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Sample records for smectic-c mesophases revealed

  1. Smectic C chevrons in nanocylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Lefort, R. Morineau, D.; Jean, F.; Noirez, L.; Ndao, M.; Cerclier, C. V.

    2014-11-17

    The structure of an achiral smectic-C liquid crystal confined in nanocylinders with a planar surface anchoring is studied by small angle neutron scattering. We observe an invariant alignment of the nematic director with the pore axis, that promotes an original chevron structure with revolution symmetry.

  2. Molecular Order and Mesophase Investigation of Thiophene-Based Forked Mesogens.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Rajasekhar; Lobo, Nitin P; Narasimhaswamy, T

    2016-07-14

    Thiophene-based rodlike molecules constructed from a three phenyl ring core and terminal dialkoxy chains recognized as forked mesogens are synthesized, and their mesophase properties as well as the molecular order are investigated. The synthesized forked mesogens would serve as model compounds for tetracatenar or biforked mesogens. On the basis of the position of the thiophene link with the rest of the core, 2-substituted and 3-substituted mesogens are realized in which the length of the terminal alkoxy chains is varied. The mesophase properties are evaluated using a hot-stage polarizing microscope and differential scanning calorimetry. For both homologues, the appearance of either nematic phase alone or in conjunction with smectic C phase is noticed depending on the length of the terminal alkoxy chains. The existence of layer ordering characteristic of the smectic C phase is confirmed for a representative mesogen using variable-temperature powder X-ray diffraction. High-resolution solid-state (13)C NMR measurements of C12 homologues of the two series reveal orientational order parameters of all rings of the core as well as terminal chains in the liquid crystalline phase. For both homologues, because of the asymmetry of ring I, the order parameter value is higher in contrast to ring II, ring III, and the thiophene ring. The chemical shifts and (13)C-(1)H dipolar couplings of OCH2 carbons of the terminal dodecyloxy chains provide contrasting conformations, reflecting the orientational constraints. Furthermore, the investigations also reveal that the mesophase range and the tendency for layer ordering are higher for 3-substituted mesogens compared to 2-substituted homologues. PMID:27294350

  3. Freedericksz transitions in circular toroidal layers of smectic C liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, J. E.; Stewart, I. W.; Constanda, C.

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to consider theoretically a Freedericksz transition for concentric toroidal layers of smectic C liquid crystal arising from a simple geometric setup, thereby extending the results of Atkin & Stewart [Q. Jl Mech. Appl. Math., 47, 1994] who considered spherical layers of smectic C in the usual cone and plate geometry. Application of smectic continuum theory leads, after suitable approximations are made, to a linear governing equilibrium equation which is satisfied by both the trivial solution and a variable solution involving Bessel functions. We are able to determine the critical magnitude cH of the magnetic field H at which this variable solution exists, and a standard energy comparison reveals that the variable solution is expected to be more energetically favourable than the zero solution provided H > cH. Numerical examples of critical thresholds are given, which are comparable to those in the literature for nematics. The paper ends with a discussion section and some indication of possible future work.

  4. Gradual phase transition between the smectic- C and smectic- C{A} phases and the thresholdless antiferroelectricity.

    PubMed

    Song, Jang-Kun; Fukuda, Atsuo; Vij, J K

    2008-10-01

    We have constructed the phase diagrams for a binary-mixture system of antiferroelectric and ferroelectric liquid-crystalline materials in both thick and thin cells. In the phase diagrams the boundary between the smectic- C and smectic- C{A} phases runs almost parallel to the temperature axis below from ca. 70 degrees C down to at least -25 degrees C . The SmC-SmC_{A} phase transition for a thin cell shows a large supercooling, and a gradual transition occurs near the boundary. Moreover, the thin cell shows a continuous evolution from the antiferroelectric to the ferroelectric state by increasing the electric field applied across the cell. The continuous evolution seemingly reflects the phenomenon of thresholdless antiferroelectricity. In order to explain these phenomena and in clarifying the mechanism of the so-called frustration between ferroelectricity and antiferroelectricity, we have measured the interlayer interaction energy by varying the constituent concentrations in the binary-mixture system. The measured interlayer interaction close to the boundary indicates that the gradual phase transition and continuous evolution result from the suppression of the solitary-wave propagation by the effect of surfaces. PMID:18999440

  5. Investigations of nanoscale helical pitch in smectic-C*alpha and smectic-C* phases of a chiral smectic liquid crystal using differential optical reflectivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Panov, V P; McCoy, B K; Liu, Z Q; Vij, J K; Goodby, J W; Huang, C C

    2006-07-01

    Differential optical reflectivity (DOR) was used to study the temperature dependence of the short helical pitch in freestanding films of a liquid crystal compound. The experimentally measured DOR signal was fitted using Berreman's 4 x 4 matrix method to get the pitch value in the smectic-C*alpha (sMC*alpha) phase. The results show continuous evolution of the pitch between the smectic-C*alpha and sMC*alpha phases. In sMC*alpha, the pitch decreases as temperature increases and is found to level off at 16+/-1 smectic layers at the sMC*alpha to smectic-A* transition. PMID:16907105

  6. Molecular models for the smectic A smectic C phase transition in a system of biaxial molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkunov, Maxim V.; Osipov, Mikhail A.

    2008-07-01

    A molecular theory of the smectic A-smectic C transition in a system of biaxial molecules is developed in the mean-field approximation. The influence of molecular biaxiality on the transition is considered in detail and it is demonstrated how the biaxial order parameters are induced by the tilt. It is shown that the ordering of biaxial molecules of low symmetry in the smectic C phase is generally described by ten independent orientational order parameters, and there exist three different tilt angles which specify the tilt of three ordering tensors. The order parameters are calculated numerically as functions of temperature for two models of biaxial molecules: molecules with two principal axes and molecules with a pair of off-center transverse dipoles. A substantial difference between the three tilt angles is found, which makes impossible a strict definition of a unique director in the smectic C phase. It is also shown that biaxial interactions may lead to an anomalously weak layer contraction in the smectic C phase. Finally, it is demonstrated that the smectic A-smectic C phase transition may be directly driven by biaxial intermolecular interactions. In this case, the tilt of long molecular axes is not a primary order parameter, and its temperature dependence is very different from convention.

  7. Amphiphilic Liquid Crystal Exhibiting the Smectic A to Smectic C Phase Transition without Layer Contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Norihiro; Takanishi, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Jun; Yoshizawa, Atsushi

    2011-02-01

    We prepared an amphiphilic liquid crystal composed of a semiperfluorinated alkyl chain and a 2,3-difluoro-1,4-diphenylbenzene core, and investigated its physical properties using polarized optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The compound was found to exhibit the smectic A to smectic C phase transition without layer contraction. The compound doped with a ferroelectric liquid crystal exhibited a fast electro-optical switching with a response time of 10 µs in the chiral smectic A phase in spite of the absence of a chiral smectic C phase. The phase transition behavior is interpreted using the de Vries cone model.

  8. Diffuse cone behavior and microscopic structure of the de Vries smectic-A and smectic-C phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, HyunGuen; Agra-Kooijman, Dena M.; Ayub, Khurshid; Lemieux, Robert P.; Kumar, Satyendra

    2011-10-01

    Direct synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements of the orientational order parameter, S, corresponding to the siloxane and hydrocarbon parts of the molecule, smectic layer spacing, and director tilt angle with respect to the smectic-C (SmC) layer normal in the de Vries smectics-A (SmA) and SmC phases of two organosiloxane mesogens are reported. The results reveal that (i) the SmC (tilt) order parameter exponent β = 0.26 +/- 0.01 for 2nd order SmA-SmC transition in excellent agreement with the tricritical behavior, (ii) the siloxane and hydrocarbon parts of the molecules are segregated and oriented parallel to the director with different degree of orientational order, and (iii) thermal evolution of the effective molecular length is different in the two phases contrary to the conventional wisdom.

  9. Layer modulated smectic-C phase in liquid crystals with a terminal hydroxyl group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimoto, Yasuhiro; Nishizawa, Ayumi; Takanishi, Yoichi; Yoshizawa, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Jun

    2014-04-01

    We investigated local layer structures of the three smectic-C phases (SmC, SmC', and SmC″) in a liquid crystal with the terminal hydroxyl group using high resolution and microbeam x-ray diffraction. It is found that SmC is the conventional SmC1 phase and SmC″ is the bilayer SmC2 phase. The SmC' phase forms an in-plane modulation structure, so that this phase is the smectic-C antiphase. From the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, it is suggested that the intermolecular hydrogen bonding is important to induce the SmC' and SmC″ phases.

  10. Solubilization of gabapentin into HII mesophases.

    PubMed

    Achrai, Ben; Libster, Dima; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2011-02-10

    In the present work, we report on the solubilization of gabapentin (GBP) into lyotropic hexagonal mesophases composed of monoolein, tricaprylin, and water. It was demonstrated that the hexagonal structure remained intact up to 2 wt % gabapentin, whereas the lamellar phase coexisted with the hexagonal one in the concentration range of 3-4 wt % of the drug. At gabapentin content of 5-6 wt %, only lamellar phases containing defects such as dislocations and multilamellar vesicles were detected. Incorporation of GBP decreased the lattice parameter of the H(II) mesophase from 56.6 to 50.6 Å, while the structural dimensions of the lamellar phase were not affected. ATR-FTIR analysis suggested enhanced hydrogen bonding between the protonated amine of GBP and the O-H groups of the GMO and the water surrounding in the inner hydrophilic interface region. This led to intercalation of the drug into the water-lipid interface. At higher GBP loads of 4-6 wt %, thermal analysis revealed disordering within the lipid packing, apparently induced by the spatially altered interface area. Rheological measurements correlated the macroscopic features of the systems with alterations on the molecular level and allowed distinguishing between closely related mesophases due to their different rheological characteristics. In vitro transdermal delivery studies showed that the examined mesophases enabled a sustained release of GBP compared to its aqueous solution. Sustained release was more pronounced in the case of the hexagonal mesophase, compared to the lamellar one. PMID:21182317

  11. (13)C NMR Studies, Molecular Order, and Mesophase Properties of Thiophene Mesogens.

    PubMed

    Veeraprakash, B; Lobo, Nitin P; Narasimhaswamy, T

    2015-12-01

    Three-ring mesogens with a core comprising thiophene linked to one phenyl ring directly and to the other via flexible ester are synthesized with terminal alkoxy chains to probe the mesophase properties and find the molecular order. The phenyl thiophene link in the core offers a comparison of the mesophase features with the molecular shape of the mesogen. The synthesized mesogens display enantiotropic polymesomorphism and accordingly nematic, smectic A, smectic C and smectic B mesophases are perceived depending upon the terminal chain length. For some of the homologues, monotropic higher order smectic phases such as smectic F and crystal E are also witnessed. The existence of polymesomorphism are originally observed by HOPM and DSC and further confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction studies. For the C8 homologue, high resolution solid state (13)C NMR spectroscopy is employed to find the molecular structure in the liquid crystalline phase and using the 2D SLF technique, the (13)C-(1)H dipolar couplings are extracted to calculate the order parameter. By comparing the ratio of local order of thiophene as well as phenyl rings, we establish the bent-core shape of the mesogen. Importantly, for assigning the carbon chemical shifts of the core unit of aligned C8 mesogen, the (13)C NMR measured in mesophase of the synthetic intermediate is employed. Thus, the proposed approach addresses the key step in the spectral assignment of target mesogens with the use of (13)C NMR data of mesomorphic intermediate. PMID:26551439

  12. Smectic-C tilt under shear in smectic-A elastomers.

    PubMed

    Stenull, Olaf; Lubensky, T C; Adams, J M; Warner, Mark

    2008-08-01

    Stenull and Lubensky [Phys. Rev. E 76, 011706 (2007)] have argued that shear strain and tilt of the director relative to the layer normal are coupled in smectic elastomers and that the imposition of one necessarily leads to the development of the other. This means, in particular, that a smectic-A elastomer subjected to a simple shear will develop smectic-C-like tilt of the director. Recently, Kramer and Finkelmann [e-print arXiv:0708.2024; Phys. Rev. E 78, 021704 (2008)], performed shear experiments on smectic-A elastomers using two different shear geometries. One of the experiments, which implements simple shear, produces clear evidence for the development of smectic-C-like tilt. Here, we generalize a model for smectic elastomers introduced by Adams and Warner [Phys. Rev. E 71, 021708 (2005)] and use it to study the magnitude of SmC-like tilt under shear for the two geometries investigated by Kramer and Finkelmann. Using reasonable estimates of model parameters, we estimate the tilt angle for both geometries, and we compare our estimates to the experimental results. The other shear geometry is problematic since it introduces additional in-plane compressions in a sheetlike sample, thus inducing instabilities that we discuss. PMID:18850850

  13. Multistability in the mixtures of smectic-C^{*} materials with compensated twisting power.

    PubMed

    Emelyanenko, A V; Pozhidaev, E P

    2016-04-01

    The effect of multistability in the mixtures of smectic-C^{*} materials with compensated twisting power, i.e., the existence of a large number of almost equiprobable states in the same mixture under the same conditions, is analyzed in the framework of elastic continuum theory. A simple molecular model is also considered. It is shown that multistability can follow from the bulk properties of the smectic-C^{*} materials with compensated twisting power, but with high spontaneous polarization. Multistability leads to the formation of ferroelectric domains, in which the director oscillates in space. The length and amplitude of this oscillation is tunable smoothly by an electric field. Theoretical results for the domain length agree completely with the experimental data. A suggestion is made as to why each domain structure is remembered without the energy consumption, when the electric field is abruptly switched off. The structural dependence on material parameters, such as the spontaneous polarization, the elastic constant, and the equilibrium wave number, is predicted. PMID:27176364

  14. Multistability in the mixtures of smectic-C* materials with compensated twisting power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanenko, A. V.; Pozhidaev, E. P.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of multistability in the mixtures of smectic-C* materials with compensated twisting power, i.e., the existence of a large number of almost equiprobable states in the same mixture under the same conditions, is analyzed in the framework of elastic continuum theory. A simple molecular model is also considered. It is shown that multistability can follow from the bulk properties of the smectic-C* materials with compensated twisting power, but with high spontaneous polarization. Multistability leads to the formation of ferroelectric domains, in which the director oscillates in space. The length and amplitude of this oscillation is tunable smoothly by an electric field. Theoretical results for the domain length agree completely with the experimental data. A suggestion is made as to why each domain structure is remembered without the energy consumption, when the electric field is abruptly switched off. The structural dependence on material parameters, such as the spontaneous polarization, the elastic constant, and the equilibrium wave number, is predicted.

  15. Orientational relaxation in free-standing smectic C film driven by rotating circular frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A. V.; Vakulenko, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The pecularities in the c ˆ -director reorientation in free-standing smectic C film without of defects and stretched between two circular frames, the rest outer and rotating inner, have been investigated theoretically based on the hydrodynamic theory including the c ˆ -director motion and with accounting for backflow. Since the orientation of the c ˆ -director is fixed at the rims of the smectic film, the shear flow induced by rotating frame winds up of the c ˆ -director field. It is found that the higher shearing flow produces the greater twisting rotation of the c ˆ -director around the normal to the smectic film directed in the opposite sense with respect to the direction of the angular velocity. Calculations also show that the relaxation dynamics of the c ˆ -director field depends crucially on the curvature of the inner rotating frame.

  16. Effect of cell surfaces on the stability of chiral smectic-C phases.

    PubMed

    Manna, U; Song, Jang-Kun; Power, G; Vij, J K

    2008-08-01

    The effect of surfaces on the stability of smectic-C* (SmC*) variant phases is investigated. The results obtained using dielectric spectroscopy by varying the cell thickness show that the temperature ranges of SmCalpha*, SmCA*(1/2) , and SmCA*(1/3) phases decrease with decreasing cell thickness, and the SmCA*(1/3) phase is more stable than the SmCA*(1/2) phase. The relative stability of any phase is found to be due to its large polar anchoring strength and low free energy compared to other phases in a cell. Experimental results are found to agree with the theory. PMID:18850856

  17. Smectic-A*-smectic-C* transition in a ferroelectric liquid crystal without smectic layer shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Giesselmann, F; Zugenmaier, P; Dierking, I; Lagerwall, S T; Stebler, B; Kaspar, M; Hamplová, V; Glogarová, M

    1999-07-01

    The smectic layer spacing of a nonfluorinated ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) compound with almost no shrinkage and only minor tendency to form zigzag defects was characterized by small angle x-ray diffraction. The material lacks a nematic phase. The smectic-A*-smectic-C* phase transition was studied by measuring the thermal and electric field response of the optical tilt and the electric polarization. These properties are described very well by a Landau expansion even without introduction of a higher-order Theta(6) term. This result suggests a pure second-order phase transition far from tricriticality and differs considerably from the typical behavior of the A*-C* transition in most FLC materials. PMID:11969798

  18. Pretransitional effects near the smectic-A-smectic-C* phase transition of hydrophilic and hydrophobic aerosil networks dispersed in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Cordoyiannis, George; Kralj, Samo; Nounesis, George; Kutnjak, Zdravko; Zumer, Slobodan

    2007-02-15

    A detailed x-ray scattering and high-resolution ac calorimetric study has been carried out near the smectic-A to chiral smectic-C phase transition of liquid-crystal compounds 4-(2-methyl butyl) phenyl 4-n-octylbiphenyl-4-carboxylate (CE8) and p-(n-decyloxy) benzylidene-p-amino-(2-methylbutyl) cinnamate (DOBAMBC) confined in hydrophilic and hydrophobic aerosil nanoparticle networks. The character of the transition, which is mean field near a tricritical point in bulk, is changed dramatically with an increase of aerosil-induced disorder. X-ray measurements revealed pretransitional behavior and compression of the smectic layers, phenomena that are strongly pronounced in high aerosil concentrations. A theoretical model that takes into account the interplay of relevant mechanisms is proposed to explain the observed phenomena. The effect of chirality on the interaction of liquid crystals with aerosils is discussed.

  19. Pretransitional effects near the smectic- A -smectic- C* phase transition of hydrophilic and hydrophobic aerosil networks dispersed in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordoyiannis, George; Kralj, Samo; Nounesis, George; Kutnjak, Zdravko; Žumer, Slobodan

    2007-02-01

    A detailed x-ray scattering and high-resolution ac calorimetric study has been carried out near the smectic- A to chiral smectic- C phase transition of liquid-crystal compounds 4-(2-methyl butyl) phenyl 4- n -octylbiphenyl-4-carboxylate (CE8) and p -( n -decyloxy) benzylidene- p -amino-(2-methylbutyl) cinnamate (DOBAMBC) confined in hydrophilic and hydrophobic aerosil nanoparticle networks. The character of the transition, which is mean field near a tricritical point in bulk, is changed dramatically with an increase of aerosil-induced disorder. X-ray measurements revealed pretransitional behavior and compression of the smectic layers, phenomena that are strongly pronounced in high aerosil concentrations. A theoretical model that takes into account the interplay of relevant mechanisms is proposed to explain the observed phenomena. The effect of chirality on the interaction of liquid crystals with aerosils is discussed.

  20. Smectic C liquid crystal growth through surface orientation by ZnxCd1-xSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katranchev, B.; Petrov, M.; Bineva, I.; Levi, Z.; Mineva, M.

    2012-12-01

    A smectic C liquid crystal (LC) texture, consisting of distinct local single crystals (DLSCs) was grown using predefined orientation of ternary nanocrystalline thin films of ZnxCd1-xSe. The surface morphology and orientation features of the ZnxCd1-xSe films were investigated by AFM measurements and micro-texture polarization analysis. The ZnxCd1-xSe surface causes a substantial enlargement of the smectic C DLSCs and induction of a surface bistable state. The specific character of the morphology of this coating leads to the decrease of the corresponding anchoring energy. Two new chiral states, not typical for this LC were indicated. The physical mechanism providing these new effects is presented.

  1. Polarity sensitive electric responses in a twisted smectic-C liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K S

    2013-12-01

    The observation of two polarity-sensitive electrical responses found in the low-frequency (<1 Hz) regime of a square wave field is reported for an achiral rodlike smectic-C liquid crystal with negative dielectric and conductivity anisotropies and in the 90°-twisted configuration. The first involves a transient director modulation appearing at each polarity reversal and vanishing under steady field conditions. The instability is polarity sensitive, with the maximum distortion localized near the negative electrode instead of the sample midplane. This is inferred from the wave-vector orientation alternating in the two halves of the driving cycle between the alignment directions at the two substrates. Various electro-optic characteristics of this temporal phenomenon are also described. Following a similar observation in nematic liquid crystals, we associate the transient periodic order with the Carr-Helfrich mechanism assisted by quadrupolar flexoelectric polarization obtaining under electric field gradients. The second polarity-sensitive effect manifests in the relative shift of the periodic Fréedericksz pattern upon field reversal. The shift, which is linear in field for low fields, tends to saturate for large fields. It is interpreted as due to flexoelectric polarization associated primarily with the c director twist about the layer normal. A model involving a periodic wedgelike band, which has the twist localized within it and is flanked by two uniformly and transversely aligned regions, accounts for the flexoelectric shift of the optical pattern. PMID:24483464

  2. Polarity sensitive electric responses in a twisted smectic-C liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    The observation of two polarity-sensitive electrical responses found in the low-frequency (<1 Hz) regime of a square wave field is reported for an achiral rodlike smectic-C liquid crystal with negative dielectric and conductivity anisotropies and in the 90°-twisted configuration. The first involves a transient director modulation appearing at each polarity reversal and vanishing under steady field conditions. The instability is polarity sensitive, with the maximum distortion localized near the negative electrode instead of the sample midplane. This is inferred from the wave-vector orientation alternating in the two halves of the driving cycle between the alignment directions at the two substrates. Various electro-optic characteristics of this temporal phenomenon are also described. Following a similar observation in nematic liquid crystals, we associate the transient periodic order with the Carr-Helfrich mechanism assisted by quadrupolar flexoelectric polarization obtaining under electric field gradients. The second polarity-sensitive effect manifests in the relative shift of the periodic Fréedericksz pattern upon field reversal. The shift, which is linear in field for low fields, tends to saturate for large fields. It is interpreted as due to flexoelectric polarization associated primarily with the c director twist about the layer normal. A model involving a periodic wedgelike band, which has the twist localized within it and is flanked by two uniformly and transversely aligned regions, accounts for the flexoelectric shift of the optical pattern.

  3. Polymer stabilization of the smectic C-alpha* liquid crystal phase—Over tenfold thermal stabilization by confining networks of photo-polymerized reactive mesogens

    SciTech Connect

    Labeeb, A.; Gleeson, H. F.; Hegmann, T.

    2015-12-07

    The smectic C*-alpha (SmC{sub α}*) phase is one of the sub-phases of ferroelectric liquid crystals that has drawn much interest due to its electro-optical properties and ultrafast switching. Generally observed above the ferroelectric SmC* phase in temperature, the SmC{sub α}* commonly shows only very narrow phase temperature range of a few degree Celsius. To broaden the SmC{sub α}* phase, polymer stabilization was investigated for thermal phase stabilization. Two different reactive monomers were tested in three mixtures, and all three broadened the temperature range of the SmC{sub α}* phase from 3 °C to 39 °C. The current reversal method was used to determine the phase existence versus temperature. Moreover, the texture and network structure was studied by polarized optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, with the latter revealing the confinement of the smectic layer structure within the porous polymer network.

  4. Crystalline mesophases: Structure, mobility, and pharmaceutical properties.

    PubMed

    Shalaev, Evgenyi; Wu, Ke; Shamblin, Sheri; Krzyzaniak, Joseph F; Descamps, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Crystalline mesophases, which are commonly classified according to their translational, orientational, and conformational order as liquid crystals, plastic crystals, and conformationally disordered crystals, represent a common state of condensed matter. As an intermediate state between crystalline and amorphous materials, crystalline mesophases resemble amorphous materials in relation to their molecular mobility, with the glass transition being their common property, and at the same time possessing a certain degree of translational periodicity (with the exception of nematic phase), with corresponding narrow peaks in X-ray diffraction patterns. For example, plastic crystals, which can be formed both by near-spherical molecules and molecules of lower symmetry, such as planar or chain molecules, can have both extremely sharp X-ray diffraction lines and exhibit glass transition. Fundamentals of structural arrangements in mesophases are compared with several types of disorder in crystalline materials, as well as with short-range ordering in amorphous solids. Main features of the molecular mobility in crystalline mesophases are found to be generally similar to amorphous materials, although some important differences do exist, depending on a particular type of mobility modes involved in relaxation processes. In several case studies reviewed, chemical stability appears to follow the extent of disorder, with the stability of crystalline mesophase found to be intermediate between amorphous (least stable) and crystalline (most stable) materials. Finally, detection of crystalline mesophases during manufacturing of two different types of dosage forms is discussed. PMID:27067607

  5. Mesophases in nearly 2D room-temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Manini, N; Cesaratto, M; Del Pópolo, M G; Ballone, P

    2009-11-26

    Computer simulations of (i) a [C(12)mim][Tf(2)N] film of nanometric thickness squeezed at kbar pressure by a piecewise parabolic confining potential reveal a mesoscopic in-plane density and composition modulation reminiscent of mesophases seen in 3D samples of the same room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). Near 2D confinement, enforced by a high normal load, as well as relatively long aliphatic chains are strictly required for the mesophase formation, as confirmed by computations for two related systems made of (ii) the same [C(12)mim][Tf(2)N] adsorbed at a neutral solid surface and (iii) a shorter-chain RTIL ([C(4)mim][Tf(2)N]) trapped in the potential well of part i. No in-plane modulation is seen for ii and iii. In case ii, the optimal arrangement of charge and neutral tails is achieved by layering parallel to the surface, while, in case iii, weaker dispersion and packing interactions are unable to bring aliphatic tails together into mesoscopic islands, against overwhelming entropy and Coulomb forces. The onset of in-plane mesophases could greatly affect the properties of long-chain RTILs used as lubricants. PMID:19886615

  6. Mesophase behavior and rheology of polyhedral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Umang; Escobedo, Fernando

    2011-03-01

    Translational and orientational excluded volume fields can guide assembly of particles with anisotropic shape to diverse morphologies. A roadmap elucidating correlations between phase behavior and particle shape may help devising efficient strategies for self-assembly of desired nanocrystal superlattices. To explore these complex correlations we performed detailed Monte Carlo simulations of six convex multi-faceted shapes belonging to the diverse class of space-filling polyhedrons. Simulations predict formation of various novel liquid-crystalline and plastic-crystalline phases at intermediate volume fractions. By correlating these findings with particle anisotropy and order of rotational symmetry, simple guidelines for predicting phase behavior of polyhedral particles are proposed. Moreover, detailed analysis of the structures of mesophases reveals importance of dynamical order in defining these phases and preliminary information about kinetics of these transitions is also obtained. Finally, to elucidate the effect of particle shape anisotropy on rheology, preliminary results will be reported from non equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the isotropic and cubatic(LC) phase of cuboidal particles. This work was supported by a Department of Energy Basic Energy Science Grant ER46517.

  7. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins Using Lipidic Mesophases

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Martin; Cherezov, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    A detailed protocol for crystallizing membrane proteins that makes use of lipidic mesophases is described. This has variously been referred to as the lipid cubic phase or in meso method. The method has been shown to be quite general in that it has been used to solve X-ray crystallographic structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins, proteins that are monomeric, homo- and hetero-multimeric, chromophore-containing and chromophore-free, and α-helical and β-barrel proteins. Its most recent successes are the human engineered β2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A G protein-coupled receptors. Protocols are provided for preparing and characterizing the lipidic mesophase, for reconstituting the protein into the monoolein-based mesophase, for functional assay of the protein in the mesophase, and for setting up crystallizations in manual mode. Methods for harvesting micro-crystals are also described. The time required to prepare the protein-loaded mesophase and to set up a crystallization plate manually is about one hour. PMID:19390528

  8. Induced Mesophase in Mixtures of Photopolymerizable Hyperbranched Polyester and Liquid Crystal Mesogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namil; Kyu, Thein; Nosaka, Mami; Kudo, Hiroto; Nishikubo, Tadatomi

    2008-03-01

    Phase behavior of a mixture of eutectic liquid crystals (E7) and hyperbranched polyester (HBPEAc-COOH) has been investigated using polarized optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The observed phase diagram is an upper azeotrope, exhibiting the coexistence of nematic + isotropic phase in the vicinity of 90˜110^oC above the clearing temperature of neat E7 (60^oC). With decreasing temperature a focal-conic fan shaped texture develops in the composition range of 70˜90 wt% of E7, suggestive of induced smectic Sm-A phase in the mixture containing no known smectic phase in their neat forms. Wide angle x-ray diffraction (WAXD) technique revealed the existence of higher order mesophase(s). The phenomenon of induced mesophase in the hyperbranched polyester/E7 system will be discussed.

  9. Critical behavior at the isotropic to nematic, nematic to smectic-A and smectic-A to smectic-C phase transitions in a pyrimidine liquid crystal compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Anish; Chakraborty, Susanta; Kumar Das, Malay

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution optical birefringence (∆n) measurement of a pyrimidine liquid crystal compound having nematic, smectic-A and smectic-C phases are reported. The high-resolution ∆n data are rather successful in assessing the critical anomaly at different phase transitions in the investigated compound with a reasonably good accuracy. The critical exponent β, describing the limiting behavior of the nematic order parameter close to the isotropic-nematic (I-N) phase transition, is found to be in good agreement with the tricritical hypothesis. The critical behavior at the nematic-smectic-A (N-Sm-A) and the smectic-A-smectic-C (Sm-A-Sm-C) phase transitions has been explored with the aid of a differential quotient extracted from the ∆n values. The yielded effective critical exponent α‧ is appeared to be nearly tricritical in nature for the N-Sm-A phase transition. For the Sm-A-Sm-C phase transition, α‧ exhibits a weak dependence on the fit range and assumes tricritical value for large temperature range considered, which again is found to be diminished slightly with reduction in the temperature range. Related critical amplitude quotient and corrections-to-scaling quotient are found to display deviations from the theoretical models. Such behavior signals the appearance of a non-Landau character for the orthogonal to tilted smectic phase transition in the investigated compound.

  10. Molecular Dynamics in a Liquid Crystal with Reentrant Mesophases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastião, P. J.; Ribeiro, A. C.; Nguyen, H. T.; Noack, F.

    1995-11-01

    It is well known that liquid crystalline compounds with a cyano terminal group can present peculiar polymorphisms in particular different types of smectic A mesophases and a reentrant behaviour for both nematic and smectic A mesophases. In this work we study by proton NMR relaxation the influence of these features on the molecular dynamics of the compound 4-cyanobenzoate-4'-octylbenzoyloxyphenyl (DB8CN Sym) in its nematic (N), partial bilayer smectic A (SAd), reentrant nematic (Nre) and reentrant smectic A (SA1) mesophases. Standard and fast field-cycling techniques were used for our spin-lattice relaxation's study over a broad frequency range of 6 decades (200 Hz up to 300 MHz). It was found that the molecular dynamics in the nematic mesophases is rather different from the molecular dynamics in the smectic A mesophases. However, the reentrant aspect present in both nematic and smectic A states is not associated to a major difference on the molecular dynamics of the nematic and reentrant nematic or smectic and reentrant smectic A mesophases. Order director fluctuations and rotations/reorientations are the most important relaxation mechanisms in the nematic mesophases in the lower and higher frequency limits, respectively, while self-diffusion has a very small contribution to the overall relaxation. As for the smectic A mesophases, self-diffusion and rotations/reorientations are the predominant relaxation mechanisms for frequencies above 20 kHz. The collective motions, which for these mesophases have to be associated with layer undulations with the frequency law T_1sim ν, are only important to the spin-lattice relaxation on the low part of the frequency spectrum (ν<10 kHz). The inclusion in the relaxation study of a contribution from the cross-relaxation between protons and nitrogen nuclei improves the quality of the 1/T_1 data fits in both kinds of mesophases. The combined study of the molecular dynamics in the N, SAd, Nre and SA1 mesophases of DB8CN Sym reveals

  11. Hydrophilic nanoparticles stabilising mesophase curvature at low concentration but disrupting mesophase order at higher concentrations.

