the journals would require about $45,200. The cost of only the asterisked items totals approximately $16,100. PMID:3888331

  15. Selected list of books and journals for the small medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N

    1975-01-01

    This revised list of 446 books and 137 journals is intended as a selection guide for small or medium-sized hospital libraries or for the small medical library serving a specified clientele. Books and journals are categorized by subject, with the books being followed by an author index and the journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase by smaller libraries are indicated by an asterisk. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for annual subscriptions to all the journals would require an expenditure for about $14,500. The cost of only the asterisked items recommended for first purchase totals approximately $4,100. PMID:1095095

  16. Selected list of books and journals for the small medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1987-01-01

    The impact that the hospital librarian's use of management techniques and comprehension of the highly competitive health care environment can have on collection development and resulting information services in his or her library is reviewed in the introduction to this revised list of 600 books and 139 journals. The list is intended as a selection guide for the small or medium-size library in a hospital or comparable medical facility, or a core collection for a consortium of small hospital libraries. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase by smaller libraries are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for 1987 subscriptions to all journals would require about $52,600. The cost of only the asterisked items totals approximately $21,000. PMID:3594025

  17. Selected list of Books and Journals for the small medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of the "Selected List" to collection development is explored in the introduction to this revised list of 559 books and 135 journals. The list is intended as a selection guide for the small or medium-sized library in a hospital or comparable medical facility or as a core collection for a consortium of small hospital libraries. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase by smaller libraries (155 books and 54 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for annual subscriptions would require an expenditure of about $38,900. The cost of only the asterisked items totals approximately $13,200. PMID:6190523

  18. Selected list of books and journals for the small medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1989-01-01

    In the introduction to this revised list of 607 books and 141 journals, quality assurance programs of health care institutions and patient education are suggested as vehicles for more directly involving the hospital library and its collection in patient care. This list is intended as a selection guide for the small or medium-sized library in a hospital or comparable medical facility, or as a core collection for a consortium of small hospital libraries. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for 1989 subscriptions would require about $63,500. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $24,000. PMID:2655782

  19. Selected list of books and journals for the small medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1991-01-01

    The current financial status of the health care industry is viewed both from its effect on the hospital library collection and the response of the hospital library to the financial crisis. Predecessors of this list have been intended as selection guides for a small or medium-size library in a hospital or comparable medical facility. As the prices of books and journals continue to soar, the secondary purpose as a core collection for a consortium of small hospital libraries or a network sharing library resources may eventually become its primary use. Books (607) and journals (140) are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for 1991 subscriptions would require about $77,700. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $29,300. PMID:2039906

  20. Patient-Centered Medical Home Among Small Urban Practices Serving Low-Income and Disadvantaged Patients

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Carolyn A.; Mijanovich, Tod; Albert, Stephanie; Winther, Chloe H.; Paul, Margaret M.; Ryan, Mandy Smith; McCullough, Colleen; Shih, Sarah C.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Research on the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model and practice redesign has not focused on the unique challenges and strengths of very small primary care practices serving disadvantaged patient populations. We analyzed the practice characteristics, prior experiences, and dimensions of the PCMH model that exist in such practices participating in the Primary Care Information Project (PCIP) of the New York City Department of Mental Health and Hygiene. METHODS We obtained descriptive data, focusing on PCMH, for 94 primary care practices with 5 or fewer clinicians serving high volumes of Medicaid and minority patient populations in New York City. Data included information extracted from PCIP administrative data and survey data collected specifically for this study. RESULTS Survey results indicated substantial implementation of key aspects of the PCMH among small practices serving disadvantaged patient populations, despite considerable potential challenges to achieving PCMH implementation. Practices tended to use few formal mechanisms, such as formal care teams and designated care or case managers, but there was considerable evidence of use of informal team-based care and care coordination nonetheless. It appears that many of these practices achieved the spirit, if not the letter, of the law in terms of key dimensions of PCMH. CONCLUSIONS Small practices can achieve important aspects of the PCMH model of primary care, often with informal rather than formal mechanisms and strategies. The use of flexible, less formal strategies is important to keep in mind when considering implementation and assessment of PCMH-like initiatives in small practices. PMID:23690391

  1. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Henry; Yennello, Sherry; Tribble, Robert

    2014-08-26

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has upgraded its accelerator facilities to extend research capabilities with both stable and radioactive beams. The upgrade is divided into three major tasks: (1) re-commission the K-150 (88”) cyclotron, couple it to existing beam lines to provide intense stable beams into the K-500 experimental areas and use it as a driver to produce radioactive beams; (2) develop light ion and heavy ion guides for stopping radioactive ions created with the K-150 beams; and (3) transport 1+ ions from the ion guides into a charge-breeding electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (CB-ECR) to produce highly-charged radioactive ions for acceleration in the K-500 cyclotron. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams in a unique energy range in the world.

  2. Medical Record Clerk Training Program, Course of Study; Student Manual: For Medical Record Personnel in Small Rural Hospitals in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Arlington, VA. Div. of Health Resources.

    The manual provides major topics, objectives, activities and, procedures, references and materials, and assignments for the training program. The topics covered are hospital organization and community role, organization and management of a medical records department, international classification of diseases and operations, medical terminology,…

  3. Development of the RF cavity for the SKKUCY-9 compact cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungwook; Lee, Jongchul; LEE, Byeong-No; Ha, Donghyup; Namgoong, Ho; Chai, Jongseo

    2015-09-01

    A 9 MeV compact cyclotron, named SKKUCY-9, for a radiopharmaceutical compound especially fludeoxyglucose (FDG) production for a positron emission tomography (PET) machine was developed at Sungkyunkwan University. H- ions which are produced from a Penning Ionization Gauge(PIG) ion source, travel through a normal conducting radio frequency (RF) cavity which operates at 83.2 MHz for an acceleration and electro-magnet for a beam focusing until the ions acquire energy of about 9 MeV. For installation at a small local hospital, our SKKUCY-9 cyclotron is developed to be compact and light-weight, comparable to conventional medical purpose cyclotrons. For compactness, we adapted a deep valley and large angle hill type for the electro-magnet design. Normally a RF cavity is installed inside of the empty space of the magnet valley region, which is extremely small in our case. We faced problems such as difficulties of installing the RF cavity, low Q-value. Despite of those difficulties, a compact RF cavity and its system including a RF power coupler to feed amplified RF power to the RF cavity and a fine tuner to compensate RF frequency variations was successfully developed and tested.

  4. Energy management techniques for ultra-small bio-medical implants

    E-print Network

    Sanchez, William R

    2012-01-01

    Trends in the medical industry have created a growing demand for implantable medical devices. In particular, the need to provide medical professionals a means to continuously monitor bio-markers over long time scales with ...

  5. Patterns of Relating Between Physicians and Medical Assistants in Small Family Medicine Offices

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Nancy C.; Jacobson, C. Jeffrey; Bolon, Shannon K.; Fixler, Joseph; Pallerla, Harini; Busick, Christina; Gerrety, Erica; Kinney, Dee; Regan, Saundra; Pugnale, Michael

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The clinician-colleague relationship is a cornerstone of relationship-centered care (RCC); in small family medicine offices, the clinician–medical assistant (MA) relationship is especially important. We sought to better understand the relationship between MA roles and the clinician-MA relationship within the RCC framework. METHODS We conducted an ethnographic study of 5 small family medicine offices (having <5 clinicians) in the Cincinnati Area Research and Improvement Group (CARInG) Network using interviews, surveys, and observations. We interviewed 19 MAs and supervisors and 11 clinicians (9 family physicians and 2 nurse practitioners) and observed 15 MAs in practice. Qualitative analysis used the editing style. RESULTS MAs’ roles in small family medicine offices were determined by MA career motivations and clinician-MA relationships. MA career motivations comprised interest in health care, easy training/workload, and customer service orientation. Clinician-MA relationships were influenced by how MAs and clinicians respond to their perceptions of MA clinical competence (illustrated predominantly by comparing MAs with nurses) and organizational structure. We propose a model, trust and verify, to describe the structure of the clinician-MA relationship. This model is informed by clinicians’ roles in hiring and managing MAs and the social familiarity of MAs and clinicians. Within the RCC framework, these findings can be seen as previously undefined constraints and freedoms in what is known as the Complex Responsive Process of Relating between clinicians and MAs. CONCLUSIONS Improved understanding of clinician-MA relationships will allow a better appreciation of how clinicians and MAs function in family medicine teams. Our findings may assist small offices undergoing practice transformation and guide future research to improve the education, training, and use of MAs in the family medicine setting. PMID:24615311

  6. Selected list of books and journals for the small medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1997-01-01

    The introduction to this revised list (seventeenth version) of 610 books and 141 journals addresses the origin, three decades ago, of the "Selected List of Books and Journals for the Small Medical Library," and the accomplishments of the late Alfred N. Brandon in helping health sciences librarians, and especially hospital librarians, to envision what collection development and a library collection are all about. This list is intended as a selection guide for the small or medium-size library in a hospital or similar facility. More realistically, it can function as a core collection for a library consortium. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Due to continuing requests from librarians, a "minimal core" book collection consisting of 78 titles has been pulled out from the 200 asterisked (*) initial-purchase books and marked with daggers ([symbol: see text]). To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for 1997 journal subscriptions would require $101,700. The cost of only the asterisked items, books and journals, totals $43,100. The "minimal core" book collection costs $12,600. PMID:9160148

  7. Selected list of books and journals for the small medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1995-01-01

    The complementary informational access roles of the traditional hospital library book and journal collection and the high-tech Internet are viewed from a 1995 perspective. Predecessors of this list have been intended as selection guides for a small or medium-size library in a hospital or comparable medical facility. As the prices of books and journals continue on an upward spiral, the secondary purpose as a core collection for a consortium of small hospital libraries or a network sharing library resources is fast becoming its primary use. Books (610) and journals (141) are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Due to requests from librarians, a "minimal core" book collection consisting of 82 titles has been pulled out from the 200 asterisked initial-purchase books. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for 1995 subscriptions would require $93,300. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $39,000. The "minimal core" book collection costs $12,700. PMID:7599581

  8. OSU Medical Center makes a large center feel small, friendly. A large academic medical center improves internal and external communications.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    Size can be an asset; it can also cause problems. Often, it's communication that can be a problem with a large organization. Ohio State University Medical Center addressed the issue with a coordinated marketing campaign that's solving their problems. PMID:10153996

  9. Cyclotron Research and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mach, Rostislav

    2010-01-05

    The twenty years old cyclotron U-120M was upgraded for R and D and Production of Radiopharmaceuticals. R and D on short-lived Radiopharmaceuticals production is done at this accelerator. These Radiopharmaceuticals are eventually delivered to nearby hospitals. Development of new diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals is also pursued at the facility. your paper.

  10. Software engineering risk factors in the implementation of a small electronic medical record system: the problem of scalability.

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Michael F.; Starren, Justin B.

    2002-01-01

    The successful implementation of clinical information systems is difficult. In examining the reasons and potential solutions for this problem, the medical informatics community may benefit from the lessons of a rich body of software engineering and management literature about the failure of software projects. Based on previous studies, we present a conceptual framework for understanding the risk factors associated with large-scale projects. However, the vast majority of existing literature is based on large, enterprise-wide systems, and it unclear whether those results may be scaled down and applied to smaller projects such as departmental medical information systems. To examine this issue, we discuss the case study of a delayed electronic medical record implementation project in a small specialty practice at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. While the factors contributing to the delay of this small project share some attributes with those found in larger organizations, there are important differences. The significance of these differences for groups implementing small medical information systems is discussed. PMID:12463804

  11. Selected list of books and journals for the small medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1993-01-01

    The potential for the hospital library as an accepted patient-focused module is viewed in terms of both the present and the future--or no future--in the introduction to this revised recommended list of 606 books and 143 journals. Predecessors of this list have been intended as selection guides for a small or medium-size library in a hospital or comparable medical facility. Due to rapidly rising prices, the secondary purpose--a basic collection for a consortium of hospital libraries or a network sharing library resources--may eventually become its primary use. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. For the first time, a "minimal core collection" consisting of 85 books has been broken out from the 200 asterisked initial purchase books. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for the 1993 subscriptions would require about $87,000; the cost of only the asterisked books and journals totals $34,800. The "minimal core list" of books costs $11,600. PMID:8472001

  12. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals for the small medical library*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Dorothy R.; Stickell, Henry N.

    2001-01-01

    After thirty-six years of biennial updates, the authors take great pride in being able to publish the nineteenth version (2001) of the “Brandon/Hill Selected List of Print Books and Journals for the Small Medical Library.” This list of 630 books and 143 journals is intended as a selection guide for health sciences libraries or similar facilities. It can also function as a core collection for a library consortium. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals, by an alphabetical title listing. Due to continuing requests from librarians, a “minimal core list” consisting of 81 titles has been pulled out from the 217 asterisked (*) initial-purchase books and marked with daggers (†*) before the asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of 630 books and to pay for 143 2001 journal subscriptions would require $124,000. The cost of only the asterisked items, books and journals, totals $55,000. The “minimal core list” book collection costs approximately $14,300. PMID:11337945

  13. Medical Engineering Education for Engineers Working in Small & Medium Sized Enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Chiaki; Moriwaki, Toshimichi

    Medical device industry is expected to be one of the growing fields in coming years, because a large amount of medical bill expenditure becomes pressing matters to overcome in Japan?s rapidly aging society. Authors have developed medical engineering programs for SMe?s to meet these demand by the government grant under academia-industry collaboration in this region and were successful to put these programs into practice. We have two medical engineering education programs in Kobe-Kansai region, one is by graduate school of Kobe University, and the other is non degree program by Kobe City Industrial Promotion Foundation. Present situation of these education are described.

  14. New magnet pole shape for isochronous cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, C.E.; Chasman, C.; Baltz, A.J.

    1981-06-01

    A new design has been developed for shaping pole tips to produce the radially increasing fields required for isochronous cyclotrons. The conventional solid hillpoles are replaced by poles mounted over a small secondary gap which tapers radially from maximum at the magnet edge to zero near the center. Field measurements with a model magnet and calculations with the code TRIM show an increase in field at the edge of the magnet without the usual corresponding large increase in fringing, and a radial field shape more nearly field independent than for conventional hills. The flying hills have several advantages for variable energy multiparticle cyclotrons: (1) a large reduction in the power dissipated by isochronizing trim coils; (2) a more constant shape and magnitude flutter factor, eliminating flutter coils and increasing the operating range; and (3) a sharper fall-off of the fringe field, simplifying beam extraction. 6 figures.

  15. New magnet pole shape for isochronous cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, C.E.; Chasman, C.; Baltz, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    A new design has been developed for shaping pole tips to produce the radially increasing fields required for isochronous cyclotrons. The conventional solid hill poles are replaced by poles mounted over a small secondary gap which tapers radially from maximum at the magnet edge to zero near the center. Field measurements with a model magnet and calculations with the code TRIM show an increase in field at the edge of the magnet without the usual corresponding large increase in fringing, and a radial field shape more nearly field independent than for conventional hills. The flying hills have several advantages for variable energy multiparticle cyclotrons: (1) a large reduction in the power dissipated by isochronizing trim coils; (2) a more constant shape and magnitude flutter factor, eliminating flutter coils and increasing the operating range; and (3) a sharper fall-off of the fringe field, simplifying beam extraction.

  16. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  17. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Robert R. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  18. Production of a small-circulation medical journal using desktop publishing methods.

    PubMed

    Peters, B A

    1994-07-01

    Since its inception in January 1988, the Baylor University Medical Center Proceedings, a quarterly medical journal, has been published by the few staff of the Scientific Publications Office (Baylor Research Institute, Dallas, Texas, USA) using microcomputers and page-makeup software in conjunction with a commercial printing company. This article outlines the establishment of the journal; the steps used in the publication process; the software and hardware used; and the changes in design, content, and circulation that have taken place as the journal and the technology used to create it have evolved. PMID:7636118

  19. Small Group Learning in the Final Year of a Medical Degree: A Quantitative and Qualitative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPherson, R.; Jones, A.; Whitehouse, C. R.; O'Neill, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    Explores what happens in senior medical student group sessions when students bring their own cases to the groups for discussion. Suggests that most groups run on a case-presentation and discussion format and that students want tutors to act as expert resources and be flexible in allowing students to direct the discussion. (Author/MM)

  20. The Role of International Medical Graduates in America?s Small Rural Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagopian, Amy; Thompson, Matthew J.; Kaltenbach, Emily; Hart, L. Gary

    2004-01-01

    Critical access hospitals (CAHs) are a federal Medicare category for isolated rural facilities with 15 or fewer acute care beds that receive cost-based reimbursement from Medicare. Purpose: This study examines the role of foreign-born international medical graduates (IMGs) in the staffing of CAHs. Methods: Chief executive officers (CEOs) of CAH…

  1. EC-5 fifth international workshop on electron cyclotron emission and electron cyclotron heating

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Lohr, J.

    1985-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: electron cyclotron emission measurements; electron cyclotron emission theory; electron cyclotron heating; gyrotron development; and ECH systems and waveguide development. These paper have been indexed separately elsewhere. (LSP).

  2. ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    In the last decade ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources have evolved from a single large, power consuming, complex prototype into a variety of compact, simple, reliable, efficient, high performance sources of high charge state ions for accelerators and atomic physics. The coupling of ECR sources to cyclotrons has resulted in significant performance gains in energy, intensity, reliability, and variety of ion species. Seven ECR sources are in regular operation with cyclotrons and numerous other projects are under development or in the planning stag. At least four laboratories have ECR sources dedicated for atomic physics research and other atomic physics programs share ECR sources with cyclotrons. An ECR source is now installed on the injector for the CERN SPS synchrotron to accelerate O/sup 8 +/ to relativistic energies. A project is underway at Argonne to couple an ECR source to a superconducting heavy-ion linac. Although tremendous progress has been made, the field of ECR sources is still a relatively young technology and there is still the potential for further advances both in source development and understanding of the plasma physics. The development of ECR sources is reviewed. The important physics mechanisms which come into play in the operation of ECR Sources are discussed, along with various models for charge state distributions (CSD). The design and performance of several ECR sources are compared. The 88-Inch Cyclotron and the LBL ECR is used as an example of cyclotron+ECR operation. The future of ECR sources is considered.

  3. Intelligent Low-level RF System by Non-destructive Beam Monitoring Device for Cyclotrons

    E-print Network

    Malafeh, M S Sharifi Asadi; Afarideh, H; Chai, J S

    2015-01-01

    The project of a10MeV PET cyclotron accelerator for medical diagnosis and treatment was started at Amirkabir University of Technology in 2012. The low-level RF system of cyclotron accelerator is designed to stabilize acceleration voltage and control the resonance frequency of the cavity. In this work Intelligent Low Level Radio Frequency Circuit or ILLRF suitable for Most of the AVF cyclotron accelerators was designed by the beam monitoring device and narrow band tunable band-pass filter. In this design, for the RF phase detection does not need to signal processing by microcontroller

  4. Aiming for prevention: medical and public health approaches to small arms, gun violence, and injury.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Brian

    2002-08-01

    The level of global small arms violence is enormous and the scale of human suffering it causes is immense, although poorly counted. It causes at least hundreds of thousands of deaths and more than a million injuries each year, as well as permanent physical and psychological damage, destruction of families, lost productivity, and diversion of resources from basic health services. Research is required on three basic issues, as follows: health effects of weapons; the contributing factors and causes, including behavioral issues; and impacts of interventions and their cost-effectiveness. Policies and programs designed to reduce the human and social impacts of small arms should make use of public health knowledge and analysis of risk factors as a means of bringing increased focus and effectiveness to their objectives. At its international conference on small arms, gun violence, and injury, "Aiming for Prevention" in Helsinki in September 2001, International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War called on health professionals as well as scientists, activists, humanitarian and development workers to contribute to an effective confrontation of the small arms pandemic. PMID:12187513

  5. Use of cyclotrons in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaim, S. M.

    2004-10-01

    Cyclotrons are versatile ion-accelerating machines which find many applications in medicine. In this short review their use in hadron therapy is briefly discussed. Proton therapy is gaining significance because of its capability to treat deep-lying tumours. A strong area of application of cyclotrons involves the production of short-lived neutron deficient radiotracers for use in emission tomography, especially positron emission tomography. This fast and quantitative in vivo diagnostic technique is being increasingly used in neurology, cardiology and oncology. Besides routine patient care, considerable interdisciplinary work on development of new positron emitters is under way. A short account of those efforts is given. The use of cyclotrons in the production of radionuclides for internal radiotherapy is also briefly described.

  6. Electron cyclotron harmonic wave acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Menyuk, C. R.; Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of particle acceleration in a finite bandwidth, obliquely propagating electromagnetic cyclotron wave is presented. It has been suggested by Sprangle and Vlahos in 1983 that the narrow bandwidth cyclotron radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring solar loop can accelerate electrons outside the loop by the interaction of a monochromatic wave propagating along the ambient magnetic field with the ambient electrons. It is shown here that electrons gyrating and streaming along a uniform, static magnetic field can be accelerated by interacting with the fundamental or second harmonic of a monochromatic, obliquely propagating cyclotron wave. It is also shown that the acceleration is virtually unchanged when a wave with finite bandwidth is considered. This acceleration mechanism can explain the observed high-energy electrons in type III bursts.

  7. HARMONIC CYCLOTRON HEATING IN THE TOROIDAL OCTUPOLE

    E-print Network

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    HARMONIC CYCLOTRON HEATING IN THE TOROIDAL OCTUPOLE J. C. Sprott October 1976 Plasma Studies PLP without consent of the author and maj or professor. #12;-2- Previous calculations of cyclotron resonance the harmonic cyclotron heating of both electrons and ions. It is well known (see, for example, O. Eldridge

  8. CURRENTS DRIVEN BY ELECTRON CYCLOTRON WAVES

    E-print Network

    Karney, Charles

    CURRENTS DRIVEN BY ELECTRON CYCLOTRON WAVES C.F.F. KARNEY, NJ. FISCH Plasma Physics Laboratory of the generation of steady-state currents by electron cyclotron waves are explored. A numerical solution of electron cyclotron wave absorption appears to be one of the more promising schemes of providing a steady

  9. Brandon/Hill selected list of books and journals for the small medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, D R

    1999-01-01

    The interrelationship of print and electronic media in the hospital library and its relevance to the "Brandon/Hill Selected List" in 1999 are addressed in the updated list (eighteenth version) of 627 books and 145 journals. This list is intended as a selection guide for the small or medium-size library in a hospital or similar facility. More realistically, it can function as a core collection for a library consortium. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Due to continuing requests from librarians, a "minimal core" book collection consisting of 82 titles has been pulled out from the 214 asterisked (*) initial-purchase books and marked with daggers ([symbol: see text]). To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for 1999 journal subscriptions would require $114,900. The cost of only the asterisked items, books and journals, totals $49,100. The "minimal core" book collection costs $13,200. PMID:10219475

  10. Excitation of low frequency waves by streaming ions via anomalous cyclotron resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Dillenburg, D.; Gaffey, J. D., Jr.; Ziebell, L. F.; Goedert, J.; Freund, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of a small population of streaming ions on low-frequency waves with frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency is analyzed for three modes of interest: Alfven waves, magnetosonic waves, and ion-cyclotron waves. The instability mechanism is the anomalous cyclotron resonance of the waves with the streaming ions. Conditions for excitation of the three types of waves are derived and expressions for the growth rates are obtained. Excitation of Alfven waves is possible even if the ratio of the densities of the streaming ions to the thermal ions is very small. For magnetosonic waves, excitation can easily occur if waves are propagating parallel or nearly parallel to the ambient magnetic field. As for ion-cyclotron waves, it is found that for the ion-whistler branch the excitation is suppressed over a broader range of wave frequencies than for the fast magnetosonic branch.

  11. Cyclotron Production of Technetium-99m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Katherine M.

    Technetium-99m (99mTc) has emerged as the most widely used radionuclide in medicine and is currently obtained from a 99Mo/ 99mTc generator system. At present, there are only a handful of ageing reactors worldwide capable of producing large quantities of the parent isotope, 99Mo, and owing to the ever growing shutdown periods for maintenance and repair of these ageing reactors, the reliable supply 99mTc has been compromised in recent years. With an interest in alternative strategies for producing this key medical isotope, this thesis focuses on several technical challenges related to the direct cyclotron production of 99mTc via the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction. In addition to evaluating the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc and 100Mo(p,x)99Mo reactions, this work presented the first experimental evaluation of the 100Mo(p,2n) 99gTc excitation function in the range of 8-18 MeV. Thick target calculations suggested that large quantities of cyclotron-produced 99mTc may be possible. For example, a 6 hr irradiation at 500 ?A with an energy window of 18?10 MeV is expected to yield 1.15 TBq of 99mTc. The level of coproduced 99gTc contaminant was found to be on par with the current 99Mo/99mTc generator standard eluted with a 24 hr frequency. Highly enriched 100Mo was required as the target material for 99mTc production and a process for recycling of this expensive material is presented. An 87% recovery yield is reported, including metallic target preparation, irradiation, 99mTc extraction, molybdate isolation, and finally hydrogen reduction to the metal. Further improvements are expected with additional optimization experiments. A method for forming structurally stable metallic molybdenum targets has also been developed. These targets are capable of withstanding more than a kilowatt of beam power and the reliable production and extraction of Curie quantities of 99mTc has been demonstrated. With the end-goal of using the cyclotron-produced 99mTc clinically, the quality of the cyclotron-produced 99mTc has been extensively compared with relevant United States Pharmacopeia (USP) specifications for the existing 99Mo/99mTc production strategy. Additional quality testing, including biodistribution studies of [ 99mTc]pertechnetate and [99mTc]disofenin in both mice and rabbits was also evaluated. Using the strategies and results presented throughout this dissertation, this thesis concludes with the world's first cyclotron-based 99mTc patient images obtained as part of a Phase I Clinical Trial at the University of Alberta using [99m Tc]pertechnetate.

  12. The cyclotron laboratory and the RFQ accelerator in Bern

    SciTech Connect

    Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Kreslo, I.; Nirkko, M.; Weber, M.; Scampoli, P.; Bremen, K. von

    2013-07-18

    Two proton accelerators have been recently put in operation in Bern: an 18 MeV cyclotron and a 2 MeV RFQ linac. The commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron, equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker, will provide beams for routine 18-F and other PET radioisotope production as well as for novel detector, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. The accelerator is embedded into a complex building hosting two physics laboratories and four Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) laboratories. This project is the result of a successful collaboration between the Inselspital, the University of Bern and private investors, aiming at the constitution of a combined medical and research centre able to provide the most cutting-edge technologies in medical imaging and cancer radiation therapy. The cyclotron is complemented by the RFQ with the primary goals of elemental analysis via Particle Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE), and the detection of potentially dangerous materials with high nitrogen content using the Gamma-Resonant Nuclear Absorption (GRNA) technique. In this context, beam instrumentation devices have been developed, in particular an innovative beam profile monitor based on doped silica fibres and a setup for emittance measurements using the pepper-pot technique. On this basis, the establishment of a proton therapy centre on the campus of the Inselspital is in the phase of advanced study.

  13. Adaptive multi-level conditional random fields for detection and segmentation of small enhanced pathology in medical images.

    PubMed

    Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Arnold, Douglas L; Arbel, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Detection and segmentation of large structures in an image or within a region of interest have received great attention in the medical image processing domains. However, the problem of small pathology detection and segmentation still remains an unresolved challenge due to the small size of these pathologies, their low contrast and variable position, shape and texture. In many contexts, early detection of these pathologies is critical in diagnosis and assessing the outcome of treatment. In this paper, we propose a probabilistic Adaptive Multi-level Conditional Random Fields (AMCRF) with the incorporation of higher order cliques for detecting and segmenting such pathologies. In the first level of our graphical model, a voxel-based CRF is used to identify candidate lesions. In the second level, in order to further remove falsely detected regions, a new CRF is developed that incorporates higher order textural features, which are invariant to rotation and local intensity distortions. At this level, higher order textures are considered together with the voxel-wise cliques to refine boundaries and is therefore adaptive. The proposed algorithm is tested in the context of detecting enhancing Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions in brain MRI, where the problem is further complicated as many of the enhancing voxels are associated with normal structures (i.e. blood vessels) or noise in the MRI. The algorithm is trained and tested on large multi-center clinical trials from Relapsing-Remitting MS patients. The effect of several different parameter learning and inference techniques is further investigated. When tested on 120 cases, the proposed method reaches a lesion detection rate of 90%, with very few false positive lesion counts on average, ranging from 0.17 for very small (3-5 voxels) to 0 for very large (50+ voxels) regions. The proposed model is further tested on a very large clinical trial containing 2770 scans where a high sensitivity of 91% with an average false positive count of 0.5 is achieved. Incorporation of contextual information at different scales is also explored. Finally, superior performance is shown upon comparing with Support Vector Machine (SVM), Random Forest and variant of an MRF. PMID:26211811

  14. Evaluation of the latent radiation dose from the activated radionuclides in a cyclotron vault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunduk; Cho, Gyuseong; Kim, Sun A.; Kang, Bo Sun

    2015-02-01

    The production of short-lived radioisotopes for the synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals typically takes advantage of a cyclotron that accelerates a proton beam up to a few tens of MeV. The number of cyclotrons has been continuously increasing since the first operation of the MC-50 for the production of radiopharmaceuticals at the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) in 1986, and currently 35 cyclotrons are under operation throughout the nation. As the number of operating cyclotrons has increased, concerns about radiation safety for the persons who are working at the facilities and dwelling in the vicinity of the facilities are becoming important issues. Radiation that could emit a time-dependent dose was shown to exist in a cyclotron vault after its shutdown. The calculation of the latent radiation dose rate was performed by using the MCNPX and the FISPACT. The calculated results for the activated long-lived radioisotopes in the concrete wall and the structural components of the cyclotron facility were compared with the measured data that were obtained by using gamma-ray spectroscopy with a HPGe detector.

  15. TRIUMF cyclotron vacuum system refurbishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekachev, I.

    2008-03-01

    The cyclotron at TRIUMF was commissioned to full energy in 1974. The volume of the cyclotron vacuum tank is about 100 m3 and it operates at 5×10-8 Torr pressure during beam production. The pumping is mainly based on a Phillips B-20 cryogenerator (Stirling cycle 4-cylinder engine). The cryogenerator supplies helium gas at 16 K and 70 K to cryopanels in the tank. The decreasing reliability of the B-20 and demanding maintenance requirements triggered the decision to completely overhaul or replace the cryogenerator. Replacement with the LINDE-1630 helium refrigerator was found to be the most attractive (technically and economically) option. The details of the proposal with installation of the helium refrigerator and with a continuous flow liquid nitrogen shield cooling system are presented.

  16. Research Activities At The RCNP Cyclotron Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hatanaka, Kichiji

    2010-05-12

    The Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) cyclotron cascade system has been operated to provide high quality beams for various experiments. In order to increase the physics research opportunities, the Azimuthally Varying Field (AVF) cyclotron facility was upgraded recently. A flat-topping system and an 18-GHz superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source were introduced to improve the beam's quality and intensity. A new beam line was installed to diagnose the characteristics of the beam to be injected into the ring cyclotron and to bypass the ring cyclotron and directly transport low energy beams from the AVF cyclotron to experimental halls. A separator is equipped to provide RI beams produced by fusion reactions at low energy and by projectile fragmentations at high energy. Development has continued to realize the designed performance of these systems.

  17. Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

  18. Commercial compact cyclotrons in the 90`s

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicate a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper the authors will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Design criteria for the different types of commercial cyclotrons will be presented, with reference to those demands that differ from those in a research oriented cyclotron project. The authors also discuss the possibility of systems designed for higher energies and capable of extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA.

  19. CURRENTS DRIVE BY ELECTRON CYCLOTRON WAVES

    E-print Network

    Karney, Charles

    JULY 1981 CURRENTS DRIVE BY ELECTRON CYCLOTRON WAVES C,F,Fn KARNEY AND NwJ, FISCH PLASMA PHYSICS. Link: http://charles.karney.info/biblio/karney81d.html #12;Currents Driven by Electron Cyclotron Waves cyclotron waves a r e explored. A numerical solution of t h e Fokker-Planck equation is used t o v e r i f y

  20. Cyclotron Line Measurements with INTEGRAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottschmidt, K.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Caballero, I.; Fritz, S.; Schoenherr, G.; Kretschmar, P.; Wilms, J.; McBride, V. A.; Suchy, S.; Rothschild, R. E.

    2008-01-01

    Due to its broadband energy coverage, INTEGRAL has made important contributions to observing and interpreting cyclotron lines, which are present in the 10-100 keV range of a sample of accreting pulsars. In these systems photons with energies fulfilling the resonance condition inelastically Compton scatter off electrons quantized in the accretion column above the neutron star's magnetic pole(s). This process gives rise to the broad, absorption-like lines or 'cyclotron resonant scattering features' (CRSF). The observed lines allow to directly measure the B-fields of these sources, resulting in values of a few times 1E12G. In this overview I will present recent highlights regarding CRSF observations as well as discuss current ideas and models for the physical conditions in the accretion column. Among the former are the stability of the spectrum of Vela X-1 during giant flares in 2003, the observation of three cyclotron lines during the 2004 outburst of V0332+53, the confirmation of the fundamental line at approximately 45 keV during a 2005 normal outburst of A0535-26, and the simultaneous detection of the two lines in the dipping source 4U 1907+09 (for which also a torque reversal was detected for the first time). Through these and other observations it has become increasingly apparent that two types of observations can potentially be used to constrain the accretion column geometry: the determination of energy ratios for multiple harmonic lines (only two sources with greater than 2 lines are known), was well as the evolution of the fundamental line centroid, which, for different sources, may or may not be correlated with flux. Furthermore, first steps have been taken away from the usual phenomenological description of the lines, towards a physical approach based on self-consistent CRSF modeling. Initial applications are presented.

  1. Purpose-Built Cyclotron DAVID WOOTAN

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    -Built Cyclotron Applications December 12, 2014 RaDIATE Collaboration Meeting 3 30 MeV protons Target Cold Neutrons Fission Materials Fusion Materials Isotopes High Energy Physics #12;Purpose-built Cyclotron has and Fusion energy programs are irradiation of fusion and fast reactor structural materials, where no suitable

  2. Lawrence's Legacy : Seaborg's Cyclotron - The 88-Inch Cyclotron turns 40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Margaret; Clark, David

    2003-04-01

    In 1958, Sputnik had recently been launched by the Russians, leading to worry in Congress and increased funding for science and technology. Ernest Lawrence was director of the "Rad Lab" at Berkeley. Another Nobel Prize winner, Glenn Seaborg, was Associate Laboratory Director and Director of the Nuclear Chemistry Division. In this atmosphere, Lawrence was phoned by commissioners of the Atomic Energy Commission and asked what they could do for Seaborg, "because he did such a fine job of setting up the chemistry for extracting plutonium from spent reactor fuel" [1]. In this informal way, the 90-Inch (eventually 88-Inch) Cyclotron became a line item in the federal budget at a cost of 3M (later increased to 5M). The 88-Inch Cyclotron achieved first internal beam on Dec. 12, 1961 and first external beam in May 1962. Forty years later it is still going strong. Pieced together from interviews with the retirees who built it, Rad Lab reports and archives from the Seaborg and Lawrence collections, the story of its design and construction - on-time and under-budget - provides a glimpse into the early days of big science. [1] remarks made by Elmer Kelly, "Physicist-in-charge' of the project on the occasion of the 40th anniversary celebration.

  3. Linear analysis of ion cyclotron interaction in a multicomponent plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendrin, R.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Omura, Y.; Quest, K.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism by which hot anisotropic protons generate electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in a plasma containing cold H(+) and He(+) ions is quantitatively studied. Linear growth rates (both temporal and spatial) are computed for different plasma parameters: concentration, temperature,and anisotropy of cold He(+) ions and of hot protons. It is shown that: (1) for parameters typical of the geostationary altitude the maximum growth rates are not drastically changed when a small proportion (about 1 to 20 percent) of cold He(+) ions is present; (2) because of the important cyclotron absorption by thermal He(+) ions in the vicinity of the He(+) gyrofrequency, waves which could resonate with the bulk of the He(+) distribution cannot be generated. Therefore quasi-linear effects, in a homogeneous medium at least, cannot be responsible for the heating of He(+) ions which is often observed in conjunction with ion cyclotron waves. The variation of growth rate versus wave number is also studied for its importance in selecting suitable parameters in numerical simulation experiments.

  4. Design study of an ultra-compact superconducting cyclotron for isotope production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Vincent, J.

    2014-11-01

    A 12.5 MeV, 25 ?A, proton compact superconducting cyclotron for medical isotope production has been designed and is currently in fabrication. The machine is initially aimed at producing 13N ammonia for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) cardiology applications. With an ultra-compact size and cost-effective price point, this system will offer clinicians unprecedented access to the preferred radiopharmaceutical isotope for cardiac PET imaging. A systems approach that carefully balanced the subsystem requirements coupled to precise beam dynamics calculations was followed. The system is designed to irradiate a liquid target internal to the cyclotron and to minimize the need for radiation shielding. The main parameters of the cyclotron, its design, and principal steps of the development work are presented here.

  5. Cavity Control in a Single-Electron Quantum Cyclotron

    E-print Network

    Hanneke, David

    Cavity Control in a Single-Electron Quantum Cyclotron An Improved Measurement of the Electron ­ Colloquium The Quantum Cyclotron · Single electron · Resolve lowest cyclotron and spin states via QND? Frequency! B #12;Hanneke MPPL 2010 ­ Colloquium Experimenter's g · The cyclotron is an anharmonic oscillator

  6. Collegiate-Based Emergency Medical Service: Impact on Alcohol-Related Emergency Department Transports at a Small Liberal Arts College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Joshua B.; Olson, Mark H.; Kelly, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the impact of a collegiate-based emergency medical service (CBEMS) on the frequency of emergency department (ED) transports. Participants: Students transported to the ED for acute alcohol intoxication during the Fall 2008 and the Fall 2009 semesters (N = 50). Methods: The frequency of students receiving…

  7. Small Group Learning in Medical Education: A Second Look at the Springer, Stanne, and Donovan Meta-Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colliver, Jerry A.; Feltovich, Paul J.; Verhulst, Steven J.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the studies on which a meta-analysis by Springer, Stanne, and Donovan (1999) were based; the meta-analysis had concluded that small group learning in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology education is effective. Concludes that the meta-analysis' call for more widespread implementation of small group learning is not supported.…

  8. Nonlinear evolution of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, I.; Sydora, R. D.; Mann, I. R.; Sauer, K.; Mace, R. L.

    2011-04-15

    Hybrid Vlasov-Fourier modeling is used to investigate the nonlinear evolution of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves driven by proton temperature anisotropy in plasmas with a population of He{sup +} ions and a cold proton background. In the pure proton-electron plasma, most of the free energy is converted into high-amplitude waves and currents. In the nonlinear stage, within a few hundred proton gyroperiods after the saturation, the wave spectrum shifts toward lower wave numbers and frequencies, from {omega}{approx}0.6{Omega}{sub p} to below {omega}{approx}0.25{Omega}{sub p}. In the presence of even a small population of He{sup +} ions almost all of the free energy is used in He{sup +} heating. The wave activity in the saturated state moves from the linearly unstable upper branch to the linearly stable lower one. In the presence of a background of cold protons, the waves can propagate in the frequency stop-band. Our results demonstrate that linear stability theory cannot be used to estimate the characteristics of the expected saturated wave spectra in the terrestrial magnetosphere. Significantly, our nonlinear simulations produce wave spectra which are in close agreement with the EMIC waves observed in situ by satellites as well as by ground-based magnetometers positioned at the ends of the magnetic field lines.

  9. Assessment of the production of medical isotopes using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA: Simulations against experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infantino, Angelo; Oehlke, Elisabeth; Mostacci, Domiziano; Schaffer, Paul; Trinczek, Michael; Hoehr, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    The Monte Carlo code FLUKA is used to simulate the production of a number of positron emitting radionuclides, 18F, 13N, 94Tc, 44Sc, 68Ga, 86Y, 89Zr, 52Mn, 61Cu and 55Co, on a small medical cyclotron with a proton beam energy of 13 MeV. Experimental data collected at the TR13 cyclotron at TRIUMF agree within a factor of 0.6 ± 0.4 with the directly simulated data, except for the production of 55Co, where the simulation underestimates the experiment by a factor of 3.4 ± 0.4. The experimental data also agree within a factor of 0.8 ± 0.6 with the convolution of simulated proton fluence and cross sections from literature. Overall, this confirms the applicability of FLUKA to simulate radionuclide production at 13 MeV proton beam energy.

  10. Cyclotron radiation losses in subcompact tori

    SciTech Connect

    Tetley, W.; Miley, G.

    1980-01-01

    Subcompact tori such as the field reversed mirror (FRM) have a relatively large surface to volume ratio. This has raised concern that in advanced fuel devices cyclotron losses could prevent their viability as reactors. Indeed the cyclotron radiation produced is several times the fusion power. However, due to reabsorption in the FRM plasma, it turns out that less than 7% of the cyclotron radiation produced escapes the plasma. Then when reflection from the first wall is included, net losses are reduced further to < 3 despite a 10% hole fraction in the wall for injector ports. Finally, a global model studies of the FRM show that even if the cyclotron loss rates are four times that predicted, the reactor energy balance remains viable.

  11. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The author built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. The author found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. The author shows how a conventional carbon negative ion source located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sample changing to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  12. Electron cyclotron wave generation by relativistic electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, H. K.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1994-01-01

    We show that an energetic electron distribution which has a temperature anisotropy (T perpendicular to b is greater than T parallel to b), or which is gyrating about a DC magnetic field, can generate electron cyclotron waves with frequencies below the electron cyclotron frequency. Relativistic effects are included in solving the dispersion equation and are shown to be quantitatively important. The basic idea of the mechanism is the coupling of the beam mode to slow waves. The unstable electron cyclotron waves are predominantly electromagnetic and right-hand polarized. For a low-density plasma in which the electron plasma frequency is less than the electron cyclotron frequency, the excited waves can have frequencies above or below the electron plasma frequency, depending upon the parameters of the energetic electron distribution. This instability may account for observed Z mode waves in the polar magnetosphere of the Earth and other planets.

  13. Method and apparatuses for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); McJunkin, Timothy R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-03-06

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber. The trapping electric field may comprise a field potential that, when taken in cross-section along the z-axis, includes at least one section that is concave down and at least one section that is concave up so that ions traversing the field potential experience a net magnetron effect on a cyclotron frequency of the ions that is substantially equal to zero. Other apparatuses and a method for performing ion cyclotron spectrometry are also disclosed herein.

  14. Cyclotron radiation cooling of a short electron bunch kicked in an undulator with guiding magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Osharin, I. V.; Savilov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    We propose to use of an undulator with the guiding axial magnetic field as a "kicker" forming a bunch of electron gyro-oscillators with a small spread in the axial velocity. The cyclotron emission from the bunch leads to losing oscillatory velocity of electron gyrorotation, but it does not perturb the axial electron velocity. This effect can be used for transformation of minimization of the spread in electron axial velocity in the undulator section into minimization of the spread in electron energy in the cyclotron radiation section.

