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Sample records for smolenice castle slovakia

  1. Castle series, 1954. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, E.J.; Rowland, R.H.

    1982-04-01

    CASTLE was an atmospheric nuclear weapons test series held in the Marshall Islands at Enewetak and Bikini atolls in 1954. This is a report of DOD peronnel in CASTLE with an emphasis on operations and radiological safety.

  2. When Home Was a Castle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessey, Gail Skroback

    1994-01-01

    Presents middle school-level interdisciplinary activities for exploring medieval life. Students conduct research then create their own castles, design personal coats of arms, learn about jousting, go through a typical castle dweller's day, learn about carousels, discuss castle life from Mark Twain's perspective, and attend a medieval feast. (SM)

  3. The Castle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Anderson; David Culler; James Demmel; Jerry Feldman; Susan Graham; Paul Hilfinger; Katherine Yelick

    2000-02-16

    The goal of the Castle project was to provide a parallel programming environment that enables the construction of high performance applications that run portably across many platforms. The authors approach was to design and implement a multilayered architecture, with higher levels building on lower ones to ensure portability, but with care taken not to introduce abstractions that sacrifice performance.

  4. Carisbrooke Castle. Teachers' Resource Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Rosemary

    Carisbrooke Castle in England, Charles I's prison for nearly a year, is a complex historic site with walls dating from the early 12th century and additions and alterations incorporated over later centuries. This guide may be used by teachers preparing their students for an on-site visit, or as an independent study of an English medieval castle.…

  5. Castles and Inverted Castles: The Work of Marcia J. Bates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartel, Jenna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Theorist Howard D. White has made a call to action for "scientist-poets" to synthesize concepts and oeuvres in the centrifugal literature of information science. In response, this paper interprets the work of canonical information scientist Marcia J. Bates through the original metaphor of "castles and inverted…

  6. Implications of Using the CASTLE Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosca, Eugene P.; De Jong, Marvin L.

    1993-01-01

    Critiques the Capacitor-Aided System for Teaching and Learning Electricity (CASTLE) curriculum. Criticism is made of the model's use of a compressible-fluid model to demonstrate charge conduction. An alternative model is proposed. (ZWH)

  7. Layer Charge of Clay Minerals; Selected papers from the Symposium on Current Knowledge on the Layer Charge of Clay Minerals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This Special issue contains papers based on the contributions presented during the workshop “Current Knowledge on the Layer Charge of Clay Minerals”, held on September 18 and 19, 2004, in the Smolenice Castle, Slovakia. Layer charge is one of the most important characteristics of clay minerals as it...

  8. Enviroment, from southwest, showing Castle Garden Bridge and alignment of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Enviroment, from southwest, showing Castle Garden Bridge and alignment of Township Road 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  9. Enviroment, from north, showing Castle Garden Bridge carrying Township Road ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Enviroment, from north, showing Castle Garden Bridge carrying Township Road 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  10. Environment, from west, showing Castle Garden Bridge carrying Township Road ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Environment, from west, showing Castle Garden Bridge carrying Township Road 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnermahoning Creek - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  11. Environment, from east, showing Castle Garden Bridge carrying Township Road ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Environment, from east, showing Castle Garden Bridge carrying Township Road 343 over Bennets Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  12. [History of Oncology in Slovakia].

    PubMed

    Ondruš, D; Kaušitz, J

    2016-01-01

    The history of oncology in Slovakia is closely linked to the history of St. Elizabeth Hospital, which was set up in the mid-18th century by nuns of the St. Elizabeth Order in Bratislava. In the first half of the 20th century, a unit was set up in the hospital dedicated to diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Shortly after World War II, the unit was turned into the Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment. In 1950, St. Elizabeth Hospital was nationalized, and the Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Science and the Institute of Clinical Oncology were located there as centers for oncological diagnosis and treatment. After the restitution of church property in the early 1990s, the hospital was returned to the Order of St. Elizabeth, which set up the St. Elisabeth Cancer Institute in the hospital premises in January of 1996. This year marks the 20th anniversary of this institute in its new premises and the 85th anniversary of the Institute of Radiumtherapy founded in Bratislava, and thus the establishment of institutional healthcare for cancer patients in Slovakia is the reason for balancing. We present a view of the consecutive changes in the organization, space and staff of the Institute and evaluate the impact of celebrities on medicine who developed oncology as a clinical, scientific and educational discipline in Bratislava and in other cities and regions of Slovakia. PMID:27296401

  13. Oblique partial east elevation of Castle Garden Bridge, from south, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique partial east elevation of Castle Garden Bridge, from south, showing structural configuration of Pratt truss, including typical panels, downstream end of squared cut stone masonry center pier, and squared cut stone masonry north abutment - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  14. 5. View of former Castle Street Wye looking East ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of former Castle Street Wye - looking East along Herald Street (formerly Castle Street). To the right is the Massachusetts Turnpike and the tracks of the former B&A R.R. - Boston Elevated Railway, Elevated Mainline, Washington Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  15. CFD: A Castle in the Sand?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil; Wood, Bill

    2004-01-01

    The computational simulation community is not routinely publishing independently verifiable tests to accompany new models or algorithms. A survey reveals that only 22% of new models published are accompanied by tests suitable for independently verifying the new model. As the community develops larger codes with increased functionality, and hence increased complexity in terms of the number of building block components and their interactions, it becomes prohibitively expensive for each development group to derive the appropriate tests for each component. Therefore, the computational simulation community is building its collective castle on a very shaky foundation of components with unpublished and unrepeatable verification tests. The computational simulation community needs to begin publishing component level verification tests before the tide of complexity undermines its foundation.

  16. Carcinoma showing thymus-like differentiation of the thyroid (CASTLE).

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuying; Wang, Li; Wang, Yan; Yang, Xibiao; Li, Qiu

    2013-10-01

    Carcinoma showing thymus-like differentiation (CASTLE) is a rare intrathyroidal neoplasm, probably arising from ectopic thymus or branchial pouch remnants. The tumor was first reported by Miyauchi et al. [1].The clinical and pathological features of this tumor were classified by Chan et al. [2] into 4 groups: ectopic hamartomatous thymoma, ectopic cervical thymoma, spindle ephithelial tumor with thymic-like differentiation (SETTLE), and carcinoma showing thymus-like differentiation (CASTLE). Recently, CASTLE has been designated as an independent clinicopathologic entity of thyroid tumors in the most recent edition of the World Health Organization classification of tumors of endocrine organs[3].To our knowledge, less than 100 cases of CASTLE have been reported in the literature, 45 cases of which (including one of the authors' patient) have been identified in China. We report a new case of this entity and suggest recommendations for diagnosis. PMID:23920320

  17. The CASTLES Imaging Survey of Gravitational Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C. Y.; Falco, E. E.; Lehar, J.; Impey, C. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; McLeod, B. A.; Rix, H.-W.

    1997-12-01

    The CASTLES survey (Cfa-Arizona-(H)ST-Lens-Survey) is imaging most known small-separation gravitational lenses (or lens candidates), using the NICMOS camera (mostly H-band) and the WFPC2 (V and I band) on HST. To date nearly half of the IR imaging survey has been completed. The main goals are: (1) to search for lens galaxies where none have been directly detected so far; (2) obtain photometric redshift estimates (VIH) for the lenses where no spectroscopic redshifts exist; (3) study and model the lens galaxies in detail, in part to study the mass distribution within them, in part to identify ``simple" systems that may permit accurate time delay estimates for H_0; (3) measure the M/L evolution of the sample of lens galaxies with look-back time (to z ~ 1); (4) determine directly which fraction of sources are lensed by ellipticals vs. spirals. We will present the survey specifications and the images obtained so far.

  18. Integration of Geodata in Documenting Castle Ruins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delis, P.; Wojtkowska, M.; Nerc, P.; Ewiak, I.; Lada, A.

    2016-06-01

    Textured three dimensional models are currently the one of the standard methods of representing the results of photogrammetric works. A realistic 3D model combines the geometrical relations between the structure's elements with realistic textures of each of its elements. Data used to create 3D models of structures can be derived from many different sources. The most commonly used tool for documentation purposes, is a digital camera and nowadays terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). Integration of data acquired from different sources allows modelling and visualization of 3D models historical structures. Additional aspect of data integration is possibility of complementing of missing points for example in point clouds. The paper shows the possibility of integrating data from terrestrial laser scanning with digital imagery and an analysis of the accuracy of the presented methods. The paper describes results obtained from raw data consisting of a point cloud measured using terrestrial laser scanning acquired from a Leica ScanStation2 and digital imagery taken using a Kodak DCS Pro 14N camera. The studied structure is the ruins of the Ilza castle in Poland.

  19. Geothermal eel farm in Slovakia

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.; Thomka, J.; Sarlinova, K.

    1998-12-01

    Turcianske Teplice, a small town in west-central Slovakia, has written records of using thermal waters since 1281. In 1992, an eel raising farm was started on the outskirts of the town and since 1994, it has been operated by the firm of Janex Slovensko. The farm, using a specialized water recirculation system, raises a species of migrating eels (Anguilla anguilla). A 220-meter deep well at 42 C provides 48 gpm to the facility for heating through a plate heat exchanger. This is the maximum flow permitted, so as not to influence the springs and wells at the spa about 1 km away. For this reason, the flow is monitored carefully by the state. A second geothermal well at 52 C and 1,500 meters deep is used only as an observation well. Cold water, which is heated by the geothermal water, is pumped from wells near the Turiec River 1.8 km away at 8 to 12 C, depending upon the season, for use in the various holding or raising tanks. The operation of the farm is described.

  20. Internal Indpendent Assessment Report - CASTLE-PX SQA

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, D. M.; Dancy, L. L.; Pope, V. L.

    2015-04-01

    This IIA assessed the flow down of institutional 830 Software Quality Assurance requirements through three required document templates to the CASTLE-PX software effort and the implementation of those SQA requirements. The templates flow down the DOE O 414.1D consensus standard requirements for Safety Software. This assessment did not include the flow down of NAP-24, Weapon Quality Policy, requirements. The assessment focused on the CASTLE-PX project’s software development and release processes. It did not assess Pantex’s acceptance or usage of the software. The assessment resulted in 3 Deficiencies, 5 Observations, 1 Recommendation, and 3 Strengths. Overall the CASTLE-PX team demonstrated it values quality and has worked to integrate quality practices into its software development processes. Improvement in documentation will enhance their SQA implementation.

  1. GIS coverages of the Castle Mountain Fault, south central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Labay, Keith A.; Haeussler, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    The Castle Mountain fault is one of several major east-northeast-striking faults in southern Alaska, and it is the only fault with had historic seismicity and Holocene surface faulting. This report is a digital compilation of three maps along the Castle Mountain fault in south central Alaska. This compilation consists only of GIS coverages of the location of the fault, line attributes indicating the certainty of the fault location, and information about scarp height, where measured. The files are presented in ARC/INFO export file format and include metadata.

  2. Long Ago in a Castle. Young Discovery Library Series: 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farre, Marie

    Part of an international series of amply illustrated, colorful, small size books designed for children ages 5 to 10, this volume describes why and how castles were built during the Middle Ages and what it was like to live in one. Poetry of the period, village life, tournaments, minstrels, games, and descriptions of the lives of children who lived…

  3. Using Models to Teach Electricity--The CASTLE Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Melvin S.; Wainwright, Camille L.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the Capacitor-Aided System for Teaching and Learning Electricity (CASTLE) project which is a high school electricity curriculum developed by high school and college physics teachers. The project is motivated by research on students' conceptual difficulties in electricity. The instructional materials developed allow students to challenge…

  4. Students' Attitudes toward Computer Use in Slovakia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

    2008-01-01

    ICT has a very short history in Slovakia. A majority of Slovak schools accessed computers and internet only after 2000. Different financial support and schools' participation in various projects resulted in non-random distribution of computers across Slovakian elementary schools. We examined whether 1) attitudes toward computers could be affected…

  5. Dirofilaria infections in working dogs in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Miterpáková, M; Antolová, D; Hurníková, Z; Dubinský, P; Pavlacka, A; Németh, J

    2010-06-01

    A monitoring programme aimed at the diagnosis of subcutaneous dirofilariasis and heartworm disease in working (police and military) dogs in Slovakia has been performed during the period of September 2007 to February 2008. In co-operation with the Ministry of the Interior and the Ministry of Defence, in total, 710 dogs (591 police dogs and 119 military dogs) were investigated for the presence of microfilariae in blood. All police and military dogs in active service held on the territory of Slovakia were included. Microfilariae were detected in 118 (20.0%) police dogs and 10 (8.4%) military dogs. The most infected individuals originated from southern parts of Slovakia (Trnava region 53.6% and Nitra region 39.6%); the prevalence was low in northern regions (Zilina 3.1% and Presov 6.6%). In several districts of southern Slovakia, the prevalence of subcutaneous dirofilariasis in working dogs exceeded 40%. In all infected animals, the autochthonous origin of the disease was confirmed; however, due to the frequent movement of working dogs, it was not possible to identify the exact locality of infection. At present, a dog living in Nemsová village in Trencín district (north-western part of the country) is regarded as the northernmost localized autochthonous case of subcutaneous dirofilariasis in Slovakia. In three dogs, co-infection of Dirofilaria repens and Dirofilaria immitis was detected. High prevalence rates in working dogs and the zoonotic characteristic of the disease represent an undoubtedly important veterinary and medical problem that requires the urgent introduction of prophylactic and control measures. PMID:19728899

  6. CASTLE: an advanced technology partnership serving law enforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoig, Thomas M.

    1997-01-01

    The Center for Applied Science and Technology for Law Enforcement (CASTLE) is supported by the National Institute of Justice Office of Science and Technology and is establishing partnerships with the National Law Enforcement Corrections and Technology Center in Charleston, South Carolina. Additionally, CASTLE is working with the American Society of Crime Lab Directors (ASCLD) to direct effective interface with and support of state and local crime laboratories. Extremely sophisticated, often one-of-a-kind, equipment and very-capable scientific expertise are resident at U.S. federal government laboratories and, until recently, have not been applied often to law enforcement problems, particularly at the state and local level. While there have been a number of research and development programs at national laboratories sponsored by agencies such as the National Institute of Justice, most of these have been focused on long-term objectives to meet broad national needs. In discussions with local law enforcement personnel, it is apparent that there are much more immediate technology needs, which are not being addressed by nationwide programs, in fundamental areas including video and audio surveillance, trace and physical evidence sampling, and forensic laboratory analysis. In a pilot program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a significant component of the nation's science and technology resources located in Tennessee, recently made a commitment to support law enforcement where possible with advanced technology. ORNL formed the Center for Applied Science and Technology for Law Enforcement (CASTLE), a partnership of scientific, university, private sector, and law enforcement personnel. The goal of the CASTLE program is to apply technology at the grassroots working level to both solve crimes, to improve safety to law enforcement personnel, and to improve the overall quality of law enforcement services within the United States.

  7. Problematic microscopic trace (?) fossils, Oligocene, Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuláš, R.; Boorová, D.; Holcová, K.

    2013-05-01

    Meioscopic to microscopic capsules found in reddish, probably marine or brackish shales (Oligocene, Pannonian Basin; South Slovakia) are interpreted as possible trace fossils. They may represent burrows of meioscopic in-fauna. Ferruginous walls of the capsules appeared very probably as late as during diagenesis; however, the (possibly organic) matrix had to exist before the diagenetic processes. Other discussed explanations (inorganic "ironstones"; coprolites) are not plausible.

  8. Education Inequality in Slovakia: The Effects of Early Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelmanova, Olga; Korsnakova, Paulina; Tramonte, Lucia; Willms, J. Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Like many other countries in Central and Eastern Europe, children in Slovakia are allocated to different types of schools at an early age based upon their perceived aptitude. Part of the selection process includes an attempt to identify those children who are particularly academic-oriented. Primary and secondary education in Slovakia is divided…

  9. Heat waves and warm periods in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faško, Pavel; Bochníček, Oliver; Markovič, Ladislav; Švec, Marek

    2016-04-01

    The scenarios of climate change caused by human activity show that frequency of occurrence and extent of heat waves in the interior of Europe is increasing. Among the most exposed regions in this regard should the area of southeastern and eastern Austria and south-western Slovakia. The relatively faster increase in the number of heat waves in this area is related also to potential desertification in this region just east of the Alps, since during summer, weather fronts advancing from the west are consequently losing their original features and moderating influence. Summer weather patterns for this area should in the future more closely remind climate typical for some inland areas of southwestern, southern and southeastern Europe. A certain shift of climate zones from south to north should thus modify future climate and Slovakia. Despite the complex natural conditions the existing trends derived from results of meteorological measurements and observations are clear and they confirm warming of climate in this region. Observations and measurements in the recent years of the 21st century confirm, that heat waves are no longer rare phenomenon during summer, but are systematically appearing even in colder regions of northern Slovakia. What is very remarkable and will be necessary to pay more attention to, is the fact that these heat waves are expanding into previously unaffected areas, associated with the lack of rainfall and drought, on larger regional scale. In this study heat wave periods and individual heat events and days are statistically identified in the time series characteristics of air temperature at selected meteorological stations for the period from the mid-20th century until 2015, in case of available historical data even for longer period.

  10. Security Research and Safety Aspects in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinay, Juraj

    In 2004 the Slovak Republic joined the European Community. This accession called for changes in the new member state's internal and external processes, as well as the acceptance of the European Community regulatory framework and its implementation in Slovakian national legislation. Even though Slovakia had started with step-by-step integration of specific regulations during accession negotiations, final implementation was only concluded upon admission into the European Community. The process spanned the fields of occupational health and safety (Safety) and civil security (Security), notwithstanding that professionals in these areas had already been working in line with the European legislation.

  11. Vascular Plant and Vertebrate Inventory of Montezuma Castle National Monument

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Cecilia A.; Drost, Charles A.; Halvorson, William Lee

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary We summarize past inventory efforts for vascular plants and vertebrates at Montezuma Castle National Monument (NM) in Arizona. We used data from previous research to compile complete species lists for the monument and to assess inventory completeness. There have been 784 species recorded at Montezuma Castle NM, of which 85 (11%) are non-native. In each taxon-specific chapter we highlight areas of resources that contributed to species richness or unique species for the monument. Of particular importance are Montezuma Well and Beaver and Wet Beaver creeks and the surrounding riparian vegetation, which are responsible for the monument having one of the highest numbers of bird species in the Sonoran Desert Network of park units. Beaver Creek is also home to populations of federally-listed fish species of concern. Other important resources include the cliffs along the creeks and around Montezuma Well (for cliff and cave roosting bats). Based on the review of past studies, we believe the inventory for most taxa is nearly complete, though some rare or elusive species will be added with additional survey effort. We recommend additional inventory, monitoring and research studies.

  12. Q fever in Bulgaria and Slovakia.

    PubMed Central

    Serbezov, V. S.; Kazár, J.; Novkirishki, V.; Gatcheva, N.; Kovácová, E.; Voynova, V.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of dramatic political and economic changes in the beginning of the 1990s, Q-fever epidemiology in Bulgaria has changed. The number of goats almost tripled; contact between goat owners (and their families) and goats, as well as goats and other animals, increased; consumption of raw goat milk and its products increased; and goats replaced cattle and sheep as the main source of human Coxiella burnetii infections. Hundreds of overt, serologically confirmed human cases of acute Q fever have occurred. Chronic forms of Q fever manifesting as endocarditis were also observed. In contrast, in Slovakia, Q fever does not pose a serious public health problem, and the chronic form of infection has not been found either in follow-ups of a Q-fever epidemic connected with goats imported from Bulgaria and other previous Q-fever outbreaks or in a serologic survey. Serologic diagnosis as well as control and prevention of Q fever are discussed. PMID:10341175

  13. Research of Rainwater Infiltration in Eastern Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudáková, Gabriela; Zeleňáková, Martina; Tometz, Ladislav

    2015-11-01

    Today precipitation water in the majority of built up and other sealed surface areas no longer reach the water circulation system via natural routes. This can lead to long-term changes to the soil and water resources, reduce the natural local regeneration of the groundwater and have effects on the chemical and biological conditions above and below the ground surface. Reasonable rainwater management leads to maintain or recover a sound and sustainable water cycle. The purpose of this paper is to present objectives and monitoring of a drainage project in Eastern Slovakia, in Kosice city. The paper focuses on percolation facilities in the research area of campus of Technical University and measurements connected with rainwater infiltration.

  14. Transformation of the Adult Education System in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švec, Štefan

    1998-07-01

    This article examines trends in adult education in Slovakia since it became a separate republic in 1993. Economic and social transformations during this period have led to a re-thinking of the adult education system. The author describes four basic modalities for providing adult education in Slovakia: (1) schools and colleges; (2) cultural centres and similar institutions; (3) institutions for vocational training; (4) voluntary organizations such as trade unions, political parties and ethnic minority groups.

  15. Studies of the astronomical array at the castle in Olsztyn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szubiakowski, Jacek P.

    2014-12-01

    The paper describes a mathematical model simulating the operation of the board for Sun observation located in Olsztyn castle. The board was made around 1517, when Nicolaus Copernicus held the office of the property administrator of the Warmian Chapter. The idea of the functioning of the array is adapted to the lighting conditions of the cloister. As an indicator of the instantaneous position of the Sun and the moment of time a ray of sunshine reflected from the mirror mounted horizontally on the windowsill of arcade was used. The paper presents the results of the analysis of the calendar lines as well as the hour lines. The architectural conditions determining the hours of operation of the array in different months and the factors affecting its accuracy has also been examined.

  16. Human Trichinella infection outbreaks in Slovakia, 1980-2008.

    PubMed

    Dubinský, Pavol; Antolová, Daniela; Reiterová, Katarína

    2016-06-01

    Trichinellosis, a parasitic zoonosis with world-wide distribution, causes serious health problems in humans and is also of economic importance. In Slovakia the most frequent species is T. britovi, causing disease mainly in wild life species. T. spiralis occurs less frequently and T. pseudospiralis only sporadically. The paper describes the epidemiology of six human Trichinella infection outbreaks recorded in Slovakia between 1980 and 2008. Before 1990 wild boar meat was the main source of infection. Later, risk farm practices, especially feeding of pigs with the wild animal´s offal contributed to the formation of synanthropic cycle and pig meat caused the epidemics in 1990, 2001 and 2008. Sausages prepared from pork and T. britovi infected dog meat and offered as a local food specialty on traditional folk festival in 1998 (Brezno district, Central Slovakia) were the source of the largest human outbreak recorded in Slovakia. The anti-Trichinella antibodies were detected in 336 event visitors. The main reason of repeated human epidemics in Slovakia has been the permanent circulation of Trichinella spp. in sylvatic cycle, especially in red foxes and wild boars. High population density of both animal species, persistent prevalence of trichinellosis in wild boars and even increasing positivity of red foxes suggest that the risk of human outbreaks in Slovakia persists. PMID:27078642

  17. Flood Warning and Forecasting System in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskova, Danica

    2016-04-01

    In 2015, it finished project Flood Warning and Forecasting System (POVAPSYS) as part of the flood protection in Slovakia till 2010. The aim was to build POVAPSYS integrated computerized flood forecasting and warning system. It took a qualitatively higher level of output meteorological and hydrological services in case of floods affecting large territorial units, as well as local flood events. It is further unfolding demands on performance and coordination of meteorological and hydrological services, troubleshooting observation, evaluation of data, fast communication, modeling and forecasting of meteorological and hydrological processes. Integration of all information entering and exiting to and from the project POVAPSYS provides Hydrological Flood Forecasting System (HYPOS). The system provides information on the current hydrometeorological situation and its evolution with the generation of alerts and notifications in case of exceeding predefined thresholds. HYPOS's functioning of the system requires flawless operability in critical situations while minimizing the loss of its key parts. HYPOS is a core part of the project POVAPSYS, it is a comprehensive software solutions based on a modular principle, providing data and processed information including alarms, in real time. In order to achieve full functionality of the system, in proposal, we have put emphasis on reliability, robustness, availability and security.

  18. Penalobo "Castle Rocks" - First approach to valuing this geoforms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinharandas, Carlos; Nobre, José; Gomes, Ana

    2013-04-01

    The village of Penalobo, located in the municipality of Sabugal (Portugal) is characterized by hercynian granites with interesting geological features, including pegmatite veins and quartz crystals with exotic forms, and presents some steep slopes and plateaus. From the mountainous configuration highlight some more pronounced elevations called "Castle Rocks". Such structures are composed by granites, which present greater fracturing at the top, which leads to the formation of large granite blocks. In less fractured zones it is possible to observe small folds. An excavation existing in one of those elevations allows us to observe a basic rock outcropping with clusters of crystals mottled with circular shape, which are indicative of the presence of late fluid during crystallization. In the zone of contact with the enclosing granite, there are small folds caused by magma intrusion. Those evidences led us to hypothesize that the peaks observed in the area of Penalobo village were due to the intrusion on basic magma. All this framework and geological environment becomes an asset for the scientific, educational and economic development of the region. On the other hand, it has a vital importance in the context of a strategy of forming a geological park, in the point of view of tourism, research and interpretation.

  19. Development of the mitigation plan for Slovakia energy sector

    SciTech Connect

    Mojik, I.

    1996-12-31

    According to the review of national communications from Annex I countries (FCCC/AGBM/1996/7), Slovakia is in 21st place among countries in descending order of GHG emissions. With respect to GHG emission per capita Slovakia is in 14th place and from the point of view of GHG emissions per GDP unit Slovakia is in 7th place. However, within world wide GHG emissions those originating from Slovakia are nearly negligible, but GHG emissions related to per capita or even to GDP are significantly high. Since energy production is responsible for more than 70% of GHG emissions (88% of CO{sub 2} emission) the high ranking of Slovakia is evidence of the high energy intensity of the Slovak Economy. As is common in countries with economies in transition there is no stable trend in macroeconomical values in Slovakia. Although the general shape of possible development curves is known, in fact the exact level of the real curve is not predictable. According to their analyses the Slovak Republic surely will meet the basic UN FCCC obligation for Annex I countries, i.e. to limit anthropogenic emissions of GHG in the year 2000 to the level of 1990. However, the above mentioned uncertainties are the main reason why they have no firm guaranty of fulfilling their domestic target (20% CO{sub 2} reduction in 2005 compared to 1988). Analyses made within the Country Study program have indicated that there is good possibility of reaching the domestic target but uncertainty is high and certain conditions have to be met.

  20. Complex Logistics Strategy for Industrial Companies in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horňáková, Natália; Hudák, Ján; Vidová, Helena

    2014-12-01

    Presented paper is a part of the dissertation thesis titled as "A proposal to develop Complex Logistics Strategy for industrial companies. The result of the thesis will be a methodology for developing a Complex Logistics Strategy for industrial companies in Slovakia. The main aim of the paper is to present some trends and strategies in Logistics and clarify the need of resolving the issue of Logistics Strategy based on the theoretical knowledge, case studies and analysis of current state of Logistics Strategies in industrial companies in Slovakia and other European countries.

  1. The past, present and future evolution of Hurst Castle spit, Hampshire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, R. J.; Webber, N. B.

    Previous models of the evolution of Hurst Castle Spit over-emphasised longshore growth at the expense of other processes, particularly rise in sea-level. Initially, a Pleistocene valley system was submerged creating a tidal strait, the West Solent, between Christchurch Bay and the East Solent. This almost certainly caused a major hydrodynamic change, transforming much of Christchurch Bay and the West Solent from a low to a high tidal energy environment. Hurst Castle Spit and the Shingles Bank then began to form due to a combination of an easterly littoral drift, offshore gravel movement due to the high tidal energy, a rising sea-level, the transgression of Hurst Beach due to overwashing and the formation of recurves due to waves in the West Solent. The growth of the Shingles Bank due to offshore sediment movement from Hurst Castle Spit was of particular importance because of its influence on the wave energy along Hurst Beach. Significant local supplies of shingle in the vicinity of Hurst Castle Spit, reworked from Quatenary deposits, were also of importance. Thus, it is not a classic multi-recurved spit and the transgressive segment, Hurst Beach, has much in common with barrier coastlines. The same processes are continuing to shape Hurst Castle Spit at present, with the additional effects of human interference in the coastal sediment system. The construction of sea defences at Milford-on-Sea in the period 1936 to 1968 has modified the sediment budget and Hurst Castle Spit is experiencing a phase of rapid evolution: maximum recession rates have increased from 1.5m a -1 (1867-1968) to 3.5m a -1 (1968-1982). It is difficult to quantify the exact role of sea-level rise in the present evolution of Hurst Castle Spit. The future evolution of Hurst Castle Spit will depend largely on man. If there is no further interference, which is highly unlikely, the beach volume will continue to decline, resulting in a further increase in the rate of recession. Ultimately, a true tidal

  2. Holocene slip rate for the western segment of the Castle Mountain fault, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willis, J.B.; Haeussler, P.J.; Bruhn, R.L.; Willis, G.C.

    2007-01-01

    The western segment of the Castle Mountain fault poses a significant seismic hazard to the most populated region of south-central Alaska. We identify a previously unrecognized margin of a postglacial outwash channel that is offset right laterally 36 ± 4 m across the western segment of the Castle Mountain fault. This offset occurred after glaciers withdrew from the lowland 11,300–15,380 cal yr b.p. and after outwash channel margins were cut and stabilized 11,210–13,470 cal yr b.p. Using these ages and the measured separation, we obtain a maximum slip rate of 3.0 ± 0.6 mm yr−1 and a minimum slip rate of 2.8 ± 0.7 mm yr−1. These are the first lateral slip rates for the Castle Mountain fault established by a field measurement. Based on timing of the most recent earthquake, 670 ± 60 yr b.p., the Castle Mountain fault could have accumulated an average single-event slip of about 1.9 m (extremes range from 1.3 to 2.6 m). The fault consists of two segments; a surface-rupturing earthquake likely will be limited to the 62-km-long western segment. Area-magnitude regression calculations suggest that such an earthquake on the western Castle Mountain fault would have a moment magnitude of 6.9 to 7.3.

  3. Rockfall hazard assessment in a cultural and natural heritage (Ortahisar Castle, Cappadocia, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunusluoglu, M. C.; Zorlu, K.

    2009-01-01

    The Cappadocia region is one of the most important tourism centers of Turkey owing to its natural beauty and historical heritage. The natural landscapes predominantly contribute to the tourism capacity of the region. This is controlled directly by the characteristic lithological units and surface processes. However, rockfall events, which are sometimes observed in the region, are typical natural hazards conditioned by discontinuities, steep topography and human activities. The Ortahisar Castle is one of the natural monuments and also one of the historical places of this region. This castle is located on a steep hill formed by jointed ignimbrite and its height and settlement area are approximately 50 m and 500 m2, respectively. However, some blocks on the castle have begun to exhibit serious rockfall potential. Rock hewn structures carved by man for various purposes contribute to increase in rockfall hazard. For this reason, the castle was closed to touristic visits. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this hazard potential and perform a series of rockfall analyses and discuss the results. Besides, location and dimension of fallen blocks were determined. At the final stage of the fieldwork, location and size of detached blocks having potential to fall were described. During the analysis stage, runout distance, bounce height, kinetic energy and velocity of the detached blocks were determined by using Rocfall V.4 software. The results obtained from rockfall analyses were used to map the areas under rockfall threat in the close vicinity of the castle and the potential risk was interpreted.

  4. Microalgae on dimension stone of a medieval castle in Thuringia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallmann, C.; Stannek, L.; Fritzlar, D.; Hoppert, M.

    2012-04-01

    Phototrophic microorganisms are important primary producers on hard rock substrata as well as on building facades. These eukaryotic microalgae and cyanobacteria, along with lichens, have also been recognized as important factors for rock weathering and stone decay. The rock substratum itself mostly provides extreme environmental conditions. Composition and diversity of sub-aeric phototrophic microbial communities is up to now poorly understood. Here we present a comparative study addressing the composition of algal biofilms on sandstone substrata based on the analysis of rDNA clone libraries from environmental samples and enrichment cultures. From a W-exposed, shaded wall area of a medieval castle ruin (Burg Gleichen, Thuringia, Germany cf. Hallmann et al., 2011), green algae like Prasiococcus, Prasiola and Elliptochloris could be retrieved. A ESE, sun-exposed wall section was colonized mainly by Apatococcus, Phyllosiphon and the lichen alga Trebouxia and Myrmecia. Accordingly, cyanobacterial communities show clear differences between both wall areas: the sun exposed area was dominated by Synechococcus-like organisms while on the W-exposed area cyanobacteria were almost absent. Just a few species, in particular Stichococcus-related strains, are ubiquitous in both areas. It is obvious that, apart from few generalists, different species colonize the wall areas that are situated in close vicinity, but provide different microclimatic conditions. These differences are discussed in view of biogenic weathering phenomena: certain microalgal species colonize crusts and scales along fracture planes and may contribute to rapid detachment and turnover of dimension stone surfaces. Hallmann, C., Fritzlar, D., Stannek, L., Hoppert, M. (2011) Ascomycete fungi on dimension stone of the "Burg Gleichen", Thuringia. Env. Earth Sci. 63, 1713-1722.

  5. Rickettsia species in fleas collected from small mammals in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Špitalská, Eva; Boldiš, Vojtech; Mošanský, Ladislav; Sparagano, Olivier; Stanko, Michal

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiological and epizootiological studies of Rickettsia felis and other Rickettsia spp. are very important, because their natural cycle has not yet been established completely. In total, 315 fleas (Siphonaptera) of 11 species of Ceratophyllidae, Hystrichopsyllidae and Leptopsyllidae families were tested for the presence of Rickettsia species and Coxiella burnetii with conventional and specific quantitative real-time PCR assays. Fleas were collected from five rodent hosts (Myodes glareolus, Apodemus flavicollis, Apodemus agrarius, Microtus subterraneus, Microtus arvalis) and three shrew species (Sorex araneus, Neomys fodiens, Crocidura suaveolens) captured in Eastern and Southern Slovakia. Overall, Rickettsia spp. was found in 10.8% (34/315) of the tested fleas of Ctenophthalmus agyrtes, Ctenophthalmus solutus, Ctenophthalmus uncinatus and Nosopsyllus fasciatus species. Infected fleas were coming from A. flavicollis, A. agrarius, and M. glareolus captured in Eastern Slovakia. C. burnetii was not found in any fleas. R. felis, Rickettsia helvetica, unidentified Rickettsia, and rickettsial endosymbionts were identified in fleas infesting small mammals in the Košice region, Eastern Slovakia. This study is the first report of R. felis infection in C. solutus male flea collected from A. agrarius in Slovakia. PMID:26346455

  6. Stigma and Roma Education Policy Reform in Slovakia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New, William

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses reform of Roma education in Slovakia against the backdrop of continued stigmatization of Roma students. Transnational NGOs and IGOs promote rights-based solutions leading to the fullest possible inclusion of Roma students in mainstream education. The Slovak state promotes educational policies that lead to the fullest…

  7. Indian Castle Shale: late synorogenic siliciclastic succession in an evolving Middle to Late Ordovician foreland basin, eastern New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Gordon C.; Brett, Carlton E.

    2002-01-01

    The thick, organic-rich, Indian Castle Shale, is a major component of the greater Utica Shale basinal facies succession associated with the Taconian Orogeny. Detailed correlations of numerous Indian Castle sections, presented herein, are based on physical matching of numerous altered ash layers (K-bentonites) coupled with use of submarine discontinuities and other distinctive beds. Several important trends are observed: first, the Dolgeville Formation extends eastward into the eastern Mohawk Valley region (Hoffmans Fault area) lithologically separating an older Utica division (Flat Creek Shale) from Indian Castle Shale proper. Second, Indian Castle Shale strata are observed to overlap the regional top-Dolgeville and post-Trenton disconformity towards the northwest. Third, the lower part, and possibly the upper part, of the Indian Castle succession is differentially thickened in the west-central Mohawk Valley region due to differential subsidence and syntectonic fault activity. Fourth, the lower part of the Indian Castle Shale succession in the central-to-eastern part of the Mohawk Valley region continues to thin slightly with little evidence for major eastward transition of Utica facies into turbiditic Schenectady deposits. Fifth, K-bentonitic beds, many displaying distinctive sedimentological features, are clustered in intervals of apparent Indian Castle stratigraphic condensation. Ashes also display an overall upward decrease in abundance within the Indian Castle Shale succession. These patterns indicate that Indian Castle deposition, influenced by lithospheric flexural processes, localized fault activity and eustatic fluctuations, occurred when the foreland basin was maximally developed. Indian Castle deposition was probably linked to a collisional tectophase of Taconian overthrusting.

  8. Capturing the Castle: An Exploration of Changes in the Democratic Accountability of Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gann, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    The history of the forced conversion to sponsored academy status of Castle Primary School in south Somerset is a tale of broken promises, lies, and a blatant breach of statutory procedures. Yet the Department for Education, the local Member of Parliament (and schools minister) and the local authority stood by--sometimes participated--while a small…

  9. Environmental assessment of metal exposure to corals living in Castle Harbour, Bermuda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prouty, N.G.; Goodkin, N.F.; Jones, R.; Lamborg, C.H.; Storlazzi, C.D.; Hughen, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental contamination in Castle Harbour, Bermuda, has been linked to the dissolution and leaching of contaminants from the adjacent marine landfill. This study expands the evidence for environmental impact of leachate from the landfill by quantitatively demonstrating elevated metal uptake over the last 30 years in corals growing in Castle Harbour. Coral Pb/Ca, Zn/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios and total Hg concentrations are elevated relative to an adjacent control site in John Smith's Bay. The temporal variability in the Castle Harbour coral records suggests that while the landfill has increased in size over the last 35 years, the dominant input of metals is through periodic leaching of contaminants from the municipal landfill and surrounding sediment. Elevated contaminants in the surrounding sediment suggest that resuspension is an important transport medium for transferring heavy metals to corals. Increased winds, particularly during the 1990s, were accompanied by higher coral metal composition at Castle Harbour. Coupled with wind-induced resuspension, interannual changes in sea level within the Harbour can lead to increased bioavailability of sediment-bound metals and subsequent coral metal assimilation. At John Smith's Bay, large scale convective mixing may be driving interannual metal variability in the coral record rather than impacts from land-based activities. Results from this study provide important insights into the coupling of natural variability and anthropogenic input of contaminants to the nearshore environment.