    PubMed

    Beddoes, Charlotte M; Berge, Johanna; Bartenstein, Julia E; Lange, Kathrin; Smith, Andrew J; Heenan, Richard K; Briscoe, Wuge H

    2016-07-13

    Using high pressure small angle X-ray scattering (HP-SAXS), we have studied monoolein (MO) mesophases at 18 wt% hydration in the presence of 10 nm silica nanoparticles (NPs) at NP-lipid number ratios (ν) of 1 × 10(-6), 1 × 10(-5) and 1 × 10(-4) over the pressure range 1-2700 bar and temperature range 20-60 °C. In the absence of the silica NPs, the pressure-temperature (p-T) phase diagram of monoolein exhibited inverse bicontinuous cubic gyroid (Q), lamellar alpha (Lα), and lamellar crystalline (Lc) phases. The addition of the NPs significantly altered the p-T phase diagram, changing the pressure (p) and the temperature (T) at which the transitions between these mesophases occurred. In particular, a strong NP concentration effect on the mesophase behaviour was observed. At low NP concentration, the p-T region pervaded by the Q phase and the Lα-Q mixture increased, and we attribute this behaviour to the NPs forming clusters at the mesophase domain boundaries, encouraging transition to the mesophase with a higher curvature. At high NP concentrations, the Q phase was no longer observed in the p-T phase diagram. Instead, it was dominated by the lamellar (L) phases until the transition to a fluid isotropic (FI) phase at 60 °C at low pressure. We speculate that NPs formed aggregates with a "chain of pearls" structure at the mesophase domain boundaries, hindering transitions to the mesophases with higher curvatures. These observations were supported by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Our results have implications to nanocomposite materials and nanoparticle cellular entry where the interactions between NPs and organised lipid structures are an important consideration. PMID:27340807

  12. Crystallizing Transmembrane Peptides in Lipidic Mesophases

    SciTech Connect

    Höfer, Nicole; Aragão, David; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-09-28

    Structure determination of membrane proteins by crystallographic means has been facilitated by crystallization in lipidic mesophases. It has been suggested, however, that this so-called in meso method, as originally implemented, would not apply to small protein targets having {le}4 transmembrane crossings. In our study, the hypothesis that the inherent flexibility of the mesophase would enable crystallogenesis of small proteins was tested using a transmembrane pentadecapeptide, linear gramicidin, which produced structure-grade crystals. This result suggests that the in meso method should be considered as a viable means for high-resolution structure determination of integral membrane peptides, many of which are predicted to be coded for in the human genome.

  13. Operating characteristics of pixelated gray-scale optically addressed spatial light modulators incorporating the twisted smectic-C* liquid crystal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Louis W.; Davey, Anthony B.; Travis, Adrian R.

    1998-08-01

    An optically addressed spatial light modulator using the twisted smectic-C* liquid crystal effect in the light- modulating layer and an intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon in the photosensitive layer is fabricated. The device incorporates a layer of pixelated aluminum mirrors, sandwiched between photosensitive and modulating layers, to increase the reflectivity of the modulated output read beam. The device is capable of achieving an intrinsic gray-scale optical output. A spatial resolution of 27 lp/mm (i.e., 54 lines/mm) at 50% modulation depth driving at 2.0 kHz and a maximum frame rate of 2.5 kHz at 80% modulation depth for which a frame cycle includes erase, write, and read operations have been demonstrated. Other operating characteristics, i.e., the sensitivity and contrast ratio, are reported.

  14. Experimental study of high-temperature smectic- C_{FI2}{ *} phase in chiral smectic liquid crystals that exhibit phase-sequence reversal.

    PubMed

    Sandhya, K L; Song, J K; Panarin, Yu P; Vij, J K; Kumar, S

    2008-05-01

    We report the results of an experimental study of a recently observed phase sequence reversal of smectic-C_{FI2}{ *} [ SmC;{ *}(q_{T}=1/2); a four layer antiferroelectric] phase appearing in the temperature range above the smectic-C{ *} (SmC;{ *}) phase from the results of optical birefringence, spontaneous polarization, selective reflection, conoscopy, and dielectric spectroscopy. The SmC_{FI2}{ *} phase is observed in an antiferroelectric liquid crystalline compound, 10OHF, in a temperature range above that of SmC{ *} phase and is found to be thermodynamically monotropic, i.e., it appears only upon cooling from SmC_{alpha}{ *} phase. This is also unstable as if it is once transformed to SmC{ *} by the application of the bias, it does not return to its original state unless the sample is heated and cooled again in the absence of the bias. Nevertheless this phase is stabilized by the addition of a chiral smectic compound 9OTBBB1M7 (abbreviated as C9), having a wide temperature range of the SmC_{FI2}{ *} phase. The temperature range of the low temperature SmC{ *} decreases with increase in the concentration of C9 and for a concentration of 55 wt. %, SmC{ *} disappears and the transition takes place directly from SmC_{FI2}{ *} to the crystalline phase on cooling. The existence of such a high-temperature SmC_{FI2}{ *} phase is also supported by a phenomenological model. PMID:18643087

  15. Tailoring the properties of polymers via formation of a mesophase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, Rocco; Auriemma, Finizia; De Rosa, Claudio; Malafronte, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The combination of the control of the concentration of stereodefects in isotactic polypropylene using metallocene catalysts and the crystallization via the mesophase is a strategy to tailor the mechanical properties. Stiff materials, flexible materials, and thermoplastic elastomers can be produced depending only on the concentration of rr stereodefects. We show that in the case of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) the material properties can be finely tuned at molecular level via formation of a solid mesophase, characterized by an intermediate degree of order between amorphous and crystalline state. The effect of different degree of stereoregularity on the mesophase formation, thermal stability, morphology, is analyzed at different length scales, using different technique including wide angle X-ray scattering, atomic and optical microscopy. Different morphologies are observed depending on the stereoregularity and conditions of crystallization. In contrast to the lamellar morphology of crystals normally obtained from the melt, the solid mesophase show a nodular morphology.

  16. Tailoring the properties of polymers via formation of a mesophase

    SciTech Connect

    Di Girolamo, Rocco Auriemma, Finizia; De Rosa, Claudio; Malafronte, Anna

    2015-12-17

    The combination of the control of the concentration of stereodefects in isotactic polypropylene using metallocene catalysts and the crystallization via the mesophase is a strategy to tailor the mechanical properties. Stiff materials, flexible materials, and thermoplastic elastomers can be produced depending only on the concentration of rr stereodefects. We show that in the case of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) the material properties can be finely tuned at molecular level via formation of a solid mesophase, characterized by an intermediate degree of order between amorphous and crystalline state. The effect of different degree of stereoregularity on the mesophase formation, thermal stability, morphology, is analyzed at different length scales, using different technique including wide angle X-ray scattering, atomic and optical microscopy. Different morphologies are observed depending on the stereoregularity and conditions of crystallization. In contrast to the lamellar morphology of crystals normally obtained from the melt, the solid mesophase show a nodular morphology.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of the interconversion of inverse bicontinuous cubic mesophases

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, Adam M.; Templer, R.H.; Seddon, J.M.; Woenkhaus, J.; Winter, R.; Narayanan, T.; Finet, S.

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes time-resolved x-ray diffraction data monitoring the transformation of one inverse bicontinuous cubic mesophase into another, in a hydrated lipid system. The first section of the paper describes a mechanism for the transformation that conserves the topology of the bilayer, based on the work of Charvolin and Sadoc, Fogden and Hyde, and Benedicto and O'Brien in this area. We show a pictorial representation of this mechanism, in terms of both the water channels and the lipid bilayer. The second section describes the experimental results obtained. The system under investigation was 2:1 lauric acid: dilauroylphosphatidylcholine at a hydration of 50% water by weight. A pressure-jump was used to induce a phase transition from the gyroid (Q{sub II}{sup G}) to the diamond (Q{sub II}{sup D}) bicontinuous cubic mesophase, which was monitored by time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The lattice parameter of both mesophases was found to decrease slightly throughout the transformation, but at the stage where the Q{sub II}{sup D} phase first appeared, the ratio of lattice parameters of the two phases was found to be approximately constant for all pressure-jump experiments. The value is consistent with a topology-preserving mechanism. However, the polydomain nature of our sample prevents us from confirming that the specific pathway is that described in the first section of the paper. Our data also reveal signals from two different intermediate structures, one of which we have identified as the inverse hexagonal (H{sub II}) mesophase. We suggest that it plays a role in the transfer of water during the transformation. The rate of the phase transition was found to increase with both temperature and pressure-jump amplitude, and its time scale varied from the order of seconds to minutes, depending on the conditions employed.

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of the interconversion of inverse bicontinuous cubic mesophases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Adam M.; Templer, R. H.; Seddon, J. M.; Woenkhaus, J.; Winter, R.; Narayanan, T.; Finet, S.

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes time-resolved x-ray diffraction data monitoring the transformation of one inverse bicontinuous cubic mesophase into another, in a hydrated lipid system. The first section of the paper describes a mechanism for the transformation that conserves the topology of the bilayer, based on the work of Charvolin and Sadoc, Fogden and Hyde, and Benedicto and O’Brien in this area. We show a pictorial representation of this mechanism, in terms of both the water channels and the lipid bilayer. The second section describes the experimental results obtained. The system under investigation was 2:1 lauric acid: dilauroylphosphatidylcholine at a hydration of 50% water by weight. A pressure-jump was used to induce a phase transition from the gyroid (QIIG) to the diamond (QIID) bicontinuous cubic mesophase, which was monitored by time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The lattice parameter of both mesophases was found to decrease slightly throughout the transformation, but at the stage where the QIID phase first appeared, the ratio of lattice parameters of the two phases was found to be approximately constant for all pressure-jump experiments. The value is consistent with a topology-preserving mechanism. However, the polydomain nature of our sample prevents us from confirming that the specific pathway is that described in the first section of the paper. Our data also reveal signals from two different intermediate structures, one of which we have identified as the inverse hexagonal (HII) mesophase. We suggest that it plays a role in the transfer of water during the transformation. The rate of the phase transition was found to increase with both temperature and pressure-jump amplitude, and its time scale varied from the order of seconds to minutes, depending on the conditions employed.

  19. Salt and mesophase formation in aqueous suspensions of lauric acid.

    PubMed

    Smith, S W; Anderson, B D

    1993-10-01

    The solubility and solution behavior of lauric acid (LA) and its 1:1 acid soap (potassium hydrogen dilaurate) were investigated at 32 degrees C over a pH range of 2.5-8.5 and at varying KCl concentrations to examine the self-association of this long-chain carboxylic acid under these conditions. LA's solubility in water exhibited the classical pH dependence of a monocarboxylic acid with no evidence of self-association. In 0.1 M KCl between pH 6.3 and pH 7.3, filtered samples were turbid, suggesting the presence of high molecular weight aggregates (mesophase), which could be removed by ultrafiltration. The apparent LA solubility vs pH profile in ultrafiltered samples was consistent with a solid phase consisting of either the free acid (pH < 6.5) or potassium hydrogen dilaurate (pH > 6.5), again with no evidence of self-association to form low molecular weight species (dimers, etc.). Quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS) studies and mannitol trapping experiments indicated that vesicles were present in samples containing mesophase. The mesophase composition was characterized and a mass-action law for mesophase formation was developed to describe the apparent LA solubility versus pH in the mesophase region in terms of three parameters. The index of cooperativity, theta, indicated that the mesophase consists of approximately 25 molecules of LA with an acid:anion ratio, rho, of 1.7. The standard free energy of mesophase formation per mole of monomer was determined to be -6.3 kcal/mol. The aggregate size determined thermodynamically is several orders of magnitude less than that of the mesophase particle size determined by QLS measurements, suggesting that the LA monomer concentration in equilibrium with mesophase may be governed by a small unit domain of the vesicle. These observations may have a bearing on the thermodynamics of self-assembly of lipid bilayer membranes. PMID:8272419

  20. Nucleation and growth of mesophase in thermolysis of petroleum pitches

    SciTech Connect

    Gusev, M.A.; Amerik, Y.B.; Anisimov, M.A.; Grishin, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper aims at determining the induction period and the rate of formation of the mesophase in thermolysis of pitches from residues differing in origin. In the thermolysis of isotropic petroleum residues that are mainly of secondary origin, an anistropic phase is formed, the so-called mesophase, similar in strucure to liquid crystals. IR spectroscopic data indicate a considerable content of aromatic hydrocarbons in the pitches. These results also indicate the predominance of aromatic hydrocarbons in the pitches. The formation of an anisotropic phase in the thermolysis of petroleum pitches is explained by the presence of ''blanks'' in these pitches--planar polyaromatic hydrocarbon fragments with a paraffinic-napthenic framework.

  1. Unit cell structure of water-filled monoolein in inverted hexagonal mesophase in the presence of incorporated tricaprylin and entrapped lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Vesselin; Ivanova, Anela; Madjarova, Galia; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2016-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) was employed by means of a specific simulation protocol to investigate the equilibrium structure at 25 °C of the hexagonal inverted (HII) mesophase composed from water, 1-monoolein (GMO), and tricaprylin, with or without entrapped lysozyme. Based on robust and fast MD simulations, the study provides a comprehensive analysis and visualization of the local structure of HII mesophase containing admixtures. The most important physical insight is the possibility to observe the strong self-recovery capacity of the GMO layer, which allows the HII mesophase tubes to reorganize and host lysozyme molecules with a size bigger than the diameter of the water channel. This is a direct message to the experimenters that the HII mesophase has the potential to host molecules larger than the diameter of the water channel. Collective character of the interlipid interactions is outlined, which is not affected by the presence of the cargo and may be the reason for the efficient GMO reorganization. Another important result is the possible explanation of the role of triacylglycerols on the low-temperature stabilization of the HII mesophase. The analysis shows that despite the low amount of tricaprylin, its molecules prevent the extreme inclination of the lipid tails and thus optimize the alignment capacity of the lipid tails layer. The study also reveals that the packing frustration does not depend on the temperature and the presence of admixtures. Hence, it might be numerically defined as a universal invariant parameter of a stable HII mesophase composed of a certain lipid. PMID:26424533

  2. Columnar mesophases of hexabenzocoronene derivatives. II. Charge carrier mobility.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, James; Marcon, Valentina; Kremer, Kurt; Nelson, Jenny; Andrienko, Denis

    2008-09-01

    Combining atomistic molecular dynamic simulations, Marcus-Hush theory description of charge transport rates, and master equation description of charge dynamics, we correlate the temperature-driven change of the mesophase structure with the change of charge carrier mobilities in columnar phases of hexabenzocoronene derivatives. The time dependence of fluctuations in transfer integrals shows that static disorder is predominant in determining charge transport characteristics. Both site energies and transfer integrals are distributed because of disorder in the molecular arrangement. It is shown that the contributions to the site energies from polarization and electrostatic effects are of opposite sign for positive charges. We look at three mesophases of hexabenzocoronene: herringbone, discotic, and columnar disordered. All results are compared to time resolved microwave conductivity data and show excellent agreement with no fitting parameters. PMID:19044876

  3. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins in Lipidic Mesophases. A Host Lipid Screen

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dianfan; Lee, Jean; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-11-30

    The default lipid for the bulk of the crystallogenesis studies performed to date using the cubic mesophase method is monoolein. There is no good reason, however, why this 18-carbon, cis-monounsaturated monoacylglycerol should be the preferred lipid for all target membrane proteins. The latter come from an array of biomembrane types with varying properties that include hydrophobic thickness, intrinsic curvature, lateral pressure profile, lipid and protein makeup, and compositional asymmetry. Thus, it seems reasonable that screening for crystallizability based on the identity of the lipid creating the hosting mesophase would be worthwhile. For this, monoacylglycerols with differing acyl chain characteristics, such as length and olefinic bond position, must be available. A lipid synthesis and purification program is in place in the author's laboratory to serve this need. In the current study with the outer membrane sugar transporter, OprB, we demonstrate the utility of host lipid screening as a means for generating diffraction-quality crystals. Host lipid screening is likely to prove a generally useful strategy for mesophase-based crystallization of membrane proteins.

  4. Low viscosity reversed hexagonal mesophases induced by hydrophilic additives.

    PubMed

    Amar-Yuli, Idit; Wachtel, Ellen; Shalev, Deborah E; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2008-04-01

    This study reports on the formation of a low viscosity H(II) mesophase at room temperature upon addition of Transcutol (diethylene glycol mono ethyl ether) or ethanol to the ternary mixture of GMO (glycerol monooleate)/TAG (tricaprylin)/water. The microstructure and bulk properties were characterized in comparison with those of the low viscosity HII mesophase formed in the ternary GMO/TAG/water mixture at elevated temperatures (35-40 degrees C). We characterized the role of Transcutol or ethanol as inducers of disorder and surfactant mobility. The techniques used were rheology, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS and SAXS, respectively), NMR (self-diffusion and (2)H NMR), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies. The incorporation of either Transcutol or ethanol induced the formation of less ordered HII mesophases with smaller domain sizes and lattice parameters at room temperature (up to 30 degrees C), similar to those found for the GMO/TAG/water mixture at more elevated temperatures (35-40 degrees C). On the basis of our measurements, we suggest that Transcutol or ethanol causes dehydration of the GMO headgroups and enhances the mobility of the GMO chains. As a result, these two small molecules, which compete for water with the GMO polar headgroups, may increase the curvature of the cylindrical micelles and also perhaps reduce their length. This results in the formation of fluid H(II) structures at room temperature (up to 30 degrees C). It is possible that these phases are a prelude to the H(II)-L(2) transformation, which takes place above 35 degrees C. PMID:18324809

  5. Large-amplitude motion in polymer crystals and mesophases

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, B. |

    1994-12-31

    Large-amplitude motion of macromolecules involves mainly rotation about bonds (conformational motion). In the liquid phases, the large- amplitude motion is coupled with disorder and accounts for the flow and viscoelastic behavior. Perfectly ordered crystals, in contrast, permit only little large-amplitude motion. The mesophases are intermediate in order and mobility. In crystals, large-amplitude motion leads initially to gauche defects and kinks (conformational defects), and ultimately may produce conformationally disordered crystals (conis crystals). Molecular dynamics simulations of crystals with up to 30,000 atoms have been carried out and show the mechanism of defect formation, permit the study of the distribution of defects, and the visualization of hexagonal crystals. Distinction between main-chain liquid-crystalline macromolecules and condis crystals, the two mesophases of polymers, can be done on basis of analysis of phase separation (partial crystallinity), present in condis crystals and not in liquid crystals. Solid state NMR is the tool of choice for detecting mobile and rigid phases. In highly drawn fibers one can find four different states of order and mobility. Besides the (defect) crystalline phase and the isotropic amorphous phase, an intermediate oriented phase and a rigid amorphous phase exists.

  6. Tunable Nanoparticulate Scaffolds from Self assembly in Surfactant Mesophase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, K. P.; Guruswamy, K.; Mondain-Monval, O.; Aswal, V. K.

    2010-03-01

    We examine the organization of silica nanoparticles in non-ionic surfactant, C12E9/water, H1 phase. We show, using SAXS, TEM , Freeze Fracture and Microscopy, that particles with sizes smaller than the mesophase characteristic size, a, template the mesophase; particles with size ˜ a, partition into a dispersed phase and into strand-like aggregates. Particles of size > a phase separate to form particulate strands organized into a scaffold. The particulate network forms by expulsion of particles from growing H1 phase domains; particles are concentrated in the isotropic phase and jam at domain boundaries. Changing the cooling rate into the H1 phase changes the nucleation of domains -- hence providing a route to tune the network mesh size. When the surfactant is heated to the micellar phase, the particles redisperse readily. SANS confirms that C12E9 forms a bilayer on the silica particles, preventing their irreversible aggregation. PEI coated particles (with size >a) also phase separate to form networks. The network of such coated particles can be crosslinked to obtain a free standing nanoparticulate scaffold.

  7. Thermoreversible hydroferrogels with tunable mechanical properties utilizing block copolymer mesophases as template.

    PubMed

    Krekhova, Marina; Lang, Tobias; Richter, Reinhard; Schmalz, Holger

    2010-12-21

    Thermoreversible hydroferrogels (FGs) have been prepared via gelation of aqueous maghemite ferrofluids (FFs) using the triblock copolymer Pluronic P123 as gelator. In the investigated concentration range of 28-42 wt % P123, long-term stable homogeneous FGs can be prepared from FFs with a maximum maghemite content of 14 wt %. For higher FF concentrations up to 29 wt %, however, homogeneous FGs were formed only for gelator contents up to ca. 33 wt %. A combination of rheology and μ-DSC was applied as an alternative method to construct the P123 phase diagram, without the need for visual methods or scattering techniques. Using this procedure, we could show that maghemite nanoparticles can be effectively templated by the cubic and hexagonal P123 mesophases in a concentration range of 33-38 wt % P123 and FF concentrations up to 14 wt %, respectively. Most importantly, the phase behavior and the corresponding phase-transition temperatures of P123 were not significantly altered. As a result, the FGs show a reversible temperature-triggered transition from a cubic hard gel to a hexagonal gel, which is linked with a softening of the gel. Furthermore, this concept can be applied to template cobalt ferrite nanoparticle effectively, too. Magnetization experiments revealed that the superparamagnetic behavior of the maghemite nanoparticles, which show a Néel type relaxation, is not altered in the corresponding FGs. In contrast, FGs based on blocked cobalt ferrite nanoparticles show a hysteretic behavior, which indicates a strong mechanical coupling between the P123 mesophase and the magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:21090823

  8. HIV-TAT enhances the transdermal delivery of NSAID drugs from liquid crystalline mesophases.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Avrahami, Marganit; Shames, Alexander I; Ottaviani, M Francesca; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2014-06-12

    Sodium diclofenac (Na-DFC) and celecoxib (CLXB) are common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drugs which suffer from poor bioavailability and severe side effects when consumed orally, and their transdermal delivery might present important advantages. In this study, the drugs were solubilized in cubic and lamellar mesophases as transdermal delivery vehicles, and a cell-penetrating peptide, HIV-TAT (TAT), was examined as a skin penetration enhancer. SD-NMR, ATR-FTIR, and EPR measurements revealed that, in the cubic mesophase (which is rich in water content), TAT populates the aqueous cores and binds water, while in the dense lamellar system (with the lower water content) TAT is bound also to the glycerol monooleate (GMO) and increases the microviscosity and the order degree. TAT secondary structure in the cubic system was found to be a random coil while once it was embedded in the closely packed lamellar system it transforms to a more ordered compact state of β-turns arranged around the GMO headgroups. TAT remarkably increased the diffusion of Na-DFC and CLXB from the cubic systems by 6- and 9-fold enhancement, respectively. TAT effect on drug diffusion from the lamellar systems was limited to an increase of 1.3- and 1.7-fold, respectively. The dense packing and strong binding in the lamellar phase led to slow diffusion rates and slower drug release in controlled pattern. These effects of the chemical composition and vehicle geometry on drug diffusion are demonstrated with the impacts of TAT which can be specifically utilized for controlling skin delivery of drugs as required. PMID:24798650

  9. Lysozyme entrapped within reverse hexagonal mesophases: physical properties and structural behavior.

    PubMed

    Mishraki, Tehila; Libster, Dima; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2010-01-01

    A model protein (lysozyme) was incorporated into monoolein-based reverse hexagonal (H(II)) mesophase and its structure effects were characterized by small angle X-ray scattering, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, and rheological measurements. Modifications in molecular organization of the H(II) mesophases as well as the conformational stability of lysozyme (LSZ) as a function of pH and denaturating agent (urea) were clarified. Up to 3 wt.% LSZ can be solubilized into the H(II). The vibration FTIR analysis revealed that LSZ interacted with OH groups of glycerol monooleate (GMO) in the outer interface region, resulting in strong hydrogen bonding between the surfactant and its environment. Simultaneously, the decrease in the hydrogen-bonded carbonyl population of GMO was monitored, indicating dehydration of the monoolein carbonyls. These molecular interactions yielded a minor decrease in the lattice parameter of the systems, as detected by small angle X-ray scattering. Furthermore, LSZ was crystallized within the medium of the hexagonal structures in a single crystal form. The alpha-helix conformation of lysozyme was stabilized at high pH conditions, demonstrating greater helical structure content, compared to D(2)O solution. Moreover, the hexagonal phase decreased the unfavorable alpha-->beta transition in lysozyme, thereby increasing the stability of the protein under chemical denaturation. The rheological behavior of the hexagonal structures varied with the incorporation of LSZ, reflected in stronger elastic properties and pronounced solid-like response of the systems. The hydrogen bonding enhancement in the interface region of the structures was most likely responsible for these phenomena. The results of this study provided valuable information on the use of hexagonal systems as a carrier for incorporation and stabilization of proteins for various applications. PMID:19748240

  10. Controlling enzymatic activity and kinetics in swollen mesophases by physical nano-confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenjie; Vallooran, Jijo J.; Zabara, Alexandru; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-05-01

    Bicontinuous lipid cubic mesophases are widely investigated as hosting matrices for functional enzymes to build biosensors and bio-devices due to their unique structural characteristics. However, the enzymatic activity within standard mesophases (in-meso) is severely hindered by the relatively small diameter of the mesophase aqueous channels, which provide only limited space for enzymes, and restrict them into a highly confined environment. We show that the enzymatic activity of a model enzyme, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), can be accurately controlled by relaxing its confinement within the cubic phases' water channels, when the aqueous channel diameters are systematically swollen with varying amount of hydration-enhancing sugar ester. The in-meso activity and kinetics of HRP are then systematically investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, as a function of the size of the aqueous mesophase channels. The enzymatic activity of HRP increases with the swelling of the water channels. In swollen mesophases with water channel diameter larger than the HRP size, the enzymatic activity is more than double that measured in standard mesophases, approaching again the enzymatic activity of free HRP in bulk water. We also show that the physically-entrapped enzymes in the mesophases exhibit a restricted-diffusion-induced initial lag period and report the first observation of in-meso enzymatic kinetics significantly deviating from the normal Michaelis-Menten behaviour observed in free solutions, with deviations vanishing when enzyme confinement is released by swelling the mesophase.Bicontinuous lipid cubic mesophases are widely investigated as hosting matrices for functional enzymes to build biosensors and bio-devices due to their unique structural characteristics. However, the enzymatic activity within standard mesophases (in-meso) is severely hindered by the relatively small diameter of the mesophase aqueous channels, which provide only limited space for enzymes, and restrict them

  11. Influence of the counteranion on the ability of 1-dodecyl-3-methyltriazolium ionic liquids to form mesophases

    SciTech Connect

    Stappert, Kathrin; Ünal, Derya; Spielberg, Eike T.; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2014-11-25

    The influence of the counteranion on the ability of the mesogenic cation 1-methyl-3-dodecyl-triazolium to form mesophases is explored. To that avail, salts of the cation with anions of different size, shape, and hydrogen bonding capability such as Cl, Br, I, I3, PF6, and Tf2N [bis(trifluorosulfonyl)amide] were synthesized and characterized. The crystal structures of the bromide, the iodide, and the triiodide reveal that the cations form bilayers with cations oriented in opposite directions featuring interdigitated alkyl tails. Within the layers, the cations are separated by anions. The rod-shaped triiodide anion forces the triazolium cation to align with it in this crystal structure but due to its space requirement reduces the alkyl chain interdigitation which prevents the formation of a mesophase. Rather the compound transforms directly from a crystalline solid to an (ionic) liquid like the analogous bis(trifluorosulfonyl)amide. In contrast, the simple halides and the hexafluorophosphate form liquid crystalline phases. As a result, their clearing points shift with increasing anion radius to lower temperatures.

  12. Influence of the counteranion on the ability of 1-dodecyl-3-methyltriazolium ionic liquids to form mesophases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stappert, Kathrin; Ünal, Derya; Spielberg, Eike T.; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2014-11-25

    The influence of the counteranion on the ability of the mesogenic cation 1-methyl-3-dodecyl-triazolium to form mesophases is explored. To that avail, salts of the cation with anions of different size, shape, and hydrogen bonding capability such as Cl–, Br–, I–, I3–, PF6–, and Tf2N– [bis(trifluorosulfonyl)amide] were synthesized and characterized. The crystal structures of the bromide, the iodide, and the triiodide reveal that the cations form bilayers with cations oriented in opposite directions featuring interdigitated alkyl tails. Within the layers, the cations are separated by anions. The rod-shaped triiodide anion forces the triazolium cation to align with it in this crystalmore » structure but due to its space requirement reduces the alkyl chain interdigitation which prevents the formation of a mesophase. Rather the compound transforms directly from a crystalline solid to an (ionic) liquid like the analogous bis(trifluorosulfonyl)amide. In contrast, the simple halides and the hexafluorophosphate form liquid crystalline phases. As a result, their clearing points shift with increasing anion radius to lower temperatures.« less

  13. Mesophases in polyethylene, polypropylene, and poly(1-butene)

    SciTech Connect

    Androsch, Rene J; Di Lorenzo, Maria; Schick, Christoph; Wunderlich, Bernhard {nmn}

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains new views about the amorphous and partially ordered phases of the three polymers listed in the title. The discussion is based on information on structure, thermodynamic stability, and large-amplitude molecular motion. Polyethylene is the basic backbone of all alkene polymers, and the other two are the first members of the vinyl polymers which have stereospecifically placed alkyl side chains. Their multiphase structures consist of metastable crystals, mesophases, and surrounding rigid and mobile amorphous fractions. All these phases have sizes ranging from micrometer dimensions down to nanometers. Besides the phase structures, information about the molecular coupling between the phases must be considered. Depending on temperature, the polymer phases can vary from solid (rigid) to liquid (mobile). New knowledge is also gained by cross-comparison of the title polymers. The experimental information was gained from (a) various forms of slow, fast, and temperature-modulated thermal analysis to identify equilibrium and non-equilibrium states, (b) measurement of structure and morphology at various length scales, and (c) tracing of the large-amplitude molecular motion, the kinetics of order/disorder changes, and the liquid/solid transitions (glass transitions). It is shown that much more needs to be known about the various phases and their coupling to characterize a given polymer and to fine-tune its properties for a given application.

  14. Mesophase stabilization in ionic liquid crystals through pairing equally shaped mesogenic cations and anions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stappert, Kathrin; Lipinski, Gregor; Kopiec, Gabriel; Spielberg, Eike T.; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-07-23

    The synthesis and properties of a set of novel ionic liquid crystals with congruently shaped cations and anions are reported to check whether pairing mesogenic cations with mesogenic anions leads to a stabilization of a liquid crystalline phase. To that avail 1-alkyl-3-methyl-triazolium cations with an alkyl chain length of 10, 12, and 14 carbon atoms have been combined with p-alkyloxy-benzenesulfonate anions with different alkyl chain lengths (n = 10, 12, and 14). The corresponding triazolium iodides have been synthesized as reference compounds where the cation and anion have strong size and shape mismatch. The mesomorphic behavior of all compounds ismore » studied by differential scanning calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy. All compounds except 1-methyl-3-decyltriazolium iodide, which qualifies as an ionic liquid, are thermotropic ionic liquid crystals. All other compounds adopt smectic A phases. As a result, a comparison of the thermal phase behavior of the 1-methyl-3-decyltriazolium bromides to the corresponding p-alkoxy-benzensulfonates reveals that definitely the mesophase is stabilized by pairing the rod-shaped 1-alkyl-3-methyltriazolium cation with a rod-like anion of similar size.« less

  15. Mesophase stabilization in ionic liquid crystals through pairing equally shaped mesogenic cations and anions

    SciTech Connect

    Stappert, Kathrin; Lipinski, Gregor; Kopiec, Gabriel; Spielberg, Eike T.; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-07-23

    The synthesis and properties of a set of novel ionic liquid crystals with congruently shaped cations and anions are reported to check whether pairing mesogenic cations with mesogenic anions leads to a stabilization of a liquid crystalline phase. To that avail 1-alkyl-3-methyl-triazolium cations with an alkyl chain length of 10, 12, and 14 carbon atoms have been combined with p-alkyloxy-benzenesulfonate anions with different alkyl chain lengths (n = 10, 12, and 14). The corresponding triazolium iodides have been synthesized as reference compounds where the cation and anion have strong size and shape mismatch. The mesomorphic behavior of all compounds is studied by differential scanning calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy. All compounds except 1-methyl-3-decyltriazolium iodide, which qualifies as an ionic liquid, are thermotropic ionic liquid crystals. All other compounds adopt smectic A phases. As a result, a comparison of the thermal phase behavior of the 1-methyl-3-decyltriazolium bromides to the corresponding p-alkoxy-benzensulfonates reveals that definitely the mesophase is stabilized by pairing the rod-shaped 1-alkyl-3-methyltriazolium cation with a rod-like anion of similar size.