  15. Building 211 cyclotron characterization survey report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-30

    The Building 211 Cyclotron Characterization Survey includes an assessment of the radioactive and chemical inventory of materials stored within the facility; an evaluation of the relative distribution of accelerator-produced activation products within various cyclotron components and adjacent structures; measurement of the radiation fields throughout the facility; measurement and assessment of internal and external radioactive surface contamination on various equipment, facility structures, and air-handling systems; and an assessment of lead (Pb) paint and asbestos hazards within the facility.

  16. An all permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for heavy ion therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yun Li, Jia Qing; Sun, Liang Ting; Zhang, Xue Zhen; Feng, Yu Cheng; Wang, Hui; Ma, Bao Hua; Li, Xi Xia

    2014-02-15

    A high charge state all permanent Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, Lanzhou All Permanent ECR ion source no. 3-LAPECR3, has been successfully built at IMP in 2012, which will serve as the ion injector of the Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) project. As a commercial device, LAPECR3 features a compact structure, small size, and low cost. According to HIMM scenario more than 100 e?A of C{sup 5+} ion beam should be extracted from the ion source, and the beam emittance better than 75 ?*mm*mrad. In recent commissioning, about 120 e?A of C{sup 5+} ion beam was got when work gas was CH{sub 4} while about 262 e?A of C{sup 5+} ion beam was obtained when work gas was C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gas. The design and construction of the ion source and its low-energy transportation beam line, and the preliminary commissioning results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  17. Electrostatic ion cyclotron, beam-plasma, and lower hybrid waves excited by an electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Conrad, J. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves have been extensively investigated in connection with both space and laboratory plasmas. The present investigation has the objective to study the excitation of low-frequency waves in a multiion plasma by electron beams. The frequencies considered range from below the lowest gyrofrequency of the heaviest ion to about the lower hybrid frequency. It is shown that electron-beam instabilities can produce peaks in the growth rate below the cyclotron frequency of each ion species if nonzero perpendicular wave number effects are included in the ion dynamics. The dispersion relations for neutralized ion Bernstein (NIB) and pure ion Bernstein (PIB) waves are considered along with an instability analysis for a cold plasma and warm electron beam, the electron beam-plasma mode, banded ion cyclotron (EIC) waves with small perpendicular wavelengths, and the growth lengths of the waves.

  18. On the electrically detected cyclotron resonance of holes in silicon nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Bagraev, N. T. Gets, D. S.; Danilovsky, E. Yu.; Klyachkin, L. E.; Malyarenko, A. M.

    2013-04-15

    The cyclotron resonance in semiconductor nanostructures is electrically detected for the first time without an external cavity, a source, and a detector of microwave radiation. An ultranarrow p-Si quantum well on an n-Si (100) surface confined by superconducting heavily boron-doped {delta}-shaped barriers is used as the object of investigation and provides microwave generation within the framework of the nonstationary Josephson effect. The cyclotron resonance is detected upon the presence of a microcavity, which is incorporated into the quantum-well plane, by measuring the longitudinal magnetoresistance under conditions of stabilization of the source-drain current. The cyclotron-resonance spectra and their angular dependences measured in a low magnetic field identify small values of the effective mass of light and heavy holes in various 2D subbands due to the presence of edge channels with a high mobility of carriers.

  19. Differentiating Fragmentation Pathways of Cholesterol by Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Agthoven, Maria A.; Barrow, Mark P.; Chiron, Lionel; Coutouly, Marie-Aude; Kilgour, David; Wootton, Christopher A.; Wei, Juan; Soulby, Andrew; Delsuc, Marc-André; Rolando, Christian; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2015-07-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is a data-independent analytical method that records the fragmentation patterns of all the compounds in a sample. This study shows the implementation of atmospheric pressure photoionization with two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. In the resulting 2D mass spectrum, the fragmentation patterns of the radical and protonated species from cholesterol are differentiated. This study shows the use of fragment ion lines, precursor ion lines, and neutral loss lines in the 2D mass spectrum to determine fragmentation mechanisms of known compounds and to gain information on unknown ion species in the spectrum. In concert with high resolution mass spectrometry, 2D Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry can be a useful tool for the structural analysis of small molecules.

  20. Differentiating Fragmentation Pathways of Cholesterol by Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Agthoven, Maria A; Barrow, Mark P; Chiron, Lionel; Coutouly, Marie-Aude; Kilgour, David; Wootton, Christopher A; Wei, Juan; Soulby, Andrew; Delsuc, Marc-André; Rolando, Christian; O'Connor, Peter B

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is a data-independent analytical method that records the fragmentation patterns of all the compounds in a sample. This study shows the implementation of atmospheric pressure photoionization with two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. In the resulting 2D mass spectrum, the fragmentation patterns of the radical and protonated species from cholesterol are differentiated. This study shows the use of fragment ion lines, precursor ion lines, and neutral loss lines in the 2D mass spectrum to determine fragmentation mechanisms of known compounds and to gain information on unknown ion species in the spectrum. In concert with high resolution mass spectrometry, 2D Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry can be a useful tool for the structural analysis of small molecules. Graphical Abstract ?. PMID:26184984

  1. Note: control of liquid helium supply to cryopanels of Kolkata superconducting cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, T K; Pal, G

    2015-02-01

    The Kolkata superconducting cyclotron utilises liquid helium to cool the main magnet niobium-titanium (NbTi) coil and the cryopanels. Three liquid helium cooled cryopanels, placed inside the dees of the radio-frequency system, maintain the high vacuum in the acceleration region of the superconducting cyclotron. The small cryostat placed inside the cryogenic distribution manifold located at the basement of the superconducting cyclotron building supplies liquid helium in parallel branches to three cold heads, used for cooling their associated cryopanels. The level in the cryostat has to be maintained at an optimum value to ensure uninterrupted flow of liquid helium to these three cold heads. This paper describes the transfer function of the overall system, its tuning parameters, and discusses the actual control of cryostat level by using these parameters. PMID:25725894

  2. Proton Beam Therapy for Patients With Medically Inoperable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer at the University of Tsukuba

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Sugahara, Shinji; Tokita, Mari; Satoh, Hiroaki; Tsuboi, Koji; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in a retrospective review the role of proton beam therapy for patients with medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: From November 2001 to July 2008, 55 medically inoperable patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with proton beam therapy. A total of 58 (T1/T2, 30/28) tumors were treated. The median age of study participants was 77 years (range, 52-86 years). A total dose of 66 GyE in 10 fractions was given to peripherally located tumors and 72.6 GyE in 22 fractions to centrally located tumors. Results: The rates (95% confidence interval) of overall and progression-free survival of all patients and of local control of all tumors at 2 years were 97.8% (93.6-102.0%), 88.7% (77.9-99.5%), and 97.0% (91.1-102.8%), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in progression-free rate between T1 and T2 tumors (p = 0.87). Two patients (3.6%) had deterioration in pulmonary function, and 2 patients (3.6%) had Grade 3 pneumonitis. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy was effective and well tolerated in medically inoperable patients with Stage I NSCLC.

  3. Results from an exploratory study to identify the factors that contribute to success for UK medical device small- and medium-sized enterprises.

    PubMed

    Hourd, P C; Williams, D J

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports the results from an exploratory study that sets out to identify and compare the strategic approaches and patterns of business practice employed by 14 UK small- and medium-sized enterprises to achieve success in the medical device sector of the health-care industry. An interview-based survey was used to construct individual case studies of the medical device technology (MDT) companies. A cross-case analysis was performed to search for patterns and themes that cut across these individual cases. Exploratory results revealed the heterogeneity of MDT companies and the distinctive features of the MDT innovation process that emphasize the importance of a strategic approach for achieving milestones in the product development and exploitation process and for creating value for the company and its stakeholders. Recognizing the heterogeneity of MDT companies, these exploratory findings call for further investigation to understand better the influence of components of the MDT innovation process on the commercialization life cycle and value trajectory. This is required to assist start-up or spin-out MDT companies in the UK and worldwide to navigate the critical transitions that determine access to financial and consumer markets and enhance the potential to build a successful business. This will be important not only for bioscience-based companies but also for engineering-based companies aiming to convert their activities into medical devices and the health- and social-care market. PMID:18756690

  4. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Radiofrequency Ablation for Medically Inoperable, Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The standard management of medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) conventionally has been fractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). The relatively poor local control rate and inconvenience associated with this therapy have prompted the development of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), a technique that delivers very high doses of irradiation typically over 3 to 5 sessions. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has also been investigated as a less costly, single-day therapy that thermally ablates small, peripheral tumors. The cost-effectiveness of these three techniques has never been compared. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states of 65-year-old men with medically inoperable NSCLC after treatment with 3D-CRT, SBRT, and RFA. Given their frail state, patients were assumed to receive supportive care after recurrence. Utility values, recurrence risks, and costs were adapted from the literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to model uncertainty in these parameters. Results: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over 3D-CRT was $6,000/quality-adjusted life-year, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over RFA was $14,100/quality-adjusted life-year. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that the results were robust across a range of tumor sizes, patient utility values, and costs. This result was confirmed with probabilistic sensitivity analyses that varied local control rates and utilities. Conclusion: In comparison to 3D-CRT and RFA, SBRT was the most cost-effective treatment for medically inoperable NSCLC over a wide range of treatment and disease assumptions. On the basis of efficacy and cost, SBRT should be the primary treatment approach for this disease.

  5. Oak Ridge Isotope Production Cyclotron Facility and Target Handling

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Eric Craig; Varma, Venugopal Koikal; Egle, Brian; Binder, Jeffrey L; Mirzadeh, Saed; Tatum, B Alan; Burgess, Thomas W; Devore, Joe; Rennich, Mark; Saltmarsh, Michael John; Caldwell, Benjamin Cale

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The Nuclear Science Advisory Committee issued in August 2009 an Isotopes Subcommittee report that recommended the construction and operation of a variable-energy, high-current, multiparticle accelerator for producing medical radioisotopes. To meet the needs identified in the report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing a technical concept for a commercial 70 MeV dual-port-extraction, multiparticle cyclotron to be located at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The conceptual design of the isotope production facility as envisioned would provide two types of targets for use with this new cyclotron. One is a high-power target cooled by water circulating on both sides, and the other is a commercial target cooled only on one side. The isotope facility concept includes an isotope target vault for target irradiation and a shielded transfer station for radioactive target handling. The targets are irradiated in the isotope target vault. The irradiated targets are removed from the target vault and packaged in an adjoining shielded transfer station before being sent out for postprocessing. This paper describes the conceptual design of the target-handling capabilities required for dealing with these radioactive targets and for minimizing the contamination potential during operations.

  6. A high resolution Small Field Of View (SFOV) gamma camera: a columnar scintillator coated CCD imager for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. E.; Bassford, D. J.; Blake, O. E.; Blackshaw, P. E.; Perkins, A. C.

    2011-12-01

    We describe a high resolution, small field of view (SFOV), Charge Coupled Device (CCD) based camera for imaging small volumes of radionuclide uptake in tissues. The Mini Gamma Ray Camera (MGRC) is a collimated, scintillator-coated, low cost, high performance imager using low noise CCDs. The prototype MGRC has a 600 ?m thick layer of columnar CsI(Tl) and operates in photon counting mode using a thermoelectric cooler to achieve an operating temperature of - 10°C. Collimation was performed using a pin hole collimator. We have measured the spatial resolution, energy resolution and efficiency using a number of radioisotope sources including 140 keV gamma-rays from 99mTc in a specially designed phantom. We also describe our first imaging of a volunteer patient.

  7. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The measurement of naturally occurring radioisotopes whose half lives are less than a few hundred million years but more than a few years provides information about the temporal behavior of geologic and climatic processes, the temporal history of meteoritic bodies as well as the production mechanisms of these radioisotopes. A new extremely sensitive technique for measuring these radioisotopes at tandem Van de Graaff and cyclotron facilities has been very successful though the high cost and limited availability have been discouraging. We have built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar in size to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. We found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. We show how a conventional carbon negative ion source, located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sampling to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  8. Interpretive Experiments: An Interpretive Experiment in Ion Cyclotron Resonance Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnier, R. C.; Freiser, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Provides a discussion which is intended for chemistry college students on the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectroscopy, the physical basis for ion cyclotron resonance, and the experimental methodology employed by ICR spectroscopists. (HM)

  9. April 16, 2008 Particle Physics Invention of Cyclotron

    E-print Network

    April 16, 2008 Particle Physics Invention of Cyclotron Physics 363 April 16, 2008 Satomi Shiraishi First cyclotron (4.5 inch) Ernest O. Lawrence, Noble Prize in 1939 "for the invention and development

  10. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    This report describes the author's continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program has 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry /Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section under the DOE grant during the 1989--1992 grant period, will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections of the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 grant period. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  11. Computer modeling of a compact isochronous cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V. L.

    2015-11-01

    The computer modeling methods of a compact isochronous cyclotron are described. The main stages of analysis of accelerator facilities systems are considered. The described methods are based on theoretical fundamentals of cyclotron physics and mention highlights of creation of the physical project of a compact cyclotron. The main attention is paid to the analysis of the beam dynamics, formation of a magnetic field, stability of the movement, and a realistic assessment of intensity of the generated bunch of particles. In the article, the stages of development of the accelerator computer model, analytical ways of assessment of the accelerator parameters, and the basic technique of the numerical analysis of dynamics of the particles are described.

  12. Design and testing of an electron cyclotron resonance heating ion source for use in high field compact superconducting cyclotrons

    E-print Network

    Artz, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of axial injection of a high brightness beam from an Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source into a high magnetic field cyclotron. Axial injection from an ion ...

  13. Toxicity and Patterns of Failure of Adaptive/Ablative Proton Therapy for Early-Stage, Medically Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe Y.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wen, Hong Y.; De Gracia, Beth; Bluett, Jaques B.; McAleer, Mary F.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Cox, James D.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze the toxicity and patterns of failure of proton therapy given in ablative doses for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with medically inoperable T1N0M0 (central location) or T2-3N0M0 (any location) NSCLC were treated with proton therapy at 87.5 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) at 2.5 Gy /fraction in this Phase I/II study. All patients underwent treatment simulation with four-dimensional CT; internal gross tumor volumes were delineated on maximal intensity projection images and modified by visual verification of the target volume in 10 breathing phases. The internal gross tumor volumes with maximal intensity projection density was used to design compensators and apertures to account for tumor motion. Therapy consisted of passively scattered protons. All patients underwent repeat four-dimensional CT simulations during treatment to assess the need for adaptive replanning. Results: At a median follow-up time of 16.3 months (range, 4.8-36.3 months), no patient had experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. The most common adverse effect was dermatitis (Grade 2, 67%; Grade 3, 17%), followed by Grade 2 fatigue (44%), Grade 2 pneumonitis (11%), Grade 2 esophagitis (6%), and Grade 2 chest wall pain (6%). Rates of local control were 88.9%, regional lymph node failure 11.1%, and distant metastasis 27.8%. Twelve patients (67%) were still alive at the last follow-up; five had died of metastatic disease and one of preexisting cardiac disease. Conclusions: Proton therapy to ablative doses is well tolerated and produces promising local control rates for medically inoperable early-stage NSCLC.

  14. Inverse ion-cyclotron damping: Laboratory demonstration and space ramificationsa...

    E-print Network

    Carlson, Charles W.

    Inverse ion-cyclotron damping: Laboratory demonstration and space ramificationsa... M. E. Koepke 2003 The familiar and ubiquitous phenomenon of ion-cyclotron damping is shown to be invertible in a laboratory plasma resembling ionospheric plasma in terms of important dimensionless parameters. The ion-cyclotron

  15. Cyclotron Resonances in a Non-Neutral Multispecies Ion Plasma

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    Cyclotron Resonances in a Non-Neutral Multispecies Ion Plasma M. Affolter, F. Anderegg, C. F, California 92093 Abstract. Shifts of the cyclotron mode frequencies, away from the single particle limit as determination of cyclotron mode frequencies from launched wave absorption. At moderately low temperatures, the m

  16. RXTE Studies of Cyclotron Lines in Accreting Pulsars

    E-print Network

    Barnstedt, Jürgen

    RXTE Studies of Cyclotron Lines in Accreting Pulsars W.A. Heindl \\Lambda , W. Coburn \\Lambda , D, 1290 Versoix, Switzerland I INTRODUCTION Cyclotron lines in accreting X­ray pulsar spectra result from near the neutron star poles. For this reason they are known as cyclotron resonance scattering features

  17. Ion cyclotron harmonics in the Saturn downward current auroral region

    E-print Network

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    Ion cyclotron harmonics in the Saturn downward current auroral region J. D. Menietti,1 P. Schippers Investigation (CAPS) instrument we have been able to identify ion cyclotron harmonic waves associated. Gurnett, F. Crary, and A. J. Coates (2011), Ion cyclotron harmonics in the Saturn downward current auroral

  18. VARIABLE CYCLOTRON LINE IN HER X-1 R. Staubert1

    E-print Network

    Barnstedt, Jürgen

    VARIABLE CYCLOTRON LINE IN HER X-1 R. Staubert1 , N. I. Shakura2 , K. P. Postnov2 , J. Wilms3 , W of California, San Diego, USA ABSTRACT We present new results on the cyclotron resonance scat- tering feature that the cyclotron line energy correlates with the observed maximum flux of the corresponding 35 day Main-On state

  19. Electron Cyclotron Emission Radiometer Cristina Morales, Advisor: Dr. John Rodgers,

    E-print Network

    Anlage, Steven

    Electron Cyclotron Emission Radiometer Cristina Morales, Advisor: Dr. John Rodgers, Abstract ·The-Maxwellian bursts in plasma temperature. ·The receiver measures electron cyclotron emission (ECE) from magnetized around the magnetic field lines and radiate at the electron cyclotron frequency given by ·Magnetic Field

  20. A room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the DC-110 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A. Bogomolov, S.; Lebedev, A.; Loginov, V.; Yazvitsky, N.

    2014-02-15

    The project of the DC-110 cyclotron facility to provide applied research in the nanotechnologies (track pore membranes, surface modification of materials, etc.) has been designed by the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna). The facility includes the isochronous cyclotron DC-110 for accelerating the intensive Ar, Kr, Xe ion beams with 2.5 MeV/nucleon fixed energy. The cyclotron is equipped with system of axial injection and ECR ion source DECRIS-5, operating at the frequency of 18 GHz. This article reviews the design and construction of DECRIS-5 ion source along with some initial commissioning results.

  1. Lack of independent effect of type 2 diabetes beyond characteristic comorbidities and medications on small muscle mass exercising muscle blood flow and exercise tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Poitras, Veronica J; Bentley, Robert F; Hopkins-Rosseel, Diana H; LaHaye, Stephen A; Tschakovsky, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Persons with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are believed to have reduced exercise tolerance; this may be partly due to impaired exercising muscle blood flow (MBF). Whether there is an impact of T2D on exercising MBF within the typical constellation of comorbidities (hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity) and their associated medications has not been investigated. We tested the hypothesis that small muscle mass exercise tolerance is reduced in persons with T2D versus Controls (matched for age, body mass index, fitness, comorbidities, non-T2D medications) and that this is related to blunted MBF. Eight persons with T2D and eight controls completed a forearm critical force (fCFimpulse) test as a measure of exercise tolerance (10-min intermittent maximal effort forearm contractions; the average contraction impulse in the last 30 sec quantified fCFimpulse). Forearm blood flow (FBF; ultrasound) and mean arterial pressure (MAP; finger photoplethysmography) were measured; forearm vascular conductance (FVK) was calculated. Data are means ± SD, T2D versus Control. fCFimpulse was not different between groups (136.9 ± 47.3  N·sec vs. 163.1 ± 49.7 N·sec, P = 0.371) nor was the ?FBF from rest to during exercise at fCFimpulse (502.9 ± 144.6 vs. 709.1 ± 289.2 mL/min, P = 0.092), or its determinants ?FVK and ?MAP (both P > 0.05), although there was considerable interindividual variability. ?FBF was strongly related to fCFimpulse (r = 0.727, P = 0.002), providing support for the relationship between oxygen delivery and exercise tolerance. We conclude that small muscle mass exercising MBF and exercise tolerance are not impaired in representative persons with T2D versus appropriately matched controls. This suggests that peripheral vascular control impairment does not contribute to reduced exercise tolerance in this population. PMID:26265750

  2. Lack of independent effect of type 2 diabetes beyond characteristic comorbidities and medications on small muscle mass exercising muscle blood flow and exercise tolerance.

    PubMed

    Poitras, Veronica J; Bentley, Robert F; Hopkins-Rosseel, Diana H; LaHaye, Stephen A; Tschakovsky, Michael E

    2015-08-01

    Persons with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are believed to have reduced exercise tolerance; this may be partly due to impaired exercising muscle blood flow (MBF). Whether there is an impact of T2D on exercising MBF within the typical constellation of comorbidities (hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity) and their associated medications has not been investigated. We tested the hypothesis that small muscle mass exercise tolerance is reduced in persons with T2D versus Controls (matched for age, body mass index, fitness, comorbidities, non-T2D medications) and that this is related to blunted MBF. Eight persons with T2D and eight controls completed a forearm critical force (fCFimpulse) test as a measure of exercise tolerance (10-min intermittent maximal effort forearm contractions; the average contraction impulse in the last 30 sec quantified fCFimpulse). Forearm blood flow (FBF; ultrasound) and mean arterial pressure (MAP; finger photoplethysmography) were measured; forearm vascular conductance (FVK) was calculated. Data are means ± SD, T2D versus Control. fCFimpulse was not different between groups (136.9 ± 47.3  N·sec vs. 163.1 ± 49.7 N·sec, P = 0.371) nor was the ?FBF from rest to during exercise at fCFimpulse (502.9 ± 144.6 vs. 709.1 ± 289.2 mL/min, P = 0.092), or its determinants ?FVK and ?MAP (both P > 0.05), although there was considerable interindividual variability. ?FBF was strongly related to fCFimpulse (r = 0.727, P = 0.002), providing support for the relationship between oxygen delivery and exercise tolerance. We conclude that small muscle mass exercising MBF and exercise tolerance are not impaired in representative persons with T2D versus appropriately matched controls. This suggests that peripheral vascular control impairment does not contribute to reduced exercise tolerance in this population. PMID:26265750

  3. Indiana University cyclotron facility Back by popular demand are guided tours of the IU cyclotron facility, a

    E-print Network

    Evans, Hal

    Open House at the Indiana University cyclotron facility Back by popular demand are guided tours of the IU cyclotron facility, a large, multi-disciplinary laboratory where research in nuclear physics of Energy and Matter, and IU Cyclotron Operations, which supports the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute

  4. Ion-cyclotron instability in magnetic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlstein, L.D.

    1987-02-02

    This report reviews the role of ion-cyclotron frequency instability in magnetic mirrors. The modes discussed here are loss-cone or anisotropy driven. The discussion includes quasilinear theory, explosive instabilities of 3-wave interaction and non-linear Landau damping, and saturation due to non-linear orbits. (JDH)

  5. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-19

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation and treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 109 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with {sup 10}B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  6. Stability of the electron cyclotron resonance

    E-print Network

    Joachim Asch; Olivier Bourget; Cédric Meresse

    2015-10-15

    We consider the magnetic AC Stark effect for the quantum dynamics of a single particle in the plane under the influence of an oscillating homogeneous electric and a constant perpendicular magnetic field. We prove that the electron cyclotron resonance is insensitive to impurity potentials.

  7. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-01

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation & treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8×109 neutrons/cm2/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with 10B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  8. Experimental measurement and Monte Carlo assessment of Argon-41 production in a PET cyclotron facility.

    PubMed

    Infantino, Angelo; Valtieri, Lorenzo; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Pancaldi, Davide; Mostacci, Domiziano; Marengo, Mario

    2015-12-01

    In a medical cyclotron facility, (41)Ar (t1/2?=?109.34?m) is produced by the activation of air due to the neutron flux during irradiation, according to the (40)Ar(n,?)(41)Ar reaction; this is particularly relevant in widely diffused high beam current cyclotrons for the production of PET radionuclides. While theoretical estimations of the (41)Ar production have been published, no data are available on direct experimental measurements for a biomedical cyclotron. In this work, we describe a sampling methodology and report the results of an extensive measurement campaign. Furthermore, the experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations performed with the FLUKA code. To measure (41)Ar activity, air samples were taken inside the cyclotron bunker in sealed Marinelli beakers, during the routine production of (18)F with a 16.5?MeV GE-PETtrace cyclotron; this sampling thus reproduces a situation of absence of air changes. Samples analysis was performed in a gamma-ray spectrometry system equipped with HPGe detector. Monte Carlo assessment of the (41)Ar saturation yield was performed directly using the standard FLUKA score RESNUCLE, and off-line by the convolution of neutron fluence with cross section data. The average (41)Ar saturation yield per one liter of air of (41)Ar, measured in gamma-ray spectrometry, resulted to be 3.0?±?0.6?Bq/µA*dm(3) while simulations gave a result of 6.9?±?0.3?Bq/µA*dm(3) in the direct assessment and 6.92?±?0.22?Bq/µA*dm(3) by the convolution neutron fluence-to-cross section. PMID:26420444

  9. Development of an Accelerator Mass Spectrometer based on a Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dogyun; Bhang, Hyeongchan; Kim, Jongwon

    2011-12-13

    An accelerator mass spectrometer based on a cyclotron has been developed, and a prototype of the injection beam line has been constructed. Mass resolution of the cyclotron is designed to be over 4000. A sawtooth RF buncher in the beam line and a flat-topping RF system for the cyclotron were utilized to enhance beam transmission efficiency, which is a primary factor for improvement compared to previous cyclotron mass spectrometers. The injection beam line comprises an ion source, Einzel lens, RF buncher, 90 deg. dipole magnet and a slit box containing beam diagnostic devices. A carbon beam was measured at the location of the slit box, and beam phase spaces will be measured. The design of a cyclotron magnet was done, and orbit tracking was carried out using cyclotron optics codes. A scheme of radial injection was chosen to place a beam on the equilibrium orbit of the cyclotron. The injection scheme will be optimized after the beam measurements are completed.

  10. EBCO Technologies TR Cyclotrons, Dynamics, Equipment, and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.R.; Erdman, K. L.; Gyles, Wm.; Burbee, J.; Kovacs, M.; VanLier, E.; Perron, F.

    2003-08-26

    The Ebco Technologies TR cyclotrons have a common parent in the 500 MeV negative ion cyclotron at TRIUMF in Vancouver. As such, the TR cyclotrons have features that can be adapted for specific application. The cyclotron design is modularized into ion source and injection system, central region and then extraction. The cyclotron ion source is configured for cyclotron beam currents ranging from 50 microAmps to 2 milliAmps. The injection line can be operated in either continuous (CW) or in pulsed mode. The center region of the cyclotron is configured to match the ion source configuration. The extracted beams are directed either to a local target station or to beam lines and thence to target stations. There has been development both in solid, liquid and gas targets. There has been development in radioisotope handling techniques, target material recovery and radiochemical synthesis.

  11. Design study of a 9 MeV compact cyclotron system for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeong-No; Shin, Seung-Wook; Song, Hoseung; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Chai, Jong-Seo

    2013-06-01

    A cyclotron is an accelerator which can be applied to both cancer diagnosis and treatment. Among commercially sold cyclotrons, the major energy is used for positron emission tomography (PET) ranges from 10 to 20 MeV. In this research, 9 MeV compact cyclotron for PET was designed. The research was conducted on the response cross section and the yield for the energy distribution to decide the design features. Also, it was determined the specifications on the basis of the fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) maximum dose. The machine, which has a 20 uA beam current, is designed to be installed in small-to-medium-sized hospitals in local cities because of its relatively light weight (6 tons). This compact cyclotron, which provides 9-MeV proton beams, is composed of a azimuthally varying field (AVF) electromagnet, 83-MHz RF systems with a 20 kW amplifier, a panning ion gauge (PIG) type ion-source for negative hydrogen, and a double-stage high-vacuum system. The basic model design was done by using 3-D CAD program, CATIA and all the field calculations were performed using commercial electromagnetic field analysis code, OPERA-3D TOSCA. From this research, we expect a time reduction for FDG production, a decrease of radioactive exposure for workers, and an equipment cost reduction.

  12. Coronal ion-cyclotron beam instabilities within the multi-fluid description

    E-print Network

    Mecheri, R

    2007-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations and theoretical models suggest resonant wave-particle interactions, involving high-frequency ion-cyclotron waves, as the principal mechanism for heating and accelerating ions in the open coronal holes. However, the mechanism responsible for the generation of the ion-cyclotron waves remains unclear. One possible scenario is that ion beams originating from small-scale reconnection events can drive micro-instabilities that constitute a possible source for the excitation of ion-cyclotron waves. In order to study ion beam-driven electromagnetic instabilities, the multi-fluid model in the low-beta coronal plasma is used. While neglecting the electron inertia this model allows one to take into account ion-cyclotron wave effects that are absent from the one-fluid MHD model. Realistic models of density and temperature as well as a 2-D analytical magnetic field model are used to define the background plasma in the open-field funnel region of a polar coronal hole. Considering the WKB approxima...

  13. Electron-cyclotron wave scattering by edge density fluctuations in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Tsironis, Christos; Peeters, Arthur G.; Isliker, Heinz; Chatziantonaki, Ioanna; Vlahos, Loukas; Strintzi, Dafni

    2009-11-15

    The effect of edge turbulence on the electron-cyclotron wave propagation in ITER is investigated with emphasis on wave scattering, beam broadening, and its influence on localized heating and current drive. A wave used for electron-cyclotron current drive (ECCD) must cross the edge of the plasma, where density fluctuations can be large enough to bring on wave scattering. The scattering angle due to the density fluctuations is small, but the beam propagates over a distance of several meters up to the resonance layer and even small angle scattering leads to a deviation of several centimeters at the deposition location. Since the localization of ECCD is crucial for the control of neoclassical tearing modes, this issue is of great importance to the ITER design. The wave scattering process is described on the basis of a Fokker-Planck equation, where the diffusion coefficient is calculated analytically as well as computed numerically using a ray tracing code.

  14. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-10-01

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves if the total density is large. We show that for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motion of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.

  15. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motion of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.

  16. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motionmore »of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.« less

  17. The Impact of Tumor Size on Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allibhai, Zishan; Taremi, Mojgan; Bezjak, Andrea; Brade, Anthony; Hope, Andrew J.; Sun, Alexander; Cho, B.C. John

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) offers excellent control rates. Most published series deal mainly with small (usually <4 cm), peripheral, solitary tumors. Larger tumors are associated with poorer outcomes (ie, lower control rates, higher toxicity) when treated with conventional RT. It is unclear whether SBRT is sufficiently potent to control these larger tumors. We therefore evaluated and examined the influence of tumor size on treatment outcomes after SBRT. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and October 2010, 185 medically inoperable patients with early (T1-T2N0M0) NSCLC were treated on a prospective research ethics board-approved single-institution protocol. Prescription doses were risk-adapted based on tumor size and location. Follow-up included prospective assessment of toxicity (as per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and serial computed tomography scans. Patterns of failure, toxicity, and survival outcomes were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method, and the significance of tumor size (diameter, volume) with respect to patient, treatment, and tumor factors was tested. Results: Median follow-up was 15.2 months. Tumor size was not associated with local failure but was associated with regional failure (P=.011) and distant failure (P=.021). Poorer overall survival (P=.001), disease-free survival (P=.001), and cause-specific survival (P=.005) were also significantly associated with tumor size (with tumor volume more significant than diameter). Gross tumor volume and planning target volume were significantly associated with grade 2 or worse radiation pneumonitis. However, overall rates of grade ?3 pneumonitis were low and not significantly affected by tumor or target size. Conclusions: Currently employed stereotactic body radiation therapy dose regimens can provide safe effective local therapy even for larger solitary NSCLC tumors (up to 5.7 cm in tumor diameter or 100 cm{sup 3} in tumor volume) but are associated with more nonlocal failures as well as poorer survival. These observations suggest these patients may benefit from more extensive staging or consideration of adjuvant therapy.

  18. Plasma processing of spent nuclear fuel by two-frequency ion cyclotron resonance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2009-11-15

    A previously developed method for analyzing the plasma processing of spent nuclear fuel is generalized to a plasma containing multicharged fuel ions. In such a plasma, ion cyclotron resonance heating of nuclear ash ions should be carried out in two monochromatic RF fields of different frequencies, provided that the fraction of {xi} multicharged ions is small, {xi} {<=} 0.1, a condition that substantially restricts the productivity of systems for processing spent nuclear fuel. Ways of overcoming this difficulty are discussed.

  19. Resonant cyclotron acceleration of particles by a time periodic singular flux tube

    E-print Network

    Joachim Asch; Tomas Kalvoda; Pavel Stovicek

    2011-03-15

    We study the dynamics of a classical nonrelativistic charged particle moving on a punctured plane under the influence of a homogeneous magnetic field and driven by a periodically time-dependent singular flux tube through the hole. We observe an effect of resonance of the flux and cyclotron frequencies. The particle is accelerated to arbitrarily high energies even by a flux of small field strength which is not necessarily encircled by the cyclotron orbit; the cyclotron orbits blow up and the particle oscillates between the hole and infinity. We support this observation by an analytic study of an approximation for small amplitudes of the flux which is obtained with the aid of averaging methods. This way we derive asymptotic formulas that are afterwards shown to represent a good description of the accelerated motion even for fluxes which are not necessarily small. More precisely, we argue that the leading asymptotic terms may be regarded as approximate solutions of the original system in the asymptotic domain as the time tends to infinity.

  20. Coronal ion-cyclotron beam instabilities within the multi-fluid description

    E-print Network

    R. Mecheri; E. Marsch

    2007-06-07

    Spectroscopic observations and theoretical models suggest resonant wave-particle interactions, involving high-frequency ion-cyclotron waves, as the principal mechanism for heating and accelerating ions in the open coronal holes. However, the mechanism responsible for the generation of the ion-cyclotron waves remains unclear. One possible scenario is that ion beams originating from small-scale reconnection events can drive micro-instabilities that constitute a possible source for the excitation of ion-cyclotron waves. In order to study ion beam-driven electromagnetic instabilities, the multi-fluid model in the low-beta coronal plasma is used. While neglecting the electron inertia this model allows one to take into account ion-cyclotron wave effects that are absent from the one-fluid MHD model. Realistic models of density and temperature as well as a 2-D analytical magnetic field model are used to define the background plasma in the open-field funnel region of a polar coronal hole. Considering the WKB approximation, a Fourier plane-wave linear mode analysis is employed in order to derive the dispersion relation. Ray-tracing theory is used to compute the ray path of the unstable wave as well as the evolution of the growth rate of the wave while propagating in the coronal funnel. We demonstrate that, in typical coronal holes conditions and assuming realistic values of the beam velocity, the free energy provided by the ion beam propagating parallel the ambient field can drive micro-instabilities through resonant ion-cyclotron excitation.

  1. ENSEMBLE SIMULATIONS OF PROTON HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND VIA TURBULENCE AND ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-07-01

    Protons in the solar corona and heliosphere exhibit anisotropic velocity distributions, violation of magnetic moment conservation, and a general lack of thermal equilibrium with the other particle species. There is no agreement about the identity of the physical processes that energize non-Maxwellian protons in the solar wind, but a traditional favorite has been the dissipation of ion cyclotron resonant Alfvén waves. This paper presents kinetic models of how ion cyclotron waves heat protons on their journey from the corona to interplanetary space. It also derives a wide range of new solutions for the relevant dispersion relations, marginal stability boundaries, and nonresonant velocity-space diffusion rates. A phenomenological model containing both cyclotron damping and turbulent cascade is constructed to explain the suppression of proton heating at low alpha-proton differential flow speeds. These effects are implemented in a large-scale model of proton thermal evolution from the corona to 1 AU. A Monte Carlo ensemble of realistic wind speeds, densities, magnetic field strengths, and heating rates produces a filled region of parameter space (in a plane described by the parallel plasma beta and the proton temperature anisotropy ratio) similar to what is measured. The high-beta edges of this filled region are governed by plasma instabilities and strong heating rates. The low-beta edges correspond to weaker proton heating and a range of relative contributions from cyclotron resonance. On balance, the models are consistent with other studies that find only a small fraction of the turbulent power spectrum needs to consist of ion cyclotron waves.

  2. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, D. S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A local electrostatic dispersion equation is derived for a shear flow perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter. The dispersion equation is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and is solved numerically. Numerical solutions indicate that an ion cyclotron instability is excited. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (modified by the shear), with the growth rate or the individual harmonics overlapping in the wavenumber. At large values of the shear parameter, the instability is confined to long wavelengths, but at smaller shear, a second distinct branch at shorter wavelengths also appears. The properties of the instability obtained are compared with those obtained in the nonlocal limit by Ganguli et al. (1985, 1988).

  3. The mirror and ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    The linear dispersion equation for fully electromagnetic waves and instabilities at arbitrary directions of propagation relative to a background magnetic field B(0) in a homogeneous Vlasov plasma is solved numerically for bi-Maxwellian particle distributions. For isotropic plasmas the dispersion and damping of the three modes below the proton cyclotron frequency are studied as functions of Beta(i) and T(e)/T(i). The transport ratios of helicity, cross-helicity, Alfven ratio, compressibility, and parallel compressibility are defined. Under the condition that the proton temperature perpendicular to B(0) is greater than the parallel temperature, the growth rates and transport ratios of the mirror instability and the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability are examined and compared. Both the proton parallel compressibility and the proton Alfven ratio are significantly different for the two growing modes.

  4. A model for cyclotron resonance scattering features

    E-print Network

    G. Schönherr; J. Wilms; P. Kretschmar; I. Kreykenbohm; A. Santangelo; R. E. Rothschild; W. Coburn; R. Staubert

    2007-07-13

    (abbreviated version of the abstract) We study the physics of cyclotron line formation in the high-energy spectra of accreting X-ray pulsars using Monte Carlo methods, assuming that the line-forming region is a low-density electron plasma in a sub-critical magnetic field. We investigate the dependence of the shape of the fundamental line on angle, geometry, optical depth and temperature. We also discuss variations of the line ratios for non-uniform magnetic fields. These numerical predictions for the line profiles are linked to results from observational data analysis using an XSPEC model based on the Monte Carlo simulations. We apply this model to observational data from RXTE and INTEGRAL. The predicted strong emission wings of the fundamental cyclotron feature are not found in observational data, hinting at a bottom illuminated slab geometry for line formation.

  5. TFTR Michelson interferometer electron cyclotron emission diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, F. J.; Boyd, D. A.; Cutler, R. C.; McCarthy, M. P.

    1985-05-01

    In July 1984, a Fourier transform spectrometer employing a fast-scanning Michelson interferometer began operating on TFTR. This diagnostic system can measure the electron cyclotron emission spectrum 72 times per s with a time resolution of 11 ms and a spectral resolution of 3.6 GHz. The initial operating spectral range is 75-540 GHz, which is adequate for measuring the first three cyclotron harmonics at present TFTR magnetic field levels. The range can be extended easily to 75-1080 GHz in order to accommodate increases in toroidal magnetic field or to study superthermal ECE. The measured spectra are absolutely calibrated using a liquid nitrogen cooled blackbody reference source. The second harmonic feature of each spectrum is used to calculate the absolute electron temperature profile.

  6. Electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, B. H.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Donne, A. J. H.; van de Pol, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    A 16-channel electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic system, developed by UC Davis in collaboration with the FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, has been installed on the Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research tokamak. The system is designed to collect multichannel electron temperature profile and fluctuation data along a vertical chord of constant magnetic field, by collecting second harmonic X-mode emission. Technical details of the system are presented together with preliminary experimental data.

  7. Simulations of ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities in the terrestrial magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Winske, Dan

    1993-01-01

    Enhanced transverse magnetic fluctuations observed below the proton cyclotron frequency in the terrestrial magnetosheath have been identified as due to the proton cyclotron and helium cyclotron instabilities driven by the T-perpendicular greater than T-parallel condition of the sheath ions. One-dimensional hybrid computer simulations are used here to examine the nonlinear properties of these two growing modes at relatively weak fluctuation energies and for wave vectors parallel to the background magnetic field. Second-order theory predicts fluctuating magnetic field energies at saturation of the proton cyclotron anisotropy instability in semiquantitative agreement with the simulation results. Introduction of the helium component enhances the wave-particle exchange rate for proton anisotropy reduction by that instability, thereby reducing the saturation energy of that mode. The simulations demonstrate that wave-particle interactions by the proton cyclotron and helium cyclotron instabilities lead to the anticorrelation observed by Anderson and Fuselier (1993).

  8. Operation of a quasioptical electron cyclotron maser

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, E.C.; Pyle, R.V.

    1984-12-01

    The electron cyclotron maser or gyrotron concept has been developed to produce sources producing 200 kW at 28 GHz continuously, and higher power outputs and frequencies in pulsed mode. These sources have been useful in electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in magnetically confined fusion devices. However, higher frequencies and higher power levels will be required in reactor-grade fusion plasmas, with likely requirements of 1.0 MW or more per source at 140 GHz. Conventional gyrotrons follow a trend of decreasing power for increasing frequency. In order to circumvent this problem, the quasioptical electron cyclotron maser was proposed. In this device, the closed resonator of the conventional gyrotron is replaced with an open, Fabry-Perot type resonator. The cavity modes are then the TEM-type modes of an optical laser. The advantage of this configuration is that the cavity size is not a function of frequency, since the length can be any half-integer number of wavelengths. Furthermore, the beam traverses across the cavity transverse to the direction of radiation output, and thus the rf window design is less complicated than in conventional tubes. The rf output, if obtained by diffraction coupling around one of the mirrors, could be in a TEM mode, which would allow for quasioptical transmission of the microwaves into the plasma in fusion devices. 4 references, 1 figure.

  9. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    Our goal is to improve the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The grant includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. The radiochemistry group seeks to develop innovative cyclotron targetry, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiolabeled antibodies, which are then used to assess important unanswered questions in tumor pharmacology and immunology. Examples include selected positron emitting radionuclides, such as Iodine-124, and Ga-66; I-124, I-123, I-131 labeled iododeoxyuridine, C-11 colchicine, and antimetabolites, like C-11 methotrexate; and radiolabeled antibodies, 3F8, M195, A33, and MRK16 for application in the pharmacology and immunology projects. The pharmacology program studies tumor resistance to chemotherapy, particularly the phenomenon of multidrug resistance and the relationship between tumor uptake and retention and the tumor response for anti-metabolite drugs. The immunology program studies the physiology of antibody localization at the tissue level as the basis for novel approaches to improving tumor localization such as through the use of an artificial lymphatic system which mechanically reduces intratumoral pressures in tumors in vivo. Quantitative imaging approaches based on PET and SPECT in radioimmunotherapy are studied to give greater insight into the physiology of tumor localization and dosimetry.