  10. The Castle in the Classroom: Story as a Springboard for Early Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Ranu

    2010-01-01

    "The Castle in the Classroom" describes a year in a kindergarten classroom as the children embark on literary exploration. Each child approaches the journey from a different perspective--some are self-sufficient, others more hesitant; some are literary adventurers, others shyly reluctant. The detailed focus lessons throughout the book use the…

  11. Quantum error-correcting codes from algebraic geometry codes of Castle type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munuera, Carlos; Tenório, Wanderson; Torres, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    We study algebraic geometry codes producing quantum error-correcting codes by the CSS construction. We pay particular attention to the family of Castle codes. We show that many of the examples known in the literature in fact belong to this family of codes. We systematize these constructions by showing the common theory that underlies all of them.

  12. Volcano-tectonic evolution of the Castle Mountains: 22 to 14 MA

    SciTech Connect

    Capps, R.C. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The alkali-calcic Castle Mountains Volcanic rocks (CMV) are host to major gold mineralization. They are located about 100 km south of Las Vegas, Nevada and are on the boundary between the Basin and Range Province and Colorado River extensional corridor (35[degree]18 minutes 45 seconds N, 115[degree]05 minutes 10 seconds W). New data show the following chronology. 22 Ma. A regional rhyolite ash-flow tuff, the Castle Mountain Tuff member, was deposited on a Proterozoic-Paleozoic basement of low relief. <22 Ma - > 17 Ma. Normal faulting (N30--60[degree]W, 60--65[degree]NE) formed half-grabens. Latite and basalt flows, minor ash-flow tuffs, lahars and sediments (Jacks Well member - JW) were deposited unconformably. JW magmas are enriched in light REE compared to the younger CMV. <17 Ma to 15.5 Ma. Oxidizing upper portions (796 C) of a shallowly emplaced silicic melt erupted to form the high-silica rhyolite dome complexes and intrusives (Linder Peak member - LP) of the NNE-striking Castle Mountains. NW-striking transverse structures caused discontinuities in strike direction of the subvolcanic intrusive and domes and helped form a synvolcanic depression. During a hiatus in volcanism, early Hart Peak member (HP) sediments were deposited marginal to the Castle Mountains. Major gold mineralization and widespread hydrothermal alteration occurred at about 15.5 Ma. 16 Ma to 14 Ma. Early HP volcaniclastic sediments, rhyolite pyroclastic-surge tuff, and basaltic flows, were deposited during late hydrothermal alteration and then fractured and displaced by NNE-striking normal faults, especially in the eastern and northeastern CMV. < 14 Ma. Tectonically significant flat-lying boulder conglomerate and unconformably overlying, largely andesitic flows fill depressions in the Castle Mountains and the Piute Range to the east.

  13. Ground-water resources of southern New Castle County, Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rima, Donald Robert; Coskery, O.J.; Anderson, P.W.

    1964-01-01

    Southern New Castle County has a land area of 190 square miles in northcentral Delaware. It is predominantly a rural area with a population of about 9,500 people who are engaged chiefly in agriculture. By and large, the residents are dependent upon ground water as a source of potable water. This investigation was made to provide knowledge of the availability and quality of .the ground-water supply to aid future development. The climate, surface features, and geology of the area are favorable for the occurrence of ground water. Temperatures are generally mild and precipitation is normally abundant and fairly evenly distributed throughout the year. The topography of the area is relatively fiat and, hence, the streams have low gradients. The surface is underlain to a considerable depth by highly permeable unconsolidated sediments that range in age from Early Cretaceous to Recent. Nearly all the subsurface stratigraphic units yield some water to wells, but only four parts or combinations of these units are sufficiently permeable, to yield large supplies. These are, from oldest to youngest, the nonmarine Cretaceous sediments and the Magothy Formation, the Monmouth Group, the Rancocas Formation, and .the surficial terrace and valley-fill deposits. In the northern part of the area the nonmarine Cretaceous sediments and the Magothy Formation can be reached economically by wells. Yields in excess of 300 gpm (gallons per minute) have been obtained from wells screened in this aquifer, but the maximum productivity of the aquifer has not been .tested. The Monmouth Group is used as a source of water in the central part of the area, where some wells yield as much as 125 gpm. The Rancocas Formation is the principal aquifer in the southern part of the area. Yields of 200-400 gpm can be expected from this aquifer, owing to its uniformly coarse texture, particularly in the upper part of the formation. The terrace deposits compose the shallow watertable aquifer throughout the area. In

  14. Checklist of water bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Nepomorpha, Gerromorpha) of Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Klementová, Barbora Reduciendo; Kment, Petr; Svitok, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The water bugs represent a significant component of the freshwater biota, play an important role in trophic webs, and may have considerable economic importance. Nevertheless, systematic research of this group has been underdeveloped in Slovakia (central Europe) for decades. This work presents a list of water bug species of Slovakia based on an exhaustive review of the literature (time span: 1808-2013) and on more than 14,000 individuals collected during extensive field campaigns (2010-2014) or obtained from insect collections. Fifty-six species belonging to 11 families of Heteroptera were recorded from a total of 767 sites. Seven species were recorded for the first time from Slovakia during our research. Among those, the first exact records of Corixa panzeri Fieber, 1848, Sigara (Subsigara) distincta (Fieber, 1848), Notonecta (Notonecta) lutea Müller, 1776, Notonecta (Notonecta) maculata Fabricius, 1794 and Microvelia (Microvelia) buenoi Drake, 1920 are provided here. Confusion concerning the records of two additional species, Arctocorisa carinata carinata (C. R. Sahlberg, 1819) and Hesperocorixa parallela (Fieber, 1860) is clarified. The water bugs species inventory appears to be nearly complete (~97 %) given an asymptotic richness estimate. The occurrence of other species is discussed taking into account their habitat requirements and distribution in neighbouring countries. Recommendations for future research are provided. PMID:26701521

  15. Hepatozoon canis infection in Slovakia: imported or autochthonous?

    PubMed

    Majláthová, Viktória; Hurníková, Zuzana; Majláth, Igor; Petko, Branislav

    2007-01-01

    Tissue samples from nine red foxes (four samples of striated muscle tissue and five samples of heart tissue) that originated from the Michalovce district (Slovakia), an area with endemic occurrence of canine babesiosis were examined by PCR method using primers amplifying a fragment of the 18S rRNA spanning the V4 region of Babesia and Theileria. An unexpected determination of 450 bp DNA fragment of Hepatozoon canis was found in four samples. Partial sequences of the 18S rRNA gene from the H. canis showed 100% similarity with the sequence from Brasil isolate of H. canis from a pampas fox (Pseudalopex gymnocercus) (AY471615) as well as from a fox in Spain (AY150067) and from a dog in Brazil (AY864677). In the present study, we report the first PCR detection of Hepatozoon canis in a naturally infected red fox from Slovakia, a Rhipicephalus sanguineus-free region. We assume that the infection was spread by infected R. sanguineus that might have been brought to Slovakia by travelers, by golden jackals, or by foxes migrating because of expansion of golden jackals and environmental and climate changes. PMID:17627439

  16. Processed seismic motion records from earthquakes (1982--1993): Recorded at Scotty`s Castle, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, P K; Honda, K K

    1993-10-01

    The 8mm data tape contains the processed seismic data of earthquakes recorded at Scotty`s Castle, California. The seismic data were recorded by seismographs maintained by the DOE/NV in Southern Nevada. Four files were generated from each seismic recorder. They are ``Uncorrected acceleration time histories, 2. corrected acceleration, velocity and displacement time histories, 3. original recording, and 4. Fourier amplitude spectra of acceleration.

  17. Ground-water conditions at the Veterans Facility, Castle Point, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brashears, M.L., Jr.

    1950-01-01

    The rock aquifers in the vicinity of the Castle Point Veterans Hospital yield limited quantities of water which, in general, are sufficient for domestic and farm purposes only. The possibility of obtaining the stated quantity requirements of about 200,000 gallons daily or more from the bedrock formations seems poor with the exception of the Wappinger limestone underlying the Fishkill Valley three miles to the south.

  18. Dynamics and conceptual model of the Rossena castle landslide (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelli, A.; Mandrone, G.; Ruffini, A.; Truffelli, G.

    2005-11-01

    In the Northern Apennines there are many historical villages and castles, which are of great value and represent a cultural heritage of great importance. Their presence within a territory greatly affected by landslide hazards creates, in many circumstances, the need to solve problems of land management and to act for the preservation of historical monuments. This paper describe an interesting landslide, failed during the night of 28 February 2004, that involved the village of Rossena: the failure damaged the village (Fig. 1), the road and the fields down to the stream but, fortunately, the castle just upslope the village was not involved at all. The 10th century massive castle of Rossena stands on the top of a cliff at about 500 m a.s.l., on the border between the provinces of Parma and Reggio Emilia, and it is surrounded by a small ancient village. The castle of Rossena is the best preserved stronghold of the Longobard times, enlarged and reinforced in the tenth century and partially rebuilt by Bonifacio, the father of Matilda of Canossa (the Vice-Queen of Italy and probably the most important woman in the Middle Ages) as a defensive structure guarding the Enza Valley. In addition, at Conossa, very close to Rossena, there was the meeting between Pope Gregory VII and the Emperor of Germany Henry IV, during the historical event known as "fight for the investitures". For these reasons, the area of Rossena is one of the most relevant from a historical point of view in the entire western part of the Emilia Romagna Region and it also has a high value as a geosite (Coratza et al., 2004).

  19. Environmental analyse of soil organic carbon stock changes in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koco, Š.; Barančíková, G.; Skalský, R.; Tarasovičová, Z.; Gutteková, M.; Halas, J.; Makovníková, J.; Novákova, M.

    2012-04-01

    The content and quality of soil organic matter is one of the basic soil parameters on which soil production functioning depends as well as it is active in non production soil functions like an ecological one especially. Morphologic segmentation of Slovakia has significant influence of structure in using agricultural soil in specific areas of our territory. Also social changes of early 90´s of 20´th century made their impact on change of using of agricultural soil (transformation from large farms to smaller ones, decreasing the number of livestock). This research is studying changes of development of soil organic carbon stock (SOC) in agricultural soil of Slovakia as results of climatic as well as social and political changes which influenced agricultury since last 40 years. The main goal of this research is an analysis of soil organic carbon stock since 1970 until now at specific agroclimatic regions of Slovakia and statistic analysis of relation between modelled data of SOC stock and soil quality index value. Changes of SOC stock were evaluated on the basis SOC content modeling using RothC-26.3 model. From modeling of SOC stock results the outcome is that in that time the soil organic carbon stock was growing until middle 90´s years of 20´th century with the highest value in 1994. Since that year until new millennium SOC stock is slightly decreasing. After 2000 has slightly increased SOC stock so far. According to soil management SOC stock development on arable land is similar to overall evolution. In case of grasslands after slight growth of SOC stock since 1990 the stock is in decline. This development is result of transformational changes after 1989 which were specific at decreasing amount of organic carbon input from organic manure at grassland areas especially. At warmer agroclimatic regions where mollic fluvisols and chernozems are present and where are soils with good quality and steady soil organic matter (SOM) the amount of SOC in monitored time is

  20. The Research of Historical Trusses in Northern Regions of Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenková, Renáta; Krušinský, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The blanket research of historical trusses in the territory of Slovakia has been running at our department since 2008. This research is done as teamwork in cooperation with experts from the field of conservation, and it is mainly focused on typology, construction, and the current technical and constructional state of investigated trusses. The long-time support of the grant scheme from the Ministry of Culture allows to get a fair amount of different data related to individual buildings and structures, which enables to carry out the in-depth research. In terms of their conservation and maintenance with an effort to extend their lifetime (the oldest known historical trusses in Slovakia are those of the 13th century), it is necessary to look into the microclimate impact of the under-roof space on wooden roof structures as well as to monitor the contemporary constructional and technical condition of a roof structure itself. The suitable microclimate in the under-roof space is influenced by a number of marginal conditions, constructional solutions of roof details, proper space ventilation etc

  1. The hill forts and castle mounds in Lithuania: interaction between geodiversity and human-shaped landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skridlaite, Grazina; Guobyte, Rimante; Satkunas, Jonas

    2015-04-01

    Lithuania is famous for its abundant, picturesque hill forts and castle mounds of natural origin. In Lithuania as well as in whole Europe the fortified hills were used as the society dwelling place since the beginning of the Late Bronze Age. Their importance increased when Livonian and Teutonic Orders directed a series of military campaigns against Lithuania with the aim of expansion of Christianity in the region at the end of 1st millennium AD, and they were intensively used till the beginning of the 15th c. when most of them were burned down during fights with the Orders or just abandoned due to the changing political and economical situation. What types of the geodiversity were used for fortified dwellings? The choice in a particular area depended on a variety of geomorphology left behind the retreating ice sheets. High spots dominating their surroundings were of prime interest. In E and SE Lithuania, the Baltic Upland hills marking the eastern margin of the last Weichselian glacier hosted numerous fortified settlements from the end of 2nd millennium BC to the Medieval Ages (Narkunai, Velikuskes etc). In W Lithuania, plateau-like hills of the insular Samogitian Upland had been repeatedly fortified from the beginning of 1st millennium AD to the 14th century (Satrija, Medvegalis etc). Chains of hill forts and castle mounds feature the slopes of glaciofluvial valleys of Nemunas, Neris and other rivers where the slopes were dissected by affluent rivulets and ravines and transformed into isolated, well protected hills (Kernave, Punia, Veliuona etc). Peninsulas and headlands formed by the erosion of fluvial and lacustrine deposits were used in the lowlands, e.g. in central and N Lithuania (Paberze, Mezotne etc). How much the landscape was modified for defense purposes? Long-term erosion and overgrowing vegetation damaged the former fortified sites, however some remains and the archeological excavations allowed their reconstruction. The fortified Bronze Age settlements

  2. Distribution of transmissivity and yield of the surficial, Castle Hayne, and Peedee aquifers in Northern New Hanover County, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Nagy, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Data were collected from more than 230 wells in northern New Hanover County, North Carolina, to evaluate the distribution of transmissivity and yield of the surficial, Castle Hayne, and Peedee aquifers of the Coastal Plain Physiographic Province. Constant-rate,single-well aquifer test data were obtained and analyzed to calculate additional transmissivity values for 25 production wells that were completed in the Castle Hayne or Peedee aquifer. In the surficial aquife, transmissivity values ranged from 400 to 12,700 feet squared per day, and reported yields ranged from 6 to 100 gallons per minute. In the Castle Hayne aquifer, transmissivity values ranged from 1,400 to 18,700 feet squared per day, and reported yields ranged from 9 to 640 gallons per minute. In the Peedee aquifer, transmissivity values ranged from 530 to 18,600 feet squared per day, and reported yields ranged from 8 to 1,000 gallons per minute.

  3. Solar energy system demonstration project at Wilmington Swim School, New Castle, Delaware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A solar energy system located at the Wilmington Swim School, New Castle, Delaware is described. The system was designed for a 40 percent heating and a 30 percent hot water solar contribution serving the heat loads in the following order: space heat - new addition, domestic water - entire facility, and pool heating - entire facility. On a cost basis for 2920 hours of operation, the heat reclaimed would cost $969.66 annually if provided by gas at 3.79 per million Btu's. At 5.5 centers per kwh, heat recovery costs of $481.80 percent a net savings of $487.86 annually.

  4. GPR Application for Road Management System in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitonak, Martin; Filipovsky, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Road Management System in Slovakia was established in 1996. Data for database are collected from Falling Weight Deflectometer, Skiddometer and Profilograph from 25 separated sections with average length of 30 km on yearly basis. The focus is especially on roads that have been built before the year 1996. In September 2014 the Slovak Road Administration announced the new project task which involved additional data request such as structure thicknesses, application to determine the thicknesses of bound layers and base layers, rutting analysis, transverse and longitudinal roughness and cross fall, ditch depths, the road width and pavement width. The request for data processing included the interpretation of the data in graphical display. The requested delivery of the final project data was in December 2014. The presentation summarizes the experiences and results of the data collection methods and technologies, data processing and evaluation methods and finally presenting the results. Also key new finding will be presented.

  5. Carcinoma of the neck showing thymic-like elements (CASTLE): report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Piacentini, Maria Gaia; Romano, Fabrizio; De Fina, Sergio; Sartori, Paola; Leone, Eugenio Biagio; Rubino, Barbara; Uggeri, Franco

    2006-04-01

    Carcinoma showing thymic-like elements (CASTLE) is a rare tumor affecting thyroid and neck soft tissues, which has to be distinguished from squamous cell and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, because it has a better prognosis. We report a new case of CASTLE which occurred in a patient submitted to total thyroidectomy with central neck dissection. The tumor stained positively for CD5, which seems to be the most useful marker in the differential diagnosis. By the analysis of the 18 cases reported in literature, total thyroidectomy with selective modified neck dissection should be the treatment of choice and radiotherapy should be considered for patients with positive nodal status. PMID:16703183

  6. Hydrology of Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tracts, central Utah, and potential effects of coal mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, R.L.; Baskin, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Alkali Creek coal-lease tract includes about 2,150 acres in the Book Cliffs coal field in central Utah, and the Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tract includes about 3,360 acres in the Wasatch Plateau coal field, also in central Utah. Both the Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tracts are near areas where coal is currently (1987) mined by underground methods from the Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation. The Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge areas have intermittent streams in which flow after snowmelt runoff is locally sustained into midsummer by springflow. The only perennial stream is South Fork Corner Canyon Creek in the Castle Valley Ridge area. Peak flow in both areas generally is from snowmelt runoff; however, peak flow from thunderstorm runoff in the Alkali Creek area can exceed that from snowmelt runoff. Estimated annual source-area sediment yield was 0.5 acre-ft/sq mi in the Alkali Creek lease tract and it was 0.3 acre-ft/sq mi in the Castle Valley Ridge lease tract. Groundwater in the Alkali Creek area occurs in perched aquifers in the Flagstaff Limestone and in other formations above the coal-bearing Blackhawk Formation. The principal source of recharge to the aquifers is snowmelt on outcrops. Faults may be major conduits and control the movement of groundwater. Groundwater discharges at formation contacts, between zones of differing permeability within a formation, near faults and into mines. Water sampled from 13 springs in the Alkali Creek area contained dissolved solids at concentrations ranging from 273 to 5,210 mg/L. Water sampled from 17 springs in the Castle Valley Ridge area contained dissolved solids at concentrations ranging from 208 to 579 mg/L. The composition of water from a recently abandoned part of an active mine the Wasatch Plateau closely resembles that of water discharging from a nearby mine that has been abandoned for more than 30 years. Mining of the Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tracts likely will

  7. The Customer Relationship Management in Terms of Business Practice in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urdziková, Jana; Jakábová, Martina; Saniuk, Sebastian

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the article is to present the results of the research on focus on the customer in relation to the use of customer relationship management in selected business subjects in Slovakia. The main goal of the research is the mapping of current state to ensure the principle of customer orientation and utilizing of CRM in organizations and industrial enterprises in Slovakia. This is the mapping of the current situation of that problem in practical conditions and determines potential opportunities for improvement.

  8. Long-term survey on Trichinella prevalence in wildlife of Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Hurníková, Z; Dubinský, P

    2009-02-23

    In Slovakia, monitoring the prevalence of Trichinella spp. in wildlife was performed since 2000 in the main reservoir animals, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and wild boar (Sus scrofa), using artificial digestion method as recommended by International Commission on Trichinellosis. The results of investigation performed in 5270 red foxes showed that Trichinella infection is widespread across Slovakia and prevalence increased significantly from 4.9% in 2000 to 20.5% in 2007. Recently, a higher Trichinella prevalence (0.11%) in wild boars was also demonstrated. The results indicate that foxes and wild boars are involved in the spread of Trichinella, although the latter host species seems to play a secondary role in the maintenance of the sylvatic cycle in Slovakia. Trichinella britovi is the predominant species circulating in Slovakia, both in foxes and wild boars, and Trichinella spiralis occurs only sporadically. Mixed infections of T. britovi and Trichinella pseudospiralis were recorded in 2005 in one wild boar from Eastern Slovakia and in 2006 in one red fox from the same region. These findings are important with respect to an outbreak caused by T. pseudospiralis in a pig farm in the same district 3 years ago. This study provides a complex picture on Trichinella occurrence in all regions of Slovakia and may be a good basis for evaluating the risk of parasite transmission to the domestic cycle and human beings. PMID:19042089

  9. Processed seismic motion records from earthquakes, 1982-1993: Recorded at Scotty's Castle, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lum, P. K.; Honda, K. K.

    1993-10-01

    As part of the contract with the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), URS/John A. Blume & Associates, Engineers (URS/Blume) maintained a network of seismographs to monitor the ground motion generated by the underground nuclear explosions (UNE's) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The seismographs were located in the communities surrounding the NTS and the Las Vegas valley. When these seismographs were not used for monitoring the UNE generated motions, a limited number of seismographs were maintained for monitoring motion generated by other than UNE's (e.g. motion generated by earthquakes, wind, blast). Scotty's Castle was one of the selected earthquake monitoring stations. During the period from 1982 through 1993, numerous earthquakes which varied in magnitudes and distances were recorded at Scotty's Castle. The records from 24 earthquakes were processed and included in this report. The processed earthquakes are listed in chronological order and in the order of epicentral distances, respectively. These epicenters and magnitudes are shown. Due to the potential benefit of these data for the scientific community, DOE/NV and the National Park Service authorize the release of these records.

  10. Geologic framework and hot dry rock geothermal potential of the Castle Dome area, Yuma County, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Gutmann, J.T.

    1981-02-01

    The Castle Dome Mountains and surrounding ranges constitute a voluminous pile of silicic volcanic rocks within the Basin and Range province of southwestern Arizona. Previously reported as Cretaceous and Quaternary in age, these volcanics all are of late Oligocene to early Miocene age as indicated by five new K-Ar dates. Reconnaissance field studies indicate that the volcanic section locally has undergone large rotations that contrast with the usual structural style of the Basin and Range and resemble the thin-skinned rotational tectonics documented for earlier, mid-Tertiary extensional deformation in ranges to the north and northeast. Significant geothermal potential of the Castle Dome area is suggested by a shallow depth to the Curie isotherm and by the apparent presence of a good electrical conductor at anomalously shallow depth in the crust. Warm wells exist in the area and Shearer (1979) reported a geothermal gradient of about 70/sup 0/C/km in a dry well near the center of the gravity low. Radiogenic heat production in the silicic batholith inferred above constitutes a reasonable candidate for a shallow regional heat source.

  11. Processed seismic motion records from earthquakes (1982--1993): Recorded at Scotty`s Castle, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, P.K.; Honda, K.K.

    1993-10-01

    As part of the contract with the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), URS/John A. Blume & Associates, Engineers (URS/Blume) maintained a network of seismographs to monitor the ground motion generated by the underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The seismographs were located in the communities surrounding the NTS and the Las Vegas valley. When these seismographs were not used for monitoring the UNE generated motions, a limited number of seismographs were maintained for monitoring motion generated by other than UNEs (e.g. motion generated by earthquakes, wind, blast). Scotty`s Castle was one of the selected earthquake monitoring station. During the period from 1982 through 1993, numerous earthquakes with varied in magnitudes and distances were recorded at Scotty`s Castle. The records from 24 earthquakes were processed and included in this report. Tables 1 and 2 lists the processed earthquakes in chronological order and in the order of epicentral distances, respectively. Figure 1 shows these epicenters and magnitudes. Due to the potential benefit of these data for the scientific community, DOE/NV and the National Park Service authorize the release of these records.

  12. Geologic framework and hot dry rock geothermal potential of the Castle Dome area, Yuma County, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmann, J. T.

    1981-02-01

    The Castle Dome Mountains and surrounding ranges constitute a voluminous pile of silicic volcanic rocks within the Basin and Range province of southwestern Arizona. Previously reported as Cretaceous and Quaternary in age, these volcancies all are of late Oligocene to early Miocene age as indicated by five new K-Ar dates. Reconnaissance field studies indicate that the volcanic section locally has undergone large rotations that contrast with the usual structural style of the Basin and Range and resemble the thin skinned rotational tectonics documented for earlier, mid Tertiary extensional deformation in ranges to the north and northeast. Significant geothermal potential of the Castle Dome area is suggested by a shallow depth to the Curie isotherm and by the apparent presence of a good electrical conductor at anomalously shallow depth in the crust. Warm wells exist in the area as well as a geothermal gradient of about 700 C/km in a dry well near the center of the gravity low radiogenic heat production in the silicic batholith inferred above constitutes a reasonable candidate for a shallow regional heat source.

  13. CASTLE3D - A Computer Aided System for Labelling Archaeological Excavations in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houshiar, H.; Borrmann, D.; Elseberg, J.; Nüchter, A.; Näth, F.; Winkler, S.

    2015-08-01

    Documentation of archaeological excavation sites with conventional methods and tools such as hand drawings, measuring tape and archaeological notes is time consuming. This process is prone to human errors and the quality of the documentation depends on the qualification of the archaeologist on site. Use of modern technology and methods in 3D surveying and 3D robotics facilitate and improve this process. Computer-aided systems and databases improve the documentation quality and increase the speed of data acquisition. 3D laser scanning is the state of the art in modelling archaeological excavation sites, historical sites and even entire cities or landscapes. Modern laser scanners are capable of data acquisition of up to 1 million points per second. This provides a very detailed 3D point cloud of the environment. 3D point clouds and 3D models of an excavation site provide a better representation of the environment for the archaeologist and for documentation. The point cloud can be used both for further studies on the excavation and for the presentation of results. This paper introduces a Computer aided system for labelling archaeological excavations in 3D (CASTLE3D). Consisting of a set of tools for recording and georeferencing the 3D data from an excavation site, CASTLE3D is a novel documentation approach in industrial archaeology. It provides a 2D and 3D visualisation of the data and an easy-to-use interface that enables the archaeologist to select regions of interest and to interact with the data in both representations. The 2D visualisation and a 3D orthogonal view of the data provide cuts of the environment that resemble the traditional hand drawings. The 3D perspective view gives a realistic view of the environment. CASTLE3D is designed as an easy-to-use on-site semantic mapping tool for archaeologists. Each project contains a predefined set of semantic information that can be used to label findings in the data. Multiple regions of interest can be joined under

  14. 75 FR 1052 - Castle Energy Services, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Castle Energy Services, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for Blanket Section 204 Authorization December 30, 2009. This is a supplemental notice in the...

  15. 75 FR 70029 - Notice of Temporary Closure of Castle Rocks Inter-Agency Recreation Area in Cassia County, ID

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Notice of Temporary Closure of Castle Rocks Inter-Agency Recreation Area in Cassia County, ID AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Temporary...

  16. Chemical constituents in the Peedee and Castle Hayne aquifers: Porters Neck area, New Hanover County, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, T.L.; Harris, W.B.

    2004-01-01

    Concerns about overuse and potential contamination of major aquifers in the southeastern part of North Carolina resulted in the initiation of a subsurface water quality study in February 2001. The focus of this study was to examine variations in nutrients (NO3-, TRP, SO42- Cl-, NH4+) and total dissolved Fe in the Cretaceous Peedee and Tertiary Castle Hayne Limestone aquifers of northeastern New Hanover County. Water samples were collected monthly for one year from sixteen wells located in the Porters Neck area (west of the Intracoastal Waterway and south of Futch Creek) and four springs located on the south side of Futch Creek. Variations in selective nutrient concentrations were measured between and within each aquifer. Concentrations of NH4+ and Fe increased in the Peedee sandstone aquifer during the warmer summer and early fall months. In late summer to early fall, Fe, NO 3-, NH4+, and TRP concentrations in the Castle Hayne Limestone aquifer were significantly higher than in the spring and winter months. Chloride and SO 42- concentrations for the Castle Hayne Limestone aquifer both increased during the warmer months, probably as a result of saltwater intrusion. Factors considered for nutrient and Fe variance include: temperature variation, anaerobic conditions, subsurface stratigraphy/structure, recharge locations, site location and surface fertilization. The shallower Castle Hayne Limestone aquifer showed seasonal variability in the study area, whereas the Peedee sandstone aquifer showed little to no seasonal variability. Increases in NO3- and TRP lagged slightly behind periods of high fertilization and were more prevalent down-dip of a major golf course. Nutrient content and seasonal variation of Futch Creek springs indicated that they originate from the Castle Hayne Limestone aquifer.

  17. Contamination by moulds of grape berries in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Mikusová, P; Ritieni, A; Santini, A; Juhasová, G; Srobárová, A

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes the first map, albeit partial, of toxigenic fungi re-isolated from grape berries collected in three out of the six most important Slovakia winemaking areas in two different periods of the harvest year 2008. Low temperatures and high relative humidity during July 2008 favoured the development of grape fungal diseases that cause rots such as Plasmopara, Uncinula, Botrytis, Metasphaeria, Elsinoë, and Saccharomycetes. In the analysed samples, the following genera of toxigenic fungi were identified in the range of 1-4%: Aspergillus, Alternaria, Cladosporium, Epicoccum, Fusarium, Penicillium, Rhizopus, Ulocladium, and Trichoderma Trichothecium, while the genera Aspergillus, Alternaria, Fusarium, and Penicillium were in the range 11-29%. A. niger, A. carbonarius, some strains of A. carbonarius-with 'crystals' and strains of A. uvarum-uniseriate were identified; these species are considered ochratoxigenic (able to produce variable amounts of toxins). In addition, a non-ochratoxigenic strain of A. ibericus and a Fusarium strain able to biosynthesize small amount of fumonisins, beauvericin, and enniatins were identified. P. expansum, able to produce citrinin, represents 29.7%, of the Penicillium genus together with P. verrucosum, P. glabrum, P. citrinum, and P. crustosum. An analysis for the identification and quantification of the main toxins: ochratoxin A, fumonisins, beauvericin, enniatins, and fusaproliferin was performed on grape samples; it was consistent with the results of the mycological analysis. Toxigenic fungi should be checked throughout the years and their occurrence compared with all environmental factors to avoid health risks. PMID:20349371

  18. Operation Castle Cascade: managing multiple casualties from a simulated chemical weapons attack.

    PubMed

    Siegel, David; Younggren, Bradley N; Ness, Brian; Kvool, Valerie

    2003-05-01

    In the wake of the recent terrorist attack on the United States, there is an ever-increasing need for the defense against weapons of mass destruction. The use of explosive devices in combination with chemical agents could result in a community disaster with multiple traumatic and medical injuries. Military medical personnel may be the first called upon due to their unique training and equipment. Operation Castle Cascade was a large-scale exercise on a military instillation involving the apprehension of hostages and detonation of an explosive device containing dimethyl sulfate. We will provide details on the medical management of 50 patients with simulated chemical and traumatic injuries. Issues relating to on-site chemical identification, triage, decontamination, treatment, casualty collection, and transportation of casualties are addressed in this article. PMID:12775167

  19. Carbon air pollution reflected in deposits on chosen building materials of Prague Castle.

    PubMed

    Sýkorová, Ivana; Havelcová, Martina; Zeman, Antonín; Trejtnarová, Hana

    2011-10-01

    Thin black surface layers or black coloured gypsum crusts can be observed on stones of many buildings and sculptures around the world. The black weathered stone and mortar surface from selected sections of the Prague Castle were studied by microscopic methods, GC/MS and pyrolysis-GC/MS analysis. Microscopically, we found an authigenic gypsum formation with an outer layer of an admixture of fine grains of quartz, clay minerals, thermally altered clay minerals, fly ash, and carbonaceous particles of natural and anthropogenic origin particularly chars, cokes, soots. Noncarbonate C content ranged between 0.8% and 4.3%. Phtalates dominated in extracts from the samples and benzonitrile had the greatest abundance in the pyrolysis products. The identified organic particles and compounds are known to result from human activities. PMID:21855962

  20. Injecting polyacrylamide into Gulf Coast sands: The White Castle Q sand polymer-injectivity test

    SciTech Connect

    Shahin, G.T.; Thigpen, D.R.

    1996-08-01

    A polymer-injectivity test designed to control mobility in cosurfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding was performed in the Q sand of the White Castle field, LA. Analysis of test data indicates that a polymer bank with an average viscosity of 4 cp was propagated as far as 90 ft into the reservoir with no measurable sign of degradation. It is estimated from pilot and laboratory data that injection of 500 ppm polyacrylamide through perforations at a rate of at least 32 B-D/in{sup 2} of perforation into gulf coast sands is feasible. Monitoring of backproduced reservoir samples indicates that, to date, no detectable change in viscosity has occurred over a 2-year period.

  1. A magnetic investigation of the Round Mountain plug, Castle Valley, Grand County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Black, R.A.

    1953-01-01

    A magnetic survey was made in Castle Valley, Grand County, Utah, to determine if the Round Mountain plug was fed laterally from the La Sal Mountains or vertically from a source at depth. Additional measurements were made around the exposure of igneous rock to obtain the shape of the plug at depth. No indication of a buried lateral igneous feeder was detected on the magnetic profileso The magnetic contour map showed that the plug was much larger than indicated by the diorite porphyry outcrop, and that the buried part of the plug southeast of Round Mountain has a higher magnetic susceptibility than the diorite outcrop. Theoretical anomalies, calculated using the susceptibility of the diorite outcrop, indicate that a lateral feeder at a depth of greater than 200 feet could not be detected. The size and shape of the magnetic anomaly as shown on the contour map suggest that the plug was fed from a source at depth.

  2. Solar energy system demonstration project at Wilmington Swim School, New Castle, Delaware. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    This document is the Final Report of the Solar Energy System located at the Wilmington, Swim School, New Castle, Delaware. This active solar system is composed of 2,700 square feet of Revere liquid flat plate collectors piped to a 2,800 gallon concrete storage tank located below ground near the building. A micro-computer based control system selects the optimal applications of the stored energy among space, domestic water and pool alternatives. The controlled logic is planned for serving the heat loads in the following order: space heat-new addition, domestic water-entire facility, and pool heating-entire facility. A modified trombe wall passive operation the active system will bypass the areas being served passively. The system was designed for a 40 percent heating and a 30 percent hot water solar contribution.

  3. Paleomagnetism of Cretaceous and Paleocene sedimentary rocks across the Castle Mountain Fault, south central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatakos, John A.; Kodama, K. P.; Vittorio, L. F.; Pavlis, T. L.

    Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic analyses on 217 samples from 13 sites in the Paleocene Chickaloon Formation south of the Castle Mountain Fault and 111 samples from 9 sites in the coeval, but lithologically distinct, Arkose Ridge Formation north of this fault indicate that these rocks contain a pre-folding magnetization carried by fine grained (<1.0μm) single domain magnetite. Secondary magnetizations are common, possibly as the result of the presence of authigenic or hydrothermal pyrrhotite. Although characteristic magnetizations were isolated for the Chickaloon and Arkose Ridge rocks, the best results were obtained from demagnetization plane analysis which estimates the location of the paleomagnetic pole for the Chickaloon Formation at 50.5°N, 277.2°E, δm = 12.2°, δP = 7.77deg;, and a paleomagnetic pole for the Arkose Ridge Formation at 60.4°N, 138.6°E, δm = 11.6°, δp = 6.4°. These results suggest that there is no paleomagnetically discernible latitudinal offset across the Castle Mountain Fault since Paleocene time, but that both the Chickaloon and Arkose Ridge rocks, as part of the Peninsular terrane, originated approximately 1600±1200 km south of their present position with respect to North America. One possible explanation of these data is that the Peninsular terrane was accreted to North America at mid-latitudes in the Cretaceous and was subsequently translated northward by right-lateral strike-slip faulting parallel to the North American margin. Hence, the Arkose Ridge and Chickaloon results may be indicative of the cumulative right-hand displacement occurring on these faults since Paleocene time. However, a calculation using the pole to the small circle fit of the present-day curvature of the Tintina-Northern Rocky Mountain Trench and Denali fault systems, and the maximum amount of structurally estimated offset across these fault systems, indicates that motion on these faults can account for no more than half of the paleomagnetically observed

  4. Flood hazards along the Toutle and Cowlitz rivers, Washington, from a hypothetical failure of Castle Lake blockage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Orzol, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    A recent evaluation of groundwater and material in the blockage impounding Castle Lake shows that the blockage is potentially unstable against failure from piping due to heave and internal erosion when groundwater levels are seasonally high. There is also a remote possibility that a 6.8 or greater magnitude earthquake could occur in the Castle Lake area when groundwater levels are critically high. If this situation occurs, the debris blockage that confines Castle Lake could breach from successive slope failure with liquefaction of a portion of the blockage. A dam-break computer model was used to simulate discharge through a hypothetical breach in the Castle Lake blockage that could be caused by failure by heave, internal erosion, or liquefaction. Approximately 18,500 acre-ft of stored water would be released from an assumed breach that fully developed to a 1,000-ft width over a 15-minute time period. The resulting flood, incorporating 3.4 x 10 to the 6th power cu yd of the debris blockage, would reach a peak magnitude of 1,500,000 cu ft/s (cubic feet per second). The flood is also assumed to incorporate an additional 137x10 to the 6th power cu yd of saturated debris material from downstream deposits. Flow is considered to be hyperconcentrated with sediment throughout the course of the flood. The hypothetical hyperconcentrated flow is routed downstream, superimposed on normal winter flood flows by use of a one-dimensional unsteady-state numerical streamflow simulation model. From a starting magnitude of 1,500,000 cu ft/s, the peak increases to 2,100,000 cu ft/s at N-1 Dam (12 mi downstream) and attenuates to 1,200,000 cu ft/s at Kid Valley (25 mi downstream) , to 100,000 cu ft/s at Longview and the confluence of the Columbia River (65 mi downstream). From time of breach, the flood peak would take 2.2 hr to reach Toutle, 3.8 hr to reach Castle Rock, and 8.5 hr to reach Longview. Communities of Toutle , Castle Rock, Kelso, and Longview would experience extreme to

  5. Prognosis of groundwater drought occurrence in selected catchments of Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojkovova, M.; Machlica, A.; Bara, M.