  16. An X-ray transparent microfluidic platform for screening of the phase behavior of lipidic mesophases

    PubMed Central

    Khvostichenko, Daria S.; Kondrashkina, Elena; Perry, Sarah L.; Pawate, Ashtamurthy S.; Brister, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Lipidic mesophases are a class of highly ordered soft materials that form when certain lipids are mixed with water. Understanding the relationship between the composition and the microstructure of mesophases is necessary for fundamental studies of self-assembly in amphiphilic systems and for applications, such as crystallization of membrane proteins. However, the laborious formulation protocol for highly viscous mesophases and the large amounts of material required for sample formulation are significant obstacles in such studies. Here we report a microfluidic platform that facilitates investigations of the phase behavior of mesophases by reducing sample consumption, and automating and parallelizing sample formulation. The mesophases were formulated on-chip using less than 40 nL of material per sample and their microstructure was analyzed in situ using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The 220 μm-thick X-ray compatible platform was comprised of thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layers sandwiched between cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) sheets. Uniform mesophases were prepared using an active on-chip mixing strategy coupled with periodic cooling of the sample to reduce the viscosity. We validated the platform by preparing and analyzing mesophases of lipid monoolein (MO) mixed with aqueous solutions of different concentrations of β-octylglucoside (βOG), a detergent frequently used in membrane protein crystallization. Four samples were prepared in parallel on chip, by first metering and automatically diluting βOG to obtain detergent solutions of different concentration, then metering MO, and finally mixing by actuation of pneumatic valves. Integration of detergent dilution and subsequent mixing significantly reduced the number of manual steps needed for sample preparation. Three different types of mesophases typical for monoolein were successfully identified in SAXS data from on-chip samples. Microstructural parameters of identical samples formulated in different

  17. Spectroscopic characterizations of a mixed surfactant mesophase and its application in materials synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Limin

    A viscous lyotropic crystalline mesophase containing bis (2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT), alpha-phosphatidylcholine (lecithin), with comparable volume fractions of isooctane and water was characterized by Fourier-transform 31P and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Shear alignment on the reverse hexagonal mesophase was reflected through both 31P NMR and 1H NMR spectra. A complicated 31P spectrum was observed as a result of superposition of chemical shifts according to the distribution of crystalline domains prior to shear. The initially disordered samples with polydomain structures became macroscopically aligned after Couette shear and the alignment retained for a long period of time. 31P NMR chemical shift anisotropy characteristics were used to elucidate orientation of the hexagonal phase. Interestingly, 1H NMR of the water, methyl and methylene groups exhibited spectral changes upon shear alignment closely corresponding with that of 31P NMR spectra. A reverse hexagonal to lamellar phase transition was manifested as an expanding of the expressed 31P NMR chemical shift anisotropy and an apparent reversal of the powder pattern with increasing water content and/or temperature. Correspondingly, 1H NMR spectra also experienced a spectral pattern transition as the water content or temperature was increased. These observations complement the findings of mesophase alignment obtained using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and imply that 31P and 1H NMR spectroscopy can be used as probes to define microstructure and monitor orientation changes in this binary surfactant system. This is especially beneficial if these mesophases are used as templates for materials synthesis. The mesophase retains its alignment for extended periods allowing materials synthesis to be decoupled from the application of shear. Highly aligned string-like silica nanostructures were obtained through templated synthesis in the columnar hexagonal structure of the viscous

  18. Dynamics of edge dislocations in a sheared lamellar mesophase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, V.

    2013-10-01

    The dynamics and interactions of edge dislocations in a nearly aligned sheared lamellar mesophase is analysed to provide insights into the relationship between disorder and rheology. First, the mesoscale permeation and momentum equations for the displacement field in the presence of external forces are derived from the model H equations for the concentration and momentum field. The secondary flow generated due to the mean shear around an isolated defect is calculated, and the excess viscosity due to the presence of the defect is determined from the excess energy dissipation due to the secondary flow. The excess viscosity for an isolated defect is found to increase with system size in the cross-stream direction as L3/2 for an isolated defect, though this divergence is cut-off due to interactions in a defect suspension. As the defects are sheared past each other due to the mean flow, the Peach-Koehler force due to elastic interaction between pairs of defects is found to cause no net displacement relative to each other as they approach from large separation to the distance of closest approach. The equivalent force due to viscous interactions is found to increase the separation for defects of opposite sign, and decrease the separation for defects of same sign. During defect interactions, we find that there is no buckling instability due to dilation of layers for systems of realistic size. However, there is another mechanism, which is the velocity difference generated across a slightly deformed bilayer due to the mean shear, which could result in the creation of new defects.

  19. Molecular Basis of Mesophase Ordering in a Thiophene-Based Copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    DeLongchamp,D.; Kline, R.; Jung, Y.; Lin, E.; Fischer, D.; Gundlach, D.; Cotts, S.; Moad, A.; Richter, L.; et al

    2008-01-01

    The carrier mobility of poly(2,5-bis(3-alkylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) semiconductors can be substantially enhanced after heating through a thermotropic mesophase transition, which causes a significant improvement in thin film structural order. By directly measuring film structure throughout a heating and cooling cycle, we identify the molecular origin of this mesophase transition as the melting of interdigitated linear alkane side chains, in this case quaterdecyl. The morphology and phase behavior throughout the thermal cycle are controlled by the changing conformation of the side chains. Surprisingly, the melting of the side chains allows increases in the backbone order, p-p stacking, and carrier mobility. Upon cooling, the side chains recrystallize to preserve the excellent mesophase order and enhanced electrical performance.

  20. Broadening of mesophase temperature range induced by doping calamitic mesogen with banana-shaped mesogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetinov, Miroslav; Stojanović, Maja; Obadović, Dušanka; Vajda, Aniko; Fodor-Csorba, Katalin; Eber, Nandor

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated three binary mixtures composed of selected banana-shaped dopant in low concentrations and calamitic mesogen in high. Banana-shaped dopant forms a B7 phase, while the calamitic mesogen exhibit nematic and smectic SmA and SmC phases. The occurring mesophases have been identified by their optical textures. At dopant concentrations of 2.2 and 3.1 mol%, there is evident broadening of nematic and smectic SmA temperature ranges in respect to the pure calamitic compound. Yet, the mixture with dopant concentration of 7 mol% exhibits narrower temperature ranges of mesophases. Increasing dopant concentration caused lowering of all phase transitions temperatures (TI-N, TN-SmA, TSmA-SmC) in all investigated mixtures. Therefore, mixing classic calamitic compounds with novel banana-shaped compound in low concentrations is viable way to attain useful mesophase range for application in industry.

  1. H(II) mesophase and peptide cell-penetrating enhancers for improved transdermal delivery of sodium diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Avrahami, Marganit; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2010-06-01

    This study develops a novel transdermal delivery vehicle for the enhanced delivery of sodium diclofenac (Na-DFC). The system utilizes the advantages of reversed hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystals (H(II)LC), combined with a peptide cell penetration enhancer (CPE), creating together an adaptable system that provides versatile options in the field of transdermal delivery. This enhancer peptide is based on a family of amphipatic peptides that exhibit improved membrane permeability. Franz permeation cell experiments revealed that the peptide enhancer (RALA) improved Na-DFC skin penetration of the liquid crystal 2.2-fold. We studied the structural effects of RALA solubilization on the H(II) mesophase. RALA acts as a chaotropic agent, interfering in the structure of the water, and causes a measurable swelling of the aqueous cylinders by 5A. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) measurements reveal enhanced hydration of the glycerol monooleate (GMO) headgroups and a 6.5% increase in the fraction of non-freezable water resulting from RALA incorporation. RALA caused a gradual increase in the GMO effective headgroup area due to the hydration, leading eventually to a transform of the hexagonal structure towards a lamellar one. Circular dichroism and ATR-FTIR measurements showed a conservation of the peptide structure when incorporated into the H(II) mesophase. The combined H(II)LC-CPE systems can serve as high potential vehicles for a variety of drugs, as they can easily be modified by varying the composition and temperature, according to the required dose and delivery features. PMID:20189781

  2. The effect of dendrimer generations on the structure of Q(G) LLC mesophase and drug release.

    PubMed

    Bitan-Cherbakovsky, Liron; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the cosolubilization of 2nd, 3rd, and 4th generations of polypropyleneimine (PPI: PPI-G2, -G3, and -G4) dendrimers with sodium diclofenac (Na-DFC) into reverse gyroid cubic (Q(G)) liquid crystals is reported. Structural properties and interactions of PPI dendrimers with and without the drug were studied using small-angle X-ray scattering, attenuated total reflected Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. Incorporation of PPI-G2 (without Na-DFC) into Q(G) mesophase led to a decrease of 78Å in the lattice parameter. Solubilization of higher PPI generations, G3 and G4, led to increases in the lattice parameter to 57Å and 64Å, respectively. At 25wt%, each of the dendrimers caused a phase transition Q(G)→reverse hexagonal (HII). According to ATR-FTIR and DSC, the large lattice parameter values of G3 and G4 (relative to G2) embedment were assigned to their interactions with the carboxyl groups of GMO at the interface in comparison to the strong interaction of PPI-G2 with the water. Cosolubilization of Na-DFC with PPI-G2 revealed enlargement of the lattice parameter (of the new HII mesophase), while in the case of G3 and G4 systems no significant influence was seen with Na-DFC. The release of Na-DFC from Q(G) and HII systems was followed by UV-vis spectroscopy and revealed generation-dependence on drug release. As dendrimer generation increased, the cumulative drug release decreased. PMID:25016542

  3. X-ray characterization of mesophases of human telomeric G-quadruplexes and other DNA analogues

    PubMed Central

    Yasar, Selcuk; Schimelman, Jacob B.; Aksoyoglu, M. Alphan; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; French, Roger H.; Parsegian, V. Adrian; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Observed in the folds of guanine-rich oligonucleotides, non-canonical G-quadruplex structures are based on G-quartets formed by hydrogen bonding and cation-coordination of guanosines. In dilute 5′-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) solutions, G-quartets form by the self-assembly of four GMP nucleotides. We use x-ray diffraction to characterize the columnar liquid-crystalline mesophases in concentrated solutions of various model G-quadruplexes. We then probe the transitions between mesophases by varying the PEG solution osmotic pressure, thus mimicking in vivo molecular crowding conditions. Using the GMP-quadruplex, built by the stacking of G-quartets with no covalent linking between them, as the baseline, we report the liquid-crystalline phase behaviors of two other related G-quadruplexes: (i) the intramolecular parallel-stranded G-quadruplex formed by the 22-mer four-repeat human telomeric sequence AG3(TTAG3)3 and (ii) the intermolecular parallel-stranded G-quadruplex formed by the TG4T oligonucleotides. Finally, we compare the mesophases of the G-quadruplexes, under PEG-induced crowding conditions, with the corresponding mesophases of the canonical duplex and triplex DNA analogues. PMID:27249961

  4. X-ray characterization of mesophases of human telomeric G-quadruplexes and other DNA analogues

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yasar, Selcuk; Schimelman, Jacob B.; Aksoyoglu, M. Alphan; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; French, Roger H.; Parsegian, V. Adrian; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-06-02

    We report that observed in the folds of guanine-rich oligonucleotides, non-canonical G-quadruplex structures are based on G-quartets formed by hydrogen bonding and cation-coordination of guanosines. In dilute 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) solutions, G-quartets form by the self-assembly of four GMP nucleotides. We use x-ray diffraction to characterize the columnar liquid-crystalline mesophases in concentrated solutions of various model G-quadruplexes. We then probe the transitions between mesophases by varying the PEG solution osmotic pressure, thus mimicking in vivo molecular crowding conditions. Using the GMP-quadruplex, built by the stacking of G-quartets with no covalent linking between them, as the baseline, we report the liquid-crystallinemore » phase behaviors of two other related G-quadruplexes: (i) the intramolecular parallel-stranded G-quadruplex formed by the 22-mer four-repeat human telomeric sequence AG3 (TTAG3)3 and (ii) the intermolecular parallel-stranded G-quadruplex formed by the TG(4)T oligonucleotides. Finally, we compare the mesophases of the G-quadruplexes, under PEG-induced crowding conditions, with the corresponding mesophases of the canonical duplex and triplex DNA analogues.« less

  5. X-ray characterization of mesophases of human telomeric G-quadruplexes and other DNA analogues.

    PubMed

    Yasar, Selcuk; Schimelman, Jacob B; Aksoyoglu, M Alphan; Steinmetz, Nicole F; French, Roger H; Parsegian, V Adrian; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Observed in the folds of guanine-rich oligonucleotides, non-canonical G-quadruplex structures are based on G-quartets formed by hydrogen bonding and cation-coordination of guanosines. In dilute 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) solutions, G-quartets form by the self-assembly of four GMP nucleotides. We use x-ray diffraction to characterize the columnar liquid-crystalline mesophases in concentrated solutions of various model G-quadruplexes. We then probe the transitions between mesophases by varying the PEG solution osmotic pressure, thus mimicking in vivo molecular crowding conditions. Using the GMP-quadruplex, built by the stacking of G-quartets with no covalent linking between them, as the baseline, we report the liquid-crystalline phase behaviors of two other related G-quadruplexes: (i) the intramolecular parallel-stranded G-quadruplex formed by the 22-mer four-repeat human telomeric sequence AG3(TTAG3)3 and (ii) the intermolecular parallel-stranded G-quadruplex formed by the TG4T oligonucleotides. Finally, we compare the mesophases of the G-quadruplexes, under PEG-induced crowding conditions, with the corresponding mesophases of the canonical duplex and triplex DNA analogues. PMID:27249961

  6. X-ray characterization of mesophases of human telomeric G-quadruplexes and other DNA analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasar, Selcuk; Schimelman, Jacob B.; Aksoyoglu, M. Alphan; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; French, Roger H.; Parsegian, V. Adrian; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-06-01

    Observed in the folds of guanine-rich oligonucleotides, non-canonical G-quadruplex structures are based on G-quartets formed by hydrogen bonding and cation-coordination of guanosines. In dilute 5‧-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) solutions, G-quartets form by the self-assembly of four GMP nucleotides. We use x-ray diffraction to characterize the columnar liquid-crystalline mesophases in concentrated solutions of various model G-quadruplexes. We then probe the transitions between mesophases by varying the PEG solution osmotic pressure, thus mimicking in vivo molecular crowding conditions. Using the GMP-quadruplex, built by the stacking of G-quartets with no covalent linking between them, as the baseline, we report the liquid-crystalline phase behaviors of two other related G-quadruplexes: (i) the intramolecular parallel-stranded G-quadruplex formed by the 22-mer four-repeat human telomeric sequence AG3(TTAG3)3 and (ii) the intermolecular parallel-stranded G-quadruplex formed by the TG4T oligonucleotides. Finally, we compare the mesophases of the G-quadruplexes, under PEG-induced crowding conditions, with the corresponding mesophases of the canonical duplex and triplex DNA analogues.

  7. Changes in the microstructure and characteristics of carbon/carbon composites with mesophase mesocarbon microbeads added during graphitization

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, H.L.; Ko, T.H.; Ku, W.S.

    2005-12-05

    Carbon/carbon (C/C) composites were prepared from oxidative PAN fiber felts, a resol-type phenolic resin, and mesophase pitch derived from coal tar. In this study, the effects on mesocarbon microbeads (MCMBs), flexural strength, flexural moduli, electric conductivity, and thermal conductivity of C/C composites with a mesophase content ranging from 0 to 30 wt % were examined during pyrolysis. The results show that the C/C composite with the addition of 10-30 wt % mesophase had a higher density, greater stacking size, and higher preferred orientation than the C/C composites without any mesophase during heat treatment. These composites also exhibited an improvement in flexural strength from 19.7 to 30.3%. The flexural moduli of these composites with mesophase added increased by 15.1 to 31.3% compared to that with no mesophase added. These composites also showed improved electric conductivity, from 15.1 to 43.7%, and thermal conductivity, from 12 to 31.3%.

  8. Polynuclear Silver(I) Triazole Complexes: Ion Conduction and Nanowire Formation in the Mesophase.

    PubMed

    Su, Padi Y S; Hsu, S J; Tseng, Jing C W; Hsu, Hsiu-Fu; Wang, Wen-Jwu; Lin, Ivan J B

    2016-01-01

    Examples of polynuclear metallomesogens are few. Herein,1,2,4-triazole ligands were used to prepare mono- and polynuclear silver(I) triazole metallomesogens. Besides showing an SmA phase in the mesophase, two interesting properties were observed. First, higher ion conductivity is always found for the polynuclear complexes than for the mononuclear complexes with the same anion, an observation contrary to the knowledge that migration of a monomeric cation should be faster than that of a polymeric cation. Second, thermolysis of the polynuclear silver(I) triazole complexes in the assembled mesophase yielded Ag nanowires, in an excellent demonstration of the assembled nature of the polynuclear silver(I) ions in the thermolysis process. PMID:26602494

  9. Mesophase formation in a system of top-shaped hard molecules: Density functional theory and Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de las Heras, Daniel; Varga, Szabolcs; Vesely, Franz J.

    2011-06-01

    We present the phase diagram of a system of mesogenic top-shaped molecules based on the Parsons-Lee density functional theory and Monte Carlo simulation. The molecules are modeled as a hard spherocylinder with a hard sphere embedded in its center. The stability of five different phases is studied, namely, isotropic, nematic, smectic A, smectic C, and columnar phases. The positionally ordered phases are investigated only for the case of parallel alignment. It is found that the central spherical unit destabilizes the nematic with respect to the isotropic phase, while increasing the length of the cylinder has the opposite effect. Also, the central hard sphere has a strong destabilizing effect on the smectic A phase, due the inefficient packing of the molecules into layers. For large hard sphere units the smectic A phase is completely replaced by a smectic C structure. The columnar phase is first stabilized with increasing diameter of the central unit, but for very large hard sphere units it becomes less stable again. The density functional results are in good agreement with the simulations.

  10. A macroscopic H+ and Cl- ions pump via reconstitution of EcClC membrane proteins in lipidic cubic mesophases.

    PubMed

    Speziale, Chiara; Salvati Manni, Livia; Manatschal, Cristina; Landau, Ehud M; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-07-01

    Functional reconstitution of membrane proteins within lipid bilayers is crucial for understanding their biological function in living cells. While this strategy has been extensively used with liposomes, reconstitution of membrane proteins in lipidic cubic mesophases presents significant challenges related to the structural complexity of the lipid bilayer, organized on saddle-like minimal surfaces. Although reconstitution of membrane proteins in lipidic cubic mesophases plays a prominent role in membrane protein crystallization, nanotechnology, controlled drug delivery, and pathology of diseased cells, little is known about the molecular mechanism of protein reconstitution and about how transport properties of the doped mesophase mirror the original molecular gating features of the reconstituted membrane proteins. In this work we design a general strategy to demonstrate correct functional reconstitution of active and selective membrane protein transporters in lipidic mesophases, exemplified by the bacterial ClC exchanger from Escherichia coli (EcClC) as a model ion transporter. We show that its correct reconstitution in the lipidic matrix can be used to generate macroscopic proton and chloride pumps capable of selectively transporting charges over the length scale of centimeters. By further exploiting the coupled chloride/proton exchange of this membrane protein and by combining parallel or antiparallel chloride and proton gradients, we show that the doped mesophase can operate as a charge separation device relying only on the reconstituted EcClC protein and an external bias potential. These results may thus also pave the way to possible applications in supercapacitors, ion batteries, and molecular pumps. PMID:27313210

  11. Controlling anisotropic drug diffusion in lipid-Fe3O4 nanoparticle hybrid mesophases by magnetic alignment.

    PubMed

    Vallooran, Jijo J; Negrini, Renata; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-01-29

    We present a new strategy to control the anisotropic diffusion of hydrophilic drugs in lyotropic liquid crystals via the dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles in the mesophase, followed by reorientation of the mesophase domains via an external magnetic field. We select a lipid reverse hexagonal phase doped with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and glucose and caffeine as model hybrid mesophase and hydrophilic drugs, respectively. Upon cooling through the disorder-order phase transition of the hexagonal phase and under exposure to an external moderate magnetic field (1.1 T), both the nanoparticles and the hexagonal domains align with their columnar axes along the field direction. As a result, the water nanochannels of the inverted hexagonal domains also align parallel to the field direction, leading to a drug diffusion coefficient parallel to the field direction much larger than what was measured perpendicularly: in the case of glucose, for example, this difference in diffusion coefficients approaches 1 order of magnitude. Drug diffusion of the unaligned reverse hexagonal phase, which consists of randomly distributed domains, shows values in between the parallel and transversal diffusion values. This study shows that modifying the overall alignment of anisotropic mesophases via moderate external fields is a valuable means to control the corresponding transport tensor of the mesophase and demonstrates that the orientation of the domains plays an important role in the diffusion process of foreign hydrophilic molecules. PMID:23302008

  12. Development of Mesophasic Microreservoir-Based Transdermal Drug Delivery System of Propranolol

    PubMed Central

    Omray, L. K.; Kohli, S.; Khopade, A. J.; Patil, S.; Gajbhiye, Asmita; Agrawal, G. P.

    2008-01-01

    The mesophasic microreservoir comprises lyotrophic liquid crystals. The liquid crystals were prepared of Brij-35, cetosteryl alcohol and propranolol and evaluated for parameters viz. anisotropy, size and size distribution and drug entrapment efficiency. Subsequent to this liquid crystals based transdermal drug delivery system (TDS) was prepared by incorporating liquid crystals in previously prepared matrix based transdermal patch and evaluated for stability studies like temperature, humidity and aging. The system was also studied for tensile strength, moisture content, water vapor transmission, drug content, anisotropy and In vitro drug release studies. PMID:21394252

  13. Symmetry Breaking of In-Plane Order in Confined Copolymer Mesophases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, G. E.; Cochran, E. W.; Katsov, K.; Fredrickson, G. H.; Kramer, E. J.; Li, X.; Wang, J.

    2007-04-01

    Packing of spherical-domain block copolymer mesophases confined to a thin film is investigated as a function of the number of layers n. We find an abrupt transition from hexagonal to orthorhombic in-plane ordering of domains when n is increased from 4 to 5. As n increases further (up to 23 in this study), the symmetry of the orthorhombic phase asymptotically approaches that of the body-centered cubic (110) plane. These results are interpreted in terms of the energetics of competing packings in the bulk and at the film interfaces. Detailed structural and thermodynamic properties are obtained with self-consistent field theory.

  14. Membrane Protein Structure Determination Using Crystallography and Lipidic Mesophases - Recent Advances and Successes

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Martin; Li, Dianfan; Dukkipati, Abhiram

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of the β2-adrenergic receptor in complex with an agonist and its cognate G protein has just recently been solved. It is now possible to explore in molecular detail the means by which this paradigmatic transmembrane receptor binds agonist, communicates the impulse or signalling event across the membrane and sets in motion a series of G protein-directed intracellular responses. The structure was determined using crystals of the ternary complex grown in a rationally designed lipidic mesophase by the so-called in meso method. The method is proving to be particularly useful in the G protein-coupled receptor field where the structures of thirteen distinct receptor types have been solved in the past five years. In addition to receptors, the method has proven useful with a wide variety of integral membrane protein classes that include bacterial and eukaryotic rhodopsins, a light harvesting complex II (LHII), photosynthetic reaction centers, cytochrome oxidases, β-barrels, an exchanger, and an integral membrane peptide. This attests to the versatility and range of the method and supports the view that the in meso method should be included in the arsenal of the serious membrane structural biologist. For this to happen however, the reluctance in adopting it attributable, in part, to the anticipated difficulties associated with handling the sticky, viscous cubic mesophase in which crystals grow must be overcome. Harvesting and collecting diffraction data with the mesophase-grown crystals is also viewed with some trepidation. It is acknowledged that there are challenges associated with the method. Over the years, we have endeavored to establish how the method works at a molecular level and to make it user-friendly. To these ends, tools for handling the mesophase in the pico- to nano-liter volume range have been developed for highly efficient crystallization screening in manual and robotic modes. Methods have been implemented for evaluating the functional

  15. A Monte Carlo study of the mesophases formed by polar bent-shaped molecules.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Silvia; Berardi, Roberto; Steltzer, Joachim; Zannoni, Claudio

    2006-03-28

    Liquid crystal phases formed by bent-shaped (or "banana") molecules are currently of great interest. Here we investigate by Monte Carlo computer simulations the phases formed by rigid banana molecules modeled combining three Gay-Berne sites and containing either one central or two lateral and transversal dipoles. We show that changing the dipole position and orientation has a profound effect on the mesophase stability and molecular organization. In particular, we find a uniaxial nematic phase only for off-center dipolar models and tilted phases only for the one with terminal dipoles. PMID:16599725

  16. A Monte Carlo study of the mesophases formed by polar bent-shaped molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, Silvia; Berardi, Roberto; Steltzer, Joachim; Zannoni, Claudio

    2006-03-01

    Liquid crystal phases formed by bent-shaped (or "banana") molecules are currently of great interest. Here we investigate by Monte Carlo computer simulations the phases formed by rigid banana molecules modeled combining three Gay-Berne sites and containing either one central or two lateral and transversal dipoles. We show that changing the dipole position and orientation has a profound effect on the mesophase stability and molecular organization. In particular, we find a uniaxial nematic phase only for off-center dipolar models and tilted phases only for the one with terminal dipoles.

  17. Three dielectric constants and orientation order parameters in nematic mesophases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hyung Guen; Jeong, Seung Yeon; Kumar, Satyendra; Park, Min Sang; Park, Jung Ok; Srinivasarao, M.; Shin, Sung Tae

    2011-03-01

    Temperature dependence of the three components ɛ1 , ɛ2 , and ɛ3 of dielectric constant and orientation order parameters in the nematic phase of mesogens with rod, banana, and zero-order dendritic shape were measured using the in-plane and vertical switching geometries, and micro-Raman technique. Results on the well-known uniaxial (Nu) nematogens, E7 and 5CB, revealed two components ɛ1 = ~ɛ| | and ɛ2 = ~ɛ3 = ~ɛ⊥ , as expected. The three dielectric constants were different for two azo substituted (A131 and A103) and an oxadiazole based (ODBP-Ph-C12) bent core mesogens, and a Ge core tetrapode. In some cases, two of the components became the same indicating a loss of biaxiality at temperatures coinciding with the previously reported Nu to biaxial nematic transition. This interpretation is substantiated by micro-Raman measurements of the uniaxial and biaxial nematic order parameters. Supported by the US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences grant ER46572 and by Samsung Electronics Corporation.

  18. On the use of mesophase pitch for the preparation of hierarchical porous carbon monoliths by nanocasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelhelm, Philipp; Cabrera, Karin; Smarsly, Bernd M.

    2012-02-01

    A detailed study is given on the synthesis of a hierarchical porous carbon, possessing both meso- and macropores, using a mesophase pitch (MP) as the carbon precursor. This carbon material is prepared by the nanocasting approach involving the replication of a porous silica monolith (hard templating). While this carbon material has already been tested in energy storage applications, various detailed aspects of its formation and structure are addressed in this study. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Hg porosimetry and N2 physisorption are used to characterize the morphology and porosity of the carbon replica. A novel approach for the detailed analysis of wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) from non-graphitic carbons is applied to quantitatively compare the graphene microstructures of carbons prepared using MP and furfuryl alcohol (FA). This WAXS analysis underlines the importance of the carbon precursor in the synthesis of templated porous carbon materials via the nanocasting route. Our study demonstrates that a mesophase pitch is a superior precursor whenever a high-purity, low-micropore-content and well-developed graphene structure is desired.

  19. Modulation of physical properties of reverse hexagonal mesophases: a dielectric spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Mishraki, Tehila; Ben Ishai, Paul; Babukh, Dmitry; Aserin, Abraham; Feldman, Yuri; Garti, Nissim

    2013-04-15

    The structural, dynamic, and kinetic aspects of the HII systems based on glycerol monooleate (GMO), phosphatidylcholine (PC), triacylglycerol (TAG), and water were investigated by dielectric spectroscopy in a frequency range of 10(-2)-10(6) Hz, and a temperature range of 290-320 K. Three distinct processes as well as a temperature-activated dc conductivity were detected and examined. These were assigned to the reorientation of the GMO polar heads, the tangential movement of counterions at the interface, the transport of TAGs through the lipids tails, and the ion mobility within the water cylinders. Upon addition of PC, the critical temperature (T0) of the dehydration of the GMO headgroups increased. The optimal concentration found for structural stabilization of the HII mesophase was 10 wt% PC, since it imparted the strongest bonding at the interfacial layer and increased the association between the lipid tails. Within the HII cluster, TAG percolated and shifted between the hexagonal rods themselves. The present study demonstrated the benefit of controlling the critical temperature of the HII mesophase partial dehydration and softening, as well as the percolation of TAGs. These factors influence the diffusion mode of embedded drugs in the physiological temperature range. PMID:23415506

  20. The effect of cation structure on the mesophase architecture of self-assembled and polymerized imidazolium-based ionic liquids.

    SciTech Connect

    Batra, D.; Seifert, S.; Firestone, M. A.; Materials Science Division

    2007-01-01

    The binary phase behavior of a series of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) has been investigated. In particular, the effect of two structural modifications of the imidazolium cation, alkyl chain length, and the introduction of a polymerizable acryloyl group at the alkyl chain terminus, has been studied using small angle X-ray scattering. Upon increasing water content, the non-polymerizable IL, 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, adopts mesophase structures of predominately two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal symmetry, including structures intermediate in character between lamellae and 2D hexagonal micelles. Introduction of a photopolymerizable acryloyl functional group to form 1-(10-(acryloyloxy)decyl)-3-methylimidazolium chloride produces a rod-coil IL cation that yields self-assembled mesophases in which the formation of tetragonal morphologies is favored. Covalent linking of the IL cations by UV-induced polymerization converts the lyotropic mesophase into three-dimensional biocontinuous chemical gels. Reducing the alkyl chain length, as in the polymerizable IL cation 1-(8-(acryloyloxy)octyl)-3-methylimidazolium chloride, severely reduces the self-assembled mesophase order, and triggers the formation of only weakly ordered one-dimensional lamellar structures.

  1. The curvature elastic-energy function of the lipid-water cubic mesophase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hesson; Caffrey, Martin

    1994-03-01

    CELL and lipid membranes are able to bend, as manifested during membrane fusion and the formation of non-lamellar lyotropic mesopbases in water. But there is an energy cost to bending of lipid layers, called the curvature elastic energy. Although the functional form of this energy is known1, a complete quantitative knowledge of the curvature elastic energy, which is central to predicting the relative stability of the large number of phases that lipid membranes can adopt, has been lacking. Here we use X-ray synchrotron diffraction measurements of the variation of lattice parameter with pressure and temperature for the periodic Ia3d (Q230) cubic phase of hydrated monoolein to calculate the complete curvature elastic-energy function for the lipid cubic mesophase. This allows us to predict the stabilities of different cubic and lamellar phases for this system as a function of composition.

  2. Liquid-crystalline octopus dendrimers: block molecules with unusual mesophase morphologies.

    PubMed

    Gehringer, Lionel; Bourgogne, Cyril; Guillon, Daniel; Donnio, Bertrand

    2004-03-31

    The synthesis and the mesomorphic properties of several new main-chain liquid-crystalline dendrimers, thereafter designated as octopus dendrimers in accordance with their eight sidearms, are reported. In these dendritic systems, the arborescence is ensured by anisotropic segments, acting as branching cells with a double multiplicity, which are incorporated at every node of the dendritic architecture. In such a way, these compounds radically differ from the classical end-functionalized liquid-crystalline dendrimers, the most commonly reported systems. Following our previous report on purely homolithic systems, that is, the building blocks constituting the dendritic matrix are all identical, several heterolithic systems made of different anisotropic blocks have been prepared. The dendritic branches and corresponding dendrimers were synthesized using a modular construction. Polarized optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies showed that all of these new octopus dendrimers exhibit either smectic-like or columnar phases with novel morphologies, the nature of the mesophases depending on the number of terminal chains attached to the peripheral groups. The mesomorphism of these heterolithic dendrimers is discussed in terms of their intrinsic architecture and compared to the analogous homolithic octopus systems. Models for the molecular organizations within both the smectic and the columnar phases are proposed on the basis of small Bragg angle X-ray diffraction studies and are supported by molecular modelizations. Moreover, this study showed that the mesophase stability is very sensitive to the nature and to the mutual arrangement (the spatial location) of the mesogenic segments within the dendritic matrix, illustrating the intimate relationships existing between the mesomorphic properties and the molecular architecture of these dendrimers. PMID:15038740

  3. Experimental study and modeling of swelling and bubble growth in carbon nanofiber filled mesophase pitch during carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calebrese, Christopher

    Graphite and all carbon bipolar plates show corrosion resistance in fuel cells and provide good electrical conductivity. These materials typically need to be individually machined, a time consuming and costly process. Mesophase pitch is used to manufacture carbon fibers and carbon-carbon composites. This material provides a good starting point for the production of a moldable, all carbon bipolar plate. However, processing of mesophase pitch to produce all carbon materials requires a time intensive oxidation step to prevent swelling during carbonization. In this work, carbon nanofibers were used to reduce swelling in mesophase pitch. It was found that the increase in viscosity with the addition of carbon nanofibers was responsible for the reduction in swelling. The influence of the filler became apparent above the percolation threshold. At loadings below the percolation threshold, the swelling of the mesophase pitch was not reduced after carbonization. The swelling of the mesophase pitch at a given carbon nanofiber loading was also dependent on the length of the carbon nanofibers. Longer carbon nanofibers led to greater increases in the viscosity of the melt and thus led to greater reduction in swelling. The final carbon product was evaluated for use as a low temperature fuel cell bipolar plate material. Constraining the mesophase pitch during carbonization led to a final product with strength and electrical conductivity comparable to current composite bipolar plate materials. The addition of micron size chopped glass fibers with a softening point near 850°C and carbon nanofibers led to a final product with air permeability less than that of graphite. A spherically symmetric, single bubble growth model was also developed. The model included temperature dependence, liquid to bubble mass transfer and reactions in the system. Results from simulations showed that that the increase in viscosity due to the addition of carbon nanofibers slows the growth of bubbles, but

  4. Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly of Hybrid Bridged Silsesquioxane Film and Particulate Mesophases with Integral Organic Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    LU,YUNFENG; FAN,HONGYOU; DOKE,NILESH; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; ASSINK,ROGER A.; LAVAN,DAVID A.; BRINKER,C. JEFFREY

    2000-06-12

    Since the discovery of surfactant-templated silica mesophases, the development of organic modification schemes to impart functionality to the pore surfaces has received much attention. Most recently, using the general class of compounds referred to as bridged silsesquioxanes (RO){sub 3}Si-R{prime}-Si(OR){sub 3} (Scheme 1), three research groups have reported the formation of a new class of poly(bridgedsilsesquioxane) mesophases BSQMs with integral organic functionality. In contrast to previous hybrid mesophases where organic ligands or molecules are situated on pore surfaces, this class of materials necessarily incorporates the organic constituents into the framework as molecularly dispersed bridging ligands. Although it is anticipated that this new mesostructural organization should result in synergistic properties derived from the molecular scale mixing of the inorganic and organic components, few properties of BSQMs have been measured. In addition samples prepared to date have been in the form of granular precipitates, precluding their use in applications like membranes, fluidics, and low k dielectric films needed for all foreseeable future generations of microelectronics.