  10. Radially Localized Measurements of Superthermal Electrons Using Oblique Electron Cyclotron Emission

    E-print Network

    Radially Localized Measurements of Superthermal Electrons Using Oblique Electron Cyclotron Emission Cyclotron Emission from superthermalelectrons can be imposed by observationof emission upshiftedfrom the thermal cyclotron resonance in the horizontal midplane of a tokamak. A new and unique diagnostic has been

  11. 76 FR 80982 - International Cyclotron, Inc., Hato Rey, Puerto Rico; Order Suspending Licensed Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ...EA-11-086; NRC-2011-0292] International Cyclotron, Inc., Hato Rey, Puerto Rico; Order Suspending Licensed Activities I International Cyclotron, Inc. (International Cyclotron; Licensee) is the holder of Byproduct...

  12. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves at proton cyclotron C. C. Chaston, J. W. Bonnell, J. P. McFadden, R. E. Ergun, and C. W. Carlson

    E-print Network

    Bonnell, John W.

    ] The importance of ion cyclotron waves in auroral physics lies in their ability to heat ions, accelerateElectromagnetic ion cyclotron waves at proton cyclotron harmonics C. C. Chaston, J. W. Bonnell, J; published 7 November 2002. [1] Waves with frequencies in the vicinity of the proton cyclotron frequency

  13. C235-V3 cyclotron for a proton therapy center to be installed in the hospital complex of radiation medicine (Dimitrovgrad)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, R. V.; Gurskii, S. V.; Jongen, Y.; Karamysheva, G. A.; Kazarinov, M. Yu.; Korovkin, S. A.; Kostromin, S. A.; Calderan, J.-M.; Cahay, P.; Mokrenko, S. P.; Morozov, N. A.; Nkongolo, H.; Ol'shevskii, A. G.; Paradis, Y.; Petrov, D. S.; Romanov, V. M.; Samsonov, E. V.; Syresin, E. M.; Shakun, A. N.; Shakun, N. G.; Shirkov, G. D.; Shirkov, S. G.

    2014-06-01

    Proton therapy is an effective method of treating oncologic diseases. In Russia, construction of several centers for proton and ion therapy is slated for the years to come. A proton therapy center in Dimitrovgrad will be the first. The Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russia) in collaboration with Ion Beam Application (IBA) (Belgium) has designed an C235-V3 medical proton cyclotron for this center. It outperforms previous versions of commercial IBA cyclotrons, which have already been installed in 11 oncologic hospital centers in different countries. Experimental and calculation data for the beam dynamics in the C235-V3 medical cyclotron are presented. Reasons for beam losses during acceleration are considered, the influence of the magnetic field radial component in the midplane of the accelerator and main resonances is studied, and a beam extraction system is designed. In 2011-2012 in Dubna, the cyclotron was mounted, its magnetic field was properly configured, acceleration conditions were optimized, and beam extraction tests were carried out after which it was supplied to Dimitrovgrad. In the C235-V3 cyclotron, an acceleration efficiency of 72% and an extraction efficiency of 62% have been achieved without diaphragming to form a vertical profile of the beam.

  14. Suppression of cyclotron instability in Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion sources by two-frequency heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.; Mansfeld, D.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-08-01

    Multiple frequency heating is one of the most effective techniques to improve the performance of Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion sources. The method increases the beam current and average charge state of the extracted ions and enhances the temporal stability of the ion beams. It is demonstrated in this paper that the stabilizing effect of two-frequency heating is connected with the suppression of electron cyclotron instability. Experimental data show that the interaction between the secondary microwave radiation and the hot electron component of ECR ion source plasmas plays a crucial role in mitigation of the instabilities.

  15. Numerical Simulation of a Multi-Cusp Ion Source for High Current H- Cyclotron at RISP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.

    The rare isotope science project (RISP) has been launched in 2011 to support a wide range science program in nuclear, material, and bio-medical sciences as well as interdisciplinary programs. The production of rare isotope beams at RISP is currently configured to include facilities for both an In-flight Fragmentation (IF) system and an Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL) system, which will utilize a 70 MeV H- cyclotron. The cyclotron will deliver 70 kW proton beam power to ISOL targets, where rare isotopes are generated and re-accelerated by a linear accelerator. A multi-cusp ion source used widely in H- cyclotrons is designed to have cusp geometries of magnetic field inside the ion source chamber, where ions are confined and enhanced plasma densities. Therefore the magnetic confinement fields produced by a number of permanent magnetic poles help to increase H- beam currents. In this work a numerical simulation is performed to understand the effect of multi-cusp magnetic fields when the number of magnetic poles is varied from 6 to 14. It is found that the larger number of magnetic poles provides a stronger ion confinement yielding higher extracted H- ion currents while the extracted electron current becomes lower.

  16. High Radiation Dose May Reduce the Negative Effect of Large Gross Tumor Volume in Patients With Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Lujun; West, Brady T.; Hayman, James A.; Lyons, Susan; Cease, Kemp; Kong, F.-M. . E-mail: Fengkong@med.umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the effect of radiation dose varies with gross tumor volume (GTV) in patients with stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 114 consecutive patients with medically inoperable stage I/II NSCLC treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy between 1992 and 2004. The median biologic equivalent dose (BED) was 79.2 Gy (range, 58.2-124.5 Gy). The median GTV was 51.8 cm{sup 3} (range, 2.1-727.8 cm{sup 3}). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Kaplan-Meier estimation and Cox regression models were used for survival analyses. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that there was a significant interaction between radiation dose and GTV (p < 0.001). In patients with BED {<=}79.2 Gy (n = 68), the OS medians for patients with GTV >51.8 cm{sup 3} and {<=}51.8 cm{sup 3} were 18.2 and 23.9 months, respectively (p 0.015). If BED was >79.2 Gy (n = 46), no significant difference was found between GTV groups (p = 0.681). For patients with GTV >51.8 cm{sup 3} (n = 45), the OS medians in those with BED >79.2 Gy and {<=}79.2 Gy were 30.4 and 18.2 months, respectively (p < 0.001). If GTV was {<=}51.8 cm{sup 3} (n = 45), the difference was no longer significant (p = 0.577). Conclusion: High-dose radiation is more important for patients with larger tumors and may be effective in reducing the adverse outcome associated with large GTV. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Versus Surgery for Medically Operable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Markov Model-Based Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Alexander V.; Rodrigues, George; Palma, David A.; Cao, Jeffrey Q.; Yaremko, Brian P.; Malthaner, Richard; Mocanu, Joseph D.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the quality-adjusted life expectancy and overall survival in patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with either stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) or surgery. Methods and Materials: We constructed a Markov model to describe health states after either SBRT or lobectomy for Stage I NSCLC for a 5-year time frame. We report various treatment strategy survival outcomes stratified by age, sex, and pack-year history of smoking, and compared these with an external outcome prediction tool (Adjuvant{exclamation_point} Online). Results: Overall survival, cancer-specific survival, and other causes of death as predicted by our model correlated closely with those predicted by the external prediction tool. Overall survival at 5 years as predicted by baseline analysis of our model is in favor of surgery, with a benefit ranging from 2.2% to 3.0% for all cohorts. Mean quality-adjusted life expectancy ranged from 3.28 to 3.78 years after surgery and from 3.35 to 3.87 years for SBRT. The utility threshold for preferring SBRT over surgery was 0.90. Outcomes were sensitive to quality of life, the proportion of local and regional recurrences treated with standard vs. palliative treatments, and the surgery- and SBRT-related mortalities. Conclusions: The role of SBRT in the medically operable patient is yet to be defined. Our model indicates that SBRT may offer comparable overall survival and quality-adjusted life expectancy as compared with surgical resection. Well-powered prospective studies comparing surgery vs. SBRT in early-stage lung cancer are warranted to further investigate the relative survival, quality of life, and cost characteristics of both treatment paradigms.

  18. The surface-state of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 revealed by cyclotron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Mcdonald, Ross D; Ayala - Valenzuela, Oscar E; Altarawneh, Moaz M; Analytis, James G

    2011-01-14

    Transport measurements of topological insulators are dominated by the conductivity of the bulk, leading to substantial difficulties in resolving the properties of the surface. To this end, we use high magnetic field, rf- and microwave-spectroscopy to selectively couple to the surface conductivity of Bi2Se3 at high frequency. In the frequency range of a few GHz we observe a crossover from quantum oscillations indicative of a small 3D Fermi surface, to cyclotron resonance indicative of a 2D surface state. By probing the conductivity at reduced skin depths, we have observed a 2D cyclotron resonance from a material whose bulk Fermi-surface is 3D. The frequency-magnetic field scaling of this resonance is inconsistent with the bulk effective mass, but more consistent with the dispersion and band filling of a Dirac-like surface state as observed by ARPES, with substantial manybody renormalization.

  19. Backward branch of surface dust cyclotron wave in a semi-bounded magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Won-Seok; Chang, Dong-Man; Jung, Iyoung Michelle; Jung, Young-Dae

    2006-01-15

    The surface dust cyclotron waves are investigated in semi-bounded magnetized dusty plasmas. The dispersion relation is obtained by the plasma dielectric function with the specular reflection boundary condition. The result shows the existence of the low-frequency backward wave branch in the surface dust cyclotron wave. The frequency of the wave is found to be decreased with the dust Debye wave number. It is also found that there is a minimum position of the scaled group velocity in the small-wave-number region. It is interesting to note that the group velocity increases below the minimum position and, however, decreases above the minimum position with increasing the dust Debye wave number.

  20. Resonant plasma heating below the cyclotron frequencya... Roscoe Whiteb)

    E-print Network

    Lin, Zhihong

    Resonant plasma heating below the cyclotron frequencya... Roscoe Whiteb) Plasma Physics Laboratory Resonant heating of a magnetized plasma by low frequency waves of large amplitude is considered leading to chaos and the generic nature of heating below the cyclotron frequency. First the classical case

  1. Electron Cyclotron Heating on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Petty, C.C.

    2005-10-15

    Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) has proved to be a very flexible system for heating applications in DIII-D. The outstanding characteristics of ECH - controllable heating location, a high degree of localization of the power, ability to heat without introducing particles, and ability to heat only the electron fluid - have been used in a wide variety of experiments to study wave physics and transport, to control magnetohydrodynamic activity, and to improve discharges. These characteristics along with relatively easy coupling to the plasma make ECH a valuable resource for both heating and instability control in burning plasmas.

  2. Cavity QED of the graphene cyclotron transition

    E-print Network

    David Hagenmüller; Cristiano Ciuti

    2011-11-15

    We investigate theoretically the cavity quantum electrodynamics of the cyclotron transition for Dirac fermions in graphene. We show that the ultrastrong coupling regime characterized by a vacuum Rabi frequency comparable or even larger than the transition frequency can be obtained for high enough filling factors of the graphene Landau levels. Important qualitative differences occur with respect to the corresponding physics of massive electrons in a semiconductor quantum well. In particular, an instability for the ground state analogous to the one occuring in the Dicke-model is predicted for increasing value of the electron density.

  3. Electron cyclotron heating in TMX-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.W.; Hooper, E.B. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    TMX-Upgrade, an improved tandem mirror experiment under construction at LLNL, will use electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) to create thermal barriers and to increase the center cell ion confining potential. Gyrotron oscillators (200 kW, 28 GHz) supply the heating power for the potential confined electron (fundamental heating) and the mirror-confined electrons (harmonic heating) in the thermal barriers. Important issues are temperature limitation and microstability for the hot electrons. Off-midplane heating can control anisotropy-driven microstability. Spacially restricting heating offers the possibility of temperature control by limiting the energy for resonant interaction.

  4. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C. M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Ng, J. S.T.; Grote, D. P.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L. F.

    2009-04-29

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where lb<< 2pi c/omega c (with lb = bunch length, omega c = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor ~;;3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined vertical density"stripes" found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The existence of the resonances has been confirmed in experiments at PEP-II. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations and experimental observations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics are discussed here.

  5. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C M; Furman, M A; Vay, J L; Grote, D P; Ng, J T; Pivi, M F; Wang, L F

    2009-05-05

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where l{sub b} << 2{pi}{omega}{sub c}, (l{sub b} = bunch duration, {omega}{sub c} = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor {approx} 3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined density 'stripes' of multipactoring found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics will be discussed.

  6. Precision phase control for the radio frequency system of K500 superconducting cyclotron at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata

    SciTech Connect

    Som, Sumit; Ghosh, Surajit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Roy, Suprakash

    2013-11-15

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC) has commissioned K500 Superconducting cyclotron (SCC) based on MSU and Texas A and M university cyclotrons. The radio frequency (RF) system of SCC has been commissioned with the stringent requirement of various RF parameters. The three-phase RF system of Superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9–27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.1°, respectively. The phase control system has the option to change the relative phase difference between any two RF cavities and maintain the phase stability within ±0.1° during round-the-clock cyclotron operation. The said precision phase loop consists of both analogue In-phase/Quadrature modulator to achieve faster response and also Direct Digital Synthesis based phase shifter to achieve wide dynamic range as well. This paper discusses detail insights into the various issues of phase control for the K500 SCC at VECC, Kolkata.

  7. Relativistic cyclotron resonance condition as applied to Type II interplanetary radio emission

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Relativistic cyclotron resonance condition as applied to Type II interplanetary radio emission W. M to couple directly to the o-mode radio branch via the relativistic cyclotron harmonic resonance interaction not exactly at) the cyclotron harmonics, mfc, where m is the cyclotron harmonic number. We compare the details

  8. Cyclotron Modes in Multispecies Ion Plasmas 0 5 10 15 20 25 30

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    Cyclotron Modes in Multispecies Ion Plasmas 1650 1700 1750 1800 1850 1900 1950 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 a variety of cyclotron modes, and electric fields shift the mode frequencies away from the "bare" cyclotron, and R represents image charge corrections from Rwall. A new laser-thermal cyclotron spectroscopy

  9. Spin Separation in Cyclotron Motion L. P. Rokhinson* and V. Larkina

    E-print Network

    Rokhinson, Leonid

    Spin Separation in Cyclotron Motion L. P. Rokhinson* and V. Larkina Department of Physics, Purdue in the same direction, and, correspondingly, different cyclotron orbits in a weak magnetic field. Two point character- istic for cyclotron motion. Then, charge carriers move along the cyclotron orbit with spin

  10. Wave dispersion near cyclotron resonance in pulsar plasmas D. B. Melrose* and Q. Luo

    E-print Network

    Melrose, Don

    Wave dispersion near cyclotron resonance in pulsar plasmas D. B. Melrose* and Q. Luo School below the cyclotron frequency and must propagate through the cyclotron resonance region where they are affected by the reso- nance. Wave dispersion near the cyclotron resonance is discussed in the formalism

  11. Collective cyclotron motion of the relativistic plasma in graphene Markus Mller and Subir Sachdev

    E-print Network

    Müller, Markus

    Collective cyclotron motion of the relativistic plasma in graphene Markus Müller and Subir Sachdev cyclotron motion with a temperature-dependent relativistic cyclotron frequency proportional to the net charge density of the Dirac plasma. In contrast to the undamped cyclotron pole in Galilean

  12. Radiotracers for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rayudu, G.A.S.

    1983-01-01

    This book discusses the medical applications of radiotracers. Diagnostic uses and pharmacokinetics of isotopes and radiopharmaceuticals is emphasized. The volume one covers the following topics: Radiohalogenated compounds, including radioiodine; Tc-labeled compounds; and in-house prepared radiopharmaceuticals. The charge particle range vs. energy in every element is tabulated for protons for cyclotrons users. Discussions are also provided on nonimaging radiotracer methods; /sup 11/C, /sup 13/N, /sup 15/O, /sup 67/Ga. /sup 111/In, /sup 75/Se, /sup 123m/Te compounds; radioactive noble gases; and miscellaneous radiotracers for imaging. Vol. II: Pertinent nuclear science data such as radiation dosimetry, radionuclide production modes, radionuclides for therapy, human experimentation regulations and consent forms, and radiotracer laboratory designs are presented. 272 pp., 7 x 10, 1983, ISBN-0-8493-6016-1.

  13. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed near the oxygen cyclotron frequency by ISEE 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, B. J.; Samson, J. C.; Hu, Y. D.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    The first results of observations of ion cyclotron waves by the elliptically orbiting ISEE 1 and 2 pair of spacecraft are reported. The most intense waves (8 nT) were observed in the outer plasmasphere where convection drift velocities were largest and the Alfven velocity was a minimum. Wave polarization is predominantly left-handed with propagation almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field, and the spectral slot and polarization reversal predicted by cold plasma propagation theory are identified in the wave data. Computations of the experimental wave spectra during the passage through the plasmapause show that the spectral slots relate to the local plasma parameters, possibly suggesting an ion cyclotron wave growth source near the spacecraft. A regular wave packet structure seen over the first 30 min of the event is attributed to the modulation of this energy source by the Pc 5 waves seen at the same time.

  14. Medical Practice Makes Perfect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Cedaron Medical Inc., was founded in 1990 as a result of a NASA SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) grant from Johnson Space Center to develop a Hand Testing and Exercise Unit for use in space. From that research came Dexter, a comprehensive workstation that creates a paperless environment for medical data management.

  15. Ionospheric modification at twice the electron cyclotron frequency.

    PubMed

    Djuth, F T; Pedersen, T R; Gerken, E A; Bernhardt, P A; Selcher, C A; Bristow, W A; Kosch, M J

    2005-04-01

    In 2004, a new transmission band was added to the HAARP high-frequency ionospheric modification facility that encompasses the second electron cyclotron harmonic at altitudes between approximately 220 and 330 km. Initial observations indicate that greatly enhanced airglow occurs whenever the transmission frequency approximately matches the second electron cyclotron harmonic at the height of the upper hybrid resonance. This is the reverse of what happens at higher electron cyclotron harmonics. The measured optical emissions confirm the presence of accelerated electrons in the plasma. PMID:15903924

  16. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes our continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections during the next year. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  17. Ion cyclotron transmission spectroscopy in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    The propagation of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies has been investigated experimentally in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. A small, broadband, radiofrequency (rf) magnetic probe located outside the plasma limiter, at a major radius near that of the plasma center, was excited with a low power, frequency swept source (1--200 MHz). Waves propagating to a distant location were detected with a second, identical probe. The rf transmission spectrum revealed a region of attenuation over a band of frequencies for which the minority fundamental resonance was located between the outer plasma edge and the major radius of the probe location. Distinct, non-overlapping attenuation bands were observed from hydrogen and helium-3 minority species; a distinct tritium band should be observed in future DT experiments. Rapid spectrum acquisition during a helium-3 gas puff experiment showed that the wave attenuation involved the plasma core and was not a surface effect. A model in which the received power varied exponentially with the minority density, averaged over the resonance region, fit the time evolution of the probe signal relatively well. Estimation of a 1-d tunneling parameter from the experimental observations is discussed. Minority concentrations of less than 0.5 % can be resolved with this measurement.

  18. Electron Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, Christine; Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Yu, Jennifer W.

    2008-06-25

    We report a previously unknown resonance for electron cloud dynamics. The 2D simulation code"POSINST" was used to study the electron cloud buildup at different z positions in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring wiggler. An electron equilibrium density enhancement of up to a factor of 3 was found at magnetic field values for which the bunch frequency is an integral multiple of the electron cyclotron frequency. At low magnetic fields the effects of the resonance are prominent, but when B exceeds ~;;(2 pi mec/(elb)), with lb = bunch length, effects of the resonance disappear. Thus short bunches and low B fields are required for observing the effect. The reason for the B field dependence, an explanation of the dynamics, and the results of the 2D simulations and of a single-particle tracking code used to elucidate details of the dynamics are discussed.

  19. Cyclotron maser using the anomalous Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, A. N.; Borisov, A. R.; Fomenko, G. P.; Shlapakovskii, A. S.; Shtein, Iu. G.

    1983-11-01

    The operation of an anomalous-Doppler-effect cyclotron-resonance maser using a waveguide partially filled with dielectric as the slow-wave system is reported. The device investigated is similar to that of Didenko et al. (1983) and comprises a 300-mm-long 50-mm-o.d. 30-mm-i.d. waveguide with fabric-laminate dielectric, located 150 mm from the cathode in a 500-mm-long region of uniform 0-20-kG magnetic field, and a coaxial magnetic-insulation gun producing a 13-mm-i.d. 25-mm-o.d. hollow electron beam. Radiation at 12 + or - 1 mm wavelength and optimum power 20 MW is observed using hot-carrier detectors, with a clear peak in the power-versus-magnetic-field curve at about 6.4 kG.

  20. Analytic descriptions of ion cyclotron absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Bers, A.; Francis, G.; Fuchs, V.; Lashmore-Davies, C.N.; Ram, A.K.

    1987-05-01

    Analysis of energy propagation and absorption in ion-cyclotron heating of tokamak plasmas has relied on numerical solutions of fourth (and sixth) order differential equations for slab models of the plasma (poloidal) cross section. Realistic two-dimensional and fully toroidal geometry analyses would become quite unwieldy. It is shown here that the analysis of the slab model can be simplified considerably. A first-order differential equation is shown to describe the transmission coefficient for the fast wave, and it is solved analytically. A second order differential equation is shown to adequately describe both transmission and reflection. Conditions for ion absorption or mode conversion are derived. Including toroidal effects in propagation, conditions for electron absorption on the mode-converted ion-Bernstein waves are also described analytically.

  1. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... topic can be found in our Audiology Information Series [PDF]. What Is Ototoxicity? Certain medications can damage ... the course of your treatment, you should have periodic hearing tests as part of the monitoring process. ...

  2. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. [2002 - 2007]. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis of modern satellite and ground-based data is needed to solve this very intriguing problem.

  3. Superconducting cyclotron and its vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, A.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2008-05-01

    A large superconducting cyclotron is under construction at this Centre and will be used to accelerate heavy ion beams to energy up to 80 MeV/A for light heavy ions and about 10 MeV/A for medium mass heavy ions. The vacuum system for this accelerator has several different aspects. The main acceleration chamber will be evacuated to a level of about 10-7 torr using both turbo molecular pumps and specially designed cryopanels. The surfaces exposed to this 'vacuum' are mostly made of OFE copper. The cryogenic transfer lines, to cool the cryopanels, are of several meters in length and they pass through RF resonators extending below the magnet. The cryostat that will house the superconducting coils has an annular vacuum chamber, which is evacuated to a level of approximately 10-5 torr using a turbo molecular pump. Cryopumping action starts once the coils are cooled to low temperatures. A differential pumping is provided below the RF liner that encloses the pole tip of the main magnet. The space that is pumped in this case contains epoxy-potted trim coils wound around the pole tips. Crucial interlocks are provided between the differential vacuum and the acceleration chamber vacuum to avoid distortion of the RF liner, which is made of thin copper sheets. The other important vacuum system provides thermal insulation for the liquid helium transfer lines. In this paper a brief description of the superconducting cyclotron will be given. Details of various vacuum aspects of the accelerator and the logistics of their operation will be presented. Introduction of some of the improved equipment now available and improved techniques are also discussed.

  4. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is very well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis of modern satellite and ground-based data is needed to solve this very intriguing problem.

  5. Ohm's Law at strong coupling: S duality and the cyclotron resonance

    E-print Network

    Sean A. Hartnoll; Christopher P. Herzog

    2007-10-18

    We calculate the electrical and thermal conductivities and the thermoelectric coefficient of a class of strongly interacting 2+1 dimensional conformal field theories with anti-de Sitter space duals. We obtain these transport coefficients as a function of charge density, background magnetic field, temperature and frequency. We show that the thermal conductivity and thermoelectric coefficient are determined by the electrical conductivity alone. At small frequency, in the hydrodynamic limit, we are able to provide a number of analytic formulae for the electrical conductivity. A dominant feature of the conductivity is the presence of a cyclotron pole. We show how bulk electromagnetic duality acts on the transport coefficients.

  6. Uses of ionizing radiation and medical-care-related problems

    SciTech Connect

    Smathers, J.B.

    1988-08-01

    The uses of ionizing radiation in medicine are currently undergoing changes due to at least four major influences: (1) the constantly changing public perception of the hazards of radiation, (2) continuing technical innovation and development in equipment, (3) the imposition of diagnosis-related group funding by government health-care funding agencies, and (4) an increase in the average age of the U.S. population. The combined effect of these influences will probably result in a major increase in biplanar fluoroscopic examinations to support nonsurgical approaches such as percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, percutaneous transluminal neuroembolism, and lithotripsy (the fracturing of kidney stones). As some of these examinations can result in 1.5 h of fluoroscopy, major doses to the patient and to the clinical staff can be expected. In addition, improved diagnostic techniques, such as using positron emission tomography (a combination of biochemistry and positron-emitting isotopes), can be expected to increase the number of small cyclotrons installed in medical centers. Counteracting these increases in radiation exposure is the development of digital radiography, which generally results in a lowering of the dose per diagnostic procedure. In the realm of therapeutic uses, one can expect higher-energy treatment accelerators, more patients being released from the hospital on therapeutic doses of isotopes, and a potential acceptance of neutron therapy as a cancer treatment modality. The latter treatment may take the form of boron capture therapy, 252Cf implant therapy, or external beam therapy using high-energy cyclotrons and the p,Be or the d,Be reaction to create the neutrons.

  7. A line-of-sight electron cyclotron emission receiver for electron cyclotron resonance heating feedback control of tearing modes.

    PubMed

    Oosterbeek, J W; Bürger, A; Westerhof, E; de Baar, M R; van den Berg, M A; Bongers, W A; Graswinckel, M F; Hennen, B A; Kruijt, O G; Thoen, J; Heidinger, R; Korsholm, S B; Leipold, F; Nielsen, S K

    2008-09-01

    An electron cyclotron emission (ECE) receiver inside the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) transmission line has been brought into operation. The ECE is extracted by placing a quartz plate acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer under an angle inside the electron cyclotron wave (ECW) beam. ECE measurements are obtained during high power ECRH operation. This demonstrates the successful operation of the diagnostic and, in particular, a sufficient suppression of the gyrotron component preventing it from interfering with ECE measurements. When integrated into a feedback system for the control of plasma instabilities this line-of-sight ECE diagnostic removes the need to localize the instabilities in absolute coordinates. PMID:19044409

  8. Undergraduate Education with the Rutgers 12-Inch Cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeth, Timothy W.

    The Rutgers 12-Inch Cyclotron is a research grade accelerator dedicated to undergraduate education. From its inception, it has been intended for instruction and has been designed to demonstrate classic beam physics phenomena and provides students hands on experience with accelerator technology. The cyclotron is easily reconfigured, allowing experiments to be designed and performed within one academic semester. Our cyclotron offers students the opportunity to operate an accelerator and directly observe many fundamental beam physics concepts, including axial and radial betatron motion, destructive resonances, weak and azimuthally varying field (AVF) focusing schemes, RF and DEE voltage effects, diagnostic techniques, and perform low energy nuclear reactions. This paper emphasizes the unique beam physics measurements and beam manipulations capable at the Rutgers 12-Inch Cyclotron.

  9. Single-Electron Detection and Spectroscopy via Relativistic Cyclotron Radiation

    E-print Network

    Asner, D.?M.

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Although first derived in 1904, cyclotron radiation from a single electron orbiting in a magnetic field has never been observed ...

  10. Single electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    E-print Network

    D. M. Asner; R. F. Bradley; L. de Viveiros; P. J. Doe; J. L. Fernandes; M. Fertl; E. C. Finn; J. A. Formaggio; D. Furse; A. M. Jones; J. N. Kofron; B. H. LaRoque; M. Leber; E. L. McBride; M. L. Miller; P. Mohanmurthy; B. Monreal; N. S. Oblath; R. G. H. Robertson; L. J Rosenberg; G. Rybka; D. Rysewyk; M. G. Sternberg; J. R. Tedeschi; T. Thummler; B. A. VanDevender; N. L. Woods

    2015-05-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta elec- tron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments.

  11. Collective cyclotron motion of the relativistic plasma in graphene

    E-print Network

    Markus Mueller; Subir Sachdev

    2008-09-19

    We present a theory of the finite temperature thermo-electric response functions of graphene, in the hydrodynamic regime induced by electron-electron collisions. In moderate magnetic fields, the Dirac particles undergo a collective cyclotron motion with a temperature-dependent relativistic cyclotron frequency proportional to the net charge density of the Dirac plasma. In contrast to the undamped cyclotron pole in Galilean-invariant systems (Kohn's theorem), here there is a finite damping induced by collisions between the counter-propagating particles and holes. This cyclotron motion shows up as a damped pole in the frequency dependent conductivities, and should be readily detectable in microwave measurements at room temperature. We also discuss the large Nernst effect to be expected in graphene.

  12. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Bradley, Rich; De Viveiros Souza Filho, Luiz A.; Doe, Peter J.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, Erin C.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Kofron, Jared N.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, Prajwal T.; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Rysewyk, Devyn M.; Sternberg, Michael G.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Thummler, Thomas; VanDevender, Brent A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges should emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spectrometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source and are magnetically trapped. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work is a proof-of-concept for future neutrino mass experiments using this technique.

  13. Cyclotrons for clinical and biomedical research with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this commentary is to present some background material on cyclotrons and other particle accelerators particularly with a view toward the considerations behind acquiring and installing such a machine for purely clinical and/or biomedical research use.

  14. Design Study Of Cyclotron Magnet With Permanent Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Wook; Chai, Jong Seo

    2011-06-01

    Low energy cyclotrons for Positron emission tomography (PET) have been wanted for the production of radio-isotopes after 2002. In the low energy cyclotron magnet design, increase of magnetic field between the poles is needed to make a smaller size of magnet and decrease power consumption. The Permanent magnet can support this work without additional electric power consumption in the cyclotron. In this paper the study of cyclotron magnet design using permanent magnet is shown and also the comparison between normal magnet and the magnet which is designed with permanent magnet is shown. Maximum energy of proton is 8 MeV and RF frequency is 79.3 MHz. 3D CAD design was done by CATIA P3 V5 R18 and the All field calculations had been performed by OPERA-3D TOSCA. The self-made beam dynamics program OPTICY is used for making isochronous field and other calculations.

  15. Cyclotron radiation by a multi-group method

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.C.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-energy group technique is developed to study conditions under which cyclotron radiation emission can shift a Maxwellian electron distribution into a non-Maxwellian; and if the electron distribution is non-Maxwellian, to study the rate of cyclotron radiation emission as compared to that emitted by a Maxwellian having the same mean electron density and energy. The assumptions in this study are: the electrons should be in an isotropic medium and the magnetic field should be uniform. The multi-group technique is coupled into a multi-group Fokker-Planck computer code to study electron behavior under the influence of cyclotron radiation emission in a self-consistent fashion. Several non-Maxwellian distributions were simulated to compare their cyclotron emissions with the corresponding energy and number density equivalent Maxwellian distribtions.

  16. Mirror and ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities in the magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckean, M. E.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    The kinetic properties of the ion cyclotron anisotropy and the mirror instabilities are investigated using one-dimensional hybrid simulations. It is found that, for moderate values of the ion beta and the proton temperature anisotropy, the two instabilities produce similar levels of turbulence. For high values of beta or temperature anisotropy, the ion cyclotron instability produces higher fluctuation levels of turbulence than does the mirror instability.

  17. Effective dose to immuno-PET patients due to metastable impurities in cyclotron produced zirconium-89

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfuraih, Abdulrahman; Alzimami, Khalid; Ma, Andy K.; Alghamdi, Ali; Al Jammaz, Ibrahim

    2014-11-01

    Immuno-PET is a nuclear medicine technique that combines positron emission tommography (PET) with radio-labeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for tumor characterization and therapy. Zirconium-89 (89Zr) is an emerging radionuclide for immuno-PET imaging. Its long half-life (78.4 h) gives ample time for the production, the administering and the patient uptake of the tagged radiopharmaceutical. Furthermore, the nuclides will remain in the tumor cells after the mAbs are catabolized so that time series studies are possible without incurring further administration of radiopharmarceuticals. 89Zr can be produced in medical cyclotrons by bombarding an yttrium-89 (89Y) target with a proton beam through the 89Y(p,n)89Zr reaction. In this study, we estimated the effective dose to the head and neck cancer patients undergoing 89Zr-based immune-PET procedures. The production of 89Zr and the impurities from proton irradiation of the 89Y target in a cyclotron was calculated with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX and the nuclear reaction code TALYS. The cumulated activities of the Zr isotopes were derived from real patient data in literature and the effective doses were estimated using the MIRD specific absorbed fraction formalism. The estimated effective dose from 89Zr is 0.5±0.2 mSv/MBq. The highest organ dose is 1.8±0.2 mSv/MBq in the liver. These values are in agreement with those reported in literature. The effective dose from 89mZr is about 0.2-0.3% of the 89Zr dose in the worst case. Since the ratio of 89mZr to 89Zr depends on the cooling time as well as the irradiation details, contaminant dose estimation is an important aspect in optimizing the cyclotron irradiation geometry, energy and time.

  18. The contribution of ion-cyclotron waves to electron heating and SAR-arc excitation near the storm-time plasmapause. [Stable Auroral Red arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1992-01-01

    The potential role of ion-cyclotron waves in the electron heating process has been studied, using the HOTRAY code. It is demonstrated that ion-cyclotron waves can play an important role in both the energy transfer to plasmaspheric electrons and the subsequent downward heat conduction to SAR arc altitudes. In particular, such waves can experience enhanced path integrated amplification along the steep plasmapause density gradient. The latter tends to keep the wave normal angle small on several successive bounces across the equator, thus allowing cyclotron-resonant amplification leading to a total gain of up to 20 e-foldings. When the wave propagation vector becomes highly oblique, absorption occurs during Landau resonance with thermal plasmaspheric electrons, increasing the electron temperature in the direction parallel to the ambient field and leading directly to heat conduction into ionosphere.

  19. Medical Assistants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and help podiatrists in surgery. <- Summary Work Environment -> Work Environment About this section Medical assistants perform administrative ... of all medical assistants worked in physicians’ offices. Work Schedules Most medical assistants work full time. Some ...

  20. Abortion - medical

    MedlinePLUS

    Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion ... A medical, or nonsurgical, abortion can be done within 7 weeks from the first day of the woman's last ...

  1. Medication Guide

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Yes No Send Us Feedback Donate Today Related Articles Glaucoma Medication Manufacturers Brand Names and Generic Medications Preservative-free Glaucoma Medications Glaucoma and the Brain Recent research has shown that the complex connection ...

  2. Development of a low-level RF control system for PET cyclotron CYCIAE-14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengzhan; Yin, Zhiguo; Ji, Bin; Zhang, Tianjue; Zhao, Zhenlu

    2014-01-01

    The project of a 14 MeV PET cyclotron aiming at medical diagnosis and treatment was proposed and started at CIAE in 2010. The low-level RF system is designed to stabilize acceleration voltage and control the resonance of the cavity. Based on the experience of the existing CRM Cyclotron in CIAE, a new start-up sequence is developed and tested. The frequency sweeping is used to activate the RF system. Before the tuner is put into use, a new state called "DDS tuning" is applied to trace the resonance frequency to the designed value. This new option state helps to cover the tuning range, if a large frequency variation occurs because of a thermal cavity deformation. The logic control unit detects the spark, reflection, Pulse/CW state and the frequency of the RF source to perform all kinds of protection and state operations. The test bench and on-line test are carried out to verify the initial design.

  3. Modelling of Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Douai, D.; Wauters, T.; Wuenderlich, D.; Bremond, S.; Lombard, G.; Mollard, P.; Pegourie, B.; Lyssoivan, A.; Van Oost, G.

    2011-12-23

    Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) is envisioned in ITER to clean the wall from impurities, to control the wall isotopic ratio and the hydrogen recycling in the presence of the toroidal magnetic field. Various experiments and modelling are advancing to consolidate this technique. In this contribution the modeling of ICWC is presented, which can be divided in two parts: plasma description and plasma wall interaction. Firstly a 0D plasma model, based on a set of energy and particle balance equations for Maxwellian Hydrogen and Helium species, is presented. The model takes into account elementary collision processes, coupled RF power, particle confinement, wall recycling, and active gas injection and pumping. The RF plasma production process is based mainly on electron collisional ionization. The dependency of the plasma parameters, the Hydrogen and Helium partial pressures and neutral or ionic fluxes on pressure and RF power are quantitatively in good agreement with those obtained experimentally on TORE SUPRA. Secondly an extension of the 0D model including the description of the wall interaction is presented and compared to TORE SUPRA multi-pulse ICWC discharges.

  4. Ferrite-guided cyclotron-resonance maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerby, Eli; Kesar, A.; Aharony, A.; Breitmeier, G.

    2002-06-01

    The concept of a cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) with a ferrite loading incorporated in its waveguide is proposed. The CRM interaction occurs between the rotating electron beam and the em wave propagating along a longitudinally magnetized ferrite medium. The ferrite anisotropic permeability resembles the CRM susceptibility in many aspects, and particularly in their similar response to the axial magnetic field (the ferrite susceptibility can be regarded as a passive analog of the active CRM interaction). The ferrite loading slows down the phase velocity of the em wave and thus the axial (Weibel) mechanism of the CRM interaction dominates. The ferrite loading enables also a mechanism of spectral tunability for CRM's. The ferrite loading is proposed, therefore, as a useful ingredient for high-power CRM devices. A linear model of the combined ferrite-guided CRM interaction reveals its useful features. Future schemes may also incorporate ferrite sections functioning as isolators, gyrators, or phase shifters within the CRM device itself for selective suppression of backward waves and spurious oscillations, and for gain and efficiency enhancement.

  5. Ferrite-guided cyclotron-resonance maser.

    PubMed

    Jerby, Eli; Kesar, A; Aharony, A; Breitmeier, G

    2002-06-01

    The concept of a cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) with a ferrite loading incorporated in its waveguide is proposed. The CRM interaction occurs between the rotating electron beam and the em wave propagating along a longitudinally magnetized ferrite medium. The ferrite anisotropic permeability resembles the CRM susceptibility in many aspects, and particularly in their similar response to the axial magnetic field (the ferrite susceptibility can be regarded as a passive analog of the active CRM interaction). The ferrite loading slows down the phase velocity of the em wave and thus the axial (Weibel) mechanism of the CRM interaction dominates. The ferrite loading enables also a mechanism of spectral tunability for CRM's. The ferrite loading is proposed, therefore, as a useful ingredient for high-power CRM devices. A linear model of the combined ferrite-guided CRM interaction reveals its useful features. Future schemes may also incorporate ferrite sections functioning as isolators, gyrators, or phase shifters within the CRM device itself for selective suppression of backward waves and spurious oscillations, and for gain and efficiency enhancement. PMID:12188841

  6. Analytic representation of cyclotron magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Whiting, G. E.; Davies, W. G.

    1994-07-01

    A model has been developed for the rapid but accurate calculation of the static magnetic field in the Chalk River cyclotron. The field is expressed in terms of elementary functions which can be handled efficiently in differential-algebra trajectory integrations. Maxwell's equations are satisfied exactly. Each of seven subdivisions of the superconducting coils is treated by a moment expansion about a central circle. Each pole is modeled as a uniformly magnetized semi-infinite prism. Monopoles and dipoles at the vertices of the polygonal pole faces correct for departures from the true pole shape. Uniform distributions of dipole strength along the edges of the pole-face polygons correct for the local inappropriateness of the assumption of uniform magnetization. The contributions of the yoke and of other relatively distant parts of the structure to the field in the region of particle acceleration are represented by low-order polynomials. Some of the source parameters are obtained by fitting to the measured values of B(z) in the horizontal plane of symmetry.

  7. Analytical representation of cyclotron magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Whiting, G.E.; Davies, W.G.

    1994-07-01

    A model has been developed for the rapid but accurate calculation of the static magnetic field in the Chalk River cyclotron. The field is expressed in terms of elementary functions which can be handled efficiently in differential-algebra trajectory integrations. Maxwell`s equations are satisfied exactly. Each of seven subdivisions of the superconducting coils is treated by a moment expansion about a central circle. Each pole is modeled as a uniformly magnetized semi-infinite prism. Monopoles and dipoles at the vertices of the polygonal pole faces correct for departures from the true pole shape. Uniform distributions of dipole strength along the edges of the pole-face polygons correct for the local inappropriateness of the assumption of uniform magnetization. The contributions of the yoke and of other relatively distant parts of the structure to the field in the region of particle acceleration are represented by low-order polynomials. Some of the source parameters are obtained by fitting to the measured values of B{sub z} in the horizontal plane of symmetry.

  8. Characterization of electron cyclotron resonance hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Outten, C.A. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Barbour, J.C.; Wampler, W.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas yield low energy and high ion density plasmas. The characteristics downstream of an ECR hydrogen plasma were investigated as a function of microwave power and magnetic field. A fast-injection Langmuir probe and a carbon resistance probe were used to determine plasma potential (V{sub p}), electron density (N{sub e}), electron temperature (T{sub e}), ion energy (T{sub i}), and ion fluence. Langmuir probe results showed that at 17 cm downstream from the ECR chamber the plasma characteristics are approximately constant across the center 7 cm of the plasma for 50 Watts of absorbed power. These results gave V{sub p} = 30 {plus minus} 5 eV, N{sub e} = 1 {times} 10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3}, and T{sub e} = 10--13 eV. In good agreement with the Langmuir probe results, carbon resistance probes have shown that T{sub i} {le} 50 eV. Also, based on hydrogen chemical sputtering of carbon, the hydrogen (ion and energetic neutrals) fluence rate was determined to be 1 {times} 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2}-sec. at a pressure of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} Torr and for 50 Watts of absorbed power. 19 refs.

  9. HISTORY of the UMH Medical Library The medical library of Cedars Medical Center was initially housed in a remove and relatively

    E-print Network

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    HISTORY of the UMH Medical Library 1 The medical library of Cedars Medical Center was initially subscriptions were purchased through dues of the Medical Staff. Selections of material were based and Journals for the Small Medical Library. Requests from medical staff members were incorporated

  10. Quality inspection of small diameter polymeric medical tubing and attached wire stent using TAP-NDE and the Gabor Wavelet Transform 

    E-print Network

    Harms, Kent David

    2001-01-01

    A non-contact, laser-optic based technique referred to as the Thermo-Acousto-Photonic Nondestructive Evaluation (TAP-NDE) was utilized to investigate bond integrity and localized stiffening due to an attached wire stent on small diameter polymeric...

  11. Issues in the analysis and interpretation of cyclotron lines in gamma ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, D. Q.

    1992-01-01

    The Bayesian approach is discussed to establishing the existence of lines, the importance of observing multiple cyclotron harmonics in determining physical parameters from the lines, and evidence from cyclotron lines of neutron star rotation.

  12. Design and construction of a cyclotron capable of accelerating protons to 2 MeV

    E-print Network

    Dewan, Leslie

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and construction of a cyclotron capable of accelerating protons to 2 MeV. A cyclotron is a charged particle accelerator that uses a magnetic field to confine particles to a spiral flight ...

  13. 75 FR 48939 - National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory of Michigan State University; Notice of Decision on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ...International Trade Administration National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory of Michigan State University; Notice of Decision...Docket Number: 10-043. Applicant: National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory of Michigan State University. Instrument:...