    2009-04-01

    The paper contains results on prognosis of groundwater drought occurrence in six selected catchments of Slovakia with different geological, hydrogeological and climatic conditions. Prognoses were made using BILAN model. Climatic scenarios CCCM1997, CCCM2000 (Canadian model CGCM.1 and CGCM.2 modified on conditions in Slovakia) and GISS1998 were used. Groundwater drought occurrence was assessed for time-frames 2030 and 2075. Each year of the whole assessed period of 24 years (1982-2005) was classified according to the water bearing degree of the stream taking into account the yearly precipitation amounts (Majercakova, et al., 2007). Three types of dry years - very dry, medium dry and moderately dry were defined. The prognosis values for 2030 and 2075 were compared with the reference period 1971-1990. Chvojnica River catchment (Lopasov profile), located in Neogene sedimentary rocks is characterized by occurrence of 26 % of dry years (very dry, medium or moderately dry) within the period 1982-2005. Prognosis of the groundwater runoff changes showed not very expressive decrease, in about 3.6-4 % in comparison with the reference period. Tuzina River catchment (Tuzina profile), located in crystalline, Mesozoic and Neogene sedimentary rocks, is characterized by occurrence of 25 % of dry years. Values of the groundwater runoff would decrease not very expressively, in about 5-7 %. These two catchments were assessed using GISS1998 climate change scenario. Groundwater changes in four other catchments were evaluated using CCCM scenarios. Topla River catchment (Bardejov profile), located in Paleogene flysh rocks, is characterized by occurrence of 58 % of dry periods. Values of the groundwater runoff would decrease importantly - in about 59-88 %. Bela River catchment (Podbanske profile), built by granitic and glaciofluvial rocks, is characterized by occurrence of 13 % of dry periods. Values of the groundwater runoff would decrease in about 42-63 %. Boca River catchment (Kralova

  6. Illegal Drug Use among Female University Students in Slovakia

    PubMed Central

    Matejovičová, Barbora; Trandžík, Jozef; Schlarmannová, Janka; Boledovičová, Mária; Velemínský, Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Background This study is focused on the issue of illegal drug use among female university students preparing to become teachers. The main aim was to determine the frequency of drug abuse in a group of young women (n=215, mean age 20.44 years). Material/Methods Using survey methods, we determined that 33.48% of female university students in Slovakia use illegal drugs and 66.51% of students have never used illegal drugs. Differences between these groups were determined using statistical analysis, mostly in 4 areas of survey questions. Results We determined that education of parents has a statistically significant influence on use of illegal drugs by their children (χ2=10.14; P<0.05). Communication between parents and children and parental attention to children have a significant role in determining risky behavior (illegal drug use, χ2=8.698, P<0.05). Parents of students not using illegal drugs were interested in how their children spend their free time (68.53%). We confirmed the relationship between consumption of alcohol and illegal drug use (χ2=16.645; P<0.001) and smoking (χ2=6.226; P<0.05). The first contact with drugs occurs most frequently at high school age. The most consumed “soft” drug in our group of female university students is marijuana. Conclusions Our findings are relevant for comparison and generalization regarding causes of the steady increase in number of young people using illegal drugs. PMID:25602526

  7. Flashiness of mountain streams in Slovakia and Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holko, Ladislav; Parajka, Juraj; Kostka, Zdeno; Škoda, Peter; Blöschl, Günter

    2011-08-01

    SummaryThis article evaluates the spatial and temporal changes in streamflow flashiness in 122 mountain catchments in Slovakia and Austria. The flashiness is quantified by the Richards-Baker flashiness index ( FI), which is the ratio of absolute day-to-day fluctuations of streamflow relative to total flow in a year. The analysis is based on daily streamflow data from the period 1976 to 2005. The results show that the average day-to-day fluctuations of streamflow vary from 6% to 43%, depending on the catchment. The spatial pattern of the FI reflects the variations in the main geological units and generally shows a trend of decreasing flashiness with increasing size of the catchment. Statistically significant temporal trends in flashiness are found in 7 Slovak and 22 Austrian catchments. Most of these trends are related to anthropogenic effects, while, in a few catchments, the change in annual flashiness appears to be caused by changes in precipitation seasonality. A multivariate statistical analysis of FI indicates negative correlations with catchment area, mean catchment elevation, percents of forest cover, agricultural land and Quaternary geology. Positive correlations are found between FI and Tertiary and Calcareous geologies. Extrapolating the regression models beyond the observed range of catchment attributes used in the estimation leads to significant prediction errors. In order to better interpret the FI values, a statistically significant relationship was found between the FI and the frequency of peak flows exceeding the long-term mean as well as between the FI and the 5% quantile of daily streamflow.

  8. Geochemical map of the Mount Eddy and Castle Crags Roadless Areas, Shasta, Siskiyou, and Trinity counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, J.A.; Caress, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    The Mount Eddy and Castle , Crags Roadless Areas occupy 9,600 acres (39 km2) and 3,300 acres (13 km2), respectively, in Shasta, Siskiyou, and Trinity Counties, Calif., approximately 8 mi (13 km) west of the towns of Mount Shasta City and Dunsmuir (fig. 1). Access is provided by secondary roads and trails from Interstate Highway 5, which passes through Mount Shasta City and Dunsmuir. The areas are located in rugged terrane in the easternmost part of the Klamath Mountains where altitudes range from about 2,500 ft (7.62 m) in the southern Castle Crags area to 9,025 ft (2,751 m) on Mount Eddy. Manzanita and other brush are ubiquitous at lower elevations whereas vegetation is lacking at higher elevations except for occasional gnarled conifers and ground-level plants.

  9. Miocene calc-alkaline magmatism, calderas, and crustal extension in the Kofa and Castle Dome Mountains, southwestern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Grubensky, M.J. ); Bagby, W.C. )

    1990-11-10

    Two widespread lower Miocene rhyolite ash flow tuffs in the Kofa and Castle Dome Mountains of southwestern Arizona are products of caldera-forming eruptions. These closely erupted tuffs, the tuff of Yaqui Tanks and the tuff of Ten Ewe Mountain, are approximately 22 Ma in age and their eruptions culminate a 1- to 2-m.y.-long burst of calc-alkaline volcanic activity centered on the northern Castle Dome Mountains. Exotic blocks of Proterozoic and Mesozoic crystalline rocks up to 20 m across are present in exposures of the tuff of Yaqui Tanks exposed in the central Castle Dome Mountains and the southern Kofa Mountains. A single, thick cooling unit of the tuff of Ten Ewe Mountain that includes thick lenses of mesobreccia marks the location of the younger caldera that extends from Palm Canyon in the western Kofa Mountains eastward more than 7 km along strike to the central part of the range. Large residual Bouguer gravity anomalies, one beneath each inferred caldera, are interpreted as batholithic rocks or low-density caldera fill. Caldera-related volcanism in the Kofa region occurred during a transition in extensional tectonic regimes: From a regime of east-west trending uplifts and basins to a regime manifest primarily by northwest striking normal faults. A narrow corridor of folding and strike-slip faulting formed during volcanism in the southern Kofa Mountains. Upper Oligocene or lower Miocene coarse sedimentary rocks along the southern flank of the Chocolate Mountains anticlinorium in the southern Castle Dome Mountains mark the periphery of a basin similar to other early and middle Tertiary basins exposed in southern California. The volcanic section of the Kofa region was dissected by high-angle normal faults related to northeast-southwest oriented crustal extension typical of the southern Basin and Range province.

  10. Report on radio observation of meteors (Iža, Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinský, Peter; Dorotovič, Ivan; Vidovenec, Marian

    2014-02-01

    During the period from 1 to 17 August 2014 meteors were experimentally registered using radio waves. This experiment was conducted in the village of Iža, Slovakia. Its main objective was to test the technical equipment intended for continuous registration of meteor echoes, which will be located in the Slovak Central Observatory in Hurbanovo. These tests are an indirect continuation of previous experiments of observation of meteor showers using the technology available in Hurbanovo at the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st century. The device consists of two independent receiver systems. One recorded echoes of the transmitter Graves 143.050 MHz (N47.3480° E5.5151°, France) and the second one recorded echoes of the TV transmitter Lviv 49.739583 MHz (N49.8480° E24.0369°, Ukraine). The apparatus for tracking radio echoes of the transmitter Graves consists of a 9-element Yagi antenna with vertical polarization (oriented with an elevation of 0° at azimuth 270°), the receiver Yaesu VR-5000 in CW mode, and a computer with registration using the program HROFFT v1.0.0f. The second apparatus recording the echoes of the transmitter Lviv consists of a LP (log-periodic) antenna with horizontal polarization (elevation of 0° and azimuth of 90°), the receiver ICOM R-75 in the CW mode, and also a computer with registration using HROFFT v1.0.0f. A total of about 78000 echoes have been registered during around 700 hours of registration. Probably not all of them are caused by meteors. These data were statistically processed and compared with visual observations in the IMO database. Planned own visual observations could not be performed due to unfavourable weather conditions lasting from 4 to 13 August 2014. The registered data suggest that observations were performed in the back-scatter mode in this configuration and not in the planned forward-scatter mode. Deeper analysis and longer data sets are, however, necessary to calibrate the observation system and this will

  11. Stochastic Flood Frequency Analysis Using the SCHADEX Method in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valent, Peter; Výleta, Roman; Szolgay, Ján; Paquet, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    between minimum and maximum estimated flood spread from 80 m3/s (from 166 to 232 m3/s) for a 10-year flood to as much as 600 m3/s (from 644 to 1391 m3/s) for a 10000-year flood. Despite of this uncertainty the SCHADEX method gives better results than traditionally used flood estimation methods used in Slovakia which was demonstrated by comparing estimated with reconstructed historical floods.

  12. Phonetic problems with Slovak in foreign students studying medicine in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Dzuganova, B; Balkova, D

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays more and more foreign students come to Slovakia to study medicine at Slovak universities. Besides specialized subjects studied in English they have to learn Slovak. The authors of this article have focused their attention to the most serious problems, the Slovak language causes to foreign students studying medicine at Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin (Ref. 6) Full Text (Free, PDF). PMID:17685013

  13. Alternative Civil Enculturation: Political Disenchantment and Civic Attitudes in Minority Schools in Estonia, Latvia, and Slovakia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golubeva, Maria; Austers, Ivars

    2011-01-01

    The article investigates the ways in which minority schools in Latvia, Estonia, and Slovakia resist the dominant narratives of nation and citizenship and provide an alternative model of civil enculturation for students. It provides evidence to support the hypothesis that differences between competing narratives of statehood and nationhood among…

  14. European Gender Lessons: Girls and Boys at Scout Camps in Denmark, Portugal, Russia and Slovakia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Harriet Bjerrum

    2004-01-01

    The article investigates the tensions between and within models of gender equality and gender complementarity by studying children who are in the midst of learning to apply these gender models in practice. Children (aged 11-15 years) were observed and interviewed while they participated in scout camps in Denmark, Portugal, Slovakia and Russia.…

  15. Teaching Translation and Interpreting in Slovakia: Is There Anything Other than Levý and Popovic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biloveský, Vladimír; Djovcoš, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Institutional translation and interpreting training has a long lasting tradition in Slovakia mainly thanks to such significant translation scholars as Anton Popovic, František Miko, Ján Vilikovský and many others. However the situation has changed after the Velvet Revolution in 1989 and the education needed to start adapting to the new market…

  16. Recombination in Tula Hantavirus Evolution: Analysis of Genetic Lineages from Slovakia

    PubMed Central

    Sibold, Claus; Meisel, Helga; Krüger, Detlev H.; Labuda, Milan; Lysy, Jan; Kozuch, Oto; Pejcoch, Milan; Vaheri, Antti; Plyusnin, Alexander

    1999-01-01

    To examine the evolution of Tula hantavirus (TUL), carried by the European common vole (Microtus arvalis and M. rossiaemeridionalis), we have analyzed genetic variants from Slovakia, the country where the virus is endemic. Phylogenetic analysis (PHYLIP) based on either partial (nucleotides [nt] 441 to 898) or complete N-protein-encoding sequences divided Slovakian TUL variants into two main lineages: (i) strains from eastern Slovakia, which clustered with Russian strains, and (ii) strains from western Slovakia situated closer to those from the Czech Republic. We found genetic diversity of 19% between the two groups and 4% within the western Slovakian TUL strains. Phylogenetic analysis of the 3′ noncoding region (3′-NCR), however, placed the eastern Slovakian strains closer to those from western Slovakia and the Czech Republic, with a greater distance to the Russian strains, suggesting a recombinant nature of the S segment in the eastern Slovakian TUL lineage. A bootscan search of the S-segment sequences of TUL strains revealed at least two recombination points in the S sequences of eastern Slovakian TUL strains (nt 400 to 415 and around 1200) which agreed well with the pattern of amino acid substitutions in the N protein and deletions/insertions in the 3′-NCR of the S segment. These data suggest that homologous recombination events occurred in the evolution of hantaviruses. PMID:9847372

  17. Stratigraphy and economic potential of Castle Gate area, Carbon County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Russon, M.

    1984-07-01

    Unexcelled exposures of the coal-bearing Blackhawk Formation near Castle Gate, Utah, provide a cross section of sediments deposited by wave-dominated deltas along the western shoreline of the Cretaceous Interior seaway. Four sandstone tongues resulted from deltaic sedimentation, each overlain by thick coal. A clear genetic relationship exists between the occurrence of coal and geometries of paleoshorelines and fluvial channels. Coals are thickest where underlain by thin shoreface sandstones, and they pinch out abruptly against beach-ridge sandstones responsible for swamp proliferation. Fluvial channels subsequently cut wide swaths in swamp deposits normal to shoreline trends. Commonly, thick coals of different seams occur together, as the compaction of vegetables controlled subsequent swamp accumulation. Excellent exposures and considerable subsurface data provide the details necessary to construct a predictive exploration model useful in the Cretaceous coals of the central Rockies. Cretaceous deltaic deposits also create hydrocarbon potential, as three facies associated with Blackhawk deposition produce ideal stratigraphic relationships for hydrocarbon accumulation. Porous delta-front sandstones interfinger with the underlying organic-rich marine shale of the Mancos formation. Shale and siltstone of the flood plain then cap the sandstone. Hydrocarbons derived from the marine shale or from associated coal may accumulate in porous sands of stream channels or in mouth-bar or beach-ridge deposits of the delta front. A clear understanding of deltaic sedimentation, provided by analysis of the Blackhawk model, could aid in predicting the occurrences of similar subsurface sandstones.

  18. Downhole measurements and fluid chemistry of a castle rock steam well, the Geysers, Lake County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.; Nathenson, M.; Frye, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Wellbore and reservoir processes in a steam well in the Castle Rock field of The Geysers have been studied by means of down-hole pressure and temperature measurements and analyses of ejected water and steam produced under bleed and full flow. Down-hole measurements show that below a vapor zone there is liquid water in the well in pressure equilibrium with reservoir steam at a depth of 2290 m. The progressive decreases, from 1973 to 1977, of pressure and temperature in the vapor zone indicate that wellbore heat loss is high enough to condense a large fraction of the steam inflow. The chemical composition of water ejected from the well is consistent with an origin from wellbore condensation of steam. Calculations using the differences in gas and isotopic compositions between bleed and full-flow steam show that about half of the full-flow steam originated as liquid water in the reservoir and that about 30% of the steam entering the well under bleed was condensed in the wellbore and drained downward. Heat loss calculations are also consistent with this amount of condensation. ?? 1981.

  19. National study of illicit drug use in Slovakia based on wastewater analysis.

    PubMed

    Mackuľak, Tomáš; Skubák, Jaroslav; Grabic, Roman; Ryba, Jozef; Birošová, Lucia; Fedorova, Ganna; Spalková, Viera; Bodík, Igor

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze illicit drugs and their metabolites in wastewater from eight selected wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Slovakia. The effect of two of the biggest music festivals in Slovakia on illicit drugs in wastewater was also investigated. Urinary bio-markers of amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine, cannabis and ecstasy use were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We then compared our results with data obtained in other parts of Europe and the world. This study demonstrates that Slovakia has one of highest methamphetamine consumption rates in Europe. Within Slovakia, the highest level of methamphetamine consumption was found in Petržalka, where the mean specific load of this drug in sewage was 169 mg/day/1000 inhabitants; the next highest loads were detected in Piešťany (128 mg/day/1000 inhabitants) and Bratislava (124 mg/day/1000 inhabitants). Amphetamine, ecstasy and cannabis consumption in our study were comparable to that found in other European cities, whereas cocaine consumption was lower. We also analyzed the pattern of drug consumption over the course of a week. The load of the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine in wastewater increased during the weekend. The use of this drug was most common in the capital of Slovakia. Increased consumption was also found during a folk festival in Piešťany. The ecstasy load in wastewater from larger cities also significantly increased over the weekend. An increase of drug consumption was also detected during a music festival in Trenčín, especially for ecstasy. The specific load of ecstasy during this festival increased from 3mg/day/1000 inhabitants to 29 mg/day/1000 inhabitants. The possible influence of music styles on the consumption of certain drugs was also observed. During a folk festival, methamphetamine and cocaine were more commonly used. PMID:25046607

  20. Recording and Modeling of Fortresses and Castles with Uas. Some Study Cases in Jaen (southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenal, J.; Pérez, J. L.; Mata, E.; Delgado, J.; Gómez-López, J. M.; Colomo, C.; Mozas, A.

    2016-06-01

    The province of Jaen (Southern Spain) has one of the largest concentrations of medieval fortresses of all Europe. Moreover ancient Iberian settlements located in oppida (fortified villages) and dated at VI-IV BC also are outstanding examples of historical heritage landmarks in the region. Most of these places are being restored or under documentation analysis to prevent their progressive deterioration. These places have several geometric characteristics in common, such as isolated locations, elongated shapes, largemedium size objects (in the order of tens to few hundred of meters), architectural features with vertical development (such as masonry or rammed earth walls, towers, gates, battlements, etc) or without it (walls, buildings or paths layouts at ground level). The object size, the required level of details and accuracy (of the order of some few cm) and both vertical and horizontal features imply that present UAS techniques can be advantageously used with respect to conventional aerial and terrestrial photogrammetric techniques. Vertical stereoscopic and oblique convergent UAS photogrammetric networks combined with processing techniques based on Structure from Motion (SfM) algorithms allow detailed low cost 2D/3D products. The proper selection of the UAS, camera, image acquisition mode (stop and/or cruising), the network and the processing software will determine the quality of final products and their usefulness in metric documentation, 3D modelization or museology. The efficiency of the use of UAS has been analyzed in several selected examples in Jaen (Burgalimar and Berrueco castles, Xth and XIIIth centuries, respectively, and the Iberian Puente Tablas oppidum, Vth-IVth centuries BC).

  1. Multianalytical approach to diagnosis and conservation of building materials: the case of Punta Troia Castle in Marettimo (Aegadian Islands—Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Fabrizio; Savalli, Angela; Cantisani, Emma; Fratini, Fabio; Giamello, Marco; Lezzerini, Marco; Pecchioni, Elena; Tesser, Elena

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the results of a multianalytical study carried out through laboratory investigations on building materials of "Punta Troia Castle" in Marettimo Island (Sicily). The main aims of the work were to characterize the petrographic nature and to determine the geological provenance of the stone materials used to build the castle as well as to define the causes and mechanisms at the origin of their decay, in order to support and ensure greater durability to the restoration interventions. Based on the collected data, the local dolomitic limestone may be stated as the main stone for reconstruction purposes. In fact, this building stone shows low porosity, high compactness and a very good durability with respect to any other lithotypes identified in the building structure of the castle.

  2. Monitoring of Landslide Activity in Slovakia Territory Using Multi-Temporal InSAR Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakon, M.; Papco, J.; Perissin, D.; Lazecky, M.; Sousa, J. J.; Hlavacova, I.; Batorova, K.; Ondrejka, P.; Liscak, P.; Paudits, P.; Real, N.

    2015-05-01

    Slope deformations are the most important geohazards in Slovakia which annually cause an extensive economic damage of significant influence. About 22000 slope deformations have been registered so far, covering an area of almost 2600 km2 . Since 2010, 639 new slope failures have been witnessed and their activation was driven mainly by the climatic anomalies such as extraordinary rainfalls. Many of these landslides currently represent a direct threat to the lives, health and property of the residents in the affected areas. The landslide Nizna Mysla is considered to be the second most catastrophic landslide in the history of Slovakia. Damages to buildings and engineering networks had not been identified in the ‘90s of the last century when the first problems with the slope stability appeared. Up-to-now monitoring techniques has currently been reassessed to account for the results from satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) techniques.

  3. The struggle to address woman battering in Slovakia: stories from service providers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Susan L; Wasileski, Gabriela

    2015-06-01

    Following the fall of communism, Slovakia found itself in a challenging position: to openly acknowledge the existence of intimate partner violence (IPV) and its disproportionate effect on women and children without an infrastructure to address victim safety, and provide resources and legal help. With collaboration with non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the government responded by developing shelters and introducing legislation that criminalized IPV and created social services for victims. To assess implementation efforts, we conducted in-depth interviews with governmental officials and NGO personnel who provide services for battered women. We focus on the operation and efficacy of shelters to discover what services are most needed for battered women, the criminal justice system's response to IPV, and what long-range goals will facilitate more permanent solutions to the social problem of violence against women in Slovakia. PMID:25845616

  4. Experience Of Implementing The Integrated Management System In Manufacturing Companies In Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestyánszka Škůrková, Katarína; Kučerová, Marta; Fidlerová, Helena

    2015-06-01

    In corporate practice, the term of Integrated Management System means a system the aim of which is to manage an organization regarding the quality, environment, health and safety at work. In the first phase of the VEGA project No. 1/0448/13 "Transformation of ergonomics program into the company management structure through interaction and utilization QMS, EMS, HSMS", we focused on obtaining information about the way or procedure of implementing the integrated management systems in manufacturing companies in Slovakia. The paper considers characteristics of integrated management system, specifies the possibilities for successive integration of the management systems and also describes the essential aspects of the practical implementation of integrated management systems in companies in Slovakia.

  5. Canine dirofilariosis endemic in Central Europe-10 years of epidemiological study in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Miterpáková, Martina; Iglódyová, Adriana; Čabanová, Viktória; Stloukal, Eduard; Miklisová, Dana

    2016-06-01

    The study presents the comprehensive results of a detailed epidemiological study on canine dirofilariosis in Slovakia, Central Europe. More than 4000 dogs were investigated, and several epidemiological factors were considered. The mean prevalence in individual regions ranged from 2.0 % in northern Slovakia to more than 25.0 % in the south-western part of the country, with the nematode Dirofilaria repens confirmed as the dominant causative agent. Canine dirofilariosis occurred more often in animals more than 3 years old and in dogs of large and giant breed sizes. Short-haired animals were infected more often than dogs with a long coat. Also, the infection was significantly more prevalent in animals kept in rural areas in comparison with urban environments.Counts of microfilariae (mf) in peripheral blood reached their highest levels in May and August and corresponded to activity peaks and population maximums of potential vectors, the mosquito species Aedes vexans and Culex pipiens, the two most prevalent species in Slovakia. Moreover, two dogs naturally infested with D. repens were included in the experiment in order to monitor daily microfilarial periodicity. This fluctuation showed the same tendency in both animals, with a peak of circulating mf recorded at 4 a.m. and minimal mf counts at 4 p.m. PMID:27021185

  6. Programs and measures to reduce GHG emissions in agriculture and waste treatment in Slovakia

    SciTech Connect

    Mareckova, K.; Bratislava, S.; Kucirek, S.

    1996-12-31

    Slovakia is a UN FCCC Annex I country and is obliged to limit its anthropogenic GHG emissions in the year 2000 to 1990 level. The key greenhouse gas in Slovakia is CO{sub 2} resulting mainly from fuel combustion processes. However the share of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O is approximately 20% of the total emissions on GWP basis. These gases are occurring mainly in non-energy sectors. The construction of the non-CO{sub 2} emission scenarios to reduce GHG and the uncertainty in N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emission estimation are discussed focusing on agriculture and waste treatment. The presentation will also include information on emission trends of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O since 1988. There are already implemented measures reducing GHG emissions in Slovakia, however, not motivated by global warming. A short view of implemented measures with an assessment of their benefit concerning non-CO{sub 2} GHG emissions reduction and some proposed mitigation options for agriculture and waste treatment are shown. Expected difficulties connected with preparing scenarios and with implementation of reducing measures are discussed.

  7. Microbial community composition in the deep sea sediments surrounding the Loki castle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, S. L.; Lanzèn, A.; Baumberger, T.; Pedersen, R.; Thorseth, I. H.; Flesland, K.; Øvreås, L.; Steen, I.; Schleper, C.

    2010-12-01

    The influence of volcanism and hydrothermal activity on microbial community composition in deep sea sediments is largely unknown. However, it could be speculated that the input of chemical compounds from such activity will have an influence on the microbial community. Volcanic and hydrothermal activity is mainly located at or near the mid-ocean ridges where low sedimentation rate in combination with ocean-floor spreading prevents accumulation of significant amounts of sediments. One exception is the arctic Mohns-Knipovich Ridges with its ultra-slow spreading and vicinity to continental margins and the Bear island fan. This enables a relatively thick sediment cover to accumulate within the rift valley and makes it a unique sampling site. Several gravity cores (3-4 metres deep) retrieved from the area surrounding the Loki’s castle hydrothermal vent field during the H2DEEP cruise 2008 have been analysed by a XRF core scanner system for geochemical composition. In addition, total inorganic and organic carbon contents (TIC and TOC) of the sediment and the pore water chemistry (e.g. ammonium, sulphide, sulphate, major elements) of distinct layers in each core have been analysed. In order to relate these data to microbial community composition, diversity and function, cell numbers (archaea, bacteria and crenarcheota) have been estimated by real time qPCR. Further, the microbial diversity and taxonomy in each layer have been analysed using massive parallel sequencing of the 16S rDNA region. This novel technique enables us to make a taxonomic profiling of the microbial community with an unprecedented high resolution. Results indicate a dynamic system with relatively high organic carbon content where iron, manganese, ammonium and sulphur compounds seem to play important roles in microbial metabolism and thus the microbial community composition. The sediment cores are highly stratified, with distinct layers of hydrothermal and/or volcanic origin, containing compounds such

  8. Permanent soil monitoring system as a basic tool for protection of soils and sustainable land use in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobza, J.

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of soil monitoring system in Slovakia is to better protect the soils with regard to sustainable land use. The main object is the observation of soil parameters indicative of change to the equilibrium of soil system as far as to the irreversible change with possible development of degradation processes in soil. The soil monitoring system in Slovakia has been running since 1993. Its importance consists of providing the information on changing spatial and temporal variations of soil parameters as well as the evolution of soil quality in topsoil and subsoil. The soil monitoring network in Slovakia is constructed using ecological principles, taking into account all main soil types and subtypes, soil organic matter, climatic regions, emission regions, polluted and non-polluted regions as well as various other land uses. The results of soil monitoring of 318 sites on agricultural land in Slovakia have been presented. Soil properties are evaluated according to the main threats to soil relating to European Commission recommendation for European soil monitoring performance as follows: soil erosion, soil compaction, decline in soil organic matter, soil salinization and sodification and soil contamination. The most significant change has been determined in physical properties of soils. The physical degradation was especially manifested in compacted and the eroded soils. On the basis of our results about 40%of agricultural land is potentially affected by soil erosion in Slovakia. In addition, decline in soil organic matter and available nutrients indicate seriousness of soil degradation processes observed during the last monitoring period in Slovakia. Measured data and required outputs are reported to Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra(Italy) and European Environmental Agency (EEA) in Copenhagen (Denmark). Finally, the soil monitoring system thus becomes a basic tool for protection of soils and sustainable land use as well as for the creation of legislation not

  9. Post-socialist forest disturbance in the Carpathian border region of Poland, Slovakia, and Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Kuemmerle, Tobias; Hostert, Patrick; Radeloff, Volker C; Perzanowski, Kajetan; Kruhlov, Ivan

    2007-07-01

    Forests provide important ecosystem services, and protected areas around the world are intended to reduce human disturbance on forests. The question is how forest cover is changing in different parts of the world, why some areas are more frequently disturbed, and if protected areas are effective in limiting anthropogenic forest disturbance. The Carpathians are Eastern Europe's largest contiguous forest ecosystem and are a hotspot of biodiversity. Eastern Europe has undergone dramatic changes in political and socioeconomic structures since 1990, when socialistic state economies transitioned toward market economies. However, the effects of the political and economic transition on Carpathian forests remain largely unknown. Our goals were to compare post-socialist forest disturbance and to assess the effectiveness of protected areas in the border triangle of Poland, Slovakia, and Ukraine, to better understand the role of broadscale political and socioeconomic factors. Forest disturbances were assessed using the forest disturbance index derived from Landsat MSS/TM/ETM+ images from 1978 to 2000. Our results showed increased harvesting in all three countries (up to 1.8 times) in 1988-1994, right after the system change. Forest disturbance rates differed markedly among countries (disturbance rates in Ukraine were 4.5 times higher than in Poland, and those in Slovakia were 4.3 times higher than in Poland), and in Ukraine, harvests tended to occur at higher elevations. Forest fragmentation increased in all three countries but experienced a stronger increase in Slovakia and Ukraine (approximately 5% decrease in core forest) than in Poland. Protected areas were most effective in Poland and in Slovakia, where harvesting rates dropped markedly (by nearly an order of magnitude in Slovakia) after protected areas were designated. In Ukraine, harvesting rates inside and outside protected areas did not differ appreciably, and harvests were widespread immediately before the

  10. Paleoseismology at high latitudes: Seismic disturbance of upper Quaternary deposits along the Castle Mountain fault near Houston, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, P.J.; Best, T.C.; Waythomas, C.F.

    2002-01-01

    Most paleoseismic studies are at low to moderate latitudes. Here we present results from a high-latitude (61??30??? N) trenching study of the Castle Mountain fault in south-central Alaska. This fault is the only one known in the greater Anchorage, Alaska, area with historical seismicity and a Holocene fault scarp. It strikes eastnortheast and cuts glacial and postglacial sediments in an area of boreal spruce-birch forest, shrub tundra, and sphagnum bog. The fault has a prominent vegetation lineament on the upthrown, north side of the fault. Nine trenches were logged across the fault in glacial and postglacial deposits, seven along the main trace, and two along a splay. In addition to thrust and strike-slip faulting, important controls on observed relationships in the trenches are the season in which faulting occurred, the physical properties of the sediments, liquefaction, a shallow water table, soil-forming processes, the strength of the modern root mat, and freeze-thaw processes. Some of these processes and physical properties are unique to northern-latitude areas and result in seismic disturbance effects not observed at lower latitudes. The two trenches across the Castle Mountain fault splay exposed a thrust fault and few liquefaction features. Radiocarbon ages of soil organic matter and charcoal within and overlying the fault indicate movement on the fault at ca. 2735 cal. (calendar) yr B.P. and no subsequent movement. In the remaining seven trenches, surface faulting was accompanied by extensive liquefaction and a zone of disruption 3 m or more wide. The presence of numerous liquefaction features at depths of <0.5-1.0 m indicates faulting when the ground was not frozen-i.e., from about April to October. Sandy-matrix till, sand, silt, gravel, and pebbly peat were injected up to the base of the modern soil, but did not penetrate the interlocking spruce-birch root mat. The strength of the root mat prohibited development of a nonvegetated scarp face and colluvial

  11. Extrathyroid carcinoma showing thymus-like differentiation (CASTLE): a new case report and review of the therapeutic role of neck dissection and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyu Young; Kwon, Mi Jung; Ahn, Hye Kyung; Kim, Jin Hwan; Lee, Dong Jin

    2014-01-01

    We present here a case of extrathyroid CASTLE (the third case reported in the English literature) treated with excision and neck dissection without radiotherapy. Also, we reviewed the literature and analyzed the therapeutic results of each treatment modality for CASTLE. A 27-year-old male had initially presented with a painless, right neck mass for 2 months. Computed tomography of the neck showed a 3.8 × 3.2 × 3.8 cm heterogeneously enhancing mass at right level IIa, and no definite thyroid lesion was found. An excisional biopsy was done and the pathologic diagnosis was CASTLE. Then we performed a right modified radical neck dissection and right thyroid lobectomy. After three years, no evidence of tumor recurrence was noted. Total excision followed by neck dissection could be a sufficient surgical treatment option for CASTLE. Postoperative radiotherapy might be an alternative treatment option for neck dissection in patients with positive nodal status. PMID:25086818

  12. A Study of Issues Related to Discipline, Grouping and Tracking, and Special Education in New Castle County, Delaware, Desegration Area. Volume I, General Issues and Introduction: Discipline Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, Charles M.; And Others

    In the former New Castle County (Delaware) School District (reorganized into four districts in 1981), minority students were numerically overrepresented from 1979 to 1982 in suspensions from school and in placement in special education and lower academic groupings. To determine if the overrepresentation was based on discriminatory practices or…

  13. Application of geophysical methods to the delineation of paleochannels and missing confining units above the Castle Hayne Aquifer at US Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniel, C. C., III; Miller, R.D.; Wrege, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina, is underlain by four freshwater-bearing aquifers--the surficial, Yorktown, and upper and lower Castle Hayne. The upper and lower Castle Hayne aquifers serve as the principal supply of freshwater for the Air Station. The potential for movement of contaminated water from the surficial aquifer downward to the water-supply aquifer is greatest in areas where clay confining units are missing. Missing confining units may indicate the presence of paleochannels filled with permeable material. Seismic-reflection techniques were successful in delinea- ting paleochannels of Quaternary and Tertiary age within unconsoli- dated sediments less than 180 feet deep at several locations. Continuous single-channel marine seismic-reflection profiling in the Neuse River was effective in delineating a large paleochannel complex consisting of at least two superimposed paleochannels within hydrogeologic units overlying the upper Castle Hayne aquifer. The complex was found immediately north of the Air Station and is thought to continue south beneath the Air Station. Shallow high-resolution land seismic-reflection techniques were used at the Air Station to delineate structures and correlate strati- graphy between the limestone of the upper Castle Hayne aquifer and the Yorktown confining unit. Three different land seismic-reflection techniques proved effective for the horizontal extrapolation of geo- logic features and identification of paleochannels at several locations. The northeastern margin of a large paleochannel was identified beneath the southern part of the Air Station. This feature strikes northwest to southeast and cuts through the Yorktown and upper Castle Hayne aquifer confining units.

  14. Multi-analytical characterization of archaeological ceramics. A case study from the Sforza Castle (Milano, Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberini, V.; Maspero, F.; Galimberti, L.; Fusi, N.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this work was the characterization, using several analytical techniques, of a sample of ancient pottery found during archaeological excavations in the 14th century's Sforza Castle in Milano. The use of a multi-analytical approach is well established in the study of archaeological materials (e.g. Tite et al. 1984, Ribechini et al. 2008). The chemical composition of the sample was determined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The chemical composition is: SiO2 61.3(±3)%, Al2O3 22.5(±2)%, Fe2O3 7.19(±6)%, K2O 3.85(±1)%, MgO 1.6(±1)%, Na2O 1.6(±4)% (probably overestimated), TiO2 1.02(±2)%, CaO 0.93(±1)%, MnO 0.15(±1)% and P2O5 0.06(±2)%. The K2O content, important when dealing with TL dating, was determined also with atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The K2O content determined with atomic absorption is 3.86(±3)%, in agreement with X-ray fluorescence analysis. The mineralogical composition of the sample was determined with X-ray powder diffraction: quartz 59.6(±1) wt%, mica 37.8(±3) wt% and feldspar (plagioclase) 2.6(±2) wt%. The sample homogeneity was assessed with X-ray computerised tomography (CT), which is a very powerful non-destructive analysis tool for 3D characterization (Sèguin, 1991). CT images show differences in materials with different X-ray absorption (mainly depending on different densities) and 3D reconstruction has many interesting archaeological applications (e.g. study of sealed jars). CT images of the studied sample showed the presence of angular fragments (probably quartz) few millimetres wide immersed in a fine grained matrix. Moreover, before and after the CT analysis, some ceramic powder was sampled to perform thermoluminescence analysis (TL, the powder used for this analysis can not be recovered). It was thus possible to evaluate the dose absorbed by the material due the X-ray irradiation. The dose absorbed after 3 hours of irradiation, the time needed for a complete scan of a 7 x 5 x 1 cm, is about 100 Gy, which

  15. Geophysical Exploration of Castle Remains in Barwałd Górny (Near Kalwaria Zebrzydowska, Poland) Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) with Assistance of Depth of Investigation Index (DOI) Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, Michał; Kula, Damian; Saternus, Robert; Lewicki, Paweł

    2014-09-01

    In March of 2014 at ruins of the 14th century castle, situated at the top of Mount Żar in Małopolska region, Poland, geophysical surveys were performed. Surveys were planned to investigate remains of the castle that could remain in the ground. Electrical Resistivity Tomography method was used there. In the paper 4 sections have been presented. During interpretation, as the supporting method, maps of Depth-of-Investigation (DOI) index have been used. Results of the surveys can point out potential remains of the castle walls and ruins of buildings that were situated in the stronghold

  16. HIV and risk behaviour among men who have sex with men in Slovakia (2008-2009).

    PubMed

    Staneková, Danica; Kramárová, Patrícia; Wimmerová, Soňa; Hábeková, Monika; Takáčová, Mária; Mojzesová, Mária

    2014-12-01

    The HIV infection remains a major public health issue in the world and especially in those countries where there exists unprotected sexual intercourse between people of the same sex. It is namely the category of men having sex with men (MSM) that still represents a group at high risk of being infected with HIV or transmitting the virus. The aim of our study was to present HIV 2nd generation surveillance data on MSM in Slovakia in the period between the years 2008 and 2009. Time-location sampling (TLS) was used to recruit participants and oral fluid samples together with completed anonymous questionnaires were collected simultaneously. The oral fluids were tested with use of the Genscreen HIV ½ version 2, (Bio-Rad) and Western Blot (Genlabs) diagnostic kits. The data analysis was performed using Stata version 8. Saliva testing revealed HIV prevalence of 6.1% (21/349) among MSM in Slovakia. 75% of HIV-positive cases were undiagnosed. The high-risk behaviour of MSM in respect to the number of their sexual partners as well as drug and condom usage did not correspond with their relatively high knowledge about HIV/AIDS. People's attitude towards MSM was found to be the worst in the religious context. Though our results reflect a relative good knowledge of MSM about HIV/AIDS infection, new HIV-positive cases and high-risk behaviour still appear, suggesting the need for more effective HIV prevention among members of this high-risk group in Slovakia. PMID:25622481

  17. Allele frequencies and population data for 11 Y-chromosome STRs in samples from Eastern Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Petrejčíková, Eva; Soták, Miroslav; Bernasovská, Jarmila; Bernasovský, Ivan; Rębała, Krzysztof; Sovičová, Adriana; Boroňová, Iveta; Bôžiková, Alexandra; Gabriková, Dana; Svíčková, Petra; Mačeková, Soňa; Carnogurská, Jana; Lohaj, Roman; Vlček, Dávid

    2011-06-01

    Haplotype data of 11 Y-STR loci (DYS391, DYS389I, DYS439, DYS389II, DYS438, DYS437, DYS19, DYS392, DYS393, DYS390 and DYS385) was obtained from 629 Slovak Caucasian men living in Eastern Slovakia. A total of 474 haplotypes were identified, of which 395 were unique. The haplotype diversity value was 0.9982. Pairwise haplotype distances showed that the Eastern Slovak Caucasian population is not significantly different from the Slavs populations and is separated from the Balkan nations and the German speaking populations. PMID:20837407

  18. A database of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions I and II sequences of individuals from Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Lehocký, Ivan; Baldovic, Marian; Kádasi, Ludevít; Metspalu, Ene

    2008-09-01

    In order to identify polymorphic positions and to determine their frequencies and the frequency of haplotypes in the human mitochondrial control region, two hypervariable regions (HV1 and HV2) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of 374 unrelated individuals from Slovakia were amplified and sequenced. Sequence comparison led to the identification of 284 mitochondrial lineages as defined by 163 variable sites. Genetic diversity (GD) was estimated at 0.997 and the probability of two randomly selected individuals from population having identical mtDNA types (random match probability, RMP) for the both regions is 0.60%. PMID:19083829

  19. Mineral resource potential map of the Mount Eddy and Castle Crags Roadless Areas, Shasta, Siskiyou, and Trinity counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Jocelyn A.; Caress, Mary E.; Denton, David K.; Spear, James M.

    1983-01-01

    Although ultramafic terranes such as that underlying the Mount Eddy and Castle Crags Roadless Areas may contain chromite, nickel, platinum-group metals, cobalt, and asbestos, there are no significant identified concentrations of these resources within the roadless areas. Platinum-group metals were sought but not detected in stream-sediment concentrates, although this does not rule out their possible occurrence. Nickel and cobalt did not occur in anomalous amounts although slightly higher nickel values in the northern part of the Mount Eddy Roadless Area may indicate low-grade mineralization within small dunite bodies, if the nickel occurs in sulfide phases rather than in olivine. The region has been examined on the surface for chromite and asbestos. Although both minerals are ubiquitous there is probably only a low potential for asbestos on the basis of the small size of veins at the surface. Only a few small areas of chromite were noted in the Mount Eddy Roadless Area; without subsurface data, however, any dunite body must be considered to have potential for chromite. The geochemical data for boron, barium, and mercury plus abundant quartz veining in gabbro and hornblende diorite suggest pervasive hydrothermal alteration, which could have formed mercury or vein gold deposits. Sand and gravel deposits occur in the Castle Crags Roadless Area but they cannot compete with superior deposits closer to markets. At a borrow pit northwest of the Mount Eddy Roadless Area, sheared serpentinite is quarried for road metal; similar rock occurs in the roadless area; however, better material is more readily available elsewhere.

  20. Detection of West Nile virus and tick-borne encephalitis virus in birds in Slovakia, using a universal primer set.

    PubMed

    Csank, Tomáš; Bhide, Katarína; Bencúrová, Elena; Dolinská, Saskia; Drzewnioková, Petra; Major, Peter; Korytár, Ľuboš; Bocková, Eva; Bhide, Mangesh; Pistl, Juraj

    2016-06-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne neurotropic pathogen that presents a major public health concern. Information on WNV prevalence and circulation in Slovakia is insufficient. Oral and cloacal swabs and bird brain samples were tested for flavivirus RNA by RT-PCR using newly designed generic primers. The species designation was confirmed by sequencing. WNV was detected in swab and brain samples, whereas one brain sample was positive for tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV). The WNV sequences clustered with lineages 1 and 2. These results confirm the circulation of WNV in birds in Slovakia and emphasize the risk of infection of humans and horses. PMID:27001305

  1. Molecular screening for bacteria and protozoa in great cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis) nesting in Slovakia, central Europe.

    PubMed

    Víchová, Bronislava; Reiterová, Katarína; Špilovská, Silvia; Blaňarová, Lucia; Hurníková, Zuzana; Turčeková, Ĺudmila

    2016-09-01

    This study brings the data about the occurrence of bacterial and protozoan pathogens in 32 great cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis), representing approximately 20% of the population nesting in the surroundings of water basin Liptovská Mara (northern part of Central Slovakia). A survey revealed the presence of tick-borne bacteria Anaplasma phagocytophilum (6.25%) and parasitic protozoa Toxoplasma gondii (3.1%). These data indicate an infectious status of the great cormorant population nesting in Slovakia; they might suggest a degree of environmental contamination by infectious agents and demonstrate the role of migratory seabirds in the circulation and dispersal of pathogens with zoonotic potential. PMID:27447224

  2. An updated numerical simulation of the ground-water flow system for the Castle Lake debris dam, Mount St. Helens, Washington, and implications for dam stability against heave

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roeloffs, Evelyn A.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the ground-water flow system in the Castle Lake debris dam, calibrated to data from the 1991 and 1992 water years, was used to estimate factors of safety against heave and internal erosion. The Castle Lake debris dam, 5 miles northwest of the summit of Mount St. Helens, impounds 19,000 acre-ft of water that could pose a flood hazard in the event of a lake breakout. A new topographic map of the Castle Lake area prior to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens was prepared and used to calculate the thickness of the debris avalanche deposits that compose the dam. Water levels in 22 piezometers and discharges from seeps on the dam face measured several times per year beginning in 1990 supplemented measurements in 11 piezometers and less frequent seep discharge measurements made since 1983. Observations in one group of piezometers reveal heads above the land surface and head gradients favoring upward flow that correspond to factors of safety only slightly greater than 2. The steady-state ground-water flow system in the debris dam was simulated using a threedimensional finite difference computer program. A uniform, isotropic model having the same shape as the dam and a hydraulic conductivity of 1.55 ft/day simulates the correct water level at half the observation points, but is in error by 10 ft or more at other points. Spatial variations of hydraulic conductivity were required to calibrate the model. The model analysis suggests that ground water flows in both directions between the debris dam and Castle Lake. Factors of safety against heave and internal erosion were calculated where the model simulated upward flow of ground water. A critical gradient analysis yields factors of safety as low as 2 near the piezometers where water level observations indicate low factors of safety. Low safety factors are also computed near Castle Creek where slumping was caused by a storm in January, 1990. If hydraulic property contrasts are present in areas of the

  3. Molecular characterization of 'Candidatus Rickettsia vini' in Ixodes arboricola from the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Novakova, Marketa; Bulkova, Alexandra; Costa, Francisco B; Kristin, Anton; Krist, Milos; Krause, Frantisek; Liznarova, Eva; Labruna, Marcelo B; Literak, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of rickettsiae in the tree-hole tick Ixodes arboricola in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. During May to September of 2009 and 2013, bird boxes belonging to three different areas were screened for ticks. In total, 454 nestlings and 109 nests of 10 hole-breeding bird species were examined. Ticks were found on Ficedula albicollis, Parus major, Cyanistes caeruleus and Sitta europaea and/or in their nests. In total, 166 ticks (17 nymphs, 10 males and 139 females) were found at 3 areas (arithmetic mean±standard error: 55.3±45.9). All ticks were tested for the presence of Rickettsia species by polymerase chain reaction targeting the rickettsial genes gltA, ompA, ompB and htrA and amplicon sequencing. All individuals except 3 nymphs were infected with 'Candidatus Rickettsia vini'. Multilocus sequence typing showed closest proximity to Rickettsia japonica and Rickettsia heilongjiangensis cluster. The presence of 'Ca. R. vini' is reported for the first time in Slovakia. PMID:25769386

  4. Wastewater analysis: the mean of the monitoring of frequently prescribed pharmaceuticals in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Mackuľak, Tomáš; Birošová, Lucia; Gál, Miroslav; Bodík, Igor; Grabic, Roman; Ryba, Jozef; Škubák, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of medication use is based on the statistical data from pharmacies and hospitals. Excessive use or misuse of some compounds, especially psychoactive medications, has not yet been monitored in Slovakia. Wastewater analysis provides useful data about the medication use and misuse in individual regions. This study is focused on the analysis of 23 substances in the wastewaters of Slovakia. The monitoring programme has included stimulants, opioid and morphine derivatives, benzodiazepines, antidepressants, drug precursors and their metabolites. Urinary markers of these compounds were analysed at WWTP influent in seven regions (Bratislava, Košice, Zvolen, Banská Bystrica, Trenčín, Prešov a Piešťany) using LC-MS/MS technique. The analysis was performed from March to October 2013. The pattern in use of these compounds was also monitored. Tramadol and venlafaxine were found to be the most concentrated compounds among of all studied psychoactive pharmaceuticals. The highest specific loads of tramadol were detected in Piešťany (409 mg/day/1000 inhabitants) and Zvolen (366 mg/day/1000 inhabitants). There is a considerable number of spa facilities (hotels) situated in these cities and this fact contributes to a higher occurrence of these psychoactive compounds in respective wastewaters. PMID:26650204

  5. Comparative health risks of domestic waste combustion in urban and rural Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Krajcovicová, Jana; Eschenroeder, Alan Q

    2007-10-01

    This paper addresses the health risk incurred by two alternative waste management schemes: open burning of household waste in barrels practiced in rural Slovakia and controlled municipal waste combustion in the city of Bratislava. Using agricultural land use data and village population data we formulate three prototype villages, each representing about one-third of the rural population. The two configurations of the controlled combustion are an outdated municipal waste incinerator (MWI) and a modern waste-to-energy (WTE) plant equipped with modern air pollution control devices. These configurations actually exist(ed) in Bratislava, Slovakia at the same site, but in different time frames. The CALPUFF model provides direct exposure data and the EMERAM software (developed in this paper) computes indirect exposure. A major source of uncertainty is that of the fraction of waste burned in the open. The analysis presented here assumed 10%. At this level, the cancer risk from open burning ranges from 10 to 80 times the commonly regarded de minimus value of one in a million. This means that underthe U.S. contemporary regulatory culture, some regulatory action to control or enforce the burning ban would be expected. Cancer risks from the incinerator ranged from 7 to 371 in a million while the WTE risks were below 1 in a million. Cancer risks from open burning are higher than those of the WTE plant and at the same time affect a larger portion of concerned population. PMID:17969705

  6. Holocaust Education in the "Black Hole of Europe": Slovakia's Identity Politics and History Textbooks Pre- and Post-1989

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Holocaust education in Slovakia stands at the confluence of diverse discourses of state and supra-national legitimation. Principles of national self-determination, minority rights, and political ideologies inform and lend credence to how Slovaks' national and state identities are narrated in Slovak history textbooks. For small nation-states with…

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF PORCINE PARVOVIRUS TYPE 3 AND PORCINE CIRCOVIRUS TYPE 2 IN WILD BOARS (SUS SCROFA) IN SLOVAKIA.

    PubMed

    Sliz, Ivan; Vlasakova, Michaela; Jackova, Anna; Vilcek, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    As the number of free-living wild boars (Sus scrofa L.) continues to rise in Slovakia, the probability of pathogen transmission between susceptible species increases. We investigated the distribution and genetic characterization of porcine parvovirus type 3 (PPV3), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), and their coinfection in wild boars. Among 194 animals tested, 19.1% were positive for PPV3 and 43.8% for PCV2. Similar rates of coinfection with both viruses reaching 11.0% and 11.8% were observed in juvenile and mature wild boars, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of PPV3 sequences from VP1 and NS1 genomic regions revealed a close genetic relationship among isolates from Slovakia and those sampled worldwide. Prevalence of PCV2 in wild boars was lower than that reported in domestic pigs in Slovakia. The PCV2 variants originating from sylvatic and domestic hosts in Slovakia were grouped in the same clusters, namely PCV2b-1A/1B and PCV2a-2D. PMID:25973618

  8. Executive Functioning in Three Groups of Pupils in D-KEFSs: Selected Issues in Adapting the Test Battery for Slovakia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferjencík, Ján; Slavkovská, Miriam; Kresila, Juraj

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports on the adaptation of a D-KEFS test battery for Slovakia. Drawing on concrete examples, it describes and illustrates the key issues relating to the transfer of test items from one socio-cultural environment to another. The standardisation sample of the population of Slovak pupils in the fourth year of primary school included 250…

  9. Medicine and Charity in Eighteenth-century Northumberland: The Early Years of the Bamburgh Castle Dispensary and Surgery, c. 1772–1802

    PubMed Central

    Withey, Alun

    2016-01-01

    In 1772 in Bamburgh Castle, Northumberland, a charitable institution was established by Dr John Sharp to offer medical provision to the poor of the parish, which was remote from the Newcastle and Edinburgh Infirmaries. Unlike urban institutions, which have dominated hospital historiography, the Bamburgh dispensary was small, occupying only a few rooms in the castle, and situated in a remote, coastal location. And yet, at its height, the Bamburgh dispensary treated thousands of patients per year, often exceeding dispensaries in large towns, and was equipped with the latest medical technologies. Unlike the majority of infirmaries and dispensaries it was not funded by subscription, nor run by governors, but was entirely funded by the Lord Crewe Trust, and administered by Dr Sharp. While Bamburgh is certainly an anomaly, it raises new questions about voluntary institutional medical provision for rural populations, and forms of medical philanthropy. PMID:27482145

  10. The effects of ground water, slope stability, and seismic hazards on the stability of the South Fork Castle Creek blockage in the Mount St. Helens area, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, William; Sabol, M.A.; Glicken, H.X.; Voight, Barry

    1985-01-01

    A slope stability analysis on the South Fork Castle Creek debris avalanche blockage, near Mount St. Helens, Washington, was conducted to determine the likelihood of mass failure of the blockage and resultant breakout of South Fork Castle Creek Lake. On the basis of material properties, groundwater levels, and seismic history of the blockage, slope stability with and without earthquake-induced forces was determined. Results indicated that the blockage will not fail from gravitational forces at September 1983 groundwater levels. An increase of 25 feet or more in water levels could cause local failures, but massive failure of the blockage is improbable. Blockage slopes are potentially unstable for present and higher water levels if an earthquake with magnitude greater than 6.0 should occur. Retrogressive slope failures are possible, but lowering of the blockage crest below lake level and consequent lake breakout are considered remote. Significant earthquake shaking could cause cracks in the blockage that might facilitate piping. (USGS)

  11. Biogeochemical controls on seasonal variations of the stable isotopes of dissolved oxygen and dissolved inorganic carbon in Castle Lake, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. M.; Poulson, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this project is to perform a seasonal dissolved oxygen (DO) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) stable isotope (δ18O, δ13C) study to assess the fluctuations in biogeochemical processes with depth in a lake. DO and DIC concentrations and stable isotope compositions (δ18O-DO, δ13C-DIC) have been used as a technique to study the systematics of diurnal freshwater biogeochemical processes, primarily photosynthesis, respiration, and gas-exchange (e.g. Quay et al. 1995, Trojanowska et al. 2008). For example, photosynthesis produces DO isotopically identical to the host water, typically light relative to atmospheric oxygen (+23.5‰), while respiration preferentially consumes isotopically light DO. Diel δ18O-DO and δ13C-DIC studies in rivers (e.g. Parker et al. 2005, Parker et al. 2010, Poulson & Sullivan 2010) have been used to determine the rates of biogeochemical processes over a 24h time scale. However, similar studies in lakes are rare, for either diel or seasonal time scales. The focus of this project is Castle Lake, 12km southwest of Mt. Shasta, CA, at an elevation of 1660m. Castle Lake is an alpine, meso-oligotrophic lake with a 19ha surface area and a maximum depth of up to 35m. This project consists of sampling profiles, 2-3 weeks apart, throughout the 2010 field season for monitoring seasonal depth trends, with measurements of DO concentration, temperature, pH, alkalinity, specific conductivity, PAR, chlorophyll concentration, δ18O-DO, δ13C-DIC, δ18O-H2O, and δD-H2O. Diel measurements of DO concentration, temperature, pH, specific conductivity, PAR, and chlorophyll concentration have also been performed at various depths. To date, the profile data collected at Castle Lake show various seasonal changes, starting after ice-out (late June 2010) through mid-August 2010. DO profiles display a positive heterograde trend with a maximum of 11.33mg/L at 12m in mid-August and minima of ≤0.12mg/L near the lake bottom. DIC concentrations increase

  12. Determination of soil degradation from flooding for estimating ecosystem services in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavcova, Kamila; Szolgay, Jan; Karabova, Beata; Kohnova, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Floods as natural hazards are related to soil health, land-use and land management. They not only represent threats on their own, but can also be triggered, controlled and amplified by interactions with other soil threats and soil degradation processes. Among the many direct impacts of flooding on soil health, including soil texture, structure, changes in the soil's chemical properties, deterioration of soil aggregation and water holding capacity, etc., are soil erosion, mudflows, depositions of sediment and debris. Flooding is initiated by a combination of predispositive and triggering factors and apart from climate drivers it is related to the physiographic conditions of the land, state of the soil, land use and land management. Due to the diversity and complexity of their potential interactions, diverse methodologies and approaches are needed for describing a particular type of event in a specific environment, especially in ungauged sites. In engineering studies and also in many rainfall-runoff models, the SCS-CN method has remained widely applied for soil and land use-based estimations of direct runoff and flooding potential. The SCS-CN method is an empirical rainfall-runoff model developed by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (formerly called the Soil Conservation Service or SCS). The runoff curve number (CN) is based on the hydrological soil characteristics, land use, land management and antecedent saturation conditions of soil. Since the method and curve numbers were derived on the basis of an empirical analysis of rainfall-runoff events from small catchments and hillslope plots monitored by the USDA, the use of the method for the conditions of Slovakia raises uncertainty and can cause inaccurate results in determining direct runoff. The objective of the study presented (also within the framework of the EU-FP7 RECARE Project) was to develop the SCS - CN methodology for the flood conditions in Slovakia (and especially for the RECARE pilot site

  13. Mycobiota of Underground Habitats: Case Study of Harmanecká Cave in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Ogórek, Rafał; Višňovská, Zuzana; Tančinová, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Harmanecká Cave is located in the Harmanec Valley to the northwest of Banská Bystrica city, in the southern part of the Great Fatra Mountains, Slovakia. This cave is the most important underground locality of bat occurrence in Slovakia (population of 1000 to 1500 individuals). The study aimed at mycological evaluation of the air, the water, and the rock surface of Harmanecká Cave in Slovakia. The samples were taken on 24 July 2014. To examine the air, the Air Ideal 3P sampler was used. Microbiological evaluation of the rock surface was performed using swab sampling and the water by using the serial dilution technique. The authors observed a relationship between air temperature and the concentration of fungi. The concentration of airborne fungi increased with the increase in the air temperature and decreased with distance from the entrance to the cave. The density of airborne fungi isolated from the outdoor air samples was 810.5 colony-forming units (CFU) per 1 m3 of air and from 27.4 to 128.5 CFU for the indoor air samples. From the rock surface inside the cave, 45.0 to 106.6 CFU per 1 cm2 were isolated, whereas from the water, 29.9 CFU per 1 ml were isolated. Seven species of filamentous fungi were isolated from the external air samples and 12 species of filamentous fungi and 3 species of yeast-like fungi from the internal air samples. From the surface of the rocks inside the cave, 5 species of filamentous fungi and 1 species of yeast-like fungi were cultured, whereas from the water samples, 6 species of filamentous fungi were cultured. Cladosporium spp. were the fungi most frequently isolated from the external air; from the internal air, Penicillium urticae was most frequently isolated; from the rock surface, it was Gliocladium roseum; and from the water, it was P. chrysogenum. The species found in the cave can be pathogenic for humans and animals, especially for immunocompromised persons, and they can also cause biodegradation of the rocks. However, the

  14. Impact of the North Atlantic Oscillation on winter precipitation totals in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskova, Livia; Stastny, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is the most important circulation mode in the Northern Hemisphere, which impacts climate in Europe in various ways. The strongest impacts of oscillation on air temperature and precipitation regime are detected in Scandinavia and Mediterranean region, but impacts have opposite effect. Therefore, assessment of the relation between NAO and precipitation totals seems to be interesting in Slovakia, because of the country location in the centre between above mentioned regions. Our former research detected only the relation between NAO and a winter precipitation totals in Slovakia. More detailed aspects of this relation is analysed in this paper. A correlation method was used at two resolution levels, which detected opposite spatial impact of NAO on above mentioned seasonal precipitation. The first generalised level was based on the precipitation regions, which were distinguished on the base of characteristic precipitation regime of individual regions. The second level was more detailed and the correlation method was applied on data of every individual rain gauge station from the set of 202 rain gauge stations with complete data for period 1901 - 2010 in Slovakia. In the northern part of the country (Orava and Kysuce regions), there was found the positive correlation. Increase in the winter precipitation totals was recorded in the same regions and general precipitation trend in this area was similar to the trend in used Hurrell oscillation index. It means, following the increasing trend in oscillation course, we can also expect the increase in precipitation totals in these regions in the near future. In a southward direction, this correlation changed to the negative values and the most negative correlation coefficients were reached in the lowland regions (Podunajská and Východoslovenská nížina) and in the region of Juhoslovenská kotlina. This last mentioned region is located in multiple precipitation shadow of Carpathians

  15. First molecular identification of Babesia gibsoni in dogs from Slovakia, central Europe.

    PubMed

    Víchová, Bronislava; Horská, Mária; Blaňarová, Lucia; Švihran, Milan; Andersson, Martin; Peťko, Branislav

    2016-02-01

    Canine babesiosis is a severe and potentially life threatening infection. In Europe, Babesia canis is considered to be the most common species responsible for the disease. We report two cases of babesiosis caused by Babesia gibsoni. The polymerase chain reaction, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and further sequencing of 18S rRNA gene fragments from blood samples of both dogs revealed the identity of isolates with B. gibsoni genotypes from other dogs worldwide. This species was previously not known to infect dogs in Slovakia. It is resistant to traditional anti-babesial therapy. Therefore, correct diagnosis is crucial for the successful treatment, especially in dogs with hemolytic anemia and febrile conditions. PMID:26304014

  16. Engineering-Geological Maps of Geological Factors of the Environment in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baliak, František; Brček, Martin

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, we have witnessed very frequent natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods, landslides, storms and similar. In most cases, disasters are caused by geological factors, especially geobarriers. Geobarriers threaten the life and works of man or reduce the effectiveness of the construction and operation of technical works, or harm the environment by negative anthropogenic influences. An important task in assessing the technical and environmental aspects of particular engineering activity is to assess the impact of constructions on the production and protection of the environment. The important part of the environment is the geological environment. In this paper, we give an overview of geological factors of the environment and the way how they are illustrated in the engineering-geological maps made in Slovakia.

  17. Dark stains on rock surfaces in Driny Cave (Little Carpathian Mountains, Slovakia).

    PubMed

    Ogórek, Rafał; Dyląg, Mariusz; Kozak, Bartosz

    2016-09-01

    Mycobiota are important in underground ecology. In 2014, we discovered dark stains on clayey sediments on the walls of Driny Cave, Slovakia. Our description is based on the morphology of the fungus and the phylogenetic relationships of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. In addition, data on its capacity for the production of extracellular enzymes, growth, and survival in vitro at different temperatures are reported. Our analyses revealed that this dark stains on the wall was produced by Penicillium glandicola. The fungus was able to synthesize amylases, proteases and cellulases, but not pectinases and keratinases. The vegetative structures of mycelium of this fungus are viable in vitro after storage at cool temperatures (from -72 to 5 °C), and show active growth at temperatures from 5 to 25 °C, but without spore germination, and without active growth at 30 and 37 °C. Penicillium glandicola is a psychrotolerant species and belong to var. glandicola. PMID:27315167

  18. Changes in hydrological regime under changed climate and forest conditions in mountainous basins in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavcova, Kamila; Roncak, Peter; Maliarikova, Marcela; Latkova, Tamara; Korbelova, Lenka

    2016-04-01

    The impacts of land use and climate change on hydrological regime have been an important field of research in recent decades, especially with respect to runoff formation. Land use directly impacts basic hydrological processes, such as evapotranspiration, infiltration and runoff. The study focuses on estimating impact of land use and climate changes on runoff generation in selected mountainous basins in Slovakia. Changes in land use were represented by changes in forest distribution and composition induced by changed climate. Two climate scenarios of the daily air temperatures, specific air humidity and precipitation (KNMI A1B and MPI A1B) regionally downscaled for the territory of Slovakia until the time horizon of 2075 were applied. For simulations of runoff and other components of hydrological balance under changed conditions a distributed rainfall-runoff model was used. The simulations were done with an emphasis on the parameterization of the land cover properties (spatially distributed model parameters) and calibration of global parameters of the hydrological model in changed conditions. The outcomes of the runoff simulations indicate that changes in the long-term mean monthly discharges are expected. During the winter and early spring periods, an increase in the long-term mean monthly runoff could be assumed. The period of an increase in runoff could occur from November/December to February/April. This increase could be caused by an increase in air temperature and a shift in the snow melting period from the spring months to the winter period. The period of a decrease in runoff could occur from March/April to September/November. The increase in winter runoff and the decrease in summer runoff are expected to be more extreme for the later time horizons.

  19. Increasing Incidence of Geomyces destructans Fungus in Bats from the Czech Republic and Slovakia

    PubMed Central

    Martínková, Natália; Bačkor, Peter; Bartonička, Tomáš; Blažková, Pavla; Červený, Jaroslav; Falteisek, Lukáš; Gaisler, Jiří; Hanzal, Vladimír; Horáček, Daniel; Hubálek, Zdeněk; Jahelková, Helena; Kolařík, Miroslav; Korytár, L'uboš; Kubátová, Alena; Lehotská, Blanka; Lehotský, Roman; Lučan, Radek K.; Májek, Ondřej; Matějů, Jan; Řehák, Zdeněk; Šafář, Jiří; Tájek, Přemysl; Tkadlec, Emil; Uhrin, Marcel; Wagner, Josef; Weinfurtová, Dita; Zima, Jan; Zukal, Jan; Horáček, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Background White-nose syndrome is a disease of hibernating insectivorous bats associated with the fungus Geomyces destructans. It first appeared in North America in 2006, where over a million bats died since then. In Europe, G. destructans was first identified in France in 2009. Its distribution, infection dynamics, and effects on hibernating bats in Europe are largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We screened hibernacula in the Czech Republic and Slovakia for the presence of the fungus during the winter seasons of 2008/2009 and 2009/2010. In winter 2009/2010, we found infected bats in 76 out of 98 surveyed sites, in which the majority had been previously negative. A photographic record of over 6000 hibernating bats, taken since 1994, revealed bats with fungal growths since 1995; however, the incidence of such bats increased in Myotis myotis from 2% in 2007 to 14% by 2010. Microscopic, cultivation and molecular genetic evaluations confirmed the identity of the recently sampled fungus as G. destructans, and demonstrated its continuous distribution in the studied area. At the end of the hibernation season we recorded pathologic changes in the skin of the affected bats, from which the fungus was isolated. We registered no mass mortality caused by the fungus, and the recorded population decline in the last two years of the most affected species, M. myotis, is within the population trend prediction interval. Conclusions/Significance G. destructans was found to be widespread in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, with an epizootic incidence in bats during the most recent years. Further development of the situation urgently requires a detailed pan-European monitoring scheme. PMID:21079781

  20. Hydrology of the Ferron sandstone aquifer and effects of proposed surface-coal mining in Castle Valley, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lines, G.C.; Morrissey, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Coal in the Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale of Cretaceous age has traditionally been mined by underground techniques in the Emery Coal Field in the southern end of Castle Valley in east-central Utah. However, approximately 99 million tons are recoverable by surface mining. Ground water in the Ferron is the sole source of supply for the town of Emery, but the aquifer is essentially untapped outside the Emery area. A three-dimensional digital-computer model was used to simulate ground-water flow in the Ferron sandstone aquifer in the Emery area. The model also was used to predict the effects of dewatering of a proposed surface mine on aquifer potentiometric surfaces and the base flow of streams. Discharge from the proposed surface mine is predicted to average about 0.3 cubic foot per second during the 15 years of mine operation. Dewatering of the mine would affect the potentiometric surface of all sections of the Ferron sanstone aquifer, but the greatest effects would be in the upper section. Modeling results indicate that, except for Christiansen Wash, the dewatering of the proposed surface mine would not affect the base flow of streams.

  1. Historical events associated with fallout from Bravo Shot--Operation Castle and 25 Y of medical findings.

    PubMed

    Cronkite, E P; Conard, R A; Bond, V P

    1997-07-01

    The events prior to Bravo Shot-Operation Castle that led to a decision not to evacuate the Marshallese prior to testing the thermonuclear bombs are presented as are the actions taken after the fallout incident in evacuating the exposed Marshallese and the military personnel. The initial medical effects (findings during first 6 wk after exposure) are briefly described and are followed by description of long term effects, namely, induction of one case of fatal acute myeloid leukemia and a large number of thyroid tumors (benign and malignant) in addition to hypothyroidism in adults and children and two cases of cretinism. The hypothyroidism and cretinism responded well to administration of oral thyroxine. During the first 25 y, there was also much unrest and political agitation initiated by exposed and unexposed Marshallese who were very unhappy as a result of relocation and inability to return to their homelands and feeling that all illness and deaths were due to the mysterious radiation, which they understandably did not understand. The difficulties in part were ameliorated by financial aid from the U.S. Congress. In view of one of us (EPC), no one agency or person in the U.S. Government was willing to take the responsibility for care of the Marshallese and its financing. The exposed and nonexposed Marshallese had their lifestyle changed, some of their homelands made uninhabitable for several years and could aptly be called "nuclear nomads," an expression coined by others. PMID:9199227

  2. Long-term UHF RiverSonde river velocity observations at Castle Rock, Washington and Threemile Slough, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teague, C.C.; Barrick, D.E.; Lilleboe, P.M.; Cheng, R.T.; Ruhl, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    Long-term, non-contact river velocity measurements have been made using a UHF RiverSonde system for several months at each of two locations having quite different flow characteristics. Observations were made on the Cowlitz River at Castle Rock, Washington from October 2003 to June 2004, where the unidirectional flow of the river ranged from about 1.0 to 3.5 m/s. The radar velocity was highly correlated with the stage height which was continually measured by the U. S. Geological Survey. The profile of the along-channel velocity across the water channel also compared favorably with in-situ measurements performed by the Survey. The RiverSonde was moved to Threemile Slough, in central California, in September 2004 and has been operating there for several months. At Threemile Slough, which connects the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, the flow is dominated by tidal effects and reverses direction four times per day, with a maximum speed of about 0.8 m/s in each direction. Water level and water velocity are continually measured by the Survey at the Threemile Slough site, with velocity recorded every 15 minutes from measurements made by an ultrasonic velocity meter (UVM). Over a period of several months, the radar and UVM velocity measurements have been highly correlated, with a coefficient of determination R2 of 0.976. ??2005 IEEE.

  3. Analysis of radiation exposure for Naval personnel at Operation Castle. Technical report, 1 January 1983-31 January 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.; Goetz, J.; Klemm, J.; Weitz, R.

    1984-02-28

    Film-badge doses are reconstructed for sixteen ships and the residence islands of Enewetak and Kwajalein Atolls resulting from the six nuclear detonations comprising Operation CASTLE (March-May 1954). Fallout from Shots BRAVO and ROMEO was the major source of contamination on most of the ships and islands. Varying amounts of fallout from Shots UNION, YANKEE, and NECTAR contributed somewhat to the total doses of the shipboard and island-based personnel; no fallout was experienced as a result of Shot KOON. Shipboard personnel received additional exposure from hulls and salt water piping systems that had become contaminated from operating in the radioactive waters of Bikini Lagoon. From the reconstructed radiation environments, both topside and below, an equivalent film badge dose is calculated and compared to actual dosimetry data. Agreement is very good during badged periods when the ships received significant fallout. When topside intensities were not documented, generally late in the operation when intensity levels were low, agreement is not as good. Calculated ship contamination doses of significance are in excellent agreement with limited available dosimetry data. Calculated average doses for shipboard personnel range from a low of 0.19 rem for the crew of the USS LST-825 to a high of 3.56 rem for the crew of the USS PHILIP. Average doses on the residence islands of Enewetak and Kwajalein Atolls are 1.09 rem and 0.32 rem, respectively.

  4. Historical events associated with fallout from Bravo Shot-Operation castle and 25 y of medical findings

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.; Conard, R.A.; Bond, V.P.

    1997-07-01

    The events prior to Bravo Shot-Operation Castle that led to a decision not to evacuate the Marshallese prior to testing the thermonuclear bombs are presented as are the actions taken after the fallout incident in evacuating the exposed Marshallese and the military personnel. The initial medical effects (findings during first 6 wk after exposure) are briefly described and are followed by description of long term effects, namely, induction of one case or fatal acute myeloid leukemia and a large number of thyroid tumors (benign and malignant) in addition to hypothyroidism in adults and children and two cases of cretinism. The hypothyroidism and cretinism responded well to administration of oral thyroxine. During the first 25 y, there was also much unrest and political agitation initiated by exposed and unexposed Marshallese who were very unhappy as a result of relocation and inability to return to their homelands and feeling that all illness and deaths were due to the mysterious radiation, which they understandably did not understand. The difficulties in part were ameliorated by financial aid from the U.S. Congress. In view of one of us (EPC), no one agency or person in the U.S. Government was willing to take the responsibility for care of the Marshallese and its financing. The exposed and non-exposed Marshallese had their lifestyle changed, some of their homelands made uninhabitable for several years and could aptly be called {open_quotes}nuclear nomads,{close_quotes} an expression coined by others. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. Hydrogeology, hydraulic characteristics, and water-quality conditions in the surficial, Castle Hayne and Peedee aquifers of the greater New Hanover County area, North Carolina, 2012-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Gurley, Laura N.; Antolino, Dominick J.

    2014-01-01

    A major issue facing the greater New Hanover County, North Carolina, area is the increased demand for drinking water resources as a result of rapid growth. The principal sources of freshwater supply in the greater New Hanover County area are withdrawals of surface water from the Cape Fear River and groundwater from the underlying Castle Hayne and Peedee aquifers. Industrial, mining, irrigation, and aquaculture groundwater withdrawals increasingly compete with public-supply utilities for freshwater resources. Future population growth and economic expansion will require increased dependence on high-quality sources of fresh groundwater. An evaluation of the hydrogeology and water-quality conditions in the surficial, Castle Hayne, and Peedee aquifers was conducted in New Hanover, eastern Brunswick, and southern Pender Counties, North Carolina. A hydrogeologic framework was delineated by using a description of the geologic and hydrogeologic units that compose aquifers and their confining units. Current and historic water-level, water-quality, and water-isotope data were used to approximate the present boundary between freshwater and brackish water in the study area. Water-level data collected during August–September 2012 and March 2013 in the Castle Hayne aquifer show that recharge areas with the highest groundwater altitudes are located in central New Hanover County, and the lowest are located in a discharge area along the Atlantic Ocean. Between 1964 and 2012, groundwater levels in the Castle Hayne aquifer in central New Hanover County have rebounded by about 10 feet, but in the Pages Creek area groundwater levels declined in excess of 20 feet. In the Peedee aquifer, the August–September 2012 groundwater levels were affected by industrial withdrawals in north-central New Hanover County. Groundwater levels in the Peedee aquifer declined more than 20 feet between 1964 and 2012 in northeastern New Hanover County because of increased withdrawals. Vertical gradients

  6. Checklist and distribution of ciliates from the family Euplotidae Ehrenberg, 1838 (Protista: Ciliophora: Spirotrichea) in Slovakia, Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Tirjaková, Eva; Botlíková, Simona; Vďačný, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A checklist of ciliates from the family Euplotidae recorded in the territory of Slovakia, Central Europe was assembled. Altogether, 11 species belonging to three genera of the family Euplotidae have been reported there: Euplotes alatus, Euplotes charon, Euplotes moebiusi, Euplotoides aediculatus, Euplotoides eurystomus, Euplotoides patella, Euplotoides woodruffi, Euplotopsis affinis, Euplotopsis finki, Euplotopsis muscicola, and Euplotopsis novemcarinata. However, records of the marine species E. alatus and E. charon are doubtful and very likely represent misidentifications of E. moebiusi. Since the euryhaline species E. woodruffi was found for the first time in Slovakia, its morphology is described. Based on the literature data and our own observations, the present checklist is also accompanied with distribution data on the 11 aforementioned species. As concerns ecology, Slovak euplotids typically occurred in freshwater bodies having higher trophic levels. Only two species, E. finki and E. muscicola, were isolated from terrestrial habitats, especially, from mosses, leaf-litter, and decaying wood mass. PMID:25781253

  7. Giardia duodenalis and Giardia enterica in children: first evidence of assemblages A and B in Eastern Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Štrkolcová, G; Goldová, M; Maďar, M; Čechová, L; Halánová, M; Mojžišová, J

    2016-05-01

    For an overview on the occurrence of Giardia assemblages in children in Eastern Slovakia, we examined 259 faecal samples of children from the segregated settlement in Medzev, 30 samples of children from the orphanage in Medzev and 40 samples of children with autism from the Special Elementary School in Košice. Thirty-eight samples (14.67 %) from the segregated settlement, 19 samples (63.33 %) from the orphanage and two samples (5.0 %) from the Special Elementary School were positive for Giardia by flotation. The initial microscopic diagnostics were completed by the genotyping of the triosephosphate isomerase-gene loci (tpi genes) which revealed the existence of two Giardia assemblages in Slovak population, namely Giardia duodenalis (assemblage A) and Giardia enterica (assemblage B). These results represent the first evidence of A and B assemblages in children in Slovakia. Epidemiological significance and the impact on the public health of Giardia infection are highlighted. PMID:26818944

  8. [A fourth-generation doctor - Hans Selye and his origins from Felvidék (today Slovakia)].

    PubMed

    Kiss, László

    2016-08-01

    Hans Selye regarded himself as the fourth generation of medical dynasty, but in his books he did not name his ancestors. Based on facts from archives and contemporary literature the author demonstrated that the grandfather of Hans Selye was called Schlesinger and he worked in Pruszka (county Trencsén; (today: Pruské, county Trenčín, Slovakia) as a district physician. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1331-1333. PMID:27523317

  9. Selected characteristics of meteorological elements and their trends since the mid-20th century in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasko, Pavel; Švec, Marek; Šťastný, Pavel; Kajaba, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Analysis of some characteristics of air temperature, air humidity, precipitation and snow cover at selected meteorological stations located in different regions of Slovakia was performed for the period 1951 to 2012. Stations represent lowland regions (up to 300 meters), mid-altitude regions (300 to 800 meters) and high altitude mountain regions (above 1000 m). Series of highest annual maximum air temperature show obvious gradual increase from 80s of the 20th century on all selected stations and also the occurrence of new record values in the last years of the analyzed period 1951 -2012. In most stations the absolute maximum air temperature for 1951 - 2012 period was recorded during July 2007, whereas the highest annual maximum temperatures were recorded predominantly during the month of August in Slovakia. Values of annual maximum of mean daily temperature show evident upward trend and at some stations the highest mean daily temperature was recorded just in recent years (e.g. at station Sliač in 2012). Positive trends of the lowest annual minimum temperature at selected stations in the period 1951-2012 are not so significant and it is evident that the lowest annual minimum air temperature didn't drop as low as in the past, respectively they didn't reach record values as in the 50s or 80s of the 20-th century. Changes of minimum and maximum monthly precipitation totals during the year indicate that the number of cases with extremely low monthly total was increasing. Although frequency of occurrence of extremely high monthly precipitation totals was rather chaotic, in some recent years the observed values of monthly precipitation totals represented the absolutely highest monthly values for entire analyzed period 1951-2012. On the other hand, towards the end of this period, cases when minimum monthly precipitation totals were close to zero also became more common. Very significant is the trend in the lowest annual relative humidity in the 1951-2012 period

  10. Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Their Hydroxylated Metabolites (OH-PCBs) in Pregnant Women from Eastern Slovakia

    PubMed Central

    Park, June-Soo; Linderholm, Linda; Charles, M. Judith; Athanasiadou, Maria; Petrik, Jan; Kocan, Anton; Drobna, Beata; Trnovec, Tomas; Bergman, Åke; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2007-01-01

    Objective Our aim in the present study was to characterize and quantify the levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and specific polychlorobiphenylol (OH-PCB) metabolites in maternal sera from women delivering in eastern Slovakia. Design During 2002–2004, blood samples were collected from women delivering in two Slovak locations: Michalovce district, where PCBs were formerly manufactured, and Svidnik and Stropkov districts, about 70 km north. Participants A total of 762 and 341 pregnant women were sampled from Michalovce and Svidnik/Stropkov, respectively, and OH-PCBs were measured in 131 and 31. Evaluation/Measurements We analyzed PCBs using gas chromatography (GC)/electron capture detection. OH-PCBs and pentachlorophenol (PCP) were determined as methyl derivatives using GC-electron capture negative ionization/mass spectrometry. We characterized distributions in the full cohort using inverse sampling weights. Results The concentrations of both PCBs and OH-PCB metabolites of Michalovce mothers were about two times higher than those of the Svidnik/Stropkov mothers (p < 0.001). The median weighted maternal serum levels of the sum of PCBs (∑PCBs) were 5.73 ng/g wet weight (Michalovce) and 2.82 ng/g wet weight (Svidnik/Stropkov). The median sum of OH-PCBs (∑OH-PCBs) was 0.55 ng/g wet weight in Michalovce mothers and 0.32 ng/g wet weight in Svidnik/Stropkov mothers. 4-OH-2,2′ ,3,4′ ,5,5′ ,6-Heptachlorobiphenyl (4-OH-CB187) was a primary metabolite, followed by 4-OH-2,2′ ,3,4′ ,5,5′ -hexachlorobiphenyl (4-OH-CB146). Only four PCB congeners—CBs 153, 138, 180, and 170—had higher concentrations than 4-OH-CB187 and 4-OH-CB146 (p < 0.001). The median ratio of the ∑OH-PCBs to the ∑PCBs was 0.10. Conclusions Mothers residing in eastern Slovakia are still highly exposed to PCBs, and their body burdens of these pollutants and OH-PCB metabolites may pose a risk for adverse effects on health for themselves and their children. PMID:17366814

  11. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 81-138-1563, Fillmore Dole Mushrooms, Castle and Cooke Foods, Fillmore, Utah. [Analyses for bacteria, fungi, formaldehyde, and vapona

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, B.J.; Thoburn, T.W.; Lockey, J.E.; Kullman, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for bacteria, fungi, formaldehyde, and 2,2-dichlorovinyldimethylphosphate (vapona) at Fillmore Dole Mushrooms, Castle and Cooke Foods, Fillmore, Utah in June, 1981. The survey was requested by the workers to evaluate respiratory problems. A total of 111 workers, including 59 Southeast Asians, were interviewed by questionnaire. There were 48 English-speaking and 18 Asian comparisons. The authors conclude that a potential hazard exists due to exposure to airborne fungi and bacteria. Formaldehyde and vapona are not a problem. Recommendations include conducting more intensive medical studies of the exposed workers and repeating the survey in about 5 years.

  12. Long-term variability and changes in thunderstorm induced extreme precipitation in Slovakia over 1951-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecho, J.; Faško, P.; Bližák, V.; Kajaba, P.; Košálová, J.; Bochníček, O.; Lešková, L.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that extreme precipitation associated with intensive rains, in summer induced mostly by local thunderstorm activity, could cause very significant problems in economical and social spheres of the countries. Heavy precipitation and consecutive flash-floods are the most serious weather-related hazards over the territory of Slovakia. The extreme precipitation analyses play a strategic role in many climatological and hydrological evaluations designed for the wide range of technical and engineering applications as well as climate change impact assessments. A thunderstorm, as a violent local storm produced by a cumulonimbus cloud and accompanied by thunder and lightning, represents extreme convective activity in the atmosphere depending upon the release of latent heat, by the condensation of water vapor, for most of its energy. Under the natural conditions of Slovakia the incidence of thunderstorms has been traditionally concentrated in the summer or warm half-year (Apr.-Sept.), but increasing air temperature resulting in higher water vapor content and more intense short-term precipitation is associated with more frequent thunderstorm occurrence in early spring as well as autumn. It is the main reason why the studies of thunderstorm phenomena have increased in Slovakia in recent years. It was found that thunderstorm occurrence, in terms of incidence of storm days, has profoundly changed particularly in spring season (~ 30 % in April and May). The present contribution is devoted to verifying the hypothesis that recently the precipitation has been more intense and significant shifts in seasonal incidence have occurred in particular regions in Slovakia. On the basis of the 60-year (1951-2010) meteorological observation series obtained from more than 20 synoptic stations, the analysis of trends and long-term variability of the days with thunderstorms and the accompanying precipitation for seasons was undertaken. Contribution also attempts to explain the main

  13. Lower Miocene plant assemblage with coastal-marsh herbaceous monocots from the Vienna Basin (Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvaček, Zlatko; Teodoridis, Vasilis; Kováčová, Marianna; Schlögl, Ján; Sitár, Viliam

    2014-06-01

    A new plant assemblage of Cerová-Lieskové from Lower Miocene (Karpatian) deposits in the Vienna Basin (western Slovakia) is preserved in a relatively deep, upper-slope marine environment. Depositional conditions with high sedimentation rates allowed exceptional preservation of plant remains. The plant assemblage consists of (1) conifers represented by foliage of Pinus hepios and Tetraclinis salicornioides, a seed cone of Pinus cf. ornata, and by pollen of the Cupressaceae, Pinaceae, Pinus sp. and Cathaya sp., and (2) angiosperms represented by Cinnamomum polymorphum, Platanus neptuni, Potamogeton sp. and lauroid foliage, by pollen of Liquidambar sp., Engelhardia sp. and Craigia sp., and in particular by infructescences (so far interpreted as belonging to cereal ears). We validate genus and species assignments of the infructescences: they belong to Palaeotriticum Sitár, including P. mockii Sitár and P. carpaticum Sitár, and probably represent herbaceous monocots that inhabited coastal marshes, similar to the living grass Spartina. Similar infructescences occur in the Lower and Middle Miocene deposits of the Carpathian Foredeep (Slup in Moravia), Tunjice Hills (Žale in Slovenia), and probably also in the Swiss Molasse (Lausanne). This plant assemblage demonstrates that the paleovegetation was represented by evergreen woodland with pines and grasses in undergrowth, similar to vegetation inhabiting coastal brackish marshes today. It also indicates subtropical climatic conditions in the Vienna Basin (central Paratethys), similar to those implied by other coeval plant assemblages from Central Europe

  14. Case study of a severe windstorm over Slovakia and Hungary on 25 June 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, André; Kaňák, Ján; Sokol, Alois; Putsay, Mária; Uhrínová, Lucia; Csirmaz, Kálmán; Okon, Ľuboslav; Habrovský, Richard

    2011-06-01

    A system of thunderstorms approached the Slovakia and Hungary in the late evening hours of 25 June 2008, causing extensive damage and peak wind gusts up to 40 m/s. This study examines the macro- and mesosynoptic conditions for the windstorm using soundings, analyses, and forecasts of numerical models (ALADIN, ECMWF). A derecho-like character of the event is discussed. Meteosat Second Generation imagery and convective indices inferred from satellite and model data are used to assess the humidity distribution and the conditional instability of the thunderstorm environment. An intrusion of the environmental dry air into the convective system and intensification of downdrafts is considered to be one of the reasons for the damaging winds observed at some areas. This is supported by the radar imagery showing a sudden drop of radar reflectivity and creation of line echo wave patterns and bow echoes. A numerical simulation provided by the non-hydrostatic MM5 model indicated the development of meso-γ scale vortices embedded in the convective system. The genesis and a possible role of such vortices in creating rear-inflow jets and intensifying the low level winds are investigated with the help of the vorticity equation and several other diagnostic parameters. In addition, the effect of various physical parameterisations on the forecast of the windstorm is evaluated.

  15. Region-specific differences in colorectal cancer: Slovakia and Hungary have highest incidence in Europe.

    PubMed

    Simko, V; Ginter, E

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data on colorectal cancer (CRC) exhibit high incidence in Central East Europe. Hungary, Slovakia and Croatia represent the lead. For decades it was the Czech Republic but it attained the fourth rank after the mid-2000. Remarkably, the Ashkenazi Jews who imigrated to the USA from Central Europe have the highest incidence of CRC among US minorities. They also have high incidence of inflammatory bowel disease, a risk for CRC. Notably, countries surrounding the Central European focus of CRC, Austria, Germany, Poland, Romania, Ukraine and Russia have substantially lower incidence. CRC in Central Europe has higher incidence than CRC among the highest at-risk cohort in the USA, the elderly blacks. Research and the genome wide screening identified genetic mutations associated with CRC in Ashkenazis from Central Europe. Some risk factors for CRC are non genotypic as evidenced by wide variation in CRC incidence in the course of only a few decades. Recent trends offer hope that identification of the non-innate pathogenic mechanisms would potentially reduce the burden of this third most lethal malignancy (Tab. 1, Fig. 4, Ref. 40). PMID:26830034

  16. Ecophysiological and ultrastructural effects of dust pollution in lichens exposed around a cement plant (SW Slovakia).

    PubMed

    Paoli, Luca; Guttová, Anna; Grassi, Alice; Lackovičová, Anna; Senko, Dušan; Sorbo, Sergio; Basile, Adriana; Loppi, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    The study investigated the ecophysiological and ultrastructural effects of dust pollution from a cement industry in the lichen species Evernia prunastri and Xanthoria parietina, which were exposed for 30, 90 and 180 days around a cement mill, two quarries, and inhabited and agricultural sites in SW Slovakia. The results showed that dust deposition from quarrying activities and cement works at the cement mill (mainly enriched in Ca, Fe and Ti) significantly affected the photosynthetic apparatus of E. prunastri (sensitive to dust and habitat eutrophication), while X. parietina (tolerant to dust and habitat eutrophication) adapted to the new environment. The length of the exposure strongly affected the vitality of the mycobiont (measured as dehydrogenase activity) in transplanted lichens. Dust deposition led to ultrastructural alterations, including lipid droplets increase, swelling of cellular components, thylakoid degeneration and sometimes plasmolysis, which, on the whole, gave the cells an aged appearance. Photosynthetic parameters deserve further attention as potential indicators for monitoring early biological symptoms of the air pollution caused during cement production. PMID:26044142

  17. Long-term corrosion study at nuclear power plant Bohunice (Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slugen, V.; Lipka, J.; Dekan, J.; Tóth, I.; Smieško, I.

    2010-03-01

    Steam generators of four VVER-440 units at nuclear power plants V-1 and V-2 in Jaslovske Bohunice (Slovakia) were gradually changed by new original "Bohunice" design in period 1994-1998. Corrosion processes before and after these design and material changes in Bohunice secondary circuit were studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy during last 25 years. Innovations in the feed water pipeline design as well as material composition improvements were evaluated positively. Mössbauer spectroscopy studies of phase composition of corrosion products were performed on real specimens scrapped from water pipelines or in form of filter deposits. The corrosion of new feed water pipelines system (from austenitic steel) in combination to innovated operation regimes goes dominantly to magnetite. The hematite presence is mostly on the internal surface of steam generator body and its concentration increases towards the top of the body. In the results interpretation it is necessary to consider also erosion as well as scope and type of maintenance activities. The long-term study of phase composition of corrosion products at VVER reactors is one of precondition for the safe operation over the projected NPP lifetime.

  18. An annotated and revised checklist of pleurostome ciliates (Protista: Ciliophora: Litostomatea) from Slovakia, Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Vďačný, Peter; Rajter, L'ubomír

    2014-01-01

    Pleurostomatids are predatory ciliates, living especially in the periphyton and benthos of various freshwater and marine habitats. In the present work, we provide an annotated and revised checklist of this ciliate group from the territory of Slovakia. Altogether 29 pleurostome species belonging to five genera have been reported there: Acineria incurvata, Ac. punctata, Ac. uncinata, Amphileptus claparedii, Am. falcatus, Am. fusiformis, Am. parafusidens, Am. pleurosigma, Am. procerus, Am. punctatus, A. rotundus, Litonotus alpestris, Li. anguilla, Li. carinatus, Li. crystallinus, Li. cygnus, Li. fasciola, Li. fusidens, Li. hirundo, Li. lamella, Li. minisculus, Li. muscorum, Li. obtusus, Li. triqueter, Li. varsaviensis, Loxophyllum helus, Lo. meleagris, Lo. rostratum, and Siroloxophyllum utriculariae. We have catalogued these records providing the following data for each species: (1) author(s) and date of publication; (2) name(s) of the species as appeared in the publication(s) followed by chronologically listed references including relevant page(s) in literature; (3) nomenclatural and taxonomic notes if needed; (4) main morphological characters; (5) morphological data on Slovak populations if available; and (6) all faunistic records. PMID:24870102

  19. Occurrence of Deoxynivalenol in Wheat in Slovakia during 2010 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Šliková, Svetlana; Gavurníková, Soňa; Šudyová, Valéria; Gregová, Edita

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a total of 299 grain samples of wheat were collected from four production regions: the maize, sugar beet, potato and feed sectors of Slovakia. The samples were analyzed for deoxynivalenol (DON) content by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay Ridascreen® Fast DON. Analysis of variance revealed a significant difference between years in DON contents (p < 0.027). The occurrence of samples with DON was 82.2% in 2010, with maximum DON content of 7.88 mg kg−1, and 70.7% in 2011, with maximum DON content of 2.12 mg·kg−1. The total mean DON content was 0.62 mg·kg−1; in the feed region 0.22 mg·kg−1; 0.63 mg·kg−1 in the maize region; 0.78 mg·kg−1 in the sugar beet region; 0.45 mg·kg−1 the potato region. The limit of 1.25 mg·kg−1 imposed by the European Union (EU) for DON content was exceeded in 13.7% of the studied samples. The average monthly rainfall for May to June played a critical role in DON content of wheat grains for maize and sugar beet producing regions. The present results indicate that DON content was at a high level in grains from wheat grown during 2010. PMID:23917334

  20. Study of a unique 16th century Antwerp majolica floor in the Rameyenhof castle's chapel by means of X-ray fluorescence and portable Raman analytical instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Voorde, Lien; Vandevijvere, Melissa; Vekemans, Bart; Van Pevenage, Jolien; Caen, Joost; Vandenabeele, Peter; Van Espen, Piet; Vincze, Laszlo

    2014-12-01

    The most unique and only known 16th century Antwerp majolica tile floor in Belgium is situated in a tower of the Rameyenhof castle (Gestel, Belgium). This exceptional work of art has recently been investigated in situ by using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Raman spectroscopy in order to study the material characteristics. This study reports on the result of the analyses based on the novel combination of non-destructive and portable instrumentation, including a handheld XRF spectrometer for obtaining elemental information and a mobile Raman spectrometer for retrieving structural and molecular information on the floor tiles in the Rameyenhof castle and on a second, similar medallion, which is stored in the Rubens House museum in Antwerp (Belgium). The investigated material, majolica, is a type of ceramic, which fascinated many people and potters throughout history by its beauty and colourful appearance. In this study the characteristic major/minor and trace element signature of 16th century Antwerp majolica is determined and the pigments used for the colourful paintings present on the floor are identified. Furthermore, based on the elemental fingerprint of the white glaze, and in particular on the presence of zinc in the tiles - an element that was not used for making 16th century majolica - valuable information about the originality of the chapel floor and the two central medallions is acquired.

  1. Fluid composition of the sediment-influenced Loki's Castle vent field at the ultra-slow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, Tamara; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Hamelin, Cédric; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Okland, Ingeborg E.; Pedersen, Rolf B.

    2016-08-01

    The hydrothermal vent field Loki's Castle is located in the Mohns-Knipovich bend (73°N) of the ultraslow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) close to the Bear Island sediment fan. The hydrothermal field is venting up to 320° C hot black smoker fluids near the summit of an axial volcanic ridge. Even though the active chimneys have grown on a basaltic ridge, geochemical fluid data show a strong sedimentary influence into the hydrothermal circulation at Loki's Castle. Compelling evidence for a sediment input is given by high alkalinity, high concentrations of NH4+, H2, CH4, C2+ hydrocarbons as well as low Mn and Fe contents. The low δ13C values of CO2 and CH4 and the thermogenic isotopic pattern of the C2+ hydrocarbons in the high-temperature vent fluids clearly point to thermal degradation of sedimentary organic matter and illustrate diminution of the natural carbon sequestration in sediments by hydrothermal circulation. Thus, carbon-release to the hydrosphere in Arctic regions is especially relevant in areas where the active Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge system is in contact with the organic matter rich detrital sediment fans.

  2. Loki's Castle: Discovery and geology of a black smoker vent field at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, R.; Thorseth, I. H.; Lilley, M. D.; Barriga, F. J.; Früh-Green, G.; Nakamura, K.

    2010-12-01

    Previous attempts to locate hydrothermal vent fields and unravel the nature of venting at the ultraslow spreading and magma starved parts of the Arctic Mid Ocean Ridge (AMOR) have been unsuccessful. A black smoker vent field was eventually discovered at the Mohns-Knipovich bend at 73.5°N in 2008, and the field was revisited in 2009 and 2010. The Loki’s Castle vent field is located on the crest of an axial volcanic ridge that is bordered by a tectonic terrain dominated by core complexes to the NW, and a ridge flank that is buried by sediments from the Bear Island Fan to the SE. Fluid compositions are anomalous to other basalt-hosted fields and indicate interactions with sediments at depths. The vent field is associated with an unusually large hydrothermal deposit, which documents that extensive venting occurs at ultraslow spreading ridges despite the strongly reduced magmatic heat budget. ROV surveys have shown that venting occurs in two areas separated by around 100 m. Micro-bathymetry acquired by a Hugin AUV documents that two 20-30 tall mounds that coalesce at the base have developed around the vent sites. The micro-bathymetry also shows that the venting is located above two normal faults that define the NW margin of a rift that runs along the crest of the volcano. The black smoker fluids reach 317 °C, with an end-member SiO2 content of 16 mmol/kg. End-member chlorinity is around 85% of seawater suggesting that the fluids have phase-separated at depth. The fluid compositions indicate that the rock-water reactions occur around 2 km below the seafloor. The crustal thickness is estimated to be 4 +/- 0.5 km in the area. Whereas the depth of the reaction zone is comparable with faster spreading ridges, the fraction of crust cooled convectively by hydrothermal circulation is two times that of vent fields at ridges with normal crustal thickness.

  3. Mineralogy, 40Ar/ 39Ar dating and apatite fission track dating of rocks along the Castle Mountain fault, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, W. T.; Bunds, M. P.; Bruhn, R. L.; Hall, C. M.; Murphy, J. M.

    2001-07-01

    The Castle Mountain fault is a 200-km-long, right-lateral fault that forms the northern boundary of the Cook Inlet basin and Matanuska Valley, Alaska. Fault gouge and fault rock at six localities contain the clay minerals illite, smectite, chlorite, and interstratified illite/smectite. At one locality, gouge contains deformed illite/smectite with very little wall rock chlorite contamination. Fine (<0.03 μm), medium (0.03-0.2 μm), and coarse (0.2-2.0 μm) illite/smectite from this site were dated using 40Ar/ 39Ar micro-encapsulation and laser microprobe methods. Total gas ages for the three size fractions are 28.21±0.12, 32.42±0.11 and 36.24±0.08 Ma for fine to coarse sizes respectively. Argon retention ages obtained from 40Ar and 39Ar retained in the three size fractions of illite at room temperature during neutron irradiation are 37.36±0.15, 42.11±0.14 and 47.20±0.10 respectively. Apatite fission track ages were measured in arkose at a locality on the fault 60 km west of the gouge locality. Three samples of arkose were dated: one within 10 m of the fault core, one 170 m from the fault, and one 335 m from the fault. The sample nearest to the fault yielded an age of 29.3±2.8 Ma, but it only had four track lengths at 10-13 μm. Two apatite grains from the intermediate sample yielded a pooled age of 34.3±6.1 Ma. The distant sample (25 grains counted, 101 track lengths) yielded an age of 32.0±2.9 Ma. This sample has a broad distribution of track lengths and a broad distribution of individual grain ages ranging from 14.8±5.1 to 67.8±8.8 Ma. Monte Carlo modeling of the apatite age and track length data is consistent with hydrothermal mineralization at 37-39 Ma followed by rapid uplift and cooling after 10 Ma. The 40Ar/ 39Ar total gas ages (K-Ar) are minimum ages, and the argon retention ages are maximum ages. The thermal model derived from the fission track data, and the argon retention age for the finest illite fraction of ˜37 Ma date a hydrothermal

  4. Hydrogeologic and Biogeochemical Controls on the Fate and Transport of Nitrate and Pesticides in the Riparian Zone of Cow Castle Creek, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, L. J.; Hughes, W. B.

    2001-12-01

    Riparian zones often contain large amounts of organic carbon and small concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) resulting in reducing conditions that favor removal of nitrate through denitrification, and in some cases pesticides. We investigated the transport and fate of nitrate, several commonly used pesticides, and selected metabolites at a farm in South Carolina adjacent to Cow Castle Creek. Sixteen shallow water-table wells were installed to map the water table and ground water was sampled using 7 multi-port wells installed at depths ranging from 0.5 to 10 m along a 1-km flow system bracketing several types of land use including a cornfield, pine forest, hay field, riparian forest, and the discharge area at Cow Castle Creek. Ground-water recharge dates, based on CFC age dating, were from the mid-to-late 1970s below the riparian zone and Cow Castle Creek indicating a maximum residence time of approximately 23-years. Organic carbon under the riparian zone was as high as 0.97 percent. DO concentrations were variable with the smallest values immediately under the riparian zone. Nitrate-nitrogen concentrations varied over the site from about 28 mg/L immediately down gradient of the cornfield to below detection (<0.05 mg/L) under the hayfield. Large decreases in nitrate-nitrogen were detected at the edge of the riparian zone and immediately below it. Nitrate concentrations initially increased with depth below the riparian zone then decreased again in deeper samples while beneath Cow Castle Creek they varied from 2.8 to 4.7 mg/L. Excess nitrogen gas concentrations, presumably derived from denitrification, varied from 1.4 to 4.1 mg/L under the riparian zone. Atrazine, metolachlor and their metabolites were the most commonly detected pesticides and were generally restricted to samples collected under and adjacent to the cornfield however, there were a few detections of atrazine, simazine, chlorpyrifos, and deethyl atrazine under and adjacent to the riparian zone. Flow

  5. Response of surface and groundwater on meteorological drought in Topla River catchment, Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendekova, Miriam; Fendek, Marian; Vrablikova, Dana; Blaskovicova, Lotta; Slivova, Valeria; Horvat, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Continuously increasing number of drought studies published in scientific journals reflects the attention of the scientific community paid to drought. The fundamental works among many others were published by Yevjevich (1967), Zelenhasic and Salvai (1987), later by Tallaksen and van Lanen Eds. (2004). The aim of the paper was to analyze the response of surface and groundwater to meteorological drought occurrence in the upper and middle part of the Topla River Basin, Slovakia. This catchment belongs to catchments with unfavourable hydrogeological conditions, being built of rocks with quite low permeability. The basin is located in the north-eastern part of Slovakia covering the area of 1050.05 km2. The response was analyzed using precipitation data from the Bardejov station (long-term annual average of 662 mm in 1981 - 2012) and discharge data from two gauging stations - Bardejov and Hanusovce nad Toplou. Data on groundwater head from eight observation wells, located in the catchment, were also used, covering the same observation period. Meteorological drought was estimated using characterisation of the year humidity and SPI index. Hydrological drought was evaluated using the threshold level method and method of sequent peak algorithm, both with the fixed and also variable thresholds. The centroid method of the cluster analysis with the squared Euclidean distance was used for clustering data according to occurrence of drought periods, lasting for 100 days and more. Results of the SPI index showed very good applicability for drought periods identification in the basin. The most pronounced dry periods occurred in 1982 - 1983, 1984, 1998 and 2012 being classified as moderately dry, and also in 1993 - 1994, 2003 - 2004 and 2007 evolving from moderately to severely dry years. Short-term drought prevailed in discharges, only three periods of drought longer than 100 days occurred during the evaluated period in 1986 - 1987, 1997 and 2003 - 2004. Discharge drought in the

  6. Acanthocephalans of the genus Centrorhynchus (Palaeacanthocephala: Centrorhynchidae) of birds of prey (Falconiformes) and owls (Strigiformes) in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Komorová, P; Špakulová, M; Hurníková, Z; Uhrín, M

    2015-06-01

    Three species of thorny-headed worms of the genus Centrorhynchus were found to parasitize birds of prey and owls in the territory of the Slovakia during the years 2012-2014. Out of 286 examined bird individuals belonging to 23 species, only Buteo buteo, Buteo rufinus, Falco tinnunculus (Falconiformes), Asio otus, Strix aluco, Strix uralensis and Tyto alba (Strigiformes) were infected by acanthocephalans. All the bird species except for S. aluco represent new host records for Slovakia. The most prevalent acanthocephalan Centrorhynchus aluconis was detected in all 15 examined birds of non-migratory Ural owl S. uralensis (P = 100%); however, it was found occasionally also in two individuals of the tawny owl S. aluco (P = 20%), one long-eared owl A. otus (P = 7.7%), one barn owl T. alba (P = 33.3%) and the common buzzard B. buteo (P = 0.8%). Two other thorny-headed worms occurred exclusively in Falconiformes in raw or mixed infections: Centrorhynchus buteonis was found in 11 individuals of B. buteo (P = 9.2%), and two birds (B. buteo and B. rufinus) were parasitized simultaneously by C. buteonis and the species Centrorhynchus globocaudatus. Moreover, the latest, relatively rare acanthocephalan was found alone in two common kestrels F. tinnunculus (P = 2.7%). Regarding intensity of infection, it ranged from a single female of C. buteonis, C. globocaudatus or C. aluconis per host (four cases) to a maximum of 82 C. aluconis per an Ural owl. The difference in acanthocephalan species spectrum between birds of prey and owls in Slovakia was apparent. PMID:25786606

  7. Re-establishment of the fish parasite fauna in the Tisa River system (Slovakia) after a catastrophic pollution event.

    PubMed

    Oros, Mikulás; Hanzelová, Vladimíra

    2009-06-01

    An extensive survey of helminth parasites in 1,316 freshwater fish representing 31 species from two aquatic ecosystems in southeastern Slovakia characterized by different level of environmental pollution was carried out. The helminth species diversity was compared between the Tisa River, heavily polluted with cyanides and heavy metals after a series of ecological disasters in 2000, and the less anthropogenically influenced Latorica River. A parasitological survey found 31 gastrointestinal helminths: Trematoda (11 species), Cestoda (14), Acanthocephala (3) and Nematoda (3). As many as 70 host-parasite combinations have been found. Twenty of them (28.6%) represent new host-parasite finding records for the territory of Slovakia. The component communities were species-poor in both rivers, with high dominance of one to three helminth species. Even though the fish communities were qualitatively similar (ICS = 81%) and the number of fish examined was approximately the same (676 and 640) in both localities, the helminth species richness and diversity of host-parasite combinations were two times lower in the more polluted Tisa River. The helminth communities were also much less abundant in the Tisa River. Based on the Czekanowski-Sørensen similarity index (ICS = 48.8%) and the Percentage similarity index (PI = 19.5%), the helminth communities were qualitatively and quantitatively different in the two rivers. The remarkable lack of species diversity in the Tisa River can be explained by the negative impact of residual contamination of the Tisa river bottom on certain freshwater invertebrates (bivalves and prosobranch mollusks, copepods and amphipods) which serve as obligatory intermediate hosts for the helminths. Four species, the aspidogastrean Aspidogaster limacoides Diesing, 1835, the acanthocephalan Pomphorhynchus tereticollis (Rudolphi, 1809) tapeworms Atractolytocestus huronensis Anthony, 1958 and Khawia sinensis Hsü, 1935 are recorded in Slovakia for the first time

  8. Intestinal and liver flukes of birds of prey (Accipitriformes, Falconiformes, Strigiformes) from Slovakia: uniform or diverse compound?

    PubMed

    Komorová, Petronela; Sitko, Jiljí; Špakulová, Marta; Hurníková, Zuzana

    2016-07-01

    During 2012-2014 up to 286 birds of the orders Falconiformes (5 species), Accipitriformes (11 species), and Strigiformes (7 species) were examined for trematodes and this represents the first detailed study in Slovakia. A total of 12 trematode species belonging to the families Diplostomidae, Cyathocotylidae, Strigeidae, and Opisthorchiidae were identified. Rare infections were found in falcons where only two species (40 %) and three of 85 examined birds (3.5 %) were infected with a low range of two to four worms of generalists Strigea falconis or Plagiorchis elegans. Contrary to that, ten accipitriformes species (90.9 %) and 63 of 156 bird individuals (40.4 %) were infected with nine flukes: Conodiplostomum perlatum, Conodiplostomum spathula, Neodiplostomum attenuatum, Neodiplostomum spathoides, Parastrigea flexilis, Strigea falconis, Strigea vandenbrokae, Paracoenogonimus ovatus, and Metorchis bilis. S. falconis and N. attenuatum were the most frequent, occurring in parallel in eight and four bird species, in numbers up to 575 and 224. The intensity of infection with other fluke species was low ranging from one to 13 worms. Three owl (Strigiformes) representatives (42.9 %) were exclusive hosts for Neodiplostomum canaliculatum and Strigea strigis, and the proportion of positive and dissected individual birds was 10:45 (22.2 %). Both trematodes occurred in two or three owl species. In conclusion, apparent dissimilarity of trematode load of three unrelated lines of falcons, eagles, and owls was revealed. The present study extends our knowledge on the composition of the trematode fauna in Slovakia as all species except S. falconis and P. elegans that represent new host and species records in Slovakia. PMID:27055533

  9. Forty years of atmospheric radiocarbon monitoring around Bohunice nuclear power plant, Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Povinec, P P; Chudý, M; Sivo, A; Simon, J; Holý, K; Richtáriková, M

    2009-02-01

    Radiocarbon variations in the atmospheric CO(2) with attenuating amplitudes and decreasing mean values with typical maxima in summer and minima in winter have been observed since 1967 in two localities of Slovakia, in Bratislava and Zlkovce, situated about 60 km NE from Bratislava, only 5 km from the Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The (14)C record in Bratislava has been influenced mainly by fossil CO(2) emissions, in contrast to the Zlkovce record which has been more variable, as it has clearly been affected by operation of the Bohunice NPP. However, during specific meteorological conditions with NE transport of air masses to Bratislava, the effect of the Bohunice NPP has been visible in Bratislava as well. Maximum (14)C concentrations (up to 120% above a natural background) were observed around A1 NPP which used CO(2) with admixture of air as a cooling agent. The (14)C concentrations around four pressurized light water reactors were up to 30% above the background. The Delta(14)C values in the heavily polluted atmosphere of Bratislava were up to 10% and at Zlkovce up to 5% lower than the European clean air represented by the Jungfraujoch Delta(14)C data. Later the Delta(14)C values were similar at both sites, and from 2003 they were close to the European clean air levels. The observed Delta(14)C behaviour in the atmosphere provides a unique evidence of decreased fossil fuel CO(2) emissions in the region, as well as the long-term effect of the Bohunice NPP on the Bratislava and Zlkovce stations. The estimated annual radiation doses to the local public due to digestion of radiocarbon contaminated food have been estimated to be around 3 microSv. PMID:18926606

  10. Wild boar (Sus scrofa) - reservoir host of Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Reiterová, Katarína; Špilovská, Silvia; Blaňarová, Lucia; Derdáková, Markéta; Čobádiová, Andrea; Hisira, Vladimír

    2016-06-01

    In Central Europe the wild boar population is permanently growing and consequently Cf foodborne infections. In this study serological and molecular detection of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum in wild boars was evaluated. Moreover, same samples were screened for the presence and genetic variability of tick-borne bacterium Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Blood samples collected from 113 wild boars from Southern Slovakia were examined for antibodies to T. gondii by indirect and to N. caninum by competitive ELISA. The presence of parasitic DNA in blood samples was determined by standard or real time PCR techniques. Antibodies against T. gondii and N. caninum were detected in 45 (39.8%) and 38 (33.6%) animals, respectively. Females were more frequently infected for both pathogens than males. The high seropositivity against both coccidia indicates a permanent occurrence of these pathogens in the studied locality. T. gondii DNA was confirmed in five seropositive boars (4.4%) and N. caninum in 23 blood samples (20.4%). Three out of 23 N. caninum PCR positive animals did not show seropositivity. Three out of 113 blood samples of wild boars were positive for A. phagocytophilum (2.7%). The obtained A. phagocytophilum sequences were 100% identical with GenBankTM isolates from Slovak dog (KC985242); German horse (JF893938) or wild boar (EF143810) and red deer (EF143808) from Poland. Coinfections of T. gondii with N. caninum and N. caninum with A. phagocytophilum were detected in single cases. Results suggest a potential zoonotic risk of toxoplasmosis transmission to humans and the spread of neosporosis to farm animals. PMID:27078648

  11. Preliminary business plan: District Heating Company for the city of Handlova, Slovakia

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The city of Handlova, Slovakia, needs to replace its district heating system, which is old, unreliable, and expensive to maintain. The current plant is owned by a state-run utility, the Slovensky Energeticky Podnik (SEP). The plan is to privatize the heating plant, acquire capital to rehabilitate the central plant (converting it to a cogeneration facility), install a new hot-water distribution system, and implement an extensive energy efficiency effort in the residential buildings on the system. System capacity is 100 MWt, with annual heat sales estimated to be 450,000 gigajoules per year (GJ/yr). The capital necessary for system improvements is estimated to be 465 million Slovakian Krowns (SK) (in 1997 price levels). The total market value of existing fixed assets that will survive the rehabilitation effort as part of the new systems is estimated at 342 million SK. There has been substantial analysis and preparation for this activity, which is documented in demand-side and supply-side technical and economic analyses, an integrated demand/supply report, and this preliminary business plan. The preparation includes investigation of ownership, management, and technology alternatives; estimation of the market value of existing assets and investment requirements; and forecasting of future cash flows. These preliminary projections indicate that the cost of heating from the new system will be reasonable from both a cost per unit of energy basis (SK/GJ) and, form the perspective of an apartment dweller in Handlova, on a total cost per year basis. Delivering heat at the projected cost will, however, require a substantial change in the way that the heating plant is run, with proportionally very large reductions in labor, operations and maintenance, and overhead charges. In addition, there will need to be significant revenues from the sale of electricity to the national grid.

  12. The Magnetic Properties of Lichens Exposed Around a Cement Plant in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Aldo; Paoli, Luca; Guttová, Anna; Loppi, Stefano; Sagnotti, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    A cement industry is a source of dust pollution, from quarrying and grinding of the raw material to kiln operations. Airborne pollutants related to combustion processes are also emitted, especially during kiln operations and power generation. The use of biomonitors can provide valuable information about the impact of airborne pollutants released during cement production and lichens are suitable bioindicators of air pollution, providing reliable information on the quality of the environment. We investigated the magnetic hysteresis properties and the elemental concentrations of epiphytic lichens from selected sites (a cement mill, two quarries, agricultural areas, and villages) in SW Slovakia; in particular, both transplanted and in situ lichens, bark, soil and rock samples from the sampling sites, as well as pre-transplant samples have been characterized. Evernia prunastri transplants, exposed up to 180 days, showed excellent correlations between the saturation magnetization (Ms) and saturation remanent magnetization (Mrs) values and the Fe concentrations; the analyzed samples were magnetically homogeneous, with marked differences only for the sample from a basalt quarry. Xanthoria parietina autochthonous samples have also a similar magnetic mineralogy; anyway their Ms and Mrs values were two orders of magnitude higher with respect to those from the transplants, implying increased concentration of magnetic particles according to the different lichen species and to the prolonged exposure. Magnetic methods can be valuable for discriminating various natural and anthropogenic sources of dust. In this study, we point out that the magnetic properties may also reflect the influence of the basalt quarry activity, of the soil and of the bedrock. For a proper evaluation of the pollution related to human activities, it is thus essential to verify the nature of the substrate and to select suitable and homogeneous pre/post lichen transplant sites.

  13. Environmental and health risk assessment in abandoned mining area, Zlata Idka, Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapant, S.; Dietzová, Z.; Cicmanová, S.

    2006-11-01

    The Zlata Idka village is a typical mountainous settlement. As a consequence of more than 500 years of mining activity, its environment has been extensively affected by pollution from potentially toxic elements. This paper presents the results of an environmental-geochemical and health research in the Zlata Idka village, Slovakia. Geochemical analysis indicates that arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) are enriched in soils, groundwater, surface water and stream sediments. The average As and Sb contents are 892 mg/kg and 818 mg/kg in soils, 195 mg/kg and 249 mg/kg in stream sediments, 0.028 mg/l and 0.021 mg/l in groundwater and 0.024 mg/l and 0.034 mg/l in surface water. Arsenic and Sb concentrations exceed upper permissible limits in locally grown vegetables. Within the epidemiological research the As and Sb contents in human tissues and fluids have been observed (blood, urine, nails and hair) in approximately one third of the village’s population (120 respondents). The average As and Sb concentrations were 16.3 μg/l and 3.8 μg/l in blood, 15.8 μg/l and 18.8 μg/l in urine, 3,179 μg/kg and 1,140 μg/kg in nails and 379 μg/kg and 357 μg/kg in hair. These concentrations are comparatively much higher than the average population. Health risk calculations for the ingestion of soil, water, and vegetables indicates a very high carcinogenic risk (>1/1,000) for as content in soil and water. The hazard quotient [HQ=average daily dose (ADD)/reference dose (RfD)] calculation method indicates a HQ>1 for groundwater As and Sb concentrations.

  14. Changes in the snow water equivalent in mountainous basins in Slovakia over recent decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavčová, K.; Kotríková, K.; Kohnová, S.; Valent, P.

    2015-06-01

    Changes in snowpack and duration of snow cover can cause changes in the regime of snow and rain-snow induced floods. The recent IPCC report suggests that, in snow-dominated regions such as the Alps, the Carpathian Mountains and the northern parts of Europe, spring snowmelt floods may occur earlier in a future climate because of warmer winters, and flood hazards may increase during wetter and warmer winters, with more frequent rain and less frequent snowfall. The monitoring and modelling of snow accumulation and snow melting in mountainous catchments is rather complicated, especially due to the high spatial variability of snow characteristics and the limited availability of terrestrial hydrological data. An evaluation of changes in the snow water equivalent (SWE) during the period of 1961-2010 in the Upper Hron river basin, which is representative of the mountainous regions in Central Slovakia, is provided in this paper. An analysis of the snow cover was performed using simulated values of the snow water equivalent by a conceptual semi-distributed hydrological rainfall-runoff model. Due to the poor availability of the measured snow water equivalent data, the analysis was performed using its simulated values. Modelling of the SWE was performed in different altitude zones by a conceptual semi-distributed hydrological rainfall-runoff model. The evaluation of the results over the past five decades indicates a decrease in the simulated snow water equivalent and the snow duration in each altitude zone and in all months of the winter season. Significant decreasing trends were found for December, January and February, especially in the highest altitude zone.

  15. Some aspects of health status of the Gypsy population in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Bartosovic, I

    2016-01-01

    Population of the Gypsy people living currently in Slovakia reaches approximately 400,000 people which represents 7.5% of the total Slovak population. The age structure of the Gypsy population is of a considerably progressive type with a high number of children and very low number of old people. This is due to the high natality and high mortality of Gypsies, whose health status is worse than the health status of the majority population. Gypsy people represent an important "old-new" risk group in case of tuberculosis and a more frequent occurrence of other transmitted diseases is observed in them while a higher incidence of genetically conditioned diseases has been confirmed, as well. As for children, a higher frequency of infectious diseases, injuries, intoxications and burns can be found as a result of their environmental conditions. A high level of infant mortality of the Gypsy children is a very negative phenomenon. We can state that the lifestyle of the Gypsy population is unhealthy, characterized by bad dietary habits, drinking alcohol, frequent smoking already in a very young age, higher weight and lower physical activity. All findings confirm that the Gypsy population is threatened by cardiovascular diseases at younger age already. Due to a more difficult approach to the health care, part of the Gypsies consult the physician only when in a serious health state. Health status of the Gypsy seniors has been reported only at minimum due to their low representation in population. Typical feature of this ethnic is, that they take care of their seniors. To prove this, during the author´s twenty seven-year practice he met just three old Gypsy women in social institutions. It is very difficult to address problems related to the Gypsy population; this task requires engagement of all spheres of our society, in particular of the Gypsies themselves, including their organizations (Ref. 50). PMID:26810166

  16. Spectroscopic and bond-topological investigation of interstitial volatiles in beryl from Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridrichová, Jana; Bačík, Peter; Bizovská, Valéria; Libowitzky, Eugen; Škoda, Radek; Uher, Pavel; Ozdín, Daniel; Števko, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Nine beryl samples from Western Carpathians, Slovakia, were investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy and differential thermal analysis. Two types of water H2O I and H2O II were detected. Infrared spectroscopy proved the presence of water type I and II in the presence of alkali cations with several bands: (1) symmetric stretching vibration—ν1; (2) antisymmetric stretching mode—ν3; (3) bending vibration—ν2. The presence of singly and doubly coordinated type II water (IIs and IId) was confirmed by single-crystal IR spectroscopy. From Raman spectra a band at 3606 cm-1 was assigned to ν1 of water type I and the range of 3597-3600 cm-1 to water type II. The presence of doubly coordinating water indicates a relatively highly hydrated environment with the presence of alkali ions including Na as the dominant cation coordinated by H2O II. CO2 bands were detected only by single-crystal IR spectroscopy. Thermal analysis proved total water loss in the range of 1.4-2.0 wt% and three main dehydration events. Based on the study of bond-topological arrangements two molecules of H2O IId are each bound with two H···O1 bonds and one Na-OW bond with an angular distortion, and by releasing one H2O molecule more stable H2O IIs is produced. The H2O I molecule is bound only by two equivalent hydrogen bonds. The H2O IIs molecule with a Na-OW bond strength of 0.28 vu and two H···O1 bonds of 0.14 vu without any forced angular distortion is the most stable of all.

  17. Relative density of host-seeking ticks in different habitat types of south-western Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Kazimírová, Mária; Hamšíková, Zuzana; Kocianová, Elena; Marini, Giovanni; Mojšová, Michala; Mahríková, Lenka; Berthová, Lenka; Slovák, Mirko; Rosá, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Ixodes ricinus is a vector of microbial pathogens of medical and veterinary importance in Europe. Recently, increasing abundance of ticks has been observed in urban and suburban areas. The aim of this study was to investigate the tick species composition and examine correlations between local environmental variables and the relative density of host-seeking I. ricinus in two habitat types. Questing ticks were collected along six 100 m(2) transects in urban/suburban locations of Bratislava town, and in a non-fragmented deciduous forest in the Small Carpathians Mountains (south-western Slovakia) during 2011-2013. In total, 6015 I. ricinus were collected (3435 and 2580 in the urban/suburban and natural habitat, respectively), out of which over 80 % were nymphs. Haemaphysalis concinna comprised 1.3 % of the tick collections. Peak I. ricinus nymph and adult host-seeking activities were registered in April-June. Spatial and temporal variation in tick relative density and differences in the subadult/adult ratio were observed between habitats and between locations within the same habitat type. The relative density of questing I. ricinus nymphs correlated negatively with altitude, geographical aspect and saturation deficit in a 64-day period comprising the 8-day period including the date of tick sampling and previous 56 days. No significant correlation was found between roe deer density and questing nymph density. The study revealed the presence of abundant I. ricinus populations in green areas of Bratislava, suggesting a risk of exposure of town dwellers and domestic and companion animals to potentially infected ticks. PMID:26926874

  18. Spectroscopic and bond-topological investigation of interstitial volatiles in beryl from Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridrichová, Jana; Bačík, Peter; Bizovská, Valéria; Libowitzky, Eugen; Škoda, Radek; Uher, Pavel; Ozdín, Daniel; Števko, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Nine beryl samples from Western Carpathians, Slovakia, were investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy and differential thermal analysis. Two types of water H2O I and H2O II were detected. Infrared spectroscopy proved the presence of water type I and II in the presence of alkali cations with several bands: (1) symmetric stretching vibration—ν1; (2) antisymmetric stretching mode—ν3; (3) bending vibration—ν2. The presence of singly and doubly coordinated type II water (IIs and IId) was confirmed by single-crystal IR spectroscopy. From Raman spectra a band at 3606 cm-1 was assigned to ν1 of water type I and the range of 3597-3600 cm-1 to water type II. The presence of doubly coordinating water indicates a relatively highly hydrated environment with the presence of alkali ions including Na as the dominant cation coordinated by H2O II. CO2 bands were detected only by single-crystal IR spectroscopy. Thermal analysis proved total water loss in the range of 1.4-2.0 wt% and three main dehydration events. Based on the study of bond-topological arrangements two molecules of H2O IId are each bound with two H···O1 bonds and one Na-OW bond with an angular distortion, and by releasing one H2O molecule more stable H2O IIs is produced. The H2O I molecule is bound only by two equivalent hydrogen bonds. The H2O IIs molecule with a Na-OW bond strength of 0.28 vu and two H···O1 bonds of 0.14 vu without any forced angular distortion is the most stable of all.

  19. Evaluating Early Upper Palaeolithic Open-Air Surface Finds from Northern Hungary and Southern Slovakia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wei; Zeeden, Christian; Mester, Zsolt; Lengyel, Gyuri; Kaminská, Ľubomíra

    2016-04-01

    The way in which Modern Humans first penetrated the European continent has been a recent focus of Upper Palaeolithic archaeological research. One hypothesis posits that the Danube River served as a main conduit for modern human movement from Southeastern into Central and Western Europe. However, a critical challenge to this theory has been the scarcity of Early Upper Palaeolithic sites along the Middle Danube catchment (Carpathian Basin). Though several sites with Early Upper Palaeolithic characteristics (Szeletian, Aurignacian) are known from surface prospections, very few have been archaeologically investigated. Our aim was to elucidate this long-standing deficiency by evaluating six known-surface sites from the Northern Middle Danube Basin in the Cserhát and Mátra Mountains (Hungary) and the nearby Košice Basin (Slovakia) through a series of "keyhole" excavations. Our objectives were (1) to see if in situ stratified material still existed at these locations, (2) to characterize their archaeological assemblages and (3) to provide radiometric dates for these assemblages. Additionally, we employed sediment grain-size and color analyses to resolve if the surrounding sedimentary matrix was aeolian loess and/or if it had been mixed with underlying older deposits. Our results suggest that many of the archaeological assemblages represent early Upper Palaeolithic assemblages experienced post-depositional mixing. However, two sites (Sena, Nagyréde) showed more nuanced taphonomic processes and may contain in situ artifacts warranting further exploration. These studies highlight the under-explored nature of archaeological and sedimentological research in the area and underscore the importance of integrating sedimentological research with archaeological investigations. It also suggests that the scarcity of archaeological sites in the region may in part be the result of a dynamic Pleistocene geomorphological evolution rather than a true demographic absence. Our results

  20. Staircases, Towers, and Castles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kara, Melike; Eames, Cheryl L.; Miller, Amanda L.; Chieu, Annie

    2015-01-01

    The very nature of algebra concerns the generalization of patterns (Lee 1996). Patterning activities that are geometric in nature can serve as powerful contexts that engage students in algebraic thinking and visually support them in constructing a variety of generalizations and justifications (e.g., Healy and Hoyles 1999; Lannin 2005). In this…

  1. Castles of Ice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lied, Nils

    Intended for students aged 11 to 13 years, this is the true story of an Antarctic exploration as told by one of the participants. In 1956, he and two companions, along with a team of huskies started from the Australian base at Mawson, Antarctica and journeyed across the sea ice to locate the Douglas Islands and fix them on the map. The story tells…

  2. Microbial life associated with low-temperature hydrothermal venting and formation of barite chimneys at Loki's Castle vent field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorseth, I. H.; Steen, I.; Roalkvam, I.; Dahle, H.; Stokke, R.; Rapp, H.; Pedersen, R.

    2010-12-01

    A low-temperature diffuse venting area with numbers of small barite chimneys is located on the flank of the large sulphide mound of the Loki’s Castle black smoker vent field at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR). White cotton-like microbial mats on top of the barite chimneys and associated siboglinid tubeworms were observed. The temperature was determined to 20°C for the surface sediment and 0°C for the white microbial mats, just above the ambient bottom seawater temperature of -0.8°C. The microbial mats were sampled using a remote operating vehicle (ROV) equipped with a hydraulic sampling cylinder (biosyringe) and the chimneys using an aluminum scuffle box. Black colored interior flow channels surrounded by white outer sections of nearly pure barite, were observed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of mats showed numerous microbial cells and large amounts of extracellular thread-like material with attached barite crystals. Inside the chimneys microbial cells are partially embedded in barite, and individual crystals are also frequently covered by extracellular material. The microbial activity could thus have an important influence on the nucleation and growth of the barite crystals and thus on the formation of the chimneys. To reveal the microbial community structure, 16S rRNA gene sequence tag-encoded pyrosequencing (1.1 x 104 - 3.5 x 104 amplicons per library) followed by taxonomic classification of the reads using the MEGAN software, were performed. Organisms assigned to a genus of sulfide oxidizers (Sulfurimonas) within the e-Proteobacteria were abundant in each chimney structure; the white microbial mats (86-96% of the reads), the white barite (36% of total reads); the black flow channel (9.9%). The second most dominating taxon in the white chimney barite, including 26% of the reads, was anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME) of the ANME-1 clade, indicating anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) as a major microbial process. Furthermore, the novel AOM associated clade

  3. Potential mosquito (Diptera:Culicidae) vector of Dirofilaria repens and Dirofilaria immitis in urban areas of Eastern Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Bocková, Eva; Iglódyová, Adriana; Kočišová, Alica

    2015-12-01

    This paper follows the study from 2013 focused on the molecular screening of mosquitoes as vectors of Dirofilaria spp. which provided the information on Aedes vexans as a potential vector of Dirofilaria repens in Slovakia. Current entomological and molecular research indicates that Ae. vexans can participate also in the transmission of Dirofilaria immitis within the region. Using the standard PCR method, we examined 10,500 mosquitoes (Ae. vexans, Ae. rossicus, Anopheles maculipennis s.l., Ochlerotatus sticticus, Ochlerotatus cantans, Ochlerotatus caspius, Culex pipiens/Culex torrentium, Coquillettidia richiardii), collected using CO2-baited traps at six locations in the Eastern Slovakia. Out of 105 pools, 6 pools of mosquitoes Ae. vexans were positive for D. repens DNA (minimum infective rate in Ae. vexas was 6:6.900, i.e. 0.8 per 1.000 mosquitoes), within which 4 were concurrently positive for D. immitis (minimum infective rate in Ae. vexans was 4:6.900 i.e. 0.5 per 1.000 mosquitoes). PMID:26391170

  4. Analysis of radiation exposure - service personnel on Rongerik Atoll: Operation Castle - Shot Bravo. Technical report, 12 March 1985-12 June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, J.; Klemm, J.; Phillips, J.; Thomas, C.

    1987-07-09

    External and internal doses are reconstructed for the 28 American servicemen stationed on Rongerik Atoll, Marshall Islands, who were exposed to fallout on 1-2 March 1954 from Shot Bravo of Operation CASTLE. External doses are determined from limited radiation survey and film-badge information. Internal-dose commitments are derived from urinalysis data. The magnitude of the calculated activity intake suggests the principal pathways. Reconstructed film-badge doses are approximately 40 rem, with adjustments from individual activity scenarios, as available. Internal dose commitments to the thyroid and large intestine (nearly all first-year dose) provide the only significant increments to the external dose. Total doses are approximately 230 rem to the thyroid, 115 rem to the lower large intestine, 85 rem to the upper large intestine, and about 40 to 50 rem to all other organs.

  5. Mineralogy and Acid-Extractable Geochemistry from the Loki's Castle Hydrothermal Field, Norwegian Sea at 74 degrees N (South Knipovich Ridge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, F. J.; Fonseca, R.; Dias, S.; Cruz, I.; Carvalho, C.; Relvas, J. M.; Pedersen, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Loki’s Castle hydrothermal vent field was discovered in the summer of 2008 during a cruise led by the Centre of Geobiology of the University of Bergen, integrated in the H2Deep Project (Eurocores, ESF; see Pedersen et al., 2010, AGU Fall Meeting, Session OS26). Fresh volcanic glasses analyzed by EPMA are basalts. The vent site is composed of several active, over 10 m tall chimneys, producing up to 320 C fluid, at the top of a very large sulfide mound (estimated diameter 200 m). Mineralogy: The main sulfide assemblage in chimneys consists of sphalerite (Sp), pyrite (Py) and pyrrhotite, with lesser chalcopyrite (Ccp). Sulphide-poor selected samples collected at the base of chimneys are mostly composed of anhydrite (Anh), gypsum and talc (Tlc). Association of quartz, anhydrite, gypsum and barite were also found in some of the samples. The sulphide-poor samples from the base of the chimneys denote seawater interaction with the hydrothermal fluid and consequent decrease in temperature, precipitating sulfates. Sphalerite compositions are Zn(0.61-0.70)Fe(0.39-0.30)S. The variations in Fe content are consistent with those of hot, reduced hydrothermal fluids. The observed sulfide assemblage is consistent with the temperature of 320C measured in Loki’s Castle vents. Compositional zonation in sphalerites suggests different pulses of activity of the hydrothermal system, with higher contents of Zn in the center of the crystals. Geochemistry: Here we report preliminary data part of a major analytical task of sequential extraction of metals from sediments in the vicinity of Loki’s Castle, in an attempt to detect correlations with microbial populations and/or subseafloor mineralized intervals. The abundances of Cu, Pb, Ni, Cr, Zn, Fe, Mn and Co in sediments were determined by aqua regia extraction on subsamples from 7 gravity cores. Several anomalous intervals were sampled, in which Cu<707ppm, Ni shows many weak peaks (<50ppm), Cr shows 6 peaks (<121ppm), Zn shows 4 well

  6. Utilizing Undergraduate Research Projects to Assist in the Development of Interpretive Resources at City of Rocks National Reserve and Castle Rocks State Park, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, K. R.

    2003-12-01

    In the Albion Mountains of southern Idaho, granitic rock of the 28 Ma Almo pluton and 2.5 Ga Green Creek Complex of southern Idaho has weathered and eroded into a spectacular landscape of towers and spires. These unusual landforms impressed travelers on the California Trail who compared their shapes to cathedrals, castles, pyramids, and other man-made structures. The region eventually became know as the City of Rocks and was a local scenic attraction until City of Rocks National Reserve (CRNR) was established in 1989 to provide more effective management for the main group of spires which were drawing an increasing number of tourists. In 2003, Castle Rocks State Park (CRSP) was created to provide both access and protection to a less extensive group of spires located a few kilometers north of the City of Rocks. Interpretive resources at CRNR have generally focused on the human history of the region, particularly its importance to the California Trail, and have largely neglected the fascinating geologic story. Although the general framework of the geology of the Albion Mountains is reasonably well known, this "big-picture" geology does little to answer many of the questions posed by the average visitor. During the summer of 2001, a Keck Geology Consortium undergraduate research project was conducted in CRNR to seek answers to these types of questions. CRNR staff could then utilize the students' research to develop interpretive resources. Six students and two professors spent 4 weeks in the field investigating the structures and processes that have contributed to the architecture of the City of Rocks. The general geomorphology of the Albion Mountains was the focus of a Keck Geology Consortium undergraduate research project conducted during the summer of 2002. Nine students and three professors studied the glacial and landslide history of the highest peaks and the geomorphic evolution of the proposed CRSP. Students working in the Castle Rocks had 2 main goals: 1

  7. Diversity of microbial communities of Loki's Castle black smoker field at the ultra-slow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, A.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Thorseth, I. H.; Pedersen, R.; Früh-Green, G.

    2010-12-01

    Here we present an organic geochemical study of Loki’s Castle, a black smoker field recently discovered at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea at around 73.2°N. Located at the Mohn-Knipovich Ridge, which is one of the slowest spreading ridge segments on Earth, Loki’s Castle is the most northerly major hydrothermal vent field known to date. The vent field is composed of five actively venting (320°C) black-smoker chimneys that tower on top of a large mound of hydrothermal sulfide deposits. Loki’s Castle is a basalt-hosted hydrothermal system, but high methane and ammonium contents in the vent fluids strongly indicate a sedimentary component below the volcanic ridge. In 2009, another site of low-temperature hydrothermal venting hosting numerous barite chimneys was discovered in the vicinity of the black smokers, which probably results from subsurface mixing of diffuse hydrothermal fluid with seawater. In our study, variations in microbial communities associated with the formation of actively venting, sulfide and sulfate chimneys in this essentially unexplored ultraslow spreading ridge system are assessed based on biomarker lipid and compound-specific carbon isotope analyses. Lipid extracts from an active, high-temperature sulfide chimney yielded abundant archaeal di- and tetraether lipids as well as irregular isoprenoidal hydrocarbons (PMIs) that are associated with archaeal methanogens and methanotrophs. Predominant archaeal biomarker lipids include archaeol, sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol as well as glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) containing 0-4 cyclopentyl moieties. In addition, GDGTs with an additional covalent bond between the isoprenoid hydrocarbon chains, so-called H-shaped GDGTs, containing 0-4 cyclopentyl rings were also found to be abundant components and are indicative of hyperthermophilic methanogens. Biomarkers characteristic of eukaryotes (sterols) and bacteria (fatty acids and hopanoids) were less prevalent in

  8. A study on the applicability of the ecosystem model on water quality prediction in urban river outer moats of Yedo Castle, Nihonbashi River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinuma, Daiki; Tsushima, Yuki; Ohdaira, Kazunori; Yamada, Tadashi

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the study is to elucidate the waterside environment in the outer moats of Yedo Castle and the downstream of Nihonbashi River in Tokyo. Scince integrated sewage system has been installed in the area around the outer moats of Yedo Castle and the Nihon River basin, when rainfall exceeds more than the sewage treatment capacity, overflowed untreated wastewater is released into the moats and the river. Because the moats is a closed water body, pollutants are deposited to the bottom without outflowing. While reeking offensive odors due to the decomposition, blue-green algae outbreaks affected by the residence time and eluted nutrient causes problems. Scince the Nihonbashi River is a typical tidal river in urban area, the water pollution problems in the river is complicated. This study clarified the characteristics of the water quality in terms of dissolved oxygen saturation through on-site observations. In particular, dissolved oxygen saturation in summer, it is clarified that variations from a supersaturated state due to the variations of horizontal insolation intensity and water temperature up to hypoxic water conditions in the moats. According to previous studies on the water quality of Nihonbashi River, it is clarified that there are three types of variations of dissolved oxygen which desided by rainfall scale. The mean value of dissolved oxygen saturation of all layers has decreased by about 20% at the spring tide after dredging, then it recoveres gradually and become the value before dredging during about a year. Further more, in places where sewage inflows, it is important to developed a ecosystem medel and the applicability of the model. 9 variables including cell quota (intracellular nutrients of phytoplankton) of phosphorus and nitrogen with considerring the nitrification of ammonia nitrogen are used in the model. This model can grasp the sections (such as oxygen production by photosynthesis of phytoplankton, oxygen consumption by respiration of

  9. Hydrology of the Ferron sandstone aquifer and effects of proposed surface-coal mining in Castle Valley, Utah; with a section on Stratigraphy and Leaching of overburden

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lines, Gregory C.; Morrissey, Daniel J.; Ryer, Thomas A.; Fuller, Richard H.

    1983-01-01

    Coal in the Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale of Cretaceous age has traditionally been mined by underground techniques in the Emery Coal Field in the southern end of Castle Valley in east-central Utah. However, approximately 99 million tons are recoverable by surface mining. Ground water in the Ferron is the sole source of supply for the town of Emery, but the aquifer is essentially untapped outside the Emery area. The Ferron Sandstone Member crops out along the eastern edge of Castle Valley and generally dips 2 ? to 10 ? to the northwest. Sandstones in the Ferron are enclosed between relatively impermeable shale in the Tununk and Blue Gate Members of the Mancos Shale. Along the outcrop, the Ferron ranges in thickness from about 80 feet in the northern part of Castle Valley to 850 feet in the southern part. The Ferron also generally thickens in the subsurface downdip from the outcrop. Records from wells and test holes indicate that the full thickness of the Ferron is saturated with water in most areas downdip from the outcrop area. Tests in the Emery area indicate that transmissivity of the Ferron sandstone aquifer ranges from about 200 to 700 feet squared per day where the Ferron is fully saturated. Aquifer transmissivity is greatest near the Paradise Valley-Joes Valley fault system where permeability has been increased by fracturing. Storage coefficient ranges from about 10 .6 to 10 -3 where the Ferron sandstone aquifer is confined and probably averages 5 x 10 -2 where it is unconfined. The largest source of recharge to the Ferron sandstone aquifer in the Emery area is subsurface inflow from the Wasatch Plateau to the west (about 2.4 cubic feet per second during 1979), most of which moves laterally through the more permeable zone along the Paradise Valley-Joes Valley fault system. Little water is recharged to the aquifer by the 8 inches of normal annual precipitation on the outcrop area. Natural discharge from the aquifer is mainly leakage to alluvium

  10. International Survey in Eight Countries about Teachers and Teaching Profession: Belgium, Cyprus, Italy, Libya, Poland, Slovakia, Turkey, United States of America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chistolini, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    An international team of experts from Belgium, Italy, Poland, Slovakia, Turkey and the USA employed a questionnaire to identify the deontology of teachers from infant to secondary school in eight countries. The survey was implemented between 2004 and 2007. The socio-cultural concept of "Verstehen" (understanding) as described in the work…

  11. Assessment of the aquatic habitat quality of the mountain streams in Eastern Slovakia by bioindication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalcovikova, Monika; Skrovinova, Marcela; Stankoci, Ivan; Bajtek, Zbynek

    2010-05-01

    In 2008 was implemented topographical and ichtyological research on the chosen streams on the east of Slovakia. For hydraulic modeling was used RHABSIM model which is component of the IFIM (Instream Flow Incremental Methodology). IFIM is an interdisciplinary decision-making system, which has arisen as a result of the knowledge that most fish species prefer certain combinations of water depths, flow velocities, hiding places and materials of a riverbed. The research was aimed at the relationship between the quantitative parameters of ichthyofauna as a bioindicator and the ratio of habitat suitability. In the IFIM methodology the relationship between abiotic and biotic characteristics is represented by the habitat suitability curves of various fish species. Fish are the best bioindicators that most sensitively indicate the quality of a stream microhabitat. The habitat suitability curves of particular fish species are determined for the two most important abiotic characteristics - flow velocity and water depth. From our research, it follows that the technique of processing for the habitat suitability curve is a very important factor that significantly influences the whole process of habitat modeling. The assessment of the habitat quality proves the appropriate input for water-management planning and decision-making, e.g. determination of the minimal (ecological) flow, river restoration planning, or the assessment of the river regulation influence on the quality and quantity of its biological guilds. It can also be used as a substitute of the ichthyofauna biodiversity assessment. These models provide a basic overview of time and spatial interaction of physical and biological components of the river system. This methodology can even be used for modeling the unaffected character of stream according to the EU framework directive 2000/60/EC. Modeling of the aquatic habitat quality using the RHABSIM model requires the simulation of the velocity field verified for two water

  12. Cartographic evidence of the disastrous ice flood of 1809 and its aftermath (Danube River, Slovakia).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pišút, P.

    2009-04-01

    The 18th and early 19th century river maps are important data sources for studying past landscapes. This is not only as a result of improved surveying techniques, but also because they depict landscape during probably the most important climatic and land-use changes since the Middle Ages. In this phase of the increased river activity during the last onset of the so-called Little Ice Age period, several major flood events occured. Local manuscript maps, which often depict the channel in major detail, help us to obtain a better understanding of their geomorphic and other impacts. The catastrophic ice flood, which occured on the Middle Danube river at the end of January 1809 was undoubtedly the most disastrous event of its kind in Slovakia, although it also hit a number of settlements in Lower Austria and Hungary. Several people drowned and the flood also resulted in great damage to settlements and livestock. Devastating effects of this flood particularly as to the towns of Bratislava and Komárno/Komárom were comparable with effects of disastrous floods of February 1830 in Vienna (Austria), March 1838 in Buda/Pest (Hungary) or 1845 flood in Prague (Czech Republic), respectively. In case of the present Slovakian capital Bratislava, on January 29, 1809, two ice barriers suddenly rose the water up to 10 m above the zero level and the river quickly overflowed its banks inundating the low-lying parts of the town. The flood blacked out communications with neighbouring regions. Record-breaking height of water led to breaches of the important right-bank embankment (constructed in 1770s). Through several openings water flooded the right bank, almost completely destroying the adjacent village of Petržalka/Engerau. The damage to Vienna highway levee was so massive that it only could be repaired 16 years later, in 1825-6 (although this was also due to Napoleonic wars). The flood also reactivated the Chorvátske rameno anabranch, 33 years after its abandonment. A number of

  13. Utilisation and Improvement of the Initialisation of Project Communication Processes During the Management of Projects in Industrial Enterprises in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samáková, Jana; Šujanová, Jana; Špirková, Marta

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, project communication is slowed due to the need for compliance with strict rules. Therefore the aim of this paper is to analyse the use of the communication environment as a basic part of the initialisation of project communication in industrial enterprises in Slovakia, and to propose measures to improve the process of initialisation of project communication in these enterprises. In this paper, theoretical and empirical research (quantitative and qualitative) approaches were chosen. On the basis of the research we can conclude, that communication as a basic part of the "Initialisation of project communication" is not adequately elaborated in international methodologies and standards of project management and in industrial enterprises. Industrial enterprises do not deal with processes of the communication environment and this results in negative consequences.

  14. National Initiatives to Improve Healthcare Outcomes: A Comparative Study of Health Delivery Systems in Slovakia and the United States.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Robert; Caplanova, Anetta; Novak, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    While the United States and Slovakia offer different healthcare delivery systems, each country faces the same challenges of improving the health status of their populations. The authors explore the impact of their respective systems on the health of their populations and compare the health outcomes of both nations. They point out that socioeconomic factors play a far more important role in determining population health outcomes than do the structures of the systems surrounding the care delivery. The authors illustrate this finding through a comparison of the poverty and education levels of a selected minority group from each country in relation to the health outcomes for each population group. The comparison reveals that education is a more influential determinant in a population's health outcomes, than the improved access to care offered by a universal system. PMID:26684681

  15. Changes in retention characteristics of 9 historical artificial water reservoirs near Banská Štiavnica, Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubinský, Daniel; Weis, Karol; Fuska, Jakub; Lehotský, Milan; Petrovič, František

    2015-12-01

    The article is focused on the evaluation of accumulation volume changes in 9 water reservoirs near Banská Štiavnica (Slovakia) by comparing historical maps and using modern bathymetric surveying technologies. The mining region of Banská Štiavnica has been inscribed into the UNESCO List of the World and Cultural Heritage in 1993. Accumulation and transfer of sediments depend mainly on changes of land cover in the watersheds that lead to the loss of retention capacity and reduction of life span of reservoirs. The results of a comparison of two 3D models, one created from historic documentation and the other created from data of field surveying have shown overall reduction in the volume of water totalling 446484m3, i.e. 16.70%from past to current time. Causes of sedimentation were searched in watersheds changes over time. These were identified by comparison of historical aerial imagery (1949) with existing aerial photographs.

  16. Model of the porphyry copper and polymetallic vein family of deposits - Applications in Slovakia, Hungary, and Romania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    A tectonic model useful in estimating the occurrence of undiscovered porphyry copper and polymetallic vein systems has been developed. This model is based on the manner in which magmatic and hydrothermal fluids flow and are trapped in fault systems as far-field stress is released in tectonic strain features above subducting plates (e.g. strike-slip fault systems). The structural traps include preferred locations for stock emplacement and tensional-shear fault meshes within the step-overs that localize porphyry- and vein-style deposits. The application of the model is illustrated for the porphyry copper and polymetallic vein deposits in the Central Slovakian Volcanic Field, Slovakia; the Ma??tra Mountains, Hungary; and the Apuseni Mountains, Romania.

  17. Effect of heavy metals on soil enzyme activity at different field conditions in Middle Spis mining area (Slovakia).

    PubMed

    Angelovičová, Lenka; Lodenius, Martin; Tulisalo, Esa; Fazekašová, Danica

    2014-12-01

    Heavy metals concentrations were measured in the former mining area located in Hornad river valley (Slovakia). Soil samples were taken in 2012 from 20 sites at two field types (grasslands, heaps of waste material) and two different areas. Total content of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, Hg), urease (URE), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), soil reaction (pH) were changing depending on the field/area type. The tailing pond and processing plants have been found as the biggest sources of pollution. URE, ACP and ALP activities significantly decreased while the heavy metal contents increased. Significant differences were found among area types in the heavy metal contents and activity of URE. No statistical differences in the content of heavy metals but significant statistical differences for soil pH were found for field types (grassland and heaps). Significant negative correlation was found for URE-Pb, URE-Zn and also between soil reaction and ACP and ALP. PMID:25293393

  18. Pre-eruptive volatile content of mafic magma from the 2.0-1.7 ka Castle Creek eruptive period, Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, J.; Wallace, P. J.; Clynne, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Among global convergent margins, the Cascade arc (Pacific Northwest, North America) has an atypically warm thermal profile due to the young age of the subducting ocean crust (≤10 Ma) and slow rate of subduction (3.5 cm/yr) in this region. Slab dehydration is thus expected to occur at relatively shallow subduction depths, resulting in high fluid fluxes in the mantle wedge below the forearc, with minimal addition of volatiles directly beneath the main volcanic front. Across-arc trends in magmatic volatiles should be most visible within particularly wide (E-W) portions of the active volcanic arc, such as are observed in Southern Washington, Central Oregon, and Northern California. As part of an ongoing study aimed at constraining variations in magmatic volatiles using monogenetic cinder cones across the Southern Washington Cascades, we analyzed the H2O and CO2 contents of olivine-hosted melt inclusions in basaltic scoria (Bu tephra) from the Castle Creek eruptive period (2.0-1.7 ka) of Mount St. Helens (MSH). The defining feature of this period is the first appearance of mafic magma at the surface, which initiated the modern Mount St. Helens and its variety of rock compositions (Mullineaux, 1996). Andesite, dacite, and basalt all were erupted during Castle Creek time, producing pyroclastic flows, surges, and tephra as well as lava flows. Our initial results show pre-eruptive H2O contents of 0.4-1.3 wt. % H2O and CO2 values that are below detection (<25-50 ppm). The morphology of the olivine crystals and their melt inclusions indicate relatively rapid crystallization. Given the low CO2 values, we conclude that the melt inclusions trapped partially degassed melts at relatively low pressure in a volcanic conduit or shallow storage reservoir. MSH represents the western extent of a stretch of volcanism extending ~100 km to the east; MSH magmas are thus expected to have high volatile contents relative to the other volcanic centers at this latitude.

  19. Effects of ground water, slope stability, and seismic hazard on the stability of the South Fork Castle Creek blockage in the Mount St. Helens Area, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, W.; Sabol, M.A.; Glicken, H.X.; Voight, B.

    1984-01-01

    South Fork Castle Creek was blocked by the debris avalanche that occurred during the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington. A lake formed behind the blockage, eventually reaching a volume of approximately 19,000 acre-feet prior to construction of a spillway - a volume sufficiently large to pose a flood hazard of unknown magnitude to downstream areas if the lake were to break out as a result of blockage failure. Breakout of lakes formed in a similar fashion is fairly common and several such events occurring in recent times have posed hazards around the world. Analyses of blockage stability included determining the effects of gravitational forces and horizontal forces induced by credible earthquakes from the Mount St. Helens seismic zone, which passes within several miles of the blockage. The blockage is stable at September 1983 water levels under static gravitational forces. If an earthquake with magnitude near 6.0 occurred with September 1983 water levels, movement on the order of 5 feet on both upstream and downstream parts of the blockage over much of its length could potentially occur. If the sliding blocks liquified, retrogressive failure could lead to lake breakout, but this is not considered to be probable. 24 refs., 25 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Efficiency calibration and coincidence summing correction for large arrays of NaI(Tl) detectors in soccer-ball and castle geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anil Kumar, G.; Mazumdar, I.; Gothe, D. A.

    2009-11-01

    Efficiency calibration and coincidence summing correction have been performed for two large arrays of NaI(Tl) detectors in two different configurations. They are, a compact array of 32 conical detectors of pentagonal and hexagonal shapes in soccer-ball geometry and an array of 14 straight hexagonal NaI(Tl) detectors in castle geometry. Both of these arrays provide a large solid angle of detection, leading to considerable coincidence summing of gamma rays. The present work aims to understand the effect of coincidence summing of gamma rays while determining the energy dependence of efficiencies of these two arrays. We have carried out extensive GEANT4 simulations with radio-nuclides that decay with a two-step cascade, considering both arrays in their realistic geometries. The absolute efficiencies have been simulated for gamma energies from 700 to 2800 keV using four different double-photon emitters, namely, 60Co, 46Sc, 94Nb and 24Na. The efficiencies so obtained have been corrected for coincidence summing using the method proposed by Vidmar et al. [11]. The simulations have also been carried out for the same energies assuming mono-energetic point sources, for comparison. Experimental measurements have also been carried out using calibrated point sources of 137Cs and 60Co. The simulated and the experimental results are found to be in good agreement. This demonstrates the reliability of the correction method [11] for efficiency calibration of two large arrays in very different configurations.

  1. A search for aquifers of sand and gravel by electrical-resistivity methods in north-central New Castle County, Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spicer, H. Cecil; McCullough, Richard A.; Mack, Frederick K.

    1955-01-01

    A search for aquifers in an area immediately north of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal in New Castle, Del., has been made by an electrical resistivity study.  The search located 32 sites that may be underlain by sand and gravel. The thicker deposits are significant with respect to the occurrence of ground water, and all of them are of interest as possible sources of sand and gravel for construction purposes, such as for highway construction.  The thickness of these deposits ranges from 4.4 feet to 77 feet, and the computed resistivity for these ranges from a low of 97,800 ohm-cms to a high of 423,800 ohm-cms.  The study located with certainty one buried channel filled with sand and gravel deposits and pointed out the possibility of others that may be aquifers.  The interpretations show that a large deposit of sand and gravel is present in the eastern part of the area investigated and it is tentatively assumed that this deposit is continuous and may yield large quantities of ground water.  Places where the deposit was found to be the thickest and of high resistivity are described.

  2. The use of microgravity technique in archaeology: A case study from the St. Nicolas Church in Pukanec, Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pánisová, Jaroslava; Pašteka, Roman

    2009-01-01

    The detection of subsurface cavities, such as crypts, cellars and tunnels, in churches and castles belongs to successful applications of the employment of surface gravity measurement techniques in archaeo-prospecting. The old historic building exploration requires using of non-invasive methods, and hence the microgravity technique is a proper candidate for this task. On a case study from the Roman-Catholic Church of St. Nicolas in the town Pukanec the results of using microgravity for detection and delineation of local density variations caused by a near-surface void are shown. The acquired negative anomaly in the residual Bouguer anomalies field suggested the presence of a possible void feature. Euler deconvolution and 3D modelling were used to estimate the depth and shape of the anomalous source. Additionally, measurements of the vertical gravity gradient on several stations were performed. We tested how the use of a downward continuation of gravity, utilizing the real vertical gravity gradient, influences the shape and amplitude of the final Bouguer anomaly map.

  3. The invasion history, distribution and colour pattern forms of the harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Pall.) (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) in Slovakia, Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Panigaj, Ľubomír; Zach, Peter; Honěk, Alois; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Kulfan, Ján; Martinková, Zdenka; Selyemová, Diana; Viglášová, Sandra; Roy, Helen E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) has invaded and established in Slovakia. Following unintentional introduction in 2008, the spread of the alien coccinellid was very fast. By the end of 2009, it was recorded across the whole country, and by the end of 2012 it was widely distributed and common in various habitats, particularly gardens, orchards and urban areas, where it was most frequent on trees. The rate of eastward spread was approximately 200 km year-1, similar to the overall rate of spread in Europe. Between 2008 and 2012, the coccinellid was recorded in a total of 153 localities, in altitudes ranging from 98 to 1,250 m. Most records of this species were made in lowlands, hilly areas and valleys separating mountain ridges. However, it was only rarely documented in areas above 700 m a.s.l. The non-melanic colour form (f. succinea) was dominant along a longitudinal transect including eight urban areas across Slovakia, with the frequency of melanic forms (f. spectabilis and f. conspicua together) between 6.3 and 19.2% and a median equal to 10.5%. The invasion history and distribution of H. axyridis in Slovakia are discussed with regard to the time sequence of records, rate of spread, altitudinal distribution, anthropogenic dispersal, effective recording, proportion of melanic forms and other relevant aspects associated with the spread of this successful invader. PMID:24899863

  4. The invasion history, distribution and colour pattern forms of the harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Pall.) (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) in Slovakia, Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Panigaj, Lubomír; Zach, Peter; Honěk, Alois; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Kulfan, Ján; Martinková, Zdenka; Selyemová, Diana; Viglášová, Sandra; Roy, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    The harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) has invaded and established in Slovakia. Following unintentional introduction in 2008, the spread of the alien coccinellid was very fast. By the end of 2009, it was recorded across the whole country, and by the end of 2012 it was widely distributed and common in various habitats, particularly gardens, orchards and urban areas, where it was most frequent on trees. The rate of eastward spread was approximately 200 km year(-1), similar to the overall rate of spread in Europe. Between 2008 and 2012, the coccinellid was recorded in a total of 153 localities, in altitudes ranging from 98 to 1,250 m. Most records of this species were made in lowlands, hilly areas and valleys separating mountain ridges. However, it was only rarely documented in areas above 700 m a.s.l. The non-melanic colour form (f. succinea) was dominant along a longitudinal transect including eight urban areas across Slovakia, with the frequency of melanic forms (f. spectabilis and f. conspicua together) between 6.3 and 19.2% and a median equal to 10.5%. The invasion history and distribution of H. axyridis in Slovakia are discussed with regard to the time sequence of records, rate of spread, altitudinal distribution, anthropogenic dispersal, effective recording, proportion of melanic forms and other relevant aspects associated with the spread of this successful invader. PMID:24899863

  5. Mechanism of cross-sectoral coordination between nature protection and forestry in the Natura 2000 formulation process in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Sarvašová, Zuzana; Sálka, Jaroslav; Dobšinská, Zuzana

    2013-09-01

    Nature protection as a policy sector is not isolated and is directly or indirectly influenced by many other sectors (e.g. forestry, water management, rural development, energy, etc.). These policy sectors are neither completely segmented nor unaffected by the decisions taken in other policy sectors. Policy formulation in nature protection is therefore also influenced by different sectors. For that reason it is inevitable to stress the need for inter-sectoral coordination to assure their policy coherence. The aim of this article is to describe the mechanism and modes of cross-sectoral coordination and to analyze the relevant actors and their interaction, using the case of the Natura 2000 formulation process in Slovakia. The European Union (EU) set up an ecological network of special protected areas, known as Natura 2000 to ensure biodiversity by conserving natural habitats and wild fauna and flora in the territory of the Member States. An optimized nature protection must therefore carefully consider existing limits and crossdisciplinary relationships at the EU, national and regional levels. The relations between forestry and biodiversity protection are analyzed using the advocacy coalition framework (ACF). The ACF is used for analyzing how two coalitions, in this case ecological and forest owners' coalitions, advocate or pursue their beliefs from the nature protection and forestry policy field. The whole process is illustrated at the regional scale on the case study of Natura 2000 sites formulation in the Slovak Republic. For better reliability and validity of research, a combination of various empiric research methods was used, supported by existing theories. So called triangulation of sociological research or triangulation of methods consists of mutual results testing of individual methodological steps through identifying corresponding political-science theories, assessing their formal points using primary and secondary document analysis and assessing their

  6. A new earthquake catalogue for seismic hazard assessment of the NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) Jaslovske Bohunice, Slovakia, site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kysel, Robert; Kristek, Jozef; Moczo, Peter; Csicsay, Kristian; Cipciar, Andrej; Srbecky, Miroslav

    2014-05-01

    According to the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) Safety Guide No. SSG-9, an earthquake catalogue should comprise all information on pre-historical, historical and seismometrically recorded earthquakes in the region which should cover geographic area not smaller than a circle with radius of 300 km around the site. Jaslovske Bohunice is an important economic site. Several nuclear facilities are located in Jaslovske Bohunice - either in operation (NPP V2, national radioactive waste repository) or in decommissioning (NPP A1, NPP V1). Moreover, a new reactor unit is being planned for the site. Jaslovske Bohunice site is not far from the Dobra Voda seismic source zone which has been the most active seismic zone at territory of Slovakia since the beginning of 20th century. Relatively small distances to Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovak capital Bratislava make the site a prominent priority in terms of seismic hazard assessment. We compiled a new earthquake catalogue for the NPP Jaslovske Bohunice region following the recommendations of the IAEA Safety Guide. The region includes parts of the territories of Slovakia, Hungary, Austria, the Czech Republic and Poland, and it partly extends up to Germany, Slovenia, Croatia and Serbia. The catalogue is based on data from six national earthquake catalogues, two regional earthquake catalogues (ACORN, CENEC) and a catalogue from the local NPP network. The primarily compiled catalogue for the time period 350 - 2011 consists of 9 142 events. We then homogenized and declustered the catalogue. Eventually we checked the catalogue for time completeness. For homogenization, we divided the catalogue into preseismometric (350 - 1900) and seismometric (1901-2011) periods. For earthquakes characterized by the epicentral intensity and local magnitude we adopted relations proposed for homogenization of the CENEC catalogue (Grünthal et al. 2009). Instead of assuming the equivalency between local magnitudes reported by the

  7. Development of the distributed hydrological model FRIER for modelling and forecasting runoff in mountainous basins in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvat, O.; Hlavcova, K.; Szolgay, J.; Kohnova, S.; Danko, M.

    2009-04-01

    The spatially distributed rainfall-runoff model FRIER (Horvát, 2006) developed at the Slovak University of Technology is based on the structure of the physically-based WetSpa model which was originally developed by Wang et al. (1997) and adapted for flood prediction by De Smedt et al. (2000) and Liu et al. (2003). Several of model's components were changed in order to make it more appropriate for modelling and forecasting runoff from rainfall and snowmelt in selected basins of the High Core Mountains of Slovakia. The applicability of the conceptualization of runoff generation in this model has proved under various physiographic conditions in Slovakia, e.g. in the Hron, Hornad and Torysa River basins and within the framework of the Tisza River Project. The FREIR rainfall-runoff model divides basins into uniform spatial units on a grid scale, in which the hydrological balance and the runoff simulation are calculated up to the basin's outlet. Several methods, classifications and determinations of many hydrologic processes and parameters are included in the model. The individual components of the hydrological balance are liquid and solid precipitation, interception, soil moisture, infiltration, actual evapotranspiration, surface runoff, interflow in the root zone, percolation into the groundwater, groundwater runoff and production of a groundwater recharge in the saturated zone. Transformation of the surface runoff in the catchment is simulated by approximating a diffusive wave model using geometric and hydraulic characteristics of hillslopes and of the stream network. Routing parameters are generated from input layers of a digital elevation model and a type of land use. The model is executed as an ArcView GIS extension, and the whole preparation of the spatial distributed data is linked to the GIS interface. The hydrological and climatic data are daily or hourly precipitation totals and mean daily or hourly values of air temperature. Besides of the large number of

  8. Simulating rainfall-runoff dynamics of selected flash flood events in Slovakia using the KLEM hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvat, O.; Hlavcova, K.; Kohnova, S.; Szolgay, J.; Remiasova, R.

    2009-04-01

    The HYDRATE project (Hydrometeorological Data Resources and Technologies for Effective Flash Flood Forecasting) objective is to improve the scientific basis of flash flood forecasting by extending the understanding of past flash flood events and developing a coherent set of technologies and tools for effective early warning systems. To understand rainfall-runoff processes during selected extreme flash floods occurred in the past in Slovakia, runoff responses during selected major events were examined by using the spatially distributed hydrologic model KLEM (Kinematic Local Excess Model (Borga et al., 2007)). The distributed hydrological model is based on availability of raster information of the landscape topography, the soil and vegetation properties and radar rainfall data. In the model, the SCS-Curve Number procedure is applied on a grid way for the spatially distributed representation of runoff generating processes. For representing runoff routing a description of the drainage system response is used. In Slovakia, 3 extreme events selected from the HYDRATE flash-flood database were simulated by the model. Three selected major flash floods occurred 20th of July 1998 in the Malá Svinka and Dubovický creeks, 24th of July 2001 in the Štrbský Creek (both with more than 1000-years return period) and 19th of June 2004 in the Turniansky Creek (with 100-years return period). Rainfall-runoff characteristics of the floods in the Malá Svinka, Dubovický and Štrbský creek basins were similar and the floods had a similar progress. A value of runoff coefficient varied from 0.39 to 0.56. Opposite to them, the highest runoff coefficient in the Turniansky Creek Basin only reached a value equal to 0.26. The simulated values by the KLEM model were comparable with maximum peaks estimated on the base of post event surveying. The consistency of the estimated and simulated values by the KLEM model was evident both in time and space and the methodology has shown its

  9. Taphonomy and diversity of Middle Miocene decapod crustaceans from the Novohrad-Nógrad Basin, Slovakia, with remarks on palaeobiography

    PubMed Central

    Hyžný, Matúš; Hudáčková, Natália; Szalma, Štefan

    2016-01-01

    Decapod crustacean assemblages from the Middle Miocene (lower ‘Badenian’=Langhian) volcanoclastic Plášťovce Beds (Sebechleby Formation) in the Slovakian part of the Novohrad-Nógrad Basin comprise five species in five families (Callianassidae, Laomediidae, Munididae, Cancridae and Retroplumidae) and are dominated by the cancrid crab Tasadia carniolica (Bittner, 1884). Munida sp. constitutes the first record of this genus from Slovakia and the second from the European Neogene. Burrowing shrimp (Jaxea kuemeli Bachmayer, 1954) are associated with burrows tentatively attributed to this species. The occurrence of Retropluma slovenica Gašparič & Hyžný, 2014, previously recorded from the Lower Miocene of Slovenia, extends both the geographical distribution and stratigraphical range of the species. Differential decapod diversity at four localities in the Plášťovce area can be explained by collecting bias and palaeoenvironmental factors. The palaeosetting is interpreted as a muddy-bottom, nearshore zone with a water depth of approximately 100 m. Abundant articulated crabs suggest rapid burial. Third maxillipeds in open posture in some specimens may indicate respiratory stress of the animals, suggesting episodic events of rapid volcanoclastic flows responsible for killing crabs and promoting their preservation. Species composition of the decapod fauna of the Plášťovce Beds further strengthens similarities with Miocene faunas from the North Sea Basin. PMID:27499675

  10. Landslide and flood hazard assessment in urban areas of Levoča region (Eastern Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magulova, Barbora; Caporali, Enrica; Bednarik, Martin

    2010-05-01

    The case study presents the use of statistical methods and analysis tools, for hazard assessment of "urbanization units", implemented in a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) environment. As a case study, the Levoča region (Slovakia) is selected. The region, with a total area of about 351 km2, is widely affected by landslides and floods. The problem, for small urbanization areas, is nowadays particularly significant from the socio-economic point of view. It is considered, presently, also an increasing problem, mainly because of climate change and more frequent extreme rainfall events. The geo-hazards are evaluated using a multivariate analysis. The landslide hazard assessment is based on the comparison and subsequent statistical elaboration of territorial dependence among different input factors influencing the instability of the slopes. Particularly, five factors influencing slope stability are evaluated, i.e. lithology, slope aspect, slope angle, hypsographic level and present land use. As a result a new landslide susceptibility map is compiled and different zones of stable, dormant and non-stable areas are defined. For flood hazard map a detailed digital elevation model is created. A compose index of flood hazard is derived from topography, land cover and pedology related data. To estimate flood discharge, time series of stream flow and precipitation measurements are used. The assessment results are prognostic maps of landslide hazard and flood hazard, which presents the optimal base for urbanization planning.

  11. Association between arsenic exposure from a coal-burning power plant and urinary arsenic concentrations in Prievidza District, Slovakia.

    PubMed Central

    Ranft, Ulrich; Miskovic, Peter; Pesch, Beate; Jakubis, Pavel; Fabianova, Elenora; Keegan, Tom; Hergemöller, Andre; Jakubis, Marian; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2003-01-01

    To assess the arsenic exposure of a population living in the vicinity of a coal-burning power plant with high arsenic emission in the Prievidza District, Slovakia, 548 spot urine samples were speciated for inorganic As (Asinorg), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), and their sum (Assum). The urine samples were collected from the population of a case-control study on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC). A total of 411 samples with complete As speciations and sufficient urine quality and without fish consumption were used for statistical analysis. Although current environmental As exposure and urinary As concentrations were low (median As in soil within 5 km distance to the power plant, 41 micro g/g; median urinary Assum, 5.8 microg/L), there was a significant but weak association between As in soil and urinary Assum(r = 0.21, p < 0.01). We performed a multivariate regression analysis to calculate adjusted regression coefficients for environmental As exposure and other determinants of urinary As. Persons living in the vicinity of the plant had 27% higher Assum values (p < 0.01), based on elevated concentrations of the methylated species. A 32% increase of MMA occurred among subjects who consumed homegrown food (p < 0.001). NMSC cases had significantly higher levels of Assum, DMA, and Asinorg. The methylation index Asinorg/(MMA + DMA) was about 20% lower among cases (p < 0.05) and in men (p < 0.05) compared with controls and females, respectively. PMID:12782488

  12. Publication of PWV and ZTD time series and models of PWV and nPWV over Slovakia and vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igondova, Miroslava; Hefty, Jan; Cibulka, Dusan

    2010-05-01

    More than 50 permanent GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) stations are processed continually within the Central European Permanent Network at the Slovak University of Technology, Department of Theoretical Geodesy. Zenith Total Delay (ZTD), one of the processing outputs, reflects delay of the GNSS signal caused by troposphere. Precipitable Water Vapour (PWV) is calculated if ground meteorological observations are available. Model of PWV over Slovakia and vicinity is produced using digital terrain model data for height correction in grid points. Real variation of PWV over the area shows model of normalized PWV (nPWV) created from PWV values reduced by theoretical PWV value corresponding to altitude and latitude of the station. Mathematical background for computing PWV and nPWV models will be presented. All computations on the way from discrete ZTD values to PWV time series and models are realized using Perl scripts. Time series of ZTD and PWV since 1996 and models of PWV and nPWV are published on the server freely available in the internet using Web Map Service, PHP, JavaScript and other web technologies. All the data are available in one hour interval. Data are continually updated and can be downloaded for scientific applications.

  13. Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) and Agrimony (Agrimonia eupatoria) as Indicators of Geogenic Contamination of Flysch Soils in Eastern Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Čurlík, Ján; Kolesár, Martin; Ďurža, Ondrej; Hiller, Edgar

    2016-04-01

    Contents of potentially toxic elements Fe, Mn, Cr, Ni, Co, V, Cu, and Mo were determined in common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) and agrimony (Agrimonia eupatoria) to show their usefulness as bioindicators of geogenic soil pollution. Both plants were collected on geochemically anomalous soils developed on flysch sedimentary rocks (Paleogene) of Eastern Slovakia, which also are composed of weathered detritus of some ultramafic rocks. Generally, contents of the investigated association of potentially toxic elements are highly increased in these "serpentine"-like soils. Elevated concentrations were detected in both shoots and roots of the plants. The highest values, which exceed world average values for plants, were observed for Ni content. They ranged from 1.7 to 16.3 mg kg(-1) in dandelion and from 1.6 to 22.6 mg kg(-1) in agrimony. Essential elements, such as Mo, Cu, and Mn, were the most concentrated in plants, whereas Co, V, and Cr were the least concentrated. Although the bioindication value of the common dandelion for anthropogenic soil pollution is well known, it is not mentioned for agrimony in literature, and no data exist to indicate the geogenic pollution for both plants. Dandelion and agrimony are widely used as herbal drugs; therefore, our intention also was to point out another fact, namely, possible high uptake of potentially toxic elements by herbal plants growing on similar soils. PMID:26254898

  14. Decrease in air pollution load in urban environment of Bratislava (Slovakia) inferred from accumulation of metal elements in lichens.

    PubMed

    Guttová, Anna; Lackovičová, Anna; Pišút, Ivan; Pišút, Peter

    2011-11-01

    The study illustrates the response of epiphytic lichens to changing atmospheric conditions in Central Europe, where the emission of air pollutants has significantly decreased from 1990, in the area in and around Bratislava City. Variation in concentrations of seven metal elements (Cu, Cd, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in the thalli of Evernia prunastri, Hypogymnia physodes and Parmelia sulcata is assessed. Samples of these species were exposed in lichen bags in 39 sites throughout the territory of the city (more than 300 km(2)) during the period December 2006-February 2007. The samples were analyzed by AAS for metal element contents prior to and after exposure. The decrease in air pollution (for all studied elements by more than 90%) corresponded to a decrease in the accumulation of elements in lichen thalli, e.g. the contents of Pb decreased by 69% and of Cd by 34% on average. The results show also variations in accumulation between with different lichen species. The background values of metal element contents in thalli of H. physodes growing in situ were measured in semi-natural sites in Slovakia. It is suggested that these can be used as a reference in large-scale monitoring studies in Central Europe. Analysis of compatible data from the current study, and the study performed at the end of 1990s shows a significant decrease of metal elements in the air pollution load. PMID:21327486

  15. Pilot study of seasonal occurrence and distribution of antibiotics and drug resistant bacteria in wastewater treatment plants in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Birošová, Lucia; Mackulak, Tomáš; Bodík, Igor; Ryba, Jozef; Škubák, Jaroslav; Grabic, Roman

    2014-08-15

    This work presents environmental and quality-control data from the analyses of 33 antibiotics in influent and effluent water from two waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) in the capital and the biggest city of Slovakia. Seeing that consumption of antibiotics depends on epidemiological season, samples were collected during February and August. Among assessed antibiotics ciprofloxacin and clarithromycin were detected in highest concentrations in influent water. Seasonal changes were observed only in plant A when antibiotic concentrations decreased. On the other hand an increase in some cases was observed in plant B. Insufficient degradation of some macrolides, sulfonamides and trimethoprim was detected according to their higher concentrations in effluent water. Contact of antibiotics in subinhibitory concentrations and sludge bacteria in WWTPs represent the base for the development of significant levels of microbial resistance. Simultaneously, antibiotic resistance of fecal coliforms and fecal streptococci from sewage sludge was evaluated. Majority of coliform bacteria were found to be resistant to ampicillin and gentamicin. A significant seasonal difference was determined only in case of high-level resistance. In summer samples, an increase in the strains resistant to concentrations higher than the resistance breakpoints established by EUCAST and NCCLS was observed. No antibiotic resistance in streptococci was observed. However, as a part of sewage sludge is mixed with compost and utilized in agriculture, better processing of sludge should be considered. PMID:24867706

  16. 'Avoidable' mortality: a measure of health system performance in the Czech Republic and Slovakia between 1971 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Kossarova, Lucia; Holland, Walter; Mossialos, Elias

    2013-08-01

    BACKGROUND Post-communist health care reforms and the break-up of Czechoslovakia have been studied from various perspectives, but little research has addressed the impact on health system performance. This paper investigates the quality and performance of the Slovak and Czech health systems before and after 1989, including the year of separation in 1993, using the concept of 'avoidable' mortality. METHODS Age-standardized mortality rates for mortality from 'avoidable' and other (non-avoidable) causes have been calculated through indirect standardization to study national and regional trends between 1971 and 2008. RESULTS The paper shows that 'avoidable' mortality in both countries has been continuously decreasing while mortality from other causes has remained unchanged or increased slightly. For some 'avoidable' conditions, mortality rates of the two countries converge while for others divergence can be observed, with either the Czech Republic or Slovakia performing better. CONCLUSION Declines in overall 'avoidable' mortality suggest improvements in the health system's performance and quality of care in both countries, compared with mortality from other causes where factors outside the control of the health care system may be stronger determinants. For conditions where 'avoidable' mortality rates stagnate or increase, more in-depth research should be carried out to identify problems in the delivery of timely and effective prevention and treatment, and to establish steps that would reduce the numbers of unnecessary deaths. PMID:23002250

  17. A new variant of endemic pemphigus foliaceus in El-Bagre, Colombia: the Hardy-Weinberg-Castle law and linked short tandem repeats

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Velez, Ana María; Robles, Edinson Villa; Howard, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: We reported a new variant of endemic pemphigus foliaceus in El Bagre, Colombia. Aims: Our study performed Complex Segregation Analysis (CSA) and short tandem repeats to discriminate between environmental and/or genetic factors in this disorder. Materials and Methods: The CSA analysis was carried out according to the unified model, implemented using the transmission probabilities implemented in the computer program POINTER, and evaluated by using a software package for population genetic data analysis (GDA), Arlequin. We performed pedigree analyses by using Cyrillic 2.1 software, with a total of 30 families with 50 probands (47 males and 3 females) tested. In parallel to the CSA, we tested for the presence of short tandem repeats from HLA class II, DQ alpha 1, involving the gene locus D6S291 by using the Hardy-Weinberg- Castle law. Results Our results indicate that the best model of inheritance in this disease is a mixed model, with multifactorial effects within a recessive genotype. Two types of possible segregation patterns were found; one with strong recessive penetrance in families whose phenotype is more Amerindian-like, and another of possible somatic mutations. Conclusion: The penetrance of 10% or less in female patients 60 years of age or older indicates that hormones could protect younger females. The greatest risk factor for men being affected by the disorder was the NN genotype. These findings are only possible due to somatic mutations, and/or strong environmental effects. We also found a protective role for two genetic loci (D6S1019 AND D6S439) in the control group. PMID:22666691

  18. State of Water Molecules and Silanol Groups in Opal Minerals: a Near Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Opals from Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobon, Miroslav; Christy, Alfred A.; Kluvanec, Daniel; Illasova, L'udmila

    2011-06-01

    Recently near infrared spectroscopy in combination with double derivative technique has been effectively used by Christy [1] to differentiate between free silanol groups and hydrogen bonded silanol groups on silica gel. The method has given some insight into the type of functionalities and their location in silica gel samples. The inportant information in this respect comes from the overtones of the OH groups of water molecules hydrogen bonded to free silanol groups, and hydrogen bonded silanol groups absorbing in the region 5500- 5100 Cm-1 region. The approach was adapted to study the state of water and silanol functionalities and their locations in opals from Slovakia. Twenty opal samples classified into CT and A classes and one quartz sample were used in this work. The samples were crushed using a hydrolic press and powderised. Each sample was then subjected to evacuation process to remove surface adsorbed water at 200°C and the near infrared spectrum of the sample was measured using a Perkin Elmer NTS near infrared spectrometer equipped with a transflectance accessory. The detailed analysis of the sample was carried out using the second derivative profile of the spectrum. The samples were also heated to 750°C to study the state of water molecules in Opal minerals. The results indicate that the opal samples contain 1) surface adsorbed water 2) free and hydrogen bonded silanol groups on the surface 3) Trapped water in the bulk 4) free and hydrogen bonded silanol groups in the cavity surfaces in the bulk. A part of the water molecules found in the bulk of opal minerals are free molecules and the rest are found in hydrogen bonded state to free and hydrogen bonded silanol groups. [1] A. A. Christy, New insights into the surface functionalities and adsorption evolution of water molecules on silica gel surface: A study by second derivative Near Infrared Spectroscopy, Vib. Spectrosc. 54 (2010) 42-49.

  19. The first finding of Neospora caninum and the occurrence of other abortifacient agents in sheep in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Spilovská, S; Reiterová, K; Kovácová, D; Bobáková, M; Dubinský, P

    2009-10-14

    Neosporosis is an infection of animals caused by an intracellular coccidian parasite, Neospora caninum, closely related to Toxoplasma gondii. The parasite is one of important abortifacient agents of bovine abortions worldwide. The aim of the study was to detect the prevalence of anti-Neospora antibodies in dairy aborting sheep from two eastern Slovak regions and to compare it with the occurrence of other potential abortifacient agents. Sera of 382 sheep, mainly the Improved Valachian and Merino breed, were tested for the presence of anti-Neospora and anti-Toxoplasma antibodies by ELISA, anti-Leptospira sp. by micro-agglutination-assay and anti-Chlamydophila antibodies using the complement fixation test. The mean seroprevalence of N. caninum was 3.7% and of T. gondii, 24.3%. This phenomenon of higher susceptibility of sheep to T. gondii is in the opposite of N. caninum infection in cattle. Anti-Leptospira antibodies were observed in 2.9% of serum samples with titres from 800 to 1600, whereas IgG antibodies against Chlamydophila abortus were found in 13.6% with titres from 64 to 1024. Half of N. caninum positive sera were simultaneously positive for T. gondii and one sample for C. abortus. From examined abortifacient agents the most important, from the frequency point of view, were toxoplasmosis (24.3%) and chlamydiosis (13.6%). No significant association between the frequencies of the abortions and mean seroprevalence of the abortifacient agents in Kosice region was determined. Likewise, no significant differences between the mean seroprevalence of neosporosis and toxoplasmosis in the two regions were detected. The first survey of neosporosis in aborting sheep from eastern Slovakia revealed a low prevalence resulting in a lower impact on reproduction losses in these small ruminants. PMID:19540672

  20. Neospora caninum, potential cause of abortions in dairy cows: the current serological follow-up in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Reiterová, K; Spilovská, S; Antolová, D; Dubinský, P

    2009-01-22

    Neosporosis is considered to be a contributing risk factor for abortions in dairy cows and other farm animals and has negative economic impact on their breeding. In respect of the rapid spread of neosporosis in herds throughout the world, our aim was to detect the prevalence of anti-Neospora antibodies in cows post-abortion (PA) (PA Group n=716) and in cows without any reproduction problems (Control Group n=247) on large breeding farms from Eastern Slovakia. The overall mean seropositivity in PA Group (20.1%) was significantly higher (p<0.0001) in comparison with the Control Group (2.3%), and this demonstrates the causal dependency of abortions on neosporosis. On farms from south-east region, 15.6% of cows were seropositive on average ranging from 7.8% to 25.8% in different districts. In the northern region, significantly (p=0.0002) higher 26.2% mean seropositivity was detected. The seroprevalence in different districts ranged from 2.9% to 39.4%. In the PA Group a high seropositivity to infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (41.5%) and sporadic occurrence of Q-fever, leptospirosis and chlamydiosis was also detected. From 11 Toxoplasma-seropositive cows, only one animal was simultaneously positive to Neospora. The relatively high prevalence rate in cows warrants the attention and a need of surveillance in Slovak herds. A better knowledge of epidemiology of this etiological agent and the mechanisms of its transmission may help in the introduction of more effective preventive and control measures. PMID:19019551

  1. Occupational dermatoses caused by contact with metalworking fluids in the region of central slovakia from 2000 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Urbanček, Slavomir; Kuklová-Bieliková, Marianna; Fetisovová, Želmira; Klimentová, Gabriela; Vilček, Rober

    2014-01-01

    Metalworking fluids (MWFs) are a common cause of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis. MWFs being currently used are mostly water based, containing biocides, emulsifiers, and other additives. We performed a retrospective analysis of the etiology of the occupational dermatoses caused by metalworking fluids in three regions of Central Slovakia (population of approximately 2 million) between 2000 and 2012. The primary aim was the analysis of metalworking fluid-induced dermatoses, which involved determining the particular disease type (allergic or irritant), its regional distribution, and the specific chemical causing the disease. The secondary aim of the study was to assess the level of knowledge and competence among dermatologists in performing patch testing for allergens contained in metalworking fluids using a study-specific questionnaire. Of the total number of 422 dermatoses during the analyzed period, 64 (41 in men and 23 in women) were caused by metalworking fluids. The implicated fluids were all aqueous, synthetic MWFs. 39 patients developed an allergic and 25 an irritant-induced contact dermatitis. 51 patients were tested using a special Trolab® metalworking battery (Almirall Hermal GmbH, Reinbek, Germany). The test identified a positive reaction to one of the following chemicals: methylchoroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI), formaldehyde, 1,2-benzisothiazoline-3-one, abietic acid, chloroxylenol, triclosan, amerchol L101, dichlorophene, propylenglycol, metylene (bis-methyl oxazolidine), monoethanolamine, and diethanolamine. The questionnaire showed that a large majority of Slovak dermatologists have no experiences with testing of MWFs. Metalworking fluids were found to be the most frequent cause of occupational contact dermatitis. They also are the second largest group of all occupational dermotoses. Their incidence corresponded with the presence of machine industry in the region. Several unresolved problems include detection of specific

  2. Influence of benomyl and prometryn on the soil microbial activities and community structures in pasture grasslands of Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Javoreková, Sona; Svrceková, Ivana; Maková, Jana

    2010-10-01

    The effects of pesticides (a herbicide and a fungicide) on the microbial community structure and their activity were analyzed in soil from four alpine pasture grasslands in Slovakia. Specifically, the effects of the herbicide, Gesagard (prometryn active ingredient), and fungicide, Fundazol 50 WP (benomyl active ingredient), on the microbial respiration activity (CO2 production), the numbers of selective microbial physiological groups (CFU.g(-1)) and the structure (relative abundance) of soil microbial communities [(phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA)] were analyzed under controlled laboratory conditions. All treatments including the treatments with pesticides increased (statistically significantly) the production of CO2 in all fields during 21 days of incubation and posed a statistically insignificant negative influence on the numbers of the observed physiological groups of microorganisms. The significantly negative influence was evaluated only in the numbers of two physiological groups; spores of bacteria utilizing organic nitrogen and bacteria, and their spores utilizing inorganic nitrogen. A shift in the microbial composition was evident when the PLFA patterns of samples from different sites and treatments were compared by the Principal Component Analysis (PCA). According to the second component PCA 2 (15.95 %) the locations were grouped into two clusters. The first one involved the Donovaly and Dubakovo sites and the second one contained the Velka Fatra and Mala Fatra locations. The PLFA composition of the soils showed important changes after the treatment with pesticides according to PCA 1 (66.06 %). Other treatments had not had a significant effect on the soil microbial community with the exception of the population of fungi. The lower relative abundance (significant effect) of Gram-positive bacteria, actinomycetes and general group of bacteria were determined in samples treated by the herbicide Gesagard. The application of fungicide Fundazol decreased

  3. [The lethal alcohol intoxications and deaths due to severe drunkenness in North Slovakia regions (1994-1996, 2003-2005): a medicolegal comparative study].

    PubMed

    Straka, L; Stuller, F; Novomeský, F

    2008-01-01

    The authors performed the complex analysis of the mortuary files (since 1994 to 1996 and 2003 to 2005) with particular focusing on the cases of deaths caused by alcohol intoxication, and the cases of deaths where an alcohol played the dominating role, in the northern regions of Slovak republic. Based on the analysis mentioned, authors point out the continuous rise of alcohol abuse, followed by the fatal consequences for human beings. The authors are to express the urgent need of public discussion concerning the alcohol consumption in Slovakia; the phenomenon being widely tolerated by the society, thus leading to the number of social tragedies even in 21st century. PMID:18335641

  4. Novel Barite Chimneys at the Loki's Castle Vent Field Shed Light on Key Factors Shaping Microbial Communities and Functions in Hydrothermal Systems

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Ida H.; Dahle, Håkon; Stokke, Runar; Roalkvam, Irene; Daae, Frida-Lise; Rapp, Hans Tore; Pedersen, Rolf B.; Thorseth, Ingunn H.

    2016-01-01

    In order to fully understand the cycling of elements in hydrothermal systems it is critical to understand intra-field variations in geochemical and microbiological processes in both focused, high-temperature and diffuse, low-temperature areas. To reveal important causes and effects of this variation, we performed an extensive chemical and microbiological characterization of a low-temperature venting area in the Loki's Castle Vent Field (LCVF). This area, located at the flank of the large sulfide mound, is characterized by numerous chimney-like barite (BaSO4) structures (≤ 1 m high) covered with white cotton-like microbial mats. Results from geochemical analyses, microscopy (FISH, SEM), 16S rRNA gene amplicon-sequencing and metatranscriptomics were compared to results from previous analyses of biofilms growing on black smoker chimneys at LCVF. Based on our results, we constructed a conceptual model involving the geochemistry and microbiology in the LCVF. The model suggests that CH4 and H2S are important electron donors for microorganisms in both high-temperature and low-temperature areas, whereas the utilization of H2 seems restricted to high-temperature areas. This further implies that sub-seafloor processes can affect energy-landscapes, elemental cycling, and the metabolic activity of primary producers on the seafloor. In the cotton-like microbial mats on top of the active barite chimneys, a unique network of single cells of Epsilonproteobacteria interconnected by threads of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was seen, differing significantly from the long filamentous Sulfurovum filaments observed in biofilms on the black smokers. This network also induced nucleation of barite crystals and is suggested to play an essential role in the formation of the microbial mats and the chimneys. Furthermore, it illustrates variations in how different genera of Epsilonproteobacteria colonize and position cells in different vent fluid mixing zones within a vent field

  5. Barite in hydrothermal environments as a recorder of subseafloor processes: a multiple-isotope study from the Loki's Castle vent field.

    PubMed

    Eickmann, B; Thorseth, I H; Peters, M; Strauss, H; Bröcker, M; Pedersen, R B

    2014-07-01

    Barite chimneys are known to form in hydrothermal systems where barium-enriched fluids generated by leaching of the oceanic basement are discharged and react with seawater sulfate. They also form at cold seeps along continental margins, where marine (or pelagic) barite in the sediments is remobilized because of subseafloor microbial sulfate reduction. We test the possibility of using multiple sulfur isotopes (δ34S, Δ33S, ∆36S) of barite to identify microbial sulfate reduction in a hydrothermal system. In addition to multiple sulfur isotopes, we present oxygen (δ18O) and strontium (87Sr/86Sr) isotopes for one of numerous barite chimneys in a low-temperature (~20 °C) venting area of the Loki's Castle black smoker field at the ultraslow-spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR). The chemistry of the venting fluids in the barite field identifies a contribution of at least 10% of high-temperature black smoker fluid, which is corroborated by 87Sr/86 Sr ratios in the barite chimney that are less radiogenic than in seawater. In contrast, oxygen and multiple sulfur isotopes indicate that the fluid from which the barite precipitated contained residual sulfate that was affected by microbial sulfate reduction. A sulfate reduction zone at this site is further supported by the multiple sulfur isotopic composition of framboidal pyrite in the flow channel of the barite chimney and in the hydrothermal sediments in the barite field, as well as by low SO4 and elevated H2S concentrations in the venting fluids compared with conservative mixing values. We suggest that the mixing of ascending H2- and CH4-rich high-temperature fluids with percolating seawater fuels microbial sulfate reduction, which is subsequently recorded by barite formed at the seafloor in areas where the flow rate is sufficient. Thus, low-temperature precipitates in hydrothermal systems are promising sites to explore the interactions between the geosphere and biosphere in order to evaluate the microbial impact on

  6. Evaluation of undiscovered natural gas in the Upper Cretaceous Ferron Coal/Wasatch Plateau Total Petroleum System, Wasatch Plateau and Castle Valley, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, M.E.; Finn, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Total Petroleum System approach was used to estimate undiscovered gas potential of the Wasatch Plateau and Castle Valley, central Utah. The Ferron Coal/Wasatch Plateau Total Petroleum System was geologically defined and subdivided into seven assessment units, six of which were formally evaluated. Geologic data considered in defining the assessment unit boundaries included thermal maturity, coal presence and thickness, overburden thickness, and faulting intensity. Historical production data were also used to estimate volumes of gas from undrilled areas. The one conventional assessment unit includes almost the entire area of the petroleum system and is characterized by known accumulations that occur in structural or combination traps in sandstone reservoirs. The estimated undiscovered conventional producible gas that may be added to reserves of this unit ranges from a low (F95) of 14.8 billion cubic feet (BCFG) [419 million cubic meters (Mm3)] of gas to a high (F5) of 82 BCFG [2321 Mm3] and a mean value of 39.9 BCFG [1130 Mm3]. Continuous gas accumulations are those in which the entire assessment unit is considered to be gas-charged. Within these assessment units, there may be wells drilled that are not economic successes but all are expected to contain gas. Coalbed gas is in this continuous category. Mean estimates of undiscovered gas for the five continuous assessment units are: (1) Northern Coal Fairway/Drunkards Wash-752.3 BCFG [21,323 Mm3]; (2) Central Coal Fairway/Buzzard Bench-536.7 BCFG [15,194 Mm3]; (3) Southern Coal Fairway-152.6 BCFG [4320 Mm3]; (4) Deep (6000 feet plus) Coal and Sandstone-59.1 BCFG [1673 Mm3]; (5) Southern Coal Outcrop-10.6 BCFG [300 Mm3]; and Joes Valley and Musinia Grabens-not assessed.The mean estimate of undiscovered gas for the entire TPS is 1551.2 BCFG [43,914 Mm3]. There is a 95% chance that at least 855.7 BCFG [24,225 Mm3] and a 5% chance that at least 2504 BCFG [70,888 Mm3] of undiscovered producible gas remain in the TPS

  7. Heterotrophic microflora of highly alkaline (pH > 13) brown mud disposal site drainage water near Ziar nad Hronom (Banska Bystrica region, Slovakia).

    PubMed

    Stramova, Zuzana; Remenar, Matej; Javorsky, Peter; Pristas, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Brown mud is a waste by-product of alumina production by Bayer process. Due to extensive sodium hydroxide use in the process, brown mud disposal site near Ziar nad Hronom (Banska Bystrica region, Slovakia) and drainage water are ones of the greatest environmental burdens in Slovakia. Drainage water from this landfills has pH value higher than 13, and it contains many heavy metals and elevated salt content. In our experiments, relatively numerous bacterial population was detected in the drainage water with frequency of about 80 cfu/ml using cultivation approach. The alkalitolerant heterotrophic isolates were identified by combination of MALDI-TOF and 16S rDNA analysis. Drainage water population was dominated by Actinobacteria (Microbacterium spp. and Micrococcus spp.) followed by low G + C-content gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus spp.). Two isolates belonged to gram-negative bacteria only, identified as Brevundimonas spp. Phylogenetic and biochemical analyses indicate that nearly half of the bacteria isolated are probably representatives of a new species. Brown mud disposal site is proposed as a source of new bacterial taxa possibly used in bioremediation processes. PMID:26077319

  8. State of water molecules and silanol groups in opal minerals: a near infrared spectroscopic study of opals from Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boboň, Miroslav; Christy, Alfred A.; Kluvanec, Daniel; Illášová, L'udmila

    2011-12-01

    Recently, near infrared spectroscopy in combination with double derivative technique has been effectively used by Christy (Vib Spectrosc 54:42-49, 2010) to study and differentiate between free and hydrogen bonded silanol groups on silica gel surface. The method has given some insight into the type of functionalities, their location in silica gel samples, and the way the water molecules bind onto the silanol groups. The important information in this respect comes from the overtones of the OH groups of water molecules hydrogen-bonded to free silanol groups, and hydrogen-bonded silanol groups absorbing in the region 5,500-5,100 cm-1. Chemically, opal minerals are hydrated silica and the same approach was adapted to study the state of water molecules, silanol functionalities, and their locations in opal samples from Slovakia. Twenty opal samples classified into CT and A classes and one quartz sample were used in this work. The samples were crushed using a hydraulic press and powderized. Each sample was then subjected to evacuation process to remove surface-adsorbed water at 200°C, and the near infrared spectrum of each sample was measured using a Perkin Elmer NTS FT-NIR spectrometer equipped with a transflectance accessory and a DTGS detector. The samples were also heated to 750°C to remove the hydrogen-bonded silanol groups on the surface to reveal their locality. Second derivative profiles of the near infrared reflectance spectra were obtained using the instrument's software and used in the detailed analysis of the samples. The analysis of the near infrared spectra and their second derivative profiles had the aim in finding relationships between the surface chemical structure and the classification of opal samples. The dry opal samples were also tested for their surface adsorption effectivity toward water molecules. The results indicate that the opal samples contain (1) surface-adsorbed water, (2) free and hydrogen-bonded silanol groups on the surface, (3) trapped

  9. Crystallochemical effects of heat treatment on Fe-dominant tourmalines from Dolní Bory (Czech Republic) and Vlachovo (Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bačík, P.; Ozdín, D.; Miglierini, M.; Kardošová, P.; Pentrák, M.; Haloda, J.

    2011-09-01

    Heat treatment was performed on selected Fe-dominant tourmalines to establish the nature of any change in optical properties. Two tourmaline samples from Dolní Bory, Czech Republic (TDB) and Vlachovo, Slovakia (TVL) were heated at 450, 700 and 900°C at 0.1 mPa and ambient oxidation conditions for 8 h. EMPA study shows that tourmaline from Vlachovo has schorlitic composition and tourmaline from Dolní Bory is alkali-depleted schorl to foitite. Although the black colour remained unchanged after heating at 450°C, it changed to brown at 700°C and reddish brown at 900°C. No significant changes of chemical composition were observed during heating. X-ray diffraction, infrared and Mössbauer study showed negligible oxidation of tourmaline heated at 450°C, but a significant change in iron valency state and deprotonization at 700°C. The oxidation of Fe is the main cause of tourmaline colour change, and the substitution vector for oxidation of Fe is Fe3+OFe{-1/2+}(OH)-1. The predicted deprotonization of OH was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, which documented a decrease in OH groups in both samples, mainly at the V site. The oxidation of Fe is mostly significant in the Y site as documented on the compression of the Y-site octahedra and subsequent decrease in the a lattice parameter. This feature is consistent with lattice dimensions in the transition from schorl and foitite dimensions to those consistent with fluor-buergerite. The Z-site octahedra did not compressed and were not affected by heating-induced Fe oxidation, which indicates only negligible content of Z Fe2+ in original samples. After heating at 900°C, the tourmaline structure collapsed likely due to the thermally induced weakening of bonds in Y and Z octahedra, which results in amorphization of tourmaline. Subsequently, breakdown products including Fe-oxides and mullite replaced alkali-depleted amorphized tourmaline.

  10. The Formation, Structure, and Ageing of As-Rich Hydrous Ferric Oxide at the Abandoned Sb Deposit Pezinok (Slovakia)

    SciTech Connect

    Majzlan,J.; Lalinska, B.; Chovan, M.; Jurkovic, L.; Milovska, S.; Gottlicher, J.

    2007-01-01

    The abandoned Sb deposit Pezinok in Slovakia is a significant source of As and Sb pollution that can be traced in the upper horizons of soils kilometers downstream. The source of the metalloids are two tailing impoundments which hold {approx}380,000 m{sup 3} of mining waste. The tailings and the discharged water have circumneutral pH values (7.0 {+-} 0.6) because the acidity generated by the decomposition of the primary sulfides (pyrite, FeS{sub 2}; arsenopyrite, FeAsS; berthierite, FeSb{sub 2}S{sub 4}) is rapidly neutralized by the abundant carbonates. The weathering rims on the primary sulfides are iron oxides which act as very efficient scavengers of As and Sb (with up to 19.2 wt% As and 23.7 wt% Sb). In-situ {mu}-XANES experiments indicate that As in the weathering rims is fully oxidized (As{sup 5+}). The pore solutions in the impoundment body contain up to 81 ppm As and 2.5 ppm Sb. Once these solutions are discharged from the impoundments, they precipitate or deposit masses of As-rich hydrous ferric oxide (As-HFO) with up to 28.3 wt% As{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 2.7 wt% Sb. All As-HFO samples are amorphous to X-rays. They contain Fe and As in their highest oxidation state and in octahedral and tetrahedral coordination, respectively, as suggested by XANES and EXAFS studies on Fe K and As K edges. The iron octahedra in the As-HFO share edges to form short single chains and the chains polymerize by sharing edges or corners with the adjacent units. The arsenate ions attach to the chains in a bidentate-binuclear and monodentate fashion. In addition, hydrogen-bonded complexes may exist to satisfy the bonding requirements of all oxygen atoms in the first coordination sphere of As{sup 5+}. Structural changes in the As-HFO samples were traced by chemical analyses and Fe EXAFS spectroscopy during an ageing experiment. As the samples age, As becomes more easily leachable. EXAFS spectra show a discernible trend of increasing number of Fe-Fe pairs at a distance of 3

  11. The formation, structure, and ageing of As-rich hydrous ferric oxide at the abandoned Sb deposit Pezinok (Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzlan, Juraj; Lalinská, Bronislava; Chovan, Martin; Jurkovič, L.'ubomír; Milovská, Stanislava; Göttlicher, Jörg

    2007-09-01

    The abandoned Sb deposit Pezinok in Slovakia is a significant source of As and Sb pollution that can be traced in the upper horizons of soils kilometers downstream. The source of the metalloids are two tailing impoundments which hold ˜380,000 m 3 of mining waste. The tailings and the discharged water have circumneutral pH values (7.0 ± 0.6) because the acidity generated by the decomposition of the primary sulfides (pyrite, FeS 2; arsenopyrite, FeAsS; berthierite, FeSb 2S 4) is rapidly neutralized by the abundant carbonates. The weathering rims on the primary sulfides are iron oxides which act as very efficient scavengers of As and Sb (with up to 19.2 wt% As and 23.7 wt% Sb). In-situ μ-XANES experiments indicate that As in the weathering rims is fully oxidized (As 5+). The pore solutions in the impoundment body contain up to 81 ppm As and 2.5 ppm Sb. Once these solutions are discharged from the impoundments, they precipitate or deposit masses of As-rich hydrous ferric oxide (As-HFO) with up to 28.3 wt% As 2O 5 and 2.7 wt% Sb. All As-HFO samples are amorphous to X-rays. They contain Fe and As in their highest oxidation state and in octahedral and tetrahedral coordination, respectively, as suggested by XANES and EXAFS studies on Fe K and As K edges. The iron octahedra in the As-HFO share edges to form short single chains and the chains polymerize by sharing edges or corners with the adjacent units. The arsenate ions attach to the chains in a bidentate-binuclear and monodentate fashion. In addition, hydrogen-bonded complexes may exist to satisfy the bonding requirements of all oxygen atoms in the first coordination sphere of As 5+. Structural changes in the As-HFO samples were traced by chemical analyses and Fe EXAFS spectroscopy during an ageing experiment. As the samples age, As becomes more easily leachable. EXAFS spectra show a discernible trend of increasing number of Fe-Fe pairs at a distance of 3.3-3.5 Å, that is, increasing polymerization of the iron

  12. Castles, Kings...and Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Susan M.

    2001-01-01

    Standards can help integrate a curriculum, as a fourth-grade teacher discovered when implementing a unit on the Middle Ages. Students created a medieval fair that demonstrated their learning in medieval history (social studies), pulleys and gears (science and technology), story telling (language arts), and costume and dance (fine arts). (MLH)

  13. Determination of low-level mercury in coralline aragonite by calcination-isotope dilution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and its application to Diploria specimens from Castle Harbour, Bermuda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamborg, Carl H.; Swarr, Gretchen; Hughen, Konrad; Jones, Ross J.; Birdwhistell, Scot; Furby, Kathryn; Murty, Sujata A.; Prouty, Nancy; Tseng, Chun-Mao

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a technique that combines a high temperature quartz furnace with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for the determination of Hg stored in the annual CaCO3 bands found in coral skeletons. Substantial matrix effects, presumably due to the discontinuous introduction of CO2 to the gas stream, were corrected for by simultaneously supplying a stream of argon containing highly enriched elemental 202Hgo and observing peaks in the 200Hg/202Hg signal as the sample was decomposed. Primary signal calibration for Hg was achieved using gas injections from a saturated vapor standard. The absolute instrument detection limit was low (about 0.2 fmol), with a practical limit of detection (3σ of blanks) of 2 fmol. Reproducibility of samples was (RSD) 15-27%. We applied this method to the determination of Hg concentrations in two colonies of Diploria labyrinthiformis collected from Castle Harbour, Bermuda, at a site about to be buried under the municipal waste landfill. The temporal reconstructions of Castle Harbour seawater Hg concentrations implied by the coral record show a decline throughout the period of record (1949-2008). The coral archived no apparent signal associated with waste disposal practices in the Harbour (bulk waste land-filling or, since 1994, disposal of waste incinerator ash), and mercury concentrations in the coral did not correlate to growth rate as assessed by linear extension. There was, however, a large and nearly exponential decrease in apparent Hg concentration in the Harbour which circumstantially implicates the dredging and/or landfilling operations associated with the construction of the airport on St. David's Island.

  14. Heterogeneous extrusion and exhumation of deep-crustal Variscan assembly: Geochronology of the Western Tatra Mountains, northern Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussallam, Y.; Schneider, D. A.; Janák, M.; Thöni, M.; Holm, D. K.

    2012-07-01

    The nature and style of mid-crustal assembly and exhumation during continental collision has been investigated in the Tatra Mountains of the Western Carpathians. The pre-Alpine basement of the Western Carpathians represents the easternmost exposure of the Variscan orogen in Europe, which marks the collision of Laurasia with Gondwanian-affiliated terranes during the Palaeozoic. The Tatric crystalline unit of the Western Tatra in northern Slovakia displays an inverted metamorphic sequence where a high-grade unit comprising migmatites with relicts of eclogite has been thrust over a lower-grade mica schist unit. New geochronological and thermochronological data together with published thermobarometry illuminate the metamorphic history of the Western Tatra. The Upper Unit eclogites with occasionally preserved omphacite record near isothermal decompression from 1.6 GPa to 1.0-1.2 GPa at 750-800 °C which lead to intensive re-equilibration at high-pressure granulite facies conditions, comparable to the peak metamorphic conditions of the host migmatite. Both eclogite and migmatite shared a retrograde P-T path following the insertion of the eclogite assemblage into the migmatites. The metamorphic evolution of the Lower Unit mica schist is constrained to peak P-T conditions of 0.6-0.8 GPa and 640 and 660 °C followed by retrogression. This suggests that different rock types of the Western Tatra metamorphic core shared only their exhumation path from mid-crustal levels. ID-TIMS Sm-Nd dating of garnet from eclogite yields a whole rock-garnet isochron age of 337 ± 10 Ma, with an initial ɛNd isotopic composition of + 8.3. In situ U-Pb dating of monazite from a migmatite surrounding the eclogite shows one age population of c. 380 Ma whereas monazite from a migmatite away from the eclogite preserves a robust 340 ± 11 Ma age which is indistinguishable from Sm-Nd garnet age and U-Pb age of zircons in the anatectic leucosome of the migmatite (347 ± 7 Ma). A younger monazite age

  15. Cytogeography of Pilosella officinarum (Compositae): Altitudinal and Longitudinal Differences in Ploidy Level Distribution in the Czech Republic and Slovakia and the General Pattern in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Mráz, Patrik; Šingliarová, Barbora; Urfus, Tomáš; Krahulec, František

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Pilosella officinarum (syn. Hieracium pilosella) is a highly structured species with respect to the ploidy level, with obvious cytogeographic trends. Previous non-collated data indicated a possible differentiation in the frequency of particular ploidy levels in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Therefore, detailed sampling and ploidy level analyses were assessed to reveal a boundary of common occurrence of tetraploids on one hand and higher ploids on the other. For a better understanding of cytogeographic differentiation of P. officinarum in central Europe, a search was made for a general cytogeographic pattern in Europe based on published data. Methods DNA-ploidy level and/or chromosome number were identified for 1059 plants using flow cytometry and/or chromosome counting on root meristem preparations. Samples were collected from 336 localities in the Czech Republic, Slovakia and north-eastern Hungary. In addition, ploidy levels were determined for plants from 18 localities in Bulgaria, Georgia, Ireland, Italy, Romania and Ukraine. Key Results Four ploidy levels were found in the studied area with a contrasting pattern of distribution. The most widespread cytotype in the western part of the Czech Republic is tetraploid (4x) reproducing sexually, while the apomictic pentaploids and mostly apomictic hexaploids (5x and 6x, respectively) clearly prevail in Slovakia and the eastern part of the Czech Republic. The boundary between common occurrence of tetraploids and higher ploids is very obvious and represents the geomorphologic boundary between the Bohemian Massif and the Western Carpathians with the adjacent part of Pannonia. Mixed populations consisting of two different ploidy levels were recorded in nearly 11% of localities. A statistically significant difference in a vertical distribution of penta- and hexaploids was observed in the Western Carpathians and the adjacent Pannonian Plain. Hexaploid populations tend to occur at lower elevations

  16. Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) (Košice, Slovakia, 23-27 July 2007).

    PubMed

    Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan; Kováč, Josef; Václavíková, Miroslava; Odenbach, Stefan

    2008-05-21

    The 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) was held in Košice, Slovakia between 23-27 July 2007. Attendance at the conference was high and its motivation was in line with the ten previous ICMF conferences organized in Udine, Orlando, Bangor, Sendai-Tokyo, Riga, Paris, Bhavnagar, Timisoara, Bremen and Guarujá. The conference in Slovakia reflected the scientific community's enthusiasm and worldwide support, with 256 participants, from 30 countries attending.The main objective of ICMF 11 was to promote progress and knowledge in the field of magnetic fluids regarding their chemistry, physical and magnetic properties, heat and mass transfer, surface phenomena, as well as their technological and biomedical applications. As research on magnetic fluids is essentially interdisciplinary, experts from related areas were invited to present their contributions with a view to increasing knowledge in the field and highlighting new trends. Submitted communications were refereed by members of the Scientific Organizing Committee and abstracts were assembled in a book of abstracts. Participants presented 180 posters in two poster sessions and 56 oral presentations. All presentations contributed to a greater understanding of the area, and helped to bridge the gap between physics, chemistry, technology, biology and medical sciences. Contributions to this conference are presented in 115 scientific papers, with some published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and the rest in Magnetohydrodynamics. The organization of the conference was made possible by generous support from the Institute of Experimental Physics and Institute of Geotechnics of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, the University of Pavol Jozef Šafárik and the Slovak Physical Society. Financial support from Ferrotec, Cryosoft Ltd, Mikrochem, Liquids Research Ltd, Askony and US Steel Košice, is also gratefully acknowledged. PMID:21694229

  17. Heat waves frequency analysis and spatial-temporal variability of daily maximum temperature in southern Slovakia within the 1951, respectively 1961-2008 periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecho, J.; Faško, P.; Mikulová, K.; Šâstný, P.

    2009-09-01

    Heat waves temporal and spatial analysis at selected meteorological stations in southern part of Slovakia within the 1951, respectively 1961-2008 periods is a goal of the presented contribution. It is expected that climate change in terms of global warming would amplify temporal frequency and spatial extension of extreme heat wave incidence in region of central Europe in the next few decades. The frequency of occurrence and amplitude of heat waves may be impacted by changes in the temperature regime. Heat waves can cause severe thermal environmental stress leading to higher hospital admission rates, health complications, and increased mortality. These effects arise because of one or more meteorology-related factors such as higher effective temperatures, sunshine, more consecutive hot days and nights, stagnation, increased humidity, increased pollutant emissions, and accelerated photochemical smog and particulate formation. Heat waves bring about higher temperatures, increased solar heating of buildings, inhibited ventilation, and a larger number of consecutive warm days and nights. All of these effects increase the thermal loads on buildings, reduce their ability to cool down, and increase indoor temperatures. The paper deals with analysis of temporal and spatial variability of heat waves occurrence at meteorological station Hurbanovo (time series of daily maximum air temperature available from at least 1901) and some other climatological stations in lowlands of southern Slovakia (Žiharec, Bratislava-airport, Jaslovské Bohunice, Kráľová pri Senci, etc.). We can characterize the heat waves by its magnitude and duration, hence both of these characteristics need to be investigated together using sophisticated statistical methods developed particularly for the analysis of extreme hydrological events. These methods are quite similar to the intensity-duration-frequency approach often used in the analysis of extreme precipitation events. The HDF-curves (heatwave

  18. Preface: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) (Košice, Slovakia, 23 27 July 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan; Kováč, Josef; Václavíková, Miroslava; Odenbach, Stefan

    2008-05-01

    The 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) was held in Košice, Slovakia between 23-27 July 2007. Attendance at the conference was high and its motivation was in line with the ten previous ICMF conferences organized in Udine, Orlando, Bangor, Sendai-Tokyo, Riga, Paris, Bhavnagar, Timisoara, Bremen and Guarujá. The conference in Slovakia reflected the scientific community's enthusiasm and worldwide support, with 256 participants, from 30 countries attending.The main objective of ICMF 11 was to promote progress and knowledge in the field of magnetic fluids regarding their chemistry, physical and magnetic properties, heat and mass transfer, surface phenomena, as well as their technological and biomedical applications. As research on magnetic fluids is essentially interdisciplinary, experts from related areas were invited to present their contributions with a view to increasing knowledge in the field and highlighting new trends. Submitted communications were refereed by members of the Scientific Organizing Committee and abstracts were assembled in a book of abstracts. Participants presented 180 posters in two poster sessions and 56 oral presentations. All presentations contributed to a greater understanding of the area, and helped to bridge the gap between physics, chemistry, technology, biology and medical sciences. Contributions to this conference are presented in 115 scientific papers, with some published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and the rest in Magnetohydrodynamics. The organization of the conference was made possible by generous support from the Institute of Experimental Physics and Institute of Geotechnics of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, the University of Pavol Jozef Šafárik and the Slovak Physical Society. Financial support from Ferrotec, Cryosoft Ltd, Mikrochem, Liquids Research Ltd, Askony and US Steel Košice, is also gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Geochemical and mineralogical characterization of a neutral, low-sulfide/high-carbonate tailings impoundment, Markušovce, eastern Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Edgar; Petrák, Marián; Tóth, Roman; Lalinská-Voleková, Bronislava; Jurkovič, L'ubomír; Kučerová, Gabriela; Radková, Anežka; Sottník, Peter; Vozár, Jaroslav

    2013-11-01

    Tailings deposits generated from mining activities represent a potential risk for the aquatic environment through the release of potentially toxic metals and metalloids occurring in a variety of minerals present in the tailings. Physicochemical and mineralogical characteristics of tailings such as total concentrations of chemical elements, pH, ratio of acid-producing to acid-neutralizing minerals, and primary and secondary mineral phases are very important factors that control the actual release of potentially toxic metals and metalloids from the tailings to the environment. The aims of this study are the determination of geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of tailings deposited in voluminous impoundment situated near the village of Markušovce (eastern Slovakia) and identification of the processes controlling the mobility of selected toxic metals (Cu, Hg) and metalloids (As, Sb). The studied tailings have unique features in comparison with the other tailings investigated previously because of the specific mineral assemblage primarily consisting of barite, siderite, quartz, and minor sulfides. To meet the aims, samples of the tailings were collected from 3 boreholes and 15 excavated pits and subjected to bulk geochemical analyses (i.e., determination of chemical composition, pH, Eh, acid generation, and neutralization potentials) combined with detailed mineralogical characterization using optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), and micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD). Additionally, the geochemical and mineralogical factors controlling the transfer of potentially toxic elements from tailings to waters were also determined using short-term batch test (European norm EN 12457), sampling of drainage waters and speciation-equilibrium calculations performed with PHREEQC. The tailings mineral assemblage consists of siderite, barite, quartz, and dolomite. Sulfide minerals constitute only a minor proportion of the tailings

  20. Human induced soil erosion and gully system development in the Late Holocene and future perspectives on landscape evolution: The Myjava Hill Land, Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotterweich, Markus; Stankoviansky, Miloš; Minár, Jozef; Koco, Štefan; Papčo, Pavol

    2013-11-01

    In humid climate zones, like Central Europe, past soil erosion and gullying are strongly connected with agricultural expansion, and extreme soil erosion events often play an important role in land abandonment. This paper provides a case study to demonstrate the interaction between land use, soil erosion, floodplain development, and land use changes in a 0-order catchment in the Babikovce catchment, Myjava Hill Land, situated in western Slovakia. Sedimentological, pedological, geoarchaeological and historical data indicate two main periods of intensive hillslope erosion and gullying since the High Middle Ages. In particular, a few extreme precipitation events (or rapid snowmelts) caused intensive runoff events and gullying on cleared land. The formation of the gully system and fan deposits in the Babikovce catchment and other areas also forced the occurrence of intensive muddy floods and caused floodplain aggradation and meander changes along rivers in the Myjava Hill Land. As a result, the development of the dense network of permanent gullies in the Myjava Hill Land can be associated with the transformation of woodland into farmland and later land abandonment. Today, the area is highly truncated by soil erosion and very difficult to farm.

  1. Episodic construction of the Tatra granitoid intrusion (Central Western Carpathians, Poland/Slovakia): consequences for the geodynamics of Variscan collision and Rheic Ocean closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawęda, Aleksandra; Burda, Jolanta; Klötzli, Urs; Golonka, Jan; Szopa, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    The Tatra granitoid pluton (Central Western Carpathians, Poland/Slovakia) is an example of composite polygenetic intrusion, comprising many magmatic pulses varying compositionally from diorite to granite. The U-Pb LA-MC-ICP-MS zircon dating of successive magma batches indicates the presence of magmatic episodes at 370-368, 365, 360, 355 and 350-340 Ma, all together covering a time span of 30 Ma of magmatic activity. The partial resorption and recycling of former granitoid material ("petrological cannibalism") was a result of the incremental growth of the pluton and temperature in the range of 750-850 °C. The long-lasting granitoid magmatism was connected to the prolonged subduction of oceanic crust and collision of the Proto-Carpathian Terrane with a volcanic arc and finally with Laurussia, closing the Rheic Ocean. The differences in granitoid composition are the results of different depths of crustal melting. More felsic magmas were generated in the outer zone of the volcanic arc, whilst more mafic magmas were formed in the inner part of the supra-subduction zone. The source rocks of the granitoid magmas covered the compositional range of metapelite-amphibolite and were from both lower and upper crust. The presence of the inherited zircon cores suggests that the collision and granitoid magmatism involved crust of Cadomian consolidation age (c. 530 and 518 Ma) forming the Proto-Carpathian Terrane, crust of Avalonian affinity (462, 426 Ma) and melted metasedimentary rocks of volcanic arc provenance.

  2. Simulating spatial aspects of a flash flood using the Monte Carlo method and GRASS GIS: a case study of the Malá Svinka Basin (Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofierka, Jaroslav; Knutová, Monika

    2015-04-01

    This paper focuses on the flash flood assessment using a spatially-distributed hydrological model based on the Monte Carlo simulation method. The model is implemented as r.sim.water module in GRASS GIS and was applied to the Malá Svinka Basin in Eastern Slovakia where a heavy rainfall (100 mm/hr.) caused a flash flood event with deadly consequences in July 1998. The event was simulated using standard datasets representing elevation, soils and land cover. The results were captured in time series of water depth maps showing gradual changes in water depths across the basin. The hydrological effects of roads in the study area were simulated using the preferential flow feature of the model. This simulation helped to identify source areas contributing to flooding in built-up areas. The implementation in a GIS environment simplifies the data preparation and eventual modification for various scenarios and flood protection measures. The simulation confirmed excellent robustness and flexibility of the method.

  3. Ghost shrimps (Decapoda: Axiidea: Callianassidae) as producers of an Upper Miocene trace fossil association from sublittoral deposits of Lake Pannon (Vienna Basin, Slovakia)

    PubMed Central

    Hyžný, Matúš; Šimo, Vladimír; Starek, Dušan

    2015-01-01

    Numerous trace fossils are described from the Late Miocene sediments of the Bzenec Formation exposed at the Gbely section (the Vienna Basin, Slovakia). During deposition of the sediments the area was part of the large, long-lived brackish to freshwater Lake Pannon. Most of the trace fossils are attributed herein to Egbellichnus jordidegiberti igen et ispec. nov. and are interpreted as burrows produced by decapod crustaceans, specifically by a ghost shrimp of the family Callianassidae. This interpretation is based on two independent lines of evidence: environmental requirements of large bioturbators and the burrow morphology itself. The new ichnotaxon is distinguished from other related ichnotaxa by a combination of typically inclined (roughly at an angle of 45°) cylindrical burrows, absence of lining, and tunnels making loops or bends at approximately right angles. The burrow systems at Gbely document the survival of ghost shrimp long after the closure of all seaways and the origin of Lake Pannon. As today, no ghost shrimp are known from long-lived brackish lakes. Egbellichnus from Gbely is the only, although indirect, record of ghost shrimp from a brackish lake environment reported so far. PMID:26089575

  4. Episodic construction of the Tatra granitoid intrusion (Central Western Carpathians, Poland/Slovakia): consequences for the geodynamics of Variscan collision and Rheic Ocean closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawęda, Aleksandra; Burda, Jolanta; Klötzli, Urs; Golonka, Jan; Szopa, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    The Tatra granitoid pluton (Central Western Carpathians, Poland/Slovakia) is an example of composite polygenetic intrusion, comprising many magmatic pulses varying compositionally from diorite to granite. The U-Pb LA-MC-ICP-MS zircon dating of successive magma batches indicates the presence of magmatic episodes at 370-368, 365, 360, 355 and 350-340 Ma, all together covering a time span of 30 Ma of magmatic activity. The partial resorption and recycling of former granitoid material ("petrological cannibalism") was a result of the incremental growth of the pluton and temperature in the range of 750-850 °C. The long-lasting granitoid magmatism was connected to the prolonged subduction of oceanic crust and collision of the Proto-Carpathian Terrane with a volcanic arc and finally with Laurussia, closing the Rheic Ocean. The differences in granitoid composition are the results of different depths of crustal melting. More felsic magmas were generated in the outer zone of the volcanic arc, whilst more mafic magmas were formed in the inner part of the supra-subduction zone. The source rocks of the granitoid magmas covered the compositional range of metapelite-amphibolite and were from both lower and upper crust. The presence of the inherited zircon cores suggests that the collision and granitoid magmatism involved crust of Cadomian consolidation age (c. 530 and 518 Ma) forming the Proto-Carpathian Terrane, crust of Avalonian affinity (462, 426 Ma) and melted metasedimentary rocks of volcanic arc provenance.

  5. Delinquent and Aggressive Behavior and Social Desirability Among Roma and Non-Roma Adolescents in Slovakia: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Kolarcik, Peter; Madarasova Geckova, Andrea; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; van Dijk, Jitse P

    2016-02-01

    Rates of aggression and delinquency are assumed to be higher among Roma and other minorities, but sound evidence of this is lacking. Our aim was to assess delinquent and aggressive behavior among Roma and non-Roma adolescents and the effects on ethnic differences of parental education and social desirability. We conducted a cross-sectional study among Roma from separated and segregated settlements in the eastern part of Slovakia (N = 330; Mage = 14.50; interview) and non-Roma adolescents (N = 722; Mage = 14.86; questionnaire). The effect of ethnicity on antisocial behaviors was analyzed using linear regression (crude) and adjusted for gender, parental education, and social desirability. Adjustment for social desirability diminished the ethnic differences in delinquency (B = 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI] = [2.12, -0.04]), led to an increase in the differences in hostility (B = 2.43; 95% CI = [0.87, 3.99]), and led to the disappearance of differences in physical aggression (B = 0.45; 95% CI = [1.14, 2.07]). Parental education did not affect the associations in an important way. Our findings indicate that Roma are not that much different from non-Roma, in terms of antisocial behavior, which contradicts the general perception of Roma. Our findings should be confirmed in other settings. PMID:25381268

  6. Perch and Its Parasites as Heavy Metal Biomonitors in a Freshwater Environment: The Case Study of the Ružín Water Reservoir, Slovakia

    PubMed Central

    Brázová, Tímea; Torres, Jordi; Eira, Catarina; Hanzelová, Vladimíra; Miklisová, Dana; Šalamún, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metal concentrations were determined in 43 perches (Perca fluviatilis) and in two of its most common parasites, the acanthocephalan Acanthocephalus lucii and the cestode Proteocephalus percae, collected in the period 2009–2010 from Ružín, a seriously polluted water reservoir in Slovakia. Samples of muscle, liver, kidney, brain, male and female reproductive organs and adipose tissue of fish and both parasites were analyzed for As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn, by ICP-MS. Mean concentrations of individual heavy metals in all fish samples decreased in the order zinc > copper > manganese > mercury > arsenic > chromium > cadmium > nickel > lead. Zinc was found to be the dominant element and its antagonistic interaction with copper was confirmed. The kidney was a key target organ receiving the highest mean concentrations of all analyzed metals, but some metals showed specific affinity for particular tissues. In terms of human health, concentration of Hg in fish muscle, which exceeded more than two-times its maximum level admitted in foodstuffs in European countries, is of great importance and should be taken into account. Bioaccumulation factors (C[parasite]/C[fish tissue]) calculated for all elements indicated much higher detection skills of A. lucii and P. percae parasites than fish organs and hence, present results allow proposing both parasite models as useful tools to monitor aquatic environmental quality. Acanthocephalans, however, seem to be superior for heavy metal monitoring, also demonstrated under experimental conditions. Present results also indicate the decreasing heavy metal burden of the reservoir and its gradual recovery in the course of time. PMID:22736993

  7. Heat wave phenomenon in southern Slovakia: long-term changes and variability of daily maximum air temperature in Hurbanovo within the 1901-2009 period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecho, J.; Výberči, D.; Jarošová, M.; Å¥Astný, P. Å.

    2010-09-01

    Analysis of long-term changes and temporal variability of heat waves incidence in the region of southern Slovakia within the 1901-2009 periods is a goal of the presented contribution. It is expected that climate change in terms of global warming would amplify temporal frequency and spatial extension of extreme heat wave incidence in region of central Europe in the next few decades. The frequency of occurrence and amplitude of heat waves may be impacted by changes in the temperature regime. Heat waves can cause severe thermal environmental stress leading to higher hospital admission rates, health complications, and increased mortality. These effects arise because of one or more meteorology-related factors such as higher effective temperatures, sunshine, more consecutive hot days and nights, stagnation, increased humidity, increased pollutant emissions, and accelerated photochemical smog and particulate formation. Heat waves bring about higher temperatures, increased solar heating of buildings, inhibited ventilation, and a larger number of consecutive warm days and nights. All of these effects increase the thermal loads on buildings, reduce their ability to cool down, and increase indoor temperatures. The paper is focused to analysis of long-term and inter-decadal temporal variability of heat waves occurrence at meteorological station Hurbanovo (time-series of daily maximum air temperature available from at least 1901). We can characterize the heat waves by its magnitude and duration, hence both of these characteristics need to be investigated together using sophisticated statistical methods developed particularly for the analysis of extreme hydrological events. We investigated particular heat wave periods either from the severity point of view using HWI index. In the paper we also present the results of statistical analysis of daily maximum air temperature within 1901-2009 period. Apart from these investigation efforts we also focused on synoptic causes of heat wave

  8. Perch and its parasites as heavy metal biomonitors in a freshwater environment: the case study of the Ružín water reservoir, Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Brázová, Tímea; Torres, Jordi; Eira, Catarina; Hanzelová, Vladimíra; Miklisová, Dana; Salamún, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metal concentrations were determined in 43 perches (Perca fluviatilis) and in two of its most common parasites, the acanthocephalan Acanthocephalus lucii and the cestode Proteocephalus percae, collected in the period 2009-2010 from Ružín, a seriously polluted water reservoir in Slovakia. Samples of muscle, liver, kidney, brain, male and female reproductive organs and adipose tissue of fish and both parasites were analyzed for As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn, by ICP-MS. Mean concentrations of individual heavy metals in all fish samples decreased in the order zinc > copper > manganese > mercury > arsenic > chromium > cadmium > nickel > lead. Zinc was found to be the dominant element and its antagonistic interaction with copper was confirmed. The kidney was a key target organ receiving the highest mean concentrations of all analyzed metals, but some metals showed specific affinity for particular tissues. In terms of human health, concentration of Hg in fish muscle, which exceeded more than two-times its maximum level admitted in foodstuffs in European countries, is of great importance and should be taken into account. Bioaccumulation factors (C([parasite])/C([fish tissue])) calculated for all elements indicated much higher detection skills of A. lucii and P. percae parasites than fish organs and hence, present results allow proposing both parasite models as useful tools to monitor aquatic environmental quality. Acanthocephalans, however, seem to be superior for heavy metal monitoring, also demonstrated under experimental conditions. Present results also indicate the decreasing heavy metal burden of the reservoir and its gradual recovery in the course of time. PMID:22736993

  9. Fluid-driven destabilization of REE-bearing accessory minerals in the granitic orthogneisses of North Veporic basement (Western Carpathians, Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondrejka, M.; Putiš, M.; Uher, P.; Schmiedt, I.; Pukančík, L.; Konečný, P.

    2016-02-01

    A variety of rare earth elements-bearing (REE) accessory mineral breakdowns were identified in granitic orthogneisses from the pre-Alpine basement in the Veporic Unit, Central Western Carpathians, Slovakia. The Ordovician granitic rocks were subjected to Variscan metamorphic-anatectic overprint in amphibolite facies. Chemical U-Th-Pb dating of monazite-(Ce) and xenotime-(Y) reveal their primary magmatic Lower to Middle Ordovician age (monazite: 472 ± 4 to 468 ± 6 Ma and xenotime: 471 ± 13 Ma) and/or metamorphic-anatectic Variscan (Carboniferous, Visean) age (monazite: 345 ± 3 Ma). Younger fluid-rock interactions caused breakdown of primary magmatic and/or metamorphic-anatectic monazite-(Ce), xenotime-(Y), fluorapatite and allanite-(Ce). Fluid-induced breakdown of xenotime-(Y) produced numerous tiny uraninite inclusions within the altered xenotime-(Y) domains. The monazite-(Ce) breakdown produced secondary egg-shaped coronal structures of different stages with well-developed concentric mineral zones. Secondary sulphatian monazite-(Ce) (up to 0.15 apfu S) occasionally formed along fluorapatite fissures. Localized fluorapatite and monazite-(Ce) recrystallization resulted in a very fine-grained, non-stoichiometric mixture of REE-Y-Fe-Th-Ca-P-Si phases. Finally, allanite-(Ce) decomposed to secondary REE carbonate minerals (members of the bastnäsite and synchysite groups) and calcite in some places. Although the xenotime alteration and formation of uraninite inclusions is believed to be the result of dissolution-reprecipitation between early magmatic xenotime and late-magmatic granitic fluids, the monazite, apatite and allanite breakdowns were driven by metamorphic hydrothermal fluids. While earlier impact of post-magmatic fluids originated probably from Permian acidic volcanic and microgranitic veins crosscutting the orthogneisses, another fluid-rock interaction event most likely occurred during Late Cretaceous metamorphism in the Veporic basement and covering

  10. Paleofloristic and paleofaunistic analysis of Dudváh River oxbow and implication for Late Holocene paleoenvironmental development of the Žitný ostrov Island (SW Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pišút, Peter; Břízová, Eva; Čejka, Tomáš; Pipík, Radovan

    2010-12-01

    Žitný ostrov, the largest island of the Danube River (SW Slovakia) gained its present shape in the Neoholocene period. As a result of increased flood and geomorphological Danube river activity dated to 1378-1528 AD, the Lower Dudváh River was abandoned and its alluvium became a part of the Žitný ostrov. Study of a Dudváh terrestrialized paleomeander by means of pollen and macrofossil analysis provides new information about the paleoenvironments of the Danubian Plain. The meander under study was cut-off during the Sub-Boreal period when the land was mostly covered by oak-dominated mixed forest with a notable high frequency of Fagus and Abies. In low-lying depressions, Alnus glutinosa formed typical alder carrs. The largest decline of the mixed forest occurred during the Sub-Atlantic period. Until the mid-19th century the region was strongly influenced by shallow groundwater and periodical floods, as reflected by pollen of aquatics and marsh species. Amongst non-arboreal taxa, pollen of Cyperaceae, Brassicaceae/Cuscuta, Poaceae and Apiaceae prevailed. Local successional changes started with i) stage of abandoned oxbow still with influx of moving water, poor in both macrophytes and molluscs, ii) shallow eutrophic oxbow lake with slowly flowing or stagnant water overgrown with aquatics (Ranunculus subgen. Batrachium, Potamogeton sp., Ceratophyllum demersum etc.) and abundant molluscs, iii) an open marsh dominated by Cyperaceae (mainly Carex riparia) with Atriplex prostrata, supporting diverse molluscan and Ostracod fauna. Present-day habitat is a result of landscape changes, which have been associated with draining, intensified agriculture, ruderalisation and spread of invasive species.