  5. Membrane Protein Crystallization in Lipidic Mesophases. Hosting Lipid Effects on the Crystallization and Structure of a Transmembrane Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Hfer, Nicole; Aragao, David; Lyons, Joseph A.; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-09-28

    Gramicidin is an apolar pentadecapeptide antibiotic consisting of alternating d- and l-amino acids. It functions, in part, by creating pores in membranes of susceptible cells rendering them leaky to monovalent cations. The peptide should be able to traverse the host membrane either as a double-stranded, intertwined double helix (DSDH) or as a head-to-head single-stranded helix (HHSH). Current structure models are based on macromolecular X-ray crystallography (MX) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, the HHSH form has only been observed by NMR. The shape and size of the different gramicidin conformations differ. We speculated therefore that reconstituting it into a lipidic mesophase with bilayers of different microstructures would preferentially stabilize one form over the other. By using such mesophases for in meso crystallogenesis, the expectation was that at least one would generate crystals of gramicidin in the HHSH form for structure determination by MX. This was tested using commercial and in-house synthesized lipids that support in meso crystallogenesis. Lipid acyl chain lengths were varied from 14 to 18 carbons to provide mesophases with a range of bilayer thicknesses. Unexpectedly, all lipids produced high-quality, structure-grade crystals with gramicidin only in the DSDH conformation.

  6. Crystalline-like molecularly ordered mesoporous aluminosilicates derived from aluminosilica-surfactant mesophases via benign template removal.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yongde; Mokaya, Robert

    2006-05-11

    We report the preparation of mesoporous aluminosilicate materials that exhibit molecular-scale ordering in their pore wall framework. The materials were derived from mesoporous aluminosilica-surfactant mesophases via benign template removal methods, which allowed the retention of molecular ordering in surfactant-free materials. The molecularly ordered aluminosilica-surfactant mesophases were obtained from hydrothermal crystallization of cetyltrimethylammonium hydroxide/Al,Si/H2O systems at 135 degrees C for 12 days. Benign template removal via H2O2-mediated oxidation of the surfactant at room temperature was found to be the most effective method in generating surfactant-free materials with molecular ordering, high textural properties (depending on Al content), and high acidity. The Al in the resulting aluminosilicates was entirely incorporated in framework (tetrahedrally coordinated) sites. Template extraction in acidified ethanol also generated molecularly ordered materials but compromised the Al content and acidity. Template removal via conventional calcination generated porous materials with high textural properties but which exhibited only limited molecular ordering and had relatively low acidity and significant amounts of nonframework Al. This work demonstrates that molecular ordering in mesoporous silicate-surfactant mesophases is due to crystallographic ordering within inorganic frameworks rather than the arrangement/packing of surfactant molecules. PMID:16671724

  7. Unit cell structure of water-filled monoolein into inverted hexagonal (H(II)) mesophase modeled by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Vesselin L; Ivanova, Anela N; Madjarova, Galia K; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2014-05-22

    The study investigates the unit cell structure of inverted hexagonal (H(II)) mesophase composed of monoolein (1-monoolein, GMO) and water using atomistic molecular dynamics methods without imposing any restraints on lipid and water molecules. Statistically meaningful and very contrast images of the radial mass density distribution, scrutinizing also the separate components water, monoolein, the polar headgroups of the lipids, the double bond, and the termini of the hydrocarbon chain (the tail), are obtained. The lipid/water interface structure is analyzed based on the obtained water density distribution, on the estimated number of hydrogen bonds per monoolein headgroup, and on the headgroup-water radial distribution functions. The headgroup mass density distribution demonstrates hexagonal shape of the monoolein/water interface that is well-defined at higher water/monoolein ratios. Water interacts with the headgroups by forming a three-layer diffusive mass density distribution, and each layer's shape is close to hexagonal, which is an indication of long-range structural interactions. It is found that the monoolein headgroups form a constant number of hydrogen bonds leaving an excessive amount of water molecules outside the first lipid coordination sphere. Furthermore, the quantity of water at the monoolein/water interface increases steadily upon extension of the unit cell, so the interface should have a very dynamic structure. Investigation of the hydrocarbon residues reveals high compression and well-expressed structuring of the tails. The tails form a very compressed and constrained structure of defined layers across the unit cell with properties corresponding to a more densely packed nonpolar liquid (oil). Due to the hexagonal shape the 2D packing frustration is constant and does not depend on the water content. All reported structural features are based on averaging of the atomic coordinates over the time-length of the simulation trajectories. That kind of

  8. Molecular dynamics approach to water structure of HII mesophase of monoolein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, Vesselin; Ivanova, Anela; Madjarova, Galia; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2012-02-01

    The goal of the present work is to study theoretically the structure of water inside the water cylinder of the inverse hexagonal mesophase (HII) of glyceryl monooleate (monoolein, GMO), using the method of molecular dynamics. To simplify the computational model, a fixed structure of the GMO tube is maintained. The non-standard cylindrical geometry of the system required the development and application of a novel method for obtaining the starting distribution of water molecules. A predictor-corrector schema is employed for generation of the initial density of water. Molecular dynamics calculations are performed at constant volume and temperature (NVT ensemble) with 1D periodic boundary conditions applied. During the simulations the lipid structure is kept fixed, while the dynamics of water is unrestrained. Distribution of hydrogen bonds and density as well as radial distribution of water molecules across the water cylinder show the presence of water structure deep in the cylinder (about 6 Å below the GMO heads). The obtained results may help understanding the role of water structure in the processes of insertion of external molecules inside the GMO/water system. The present work has a semi-quantitative character and it should be considered as the initial stage of more comprehensive future theoretical studies.

  9. Surfactant removal and silica condensation during the photochemical calcination of thin film silica mesophases.

    PubMed

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M; Amweg, Meri L; Ruiz, Julia D; Ecke, Laurel E; Shreve, Andrew P; Parikh, Atul N

    2005-08-01

    The evolution of photochemical surfactant removal and silica condensation from organically templated thin film silica nanocomposites with mesoscopic ordering has been probed using a combined application of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and single wavelength ellipsometry. Thin films of silica nanocomposites were prepared by a previously reported evaporation-induced self-assembly process. Specifically, oxidized silicon and gold substrates were withdrawn at 25 mm/min from a subcritical micelle concentration solution containing an ethylene oxide surfactant as a structure-directing agent and tetraethyl orthosilicate as a silica precursor. Real-time grazing incidence difference FT-IR spectra of the nanocomposite films on gold taken during exposure to short-wavelength ultraviolet light (184-257 nm) show that surfactant removal and silica condensation occur gradually and concomitantly. Surfactant removal and silica reconstructions were found to be nearly complete after 90 min of exposure. Further, a transient feature was observed in the FT-IR spectra around 1713 cm(-1) during the UV exposure process and was assigned to a carbonyl (C=O) stretching mode absorption, reflecting the transient formation of a partially oxidized surfactant intermediate. From these data we propose a stepwise model for surfactant removal from the nanocomposite films. Ellipsometrically determined index of refraction values collected as a function of UV exposure are also shown to support such a stepwise mechanism of surfactant removal from the ordered nanocomposite silica thin film mesophases studied here. PMID:16852834

  10. Molecular dynamics approach to water structure of H(II) mesophase of monoolein.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Vesselin; Ivanova, Anela; Madjarova, Galia; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2012-02-21

    The goal of the present work is to study theoretically the structure of water inside the water cylinder of the inverse hexagonal mesophase (H(II)) of glyceryl monooleate (monoolein, GMO), using the method of molecular dynamics. To simplify the computational model, a fixed structure of the GMO tube is maintained. The non-standard cylindrical geometry of the system required the development and application of a novel method for obtaining the starting distribution of water molecules. A predictor-corrector schema is employed for generation of the initial density of water. Molecular dynamics calculations are performed at constant volume and temperature (NVT ensemble) with 1D periodic boundary conditions applied. During the simulations the lipid structure is kept fixed, while the dynamics of water is unrestrained. Distribution of hydrogen bonds and density as well as radial distribution of water molecules across the water cylinder show the presence of water structure deep in the cylinder (about 6 Å below the GMO heads). The obtained results may help understanding the role of water structure in the processes of insertion of external molecules inside the GMO∕water system. The present work has a semi-quantitative character and it should be considered as the initial stage of more comprehensive future theoretical studies. PMID:22360250

  11. Ferrielectricity in smectic-C* dechiralization-line lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettout, B.; Logbo, H. Pasco; Gagou, Y.; Vasseur, H.; Gisse, P.

    2016-04-01

    Recent experiments probing a new ferroelectric liquid crystal (CLF08) confined in cells with planar alignment have shown dielectric and optic anomalies suggesting the onset of ferrielectric ordering within the surface lattice of dechiralization lines. We present a phenomenological theory describing the corresponding phase transition sequence Sm A →Sm C*→Ferri . Phase diagrams and thermodynamic, dielectric, and optic properties are worked out and compared with experiments. The anomalies are related to the predicted tristability of the experimental cells under applied electric field. The order parameters of Landau theory are reinterpreted in terms of line positions, allowing description of the entrance and exit line behavior, and yielding the prediction and identification of new limit phases within a nonconventional Landau approach.

  12. Structural modeling of carbonaceous mesophase amphotropic mixtures under uniaxial extensional flow.

    PubMed

    Golmohammadi, Mojdeh; Rey, Alejandro D

    2010-07-21

    The extended Maier-Saupe model for binary mixtures of model carbonaceous mesophases (uniaxial discotic nematogens) under externally imposed flow, formulated in previous studies [M. Golmohammadi and A. D. Rey, Liquid Crystals 36, 75 (2009); M. Golmohammadi and A. D. Rey, Entropy 10, 183 (2008)], is used to characterize the effect of uniaxial extensional flow and concentration on phase behavior and structure of these mesogenic blends. The generic thermorheological phase diagram of the single-phase binary mixture, given in terms of temperature (T) and Deborah (De) number, shows the existence of four T-De transition lines that define regions that correspond to the following quadrupolar tensor order parameter structures: (i) oblate (perpendicular, parallel), (ii) prolate (perpendicular, parallel), (iii) scalene O(perpendicular, parallel), and (iv) scalene P(perpendicular, parallel), where the symbols (perpendicular, parallel) indicate alignment of the tensor order ellipsoid with respect to the extension axis. It is found that with increasing T the dominant component of the mixture exhibits weak deviations from the well-known pure species response to uniaxial extensional flow (uniaxial perpendicular nematic-->biaxial nematic-->uniaxial parallel paranematic). In contrast, the slaved component shows a strong deviation from the pure species response. This deviation is dictated by the asymmetric viscoelastic coupling effects emanating from the dominant component. Changes in conformation (oblate <==> prolate) and orientation (perpendicular <==> parallel) are effected through changes in pairs of eigenvalues of the quadrupolar tensor order parameter. The complexity of the structural sensitivity to temperature and extensional flow is a reflection of the dual lyotropic/thermotropic nature (amphotropic nature) of the mixture and their cooperation/competition. The analysis demonstrates that the simple structures (biaxial nematic and uniaxial paranematic) observed in pure discotic

  13. Phase states and thermomorphologic, thermotropic, and magnetomorphologic properties of lyotropic mesophases: Sodium lauryl sulphate-water-1-decanol liquid-crystalline system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özden, Pınar; Nesrullajev, Arif; Oktik, Şener

    2010-12-01

    Phase states in sodium lauryl sulphate-water-1-decanol lyotropic liquid-crystalline system have been investigated for different temperature ranges. The dependence of triangle phase diagram types, phase boundaries, and sequence of lyotropic mesophases vs temperature has been found. The thermomorphologic, thermotropic, and magnetomorphologic properties of hexagonal E, lamellar D, nematic-calamitic NC , nematic-discotic ND , and biaxial nematic Nbx mesophases have been studied in detail. Dynamics of transformations of magnetically induced textures has been investigated. Peculiarities of typical and magnetically induced textures have been investigated in detail. Triangle phase diagrams of sodium lauryl sulphate-water-1-decanol lyotropic liquid-crystalline system for different temperatures and typical and magnetically induced textures of E, D, NC , ND , and Nbx mesophases are presented.

  14. John H. Dillon Medal Lecture: Magnetic Field Directed Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers and Surfactant Mesophases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuji, Chinedum

    2015-03-01

    Molecular self-assembly of block copolymers and small molecule surfactants gives rise to a rich phase behavior as a function of temperature, composition, and other variables. We consider the directed self-assembly of such soft mesophases using magnetic fields, principally through the use of in situ x-ray scattering studies. Field alignment is predicated on a sufficiently large product of magnetic anisotropy and grain size to produce magnetostatic interactions which are substantive relative to thermal forces. We examine the role of field strength on the phase behavior and alignment dynamics of a series of soft mesophases, outlining the possibility to readily create highly ordered functional materials over macroscopic length scales. We show that magnetic fields as large as 10 T have little discernable impact on the stability of block copolymer systems considered, with shifts in order-disorder transition temperatures of roughly 5 mK or smaller. Consequently, directed self-assembly in these systems proceeds by nucleation of randomly aligned grains which thereafter rotate into registry with the field. We highlight the tradeoff between decreasing mobility and increasing anisotropic field interaction that dictates alignment kinetics while transiting from a high temperature disordered state to an ordered system at lower temperatures. NSF support through DMR-0847534 is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Characterization of Lipid-Templated Silica and Hybrid Thin Film Mesophases by Grazing Incidence Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Dunphy, Darren R.; Alam, Todd M.; Tate, Michael P.; Hillhouse, Hugh W.; Smarsly, Bernd; Collord, Andrew D.; Carnes, Eric; Baca, Helen K.; Köhn, Ralf; Sprung, Michael; Wang, Jin; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The nanostructure of silica and hybrid thin film mesophases templated by phospholipids via an evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) process was investigated by grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Diacyl phosphatidylcholines with two tails of 6 or 8 carbons were found to template 2D hexagonal mesophases, with the removal of lipid from these lipid/silica films by thermal or UV/O3 processing resulting in a complete collapse of the pore volume. Monoacyl phosphatidylcholines with single tails of 10–14 carbons formed 3D micellular mesophases; the lipid was found to be extractable from these 3D materials, yielding a porous material. In contrast to pure lipid/silica thin film mesophases, films formed from the hybrid bridged silsesquioxane precursor bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane exhibited greater stability toward (both diacyl and monoacyl) lipid removal. Ellipsometric, FTIR, and NMR studies show that the presence of phospholipid suppresses siloxane network formation, while actually promoting condensation reactions in the hybrid material. 1D X-ray scattering and FTIR data were found to be consistent with strong interactions between lipid headgroups and the silica framework. PMID:19496546

  16. Design of Light-Triggered Lyotropic Liquid Crystal Mesophases and Their Application as Molecular Switches in "On Demand" Release.

    PubMed

    Aleandri, Simone; Speziale, Chiara; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Landau, Ehud M

    2015-06-30

    Here, we present the design and assembly of a new light-responsive functional lyotropic liquid crystal system using host-guest lipidic mesophases (LMPs). Light as an external stimulus has many advantages in comparison to other stimuli: it is milder than acids or bases, and variation of intensity and duration can provide a high level of pharmacological control. The LMPs are composed of monoolein (MO) and oleic acid (OA) as host lipids and a small amount of a judiciously synthesized lipid bearing an azobenzene photoactive unit as a guest. While preserving the structure and stability of the host lipidic aggregates, the guest lipids render them specific functionalities. Single-step and sequential light-triggered release and retention of the embedded dye molecules are demonstrated, thereby achieving exquisite temporal, spatial, and dosage control of the release, opening up the possibility of using such lipidic biomaterials as effective matrices in therapy, when a continuous release of active drugs might be toxic. PMID:26039728

  17. Analytical contribution of NAD 2D-NMR spectroscopy in polypeptide mesophases to the investigation of triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Lesot, Philippe; Serhan, Zeinab; Aroulanda, Christie; Billault, Isabelle

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we report and discuss on the use and limitations of the natural abundance deuterium two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy in polypeptide chiral and achiral aligning media in the studies of homogenous triglycerides at 14.1 T. As illustrative examples, two triglycerides with short and long alkyl chains were investigated: the 1,3-di(butanoyloxy)propan-2-yl butanoate or tributyrin (TB) and the 1,3-di(tetradecanoyloxy)propan-2-yl tetradecanoate or trimyristin (TM). If both flexible compounds are theoretically of C(s) symmetry on average, according to the Altmann's definition (Proc. Roy. Soc., 1967, A298, 184.), the analysis of spectral data in terms of enantiotopic and diastereotopic discriminations shows noticeable differences related to their orientational ordering behavior inside the mesophases. Although from NMR analysis viewpoint, TB behaves as a C(s) symmetry molecule as expected, the NMR results obtained for TM suggest a behavior that could be formally predicted for a C(3v) symmetry molecule on average. This conclusion was nicely supported by the comparison with the tri-n-propylorthoformate, a real C(3v) symmetry solute on average on the NMR timescale. This difference of effective orientational behavior could originate from the difference of size and shape between lateral and central alkyl chains of the solute molecule. PMID:23280656

  18. Exploring the in meso crystallization mechanism by characterizing the lipid mesophase microenvironment during the growth of single transmembrane α-helical peptide crystals.

    PubMed

    van 't Hag, Leonie; Knoblich, Konstantin; Seabrook, Shane A; Kirby, Nigel M; Mudie, Stephen T; Lau, Deborah; Li, Xu; Gras, Sally L; Mulet, Xavier; Call, Matthew E; Call, Melissa J; Drummond, Calum J; Conn, Charlotte E

    2016-07-28

    The proposed mechanism for in meso crystallization of transmembrane proteins suggests that a protein or peptide is initially uniformly dispersed in the lipid self-assembly cubic phase but that crystals grow from a local lamellar phase, which acts as a conduit between the crystal and the bulk cubic phase. However, there is very limited experimental evidence for this theory. We have developed protocols to investigate the lipid mesophase microenvironment during crystal growth using standard procedures readily available in crystallography laboratories. This technique was used to characterize the microenvironment during crystal growth of the DAP12-TM peptide using synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) with a micro-sized X-ray beam. Crystal growth was found to occur from the gyroid cubic mesophase. For one in four crystals, a highly oriented local lamellar phase was observed, providing supporting evidence for the proposed mechanism for in meso crystallization. A new observation of this study was that we can differentiate diffraction peaks from crystals grown in meso, from peaks originating from the surrounding lipid matrix, potentially opening up the possibility of high-throughput SAXS analysis of in meso grown crystals.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298442

  19. Facile synthesis of mesophase pitch/exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets nanocomposite and its application as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yishuang; Wang Chengyang; Chen Mingming; Shi Zhiqiang; Zheng Jiaming

    2010-09-15

    Mesophase pitch (MP)/exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) nanocomposite has been prepared by an efficient method with an initiation of graphite intercalation compounds (GIC). X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis techniques are used to characterize the samples. It is observed that GIC has exfoliated completely into GNPs during the formation of MP/GNPs nanocomposite and the GNPs are distributed uniformly in MP matrix, which represent a conductive path for a movement of electrons throughout the composites. Electrochemical tests demonstrate that the carbonized MP/GNPs nanocomposite displays higher capacity and better cycle performance in comparison with the pure carbonized MP. It is concluded that such a large improvement of electrochemical performance within the nanocomposite may in general be related to the enhanced electronic conductivity, which is achieved by good dispersion of GNPs within MP matrix and formation of a 3D network of GNPs. - Graphical abstract: Uniform mesophase pitch/exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets nanocomposite has been efficiently fabricated with an initiation of graphite intercalation compounds. The as-prepared composite electrode exhibited high electrochemical performance for Li-ion batteries.

  20. A Plug-Based Microfluidic System for Dispensing Lipidic Cubic Phase (LCP) Material Validated by Crystallizing Membrane Proteins in Lipidic Mesophases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Fu, Qiang; Kors, Christopher A.; Stewart, Lance; Nollert, Peter; Laible, Philip D.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a plug-based microfluidic system to dispense nanoliter-volume plugs of Lipidic Cubic Phase (LCP) material and subsequently merge the LCP plugs with aqueous plugs. This system was validated by crystallizing membrane proteins in lipidic mesophases, including LCP. This system allows for accurate dispensing of LCP material in nanoliter volumes, prevents inadvertent phase transitions that may occur due to dehydration by enclosing LCP in plugs, and is compatible with the traditional method of forming LCP material using a membrane protein sample, as shown by the successful crystallization of bacteriorhodopsin from Halobacterium salinarum. Conditions for the formation of LCP plugs were characterized and presented in a phase diagram. This system was also implemented using two different methods of introducing the membrane protein: 1) the traditional method of generating the LCP material using a membrane protein sample and 2) Post LCP-formation Incorporation (PLI), which involves making LCP material without protein, adding the membrane protein sample externally to the LCP material, and allowing the protein to diffuse into the LCP material or into other lipidic mesophases that may result from phase transitions. Crystals of bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Blastochloris viridis were obtained using PLI. The plug-based, LCP-assisted microfluidic system, combined with the PLI method for introducing membrane protein into LCP, should be useful for minimizing consumption of samples and broadening the screening of parameter space in membrane protein crystallization. PMID:20473353

  1. Light sensitive achiral polar polymeric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Henríquez, C. M.; Soto-Bustamante, E. A.; Vergara-Toloza, R. O.; Haase, W.

    2011-07-01

    The occurrence of antiferroelectric phenomenon in achiral composites composed of azo-benzene containing liquid crystals was observed. Some of the composites evidenced typical antiferroelectric polarization hysteresis loop in the mesophase, showing bilayer smectic C 2 mesophases with some interdigitation grade at the layer interface in a broad temperature range. Surprisingly composites of similar structure developed pyroelectricity but not switchable states. This new class of antiferroelectric materials is also capable of producing E-Z photoisomerization making them good candidates for energy harvesting.

  2. Strong Acid-Nonionic Surfactant Lyotropic Liquid-Crystalline Mesophases as Media for the Synthesis of Carbon Quantum Dots and Highly Proton Conducting Mesostructured Silica Thin Films and Monoliths.

    PubMed

    Olutaş, Elif B; Balcı, Fadime M; Dag, Ömer

    2015-09-22

    Lyotropic liquid-crystalline (LLC) materials are important in designing porous materials, and acids are as important in chemical synthesis. Combining these two important concepts will be highly beneficial to chemistry and material science. In this work, we show that a strong acid can be used as a solvent for the assembly of nonionic surfactants into various mesophases. Sulfuric acid (SA), 10-lauryl ether (C12E10), and a small amount of water form bicontinuous cubic (V1), 2D-hexagonal (H1), and micelle cubic (I1) mesophases with increasing SA/C12E10 mole ratio. A mixture of SA and C12E10 is fluidic but transforms to a highly ordered LLC mesophase by absorbing ambient water. The LLC mesophase displays high proton conductivity (1.5 to 19.0 mS/cm at room temperature) that increases with an increasing SA content up to 11 SA/C12E10 mole ratio, where the absorbed water is constant with respect to the SA amount but gradually increases from a 2.3 to 4.3 H2O/C12E10 mole ratio with increasing SA/C12E10 from 2 to 11, respectively. The mixture of SA and C12E10 slowly undergoes carbonization to produce carbon quantum dots (c-dots). The carbonization process can be controlled by simply controlling the water content of the media, and it can be almost halted by leaving the samples under ambient conditions, where the mixture slowly absorbs water to form photoluminescent c-dot-embedded mesophases. Over time the c-dots grow in size and increase in number, and the photoluminescence frequency gradually shifts to a lower frequency. The SA/C12E10 mesophase can also be used as a template to produce highly proton conducting mesostructured silica films and monoliths, as high as 19.3 mS/cm under ambient conditions. Aging the silica samples enhances the conductivity that can be even larger than for the LLC mesophase with the same amount of SA. The presence of silica has a positive effect on the proton conductivity of SA/C12E10 systems. PMID:26332603

  3. The structures of the crystalline phase and columnar mesophase of rhodium (II) heptanoate and of its binary mixture with copper (II) heptanoate probed by EXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inb-Elhaj, M.; Guillon, D.; Skoulios, A.; Maldivi, P.; Giroud-Godquin, A. M.; Marchon, J.-C.

    1992-12-01

    EXAFS was used to investigate the local structure of the polar spines of rhodium (II) soaps in the columnar liquid crystalline state. It was also used to ascertain the degree of blending of the cores in binary mixtures of rhodium (II) and copper (II) soaps. For the pure rhodium soaps, the columns are shown to result from the stacking of binuclear metal-metal bonded dirhodium tetracarboxylate units bonded to one another by apical ligation of the metal atom of each complex with one of the oxygen atoms of the adjacent molecule. Mixtures of rhodium (II) and copper (II) soaps give a hexagonal columnar mesophase in which pure rhodium and pure copper columns are randomly distributed.

  4. Thermotropic ionic liquid crystals. II. 1H and 23Na NMR study of the smectic mesophase of molten sodium n-butyrate and sodium isovalerate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonekamp, J. E.; Eguchi, T.; Plesko, S.; Jonas, J.

    1983-08-01

    The 1H and 23Na NMR studies of smectic ionic mesophases of molten sodium n-butyrate and sodium isovalerate are reported over the temperature range of the stability of the liquid crystalline phases. The 1H spin-lattice relaxation times T1 at ν0=9.2, 24.3, and 60 MHz for the anions of both the systems are interpreted in terms of diffusion intermolecular relaxation mechanism. The predicted anion diffusion coefficients are in agreement with those measured directly by spin-echo technique and indicate that the anion diffuses rapidly. In contrast to the T1 relaxation mechanism the results obtained for the proton relaxation times in the rotating coordinate frame T1ρ indicate that the order-fluctuation relaxation mechanism determines the frequency dispersion of T1ρ. The analysis of the T1ρ data provides an approximate measure of the order parameter S as a function of temperature. Fourier transform spectra of the 23Na transitions show that the electric field gradient (EFG) at the Na+ ion is nonaveraged and of such a strength as to produce a second order quadrupole effect in the spectra of the central transition. From the first-order splitting, the quadrupole coupling constant (QCC) is obtained as a function of temperature. The gradual temperature change of QCC demonstrates that only a single liquid crystalline phase exists over the temperature interval of the stability of the smectic mesophase. Using approximate analysis the correlation time τc for the EFG fluctuation is obtained from the 23Na T1 data for the melts of both sodium n-butyrate and sodium isovalerate.

  5. Effect of enantiomeric excess on the smectic-C* phases under electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemingui, M.; Soltani, T.; Marcerou, J. P.; Othman, T.

    2016-03-01

    A series of enantiomeric mixtures of 4-(1-methylheptyloxycarbonyl) phenol 4'-octyloxybiphenyl-4-carbonate (MHPOBC) is reported to understand the structures and stability conditions of emerging liquid crystal phases. The mesomorphic properties are studied by microscopic observation, electro-optic and dielectric measurements. The electric field-concentration (E-x) phase diagram for each phase at constant temperature is constructed. The complete electric field-temperature (E-T) phase diagrams for several enantiomeric mixtures of the antiferroelectric MHPOBC are established. These phase diagrams show the influence of optical purity on the phase stability and the unwinding threshold.

  6. Effect of Pyridine on the Mesophase of Teraryl Liquid Crystals: A New Series of Nematic Liquid Crystals Named 2-(4-Alkoxybiphen-4′-yl)-5-methylpyridines

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Win-Long; Huang, Yu-Sin

    2016-01-01

    A new series of teraryl 2-(4-alkoxybiphen-4′-yl)-5-methylpyridines (nO-PPPyMe, n = 3–8) nematic liquid crystal compounds, bearing a biphenylene core and a picoline terminus, were synthesized using a short two-step reaction, and overall yields between 34% and 38% were obtained. Spectral analysis results were in accordance with the expected structures. The thermotropic behavior of the teraryl liquid crystal compounds was investigated through polarized optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. All compounds exhibited a solely enantiotropic nematic phase at the medium–high temperature range of 162.4–234.2 °C. Furthermore, the results for the nO-PPPyMe series were analyzed relative to three other compound series, mO-PPPyCN (m = 2–8), iO-PPQMe (i = 3–8) and xO-PPyPMe (x = 1–10). Consequently, the effect of pyridine on the mesophase of teraryl liquid crystals was demonstrated. PMID:26959017

  7. Effect of Pyridine on the Mesophase of Teraryl Liquid Crystals: A New Series of Nematic Liquid Crystals Named 2-(4-Alkoxybiphen-4'-yl)-5-methylpyridines.

    PubMed

    Chia, Win-Long; Huang, Yu-Sin

    2016-01-01

    A new series of teraryl 2-(4-alkoxybiphen-4'-yl)-5-methylpyridines (nO-PPPyMe, n = 3-8) nematic liquid crystal compounds, bearing a biphenylene core and a picoline terminus, were synthesized using a short two-step reaction, and overall yields between 34% and 38% were obtained. Spectral analysis results were in accordance with the expected structures. The thermotropic behavior of the teraryl liquid crystal compounds was investigated through polarized optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. All compounds exhibited a solely enantiotropic nematic phase at the medium-high temperature range of 162.4-234.2 °C. Furthermore, the results for the nO-PPPyMe series were analyzed relative to three other compound series, mO-PPPyCN (m = 2-8), iO-PPQMe (i = 3-8) and xO-PPyPMe (x = 1-10). Consequently, the effect of pyridine on the mesophase of teraryl liquid crystals was demonstrated. PMID:26959017

  8. Structural effects of insulin-loading into HII mesophases monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), small angle X-ray spectroscopy (SAXS), and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR).

    PubMed

    Mishraki, Tehila; Ottaviani, Maria Francesca; Shames, Alexander I; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2011-06-30

    Insulin entrapment within a monoolein-based reverse hexagonal (H(II)) mesophase was investigated under temperature-dependent conditions at acidic (pH 3) and basic (pH 8) conditions. Studying the structure of the host H(II) system and the interactions of insulin under temperature-dependent conditions has great impact on the enhancement of its thermal stabilization and controlled release for the purposes of transdermal delivery. Small angle X-ray spectroscopy (SAXS) measurements show that pH variation and/or insulin entrapment preserve the hexagonal structure and do not influence the lattice parameter. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) spectra indicate that, although insulin interacts with hydroxyl groups of GMO in the interface region, it is not affected by pH variations. Hence different microenvironments within the H(II) mesophase were monitored by a computer-aided electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis using 5-doxylstearic acid (5-DSA) as a pH-dependent probe. The microviscosity, micropolarity, order of systems, and distribution of the probes in different microenvironments were influenced by three factors: temperature, pH, and insulin solubilization. When the temperature is increased, microviscosity and order parameters decreased at both pH 3 and 8, presenting different decrease trends. It was found that, at pH 3, the protein perturbs the lipid structure while "pushing aside" the un-ionized 5-DSA probe to fit into the narrow water cylinders. At the interface region (pH 8), the probe was distributed in two differently structured environments that significantly modifies by increasing temperature. Insulin loading within the H(II) mesophase decreased the order and microviscosity of both the microenvironments and increased their micropolarity. Finally, the EPR analysis also provides information about the unfolding/denaturation of insulin within the channel at high temperatures. PMID:21591776

  9. Anomalous behavior in the crossover between the negative and positive biaxial nematic mesophases in a lyotropic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Erol; Reis, Dennys; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio M

    2014-05-19

    A novel quaternary lyotropic liquid-crystalline mixture of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DDTMABr)/sodium bromide/1-dodecanol/water, presenting the biaxial nematic phase (NB ) in addition to two uniaxial discotic (ND) and calamitic (NC) nematic ones, was synthesized. The partial phase diagram of this new mixture was constructed as a function of the DDTMABr molar-fraction concentration. The phase transitions from uniaxial to biaxial nematic phases were studied by means of the temperature dependence of the optical birefringence. In a particular region of the phase diagram, anomalous behavior was observed in the crossover from N-B to N+b: the contrast of the conoscopic fringes, which allows the birefringence measurements, almost vanishes, and the sample loses its alignment. This behavior, which was not observed before in lyotropics, was interpreted as a decrease in the mean diamagnetic susceptibility anisotropy (Δχ) of the sample, which was related to the shape anisotropy of the micelles. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed to evaluate the micellar shape anisotropy; these revealed that this mixture presented a smaller shape anisotropy than those of other lyotropic micellar systems presenting the NB phase. PMID:24692308

  10. Revealing Rembrandt

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results emphasized the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt's portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings. PMID:24795552

  11. Revealing Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.; Watters, T. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Chapman, C. R.; McNutt, R. L.