  14. Physica E 34 (2006) 640643 Geometric resonance of bragg-reflected cyclotron orbits in

    E-print Network

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    2006-01-01

    Physica E 34 (2006) 640­643 Geometric resonance of bragg-reflected cyclotron orbits in a unidirectional lateral superlattice (ULSL) attributable to the geometric resonance of Bragg-reflected cyclotron

  15. Electron cyclotron wave resonance plasma assisted deposition of cubic boron nitride thin films

    E-print Network

    Zexian, Cao

    Electron cyclotron wave resonance plasma assisted deposition of cubic boron nitride thin films Z. X-pressure plasma source. The electron-cyclotron-wave resonance ECWR plasma served both to sputter the hBN target

  16. Development of a fast scintillator based beam phase measurement system for compact superconducting cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Tanushyam; Kanti Dey, Malay; Dhara, Partha; Roy, Suvodeep; Debnath, Jayanta; Balakrishna Bhole, Rajendra; Dutta, Atanu; Pradhan, Jedidiah; Pal, Sarbajit; Pal, Gautam; Roy, Amitava; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2013-05-15

    In an isochronous cyclotron, measurements of central phase of the ion beam with respect to rf and the phase width provide a way to tune the cyclotron for maximum energy gain per turn and efficient extraction. We report here the development of a phase measurement system and the measurements carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre's (VECC's) K= 500 superconducting cyclotron. The technique comprises detecting prompt {gamma}-rays resulting from the interaction of cyclotron ion beam with an aluminium target mounted on a radial probe in coincidence with cyclotron rf. An assembly comprising a fast scintillator and a liquid light-guide inserted inside the cyclotron was used to detect the {gamma}-rays and to transfer the light signal outside the cyclotron where a matching photo-multiplier tube was used for light to electrical signal conversion. The typical beam intensity for this measurement was a few times 10{sup 11} pps.

  17. Electron energy distributions in electron cyclotron resonance discharges for materials processing

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    Electron energy distributions in electron cyclotron resonance discharges for materials processing 12 March 1992) Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) reactors are now being investigated for use results from a computer simulation of the electron kinetics in ECR reactors. The model

  18. Progress in the development of an H{sup ?} ion source for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Etoh, H. Aoki, Y.; Mitsubori, H.; Arakawa, Y.; Kato, T.; Sakuraba, J.; Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Okumura, Y.

    2015-04-08

    A multi-cusp DC H{sup ?} ion source has been developed for cyclotrons in medical use. Beam optics of the H{sup ?} ion beam is studied using a 2D beam trajectory code. The simulation results are compared with the experimental results obtained in the Mark I source, which has produced up to 16?mA H{sup ?} ion beams. The optimum extraction voltages show good agreement between the calculation and the experimental results. A new ion source, Mark II source, is designed to achieve the next goal of producing an H{sup ?} beam of 20?mA. The magnetic field configurations and the plasma electrode design are optimized for Cs-seeded operation. Primary electron trajectory simulation shows that primary electrons are confined well and the magnetic filter prevents the primary electrons from entering into the extraction region.

  19. Progress in the development of an H- ion source for cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etoh, H.; Aoki, Y.; Mitsubori, H.; Arakawa, Y.; Kato, T.; Sakuraba, J.; Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Okumura, Y.

    2015-04-01

    A multi-cusp DC H- ion source has been developed for cyclotrons in medical use. Beam optics of the H- ion beam is studied using a 2D beam trajectory code. The simulation results are compared with the experimental results obtained in the Mark I source, which has produced up to 16 mA H- ion beams. The optimum extraction voltages show good agreement between the calculation and the experimental results. A new ion source, Mark II source, is designed to achieve the next goal of producing an H- beam of 20 mA. The magnetic field configurations and the plasma electrode design are optimized for Cs-seeded operation. Primary electron trajectory simulation shows that primary electrons are confined well and the magnetic filter prevents the primary electrons from entering into the extraction region.

  20. Electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder ion source simulation by MCBC and GEM

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. S.; Zhao, L.; Cluggish, B. P.; Bogatu, I. N.; Pardo, R.

    2008-02-15

    Numerical simulation results by the GEM and MCBC codes are presented, along with a comparison with experiments for beam capture dynamics and parameter studies of charge state distribution (CSD) of electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder ion sources. First, steady state plasma profiles are presented by GEM with respect to key experimental parameters such as rf power and gas pressure. As rf power increases, electron density increases by a small amount and electron energy by a large amount. The central electrostatic potential dip also increased. Next, MCBC is used to trace injected beam ions to obtain beam capture profiles. Using the captured ion profiles, GEM obtains a CSD of beam ions. As backscattering can be significant, capturing the ions near the center of the device enhances the CSD. The effect of rf power on the beam CSD is mainly due to different steady states plasmas. Example cases are presented assuming that the beam ions are small enough not to affect the plasma.

  1. Spectra and Neutron Dosimetry Inside a PET Cyclotron Vault Room

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene; Mendez, Roberto; Iniguez, Maria Pilar; Marti-Climent, Joseph; Penuelas, Ivan; Barquero, Raquel

    2006-09-08

    The neutron field around a PET cyclotron was investigated during 18F radioisotope production with an 18 MeV proton beam. Pairs of thermoluminescent dosemeters, TLD600 and TLD700, were used as thermal neutron detector inside a Bonner Spheres Spectrometer to measure the neutron spectra at three different positions inside the cyclotron's vault room. Neutron spectra were also determined by Monte Carlo calculations. The hardest spectrum was observed in front of cyclotron target and the softest was noticed at the antipode of target. Neutron doses derived from the measured spectra vary between 11 and 377 mSv/{mu}A-h of proton integrated current, Doses were also measured with a single-moderator remmeter, with an active thermal neutron detector, whose response in affected by the radiation field in the vault room.

  2. Simultaneous observations of electrostatic oxygen cyclotron waves and ion conics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M.; Scales, W.; Vago, J.; Arnoldy, R.; Garbe, G.; Moore, T.

    1989-01-01

    A sounding rocket launched to 927 km apogee during an auroral substorm encountered regions of large quasi-static electric fields (not greater than 400 mV/m), ion conics (up to 700 eV maximum observed energy), and fluctuating electric fields near the oxygen cyclotron frequency. Since the fluctuating electric fields frequently exhibited spectral peaks just above the local oxygen cyclotron frequency, and since the fluctuating electric fields were linearly polarized, they are positively identified as electrostatic oxygen cyclotron waves (EOCW). The maximum amplitude of the EOCW was about 5 mV/m rms. The EOCW closely correlated with the presence of ion conics. Because of the relatively low amplitude of the EOCW and their relatively low coherence, it cannot be concluded that they are solely responsible for the production of the ion conics.

  3. Proton and helium cyclotron anisotropy instability thresholds in the magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. Peter; Convery, Patrick D.; Denton, Richard E.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Anderson, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    Both the protons and the helium ions of the terrestrial magnetosheath typically display T (sub perpendicular) greater than T (sub parallel), where perpendicular to and parallel to denote directions perpendicular and parallel to the background magnetic field. Observations of the highly compressed magnetosheath show an inverse correlation between these ion temperature anisotropies and the parallel proton beta. Computer simulations have demonstrated that these correlations are due to wave-particle scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities. These correlations correspond to linear theory thresholds of the proton cyclotron and the helium cyclotron instabilities. This paper uses linear Vlasov theory and the assumption of a constant maximum growth rate to obtain closed-form expressions for these thresholds as a function of the relative helium density and the parallel proton beta in a parameter model of the magnetosheath.

  4. Development of a magnetic field measurement instrument for compact cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeong-No; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Oh, Jin-Hwan; Park, Ki-Hyeon; Chai, Jong-seo

    2012-07-01

    A magnetic field measurement instrument for compact cyclotrons has been developed. Forty-eight Hall sensors are used for magnetic measurements, and a set of four Hall sensors is allocated to each channel. The magnetic field and the offset are tabulated with a permanent 4,500-G magnet. The measurement device is made to be thin, long, and rectangular, to overcome the narrow gap between upper and lower hills in a compact cyclotron (2 ˜ 3 cm). This instrument measures a magnetic field signal in the unit of Tesla and transforms it to a voltage signal as an output. The instrument has a 0.1-percent field-measurement stability margin and can be used to measure the magnetic field produced by a 9-MeV cyclotron magnet.

  5. SPIE Medical Imaging Medical Imaging

    E-print Network

    Miga, Michael I.

    1 SPIE Medical Imaging 2006 1 Medical Imaging Fundamentals Kenneth H. Wong, Ph.D. Division of Computer Assisted Interventions and Medical Robotics (CAIMR) Imaging Science and Information Systems (ISIS) Center Department of Radiology Georgetown University SPIE Medical Imaging 2006 2 Main Themes · Describe

  6. MEDICAL SCHOOL Medical School Communications

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    MEDICAL SCHOOL Medical School Communications Strategic Plan © 2015 Regents of the University of Minnesota Medical School is a large institution made up of 27 departments and over 3000 faculty members. It is the faculty's role to achieve the overall goals of the Medical School through research, patient care

  7. Cold Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves for Preionization and IBW Launching in LHD*

    E-print Network

    - 1 - Cold Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves for Preionization and IBW Launching in LHD* Masayuki CESICW (Cold Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Wave) for heating the core of LHD with the folded waveguide to use for the E|| polarized folded waveguide is the cold electrostatic ion cyclotron wave (CESICW).2

  8. Cold Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves for Preionization and IBW Launching in LHD *

    E-print Network

    ­ 1 ­ Cold Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves for Preionization and IBW Launching in LHD * Masayuki CESICW (Cold Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Wave) for heating the core of LHD with the folded waveguide to use for the E || polarized folded waveguide is the cold electrostatic ion cyclotron wave (CESICW). 2

  9. PPPL3119 Preprint: July 1995, UC426 Alfvnic Behavior of Alpha Particle Driven Ion Cyclotron

    E-print Network

    PPPL­3119 ­ Preprint: July 1995, UC­426 Alfvénic Behavior of Alpha Particle Driven Ion Cyclotron, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB UK (Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association) ABSTRACT Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) has been the top and bottom of the vacuum vessel. Harmonics of the alpha cyclotron frequency (W a ) evaluated

  10. Radially Localized Measurements of Superthermal Electrons Using Oblique Electron Cyclotron Emission

    E-print Network

    Radially Localized Measurements of Superthermal Electrons Using Oblique Electron Cyclotron Emission Electron Cyclotron Emission from superthermal electrons can be imposed by observation of emission upshifted from the thermal cyclotron resonance in the horizontal midplane of a tokamak. A new and unique

  11. Generation of "spiky" potential structures associated with multiharmonic electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves

    E-print Network

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Generation of "spiky" potential structures associated with multiharmonic electrostatic ion-cyclotron plasma. These structures are associated with coherent multiharmonic electrostatic ion-cyclotron EIC waves of the potential fluctuations exhibit spiky structures with repetition rates near the ion-cyclotron frequency

  12. SPITZER IRS SPECTROSCOPY OF INTERMEDIATE POLARS: CONSTRAINTS ON MID-INFRARED CYCLOTRON EMISSION

    E-print Network

    Harrison, Thomas

    SPITZER IRS SPECTROSCOPY OF INTERMEDIATE POLARS: CONSTRAINTS ON MID-INFRARED CYCLOTRON EMISSION into the mid-infrared. There is no evidence for discrete cyclotron emission features in the near- or mid, and possibly EX Hya and V1223 Sgr, do show longer wavelength excesses. We have used a cyclotron modeling code

  13. ION CYCLOTRON HEATING IN A TOROIDAL OC TUPOLE J. D. Barter and J. C. Sprott

    E-print Network

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    ION CYCLOTRON HEATING IN A TOROIDAL OC TUPOLE J. D. Barter and J. C. Sprott February 1975;ION CYCLOTRON HEAT ING IN A TOROIDAL OCTUPOLE J. ,D. Barter and J. C. Sprott University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ABSTRACT COO-2387-36 RF power near the ion cyclotron resonance frequency has been

  14. Cyclotron mode frequencies and resonant absorption in multi-species ion M. Affolter,b)

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    Cyclotron mode frequencies and resonant absorption in multi-species ion plasmasa) M. Affolter,b) F online 8 April 2015) Cyclotron mode frequencies are studied on trapped rigid-rotor multi-species ion on the distinct cyclotron modes (m ¼ 0; 1; and 2) with cosðmhÞ azimuthal dependence. We find that for radially

  15. Inhomogeneous cyclotron emission source for the five branch mode conversion problem

    E-print Network

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    Inhomogeneous cyclotron emission source for the five branch mode conversion problem C. S. Ng, V. F distribution from a cyclotron mode conversion layer are extended to the five branch wave coupling case which source distribution from a cyclotron layer.3 Besides obvious theoretical interest, the problem

  16. Electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves driven by parallel velocity shear R. L. Merlinoa)

    E-print Network

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves driven by parallel velocity shear R. L. Merlinoa) Department cyclotron frequency propagating at large angles to the ambient magnetic field can be excited in a magnetized in determining the stability of shear-driven electrostatic ion-cyclotron EIC modes is also considered

  17. Cyclotron resonance photoconductivity of a two-dimensional electron gas in HgTe quantum wells

    E-print Network

    Ganichev, Sergey

    Cyclotron resonance photoconductivity of a two-dimensional electron gas in HgTe quantum wells Ze-infrared cyclotron resonance photoconductivity (CRP) is investigated in HgTe quantum wells (QWs) of various widths that the transport time substantially exceeds the cyclotron resonance lifetime as well as the quantum lifetime which

  18. A Polarized 3He Beam for Parity Violation Studies on the Princeton Cyclotron

    E-print Network

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    A Polarized 3He Beam for Parity Violation Studies on the Princeton Cyclotron David Aaron Siegel in the Princeton cyclotron were coupled with calculations that predicted ow rates and inhomogeneity e ects to yield a complete characterization of the 3 He as it is injected into the cyclotron, including a theoretical value

  19. PPPL-3119 -Preprint: July 1995, UC-426 Alfvnic Behavior of Alpha Particle Driven Ion Cyclotron

    E-print Network

    PPPL-3119 - Preprint: July 1995, UC-426 Alfvénic Behavior of Alpha Particle Driven Ion Cyclotron, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB UK (Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association) ABSTRACT Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) has been the top and bottom of the vacuum vessel. Harmonics of the alpha cyclotron frequency ( ) evaluated

  20. IsoRay Medical William A. Cavanagh

    E-print Network

    IsoRay Medical William A. Cavanagh Vice President of Research and Development IsoRay Medical March 2011 #12;IsoRay Medical AMEX: ISR Founded: 1998 Richland, Washington Employees: 35 Market Cap (3/3/11): 32.5M #12;IsoRay Medical 1901: Pierre Curie suggests that a small radium tube be inserted

  1. Impact of a medical waste incinerator on mercury levels in lagoon fish from a small tropical island in the Western Pacific.

    PubMed

    Denton, Gary R W; Trianni, Michael S; Bearden, Brian G; Houk, Peter C; Starmer, John A

    2011-01-01

    In 2004-2005, several species of marine fish were collected for mercury (Hg) analysis from Saipan Lagoon, Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Relatively high concentrations were found in representatives from the Hafa Adai Beach area located some distance from known sources of Hg contamination. A follow-up investigation aimed at identifying additional land-based sources of Hg in the area was launched in early 2007. The study identified a medical waste incinerator as the primary source of Hg enrichment. The incinerator was operational for about 20 years before it was closed down by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in January 2006, for multiple violations of the Clean Air Act. Stormwater runoff from this facility entered a drainage network that discharged into the ocean at the southern end of Hafa Adai Beach, about 1 km away. At the time of this investigation storm drain sediments at the coast were only marginally enriched with mercury although values some 50x above background were detected in drainage deposits a few meters down-gradient of the incinerator site. Mercury concentrations in fish from the Hafa Adai Beach area were also significantly lower than those determined in similar species 3 yr earlier. The implications of the data are briefly discussed. PMID:21598167

  2. Single-Electron Detection and Spectroscopy via Relativistic Cyclotron Radiation.

    PubMed

    Asner, D M; Bradley, R F; de Viveiros, L; Doe, P J; Fernandes, J L; Fertl, M; Finn, E C; Formaggio, J A; Furse, D; Jones, A M; Kofron, J N; LaRoque, B H; Leber, M; McBride, E L; Miller, M L; Mohanmurthy, P; Monreal, B; Oblath, N S; Robertson, R G H; Rosenberg, L J; Rybka, G; Rysewyk, D; Sternberg, M G; Tedeschi, J R; Thümmler, T; VanDevender, B A; Woods, N L

    2015-04-24

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Although first derived in 1904, cyclotron radiation from a single electron orbiting in a magnetic field has never been observed directly. We demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radio-frequency spectrometer. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay end point, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments. PMID:25955048

  3. Theory of propagation of ordinary surface cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Girka, V. O.; Klyzhka, A. V.

    2009-01-15

    The dispersion properties of ordinary surface cyclotron waves in a semiinfinite nonuniform plasma are investigated. The waves propagate across the external magnetic field directed along the plasma surface in a metal waveguide the internal surface of which is covered with a dielectric. The problem is solved analytically in the framework of a kinetic model for plasma particles under the assumption of weak spatial dispersion. The influence of the parameters of the dielectric layer separating the plasma from the metal wall, the shape of the plasma density profile, and the value of the external magnetic field on the dispersion properties of surface cyclotron waves is studied both numerically and analytically.

  4. N-bursty emission from Uranus: A cyclotron maser source?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, D. B.; Menietti, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Ray tracing studies of RX-mode emission from the north polar regions of Uranus indicate that the n-bursty radio emission may have a source along field lines with footprints near the northern magnetic pole (perhaps in the cusp), but not necessarily associated with regions of strong UV emission. This is in contrast with similar studies for the Uranus nightside smooth radio emission, which are believed to be due to the cyclotron maser instability. Source regions can be found for both hollow and filled emission cones and for frequencies well above the local gyrofreuquency implying that mechanisms other than the cyclotron maser mechanism may be operating.

  5. Fluid equations in the presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2012-12-15

    Two-fluid equations, which include the physics imparted by an externally applied radiofrequency source near electron cyclotron resonance, are derived in their extended magnetohydrodynamic forms using the formalism of Hegna and Callen [Phys. Plasmas 16, 112501 (2009)]. The equations are compatible with the closed fluid/drift-kinetic model developed by Ramos [Phys. Plasmas 17, 082502 (2010); 18, 102506 (2011)] for fusion-relevant regimes with low collisionality and slow dynamics, and they facilitate the development of advanced computational models for electron cyclotron current drive-induced suppression of neoclassical tearing modes.

  6. Temperature-resonant cyclotron spectra in confined geometries

    E-print Network

    Andrey Pototsky; Peter Hänggi; Fabio Marchesoni; Sergey Savel'ev

    2011-05-22

    We consider a two-dimensional gas of colliding charged particles confined to finite size containers of various geometries and subjected to a uniform orthogonal magnetic field. The gas spectral densities are characterized by a broad peak at the cyclotron frequency. Unlike for infinitely extended gases, where the amplitude of the cyclotron peak grows linearly with temperature, here confinement causes such a peak to go through a maximum for an optimal temperature. In view of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, the reported resonance effect has a direct counterpart in the electric susceptibility of the confined magnetized gas.

  7. Backward wave cyclotron-maser emission in the auroral magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Speirs, D C; Bingham, R; Cairns, R A; Vorgul, I; Kellett, B J; Phelps, A D R; Ronald, K

    2014-10-10

    In this Letter, we present theory and particle-in-cell simulations describing cyclotron radio emission from Earth's auroral region and similar phenomena in other astrophysical environments. In particular, we find that the radiation, generated by a down-going electron horseshoe distribution is due to a backward-wave cyclotron-maser emission process. The backward wave nature of the radiation contributes to upward refraction of the radiation that is also enhanced by a density inhomogeneity. We also show that the radiation is preferentially amplified along the auroral oval rather than transversely. The results are in agreement with recent Cluster observations. PMID:25375713

  8. A 600 MeV cyclotron for radioactive beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.

    1993-05-17

    The magnetic field design for a 600 MeV proton cyclotron is described. The cyclotron has a single stage, a normal conducting magnet coil and a 9.8 m outside yoke diameter. It has 8 sectors, with a transition to 4 sectors in the center region. The magnetic field design was done using 1958 Harwell rectangular ridge system measurements and was compared with recent 3-dimensional field calculations with the program TOSCA at NSCL. The center region 4--8 sector transition focussing was also checked with TOSCA.

  9. ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE EFFICIENCY IN GENERAL TOKAMAK GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    LIN-LUI,Y.R; CHAN,V.S; PRATER,R

    2003-03-01

    Green's-function techniques are used to calculate electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency in general tokamak geometry in the low-collisionality regime. Fully relativistic electron dynamics is employed in the theoretical formulation. The high-velocity collision model is used to model Coulomb collisions and a simplified quasi-linear rf diffusion operator describes wave-particle interactions. The approximate analytic solutions which are benchmarked with a widely used ECCD model, facilitate time-dependent simulations of tokamak operational scenarios using the non-inductive current drive of electron cyclotron waves.

  10. 30 Gy or 34 Gy? Comparing 2 Single-Fraction SBRT Dose Schedules for Stage I Medically Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M. Stephans, Kevin L.; Woody, Neil M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Zhuang, Tingliang; Magnelli, Anthony; Djemil, Toufik

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To review outcomes of 2 single-fraction lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) schedules used for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients in our institution have been treated on and off protocols using single-fraction SBRT (30 Gy and 34 Gy, respectively). All patients had node-negative lung cancer measuring ?5 cm and lying ?2 cm beyond the trachea-bronchial tree and were treated on a Novalis/BrainLAB system with the ExactTrac positioning system for daily image guidance. Results: For the interval from 2009 to 2012, 80 patients with 82 lesions were treated with single-fraction lung SBRT. Fifty-five patients (69%) and 25 patients (31%) received 30 Gy and 34 Gy, respectively. In a comparison of 30 Gy and 34 Gy cohorts, patient and tumor characteristics were balanced and median follow-up in months was 18.7 and 17.8, respectively. The average heterogeneity-corrected mean doses to the target were 33.75 Gy and 37.94 Gy for the 30-Gy and 34-Gy prescriptions, respectively. Comparing 30-Gy and 34-Gy cohorts, 92.7% and 84.0% of patients, respectively, experienced no toxicity (P was not significant), and had neither grade 3 nor higher toxicities. For the 30-Gy and 34-Gy patients, rates of 1-year local failure, overall survival, and lung cancer-specific mortality were 2.0% versus 13.8%, 75.0% versus 64.0%, and 2. 1% versus 16.0%, respectively (P values for differences were not significant). Conclusions: This is the largest single-fraction lung SBRT series yet reported. and it confirms the safety, efficacy, and minimal toxicity of this schedule for inoperable early stage lung cancer.

  11. Performance of the beam chamber vacuum system of K = 500 cyclotron at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre Kolkata

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Gautam DuttaGupta, Anjan; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-07-15

    The beam chamber of Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata's K = 500 superconducting cyclotron is pumped by liquid helium cooled cryopanel with liquid nitrogen cooled radiation shield. Performance of the vacuum system was evaluated by cooling the cryopanel assembly with liquid nitrogen and liquid helium. Direct measurement of beam chamber pressure is quite difficult because of space restrictions and the presence of high magnetic field. Pressure gauges were placed away from the beam chamber. The beam chamber pressure was evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulation software for vacuum system and compared with measurements. The details of the vacuum system, measurements, and estimation of pressure of the beam chamber are described in this paper.

  12. Measurement of cyclotron resonance relaxation time in the two-dimensional electron system

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, I. V. Muravev, V. M.; Kukushkin, I. V.; Belyanin, V. N.

    2014-11-17

    Dependence of cyclotron magneto-plasma mode relaxation time on electron concentration and temperature in the two-dimensional electron system in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells has been studied. Comparative analysis of cyclotron and transport relaxation time has been carried out. It was demonstrated that with the temperature increase transport relaxation time tends to cyclotron relaxation time. It was also shown that cyclotron relaxation time, as opposed to transport relaxation time, has a weak electron density dependence. The cyclotron time can exceed transport relaxation time by an order of magnitude in a low-density range.

  13. Medical Scientists

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by investigating safe dosage limits. <- Summary Work Environment -> Work Environment About this section Medical scientists usually work ... they take precautions that ensure a safe environment. Work Schedules Most medical scientists work full time. <- What ...

  14. Medical Management

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search form Search Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Medical Management Although there’s no cure for CMT, there ... an individualized physical therapy program. For more on medical management of CMT, see Surgery Sometimes, Bracing Often, ...

  15. Laboratory and cyclotron requirements for PET research

    SciTech Connect

    Schlyer, D.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes four types of PET facilities: Clinical PET with no radionuclide production; clinical PET with a small accelerator; clinical PET with research support; and research PET facilities. General facility considerations are also discussed.

  16. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kritz, A.H.

    1991-11-01

    The Principal Investigator has continued to work on problems associated both with the deposition and with the emission of electron cyclotron power in toroidal plasmas. We have investigated the use of electron cyclotron resonance heating for bringing compact tokamaks (BPX) to ignition-like parameters. This requires that we continue to refine the modeling capability of the TORCH code linked with the BALDUR 1 {1/2} D transport code. Using this computational tool, we have examined the dependence of ignition on heating and transport employing both theoretical (multi-mode) and empirically based transport models. The work on current drive focused on the suppression of tearing modes near the q = 2 surface and sawteeth near the q = 1 surface. Electron cyclotron current drive in CIT near the q =2 surface was evaluated for a launch scenario where electron cyclotron power was launched near the equatorial plane. The work on suppression of sawteeth has been oriented toward understanding the suppression that has been observed in a number of tokamaks, in particular, in the WT-3 tokamak in Kyoto. To evaluate the changes in current profile (shear) near the q =1 surface, simulations have been carried out using the linked BALDUR-TORCH code. We consider effects on shear resulting both from wave-induced current as well as from changes in conductivity associated with changes in local temperature. Abstracts and a paper relating to this work is included in Appendix A.

  17. Cyclotron Resonance of Electrons Trapped in a Microwave Cavity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the free-electron cyclotron resonance of electrons trapped in a microwave cavity by a Penning trap is observed. The experiment constitutes an attractive alternative to one of the Gardner-Purcell variety. (Author/GS)

  18. Dynamic effects on cyclotron scattering in pulsar accretion columns

    SciTech Connect

    Brainerd, J.J.; Meszaros, P. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park )

    1991-03-01

    A resonant scattering model for photon reprocessing in a pulsar accretion column is presented. The accretion column is optically thin to Thomson scattering and optically thick to resonant scattering at the cyclotron frequency. Radiation from the neutron star surface propagates freely through the column until the photon energy equals the local cyclotron frequency, at which point the radiation is scattered, much of it back toward the star. The radiation pressure in this regime is insufficient to stop the infall. Some of the scattered radiation heats the stellar surface around the base of the column, which adds a softer component to the spectrum. The partial blocking by the accretion column of X-rays from the surface produces a fan beam emission pattern. X-rays above the surface cyclotron frequency freely escape and are characterized by a pencil beam. Gravitational light bending produces a pencil beam pattern of column-scattered radiation in the antipodal direction, resulting in a strongly angle-dependent cyclotron feature. 31 refs.

  19. Electron-cyclotron-resonant-heated electron distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Y.; Nevins, W.M.; Cohen, R.H.

    1981-06-26

    Recent studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck code indicate that the energetic electron tail formed by electron-cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) at the second harmonic is not Maxwellian. We present the results of our bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck code along with some simple analytic models of hot-electron distribution functions.

  20. Electron cyclotron thruster new modeling results preparation for initial experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooper, E. Bickford

    1993-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: a whistler-based electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) thruster; cross-field coupling in the helicon approximation; wave propagation; wave structure; plasma density; wave absorption; the electron distribution function; isothermal and adiabatic plasma flow; ECRH thruster modeling; a PIC code model; electron temperature; electron energy; and initial experimental tests. The discussion is presented in vugraph form.

  1. On the possibility of coherent cyclotron emission from extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Desch, M. D.; Zarka, P.

    1999-06-01

    A model of the coherent cyclotron emission from extrasolar planets is presented. Scaling laws known to operate in our solar system (including scaling laws of planetary magnetic fields and the radiometric Bode's law of radio power generation) are applied to the extrasolar systems. We consider the possibility that each of the extrasolar planets possesses a substantial planetary magnetic field which is in quasi-continuous interaction with the local stellar wind. Cyclotron emission from extrasolar planets is then driven by the stellar wind/magnetospheric interaction, much like the coherent cyclotron radio emission processes associated with planets in our solar system. Based on the model results, the best candidate for solar-wind-driven cyclotron emission is Tau Bootes, with an expected median amplitude of about 2 janskys (1Jy=10-26Wm-2Hz-1) at 28 MHz, an intensity level of about a factor of 100 below the current limit of detectability. However, variations in the local stellar medium could conceivably increase power levels by a factor of 100 for short periods of time. Like the solar planets, the extrasolar planets should radiate episodically, with emission reoccurring at the planetary rotation period. Thus spectral integration techniques could also be applied to improve the likelihood of detectability.

  2. Electron-cyclotron-heating experiments in tokamaks and stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    England, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of high-frequency microwave radiation to plasma heating near the electron-cyclotron frequency in tokamaks and stellarators. Successful plasma heating by microwave power has been demonstrated in numerous experiments. Predicted future technological developments and current theoretical understanding suggest that a vigorous program in plasma heating will continue to yield promising results.

  3. Ion Cyclotron Waves (ICWs) in the Solar Wind

    E-print Network

    Strangeway, Robert J.

    Ion Cyclotron Waves (ICWs) in the Solar Wind of the Inner Heliosphere Lan K. Jian1,2 1Dept;History of the Study · In 2008, before I graduated, when I was studying the solar wind magnetic field data in various planetary environment. I found the characteristics of these waves in the solar wind mimicked

  4. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 35

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-29

    Efforts are reported on the installation and checkout of cyclotron components which had been previously fabricated. Final integration of subsystems and major systems leading to internal beam tests is reported near completion. Progress is reported in relation to control system components, focus and steering magnet design, and rf system testing. (LEW)

  5. Thesis Proposal Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) Waves for Radiation Belt

    E-print Network

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Thesis Proposal Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) Waves for Radiation Belt Remediation particles of the Van Allen belts coming from cosmic rays, solar storms, high altitude nuclear explosions regions, as well as an obstacle to exploration and development of space technologies. The "Radiation Belt

  6. Cyclotron maser emission of auroral Z mode radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Hewitt, R. G.; Dulk, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented suggesting that loss cone driven cyclotron maser emission by upgoing electrons, closely analogous to auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), may be the mechanism behind the observed Z mode radiation. With this hypothesis, the lack of a strong correlation between the Z mode radiation and AKR is not surprising; the ray paths for the X mode and the Z mode are markedly different, with the former directed upward and the latter downward. In addition, it is expected that the generation of the Z mode will be favored only in regions where the ratio of the plasma frequency to the electron cyclotron frequency is greater than or approximately equal to 0.3, that is, where the X mode radiation is suppressed. If the fraction of the radiation generated that crosses the cyclotron layer is large, then the argument in favor of the loss cone driven cyclotron maser as the source of the observed Z mode radiation is a strong one. The spatial growth rates are fairly large in comparison with those for the X mode, and there seems to be little doubt that Z mode radiation should be generated under conditions that differ only slightly from those for the generation of X mode radiation in AKR.

  7. Nonlinear analysis of a relativistic beam-plasma cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1986-01-01

    A self-consistent set of nonlinear and relativistic wave-particle equations are derived for a magnetized beam-plasma system interacting with electromagnetic cyclotron waves. In particular, the high-frequency cyclotron mode interacting with a streaming and gyrating electron beam within a background plasma is considered in some detail. This interaction mode may possibly find application as a high-power source of coherent short-wavelength radiation for laboratory devices. The background plasma, although passive, plays a central role in this mechanism by modifying the dielectric properties in which the magnetized electron beam propagates. For a particular choice of the transverse beam velocity (i.e., the speed of light divided by the relativistic mass factor), the interaction frequency equals the nonrelativistic electron cyclotron frequency times the relativistic mass factor. For this choice of transverse beam velocity the detrimental effects of a longitudinal beam velocity spread is virtually removed. Power conversion efficiencies in excess of 18 percent are both analytically calculated and obtained through numerical simulations of the wave-particle equations. The quality of the electron beam, degree of energy and pitch angle spread, and its effect on the beam-plasma cyclotron instability is studied.

  8. Cyclotron waves in a non-neutral plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2013-04-15

    A kinetic theory of linear electrostatic plasma waves with frequencies near the cyclotron frequency {Omega}{sub c{sub s}} of a given plasma species s is developed for a multispecies non-neutral plasma column with general radial density and electric field profiles. Terms in the perturbed distribution function up to O(1/{Omega}{sub c{sub s}{sup 2}}) are kept, as are the effects of finite cyclotron radius r{sub c} up to O(r{sub c}{sup 2}). At this order, the equilibrium distribution is not Maxwellian if the plasma temperature or rotation frequency is not uniform. For r{sub c}{yields}0, the theory reproduces cold-fluid theory and predicts surface cyclotron waves propagating azimuthally. For finite r{sub c}, the wave equation predicts that the surface wave couples to radially and azimuthally propagating Bernstein waves, at locations where the wave frequency equals the local upper hybrid frequency. The equation also predicts a second set of Bernstein waves that do not couple to the surface wave, and therefore have no effect on the external potential. The wave equation is solved both numerically and analytically in the WKB approximation, and analytic dispersion relations for the waves are obtained. The theory predicts that both types of Bernstein wave are damped at resonances, which are locations where the Doppler-shifted wave frequency matches the local cyclotron frequency as seen in the rotating frame.

  9. Radiotherapy alone or with chemotherapy in the treatment of small-cell carcinoma of the lung. Medical Research Council Lung Cancer Working Party.

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    This report gives the complete findings at one year of a study comparing radiotherapy (Rt) with radiotherapy followed by 3-drug chemotherapy (RtC3) in the treatment of histologically proven small-cell carcinoma of the lung of limited extent. Over the 12-month period there was a significantly increased survival for the RtC3 patients (P = 0.002) and at 12 months 18% of the 121 Rt but 34% of the 115 RtC3 patients were alive (P = 0.009). The median survival for the Rt series was 25 weeks and for the RtC3 series 43 weeks. There was evidence of recurrence of the primary cancer in 32 (32%) of the 99 Rt and 20 (26%) of the 76 RtC3 patients who died. Distant metastases appeared earlier and were more frequent in the Rt series (P less than 0.0001) and over the 12-month period 79% of the Rt and 57% of the RtC3 patients developed distant metastases (P less than 0.0005). At 12 months only 8% of the Rt but 26% of the RtC3 patients were alive and free of metastases. Adverse reactions occurred much more frequently in the RtC3 series; 32% of the Rt series as against 83% of the RtC3 series had reactions, the most common being nausea and vomiting (13% Rt, 71% RtC3) and the most serious being marrow depression (23% Rt, 54% RtC3). No important differences were found among the survivors in the 2 series at 3, 6 or 12 months, in general condition, physical activity or respiratory function. It is concluded that radiotherapy plus chemotherapy was superior to radiotherapy alone, although chemotherapy did not protect patients from recurrence of primary growth. PMID:222312

  10. Accelerator science in medical physics

    PubMed Central

    Peach, K; Wilson, P; Jones, B

    2011-01-01

    The use of cyclotrons and synchrotrons to accelerate charged particles in hospital settings for the purpose of cancer therapy is increasing. Consequently, there is a growing demand from medical physicists, radiographers, physicians and oncologists for articles that explain the basic physical concepts of these technologies. There are unique advantages and disadvantages to all methods of acceleration. Several promising alternative methods of accelerating particles also have to be considered since they will become increasingly available with time; however, there are still many technical problems with these that require solving. This article serves as an introduction to this complex area of physics, and will be of benefit to those engaged in cancer therapy, or who intend to acquire such technologies in the future. PMID:22374548

  11. Cyclotron production of I-123: An evaluation of the nuclear reactions which produce this isotope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodd, V. J.; Scholz, K. L.; Blue, J. W.; Wellman, H. N.

    1970-01-01

    The use of the various nuclear reactions is described by which I-123,a low radiation dose radiopharmaceutical, can be cyclotron-produced. Methods of directly producing I-123 and those which indirectly produce the radionuclide through the beta (+) decay of its nautral precursor, Xe-123. It is impossible to separate from the radioiodine contaminants, notably I-124, which occur in the direct method. Thus, it is preferable to produce pure I-123 from Xe-123 which is easily separated from the radioiodines. Among the characteristics of I-123 is the capability of reducing the patient dose in a thyroid uptake measurement to a very small percentage of that delivered by the more commonly used I-131.

  12. Finite-width currents, magnetic shear, and the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakshi, P.; Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.

    1983-01-01

    Our earlier results that non-local effects due to even a small magnetic shear produce a significant reduction of the growth rate of the ion cyclotron instability driven by a uniform current are now generalized to finite width currents. Externally prescribed as well as self-consistent shears are considered. If the current width Lc exceeds the shear length Ls, the previous results are recovered. Shear becomes less effective with reduction of Lc, and for typical parameters, the growth rate attains its (shearless) local value for Lc/Ls approximately less than 10 to the minus 2. Non-local effects of the finite current width itself come into play if Lc is further reduced to a few ion Larmor radii and can quench the instability. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28996

  13. Magnetic field calculation for a 10 MeV positron emission tomography cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Dezhi; Liu Kaifeng; Yang Jun; Li Dong; Qin Bin; Xiong Yongqian; Chen Zihao

    2013-05-15

    The magnetic field calculation and correction for a 10 MeV positron emission tomography cyclotron is presented. 3D TOSCA analysis results are compared with the measured data, and the calculation error is used to calibrate the B-H curve to obtain a very precise finite element method estimator, which is used to predict the correction of the magnet pole for achieving the isochronous field. The isochronous field error is approximated with the effects of a set of standard patches. On the assumption that the effect of each small patch is proportional to its surface, the correction of the magnet pole is found by solving a system of equations using the least square scheme. The magnet shimming is performed and the measured magnetic field is found in good agreement with the prediction, with an error less than 2 G.

  14. Nonlinear response of magnetic islands to localized electron cyclotron current injection

    SciTech Connect

    Borgogno, D.; Comisso, L.; Grasso, D.; Lazzaro, E.

    2014-06-15

    The magnetic island evolution under the action of a current generated externally by electron cyclotron wave beams is studied using a reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics plasma model. The use of a two-dimensional reconnection model shows novel features of the actual nonlinear evolution as compared to the zero-dimensional model of the generalized Rutherford equation. When the radio frequency control is applied to a small magnetic island, the complete annihilation of the island width is followed by a spatial phase shift of the island, referred as “flip” instability. On the other hand, a current-drive injection in a large nonlinear island can be accompanied by the occurrence of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. These effects need to be taken into account in designing tearing mode control systems based on radio frequency current-drive.

  15. Do we need medical leadership or medical engagement?

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, Peter; Long, Paul; Clark, John; Daly, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to address issues of medical leadership within health systems and to clarify the associated conceptual issues, for example, leadership versus management and medical versus clinical leadership. However, its principle contribution is to raise the issue of the purpose or outcome of medical leadership, and, in this respect, it argues that it is to promote medical engagement. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is to provide evidence, both from the literature and empirically, to suggest that enhanced medical engagement leads to improved organisational performance and, in doing so, to review the associated concepts. Findings - Building on current evidence from the UK and Australia, the authors strengthen previous findings that effective medical leadership underpins the effective organisational performance. Research limitations/implications - There is a current imbalance between the size of the databases on medical engagement between the UK (very large) and Australia (small but developing). Practical implications - The authors aim to equip medical leaders with the appropriate skill set to promote and enhance greater medical engagement. The focus of leaders in organisations should be in creating a culture that fosters and supports medical engagement. Social implications - This paper provides empowerment of medical professionals to have greater influence in the running of the organisation in which they deliver care. Originality/value - The paper contains, for the first time, linked performance data from the Care Quality Commission in the UK and from Australia with the new set of medical engagement findings. PMID:26083633

  16. Improved ion optics for introduction of ions into a 9.4-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Dang, Xibei; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2015-01-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry provides unparalleled mass accuracy and resolving power.[1],[2] With electrospray ionization (ESI), ions are typically transferred into the mass spectrometer through a skimmer, which serves as a conductance-limiting orifice. However, the skimmer allows only a small fraction of incoming ions to enter the mass spectrometer. An ion funnel, originally developed by Smith and coworkers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)[3-5] provides much more efficient ion focusing and transfer. The large entrance aperture of the ion funnel allows almost all ions emanating from a heated capillary to be efficiently captured and transferred, resulting in nearly lossless transmission.

  17. Medication Errors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... broader product safety issues. Relevant FDA Drug Safety Communications for Drug Products Associated with Medication Errors FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA cautions about dosing errors when switching between ...

  18. Sawtooth control in ITER using ion cyclotron resonance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, I. T.; Graves, J P; Johnson, T.; Asunta, O.; Bonoli, P.; Choi, M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Jucker, M.; Sauter, O.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical modeling of the effects of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) on the stability of the internal kink mode suggests that ICRH should be considered as an essential sawtooth control tool in ITER. Sawtooth control using ICRH is achieved by directly affecting the energy of the internal kink mode rather than through modification of the magnetic shear by driving localized currents. Consequently, ICRH can be seen as complementary to the planned electron cyclotron current drive actuator, and indeed will improve the efficacy of current drive schemes. Simulations of the ICRH distribution using independent RF codes give confidence in numerical predictions that the stabilizing influence of the fusion-born alphas can be negated by appropriately tailored minority (3)He ICRH heating in ITER. Finally, the effectiveness of all sawtooth actuators is shown to increase as the q = 1 surface moves towards the manetic axis, whilst the passive stabilization arising from the alpha and NBI particles decreases.

  19. Electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic system for Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, B.H.; Hsia, R.P.; Domier, C.W.; Burns, S.R.; Hillyer, T.R.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Oyevaar, T.; Donne, A.J.; RTP team

    1999-01-01

    A 16-channel electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging diagnostic system has been developed and installed on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project for measuring plasma electron cyclotron emission with a temporal resolution of 2 {mu}s. The high spatial resolution of the system is achieved by utilizing a low cost linear mixer/receiver array. Unlike conventional ECE diagnostics, the sample volumes of the ECE imaging system are aligned vertically, and can be shifted across the plasma cross-section by varying the local oscillator frequency, making possible 2D measurements of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations. The poloidal/radial wavenumber spectra and correlation lengths of T{sub e} fluctuations in the plasma core can also be obtained by properly positioning the focal plane of the imaging system. Due to these unique features, ECE imaging is an ideal tool for plasma transport study. Technical details of the system are described, together with preliminary experimental results. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Evidence for proton cyclotron waves near Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L. C.; Mason, G. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1993-02-01

    We have computed frequency spectra of power density and polarization parameters of magnetohydrodynamic waves from observations on board the ICE spacecraft as it flew past Comet Giacobini-Zinner on September 11, 1985. Since the spectral parameters are frequency dependent, we find that the analysis is best carried out in a 'wave' reference frame where one of the major axes is along the wave normal direction for each frequency component. The power density along the wave normal direction shows a systematic peak structure which we identify as belonging to cyclotron wave harmonics of pickup ions near the comet. The fundamental harmonics of the cyclotron waves are also consistent with the gyrofrequencies calculated from the magnetic field data.

  1. PHYSICS OF ELCTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    PETTY,CC; PRATER,R; LUCE,TC; ELLIS,RA; HARVEY,RW; KINSEY,JE; LAO,LL; LOHR,J; MAKOWSKI,MA

    2002-09-01

    OAK A271 PHYSICS OF ELCTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have focused on determining the effect of trapped particles on the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency. The measured ECCD efficiency increases as the deposition location is moved towards the inboard midplane or towards smaller minor radius for both co and counter injection. The measured ECCD efficiency also increases with increasing electron density and/or temperature. The experimental ECCD is compared to both the linear theory (Toray-GA) as well as a quasilinear Fokker-Planck model (CQL3D). The experimental ECCD is found to be in better agreement with the more complete Fokker-Planck calculation, especially for cases of high rf power density and/or loop voltage. The narrow width of the measured ECCD profile is consistent with only low levels of radial transport for the current carrying electrons.

  2. LH wave absorption by mode conversion near ion cyclotron harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, K.; Bers, A.; Fuchs, V.

    1981-02-01

    Numerical studies of the dispersion relation near the lower-hybrid frequency in an inhomogeneous plasma (..delta.. n, ..delta.. T, ..delta.. B) show that portions of an incident lower-hybrid wave spectrum undergo successive but partial mode conversions to warm-plasma waves in the presence of ion cyclotron harmonics. Wave absorption beyond the first mode conversion occurs near an ion cyclotron harmonic where ion Landau damping is enhanced. A second-order dispersion relation numerically in good agreement with the full dispersion relation in the mode conversion region is derived using the condition par. delta D/par. delta k = 0. The mode conversion efficiency at each confluence is evaluated by solving the corresponding differential equation.

  3. Radiation protection aspects of the operation in a cyclotron facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, P. P. N.; Carneiro, J. C. G. G.

    2014-02-01

    The activated accelerator cyclotron components and the radioisotope production may impact on the personnel radiation exposure of the workers during the routine maintenance and emergency repair procedures and any modification of the equipment. Since the adherence of the principle of ALARA (as low as reasonable achievable) constitutes a major objective of the cyclotron management, it has become imperative to investigate the radiation levels at the workplace and the probable health effects to the worker caused by radiation exposure. The data analysis in this study was based on the individual monitoring records during the period from 2007 to 2011. Monitoring of the workplace was also performed using gamma and neutron detectors to determine the dose rate in various predetermined spots. The results of occupational radiation exposures were analysed and compared with the values established in national standards and international recommendations. Important guidelines have been developed to reduce the individual dose.

  4. Loss-cone-driven ion cyclotron waves in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denton, Richard E.; Hudson, Mary K.; Roth, Ilan

    1992-01-01

    The study examines the theoretical properties of linear ion cyclotron waves propagating in the magnetosphere at arbitrary angles to the background magnetic field. It is found that in some cases the linear wave growth of modes with oblique propagation can dominate that of the parallel propagating electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave. The growth rate of the loss-cone-driven mode depends strongly on the depth of the loss cone. A simple analytical theory which explains the scaling of the growth rate of the oblique mode with respect to various parameters is presented. The loss-cone-driven mode is an electromagnetic mode which is preferentially nearly linearly polarized. The wave field which results from the oblique mode in its perferentially nearly linearly polarized form are nearly perpendicular to B0 and are such that they may be difficult to distinguish from those of a linearly polarized parallel propgating EMIC wave.

  5. Evidence for proton cyclotron waves near Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, L. C.; Mason, G. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    We have computed frequency spectra of power density and polarization parameters of magnetohydrodynamic waves from observations on board the ICE spacecraft as it flew past Comet Giacobini-Zinner on September 11, 1985. Since the spectral parameters are frequency dependent, we find that the analysis is best carried out in a 'wave' reference frame where one of the major axes is along the wave normal direction for each frequency component. The power density along the wave normal direction shows a systematic peak structure which we identify as belonging to cyclotron wave harmonics of pickup ions near the comet. The fundamental harmonics of the cyclotron waves are also consistent with the gyrofrequencies calculated from the magnetic field data.

  6. On the cyclotron line in Cep X-4

    E-print Network

    V. A. McBride; J. Wilms; I. Kreykenbohm; M. J. Coe; R. E. Rothschild; P. Kretschmar; K. Pottschmidt; J. Fisher; T. Hamson

    2007-05-21

    Accreting X-ray pulsars provide us with laboratories for the study of extreme gravitational and magnetic fields, hence accurate descriptions of their observational properties contribute to our understanding of this group of objects. We aim to detect a cyclotron resonance scattering feature in the Be/X-ray binary Cep X-4 and to investigate pulse profile and spectral changes through the outburst. Spectral fitting and timing analysis are employed to probe the properties of Cep X-4 during an outburst in 2002 June. A previously announced cyclotron feature at 30.7 keV is confirmed, while the source shows spectral behaviour and luminosity related changes similar to those observed in previous outbursts. The long-term X-ray lightcurve shows a periodicity at 20.85 d, which could be attributed to the orbit in this Be system.

  7. Cyclotron resonance in topological insulators: non-relativistic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabert, C. J.; Carbotte, J. P.

    2015-09-01

    The low-energy Hamiltonian used to describe the dynamics of the helical Dirac fermions on the surface of a topological insulator contains a subdominant non-relativistic (Schrödinger) contribution. This term can have an important effect on some properties while having no effect on others. The Hall plateaus retain the same relativistic quantization as the pure Dirac case. The height of the universal interband background conductivity is unaltered, but its onset is changed. However, the non-relativistic term leads directly to particle-hole asymmetry. It also splits the interband magneto-optical lines into doublets. Here, we find that, while the shape of the semiclassical cyclotron resonance line is unaltered, the cyclotron frequency and its optical spectral weight are changed. There are significant differences in both of these quantities for a fixed value of chemical potential or fixed doping away from charge neutrality depending on whether the Fermi energy lies in the valence or conduction band.

  8. Neutron spectra due (13)N production in a PET cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Benavente, J A; Vega-Carrillo, H R; Lacerda, M A S; Fonseca, T C F; Faria, F P; da Silva, T A

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo and experimental methods have been used to characterize the neutron radiation field around PET (Positron Emission Tomography) cyclotrons. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to estimate the neutron spectra, the neutron fluence rates and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) in seven locations around a PET cyclotron during (13)N production. In order to validate these calculations, H*(10) was measured in three sites and were compared with the calculated doses. All the spectra have two peaks, one above 0.1MeV due to the evaporation neutrons and another in the thermal region due to the room-return effects. Despite the relatively large difference between the measured and calculated H*(10) for one point, the agreement was considered good, compared with that obtained for (18)F production in a previous work. PMID:25699664

  9. Electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves in magnetospheric plasmas Nonlocal aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, G.; Bakshi, P.; Palmadesso, P.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of the effect of the magnetic shear and the finite size of current channel on the electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability for the space plasmas is illustrated. A non-local treatment is used. When the channel width Lc, is larger than the shear length Ls, there is a large reduction in the growth rate along with a noteworthy reduction of the band of the unstable perpendicular wavelengths. For Lc less than or = Ls/10 the growth rate is not much altered from its local value, however for Lc/pi i less than or = 10 to the second power the growth rate starts falling below the local value and vanishes for Lc pi i. The non-local effects lead to enhanced coherence in the ion cyclotron waves. Previously announced in STAR as N84-14917

  10. RF physics of ICWC discharge at high cyclotron harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Lyssoivan, A.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Vervier, M.; Van Schoor, M.; Bobkov, V.; Rohde, V.; Schneider, P.; Douai, D.; Kogut, D.; Kreter, A.; Möller, S.; Philipps, V.; Sergienko, G.; Moiseenko, V.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Collaboration: TEXTOR Team; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-12

    Recent experiments on Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) performed in tokamaks TEXTOR and ASDEX Upgrade with standard ICRF antennas operated at fixed frequencies but variable toroidal magnetic field demonstrated rather contrasting parameters of ICWC discharge in scenarios with on-axis fundamental ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) for protons,?=?{sub H+}, and with its high cyclotron harmonics (HCH), ?=10?{sub cH+}? HCH scenario: very high antenna coupling to low density RF plasmas (P{sub pl}?0.9P{sub RF-G}) and low energy Maxwellian distribution of CX hydrogen atoms with temperature T{sub H}?350 eV. Fundamental ICR: lower antenna-plasma coupling efficiency (by factor of about 1.5 times) and generation of high energy non-Maxwellian CX hydrogen atoms (with local energy E{sub ?H} ?1.0 keV). In the present paper, we analyze the obtained experimental results numerically using (i) newly developed 0-D transport code describing the process of plasma production with electron and ion collisional ionization in helium-hydrogen gas mixture and (ii) earlier developed 1-D Dispersion Relation Solver accounting for finite temperature effects and collision absorption mechanisms for all plasma species in addition to conventionally examined Landau/TTPM damping for electrons and cyclotron absorption for ions. The numerical study of plasma production in helium with minor hydrogen content in low and high toroidal magnetic fields is presented. The investigation of the excitation, conversion and absorption of plasma waves as function of B{sub T}-field suggests that only fast waves (FW) may give a crucial impact on antenna coupling and characteristics of the ICWC discharge using standard poloidally polarized ICRF antennas designed to couple RF power mainly to FW. The collisional (non-resonant) absorption by electrons and ions and IC absorption by resonant ions of minor concentration in low T{sub e} plasmas is studied at fundamental ICR and its high harmonics.

  11. Converting an AEG Cyclotron to H- Acceleration and Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Fred; Carroll, Lewis; Rathmann, Tom; Huenges, Ernst; Bechtold, Matthias Mentler Volker

    2009-03-01

    Clinical Trials are under way to evaluate agents labeled with the nuclide 225Ac and its decay product 213Bi, in targeted alpha-immuno-therapy [1]. 225Ac can be produced on a medium-energy cyclotron via the nuclear reaction 226Ra(p,n)225Ac. To demonstrate proof-of-principle, a vintage AEG cyclotron, Model E33 [2], with an internal target, had been employed in a pilot production program at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). To enhance production capability and further support the clinical studies, the TUM facility has recently been refurbished and upgraded, adding a new external beam-line, automated target irradiation and transport systems, new laboratories, hot cells, etc. [3]. An improved high-power rotating target has been built and installed [4]. The AEG cyclotron itself has also been modified and upgraded to accelerate and extract H- ions. We have designed, built, and tested a new axial Penning-type ion source which is optimized for the production of H- ions. The ion source has continued to evolve through experiment and experience. Steady improvements in materials and mechanics have led to enhanced source stability, life-time, and H- production. We have also designed and built a precision H- charge-exchange beam-extraction system which is equipped with a vacuum lock. To fit within the tight mechanical constraint imposed by the narrow magnet gap, the system incorporates a novel chain-drive foil holder and foil-changer mechanism. The reconfigured cyclotron system has now been in operation for more than 1 year. Three long-duration target irradiations have been conducted. The most recent bombardment ran 160 continuous hours at a beam on target of ˜80 microamperes for a total yield of ˜70 milli-curies of 225Ac.

  12. Intra-Landau-Level Cyclotron Resonance in Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlas, Yafis; Côté, R.; Nomura, K.; MacDonald, A. H.

    2008-08-01

    Interaction driven integer quantum-Hall effects are anticipated in graphene bilayers because of the near degeneracy of the eight Landau levels which appear near the neutral system Fermi level. We predict that an intra-Landau-level cyclotron resonance signal will appear at some odd-integer filling factors, accompanied by collective modes which are nearly gapless and have approximate k3/2 dispersion. We speculate on the possibility of unusual localization physics associated with these modes.

  13. Hadronic Cross sections: from cyclotrons to colliders to cosmic rays

    E-print Network

    Martin M. Block

    2010-09-02

    We present evidence for the saturation of the Froissart bound at high energy for {\\em all hadronic} total cross sections at high energies, and use this to unify $pp$ (and $\\bar p p$) total cross sections over the energy range from cyclotrons to colliders to ultra-high energy cosmic rays, an energy span from $\\sqrt s = 4$ GeV to 80 TeV.

  14. Medical Terminology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer County Community Coll., Trenton, NJ.

    This document is one of a series of student workbooks developed for workplace skill development courses or workshops by Mercer County Community College (New Jersey) and its partners. Designed to help employees of medical establishments learn medical terminology, this course provides information on basic word structure, body parts, suffixes and…

  15. Considerations, measurements and logistics associated with low-energy cyclotron decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderland, J. J.; Erdahl, C. E.; Bender, B. R.; Sensoy, L.; Watkins, G. L.

    2012-12-19

    The University of Iowa's 20-year-old 17 MeV Scanditronix cyclotron underwent decommissioning in the summer of 2011. To satisfy local, state and federal regulations defining removal, transportation and long-term safe and environmentally secure disposal of the 22 ton activated cyclotron, a series of nuclear spectroscopic measurements were performed to characterize the nature and extent of proton and neutron activation of the 22-ton cyclotron, its associated targets, and the concrete wall that was demolished to remove the old cyclotron. Neutron activation of the concrete wall was minimal and below exempt concentrations resulting in standard landfill disposal. The cyclotron assessment revealed the expected array of short and medium-lived radionuclides. Subsequent calculations suggest that meaningful levels residual activity will have decayed virtually to background after 15 years, with the total residual activity of the entire cyclotron dropping below 37 MBq (1 mCi).

  16. Backward mode of the ion-cyclotron wave in a semi-bounded magnetized Lorentzian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Dae-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2012-08-15

    The backward modes of the surface ion-cyclotron wave are investigated in a semi-bounded magnetized Lorentzian plasma. The dispersion relation of the backward mode of the surface ion-cyclotron wave is obtained using the specular reflection boundary condition with the plasma dielectric function. The result shows that the nonthermal effect suppresses the wave frequency as well as the group velocity of the surface ion-cyclotron wave. It is also found that the nonthermal effect on the surface ion-cyclotron wave increases with an increase of the wave number. In addition, it is found that the propagation domain of the surface ion-cyclotron wave increases with an increase of the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the electron gyrofrequency. It is also found that the nonthermal effect increases the propagation domain of the surface ion-cyclotron wave in a semi-bounded magnetized Lorentzian plasma.

  17. Cryogenic system upgrade for the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    A. McCartney; V. Ganni; H. Laumer; D. Arenius; J. Creel; W. Chronis; K. Davidson

    2002-05-10

    The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) is a National Science Foundation supported facility, with additional support from Michigan State University (MSU). The facility consists of two superconducting cyclotrons and over fifty individual cryostats, each containing several superconducting magnets that are used in the beam transport system. The facility also has a superconducting ion source and a large superconducting spectrograph. To support this facility we operated two helium refrigerators producing approximate 900W at 4.5K. In July of 1999, construction of a new beam analysis system, the A1900, was started. The laboratory was reconfigured to couple the two cyclotrons in series to enable the facility to produce higher intensity radioactive beams than previously possible in the stand-alone mode. In addition, the helium distribution system was upgraded with new transfer lines and a new distribution box. The new requirements increased the refrigeration load to more than 1 KW at 4.5K. To support this increased cryogenic load, the existing two helium cryogenic plants, were at best, marginal in capacity. This would have required both plants to run at full capacity, maximum efficiency and availability. To achieve higher reliability, availability, and process transient capacity for magnet cool down and filling, a decision was made to obtain a larger cryogenic plant to support the new system. The following paper describes the important aspects and capabilities of the new cryogenic system to accomplish this goal.

  18. Resonant Cyclotron Scattering and Comptonization in Neutron Star Magnetospheres

    E-print Network

    Maxim Lyutikov; Fotis P. Gavriil

    2006-02-10

    Resonant cyclotron scattering of the surface radiation in the magnetospheres of neutron stars may considerably modify the emergent spectra and impede efforts to constraint neutron star properties. Resonant cyclotron scattering by a non-relativistic warm plasma in an inhomogeneous magnetic field has a number of unusual characteristics: (i) in the limit of high resonant optical depth, the cyclotron resonant layer is half opaque, in sharp contrast to the case of non-resonant scattering. (ii) The transmitted flux is on average Compton up-scattered by ~ $1+ 2 beta_T$, where $\\beta_T$ is the typical thermal velocity in units of the velocity of light; the reflected flux has on average the initial frequency. (iii) For both the transmitted and reflected fluxes the dispersion of intensity decreases with increasing optical depth. (iv) The emergent spectrum is appreciably non-Plankian while narrow spectral features produced at the surface may be erased. We derive semi-analytically modification of the surface Plankian emission due to multiple scattering between the resonant layers and apply the model to anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1048.1--5937. Our simple model fits just as well as the ``canonical'' magnetar spectra model of a blackbody plus power-law.

  19. A Suzaku View of Cyclotron Line Sources and Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottschmidt, K.; Suchy, S.; Rivers, E.; Rothschild, R. E.; Marcu, D. M.; Barragan, L.; Kuehnel, M.; Fuerst, F.; Schwarm, F.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Wilms, J.; Schoenherr, G.; Caballero, I.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Bodaghee, A.; Doroshenko, V.; Klochkov, D.; Santangelo, A.; Staubert, R.; Kretschmar, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Finger, M. H.; Terada, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Seventeen accreting neutron star pulsars, mostly high mass X-ray binaries with half of them Be-type transients, are known to exhibit Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Features (CRSFs) in their X-ray spectra, with characteristic line energies from 10 to 60 keY. To date about two thirds of them, plus a few similar systems without known CRSFs, have been observed with Suzaku. We present an overview of results from these observations, including the discovery of a CRSF in the transient IA1118-61 and pulse phase resolved spectroscopy of OX 301-2. These observations allow for the determination of cyclotron line parameters to an unprecedented degree of accuracy within a moderate amount of observing time. This is important since these parameters vary - e.g., with orbital phase, pulse phase, or luminosity - depending on the geometry of the magnetic field of the pulsar and the properties of the accretion column at the magnetic poles. We briefly introduce a spectral model for CRSFs that is currently being developed and that for the first time is based on these physical properties. In addition to cyclotron line measurements, selected highlights from the Suzaku analyses include dip and flare studies, e.g., of 4U 1907+09 and Vela X-I, which show clumpy wind effects (like partial absorption and/or a decrease in the mass accretion rate supplied by the wind) and may also display magnetospheric gating effects.

  20. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    Our goal is to improve the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The grant includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. The radiochemistry group seeks to develop innovative cyclotron targetry, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiolabeled antibodies, which are then used to assess important unanswered questions in tumor pharmacology and immunology. Examples include selected positron emitting radionuclides, such as Iodine-124, and Ga-66; I-124, I-123, I-131 labeled iododeoxyuridine, C-11 colchicine, and antimetabolites, like C-11 methotrexate; and radiolabeled antibodies, 3F8, M195, A33, and MRK16 for application in the pharmacology and immunology projects. The pharmacology program studies tumor resistance to chemotherapy, particularly the phenomenon of multidrug resistance and the relationship between tumor uptake and retention and the tumor response for anti-metabolite drugs. The immunology program studies the physiology of antibody localization at the tissue level as the basis for novel approaches to improving tumor localization such as through the use of an artificial lymphatic system which mechanically reduces intratumoral pressures in tumors in vivo. Quantitative imaging approaches based on PET and SPECT in radioimmunotherapy are studied to give greater insight into the physiology of tumor localization and dosimetry.

  1. RF control hardware design for CYCIAE-100 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhiguo; Fu, Xiaoliang; Ji, Bin; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tianjue; Li, Pengzhan; Wei, Junyi; Xing, Jiansheng; Wang, Chuan

    2015-11-01

    The Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility project is being constructed by BRIF division of China Institute of Atomic Energy. In this project, a 100 MeV high intensity compact proton cyclotron is built for multiple applications. The first successful beam extraction of CYCIAE-100 cyclotron was done in the middle of 2014. The extracted proton beam energy is 100 MeV and the beam current is more than 20 ?A. The RF system of the CYCIAE-100 cyclotron includes two half-wavelength cavities, two 100 kW tetrode amplifiers and power transmission line systems (all above are independent from each other) and two sets of Low Level RF control crates. Each set of LLRF control includes an amplitude control unit, a tuning control unit, a phase control unit, a local Digital Signal Process control unit and an Advanced RISC Machines based EPICS IOC unit. These two identical LLRF control crates share one common reference clock and take advantages of modern digital technologies (e.g. DSP and Direct Digital Synthesizer) to achieve closed loop voltage and phase regulations of the dee-voltage. In the beam commission, the measured dee-voltage stability of RF system is better than 0.1% and phase stability is better than 0.03°. The hardware design of the LLRF system will be reviewed in this paper.

  2. Cyclotron electron beam excited surface plasmon polaritons coherent radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Gong; Tao, Zhao; Min, Hu; Renbin, Zhong; Xiaoxing, Chen; Diwei, Liu; Ping, Zhang; Chao, Zhang; Jian, Chen; Biaobin, Jin; Huabing, Wang; Peiheng, Wu; Shenggang, Liu

    2015-07-01

    A physical mechanism of electron beam excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on the circular cylindrical structure and transformation into coherent radiation is proposed. Here SPPs on the circular cylindrical structures are excited by a cyclotron electron beam (CEB) rather than by the linearly moving electron beam (LEB). This change leads to an essential consequence due to the natural periodicity of 2? in structure and CEB, and this dual natural periodicity makes the SPPs transformation possible and brings significant excellences. HEM hybrid modes and \\text{TM}0n modes SPPs can be excited and propagate along a cyclotron trajectory together with the CEB to attract energy from CEB continuously to compensate the energy loss; the phase velocity of SPPs synchronizes the CEB; the process of the excitation and transformation is longer. Therefore, the transformed power density is enhanced and reaches up to 1010 \\text{W/cm}2 . The cyclotron frequency of the electron beam is 1 THz, but the frequency regime of the SPPs and the radiation are much higher, up to hundreds of terahertz. The mechanism presented in this letter opens the way for developing the desired room temperature, powerful and coherent light radiation sources from the infrared to the ultraviolet frequency regime.

  3. Cyclotron harmonic lines in magnetic fluctuations of spiralling electrons in plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubiatnikov, G.; Stenzel, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    The magnetic fluctuation spectrum in a magnetoplasma containing energetic electrons is observed to exhibit many lines at the cyclotron harmonics. It is shown that these fluctuations are neither due to cyclotron radiation nor due to velocity-space instabilities but due to coherent solenoidal fields produced by electron cyclotron orbits and excited by thermal fluctuations. Such line spectra, observed in discharges and beam-plasma systems, may be useful for precise magnetic field diagnostics in plasmas.

  4. Ray trajectories near the electron cyclotron resonance surface in an axisymmetric magnetic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Gospodchikov, E. D.; Smolyakova, O. B.

    2011-09-15

    Characteristic features of the propagation of electromagnetic electron cyclotron waves in the vicinity of the electron cyclotron resonance surface are investigated both analytically and numerically with allowance for variation in the magnetic field strength and a corresponding variation in the magnetic field direction. It is demonstrated that variation in the magnetic field direction can qualitatively change the wave propagation pattern and can markedly affect the efficiency of electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating in an axisymmetric magnetic trap.

  5. The cyclotron maser theory of AKR and Z-mode radiation. [Auroral Kilometric Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    The cyclotron maser mechanism which may be responsible for the generation of auroral kilometric radiation and Z-mode radiation is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the basic concepts of the cyclotron maser theory, particularly the relativistic effect of the cyclotron resonance condition. Recent development of the theory is reviewed. Finally, the results of a computer simulation study which helps to understand the nonlinear saturation of the maser instability are reported.

  6. Development of a PET cyclotron based irradiation setup for proton radiobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghithan, Sharif; Crespo, Paulo; do Carmo, S. J. C.; Ferreira Marques, Rui; Fraga, F. A. F.; Simões, Hugo; Alves, Francisco; Rachinhas, P. J. B. M.

    2015-02-01

    An out-of-yoke irradiation setup using the proton beam from a cyclotron that ordinary produces radioisotopes for positron emission tomography (PET) has been developed, characterized, calibrated and validated. The current from a 20 ?m thick aluminum transmission foil is readout by home-made transimpedance electronics, providing online dose information. The main monitoring variables, delivered in real-time, include beam current, integrated charge and dose rate. Hence the dose and integrated current delivered at a given instant to an experimental setup can be computer-controlled with a shutter. In this work, we report on experimental results and Geant4 simulations of a setup which exploits for the first time the 18 MeV proton beam from a PET cyclotron to irradiate a selected region of a target using the developed irradiation system. By using this system, we are able to deliver a homogeneous beam on targets with 18 mm diameter, allowing to achieve the controlled irradiation of cell cultures located in biological multi-well dishes of 16 mm diameter. We found that the magnetic field applied inside the cyclotron plays a major role for achieving the referred to homogeneity. The quasi-Gaussian curve obtained by scanning the magnet current and measuring the corresponding dose rate must be measured before any irradiation procedure, with the shutter closed. At the optimum magnet current, which corresponds to the center of the Gaussian, a homogenous dose is observed over the whole target area. Making use of a rotating disk with a slit of 0.5 mm at a radius of 150 mm, we could measure dose rates on target ranging from 500 mGy/s down to 5 mGy/s. For validating the developed irradiation setup, several Gafchromic® EBT2 films were exposed to different values of dose. The absolute dose in the irradiated films were assessed in the 2D film dosimetry system of the Department of Radiotherapy of Coimbra University Hospital Center with a precision better than 2%. In the future, we plan to irradiate small animals, cell cultures, or other materials or samples.

  7. Accelerator Production of Isotopes for Medical Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapi, Suzanne

    2014-03-01

    The increase in use of radioisotopes for medical imaging and therapy has led to the development of novel routes of isotope production. For example, the production and purification of longer-lived position emitting radiometals has been explored to allow for nuclear imaging agents based on peptides, antibodies and nanoparticles. These isotopes (64Cu, 89Zr, 86Y) are typically produced via irradiation of solid targets on smaller medical cyclotrons at dedicated facilities. Recently, isotope harvesting from heavy ion accelerator facilities has also been suggested. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will be a new national user facility for nuclear science to be completed in 2020. Radioisotopes could be produced by dedicated runs by primary users or may be collected synergistically from the water in cooling-loops for the primary beam dump that cycle the water at flow rates in excess of hundreds of gallons per minute. A liquid water target system for harvesting radioisotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) was designed and constructed as the initial step in proof-of-principle experiments to harvest useful radioisotopes in this manner. This talk will provide an overview of isotope production using both dedicated machines and harvesting from larger accelerators typically used for nuclear physics. Funding from Department of Energy under DESC0007352 and DESC0006862.

  8. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Hojo, S. Katagiri, K.; Nakao, M.; Sugiura, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Noda, A.; Noda, K.; Okada, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Komiyama, A.; Honma, T.

    2014-02-15

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C{sup 4+} ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8–10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 ?A for proton and deuteron, 50 ?A for C{sup 4+}, for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source.

  9. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Hojo, S; Katagiri, K; Nakao, M; Sugiura, A; Muramatsu, M; Noda, A; Okada, T; Takahashi, Y; Komiyama, A; Honma, T; Noda, K

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C(4+) ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 ?A for proton and deuteron, 50 ?A for C(4+), for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source. PMID:24593538

  10. Laboratory modeling of pulsed regimes of electron cyclotron instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, S. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Viktorov, M. E.; Izotov, I. V.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Demekhov, A. G.; Shalashov, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    One of the most interesting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) manifestations is the generation of bursts of electromagnetic radiation that are related to the explosive growth of cyclotron instabilities of the magnetoactive plasma confined in magnetic traps of various kinds and that are accompanied by particle precipitations from the trap. Such phenomena are observed in a wide range of plasma parameters under various conditions: in the magnetospheres of the Earth and planets, in solar coronal loops, and in laboratory magnetic traps. We demonstrate the use of a laboratory setup based on a magnetic mirror trap with plasma sustained by a gyrotron radiation under ECR conditions for investigation of the cyclotron instabilities similar to the ones which take place in space plasmas. Two regimes of the cyclotron instability are studied. In the first place, quasi-periodic pulsed precipitation of energetic electrons from the trap, accompanied by microwave bursts at frequencies below the electron gyrofrequency in the center of the trap, is detected. The study of the microwave plasma emission and the energetic electrons precipitated from the trap shows that the precipitation is related to the excitation of whistlers propagating nearly parallel to the trap axis. The observed instability has much in common with phenomena in space magnetic traps, such as radiation belts of magnetized planets and solar coronal loops. Such regimes have much in common with the quasi-periodic VLF radiation in the Earth's inner magnetosphere (with periods of T ~ 100 s) and can also be met in solar flaring loops and at other space objects. In the second place, we have detected and investigated quasi-periodic series of pulsed energetic electron precipitations in the decaying plasma of a pulsed ECR discharge in a mirror axisymmetric magnetic trap. The observed particle ejections from the trap are interpreted as the result of resonant interaction between energetic electrons and a slow extraordinary wave propagating in the rarefied plasma across the external magnetic field. We have been able to explain the generation mechanism of the sequences of pulsed precipitations at the nonlinear instability growth phase in terms of a cyclotron maser model in which the instability threshold is exceeded through a reduction in electromagnetic energy losses characteristic of the plasma decay. The conditions in the decaying plasma resemble those in auroral plasma cavities and similar systems, and in this case electromagnetic waves with quasi-perpendicular propagation direction are excited.

  11. Cyclotron resonance in an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.M. )

    1993-08-01

    Relativistic test particles interacting with a small monochromatic electromagnetic wave are studied in the presence of an inhomogeneous background magnetic field. A resonance-averaged Hamiltonian is derived which retains the effects of passage through resonance. Two distinct regimes are found. In the strongly inhomogeneous case, the resonant phase angle at successive resonances is random, and multiple resonant interactions lead to a random walk in phase space. In the other, adiabatic limit, the phase angle is determined by the phase portrait of the Hamiltonian and leads to a systematic change in the appropriate canonical action (and therefore in the energy and pitch angle), so that the cumulative effect increases directly with the number of resonances.

  12. Microwave emission related to cyclotron instabilities in a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, I.; Tarvainen, O.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.

    2015-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) have been essential in the research and applications of nuclear physics over the past 40?years. They are extensively used in a wide range of large-scale accelerator facilities for the production of highly charged heavy ion beams of stable and radioactive elements. ECRISs are susceptible to kinetic instabilities due to resonance heating mechanism leading to anisotropic electron velocity distribution function. Instabilities of cyclotron type are a proven cause of frequently observed periodic bursts of ‘hot’ electrons and bremsstrahlung, accompanied with emission of microwave radiation and followed by considerable drop of multiply charged ions current. Detailed studies of the microwave radiation associated with the instabilities have been performed with a minimum-B 14?GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen and argon plasmas. It is demonstrated that during the development of cyclotron instability ‘hot’ electrons emit microwaves in sub-microsecond scale bursts at temporally descending frequencies in the 8-15?GHz range with two dominant frequencies of 11.09 and 12.59?GHz regardless of ECRIS settings i.e. magnetic field strength, neutral gas pressure or species and microwave power. The experimental data suggest that the most probable excited plasma wave is a slow extraordinary Z-mode propagating quasi-longitudinally with respect to the external magnetic field.

  13. Linear and nonlinear physics of the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability of fusion-born ions in relation to ion cyclotron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajal, L. Cook, J. W. S.; Dendy, R. O.; Chapman, S. C.; Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Tromsø, N-9037, Tromsø; Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, D-01187, Dresden

    2014-01-15

    The magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability (MCI) probably underlies observations of ion cyclotron emission (ICE) from energetic ion populations in tokamak plasmas, including fusion-born alpha-particles in JET and TFTR [Dendy et al., Nucl. Fusion 35, 1733 (1995)]. ICE is a potential diagnostic for lost alpha-particles in ITER; furthermore, the MCI is representative of a class of collective instabilities, which may result in the partial channelling of the free energy of energetic ions into radiation, and away from collisional heating of the plasma. Deep understanding of the MCI is thus of substantial practical interest for fusion, and the hybrid approximation for the plasma, where ions are treated as particles and electrons as a neutralising massless fluid, offers an attractive way forward. The hybrid simulations presented here access MCI physics that arises on timescales longer than can be addressed by fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations and by analytical linear theory, which the present simulations largely corroborate. Our results go further than previous studies by entering into the nonlinear stage of the MCI, which shows novel features. These include stronger drive at low cyclotron harmonics, the re-energisation of the alpha-particle population, self-modulation of the phase shift between the electrostatic and electromagnetic components, and coupling between low and high frequency modes of the excited electromagnetic field.

  14. Low energy cyclotron production of multivalent transition metals for PET imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel Angel

    Recent advances in high-resolution tomographs for small animals require the production of nonconventional long-lived positron emitters to label novel radiopharmaceuticals for PET-based molecular imaging. Radioisotopes with an appropriate half life to match the kinetics of slow biological processes will allow to researchers to study the phamacokinetics of PET ligands over several hours, or even days, on the same animal, with the injection of a single dose. In addition, radionuclides with a suitable half life can potentially be distributed from a central production site making them available in PET facilities that lack an in-house cyclotron. In the last few years there has been a growing interest in the use of PET ligands labeled with radiometals, particularly isotopes of copper, yttrium and zirconium. Future clinical applications of these tracers will require them to be produced reliably and efficiently. This thesis work deals with implementing and optimizing the production of the multivalent transition metals 61,64Cu, 86Y and 89Zr for molecular PET imaging and therapy. Our findings in the production of these radionuclides at high specific activity on an 11 MeV proton-only cyclotron are presented. Local applications of these tracers, including Cu-ATSM for in vivo quantification of hypoxia, synthesis of targeted radiopharmaceuticals using activated esters of DOTA, and a novel development of positron emitting resin microspheres, are also be discussed. As a result of this thesis work, metallic radionuclides are now efficiently produced on a weekly basis in sufficient quality and quantity for collaborating scientists at UW-Madison and external users in other Universities across the country.

  15. Microwave-Excited Microplasma Thrusters Using Surface Wave and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Daisuke; Kawanabe, Tetsuo; Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2012-10-01

    Downsizing spacecrafts has recently been focused on to decrease mission costs and to increase launch rates, and missions with small satellites would bring a great advantage of reducing their risks. Such a concept supports a new approach to developing precise, reliable, and low-cost micropropulsion systems. We have studied two types of microwave-excited microplasma thrusters, using surface wave-excited and electron cyclotron resonance-excited discharges. Microwaves of S-band (4 GHz) and X-band (11 GHz) were employed to excite the plasma in these experiments, with the feed or propellant gases of Ar and He. A microplasma thruster of electrothermal type consisted of a surface wave-excited microplasma source, and a converging-diverging micronozzle to obtain the thrust. For 11-GHz microwaves at a power of 6 W, a thrust of 1.1 mN and a specific impulse of 90 s were obtained at an Ar gas flow rate of 40 sccm, where the plasma electron density was 1.2x10^20 m-3, and the gas temperature was 1.5x10^3 K; under the same conditions for 4-GHz microwaves, the thrust, specific impulse, electron density, and gas temperature were 0.93 mN, 80 s, 7.0x10^19 m-3, and 8.0x10^2 K, respectively. A microplasma thruster of electromagnetic type had a microplasma source excited by electron cyclotron resonance with external magnetic fields, to obtain the thrust through accelerating ions by ambipolar electric fields. Optical emission spectrum was dominated by Ar^+ ion lines in the microplasma thruster of electromagnetic type, owing to higher electron temperatures at lower feed-gas pressures.

  16. Medical Transcriptionists

    MedlinePLUS

    ... answering phones and greeting patients. <- Summary Work Environment -> Work Environment About this section Many transcriptionists receive dictation ... home offices, receiving dictation and submitting drafts electronically. Work Schedules Most medical transcriptionists work full time, although ...

  17. Medical Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, M. C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four main types of medical imaging (x-ray, radionuclide, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance) and considers their relative merits. Describes important recent and possible future developments in image processing. (Author/MKR)

  18. Medication Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... behavior, such as to reduce self-injury or aggression. Once a symptom is no longer a problem, ... of repetitive behaviors; decrease anxiety, irritability, tantrums, and aggressive behavior; and improve eye contact. Tricyclics These medications ...

  19. Taking Medication

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Tracker App Tip Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking Medication ... Legislative Action Center Federal Legislation State Legislation Affordable Care Act Information Advocacy Tools and Resources Cart Search ...

  20. Medical decisions.

    PubMed

    Black, D

    1980-04-01

    In relation to the application of decision theory to medical problems, a description is given of the terms 'probability', 'utility' and 'coherence'. The use of utilities is illustrated by comparing the outcomes of various methods of palliating terminal renal failure. The use of Bayes' theorem in incorporating additional information is described. Reference is made to specific clinical applications of mathematical methods. Some general comments are made on the way in which clinical and other medical decisions are reached. PMID:7006081

  1. Medical Marijuana.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri

    2016-01-01

    The use of medicinal marijuana is increasing. Marijuana has been shown to have therapeutic effects in certain patients, but further research is needed regarding the safety and efficacy of marijuana as a medical treatment for various conditions. A growing body of research validates the use of marijuana for a variety of healthcare problems, but there are many issues surrounding the use of this substance. This article discusses the use of medical marijuana and provides implications for home care clinicians. PMID:26645838

  2. Fast particle-driven ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in tokamak plasmas and the case for an ICE diagnostic in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClements, K. G.; D'Inca, R.; Dendy, R. O.; Carbajal, L.; Chapman, S. C.; Cook, J. W. S.; Harvey, R. W.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Pinches, S. D.

    2015-04-01

    The detection of fast particle-driven waves in the ion cyclotron frequency range (ion cyclotron emission or ICE) could provide a passive, non-invasive diagnostic of confined and escaping fast particles (fusion ?-particles and beam ions) in ITER, and would be compatible with the high radiation environment of deuterium-tritium plasmas in that device. Recent experimental results from ASDEX Upgrade and DIII-D demonstrate the efficacy of ICE as a diagnostic of different fast ion species and of fast ion losses, while recent particle-in-cell (PIC) and hybrid simulations provide a more exact comparison with measured ICE spectra and open the prospect of exploiting ICE more fully as a fast ion diagnostic in future experiments. In particular the PIC/hybrid approach should soon make it possible to simulate the nonlinear physics of ICE in full toroidal geometry. Emission has been observed previously at a wide range of poloidal angles, so there is flexibility in the location of ICE detectors. Such a detector could be implemented in ITER by installing a small toroidally orientated loop near the plasma edge or by adding a detection capability to the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennae. In the latter case, the antenna could be used simultaneously to heat the plasma and detect ICE, provided that frequencies close to those of the ICRH source are strongly attenuated in the detection system using a suitable filter. Wavenumber information, providing additional constraints on the fast ion distribution exciting the emission, could be obtained by measuring ICE using a toroidally distributed array of detectors or different straps of the ICRH antenna.

  3. High-Dose Hypofractionated Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Is Safe and Effective for Central and Peripheral Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of a 12-Year Experience at Loma Linda University Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, David A.; Cheek, Gregory; Zaheer, Salman; Wallen, Jason; Mirshahidi, Hamid; Katerelos, Ari; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We update our previous reports on the use of hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy for early-stage lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had biopsy-proven non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and were medically inoperable or refused surgery. Clinical workup required staging of T1 or T2, N0, M0. Subjects received hypofractionated proton beam therapy to the primary tumor only. The dose delivered was sequentially escalated from 51 to 60 Gy, then to 70 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Endpoints included toxicity, pulmonary function, overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC). Results: One hundred eleven subjects were analyzed for treatment outcomes. The patient population had the following average characteristics; age 73.2 years, tumor size 3.6 cm, and 1.33 L forced expiratory volume in 1 second. The entire group showed improved OS with increasing dose level (51, 60, and 70 Gy) with a 4-year OS of 18%, 32%, and 51%, respectively (P=.006). Peripheral T1 tumors exhibited LC of 96%, DSS of 88%, and OS of 60% at 4 years. Patients with T2 tumors showed a trend toward improved LC and survival with the 70-Gy dose level. On multivariate analysis, larger tumor size was strongly associated with increased local recurrence and decreased survival. Central versus peripheral location did not correlate with any outcome measures. Clinical radiation pneumonitis was not found to be a significant complication, and no patient required steroid therapy after treatment for radiation pneumonitis. Pulmonary function was well maintained 1 year after treatment. Conclusions: High-dose hypofractionated proton therapy achieves excellent outcomes for lung carcinomas that are peripherally or centrally located. The 70-Gy regimen has been adopted as standard therapy for T1 tumors at our institution. Larger T2 tumors show a trend toward improved outcomes with higher doses, suggesting that better results could be seen with intensified treatment.

  4. Long-term results of high-dose conformal radiotherapy for patients with medically inoperable T1-3N0 non-small-cell lung cancer: Is low incidence of regional failure due to incidental nodal irradiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Ming; Hayman, James A.; Haken, Randall K. ten; Tatro, Daniel; Fernando, Shaneli; Kong, F.-M. . E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of high-dose conformal irradiation and examine incidental nodal irradiation and nodal failure in patients with inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: This analysis included patients with inoperable CT-staged T1-3N0M0 NSCLC treated on our prospective dose-escalation trial. Patients were treated with radiation alone (total dose, 63-102.9 Gy in 2.1-Gy daily fractions) with a three-dimensional conformal technique without intentional nodal irradiation. Bilateral highest mediastinal and upper/lower paratracheal, prevascular and retrotracheal, sub- and para-aortic, subcarinal, paraesophageal, and ipsilateral hilar regions were delineated individually. Nodal failure and doses of incidental irradiation were studied. Results: The potential median follow-up was 104 months. For patients who completed protocol treatment, median survival was 31 months. The actuarial overall survival rate was 86%, 61%, 43%, and 21% and the cause-specific survival rate was 89%, 70%, 53%, and 35% at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Weight loss (p = 0.008) and radiation dose in Gy (p = 0.013) were significantly associated with overall survival. In only 22% and 13% of patients examined did ipsilateral hilar and paratracheal (and subaortic for left-sided tumor) nodal regions receive a dose of {>=}40 Gy, respectively. Less than 10% of all other nodal regions received a dose of {>=}40 Gy. No patients failed initially at nodal sites. Conclusions: Radiation dose is positively associated with overall survival in patients with medically inoperable T1-3N0 NSCLC, though long-term results remain poor. The nodal failure rate is low and does not seem to be due to high-dose incidental irradiation.