    2009-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, launched in August 2004. En route to insertion into orbit about Mercury in 2011, MESSENGER flies by Mercury three times. The first and second of these encounters were accomplished in January and October of 2008. These flybys viewed portions of Mercury's surface that were not observed by Mariner 10 during its reconnaissance of somewhat less than half of the planet in 1974-1975. All MESSENGER instruments operated during each flyby and returned a wealth of new data. Many of the new observations were focused on the planet's geology, including monochrome imaging at resolutions as high as 100 m/pixel, multispectral imaging in 11 filters at resolutions as high as 500 m/pixel, laser altimetry tracks extending over several thousands of kilometers, and high-resolution spectral measurements of several types of terrain. Here we present an overview of the first inferences on the global geology of Mercury from the MESSENGER observations. Whereas evidence for volcanism was equivocal from Mariner 10 data, the new MESSENGER images and altimetry provide compelling evidence that volcanism was widespread and protracted on Mercury. Color imaging reveals three common spectral units on the surface: a higher-reflectance, relatively red material occurring as a distinct class of smooth plains, typically with distinct embayment relationships interpreted to indicate volcanic emplacement; a lower-reflectance, relatively blue material typically excavated by impact craters and therefore inferred to be more common at depth; and a spectrally intermediate terrain that constitutes much of the uppermost crust. Three more minor spectral units are also seen: fresh crater ejecta, reddish material associated with rimless depressions interpreted to be volcanic centers, and high-reflectance deposits seen in some crater floors. Preliminary measurements of crater size

  12. Mesomorphic properties of chiral three-arm liquid crystals containing 1,2,4-butanetriol as core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Mei; Wu, Shuang-jie; Tian, Xiao-Wei; Yao, Dan-Shu; Li, Chong-Liang; Hu, Jian-She; Zhang, Bao-Yan

    2016-03-01

    A series of symmetric and asymmetric three-arm liquid crystals (TALCs) of which the molecular structure with a central core of 1, 2, 4-butanetriol attached by three rod-like mesogenic moieties have successfully been synthesized. The rod-like mesogenic side arms are 4‧-(4-(trifluoromethyl) benzoyloxy) biphenyl-4-carboxylic acid (TFBA) and 4‧-(4-(allyloxy) benzoyloxy) biphenyl-4-carboxylic acid (AOBA), respectively. BTA0 and BTA3 are symmetric TALCs with three TFBA or three AOBA as LC side arms, respectively. BTA1 is an asymmetric TALC with one AOBA and two TFBA as side arms. BTA2 is an asymmetric TALC with two AOBA and one TFBA as side arms. The chemical structures and LC properties of the LC side arms and TALCs were characterised by FTIR, 1H NMR, elemental analysis, DSC, TG, POM and X-ray diffractometer. TFBA displayed smectic B (SmB) phase, AOBA exhibited nematic (N) phase. The TALCs all displayed chiral mesophase properties. BTA0 displayed chiral smectic C (SmC∗) mesophase. BTA1, BTA2 and BTA3 exhibited cholesteric (ch) mesophase. In addition, a chiral smectic A (SmA∗) mesophase was observed for BTA1. The results indicated that the 1, 2, 4-butanetriol is vital in inducing chiral mesophase of the TALCs. The side arms also played an important role in the mesophase type and mesogenic region. The TALCs displayed cholesteric mesophase when nematic LC side arm AOBA was introduced into the chiral core. The mesogenic region of the TALCs increased with the content of the wide-mesophase-region LC side arm AOBA introduced into the TALCs increasing. The melting temperature and the clear temperature of the TALCs were lower than those of the LC side arms (TFBA and AOBA). The mesophase regions of the TALCs were wider than those of the LC side arms.

  13. Spontaneous sense inversion in helical mesophases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensink, H. H.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the pitch sensitivity of chiral nematic phases of helicoidal patchy cylinders as a generic model for chiral (bio-)polymers and helix-shaped colloidal rods. The behaviour of the macroscopic helical pitch is studied from microscopic principles by invoking a simple density functional theory generalised to accommodate weakly twisted director fields. Upon changing the degree of alignment along the local helicoidal director we find that chiral nematic phases exhibit a sudden sense inversion whereby the helical symmetry changes from left- to right-handed and vice versa. Since the local alignment is governed by thermodynamic variables such as density, temperature or the amplitude of an external directional field, such pitch sense inversions can be expected in systems of helical mesogens of both thermotropic and lyotropic origin. We show that the spontaneous change of helical symmetry is a direct consequence of an antagonistic effective torque between helical particles with a certain prescribed internal helicity. The results may help opening up new routes towards precise control of the helical handedness of chiral assemblies by a judicious choice of external control parameters.

  14. Shear alignment of lamellar mesophase systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaju, S. J.; Kumaran, V.

    2015-11-01

    Mixtures of oil, water and surfactants form different microphases. Some of these phases, e.g. lamellar, hexagonal phases, lead to complex rheological behaviour at macroscale due to inherent anisotropy and irregularities in the microstructures. We present a comprehensive simulation study to examine the structure-rheology relationship in lamellar phase flow. At mesoscale, Reynolds number (Re), Schmidt number (Sc), Ericksen number (Er), extent of segregation between hydrophilic and hydrophobic components (r), ratio of viscosity of the two components (Δμ /μ0), and system size to layer width ratio (L / λ) complete the lamellar phase description. We have used lattice Boltzmann simulations to study a two dimensional lamellar phase system of moderate size. The domains and grain boundaries seen at low Sc are replaced by isolated edge dislocations at high Sc. The alignment mechanism does not change with changes in layer bending moduli (Er), viscosity contrast or r. Increasing segregation, increases disorder; this however does not lead to higher resistance to flow. At high Er, the shear tries homogenise the concentration field and disrupt layer formation. We see significantly higher peak viscosity at low Er at high viscosity contrast and due to defect pinning. The authors would like to thank the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India for financial support, and Supercomputer Education and Research Centre at Indian Institute of Science for the computational resources.

  15. Solubilization of nutraceuticals into reverse hexagonal mesophases.

    PubMed

    Amar-Yuli, Idit; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2008-08-21

    The solubilization of four bioactive molecules with different polarities, in three reverse hexagonal (HII) systems has been investigated. The three HII systems were a typical reverse hexagonal composed of glycerol monooleate (GMO)/tricaprylin/water and two fluid hexagonal systems containing either 2.75 wt % Transcutol or ethanol as a fourth component. The phase behavior of the liquid crystalline phases in the presence of ascorbic acid, ascorbyl palmitate, D-alpha-tocopherol and D-alpha-tocopherol acetate were determined by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and optical microscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) techniques were utilized to follow modifications in the thermal behavior and in the vibrations of different functional groups upon solubilizing the bioactive molecules. The nature of each guest molecule (in both geometry and polarity) together with the different HII structures (typical and fluids) determined the corresponding phase behavior, swelling or structural transformations and its location in the HII structures. Ascorbic acid was found to act as a chaotropic guest molecule, localized in the water-rich core and at the interface. The AP was also a chaotropic guest molecule with its head located in the vicinity of the GMO headgroup while its tail embedded close to the surfactant tail. D-alpha-tocopherol and D-alpha-tocopherol acetate were incorporated between the GMO tails; however, the D-alpha-tocopherol was located closer to the interface. Once Transcutol or ethanol was present and upon guest molecule incorporation, partial migration was detected. PMID:18665631

  16. Revealing the potential of Didodecyldimethylammonium bromide as efficient scaffold for fabrication of nano liquid crystalline structures.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Rohini; Kaur, Gurpreet; Mehta, S K

    2016-03-01

    To exploit the potential of Didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (D12DAB) as a core lipidic constituent, an attempt was made to fabricate and optimize cationic nanostructured lipid carriers (cNLCs) using a cost-effective microemulsification methodology. Designed composition was optimized by studying the effect of different microemulsion components on D12DAB cNLCs characteristics. ​Spherical shaped D12DAB cNLCs were obtained with an average size of ∼160nm and zeta potential of +30.2mV. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) depicted the presence of thermotropic character, whereas polarized optical microscopy confirmed the mesophase like behavior of D12DAB based cNLCs. In addition, hemolysis analysis revealed that the toxicity was concentration dependent as LC50 was reached at a concentration of 50μg/mL of cNLCs. This class of cNLCs is expected to become a potent candidate for a broad spectrum of medicaments as carriers, targeting for pharmaceutical and medicinal purposes, due to the combination of a hard lipid with a soft lipid, where the liquid crystalline structure of the lipid co-exists. PMID:26896840

  17. How Are Preferences Revealed?

    PubMed Central

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J.; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C.

    2009-01-01

    Revealed preferences are tastes that rationalize an economic agent’s observed actions. Normative preferences represent the agent’s actual interests. It sometimes makes sense to assume that revealed preferences are identical to normative preferences. But there are many cases where this assumption is violated. We identify five factors that increase the likelihood of a disparity between revealed preferences and normative preferences: passive choice, complexity, limited personal experience, third-party marketing, and intertemporal choice. We then discuss six approaches that jointly contribute to the identification of normative preferences: structural estimation, active decisions, asymptotic choice, aggregated revealed preferences, reported preferences, and informed preferences. Each of these approaches uses consumer behavior to infer some property of normative preferences without equating revealed and normative preferences. We illustrate these issues with evidence from savings and investment outcomes. PMID:24761048

  18. US weapons secrets revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, R.S.; Arkin, W.M.

    1993-03-01

    Extraordinary details have only recently been revealed about the struggle over the control of early U.S. nuclear weapons and their initial deployments abroad. The information comes from a newly declassified top secret report, part of a larger study, The History of the Strategic Arms Competition, 1945-1972, commissioned by Defense Secretary James R. Schlisinger in summer 1974.

  19. Revealing power in truth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kelley

    2015-01-01

    Jeremy Shiffman’s editorial appropriately calls on making all forms of power more apparent and accountable, notably productive power derived from expertise and claims to moral authority. This commentary argues that relationships based on productive power can be especially difficult to reveal in global health policy because of embedded notions about the nature of power and politics. Yet, it is essential to recognize that global health is shot through with power relationships, that they can take many forms, and that their explicit acknowledgement should be part of, rather than factored out of, any reform of global health governance. PMID:25844390

  20. The Universe Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Pam

    1998-10-01

    The Universe is a bewildering place to the uninitiated. The concepts and theories that govern space seem complex and often contradictory. The Universe Revealed provides the keys to unlocking the wonders of the cosmos. Elegantly written and lavishly illustrated, it begins with the Sun and stretches through our solar system into deepest space. Lucid prose, written by many of the people who have shaped our current thinking on space, and spectacular photographs make the physics of the Universe accessible and provide a solid background for understanding the most recent astronomical discoveries. Covering the most intriguing features of the cosmos, the topics discussed range from the Earth and global warming to cosmic collisions and the size of the Universe. Major sections examine the Solar System, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and the observational techniques used by astronomers, both amateur and professional. The Universe Revealed represents the collaboration of internationally renowned experts in astronomy and cosmology, with contributions from authors including David Malin, F. Duccio Macchetto, Iain Nicholson, Neil Bone, Ian Ridpath, Seth Shostak, Mike Lancaster, Steve Miller, Ken Croswell, Geoff McNamara, and Steven Young. This extraordinary blend of astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology, will appeal to amateur and armchair astronomers alike.

  1. Gusev's Rim Revealed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image on sol 91 (April 5, 2004). Spirit is looking to the southeast, and through the martian haze has captured the rim of Gusev Crater approximately 80 kilometers (49.7 miles) away on the horizon.

    The right side of this image reveals the portion of the crater edge that descends into the mouth of Ma'adim Vallis, a channel that opens into Gusev Crater. Spirit is currently traveling toward the informally named 'Columbia Hills,' which lie to the left of the region pictured here.

    This image is similar to a panoramic camera image taken on sol 68, but Gusev's ridge is more visible here because the atmospheric dust caused by winter dust storms has settled. Scientists expect to get even clearer images than this one in upcoming sols.

    This image has been modified to make the crater rim more visible.

  2. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in

  3. Revealing the Beast Within

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    Deeply Embedded Massive Stellar Clusters Discovered in Milky Way Powerhouse Summary Peering into a giant molecular cloud in the Milky Way galaxy - known as W49 - astronomers from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) have discovered a whole new population of very massive newborn stars . This research is being presented today at the International Astronomical Union's 25th General Assembly held in Sydney, Australia, by ESO-scientist João Alves. With the help of infrared images obtained during a period of excellent observing conditions with the ESO 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at the La Silla Observatory (Chile), the astronomers looked deep into this molecular cloud and discovered four massive stellar clusters, with hot and energetic stars as massive as 120 solar masses. The exceedingly strong radiation from the stars in the largest of these clusters is "powering" a 20 light-year diameter region of mostly ionized hydrogen gas (a "giant HII region"). W49 is one of the most energetic regions of star formation in the Milky Way. With the present discovery, the true sources of the enormous energy have now been revealed for the first time, finally bringing to an end some decades of astronomical speculations and hypotheses. PR Photo 21a/03 : Colour Composite of W49A (NTT+SOFI). PR Photo 21b/03 : Radio and Near-Infrared Composite of W49A Giant molecular clouds Stars form predominantly inside Giant Molecular Clouds which populate our Galaxy, the Milky Way. One of the most prominent of these is W49 , which has a mass of a million solar masses. It is located some 37,000 light-years away and is the most luminous star-forming region known in our home galaxy: its luminosity is several million times the luminosity of our Sun. A smaller region within this cloud is denoted W49A - this is one of the strongest radio-emitting areas known in the Galaxy . Massive stars are excessive in all ways. Compared to their smaller and ligther brethren, they form at an Olympic speed and

  4. Novel ferroelectric liquid crystals consisting glassy liquid crystal as chiral dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huang-Ming Philip; Tsai, Yun-Yen; Lin, Chi-Wen; Shieh, Han-Ping David

    2006-08-01

    A series of ferroelectric liquid crystals consisting new glassy liquid crystals (GLCs) as chiral dopants were prepared and evaluated for their potentials in fast switching ability less than 1 ms. The properties of pure ferroelectric glassy liquid crystals (FGLCs) and mixtures were reported in this paper. In particular, the novel FGLC possessing wide chiral smectic C mesophase over 100 °C is able to suppress smectic A phase of host. The mixture containing 2.0 % GLC-1 performs greater alignment ability and higher contrast ratio than R2301 (Clariant, Japan) in a 2 μm pre-made cell (EHC, Japan). These results indicate that novel FLC mixtures consisting glassy liquid crystals present a promising liquid crystal materials for fast switching field sequential color displays.

  5. Ischemic Colitis Revealing Polyarteritis Nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamzaoui, Amira; Litaiem, Noureddine; Smiti Khanfir, M.; Ayadi, Sofiene; Nfoussi, Haifa; Houman, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is one of the most common intestinal ischemic injuries. It results from impaired perfusion of blood to the bowel and is rarely caused by vasculitis. We report a case of ischemic colitis revealing polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) in a 55-year-old man. Histological examination of the resected colon led to the diagnosis of PAN. PMID:24382967

  6. Electrocardiograph abnormalities revealed during laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Dubrey, Simon William

    2010-01-01

    This brief case presents a well patient in whom an electrocardiograph abnormality consistent with an accessory pathway was found during a routine procedure. We present the electrocardiographs, explain the underlying condition, and consider why the abnormality was revealed in this manner. PMID:22419949

  7. Confinement-Induced Orientational Order in a Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal Containing Dispersed Aerosils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordoyiannis, George; Nounesis, George; Bobnar, Vid; Kralj, Samo; Kutnjak, Zdravko

    2005-01-01

    The study of the smectic-A to chiral smectic-C* phase transition of the liquid crystal S-(+)-[4-(2'-methyl butyl) phenyl 4'-n-octylbiphenyl-4-carboxylate] (CE8) containing dispersed hydrophilic aerosils reveals novel properties, important to understanding quenched disorder and confinement in ferroelectric liquid crystals. Smectic layer compression leads to a distribution of transition temperatures inducing smearing of the macroscopic data across the transition. A pronounced confinement-induced pretransitional tilted order is observed.

  8. Urticarial vasculitis reveals unsuspected thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Olga; Mota, Alberto; Baudrier, Teresa; Azevedo, Filomena

    2012-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman presented with erythematous, violaceous plaques with a serpiginous and unusual appearance located on the left shoulder, left thigh, and right buttock, evolving for 5 days, which eventually became generalized. A skin biopsy revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis and a diagnosis of urticarial vasculitis was made. The complete blood count, biochemistry, complement levels, and other immunological test results were unremarkable. However, antithyroid antibody titers were increased. Despite having normal thyroid function tests and an absence of specific symptoms, the patient underwent a thyroid ultrasound, which revealed features of thyroiditis, and was subsequently referred to an endocrinologist. Several diseases can be associated with urticarial vasculitis, namely infections and autoimmune connective-tissue disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren syndrome. Thyroiditis is an uncommon association. PMID:23000939

  9. CMB source apportionment during REVEAL

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenthal, D.H.; Gertler, A.W.; Wittorff, D.; Sakiyama, S.

    1997-01-01

    Source contributions to PM{sub 2.5} aerosol measured at Chilliwack and Pitt Meadows in the Lower Fraser Valley, B.C., Canada, during the REVEAL study, were estimated using chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor modeling. ON average, motor vehicles accounted for 34 and 43% of PM{sub 2.5} at Chilliwack and Pitt Meadows, respectively. Secondary sulfate and secondary nitrate were the next most significant PM{sub 2.5} components, accounting for 25 and 27%, respectively, at Chilliwack, and 27 and 12%, respectively, at Pitt Meadows. Geological material accounted for 3 and 5% of PM{sub 2.5} at Chilliwack and Pitt Meadows, respectively. A significant contribution of wood smoke was estimated for both sites: 8% at Chilliwack and 9% at Pitt Meadows.

  10. Archimedes: Accelerator Reveals Ancient Text

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2004-02-24

    Archimedes (287-212 BC), who is famous for shouting 'Eureka' (I found it) is considered one of the most brilliant thinkers of all times. The 10th-century parchment document known as the 'Archimedes Palimpsest' is the unique source for two of the great Greek's treatises. Some of the writings, hidden under gold forgeries, have recently been revealed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at SLAC. An intense x-ray beam produced in a particle accelerator causes the iron in original ink, which has been partly erased and covered, to send out a fluorescence glow. A detector records the signal and a digital image showing the ancient writings is produced. Please join us in this fascinating journey of a 1,000-year-old parchment from its origin in the Mediterranean city of Constantinople to a particle accelerator in Menlo Park.

  11. Plan competitions reveal entrepreneurial talent

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Alison L.

    2011-05-15

    Monthly economic diversity column for Tri-City Herald business section. Excerpt below: There’s something to be said for gaining valuable real-world experience in a structured, nurturing environment. Take for instance learning to scuba dive in the comfort of my resort pool rather than immediately hanging out with sharks while I figure out little things like oxygen tanks and avoiding underwater panic attacks. Likewise, graduate students are getting some excellent, supportive real-world training through university business plan competitions. These competitions are places where smart minds, new technologies, months of preparation and coaching, and some healthy pre-presentation jitters collide to reveal not only solid new business ideas, but also some promising entrepreneurial talent. In fact, professionals from around our region descend upon college campuses every spring to judge these events, which help to bridge the gap between academics and the real technology and business-driven economy.

  12. Revealing ontological commitments by magic.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Thomas L

    2015-03-01

    Considering the appeal of different magical transformations exposes some systematic asymmetries. For example, it is more interesting to transform a vase into a rose than a rose into a vase. An experiment in which people judged how interesting they found different magic tricks showed that these asymmetries reflect the direction a transformation moves in an ontological hierarchy: transformations in the direction of animacy and intelligence are favored over the opposite. A second and third experiment demonstrated that judgments of the plausibility of machines that perform the same transformations do not show the same asymmetries, but judgments of the interestingness of such machines do. A formal argument relates this sense of interestingness to evidence for an alternative to our current physical theory, with magic tricks being a particularly pure source of such evidence. These results suggest that people's intuitions about magic tricks can reveal the ontological commitments that underlie human cognition. PMID:25490128

  13. Dunes reveal Titan's recent history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Christopher J.; Radebaugh, Jani

    2010-04-01

    Large fields of linear dunes are abundant on Titan, covering nearly 20% of the surface. They are among the youngest features and represent interactions between near-surface winds and sediment. This interaction may vary from area to area creating unique populations of eolian features identified by dune field parameters such as crest-to-crest spacing, dune width and orientation. These parameters respond to changes in near-surface conditions over periods of time ranging from minutes to many thousands of years depending on dune size and the duration of the changes. While pattern analysis of dune field parameters on Earth and, in this study, Titan reveals much about current climatic conditions, such as wind regimes and wetter vs. drier areas, many inferences about past conditions can also be made. Initial pattern analysis of linear dunes on Titan reveals a single population of linear dunes representing a large percentage of all observed dunes. This single population is the result of two leading possibilities: Either there has been only one long period of dune building, leading to very old cores that have been built upon over long periods of time, perhaps punctuated with few or many intervals of non-deposition; or the current conditions of dune building have persisted long enough to completely erase any evidence of previous conditions. We have not yet worked through all the input parameters to adjust Earth's time scales to Titan's, and thus it is not yet possible to give a precise age for Titan's dunes. However, if these large linear dunes are similar to Earth's large linear dunes, they may represent at least several thousand years of dune building.

  14. Erosion and what it Reveals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 20 November 2003

    This image is located near the boundary between Syrtis Major and Isidis Planitia. The top of the image shows rough material that has eroded away from the lower portion of the image, revealing an underlying surface that has many small craters. It also reveals an ancient flow lobe that is barely discernable, crossing the southern part of the image (this flow lobe is much easier to see as a smooth region in the context image).

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16.4, Longitude 77.9 East (282.1 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Synthesis, mesomorphic properties and X-ray diffraction studies on 7-alkyloxy-3-(4-alkyloxyphenyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one: Crystal structure of 7-hexyloxy-3-(4-hexyloxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeap, Guan-Yeow; Yam, Wan-Sinn; Dobrzyscky, Lucasz; Gorecka, Ewa; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Boey, Peng-Lim; Mahmood, Wan Ahmad Kamil; Ito, Masato M.

    2009-11-01

    Eight new compounds, 7-alkyloxy-3-(4-alkyloxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one incorporating isoflavone core and identical terminal side chains, OR (where R = C nH 2n+1 with n ranging from 4 to 18 in even parity) have been synthesized and isolated. The thermal stability in relation to the phase behaviour and respective enthalpy values of these compounds were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry. The texture of the preferred molecular orientation at different temperatures was observed under polarized light wherein all compounds exhibited nematic (N), smectic A (SmA) and smectic C (SmC) phases. The difference in mesogenicity of these compounds was also investigated from the viewpoints of conformation and polarity of the side chains which contributed remarkably towards the change in the intermolecular interaction within the mesophase. X-ray diffraction technique was employed to investigate the molecular packing associated with the intermolecular interaction as well as the correlation between the thermal behaviour of these compounds with their anisotropy properties within a mesophase. The molecular structure of compound 7-hexyloxy-3-(4-hexyloxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one in crystal phase was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

  16. APEX reveals glowing stellar nurseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Illustrating the power of submillimetre-wavelength astronomy, an APEX image reveals how an expanding bubble of ionised gas about ten light-years across is causing the surrounding material to collapse into dense clumps that are the birthplaces of new stars. Submillimetre light is the key to revealing some of the coldest material in the Universe, such as these cold, dense clouds. Glowing Stellar Nurseries ESO PR Photo 40/08 Glowing Stellar Nurseries The region, called RCW120, is about 4200 light years from Earth, towards the constellation of Scorpius. A hot, massive star in its centre is emitting huge amounts of ultraviolet radiation, which ionises the surrounding gas, stripping the electrons from hydrogen atoms and producing the characteristic red glow of so-called H-alpha emission. As this ionised region expands into space, the associated shock wave sweeps up a layer of the surrounding cold interstellar gas and cosmic dust. This layer becomes unstable and collapses under its own gravity into dense clumps, forming cold, dense clouds of hydrogen where new stars are born. However, as the clouds are still very cold, with temperatures of around -250˚ Celsius, their faint heat glow can only be seen at submillimetre wavelengths. Submillimetre light is therefore vital in studying the earliest stages of the birth and life of stars. The submillimetre-wavelength data were taken with the LABOCA camera on the 12-m Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope, located on the 5000 m high plateau of Chajnantor in the Chilean Atacama desert. Thanks to LABOCA's high sensitivity, astronomers were able to detect clumps of cold gas four times fainter than previously possible. Since the brightness of the clumps is a measure of their mass, this also means that astronomers can now study the formation of less massive stars than they could before. The plateau of Chajnantor is also where ESO, together with international partners, is building a next generation submillimetre telescope, ALMA

  17. Hubble Images Reveal Jupiter's Auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    These images, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, reveal changes in Jupiter's auroral emissions and how small auroral spots just outside the emission rings are linked to the planet's volcanic moon, Io. The images represent the most sensitive and sharply-detailed views ever taken of Jovian auroras.

    The top panel pinpoints the effects of emissions from Io, which is about the size of Earth's moon. The black-and-white image on the left, taken in visible light, shows how Io and Jupiter are linked by an invisible electrical current of charged particles called a 'flux tube.' The particles - ejected from Io (the bright spot on Jupiter's right) by volcanic eruptions - flow along Jupiter's magnetic field lines, which thread through Io, to the planet's north and south magnetic poles. This image also shows the belts of clouds surrounding Jupiter as well as the Great Red Spot.

    The black-and-white image on the right, taken in ultraviolet light about 15 minutes later, shows Jupiter's auroral emissions at the north and south poles. Just outside these emissions are the auroral spots. Called 'footprints,' the spots are created when the particles in Io's 'flux tube' reach Jupiter's upper atmosphere and interact with hydrogen gas, making it fluoresce. In this image, Io is not observable because it is faint in the ultraviolet.

    The two ultraviolet images at the bottom of the picture show how the auroral emissions change in brightness and structure as Jupiter rotates. These false-color images also reveal how the magnetic field is offset from Jupiter's spin axis by 10 to 15 degrees. In the right image, the north auroral emission is rising over the left limb; the south auroral oval is beginning to set. The image on the left, obtained on a different date, shows a full view of the north aurora, with a strong emission inside the main auroral oval.

    The images were taken by the telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 between May 1994 and September 1995.

    This image and

  18. Revealing ionic motion molecular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurzo, I.; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2006-01-01

    Thin films of mixed valence semiconductor copper-tetracyano-quinodimethane (Cu-TCNQ) and small molecule tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq3) were investigated by current-voltage (I-V) and admittance (C-V,G-V) techniques in single-layer configuration with different combinations of electrodes. The predicted hysteresis of I-V curves and nearly constant loss (NCL) could be observed for both materials. When cycling devices between negative and positive biases, slowly decaying ionic transient currents interfere with steady-state currents and point to unidirectional motions of the ionic species with subsequent redox reaction at one of the electrodes. Plotting the frequency f dependence of the equivalent parallel capacitance at zero bias as log10 C(0) versus log10(f), the dielectric behavior of Cu-TCNQ and Alq3 complies with the effective-medium model for NCL in ionic conductors [J. R. Macdonald J. Appl. Phys. 94, 558 (2003)]. It also holds for a similar plot of the equivalent parallel zero-bias conductance G(0). The nature of the revealed mobile ions is discussed with emphasis on their sources.

  19. Plant transcriptomes reveal hidden guests.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiao; Wang, Guirong; Pelosi, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    With the wide adoption of transcriptome sequencing an ever increasing amount of information is becoming available, together with spurious data originating from contamination. We show that sometimes errors and inaccuracy can turn beneficial, revealing insect and arthropod pests when analysing plant transcriptomes. We have found a large number of soluble olfactory proteins, odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs), in plant databases, likely due to contamination by guest insects. In fact, both classes of proteins are only expressed in insects, with few CSPs also present in other arthropods. In addition, we found many sequences of the Niemann-Pick (Npc2) family, proteins dedicated to cholesterol transport in vertebrates and hypothesised to be involved in chemical communication in insects, but absent in plants. In several cases we were able to trace down members of the three classes of proteins to the insect or arthopod species responsible for contamination. Our work suggests that genes found in plants and recognised as contaminants can be turned into useful information to investigate plant-insect relationships or to identify new sequences from insects species not yet investigated. PMID:27130825

  20. Reveal for Salmonella test system.

    PubMed

    Bird, C B; Miller, R L; Miller, B M

    1999-01-01

    The Reveal for Salmonella (RSS) test system is a presumptive qualitative test that detects the presence of Salmonella organisms in foods within 21 h total testing time, allowing the user to release negative products 24 h earlier than when using other rapid test kits. Foods are enriched with a proprietary resuscitation medium called Revive and then selectively enriched with either Selenite Cystine or Rappaport-Vassiliadis selective media. The enriched culture is used to inoculate the RSS detection device, which initiates a lateral flow through a reagent zone containing anti-Salmonella antibodies conjugated to colloidal gold particles that capture antigens present in the culture. The antigen-antibody complex migrates farther and is captured by an additional anti-Salmonella antibody, causing the colloidal gold to precipitate and form a visual line, indicating a positive result. A procedural control line also will form regardless of the presence of Salmonella organisms to indicate the test is working properly. Existing AOAC Official Methods for Salmonella organisms require a 48 h enrichment before testing. Hence, a food product has to be held before release, adding extra cost to the company and the consumer. The RSS test system was evaluated by quantitative spiking studies. Although AOAC encourages inclusion of naturally contaminated foods, almost all microbiological AOAC validation studies have been performed with artificially contaminated foods for absolute control over the study. The RSS test system is designed to test many food types for Salmonella organisms and has a limit of detection of 5-10 colony-forming units (cfu)/25 g with a false-negative rate of < 1% and a false-positive rate of < 5.0%. It showed an 81% overall agreement with the traditional procedure of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety Inspection Service. PMID:10367381

  1. Focus groups reveal consumer ambivalence.

    PubMed

    1983-01-01

    According to qualitative research, Salvadoreans are ambivalent about the use of contraceptives. Since complete responsibility for management of the CSM project was accepted by the Association Demografica Salvadorena (ADS), the agency which operates the contraceptive social marketing project in El Salvador, in November 1980, the need for decisions in such areas as product price increases, introduction of new condom brands, promotion of the vaginal foaming tablet, and assessment of product sales performance had arisen. The ICSMP funded market research, completed during 1983, was intended to provide the data on which such decisions by ADS could be based. The qualitative research involved 8 focus groups, comprised of men and women, aged 18-45, contraceptive users and nonusers, from the middle and lower socioeconomic strata of the city of San Salvador and other suburban areas. In each group a moderator led discussion of family planning and probed respondents for specific attitudes, knowledge, and behavior regarding the use of contraceptives. To assess attitudes at a more emotional level, moderators asked respondents to "draw" their ideas on certain issues. A marked discrepancy was revealed between respondents' intellectual responses to the issues raised in group discussion, as opposed to their feelings expressed in the drawings. Intellectually, participants responded very positively to family planning practice, but when they were asked to draw their perceptions, ambivalent feelings emerged. Drawings of both the user and the nonuser convey primarily negative aspects for either choice. The user is tense and moody toward her children; the nonuser loses her attractiveness and "dies." Figures also show drawings of some of the attitudes of single and married male participants. 1 drawing shows an incomplete and a complete circle, symbolizing a sterilized man (incomplete) and a nonsterilized man (complete). Another picture depicts a chained man who has lost his freedom

  2. REVEAL: Software Documentation and Platform Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Veibell, Victoir T.; Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2008-01-01

    The Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL) is reconfigurable data acquisition software designed for network-distributed test and measurement applications. In development since 2001, it has been successfully demonstrated in support of a number of actual missions within NASA s Suborbital Science Program. Improvements to software configuration control were needed to properly support both an ongoing transition to operational status and continued evolution of REVEAL capabilities. For this reason the project described in this report targets REVEAL software source documentation and deployment of the software on a small set of hardware platforms different from what is currently used in the baseline system implementation. This report specifically describes the actions taken over a ten week period by two undergraduate student interns and serves as a final report for that internship. The topics discussed include: the documentation of REVEAL source code; the migration of REVEAL to other platforms; and an end-to-end field test that successfully validates the efforts.

  3. Revealing advantage in a quantum network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Kaushiki; Paul, Biswajit; Sarkar, Debasis

    2016-07-01

    The assumption of source independence was used to reveal nonlocal (apart from standard Bell-CHSH scenario) nature of correlations generated in entanglement swapping experiments. In this work, we have discussed the various utilities of this assumption to reveal nonlocality (via generation of nonbilocal correlations) and thereby exploiting quantumness under lesser requirements compared to some standard means of doing the same. We have also provided with a set of sufficient criteria, imposed on the states (produced by the sources) under which source independence can reveal nonbilocal nature of correlations in a quantum network.