  5. Utilization of the CS-30 cyclotron at the Duke University Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Wieland, B.W.; McKinney, C.J.; Dailey, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    Present routine radionuclide production includes {sup 18}F fluoride from protons on {sup 18}O water, {sup 13}N ammonia from protons on {sup 13}C slurry, {sup 15}O water from deuterons on nitrogen gas, and {sup 211}At from alphas on bismuth metal. Clinical PET using two tomographs (GE 4096 and Advance) is done Tuesday through Friday, typically 4 to 11 patients per day using {sup 15}O water, {sup 13}N ammonia, and {sup 18}F FDG synthesized with a GE Microlab. Clinical patient studies are 50% neurology using FDG, 45% body using FDG, and 5% cardiology using ammonia and FDG (oncology in these three areas totals 60%). {sup 15}O water for clinical research patients (THC and cognitive) is produced twice a week. {sup 211}At is produced about twice a week for monoclonal antibody labelling.

  6. The new bern PET cyclotron, its research beam line, and the development of an innovative beam monitor detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, Saverio

    2013-04-01

    The new Bern cyclotron laboratory aims at industrial radioisotope production for PET diagnostics and multidisciplinary research by means of a specifically conceived beam transfer line, terminated in a separate bunker. In this framework, an innovative beam monitor detector based on doped silica and optical fibres has been designed, constructed, and tested. Scintillation light produced by Ce and Sb doped silica fibres moving across the beam is measured, giving information on beam position, shape, and intensity. The doped fibres are coupled to commercial optical fibres, allowing the read-out of the signal far away from the radiation source. This general-purpose device can be easily adapted for any accelerator used in medical applications and is suitable either for low currents used in hadrontherapy or for currents up to a few ?A for radioisotope production, as well as for both pulsed and continuous beams.

  7. The new bern PET cyclotron, its research beam line, and the development of an innovative beam monitor detector

    SciTech Connect

    Braccini, Saverio

    2013-04-19

    The new Bern cyclotron laboratory aims at industrial radioisotope production for PET diagnostics and multidisciplinary research by means of a specifically conceived beam transfer line, terminated in a separate bunker. In this framework, an innovative beam monitor detector based on doped silica and optical fibres has been designed, constructed, and tested. Scintillation light produced by Ce and Sb doped silica fibres moving across the beam is measured, giving information on beam position, shape, and intensity. The doped fibres are coupled to commercial optical fibres, allowing the read-out of the signal far away from the radiation source. This general-purpose device can be easily adapted for any accelerator used in medical applications and is suitable either for low currents used in hadrontherapy or for currents up to a few {mu}A for radioisotope production, as well as for both pulsed and continuous beams.

  8. Electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency: Stereo observations

    SciTech Connect

    Jian, L. K.; Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Klecker, B.; Omidi, N.; Isenberg, P. A.; Goldstein, M. L.; Figueroa-Viñas, A.; Blanco-Cano, X.

    2014-05-10

    Transverse, near-circularly polarized, parallel-propagating electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency were found sporadically in the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere. They could play an important role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. These low-frequency waves (LFWs) are intermittent but often occur in prolonged bursts lasting over 10 minutes, named 'LFW storms'. Through a comprehensive survey of them from Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory A using dynamic spectral wave analysis, we have identified 241 LFW storms in 2008, present 0.9% of the time. They are left-hand (LH) or right-hand (RH) polarized in the spacecraft frame with similar characteristics, probably due to Doppler shift of the same type of waves or waves of intrinsically different polarities. In rare cases, the opposite polarities are observed closely in time or even simultaneously. Having ruled out interplanetary coronal mass ejections, shocks, energetic particles, comets, planets, and interstellar ions as LFW sources, we discuss the remaining generation scenarios: LH ion cyclotron instability driven by greater perpendicular temperature than parallel temperature or by ring-beam distribution, and RH ion fire hose instability driven by inverse temperature anisotropy or by cool ion beams. The investigation of solar wind conditions is compromised by the bias of the one-dimensional Maxwellian fit used for plasma data calibration. However, the LFW storms are preferentially detected in rarefaction regions following fast winds and when the magnetic field is radial. This preference may be related to the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in fast wind and the minimum in damping along the radial field.

  9. Sawtooth-Control Mechanism using Toroidally Propagating Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance Waves in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, J. P.; Coda, S.; Chapman, I.

    2009-02-13

    The sawtooth control mechanism in plasmas employing off-axis toroidally propagating ion cyclotron resonance waves in tokamaks is reinvestigated. The radial drift excursion of energetic passing ions distributed asymmetrically in the velocity parallel to the magnetic field determines stability when the rational q=1 surface resides within a narrow region centered about the shifted fundamental cyclotron resonance.

  10. Cyclotron-resonance maser in a periodically loaded quadrupole transmission line Y. Leibovitch and E. Jerby*

    E-print Network

    Jerby, Eli

    the circular polarization of the em wave inside the tube. The results of this experiment may leadCyclotron-resonance maser in a periodically loaded quadrupole transmission line Y. Leibovitch and E quadrupole waveguide. The device oscillates at the fundamental and high harmonics of the cyclotron frequency

  11. Fast earthward flows, electron cyclotron harmonic waves, and diffuse auroras: Conjunctive observations

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Fast earthward flows, electron cyclotron harmonic waves, and diffuse auroras: Conjunctive of fast earthward flows, electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves, and diffuse auroras a causal conjunction between the ECH waves and diffuse auroras for the reported event. We also propose

  12. The Upgrade Project at Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute: Update

    SciTech Connect

    Tabacaru, G.; Abegglen, F.; Chubaryan, G.; Derrig, G.; Clark, H. L.; Kim, G.; May, D.; Tribble, R. E.; Aerje, J.

    2010-11-24

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A and M University is currently under an upgrade process. The plan is to produce re-accelerated radioactive ion beams using the recommissioned 88'' Cyclotron as a driver and two different devices. The technique for producing radioactive species will be presented.

  13. Electron cyclotron maser based on the combination two-wave resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Savilov, A. V.

    2012-11-01

    A mechanism of a combination two-wave cyclotron interaction between an electron beam and the forward/backward components of a far-from-cutoff standing wave is analyzed. This regime can be promising for the realization of high-power continuous-wave electron cyclotron masers operating in the THz frequency range.

  14. Quantum non demolition measurement of cyclotron excitations in a Penning trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzoli, Irene; Tombesi, Paolo

    1993-01-01

    The quantum non-demolition measurement of the cyclotron excitations of an electron confined in a Penning trap could be obtained by measuring the resonance frequency of the axial motion, which is coupled to the cyclotron motion through the relativistic shift of the electron mass.

  15. Cyclotron absorption of radio emission within pulsar magnetospheres Qinghuan LuoP

    E-print Network

    Melrose, Don

    as B/1/R3 . Thus, radio waves with frequency v must propagate through a transition region from Ve @ v radio emission, as cyclotron resonance causes preferential absorption of waves with a particular typeCyclotron absorption of radio emission within pulsar magnetospheres Qinghuan LuoP and D. B. Melrose

  16. IN-SITU ELECTRON CYCLOTRON RESONANCE (ECR) PLASMA POTENTIAL DETERMINATION USING AN EMISSIVE PROBE*

    E-print Network

    IN-SITU ELECTRON CYCLOTRON RESONANCE (ECR) PLASMA POTENTIAL DETERMINATION USING AN EMISSIVE PROBE electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. It is shown that, for normal ECR ion source operating conditions, the large population of hot electrons may make the emissive floating point method fail, and may

  17. Cyclotron waves in a non-neutral plasma column Daniel H. E. Dubin

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    #12;Cyclotron waves in a non-neutral plasma column Daniel H. E. Dubin Department of Physics April 2013; published online 25 April 2013) A kinetic theory of linear electrostatic plasma waves cyclotron waves propagating azimuthally. For finite rc, the wave equation predicts that the surface wave

  18. CONSTRUCTION OF GATCHINA ISOCHRONOUS CYCLOTRON N.K.Abrossimov, G.A.Riabov

    E-print Network

    Titov, Anatoly

    15 CONSTRUCTION OF GATCHINA ISOCHRONOUS CYCLOTRON N.K.Abrossimov, G.A.Riabov 1. Introduction high that it is able to justify the expenditure on cyclotron construction during in a few years.e. the building, the bridge crane for 30 tones, the electric power, water cooling, ventilation systems, etc

  19. CYCLOTRON HEATING NFR THE MULTIPOLE B = 0 AXIS J. C. Sprott

    E-print Network

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    CYCLOTRON HEATING NFR THE MULTIPOLE B = 0 AXIS by J. C. Sprott November 1973 PLP 536 Plasma Studies of the author and major professor. #12;Ion and Electron Cyclotron heating rates in multipoles are generally is a collection of formulas and graphs useful for both electron and ion cyclo- tron resonance heating near the B

  20. Ion-cyclotron turbulence and diagonal double layers in a magnetospheric plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liperovskiy, V. A.; Pudovkin, M. I.; Skuridin, G. A.; Shalimov, S. L.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of current concepts regarding electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence (theory and experiment), and regarding inclined double potential layers in the magnetospheric plasma is presented. Anomalous resistance governed by electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence, and one-dimensional and two-dimensional models of double electrostatic layers in the magnetospheric plasma are examined.

  1. Medical migration.

    PubMed

    Loefler, I J

    2001-10-01

    The issue of professional migration, however emotional it may have become, ought not to be regarded in moralizing terms. The history of western medicine is the history of migrating physicians. A doctor who moves from a locality to another to take up a new assignment there cannot be said to have "abandoned his patients". This emotional bond has become the victim of specialization and of depersonalization of medical services and not of medical migration, brain drain or otherwise. The primary reason for medical migration is not financial; the desire to migrate usually begins with the desire to learn. Professionals crave in the first line for professional satisfaction. The migration of medical manpower cannot be stopped with administrative measures and will not be stopped by exhortations and appeals, moralization and condemnations. Brain drain is a global phenomenon and has always been so. A country which loses its professionals, its doctors, should examine the social relationships within the profession and should investigate whether the opportunities for deriving professional satisfaction from everyday work exist or whether these have been thwarted by the hierarchy, conservatism, cronyism and the general lack of comprehension of what good medical care is about. PMID:11593497

  2. Medical Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2015-06-01

    The Medical Renaissance started as the regular Renaissance did in the early 1400s and ended in the late 1600s. During this time great medical personalities and scholar humanists made unique advances to medicine and surgery. Linacre, Erasmus, Leonicello and Sylvius will be considered first, because they fit the early classic Renaissance period. Andreas Vesalius and Ambroise Paré followed thereafter, making outstanding anatomical contributions with the publication of the "Human Factory" (1543) by Vesalius, and describing unique surgical developments with the publication of the "The Apologie and Treatise of Ambroise Paré." At the end of the Renaissance and beginning of the New Science, William Harvey, noted British medical doctor and cardiovascular researcher, discovered the general circulation. He published his findings in "The Motu Cordis" in 1628 (Figure 1). The Medical Renaissance, in summary, included a great number of accomplished physicians and surgeons who made especial contributions to human anatomy; Vesalius assembled detailed anatomical information; Paré advanced surgical techniques; and Harvey, a medical genius, detailed the circulatory anatomy and physiology. PMID:26065591

  3. Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources in use for heavy ion cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tinschert, K.; Iannucci, R.; Lang, R.

    2008-02-15

    The use of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources for producing ion beams for heavy ion cancer therapy has been established for more than ten years. After the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) at Chiba, Japan started therapy of patients with carbon ions in 1994 the first carbon ion beam for patient treatment at the accelerator facility of GSI was delivered in 1997. ECR ion sources are the perfect tool for providing the required ion beams with good stability, high reliability, and easy maintenance after long operating periods. Various investigations were performed at GSI with different combinations of working gas and auxiliary gas to define the optimal beam conditions for an extended use of further ion species for the dedicated Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy (HIT) facility installed at the Radiological University Hospital Heidelberg, Germany. Commercially available compact all permanent magnet ECR ion sources operated at 14.5 GHz were chosen for this facility. Besides for {sup 12}C{sup 4+} these ion sources are used to provide beams of {sup 1}H{sub 3}{sup 1+}, {sup 3}He{sup 1+}, and {sup 16}O{sup 6+}. The final commissioning at the HIT facility could be finished at the end of 2006.

  4. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source experience at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center

    SciTech Connect

    Winkelmann, T.; Cee, R.; Haberer, T.; Naas, B.; Peters, A.; Scheloske, S.; Spaedtke, P.; Tinschert, K.

    2008-02-15

    Radiotherapy with heavy ions is an upcoming cancer treatment method with to date unparalleled precision. It associates higher control rates particularly for radiation resistant tumor species with reduced adverse effects compared to conventional photon therapy. The accelerator beam lines and structures of the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) have been designed under the leadership of GSI, Darmstadt with contributions of the IAP Frankfurt. Currently, the accelerator is under commissioning, while the injector linac has been completed. When the patient treatment begins in 2008, HIT will be the first medical heavy ion accelerator in Europe. This presentation will provide an overview about the project, with special attention given to the 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources in operation with carbon, hydrogen, helium, and oxygen, and the experience of one year of continuous operation. It also displays examples for beam emittances, measured in the low energy beam transport. In addition to the outlook of further developments at the ECR ion sources for a continuously stable operation, this paper focuses on some of the technical processings of the past year.

  5. Asymmetric spectral broadening of modulated electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Koepke, M.E.; Alport, M.J.; Sheridan, T.E.; Amatucci, W.E.; Carroll, J.J. III

    1994-06-01

    Modulated, current-driven, electrostatic ion-cyclotron (CDEIC) waves are shown to exhibit amplitude and frequency modulation, spectral broadening, and time-averaged frequency pulling. The observed spectral broadening is asymmetric and sensitively dependent on the driving frequency. Qualitative features of the experimental data are reproduced by the forced van der Pol equation and are explainable using processes associated with driven self oscillations. These results may be relevant to ionospheric modification experiments involving the controlled modulation of the natural electrojet. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Electron-cyclotron maser instability in relativistic plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, P. L.

    1986-01-01

    The electron-cyclotron maser instability is studied for the case of an anisotropic electron velocity distribution in the regime where the relativistic corrections to the wave dispersion are significant. Solution of the linear dispersion relation reveals that when the plasma frequency-gyrofrequency ratio is less than v(te)/c, the instability is localized just below k(perpendicular)c/Omega(e) = 1. The growth rate is then strongly peaked for emission at 90 deg to the magnetic field and is considerably larger than would be the case if the cold-plasma dispersion theory were valid. These features are confirmed by EM particle simulations.

  7. Beam injection improvement for electron cyclotron resonance charge breeders

    SciTech Connect

    Lamy, T.; Angot, J.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.

    2012-02-15

    The injection of a 1+ beam into an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) charge breeder is classically performed through a grounded tube placed on its axis at the injection side. This tube presents various disadvantages for the operation of an ECR charge breeder. First experiments without a grounded tube show a better use of the microwave power and a better charge breeding efficiency. The optical acceptance of the charge breeder without decelerating tube allows the injection of high intensity 1+ ion beams at high energy, allowing metals sputtering inside the ion source. The use of this method for refractory metallic ion beams production is evaluated.

  8. Deposition of diamondlike films by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, F. S.; Shing, Y. H.

    1990-01-01

    Hard a-C:H films have been deposited through electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma decomposition of CH4 diluted with H2 gas. It has been found that hard diamondlike films could only be produced under a RF-induced negative self-bias of the substrate stage. Raman spectra indicate the deposition of two distinct film types: one film type exhibiting well-defined bands at 1360 and 1580/cm and another displaying a broad Raman peak centered at approximately 1500/cm. Variation of the mirror magnetic-field profile of the ECR system was examined, demonstrating the manipulation of film morphology through the extraction of different ion energies.

  9. Numerical model of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source

    E-print Network

    Mironov, V; Bondarchenko, A; Efremov, A; Loginov, V

    2015-01-01

    Important features of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) operation are accurately reproduced with a numerical code. The code uses the particle-in-cell technique to model a dynamics of ions in ECRIS plasma. It is shown that gas dynamical ion confinement mechanism is sufficient to provide the ion production rates in ECRIS close to the experimentally observed values. Extracted ion currents are calculated and compared to the experiment for few sources. Changes in the extracted ion currents are obtained with varying the gas flow into the source chamber and the microwave power. Empirical scaling laws for ECRIS design are studied and the underlying physical effects are discussed.

  10. Initiative in Nuclear Theory at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre

    E-print Network

    D. K. Srivastava; J. Alam; D. N. Basu; A. K. Chaudhuri; J. N. De; K. Krishan; S. Pal

    2005-06-24

    We recall the path breaking contributions of the nuclear theory group of the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata. From a beginning of just one person in 1970s, the group has steadily developed into a leading group in the country today, with seminal contributions to almost the entire range of nuclear physics, viz., low energy nuclear reactions, nuclear structure, deep inelastic collisions, fission, liquid to gas phase transitions, nuclear matter, equation of state, mass formulae, neutron stars, relativistic heavy ion collisions, medium modification of hadron properties, quark gluon plasma, and cosmology of early universe.

  11. Cyclotron production of Ac-225 for targeted alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Apostolidis, C; Molinet, R; McGinley, J; Abbas, K; Möllenbeck, J; Morgenstern, A

    2005-03-01

    The feasibility of producing Ac-225 by proton irradiation of Ra-226 in a cyclotron through the reaction Ra-226(p,2n)Ac-225 has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Proton energies were varied from 8.8 to 24.8 MeV and cross-sections were determined by radiochemical analysis of reaction yields. Maximum yields were reached at incident proton energies of 16.8 MeV. Radiochemical separation of Ac-225 from the irradiated target yielded a product suitable for targeted alpha therapy of cancer. PMID:15607913

  12. Superthermal electron distribution measurements from polarized electron cyclotron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1988-06-01

    Measurements of the superthermal electron distribution can be made by observing the polarized electron cyclotron emission. The emission is viewed along a constant magnetic field surface. This simplifies the resonance condition and gives a direct correlation between emission frequency and kinetic energy of the emitting electron. A transformation technique is formulated which determines the anisotropy of the distribution and number density of superthermals at each energy measured. The steady-state distribution during lower hybrid current drive and examples of the superthermal dynamics as the runaway conditions is varied are presented for discharges in the PLT tokamak. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Calibration of electron cyclotron emission radiometer for KSTARa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogi, Y.; Jeong, S. H.; Lee, K. D.; Akaki, K.; Mase, A.; Kuwahara, D.; Yoshinaga, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Kwon, M.; Kawahata, K.

    2010-10-01

    We developed and installed an electron cyclotron emission radiometer for taking measurements of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) plasma. In order to precisely measure the absolute value of electron temperatures, a calibration measurement of the whole radiometer system was performed, which confirmed that the radiometer has an acceptably linear output signal for changes in input temperature. It was also found that the output power level predicted by a theoretical calculation agrees with that obtained by the calibration measurement. We also showed that the system displays acceptable noise-temperature performance around 0.23 eV.

  14. Plane gyroklinotron at first and third harmonics of cyclotron frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Kurayev, A.A.; Lukashonok, D.V.; Sinitsyn, A.K. E-mail: timka86@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    The results of gyroklinotron's parameters optimization for efficiency at f = 100 GHz with interaction on first and third harmonics of the cyclotron frequency are presented. The predicted electron gyroklinotron's efficiency reaches 70% on first harmonic and 40% on third harmonic. This is more than in usual gyrotron. Besides in contrast to usual gyrotron the width electron beam on radius of guiding centers of electron orbits in gyroklinotron may considerable exceed working wave length {lambda}. This allows to use in it considerable more power of electron beams EB then in usual gyrotron. (author)

  15. Linear coupling of acoustic and cyclotron waves in plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rogava, Andria; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2005-05-15

    It is found that in magnetized electrostatic plasma flows the velocity shear couples ion-acoustic waves with ion-cyclotron waves and leads, under favorable conditions, to their efficient reciprocal transformations. It is shown that in a two-dimensional setup this coupling has a remarkable feature: it is governed by equations that are mathematically equal to the ones describing coupling of sound waves with internal gravity waves [Rogava and Mahajan, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1185 (1997)] in neutral fluids. For flows with low shearing rates a fully analytic, quantitative description of the coupling efficiency, based on a noteworthy quantum-mechanical analogy, is given and transformation coefficients are calculated.

  16. Electron cyclotron current drive modelling with parallel momentum correction for tokamaks and stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Maassberg, H.; Beidler, C. D.; Marushchenko, N. B.

    2012-10-15

    The electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) is described by the solution of a drift-kinetic equation (DKE) with the quasi-linear heating term which is highly localised in phase space. Within the adjoint approach, an equivalent DKE must be solved without this highly localised source, and the ECCD is described by a straightforward convolution in phase space. The parallel momentum correction technique [Maassberg et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 072504 (2009)] reduces the problem to the solution of a simplified mono-energetic DKE. The mono-energetic distribution functions are calculated by the DKES code [W. I. van Rij and S. P. Hirshman, Phys. Fluids B 1, 563 (1989)]. Parallel momentum correction, requiring only an energy-dependent weighting factor, is applied to these distribution functions allowing for the direct estimation of the EC-driven current. For small yet finite collisionalities, a rather simple model for ECCD is presented. In this approach, the symmetric portion of the electron distribution function with respect to v{sub Parallel-To} (the Ware pinch contribution) is neglected and an 'off-set' only in the passing particle domain adds to the collisionless (anti-symmetric) distribution function. For this approximation, only the mono-energetic parallel conductivity coefficient as function of the collisionality is needed. The impact of small yet finite collisionalities on ECCD is shown for X2- and O2-scenarios at W7-X.

  17. July 1987 / Vol. 12, No. 7 / OPTICS LETTERS 489 Optical high-order subharmonic excitation of free cyclotron

    E-print Network

    Kaplan, Alexander

    cyclotron electrons A. E. Kaplan* School ofElectrical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette or infrared range can excite high-order subharmonics at the cyclotron frequency of free electrons. It wasre- cently predicted1 that the cyclotron motion of a single electron must demonstrate a strongly

  18. Relaxation of quasi-two-dimensional electrons in a quantizing magnetic field probed by time-resolved cyclotron resonance

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    -resolved cyclotron resonance G. A. Khodaparast, D. C. Larrabee, and J. Kono* Department of Electrical and Computer 16 September 2002; published 14 January 2003 We have measured the picosecond time-resolved cyclotron the average cyclotron mass of the electrons, which we monitor directly in time, to decrease as the electrons

  19. Ultrahigh-field hole cyclotron resonance absorption in In1-xMnxAs films Y. H. Matsuda*

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    Ultrahigh-field hole cyclotron resonance absorption in In1-xMnxAs films Y. H. Matsuda* Department carried out an ultrahigh-field cyclotron resonance (CR) study of p-type In1-xMnxAs films, with Mn fields up to 500 T were used to make cyclotron resonance observable in these low-mobility samples. Clear

  20. Nonlinear theory of drift-cyclotron kinetics and the possible breakdown of gyro-kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Deng Zhao

    2013-01-15

    A nonlinear theory of drift-cyclotron kinetics (termed cyclo-kinetics here) is formulated to test the breakdown of the gyro-kinetic approximations. Six dimensional cyclo-kinetics can be regarded as an extension of five dimensional gyro-kinetics to include high-frequency cyclotron waves, which can interrupt the low-frequency gyro-averaging in the (sixth velocity grid) gyro-phase angle. Nonlinear cyclo-kinetics has no limit on the amplitude of the perturbations. Formally, there is no gyro-averaging when all cyclotron (gyro-phase angle) harmonics of the perturbed distribution function (delta-f) are retained. Retaining only the (low frequency) zeroth cyclotron harmonic in cyclo-kinetics recovers both linear and nonlinear gyro-kinetics. Simple recipes are given for converting continuum nonlinear delta-f gyro-kinetic transport simulation codes to cyclo-kinetics codes by retaining (at least some) higher cyclotron harmonics.

  1. Cyclotron instabilities of low frequency, parallel propagating electromagnetic waves in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwal, A. K.; Singh, Manjesh; Horita, R. E.

    1990-06-01

    Electromagnetic electron- and ion-cyclotron instabilities incorporating the details of wave-particle interactions have been studied with reference to low frequency waves in the magnetosphere. The general dispersion relation for transverse electromagnetic waves propagating along the ambient magnetic field in an anisotropic bi-Maxwellian plasma with a mirror loss-cone configuration has been considered. The growth/damping rates for electron-cyclotron waves (whistler) and ion-cyclotron waves have been derived. The electron- and ion-cyclotron wave growths have been computed from the magnetospheric VLF data from ISIS-2 satellite for equatorial and midlatitude auroral regions of the magnetosphere. The dependence of the growth rate of these waves on the temperature anisotropy and mirror loss-cone has been discussed. Loss-cone and electron-cyclotron instabilities are interpreted as the generation mechanism for the low frequency waves in the magnetosphere.

  2. Evolution of the axial electron cyclotron maser instability, with applications to solar microwave spikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, Loukas; Sprangle, Phillip

    1987-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of cyclotron radiation from streaming and gyrating electrons in an external magnetic field is analyzed. The nonlinear dynamics of both the fields and the particles are treated fully relativistically and self-consistently. The model includes a background plasma and electrostatic effects. The analytical and numerical results show that a substantial portion of the beam particle energy can be converted to electromagnetic wave energy at frequencies far above the electron cyclotron frequency. In general, the excited radiation can propagate parallel to the magnetic field and, hence, escape gyrothermal absorption at higher cyclotron harmonics. The high-frequency Doppler-shifted cyclotron instability can have saturation efficiencies far higher than those associated with well-known instabilities of the electron cyclotron maser type. Although the analysis is general, the possibility of using this model to explain the intense radio emission observed from the sun is explored in detail.

  3. Medical marijuana.

    PubMed

    1999-04-30

    The Florida Supreme Court heard oral arguments in April regarding a glaucoma patient's request for a medical exception to the State prohibition on use of marijuana. [Name removed] was convicted on possession and cultivation charges, and a trial judge refused to allow a medical necessity defense. A State appeals court subsequently overturned [name removed]'s conviction. The case focuses on whether the legislature intended to prohibit such a defense when it declared in 1993 that the substance had no medicinal benefits. PMID:11366533

  4. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  5. MEDICAL EDUCATION Professional Organizations

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    MEDICAL EDUCATION Professional Organizations: Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Association for Hospital Medical Education (AHME) Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions (ACEHP) Society for Academic Continuing Medical

  6. COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M=2/N-1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    PETTY,CC; LAHAYE,LA; LUCE,TC; HUMPHREYS,DA; HYATT,AW; PRATER,R; STRAIT,EJ; WADE,MR

    2003-03-01

    A271 COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M=2/N-1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. The first suppression of the important and deleterious m=2/n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) is reported using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) to replace the ''missing'' bootstrap current in the island O-point. Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak verify the maximum shrinkage of the m=2/n=1 island occurs when the ECCD location coincides with the q = 2 surface. The DIII-D plasma control system is put into search and suppress mode to make small changes in the toroidal field to find and lock onto the optimum position, based on real time measurements of dB{sub {theta}}/dt, for complete m=2/n=1 NTM suppression by ECCD. The requirements on the ECCD for complete island suppression are well modeled by the modified Rutherford equation for the DIII-D plasma conditions.

  7. Response of thermal ions to electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Fuselier, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves generated by 10 - 50 keV protons in the Earth's equatorial magnetosphere will interact with the ambient low-energy ions also found in this region. We examine H(+) and He(+) distribution functions from approx. equals 1 to 160 eV using the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment instrument on AMPTE/CCE to investigate the thermal ion response to the waves. A total of 48 intervals were chosen on the basis of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave activity: 24 with prevalent EMIC waves and 24 with no EMIC waves observed on the orbit. There is a close correlation between EMIC waves and perpendicular heated ion distributions. For protons the perpendicular temperature increase is modest, about 5 eV, and is always observed at 90 deg pitch angles. This is consistent with a nonresonant interaction near the equator. By contrast, He(+) temperatures during EMIC wave events averaged 35 eV and sometimes exceeded 100 eV, indicating stronger interaction with the waves. Furthermore, heated He(+) ions have X-type distributions with maximum fluxes occurring at pitch angles intermediate between field-aligned and perpendicular directions. The X-type He(+) distributions are consistent with a gyroresonant interaction off the equator. The concentration of He(+) relative to H(+) is found to correlate with EMIC wave activity, but it is suggested that the preferential heating of He(+) accounts for the apparent increase in relative He(+) concentration by increasing the proportion of He(+) detected by the ion instrument.

  8. Vacuum system of the cyclotrons in VECC, Kolkata

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Anindya; Bhole, R.B.; Akhtar, J.; Yadav, R.C.; Pal, Sarbajit; Sarkar, D.; Bhandari, R.K. E-mail: rbb@vecc.gov.in E-mail: yadav@vecc.gov.in E-mail: dsarkar@vecc.gov.in

    2011-07-01

    The vacuum system of the K=130 Room Temperature Cyclotron (RTC) (operational since 1978) has been recently modernized and the same of the K{sub bend}=520 Superconducting Cyclotron (SCC), currently under commissioning, is being deployed for remote monitoring and control. The vacuum system of RTC is designed to achieve and maintain vacuum level of 2 X 10{sup -6} mbar inside 23 m{sup 3} volume of Resonator tank and DEE tank. This has been upgraded by replacing several valves, Freon units, gauges and pumps. The relay based manual control system has been replaced by PLC based automated system. The SCC vacuum system also has an elaborate arrangement comprising of turbo molecular pumping modules with associated isolation valves and characteristic gauges. This paper describes essential elements, typically used to obtain high (1X10{sup -7} mbar) vacuum using rotary pumps, diffusion pumps and cold traps/turbo-molecular pumps and other system components such as valves, gauges and baffles. The supervisory control methodology/scheme of both the vacuum systems, developed in-house using EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System), a standard open-source software tool for designing distributed control system, is also elaborated here. (author)

  9. Electronuclear ion fusion in an ion cyclotron resonance reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    1996-12-01

    A method and apparatus for generating nuclear fusion by ion cyclotron resonance in an ion trap reactor. The reactor includes a cylindrical housing having an axial axis, an internal surface, and first and second ends. First and second end plates that are charged are respectively located at the first and second ends of the cylindrical housing. A gas layer is adsorbed on the internal surface of the cylindrical housing. Ions are desorbed from the gas layer, forming a plasma layer adjacent to the cylindrical housing that includes first ions that have a same charge sign as the first and second end plates. A uniform magnetic field is oriented along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. Second ions, that are unlike the first ions, but have the same charge sign, are injected into the cylindrical housing along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. A radio frequency field resonantly accelerates the injected second ions at the cyclotron resonance frequency of the second ions. The second ions circulate in increasing helical orbits and react with the first ions, at the optimum energy for nuclear fusion. The amplitude of the radio frequency field is adjusted to accelerate the second ions at a rate equal to the rate of tangential energy loss of the second ions by nuclear scattering in the first ions, causing the ions to continually interact until fusion occurs.

  10. New Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment and the Fine Structure Constant: A First Application of a One-Electron Quantum Cyclotron

    ScienceCinema

    Gabrielse, Gerald [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2009-09-01

    Remarkably, the famous UW measurement of the electron magnetic moment has stood since 1987. With QED theory, this measurement has determined the accepted value of the fine structure constant. This colloquium is about a new Harvard measurement of these fundamental constants. The new measurement has an uncertainty that is about six times smaller, and it shifts the values by 1.7 standard deviations. One electron suspended in a Penning trap is used for the new measurement, like in the old measurement. What is different is that the lowest quantum levels of the spin and cyclotron motion are resolved, and the cyclotron as well as spin frequencies are determined using quantum jump spectroscopy. In addition, a 0.1 mK Penning trap that is also a cylindrical microwave cavity is used to control the radiation field, to suppress spontaneous emission by more than a factor of 100, to control cavity shifts, and to eliminate the blackbody photons that otherwise stimulate excitations from the cyclotron ground state. Finally, great signal-to-noise for one-quantum transitions is obtained using electronic feedback to realize the first one-particle self-excited oscillator. The new methods may also allow a million times improved measurement of the 500 times small antiproton magnetic moment.

  11. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, J.J.; Fraser, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a discussion of medical genetics for the practitioner treating or counseling patients with genetic disease. It includes a discussion of the relationship of heredity and diseases, the chromosomal basis for heredity, gene frequencies, and genetics of development and maldevelopment. The authors also focus on teratology, somatic cell genetics, genetics and cancer, genetics of behavior.

  12. Medical marijuana.

    PubMed Central

    Marmor, J B

    1998-01-01

    Although many clinical studies suggest the medical utility of marijuana for some conditions, the scientific evidence is weak. Many patients in California are self-medicating with marijuana, and physicians need data to assess the risks and benefits. The only reasonable solution to this problem is to encourage research on the medical effects of marijuana. The current regulatory system should be modified to remove barriers to clinical research with marijuana. The NIH panel has identified several conditions for which there may be therapeutic benefit from marijuana use and that merit further research. Marijuana should be held to the same evaluation standards of safety and efficacy as other drugs (a major flaw in Proposition 215) but should not have to be proved better than current medications for its use to be adopted. The therapeutic window for marijuana and THC between desired effect and unpleasant side effects is narrow and is a major reason for discontinuing use. Although the inhaled route of administration has the benefit of allowing patients to self-titrate the dose, the smoking of crude plant material is problematic. The NIH panel recommended that a high priority be given to the development of a controlled inhaled form of THC. The presence of a naturally occurring cannabinoid-receptor system in the brain suggests that research on selective analogues of THC may be useful to enhance its therapeutic effects and minimize adverse effects. PMID:9656007

  13. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 91, NO. A12, PAGES 13,729-13,731, DECEMBER 1, 1986 A Laboratory Study of Collisional Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    E-print Network

    Merlino, Robert L.

    A Laboratory Study of Collisional Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves D. M. SUSZCYNSKY,S. L. CARTIER,R. L The effectsof neutral-particlecollisionson current-drivenelectrostaticion cyclotron(EIC) waves are studiedin a Q(/Xn/nof severalpercent)can be excited. Electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves have been ob- servedin laboratoryplasmas

  14. September 1987 / Vol. 12, No. 9 / OPTICS LETTERS 699 Isolas in the three-photon optical excitation of a single cyclotron

    E-print Network

    Kaplan, Alexander

    of a single cyclotron electron Y. J. Ding and A. E. Kaplan Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering show that sufficiently strong laser beams with two frequencies differing by a cyclotron frequency of a free electron can give rise to strong cyclotron excitation with prohibited and allowed cyclotron orbits

  15. Simulation of the direct production of 99mTc at a small cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, M.; Kakavand, T.

    2014-06-01

    Usually 99mTc is produced indirectly through generator 99Mo/99mTc. In the present study, the direct production of this radioisotope by charged particle irradiation was investigated using Monte Carlo method. After scouting of the reactions that produce 99mTc, excitation functions of these reactions were predicted by optical model components in the TALYS-1.6 code. Suitable energy range of projectile for this production was selected by spotting of maximum cross section and minimum impurity due to other emission channels. Then target geometry was designed based on stopping power calculation by the SRIM code. Thick target yield of 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc, 98Mo(p,?)99mTc and natMo(p,x)99mTc reactions was predicted by the result of excitation function and stopping power calculations. Finally, 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction was selected as a primary reaction for the direct production of 99mTc and its process was simulated by employing the MCNPX code to calculate the energy distribution of proton in the 100Mo target body and estimation of residual nuclei during irradiation. Good agreement was obtained between the experimental, the theoretical, and the simulation-based (analytical and directly) production yields. This study demonstrated that Monte Carlo provides a method for the design and optimization of targets for the radionuclide production purposes.

  16. Technical Note: Building a combined cyclotron and MRI facility: Implications for interference

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Mark B. M.; Kuijer, Joost P. A.; Ridder, Jan Willem de; Perk, Lars R.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: With the introduction of hybrid PET/MRI systems, it has become more likely that the cyclotron and MRI systems will be located close to each other. This study considered the interference between a cyclotron and a superconducting MRI system. Methods: Interactions between cyclotrons and MRIs are theoretically considered. The main interference is expected to be the perturbation of the magnetic field in the MRI due to switching on or off the magnetic field of the cyclotron. MR imaging is distorted by a dynamic spatial gradient of an external inplane magnetic field larger than 0.5-0.04 {mu}T/m, depending on the specific MR application. From the design of a cyclotron, it is expected that the magnetic fringe field at large distances behaves as a magnetic dipolar field. This allows estimation of the full dipolar field and its spatial gradients from a single measurement. Around an 18 MeV cyclotron (Cyclone, IBA), magnetic field measurements were performed on 5 locations and compared with calculations based upon a dipolar field model. Results: At the measurement locations the estimated and measured values of the magnetic field component and its spatial gradients of the inplane component were compared, and found to agree within a factor 1.1 for the magnetic field and within a factor of 1.5 for the spatial gradients of the field. In the specific case of the 18 MeV cyclotron with a vertical magnetic field and a 3T superconducting whole body MR system, a minimum distance of 20 m has to be considered to prevent interference. Conclusions: This study showed that a dipole model is sufficiently accurate to predict the interference of a cyclotron on a MRI scanner, for site planning purposes. The cyclotron and a whole body MRI system considered in this study need to be placed more than 20 m apart, or magnetic shielding should be utilized.

  17. Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccara, A. Claude; Mordon, Serge

    2015-10-01

    In re-listening to the lectures of Charles Townes shortly after the invention of the laser (e.g., in the Boston Science Museum), one can already have a realistic vision of the potentialities of this new tool in the field of medical therapy, as evidenced by the use of the laser in ophthalmology to cure retinal detachment in the 1960's. Since then, applications have flourished in the domain of therapy. We will thus illustrate here only some of the main fields of application of medical lasers. On the opposite, the use of lasers in medical imaging is, with one exception in ophthalmology, still at the development level. It is becoming a diagnostic tool in addition to high performance imaging facilities that are often very expensive (such as CT scan, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging). Even if progress is sometimes slow, one can now image with light inside the human body, in spite of the strong scattering of light by tissues, in the same way as a pathologist sees surgical specimens.

  18. Electron cyclotron emission imaging and applications in magnetic fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Benjamin John

    Energy production through the burning of fossil fuels is an unsustainable practice. Exponentially increasing energy consumption and dwindling natural resources ensure that coal and gas fueled power plants will someday be a thing of the past. However, even before fuel reserves are depleted, our planet may well succumb to disastrous side effects, namely the build up of carbon emissions in the environment triggering world-wide climate change and the countless industrial spills of pollutants that continue to this day. Many alternatives are currently being developed, but none has so much promise as fusion nuclear energy, the energy of the sun. The confinement of hot plasma at temperatures in excess of 100 million Kelvin by a carefully arranged magnetic field for the realization of a self-sustaining fusion power plant requires new technologies and improved understanding of fundamental physical phenomena. Imaging of electron cyclotron radiation lends insight into the spatial and temporal behavior of electron temperature fluctuations and instabilities, providing a powerful diagnostic for investigations into basic plasma physics and nuclear fusion reactor operation. This dissertation presents the design and implementation of a new generation of Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostics on toroidal magnetic fusion confinement devices, or tokamaks, around the world. The underlying physics of cyclotron radiation in fusion plasmas is reviewed, and a thorough discussion of millimeter wave imaging techniques and heterodyne radiometry in ECEI follows. The imaging of turbulence and fluid flows has evolved over half a millennium since Leonardo da Vinci's first sketches of cascading water, and applications for ECEI in fusion research are broad ranging. Two areas of physical investigation are discussed in this dissertation: the identification of poloidal shearing in Alfven eigenmode structures predicted by hybrid gyrofluid-magnetohydrodynamic (gyrofluid-MHD) modeling, and magnetic field line displacement during precursor oscillations associated with the sawtooth crash, a disruptive instability observed both in tokamak plasmas with high core current and in the magnetized plasmas of solar flares and other interstellar plasmas. Understanding both of these phenomena is essential for the future of magnetic fusion energy, and important new observations described herein underscore the advantages of imaging techniques in experimental physics.

  19. Cyclotrons with fast variable and/or multiple energy extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarten, C.

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the possibility in principle of stripping extraction in combination with reverse bends in isochronous separate-sector cyclotrons (and/or fixed field alternating gradient accelerators). If one uses reverse bends between the sectors (instead of or in combination with drifts) and places stripper foils at the sector exit edges, the stripped beam has a reduced bending radius and it should be able to leave the cyclotron within the range of the valley—even if the beam is stripped at less than full energy. We are especially interested in stripping of H2+, as it doubles the charge to mass ratio of the ions. However the method could be applied to other ions or ionized molecules as well. For the production of proton beams by stripping extraction of an H2+ beam, we discuss possible designs for three types of machines: First, a low-energy cyclotron for the simultaneous production of several beams at multiple energies—for instance 15, 30, and 70 MeV—thus allowing beam delivery on several isotope production targets. In this case it can be an advantage to have a strong energy dependence of the direction of the extracted beam. Second, we consider a fast variable-energy proton machine for cancer therapy that should allow extraction (of the complete beam) at all energies in the range of about 70 MeV to about 250 MeV into the same beam line. Third, we consider a high-intensity high-energy machine, where the main design goals are extraction with low losses, low activation of components, and high reliability. Especially if such a machine is considered for an accelerator driven system (ADS), this extraction mechanism has advantages: Beam trips by the failure of electrostatic elements could be avoided and the turn separation would be less critical, which allows operation at lower main cavity voltages. This would in turn reduce the number of rf trips. The price that has to be paid for these advantages is an increase in size and/or field strength compared to proton machines with standard extraction at the final energy.

  20. On the feasibility of electron cyclotron heating of overcritical plasma in a magnetic mirror trap

    SciTech Connect

    Vodopyanov, A. V.; Golubev, S. V.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Smolyakova, O. B.; Suvorov, E. V.

    2012-06-15

    The feasibility of matching electromagnetic radiation in the electron cyclotron frequency range to a dense plasma in an open magnetic trap by producing an inverted (with a minimum on the axis) plasma density profile is discussed. The use of such a profile shows promise for the implementation of efficient cyclotron heating at plasma densities above the critical density, at which the Langmuir frequency is equal to the heating radiation frequency. Examples of the magnetic field and plasma density distributions in a mirror trap are presented for which analysis of the beam trajectories shows the feasibility of efficient electron cyclotron absorption of microwave beams in overcritical plasma.

  1. Production of rare isotope beams at the Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Tabacaru, G.; May, D. P.; Chubarian, G.; Clark, H.; Kim, G. J.; Tribble, R. E.; Arje, J.

    2012-02-15

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A and M is currently configuring a scheme for the production of radioactive-ion beams that incorporates a light-ion guide and a heavy-ion guide coupled with an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source constructed for charge-breeding. This scheme is part of an upgrade to the facility and is intended to produce radioactive beams suitable for injection into the K500 superconducting cyclotron. The current status of the project and details on the ion sources used in the project is presented.

  2. Drude weight, cyclotron resonance, and the Dicke model of graphene cavity QED

    E-print Network

    Luca Chirolli; Marco Polini; Vittorio Giovannetti; Allan H. MacDonald

    2012-07-30

    The Dicke model of cavity quantum electrodynamics is approximately realized in condensed matter when the cyclotron transition of a two-dimensional electron gas is nearly resonant with a cavity photon mode. We point out that in the strong coupling limit the Dicke model of cavity cyclotron resonance must be supplemented by a term that is quadratic in the cavity photon field and suppresses the model's transition to a super-radiant state. We develop the theory of graphene cavity cyclotron resonance and show that the quadratic term, which is absent in graphene's low-energy Dirac model Hamiltonian, is in this case dynamically generated by virtual inter-band transitions.