  4. Hiding personal information reveals the worst

    PubMed Central

    John, Leslie K.; Barasz, Kate; Norton, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Seven experiments explore people’s decisions to share or withhold personal information, and the wisdom of such decisions. When people choose not to reveal information—to be “hiders”—they are judged negatively by others (experiment 1). These negative judgments emerge when hiding is volitional (experiments 2A and 2B) and are driven by decreases in trustworthiness engendered by decisions to hide (experiments 3A and 3B). Moreover, hiders do not intuit these negative consequences: given the choice to withhold or reveal unsavory information, people often choose to withhold, but observers rate those who reveal even questionable behavior more positively (experiments 4A and 4B). The negative impact of hiding holds whether opting not to disclose unflattering (drug use, poor grades, and sexually transmitted diseases) or flattering (blood donations) information, and across decisions ranging from whom to date to whom to hire. When faced with decisions about disclosure, decision-makers should be aware not just of the risk of revealing, but of what hiding reveals. PMID:26755591

  5. REVEAL: Software Documentation and Platform Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Veibell, Victoir T.

    2011-01-01

    The Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL) is reconfigurable data acquisition software designed for network-distributed test and measurement applications. In development since 2001, it has been successfully demonstrated in support of a number of actual missions within NASA's Suborbital Science Program. Improvements to software configuration control were needed to properly support both an ongoing transition to operational status and continued evolution of REVEAL capabilities. For this reason the project described in this report targets REVEAL software source documentation and deployment of the software on a small set of hardware platforms different from what is currently used in the baseline system implementation. This presentation specifically describes the actions taken over a ten week period by two undergraduate student interns and serves as an overview of the content of the final report for that internship.

  6. Omics strategies for revealing Yersinia pestis virulence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruifu; Du, Zongmin; Han, Yanping; Zhou, Lei; Song, Yajun; Zhou, Dongsheng; Cui, Yujun

    2012-01-01

    Omics has remarkably changed the way we investigate and understand life. Omics differs from traditional hypothesis-driven research because it is a discovery-driven approach. Mass datasets produced from omics-based studies require experts from different fields to reveal the salient features behind these data. In this review, we summarize omics-driven studies to reveal the virulence features of Yersinia pestis through genomics, trascriptomics, proteomics, interactomics, etc. These studies serve as foundations for further hypothesis-driven research and help us gain insight into Y. pestis pathogenesis. PMID:23248778

  7. Eye Movements Reveal Dynamics of Task Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ulrich; Kuhns, David; Rieter, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    With the goal to determine the cognitive architecture that underlies flexible changes of control settings, we assessed within-trial and across-trial dynamics of attentional selection by tracking of eye movements in the context of a cued task-switching paradigm. Within-trial dynamics revealed a switch-induced, discrete delay in onset of…

  8. PULMONARY ARTERY ACCELERATED FLOW REVEALING HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tony; Chehab, Ghassan; Saliba, Zakhia; Smayra, Tarek; Baz, Maria; Abdo, Lynn; Haddad, Fady; Abdel-Massih, Tony

    2016-01-01

    We present a case in which transthoracic echocardiography was the first diagnostic tool to suspect mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma by revealing a change in the hemodynamic of left pulmonary artery flow, and it was used as a follow-up method for monitoring treatment efficacy by demonstrating a normalization of pulmonary artery hemodynamics. PMID:27169170

  9. Revealing a Child's Pathology: Physicians' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scelles, Regine; Aubert-Godard, Anne; Gargiulo, Marcela; Avant, Monique; Gortais, Jean

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 12 physicians and 12 care-givers were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. We explored physicians' experiences when they revealed a diagnosis. We also tried to understand which family members the physician was thinking of, with whom they identified themselves, and their first choice of the person to whom they prefer to…

  10. [Factor VII deficiency revealed by intracranial hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Sfaihi Ben Mansour, L; Thabet, A; Aloulou, H; Turki, H; Chabchoub, I; Mhiri, F; Mnif, Z; Ben Ali, H; Kammoun, T; Hachicha, M

    2009-07-01

    Constitutional factor VII deficiency is a hereditary disease with recessive autosomic transmission. Its incidence is estimated to be 1/1,000,000 in the general population. We report a case of severe factor VII deficiency in infancy revealed by an intracranial hemorrhage in a 2-month-old infant. We describe the clinical, biological and therapeutic characteristics of this disease. PMID:19409767

  11. [Skin metastases revealing a bronchial adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Zemmez, Youssef; Zegmout, Adil; Hamama, Jalal; Bouhamidi, Ahmed; El Amraoui, Mohammed; El Azhari, Jaouad; Boui, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of bronchial carcinoma revealed by metastatic skin nodules on the scalp. This fairly common mode of discovery is often associated with poor prognosis. This study aims to underline the importance of directing the search for a primary lung cancer in cases of secondary skin involvement. PMID:27583066

  12. The cattle genome reveals its secrets

    PubMed Central

    Burt, David W

    2009-01-01

    The domesticated cow is the latest farm animal to have its genome sequenced and deciphered. The members of the Bovine Genome Consortium have published a series of papers on the assembly and what the sequence reveals so far about the biology of this ruminant and the consequences of its domestication. PMID:19439025

  13. Septic sacroiliitis revealing an infectious endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Hariz, Anis; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old man admitted for right hip ache and fever. Physical examination revealed a fever, an ache at the manipulation of the sacroiliac joint and a limitation of abduction and external rotation of the right hip. There was no murmur in cardiac auscultation. No anomaly was found at the conventional radiographs of the sacroiliac joint, while the pelvic MRI confirmed a right sacroiliitis. A sacroiliac puncture with a study of synovial fluid demonstrated the presence of Streptococcus viridans. The blood culture revealed the same germ. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography confirmed infectious endocarditis with vegetation in the mitral valve. He received penicillin G and gentamicin relayed by pristinamycin because of an allergy to penicillin G with a total duration of treatment of 40 days. His symptoms and the laboratory and radiological tests abnormalities resolved totally with no recurrence. PMID:25123569

  14. Orbital tumor revealing a systemic sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Hannanachi Sassi, Samia; Dhouib, Rim; Kanchal, Fatma; Doghri, Raoudha; Boujelbene, Nadia; Bouguila, Hedi; Mrad, Karima

    2015-01-01

    Ocular involvement is seen in approximately 25% of patients with sarcoidosis. Uveitis is the most common ocular manifestation, but sarcoidosis may involve any part of the eye. Orbital manifestations of sarcoidosis are uncommon with few series in the literature. A 65-year-old woman presented with redness of the right eye and painless, unilateral eyelid swelling. Orbital scanning revealed mass infiltrating the soft tissue of the inferior right orbital quadrant. Biopsy results showed nodular, noncaseating granulomas consistent with sarcoidosis. The complete systemic workup revealed systemic manifestations of sarcoidosis at the time of examination with hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathies noted on CT scan. The orbital surgical treatment was followed by systemic prednisone therapy with good response. Although rare, orbital sarcoidosis must be considered in the evaluation of orbital tumors in elderly patients. A search for systemic findings should be undertaken and appropriate therapy should be instituted. PMID:25796029

  15. Mediastinal Mature Teratoma Revealed by Empyema.

    PubMed

    Raoufi, Mohammed; Herrak, Laila; Benali, Anas; Achaachi, Leila; El Ftouh, Mustapha; Bellarbi, Salma; Tilfine, Charaf; Taouarsa, Firdaous

    2016-01-01

    Teratomas are germ cell tumors, manifested with a great variety of clinical features; the most common extragonadal site is the anterior mediastinum. In this case, we report the patient with a large mature mediastinal teratoma with several components of ectodermal and endothermal epithelium. A 24-year-old female patient presented with history of persistent chest pain and progressively aggravating dyspnea for the previous 3 months. A chest X-ray showed a large opacity of the entire left hemithorax. Transcutaneous needle aspiration revealed a purulent fluid. The tube thoracostomy was introduced and the effusion was evacuated. Some weeks later, patient was seen in emergency for persistent cough and lateral chest pain. CT scan revealed a mass of the left hemithorax. The mass showed heterogeneous density, without compressing mediastinum great vessels and left hilar structures. Lipase value was elevated in needle aspiration. The patient underwent a total resection of the mediastinum mass via a left posterolateral thoracotomy. Microscopy revealed a mature teratoma with cystic structures. The patient subsequently made a full recovery. This case provide benign mediastinal teratoma with total atelectasis of left lung and elevated lipase value in needle transcutaneous aspiration; this event is explained by pancreatic component in the cystic tumor. Total removal of the tumor is adequate treatment for this type of teratoma and the prognosis is excellent. PMID:27144046

  16. Mediastinal Mature Teratoma Revealed by Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Raoufi, Mohammed; Herrak, Laila; Benali, Anas; Achaachi, Leila; El Ftouh, Mustapha; Bellarbi, Salma; Tilfine, Charaf; Taouarsa, Firdaous

    2016-01-01

    Teratomas are germ cell tumors, manifested with a great variety of clinical features; the most common extragonadal site is the anterior mediastinum. In this case, we report the patient with a large mature mediastinal teratoma with several components of ectodermal and endothermal epithelium. A 24-year-old female patient presented with history of persistent chest pain and progressively aggravating dyspnea for the previous 3 months. A chest X-ray showed a large opacity of the entire left hemithorax. Transcutaneous needle aspiration revealed a purulent fluid. The tube thoracostomy was introduced and the effusion was evacuated. Some weeks later, patient was seen in emergency for persistent cough and lateral chest pain. CT scan revealed a mass of the left hemithorax. The mass showed heterogeneous density, without compressing mediastinum great vessels and left hilar structures. Lipase value was elevated in needle aspiration. The patient underwent a total resection of the mediastinum mass via a left posterolateral thoracotomy. Microscopy revealed a mature teratoma with cystic structures. The patient subsequently made a full recovery. This case provide benign mediastinal teratoma with total atelectasis of left lung and elevated lipase value in needle transcutaneous aspiration; this event is explained by pancreatic component in the cystic tumor. Total removal of the tumor is adequate treatment for this type of teratoma and the prognosis is excellent. PMID:27144046

  17. Effects of graphene on electro-optic switching and spontaneous polarization of a ferroelectric liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Rajratan

    2014-09-15

    A small quantity of graphene flakes was doped in a ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC), and the field-induced ferroelectric electro-optic switching was found to be significantly faster in the FLC + graphene hybrid than that of the pure FLC. Further studies revealed that the suspended graphene flakes enhanced the FLC's spontaneous polarization by improving smectic-C ordering resulting from the π–π electron stacking, and reduced rotation viscosity by trapping some of the free ions of the FLC media. These effects coherently impacted the FLC-switching phenomenon, enabling the FLC molecules to switch faster on reversing an external electric field.

  18. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  19. What Eye Movements Reveal about Deaf Readers

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, Nathalie N.; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Levels of illiteracy in the deaf populations around the world have been extremely high for decades and much higher than the illiteracy levels found in the general population. Research has mostly focused on deaf readers’ difficulties rather than on their strengths, which can then inform reading education. Deaf readers are a unique population. They process language and the world surrounding them mostly via the visual channel and this greatly affects how they read or might learn to read. The study of eye movements in reading provides highly sophisticated information about how words and sentences are processed and our research with deaf readers reveals the importance of their uniqueness. PMID:26594098

  20. Trench Reveals Two Faces of Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color image mosaic from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a trench dug by the rover in the vicinity of the 'Anatolia' region. Two imprints from the rover's Mossbauer spectrometer instrument were left in the exposed soils. Detailed comparisons between soils exposed at the surface and those found at depth reveal that surface soils have higher levels of hematite while subsurface soils show fine particles derived from basalt. The trench is approximately 11 centimeters deep. This image was taken on sol 81 with the panoramic camera's 430-, 530- and 750-nanometer filters.

  1. Reveal quantum correlation in complementary bases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shengjun; Ma, Zhihao; Chen, Zhihua; Yu, Sixia

    2014-01-01

    An essential feature of genuine quantum correlation is the simultaneous existence of correlation in complementary bases. We reveal this feature of quantum correlation by defining measures based on invariance under a basis change. For a bipartite quantum state, the classical correlation is the maximal correlation present in a certain optimum basis, while the quantum correlation is characterized as a series of residual correlations in the mutually unbiased bases. Compared with other approaches to quantify quantum correlation, our approach gives information-theoretical measures that directly reflect the essential feature of quantum correlation. PMID:24503595

  2. Cerebral venous thrombosis revealing an ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Taous, Abdellah; Berri, Maha Aït; Lamsiah, Taoufik; Zainoun, Brahim; Ziadi, Tarik; Rouimi, Abdelhadi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has been reported as an uncommon and devastating complication of ulcerative colitis (UC), with an annual incidence varying between 0,5 to 6,7%. It is suspected to be a consequence of the hypercoagulable state occurring during disease relapse. We report a case of 22-year-old female patient presenting with CVT revealing an UC. Our case raises the awareness among health professionals about the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) as a rare etiology of CVT, and signifies the importance of considering antithrombotic prophylaxis in all hospitalised IBD patients, especially those with active disease. PMID:27279947

  3. Apocalypto: revealing lost text with XMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, David; Davis, Graham R.; Lai, Yu-kun; Rosin, Paul

    2014-09-01

    "Can brute-force high-contrast tomography techniques and image processing techniques retrieve textual content from damaged heritage materials?" The Dental Institute at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) is the leading centre for very high contrast X-Ray Microtomography imaging. The Apocalypto Project is our collaboration with the heritage community and experts in Computer Vision systems in the Computer Science Department at Cardiff University. This collaboration has developed techniques and a workflow that allows us to reveal textual content from moisture-damaged parchment rolls. This article will also present some initial results from burned and heat shrunken parchment rolls, an insect damaged Mamluk cap and a birch bark roll.

  4. Middle atmosphere composition revealed by satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. M., III; Solomon, S.; Mccormick, M. P.; Miller, A. J.; Barnett, J. J.; Jones, R. L.; Rusch, D. W.

    1986-01-01

    A series of plots that describe the state of the stratosphere and to some degree, the mesosphere as revealed by satellite observations are shown. The pertinent instrument features, spatial and temporal coverage, and details of accuracy and precision for the experiments providing the data were described. The main features of zonal mean cross sections and polar stereographic projections were noted and intercomparisons were discussed where a parameter was measured by more than one experiment. The main purpose was to collect the available data in one place and provide enough inforamation on limitations or cautions about the data so that they could be used in model comparisons and science studies.

  5. Exertional rhabdomyolysis and exercise intolerance revealing dystrophinopathies.

    PubMed

    Figarella-Branger, D; Baeta Machado, A M; Putzu, G A; Malzac, P; Voelckel, M A; Pellissier, J F

    1997-07-01

    Exercise intolerance associated with myalgias, muscle cramps or myoglobinuria may be associated with a dystrophinopathy. A search for abnormal dystrophin expression (using immunohistochemistry, immunoblot and DNA analysis) was carried out in a series of 15 patients. They were selected because they presented exercise intolerance, negative biochemical tests (lipid, glycogen and mitochondrial metabolism) and abnormal immunohistochemistry with at least one anti-dystrophin antibody (anti-Dys 1, rod domain; anti-Dys 2, C terminus; anti-Dys 3, N terminus). Lack of anti-Dys 1 immunoreactivity was seen in three patients and abnormal immunoreactivity with all three anti-dystrophin antibodies in two. Immunoblot confirmed the dystrophinopathy in these five patients only, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction DNA analysis revealed a deletion in the dystrophin gene in two of these patients, affecting the proximal part of the rod domain in one and the distal part of this domain in the other. The clinical, biological and histopathological features of the five patients reported here, together with the previous cases reported in the literature, are described and reveal that exercise intolerance associated with dystrophinopathy displays characteristic clinical, biological and immunohistochemical features and defines a new dystrophinopathy phenotype. The absence of staining in the rod domain provides a secure diagnosis of this syndrome. Dystrophinopathy is one etiology of idiopathic myoglobinuria, requiring genetic counseling. PMID:9224530

  6. Mammalian phylogeny reveals recent diversification rate shifts.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Tanja

    2011-04-12

    Phylogenetic trees of present-day species allow investigation of the rate of evolution that led to the present-day diversity. A recent analysis of the mammalian phylogeny challenged the view of explosive mammalian evolution after the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary (65 Mya). However, due to lack of appropriate methods, the diversification (speciation minus extinction) rates in the more recent past of mammalian evolution could not be determined. In this paper, I provide a method that reveals that the tempo of mammalian evolution did not change until ∼ 33 Mya. This constant period was followed by a peak of diversification rates between 33 and 30 Mya. Thereafter, diversification rates remained high and constant until 8.55 Mya. Diversification rates declined significantly at 8.55 and 3.35 Mya. Investigation of mammalian subgroups (marsupials, placentals, and the six largest placental subgroups) reveals that the diversification rate peak at 33-30 Mya is mainly driven by rodents, cetartiodactyla, and marsupials. The recent diversification rate decrease is significant for all analyzed subgroups but eulipotyphla, cetartiodactyla, and primates. My likelihood approach is not limited to mammalian evolution. It provides a robust framework to infer diversification rate changes and mass extinction events in phylogenies, reconstructed from, e.g., present-day species or virus data. In particular, the method is very robust toward noise and uncertainty in the phylogeny and can account for incomplete taxon sampling. PMID:21444816

  7. Saturn's secrets revealed - A special report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, C.

    1980-11-01

    Scientific results of the encounter of Voyager 1 with Saturn are reported. Instruments on the Voyager spacecraft, which was launched on September 5, 1977 and flew within 124,200 km of the Saturn cloud tops on November 12, 1980, revealed the presence of several hundred rings within the six visible from earth, as well as eccentric rings, braiding and clumps within the narrow F ring, and spoke-like structures in the B ring. During its flight beneath the ring plane, Voyager 1 also discovered that the rings extend toward the visible surface of the cloud tops, and are composed of ice chunks or silicate with an icy coating about a meter in diameter. Observations of Titan revealed the satellite to have a dense atmosphere, composed primarily of molecular nitrogen, with as many as three layers of haze above the cloud tops. Three additional moons of Saturn were discovered apparently focusing ring particles, and the moon Janus, discovered from earth in 1966, was shown to be actually two moons. Close approaches to other Saturn satellites show Mimas, Tethys, Dione and Rhea to be heavily cratered, icy bodies, some with features indicating they had been struck by objects almost large enough to shatter them. Surface features on Saturn, which is covered by a deep layer of haze, and the details of the Saturn magnetosphere have also been observed.

  8. Interior Evolution of Ceres Revealed by Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Carol A.; Park, Ryan S.; Konopliv, Alex S.; Bland, Michael T.; Marchi, Simone; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; McCord, Thomas B.; Jaumann, Ralf; Russell, Christopher T.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2015-11-01

    Dawn's exploration of Ceres has revealed its geophysical characteristics, informing the processes that have shaped it. Dawn has determined the average diameter of Ceres to be 940 km, smaller than the previously estimated 975 km [1]. This implies a density of 2160 kg/m3, indicating that Ceres is less differentiated than predicted [2]. The low-degree gravity field is consistent with the body being in hydrostatic equilibrium and the magnitude of J2 implies some central condensation. Ceres' entire surface is cratered, implying the lack of a thick (10's of km) water ice layer at the surface. Variability in Ceres' crater morphology indicates that the near-surface layer has variable strength and rheology, likely due to heterogeneity in the near-surface mixture of rock, ice and salt. The lack of a number of expected large impact basins on Ceres can be interpreted to be the result of viscous relaxation, resurfacing or a combination of both. These data provide insights into Ceres' thermal evolution and mechanical properties, which appear to be unique to this warm, icy body.[1] Thomas, P. C., et al., Differentiation of the asteroid Ceres as revealed by its shape, Nature, 437, 224-226, 2005; [2] McCord et al., Ceres: Its Origin, Evolution and Structure and Dawn's Potential Contribution, Space Sci Rev DOI 10.1007/s11214-010-9729-9, 2011.

  9. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers-Melnick, Eli; Vera, Daniel L.; Bass, Hank W.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular processes mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. Chromatin structural assays can efficiently integrate information across diverse regulatory elements, revealing the functional noncoding genome. In this study, we use a differential nuclease sensitivity assay based on micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion to discover open chromatin regions in the maize genome. We find that maize MNase-hypersensitive (MNase HS) regions localize around active genes and within recombination hotspots, focusing biased gene conversion at their flanks. Although MNase HS regions map to less than 1% of the genome, they consistently explain a remarkably large amount (∼40%) of heritable phenotypic variance in diverse complex traits. MNase HS regions are therefore on par with coding sequences as annotations that demarcate the functional parts of the maize genome. These results imply that less than 3% of the maize genome (coding and MNase HS regions) may give rise to the overwhelming majority of phenotypic variation, greatly narrowing the scope of the functional genome. PMID:27185945

  10. Social patterns revealed through random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Camellia; Jalan, Sarika

    2014-11-01

    Despite the tremendous advancements in the field of network theory, very few studies have taken weights in the interactions into consideration that emerge naturally in all real-world systems. Using random matrix analysis of a weighted social network, we demonstrate the profound impact of weights in interactions on emerging structural properties. The analysis reveals that randomness existing in particular time frame affects the decisions of individuals rendering them more freedom of choice in situations of financial security. While the structural organization of networks remains the same throughout all datasets, random matrix theory provides insight into the interaction pattern of individuals of the society in situations of crisis. It has also been contemplated that individual accountability in terms of weighted interactions remains as a key to success unless segregation of tasks comes into play.

  11. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome.

    PubMed

    Rodgers-Melnick, Eli; Vera, Daniel L; Bass, Hank W; Buckler, Edward S

    2016-05-31

    Cellular processes mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. Chromatin structural assays can efficiently integrate information across diverse regulatory elements, revealing the functional noncoding genome. In this study, we use a differential nuclease sensitivity assay based on micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion to discover open chromatin regions in the maize genome. We find that maize MNase-hypersensitive (MNase HS) regions localize around active genes and within recombination hotspots, focusing biased gene conversion at their flanks. Although MNase HS regions map to less than 1% of the genome, they consistently explain a remarkably large amount (∼40%) of heritable phenotypic variance in diverse complex traits. MNase HS regions are therefore on par with coding sequences as annotations that demarcate the functional parts of the maize genome. These results imply that less than 3% of the maize genome (coding and MNase HS regions) may give rise to the overwhelming majority of phenotypic variation, greatly narrowing the scope of the functional genome. PMID:27185945

  12. Revealing effective classifiers through network comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallos, Lazaros K.; Fefferman, Nina H.

    2014-11-01

    The ability to compare complex systems can provide new insight into the fundamental nature of the processes captured, in ways that are otherwise inaccessible to observation. Here, we introduce the n-tangle method to directly compare two networks for structural similarity, based on the distribution of edge density in network subgraphs. We demonstrate that this method can efficiently introduce comparative analysis into network science and opens the road for many new applications. For example, we show how the construction of a “phylogenetic tree” across animal taxa according to their social structure can reveal commonalities in the behavioral ecology of the populations, or how students create similar networks according to the University size. Our method can be expanded to study many additional properties, such as network classification, changes during time evolution, convergence of growth models, and detection of structural changes during damage.

  13. Semantic priming revealed by mouse movement trajectories.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kunchen; Yamauchi, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Congruency effects are taken as evidence that semantic information can be processed automatically. However, these effects are often weak, and the straightforward association between primes and targets can exaggerate congruency effects. To address these problems, a mouse movement method is applied to scrutinize congruency effects. In one experiment, participants judged whether two numbers were the same ("3\\3") or different ("3\\5"), preceded by briefly presented pictures with either positive or negative connotations. Participants indicated their responses by clicking a "Same" or "Different" button on the computer screen, while their cursor trajectories were recorded for each trial. The trajectory data revealed greater deviation to unselected buttons in incongruent trials (e.g., "3\\5" preceded by a green traffic light picture). This effect was influenced by the type of responses but not by prime durations. We suggest that the mouse movement method can complement the reaction time to study masked semantic priming. PMID:24797040

  14. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Kang, Misun; Voisin, Sophie; Cheng, Chu-Lin; Horita, Jusuke; Perfect, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  15. Chain networking revealed by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yexin; Tsige, Mesfin; Wang, Shi-Qing

    Based on Kremer-Grest model for entangled polymer melts, we demonstrate how the response of a polymer glass depends critically on the chain length. After quenching two melts of very different chain lengths (350 beads per chain and 30 beads per chain) into deeply glassy states, we subject them to uniaxial extension. Our MD simulations show that the glass of long chains undergoes stable necking after yielding whereas the system of short chains is unable to neck and breaks up after strain localization. During ductile extension of the polymer glass made of long chain significant chain tension builds up in the load-bearing strands (LBSs). Further analysis is expected to reveal evidence of activation of the primary structure during post-yield extension. These results lend support to the recent molecular model 1 and are the simulations to demonstrate the role of chain networking. This work is supported, in part, by a NSF Grant (DMR-EAGER-1444859)

  16. Metabolomics reveals metabolic biomarkers of Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, J.K.; Willing, B.; Lucio, M.; Fekete, A.; Dicksved, J.; Halfvarson, J.; Tysk, C.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2009-06-01

    The causes and etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) are currently unknown although both host genetics and environmental factors play a role. Here we used non-targeted metabolic profiling to determine the contribution of metabolites produced by the gut microbiota towards disease status of the host. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS) was used to discern the masses of thousands of metabolites in fecal samples collected from 17 identical twin pairs, including healthy individuals and those with CD. Pathways with differentiating metabolites included those involved in the metabolism and or synthesis of amino acids, fatty acids, bile acids and arachidonic acid. Several metabolites were positively or negatively correlated to the disease phenotype and to specific microbes previously characterized in the same samples. Our data reveal novel differentiating metabolites for CD that may provide diagnostic biomarkers and/or monitoring tools as well as insight into potential targets for disease therapy and prevention.

  17. Licking Microstructure Reveals Rapid Attenuation of Neophobia

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Kevin J.; Rubin, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Many animals hesitate when initially consuming a novel food and increase their consumption of that food between the first and second sessions of access—a process termed attenuation of neophobia (AN). AN has received attention as a model of learning and memory; it has been suggested that plasticity resulting from an association of the novel tastant with “safe outcome” results in a change in the neural response to the tastant during the second session, such that consumption increases. Most studies have reported that AN emerges only an hour or more after the end of the first exposure to the tastant, consistent with what is known of learning-related plasticity. But these studies have typically measured consumption, rather than real-time behavior, and thus the possibility exists that a more rapidly developing AN remains to be discovered. Here, we tested this possibility, examining both consumption and individual lick times in a novel variant of a brief-access task (BAT). When quantified in terms of consumption, data from the BAT accorded well with the results of a classic one-bottle task—both revealed neophobia/AN specific to higher concentrations (for instance, 28mM) of saccharin. An analysis of licking microstructure, however, additionally revealed a real-time correlate of neophobia—an explicit tendency, similarly specific for 28-mM saccharin, to cut short the initial bout of licks in a single trial (compared with water). This relative hesitancy (i.e., the shortness of the first lick bout to 28-mM saccharin compared with water) that constitutes neophobia not only disappeared between sessions but also gradually declined in magnitude across session 1. These data demonstrate that the BAT accurately measures AN, and that aspects of AN—and the processes underlying familiarization—begin within minutes of the very first taste. PMID:24363269

  18. Ceres Revealed in a Grain of Salt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Bodnar, R. J.; Fries, M.; Chan, Q. H.-S.; Kebukawa, Y.; Mikouchi, T.; Hagiya, K.; Komatsu, M.; Ohsumi, K.; Steele, A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Zag and Monahans (1998) are H chondrite regolith breccias containing 4.5 giga-year-old halite crystals which contain abundant inclusions of aqueous fluids, solids and organics. These all originated on a cryo-volcanically-active C class asteroid, probably 1 Ceres; the halite was transported to the regolith of the H chondrite parent asteroid, potentially 6 Hebe. Detailed analysis of these solids will thus potentially reveal the mineralogy of Ceres. Mineralogy of solids in the Monahans Halite Solid grains are present in the halites, which were entrained within the mother brines during eruption, including material from the interior and surface of the erupting body. The solids include abundant, widely variable organics that could not have been significantly heated (which would have resulted in the loss of fluids from the halite). Our analyses by Raman microprobe, SEM/EDX, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, UPLC-FD/QToF-MS, C-XANES and TEM reveal that these trapped grains include macromolecular carbon (MMC) similar in structure to CV3 chondrite matrix carbon, aliphatic carbon compounds, olivine (Fo99-59), high- and low-Ca pyroxene, feldspars, phyllosilicates, magnetite, sulfides, metal, lepidocrocite, carbonates, diamond, apatite and zeolites. Conclusions: The halite in Monahans and Zag derive from a water and carbon-rich object that was cryo-volcanically active in the early solar system, probably Ceres. The Dawn spacecraft found that Ceres includes C chondrite materials. Our samples include both protolith and aqueously-altered samples of the body, permitting understanding of alteration conditions. Whatever the halite parent body, it was rich in a wide variety of organics and warm, liquid water at the solar system's dawn.

  19. X-ray diffraction studies on mesophases of cetyl- and dodecyltrimethylammoniumbromide in liquid ammonia.

    PubMed

    Bzik, Stefan; Jansen, Martin

    2003-02-01

    We have studied solutions of the surfactants cetyltrimethylammoniumbromide (CTAB) and dodecyltrimethylammoniumbromide (DTAB) in liquid ammonia with respect to the formation of lyotropic phases. For this purpose, a set-up for performing X-ray scattering experiments at temperatures up to 120 degrees C on samples containing liquid ammonia has been developed. Both systems form hexagonal and monoclinic lyotropic phases above the dissolving temperature of the surfactant, thus representing the first examples for lyotropic phases in liquid ammonia, and for monoclinic phases in nonaqueous solvents. The phase diagrams of CTAB/liquid NH(3) and DTAB/liquid NH(3) show similarities to their respective aqueous systems. However, the regions of existence of monoclinic phases are much larger in the ammonia system, while the cubic phases, as observed in the water based systems, do not seem to exist. The liquid-crystalline phases found provide potentiality for preparing mesoporous, nitride-based solids. PMID:12569452

  20. Quantifying the transport properties of lipid mesophases by theoretical modelling of diffusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Antognini, Luca M; Assenza, Salvatore; Speziale, Chiara; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-08-28

    Lyotropic Liquid Crystals (LLCs) are a class of lipid-based membranes with a strong potential for drug-delivery employment. The characterization and control of their transport properties is a central issue in this regard, and has recently prompted a notable volume of research on the topic. A promising experimental approach is provided by the so-called diffusion setup, where the drug molecules diffuse from a feeding chamber filled with water to a receiving one passing through a LLC. In the present work we provide a theoretical framework for the proper description of this setup, and validate it by means of targeted experiments. Due to the inhomogeneity of the system, a rich palette of different diffusion dynamics emerges from the interplay of the different time- and lengthscales thereby present. Our work paves the way to the employment of diffusion experiments to quantitatively characterize the transport properties of LLCs, and provides the basic tools for device diffusion setups with controlled kinetic properties. PMID:27586942

  1. Some aspects of the orientational order distribution of flexible chains in a diblock mesophase

    SciTech Connect

    Lorthioir, Cédric Randriamahefa, Solo

    2013-12-14

    The segmental motions of flexible chains in the lamellar structure of a strongly segregated poly(styrene)-poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PS-PDMS) diblock were investigated over a time scale of a few tens of microseconds. {sup 2}H NMR experiments were performed on the PDMS block, selectively perdeuterated. Transverse relaxation measurements show that the main part of the PDMS repeat units display anisotropic reorientational motions within the diblock lamellae and such a segmental ordering essentially results from interchain steric repulsions. {sup 2}H double quantum-based experiments evidenced a non-uniform local stretching of PDMS chains and enabled the underlying distribution of the orientational order parameter to be determined quantitatively. Besides, a fraction of the PDMS chain segments, about 14%, were found to display isotropic – or nearly isotropic – reorientations, which could be assigned to repeat units located within a thin sublayer (about 1–2 nm) at the lamellae midplane, but also deeper in the lamellae, close to folded parts of the chains. These experimental results were confronted to theoretical descriptions of opposing polymer brushes and, in particular, to the strong-stretching theory (SST) including the entropic contribution of free chain ends.

  2. Stabilization of the Columnar Mesophase of Perylenediimide by Racemic Triple Tails.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Oliveira Santos, Deise M; Belarmino Cabral, Marilia G; Bentaleb, Ahmed; Cristiano, Rodrigo; Gallardo, Hugo; Durola, Fabien; Bock, Harald

    2016-05-23

    Whereas perylene tetracarboxdiimides derived from amino-n-alkanes if at all only show monotropic (thermodynamically unstable) mesogenic self-assembly, the hexagonal columnar liquid crystalline state can be stabilized over a broad temperature range with doubly branched, doubly racemic alkyl residues. An improved tendency to homeotropic surface orientation is observed, and the orientation of the liquid crystalline domains is maintained upon cycling through the crystalline state at room temperature. PMID:27145525

  3. A Liquid Crystalline Oligomer Exhibiting Nematic and Twist-Bend Nematic Mesophases.

    PubMed

    Mandle, Richard J; Goodby, John W

    2016-04-01

    The twist-bend nematic phase (NTB ) has been described as the structural link between the untilted uniaxial nematic phase (N) and the helical chiral nematic phase (N*). The NTB phase exhibits phenomena of fundamental importance to science, that is, 1) the spontaneous formation of a helical pitch on the nanometer scale in a fluid and 2) the spontaneous breaking of mirror symmetry, leading to the emergence of chiral domains in an achiral system. In this Communication, we present a study on T49 [bis(4-(9-(4-((4-cyanobenzoyl)oxy)phenyl)nonyl)phenyl) 4,4'-(nonane-1,9-diyl)dibenzoate], a liquid-crystalline oligomer exhibiting the twist-bend nematic phase, which has a molecular length that is of comparable dimensions to the sub-10 nm pitch determined for CB9CB, and provide new insights into the differentiation between the nano- and macro-science for self-assembling supermolecular systems. PMID:26777310

  4. Interaction of some laser radiations with the lauric acid in mesophase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, Mihaela A.; Honciuc, Maria; Popescu, Ion M.

    1994-07-01

    In `optoelectronic devices' area, a new domain occurred: organic and biological optoelectronics. Since 1988 our researches axed on this exciting theme and several works materialize the results we obtained. In this paper, we used the lauric acid, a fatty acid, which can be found, for example, under an esterified form, in the cocobutter.

  5. Nonequilibrium effects in self-assembled mesophase materials: unexpected supercooling effects for cubosomes and hexosomes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yao-Da; Tilley, Adam J; Larson, Ian; Lawrence, M Jayne; Amenitsch, Heinz; Rappolt, Michael; Hanley, Tracey; Boyd, Ben J

    2010-06-01

    Polar lipids often exhibit equilibrium liquid crystalline structures in excess water, such as the bicontinuous cubic phases (Q(II)) at low temperatures and inverse hexagonal phase (H(II)) at higher temperatures. In this study, the equilibrium and nonequilibrium phase behavior of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) and phytantriol (PHYT) systems in excess water were investigated using both continuous heating and cooling cycles, and rapid temperature changes. Evolution of the phase structure was followed using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). During cooling, not only was supercooling of the liquid crystalline systems by up to 25 degrees C observed, but evidence for nonequilibrium phase structures (not present on heating; such as the gyroid cubic phase only present at low water content in equilibrium) was also apparent. The nonequilibrium phases were surprisingly stable, with return to equilibrium structure for dispersed submicrometer sized particle systems taking more than 13 h in some cases. Inhibition of phase nucleation was the key to greater supercooling effects observed for the dispersed particles compared to the bulk systems. These findings highlight the need for continued study into the nonequilibrium phase structures for these types of systems, as this may influence performance in applications such as drug delivery. PMID:20364857

  6. Volume and porosity thermal regulation in lipid mesophases by coupling mobile ligands to soft membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parolini, Lucia; Mognetti, Bortolo M.; Kotar, Jurij; Eiser, Erika; Cicuta, Pietro; di Michele, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Short DNA linkers are increasingly being exploited for driving-specific self-assembly of Brownian objects. DNA-functionalized colloids can assemble into ordered or amorphous materials with tailored morphology. Recently, the same approach has been applied to compliant units, including emulsion droplets and lipid vesicles. The liquid structure of these substrates introduces new degrees of freedom: the tethers can diffuse and rearrange, radically changing the physics of the interactions. Unlike droplets, vesicles are extremely deformable and DNA-mediated adhesion causes significant shape adjustments. We investigate experimentally the thermal response of pairs and networks of DNA-tethered liposomes and observe two intriguing and possibly useful collective properties: negative thermal expansion and tuneable porosity of the liposome networks. A model providing a thorough understanding of this unexpected phenomenon is developed, explaining the emergent properties out of the interplay between the temperature-dependent deformability of the vesicles and the DNA-mediated adhesive forces.

  7. Revealing the Hot Side of Epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoard, Donald; Stencel, Robert; Howell, Steve

    2012-12-01

    We request a small investment of 24 minutes of Spitzer time, to obtain four IRAC observations of epsilon Aurigae. A naked eye object located near Capella, epsilon Aurigae is the eclipsing binary star with the longest known orbital period, showing a single long duration (~2 yr) eclipse every 27.1 yr. For much of the last 200 years, the nature of the eclipsing object defied explanation. We recently demonstrated that epsilon Aurigae consists of a high luminosity F0 post-AGB star in orbit with a B5 V star surrounded by a solar system sized (~8 AU diameter) disk of cool, dust-dominated material. The eclipse of epsilon Aurigae is a rare event; moreover, it is a unique astrophysical opportunity, since the backlighting of the disk by the high luminosity eclipsed star reveals details that cannot be detected in similar dusty disks around single stars. The current eclipse started in August 2009 and ended in July 2011; we are now in the post-eclipse phase, when the irradiation-heated side of the disk will begin rotating into view. The goals for these observations include: (1) extend our ongoing IRAC monitoring campaign covering the current eclipse to post-eclipse visits; (2) provide a consistent, well-calibrated space-based set of IR photometry for comparison with ongoing ground-based work; and (3) use the composite results to constrain the thermal profile of the disk. A key expectation of these particular observations is to reveal the irradiation-heated portion of the disk, which will be visible on its trailing side following eclipse. Observations of this side of the disk will be crucial to test and constrain new models of disk structure. As part of our overall monitoring campaign with Spitzer, Hubble, Herschel, and numerous ground-based facilities, these proposed observations will make an important contribution to the understanding of stellar evolution in binary stars, including mass transfer and evolution studies, along with new insights into astrophysical disks and post

  8. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Bilheux, H.; Kang, M.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C.; Horita, J.; Perfect, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ quantification of soil-plant water fluxes have not been fully successful due to a lack of non-destructive techniques capable of revealing roots or water fluxes at relevant spatial scales. Neutron imaging is a unique non-invasive tool that can assess sub-millimeter scale material properties and transport in situ, and which has been successfully applied to characterize soil and plant water status. Here, we have applied neutron radiography and tomography to quantify water transport through individual maize roots in response to internal plant demand. Zea mays seedlings were grown for 10 days in Flint silica sand within 2.6 cm diameter Al chambers. Using a reactor-based neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (HFIR), water fluxes were tracked through the maize soil-root systems by collecting consecutive neutron radiographs over a 12 h period following irrigation with D2O. D has a much lower neutron attenuation than H, thus D2O displacement of existing H2O within the plant vascular system, or influx of D2O into previously dry tissue or soil is readily tracked by changes in image intensity through time. Plant water release and uptake was regulated by periodically cycling on a high-intensity grow light. From each maize replicate, selected regions of interest (ROI) were delineated around individual roots, root free soil, stem and leaf segments. Changes in ROI were tracked through time to reveal patterns of water flux. The hydration of root and stem tissue cycled in response to illumination; root water content often increased during darkness, then decreased with illumination as water was transported from the root into the stem. Relative root-shoot hydration through time illustrates the balance between demand, storage capacity and uptake, which varies depending on root characteristics and its localized soil environment. The dynamic transport of water between soil, individual roots, stems and leaves was readily visualized and quantified illustrating the value

  9. Revealing Invisible Photonic Inscriptions: Images from Strain.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tao; Cao, Guoshuai; Schäfer, Christian G; Zhao, Qibin; Gallei, Markus; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2015-06-24

    Photonic structural materials have received intensive interest and have been strongly developed over the past few years for image displays, sensing, and anticounterfeit materials. Their "smartness" arises from their color responsivity to changes of environment, strain, or external fields. Here, we introduce a novel invisible photonic system that reveals encrypted images or characters by simply stretching, or immersing in solvents. This type of intriguing photonic material is composed of regularly arranged core-shell particles that are selectively cross-linked by UV irradiation, giving different strain response compared to un-cross-linked regions. The images reversibly appear and disappear when cycling the strain and releasing it. The unique advantages of this soft polymer opal system compared with other types of photonic gels are that it can be produced in roll to roll quantities, can be vigorously deformed to achieve strong color changes, and has no solvent evaporation issues because it is a photonic rubber system. We demonstrate potential applications together with a fabrication procedure which is straightforward and scalable, vital for user take-up. Our work deepens understanding of this rubbery photonic system based on core-shell nanospheres. PMID:26039279

  10. Chimaeric sounds reveal dichotomies in auditory perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Zachary M.; Delgutte, Bertrand; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2002-03-01

    By Fourier's theorem, signals can be decomposed into a sum of sinusoids of different frequencies. This is especially relevant for hearing, because the inner ear performs a form of mechanical Fourier transform by mapping frequencies along the length of the cochlear partition. An alternative signal decomposition, originated by Hilbert, is to factor a signal into the product of a slowly varying envelope and a rapidly varying fine time structure. Neurons in the auditory brainstem sensitive to these features have been found in mammalian physiological studies. To investigate the relative perceptual importance of envelope and fine structure, we synthesized stimuli that we call `auditory chimaeras', which have the envelope of one sound and the fine structure of another. Here we show that the envelope is most important for speech reception, and the fine structure is most important for pitch perception and sound localization. When the two features are in conflict, the sound of speech is heard at a location determined by the fine structure, but the words are identified according to the envelope. This finding reveals a possible acoustic basis for the hypothesized `what' and `where' pathways in the auditory cortex.

  11. Bone structure as revealed by microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, Tor; Laib, Andres; Ulrich, Dieter; Kohlbrenner, Adrian; Ruegsegger, Peter

    1997-10-01

    The appearance of cancellous bone architecture is different for various skeletal sites and various disease states. In the iliac crest it is more plate-like, whereas in the spine rods dominate. During aging and disease plates are perforated and connecting rods are dissolved. There is a continuous shift from one structural type to the other. So traditional histomorphometric procedures, which are based on a fixed model type, will lead to questionable results. 3D microtomography allows to assess model independent structural parameters so that trabecular thickness, for example, can be determined directly. Not only mean thicknesses are available but also thickness histograms which are helpful to identify pathological states. Other features such as trabecular separation, degree of anisotropy and structural type index can be extracted from the 3D images and allow to characterize cancellous bone and its changes due to aging, disease and treatment. To fully exploit the significance of bone structure on bone strength large scale finite element (FE) analyses are performed. Hence microtomography, performed with a sufficiently fine isotropic spatial resolution, reveals information on the structural features of cancellous bone which were not available so far and which will, hopefully, lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of bone diseases and subsequently to improved treatment regimes.

  12. Biosignatures as revealed by spectropolarimetry of Earthshine.

    PubMed

    Sterzik, Michael F; Bagnulo, Stefano; Palle, Enric

    2012-03-01

    Low-resolution intensity spectra of Earth's atmosphere obtained from space reveal strong signatures of life ('biosignatures'), such as molecular oxygen and methane with abundances far from chemical equilibrium, as well as the presence of a 'red edge' (a sharp increase of albedo for wavelengths longer than 700 nm) caused by surface vegetation. Light passing through the atmosphere is strongly linearly polarized by scattering (from air molecules, aerosols and cloud particles) and by reflection (from oceans and land). Spectropolarimetric observations of local patches of Earth's sky light from the ground contain signatures of oxygen, ozone and water, and are used to characterize the properties of clouds and aerosols. When applied to exoplanets, ground-based spectropolarimetry can better constrain properties of atmospheres and surfaces than can standard intensity spectroscopy. Here we report disk-integrated linear polarization spectra of Earthshine, which is sunlight that has been first reflected by Earth and then reflected back to Earth by the Moon. The observations allow us to determine the fractional contribution of clouds and ocean surface, and are sensitive to visible areas of vegetation as small as 10 per cent. They represent a benchmark for the diagnostics of the atmospheric composition, mean cloud height and surfaces of exoplanets. PMID:22382980

  13. Niche engineering reveals complementary resource use.

    PubMed

    Gable, Jacob T; Crowder, David W; Northfield, Tobin D; Steffan, Shawn A; Snyder, William E

    2012-09-01

    Greater resource use by diverse communities might result from species occupying complementary niches. Demonstrating niche complementarity among species is challenging, however, due to the difficulty in relating differences between species in particular traits to their use of complementary resources. Here, we overcame this obstacle by exploiting plastic foraging behavior in a community of predatory insects common on Brassica oleracea plants in Washington, USA. These predators complemented one another by partitioning foraging space, with some species foraging primarily along leaf edges and others at leaf centers. We hypothesized that emergent biodiversity effects would occur when predators partitioned foraging space on leaves, but not when spatial complementarity was dampened. Indeed, on intact leaves, edge- and center-foraging predators combined to kill more prey than any single predator species could by itself. These emergent diversity effects, however, disappeared on plants damaged by the caterpillar Plutella xylostella. Caterpillar chew-holes brought edge habitats to the center of leaves, so that all predator species could attack aphids anywhere on plants. With spatial niche differences diminished, there were no benefits of predator diversity; the most voracious single predator species killed the most aphids. Thus, caterpillar herbivory determined whether multi-predator-species effects reflected complementarity or species' individual impacts. Our study provides direct evidence for a causative relationship between niche differentiation and increased resource consumption by diverse communities, as revealed by ecological engineers that homogenize the foraging environment. PMID:23094370

  14. VISTA Reveals the Secret of the Unicorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    A new infrared image from ESO's VISTA survey telescope reveals an extraordinary landscape of glowing tendrils of gas, dark clouds and young stars within the constellation of Monoceros (the Unicorn). This star-forming region, known as Monoceros R2, is embedded within a huge dark cloud. The region is almost completely obscured by interstellar dust when viewed in visible light, but is spectacular in the infrared. An active stellar nursery lies hidden inside a massive dark cloud rich in molecules and dust in the constellation of Monoceros. Although it appears close in the sky to the more familiar Orion Nebula it is actually almost twice as far from Earth, at a distance of about 2700 light-years. In visible light a grouping of massive hot stars creates a beautiful collection of reflection nebulae where the bluish starlight is scattered from parts of the dark, foggy outer layers of the molecular cloud. However, most of the new-born massive stars remain hidden as the thick interstellar dust strongly absorbs their ultraviolet and visible light. In this gorgeous infrared image taken from ESO's Paranal Observatory in northern Chile, the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA [1], eso0949) penetrates the dark curtain of cosmic dust and reveals in astonishing detail the folds, loops and filaments sculpted from the dusty interstellar matter by intense particle winds and the radiation emitted by hot young stars. "When I first saw this image I just said 'Wow!' I was amazed to see all the dust streamers so clearly around the Monoceros R2 cluster, as well as the jets from highly embedded young stellar objects. There is such a great wealth of exciting detail revealed in these VISTA images," says Jim Emerson, of Queen Mary, University of London and leader of the VISTA consortium. With its huge field of view, large mirror and sensitive camera, VISTA is ideal for obtaining deep, high quality infrared images of large areas of the sky, such as the Monoceros R2 region

  15. Overnight lexical consolidation revealed by speech segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dumay, Nicolas; Gareth Gaskell, M

    2012-04-01

    Two experiments explored the consolidation of spoken words, and assessed whether post-sleep novel competitor effects truly reflect engagement of these novel words in competition for lexical segmentation. Two types of competitor relationships were contrasted: the onset-aligned case (such as "frenzylk"), where the novel word is a close variant of the existing word: they start at the same time point and overlap on most of their segments; and the fully embedding case (such as "lirmucktoze"), where the existing word corresponds to a smaller embedded portion of its novel competitor and is thus less noticeable. Experiment 1 (pause detection) revealed a similar performance for both cases, with no competitor effect immediately after exposure, but significant inhibition after 24 h and seven days. Experiment 2 (word spotting) produced exactly the same pattern; however, as is the case with existing word carriers (cf. McQueen, Norris, & Cutler, 1994), the inhibition was much stronger for fully embedded than for onset-aligned targets (e.g., "lirmuckt" vs. "frenzyl"). Meanwhile, explicit measures of learning, i.e., free recall and recognition, improved over time. These results cannot be explained by either consolidation of episodic traces or acquisition of new phonological/dialectal variants. We argue instead that they reflect a general trait of vocabulary learning and consolidation. PMID:22261419

  16. Sequence tagging reveals unexpected modifications in toxicoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; Codreanu, Simona G.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Collins, Ben C.; Pennington, Stephen R.; Gallagher, William M.; Tabb, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Toxicoproteomic samples are rich in posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. Identifying these modifications via standard database searching can incur significant performance penalties. Here we describe the latest developments in TagRecon, an algorithm that leverages inferred sequence tags to identify modified peptides in toxicoproteomic data sets. TagRecon identifies known modifications more effectively than the MyriMatch database search engine. TagRecon outperformed state of the art software in recognizing unanticipated modifications from LTQ, Orbitrap, and QTOF data sets. We developed user-friendly software for detecting persistent mass shifts from samples. We follow a three-step strategy for detecting unanticipated PTMs in samples. First, we identify the proteins present in the sample with a standard database search. Next, identified proteins are interrogated for unexpected PTMs with a sequence tag-based search. Finally, additional evidence is gathered for the detected mass shifts with a refinement search. Application of this technology on toxicoproteomic data sets revealed unintended cross-reactions between proteins and sample processing reagents. Twenty five proteins in rat liver showed signs of oxidative stress when exposed to potentially toxic drugs. These results demonstrate the value of mining toxicoproteomic data sets for modifications. PMID:21214251

  17. Chandra Reveals Remains of Giant Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo taken by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory that reveals the remains of an explosion in the form of two enormous arcs of multimillion-degree gas in the galaxy Centaurus A that appear to be part of a ring 25,000 light years in diameter. The size and location of the ring suggest that it could have been an explosion that occurred about 10 million years ago. A composite image made with radio (red and green), optical (yellow-orange), and X-ray data (blue) presents a sturning tableau of a turbulent galaxy. A broad band of dust and cold gas is bisected at an angle by opposing jets of high-energy particles blasting away from the supermassive black hole in the nucleus. Lying in a plane perpendicular to the jets are the two large arcs of x-ray emitting multi-million degree gas. This discovery can help astronomers better understand the cause and effect of violent outbursts from the vicinity of supermassive black holes of active galaxies. The Chandra program is managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

  18. Revealing the values behind convenience food consumption.

    PubMed

    Botonaki, Anna; Mattas, Konstadinos

    2010-12-01

    The increasing importance of convenience in consumer food choices has attracted researchers' interest. In the effort to understand how convenience affects consumers' food preferences, values are believed to play an important role. The present study attempts to examine the way personal values suggested by Schwartz (1992) are associated with behaviour and attitudes regarding convenience food. A number of constructs describing food related attitudes and behaviours were developed and their relationship with personal values was analyzed following the methodology proposed by Brunsø, Scholderer, and Grunert (2004). Data were collected through a questionnaire survey from a random sample of consumers in Thessaloniki city, Greece. The results reveal that convenience food consumption and convenience orientation in the food domain are mainly connected with values that motivate people to seek new experiences, act independently and enhance their own personal interests, while are in conflict with values of conservation and self-transcendence. The opposite holds for other food related attitudes and behaviours like involvement with cooking and variety in diet. The findings seem to be of particular interest not only for marketers of food products, but also for food policy makers. PMID:20875475

  19. VISTA Reveals the Secret of the Unicorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    A new infrared image from ESO's VISTA survey telescope reveals an extraordinary landscape of glowing tendrils of gas, dark clouds and young stars within the constellation of Monoceros (the Unicorn). This star-forming region, known as Monoceros R2, is embedded within a huge dark cloud. The region is almost completely obscured by interstellar dust when viewed in visible light, but is spectacular in the infrared. An active stellar nursery lies hidden inside a massive dark cloud rich in molecules and dust in the constellation of Monoceros. Although it appears close in the sky to the more familiar Orion Nebula it is actually almost twice as far from Earth, at a distance of about 2700 light-years. In visible light a grouping of massive hot stars creates a beautiful collection of reflection nebulae where the bluish starlight is scattered from parts of the dark, foggy outer layers of the molecular cloud. However, most of the new-born massive stars remain hidden as the thick interstellar dust strongly absorbs their ultraviolet and visible light. In this gorgeous infrared image taken from ESO's Paranal Observatory in northern Chile, the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA [1], eso0949) penetrates the dark curtain of cosmic dust and reveals in astonishing detail the folds, loops and filaments sculpted from the dusty interstellar matter by intense particle winds and the radiation emitted by hot young stars. "When I first saw this image I just said 'Wow!' I was amazed to see all the dust streamers so clearly around the Monoceros R2 cluster, as well as the jets from highly embedded young stellar objects. There is such a great wealth of exciting detail revealed in these VISTA images," says Jim Emerson, of Queen Mary, University of London and leader of the VISTA consortium. With its huge field of view, large mirror and sensitive camera, VISTA is ideal for obtaining deep, high quality infrared images of large areas of the sky, such as the Monoceros R2 region

  20. Dynamic Environmental Photosynthetic Imaging Reveals Emergent Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jeffrey A; Savage, Linda J; Zegarac, Robert; Hall, Christopher C; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Davis, Geoffry A; Kovac, William Kent; Chen, Jin; Kramer, David M

    2016-06-22

    Understanding and improving the productivity and robustness of plant photosynthesis requires high-throughput phenotyping under environmental conditions that are relevant to the field. Here we demonstrate the dynamic environmental photosynthesis imager (DEPI), an experimental platform for integrated, continuous, and high-throughput measurements of photosynthetic parameters during plant growth under reproducible yet dynamic environmental conditions. Using parallel imagers obviates the need to move plants or sensors, reducing artifacts and allowing simultaneous measurement on large numbers of plants. As a result, DEPI can reveal phenotypes that are not evident under standard laboratory conditions but emerge under progressively more dynamic illumination. We show examples in mutants of Arabidopsis of such "emergent phenotypes" that are highly transient and heterogeneous, appearing in different leaves under different conditions and depending in complex ways on both environmental conditions and plant developmental age. These emergent phenotypes appear to be caused by a range of phenomena, suggesting that such previously unseen processes are critical for plant responses to dynamic environments. PMID:27336966

  1. Revealing Invisible Photonic Inscriptions: Images from Strain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photonic structural materials have received intensive interest and have been strongly developed over the past few years for image displays, sensing, and anticounterfeit materials. Their “smartness” arises from their color responsivity to changes of environment, strain, or external fields. Here, we introduce a novel invisible photonic system that reveals encrypted images or characters by simply stretching, or immersing in solvents. This type of intriguing photonic material is composed of regularly arranged core–shell particles that are selectively cross-linked by UV irradiation, giving different strain response compared to un-cross-linked regions. The images reversibly appear and disappear when cycling the strain and releasing it. The unique advantages of this soft polymer opal system compared with other types of photonic gels are that it can be produced in roll to roll quantities, can be vigorously deformed to achieve strong color changes, and has no solvent evaporation issues because it is a photonic rubber system. We demonstrate potential applications together with a fabrication procedure which is straightforward and scalable, vital for user take-up. Our work deepens understanding of this rubbery photonic system based on core–shell nanospheres. PMID:26039279

  2. [The life of human hair follicle revealed].

    PubMed

    Bernard, Bruno A

    2006-02-01

    The human hair follicle is a unique appendage which results from epithelio-mesenchymal interactions initiated around the 3rd month of development. This appendage has a very complex structure, with a dermal compartment and an epithelial compartment. The dermal compartment comprises the connective tissue sheath and the dermal papilla, both of which are irrigated by microvessels. The epithelial compartment is made of highly replicating matrix cells giving rise to three concentrical domains, namely the outer root sheath, the inner root sheath and the hair shaft. The pigmentation unit, responsible for hair color, is made of fully active melanocytes located on top of the dermal papilla. Altogether a hair follicle contains more than 20 different cell types, engaged in different differentiation pathways and/or interacting with each other. This complex appendage has a unique behavior in mammals since, after a hair production phase, it involutes in place before entering a resting phase after which it renews itself under a cyclical but stochastic way, out of a double reservoir of pluripotent stem cells able to also regenerate epidermis. For yet unknown reasons, this well ordered process can be disturbed, provoking alopecia. The pigmentation unit also renews itself under a cyclical way, out of a melanocyte progenitor reservoir which progressively declines with time, provoking the hair whitening process. Finally, the shape of the hair shaft is programmed from the bulb. What makes this appendage unique and fascinating is its high degree of autonomy, its incredibly complex though stable structure, the number of different cell types interacting under an equilibrated way and its potential of regeneration. It represents a true paradigm of tissue homeostasis, exemplifying in a small living cylinder all the fundamental laws of cell-cell and tissue interactions. This life is revealed in this short synthesis. PMID:16457752

  3. NASA's Hyperwall Revealing the Big Picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, Piers

    2011-01-01

    NASA:s hyperwall is a sophisticated visualization tool used to display large datasets. The hyperwall, or video wall, is capable of displaying multiple high-definition data visualizations and/or images simultaneously across an arrangement of screens. Functioning as a key component at many NASA exhibits, the hyperwall is used to help explain phenomena, ideas, or examples of world change. The traveling version of the hyperwall is typically comprised of nine 42-50" flat-screen monitors arranged in a 3x3 array (as depicted below). However, it is not limited to monitor size or number; screen sizes can be as large as 52" and the arrangement of screens can include more than nine monitors. Generally, NASA satellite and model data are used to highlight particular themes in atmospheric, land, and ocean science. Many of the existing hyperwall stories reveal change across space and time, while others display large-scale still-images accompanied by descriptive, story-telling captions. Hyperwall content on a variety of Earth Science topics already exists and is made available to the public at: eospso.gsfc.nasa.gov/hyperwall. Keynote and PowerPoint presentations as well as Summary of Story files are available for download on each existing topic. New hyperwall content and accompanying files will continue being developed to promote scientific literacy across a diverse group of audience members. NASA invites the use of content accessible through this website but requests the user to acknowledge any and all data sources referenced in the content being used.

  4. Saturn Probe: Revealing Solar System Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Comparative studies of the gas giant and ice giant planets are needed to reliably discriminate among competing theories of the origin and evolution of giant planets and the solar system, but we lack critical measurements. A Saturn atmospheric entry probe mission would fill a vital part of that gap, allowing comparative studies of Jupiter and Saturn, providing the basis for later comparisons with the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, and informing studies of extrasolar planetary systems now being characterized. The Galileo Probe mission provided the first in situ studies of Jupiter's atmosphere. Similar measurements at Saturn, Uranus and Neptune would provide an important comparative planetology context for the Galileo results. Cassini's "Proximal Orbits" in 2017 will reveal Saturn's internal structure to complement the Juno mission's similar measurements at Jupiter. A Saturn entry probe, complementing the Galileo Probe investigations at Jupiter, would complete a solid basis for improved understanding of both Jupiter and Saturn, an important stepping stone to understanding Uranus and Neptune and solar system formation and evolution. The 2012 Decadal Survey ("DS") added Saturn Probe science objectives to NASA's New Frontiers Program: highest-priority Tier 1 objectives any New Frontiers implementation must achieve, and Tier 2, high priority but lower than Tier 1. A DS mission concept study using extremely conservative assumptions concluded that a Saturn Probe project could fit within New Frontiers resource constraints, giving a PI confidence that they could pursue some Tier 2 objectives, customizing for the proper balance of science return, science team composition, procured or contributed instruments, etc. Contributed instruments could significantly enhance the payload and the science team for greater science return. They also provide international collaboration opportunities, with science benefits well demonstrated by missions such as Cassini-Huygens and Rosetta.

  5. World population profile reveals bleak data.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    This article presents selected demographic and HIV/AIDS indicators for 1998 and projections for 2010 for selected African countries. The statistics are provided by the US Bureau of the Census. The Census HIV/AIDS database is one of the best in the world. Findings reveal that Africa is the worst affected by AIDS. Eight countries are particularly affected: Zimbabwe, Namibia, Botswana, Swaziland, Zambia, Kenya, Malawi, and South Africa. In 1998, life expectancy declined by 25.7 years. Population growth is expected to decline from 2.5% to 1.1% due to the impact of AIDS mortality. HIV continues to spread in African countries and its spread and impact is not recorded in present data. With AIDS, life expectancy is likely to decline in Zimbabwe from 39.2 to 38.8 years during 1998-2010; without AIDS, it is expected to rise from 64.9 to 69.5 years during the same time period. Only in Zambia is there a slight increase in life expectancy with AIDS. The overwhelming poor life prospects for Africans are reflected in this article, which can provide statistics only for 21 of 53 African countries. The absence of data may mean low HIV prevalence, lack of data, or the beginning of the HIV epidemic. The UNDP provides a Human Poverty Index with indicators for deprivation in knowledge, deprivation in living standards, and longevity. African countries are likely to shift to the bottom of this index due to the impact of AIDS. PMID:12294386

  6. Configuration effects of H-bonded sites and rigid core lengths on h-bonded banana-shaped liquid crystalline supramolecules consisting of symmetric trimers and asymmetric heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Yung; Chiang, I-Hung; Yang, Po-Jen; Li, Wan-Sheung; Chao, I-To; Lin, Hong-Cheu

    2009-11-01

    Several series of novel banana-shaped H-bonded symmetric trimers (with two H-bonds) and asymmetric heterodimers (with one H-bond) were self-assembled by appropriate molar ratios of proton donors (H-donors) and acceptors (H-acceptors). The influences of H-bonded linking positions and aromatic ring numbers (4-8 aromatic rings in the rigid cores) as well as the chain lengths (n, m = 12 or 16, respectively, in the flexible parts) on the mesomorphism and the switching behavior of the bent-core supramolecules were evaluated and theoretically analyzed. Except for the supramolecular structures with longer rigid cores or shorter flexible chains possessing the rectangular columnar (Col(r) or B1) phase, the SmC(A)P(A) phase was revealed in most supramolecular asymmetric heterodimers and switched to the SmC(S)P(F) phase by applying electric fields. The polar smectic C phase was dominated for those with H-bonded sites apart from the core center. Interestingly, the SmA and nematic phases were observed in H-bonded asymmetric dimers with H-bonded sites close to the core center, which theoretically proved that the polar smectic C phase was disfavored due to an unfavorable bend angle (smaller than the lower limit of 110 degrees ) in the lowest-energy H-bonded conformer. Compared with the fully covalently bonded analogue, lower transition temperatures and lower threshold voltages were developed in the H-bonded asymmetric dimers with the polar smectic C phase. On the basis of the theoretical calculations of molecular modeling, the existence of polar switching behavior in the polar smectic C phase of asymmetric heterodimers was proven to be associated with their configurations with higher dipole moments and suitable bend angles. Furthermore, the lack of polar switching behavior in supramolecular symmetric trimers, which exhibited the regular SmC phase with weak electrical stabilities, was related to their configurations with smaller dipole moments and confirmed by theoretical

  7. Passive seismology reveals biannual calving periodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomaus, T. C.; Larsen, C. F.; West, M. E.; Oneel, S.