  3. The rare isotope beams production at the Texas A and M university Cyclotron Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Tabacaru, G.; May, D. P.; Chubarian, G.; Clark, H.; Kim, G. J.; Tribble, R. E.; Arje, J.

    2013-04-19

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A and M initiated an upgrade project for the production of radioactive-ion beams that incorporates a light-ion guide (LIG) and a heavy-ion guide coupled (HIG) with an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) constructed for charge-boosting (CB-ECRIS). This scheme is intended to produce radioactive beams suitable for injection into the K500 superconducting cyclotron. The current status of the project and details on the ion sources and devices used in the project is presented.

  4. Smoking cessation medications

    MedlinePLUS

    Smoking cessation - medications; Smokeless tobacco - medications; Medications for stopping tobacco ... quit tobacco use. These medicines do not contain nicotine. They work in a different way than nicotine ...

  5. 76 FR 76573 - Medical Loss Ratio Requirements Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ...health outcomes, and medical research. They also...collection for diagnoses and medical procedure coordination...health outcomes, and medical research. In addition, we consulted with the Office of E-Health Standards...market (individual, small group and large...

  6. Distorted cyclotron line profile in Cep X-4 as observed by NuSTAR

    E-print Network

    Fuerst, F; Miyasaka, H; Bhalerao, V; Bachetti, M; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Grinberg, V; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Kennea, J A; Rahoui, F; Stern, D; Tendulkar, S P; Tomsick, J A; Walton, D J; Wilms, J; Zhang, W W

    2015-01-01

    We present spectral analysis of NuSTAR and Swift observations of Cep X-4 during its outburst in 2014. We observed the source once during the peak of the outburst and once during the decay, finding good agreement in the spectral shape between the observations. We describe the continuum using a powerlaw with a Fermi-Dirac cutoff at high energies. Cep X-4 has a very strong cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) around 30 keV. A simple absorption-like line with a Gaussian optical depth or a pseudo-Lorentzian profile both fail to describe the shape of the CRSF accurately, leaving significant deviations at the red side of the line. We characterize this asymmetry with a second absorption feature around 19 keV. The line energy of the CRSF, which is not influenced by the addition of this feature, shows a small but significant positive luminosity dependence. With luminosities between (1-6)e36 erg/s, Cep X-4 is below the theoretical limit where such a correlation is expected. This behavior is similar to Vela X-1 a...

  7. Distorted Cyclotron Line Profile in Cep X-4 as Observed by NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürst, F.; Pottschmidt, K.; Miyasaka, H.; Bhalerao, V.; Bachetti, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Grinberg, V.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Kennea, J. A.; Rahoui, F.; Stern, D.; Tendulkar, S. P.; Tomsick, J. A.; Walton, D. J.; Wilms, J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-06-01

    We present spectral analysis of Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array and Swift observations of Cep X-4 during its outburst in 2014. We observed the source once during the peak of the outburst and once during the decay, finding good agreement in the spectral shape between the observations. We describe the continuum using a power law with a Fermi-Dirac cutoff at high energies. Cep X-4 has a very strong cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) around 30 keV. A simple absorption-like line with a Gaussian optical depth or a pseudo-Lorentzian profile both fail to describe the shape of the CRSF accurately, leaving significant deviations at the red side of the line. We characterize this asymmetry with a second absorption feature around 19 keV. The line energy of the CRSF, which is not influenced by the addition of this feature, shows a small but significant positive luminosity dependence. With luminosities between (1-6) × 1036 erg s-1, Cep X-4 is below the theoretical limit where such a correlation is expected. This behavior is similar to Vela X-1 and we discuss parallels between the two systems.

  8. Ion Trap with Narrow Aperture Detection Electrodes for Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Oleg Y.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2015-05-01

    The current paradigm in ion trap (cell) design for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) is the ion detection with wide aperture detection electrodes. Specifically, excitation and detection electrodes are typically 90° wide and positioned radially at a similar distance from the ICR cell axis. Here, we demonstrate that ion detection with narrow aperture detection electrodes (NADEL) positioned radially inward of the cell's axis is feasible and advantageous for FT-ICR MS. We describe design details and performance characteristics of a 10 T FT-ICR MS equipped with a NADEL ICR cell having a pair of narrow aperture (flat) detection electrodes and a pair of standard 90° excitation electrodes. Despite a smaller surface area of the detection electrodes, the sensitivity of the NADEL ICR cell is not reduced attributable to improved excite field distribution, reduced capacitance of the detection electrodes, and their closer positioning to the orbits of excited ions. The performance characteristics of the NADEL ICR cell are comparable with the state-of-the-art FT-ICR MS implementations for small molecule, peptide, protein, and petroleomics analyses. In addition, the NADEL ICR cell's design improves the flexibility of ICR cells and facilitates implementation of advanced capabilities (e.g., quadrupolar ion detection for improved mainstream applications). It also creates an intriguing opportunity for addressing the major bottleneck in FTMS—increasing its throughput via simultaneous acquisition of multiple transients or via generation of periodic non-sinusoidal transient signals.

  9. Plasma Simulation Studies in the Ion Cyclotron Frequency Range: the Alfven Ion-Cyclotron Instability and Stabilizing Effects of Icrf on the Interchange Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, Niels Fujio

    A combination of computer simulation and theoretical tech- niques is employed in the study of two plasma effects: the Alfven ion-cyclotron (AIC) instability and the effect of finite-amplitude ICRF waves on the growth rate of the interchange instability. Simulation of the AIC instability is conducted with two simulation codes. Charac- teristics of the simulation algorithms are analyzed theoretically. Several features of the single-wave version of the AIC instability are extracted from invariants of the ion motion. In particular, the invariant associated with the helical symmetry of the AIC wave is found to con- fine classes of ion particles to two-dimensional surfaces in velocity space on which trapping is observed to occur. Multiwave simulations of the instability show evidence of both ion trapping and quasilinear diffusion. Short-wavelength field fluctuations are observed to agree with theory based on a test-particle model. Simulations of the stabi- lizing properties of RF waves on the interchange instability are con- ducted on a two-dimensional plane perpendicular to the background magnetic field. RF-induced stabilizing ion drifts are found to be negligibly small both theoretically and in simulation. The stabilizing influence of perpendicularly -propagating RF waves is observed to be relatively modest even for very large wave fields. Presence of the RF wave is also sometimes destabilizing. A line-bending stabilizing mechanism is shown to exist based on a three-dimensional fluid-displacement perturbation calculation; however, this mechanism is not predicted to be operative in the two-dimensional system modeled by the simulation.

  10. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves stimulated by modest magnetospheric compressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Hamilton, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    AMPTE/CCE magnetic field and particle data are used to test the suggestion that increased hot proton temperature anisotropy resulting from convection during magnetospheric compression is responsible for the enhancement in Pc 1 emission via generation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the dayside outer equatorial magnetosphere. The relative increase in magnetic field is used to gauge the strength of the compression, and an image dipole model is used to estimate the motion of the plasma during compression. Proton data are used to analyze the evolution of the proton distribution and the corresponding changes in EMIC wave activity expected during the compression. It is suggested that enhancements in dynamic pressure pump the energetic proton distributions in the outer magnetosphere, driving EMIC waves. Waves are expected to be generated most readily close to the magnetopause, and transient pressure pulses may be associated with bursts of EMIC waves, which would be observed on the ground in association with ionospheric transient signatures.

  11. Concept for a fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.; Ferracin, P.; Caspi, S.; Hodgkinson, A.; Sabbi, G. L.

    2012-02-15

    A fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance ion source with an operating frequency between 40 and 56 GHz has the potential to quadruple the heavy-ion beam currents and provide a cost effective upgrade path for heavy ion drivers in use or in the planning stage at radioactive beam facilities. Design studies show it is feasible to produce the required magnetic fields in the plasma chamber, 7 T axially and 4 T in the radial direction with a magnetic structure using commercially available Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting materials. In this paper we describe the design of such a magnet structure including a 3D analysis of the Lorentz forces generated by the magnetic fields and the necessary clamping structure to stabilize the conductor against these forces.

  12. Theory of Synergy between Electron Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Waves

    E-print Network

    Dumont, R J

    2003-01-01

    A theoretical study of the improvement of the Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) efficiency in regimes where most of the current is driven by Lower Hybrid (LH) waves is presented. A perturbation technique is employed to solve the adjoint equation and derive the response function including both collisional and LH effects in the limit where the former dominate. An alternative treatment of the problem, involving a numerical solution of the Langevin equations is proposed to gain insight into the current drive mechanism and confirm the obtained results. The existence of a cross-effect between the two waves is demonstrated and the conditions for the synergy, i.e. significant enhancement of the ECCD efficiency in the presence of LH power, are identified.

  13. Importance of electron cyclotron wave energy transport in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albajar, F.; Bornatici, M.; Cortes, G.; Dies, J.; Engelmann, F.; Garcia, J.; Izquierdo, J.

    2005-07-01

    The importance of electron cyclotron (EC) wave emission to the local electron power balance is analysed for various ITER operation regimes and, for comparison, for typical working conditions of FIRE, IGNITOR and the reactor-grade ITER concept as considered during the Engineering Design Phase (ITER-EDA). To cover the non-local effects in EC wave emission as well, the CYTRAN routine along with the ASTRA transport code is used. As a result, EC wave emission is shown to be a significant contributor to core electron cooling if the core electron temperature is about 35 keV or higher, as expected for ITER and tokamak reactor steady-state operation; in fact, it becomes the dominant core electron cooling mechanism at temperatures exceeding 40 keV, as such affecting the core plasma power balance in an important way.

  14. Alternative optical concept for electron cyclotron emission imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. X.; Milbourne, T.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dominguez, A.; Efthimion, P. C.; Hill, K. W.; Kramer, G. J.; Kung, C.; Pablant, N. A.; Tobias, B.; Kubota, S.; Kasparek, W.; Lu, J.; Park, H.

    2014-11-15

    The implementation of advanced electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems on tokamak experiments has revolutionized the diagnosis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities and improved our understanding of instabilities, which lead to disruptions. It is therefore desirable to have an ECEI system on the ITER tokamak. However, the large size of optical components in presently used ECEI systems have, up to now, precluded the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER. This paper describes a new optical ECEI concept that employs a single spherical mirror as the only optical component and exploits the astigmatism of such a mirror to produce an image with one-dimensional spatial resolution on the detector. Since this alternative approach would only require a thin slit as the viewing port to the plasma, it would make the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER feasible. The results obtained from proof-of-principle experiments with a 125 GHz microwave system are presented.

  15. Characteristics of microinstabilities in electron cyclotron and ohmic heated discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusztai, I.; Moradi, S.; Fülöp, T.; Timchenko, N.

    2011-08-01

    Characteristics of microinstabilities in electron cyclotron (EC) and ohmic heated (OH) discharges in the T10 tokamak have been analyzed by linear electrostatic gyrokinetic simulations with gyro [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] aiming to find insights into the effect of auxiliary heating on the transport. Trapped electron modes are found to be unstable in both OH and the EC heated scenarios. In the OH case the main drive is from the density gradient and in the EC case from the electron temperature gradient. The growth rates and particle fluxes exhibit qualitatively different scaling with the electron-to-ion temperature ratios in the two cases. This is mainly due to the fact that the dominant drives and the collisionalities are different. The inward flow velocity of impurities and the impurity diffusion coefficient decreases when applying EC heating, which leads to lower impurity peaking, consistently with experimental observations.

  16. Characteristics of microinstabilities in electron cyclotron and ohmic heated discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Pusztai, I.; Moradi, S.; Fueloep, T.; Timchenko, N.

    2011-08-15

    Characteristics of microinstabilities in electron cyclotron (EC) and ohmic heated (OH) discharges in the T10 tokamak have been analyzed by linear electrostatic gyrokinetic simulations with gyro[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] aiming to find insights into the effect of auxiliary heating on the transport. Trapped electron modes are found to be unstable in both OH and the EC heated scenarios. In the OH case the main drive is from the density gradient and in the EC case from the electron temperature gradient. The growth rates and particle fluxes exhibit qualitatively different scaling with the electron-to-ion temperature ratios in the two cases. This is mainly due to the fact that the dominant drives and the collisionalities are different. The inward flow velocity of impurities and the impurity diffusion coefficient decreases when applying EC heating, which leads to lower impurity peaking, consistently with experimental observations.

  17. Transport induced by ion cyclotron range of frequencies waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Debing Xu, Yingfeng; Wang, Shaojie

    2014-11-15

    The Vlasov equation, which includes the effect of the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves, can be written as the Fokker-Planck equation which describes the quasilinear transport in phase space by using the Lie-transform method. The radial transport fluxes of particle, energy and parallel momentum driven by ICRF waves in the slab geometry have been derived. The results show that the ICRF-induced radial redistributions of particle, energy and parallel momentum are driven by the inhomogeneity in energy of the equilibrium distribution function, and related to the correlation between the excursion in the real space and the excursion in energy. For the case with strong asymmetry of k{sub y} spectrum, the ICRF-induced radial transport driven by the energy inhomogeneity dominates the ICRF-induced radial transport driven by the spatial inhomogeneity.

  18. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed in the plasma depletion layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Murr, D.

    1991-01-01

    Observations from AMPTE/CCE in the earth's magnetosheath on October 5, 1984 are presented to illustrate 0.1 - 4.0 Hz magnetic field pulsations in the subsolar plasma depletion layer (PDL) for northward sheath field during a magnetospheric compression. The PDL is unambiguously identified by comparing CCE data with data from IRM in the upstream solar wind. Pulsations in the PDL are dominated by transverse waves with F/F(H+) 1.0 or less and a slot in spectral power at F/F(H+) = 0.5. The upper branch is left hand polarized while the lower branch is linearly polarized. In the sheath the proton temperature anisotropy is about 0.6 but it is about 1.7 in the PDL during wave occurrence. The properties and correlation of waves with increased anisotropy indicate that they are electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  19. Ring Current Ion Coupling with Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov. G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Jordanova, V. K.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new ring current global model has been developed that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes wave evolution of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (EMIC). The coupled model is able to simulate, for the first time self-consistently calculated RC ion kinetic and evolution of EMIC waves that propagate along geomagnetic field lines and reflect from the ionosphere. Ionospheric properties affect the reflection index through the integral Pedersen and Hall conductivities. The structure and dynamics of the ring current proton precipitating flux regions, intensities of EMIC global RC energy balance, and some other parameters will be studied in detail for the selected geomagnetic storms.

  20. Electromagnetic ion/ion cyclotron instability - Theory and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Omidi, N.

    1992-01-01

    Linear theory and 1D and 2D hybrid simulations are employed to study electromagnetic ion/ion cyclotron (EMIIC) instability driven by the relative streaming of two field-aligned ion beams. The characteristics of the instability are studied as a function of beam density, propagation angle, electron-ion temperature ratios, and ion beta. When the propagation angle is near 90 deg the EMIIC instability has the characteristics of an electrostatic instability, while at smaller angles electromagnetic effects play a significant role as does strong beam coupling. The 2D simulations point to a narrowing of the wave spectrum and accompanying coherent effects during the linear growth stage of development. The EMIIC instability is an important effect where ion beta is low such as in the plasma-sheet boundary layer and upstream of slow shocks in the magnetotail.

  1. Ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities in the magnetosheath - Theory and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Mckean, Michael E.; Winske, Dan

    1993-01-01

    Second-order theory and 1D hybrid computer simulations are used to examine the nonlinear properties of proton and helium cyclotron anisotropy instabilities in the terrestrial magnetosheath at relatively weak fluctuations levels and at propagation parallel to the background magnetic field. The simulations confirm the second-order predictions that both instabilities yield efficient wave-particle interactions; the rate at which the driving species anisotropy is reduced is much greater than the rate at which that species loses kinetic energy. It is suggested that these instabilities should saturate at relatively low levels. An approximate expression is derived for the fluctuating field energy at saturation of the fastest growing modes, and it is found that it is in fair agreement with three computer simulations.

  2. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the plasma depletion layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denton, Richard E.; Hudson, Mary K.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Anderson, Brian J.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a study of the theoretical properties of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves which occur in the plasma depletion layer are presented. The analysis assumes a homogeneous plasma with the characteristics which were measured by the AMPTE/CCE satellite at 1450-1501 UT on October 5, 1984. Waves were observed in the Pc 1 frequency range below the hydrogen gyrofrequency, and these waves are identified as EMIC waves. The higher-frequency instability is driven by the temperature anisotropy of the H(+) ions, while the lower-frequency instability is driven by the temperature anisotropy of the He(2+) ions. It is argued that the higher-frequency waves will have k roughly parallel to B(0) and will be left-hand polarized, while the lower frequency wave band will have k oblique to B(0) and will be linearly polarized, in agreement with observations.

  3. Ring Current Ion Coupling with Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.

    2002-01-01

    A new ring current global model has been developed for the first time that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes wave evolution of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (EMIC). The coupled model is able to simulate, for the first time self-consistently calculated RC ion kinetic and evolution of EMIC waves that propagate along geomagnetic field lines and reflect from the ionosphere. Ionospheric properties affect the reflection index through the integral Pedersen and Hall coductivities. The structure and dynamics of the ring current proton precipitating flux regions, intensities of EMIC, global RC energy balance, and some other parameters will be studied in detail for the selected geomagnetic storms. The space whether aspects of RC modelling and comparison with the data will also be discussed.

  4. Pulsed magnetic field-electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Muehle, C.; Ratzinger, U.; Joest, G.; Leible, K.; Schennach, S.; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-03-01

    The pulsed magnetic field (PuMa)-electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source uses a pulsed coil to improve the peak current by opening the magnetic bottle along the beam axis. After demonstration of the principle of the pulsed magnetic extraction, the ion source was tested with different gases. We received promising results from helium to krypton. The influence of the current in the pulsed coil on the analyzed ion current was measured. With increased current levels within the pulsed coil not only the pulse height of the PuMa pulse, but the pulse length can also be controlled. By using the pulsed coil the maximum of the charge state distribution can be shifted to higher charge states. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Observation of the backward electrostatic ion cyclotron wave

    SciTech Connect

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Wong, K.L.

    1984-12-01

    The backward branch of the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave has been observed, we believe, for the first time. The wave, which was driven by a phased antenna structure inserted in a neon plasma, exists in the parameter ranges 2T/sub i//m/sub i/ << (..omega../k/sub parallel/)/sup 2/ << 2T/sub e//m/sub e/, n..cap omega../sub i/ < ..omega.. < (n+1)..cap omega../sub i/, T/sub e/ greater than or equal to T/sub i/, and ..omega../sub pi/ > ..cap omega../sub i/. Double-tip probe interferomety data agree with the theoretical dispersion relation.

  6. Electron cyclotron beam measurement system in the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Kamio, S. Takahashi, H.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Osakabe, M.; Mutoh, T.

    2014-11-15

    In order to evaluate the electron cyclotron (EC) heating power inside the Large Helical Device vacuum vessel and to investigate the physics of the interaction between the EC beam and the plasma, a direct measurement system for the EC beam transmitted through the plasma column was developed. The system consists of an EC beam target plate, which is made of isotropic graphite and faces against the EC beam through the plasma, and an IR camera for measuring the target plate temperature increase by the transmitted EC beam. This system is applicable to the high magnetic field (up to 2.75 T) and plasma density (up to 0.8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}). This system successfully evaluated the transmitted EC beam profile and the refraction.

  7. Recent developments of cyclotron produced radionuclides for nuclear cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, P. V.; Jansen, D. E.; Corbett, J. R.

    1987-04-01

    For over a decade myocardial perfusion imaging with thallium-201, a cyclotron product, has been routinely used in clinical medicine. Recent advances have allowed the efficient production of very high purity (> 99.8%) iodine-123. New metabolically active 123I labeled radiopharmaceuticals, including alkyl and phenyl fatty acids, and norepinephrine analogs, have been developed and are undergoing clinical trials. Fab' fragments of monoclonal antibodies to cardiac myosin have been labeled with indium-111 ( 111In) and are undergoing clinical evaluation for imaging myocardial infarcts. Monoclonal antibodies to platelets, fibrin, and the thrombolytic agent, tissue plasminogen activator (TPA), have recently been labeled with 111In. Together these developments in radiotracers and instrumentation should have a significant impact on the future of cardiovascular nuclear medicine. This manuscript will discuss developments in single photon emitting radiotracers for myocardial imaging.

  8. Grating monochromator for electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shouichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Shimoura, Susumu; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kase, Masayuki; Kubono, Shigeru; RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, Wako Saitama 351-0198; Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanchang Road 509, Lanzhou 730000 ; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2013-07-15

    Recently, we started to observe optical line spectra from an ECR plasma using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for beam tuning because it allows the extraction of the desired ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research gives new insights into its simplification. In this paper, the grating monochromator method for beam tuning of a Hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN azimuthal varying field (AVF) cyclotron is described.

  9. Nonresonant interaction of heavy ions with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, J.; Gendrin, R.

    1985-01-01

    The motion of a heavy ion in the presence of an intense ultralow-frequency electromagnetic wave propagating along the dc magnetic field is analyzed. Starting from the basic equations of motion and from their associated two invariants, the heavy ion velocity-space trajectories are drawn. It is shown that after a certain time, particles whose initial phase angles are randomly distributed tend to bunch together, provided that the wave intensity b-sub-1 is sufficiently large. The importance of these results for the interpretation of the recently observed acceleration of singly charged He ions in conjunction with the occurrence of large-amplitude ion cyclotron waves in the equatorial magnetosphere is discussed.

  10. Two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic for TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Domier, C.W.; Xia, Z.G.; Liang, Y.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Park, H.; Munsat, T.; Mazzucato, E.; Pol, M.J. van de; Classen, I.G.J.; Donne, A.J.H.

    2004-10-01

    A two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic has been developed in which broad bandwidth radiation is collected by a vertically aligned mixer array and separated by frequency band. Using a 16 element array, and an 8 band receiver attached to each array element, time-resolved 16x8 images of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations of the TEXTOR plasma are acquired with vertical and horizontal channel spacings of 11 and 8 mm, and spot sizes of 13 and 9 mm, respectively. The system is wideband tunable from 95 to 130 GHz, and the focus location may be shifted horizontally via translation of one of the optical imaging elements. System design and laboratory testing details of the ECE Imaging optics and multichannel wideband electronics are presented, together with TEXTOR plasma data.

  11. Upgrades to the TEXTOR electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Domier, C. W.; Xia, Z. G.; Zhang, P.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Park, H. K.; Mazzucato, E.; Pol, M. J. van de; Classen, I. G. J.; Donne, A. J. H.; Jaspers, R.

    2006-10-15

    A 128 channel electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument has been routinely used to study magnetohydrodynamics physics such as m=1 and m=2 modes on the TEXTOR tokamak. As currently configured, each of the 16 mixer array elements measures plasma emission at 8 simultaneous frequencies to form a 16x8 image of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations over an area of 16 cm (vertical) by 6 cm (horizontal). A redesigned mixer array, coupled with new wideband electronics to be installed later this year, will increase the plasma coverage to 17 cm(v)x9 cm(h). The new arrangement offers increased temperature resolution together with new gain and video bandwidth controls in a highly modular configuration for ease of maintenance and facilitation of future upgrades both in frequency coverage as well as number of channels.

  12. Grating monochromator for electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation.

    PubMed

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shouichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kubono, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Kase, Masayuki; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Shimoura, Susumu

    2013-07-01

    Recently, we started to observe optical line spectra from an ECR plasma using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for beam tuning because it allows the extraction of the desired ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research gives new insights into its simplification. In this paper, the grating monochromator method for beam tuning of a Hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN azimuthal varying field (AVF) cyclotron is described. PMID:23902055

  13. A numerical analysis of the RF wave propagation under the sheath boundary condition in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Haruhiko; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2009-11-01

    Applying radio-frequency (RF) waves to heat plasmas and drive current is an important technique for magnetic fusion, and much research effort has been spent on improving the methods, particularly in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In this study, a numerical analysis is carried out in order to observe the RF wave propagation and its interaction with the sheath in the scrape-off layer. A two-dimensional finite element code is developed to test the effect of sheaths on waves in cold plasma with the equilibrium magnetic field having a small component into the wall. Here the C-Mod like parameters are used to construct the calculation domain, on which the sheath boundary condition proposed by D'Ippolito and Myra, and the absorbing boundary condition are imposed. Various mechanisms for antenna coupling to the slow wave (SW) and fast-wave coupling to the SW by the sheath boundary condition are qualitatively investigated.

  14. Chirped dissipative ion-cyclotron solitons in the Earth's low-altitude ionospheric plasma with two ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Kovaleva, I. Kh.

    2013-03-15

    Conditions for the excitation of small-scale nonlinear ion-cyclotron gradient-drift dissipative structures in cold ionospheric plasma are considered. The solution for the wave electric field in this structure in the form of a chirped soliton satisfying the equation of the Ginzburg-Landau type is derived in the electrostatic approach. The dissipative structure as a whole represents the chirped soliton accompanied by the comoving quasineutral plasma hump. The possibility of the excitation of two modes of this type (the high- and low-frequency ones) in plasma containing light and heavy ion impurities is considered. The role of electromagnetic corrections and the possible contribution introduced by these structures to the transport processes in the ionosphere are discussed.

  15. A Medical Tape-Slide Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Valerie

    1974-01-01

    Article describes a medical lending library service using tape-slide programs which started in a very small way 17 years ago and which has grown into a large concern handling some 20,000 tapes a year. (Author)

  16. Medical electromechatronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Y. M.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Osipov, O. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The first part of the article presentsdevices of rehabilitation electromechatronics.As a research work, the author's team has performed sketch and technical developments on this subject, which are protected by patents of the Russian Federation. The second part providesan overview of medical robotic surgery, which is ideal for imperfections removing.It also describes capabilities of the author's team in development of active driveline based "iron" hands.Scalpels never tremble in the iron hands, which are not afraid of the aftershocks and never get tired.They can perform operations during not less than 48 consecutive hours.

  17. Medical clip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, R. M. (inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An X-ray transparent and biological inert medical clip for treating aneurisms and the like is described. A graphite reinforced composite film is molded into a unitary structure having a pair of hourglass-like cavities hinged together with a pair of jaws for grasping the aneurism extending from the wall of one cavity. A silicone rubber pellet is disposed in the other cavity to exert a spring force through the hinge area to normally bias the jaws into contact with each other.

  18. Medication/Drug Allergy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information > Condition Information > Allergens > Medication/Drug Allergy Medication/Drug Allergy Allergies to medications/drugs are complicated because ... allergy symptoms. Learn more. Doctors Who Treat Medication/Drug Allergy Rohit K. Katial Harold S. Nelson Richard W. ...

  19. Medical alert bracelet (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will ... People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will ...

  20. Your Medical Records

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Your Medical Records KidsHealth > Teens > Body > Health Basics > Your Medical ... I Keep My Own Medical Records? What Are Medical Records? Each time you climb up on a ...

  1. Western medical schools--a breed apart.

    PubMed Central

    Dale, D C

    1989-01-01

    The 16 medical schools in the 13 western states are distinctive from their counterparts nationally in several ways: they are relatively young, enroll a small number of medical students, and tend to be strongly research oriented. The rise of these institutions since Abraham Flexner's visit to all of the western schools in 1909 reflects a truly remarkable development. PMID:2741461

  2. 77 FR 31143 - Emergency Medical Services Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ...Proclamation 8824--Emergency Medical Services Week, 2012 Proclamation 8825--National Safe Boating Week, 2012 Proclamation 8826--National Small Business Week, 2012 Proclamation 8827--World Trade Week, 2012...

  3. Cyclotron-based nuclear science. Progress report, April 1, 1979-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Research at the cyclotron institute is summarized. These major areas are covered: nuclear structure; nuclear reactions and scattering; polarization studies; interdisciplinary nuclear science; instrumentation and systems development; and publications. (GHT)

  4. Ultracompact superconducting isochronous cyclotron production of ¹³N for positron emission tomography applications

    E-print Network

    Fitzgerald, Shawn (Shawn Michael)

    2013-01-01

    Testing was performed on a data acquisition (DAQ) system that was built specifically to characterize a new ultracompact superconducting isochronous cyclotron (USIC) at MIT. A production model of Nitrogen-13 was validated ...

  5. ECR heavy-ion source for the LBL 88-inch cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.; Kalnins, J.G.; Lyneis, C.M.

    1983-03-01

    An Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heavy-ion source is under construction at the LBL 88-Inch Cyclotron. This source will produce very-high-charge-state heavy ions, such as 0/sup 8 +/ and Ar/sup 12 +/, which will increase cyclotron energies by a factor of 2-4, up to A = 80. It is a two-stage source using room-temperature coils, a permanent-magnet sextupole, and a 6-9 GHz microwave system. Design features include adjustable first-to-second-stage plasma coupling, a variable second-stage mirror ratio, high-conductance radial pumping of the second stage, and a beam-diagnostic system. A remotely movable extraction electrode will optimize extraction efficiency. The project includes construction of a transport line and improvements to the cyclotron axial-injection system. The construction period is expected to be two years.

  6. Multiple Cyclotron Method to Search for CP Violation in the Neutrino Sector

    E-print Network

    Conrad, Janet

    New low-cost, high-power proton cyclotrons open the opportunity for a novel precision search for CP violation in the light neutrino sector. The accelerators can produce decay-at-rest neutrino beams located at multiple ...

  7. Feasibility study for a correlation electron cyclotron emission turbulence diagnostic based on nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations

    E-print Network

    Mikkelsen, D. R.

    This paper describes the use of nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations to assess the feasibility of a new correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) diagnostic that has been proposed for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak (Marmar ...

  8. Medical Misuse of Controlled Medications Among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Sean Esteban; West, Brady T.; Cranford, James A.; Ross-Durow, Paula; Young, Amy; Teter, Christian J.; Boyd, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the past-year medical misuse prevalence for 4 controlled medication classes (pain, stimulant, sleeping, and antianxiety) among adolescents, and to assess substance use outcomes among adolescents who report medical misuse. Design A Web-based survey was self-administered by 2744 secondary school students in 2009-2010. Setting Two southeastern Michigan school districts. Participants The sample had a mean age of 14.8 years and was 51.1% female. The racial/ethnic distribution was 65.0% white, 29.5% African American, 3.7% Asian, 1.3% Hispanic, and 0.5% other. Main Outcome Measures Past-year medical use and misuse of 4 controlled medication classes. Results Eighteen percent of the sample reported past-year medical use of at least 1 prescribed controlled medication. Among past-year medical users, 22.0% reported misuse of their controlled medications, including taking too much, intentionally getting high, or using to increase alcohol or other drug effects. Medical misusers were more likely than nonmisusers to divert their controlled medications and to abuse other substances. The odds of a positive screening result for drug abuse were substantially higher among medical misusers (adjusted odds ratio, 7.8; 95% confidence interval, 4.3-14.2) compared with medical users who used their controlled medications appropriately. The odds of drug abuse did not differ between medical users who used their controlled medications appropriately and nonusers. Conclusions Most adolescents who used controlled medications took their medications appropriately. Substance use and diversion of controlled medications were more prevalent among adolescents who misused their controlled medications. Careful therapeutic monitoring could reduce medical misuse and diversion of controlled medications among adolescents. PMID:21810634

  9. Medical robotics.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Baroni, Guido; Casolo, Federico; De Momi, Elena; Gini, Giuseppina; Matteucci, Matteo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) and mechatronics play a basic role in medical robotics and computer-aided therapy. In the last three decades, in fact, ICT technology has strongly entered the health-care field, bringing in new techniques to support therapy and rehabilitation. In this frame, medical robotics is an expansion of the service and professional robotics as well as other technologies, as surgical navigation has been introduced especially in minimally invasive surgery. Localization systems also provide treatments in radiotherapy and radiosurgery with high precision. Virtual or augmented reality plays a role for both surgical training and planning and for safe rehabilitation in the first stage of the recovery from neurological diseases. Also, in the chronic phase of motor diseases, robotics helps with special assistive devices and prostheses. Although, in the past, the actual need and advantage of navigation, localization, and robotics in surgery and therapy has been in doubt, today, the availability of better hardware (e.g., microrobots) and more sophisticated algorithms(e.g., machine learning and other cognitive approaches)has largely increased the field of applications of these technologies,making it more likely that, in the near future, their presence will be dramatically increased, taking advantage of the generational change of the end users and the increasing request of quality in health-care delivery and management. PMID:21642033

  10. MEDICAL IMAGE PROCESSINGNegin Nahoomi

    E-print Network

    Matsakis, Pascal

    MEDICAL IMAGE PROCESSINGNegin Nahoomi Prof. Pascal Matsakis Fall 2015 INTRODUCTION Medical Image Processing goal is to effectively process and analyze the medical images in order to extract information medical image processing system ·Medical imaging tools ·Processing of medical images ·Some other

  11. Present Capabilities and Future Plans of the Texas A&m Cyclotron Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yennello, S. J.

    2015-06-01

    The Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute has been studying nuclear science with radioactive beams for the past two decades with in-flight production and separation using the MARS spectrometer. The TREX upgrade to the facility will augment this fast beam capability with the ability to deliver both stopped and reaccelerated radioactive ions. This paper will discuss the present capabilities and future plans of the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute.

  12. Rapid Current Ramp-Up by Cyclotron-Driving Electrons beyond Runaway Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, M.; Yoshinaga, T.; Tanaka, H.; Maekawa, T.

    2010-02-01

    The toroidal current has been rapidly ramped-up after the formation of an initial closed flux surface in an electron cyclotron heated discharge in the low aspect ratio torus experiment device. A current carrying fast electron tail is developed well beyond the runaway velocity against the reverse voltage from self-induction, suggesting a forward driving force on the tail by the cyclotron absorption of high N? electron Bernstein waves.

  13. Comparison of fine structures of electron cyclotron harmonic emissions in aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBelle, J.; Dundek, M.

    2015-10-01

    Recent discoveries of higher harmonic cyclotron emissions in aurora occurring under daylight conditions motivated the modification of radio receivers at South Pole Station, Antarctica, to measure fine structure of such emissions during two consecutive austral summers, 2013-2014 and 2014-2015. The experiment recorded 347 emission events over 376 days of observation. The seasonal distribution of these events reveals that successively higher harmonics require higher solar zenith angles for occurrence, as expected if they are generated at the matching condition fuh = Nfce, which for higher N requires higher electron densities which are associated with higher solar zenith angles. This result implies that generation of higher harmonics from lower harmonics via wave-wave processes explains only a minority of events. Detailed examination of 21 cases in which two harmonics occur simultaneously shows that in almost all events the higher harmonic comes from higher altitudes, and only for a small fraction of events is it plausible that the frequencies of the fine structures of the emissions are correlated and in exact integer ratio. This observation puts an upper bound of 15-20% on the fraction of emissions which can be explained by wave-wave interactions involving Z mode waves at fce and, combined with consideration of source altitudes, puts an upper bound of 75% on the fraction explained by coalescence of Z mode waves at 2fce. Taken together, these results suggest that the dominant mechanism for the higher harmonics is independent generation at the matching points fuh = Nfce and that the wave-wave interaction mechanisms explain a relatively small fraction of events.

  14. Medical schools in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Mullan, Fitzhugh; Frehywot, Seble; Omaswa, Francis; Buch, Eric; Chen, Candice; Greysen, S Ryan; Wassermann, Travis; Abubakr, Diaa ElDin ElGaili; Awases, Magda; Boelen, Charles; Diomande, Mohenou Jean-Marie Isidore; Dovlo, Delanyo; Ferro, Josefo; Haileamlak, Abraham; Iputo, Jehu; Jacobs, Marian; Koumaré, Abdel Karim; Mipando, Mwapatsa; Monekosso, Gottleib Lobe; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi; Rugarabamu, Paschalis; Sewankambo, Nelson K; Ross, Heather; Ayas, Huda; Chale, Selam Bedada; Cyprien, Soeurette; Cohen, Jordan; Haile-Mariam, Tenagne; Hamburger, Ellen; Jolley, Laura; Kolars, Joseph C; Kombe, Gilbert; Neusy, Andre-Jacques

    2011-03-26

    Small numbers of graduates from few medical schools, and emigration of graduates to other countries, contribute to low physician presence in sub-Saharan Africa. The Sub-Saharan African Medical School Study examined the challenges, innovations, and emerging trends in medical education in the region. We identified 168 medical schools; of the 146 surveyed, 105 (72%) responded. Findings from the study showed that countries are prioritising medical education scale-up as part of health-system strengthening, and we identified many innovations in premedical preparation, team-based education, and creative use of scarce research support. The study also drew attention to ubiquitous faculty shortages in basic and clinical sciences, weak physical infrastructure, and little use of external accreditation. Patterns recorded include the growth of private medical schools, community-based education, and international partnerships, and the benefit of research for faculty development. Ten recommendations provide guidance for efforts to strengthen medical education in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:21074256

  15. FIRST AID & SPECIAL MEDICAL Emergency Medical Plan*

    E-print Network

    Tullos, Desiree

    155 FIRST AID & SPECIAL MEDICAL SERVICE Emergency Medical Plan* Oregon Safety Codes state that every place of employment having more than one employee must have an emergency medical plan. If a physician or an ambulance with an emergency medical technician is available to the place of employment

  16. PRE-MEDICAL PROFESSIONS Medical professional schools

    E-print Network

    PRE-MEDICAL PROFESSIONS Medical professional schools encourage students to develop the broadest requirements required for application to the following medical professional schools include: chiropractic medicine programs, as well as other programs in the medical field. A Bachelor's degree is required

  17. Stanford University Medical Center Lane Medical Library

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Stanford University Medical Center Lane Medical Library 300 Pasteur Drive Room L109 Stanford, CA 94305-5126 Circulation: (650) 723-6691 LANE MEDICAL LIBRARY REGISTRATION FORM Print legibly and complete: ________________________________ The undersigned agrees to abide by Lane Medical Library regulations and acknowledge that the proxy's use

  18. Multi-Species Test of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating at High Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, A. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Andre, M.; Chang, T.; Gurnett, D. A.; Retterer, J. M.; Crew, G. B.

    1997-01-01

    Observations of ion distributions and plasma waves obtained by the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite in the high-altitude, nightside auroral zone are used to study ion energization for three ion species. A number of theoretical models have been proposed to account for the transverse heating of these ion populations. One of these, the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) mechanism, explains ion conic formation through ion cyclotron resonance with broadband electromagnetic wave turbulence in the vicinity of the characteristic ion cyclotron frequency. The cyclotron resonant heating of the ions by low- frequency electromagnetic waves is an important energy source for the transport of ions from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. In this paper we test the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to three simultaneously heated and accelerated ion species by modelling the ion conic formation in terms of a resonant wave-particle interaction in which the ions extract energy from the portion of the broadband electromagnetic wave spectrum which includes the ion cyclotron frequency. Using a Monte Carlo technique we evaluate the ion heating produced by the electromagnetic turbulence at low frequencies and find that the wave amplitudes near the ion cyclotron frequencies are sufficient to explain the observed ion energies.

  19. Multi-Species Test of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating at High Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, A. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Andre, M.; Chang, T.; Gurnett, D. A.; Retterer, J. M.; Crew, G. B.

    1997-01-01

    Observations of ion distributions and plasma waves obtained by the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite in the high-altitude, nightside auroral zone are used to study ion energization for three ion species. A number of theoretical models have been proposed to account for the transverse heating of these ion populations. One of these, the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) mechanism, explains ion conic formation through ion cyclotron resonance with broadband electromagnetic wave turbulence in the vicinity of the characteristic ion cyclotron frequency. The cyclotron resonant heating of the ions by low-frequency electromagnetic waves is an important energy source for the transport of ions from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. In this paper we test the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to three simultaneously heated and accelerated ion species by modelling the ion conic formation in terms of a resonant wave-particle interaction in which the ions extract energy from the portion of the broadband electromagnetic wave spectrum which includes the ion cyclotron frequency. Using a Monte Carlo technique we evaluate the ion heating produced by the electromagnetic turbulence at low frequencies and find that the wave amplitudes near the ion cyclotron frequencies are sufficient to explain the observed ion energies.

  20. Influence of injection beam emittance on beam transmission efficiency in a cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kurashima, Satoshi Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Okumura, Susumu

    2014-02-15

    The JAEA AVF cyclotron accelerates various kinds of high-energy ion beams for research in biotechnology and materials science. Beam intensities of an ion species of the order of 10{sup ?9}–10{sup ?6} ampere are often required for various experiments performed sequentially over a day. To provide ion beams with sufficient intensity and stability, an operator has to retune an ion source in a short time. However, the beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron rarely increases in proportion to the intensity at the ion source. To understand the cause of this beam behavior, transmission efficiencies of a {sup 12}C{sup 5+} beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to the cyclotron were measured for various conditions of the ion source. Moreover, a feasible region for acceleration in the emittance of the injection beam was clarified using a transverse-acceptance measuring system. We confirmed that the beam emittance and profile were changed depending on the condition of the ion source and that matching between the beam emittance and the acceptance of the cyclotron was degraded. However, after fine-tuning to improve the matching, beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron increased.

  1. SUPERPOSITION OF CYCLOTRON LINES IN ACCRETING X-RAY PULSARS. I. LONG SPIN PERIOD

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Osamu

    2011-04-01

    I model cyclotron lines by calculating a superposition of a large number of cyclotron line spectra emerging from different heights of a line-forming region of a non-uniform density and temperature of an electron-proton plasma threaded by a dipole magnetic field. In this paper, I mainly discuss the properties of the cyclotron lines in accreting X-ray pulsars with long spin periods ({approx}100-800 s). My simplified model succeeds in reproducing asymmetric line profiles, anharmonic ratios of line energy, relationship between the width and the depth of the line, and correlation between cyclotron line energy and X-ray intensity in the main pulse. In addition, I demonstrate that a shallower and broader fundamental (= first harmonic) line and a deeper second harmonic line as observed in accreting X-ray pulsars such as Vela X-1 and A0535+26 can be produced via a superposition of a large number of cyclotron lines formed at numerous different heights in a line-forming region with a dipole magnetic field. In this case, the ratio of the peak energy of the second harmonic absorption line to the fundamental can be larger than harmonic ratio 2. Furthermore, the width of the fundamental line is comparable to or larger than that of the second harmonic. These characteristics of the cyclotron lines are consistent with those observed in Vela X-1 and A0535+26.

  2. Variations of cyclotron line energy with luminosity in accreting X-ray pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Osamu

    2014-01-20

    I develop a new model for changes of cyclotron line energy with luminosity based on changes in polar cap dimensions and the direction of photon propagation as well as a shock height. In X0115+63 and V0332+53, the fundamental cyclotron line energy has been observed to decrease with increasing luminosity. This phenomenon has been interpreted as a change of a shock height with luminosity. However, the rates of the observed changes are quite different, in which the line energy in V0332+53 varies slowly with luminosity compared with that in X0115+63. I demonstrate that a new model successfully reproduces the changes of the fundamental cyclotron line energies with luminosity in both X0115+63 and V0332+53. On the other hand, the cyclotron line energies in Her X–1, GX301–2, and GX304–1 were reported to increase with increasing luminosity. I discuss the positive correlation between the cyclotron line energy and luminosity based on changes in a beam pattern for Her X–1, GX301–2, and GX304–1. In addition, I discuss how a switch of the predominant, observed emission region from pole1 to pole2 influences cyclotron line energy for GX304–1 and A0535+26.

  3. First operation of the charge-breeder electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source at the Texas A and M Cyclotron Institute

    SciTech Connect

    May, D. P.; Tabacaru, G.; Abegglen, F. P.; Cornelius, W. D.

    2010-02-15

    The 14.5 GHz electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (ECRIS) designed and fabricated specifically for charge breeding has been installed at the Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute for use in the institute's ongoing radioactive-ion-beam upgrade. The initial testing of the source has just begun with magnetic analysis of the ECRIS beam. The source has only been conditioning for a brief time at low microwave power, and it is continuing to improve. After the source has been conditioned and characterized, charge-breeding trials with stable beams from a singly ionizing source will begin.

  4. A review of ion sources for medical accelerators (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.

    2012-02-15

    There are two major medical applications of ion accelerators. One is a production of short-lived isotopes for radionuclide imaging with positron emission tomography and single photon emission computer tomography. Generally, a combination of a source for negative ions (usually H- and/or D-) and a cyclotron is used; this system is well established and distributed over the world. Other important medical application is charged-particle radiotherapy, where the accelerated ion beam itself is being used for patient treatment. Two distinctly different methods are being applied: either with protons or with heavy-ions (mostly carbon ions). Proton radiotherapy for deep-seated tumors has become widespread since the 1990s. The energy and intensity are typically over 200 MeV and several 10{sup 10} pps, respectively. Cyclotrons as well as synchrotrons are utilized. The ion source for the cyclotron is generally similar to the type for production of radioisotopes. For a synchrotron, one applies a positive ion source in combination with an injector linac. Carbon ion radiotherapy awakens a worldwide interest. About 6000 cancer patients have already been treated with carbon beams from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. These clinical results have clearly verified the advantages of carbon ions. Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center and Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center have been successfully launched. Several new facilities are under commissioning or construction. The beam energy is adjusted to the depth of tumors. It is usually between 140 and 430 MeV/u. Although the beam intensity depends on the irradiation method, it is typically several 10{sup 8} or 10{sup 9} pps. Synchrotrons are only utilized for carbon ion radiotherapy. An ECR ion source supplies multi-charged carbon ions for this requirement. Some other medical applications with ion beams attract developer's interests. For example, the several types of accelerators are under development for the boron neutron capture therapy. This treatment is conventionally demonstrated by a nuclear reactor, but it is strongly expected to replace the reactor by the accelerator. We report status of ion source for medical application and such scope for further developments.

  5. A review of ion sources for medical accelerators (invited).

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, M; Kitagawa, A

    2012-02-01

    There are two major medical applications of ion accelerators. One is a production of short-lived isotopes for radionuclide imaging with positron emission tomography and single photon emission computer tomography. Generally, a combination of a source for negative ions (usually H- and/or D-) and a cyclotron is used; this system is well established and distributed over the world. Other important medical application is charged-particle radiotherapy, where the accelerated ion beam itself is being used for patient treatment. Two distinctly different methods are being applied: either with protons or with heavy-ions (mostly carbon ions). Proton radiotherapy for deep-seated tumors has become widespread since the 1990s. The energy and intensity are typically over 200 MeV and several 10(10) pps, respectively. Cyclotrons as well as synchrotrons are utilized. The ion source for the cyclotron is generally similar to the type for production of radioisotopes. For a synchrotron, one applies a positive ion source in combination with an injector linac. Carbon ion radiotherapy awakens a worldwide interest. About 6000 cancer patients have already been treated with carbon beams from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. These clinical results have clearly verified the advantages of carbon ions. Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center and Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center have been successfully launched. Several new facilities are under commissioning or construction. The beam energy is adjusted to the depth of tumors. It is usually between 140 and 430 MeV?u. Although the beam intensity depends on the irradiation method, it is typically several 10(8) or 10(9) pps. Synchrotrons are only utilized for carbon ion radiotherapy. An ECR ion source supplies multi-charged carbon ions for this requirement. Some other medical applications with ion beams attract developer's interests. For example, the several types of accelerators are under development for the boron neutron capture therapy. This treatment is conventionally demonstrated by a nuclear reactor, but it is strongly expected to replace the reactor by the accelerator. We report status of ion source for medical application and such scope for further developments. PMID:22380341

  6. Medical responsibility.

    PubMed

    Hamowy, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    These comments seek to take issue with the contention that society has a responsibility to provide its members with any needed health care. In order to deal with this claim we must first make clear exactly what it meant by the proposition. I take it that those who embrace this view mean considerably more than that each of us has a moral obligation to contribute to those in need of medical attention who are unable, for one reason or another, to afford the necessary care. This is a moral proposition and is traditionally dealt with under the heading of charity. But the contention, as here used, means considerably more since its main implications are not moral but primarily political. PMID:23061581

  7. Proton Cyclotron Echo: a Phenomenon of Wave-Wave and Wave-Particle Interactions in Topside Sounding of the Ionosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang-Ming

    Proton cyclotron echoes are phenomena related to the proton cyclotron frequency discovered on topside sounder swept-frequency ionograms from the Canadian satellite Alouette II in 1969. Subsequent studies were also limited to the use of the swept-frequency ionograms and devoted only to these so called regular proton cyclotron echoes. The regular proton cyclotron echoes occur on the swept-frequency ionograms at constant apparent ranges predominantly at frequencies below the electron plasma frequency f N, and slightly above the electron cyclotron frequency fH. In this dissertation over 2000 topside sounder ionograms (both swept-frequency mode and fixed-frequency mode) obtained from the Alouette II, ISIS I and II satellites of the Alouette -ISIS program are used to investigate proton cyclotron echoes in detail. Examination of the combined swept-frequency and fixed ionograms indicates that the proton cyclotron echoes are also observed on the fixed-frequency ionograms. In addition to some features, such as constant apparent ranges and higher order multiple echoes, which have been already observed on the swept-frequency ionograms and also occur on the fixed-frequency ionograms, under some conditions non-constant apparent ranges and modulations in intensity of the proton cyclotron echoes on the fixed-frequency ionograms are observed. Usually the proton cyclotron echoes on the fixed -frequency ionogram can be observed for a much longer time than on the swept-frequency ionograms due to the fixed sounding frequencies. A proton cyclotron echo can be under observation for several spin periods of the satellite if the plasma parameters encountered by the sounder are appropriate. The modulation in intensity of the proton cyclotron echo by antenna orientation is evident. In terms of analysis of the combined swept-frequency and fixed-frequency ionograms, and the satellite orbital parameters and spin axis attitude, effects on proton cyclotron echoes of antenna orientation with respect to the earth's magnetic field are examined. It is found that higher intensity and higher harmonics of proton cyclotron echoes occur when the sounding antenna is parallel to the earth's magnetic field. A new class of proton cyclotron echoes was discovered, which occur on electron plasma resonances. The proton cyclotron echoes on the fH, nfH (n = 2, 3, 4), fQ3 and f_{D } have been observed. The first three are checked in more detail. The proton cyclotron echoes observed on the fH, 4f_ {H}, fQ3 and fD resonances exhibit doublet, on the 2fH resonance triplex and on 3fH resonance single while the regular proton cyclotron echoes are always single. A frequency difference of about 5-10 Hz exists between sub-echoes in a doublet or triplex. The regular proton cyclotron echo seems to correspond to the first echo of the double or triple proton cyclotron echoes. No echo minus exists and most proton cyclotron echoes on the electron plasma resonances are observed at dip angles whose magnitudes are less than 8^circ. This new class of proton cyclotron echoes is attributed to the results of nonlinear interactions of ion and electron Bernstein waves or ion Bernstein waves and DKO mode electromagnetic waves (for the fH resonance). Absorption phenomena on the 3fH, 4fH and f_{Q3 } resonance spikes near the proton cyclotron period on swept-frequency ionograms are observed occasionally, but not yet understood. A theory based on nonlinear interaction of two waves is suggested to interpret proton cyclotron echoes. Many observational features of proton cyclotron echoes can be interpreted by this nonlinear interaction model of two waves.

  8. Lower hybrid current drive favoured by electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating

    SciTech Connect

    Cesario, R.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Marinucci, M.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Giruzzi, G.; Napoli, F.; Schettini, G.

    2014-02-12

    The important goal of adding to the bootstrap a fraction of non-inductive plasma current, which would be controlled for obtaining and optimizing steady-state profiles, can be reached by using the Current Drive produced by Lower Hybrid waves (LHCD). FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) experiments demonstrated, indeed, that LHCD is effective at reactor-graded high plasma density, and the LH spectral broadening is reduced, operating with higher electron temperature in the outer region of plasma column (T{sub e-periphery}). This method was obtained following the guidelines of theoretical predictions indicating that the broadening of launched spectrum produced by parametric instability (PI) should be reduced, and the LHCD effect at high density consequently enabled, under higher (T{sub e-periphery}). In FTU, the temperature increase in the outer plasma region was obtained by operating with reduced particle recycling, lithized walls and deep gas fuelling by means of fast pellet. Heating plasma periphery with electron cyclotron resonant waves (ECRH) will provide a further tool for achieving steady-state operations. New FTU experimental results are presented here, demonstrating that temperature effect at the plasma periphery, affecting LH penetration, occurs in a range of plasma parameters broader than in previous work. New information is also shown on the modelling assessing frequencies and growth rates of the PI coupled modes responsible of spectral broadening. Finally, we present the design of an experiment scheduled on FTU next campaign, where ECRH power is used to slightly increase the electron temperature in the outer plasma region of a high-density discharge aiming at restoring LHCD. Consequent to model results, by operating with a toroidal magnetic field of 6.3 T, useful for locating the electron cyclotron resonant layer at the periphery of the plasma column (r/a?0.8, f{sub 0}=144 GHz), an increase of T{sub e} in the outer plasma (from 40 eV to 80 eV at r/a?0.8) is expected by the JETTO code, sufficient for recovering LHCD. An ECRH power of 0.8 MW, and the standard FTU regime at high plasma density (n{sub eav}?1.3×10{sup 20}m{sup ?3} and plasma current of 0.5 MA) have been considered. The code has been set with transport modelling to reproduce the evolution of FTU kinetic profiles.

  9. Upstream proton cyclotron waves at Venus near solar maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delva, M.; Bertucci, C.; Volwerk, M.; Lundin, R.; Mazelle, C.; Romanelli, N.

    2015-01-01

    magnetometer data of Venus Express are analyzed for the occurrence of waves at the proton cyclotron frequency in the spacecraft frame in the upstream region of Venus, for conditions of rising solar activity. The data of two Venus years up to the time of highest sunspot number so far (1 Mar 2011 to 31 May 2012) are studied to reveal the properties of the waves and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions under which they are observed. In general, waves generated by newborn protons from exospheric hydrogen are observed under quasi- (anti)parallel conditions of the IMF and the solar wind velocity, as is expected from theoretical models. The present study near solar maximum finds significantly more waves than a previous study for solar minimum, with an asymmetry in the wave occurrence, i.e., mainly under antiparallel conditions. The plasma data from the Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms instrument aboard Venus Express enable analysis of the background solar wind conditions. The prevalence of waves for IMF in direction toward the Sun is related to the stronger southward tilt of the heliospheric current sheet for the rising phase of Solar Cycle 24, i.e., the "bashful ballerina" is responsible for asymmetric background solar wind conditions. The increase of the number of wave occurrences may be explained by a significant increase in the relative density of planetary protons with respect to the solar wind background. An exceptionally low solar wind proton density is observed during the rising phase of Solar Cycle 24. At the same time, higher EUV increases the ionization in the Venus exosphere, resulting in higher supply of energy from a higher number of newborn protons to the wave. We conclude that in addition to quasi- (anti)parallel conditions of the IMF and the solar wind velocity direction, the higher relative density of Venus exospheric protons with respect to the background solar wind proton density is the key parameter for the higher number of observable proton cyclotron waves near solar maximum.

  10. Quasioptical design of integrated Doppler backscattering and correlation electron cyclotron emission systems on the DIII-D tokamak

    E-print Network

    Rhodes, T. L.

    The quasioptical design of a new integrated Doppler backscattering (DBS) and correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system is presented. The design provides for simultaneous measurements of intermediate wavenumber ...

  11. Spatially resolved charge-state and current-density distributions at the extraction of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Peleikis, Thies; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    In this paper we present our measurements of charge-state and current-density distributions performed in very close vicinity (15 mm) of the extraction of our hexapole geometry electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We achieved a relatively high spatial resolution reducing the aperture of our 3D-movable extraction (puller) electrode to a diameter of only 0.5 mm. Thus, we are able to limit the source of the extracted ion beam to a very small region of the plasma electrode's hole (O = 4 mm) and therefore to a very small region of the neutral plasma sheath. The information about the charge-state distribution and the current density in the plane of the plasma electrode at each particular position is conserved in the ion beam. We determined the total current density distribution at a fixed coaxial distance of only 15 mm to the plasma electrode by remotely moving the small-aperture puller electrode which contained a dedicated Faraday cup (FC) across the aperture of the plasma electrode. In a second measurement we removed the FC and recorded m/q-spectra for the different positions using a sector magnet. From our results we can deduce that different ion charge-states can be grouped into bloated triangles of different sizes and same orientation at the extraction with the current density peaking at centre. This confirms observations from other groups based on simulations and emittance measurements. We present our measurements in detail and discuss possible systematic errors.

  12. Dynamics of multiple flux tubes in sawtoothing KSTAR plasmas heated by electron cyclotron waves: II. Theoretical and numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierwage, Andreas; Yun, Gunsu S.; Hyuen Choe, Gyueng; Nam, Yoonbum; Lee, Woochang; Park, Hyeon K.; Bae, Youngsoon

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of multiple closed flux tubes in the core of a sawtoothing tokamak plasma are studied using nonlinear simulations. This is motivated by recent observations of long-lived hot spots in the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) images of KSTAR plasmas with electron cyclotron heating (ECH) (Yun et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 145003). Using an empirical source term in a reduced set of MHD equations, it is shown that flux tubes with helicity h = 1 are easily produced and survive for the observed time intervals only if the safety factor is close to unity (|q - 1| ? 0.5%) and the magnetic shear is small (|s| ? 1). This suggests that sawteeth in KSTAR leave behind wide regions where q ? 1. On the basis of the relevant time scales, we discuss how this magnetic geometry and the spatial localization of the EC resonance may allow ECH to actively induce the formation of flux tubes. Using simulations with q profiles that possess a wide q = 1 region inside the sawtooth inversion radius, we examine how the flux tubes merge and annihilate, and how their dynamics depend on the strength of the drive. The phenomena seen in the simulations and experiments lead us to conclude that, during the sawtooth ramp phase, there is a dynamic competition between sources and sinks of thermal and magnetic energy, where the flux tubes may play an important role; both as carriers of and channels for energy. The development of self-consistent simulation models is motivated and directions for future experiments are given.

  13. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: Waves in Multi-Ion Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2006-01-01

    The further development of a self-consistent theoretical model of interacting ring current ions and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (Khazanov et al., 2003) is presented In order to adequately take into account wave propagation and refraction in a multi-ion magnetosphere, we explicitly include the ray tracing equations in our previous self-consistent model and use the general form of the wave kinetic equation. This is a major new feature of the present model and, to the best of our knowledge, the ray tracing equations for the first time are explicitly employed on a global magnetospheric scale in order to self-consistently simulate the spatial, temporal, and spectral evolution of the ring current and of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves To demonstrate the effects of EMIC wave propagation and refraction on the wave energy distribution and evolution, we simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings of our simulation can be summarized as follows. First, owing to the density gradient at the plasmapause, the net wave refraction is suppressed, and He+-mode grows preferably at the plasmapause. This result is in total agreement with previous ray tracing studies and is very clearly found in presented B field spectrograms. Second, comparison of global wave distributions with the results from another ring current model (Kozyra et al., 1997) reveals that this new model provides more intense and more highly plasmapause-organized wave distributions during the May 1998 storm period Finally, it is found that He(+)-mode energy distributions are not Gaussian distributions and most important that wave energy can occupy not only the region of generation, i.e., the region of small wave normal angles, but all wave normal angles, including those to near 90 . The latter is extremely crucial for energy transfer to thermal plasmaspheric electrons by resonant Landau damping and subsequent downward heat transport and excitation of stable auroral red arcs.

  14. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves. 1; Waves in Multi Ion Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gumayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2006-01-01

    The further development of a self-consistent theoretical model of interacting ring current ions and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves [Khazanov et al., 2003] is presented. In order to adequately take into account the wave propagation and refraction in a multi-ion plasmasphere, we explicitly include the ray tracing equations in our previous self-consistent model and use the general form of the wave kinetic equation. This is a major new feature of the present model and, to the best of our knowledge, the ray tracing equations for the first time are explicitly employed on a global magnetospheric scale in order to self-consistently simulate spatial, temporal, and spectral evolutions of the ring current and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. To demonstrate the effects of EMIC wave propagation and refraction on the EMIC wave energy distributions and evolution we simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings of our simulation can be summarized as follows. First, due to the density gradient at the plasmapause, the net wave refraction is suppressed, and He(+)-mode grows preferably at plasmapause. This result is in a total agreement with the previous ray tracing studies, and very clear observed in presented B-field spectrograms. Second, comparison the global wave distributions with the results from other ring current model [Kozyra et al., 1997] reveals that our model provides more intense and higher plasmapause organized distributions during the May, 1998 storm period. Finally, the found He(+)-mode energy distributions are not Gaussian distributions, and most important that wave energy can occupy not only the region of generation, i. e. the region of small wave normal angles, but the entire wave normal angle region and even only the region near 90 degrees. The latter is extremely crucial for energy transfer to thermal plasmaspheric electrons by resonant Landau damping, and subsequent downward heat transport and excitation of stable auroral red arcs.

  15. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition of diamond-like films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma CVD has been developed at low pressures (0.0001 - 0.01 torr) and at ambient and high substrate temperatures (up to 750 C), to achieve large-area (greater than 4 in. diameter) depositions of diamondlike amorphous carbon (a - C:H) films. The application of a RF bias to the substrate stage, which induces a negative self-bias voltage, is found to play a critical role in determining carbon bonding configurations and in modifying the film morphology. There are two distinct types of ECR-deposited diamondlike films. One type of diamondlike film exhibits a Raman spectrum consisting of broad and overlapping, graphitic D (1360/cm, line width = 280/cm) and G (1590/cm, line width 140/cm) lines, and the other type has a broad Raman peak centered at appoximately 1500/cm. Examination of plasma species by optical emission spectroscopy shows no correlation between the CH-asterisk emission intensity and the deposition rate of diamondklike films.

  16. Operation of cusptron at fundamental and harmonic cyclotron frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Namkung, W.; Choe, J.Y.; Uhm, H.S.; Ayres, V.

    1988-04-01

    Microwave radiation at the fundamental and harmonic electron cyclotron frequencies is generated by a cusptron oscillator. A low-energy axis-rotating beam of 28 - 30 kV, 0.8 - 3.5 A, 4 ..mu..s, and 60 pps interacts with a single RF mode, both in a circular cavity and in a six-vane circuit by the negative mass instability. In fundamental and second-harmonic frequency generation with a circular circuit, the independently excited modes are TE/sub 11/'s and TE/sub 21/'s with radiation power of more than 1.8 kW and an electronic efficiency of approximately 7.5 percent. Employing a six-vane circuit, microwave radiation at 6.0 (sixth harmonic) and 3.9 GHz (fourth harmonic) is also independently generated with more than 10.4 and 4.0 kW, respectively. Corresponding electronic efficiencies are approximately 10.0 and 9.5 percent.

  17. Electron cyclotron current drive experiments on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.A. ); Giruzzi, G.; Gentile, B. de; Rodriguez, L. ); Fyaretdinov, A.; Gorelov, Yu.; Trukhin, V. ); Harvey, R.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Matsuda, K.; Politzer, P.; Prater, R.; Snider, R. (General Atomics, San Di

    1990-05-01

    Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have been performed using 60 GHz waves launched from the high field side of the torus. Preliminary analysis indicates rf driven currents between 50 and 100 kA in discharges with total plasma currents between 200 and 500 kA. These are the first ECCD experiments with strong first pass absorption, localized deposition of the rf power, and {tau}{sub E} much longer than the slowing-down time of the rf generated current carriers. The experimentally measured profiles for T{sub e}, {eta}{sub e} and Z{sub eff} are used as input for a 1D transport code and a multiply-ray, 3D ray tracing code. Comparisons with theory and assessment of the influence of the residual electric field, using a Fokker-Planck code, are in progress. The ECH power levels were between 1 and 1.5 MW with pulse lengths of about 500 msec. ECCD experiments worldwide are motivated by issues relating to the physics and technical advantages of the use of high frequency rf waves to drive localized currents. ECCD is accomplished by preferentially heating electrons moving in one toroidal direction, reducing their collisionality and thereby producing a non-inductively driven toroidal current. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Multi-harmonic electron cyclotron instabilities. [diffuse electron aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Kennel, C. F.

    1978-01-01

    The reported investigation constitutes an extension of studies conducted by Ashour-Abdalla and Kennel (1975, 1976, 1978) with respect to a basic plasma model of Young et al. (1973). The model involves a combination of a cold Maxwellian background plasma, a hot plasma, and a 'loss cone' type of free energy source. Previous results on the first cyclotron harmonic bands are extended to multiharmonics. The significance of the obtained relations is discussed and tentative conclusions are presented. Given that the spatial growth rates of the convective modes are comparable, and that simultaneous nonconvective instability (NCI) is possible, it is concluded that multiharmonic emissions ought to be a common feature of the magnetospheric electrostatic wave observations. Since the volume of parameter space for which the first harmonic is NCI, and the volume for which the convective first harmonic mode has significant spatial growth rates, exceed those for the higher harmonics, first harmonic waves should be the most commonly observed and the higher harmonics should usually be accompanied by the first harmonic.

  19. Isotope exchange by Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauters, T.; Douai, D.; Kogut, D.; Lyssoivan, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Belonohy, E.; Blackman, T.; Bobkov, V.; Crombé, K.; Drenik, A.; Graham, M.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Loarer, T.; Lomas, P. L.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.; Oberkofler, M.; Philipps, V.; Plyusnin, V.; Sergienko, G.; Van Eester, D.

    2015-08-01

    The isotopic exchange efficiencies of JET Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) discharges produced at ITER half and full field conditions are compared for JET carbon (C) and ITER like wall (ILW). Besides an improved isotope exchange rate on the ILW providing cleaner plasma faster, the main advantage compared to C-wall is a reduction of the ratio of retained discharge gas to removed fuel. Complementing experimental data with discharge modeling shows that long pulses with high (?240 kW coupled) ICRF power maximizes the wall isotope removal per ICWC pulse. In the pressure range 1-7.5 × 10-3 Pa, this removal reduces with increasing discharge pressure. As most of the wall-released isotopes are evacuated by vacuum pumps in the post discharge phase, duty cycle optimization studies for ICWC on JET-ILW need further consideration. The accessible reservoir by H2-ICWC at ITER half field conditions on the JET-ILW preloaded by D2 tokamak operation is estimated to be 7.3 × 1022 hydrogenic atoms, and may be exchanged within 400 s of cumulated ICWC discharge time.

  20. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed in the plasma depletion layer

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.J. ); Fuselier, S.A. ); Murr, D. )

    1991-11-01

    Observations from AMPTE/CCE in the Earth's magnetosheath on October 5, 1984 are presented to illustrate 0.1-4.0 Hz magnetic field pulsations in the subsolar plasma depletion layer (PDL) for northward sheath field during a magnetospheric compression. The PDL is unambiguously identified by comparing CCE data with data from IRM in the upstream solar wind. Pulsations in the PDL are dominated by transverse waves with F/F{sub H{sup +}} {le} 1.0 and a slot in spectral power at F/F{sub H{sup +}} = 0.5. The upper branch is left hand polarized while the lower branch is linearly polarized. In the sheath the proton temperature anisotropy, A = T{sub {perpendicular}}/T{sub {parallel}} {minus} 1, is {approx} 0.6 but it is {approx} 1.7 in the PDL during wave occurrence. The properties and correlation of waves with increased anisotropy indicate that they are electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  1. Electron-cyclotron maser and solar microwave millisecond spike emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hong-Wei; Li, Chun-Sheng; Fu, Qi-Jun

    1986-01-01

    An intense solar microwave millisecond spike emission (SMMSE) event was observed on May 16, 1981 by Zhao and Jin at Beijing Observatory. The peak flux density of the spikes is high to 5 x 100,000 s.f.u. and the corresponding brightness temperature (BT) reaches approx. 10 to the 15th K. In order to explain the observed properties of SMMSE, it is proposed that a beam of electrons with energy of tens KeV injected from the acceleration region downwards into an emerging magnetic arch forms so-called hollow beam distribution and causes electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) instability. The growth rate of second harmonic X-mode is calculated and its change with time is deduced. It is shown that the saturation time of ECM is t sub s approx. equals 0.42 ms and only at last short stage (delta t less than 0.2 t sub s) the growth rate decreases to zero rather rapidly. So a SMMSE with very high BT will be produced if the ratio of number density of nonthermal electrons to that of background electrons, n sub s/n sub e, is larger than 4 x .00001.

  2. SPECE: a code for Electron Cyclotron Emission in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Platania, P.; Sozzi, C.

    2008-03-12

    The code SPECE has been developed for the analysis of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) in a general tokamak equilibrium. The code solves the radiation transport equation along the ray trajectories in a tokamak plasma, in which magnetic equilibrium and plasma profiles are given either analytically or numerically, for a Maxwellian plasma or a non thermal plasma characterized by a distribution function that is the sum of drifting Maxwellian distributions. Ray trajectories are computed making use of the cold dispersion relation, while the absorption and emission coefficients are obtained solving the relevant fully relativistic dispersion relation valid at high electron temperature. The actual antenna pattern is simulated by means of a multi-rays calculation, and the spatial resolution of the ECE measurements is computed by means of an algorithm that takes properly into account the emission along each ray of the beam. Wall effects are introduced in the code by means of a heuristic model. Results of ECE simulations in a standard ITER scenario are presented.

  3. A novel mechanism for electron-cyclotron maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, G. Q.; Tang, J. F.

    2014-06-01

    Context. It has been a long-standing puzzle on how to produce natural radio bursts of various cosmic objects, ranging from remote active galactic nuclei and pulsars to the nearest solar radio bursts and terrestrial auroral kilometer radiations. Aims: An electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) driven by fast electron beams trapped in magnetic fields has been suggested as a dominant mechanism of producing natural high-power radio radiation. However, there have been two serious difficulties: the magnetization condition of requiring the electron gyrofrequency over the plasma frequency and the inversion condition of the perpendicular velocity distribution of the fast electrons, which has held back the popularization of ECM in the astrophysical community. Methods: By including effects of self-generated Alfvén waves (AW) excited by the beam current, this paper proposes a novel, self-consistent ECM model. Results: The results show that the self-generated AW can effectively make a density-depleted duct, in which the magnetization condition is easily satisfied, and result in the inversion condition of perpendicular velocity distribution of the beam electrons. Conclusions: This self-consistent ECM model can effectively overcome the two difficulties, make ECM very easily occur, and, hence, has greatly interesting implications and general significance in radio astrophysics because of its self-consistency, simplicity, and efficiency.

  4. Solar cycle dependence of ion cyclotron wave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessard, M.; Lindgren, E. A.; Weaver, C.; Engebretson, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves have been studied for decades, though remain a fundamentally important topic in heliospheric physics. The connection of EMIC waves to the scattering of energetic particles from Earth's radiation belts is one of many topics that motivate the need for a deeper understanding of characteristics and occurrence distributions of the waves. In this study, we show that EMIC wave frequencies, as observed at Halley Station in Antarctica from 2009 through 2012, increase by approximately 50% over that interval. Assuming that these waves are excited in the vicinity of the plasmapause, the change in Kp in going from solar minimum to near solar maximum would drive increased plasmapause erosion, potentially shifting the generation region of the EMIC to lower L and resulting in the higher frequencies. A numerical estimate of the change in plasmapause location, however, implies that it is not enough to account for the shift in EMIC frequencies that are observed at Halley Station. Another possible explanation for the frequency shift, however, is that the relative density of heavier ions in the magnetosphere (that would be associated with increased solar activity) could account for the change in frequencies.

  5. Medical muddle.

    PubMed

    Gartrell, Nanette

    2014-01-01

    Nanette Gartrell, MD, is a psychiatrist and researcher whose investigations have documented the mental health and psychological well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people over the past four decades. Nanette is the principal investigator of an ongoing longitudinal study of lesbian families in which the children were conceived by donor insemination. Now in its 27th year, this project has been cited internationally in the debates over equality in marriage, foster care, and adoption. Previously on the faculty at Harvard Medical School and the University of California, San Francisco, Nanette is currently a Visiting Distinguished Scholar at the Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law. In 2013, Nanette received the Association of Women Psychiatrists Presidential Commendation Award for "selfless and enduring vision, leadership, wisdom, and mentorship in the fields of women's mental health, ethics, and gender research." At the age of 63, Nanette experienced a 3 ½ month period of intractable, incapacitating dizziness for which there was never a clear diagnosis. PMID:24400630

  6. Mobile medical image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Samuel; Depeursinge, Adrien; Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2011-03-01

    Images are an integral part of medical practice for diagnosis, treatment planning and teaching. Image retrieval has gained in importance mainly as a research domain over the past 20 years. Both textual and visual retrieval of images are essential. In the process of mobile devices becoming reliable and having a functionality equaling that of formerly desktop clients, mobile computing has gained ground and many applications have been explored. This creates a new field of mobile information search & access and in this context images can play an important role as they often allow understanding complex scenarios much quicker and easier than free text. Mobile information retrieval in general has skyrocketed over the past year with many new applications and tools being developed and all sorts of interfaces being adapted to mobile clients. This article describes constraints of an information retrieval system including visual and textual information retrieval from the medical literature of BioMedCentral and of the RSNA journals Radiology and Radiographics. Solutions for mobile data access with an example on an iPhone in a web-based environment are presented as iPhones are frequently used and the operating system is bound to become the most frequent smartphone operating system in 2011. A web-based scenario was chosen to allow for a use by other smart phone platforms such as Android as well. Constraints of small screens and navigation with touch screens are taken into account in the development of the application. A hybrid choice had to be taken to allow for taking pictures with the cell phone camera and upload them for visual similarity search as most producers of smart phones block this functionality to web applications. Mobile information access and in particular access to images can be surprisingly efficient and effective on smaller screens. Images can be read on screen much faster and relevance of documents can be identified quickly through the use of images contained in the text. Problems with the many, often incompatible mobile platforms were discovered and are listed in the text. Mobile information access is a quickly growing domain and the constraints of mobile access also need to be taken into account for image retrieval. The demonstrated access to the medical literature is most relevant as the medical literature and their images are clearly the largest knowledge source in the medical field.

  7. Depressogenic effects of medications: a review.

    PubMed

    Celano, Christopher M; Freudenreich, Oliver; Fernandez-Robles, Carlos; Stern, Theodore A; Caro, Mario A; Huffman, Jeff C

    2011-01-01

    The literature is filled with reports that link medications with the onset or progression of depression. Because depression is so common in patients with medical illness, assessing whether a medication has in fact caused depression, or whether the relationship is coincidental, can be challenging. In this article, we review the literature on the association between medications and depression. For most agents, there are case reports or small studies linking the medication with the onset of depression, but more rigorous prospective studies are either lacking or found no association between the agent and depression. However, several medications, (eg, barbiturates, vigabatrin, topiramate, flunarizine, corticosteroids, mefloquine, efavirenz, and interferon-alpha) do appear to cause depression in some patients and should be used with caution in patients at risk for depression. PMID:21485751

  8. Depressogenic effects of medications: a review

    PubMed Central

    Celano, Christopher M.; Freudenreich, Oliver; Fernandez-Robles, Carlos; Stern, Theodore A.; Caro, Mario A.; Huffman, Jeff C.

    2011-01-01

    The literature is filled with reports that link medications with the onset or progression of depression. Because depression is so common in patients with medical illness, assessing whether a medication has in fact caused depression, or whether the relationship is coincidental, can be challenging. In this article, we review the literature on the association between medications and depression. For most agents, there are case reports or small studies linking the medication with the onset of depression, but more rigorous prospective studies are either lacking or found no association between the agent and depression. However, several medications, (eg, barbiturates, vigabatrin, topiramate, flunarizine, corticosteroids, mefloquine, efavirenz, and interferon-?) do appear to cause depression in some patients and should be used with caution in patients at risk for depression. PMID:21485751

  9. Medical Bibliography and Medical Library Administration. LS 8497, 4 Quarter Hours: Course Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI. Dept. of Library Science.

    This publication outlines and presents a series of 27 learning modules for a course in medical librarianship intended to be conducted in an individualized instructional framework featuring lectures, small group discussions, talks by guest speakers from the medical profession, on-site observation of hospital libraries, on-line demonstrations of…

  10. Control System of the Small Isochronous ring

    SciTech Connect

    Felix Marti; Eduard Pozdeyev

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the control system of the Small Isochronous Ring (SIR) developed and built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University (MSU). SIR is a small-scale experiment that simulates the dynamics of intense beams in large accelerators. A 20 to 30 keV hydrogen or deuterium ion bunch is injected in the ring, extracted after a variable number of turns and its longitudinal profile is studied. Information about the electronics used and software written to control different injection line, ring and extraction line elements is included. Some of these elements are magnets, electrostatic quadrupoles, electric and magnetic correctors, scanning wires, emittance measurement system, chopper and a fast Faraday cup.

  11. Beam Diagnostics of the Small Isochronous Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Felix Marti; Eduard Pozdeyev

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the beam diagnostic systems in the Small Isochronous Ring (SIR) developed and built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University (MSU). SIR is a small-scale experiment that simulates the dynamics of intense beams in large accelerators. A 20 to 30 keV hydrogen or deuterium ion bunch is injected in the ring, extracted after a variable number of turns and its longitudinal profile is studied. Some of the diagnostic tools available in SIR include an emittance measurement system in the injection line, scanning wires in different sections of the ring, phosphor screens at the injection and extraction points and a fast Faraday cup in the extraction line. The design of these systems and the kind of beam information they provide are discussed in detail.

  12. A quasi-optical electron cyclotron maser for fusion reactor heating

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, E.C.

    1990-01-01

    High power microwave and millimeter sources, such as the quasi-optical electron cyclotron maser (QOECM) are important in fusion research as well as in high-energy physics and in other applications. The interaction between the electromagnetic modes of a Fabry-Perot resonator and an electron beam gyrating through a magnetic field has been studied for both the cases of beams parallel and perpendicular to the resonator. The parallel case was theoretically first studied by Kurin for forward and backward wave interaction, and experimentally by Komlev and Kurin. Kreischer and Temkin reviewed the general case of the linear small signal interaction parallel and perpendicular to the resonator. Sprangle, et al discussed the perpendicular case in a self-consistent linear and nonlinear theoretical study using the Gaussian transverse profile of an open resonator with a single longitudinal mode. Experimental verification of the devices operation was first mentioned in work at the Naval Research Laboratory. Theoretical studies using a time-dependent analysis of a large number of longitudinal modes with similar transverse mode profiles have demonstrated that single longitudinal-mode operation can be achieved at equilibrium and that performance can be enhanced by prebunching the electron beam and tapering the magnetic field. The use of output coupling apertures in the mirrors has been studied theoretically in relation to the structure of the modes for both confocal and nonconfocal resonators by Permnoud; use of an open resonator with stepped mirrors has been studied in order to choose a particular longitudinal mode. Studies at the Naval Research Laboratory mirror used configurations that diffraction couple the energy from around the mirror edges, so that the transverse profile inside the resonator can be selective to the fundamental mode.

  13. A quasi-optical electron cyclotron maser for fusion reactor heating. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, E.C.

    1990-12-31

    High power microwave and millimeter sources, such as the quasi-optical electron cyclotron maser (QOECM) are important in fusion research as well as in high-energy physics and in other applications. The interaction between the electromagnetic modes of a Fabry-Perot resonator and an electron beam gyrating through a magnetic field has been studied for both the cases of beams parallel and perpendicular to the resonator. The parallel case was theoretically first studied by Kurin for forward and backward wave interaction, and experimentally by Komlev and Kurin. Kreischer and Temkin reviewed the general case of the linear small signal interaction parallel and perpendicular to the resonator. Sprangle, et al discussed the perpendicular case in a self-consistent linear and nonlinear theoretical study using the Gaussian transverse profile of an open resonator with a single longitudinal mode. Experimental verification of the devices operation was first mentioned in work at the Naval Research Laboratory. Theoretical studies using a time-dependent analysis of a large number of longitudinal modes with similar transverse mode profiles have demonstrated that single longitudinal-mode operation can be achieved at equilibrium and that performance can be enhanced by prebunching the electron beam and tapering the magnetic field. The use of output coupling apertures in the mirrors has been studied theoretically in relation to the structure of the modes for both confocal and nonconfocal resonators by Permnoud; use of an open resonator with stepped mirrors has been studied in order to choose a particular longitudinal mode. Studies at the Naval Research Laboratory mirror used configurations that diffraction couple the energy from around the mirror edges, so that the transverse profile inside the resonator can be selective to the fundamental mode.

  14. Implantable Medical Devices

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Implantable Medical Devices Updated:Sep 15,2015 For Rhythm Control ... Lifestyle Changes Recovery FAQs Medications Surgical Procedures Implantable Medical Devices Healthy Heart Quizzes • Heart Attack Tools & Resources ...

  15. The Medical Home

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect The Medical Home KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > Doctor & Hospital Visits > ... home" for your child. What Does the Term "Medical Home" Mean? A medical home isn't a ...

  16. Mental Health Medications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... people include: Type of mental disorder, such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia Age, sex, and body ... information, see the section on medications for treating depression. . Benzodiazepines (anti-anxiety medications) The anti-anxiety medications called benzodiazepines can ...

  17. Ion beam driven resonant ion-cyclotron instability in a magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Ved; Vijayshri; Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Ruby

    2014-03-15

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves are excited by axial ion beam in a dusty plasma via Cerenkov and slow cyclotron interaction. The dispersion relation of the instability is derived in the presence of positively/negatively charged dust grains. The minimum beam velocity needed for the excitation is estimated for different values of relative density of negatively charged dust grains. It is shown that the minimum beam velocity needed for excitation increases as the charge density carried by dust increases. Temperature of electrons and ions, charge and mass of dust grains, external static magnetic field and finite boundary of dusty plasma significantly modify the dispersion properties of these waves and play a crucial role in the growth of resonant ion cyclotron instability. The ion cyclotron modes with phase velocity comparable to the beam velocity possess a large growth rate. The maximum value of growth rate increases with the beam density and scales as the one-third power of the beam density in Cerenkov interaction and is proportional to the square root of beam density in slow cyclotron interaction.

  18. The cyclotron spectrum of anisotropic ultrarelativistic electrons: interpretation of X-ray pulsar spectra

    E-print Network

    A. N. Baushev

    2008-04-10

    The spectrum of cyclotron radiation produced by electrons with a strongly anisotropic velocity distribution is calculated taking into account higher harmonics. The motion of the electrons is assumed to be ultrarelativistic along the magnetic field and nonrelativistic across the field. One characteristic feature of the resulting spectrum is that harmonics of various orders are not equally spaced. The physical properties and observed spectra of four X-ray pulsars displaying higher cyclotron harmonics are analyzed. The cyclotron features in the spectra of all four pulsars can be interpreted only as emission lines. Moreover, the observed harmonics are not equidistant, and display certain other properties characteristic of emission by strongly anisotropic ultrarelativistic electrons. In addition, there are indirect theoretical arguments that the electrons giving rise to cyclotron features in the spectra of X-ray pulsars are ultrarelativistic and characterized by strongly anisotropic distributions. As a result, estimates of the magnetic fields of X-ray pulsars (which are usually derived from the energies of cyclotron lines) and certain other physical parameters require substantial revision.

  19. SELF-CONSISTENT ION CYCLOTRON ANISOTROPY-BETA RELATION FOR SOLAR WIND PROTONS

    SciTech Connect

    Isenberg, Philip A.; Maruca, Bennett A.; Kasper, Justin C. E-mail: bmaruca@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2013-08-20

    We derive a set of self-consistent marginally stable states for a system of ion-cyclotron waves propagating parallel to the large-scale magnetic field through a homogeneous proton-electron plasma. The proton distributions and the wave dispersions are related through the condition that no further ion-cyclotron resonant particle scattering or wave growth/damping may take place. The thermal anisotropy of the protons in these states therefore defines the threshold value for triggering the proton-cyclotron anisotropy instability. A number of recent papers have noted that the anisotropy of solar wind protons at 1 AU does not seem to be limited by the proton-cyclotron anisotropy threshold, even at low plasma beta. However, this puzzle seems to be due solely to the estimation of this anisotropy threshold under the assumption that the protons have a bi-Maxwellian distribution. We note that bi-Maxwellian distributions are never marginally stable to the resonant cyclotron interaction, so these estimates do not represent physically valid thresholds. The threshold anisotropies obtained from our marginally stable states are much larger, as a function of proton parallel beta, than the bi-Maxwellian estimates, and we show that the measured data remains below these more rigorous thresholds. Thus, the results of this paper resolve the apparent contradiction presented by the solar wind anisotropy observations at 1 AU: the bi-Maxwellian anisotropies are not rigorous thresholds, and so do not limit the proton distributions in the solar wind.

  20. A REFLECTION MODEL FOR THE CYCLOTRON LINES IN THE SPECTRA OF X-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Poutanen, Juri; Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Nagirner, Dmitrij I.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Doroshenko, Victor; Lutovinov, Alexander A.

    2013-11-10

    Cyclotron resonance scattering features observed in the spectra of some X-ray pulsars show significant changes of the line energy with the pulsar luminosity. At high luminosities, these variations are often associated with the onset and growth of the accretion column, which is believed to be the origin of the observed emission and of the cyclotron lines. However, this scenario inevitably implies a large gradient of the magnetic field strength within the line-forming region, which makes the formation of the observed line-like features problematic. Moreover, the observed variation of the cyclotron line energy is much smaller than could be anticipated for the corresponding luminosity changes. We argue here that a more physically realistic situation is that the cyclotron line forms when the radiation emitted by the accretion column is reflected from the neutron star surface, where the gradient of the magnetic field strength is significantly smaller. Here we develop a reflection model and apply it to explain the observed variations of the cyclotron line energy in a bright X-ray pulsar V 0332+53 over a wide range of luminosities.