    2013-12-01

    Iceberg calving is a large and variable component of the total mass loss from marine-terminating glaciers worldwide. However, the processes that control the size and variability of calving fluxes are poorly understood. Even more basic descriptions of iceberg calving, such as its seasonality, are uncertain. Here, we present nearly two years of automatically-estimated calving fluxes at Yahtse Glacier, a tidewater glacier whose terminus flows at ~7 km/yr towards the Gulf of Alaska. At the terminus, ice losses to calving and submarine melt total approximately 1.5 km^3/yr. In order to identify temporal variability in this mean rate, we develop a statistical model of calving size based on characteristics of calving-generated icequakes. These characteristics include 4 amplitude-based variables and 5 variables related to the shape of the icequake envelope. We build our model by combining automatically-detected icequakes (O'Neel et al., 2007) located at the terminus of Yahtse Glacier (Jones et al., 2013) with a training set of 1400 icequakes produced by visually-observed calving events (Bartholomaus et al., 2012). In each of the models tested (regression trees, multinomial logistic regression and multiple linear regession), icequake duration emerges as the single best predictor of iceberg size, consistent with past studies (Qamar, 1988; O'Neel et al., 2007). Additional predictors, such as the mean icequake amplitude and the kurtosis of the icequake envelope improve the predictive capability of the model and reduce the mean squared error to well-within the error of the in-person classification. Once validated, we apply our model to ~ 400,000 icequakes produced by calving events at Yahtse Glacier between June 2009 and September 2011. These results reveal fluctuations in calving rate at a range of timescales, including twice per year. We suggest that the roughly 50%, biannual variation in calving rate is the result of the trade-off between two competing processes at the

  8. Microradiometers Reveal Ocean Health, Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    When NASA researcher Stanford Hooker is in the field, he pays close attention to color. For Hooker, being in the field means being at sea. On one such research trip to the frigid waters of the Arctic, with a Coast Guard icebreaker looming nearby and the snow-crusted ice shelf a few feet away, Hooker leaned over the edge of his small boat and lowered a tethered device into the bright turquoise water, a new product devised by a NASA partner and enabled by a promising technology for oceanographers and atmospheric scientists alike. Color is a function of light. Pure water is clear, but the variation in color observed during a visit to the beach or a flight along a coastline depends on the water s depth and the constituents in it, how far down the light penetrates and how it is absorbed and scattered by dissolved and suspended material. Hooker cares about ocean color because of what it can reveal about the health of the ocean, and in turn, the health of our planet. "The main thing we are interested in is the productivity of the water," Hooker says. The seawater contains phytoplankton, microscopic plants, which are the food base for the ocean s ecosystems. Changes in the water s properties, whether due to natural seasonal effects or human influence, can lead to problems for delicate ecosystems such as coral reefs. Ocean color can inform researchers about the quantities and distribution of phytoplankton and other materials, providing clues as to how the world ocean is changing. NASA s Coastal Zone Color Scanner, launched in 1978, was the first ocean color instrument flown on a spacecraft. Since then, the Agency s ocean color research capabilities have become increasingly sophisticated with the launch of the SeaWiFS instrument in 1997 and the twin MODIS instruments carried into orbit on NASA s Terra (1999) and Aqua (2002) satellites. The technology provides sweeping, global information on ocean color on a scale unattainable by any other means. One issue that arises from

  9. Frantic activity revealed in dusty stellar factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-01-01

    Thanks to the Very Large Telescope's acute and powerful near-infrared eye, astronomers have uncovered a host of new young, massive and dusty stellar nurseries in nearby galaxy NGC 253. The centre of this galaxy appears to harbour a twin of our own Milky Way's supermassive black hole. ESO PR Photo 02a/09 The Spiral Galaxy NGC 253 Astronomers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Spain) used NACO, a sharp-eyed adaptive optics instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), to study the fine detail in NGC 253, one of the brightest and dustiest spiral galaxies in the sky. Adaptive Optics (AO) corrects for the blurring effect introduced by the Earth's atmosphere. This turbulence causes the stars to twinkle in a way that delights poets, but frustrates astronomers, since it smears out the images. With AO in action the telescope can produce images that are as sharp as is theoretically possible, as if the telescope were in space. NACO revealed features in the galaxy that were only 11 light-years across. "Our observations provide us with so much spatially resolved detail that we can, for the first time, compare them with the finest radio maps for this galaxy -- maps that have existed for more than a decade," says Juan Antonio Fernández-Ontiveros, the lead author of the paper reporting the results [1]. Astronomers identified 37 distinct bright regions, a threefold increase on previous results, packed into a tiny region at the core of the galaxy, comprising just one percent of the galaxy's total size. The astronomers combined their NACO images with data from another VLT instrument, VISIR, as well as with images from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and radio observations made by the Very Large Array and the Very Large Baseline Interferometer. Combining these observations, taken in different wavelength regimes, provided a clue to the nature of these regions. "We now think that these are probably very active nurseries that contain many stars bursting from their

  10. Shocking Detail of Superstar's Activity Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-10-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has imaged Eta Carinae and revealed a hot inner core around this mysterious superstar. The new X-ray observation shows three distinct structures: an outer, horseshoe shaped ring about two light years in diameter, a hot inner core about 3 light months in diameter, and a hot central source less than a light month in diameter which may contain the superstar. All three structures are thought to represent shock waves produced by matter rushing away from the superstar at supersonic speeds. The temperature of the shock-heated gas ranges from 60 million degrees Celsius in the central regions to 3 million degrees Celsius on the outer structure. An earlier image of Eta Carinae by the Hubble Space Telescope revealed two spectacular bubbles of gas expanding in opposite directions away from a central bright region at speeds in excess of a million miles per hour. The inner region visible in the Chandra image has never been resolved before, and appears to be associated with a central disk of high velocity gas rushing out at much higher speeds perpendicular to the bipolar optical nebula. "It is not what I expected," said Dr. Fred Seward of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "I expected to see a strong point source with a little diffuse emission cloud around it. Instead, we see just the opposite- a bright cloud of diffuse emission, and much less radiation from the center." "The Chandra image contains some puzzles for existing ideas of how a star can produce such hot and intense X-rays," agreed Prof. Kris Davidson of the University of Minnesota. "In the most popular theory, X-rays are made by colliding gas streams from two stars so close together that they'd look like a point source to us. But what happens to gas streams that escape to farther distances? The extended hot stuff in the middle of the new image gives demanding new conditions for any theory to meet." Eta Carinae is one of the most enigmatic and intriguing objects in our

  11. Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    A new study using results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory provides one of the best pieces of evidence yet that many supermassive black holes are spinning extremely rapidly. The whirling of these giant black holes drives powerful jets that pump huge amounts of energy into their environment and affects galaxy growth. A team of scientists compared leading theories of jets produced by rotating supermassive black holes with Chandra data. A sampling of nine giant galaxies that exhibit large disturbances in their gaseous atmospheres showed that the central black holes in these galaxies must be spinning at near their maximum rates. People Who Read This Also Read... NASA’s Swift Satellite Catches First Supernova in The Act of Exploding Black Holes Have Simple Feeding Habits Jet Power and Black Hole Assortment Revealed in New Chandra Image Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself "We think these monster black holes are spinning close to the limit set by Einstein's theory of relativity, which means that they can drag material around them at close to the speed of light," said Rodrigo Nemmen, a visiting graduate student at Penn State University, and lead author of a paper on the new results presented at American Astronomical Society in Austin, Texas. The research reinforces other, less direct methods previously used which have indicated that some stellar and supermassive black holes are spinning rapidly. According to Einstein's theory, a rapidly spinning black hole makes space itself rotate. This effect, coupled with gas spiraling toward the black hole, can produce a rotating, tightly wound vertical tower of magnetic field that flings a large fraction of the inflowing gas away from the vicinity of the black hole in an energetic, high-speed jet. Computer simulations by other authors have suggested that black holes may acquire their rapid spins when galaxies merge, and through the accretion of gas from their surroundings. "Extremely fast spin might be very common for large

  12. 21 CFR 1.21 - Failure to reveal material facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Failure to reveal material facts. 1.21 Section 1... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General Labeling Requirements § 1.21 Failure to reveal material facts. (a... to reveal facts that are: (1) Material in light of other representations made or suggested...

  13. 21 CFR 1.21 - Failure to reveal material facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Failure to reveal material facts. 1.21 Section 1... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General Labeling Requirements § 1.21 Failure to reveal material facts. (a) Labeling of a food, drug, device, or cosmetic shall be deemed to be misleading if it fails to reveal...

  14. 21 CFR 1.21 - Failure to reveal material facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Failure to reveal material facts. 1.21 Section 1... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General Labeling Requirements § 1.21 Failure to reveal material facts. (a) Labeling of a food, drug, device, or cosmetic shall be deemed to be misleading if it fails to reveal...

  15. The lower atmosphere of Pluto revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    ), attached to ESO's Very Large Telescope, have now revealed that the atmosphere as a whole, not just the upper atmosphere, has a mean temperature of minus 180 degrees Celsius, and so it is indeed "much hotter" than the surface. In contrast to the Earth's atmosphere [2], most, if not all, of Pluto's atmosphere is thus undergoing a temperature inversion: the temperature is higher, the higher in the atmosphere you look. The change is about 3 to 15 degrees per kilometre. On Earth, under normal circumstances, the temperature decreases through the atmosphere by about 6 degrees per kilometre. "It is fascinating to think that with CRIRES we are able to precisely measure traces of a gas in an atmosphere 100 000 times more tenuous than the Earth's, on an object five times smaller than our planet and located at the edge of the Solar System," says co-author Hans-Ulrich Käufl. "The combination of CRIRES and the VLT is almost like having an advanced atmospheric research satellite orbiting Pluto." The reason why Pluto's surface is so cold is linked to the existence of Pluto's atmosphere, and is due to the sublimation of the surface ice; much like sweat cools the body as it evaporates from the surface of the skin, this sublimation has a cooling effect on the surface of Pluto. In this respect, Pluto shares some properties with comets, whose coma and tails arise from sublimating ice as they approach the Sun. The CRIRES observations also indicate that methane is the second most common gas in Pluto's atmosphere, representing half a percent of the molecules. "We were able to show that these quantities of methane play a crucial role in the heating processes in the atmosphere and can explain the elevated atmospheric temperature," says Lellouch. Two different models can explain the properties of Pluto's atmosphere. In the first, the astronomers assume that Pluto's surface is covered with a thin layer of methane, which will inhibit the sublimation of the nitrogen frost. The second scenario invokes

  16. Dramatic Outburst Reveals Nearest Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    Sgr. The radio observations revealed the presence of a jet escaping from the system at mind-boggling speeds. Only three other galactic X-ray stellar systems have been found to eject material at such speeds. They have been dubbed "microquasars" because, on a smaller scale, they resemble quasars, which lie at the hearts of distant galaxies and also spew out high-velocity jets of particles. In galaxy-core quasars, the black holes are millions of times more massive than the Sun; in the more nearby microquasars the black holes are roughly three to twenty times more massive than the Sun. The extremely high velocity of the jets suggests that their origin lies close to the event horizon of a black hole. Microquasar activity is thought to arise when the black hole in the binary system draws material away from its companion star. The material surrounding the black hole forms a rapidly spinning disk called an accretion disk. This disk is heated by friction to millions of degrees, causing it to emit X-rays. As spiralling gas moves into the gravity well of the black hole, it moves faster and faster. Magnetic fields in the disk are believed to expel the charged subatomic particles at speeds close to that of light. As the charged particles interact with the magnetic fields, they emit radio waves. If some of the material escapes by being magnetically expelled into space, the matter may continue moving at the tremendous speed it had attained near the black hole. After their ejection, the jets of particles expand and cool, fading from astronomers' view. V4641 Sgr excites astronomers because it is close and because it acted so differently from other microquasars. In other microquasars, outbursts have dimmed more slowly over weeks or months rather than hours. "There's something fundamentally different about this one; it's more extreme than any other example," Hjellming said. "And because this system happens to be so close to us, `it is very likely that there are more objects like V4641

  17. Effect of Enantiomeric Excess on the Phase Behavior of Antiferroelectric Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    L Pan; B McCoy; S Wang; Z Liu; S Wang; R Pindak; C Huang

    2011-12-31

    Null transmission ellipsometry and resonant x-ray diffraction are employed to study the effect of enantiomeric excess (EE) on the phase behavior of antiferroelectric liquid crystal 10OTBBB1M7. Phase sequence, layer spacing, and pitch of the helical structures of the smectic-C*{sub {alpha}} and smectic-C* phases are studied as a function of temperature and EE. Upon reducing EE, a liquid-gas-type critical point of the smectic-C*{sub {alpha}} to smectic-C* transition is observed, as well as the disappearance of the smectic-C*{sub d4} and the smectic-C*{sub d3} phases. Results are analyzed in a mean-field model.

  18. What Facial Appearance Reveals Over Time: When Perceived Expressions in Neutral Faces Reveal Stable Emotion Dispositions.

    PubMed

    Adams, Reginald B; Garrido, Carlos O; Albohn, Daniel N; Hess, Ursula; Kleck, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    It might seem a reasonable assumption that when we are not actively using our faces to express ourselves (i.e., when we display nonexpressive, or neutral faces), those around us will not be able to read our emotions. Herein, using a variety of expression-related ratings, we examined whether age-related changes in the face can accurately reveal one's innermost affective dispositions. In each study, we found that expressive ratings of neutral facial displays predicted self-reported positive/negative dispositional affect, but only for elderly women, and only for positive affect. These findings meaningfully replicate and extend earlier work examining age-related emotion cues in the face of elderly women (Malatesta et al., 1987a). We discuss these findings in light of evidence that women are expected to, and do, smile more than men, and that the quality of their smiles predicts their life satisfaction. Although ratings of old male faces did not significantly predict self-reported affective dispositions, the trend was similar to that found for old female faces. A plausible explanation for this gender difference is that in the process of attenuating emotional expressions over their lifetimes, old men reveal less evidence of their total emotional experiences in their faces than do old women. PMID:27445944

  19. What Facial Appearance Reveals Over Time: When Perceived Expressions in Neutral Faces Reveal Stable Emotion Dispositions

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Reginald B.; Garrido, Carlos O.; Albohn, Daniel N.; Hess, Ursula; Kleck, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    It might seem a reasonable assumption that when we are not actively using our faces to express ourselves (i.e., when we display nonexpressive, or neutral faces), those around us will not be able to read our emotions. Herein, using a variety of expression-related ratings, we examined whether age-related changes in the face can accurately reveal one’s innermost affective dispositions. In each study, we found that expressive ratings of neutral facial displays predicted self-reported positive/negative dispositional affect, but only for elderly women, and only for positive affect. These findings meaningfully replicate and extend earlier work examining age-related emotion cues in the face of elderly women (Malatesta et al., 1987a). We discuss these findings in light of evidence that women are expected to, and do, smile more than men, and that the quality of their smiles predicts their life satisfaction. Although ratings of old male faces did not significantly predict self-reported affective dispositions, the trend was similar to that found for old female faces. A plausible explanation for this gender difference is that in the process of attenuating emotional expressions over their lifetimes, old men reveal less evidence of their total emotional experiences in their faces than do old women. PMID:27445944

  20. Stated and revealed inequality aversion in three subject pools

    PubMed Central

    Beranek, Benjamin; Cubitt, Robin; Gächter, Simon

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports data from three subject pools (n=717 subjects) using techniques based on those of Loewenstein, et al. (1989) and Blanco, et al. (2011) to obtain parameters, respectively, of stated and revealed inequality aversion. We provide a replication opportunity for those papers, with two innovations: (i) a design which allows stated and revealed preferences to be compared at the individual level; (ii) assessment of robustness of findings across subjects from a UK university, a Turkish university and Amazon Mechanical Turk. Our findings on stated aversion to inequality are qualitatively similar to those of Loewenstein, et al. in each of our subject pools, whereas there are notable differences between some of our findings on revealed preference and those of Blanco, et al. We find that revealed advantageous inequality aversion is often stronger than revealed dis-advantageous inequality aversion. In most subject pools, we find some (weak) correlation between corresponding parameters of stated and revealed inequality aversion. PMID:27069847

  1. Bent core liquid crystal elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Verduzco, R.; DiMasi, E.; Luchette, P.; Ho Hong, S.; Harden, J.; Palffy-Muhoray, P.; Kilbey II, S.M.; Sprunt, S.; Gleeson, G.T. Jakli, A.

    2010-07-28

    Liquid crystal (LC) elastomers with bent-core side-groups incorporate the properties of bent-core liquid crystals in a flexible and self-supporting polymer network. Bent-core liquid crystal elastomers (BCEs) with uniform alignment were prepared by attaching a reactive bent-core LC to poly(hydrogenmethylsiloxane) and crosslinking with a divinyl crosslinker. Phase behavior studies indicate a nematic phase over a wide temperature range that approaches room temperature, and thermoelastic measurements show that these BCEs can reversibly change their length by more than a factor of two upon heating and cooling. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies reveal multiple, broad low-angle peaks consistent with short-range smectic C order of the bent-core side groups. A comparison of these patterns with predictions of a Landau model for short-range smectic C order shows that the length scale for smectic ordering in BCEs is similar to that seen in pure bent-core LCs. The combination of rubber elasticity and smectic ordering of the bent-core side groups suggests that BCEs may be promising materials for sensing, actuating, and other advanced applications.

  2. Resonant X-Ray Diffraction Study of an Unusually Large Phase Coexistance in Smectic Liquid-Crystal Films

    SciTech Connect

    Pan L.; Pindak R.; Barois, P.; Liu, Z.Q.; McCoy, B.K. & Hyang, C.C.

    2012-01-19

    The recent discovery of the new smectic-C{sub d6}* (SmC{sub d6}*) phase [S. Wang et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 104 027801 (2010)] also revealed the existence of a noisy region in the temperature window between the SmC{sub d6}* phase and the smectic-C{sub d4}* (SmC{sub d4}*) phase. Characterized by multiple resonant peaks spanning a wide region in Q{sub Z}, the corresponding structure of this temperature window has been a mystery. In this Letter, through a careful resonant x-ray diffraction study and simulations of the diffraction spectra, we show that this region is in fact an unusually large coexistence region of the SmC{sub d6}* phase and the SmC{sub d4}* phase. The structure of the noisy region is found to be a heterogeneous mixture of local SmC{sub d6}* and SmC{sub d4}* orders on the sub-{micro}m scale.

  3. 21 CFR 1.21 - Failure to reveal material facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Failure to reveal material facts. 1.21 Section 1.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... to reveal facts that are: (1) Material in light of other representations made or suggested...

  4. Everett Weinreb, Photographer, April 1989 FOUNDATION DETAIL REVEALED AS RESULT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Everett Weinreb, Photographer, April 1989 FOUNDATION DETAIL REVEALED AS RESULT OF HOUSE DEMOLITION - Irvine Ranch Agricultural Headquarters, Boyd Tenant House, Southeast of Intersection of San Diego & Santa Ana Freeways, Irvine, Orange County, CA

  5. 14. DETAIL VIEW, FLUTED PILASTER AND PANELLED REVEAL IN DOORWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL VIEW, FLUTED PILASTER AND PANELLED REVEAL IN DOORWAY BETWEEN VESTIBULE AND STAIRHALL (NOTE WOOD GRAINING), WITH SCALE - Bowieville, 522 Church Road South, Leeland, Prince George's County, MD

  6. General view of the archaeological site showing excavation and revealing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the archaeological site showing excavation and revealing the steps leading down into the eighteenth-century burial vault - Harry Buck House, North of Main Street (14800 Governor Oden Bowie Drive), Upper Marlboro, Prince George's County, MD

  7. [An original revealing mode of sarcoidosis: Sweet's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bricha, Myriem; Sqalli, Fatimazzahra; Hammi, Sanae; Bourkadi, Jamal Eddine

    2016-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome is a neutrophilic dermatosis which usually presents as an idiopathic disorder. The combination of Sweet's syndrome and sarcoidosis is rare. We report the clinical case of a Sweet's syndrome revealing sarcoidosis. PMID:27279949

  8. Revealing the molecular signatures of host-pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technology and genome-wide association studies are now revealing the complex interactions between hosts and pathogen through genomic variation signatures, which arise from evolutionary co-existence. PMID:22011345

  9. Revealing ecological networks using Bayesian network inference algorithms.

    PubMed

    Milns, Isobel; Beale, Colin M; Smith, V Anne

    2010-07-01

    Understanding functional relationships within ecological networks can help reveal keys to ecosystem stability or fragility. Revealing these relationships is complicated by the difficulties of isolating variables or performing experimental manipulations within a natural ecosystem, and thus inferences are often made by matching models to observational data. Such models, however, require assumptions-or detailed measurements-of parameters such as birth and death rate, encounter frequency, territorial exclusion, and predation success. Here, we evaluate the use of a Bayesian network inference algorithm, which can reveal ecological networks based upon species and habitat abundance alone. We test the algorithm's performance and applicability on observational data of avian communities and habitat in the Peak District National Park, United Kingdom. The resulting networks correctly reveal known relationships among habitat types and known interspecific relationships. In addition, the networks produced novel insights into ecosystem structure and identified key species with high connectivity. Thus, Bayesian networks show potential for becoming a valuable tool in ecosystem analysis. PMID:20715607

  10. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2012 July 2012 (historical) Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma A ... out to see if a technology called whole genome sequencing would help them find other genetic risk ...

  11. Direct sequencing of the human microbiome readily reveals community differences

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Culture-independent studies of human microbiota by direct genomic sequencing reveal quite distinct differences among communities, indicating that improved sequencing capacity can be most wisely utilized to study more samples, rather than more sequences per sample. PMID:20441597

  12. Revealing of HII-regions in Galaxies with Panoramic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakopian, S. A.; Balayan, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    Observations intended to investigation and revealing of nodes of processes of nuclear and starforming activity in galaxies were performed via panoramic spectroscopy. Data obtained on Mrk 1050 revealed evidence of starforming activity also outside the central engine of high surface brightness. Two small HII-regions, being likely a part of the chain, are located in the part of the spiral branch coming from the nucleus part.

  13. On the correlation between the structure of lyotropic carriers and the delivery profiles of two common NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Avrahami, Marganit; Shames, Alexander I; Ottaviani, M Francesca; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2014-10-01

    Two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), sodium diclofenac (Na-DFC) and celecoxib (CLXB) were solubilized within cubic and lamellar mesophases as carriers for transdermal drug delivery. SD-NMR, SAXS, ATR-FTIR, and EPR measurements were performed to examine the systems' characteristics and the interactions between the drugs and their hosting mesophases. The amphiphilic drug Na-DFC was found to incorporate at the interfaces of the cubic and lamellar mesophases and thus to act as a cosurfactant and a "structure stabilizer". It increased the order degree and the interactions between the GMO molecules and led the systems toward denser packing. CLXB exhibits an opposite effect on the mesophases. Its solubilization within both systems is accompanied with significant channel swelling and decrease in the order degree. The hydrophobic, rigid and bulky CLXB behaves as a "structure breaker", incorporated between the GMO tails, disturbing the mesophase packing and enhancing the repulsion at the tails region, limiting their close binding. Release experiments from Franz cells revealed that Na-DFC release is dependent on the quantity of water within the hosting mesophase as the water-rich formulation exhibits 1.5-fold enhancement in the release of the drug, compared to the lamellar phase. In contrast, CLXB release was not influenced by the water quantity, hinting that the release mechanisms of the drugs are different while Na-DFC diffuses from the water channels to the external phase, CLXB diffusion occurs through the continuous lipophilic region. The difference in the solubilization sites and interactions of each drug with the mesophases affect their release profiles and determine the preferred formulations for each drug's delivery vehicle. PMID:25048360

  14. Camelid genomes reveal evolution and adaptation to desert environments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huiguang; Guang, Xuanmin; Al-Fageeh, Mohamed B; Cao, Junwei; Pan, Shengkai; Zhou, Huanmin; Zhang, Li; Abutarboush, Mohammed H; Xing, Yanping; Xie, Zhiyuan; Alshanqeeti, Ali S; Zhang, Yanru; Yao, Qiulin; Al-Shomrani, Badr M; Zhang, Dong; Li, Jiang; Manee, Manee M; Yang, Zili; Yang, Linfeng; Liu, Yiyi; Zhang, Jilin; Altammami, Musaad A; Wang, Shenyuan; Yu, Lili; Zhang, Wenbin; Liu, Sanyang; Ba, La; Liu, Chunxia; Yang, Xukui; Meng, Fanhua; Wang, Shaowei; Li, Lu; Li, Erli; Li, Xueqiong; Wu, Kaifeng; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Junyi; Yin, Ye; Yang, Huanming; Al-Swailem, Abdulaziz M; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus), dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos) are economically important livestock. Although the Bactrian camel and dromedary are large, typically arid-desert-adapted mammals, alpacas are adapted to plateaus. Here we present high-quality genome sequences of these three species. Our analysis reveals the demographic history of these species since the Tortonian Stage of the Miocene and uncovers a striking correlation between large fluctuations in population size and geological time boundaries. Comparative genomic analysis reveals complex features related to desert adaptations, including fat and water metabolism, stress responses to heat, aridity, intense ultraviolet radiation and choking dust. Transcriptomic analysis of Bactrian camels further reveals unique osmoregulation, osmoprotection and compensatory mechanisms for water reservation underpinned by high blood glucose levels. We hypothesize that these physiological mechanisms represent kidney evolutionary adaptations to the desert environment. This study advances our understanding of camelid evolution and the adaptation of camels to arid-desert environments. PMID:25333821

  15. [Ovarian torsion revealing an ovarian cavernous hemangioma in a child].

    PubMed

    M'pemba Loufoua-Lemay, A-B; Peko, J-F; Mbongo, J-A; Mokoko, J-C; Nzingoula, S

    2003-11-01

    The authors report one case of cavernous hemangioma of the left ovary, which was revealed by ovarian torsion. Such benign tumors of the blood vessels are rare in ovaries during childhood. This hemangioma was observed in a 13-year-old patient, who presented with abdominal and pelvic pain and vomiting. The pelvic mass was noted and sonography revealed a cystic tumor. An annexectomia was realized. Histology showed narcotized ovary cells, with an increased number of vascular channels composed of thin walled vessels, whose wall consisted of an endothelium. This aspect evoked a cavernous hemangioma of the ovary. PMID:14613693

  16. Nilaja Sun's "No Child"...: Revealing Teaching and Learning through Theater

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetland, Lois

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of Nilaja Sun's one-woman play, "No Child" . . ., that applies the Studio Habits of Mind framework to reveal essential features of great teaching artistry and great teaching. The play conveys much about twenty-first century schools and the policies that control them; about respect, equity, justice, and the lack of…

  17. The Basics of How to Reveal Epilepsy--Part Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittan, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    In the April 2009 edition of "Exceptional Parent," Part One of this series explored why, for their own emotional well-being, it is so important for parents to tell others about their or their child's epilepsy. This month's installment will discuss the basics of how to reveal epilepsy to others, including some additional advantages one receives in…

  18. Carbohydrate active enzymes revealed in Coptotermes formosanus transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A normalized cDNA library of Coptotermes formosanus was constructed using mixed RNA isolated from workers, soldiers, nymphs and alates of both sexes. Sequencing of this library generated 131,637 EST and 25,939 unigenes were assembled. Carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) revealed in this library we...

  19. [Ulcerated duodenitis revealing Henoch-Schönlein purpura].

    PubMed

    Marting, A; Defrance, P; Wain, E; Van Severen, M; Deflandre, J

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and duodenal ulcers can meet many etiologies. We report the case of a young adult with an ulcerated duodenitis revealing Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The abdominal symptoms preceded the emergence of the classical cutaneous signs of the disease. PMID:26376566

  20. Natural Disasters that Reveal Cracks in Our Social Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langer, Nieli

    2004-01-01

    The recent deaths of more than 13,000 French elderly in the European heat wave of 2003 revealed cracks in the social foundation of urban communities, here and abroad. The breakdown occurred in community services, neighborhood networks, and governmental agencies that were responsible for warning of impending dangers to at-risk elderly. This paper…

  1. Perspective view. Fivestory reinforced concrete factory building reveals the structural ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view. Five-story reinforced concrete factory building reveals the structural frame on the exterior of the facade. Twelve bay facade facing onto Clay Avenue (north facade) has first floor openings bricked up. Mix of typical factory windows and glass block windows fill the majority of the openings on the rest of building - Russell Industrial Center, 1600 Clay Avenue, Detroit, MI

  2. Experimentally implementable criteria revealing substructures of genuine multipartite entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Marcus; Schimpf, Hans; Gabriel, Andreas; Spengler, Christoph; Bruss, Dagmar; Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.

    2011-02-15

    We present a general framework that reveals substructures of genuine multipartite entanglement. Via simple inequalities it is possible to discriminate different sets of multipartite qubit states. These inequalities are beneficial regarding experimental examinations as only local measurements are required. Furthermore, the number of observables scales favorably with system size. In exemplary cases we demonstrate the noise resistance and discuss implementations.

  3. In Reporting Lobbying Expenses, Some Institutions Do Not Reveal All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederman, Douglas

    1998-01-01

    On a federal tax form, only 75 of 475 colleges and universities surveyed reported that they had spent money on lobbying, defined as direct contacts with legislators or executive-branch officials about specific bills. Guidelines concerning reporting are unclear and confusing, and some institutions reveal as little as possible. Data on 78…

  4. Adaptation to High Ethanol Reveals Complex Evolutionary Pathways.

    PubMed

    Voordeckers, Karin; Kominek, Jacek; Das, Anupam; Espinosa-Cantú, Adriana; De Maeyer, Dries; Arslan, Ahmed; Van Pee, Michiel; van der Zande, Elisa; Meert, Wim; Yang, Yudi; Zhu, Bo; Marchal, Kathleen; DeLuna, Alexander; Van Noort, Vera; Jelier, Rob; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-11-01

    Tolerance to high levels of ethanol is an ecologically and industrially relevant phenotype of microbes, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this complex trait remain largely unknown. Here, we use long-term experimental evolution of isogenic yeast populations of different initial ploidy to study adaptation to increasing levels of ethanol. Whole-genome sequencing of more than 30 evolved populations and over 100 adapted clones isolated throughout this two-year evolution experiment revealed how a complex interplay of de novo single nucleotide mutations, copy number variation, ploidy changes, mutator phenotypes, and clonal interference led to a significant increase in ethanol tolerance. Although the specific mutations differ between different evolved lineages, application of a novel computational pipeline, PheNetic, revealed that many mutations target functional modules involved in stress response, cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and respiration. Measuring the fitness effects of selected mutations introduced in non-evolved ethanol-sensitive cells revealed several adaptive mutations that had previously not been implicated in ethanol tolerance, including mutations in PRT1, VPS70 and MEX67. Interestingly, variation in VPS70 was recently identified as a QTL for ethanol tolerance in an industrial bio-ethanol strain. Taken together, our results show how, in contrast to adaptation to some other stresses, adaptation to a continuous complex and severe stress involves interplay of different evolutionary mechanisms. In addition, our study reveals functional modules involved in ethanol resistance and identifies several mutations that could help to improve the ethanol tolerance of industrial yeasts. PMID:26545090

  5. Chemical milling solution reveals stress corrosion cracks in titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braski, D. N.

    1967-01-01

    Solution of hydrogen flouride, hydrogen peroxide, and water reveals hot salt stress corrosion cracks in various titanium alloys. After the surface is rinsed in water, dried, and swabbed with the solution, it can be observed by the naked eye or at low magnification.

  6. Revealing Evidence of Spin in Galactic Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Nowak, M.; Wijnands, R.; Homan, J.; Belloni, T.; van der Klis, M.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    2002-12-01

    Our observations of Galactic black holes with Chandra and XMM-Newton have recently revealed broad, skewed Fe K-alpha emission lines similar to those seen in some AGN. If such lines are produced near the inner edge of the accretion disk, they can serve as an excellent spin diagnostic. Our analysis of the XMM-Newton spectrum of XTE J1650-500 reveals a strong, skewed Fe K-alpha emission line that requires near-maximal spin; with RXTE, we have discovered a 250 Hz QPO in this source which may also be produced near to the black hole. Although many Galactic black holes have been studied extensively, it is extremely rare that spectroscopic and timing studies both reveal features plausibly associated with the inner accretion disk. We will present the results of our XMM-Newton, Chandra, and RXTE observations of XTE J1650-500, as well as the results of our Chandra observations of Cygnus X-1 and preliminary results from our observations of GX 339-4 with XMM-Newton. We will discuss these results within the context of the relativistic Fe K lines reported by our group and others, and comment on the prospects for revealing evidence of spin in future observations. (JMM acknowledges support from the NSF through the Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellowship program.)

  7. 24. Demolitin of Pier G reveals the center bays at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Demolitin of Pier G reveals the center bays at the track well in transverse section. Note structural system of first, second, and third floors, as well as the monitor roof. - Lehigh Valley Railroad, Pier G, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  8. Adaptation to High Ethanol Reveals Complex Evolutionary Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anupam; Espinosa-Cantú, Adriana; De Maeyer, Dries; Arslan, Ahmed; Van Pee, Michiel; van der Zande, Elisa; Meert, Wim; Yang, Yudi; Zhu, Bo; Marchal, Kathleen; DeLuna, Alexander; Van Noort, Vera; Jelier, Rob; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance to high levels of ethanol is an ecologically and industrially relevant phenotype of microbes, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this complex trait remain largely unknown. Here, we use long-term experimental evolution of isogenic yeast populations of different initial ploidy to study adaptation to increasing levels of ethanol. Whole-genome sequencing of more than 30 evolved populations and over 100 adapted clones isolated throughout this two-year evolution experiment revealed how a complex interplay of de novo single nucleotide mutations, copy number variation, ploidy changes, mutator phenotypes, and clonal interference led to a significant increase in ethanol tolerance. Although the specific mutations differ between different evolved lineages, application of a novel computational pipeline, PheNetic, revealed that many mutations target functional modules involved in stress response, cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and respiration. Measuring the fitness effects of selected mutations introduced in non-evolved ethanol-sensitive cells revealed several adaptive mutations that had previously not been implicated in ethanol tolerance, including mutations in PRT1, VPS70 and MEX67. Interestingly, variation in VPS70 was recently identified as a QTL for ethanol tolerance in an industrial bio-ethanol strain. Taken together, our results show how, in contrast to adaptation to some other stresses, adaptation to a continuous complex and severe stress involves interplay of different evolutionary mechanisms. In addition, our study reveals functional modules involved in ethanol resistance and identifies several mutations that could help to improve the ethanol tolerance of industrial yeasts. PMID:26545090

  9. When Values and Behaviors Conflict: Immigrant BSW Students' Experiences Revealed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderwood, Kimberly; Harper, Kim; Ball, Kellie; Liang, David

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study reveals the discomfort seven immigrant bachelor of social work students reported experiencing when the behaviors expected of them as Canadian social workers conflicted with their fundamental family values. Behaviorally, participants had assimilated to Canadian and to social work cultures; however, the values they held from…

  10. Detail of south granite pier revealing riveted truss ends and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of south granite pier revealing riveted truss ends and iron footing plates on top of granite cap stones. View north - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA