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Sample records for snp frequency haplotype

  1. Approaches for identifying multiple-SNP haplotype blocks for use in human identification.

    PubMed

    Hiroaki, Nakahara; Koji, Fujii; Tetsushi, Kitayama; Kazumasa, Sekiguchi; Hiroaki, Nakanishi; Kazuyuki, Saito

    2015-09-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination effectiveness is low due to the bi-allelic nature of SNPs, and large numbers of loci must be analyzed for human identification in forensic casework. To resolve these issues, the authors support the use of multiple SNP haplotypes that will generate many haplotypes based on the combination of SNP alleles. First, 27 regions were selected from the JSNP database (http://snp.ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp) according to the following criteria: (1) 3 or more SNP loci within 100bp; (2) on-intron or out-of-gene location; and (3) frequency of more than 40% for each SNP allele. PCR amplification and high-resolution melting curve (HRM) analysis were then carried out for all selected regions to determine variation in the haplotypes of each. HRM analysis indicated that 7 regions (1q25, 1q42.2, 3p24, 10p13, 11p15.1, 14q12-q13, and 20q12) containing 3 SNP loci had more than 2 haplotypes. The frequencies of the haplotypes for each region were observed via direct sequencing of more than 100 individuals. Not only haplotyping increases the effectiveness of individual identification but also the analysis region is shorter than in common short tandem repeat analysis, representing a further advantage for fragmented DNA samples in SNP typing. PMID:26116993

  2. Haplotype inference from unphased SNP data in heterozygous polyploids based on SAT

    PubMed Central

    Neigenfind, Jost; Gyetvai, Gabor; Basekow, Rico; Diehl, Svenja; Achenbach, Ute; Gebhardt, Christiane; Selbig, Joachim; Kersten, Birgit

    2008-01-01

    Background Haplotype inference based on unphased SNP markers is an important task in population genetics. Although there are different approaches to the inference of haplotypes in diploid species, the existing software is not suitable for inferring haplotypes from unphased SNP data in polyploid species, such as the cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum). Potato species are tetraploid and highly heterozygous. Results Here we present the software SATlotyper which is able to handle polyploid and polyallelic data. SATlo-typer uses the Boolean satisfiability problem to formulate Haplotype Inference by Pure Parsimony. The software excludes existing haplotype inferences, thus allowing for calculation of alternative inferences. As it is not known which of the multiple haplotype inferences are best supported by the given unphased data set, we use a bootstrapping procedure that allows for scoring of alternative inferences. Finally, by means of the bootstrapping scores, it is possible to optimise the phased genotypes belonging to a given haplotype inference. The program is evaluated with simulated and experimental SNP data generated for heterozygous tetraploid populations of potato. We show that, instead of taking the first haplotype inference reported by the program, we can significantly improve the quality of the final result by applying additional methods that include scoring of the alternative haplotype inferences and genotype optimisation. For a sub-population of nineteen individuals, the predicted results computed by SATlotyper were directly compared with results obtained by experimental haplotype inference via sequencing of cloned amplicons. Prediction and experiment gave similar results regarding the inferred haplotypes and phased genotypes. Conclusion Our results suggest that Haplotype Inference by Pure Parsimony can be solved efficiently by the SAT approach, even for data sets of unphased SNP from heterozygous polyploids. SATlotyper is freeware and is distributed as a Java JAR file. The software can be downloaded from the webpage of the GABI Primary Database at . The application of SATlotyper will provide haplotype information, which can be used in haplotype association mapping studies of polyploid plants. PMID:18667059

  3. A two-SNP IL-6 promoter haplotype is associated with increased lung cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Liu, Reng-Yun; Yang, Lixin; Zhao, Jun; Zhao, Xueying; Lu, Daru; Yi, Nengjun; Han, Baohui; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Kui; He, Jun; Lei, Zhe; Zhou, Yifeng

    2015-01-01

    Background Aberrant expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) may play an important role in lung carcinogenesis. Whether IL-6 promoter haplotypes are associated with lung cancer risk and their functions have not yet been studied. We tested the hypothesis that single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and/or haplotypes of IL-6 promoter are associated with risk of lung cancer. Methods Two functional IL-6 promoter SNPs (-6331T>C and -572C>G) were genotyped in the discovery group including 622 patients and 614 controls, and the results were replicated in an independent validation group including 615 patients and 638 controls. Luciferase reporter gene assays were conducted to examine the function of IL-6 promoter haplotypes. Results None of the functional IL-6 promoter SNPs were associated with lung cancer risk in either study. However, a two-SNP CC (-6331C and -572C) IL-6 promoter haplotype was significantly more common among cases than among controls in both groups (P = 0.031 and P = 0.035, respectively), indicating that this haplotype is associated with increased lung cancer risk {adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.56 [95 % confidence interval (95 % CI), 1.04–2.34] and 1.51 [95 % CI, 1.03–2.22], respectively}. Combined analysis of both studies showed a strong association of this two-SNP haplotype with increased lung cancer risk (adjusted OR, 1.53; 95 % CI, 1.16–2.03; P = 0.003). Comparably, luciferase reporter assays of A549 lung cancer cell lines transfected with the CC haplotype revealed that the two-SNP haplotype had significantly higher IL-6 transcriptional activity compared with cells transfected with the common haplotype. Conclusions This is the first evidence of identifying an IL-6 promoter haplotype (CC) associated with increased risk of lung cancer. PMID:23052692

  4. Efficient fast heuristic algorithms for minimum error correction haplotyping from SNP fragments.

    PubMed

    Anaraki, Maryam Pourkamali; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Availability of complete human genome is a crucial factor for genetic studies to explore possible association between the genome and complex diseases. Haplotype, as a set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on a single chromosome, is believed to contain promising data for disease association studies, detecting natural positive selection and recombination hotspots. Various computational methods for haplotype reconstruction from aligned fragment of SNPs have already been proposed. This study presents a novel approach to obtain paternal and maternal haplotypes form the SNP fragments on minimum error correction (MEC) model. Reconstructing haplotypes in MEC model is an NP-hard problem. Therefore, our proposed methods employ two fast and accurate clustering techniques as the core of their procedure to efficiently solve this ill-defined problem. The assessment of our approaches, compared to conventional methods, on two real benchmark datasets, i.e., ACE and DALY, proves the efficiency and accuracy. PMID:25539847

  5. SNP and haplotype mapping for genetic analysis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Saar, Kathrin; Beck, Alfred; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Birney, Ewan; Brocklebank, Denise; Chen, Yuan; Cuppen, Edwin; Demonchy, Stephanie; Dopazo, Joaquin; Flicek, Paul; Foglio, Mario; Fujiyama, Asao; Gut, Ivo G; Gauguier, Dominique; Guigo, Roderic; Guryev, Victor; Heinig, Matthias; Hummel, Oliver; Jahn, Niels; Klages, Sven; Kren, Vladimir; Kube, Michael; Kuhl, Heiner; Kuramoto, Takashi; Kuroki, Yoko; Lechner, Doris; Lee, Young-Ae; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Lathrop, G Mark; Mashimo, Tomoji; Medina, Ignacio; Mott, Richard; Patone, Giannino; Perrier-Cornet, Jeanne-Antide; Platzer, Matthias; Pravenec, Michal; Reinhardt, Richard; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Schilhabel, Markus; Schulz, Herbert; Serikawa, Tadao; Shikhagaie, Medya; Tatsumoto, Shouji; Taudien, Stefan; Toyoda, Atsushi; Voigt, Birger; Zelenika, Diana; Zimdahl, Heike; Hubner, Norbert

    2008-05-01

    The laboratory rat is one of the most extensively studied model organisms. Inbred laboratory rat strains originated from limited Rattus norvegicus founder populations, and the inherited genetic variation provides an excellent resource for the correlation of genotype to phenotype. Here, we report a survey of genetic variation based on almost 3 million newly identified SNPs. We obtained accurate and complete genotypes for a subset of 20,238 SNPs across 167 distinct inbred rat strains, two rat recombinant inbred panels and an F2 intercross. Using 81% of these SNPs, we constructed high-density genetic maps, creating a large dataset of fully characterized SNPs for disease gene mapping. Our data characterize the population structure and illustrate the degree of linkage disequilibrium. We provide a detailed SNP map and demonstrate its utility for mapping of quantitative trait loci. This community resource is openly available and augments the genetic tools for this workhorse of physiological studies. PMID:18443594

  6. Complex SNP-Based Haplotypes in Three Human Helicases: Implications for Cancer Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Trikka, Dimitra; Fang, Zhe; Renwick, Alex; Jones, Sally H.; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Kimmel, Marek; Nelson, David L.

    2002-01-01

    We have initiated a candidate gene approach to study variation and predisposition to cancer in the four major ethnic groups that constitute the U.S. population (African Americans, Caucasians, Hispanics, and Asians). We resequenced portions of three helicase genes (BLM, WRN, and RECQL) identifying a total of 37 noncoding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Haplotype inference predicted 50 haplotypes in BLM, 56 in WRN, and 47 in RECQL in a sample of 600 chromosomes. Approximately 10% of the predicted haplotypes were shared among all ethnic groups. Linkage disequilibrium and recombination effects showed that each locus has taken a diverse evolutionary path. Primate DNA analysis of the same loci revealed one human haplotype per gene shared with the great apes, indicating that the observed diversity occurred since the divergence of humans from the last common ancestor. In BLM, we confirmed the presence of a founder haplotype among Ashkenazi Jews homozygous for the blmAsh mutation. The cosegregating haplotype was seen in all (6/6) samples of Ashkenazi descent, whereas in the general population it has a low frequency (0.02) and was not found in African Americans. In WRN, ethnic samples were studied for their haplotype content and the presence or absence of six previously described coding SNPs (cSNPs). Hispanic individuals carrying two of these cSNPs showed a 60% increase in the frequency of a common haplotype (haplotype No. 28). In the pooled sample, no association was found. Because (1) the majority of the haplotypes are population specific and (2) the patterns of linkage disequilibrium, recombination, and haplotype diversity are markedly different between gene regions, these data show the importance of either ethnically matched controls or within-family-based disease-gene association studies. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AC006559. Online supplemental material available at http://www.genome.org] PMID:11932247

  7. Increasing the Number of SNP loci does not Necessarily Improve Prediction Power at Least in the Comparison of MTHFR SNP and Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Miyaki, Koichi; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Song, Yixuan; Zhang, Ling; Muramatsu, Masaaki; Nakayama, Takeo

    2008-01-01

    Background Rapid advances in genotyping technology have made it possible to easily utilize a large number of genetic markers. According to information theory, an increase in the number of markers provides more information; however, the clinical usefulness does not increase linearly. This study aimed to assess the effect of folic acid supplementation quantitatively in MTHFR haplotypes, and compare its prediction power with that of the C677T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alone. Methods The study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, designed in accordance with the CONSORT statement. The participants were 202 healthy Japanese males who were administered either folic acid at 1 mg/day or a placebo postoperatively for 3 months. The primary endpoint was the total plasma homocysteine levels (tHcy). Stratified analysis by HapMap-based tag SNPs was performed. Results Of 52 SNPs on the MTHFR gene, 4 SNP loci covering more than 80% of the information were selected, and the haplotypes were estimated. The haplotypes were classified into 3 groups (Hap0, Hap1, and Hap2), on the basis of the number of times the most frequent haplotype was present. The greatest decrease was observed in Hap2 (6.61 mol/L), compared with the other haplotypes (Hap0, 2.67; Hap1, 2.60) (trend test, P < 0.01). The haplotype information obtained was not more informative than that obtained with grouping by a single SNP, C677T, which strongly influences enzyme activity. Conclusions Grouping by the C677T SNP alone was almost as good a predictor of the homocysteine-lowering effects as was grouping by the 4 best SNPs. This shows that increasing the number of typed SNPs does not necessarily provide more information, at least for this gene. A more efficient, cost-informative method for analyzing genomic data is required. PMID:19075497

  8. The Effect of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Marker Selection on Patterns of Haplotype Blocks and Haplotype Frequency Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Nothnagel, Michael; Rohde, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    The definition of haplotype blocks of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has been proposed so that the haplotypes can be used as markers in association studies and to efficiently describe human genetic variation. The International Haplotype Map (HapMap) project to construct a comprehensive catalog of haplotypic variation in humans is underway. However, a number of factors have already been shown to influence the definition of blocks, including the population studied and the sample SNP density. Here, we examine the effect that marker selection has on the definition of blocks and the pattern of haplotypes by using comparable but complementary SNP sets and a number of block definition methods in various genomic regions and populations that were provided by the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project. We find that the chosen SNP set has a profound effect on the block-covered sequence and block borders, even at high marker densities. Our results question the very concept of discrete haplotype blocks and the possibility of generalizing block findings from the HapMap project. We comparatively apply the block-free tagging-SNP approach and discuss both the haplotype approach and the tagging-SNP approach as means to efficiently catalog genetic variation. PMID:16380910

  9. Tagging SNP haplotype analysis of the secretory PLA2-V gene, PLA2G5, shows strong association with LDL and oxLDL levels, suggesting functional distinction from sPLA2-IIA: results from the UDACS study.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Peter T E; Arora, Nupur L; Drenos, Fotios; Thompson, Simon R; Cooper, Jackie A; Stephens, Jeffrey W; Hurel, Steven J; Hurt-Camejo, Eva; Wiklund, Olov; Humphries, Steve E; Talmud, Philippa J

    2007-06-15

    Animal and human studies suggest that both secretory PLA2 (sPLA2)-V and sPLA2-IIA (encoded, respectively, by the neighbouring PLA2G5 and PLA2G2A genes) contribute to atherogenesis. Elevated plasma sPLA2-IIA predicts coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but no mass assay for sPLA2-V is available. We previously reported that tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (tSNP) haplotypes of PLA2G2A are strongly associated with sPLA2-IIA mass, but not lipid levels. Here, we use tSNPs of the sPLA2-V gene to investigate the association of PLA2G5 with CHD risk markers. Seven PLA2G5 tSNPs genotypes, explaining >92% of the locus genetic variability, were determined in 519 patients with Type II diabetes (in whom PLA2G2A tSNP data was available), and defined seven common haplotypes (frequencies >5%). PLA2G5 and PLA2G2A tSNPs showed linkage disequilibrium (LD). Compared to the common PLA2G5 haplotype, H1 (frequency 34.9%), haplotypes H2-7 were associated with overall higher plasma LDL (P < 0.00004) and total cholesterol (P < 0.00003) levels yet lower oxLDL/LDL (P = 0.006) and sPLA2-IIA mass (P = 0.04), probably reflecting LD with PLA2G2A. Intronic tSNP (rs11573248), unlikely itself to be functional, distinguished H1 from LDL-raising haplotypes and may mark a functional site. In conclusion, PLA2G5 tSNP haplotypes demonstrate an association with total and LDL cholesterol and oxLDL/LDL, not seen with PLA2G2A, thus confirming distinct functional roles for these two sPLA2s. PMID:17545304

  10. Comparison of high-resolution human leukocyte antigen haplotype frequencies in different ethnic groups: Consequences of sampling fluctuation and haplotype frequency distribution tail truncation.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Derek James; Tomich, Alannah; Garnier, Federico; Marry, Evelyne; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution haplotype frequency estimations and descriptive metrics are becoming increasingly popular for accurately describing human leukocyte antigen diversity. In this study, we compared sample sets of publically available haplotype frequencies from different populations to characterize the consequences of unequal sample size on haplotype frequency estimation. We found that for low samples sizes (a few thousand), haplotype frequencies were overestimated, affecting all descriptive metrics of the underlying distribution, such as most frequent haplotype, the number of haplotypes, and the mean/median frequency. This overestimation was a result of random sample fluctuation and truncation of the tail end of the frequency distribution that comprises the least frequent haplotypes. Finally, we simulated balanced datasets through resampling and contrasted the disparities of descriptive metrics among equal and unequal datasets. This simulation resulted in the global description of the most frequent human leukocyte antigen haplotypes worldwide. PMID:25637668

  11. Molecular evidence of founder effects of fatal familial insomnia through SNP haplotypes around the D178N mutation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Ana B; Alfonso-Sánchez, Miguel A; Peña, José A; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Zerr, Inga; Capellari, Sabina; Calero, Miguel; Zarranz, Juan J; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2008-05-01

    This work presents a detailed investigation of the genomic region surrounding the PRNP gene in a sample of patients diagnosed with fatal familial insomnia (FFI) from several European countries, notably Spain. The main focus of the study was to explore the origins of the chromosomes carrying the D178N mutation by designing a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype around the PRNP gene. Haplotypes were constructed by genotyping six SNPs (rs2756271, rs13040327, rs6037932, rs13045348, rs6116474, and rs6116475) in 25 FFI patients from all over Spain. To augment the geographical scope of our study, 13 further FFI cases from Germany (9) and Italy (4) were also examined. Genotyping of SNPs in conjunction with the analysis of genealogical data for a group of FFI patients revealed the existence of two distinct haplotypes potentially associated with the D178N mutation. Of them, GCATTA-M proved to be the common haplotype of Spanish patients, whereas ACATTA-M was typical of the German cases. It is interesting to note that both haplotypes were identified in the Italian samples: GCATTA-M in a family from the Tuscany region and ACATTA-M in a family from the Veneto region. Our findings suggest the occurrence of two independent D178N-129M mutational events in Europe, preserved and transmitted from one generation to the next until nowadays. Likewise, results based on the analysis of SNP data indicate that previous hypotheses postulating that the D178N mutation had independent origins for each family and that its global distribution was determined by recurrent mutational events must be regarded with caution. PMID:18347820

  12. [Genetic Variability and Structure of SNP Haplotypes in the DMPK Gene in Yakuts and Other Ethnic Groups of Northern Eurasia in Relation to Myotonic Dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Swarovskaya, M G; Stepanova, S K; Marussin, A V; Sukhomyasova, A L; Maximova, N R; Stepanov, V A

    2015-06-01

    The genetic variability of the DMPK locus has been studied in relation to six SNP markers (rs2070736, rs572634, rs1799894, rs527221, rs915915, and rs10415988) in Yakuts with myotonic dystrophy (MD) in the Yakut population and in populations of northern Eurasia. Significant differences were observed in the allele frequencies between patients and a population sample of Yakuts for three SNP loci (rs915915, rs1799894, and rs10415988) associated with a high chance of disease manifestation. The odds ratios (OR) of MD development in representatives of the Yakut population for these three loci were 2.59 (95% CI, p = 0,004), 4.99 (95% CI, p = 0.000), and 3.15 (95% CI, p = 0.01), respectively. Haplotype TTTCTC, which is associated with MD, and haplotype GTCCTT, which was observed only in Yakut MD patients (never in MD patients of non-Yakut origin), were revealed. A low level of variability in the locus of DMRK gene in Yakuts (H(e) = 0.283) compared with other examined populations was noted. An analysis of pairwise genetic relationships between populations revealed their significant differentiation for all the examined loci. In addition, a low level of differentiation in territorial groups of Yakut populations (F(ST) = 0.79%), which was related to the high subdivision of the northern Eurasian population (F(ST) = 11.83%), was observed. PMID:26310035

  13. HLA Haplotypes and Genotypes Frequencies in Brazilian Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sippert, Emília Ângela; Silva, Cléverson de Oliveira e; Ayo, Christiane Maria; Marques, Silvia Barbosa Dutra; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila; Sell, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) have a pivotal role in immune response and may be involved in antigen recognition of periodontal pathogens. However, the associations of HLA with chronic periodontitis (CP) have not been previously studied in the Brazilian population. In an attempt to clarify the issue of genetic predisposition to CP, we examined the distribution of HLA alleles, genotypes, and haplotypes in patients from Southern Brazil. One hundred and eight CP patients and 151 healthy and unrelated controls with age-, gender-, and ethnicity-matched were HLA investigated by polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific oligonucleotides. To exclude smoking as a predisposing factor, statistical analyses were performed in the total sample and in nonsmoking individuals. The significant results showed a positive association of the A∗02/HLA-B∗40 haplotype with CP (total samples: 4.2% versus 0%, Pc = 0.03; nonsmokers: 4.3% versus 0%, Pc = 0.23) and a lower frequency of HLA-B∗15/HLA-DRB1∗11 haplotype in CP compared to controls (total samples: 0.0% versus 4.3%, Pc = 0.04; nonsmokers: 0 versus 5.1%, Pc = 1.0). In conclusion, the HLA-A∗02/B∗40 haplotype may contribute to the development of CP, while HLA-B∗15/DRB1∗11 haplotype might indicate resistance to disease among Brazilians. PMID:26339134

  14. Rapid gene-based SNP and haplotype marker development in non-model eukaryotes using 3'UTR sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.), a non-model crop with narrow genetic diversity, is an important member of sub-family Amygdoloideae within Rosaceae. Compared to other important members like peach and apple, sweet cherry lacks in genetic and genomic information, impeding understanding of important biological processes and development of efficient breeding approaches. Availability of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based molecular markers can greatly benefit breeding efforts in such non-model species. RNA-seq approaches employing second generation sequencing platforms offer a unique avenue to rapidly identify gene-based SNPs. Additionally, haplotype markers can be rapidly generated from transcript-based SNPs since they have been found to be extremely utile in identification of genetic variants related to health, disease and response to environment as highlighted by the human HapMap project. Results RNA-seq was performed on two sweet cherry cultivars, Bing and Rainier using a 3' untranslated region (UTR) sequencing method yielding 43,396 assembled contigs. In order to test our approach of rapid identification of SNPs without any reference genome information, over 25% (10,100) of the contigs were screened for the SNPs. A total of 207 contigs from this set were identified to contain high quality SNPs. A set of 223 primer pairs were designed to amplify SNP containing regions from these contigs and high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was performed with eight important parental sweet cherry cultivars. Six of the parent cultivars were distantly related to Bing and Rainier, the cultivars used for initial SNP discovery. Further, HRM analysis was also performed on 13 seedlings derived from a cross between two of the parents. Our analysis resulted in the identification of 84 (38.7%) primer sets that demonstrated variation among the tested germplasm. Reassembly of the raw 3'UTR sequences using upgraded transcriptome assembly software yielded 34,620 contigs containing 2243 putative SNPs in 887 contigs after stringent filtering. Contigs with multiple SNPs were visually parsed to identify 685 putative haplotypes at 335 loci in 301 contigs. Conclusions This approach, which leverages the advantages of RNA-seq approaches, enabled rapid generation of gene-linked SNP and haplotype markers. The general approach presented in this study can be easily applied to other non-model eukaryotes irrespective of the ploidy level to identify gene-linked polymorphisms that are expected to facilitate efficient Gene Assisted Breeding (GAB), genotyping and population genetics studies. The identified SNP haplotypes reveal some of the allelic differences in the two sweet cherry cultivars analyzed. The identification of these SNP and haplotype markers is expected to significantly improve the genomic resources for sweet cherry and facilitate efficient GAB in this non-model crop. PMID:22239826

  15. Genomic-assisted haplotype analysis and the development of high-throughput SNP markers for salinity tolerance in soybean.

    PubMed

    Patil, Gunvant; Do, Tuyen; Vuong, Tri D; Valliyodan, Babu; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Chaudhary, Juhi; Shannon, J Grover; Nguyen, Henry T

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a limiting factor of crop yield. The soybean is sensitive to soil salinity, and a dominant gene, Glyma03g32900 is primarily responsible for salt-tolerance. The identification of high throughput and robust markers as well as the deployment of salt-tolerant cultivars are effective approaches to minimize yield loss under saline conditions. We utilized high quality (15x) whole-genome resequencing (WGRS) on 106 diverse soybean lines and identified three major structural variants and allelic variation in the promoter and genic regions of the GmCHX1 gene. The discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with structural variants facilitated the design of six KASPar assays. Additionally, haplotype analysis and pedigree tracking of 93 U.S. ancestral lines were performed using publically available WGRS datasets. Identified SNP markers were validated, and a strong correlation was observed between the genotype and salt treatment phenotype (leaf scorch, chlorophyll content and Na(+) accumulation) using a panel of 104 soybean lines and, an interspecific bi-parental population (F8) from PI483463 x Hutcheson. These markers precisely identified salt-tolerant/sensitive genotypes (>91%), and different structural-variants (>98%). These SNP assays, supported by accurate phenotyping, haplotype analyses and pedigree tracking information, will accelerate marker-assisted selection programs to enhance the development of salt-tolerant soybean cultivars. PMID:26781337

  16. Genomic-assisted haplotype analysis and the development of high-throughput SNP markers for salinity tolerance in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Gunvant; Do, Tuyen; Vuong, Tri D.; Valliyodan, Babu; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Chaudhary, Juhi; Shannon, J. Grover; Nguyen, Henry T.

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a limiting factor of crop yield. The soybean is sensitive to soil salinity, and a dominant gene, Glyma03g32900 is primarily responsible for salt-tolerance. The identification of high throughput and robust markers as well as the deployment of salt-tolerant cultivars are effective approaches to minimize yield loss under saline conditions. We utilized high quality (15x) whole-genome resequencing (WGRS) on 106 diverse soybean lines and identified three major structural variants and allelic variation in the promoter and genic regions of the GmCHX1 gene. The discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with structural variants facilitated the design of six KASPar assays. Additionally, haplotype analysis and pedigree tracking of 93 U.S. ancestral lines were performed using publically available WGRS datasets. Identified SNP markers were validated, and a strong correlation was observed between the genotype and salt treatment phenotype (leaf scorch, chlorophyll content and Na+ accumulation) using a panel of 104 soybean lines and, an interspecific bi-parental population (F8) from PI483463 x Hutcheson. These markers precisely identified salt-tolerant/sensitive genotypes (>91%), and different structural-variants (>98%). These SNP assays, supported by accurate phenotyping, haplotype analyses and pedigree tracking information, will accelerate marker-assisted selection programs to enhance the development of salt-tolerant soybean cultivars. PMID:26781337

  17. Identification of SNP Haplotypes and Prospects of Association Mapping in Watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watermelon is the fifth most economically important vegetable crop cultivated world-wide. Implementing Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) marker technology in watermelon breeding and germplasm evaluation programs holds a key to improve horticulturally important traits. Next-generation sequencing...

  18. Alternative haplotype construction methods for genomic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jónás, Dávid; Ducrocq, Vincent; Fouilloux, Marie-Noëlle; Croiseau, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    Genomic evaluation methods today use single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) as genomic markers to trace quantitative trait loci (QTL). Today most genomic prediction procedures use biallelic SNP markers. However, SNP can be combined into short, multiallelic haplotypes that can improve genomic prediction due to higher linkage disequilibrium between the haplotypes and the linked QTL. The aim of this study was to develop a method to identify the haplotypes, which can be expected to be superior in genomic evaluation, as compared with either SNP or other haplotypes of the same size. We first identified the SNP (termed as QTL-SNP) from the bovine 50K SNP chip that had the largest effect on the analyzed trait. It was assumed that these SNP were not the causative mutations and they merely indicated the approximate location of the QTL. Haplotypes of 3, 4, or 5 SNP were selected from short genomic windows surrounding these markers to capture the effect of the QTL. Two methods described in this paper aim at selecting the most optimal haplotype for genomic evaluation. They assumed that if an allele has a high frequency, its allele effect can be accurately predicted. These methods were tested in a classical validation study using a dairy cattle population of 2,235 bulls with genotypes from the bovine 50K SNP chip and daughter yield deviations (DYD) on 5 dairy cattle production traits. Combining the SNP into haplotypes was beneficial with all tested haplotypes, leading to an average increase of 2% in terms of correlations between DYD and genomic breeding value estimates compared with the analysis when the same SNP were used individually. Compared with haplotypes built by merging the QTL-SNP with its flanking SNP, the haplotypes selected with the proposed criteria carried less under- and over-represented alleles: the proportion of alleles with frequencies <1 or >40% decreased, on average, by 17.4 and 43.4%, respectively. The correlations between DYD and genomic breeding value estimates increased by 0.7 to 0.9 percentage points when the haplotypes were selected using any of the proposed methods compared with using the haplotypes built from the QTL-SNP and its flanking markers. We showed that the efficiency of genomic prediction could be improved at no extra costs, only by selecting the proper markers or combinations of markers for genomic prediction. One of the presented approaches was implemented in the new genomic evaluation procedure applied in dairy cattle in France in April 2015. PMID:26995132

  19. SNP analyses of growth factor genes EGF, TGF{beta}-1, and HGF reveal haplotypic association of EGF with autism

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Takao; Thanseem, Ismail; Kawai, Masayoshi; Sekine, Yoshimoto; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Anitha, Ayyappan; Suda, Shiro . E-mail: nakamura@hama-med.ac.jp; Yamada, Kazuo; Tsujii, Masatsugu |; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Hattori, Eiji; Toyota, Tomoko; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Miyachi, Taishi; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Sugihara, Gen-ichi; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Iwata, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Mori, Norio |; Ouchi, Yasuomi |; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Takei, Nori

    2007-09-07

    Autism is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder diagnosed in early childhood. Growth factors have been found to play a key role in the cellular differentiation and proliferation of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is detected in several regions of the developing and adult brain, where, it enhances the differentiation, maturation, and survival of a variety of neurons. Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF{beta}) isoforms play an important role in neuronal survival, and the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been shown to exhibit neurotrophic activity. We examined the association of EGF, TGF{beta}1, and HGF genes with autism, in a trio association study, using DNA samples from families recruited to the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange; 252 trios with a male offspring scored for autism were selected for the study. Transmission disequilibrium test revealed significant haplotypic association of EGF with autism. No significant SNP or haplotypic associations were observed for TGF{beta}1 or HGF. Given the role of EGF in brain and neuronal development, we suggest a possible role of EGF in the pathogenesis of autism.

  20. Genome-wide SNP and haplotype analyses reveal a rich history underlying dog domestication

    PubMed Central

    vonHoldt, Bridgett M.; Pollinger, John P.; Lohmueller, Kirk E.; Han, Eunjung; Parker, Heidi G.; Quignon, Pascale; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D.; Boyko, Adam R.; Earl, Dent A.; Auton, Adam; Reynolds, Andy; Bryc, Kasia; Brisbin, Abra; Knowles, James C.; Mosher, Dana S.; Spady, Tyrone C.; Elkahloun, Abdel; Geffen, Eli; Pilot, Malgorzata; Jedrzejewski, Wlodzimierz; Greco, Claudia; Randi, Ettore; Bannasch, Danika; Wilton, Alan; Shearman, Jeremy; Musiani, Marco; Cargill, Michelle; Jones, Paul G.; Qian, Zuwei; Huang, Wei; Ding, Zhao-Li; Zhang, Ya-ping; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Novembre, John; Wayne, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in genome technology have facilitated a new understanding of the historical and genetic processes crucial to rapid phenotypic evolution under domestication1,2. To understand the process of dog diversification better, we conducted an extensive genome-wide survey of more than 48,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in dogs and their wild progenitor, the grey wolf. Here we show that dog breeds share a higher proportion of multi-locus haplotypes unique to grey wolves from the Middle East, indicating that they are a dominant source of genetic diversity for dogs rather than wolves from east Asia, as suggested by mitochondrial DNA sequence data3. Furthermore, we find a surprising correspondence between genetic and phenotypic/functional breed groupings but there are exceptions that suggest phenotypic diversification depended in part on the repeated crossing of individuals with novel phenotypes. Our results show that Middle Eastern wolves were a critical source of genome diversity, although interbreeding with local wolf populations clearly occurred elsewhere in the early history of specific lineages. More recently, the evolution of modern dog breeds seems to have been an iterative process that drew on a limited genetic toolkit to create remarkable phenotypic diversity. PMID:20237475

  1. Frequency-based haplotype reconstruction from deep sequencing data of bacterial populations

    PubMed Central

    Pulido-Tamayo, Sergio; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Swings, Toon; Van den Bergh, Bram; Dubey, Akanksha; Steenackers, Hans; Michiels, Jan; Fostier, Jan; Marchal, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Clonal populations accumulate mutations over time, resulting in different haplotypes. Deep sequencing of such a population in principle provides information to reconstruct these haplotypes and the frequency at which the haplotypes occur. However, this reconstruction is technically not trivial, especially not in clonal systems with a relatively low mutation frequency. The low number of segregating sites in those systems adds ambiguity to the haplotype phasing and thus obviates the reconstruction of genome-wide haplotypes based on sequence overlap information. Therefore, we present EVORhA, a haplotype reconstruction method that complements phasing information in the non-empty read overlap with the frequency estimations of inferred local haplotypes. As was shown with simulated data, as soon as read lengths and/or mutation rates become restrictive for state-of-the-art methods, the use of this additional frequency information allows EVORhA to still reliably reconstruct genome-wide haplotypes. On real data, we show the applicability of the method in reconstructing the population composition of evolved bacterial populations and in decomposing mixed bacterial infections from clinical samples. PMID:25990729

  2. Linkage disequilibrium, SNP frequency change due to selection, and association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits

    PubMed Central

    Paes, Geísa Pinheiro; Viana, José Marcelo Soriano; Silva, Fabyano Fonseca e; Mundim, Gabriel Borges

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objectives of this study were to assess linkage disequilibrium (LD) and selection-induced changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequency, and to perform association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for quality traits. Seven tropical and two temperate popcorn populations were genotyped for 96 SNPs chosen in chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits. The populations were phenotyped for expansion volume, 100-kernel weight, kernel sphericity, and kernel density. The LD statistics were the difference between the observed and expected haplotype frequencies (D), the proportion of D relative to the expected maximum value in the population, and the square of the correlation between the values of alleles at two loci. Association mapping was based on least squares and Bayesian approaches. In the tropical populations, D-values greater than 0.10 were observed for SNPs separated by 100-150 Mb, while most of the D-values in the temperate populations were less than 0.05. Selection for expansion volume indirectly led to increase in LD values, population differentiation, and significant changes in SNP frequency. Some associations were observed for expansion volume and the other quality traits. The candidate genes are involved with starch, storage protein, lipid, and cell wall polysaccharides synthesis. PMID:27007903

  3. Improved imputation of low-frequency and rare variants using the UK10K haplotype reference panel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Howie, Bryan; McCarthy, Shane; Memari, Yasin; Walter, Klaudia; Min, Josine L; Danecek, Petr; Malerba, Giovanni; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Gambaro, Giovanni; Richards, J Brent; Durbin, Richard; Timpson, Nicholas J; Marchini, Jonathan; Soranzo, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Imputing genotypes from reference panels created by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) provides a cost-effective strategy for augmenting the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) content of genome-wide arrays. The UK10K Cohorts project has generated a data set of 3,781 whole genomes sequenced at low depth (average 7x), aiming to exhaustively characterize genetic variation down to 0.1% minor allele frequency in the British population. Here we demonstrate the value of this resource for improving imputation accuracy at rare and low-frequency variants in both a UK and an Italian population. We show that large increases in imputation accuracy can be achieved by re-phasing WGS reference panels after initial genotype calling. We also present a method for combining WGS panels to improve variant coverage and downstream imputation accuracy, which we illustrate by integrating 7,562 WGS haplotypes from the UK10K project with 2,184 haplotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project. Finally, we introduce a novel approximation that maintains speed without sacrificing imputation accuracy for rare variants. PMID:26368830

  4. Haplotype Frequency Distribution in Northeastern European Saduria entomon (Crustacea: Isopoda) Populations. A Phylogeographic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Jerzy

    2003-11-01

    The distribution pattern of mtDNA haplotypes in distinct populations of the glacial relict crustacean Saduria entomon was examined to assess phylogeographic relationships among them. Populations from the Baltic, the White Sea and the Barents Sea were screened for mtDNA variation using PCR-based RFLP analysis of a 1150 bp fragment containing part of the CO I and CO II genes. Five mtDNA haplotypes were recorded. An analysis of geographical heterogeneity in haplotype frequency distributions revealed significant differences among populations. The isolated populations of S. entomon have diverged since the retreat of the last glaciation. The geographical pattern of variation is most likely the result of stochastic (founder effect, genetic drift) mechanisms and suggests that the haplotype differentiation observed is probably older than the isolation of the Baltic and Arctic seas.

  5. Frequency of carriers of 8.1 ancestral haplotype and its fragments in two Caucasian populations.

    PubMed

    Kiszel, Petra; Kovács, Margit; Szalai, Csaba; Yang, Yan; Pozsonyi, Eva; Blaskó, Bernadett; Laki, Judit; Prohászka, Zoltán; Fazakas, Adám; Pánczél, Pál; Hosszúfalusi, Nóra; Rajczy, Katalin; Wu, Yee-Ling; Chung, Erwin K; Zhou, Bi; Blanchong, Carol A; Vatay, Agnes; Yu, C Yung; Füst, G

    2007-01-01

    Within the human MHC region larger stretches of conserved DNA, called conserved ancestral haplotypes exist. However, many MHC haplotypes contain only fragments of an ancestral haplotype. Little is known, however, on relative distribution of the ancestral haplotypes to their fragments. Therefore we determined the frequency of carriers of the whole ancestral haplotype 8.1 (AH8.1) and its fragments in 127 healthy Hungarian people, 101 healthy Ohioian females, and in nine Hungarian families. The HLA-DQ2, HLA-DR3(17), RAGE -429C allele, the mono-S-C4B genotype, the HSP70-2 1267G allele and the TNF -308A (TNF2) allele were used as markers of the AH8.1. Frequency of carriers of the whole AH8.1 and its fragments was similar in the both populations. 18% of the subjects carried the whole AH8.1 in at least one chromosome, while 17-20%, 36-39%, and 24-29%, respectively carried two or three constituents of the haplotype, only one constituent or none of them. Similar results were obtained in the family study. In addition, marked differences were found in the relationship of the constituents' alleles to the whole AH8.1. In both populations, 29%, 50-59%, 52-56% and 76-96%, respectively of the carriers of HSP70-2 1267G, RAGE-429C, TNF2, and mono-S carriers carried the whole 8.1 haplotype. These findings may have important implications for studies of the disease associations with different MHC ancestral haplotypes. PMID:17558713

  6. A tagging SNP in ALOX5AP and risk of stroke: a haplotype-based analysis among eastern Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Jun; Lu, Ying; Ding, Haixia; Xiao, Hang; Zhang, Jinsong

    2011-10-01

    A genome-wide approach found significant association of two at-risk haplotypes (HapA, HapB) in the ALOX5AP gene with myocardial infarction and stroke. To date, it is still controversial whether ALOX5AP gene polymorphisms are risk factors for stroke. The aim of the present study is to investigate the association between the ALOX5AP gene polymorphism and the risk for stroke in Eastern Chinese Han population with a haplotype-based analysis. We conducted a comprehensive association study of 507 stroke patients and 510 healthy controls to assess the association between the ALOX5AP tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) and stroke risk. Genotyping was performed using the PCR-RFLP assay. In the single-locus analysis, we found that the rs9579646 AG genotype was associated with a marginally decreased risk for stroke (adjusted odds ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.96), compared with the AA genotype. Haplotype-based association analysis of block 2 involving rs10507391 and rs12429692 revealed that the decreased risk of stroke was significantly associated with haplotype AA (OR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.46-0.95). These results suggested that the genetic variants in ALOX5AP might modulate the risk of stroke in Eastern Chinese Han population. The frequencies of single-marker alleles and haplotypes showed remarkable differences from those in other populations. PMID:21153769

  7. Frequencies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes of the SLCO1B1 gene in selected populations of the western balkans

    PubMed Central

    Grapci, A Daka; Dimovski, AJ; Kapedanovska, A; Vavlukis, M; Eftimov, A; Geshkovska, N Matevska; Labachevski, N; Jakjovski, K; Gorani, D; Kedev, S; Mladenovska, K

    2015-01-01

    As a membrane influx transporter, organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) regulates the cellular uptake of a number of endogenous compounds and drugs. The aim of this study was to characterize the diversity of the solute carrier organic anion transporter family member 1B1 (SLCO1B1) gene encoding this transporter in two ethnic groups populating the Western Balkans. The distribution of SCLO1B1 alleles was determined at seven variant sites (c.388A>G, c.521T>C, c.571T>C, c.597C>T, c.1086C>T, c.1463G>C and c.*439T>G) in 266 Macedonians and 94 Albanians using the TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. No significant difference in the frequencies of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was observed between these populations. The frequency of the c.521T>C SNP was the lowest (<13.7 and 12.2%, respectively), while the frequencies of all other SNP alleles were above 40.0%. Variant alleles of c.1463G>C and c.1086 C>T SNPs were not identified in either ethnic group. The haplotype analysis revealed 20 and 21 different haplotypes in the Macedonian and Albanian population, respectively. The most common haplotype in both ethnic groups, *1J/*1K/*1L, had a frequency of 39.0% and 26.6%, respectively. In both populations, the variant alleles of the functionally significant c.521T>C and c.388A>G SNPs existed in one major haplotype (*15/*16/*17), with a frequency of 8.6 and 2.4% in the Macedonian and Albanian subjects, respectively. In conclusion, sequence variations of the SLCO1B1 gene in the studied populations occur at high frequencies, which are similar to that of the Caucasian population. Further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical significance of these SNPs and/ or the major SLCO1B1 haplotypes they form for a large number of substrates and for susceptibility to certain diseases. PMID:26929901

  8. Frequencies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes of the SLCO1B1 gene in selected populations of the western balkans.

    PubMed

    Grapci, A Daka; Dimovski, A J; Kapedanovska, A; Vavlukis, M; Eftimov, A; Geshkovska, N Matevska; Labachevski, N; Jakjovski, K; Gorani, D; Kedev, S; Mladenovska, K

    2015-06-01

    As a membrane influx transporter, organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) regulates the cellular uptake of a number of endogenous compounds and drugs. The aim of this study was to characterize the diversity of the solute carrier organic anion transporter family member 1B1 (SLCO1B1) gene encoding this transporter in two ethnic groups populating the Western Balkans. The distribution of SCLO1B1 alleles was determined at seven variant sites (c.388A>G, c.521T>C, c.571T>C, c.597C>T, c.1086C>T, c.1463G>C and c.*439T>G) in 266 Macedonians and 94 Albanians using the TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. No significant difference in the frequencies of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was observed between these populations. The frequency of the c.521T>C SNP was the lowest (<13.7 and 12.2%, respectively), while the frequencies of all other SNP alleles were above 40.0%. Variant alleles of c.1463G>C and c.1086 C>T SNPs were not identified in either ethnic group. The haplotype analysis revealed 20 and 21 different haplotypes in the Macedonian and Albanian population, respectively. The most common haplotype in both ethnic groups, *1J/*1K/*1L, had a frequency of 39.0% and 26.6%, respectively. In both populations, the variant alleles of the functionally significant c.521T>C and c.388A>G SNPs existed in one major haplotype (*15/*16/*17), with a frequency of 8.6 and 2.4% in the Macedonian and Albanian subjects, respectively. In conclusion, sequence variations of the SLCO1B1 gene in the studied populations occur at high frequencies, which are similar to that of the Caucasian population. Further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical significance of these SNPs and/ or the major SLCO1B1 haplotypes they form for a large number of substrates and for susceptibility to certain diseases. PMID:26929901

  9. Reducing animal sequencing redundancy by preferentially selecting animals with low-frequency haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many studies leverage targeted whole genome sequencing (WGS) experiments in order to identify rare and causal variants within populations. As a natural consequence of experimental design, many of these surveys tend to sequence redundant haplotype segments due to high frequency in the base population...

  10. How well do HapMap haplotypes identify common haplotypes of genes? A comparison with haplotypes of 334 genes resequenced in the environmental genome project.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jack A; Xu, Zong-Li; Kaplan, Norman L; Morris, Richard W

    2006-01-01

    One of the goals of the International HapMap Project is the identification of common haplotypes in genes. However, HapMap uses an incomplete catalogue of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and might miss some common haplotypes. We examined this issue using data from the Environmental Genome Project (EGP) which resequenced 335 genes in 90 people, and thus, has a nearly complete catalogue of gene SNPs. The EGP identified a total of 45,243 SNPs, of which 10,780 were common SNPs (minor allele frequency >or=0.1). Using EGP common SNP genotype data, we identified 1,459 haplotypes with frequency >or=0.05 and we use these as "benchmark" haplotypes. HapMap release 16 had genotype information for 1,573 of 10,780 (15%) EGP common SNPs. Using these SNPs, we identified common HapMap haplotypes (frequency >or=0.05) in each of the four HapMap ethnic groups. To compare common HapMap haplotypes to EGP benchmark haplotypes, we collapsed benchmark haplotypes to the set of 1,573 SNPs. Ninety-eight percent of the collapsed benchmark haplotypes could be found as common HapMap haplotypes in one or more of the four HapMap ethnic groups. However, collapsing benchmark haplotypes to the set of SNPs available in HapMap resulted in a loss of haplotype information: 545 of 1,459 (37%) benchmark haplotypes were uniquely identified, and only 25% of genes had all their benchmark haplotypes uniquely identified. We resampled the EGP data to examine the effect of increasing the number of HapMap SNPs to 5 million, and estimate that approximately 40% of common SNPs in genes will be sampled and that half of the genes will have sufficient SNPs to identify all common haplotypes. This inability to distinguish common haplotypes of genes may result in loss of power when examining haplotype-disease association. PMID:16434598

  11. Fish scales and SNP chips: SNP genotyping and allele frequency estimation in individual and pooled DNA from historical samples of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA extracted from historical samples is an important resource for understanding genetic consequences of anthropogenic influences and long-term environmental change. However, such samples generally yield DNA of a lower amount and quality, and the extent to which DNA degradation affects SNP genotyping success and allele frequency estimation is not well understood. We conducted high density SNP genotyping and allele frequency estimation in both individual DNA samples and pooled DNA samples extracted from dried Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) scales stored at room temperature for up to 35 years, and assessed genotyping success, repeatability and accuracy of allele frequency estimation using a high density SNP genotyping array. Results In individual DNA samples, genotyping success and repeatability was very high (> 0.973 and > 0.998, respectively) in samples stored for up to 35 years; both increased with the proportion of DNA of fragment size > 1000 bp. In pooled DNA samples, allele frequency estimation was highly repeatable (Repeatability = 0.986) and highly correlated with empirical allele frequency measures (Mean Adjusted R2 = 0.991); allele frequency could be accurately estimated in > 95% of pooled DNA samples with a reference group of at least 30 individuals. SNPs located in polyploid regions of the genome were more sensitive to DNA degradation: older samples had lower genotyping success at these loci, and a larger reference panel of individuals was required to accurately estimate allele frequencies. Conclusions SNP genotyping was highly successful in degraded DNA samples, paving the way for the use of degraded samples in SNP genotyping projects. DNA pooling provides the potential for large scale population genetic studies with fewer assays, provided enough reference individuals are also genotyped and DNA quality is properly assessed beforehand. We provide recommendations for future studies intending to conduct high-throughput SNP genotyping and allele frequency estimation in historical samples. PMID:23819691

  12. Estimating population haplotype frequencies from pooled DNA samples using PHASE algorithm.

    PubMed

    Pirinen, Matti; Kulathinal, Sangita; Gasbarra, Dario; Sillanpää, Mikko J

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies show that the PHASE algorithm is a state-of-the-art method for population-based haplotyping from individually genotyped data. We present a modified version of PHASE for estimating population haplotype frequencies from pooled DNA data. The algorithm is compared with (i) a maximum likelihood estimation under the multinomial model and (ii) a deterministic greedy algorithm, on both simulated and real data sets (HapMap data). Our results suggest that the PHASE algorithm is a method of choice also on pooled DNA data. The main reason for improvement over the other approaches is assumed to be the same as with individually genotyped data: the biologically motivated model of PHASE takes into account correlated genealogical histories of the haplotypes by modelling mutations and recombinations. The important questions of efficiency of DNA pooling as well as influence of the pool size on the accuracy of the estimates are also considered. Our results are in line with the earlier findings in that the pool size should be relatively small, only 2-5 individuals in our examples, in order to provide reliable estimates of population haplotype frequencies. PMID:19123969

  13. SNP-VISTA

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-11-07

    SNP-VISTA aids in analyses of the following types of data: A. Large-scale re-sequence data of disease-related genes for discovery of associated and/or causative alleles (GeneSNP-VISTA). B. Massive amounts of ecogenomics data for studying homologous recombination in microbial populations (EcoSNP-VISTA). The main features and capabilities of SNP-VISTA are: 1) Mapping of SNPs to gene structure; 2) classification of SNPs, based on their location in the gene, frequency of occurrence in samples and allele composition; 3) clustering,more » based on user-defined subsets of SNPs, highlighting haplotypes as well as recombinant sequences; 4) integration of protein conservation visualization; and 5) display of automatically calculated recombination points that are user-editable. The main strength of SNP-VISTA is its graphical interface and use of visual representations, which support interactive exploration and hence better understanding of large-scale SNPs data.« less

  14. Antigen, allele, and haplotype frequencies report of the ASHI minority antigens workshops: part 1, African-Americans.

    PubMed

    Zachary, A A; Bias, W B; Johnson, A; Rose, S M; Leffell, M S

    2001-10-01

    HLA typing was performed on 977 African Americans residing throughout most of the United States. Class I and class II antigens and class II alleles were defined for all individuals and class I alleles were determined for a subset of individuals. The occurrence of 854 of the individuals in family groups permitted direct counting of allele and haplotype frequencies. The data were analyzed for antigen, allele, and haplotype frequencies; recombination frequencies; segregation distortion; distribution of haplotype frequencies; linkage disequilibria; and geographic distribution of DR antigens. Tables of the antigen, allele, the most common two and three point haplotypes, and 88 extended haplotypes that include class I and class II alleles are presented. Notable findings include a lower than expected frequency of recombination between the B and DR loci (theta= 0.0013), lower than expected frequency of inheritance (44.5% vs 54.5%) of the DRB1*1503; DQB1*0602 haplotype, lower than anticipated linkage disequilibrium values for DR; DQ haplotypes, and a skewed geographic distribution of DR antigens. PMID:11600220

  15. Transcriptional defect of an inherited NKX2-5 haplotype comprising a SNP, a nonsynonymous and a synonymous mutation, associated with human congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Reamon-Buettner, Stella Marie; Sattlegger, Evelyn; Ciribilli, Yari; Inga, Alberto; Wessel, Armin; Borlak, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Germline mutations in cardiac-specific transcription factor genes have been associated with congenital heart disease (CHD) and the homeodomain transcription factor NKX2-5 is an important member of this group. Indeed, more than 40 heterozygous NKX2-5 germline mutations have been observed in individuals with CHD, and these are spread along the coding region, with many shown to impact protein function. In pursuit of understanding causes of CHD, we analyzed n = 49 cardiac biopsies from 28 patients and identified by direct sequencing two nonsynonymous NKX2-5 alterations affecting alanine 119, namely c.356C>A (p.A119E) and c.355G>T, (p.A119S), in patients with AVSD and HLHS, respectively. In functional assays, a significant reduction in transcriptional activities could be determined for the NKX2-5 variants. Importantly, in one family the mother, besides p.A119E, carried a synonymous mutant allele in the homeodomain (c.543G>A, p.Q181), and a synonymous dbSNP (c.63A>G, p.E21) in the transactivation domain of the protein, that were transmitted to the CHD daughter. The presence of these variants in-cis with the p.A119E mutation led to a further reduction in transcriptional activities. Such difference in activity may be in part related to reduced protein expression for the double variant c.356C>A and c.543G>A. We propose changes in mRNA stability and folding, due to a silent mutation and a dbSNP in the NKX2-5 coding region to contribute to the functional defect. Although the clinical significance of the NKX2-5 haplotype identified in the CHD patients remains to be ascertained, we provide evidence of an interaction of a dbSNP, with synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations to negatively impact NKX2-5 transcriptional activity. PMID:24376681

  16. Transcriptional Defect of an Inherited NKX2-5 Haplotype Comprising a SNP, a Nonsynonymous and a Synonymous Mutation, Associated with Human Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reamon-Buettner, Stella Marie; Sattlegger, Evelyn; Ciribilli, Yari; Inga, Alberto; Wessel, Armin; Borlak, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Germline mutations in cardiac-specific transcription factor genes have been associated with congenital heart disease (CHD) and the homeodomain transcription factor NKX2-5 is an important member of this group. Indeed, more than 40 heterozygous NKX2-5 germline mutations have been observed in individuals with CHD, and these are spread along the coding region, with many shown to impact protein function. In pursuit of understanding causes of CHD, we analyzed n = 49 cardiac biopsies from 28 patients and identified by direct sequencing two nonsynonymous NKX2-5 alterations affecting alanine 119, namely c.356C>A (p.A119E) and c.355G>T, (p.A119S), in patients with AVSD and HLHS, respectively. In functional assays, a significant reduction in transcriptional activities could be determined for the NKX2-5 variants. Importantly, in one family the mother, besides p.A119E, carried a synonymous mutant allele in the homeodomain (c.543G>A, p.Q181), and a synonymous dbSNP (c.63A>G, p.E21) in the transactivation domain of the protein, that were transmitted to the CHD daughter. The presence of these variants in-cis with the p.A119E mutation led to a further reduction in transcriptional activities. Such difference in activity may be in part related to reduced protein expression for the double variant c.356C>A and c.543G>A. We propose changes in mRNA stability and folding, due to a silent mutation and a dbSNP in the NKX2-5 coding region to contribute to the functional defect. Although the clinical significance of the NKX2-5 haplotype identified in the CHD patients remains to be ascertained, we provide evidence of an interaction of a dbSNP, with synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations to negatively impact NKX2-5 transcriptional activity. PMID:24376681

  17. A high resolution HLA and SNP haplotype map for disease association studies in the extended human MHC

    PubMed Central

    de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Mcvean, Gil; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Miretti, Marcos M.; Green, Todd; Marchini, Jonathan; Ke, Xiayi; Monsuur, Alienke J.; Whittaker, Pamela; Delgado, Marcos; Morrison, Jonathan; Richardson, Angela; Walsh, Emily C.; Gao, Xiaojiang; Galver, Luana; Hart, John; Hafler, David A.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Todd, John A.; Daly, Mark J.; Trowsdale, John; Wijmenga, Cisca; Vyse, Tim J.; Beck, Stephan; Murray, Sarah Shaw; Carrington, Mary; Gregory, Simon; Deloukas, Panos; Rioux, John D.

    2009-01-01

    The proteins encoded by the classical HLA class I and class II genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are highly polymorphic and play an essential role in self/non-self immune recognition. HLA variation is a crucial determinant of transplant rejection and susceptibility to a large number of infectious and autoimmune disease1. Yet identification of causal variants is problematic due to linkage disequilibrium (LD) that extends across multiple HLA and non-HLA genes in the MHC2,3. We therefore set out to characterize the LD patterns between the highly polymorphic HLA genes and background variation by typing the classical HLA genes and >7,500 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and deletion/insertion polymorphisms (DIPs) across four population samples. The analysis provides informative tag SNPs that capture some of the variation in the MHC region and that could be used in initial disease association studies, and provides new insight into the evolutionary dynamics and ancestral origins of the HLA loci and their haplotypes. PMID:16998491

  18. Allele-Level Haplotype Frequencies and Pairwise Linkage Disequilibrium for 14 KIR Loci in 506 European-American Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Vierra-Green, Cynthia; Roe, David; Hou, Lihua; Hurley, Carolyn Katovich; Rajalingam, Raja; Reed, Elaine; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Yu, Neng; Stewart, Mary; Noreen, Harriet; Hollenbach, Jill A.; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen; Maiers, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The immune responses of natural killer cells are regulated, in part, by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). The 16 closely-related genes in the KIR gene system have been diversified by gene duplication and unequal crossing over, thereby generating haplotypes with variation in gene copy number. Allelic variation also contributes to diversity within the complex. In this study, we estimated allele-level haplotype frequencies and pairwise linkage disequilibrium statistics for 14 KIR loci. The typing utilized multiple methodologies by four laboratories to provide at least 2x coverage for each allele. The computational methods generated maximum-likelihood estimates of allele-level haplotypes. Our results indicate the most extensive allele diversity was observed for the KIR framework genes and for the genes localized to the telomeric region of the KIR A haplotype. Particular alleles of the stimulatory loci appear to be nearly fixed on specific, common haplotypes while many of the less frequent alleles of the inhibitory loci appeared on multiple haplotypes, some with common haplotype structures. Haplotype structures cA01 and/or tA01 predominate in this cohort, as has been observed in most populations worldwide. Linkage disequilibrium is high within the centromeric and telomeric haplotype regions but not between them and is particularly strong between centromeric gene pairs KIR2DL5∼KIR2DS3S5 and KIR2DS3S5∼KIR2DL1, and telomeric KIR3DL1∼KIR2DS4. Although 93% of the individuals have unique pairs of full-length allelic haplotypes, large genomic blocks sharing specific sets of alleles are seen in the most frequent haplotypes. These high-resolution, high-quality haplotypes extend our basic knowledge of the KIR gene system and may be used to support clinical studies beyond single gene analysis. PMID:23139747

  19. Integrating sequence and array data to create an improved 1000 Genomes Project haplotype reference panel.

    PubMed

    Delaneau, Olivier; Marchini, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    A major use of the 1000 Genomes Project (1000 GP) data is genotype imputation in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Here we develop a method to estimate haplotypes from low-coverage sequencing data that can take advantage of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray genotypes on the same samples. First the SNP array data are phased to build a backbone (or 'scaffold') of haplotypes across each chromosome. We then phase the sequence data 'onto' this haplotype scaffold. This approach can take advantage of relatedness between sequenced and non-sequenced samples to improve accuracy. We use this method to create a new 1000 GP haplotype reference set for use by the human genetic community. Using a set of validation genotypes at SNP and bi-allelic indels we show that these haplotypes have lower genotype discordance and improved imputation performance into downstream GWAS samples, especially at low-frequency variants. PMID:25653097

  20. The discrete Laplace exponential family and estimation of Y-STR haplotype frequencies.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mikkel Meyer; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Morling, Niels

    2013-07-21

    Estimating haplotype frequencies is important in e.g. forensic genetics, where the frequencies are needed to calculate the likelihood ratio for the evidential weight of a DNA profile found at a crime scene. Estimation is naturally based on a population model, motivating the investigation of the Fisher-Wright model of evolution for haploid lineage DNA markers. An exponential family (a class of probability distributions that is well understood in probability theory such that inference is easily made by using existing software) called the 'discrete Laplace distribution' is described. We illustrate how well the discrete Laplace distribution approximates a more complicated distribution that arises by investigating the well-known population genetic Fisher-Wright model of evolution by a single-step mutation process. It was shown how the discrete Laplace distribution can be used to estimate haplotype frequencies for haploid lineage DNA markers (such as Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats), which in turn can be used to assess the evidential weight of a DNA profile found at a crime scene. This was done by making inference in a mixture of multivariate, marginally independent, discrete Laplace distributions using the EM algorithm to estimate the probabilities of membership of a set of unobserved subpopulations. The discrete Laplace distribution can be used to estimate haplotype frequencies with lower prediction error than other existing estimators. Furthermore, the calculations could be performed on a normal computer. This method was implemented in the freely available open source software R that is supported on Linux, MacOS and MS Windows. PMID:23524164

  1. Development of COS-SNP and HRM markers for high-throughput and reliable haplotype-based detection of Lr14a in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

    PubMed

    Terracciano, Irma; Maccaferri, Marco; Bassi, Filippo; Mantovani, Paola; Sanguineti, Maria C; Salvi, Silvio; Simková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Massi, Andrea; Ammar, Karim; Kolmer, James; Tuberosa, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks. & Henn.) is a major disease affecting durum wheat production. The Lr14a-resistant gene present in the durum wheat cv. Creso and its derivative cv. Colosseo is one of the best characterized leaf-rust resistance sources deployed in durum wheat breeding. Lr14a has been mapped close to the simple sequence repeat markers gwm146, gwm344 and wmc10 in the distal portion of the chromosome arm 7BL, a gene-dense region. The objectives of this study were: (1) to enrich the Lr14a region with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and high-resolution melting (HRM)-based markers developed from conserved ortholog set (COS) genes and from sequenced Diversity Array Technology (DArT(®)) markers; (2) to further investigate the gene content and colinearity of this region with the Brachypodium and rice genomes. Ten new COS-SNP and five HRM markers were mapped within an 8.0 cM interval spanning Lr14a. Two HRM markers pinpointed the locus in an interval of <1.0 cM and eight COS-SNPs were mapped 2.1-4.1 cM distal to Lr14a. Each marker was tested for its capacity to predict the state of Lr14a alleles (in particular, Lr14-Creso associated to resistance) in a panel of durum wheat elite germplasm including 164 accessions. Two of the most informative markers were converted into KASPar(®) markers. Single assay markers ubw14 and wPt-4038-HRM designed for agarose gel electrophoresis/KASPar(®) assays and high-resolution melting analysis, respectively, as well as the double-marker combinations ubw14/ubw18, ubw14/ubw35 and wPt-4038-HRM-ubw35 will be useful for germplasm haplotyping and for molecular-assisted breeding. PMID:23292293

  2. A substantially lower frequency of uninformative matches between 23 versus 17 Y-STR haplotypes in north Western Europe.

    PubMed

    Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Vanderheyden, Nancy; Van Geystelen, Anneleen; Decorte, Ronny

    2014-07-01

    The analysis of human short tandem repeats of the Y-chromosome (Y-STRs) provides a powerful tool in forensic cases for male sex identification, male lineage identification and identification of the geographical origin of male lineages. As the commonly used 12 and 17 Y-STR multiplexes do not discriminate between some unrelated males, additional Y-STRs were implemented in the PowerPlex() Y23 System to supplement the existing commercial Y-STR kits. Until today, the forensic value of a (near) 23 versus 17 Y-STR haplotype match between an unknown DNA donor and a certain biological sample in a database is not yet well studied. This will be of huge interest for cases where an autosomal DNA profile yields no match to a DNA database and the database is used for familial searching (male relative(s) of the offender) or for the estimation of the geographical origin of the offender. In order to value (near) 23 Y-STR haplotype matches in a local sample from Western Europe, we selected the region of Flanders (Belgium) due to the already present knowledge on its Y-chromosomal variants. Many Y-chromosomes of this region were previously genotyped with Y-SNPs at a high resolution of the most recently updated Y-chromosomal tree and the deep-rooted genealogy of each DNA donor was already established. By comparing (near) matches of 23 versus 17 Y-STR haplotypes between patrilineal-unrelated males, a substantial lower number of uninformative (near) 23 Y-STR haplotype matches has been observed compared to 17 Y-STR haplotypes. Furthermore, the use of SNP data was informative to discriminate >60% of unrelated males with an (near) identical 17 Y-STR match while SNP data was only necessary to discriminate about 10% of unrelated males with a 23 Y-STR haplotype that differed at only two Y-STRs. This shows the higher value of the Y23 haplotype within familial DNA searching and the estimation of the geographical origin of a DNA donor. Therefore, the use of the PowerPlex() Y23 System instead of the commonly used 12 and 17 Y-STRs by the forensic community is recommended as it will increase the efficiency of Y-STRs in forensic casework. PMID:24815371

  3. PRNP haplotype and genotype frequencies in Brazilian sheep: issues for conservation and breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Ianella, P; McManus, C M; Caetano, A R; Paiva, S R

    2012-08-01

    Polymorphisms of PRNP gene have been strongly correlated to the susceptibility/resistance to scrapie in sheep. Variants at the coding positions 136, 154 and 171 have been the most frequently associated to susceptibility to classical scrapie. The aim of this study was to estimate PRNP haplotype and genotype frequencies in a sample of 1400 sheep from 13 different breeds that are representative of the main production regions in Brazil. A total of four different alleles (ARR, ARQ, AHQ and VRQ) and nine genotypes were observed at different frequencies among the investigated breeds. There were distinct patterns of allelic distribution between naturalized and commercial/specialized breeds and different geographic regions. These results will influence the development and management of breeding and conservation programs and will help to develop Brazilian efforts to avoid scrapie epidemics. PMID:21816449

  4. Haplotypic Background of a Private Allele at High Frequency in the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Kari B.; Jakobsson, Mattias; Crawford, Michael H.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Boca, Simina M.; Conrad, Donald F.; Tito, Raul Y.; Osipova, Ludmilla P.; Tarskaia, Larissa A.; Zhadanov, Sergey I.; Wall, Jeffrey D.; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Malhi, Ripan S.; Smith, David G.; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the observation of a high-frequency private allele, the 9-repeat allele at microsatellite D9S1120, in all sampled Native American and Western Beringian populations has been interpreted as evidence that all modern Native Americans descend primarily from a single founding population. However, this inference assumed that all copies of the 9-repeat allele were identical by descent and that the geographic distribution of this allele had not been influenced by natural selection. To investigate whether these assumptions are satisfied, we genotyped 34 single nucleotide polymorphisms across ∼500 kilobases (kb) around D9S1120 in 21 Native American and Western Beringian populations and 54 other worldwide populations. All chromosomes with the 9-repeat allele share the same haplotypic background in the vicinity of D9S1120, suggesting that all sampled copies of the 9-repeat allele are identical by descent. Ninety-one percent of these chromosomes share the same 76.26 kb haplotype, which we call the “American Modal Haplotype” (AMH). Three observations lead us to conclude that the high frequency and widespread distribution of the 9-repeat allele are unlikely to be the result of positive selection: 1) aside from its association with the 9-repeat allele, the AMH does not have a high frequency in the Americas, 2) the AMH is not unusually long for its frequency compared with other haplotypes in the Americas, and 3) in Latin American mestizo populations, the proportion of Native American ancestry at D9S1120 is not unusual compared with that observed at other genomewide microsatellites. Using a new method for estimating the time to the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of all sampled copies of an allele on the basis of an estimate of the length of the genealogy descended from the MRCA, we calculate the mean time to the MRCA of the 9-repeat allele to be between 7,325 and 39,900 years, depending on the demographic model used. The results support the hypothesis that all modern Native Americans and Western Beringians trace a large portion of their ancestry to a single founding population that may have been isolated from other Asian populations prior to expanding into the Americas. PMID:19221006

  5. Heuristics for haplotype frequency estimation with a large number of analyzed loci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotka, Michał; Nowak, Robert

    Determining haplotypes with laboratory methods is an expensive and time-consuming activity therefore unsuit- able for the analysis of genetic data coming from a large number of tested individuals. Many existing algorithms for phasing genotypes operate on very impractical runtime and take into account only certain types of polymor- phisms, often without providing graphical user interface. The heuristic algorithm for estimating haplotype frequency developed in this work was examined in terms of time complexity, the speed of execution and the accuracy of results. Consequently, a Rich Internet Application that implements described algorithm has been created and its performance and accuracy to a known set of test data is analyzed. Eventually, a discussion on the architecture and the applications usability in bioinformatics applications is presented. Proposed algorithm can be used to improve the complexity of any algorithm that solves the problem of genotype phasing, which has a worse time complexity and is convergent. The algorithm is easy to scale and can achieve the desired ratio of calculations accuracy to execution time. Implemented application meets all requirements for the programs to solve problems in biology i.e. high performance, accessibility, scalability and usability.

  6. Allele frequencies for 40 autosomal SNP loci typed for US population samples using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kiesler, Kevin M.; Vallone, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim To type a set of 194 US African American, Caucasian, and Hispanic samples (self-declared ancestry) for 40 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers intended for human identification purposes. Methods Genotyping was performed on an automated commercial electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer, the PLEX-ID. The 40 SNP markers were amplified in eight unique 5plex PCRs, desalted, and resolved based on amplicon mass. For each of the three US sample groups statistical analyses were performed on the resulting genotypes. Results The assay was found to be robust and capable of genotyping the 40 SNP markers consuming approximately 4 nanograms of template per sample. The combined random match probabilities for the 40 SNP assay ranged from 10−16 to 10−21. Conclusion The multiplex PLEX-ID SNP-40 assay is the first fully automated genotyping method capable of typing a panel of 40 forensically relevant autosomal SNP markers on a mass spectrometry platform. The data produced provided the first allele frequencies estimates for these 40 SNPs in a National Institute of Standards and Technology US population sample set. No population bias was detected although one locus deviated from its expected level of heterozygosity. PMID:23771752

  7. Frequency of alleles and haplotypes of the human leukocyte antigen system in Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Luana de Cassia; Santana, Fabiana Covolo de Souza; Marcos, Elaine Valim Camarinha

    2014-01-01

    Background: HLA allele identification is used in bone marrow transplant programs as HLA compatibility between the donor and recipient may prevent graft rejection. Objective: This study aimed to estimate the frequency of alleles and haplotypes of the HLA system in the region of Bauru and compare these with the frequencies found in other regions of the country. Methods: HLA-A*, HLA-B*, and HLA-DRB1* allele frequencies and haplotypes were analyzed in a sample of 3542 volunteer donors at the National Registry of Voluntary Bone Marrow Donors (REDOME) in Bauru. HLA low resolution typing was performed using reverse line blot with the Dynal Reli(tm) SSO-HLA Typing Kit and automated Dynal AutoReli(tm)48 device (Invitrogen, USA). Results: Twenty, 36, and 13 HLA-A*, HLA-B*, and HLA-DRB1* allele groups, respectively, were identified. The most common alleles for each locus were HLA-A*02, HLA-B*35, and HLA-DRB1*07. The most frequent haplotype was A*01-B*08-DRB1*03. Allele and haplotype frequencies were compared to other regions in Brazil and the similarities and differences among populations are shown. Conclusion: The knowledge of the immunogenic profile of a population contributes to the comprehension of the historical and anthropological aspects of different regions. Moreover, this helps to find suitable donors quickly, thereby shortening waiting lists for transplants and thus increasing survival rates among recipients. PMID:24790535

  8. Frequency of alleles and haplotypes of the human leukocyte antigen system in Bauru São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Luana de Cassia; Santana, Fabiana Covolo de Souza; Marcos, Elaine Valim Camarinha

    2014-01-01

    Background HLA allele identification is used in bone marrow transplant programs as HLA compatibility between the donor and recipient may prevent graft rejection. Objective This study aimed to estimate the frequency of alleles and haplotypes of the HLA system in the region of Bauru and compare these with the frequencies found in other regions of the country. Methods HLA-A*, HLA-B*, and HLA-DRB1* allele frequencies and haplotypes were analyzed in a sample of 3542 volunteer donors at the National Registry of Voluntary Bone Marrow Donors (REDOME) in Bauru. HLA low resolution typing was performed using reverse line blot with the Dynal Reli™ SSO-HLA Typing Kit and automated Dynal AutoReli™48 device (Invitrogen, USA). Results Twenty, 36, and 13 HLA-A*, HLA-B*, and HLA-DRB1* allele groups, respectively, were identified. The most common alleles for each locus were HLA-A*02, HLA-B*35, and HLA-DRB1*07. The most frequent haplotype was A*01-B*08-DRB1*03. Allele and haplotype frequencies were compared to other regions in Brazil and the similarities and differences among populations are shown. Conclusion The knowledge of the immunogenic profile of a population contributes to the comprehension of the historical and anthropological aspects of different regions. Moreover, this helps to find suitable donors quickly, thereby shortening waiting lists for transplants and thus increasing survival rates among recipients.

  9. Application of site and haplotype-frequency based approaches for detecting selection signatures in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 'Selection signatures' delimit regions of the genome that are, or have been, functionally important and have therefore been under either natural or artificial selection. In this study, two different and complementary methods--integrated Haplotype Homozygosity Score (|iHS|) and population differentiation index (FST)--were applied to identify traces of decades of intensive artificial selection for traits of economic importance in modern cattle. Results We scanned the genome of a diverse set of dairy and beef breeds from Germany, Canada and Australia genotyped with a 50 K SNP panel. Across breeds, a total of 109 extreme |iHS| values exceeded the empirical threshold level of 5% with 19, 27, 9, 10 and 17 outliers in Holstein, Brown Swiss, Australian Angus, Hereford and Simmental, respectively. Annotating the regions harboring clustered |iHS| signals revealed a panel of interesting candidate genes like SPATA17, MGAT1, PGRMC2 and ACTC1, COL23A1, MATN2, respectively, in the context of reproduction and muscle formation. In a further step, a new Bayesian FST-based approach was applied with a set of geographically separated populations including Holstein, Brown Swiss, Simmental, North American Angus and Piedmontese for detecting differentiated loci. In total, 127 regions exceeding the 2.5 per cent threshold of the empirical posterior distribution were identified as extremely differentiated. In a substantial number (56 out of 127 cases) the extreme FST values were found to be positioned in poor gene content regions which deviated significantly (p < 0.05) from the expectation assuming a random distribution. However, significant FST values were found in regions of some relevant genes such as SMCP and FGF1. Conclusions Overall, 236 regions putatively subject to recent positive selection in the cattle genome were detected. Both |iHS| and FST suggested selection in the vicinity of the Sialic acid binding Ig-like lectin 5 gene on BTA18. This region was recently reported to be a major QTL with strong effects on productive life and fertility traits in Holstein cattle. We conclude that high-resolution genome scans of selection signatures can be used to identify genomic regions contributing to within- and inter-breed phenotypic variation. PMID:21679429

  10. Global patterns of variation in allele and haplotype frequencies and linkage disequilibrium across the CYP2E1 gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, M-Y; Mukherjee, N; Pakstis, A J; Khaliq, S; Mohyuddin, A; Mehdi, S Q; Speed, W C; Kidd, J R; Kidd, K K

    2008-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 2E1, gene symbol CYP2E1, is one of a family of enzymes with a central role in activating and detoxifying xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. Genetic variation at this gene has been reported in different human populations, and some association studies have reported increased risk for cancers and other diseases. To the best of our knowledge, multi-single-nucleotide polymorphism haplotypes and linkage disequilibrium (LD) have not been systematically studied for CYP2E1 in multiple populations. Haplotypes can greatly increase the power both to identify patterns of genetic variation relevant for gene expression as well as to detect disease-related susceptibility mutations. We present frequency and LD data and analyses for 11 polymorphisms and their haplotypes that we have studied on over 2600 individuals from 50 human population samples representing the major geographical regions of the world. The diverse patterns of haplotype variation found in the different populations we have studied show that ethnicity may be an important variable helping to explain inconsistencies that have been reported by association studies. More studies clearly are needed of the variants we have studied, especially those in the 5' region, such as the variable number of tandem repeats, as well as studies of additional polymorphisms known for this gene to establish evidence relating any systematic differences in gene expression that exist to the haplotypes at this gene. PMID:18663376

  11. Probability distribution of haplotype frequencies under the two-locus Wright-Fisher model by diffusion approximation.

    PubMed

    Boitard, Simon; Loisel, Patrice

    2007-05-01

    The probability distribution of haplotype frequencies in a population, and the way it is influenced by genetical forces such as recombination, selection, random drift ...is a question of fundamental interest in population genetics. For large populations, the distribution of haplotype frequencies for two linked loci under the classical Wright-Fisher model is almost impossible to compute because of numerical reasons. However the Wright-Fisher process can in such cases be approximated by a diffusion process and the transition density can then be deduced from the Kolmogorov equations. As no exact solution has been found for these equations, we developed a numerical method based on finite differences to solve them. It applies to transient states and models including selection or mutations. We show by several tests that this method is accurate for computing the conditional joint density of haplotype frequencies given that no haplotype has been lost. We also prove that it is far less time consuming than other methods such as Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:17316725

  12. Frequency of SNP -336A/G in the promoter region of CD209 in a population from northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, P N; Ferreira-Fernandes, H; de Oliveira, J S; Pereira, A C T C; Pinto, G R; Ferreira, G P

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) mediate the initiation of the immune response against a variety of pathogens. The DC-SIGN receptor is encoded by the gene CD209 and is expressed on the surface of DCs. It binds to mannose-rich carbohydrates and enables the recognition of bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses. SNP -336A/G in the promoter region of CD209 influences the expression of the DC-SIGN receptor. Several studies have associated this SNP with an increased susceptibility to infectious diseases and the development of more severe forms of disease. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of SNP -336A/G in a population from northeastern Brazil. We analyzed 181 individuals from the general population of Parnaíba, Piauí, Brazil, of which 37% were men and 63% were women. SNP -336A/G was detected by polymerase chain reaction and treatment with the restriction enzyme MscI and visualized by electrophoresis on an 8% polyacrylamide gel stained with silver nitrate. Of the individuals analyzed, 116 (64.1%) were homozygous AA, 57 (31.5%) were heterozygous (AG), and 8 (4.4%) were homozygous GG. The allele frequency of -336G was 20.2%. Genotype frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the frequency of the CD209 SNP -336A/G in a population in the State of Piauí. Further studies are needed to determine the relationship between this SNP and the vulnerability of this population to major infectious diseases. PMID:26345873

  13. Genetic Analysis of Case/Control Data Using Estimated Haplotype Frequencies: Application to APOE Locus Variation and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fallin, Daniele; Cohen, Annick; Essioux, Laurent; Chumakov, Ilya; Blumenfeld, Marta; Cohen, Daniel; Schork, Nicholas J.

    2001-01-01

    There is growing debate over the utility of multiple locus association analyses in the identification of genomic regions harboring sequence variants that influence common complex traits such as hypertension and diabetes. Much of this debate concerns the manner in which one can use the genotypic information from individuals gathered in simple sampling frameworks, such as the case/control designs, to actually assess the association between alleles in a particular genomic region and a trait. In this paper we describe methods for testing associations between estimated haplotype frequencies derived from multilocus genotype data and disease endpoints assuming a simple case/control sampling design. These proposed methods overcome the lack of phase information usually associated with samples of unrelated individuals and provide a comprehensive way of assessing the relationship between sequence or multiple-site variation and traits and diseases within populations. We applied the proposed methods in a study of the relationship between polymorphisms within the APOE gene region and Alzheimer's disease. Cases and controls for this study were collected from the United States and France. Our results confirm the known association between the APOE locus and Alzheimer's disease, even when the ɛ4 polymorphism is not contained in the tested haplotypes. This suggests that, in certain situations, haplotype information and linkage disequilibrium-induced associations between polymorphic loci that neighbor loci harboring functional sequence variants can be exploited to identify disease-predisposing alleles in large, freely mixing populations via estimated haplotype frequency methods. PMID:11156623

  14. SNP discovery and allele frequency estimation by deep sequencing of reduced representation libraries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome projects routinely produce draft sequences for species from diverse evolutionary clades, but generally do not create single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) resources. We present an approach for de novo SNP discovery based on short-read sequencing of reduced representation libraries (RRL) to ge...

  15. HLA-A, -B and -DR allele and haplotype frequencies in Malays.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J S; Shahnaz, M; Too, C L; Azrena, A; Maiselamah, L; Lee, Y Y; Irda, Y A; Salawati, M

    2007-03-01

    One thousand four hundreds and forty-five Malays registered with the Malaysian Marrow Donor Registry were typed for HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DR. Fifteen HLA-A, twenty nine HLA-B and fourteen HLA-DR alleles were detected. The most common HLA-A alleles and their frequencies were HLA-A24 (0.35), HLA-A11 (0.21) and HLA-A2 (0.15). The most common HLA-B alleles were HLA-B15 (0.26), HLA-B35 (0.11) and HLA-B18 (0.10) while the most common HLA-DR alleles were HLA-DR15 (0.28), HLA-DR12 (0.27) and HLA-DR7 (0.10). A24-B15-DR12 (0.047), A24-B15-DR15 (0.03) and the A24-B35-DR12 (0.03) were the most frequent haplotypes. This data may be useful in determining the probability of finding a matched donor and for estimating the incidence of HLA associated diseases. PMID:17891921

  16. Human leukocyte antigen alleles, genotypes and haplotypes frequencies in renal transplant donors and recipients from West Central India

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jaina S.; Patel, Manisha M.; Koringa, Prakash G.; Shah, Tejas M.; Patel, Amrutlal K.; Tripathi, Ajai K.; Mathew, Anila; Rajapurkar, Mohan M.; Joshi, Chaitanya G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) is comprised of a highly polymorphic set of genes which determines the histocompatibility of organ transplantation. The present study was undertaken to identify HLA class I and class II allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies in renal transplant recipients and donors from West Central India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: HLA typing was carried out using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Sequence Specific Primer in 552 live related and unrelated renal transplant recipients and donors. RESULTS: The most frequent HLA class I and class II alleles and their frequencies in recipients were HLA-AFNx0101 (0.1685) and AFNx0102 (0.1649), HLA-BFNx0135 (0.1322), and HLA-DR beta 1 (DRB 1)FNx0115 (0.2192), whereas in donors, these were HLA-AFNx0102 (0.1848) and AFNx0101 (0.1667), HLA-BFNx0135 (0.1359), and HLA-DRB1FNx0115 (0.2409). The two-locus haplotype statistical analysis revealed HLA-AFNx0102-B61 as the most common haplotype with the frequency of 0.0487 and 0.0510 in recipients and donors, respectively. Further, among the three locus haplotypes HLA-AFNx0133-BFNx0144-DRB1FNx0107 and HLA-AFNx0102-BFNx0161-DRB1FNx0115 were the most common haplotypes with frequencies 0.0362 and 0.0326, respectively in recipients and 0.0236 and 0.0323, respectively in donors. Genotype frequency revealed a high prevalence of genotype HLA-AFNx0102/AFNx0124 in recipients (0.058) compared to donors (0.0109) whereas low prevalence of HLA-AFNx0101/AFNx0102 in recipients (0.0435) than in donors (0.0797). The phylogenetic and principal component analysis of HLA allele and haplotype frequency distribution revealed genetic similarities of various ethnic groups. Further, case control analysis provides preliminary evidence of association of HLA-A genotype (P < 0.05) with renal failure. CONCLUSION: This study will be helpful in suitable donor search besides providing valuable information for population genetics and HLA disease association analysis. PMID:24019626

  17. The likelihood ratio and frequency of DQ2/DQ8 haplotypes in Iranian patients with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Asghar; Mansouri, Masoume; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ekhlasi, Golnaz; Kalantari, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the likelihood ratio and frequency of DQ2 and DQ8 in Iranian patients with celiac disease (CD). Background: The HLA DQ2 and HLA DQ8 are the important mediators in the development of celiac disease. A few studies evaluated the frequency of HLA DQ2 and HLA DQ8 haplotypes among the Iranian population with low sample size. Patients and methods: In this cross-sectional study, to predict HLA–DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes, 141(73 male, 78 female) confirmed CD patients compared to 151 healthy controls were enrolled into this study during 2013-2014. HLA DQ2/ DQ8 haplotypes was determined in cases and controls using PCR-SSP technique. Results: DQ2 and DQ8 were positive in 80% (n=111) and 49% (n= 69) of CD patients and 36% (n=61) and 13% (n=21) of control group respectively. Moreover, 32% (n=45) of CD patients and 5.3% (n=8) of the control group were carrier of both haplotypes. In the case group about one-third of patients (32.2%) were positive for carrying both DQ2 and DQ8 heterodimers while only 5.3% (n=8) of the control group were carrier. In addition, the positive likelihood ratio of DQ2 and DQ8 were 1.74 (CI: 1.4- 2.1), and 2.6 (CI: 1.8– 2.7), respectively. Conclusion: The result of this study showed that the frequency of DQ8 among our population is higher than those reported by European countries, but it is close to those founded in South America and Middle East. This result suggests that the higher prevalence of HLA DQ8 pattern in Iranian CD patients is similar to non-European patients. PMID:26744610

  18. Haplotype frequencies of the PowerPlex Y system in a Mexican-Mestizo population sample from Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vázquez, A; Vilchis-Dorantes, G; Aguilar-Ruiz, M O; Bautista-Rivas, A; Pérez-García, A; Orea-Ochoa, R; Villanueva-Hernández, D; Muñoz-Valle, J F; Rangel-Villalobos, H

    2008-01-01

    The PowerPlex Y system including 11 Y-STRs (DYS19, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439) was analyzed by capillary electrophoresis in 357 males from Mexico City. Haplotype frequency for this system was reported. The haplotype diversity was 99.56+/-0.04%, and gene diversity ranged from 51.4% for DYS393 to 92.5% for DYS385. AMOVA tests including previous reports from Mexico (Chihuahua and Jalisco States), demonstrated significant genetic heterogeneity between north and western populations regarding Mexico City, justifying the establishment of local databases in this country for male-identification purposes. PMID:19083779

  19. HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies of 8333 Chinese Han from the Zhejiang province, China.

    PubMed

    He, Y; Zhang, W; Chen, N; Wang, W; He, J; Han, Z; Tao, S; Dong, L; He, J; Zhu, F; Lv, H

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) allele and haplotype is varied among different ethnic populations. In this study, HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies were determined in 8333 volunteer bone marrow donors of Zhejiang Han population using the polymerase chain reaction sequence-based typing. A total of 52 HLA-A, 96 HLA-B and 61 HLA-DRB1 alleles were found. Of these, the top three frequent alleles in HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 loci, respectively, were A*11:01 (24.53%), A*24:02 (17.35%), A*02:01 (11.58%); B*40:01 (15.67%), B*46:01 (11.87%), B*58:01 (9.05%); DRB1*09:01 (17.54%),DRB1*12:02 (9.64%) and DRB1*08:03 (8.65%). A total of 171 A-B-DRB1 haplotypes with a frequency of >0.1% were presented and the five most common haplotypes were A*33:03-B*58:01- DRB1*03:01, A*02:07-B*46:01-DRB1*09:01, A*30:01-B*13:02-DRB1*07:01, A*33:03-B*58:01-RB1*13:02 and A*11:01-B*15:02-DRB1*12:02. The information will be useful for selecting unrelated bone marrow donors and for anthropology studies and pharmacogenomics analysis. PMID:26919533

  20. Allele frequencies for 15 autosomal STR loci and haplotype data for 17 Y-STR loci in a population from Belize.

    PubMed

    Flores, Shahida; Sun, Jie; King, Jonathan; Eisenberg, Arthur; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    Allele frequencies for 15 autosomal STR loci (N = 290) and haplotype data for 17 Y-STR loci (N = 157) were determined for an admixed population from Belize. There were no detectable departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations at any autosomal STR loci except for the D8S1179 locus (p = 0.002). The combined power of discrimination (PD) and combined power of exclusion (PE) were greater than 0.99999999 and 0.99999951, respectively. In addition, a total of 144 distinct Y-STR haplotypes were observed with 133 Y-STR haplotypes observed only once. The most common Y-STR haplotype was observed three times for two separate haplotypes. The various analyses of these forensically relevant STR loci showed that these markers are informative in the Belize population for forensic and parentage testing applications. PMID:25193820

  1. NullHap – a versatile application to estimate haplotype frequencies from unphased genotypes in the presence of null alleles

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Robert M; Płoski, Rafał

    2008-01-01

    Background Laboratory techniques used to determine haplotypes are often too expensive for large-scale studies and lack of phase information is commonly overcome using likelihood-based calculations. Whereas a number of programs are available for that purpose, none of them can handle loci with both multiple and null alleles. Results Here we present a description of a modified Expectation – Maximization algorithm as well as its implementation (NullHap) which allow to effectively overcome these limitations. As an example of application we used Nullhap to reanalyze published data on distribution of KIR genotypes in Polish psoriasis patients and controls showing that the KIR2DS4/1D locus may be a marker of KIR2DS1 haplotypes with different effects on disease susceptibility. Conclusion The developed application can estimate haplotype frequencies for every type of polymorphism and can effectively be used in genetic research as illustrated by a novel finding regarding the genetic susceptibility to psoriasis. PMID:18681957

  2. Infection Frequency of Hepatitis C Virus and IL28B Haplotypes in Papua New Guinea, Fiji, and Kiribati

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, G. L. Abby; Pryor, Jan; Malani, Joji; Supuri, Mathias; Masta, Andrew; Teriboriki, Burentau; Toatu, Tebuka; Penny, David; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Barnes, Eleanor; Pybus, Oliver G.; Klenerman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    It has been estimated that there are more than 60 million Hepatitis C virus (HCV) carriers in the World Health Organisation's Western Pacific region (WHO-WPR), where liver cancer is among the top three causes of cancer death. WHO and the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention report the prevalence of HCV in the South Pacific islands (countries within the WHO-WPR) to be high (5–10% and >2% respectively). However, since HCV is not tested for in many of these countries, there is sparse data available to support this assertion. We screened ∼2000 apparently healthy individuals from Papua New Guinea, Fiji and Kiribati and found a sero-prevalence of 2.0%, 0.1% and 0%, respectively. All sero-positive samples tested negative for HCV RNA. Curious as to why all the sero-positive individuals were negative for HCV-RNA, we also screened them for the HCV protective IL28B SNP markers rs12979860 and rs8099917. All antibody-positive participants bar one had HCV protective haplotypes. Our results suggest that HCV is present in these Pacific island countries, albeit at a prevalence lower than previous estimates. As none of our participants had undergone antiviral treatment, and therefore must have cleared infection naturally, we hypothesise that genotypes 1 and/or 4 are circulating in South Pacific Island people and that these peoples are genetically predisposed to be more likely to spontaneous resolve HCV infection than to become chronic carriers. PMID:23976941

  3. HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1 Allele and Haplotype Frequencies Distinguish Eastern European Americans from the General European American Population

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Steven J.; Tu, Bin; Lazaro, Ana; Yang, Ruyan; Lancaster, Alex K.; Cao, Kai; Ng, Jennifer; Hurley, Carolyn Katovich

    2012-01-01

    Sequence based typing was used to identify HLA-A,B,C,DRB1 alleles from 558 consecutively recruited U.S. volunteers with Eastern European ancestry for an unrelated hematopoietic stem cell registry. Four of the 31 HLA-A alleles, 29 -C alleles, 59 -B alleles, and 42 -DRB1 alleles identified (A*0325, B*440204, Cw*0332, and *0732N) are novel. The HLA-A*02010101g allele was observed at a frequency of 0.28. Two-, three- and four-locus haplotypes were estimated using the expectation maximization algorithm. The highest-frequency extended haplotypes (A*010101g-Cw*070101g-B*0801g-DRB1*0301 and A*03010101g-Cw*0702-B*0702-DRB1*1501) were observed at frequencies of 0.04 and 0.03, respectively. Linkage disequilibrium values (D’ij) of the constituent 2-locus haplotypes were highly significant for both extended haplotypes (p-values were less than 8 × 10−10), but were consistently higher for the more frequent haplotype. Balancing selection was inferred to be acting on all four loci, with the strongest evidence of balancing selection observed for the HLA-C locus. Comparisons of the A-C-B haplotype and DRB1 frequencies in this population to those for African, European and western Asian populations revealed high degrees of identity with Czech, Polish, and Slovenian populations and significant differences from the general European American population. PMID:19000140

  4. Genetic variation within the Mx gene of commercially selected chicken lines reveals multiple haplotypes, recombination and a protein under selection pressure.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Janet E; Arango, Jesus; Ali, Rizwana A; Bohorquez, Elaine B; Lund, Ashlee R; Ashwell, Chris M; Settar, Petek; O'Sullivan, Neil P; Koci, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    The Mx protein is one of the best-characterized interferon-stimulated antiviral mediators. Mx homologs have been identified in most vertebrates examined; however, their location within the cell, their level of activity, and the viruses they inhibit vary widely. Recent studies have demonstrated multiple Mx alleles in chickens and some reports have suggested a specific variant (S631N) within exon 14 confers antiviral activity. In the current study, the complete genome of nine elite egg-layer type lines were sequenced and multiple variants of the Mx gene identified. Within the coding region and upstream putative promoter region 36 SNP variants were identified, producing a total of 12 unique haplotypes. Each elite line contained from one to four haplotypes, with many of these haplotypes being found in only one line. Observation of changes in haplotype frequency over generations, as well as recombination, suggested some unknown selection pressure on the Mx gene. Trait association analysis with either individual SNP or haplotypes showed a significant effect of Mx haplotype on several egg production related traits, and on mortality following Marek's disease virus challenge in some lines. Examination of the location of the various SNP within the protein suggests synonymous SNP tend to be found within structural or enzymatic regions of the protein, while non-synonymous SNP are located in less well defined regions. The putative resistance variant N631 was found in five of the 12 haplotypes with an overall frequency of 47% across the nine lines. Two Mx recombinants were identified within the elite populations, indicating that novel variation can arise and be maintained within intensively selected lines. Collectively, these results suggest the conflicting reports in the literature describing the impact of the different SNP on chicken Mx function may be due to the varying context of haplotypes present in the populations studied. PMID:25244433

  5. Genetic Variation within the Mx Gene of Commercially Selected Chicken Lines Reveals Multiple Haplotypes, Recombination and a Protein under Selection Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Janet E.; Arango, Jesus; Ali, Rizwana A.; Bohorquez, Elaine B.; Lund, Ashlee R.; Ashwell, Chris M.; Settar, Petek; O'Sullivan, Neil P.; Koci, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    The Mx protein is one of the best-characterized interferon-stimulated antiviral mediators. Mx homologs have been identified in most vertebrates examined; however, their location within the cell, their level of activity, and the viruses they inhibit vary widely. Recent studies have demonstrated multiple Mx alleles in chickens and some reports have suggested a specific variant (S631N) within exon 14 confers antiviral activity. In the current study, the complete genome of nine elite egg-layer type lines were sequenced and multiple variants of the Mx gene identified. Within the coding region and upstream putative promoter region 36 SNP variants were identified, producing a total of 12 unique haplotypes. Each elite line contained from one to four haplotypes, with many of these haplotypes being found in only one line. Observation of changes in haplotype frequency over generations, as well as recombination, suggested some unknown selection pressure on the Mx gene. Trait association analysis with either individual SNP or haplotypes showed a significant effect of Mx haplotype on several egg production related traits, and on mortality following Marek's disease virus challenge in some lines. Examination of the location of the various SNP within the protein suggests synonymous SNP tend to be found within structural or enzymatic regions of the protein, while non-synonymous SNP are located in less well defined regions. The putative resistance variant N631 was found in five of the 12 haplotypes with an overall frequency of 47% across the nine lines. Two Mx recombinants were identified within the elite populations, indicating that novel variation can arise and be maintained within intensively selected lines. Collectively, these results suggest the conflicting reports in the literature describing the impact of the different SNP on chicken Mx function may be due to the varying context of haplotypes present in the populations studied. PMID:25244433

  6. Human leukocyte A and B antigen, gene and haplotype frequencies in the population of the city of São Paulo in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rosales, T; Guilherme, L; Chiarella, J; Marin, M L; Rosales, C; Melo, C P; Goldberg, A C; Kalil, J

    1992-01-01

    1. Antigen, gene and haplotype frequencies are important data for population analysis, paternity exclusion testing, genetic studies, and for organ transplantation selection. 2. We have studied the Class I histocompatibility antigens of 617 unrelated individuals from the city of São Paulo, Brazil, to determine antigen and gene frequencies of 16 HLA-A and 28 HLA-B antigens. Estimated haplotype frequencies were also determined, as well as the genetic distances of this population from European Caucasian and Negro populations. 3. A previously unknown linkage disequilibrium was detected for A23-B49 and a clear trend towards antigen frequencies intermediate between Caucasoid and Negro populations was observed. PMID:1304942

  7. Unique AGG Interruption in the CGG Repeats of the FMR1 Gene Exclusively Found in Asians Linked to a Specific SNP Haplotype.

    PubMed

    Limprasert, Pornprot; Thanakitgosate, Janpen; Jaruthamsophon, Kanoot; Sripo, Thanya

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited intellectual disability. It is caused by the occurrence of more than 200 pure CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene. Normal individuals have 6-54 CGG repeats with two or more stabilizing AGG interruptions occurring once every 9- or 10-CGG-repeat blocks in various populations. However, the unique (CGG)6AGG pattern, designated as 6A, has been exclusively reported in Asians. To examine the genetic background of AGG interruptions in the CGG repeats of the FMR1 gene, we studied 8 SNPs near the CGG repeats in 176 unrelated Thai males with 19-56 CGG repeats. Of these 176 samples, we identified AGG interruption patterns from 95 samples using direct DNA sequencing. We found that the common CGG repeat groups (29, 30, and 36) were associated with 3 common haplotypes, GCGGATAA (Hap A), TTCATCGC (Hap C), and GCCGTTAA (Hap B), respectively. The configurations of 9A9A9, 10A9A9, and 9A9A6A9 were commonly found in chromosomes with 29, 30, and 36 CGG repeats, respectively. Almost all chromosomes with Hap B (22/23) carried at least one 6A pattern, suggesting that the 6A pattern is linked to Hap B and may have originally occurred in the ancestors of Asian populations. PMID:27042357

  8. Unique AGG Interruption in the CGG Repeats of the FMR1 Gene Exclusively Found in Asians Linked to a Specific SNP Haplotype

    PubMed Central

    Limprasert, Pornprot; Thanakitgosate, Janpen; Jaruthamsophon, Kanoot; Sripo, Thanya

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited intellectual disability. It is caused by the occurrence of more than 200 pure CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene. Normal individuals have 6–54 CGG repeats with two or more stabilizing AGG interruptions occurring once every 9- or 10-CGG-repeat blocks in various populations. However, the unique (CGG)6AGG pattern, designated as 6A, has been exclusively reported in Asians. To examine the genetic background of AGG interruptions in the CGG repeats of the FMR1 gene, we studied 8 SNPs near the CGG repeats in 176 unrelated Thai males with 19–56 CGG repeats. Of these 176 samples, we identified AGG interruption patterns from 95 samples using direct DNA sequencing. We found that the common CGG repeat groups (29, 30, and 36) were associated with 3 common haplotypes, GCGGATAA (Hap A), TTCATCGC (Hap C), and GCCGTTAA (Hap B), respectively. The configurations of 9A9A9, 10A9A9, and 9A9A6A9 were commonly found in chromosomes with 29, 30, and 36 CGG repeats, respectively. Almost all chromosomes with Hap B (22/23) carried at least one 6A pattern, suggesting that the 6A pattern is linked to Hap B and may have originally occurred in the ancestors of Asian populations. PMID:27042357

  9. [Functional haplotypes of INCENP affect promoter activity and bovine semen quality].

    PubMed

    Juan, Liu; Yan, Sun; Qiang, Jiang; Chunhong, Yang; Jinming, Huang; Jianbin, Li; Minghai, Hou; Jifeng, Zhong; Changfa, Wang; Baoshen, Liu

    2016-01-01

    To explore the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region of the inner centromere protein (INCENP) gene and bovine semen quality, the haplotypes in 250 Chinese Holstein bulls were detected using PCR-RFLP method in this study. Two SNPs (g.-556 G>T, rs 136823901 and g.-692 C>T, rs 211010999) and three haplotypes (CG, TT, TG) were identified in the promoter region of INCENP. The genotype frequency and allele frequency of these two SNPs as well as the correlation between different SNP haplotype combinations and bovine semen quality were then analyzed. Our results showed that fresh sperm motility of the GT genotype was significantly higher than that of the GG genotype (P<0.05) at the SNP site g.-556 G>T, while fresh and frozen-thawed sperm motilities of the haplotype combinations H1H1(CCGG), H1H3(CTGT), H2H3(TTGT) and H3H3(TTTT) were significantly higher than that of H1H2 (P<0.05). To further study the possible mechanisms by which g.-556 G>T and g.-692 C>T affect semen quality, three haplotype plasmids were respectively transfected into MLTC-1 cells. The TG haplotype demonstrated the highest luciferase activity, suggesting that g.-556 G>T and g.-692 C>T are functional mutations which could regulate INCENP gene expression by affecting promoter activity and thus affect semen quality. PMID:26787524

  10. Factors affecting the power of haplotype markers in association studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important, unresolved question in genome-wide association studies is whether there are predictable differences in power between single-SNP and haplotype markers. In this study, we use coalescent simulations to compare power for single-SNP and haplotype markers under a number of different models ...

  11. Haplotyping Problem, A Clustering Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslahchi, Changiz; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Pezeshk, Hamid; Kargar, Mehdi; Poormohammadi, Hadi

    2007-09-01

    Construction of two haplotypes from a set of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) fragments is called haplotype reconstruction problem. One of the most popular computational model for this problem is Minimum Error Correction (MEC). Since MEC is an NP-hard problem, here we propose a novel heuristic algorithm based on clustering analysis in data mining for haplotype reconstruction problem. Based on hamming distance and similarity between two fragments, our iterative algorithm produces two clusters of fragments; then, in each iteration, the algorithm assigns a fragment to one of the clusters. Our results suggest that the algorithm has less reconstruction error rate in comparison with other algorithms.

  12. Haplotyping Problem, A Clustering Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Eslahchi, Changiz; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Pezeshk, Hamid; Kargar, Mehdi; Poormohammadi, Hadi

    2007-09-06

    Construction of two haplotypes from a set of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) fragments is called haplotype reconstruction problem. One of the most popular computational model for this problem is Minimum Error Correction (MEC). Since MEC is an NP-hard problem, here we propose a novel heuristic algorithm based on clustering analysis in data mining for haplotype reconstruction problem. Based on hamming distance and similarity between two fragments, our iterative algorithm produces two clusters of fragments; then, in each iteration, the algorithm assigns a fragment to one of the clusters. Our results suggest that the algorithm has less reconstruction error rate in comparison with other algorithms.

  13. Genome-Wide SNP Detection, Validation, and Development of an 8K SNP Array for Apple

    PubMed Central

    Chagn, David; Crowhurst, Ross N.; Troggio, Michela; Davey, Mark W.; Gilmore, Barbara; Lawley, Cindy; Vanderzande, Stijn; Hellens, Roger P.; Kumar, Satish; Cestaro, Alessandro; Velasco, Riccardo; Main, Dorrie; Rees, Jasper D.; Iezzoni, Amy; Mockler, Todd; Wilhelm, Larry; Van de Weg, Eric; Gardiner, Susan E.; Bassil, Nahla; Peace, Cameron

    2012-01-01

    As high-throughput genetic marker screening systems are essential for a range of genetics studies and plant breeding applications, the International RosBREED SNP Consortium (IRSC) has utilized the Illumina Infinium II system to develop a medium- to high-throughput SNP screening tool for genome-wide evaluation of allelic variation in apple (Malusdomestica) breeding germplasm. For genome-wide SNP discovery, 27 apple cultivars were chosen to represent worldwide breeding germplasm and re-sequenced at low coverage with the Illumina Genome Analyzer II. Following alignment of these sequences to the whole genome sequence of Golden Delicious, SNPs were identified using SoapSNP. A total of 2,113,120 SNPs were detected, corresponding to one SNP to every 288 bp of the genome. The Illumina GoldenGate assay was then used to validate a subset of 144 SNPs with a range of characteristics, using a set of 160 apple accessions. This validation assay enabled fine-tuning of the final subset of SNPs for the Illumina Infinium II system. The set of stringent filtering criteria developed allowed choice of a set of SNPs that not only exhibited an even distribution across the apple genome and a range of minor allele frequencies to ensure utility across germplasm, but also were located in putative exonic regions to maximize genotyping success rate. A total of 7867 apple SNPs was established for the IRSC apple 8K SNP array v1, of which 5554 were polymorphic after evaluation in segregating families and a germplasm collection. This publicly available genomics resource will provide an unprecedented resolution of SNP haplotypes, which will enable marker-locus-trait association discovery, description of the genetic architecture of quantitative traits, investigation of genetic variation (neutral and functional), and genomic selection in apple. PMID:22363718

  14. High-resolution HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 haplotype frequencies from the French Bone Marrow Donor Registry.

    PubMed

    Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Pappas, Derek James; Baouz, Amar; Balère, Marie-Lorraine; Garnier, Federico; Marry, Evelyne

    2015-05-01

    We have estimated human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype frequencies using the maximum likelihood mode, which accommodates typing ambiguities. The results of the frequency distribution of the 7015 haplotypes obtained are presented here. These include a total of 114 HLA-A, 185 HLA-B, and 76 HLA-DRB1 unique alleles at each locus. Across all populations, although the most common individual HLA alleles were HLA-A(∗)02:01 (29.0%), HLA-B(∗)07:02 (11.4%), and HLA-DRB1(∗)07:01 (15.9%), the most frequent haplotype was found to be HLA-A(∗)01:01∼B(∗)08:01∼DRB1(∗)03:01. PMID:25637665

  15. Male dominance rarely skews the frequency distribution of Y chromosome haplotypes in human populations

    PubMed Central

    Lansing, J. Stephen; Watkins, Joseph C.; Hallmark, Brian; Cox, Murray P.; Karafet, Tatiana M.; Sudoyo, Herawati; Hammer, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    A central tenet of evolutionary social science holds that behaviors, such as those associated with social dominance, produce fitness effects that are subject to cultural selection. However, evidence for such selection is inconclusive because it is based on short-term statistical associations between behavior and fertility. Here, we show that the evolutionary effects of dominance at the population level can be detected using noncoding regions of DNA. Highly variable polymorphisms on the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome can be used to trace lines of descent from a common male ancestor. Thus, it is possible to test for the persistence of differential fertility among patrilines. We examine haplotype distributions defined by 12 short tandem repeats in a sample of 1269 men from 41 Indonesian communities and test for departures from neutral mutation-drift equilibrium based on the Ewens sampling formula. Our tests reject the neutral model in only 5 communities. Analysis and simulations show that we have sufficient power to detect such departures under varying demographic conditions, including founder effects, bottlenecks, and migration, and at varying levels of social dominance. We conclude that patrilines seldom are dominant for more than a few generations, and thus traits or behaviors that are strictly paternally inherited are unlikely to be under strong cultural selection. PMID:18703660

  16. MHC haplotype frequencies in a UK breeding colony of Mauritian cynomolgus macaques mirror those found in a distinct population from the same geographic origin

    PubMed Central

    Mee, Edward T.; Badhan, Anjna; Karl, Julie A.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Cutler, Keith; Knapp, Leslie A.; Almond, Neil; O’Connor, David H.; Rose, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mauritian cynomolgus macaques have greatly restricted genetic diversity in the MHC region compared to other nonhuman primates; however the frequency of common MHC haplotypes among captive-bred populations has not been reported. Methods Microsatellite PCR was used to determine MHC haplotype frequencies among captive macaques at a UK breeding facility. Allele-specific PCR and Reference Strand Conformational Analysis were used to determine the allele expression profile of a subset of animals. Results Haplotypes H3 (21%) and H1 (19%) were most common in the captive population of Mauritian cynomolgus macaques. Predicted alleles were detected by allele-specific PCR-SSP in 99% of animals. Allele expression profiles were similar in animals with identical haplotypes. Conclusion Mauritian cynomolgus macaques in the UK breeding facility have restricted MHC diversity comparable to a previously described population. Microsatellite-derived haplotypes are highly predictive of allele expression. A selective breeding program has been established to produce MHC-identical animals for biomedical research. PMID:19018947

  17. The association of XRCC1 haplotypes and chromosomal damage levels in peripheral blood lymphocyte among coke-oven workers

    SciTech Connect

    Shuguang Leng; Juan Cheng; Linyuan Zhang; Yong Niu; Yufei Dai; Zufei Pan; Bin Li; Fengsheng He; Yuxin Zheng

    2005-05-15

    Theoretically, a haplotype has a higher level of heterozygosity than individual single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and the association study based on the haplotype may have an increased power for detecting disease associations compared with SNP-based analysis. In this study, we investigated the effects of four haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNP) and the inferred haplotype pairs of the X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene on chromosome damage detected by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. The study included 141 coke-oven workers with exposure to a high level of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 66 nonexposed controls. The frequencies of total MN and MNed cells were borderline associated with the Arg{sup 194}Trp polymorphism (P = 0.053 and P = 0.050, respectively) but not associated with the Arg{sup 280}His, Arg{sup 399}Gln and Gln{sup 632}Gln polymorphisms among coke-oven workers. Five haplotypes, including CGGG, TGGG, CAGG, CGAG, and CGGA, were inferred based on the four htSNPs of XRCC1 gene. The haplotype CGGG was associated with the decreased frequencies of total MN and MNed cells, and the haplotypes TGGG and CGAG were associated with the increased frequencies of total MN and MNed cells with adjustment for covariates among coke-oven workers. This study showed that the haplotypes derived from htSNPs in the XRCC1 gene were more likely than single SNPs to correlate with the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced chromosome damage among coke-oven workers.

  18. The evolution and diversity of TNF block haplotypes in European, Asian and Australian Aboriginal populations.

    PubMed

    Valente, F P; Tan, C R T; Temple, S E; Phipps, M; Witt, C S; Kaur, G; Gut, I; McGinn, S; Allcock, R J N; Chew, C S N; Price, P

    2009-10-01

    The region spanning the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) cluster in the human major histocompatibility complex is implicated in susceptibility to immunopathological disease, but ethnic differences and linkage disequilibrium have hampered identification of critical polymorphisms. Here, we investigate Europeans, Asians (Bidayuh, Chinese, Indian, Jehai, Malay, Temuan) and Australian Aborigines to provide a framework for disease-association studies. DNA from 999 unrelated healthy donors was genotyped at 38 loci, primarily in coding and promoter regions over a 60-kb region spanning seven genes near TNF. The PHASE algorithm was used to statistically infer TNF block haplotypes and estimate their frequencies in each population. The TNF block is carried as 31 haplotypes in all populations combined, with <19 in any single population. Only six haplotypes have a unique tag single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) valid for all populations, but seven haplotypes could be tagged with individual SNPs in selected populations. Four to eight TNF block haplotypes exist across all ethnicities, and hence must pre-date the divergence of these populations from a common ancestor >160,000 years ago. Some haplotypes are unique to isolated populations, but they do not contain unique SNP. Hence, they reflect restricted migration and/or extinction of some families rather than de novo mutation. PMID:19536152

  19. Haplotype uncertainty in association studies.

    PubMed

    Mensah, F K; Gilthorpe, M S; Davies, C F; Keen, L J; Adamson, P J; Roman, E; Morgan, G J; Bidwell, J L; Law, G R

    2007-05-01

    Inferring haplotypes from genotype data is commonly undertaken in population genetic association studies. Within such studies the importance of accounting for uncertainty in the inference of haplotypes is well recognised. We investigate the effectiveness of correcting for uncertainty using simple methods based on the output provided by the PHASE haplotype inference methodology. In case-control analyses investigating non-Hodgkin lymphoma and haplotypes associated with immune regulation we find little effect of making adjustment for uncertainty in inferred haplotypes. Using simulation we introduce a higher degree of haplotype uncertainty than was present in our study data. The simulation represents two genetic loci, physically close on a chromosome, forming haplotypes. Considering a range of allele frequencies, degrees of linkage between the loci, and frequency of missing genotype data, we detail the characteristics of genetic regions which may be susceptible to the influence of haplotype uncertainty. Within our evaluation we find that bias is avoided by considering haplotype probabilities or using multiple imputation, provided that for each of these methods haplotypes are inferred separately for case and control populations; furthermore using multiple imputation provides the facility to incorporate haplotype uncertainty in the estimation of confidence intervals. We discuss the implications of our findings within the context of the complexity of haplotype inference for larger marker rich regions as would typically be encountered in genetic analyses. PMID:17323369

  20. Determination of arylsulfatase A pseudodeficiency allele and haplotype frequency in the Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Ben Halim, Nizar; Dorboz, Imen; Kefi, Rym; Kharrat, Najla; Eymard-Pierre, Eleonore; Nagara, Majdi; Romdhane, Lilia; Ben Alaya-Bouafif, Nissaf; Rebai, Ahmed; Miladi, Najoua; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2016-03-01

    Arylsulfatase A (ASA) is a lysosomal enzyme involved in the catabolism of cerebroside sulfate. ASA deficiency is associated with metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD). Low ASA activities have also been reported in a more common condition with no apparent clinical consequences termed ASA pseudo-deficiency (ASA-PD) which is associated with two linked mutations in the ASA gene (c.1049A>G and c.*96A>G). This study aimed to investigate the frequency of the two ASA-PD variants and their linkage disequilibrium (LD) among Tunisians. ASA-PD variants were detected in 129 healthy Tunisians and their frequencies were compared to those described worldwide. The frequency of the PD allele was estimated at 17.4 % for the overall sample, with c.1049A>G and c.*96A>G frequencies of 25.6 and 17.4 %, respectively. This study also revealed a high LD between the two ASA-PD variants (r (2) = 0.61). Inter-population analysis revealed similarities in the ASA-PD genetic structure between Tunisians and populations from Middle East with c.*96A>G frequencies being the highest in the world. A significant North vs. South genetic differentiation in the ASA-PD frequency was also observed in Tunisian population who seems genetically intermediate between Africans, Middle-Easterners and Europeans. This is the first report on the allele frequency of the ASA-PD in North Africa, revealing a relatively high frequency of the PD allele among Tunisians. This study gives also evidence on the importance of discriminating ASA-PD allele from pathological mutations causing MLD and supporting enzymatic activity testing with both sulfatiduria determination and genetic testing in the differential diagnosis of MLD in the Tunisian population. PMID:26577183

  1. Rainfall-driven sex-ratio genes in African buffalo suggested by correlations between Y-chromosomal haplotype frequencies and foetal sex ratio

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Y-chromosomal diversity in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population of Kruger National Park (KNP) is characterized by rainfall-driven haplotype frequency shifts between year cohorts. Stable Y-chromosomal polymorphism is difficult to reconcile with haplotype frequency variations without assuming frequency-dependent selection or specific interactions in the population dynamics of X- and Y-chromosomal genes, since otherwise the fittest haplotype would inevitably sweep to fixation. Stable Y-chromosomal polymorphism due one of these factors only seems possible when there are Y-chromosomal distorters of an equal sex ratio, which act by negatively affecting X-gametes, or Y-chromosomal suppressors of a female-biased sex ratio. These sex-ratio (SR) genes modify (suppress) gamete transmission in their own favour at a fitness cost, allowing for stable polymorphism. Results Here we show temporal correlations between Y-chromosomal haplotype frequencies and foetal sex ratios in the KNP buffalo population, suggesting SR genes. Frequencies varied by a factor of five; too high to be alternatively explained by Y-chromosomal effects on pregnancy loss. Sex ratios were male-biased during wet and female-biased during dry periods (male proportion: 0.47-0.53), seasonally and annually. Both wet and dry periods were associated with a specific haplotype indicating a SR distorter and SR suppressor, respectively. Conclusions The distinctive properties suggested for explaining Y-chromosomal polymorphism in African buffalo may not be restricted to this species alone. SR genes may play a broader and largely overlooked role in mammalian sex-ratio variation. PMID:20416038

  2. Identification of HAVCR1 gene haplotypes associated with mRNA expression levels and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    García-Lozano, José Raúl; Abad, Cristina; Escalera, Ana; Torres, Belén; Fernández, Olga; García, Alicia; Sánchez-Román, Julio; Sabio, José-Mario; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Raya-Alvarez, Enrique; Núñez-Roldán, Antonio; Martín, Javier; González-Escribano, María Francisca

    2010-08-01

    Human HAVCR1 gene maps on 5q33.2, a region linked with susceptibility to allergic and autoimmune diseases. The aims of the present study were to define the haplotypes of HAVCR1 gene taking into account both HapMap Project SNP haplotypes and exon 4 variants, to investigate a possible relationship between these haplotypes and mRNA expression levels, and to assess whether HAVCR1 gene is involved in susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Genotyping of three ins/del variants in the exon 4 was performed by fragment length analysis. Five tag SNPs genotypes and mRNA levels were determined using TaqMan assays. We defined four major haplotypes in our population: the two major haplotypes (named haplotypes A and B) bear both the 5383_5397del variant and the two most common SNP sets found in the CEU population. Quantification analysis revealed that genotype B/B had the highest median of mRNA expression levels (vs. BX + XX, p < 0.0001). Additionally, frequency of the genotype BB was significantly higher in RA patients than in controls (12.3 vs. 5.9% in controls, p = 0.0046, p (c) = 0.014, OR = 2.23, 95% CI 1.23-4.10). Our results support a relationship between HAVCR1 haplotypes and mRNA expression levels, and suggest an association of this gene with autoimmune diseases. PMID:20549518

  3. Coding region SNP analysis to enhance dog mtDNA discrimination power in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Verscheure, Sophie; Backeljau, Thierry; Desmyter, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    The high population frequencies of three control region haplotypes contribute to the low discrimination power of the dog mtDNA control region. It also diminishes the evidential power of a match with one of these haplotypes in forensic casework. A mitochondrial genome study of 214 Belgian dogs suggested 26 polymorphic coding region sites that successfully resolved dogs with the three most frequent control region haplotypes. In this study, three SNP assays were developed to determine the identity of the 26 informative sites. The control region of 132 newly sampled dogs was sequenced and added to the study of 214 dogs. The assays were applied to 58 dogs of the haplotypes of interest, which confirmed their suitability for enhancing dog mtDNA discrimination power. In the Belgian population study of 346 dogs, the set of 26 sites divided the dogs into 25 clusters of mtGenome sequences with substantially lower population frequency estimates than their control region sequences. In case of a match with one of the three control region haplotypes, using these three SNP assays in conjunction with control region sequencing would augment the exclusion probability of dog mtDNA analysis from 92.9% to 97.0%. PMID:25299153

  4. High-Resolution Analyses of Human Leukocyte Antigens Allele and Haplotype Frequencies Based on 169,995 Volunteers from the China Bone Marrow Donor Registry Program

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Yang; Zhu, Fa-Ming; Li, Jian-Ping; Mao, Wei; Zhang, De-Mei; Liu, Meng-Li; Hei, Ai-Lian; Dai, Da-Peng; Jiang, Ping; Shan, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Bo-Wei; Zhu, Chuan-Fu; Shen, Jie; Deng, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Zheng-Lei; Yu, Wei-Jian; Chen, Qiang; Qiao, Yan-Hui; Zhu, Xiang-Ming; Lv, Rong; Li, Guo-Ying; Li, Guo-Liang; Li, Heng-Cong; Zhang, Xu; Pei, Bin; Jiao, Li-Xin; Shen, Gang; Liu, Ying; Feng, Zhi-Hui; Su, Yu-Ping; Xu, Zhao-Xia; Di, Wen-Ying; Jiang, Yao-Qin; Fu, Hong-Lei; Liu, Xiang-Jun; Liu, Xiang; Zhou, Mei-Zhen; Du, Dan; Liu, Qi; Han, Ying; Zhang, Zhi-Xin; Cai, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a widely used and effective therapy for hematopoietic malignant diseases and numerous other disorders. High-resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype frequency distributions not only facilitate individual donor searches but also determine the probability with which a particular patient can find HLA-matched donors in a registry. The frequencies of the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1 alleles and haplotypes were estimated among 169,995 Chinese volunteers using the sequencing-based typing (SBT) method. Totals of 191 HLA-A, 244 HLA-B, 146 HLA-C, 143 HLA-DRB1 and 47 HLA-DQB1 alleles were observed, which accounted for 6.98%, 7.06%, 6.46%, 9.11% and 7.91%, respectively, of the alleles in each locus in the world (IMGT 3.16 Release, Apr. 2014). Among the 100 most common haplotypes from the 169,995 individuals, nine distinct haplotypes displayed significant regionally specific distributions. Among these, three were predominant in the South China region (i.e., the 20th, 31st, and 81sthaplotypes), another three were predominant in the Southwest China region (i.e., the 68th, 79th, and 95th haplotypes), one was predominant in the South and Southwest China regions (the 18th haplotype), one was relatively common in the Northeast and North China regions (the 94th haplotype), and one was common in the Northeast, North and Northwest China (the 40th haplotype). In conclusion, this is the first to analyze high-resolution HLA diversities across the entire country of China, based on a detailed and complete data set that covered 31 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities. Specifically, we also evaluated the HLA matching probabilities within and between geographic regions and analyzed the regional differences in the HLA diversities in China. We believe that the data presented in this study might be useful for unrelated HLA-matched donor searches, donor registry planning, population genetic studies, and anthropogenesis studies. PMID:26421847

  5. High-Resolution Analyses of Human Leukocyte Antigens Allele and Haplotype Frequencies Based on 169,995 Volunteers from the China Bone Marrow Donor Registry Program.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Yang; Zhu, Fa-Ming; Li, Jian-Ping; Mao, Wei; Zhang, De-Mei; Liu, Meng-Li; Hei, Ai-Lian; Dai, Da-Peng; Jiang, Ping; Shan, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Bo-Wei; Zhu, Chuan-Fu; Shen, Jie; Deng, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Zheng-Lei; Yu, Wei-Jian; Chen, Qiang; Qiao, Yan-Hui; Zhu, Xiang-Ming; Lv, Rong; Li, Guo-Ying; Li, Guo-Liang; Li, Heng-Cong; Zhang, Xu; Pei, Bin; Jiao, Li-Xin; Shen, Gang; Liu, Ying; Feng, Zhi-Hui; Su, Yu-Ping; Xu, Zhao-Xia; Di, Wen-Ying; Jiang, Yao-Qin; Fu, Hong-Lei; Liu, Xiang-Jun; Liu, Xiang; Zhou, Mei-Zhen; Du, Dan; Liu, Qi; Han, Ying; Zhang, Zhi-Xin; Cai, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a widely used and effective therapy for hematopoietic malignant diseases and numerous other disorders. High-resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype frequency distributions not only facilitate individual donor searches but also determine the probability with which a particular patient can find HLA-matched donors in a registry. The frequencies of the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1 alleles and haplotypes were estimated among 169,995 Chinese volunteers using the sequencing-based typing (SBT) method. Totals of 191 HLA-A, 244 HLA-B, 146 HLA-C, 143 HLA-DRB1 and 47 HLA-DQB1 alleles were observed, which accounted for 6.98%, 7.06%, 6.46%, 9.11% and 7.91%, respectively, of the alleles in each locus in the world (IMGT 3.16 Release, Apr. 2014). Among the 100 most common haplotypes from the 169,995 individuals, nine distinct haplotypes displayed significant regionally specific distributions. Among these, three were predominant in the South China region (i.e., the 20th, 31st, and 81sthaplotypes), another three were predominant in the Southwest China region (i.e., the 68th, 79th, and 95th haplotypes), one was predominant in the South and Southwest China regions (the 18th haplotype), one was relatively common in the Northeast and North China regions (the 94th haplotype), and one was common in the Northeast, North and Northwest China (the 40th haplotype). In conclusion, this is the first to analyze high-resolution HLA diversities across the entire country of China, based on a detailed and complete data set that covered 31 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities. Specifically, we also evaluated the HLA matching probabilities within and between geographic regions and analyzed the regional differences in the HLA diversities in China. We believe that the data presented in this study might be useful for unrelated HLA-matched donor searches, donor registry planning, population genetic studies, and anthropogenesis studies. PMID:26421847

  6. Genotype, allele and haplotype frequencies of four TCL1A gene polymorphisms associated with musculoskeletal toxicity in the South Indian descent

    PubMed Central

    Umamaheswaran, Gurusamy; Dkhar, Steven Aibor; Kumar, Annan Sudarsan Arun; Srinivasa, Rao Katiboina; Kadambari, Dharanipragada; Adithan, Chandrasekaran

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Decline in circulating estrogen levels causes lessening of bone mass accompanied with musculoskeletal pain, which is the primary cause of treatment discontinuation in patients taking aromatase inhibitors. Evidence from recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) suggests that the genetic variability underlying TCL1A gene increases the risk of aromatase inhibitors (AIs) - induced musculoskeletal toxicity. Currently, no data is available on the frequency distribution of TCL1A gene polymorphisms in Indians. Methods: In this pilot study, we used TaqMan fluorescent probes to assess the genotypes of four TCL1A gene polymorphisms associated with musculoskeletal toxicity in 247 healthy homogenous South Indian subjects on real time thermocycler. Haplotype estimation and pairwise linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis were executed by Haploview. Results: The incidence of polymorphic variant allele (G) frequencies of rs7158782, rs7159713, rs2369049 and rs11849538 were 22.1%, 23.5%, 18.2% and 22.9% in the study population, respectively. The polymorphisms were found to be in complete LD with each other. Four different haplotypes, each of which having a frequency of above 1% were inferred in South Indians using an expectation-maximization algorithm. Notably, three haplotypes were found to be population specific viz H4 A-A-A-G (1.2%) for South India, H5 G-G-A-C (1.3%) for JPT and H6 G-G-G-C (40.4%) for YRI. Further, H3 G-G-A-G (2.3-16.3%) haplotype occurs primarily in Asians and is virtually absent in Africans. Overall, the genetic variability and haplotype profile of South Indian population revealed significant inter-racial variability compared with HapMap data. Conclusion: This documentation contributes for further investigations on the pharmacogenetics of AIs in South Indians. PMID:25035853

  7. Discovery of high frequencies of the Gly-Ile haplotype of TLR4 in Indian populations requires reformulation of the evolutionary model of its maintenance.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Souvik; Ganguli, Debdutta; Majumder, Partha P

    2013-10-01

    The Out-of-Africa migration of modern humans has led to the evolution of immunity genes in general, particularly those related to direct host-pathogen interactions. The Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is one such cell-surface pattern recognition receptor that has been associated with susceptibility and resistance to Gram-negative infections. In this report, we have studied the genetic variation in the TLR4 gene across pre- and post-agricultural populations in India. Two non-synonymous SNPs at the loci Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile are genotyped in 266 individuals from these populations. Previous studies have shown that specific alleles at these two loci are associated with inflammatory response and also claimed the complete absence of the Gly-Ile (double-mutated) haplotype in populations from Asia and America due to some evolutionary disadvantage owing to septic shock. Contrary to such claims, our study reports for the first time, high (10%) to moderate (3-6%) frequencies of the Gly-Ile haplotype in one non-tribal and two tribal populations of India respectively. The presence of this haplotype in ancient tribal populations of India indicates the possibility of its important role in pathogen recognition or susceptibility to infections. Therefore, natural selection, not merely genetic drift, may have played an important role in shaping the frequency distribution of haplotypes at these two loci in TLR4. For a more global perspective, we have also estimated the frequency of this haplotype in all the 14 continental populations included in the 1000 Genomes Project. Our study provides direct evidence for the reformulation of existing models of evolutionary maintenance of these polymorphisms in the TLR4 gene. PMID:23892373

  8. APC Yin-Yang haplotype associated with colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Garre, P; DE LA Hoya, M; Iniesta, P; Romera, A; Llovet, P; Gonzalez, S; Perez-Segura, P; Capella, G; Diaz-Rubio, E; Caldes, T

    2010-09-01

    The Yin-Yang haplotype is defined as two mismatched haplotypes (Yin and Yang) representing the majority of the existing haplotypes in a particular genomic region. The human adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene shows a Yin-Yang haplotype pattern accounting for 84% of all of the haplotypes existing in the Spanish population. Several association studies have been published regarding APC gene variants (SNPs and haplotypes) and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. However, no studies concerning diplotype structure and CRC risk have been conducted. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the APC Yin-Yang homozygote diplotype is over-represented in patients with sporadic CRC when compared to its distribution in controls, and its association with CRC risk. TaqMan() assays were used to genotype three tagSNPs selected across the APC Yin-Yang region. Frequencies of the APC Yin-Yang tagSNP alleles, haplotype and diplotype of 378 CRC cases and 642 controls were compared. Two Spanish CRC group samples were included [Hospital Clnico San Carlos in Madrid (HCSC) and Instituto Cataln de Oncologa in Barcelona (ICO)]. Analysis of 157 consecutive CRC patients and 405 control subjects from HCSC showed a significative effect for the risk of CRC (OR=1.93; 95% CI 1.32-2.81; P=0.001). However, this effect was not confirmed in 221 CRC patients and 237 control subjects from ICO (OR=0.89; 95% CI 0.61-1.28; P=0.521). We found a significant association between the APC homozygote Yin-Yang diplotype and the risk of colorectal cancer in the HCSC samples. However, we did not observe this association in the ICO samples. These observations suggest that a study with a larger Spanish cohort is necessary to confirm the effects of the APC Yin-Yang diplotype on the risk of CRC. PMID:22993613

  9. HaplotypeCN: copy number haplotype inference with Hidden Markov Model and localized haplotype clustering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Jen; Chen, Yu-Tin; Hsu, Shu-Ni; Peng, Chien-Hua; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Hsieh, Wen-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) has been reported to be associated with disease and various cancers. Hence, identifying the accurate position and the type of CNV is currently a critical issue. There are many tools targeting on detecting CNV regions, constructing haplotype phases on CNV regions, or estimating the numerical copy numbers. However, none of them can do all of the three tasks at the same time. This paper presents a method based on Hidden Markov Model to detect parent specific copy number change on both chromosomes with signals from SNP arrays. A haplotype tree is constructed with dynamic branch merging to model the transition of the copy number status of the two alleles assessed at each SNP locus. The emission models are constructed for the genotypes formed with the two haplotypes. The proposed method can provide the segmentation points of the CNV regions as well as the haplotype phasing for the allelic status on each chromosome. The estimated copy numbers are provided as fractional numbers, which can accommodate the somatic mutation in cancer specimens that usually consist of heterogeneous cell populations. The algorithm is evaluated on simulated data and the previously published regions of CNV of the 270 HapMap individuals. The results were compared with five popular methods: PennCNV, genoCN, COKGEN, QuantiSNP and cnvHap. The application on oral cancer samples demonstrates how the proposed method can facilitate clinical association studies. The proposed algorithm exhibits comparable sensitivity of the CNV regions to the best algorithm in our genome-wide study and demonstrates the highest detection rate in SNP dense regions. In addition, we provide better haplotype phasing accuracy than similar approaches. The clinical association carried out with our fractional estimate of copy numbers in the cancer samples provides better detection power than that with integer copy number states. PMID:24849202

  10. HaplotypeCN: Copy Number Haplotype Inference with Hidden Markov Model and Localized Haplotype Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen-Jen; Chen, Yu-Tin; Hsu, Shu-Ni; Peng, Chien-Hua; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Hsieh, Wen-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) has been reported to be associated with disease and various cancers. Hence, identifying the accurate position and the type of CNV is currently a critical issue. There are many tools targeting on detecting CNV regions, constructing haplotype phases on CNV regions, or estimating the numerical copy numbers. However, none of them can do all of the three tasks at the same time. This paper presents a method based on Hidden Markov Model to detect parent specific copy number change on both chromosomes with signals from SNP arrays. A haplotype tree is constructed with dynamic branch merging to model the transition of the copy number status of the two alleles assessed at each SNP locus. The emission models are constructed for the genotypes formed with the two haplotypes. The proposed method can provide the segmentation points of the CNV regions as well as the haplotype phasing for the allelic status on each chromosome. The estimated copy numbers are provided as fractional numbers, which can accommodate the somatic mutation in cancer specimens that usually consist of heterogeneous cell populations. The algorithm is evaluated on simulated data and the previously published regions of CNV of the 270 HapMap individuals. The results were compared with five popular methods: PennCNV, genoCN, COKGEN, QuantiSNP and cnvHap. The application on oral cancer samples demonstrates how the proposed method can facilitate clinical association studies. The proposed algorithm exhibits comparable sensitivity of the CNV regions to the best algorithm in our genome-wide study and demonstrates the highest detection rate in SNP dense regions. In addition, we provide better haplotype phasing accuracy than similar approaches. The clinical association carried out with our fractional estimate of copy numbers in the cancer samples provides better detection power than that with integer copy number states. PMID:24849202

  11. Haplotype-based approach to known MS-associated regions increases the amount of explained risk

    PubMed Central

    Khankhanian, Pouya; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Lizee, Antoine; Goodin, Douglas S

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS), using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), have yielded 110 non-human leucocyte antigen genomic regions that are associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). Despite this large number of associations, however, only 28% of MS-heritability can currently be explained. Here we compare the use of multi-SNP-haplotypes to the use of single-SNPs as alternative methods to describe MS genetic risk. SNP-haplotypes (of various lengths from 1 up to 15 contiguous SNPs) were constructed at each of the 110 previously identified, MS-associated, genomic regions. Even after correcting for the larger number of statistical comparisons made when using the haplotype-method, in 32 of the regions, the SNP-haplotype based model was markedly more significant than the single-SNP based model. By contrast, in no region was the single-SNP based model similarly more significant than the SNP-haplotype based model. Moreover, when we included the 932 MS-associated SNP-haplotypes (that we identified from 102 regions) as independent variables into a logistic linear model, the amount of MS-heritability, as assessed by Nagelkerke's R-squared, was 38%, which was considerably better than 29%, which was obtained by using only single-SNPs. This study demonstrates that SNP-haplotypes can be used to fine-map the genetic associations within regions of interest previously identified by single-SNP GWAS. Moreover, the amount of the MS genetic risk explained by the SNP-haplotype associations in the 110 MS-associated genomic regions was considerably greater when using SNP-haplotypes than when using single-SNPs. Also, the use of SNP-haplotypes can lead to the discovery of new regions of interest, which have not been identified by a single-SNP GWAS. PMID:26185143

  12. Evaluating the Feasibility of Fitting Haplotype Effects as Random: Variance Component Estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fitting haplotypes as random effects in association studies may prevent overestimation of haplotypic effects with low frequencies. The objective was to determine whether haplotypic variance could be accurately estimated. Using simulation, haplotypic effects were deterministically assigned to eithe...

  13. HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies of 14 529 Chinese Han bone marrow donors living in Dalian, China.

    PubMed

    Shao, L N; Zhang, S T; Yu, W J; Zhou, S H; Duan, Y; Pan, L Z; Wang, N; Hu, Y

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the allele and haplotype frequencies of HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 loci in Dalian Chinese Han population using blood samples of unrelated marrow donors who live in Dalian. The genetic relationship between Dalian and different regions worldwide was further explored based on HLA status of different populations. A total of 14 529 samples were genotyped at 2-digit level only by sequence-specific oligonucleotide and sequence-based typing methods. Allele frequencies of HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 were calculated by the direct counting method. Haplotype frequencies and linkage disequilibrium (LD) values were calculated by the maximum likelihood method. FST values were calculated by allele frequency data of each locus. Phylogeny tree of Nei's DA genetic distances was constructed by the UPGMA method. HLA-A*02 was the most frequent allele at HLA-A locus followed by A*11 and A*24. Alleles at HLA-B locus ranked in decreasing order by frequency were B*40, B*15 and B*13. The three highest frequency alleles were DRB1*15, DRB1*09 and DRB1*12 at HLA-DRB1 locus. A*30-B*13-DRB1*07 was the most frequent three-locus haplotype. For the population relationships, Dalian had a relative close genetic relationship with Liaoning and Yantai-Weihai and a relative distant genetic relationship with Australia. The information obtained in this study may provide useful information for anthropological studies, for disease-association studies and helping bone marrow transplantation patients to search HLA-matched donors. PMID:26846461

  14. A human leukocyte antigen locus haplotype confers risk for allopurinol-related adverse effects in Caucasian patients with gout.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rebecca L; Wallace, Mary C; Harrison, Andrew; Dalbeth, Nicola; Merriman, Tony R; Stamp, Lisa K

    2015-08-01

    A human leukocyte antigen haplotype comprising six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) confers risk for allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome in Caucasians. The objective of the current study was to test for association of this haplotype with other, less severe adverse effects (AEs) of allopurinol therapy in a large New Zealand gout cohort. A total of 626 Caucasian and 766 Polynesian patients were genotyped for six SNPs (rs2844665, rs9263715, rs3130931, rs3130501, rs3094188, rs9469003) using TaqMan SNP assays. The CACGAC haplotype occurred at a frequency of 0.018 in Caucasians and 0.009 in Polynesians. The CACGAC haplotype occurred at a significantly higher frequency in Caucasian patients who experienced allopurinol-related AEs (13.3 vs. 1.7%, P=8.9e-06, odds ratio=8.9, 95% confidence interval 2.8-27.9), but it was not associated with overall allopurinol toxicity in Polynesians (P>0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate the potential utility of this six-SNP haplotype as a predictor of milder allopurinol AEs. PMID:26049586

  15. SNP genotyping by heteroduplex analysis.

    PubMed

    Paniego, Norma; Fusari, Corina; Lia, Verónica; Puebla, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Heteroduplex-based genotyping methods have proven to be technologically effective and economically efficient for low- to medium-range throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) determination. In this chapter we describe two protocols that were successfully applied for SNP detection and haplotype analysis of candidate genes in association studies. The protocols involve (1) enzymatic mismatch cleavage with endonuclease CEL1 from celery, associated with fragment separation using capillary electrophoresis (CEL1 cleavage), and (2) differential retention of the homo/heteroduplex DNA molecules under partial denaturing conditions on ion pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography (dHPLC). Both methods are complementary since dHPLC is more versatile than CEL1 cleavage for identifying multiple SNP per target region, and the latter is easily optimized for sequences with fewer SNPs or small insertion/deletion polymorphisms. Besides, CEL1 cleavage is a powerful method to localize the position of the mutation when fragment resolution is done using capillary electrophoresis. PMID:25373754

  16. Concurrent whole-genome haplotyping and copy-number profiling of single cells.

    PubMed

    Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Mateiu, Ligia; Melotte, Cindy; Van der Aa, Niels; Kumar, Parveen; Das, Rakhi; Theunis, Koen; Cheng, Jiqiu; Legius, Eric; Moreau, Yves; Debrock, Sophie; D'Hooghe, Thomas; Verdyck, Pieter; De Rycke, Martine; Sermon, Karen; Vermeesch, Joris R; Voet, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    Methods for haplotyping and DNA copy-number typing of single cells are paramount for studying genomic heterogeneity and enabling genetic diagnosis. Before analyzing the DNA of a single cell by microarray or next-generation sequencing, a whole-genome amplification (WGA) process is required, but it substantially distorts the frequency and composition of the cell's alleles. As a consequence, haplotyping methods suffer from error-prone discrete SNP genotypes (AA, AB, BB) and DNA copy-number profiling remains difficult because true DNA copy-number aberrations have to be discriminated from WGA artifacts. Here, we developed a single-cell genome analysis method that reconstructs genome-wide haplotype architectures as well as the copy-number and segregational origin of those haplotypes by employing phased parental genotypes and deciphering WGA-distorted SNP B-allele fractions via a process we coin haplarithmisis. We demonstrate that the method can be applied as a generic method for preimplantation genetic diagnosis on single cells biopsied from human embryos, enabling diagnosis of disease alleles genome wide as well as numerical and structural chromosomal anomalies. Moreover, meiotic segregation errors can be distinguished from mitotic ones. PMID:25983246

  17. Concurrent Whole-Genome Haplotyping and Copy-Number Profiling of Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Mateiu, Ligia; Melotte, Cindy; Van der Aa, Niels; Kumar, Parveen; Das, Rakhi; Theunis, Koen; Cheng, Jiqiu; Legius, Eric; Moreau, Yves; Debrock, Sophie; D’Hooghe, Thomas; Verdyck, Pieter; De Rycke, Martine; Sermon, Karen; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Voet, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Methods for haplotyping and DNA copy-number typing of single cells are paramount for studying genomic heterogeneity and enabling genetic diagnosis. Before analyzing the DNA of a single cell by microarray or next-generation sequencing, a whole-genome amplification (WGA) process is required, but it substantially distorts the frequency and composition of the cell’s alleles. As a consequence, haplotyping methods suffer from error-prone discrete SNP genotypes (AA, AB, BB) and DNA copy-number profiling remains difficult because true DNA copy-number aberrations have to be discriminated from WGA artifacts. Here, we developed a single-cell genome analysis method that reconstructs genome-wide haplotype architectures as well as the copy-number and segregational origin of those haplotypes by employing phased parental genotypes and deciphering WGA-distorted SNP B-allele fractions via a process we coin haplarithmisis. We demonstrate that the method can be applied as a generic method for preimplantation genetic diagnosis on single cells biopsied from human embryos, enabling diagnosis of disease alleles genome wide as well as numerical and structural chromosomal anomalies. Moreover, meiotic segregation errors can be distinguished from mitotic ones. PMID:25983246

  18. Following the footprints of polymorphic inversions on SNP data: from detection to association tests

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, Alejandro; González, Juan R.

    2015-01-01

    Inversion polymorphisms have important phenotypic and evolutionary consequences in humans. Two different methodologies have been used to infer inversions from SNP dense data, enabling the use of large cohorts for their study. One approach relies on the differences in linkage disequilibrium across breakpoints; the other one captures the internal haplotype groups that tag the inversion status of chromosomes. In this article, we assessed the convergence of the two methods in the detection of 20 human inversions that have been reported in the literature. The methods converged in four inversions including inv-8p23, for which we studied its association with low-BMI in American children. Using a novel haplotype tagging method with control on inversion ancestry, we computed the frequency of inv-8p23 in two American cohorts and observed inversion haplotype admixture. Accounting for haplotype ancestry, we found that the European inverted allele in children carries a recessive risk of underweight, validated in an independent Spanish cohort (combined: OR= 2.00, P = 0.001). While the footprints of inversions on SNP data are complex, we show that systematic analyses, such as convergence of different methods and controlling for ancestry, can reveal the contribution of inversions to the ancestral composition of populations and to the heritability of human disease. PMID:25672393

  19. µ-Calpain, calpastatin, and growth hormone receptor genetic effects on preweaning performance, carcass quality traits, and residual variance of tenderness in Angus cattle selected to increase minor haplotype ... frequencies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic marker effects and interactions are estimated with poor precision when minor marker allele frequencies are low. An Angus population was subjected to marker assisted selection for multiple years to increase divergent haplotype and minor marker allele frequencies to 1) estimate effect size an...

  20. HapScope: a software system for automated and visual analysis of functionally annotated haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinghui; Rowe, William L.; Struewing, Jeffery P.; Buetow, Kenneth H.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a software analysis package, HapScope, which includes a comprehensive analysis pipeline and a sophisticated visualization tool for analyzing functionally annotated haplotypes. The HapScope analysis pipeline supports: (i) computational haplotype construction with an expectation-maximization or Bayesian statistical algorithm; (ii) SNP classification by protein coding change, homology to model organisms or putative regulatory regions; and (iii) minimum SNP subset selection by either a Brute Force Algorithm or a Greedy Partition Algorithm. The HapScope viewer displays genomic structure with haplotype information in an integrated environment, providing eight alternative views for assessing genetic and functional correlation. It has a user-friendly interface for: (i) haplotype block visualization; (ii) SNP subset selection; (iii) haplotype consolidation with subset SNP markers; (iv) incorporation of both experimentally determined haplotypes and computational results; and (v) data export for additional analysis. Comparison of haplotypes constructed by the statistical algorithms with those determined experimentally shows variation in haplotype prediction accuracies in genomic regions with different levels of nucleotide diversity. We have applied HapScope in analyzing haplotypes for candidate genes and genomic regions with extensive SNP and genotype data. We envision that the systematic approach of integrating functional genomic analysis with population haplotypes, supported by HapScope, will greatly facilitate current genetic disease research. PMID:12466546

  1. Association of TERC and OBFC1 Haplotypes with Mean Leukocyte Telomere Length and Risk for Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maubaret, Cécilia G.; Salpea, Klelia D.; Romanoski, Casey E.; Folkersen, Lasse; Cooper, Jackie A.; Stephanou, Coralea; Wah Li, Ka; Palmen, Jutta; Hamsten, Anders; Neil, Andrew; Stephens, Jeffrey W.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Eriksson, Per; Talmud, Philippa J.; Humphries, Steve E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To replicate the associations of leukocyte telomere length (LTL) with variants at four loci and to investigate their associations with coronary heart disease (CHD) and type II diabetes (T2D), in order to examine possible causal effects of telomere maintenance machinery on disease aetiology. Methods Four SNPs at three loci BICD1 (rs2630578 GγC), 18q12.2 (rs2162440 GγT), and OBFC1 (rs10786775 CγG, rs11591710 AγC) were genotyped in four studies comprised of 2353 subjects out of which 1148 had CHD and 566 T2D. Three SNPs (rs12696304 CγG, rs10936601G>T and rs16847897 GγC) at the TERC locus were genotyped in these four studies, in addition to an offspring study of 765 healthy students. For all samples, LTL had been measured using a real-time PCR-based method. Results Only one SNP was associated with a significant effect on LTL, with the minor allele G of OBFC1 rs10786775 SNP being associated with longer LTL (β=0.029, P=0.04). No SNPs were significantly associated with CHD or T2D. For OBFC1 the haplotype carrying both rare alleles (rs10786775G and rs11591710C, haplotype frequency 0.089) was associated with lower CHD prevalence (OR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.61–0.97; P= 0.03). The TERC haplotype GTC (rs12696304G, rs10936601T and rs16847897C, haplotype frequency 0.210) was associated with lower risk for both CHD (OR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.75-0.99; P=0.04) and T2D (OR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.61–0.91; P= 0.004), with no effect on LTL. Only the last association remained after adjusting for multiple testing. Conclusion Of reported associations, only that between the OBFC1 rs10786775 SNP and LTL was confirmed, although our study has a limited power to detect modest effects. A 2-SNP OBFC1 haplotype was associated with higher risk of CHD, and a 3-SNP TERC haplotype was associated with both higher risk of CHD and T2D. Further work is required to confirm these results and explore the mechanisms of these effects. PMID:24349443

  2. Frequency of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 Alleles and Haplotype Association in Syrian Population.

    PubMed

    Jazairi, Batoul; Khansaa, Issam; Ikhtiar, Adnan; Murad, Hossam

    2016-02-01

    The study of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) system is very important in health and diseases. As the HLA loci are the most polymorphic in the human genome, it plays a very important role in the immune responses to self and nonself antigens. In the light of the growing importance of typing the HLA alleles in transplantation, autoimmune diseases, cancer, and many other diseases, we studied 225 unrelated healthy Syrian subjects for their HLA class II genotypes in an attempt to reveal the distribution of the HLA (DRB1-DQB1) alleles in the general Syrian population. Our results revealed that the most common alleles for the DRB1 locus were DRB1*11 (26.4%), DRB1*04 (14%), and DRB1*07 (12%). However, the most frequent alleles for the DQB1 locus were DQB1*03 (40.9%) and DQB1*05 (25.1%). The frequent of two-locus haplotypes carry the most frequent alleles at these loci. The most frequently detected class II ''haplotypes'' are DRB1*11-DQB1*03 (8.9%), DRB1*01-DQB1*05 (3.6%), and DRB1*04-DQB1*03 (2.7%). Compared with other populations, our result, deduced from the analysis of genetic distances and the construction of neighbor-joining (NJ) dendrogram, and principal component analysis (PCA) indicates that Syrians are related to Middle Eastern populations. Our data about the Syrian population will aid researchers in studying the relation of HLA class II with different diseases in a Syrian population and will add to the available international literature associated with these loci. PMID:26853713

  3. Increased frequency and function of KIR2DL1-3+ NK cells in primary HIV-1 infection are determined by HLA-C group haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Körner, Christian; Granoff, Mitchell E.; Amero, Molly A.; Sirignano, Michael N.; Vaidya, Sagar A.; Jost, Stephanie; Allen, Todd M.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Altfeld, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Acquisition and maintenance of NK cell function is mediated by inhibitory killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) through the interaction with HLA class I molecules. Recently, HLA-C expression levels were shown to be correlated with protection against multiple outcomes of HIV-1 infection; however the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. As HLA-C is the natural ligand for the inhibitory receptors KIR2DL1 and KIR2DL2/3, we sought to determine whether HLA-C group haplotypes affect NK cell responses during primary HIV-1 infection. The phenotypes and functional capacity of NK cells derived from HIV-1(+) and HIV-1(-) individuals were assessed (N=42 and N=40, respectively). HIV-1 infection was associated with an increased frequency of KIR2DL1-3+ NK cells. Further analysis showed that KIR2DL1+ NK cells were selectively increased in individuals homozygous for HLA-C2, while HLA-C1-homozygous individuals displayed increased proportions of KIR2DL2/3+ NK cells. KIR2DL1-3+ NK cells were furthermore more polyfunctional during primary HIV-1 infection in individuals also encoding for their cognate HLA-C group haplotypes as measured by degranulation and cytokine production. These results identify a novel relationship between HLA-C and KIR2DL+ NK cell subsets and demonstrate that HLA-C-mediated licensing modulates NK cell responses to primary HIV-1 infection. PMID:25043727

  4. Mutation and haplotype studies of familial Mediterranean fever reveal new ancestral relationships and evidence for a high carrier frequency with reduced penetrance in the Ashkenazi Jewish population.

    PubMed Central

    Aksentijevich, I; Torosyan, Y; Samuels, J; Centola, M; Pras, E; Chae, J J; Oddoux, C; Wood, G; Azzaro, M P; Palumbo, G; Giustolisi, R; Pras, M; Ostrer, H; Kastner, D L

    1999-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a recessive disorder characterized by episodes of fever with serositis or synovitis. The FMF gene (MEFV) was cloned recently, and four missense mutations were identified. Here we present data from non-Ashkenazi Jewish and Arab patients in whom we had not originally found mutations and from a new, more ethnically diverse panel. Among 90 symptomatic mutation-positive individuals, 11 mutations accounted for 79% of carrier chromosomes. Of the two mutations that are novel, one alters the same residue (680) as a previously known mutation, and the other (P369S) is located in exon 3. Consistent with another recent report, the E148Q mutation was observed in patients of several ethnicities and on multiple microsatellite haplotypes, but haplotype data indicate an ancestral relationships between non-Jewish Italian and Ashkenazi Jewish patients with FMF and other affected populations. Among approximately 200 anonymous Ashkenazi Jewish DNA samples, the MEFV carrier frequency was 21%, with E148Q the most common mutation. Several lines of evidence indicate reduced penetrance among Ashkenazi Jews, especially for E148Q, P369S, and K695R. Nevertheless, E148Q helps account for recessive inheritance in an Ashkenazi family previously reported as an unusual case of dominantly inherited FMF. The presence of three frequent MEFV mutations in multiple Mediterranean populations strongly suggests a heterozygote advantage in this geographic region. PMID:10090880

  5. TUMOR HAPLOTYPE ASSEMBLY ALGORITHMS FOR CANCER GENOMICS

    PubMed Central

    AGUIAR, DEREK; WONG, WENDY S.W.; ISTRAIL, SORIN

    2014-01-01

    The growing availability of inexpensive high-throughput sequence data is enabling researchers to sequence tumor populations within a single individual at high coverage. But, cancer genome sequence evolution and mutational phenomena like driver mutations and gene fusions are difficult to investigate without first reconstructing tumor haplotype sequences. Haplotype assembly of single individual tumor populations is an exceedingly difficult task complicated by tumor haplotype heterogeneity, tumor or normal cell sequence contamination, polyploidy, and complex patterns of variation. While computational and experimental haplotype phasing of diploid genomes has seen much progress in recent years, haplotype assembly in cancer genomes remains uncharted territory. In this work, we describe HapCompass-Tumor a computational modeling and algorithmic framework for haplotype assembly of copy number variable cancer genomes containing haplotypes at different frequencies and complex variation. We extend our polyploid haplotype assembly model and present novel algorithms for (1) complex variations, including copy number changes, as varying numbers of disjoint paths in an associated graph, (2) variable haplotype frequencies and contamination, and (3) computation of tumor haplotypes using simple cycles of the compass graph which constrain the space of haplotype assembly solutions. The model and algorithm are implemented in the software package HapCompass-Tumor which is available for download from http://www.brown.edu/Research/Istrail_Lab/. PMID:24297529

  6. Human leukocyte antigen class II (DRB1 and DQB1) alleles and haplotypes frequencies in patients with pemphigus vulgaris among the Serbian population.

    PubMed

    Zivanovic, D; Bojic, S; Medenica, L; Andric, Z; Popadic, D

    2016-05-01

    The etiology of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is multifactorial and includes genetic, environmental, hormonal, and immunological factors. Inheritance of certain Human class II leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles is by far the best-established predisposing factor for the development of PV. Class II HLA alleles vary among racial/ethnic backgrounds. We have determined an association between HLA class II alleles and PV among the Serbian population. A total of 72 patients with confirmed diagnosis of PV were genotyped for HLA class II alleles. HLA frequencies were compared with unrelated healthy bone marrow donors. The statistical significance of differences between patients and controls was evaluated using Fisher's exact test. The DRB1*04 and DRB1*14 allelic groups were associated with PV (P adj = 4.45 × 10(-13) and 4.06 × 10(-19) respectively), while HLA-DRB1*11 was negatively associated with PV (P adj = 0.0067) suggesting a protective role. DRB1*04:02, DRB1*14:04, DQB1*03:02 and DQB1*05:03 alleles were shown to be strongly associated with PV (P adj = 1.63 × 10(-12) , 5.20 × 10(-7) , 1.28 × 10(-6) , and 4.44 × 10(-5) , respectively). The frequency of HLA DRB1*04-DQB1*03 and HLA DRB1*14-DQB1*05 haplotypes in PV patients was significantly higher than in controls (31.3% vs 8.8%, P adj =7.66 × 10(-8) and 30.6% vs 6.3%, P adj = 3.22 × 10(-10) , respectively). At high-resolution level, statistical significance was observed in HLA-DRB1*04:02-DQB1*03:02 and HLA-DRB1*14:04-DQB1*05:03 haplotypes (P adj = 5.55 × 10(-12) , and P adj = 3.91 × 10(-6) , respectively). Our findings suggest that HLA-DRB1*04:02, DRB1*14:04, HLA-DQB1* 03:02 and DQB1*05:03 alleles and HLA-DRB1*04:02-DQB1*03:02 and HLA-DRB1*14:04-DQB1*05:03 haplotypes are genetic markers for susceptibility for PV, while DRB1*11 allelic group appears protective in Serbian population. PMID:27072514

  7. HLA-A, B and DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies in volunteer bone marrow donors from the north of Parana State

    PubMed Central

    Bardi, Marlene Silva; Jarduli, Luciana Ribeiro; Jorge, Adylson Justino; Camargo, Rossana Batista Oliveira Godoy; Carneiro, Fernando Pagotto; Gelinski, Jair Roberto; Silva, Roseclei Assunção Feliciano; Lavado, Edson Lopes

    2012-01-01

    Background Knowledge of allele and haplotype frequencies of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system is important in the search for unrelated bone marrow donors. The Brazilian population is very heterogeneous and the HLA system is highly informative of populations because of the high level of polymorphisms. Aim The aim of this study was to characterize the immunogenetic profile of ethnic groups (Caucasians, Afro-Brazilians and Asians) in the north of Parana State. Methods A study was carried out of 3978 voluntary bone marrow donors registered in the Brazilian National Bone Marrow Donor Registry and typed for the HLA-A, B and DRB1 (low resolution) loci. The alleles were characterized by the polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotides method using the LabType SSO kit (One Lambda, CA, USA). The ARLEQUIN v.3.11 computer program was used to calculate allele and haplotype frequencies Results The most common alleles found in Caucasians were HLA-A*02, 24, 01; HLA-B*35, 44, 51; DRB1*11, 13, 07; for Afro-Brazilians they were HLA-A*02, 03, 30; HLA-B*35, 15, 44; DRB1*13, 11, 03; and for Asians they were: HLA-A*24, 02, 26; HLA-B*40, 51, 52; DRB1*04, 15, 09. The most common haplotype combinations were: HLA-A*01, B*08, DRB1*03 and HLA-A*29, B*44, DRB1*07 for Caucasians; HLA-A*29, B*44, DRB1*07 and HLA-A*01, B*08 and DRB1*03 for Afro-Brazilians; and HLA-A*24, B*52, DRB1*15 and HLA-A*24, B*40 and DRB1*09 for Asians. Conclusion There is a need to target and expand bone marrow donor campaigns in the north of Parana State. The data of this study may be used as a reference by the Instituto Nacional de Cancer/Brazilian National Bone Marrow Donor Registry to evaluate the immunogenetic profile of populations in specific regions and in the selection of bone marrow donors PMID:23049380

  8. Human Leukocyte Antigens-A, -B, -C, -DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies in Americans originating from Southern Europe: Contrasting patterns of population differentiation between Italian and Spanish Americans

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Steven J.; Tu, Bin; Yang, Ruyan; Masaberg, Carly; Ng, Jennifer; Hurley, Carolyn Katovich

    2010-01-01

    High resolution DNA sequencing was used to identify the HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 alleles found in 552 individuals from the United States indicating Southern European (Italian or Spanish) heritage. A total of 46 HLA-A, 80 HLA-B, 32 HLA-C, and 50 DRB1 alleles were identified. Frequent alleles included A*02:01:01G (allele frequency = 0.26 in Italian Americans; 0.22 in Spanish Americans); B*07:02:01G (Italian Americans allele frequency = 0.11); B*44:03 (Spanish Americans allele frequency = 0.07); C*04:01:01G and C*07:01:01G (allele frequency = 0.13 and 0.16, respectively, in Italian Americans; 0.15 and 0.12, respectively, in Spanish Americans); and DRB1*07:01:01 (allele frequency = 0.12 in each population). The action of balancing selection was inferred at the HLA-B and -C loci in both populations. The A*01:01:01G-C*07:01:01G-B*08:01:01G-DRB1*03:01:01 haplotype was the most frequent A-C-B-DRB1 haplotype in Italian Americans (haplotype frequency = 0.049), and was the second most frequent haplotype in Spanish Americans (haplotype frequency = 0.021). A*29:02:01-C*16:01:01-B*44:03-DRB1*07:01:01 was the most frequent A-C-B-DRB1 haplotype in Spanish Americans (haplotype frequency = 0.023), and was observed at a frequency of 0.015 in Italian Americans. Pairwise F’st values measuring the degree of differentiation between these Southern European-American populations and European and European-American populations suggest that Spanish Americans constitute a distinct subset of the European-American population, most similar to Mexican Americans, whereas Italian Americans cannot be distinguished from the larger European-American population. PMID:20974205

  9. Fast accurate missing SNP genotype local imputation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assays normally give rise to certain percents of no-calls; the problem becomes severe when the target organisms, such as cattle, do not have a high resolution genomic sequence. Missing SNP genotypes, when related to target traits, would confound downstream data analyses such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Existing methods for recovering the missing values are successful to some extent – either accurate but not fast enough or fast but not accurate enough. Results To a target missing genotype, we take only the SNP loci within a genetic distance vicinity and only the samples within a similarity vicinity into our local imputation process. For missing genotype imputation, the comparative performance evaluations through extensive simulation studies using real human and cattle genotype datasets demonstrated that our nearest neighbor based local imputation method was one of the most efficient methods, and outperformed existing methods except the time-consuming fastPHASE; for missing haplotype allele imputation, the comparative performance evaluations using real mouse haplotype datasets demonstrated that our method was not only one of the most efficient methods, but also one of the most accurate methods. Conclusions Given that fastPHASE requires a long imputation time on medium to high density datasets, and that our nearest neighbor based local imputation method only performed slightly worse, yet better than all other methods, one might want to adopt our method as an alternative missing SNP genotype or missing haplotype allele imputation method. PMID:22863359

  10. Detecting local haplotype sharing and haplotype association

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel haplotype association method is presented, and its power is demonstrated. Relying on a statistical model for linkage disequilibrium (LD), the method first infers ancestral haplotypes and their loadings at each marker for each individual. The loadings are then used to quantify local haplotype...

  11. Haplotype combination of the bovine CFL2 gene sequence variants and association with growth traits in Qinchuan cattle.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujia; Lan, Xianyong; Lei, Chuzhao; Zhang, Chunlei; Chen, Hong

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association of cofilin2 (CFL2) gene polymorphisms with growth traits in Chinese Qinchuan cattle. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the bovine CFL2 gene using DNA sequencing and (forced) PCR-RFLP methods. These polymorphisms included a missense mutation (NC_007319.5: g. C 2213 G) in exon 4, one synonymous mutation (NC_007319.5: g. T 1694 A) in exon 4, and a mutation (NC_007319.5: g. G 1500 A) in intron 2, respectively. In addition, we evaluated the haplotype frequency and linkage disequilibrium coefficient of three sequence variants in 488 individuals in QC cattle. All the three SNPs in QC cattle belonged to an intermediate level of genetic diversity (0.25Haplotype analysis of three SNPs showed that 8 different haplotypes were identified in all, but only 5 haplotypes were listed except for those with a frequency of <0.03. Hap4 (-GTC-) had the highest haplotype frequencies (34.70%). However in the three SNPs there were no significant associations between the 13 combined genotypes of the CFL2 gene and growth traits. LD analysis showed that the SNP T 1694 A and C 2213 G loci had a strong linkage (r(2)>0.33). Association analysis indicated that SNP G 1500 A, T 1694 A and C 2213 G were significantly associated with growth traits in the QC population. The results of our study suggest that the CFL2 gene may be a strong candidate gene that affects growth traits in the QC cattle breeding program. PMID:25772133

  12. Genome-Wide Pharmacogenomic Study on Methadone Maintenance Treatment Identifies SNP rs17180299 and Multiple Haplotypes on CYP2B6, SPON1, and GSG1L Associated with Plasma Concentrations of Methadone R- and S-enantiomers in Heroin-Dependent Patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsin-Chou; Chu, Shih-Kai; Huang, Chieh-Liang; Kuo, Hsiang-Wei; Wang, Sheng-Chang; Liu, Sheng-Wen; Ho, Ing-Kang; Liu, Yu-Li

    2016-03-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is commonly used for controlling opioid dependence, preventing withdrawal symptoms, and improving the quality of life of heroin-dependent patients. A steady-state plasma concentration of methadone enantiomers, a measure of methadone metabolism, is an index of treatment response and efficacy of MMT. Although the methadone metabolism pathway has been partially revealed, no genome-wide pharmacogenomic study has been performed to identify genetic determinants and characterize genetic mechanisms for the plasma concentrations of methadone R- and S-enantiomers. This study was the first genome-wide pharmacogenomic study to identify genes associated with the plasma concentrations of methadone R- and S-enantiomers and their respective metabolites in a methadone maintenance cohort. After data quality control was ensured, a dataset of 344 heroin-dependent patients in the Han Chinese population of Taiwan who underwent MMT was analyzed. Genome-wide single-locus and haplotype-based association tests were performed to analyze four quantitative traits: the plasma concentrations of methadone R- and S-enantiomers and their respective metabolites. A significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs17180299 (raw p = 2.24 × 10-8), was identified, accounting for 9.541% of the variation in the plasma concentration of the methadone R-enantiomer. In addition, 17 haplotypes were identified on SPON1, GSG1L, and CYP450 genes associated with the plasma concentration of methadone S-enantiomer. These haplotypes accounted for approximately one-fourth of the variation of the overall S-methadone plasma concentration. The association between the S-methadone plasma concentration and CYP2B6, SPON1, and GSG1L were replicated in another independent study. A gene expression experiment revealed that CYP2B6, SPON1, and GSG1L can be activated concomitantly through a constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation pathway. In conclusion, this study revealed new genes associated with the plasma concentration of methadone, providing insight into the genetic foundation of methadone metabolism. The results can be applied to predict treatment responses and methadone-related deaths for individualized MMTs. PMID:27010727

  13. Genome-Wide Pharmacogenomic Study on Methadone Maintenance Treatment Identifies SNP rs17180299 and Multiple Haplotypes on CYP2B6, SPON1, and GSG1L Associated with Plasma Concentrations of Methadone R- and S-enantiomers in Heroin-Dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hsin-Chou; Chu, Shih-Kai; Huang, Chieh-Liang; Kuo, Hsiang-Wei; Wang, Sheng-Chang; Liu, Sheng-Wen; Ho, Ing-Kang; Liu, Yu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is commonly used for controlling opioid dependence, preventing withdrawal symptoms, and improving the quality of life of heroin-dependent patients. A steady-state plasma concentration of methadone enantiomers, a measure of methadone metabolism, is an index of treatment response and efficacy of MMT. Although the methadone metabolism pathway has been partially revealed, no genome-wide pharmacogenomic study has been performed to identify genetic determinants and characterize genetic mechanisms for the plasma concentrations of methadone R- and S-enantiomers. This study was the first genome-wide pharmacogenomic study to identify genes associated with the plasma concentrations of methadone R- and S-enantiomers and their respective metabolites in a methadone maintenance cohort. After data quality control was ensured, a dataset of 344 heroin-dependent patients in the Han Chinese population of Taiwan who underwent MMT was analyzed. Genome-wide single-locus and haplotype-based association tests were performed to analyze four quantitative traits: the plasma concentrations of methadone R- and S-enantiomers and their respective metabolites. A significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs17180299 (raw p = 2.24 × 10−8), was identified, accounting for 9.541% of the variation in the plasma concentration of the methadone R-enantiomer. In addition, 17 haplotypes were identified on SPON1, GSG1L, and CYP450 genes associated with the plasma concentration of methadone S-enantiomer. These haplotypes accounted for approximately one-fourth of the variation of the overall S-methadone plasma concentration. The association between the S-methadone plasma concentration and CYP2B6, SPON1, and GSG1L were replicated in another independent study. A gene expression experiment revealed that CYP2B6, SPON1, and GSG1L can be activated concomitantly through a constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation pathway. In conclusion, this study revealed new genes associated with the plasma concentration of methadone, providing insight into the genetic foundation of methadone metabolism. The results can be applied to predict treatment responses and methadone-related deaths for individualized MMTs. PMID:27010727

  14. Increased Frequency of De Novo Copy Number Variations in Congenital Heart Disease by Integrative Analysis of SNP Array and Exome Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Murillo, Laura; Fromer, Menachem; Mazaika, Erica; Vardarajan, Badri; Italia, Michael; Leipzig, Jeremy; DePalma, Steven R.; Golhar, Ryan; Sanders, Stephan J.; Yamrom, Boris; Ronemus, Michael; Iossifov, Ivan; Willsey, A. Jeremy; State, Matthew W.; Kaltman, Jonathan R.; White, Peter S.; Shen, Yufeng; Warburton, Dorothy; Brueckner, Martina; Seidman, Christine; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Gelb, Bruce D.; Lifton, Richard; Seidman, Jonathan; Hakonarson, Hakon; Chung, Wendy K.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Congenital heart disease (CHD) is among the most common birth defects. Most cases are of unknown etiology. Objective To determine the contribution of de novo copy number variants (CNVs) in the etiology of sporadic CHD. Methods and Results We studied 538 CHD trios using genome-wide dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and/or whole exome sequencing (WES). Results were experimentally validated using digital droplet PCR. We compared validated CNVs in CHD cases to CNVs in 1,301 healthy control trios. The two complementary high-resolution technologies identified 63 validated de novo CNVs in 51 CHD cases. A significant increase in CNV burden was observed when comparing CHD trios with healthy trios, using either SNP array (p=7x10−5, Odds Ratio (OR)=4.6) or WES data (p=6x10−4, OR=3.5) and remained after removing 16% of de novo CNV loci previously reported as pathogenic (p=0.02, OR=2.7). We observed recurrent de novo CNVs on 15q11.2 encompassing CYFIP1, NIPA1, and NIPA2 and single de novo CNVs encompassing DUSP1, JUN, JUP, MED15, MED9, PTPRE SREBF1, TOP2A, and ZEB2, genes that interact with established CHD proteins NKX2-5 and GATA4. Integrating de novo variants in WES and CNV data suggests that ETS1 is the pathogenic gene altered by 11q24.2-q25 deletions in Jacobsen syndrome and that CTBP2 is the pathogenic gene in 10q sub-telomeric deletions. Conclusions We demonstrate a significantly increased frequency of rare de novo CNVs in CHD patients compared with healthy controls and suggest several novel genetic loci for CHD. PMID:25205790

  15. Probabilistic Multilocus Haplotype Reconstruction in Outcrossing Tetraploids.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chaozhi; Voorrips, Roeland E; Jansen, Johannes; Hackett, Christine A; Ho, Julie; Bink, Marco C A M

    2016-05-01

    For both plant (e.g., potato) and animal (e.g., salmon) species, unveiling the genetic architecture of complex traits is key to the genetic improvement of polyploids in agriculture. F1 progenies of a biparental cross are often used for quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in outcrossing polyploids, where haplotype reconstruction by identifying the parental origins of marker alleles is necessary. In this paper, we build a novel and integrated statistical framework for multilocus haplotype reconstruction in a full-sib tetraploid family from biallelic marker dosage data collected from single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays or next-generation sequencing technology given a genetic linkage map. Compared to diploids, in tetraploids, additional complexity needs to be addressed, including double reduction and possible preferential pairing of chromosomes. We divide haplotype reconstruction into two stages: parental linkage phasing for reconstructing the most probable parental haplotypes and ancestral inference for probabilistically reconstructing the offspring haplotypes conditional on the reconstructed parental haplotypes. The simulation studies and the application to real data from potato show that the parental linkage phasing is robust to, and that the subsequent ancestral inference is accurate for, complex chromosome pairing behaviors during meiosis, various marker segregation types, erroneous genetic maps except for long-range disturbances of marker ordering, various amounts of offspring dosage errors (up to ∼20%), and various fractions of missing data in parents and offspring dosages. PMID:26920758

  16. Comparing the frequency of common genetic variants and haplotypes between carriers and non-carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in Australian women diagnosed with breast cancer before 40 years of age

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are found in a proportion of families with multiple early-onset breast cancers. There are a large number of different deleterious mutations in both genes, none of which would be detectable using standard genetic association studies. Single common variants and haplotypes of common variants may capture groups of deleterious mutations since some low prevalence haplotypes of common variants occur more frequently among chromosomes that carry rare, deleterious mutations than chromosomes that do not. Methods DNA sequence data for BRCA1 and BRCA2 was obtained from 571 participants from the Australian Breast Cancer Family Study. Genetic variants were classified as either deleterious mutations or common genetic variants. Variants tagging common polymorphisms were selected and haplotypes resolved using Haploview. Their frequency was compared to those with and without deleterious mutations using a permutation test. Results A common genetic variant in BRCA1 (3232A > G) was found to be over-represented in deleterious mutation carriers (p = 0.05), whereas a common genetic variant in BRCA2 (1342A > C) occurred less frequently in deleterious mutation carriers (p = 0.04). All four of the common BRCA1 variants used to form haplotypes occurred more frequently in the deleterious mutation carriers when compared to the non-carriers, but there was no evidence of a difference in the distributions between the two groups (p = 0.34). In BRCA2, all four common variants were found to occur less frequently in the deleterious mutation carriers when compared to non-carriers, but the evidence for difference in the distribution between the two groups was weak (p = 0.16). Several less common haplotypes of common BRCA1 variants were found to be over-represented among deleterious mutation carriers but there was no evidence for this at the population level. In BRCA2, only the most common haplotype was found to occur more frequently in deleterious mutation carriers, with again no evidence at the population level. Conclusions We observed differences in the frequency of common genetic variants of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 and their haplotypes between early-onset breast cancer cases who did and did not carry deleterious mutations in these genes. Although our data provide only weak evidence for a difference in frequencies at the population level, the number of deleterious mutation carriers was low and the results may yet be substantiated in a larger study using pooled data. PMID:20807450

  17. MADD-FOLH1 Polymorphisms and Their Haplotypes with Serum Lipid Levels and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease and Ischemic Stroke in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dong-Feng; Yin, Rui-Xing; Cao, Xiao-Li; Huang, Feng; Wu, Jin-Zhen; Chen, Wu-Xian

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the association of the MADD-FOLH1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and their haplotypes with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke (IS) in a Chinese Han population. Six SNPs of rs7395662, rs326214, rs326217, rs1051006, rs3736101, and rs7120118 were genotyped in 584 CHD and 555 IS patients, and 596 healthy controls. The genotypic and allelic frequencies of the rs7395662 SNP were different between controls and patients, and the genotypes of the rs7395662 SNP were associated with the risk of CHD and IS in different genetic models. Six main haplotypes among the rs1051006, rs326214, rs326217, rs3736101, and rs7120118 SNPs were detected in our study population, the haplotypes of G-G-T-G-C and G-A-T-G-T were associated with an increased risk of CHD and IS, respectively. The subjects with rs7395662GG genotype in controls had higher triglyceride (TG) and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels than the subjects with AA/AG genotypes. Several SNPs interacted with alcohol consumption to influence serum TG (rs326214, rs326217, and rs7120118) and HDL-C (rs7395662) levels. The SNP of rs3736101 interacted with cigarette smoking to modify serum HDL-C levels. The SNP of rs1051006 interacted with body mass index ≥24 kg/m2 to modulate serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The interactions of several haplotypes and alcohol consumption on the risk of CHD and IS were also observed. PMID:27070640

  18. MADD-FOLH1 Polymorphisms and Their Haplotypes with Serum Lipid Levels and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease and Ischemic Stroke in a Chinese Han Population.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dong-Feng; Yin, Rui-Xing; Cao, Xiao-Li; Huang, Feng; Wu, Jin-Zhen; Chen, Wu-Xian

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the association of the MADD-FOLH1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and their haplotypes with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke (IS) in a Chinese Han population. Six SNPs of rs7395662, rs326214, rs326217, rs1051006, rs3736101, and rs7120118 were genotyped in 584 CHD and 555 IS patients, and 596 healthy controls. The genotypic and allelic frequencies of the rs7395662 SNP were different between controls and patients, and the genotypes of the rs7395662 SNP were associated with the risk of CHD and IS in different genetic models. Six main haplotypes among the rs1051006, rs326214, rs326217, rs3736101, and rs7120118 SNPs were detected in our study population, the haplotypes of G-G-T-G-C and G-A-T-G-T were associated with an increased risk of CHD and IS, respectively. The subjects with rs7395662GG genotype in controls had higher triglyceride (TG) and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels than the subjects with AA/AG genotypes. Several SNPs interacted with alcohol consumption to influence serum TG (rs326214, rs326217, and rs7120118) and HDL-C (rs7395662) levels. The SNP of rs3736101 interacted with cigarette smoking to modify serum HDL-C levels. The SNP of rs1051006 interacted with body mass index ≥24 kg/m² to modulate serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The interactions of several haplotypes and alcohol consumption on the risk of CHD and IS were also observed. PMID:27070640

  19. Bayesian genomic selection: the effect of haplotype length and priors

    PubMed Central

    Villumsen, Trine Michelle; Janss, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Breeding values for animals with marker data are estimated using a genomic selection approach where data is analyzed using Bayesian multi-marker association models. Fourteen model scenarios with varying haplotype lengths, hyper parameter and prior distributions were compared to find the scenario expected to give the most correct genomic estimated breeding values for animals with marker information only. Five-fold cross validation was performed to assess the ability of models to estimate breeding values for animals in generation 3. In each of the five subsets, 20% of phenotypic records in generation 3 were left out. Correlations between breeding values estimated on full data and on subsets for the "leave-out" animals varied between 0.77–0.99. Regression coefficients of breeding values from full data on breeding values from subsets ranged from 0.78–1.01. Single-SNP marker models didn't perform well. Correlations were 0.77–0.89 and predicted breeding values were biased. In addition the models seemed to over fit the genomic part of the variation. Highest correlations and most unbiased results were obtained when SNP markers were joined into haplotypes. Especially the scenarios with 5-SNP haplotypes gave promising results (distance between adjacent SNPs is 0.1 cM evenly over the genome). All correlations were 0.99 and regression coefficients were 0.99–1.01. Models with 5-SNP markers seemed robust to hyper parameter and prior changes. Haplotypes up to 40 SNPs also gave good results. However, longer haplotypes are expected to have less predictive ability over several generations and therefore the 5-SNP haplotypes are expected to give the best predictions for generations 4–6. PMID:19278537

  20. MDM2 promoter SNP285 and SNP309; phylogeny and impact on cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Knappskog, Stian; Lønning, Per E.

    2011-01-01

    MDM2 plays a key role to physiological processes like growth arrest, senescence and apoptosis. It binds to and inhibits key proteins like p53 and the RB protein, and MDM2 amplification as well as protein overexpression without amplification is seen in many solid tumors. An MDM2 promoter polymorphism (SNP309T>G) has been found associated with enhanced Sp1 transcription factor binding and elevated MDM2 transcription. While 309G has been found associated with elevated cancer risk and young age at diagnosis of different cancers, results in Caucasians have been at variance. Recently, we reported a second polymorphism (SNP285G>C) located on the 309G allele. The 285C/309G haplotype accounts for about 12% of all 309G alleles among Norwegians, Dutch and British habitants. Assessing Sp1 binding to the MDM2 promoter using surface plasmon resonance technology, we found SNP309G to enhance Sp1 binding by 22% while SNP285C reduced Sp1 binding by 51%. SNP285C reduced the risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer among 309TG/309GG carriers by 21 and 26%, respectively, but in particular the risk of ovarian cancer among 309TG heterozygotes (reduction by 37%). The fact that the 285C/309G haplotype accounted for only 1.9% of all 309G alleles among Finns and was absent in Chinese indicate 285C to be a young polymorphism. PMID:21436469

  1. Subtyping of phosphoglucomutase locus 1 (PGM1) polymorphism in some populations of Rwanda: description of variant phenotypes, "haplotype" frequencies, and linkage disequilibrium data.

    PubMed Central

    Santachiara-Benerecetti, A S; Ranzani, G N; Antonini, G; Beretta, M

    1982-01-01

    Some populations of Rwanda (South Twa Pygmies, Hutu, and Tutsi) have been analyzed by acid starch gel electrophoresis for the subtyping of PGM1 polymorphism. The new polymorphic third PGM11 allele, the PGM1(1Twa), which we recently detected in Twa Pygmies from North Rwanda, has not been found in this survey, whereas the rare PGM1(6) allele attains subpolymorphic frequencies in all groups. Comparison between the various populations of Rwanda shows that they differ significantly from each other with the exception of South Twa Pygmies and Tutsi. A relatively low frequency (9.6%) of the PGM1(2S) allele appears to be typical of North Twa Pygmies; a low frequency of PGM1(2F) (1.2%-3.6%) has been found in all these groups but not in the Hutu (6.4%); and a particularly high incidence of the PGM1(1F) allele (the highest so far reported) has been observed in the South Twa Pygmies (20%) and in the Tutsi (18%). The PGM1(1Twa) and PGM1(6) enzymes, which in acid starch gel are not distinguishable, can be clearly differentiated by isoelectric focusing. In addition, the same technique has shown that the rare PGM1(7) allele observed in one Hutu is different from that found at polymorphic frequency in the Japanese and from a rare PGM1(7) allele found in Germany. On the very likely hypothesis that the PGM1(1S), PGM1(1F), PGM1(2S), and PGM1(2F) result from variations at two different polymorphic sites, 1/2 and F/S, within the PGM1 structural gene, all the available population data have been analyzed to investigate whether preferential combinations (haplotypes) were identifiable. Whereas Caucasians show a prevalence of 2F and 1S combination with an 8.02% mean value of linkage disequilibrium expressed as % Dmax, from the very few and scattered African data, it is impossible to draw any inference at present. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6462057

  2. Use of Haplotypes to Estimate Mendelian Sampling Effects and Selection Limits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limits to selection and Mendelian sampling terms can be calculated using haplotypes, by summing the individual additive effects on each chromosome. Haplotypes were imputed for 43,382 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 1,455 Brown Swiss, 40,351 Holstein, and 4,064 Jersey bulls and cows using th...

  3. Haplotypes of the D-Amino Acid Oxidase Gene Are Significantly Associated with Schizophrenia and Its Neurocognitive Deficits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Li; Wang, Sheng-Chang; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Fann, Cathy Shen-Jang; Yang, Ueng-Cheng; Yang, Wei-Chih; Hsu, Pei-Chun; Chang, Chien-Ching; Wen, Chun-Chiang; Tsai-Wu, Jyy-Jih; Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; Hsieh, Ming H; Liu, Chen-Chung; Chien, Yi-Ling; Fang, Chiu-Ping; Faraone, Stephen V; Tsuang, Ming T; Chen, Wei J; Liu, Chih-Min

    2016-01-01

    D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) has been reported to be associated with schizophrenia. This study aimed to search for genetic variants associated with this gene. The genomic regions of all exons, highly conserved regions of introns, and promoters of this gene were sequenced. Potentially meaningful single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) obtained from direct sequencing were selected for genotyping in 600 controls and 912 patients with schizophrenia and in a replicated sample consisting of 388 patients with schizophrenia. Genetic associations were examined using single-locus and haplotype association analyses. In single-locus analyses, the frequency of the C allele of a novel SNP rs55944529 located at intron 8 was found to be significantly higher in the original large patient sample (p = 0.016). This allele was associated with a higher level of DAO mRNA expression in the Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes. The haplotype distribution of a haplotype block composed of rs11114083-rs2070586-rs2070587-rs55944529 across intron 1 and intron 8 was significantly different between the patients and controls and the haplotype frequencies of AAGC were significantly higher in patients, in both the original (corrected p < 0.0001) and replicated samples (corrected p = 0.0003). The CGTC haplotype was specifically associated with the subgroup with deficits in sustained attention and executive function and the AAGC haplotype was associated with the subgroup without such deficits. The DAO gene was a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia and the genomic region between intron 1 and intron 8 may harbor functional genetic variants, which may influence the mRNA expression of DAO and neurocognitive functions in schizophrenia. PMID:26986737

  4. Haplotypes of the D-Amino Acid Oxidase Gene Are Significantly Associated with Schizophrenia and Its Neurocognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Fann, Cathy Shen-Jang; Yang, Ueng-Cheng; Yang, Wei-Chih; Hsu, Pei-Chun; Chang, Chien-Ching; Wen, Chun-Chiang; Tsai-Wu, Jyy-Jih; Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; Hsieh, Ming H.; Liu, Chen-Chung; Chien, Yi-Ling; Fang, Chiu-Ping; Faraone, Stephen V.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Chen, Wei J.; Liu, Chih-Min

    2016-01-01

    D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) has been reported to be associated with schizophrenia. This study aimed to search for genetic variants associated with this gene. The genomic regions of all exons, highly conserved regions of introns, and promoters of this gene were sequenced. Potentially meaningful single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) obtained from direct sequencing were selected for genotyping in 600 controls and 912 patients with schizophrenia and in a replicated sample consisting of 388 patients with schizophrenia. Genetic associations were examined using single-locus and haplotype association analyses. In single-locus analyses, the frequency of the C allele of a novel SNP rs55944529 located at intron 8 was found to be significantly higher in the original large patient sample (p = 0.016). This allele was associated with a higher level of DAO mRNA expression in the Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes. The haplotype distribution of a haplotype block composed of rs11114083-rs2070586-rs2070587-rs55944529 across intron 1 and intron 8 was significantly different between the patients and controls and the haplotype frequencies of AAGC were significantly higher in patients, in both the original (corrected p < 0.0001) and replicated samples (corrected p = 0.0003). The CGTC haplotype was specifically associated with the subgroup with deficits in sustained attention and executive function and the AAGC haplotype was associated with the subgroup without such deficits. The DAO gene was a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia and the genomic region between intron 1 and intron 8 may harbor functional genetic variants, which may influence the mRNA expression of DAO and neurocognitive functions in schizophrenia. PMID:26986737

  5. Factor IX gene haplotypes in Amerindians.

    PubMed

    Franco, R F; Araújo, A G; Zago, M A; Guerreiro, J F; Figueiredo, M S

    1997-02-01

    We have determined the haplotypes of the factor IX gene for 95 Indians from 5 Brazilian Amazon tribes: Wayampí, Wayana-Apalaí, Kayapó, Arára, and Yanomámi. Eight polymorphisms linked to the factor IX gene were investigated: MseI (at 5', nt -698), BamHI (at 5', nt -561), DdeI (intron 1), BamHI (intron 2), XmnI (intron 3), TaqI (intron 4), MspI (intron 4), and HhaI (at 3', approximately 8 kb). The results of the haplotype distribution and the allele frequencies for each of the factor IX gene polymorphisms in Amerindians were similar to the results reported for Asian populations but differed from results for other ethnic groups. Only five haplotypes were identified within the entire Amerindian study population, and the haplotype distribution was significantly different among the five tribes, with one (Arára) to four (Wayampí) haplotypes being found per tribe. These findings indicate a significant heterogeneity among the Indian tribes and contrast with the homogeneous distribution of the beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes but agree with our recent findings on the distribution of alpha-globin gene cluster haplotypes and the allele frequencies for six VNTRs in the same Amerindian tribes. Our data represent the first study of factor IX-associated polymorphisms in Amerindian populations and emphasizes the applicability of these genetic markers for population and human evolution studies. PMID:9037891

  6. Haplotype phasing: Existing methods and new developments

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Sharon R.; Browning, Brian L.

    2011-01-01

    Determination of haplotype phase is increasingly important as we enter the era of large-scale sequencing because many of its applications, such as imputing low frequency variants and characterizing the relationship between genetic variation and disease susceptibility, are particularly relevant to sequence data. Haplotype phase can be generated through laboratory-based experimental methods, or it can be estimated with computational approaches. We assess the haplotype phasing methods that are available, with particular focus on statistical methods, and discuss practical aspects of their application. We also describe recent developments that may transform this field, particularly the use of identity-by-descent for computational phasing. PMID:21921926

  7. Haplotype analysis of TLR4 gene and its effects on milk somatic cell score in Chinese commercial cattle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing Ping; Luoreng, Zhuo Ma; Gao, Shu Xin; Guo, Dong Sheng; Li, Jun Ya; Gao, Xue; Xu, Shang Zhong; Li, Feng; Chen, Gang; Wang, Jin Ren

    2014-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a very complex and common disease of dairy cattle and a major source of economic losses to the dairy industry worldwide. In this study, the bovine TLR4 was taken as a candidate gene for mastitis resistance. This study aimed to analyze the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) or haplotype and somatic cell score (SCS) in 404 Chinese commercial dairy cattle including Chinese Holstein, Sanhe cattle and Chinese Simmental breeds. The polymerase chain reaction and sequencing methods were used for detecting genotype and allele frequency distribution of the two SNPs (rs8193062, rs8193064), statistical results showed that T allele at rs8193062 and C allele at rs8193064 were the predominate alleles. Moreover, six SNPs, including two SNPs (rs8193062, rs8193064) and four SNPs (rs8193060, rs8193069, rs29017188, rs8193046) which were chosen according the polymorphism level for the same cattle populations in previous studies, were used for haplotype analysis, the results revealed that twenty-one haplotypes were found in the mentioned animals, of which, Hap1 (30.5 %) and Hap2 (30.4 %) were the most common haplotypes. Hap2, Hap4 and Hap12 might negatively effect on milk SCS, whereas Hap13 might positively effect on milk SCS. The results in this study might assist in marker assisted selection and provided some reference to be implemented in breeding programs to improve the mastitis resistance of dairy cattle. PMID:24415303

  8. SNP Haplotypes: Unveiling the Truth of Past Relationships

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last ten years, molecular markers have been widely accepted as a breeding tool for crop improvement. Currently, microsatellite markers are being used in rice to select for several simply inherited traits like components of cooking quality and a number of major genes linked to resistance to ...

  9. Imputation of microsatellite alleles from dense SNP genotypes for parentage verification across multiple Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Matthew C.; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Wiggans, George R.; Van Eenennaam, Alison L.; Weber, Kristina L.; Penedo, Cecilia T.; Berry, Donagh P.; Flynn, John; Garcia, Jose F.; Carmo, Adriana S.; Regitano, Luciana C. A.; Albuquerque, Milla; Silva, Marcos V. G. B.; Machado, Marco A.; Coffey, Mike; Moore, Kirsty; Boscher, Marie-Yvonne; Genestout, Lucie; Mazza, Raffaele; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Simpson, Barry; Marques, Elisa; McEwan, John C.; Cromie, Andrew; Coutinho, Luiz L.; Kuehn, Larry A.; Keele, John W.; Piper, Emily K.; Cook, Jim; Williams, Robert; Van Tassell, Curtis P.

    2013-01-01

    To assist cattle producers transition from microsatellite (MS) to single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping for parental verification we previously devised an effective and inexpensive method to impute MS alleles from SNP haplotypes. While the reported method was verified with only a limited data set (N = 479) from Brown Swiss, Guernsey, Holstein, and Jersey cattle, some of the MS-SNP haplotype associations were concordant across these phylogenetically diverse breeds. This implied that some haplotypes predate modern breed formation and remain in strong linkage disequilibrium. To expand the utility of MS allele imputation across breeds, MS and SNP data from more than 8000 animals representing 39 breeds (Bos taurus and B. indicus) were used to predict 9410 SNP haplotypes, incorporating an average of 73 SNPs per haplotype, for which alleles from 12 MS markers could be accurately be imputed. Approximately 25% of the MS-SNP haplotypes were present in multiple breeds (N = 2 to 36 breeds). These shared haplotypes allowed for MS imputation in breeds that were not represented in the reference population with only a small increase in Mendelian inheritance inconsistancies. Our reported reference haplotypes can be used for any cattle breed and the reported methods can be applied to any species to aid the transition from MS to SNP genetic markers. While ~91% of the animals with imputed alleles for 12 MS markers had ≤1 Mendelian inheritance conflicts with their parents' reported MS genotypes, this figure was 96% for our reference animals, indicating potential errors in the reported MS genotypes. The workflow we suggest autocorrects for genotyping errors and rare haplotypes, by MS genotyping animals whose imputed MS alleles fail parentage verification, and then incorporating those animals into the reference dataset. PMID:24065982

  10. High SNP density in the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis, the principal vector of Lyme disease spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Van Zee, Janice; Black, William C; Levin, Michael; Goddard, Jerome; Smith, Joshua; Piesman, Joseph

    2013-02-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most widespread type of sequence variation in genomes. SNP density and distribution varies among different organisms and genes. Here, we report the first estimates of SNP distribution and density in the genome of the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis), an important vector of the pathogens causing Lyme disease, human granulocytic anaplasmosis and human babesiosis in North America. We sampled 10 individuals from each of 4 collections from New Jersey, Virginia, Georgia, and Mississippi and analyzed the sequences of 9 nuclear genes and the mitochondrial 16S gene. SNPs are extremely abundant (one SNP per every 14 bases). This is the second highest density so far reported in any eukaryotic organism. Population genetic analyses based either on haplotype frequencies or the 372 SNPs in these 9 genes showed that the 40 ticks formed 3 genetic groups. In agreement with earlier population genetic studies, northern ticks from New Jersey and Virginia formed a homogeneous group with low genetic diversity, whereas southern ticks from Georgia and Mississippi consisted of 2 separate groups, each with high genetic diversity. PMID:23219364

  11. Genome Patterns of Selection and Introgression of Haplotypes in Natural Populations of the House Mouse (Mus musculus)

    PubMed Central

    Staubach, Fabian; Lorenc, Anna; Messer, Philipp W.; Tang, Kun; Petrov, Dmitri A.; Tautz, Diethard

    2012-01-01

    General parameters of selection, such as the frequency and strength of positive selection in natural populations or the role of introgression, are still insufficiently understood. The house mouse (Mus musculus) is a particularly well-suited model system to approach such questions, since it has a defined history of splits into subspecies and populations and since extensive genome information is available. We have used high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing arrays to assess genomic patterns of positive selection and introgression of alleles in two natural populations of each of the subspecies M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus. Applying different statistical procedures, we find a large number of regions subject to apparent selective sweeps, indicating frequent positive selection on rare alleles or novel mutations. Genes in the regions include well-studied imprinted loci (e.g. Plagl1/Zac1), homologues of human genes involved in adaptations (e.g. alpha-amylase genes) or in genetic diseases (e.g. Huntingtin and Parkin). Haplotype matching between the two subspecies reveals a large number of haplotypes that show patterns of introgression from specific populations of the respective other subspecies, with at least 10% of the genome being affected by partial or full introgression. Using neutral simulations for comparison, we find that the size and the fraction of introgressed haplotypes are not compatible with a pure migration or incomplete lineage sorting model. Hence, it appears that introgressed haplotypes can rise in frequency due to positive selection and thus can contribute to the adaptive genomic landscape of natural populations. Our data support the notion that natural genomes are subject to complex adaptive processes, including the introgression of haplotypes from other differentiated populations or species at a larger scale than previously assumed for animals. This implies that some of the admixture found in inbred strains of mice may also have a natural origin. PMID:22956910

  12. Genome patterns of selection and introgression of haplotypes in natural populations of the house mouse (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Staubach, Fabian; Lorenc, Anna; Messer, Philipp W; Tang, Kun; Petrov, Dmitri A; Tautz, Diethard

    2012-01-01

    General parameters of selection, such as the frequency and strength of positive selection in natural populations or the role of introgression, are still insufficiently understood. The house mouse (Mus musculus) is a particularly well-suited model system to approach such questions, since it has a defined history of splits into subspecies and populations and since extensive genome information is available. We have used high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing arrays to assess genomic patterns of positive selection and introgression of alleles in two natural populations of each of the subspecies M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus. Applying different statistical procedures, we find a large number of regions subject to apparent selective sweeps, indicating frequent positive selection on rare alleles or novel mutations. Genes in the regions include well-studied imprinted loci (e.g. Plagl1/Zac1), homologues of human genes involved in adaptations (e.g. alpha-amylase genes) or in genetic diseases (e.g. Huntingtin and Parkin). Haplotype matching between the two subspecies reveals a large number of haplotypes that show patterns of introgression from specific populations of the respective other subspecies, with at least 10% of the genome being affected by partial or full introgression. Using neutral simulations for comparison, we find that the size and the fraction of introgressed haplotypes are not compatible with a pure migration or incomplete lineage sorting model. Hence, it appears that introgressed haplotypes can rise in frequency due to positive selection and thus can contribute to the adaptive genomic landscape of natural populations. Our data support the notion that natural genomes are subject to complex adaptive processes, including the introgression of haplotypes from other differentiated populations or species at a larger scale than previously assumed for animals. This implies that some of the admixture found in inbred strains of mice may also have a natural origin. PMID:22956910

  13. Apolipoprotein A1/C3/A5 haplotypes and serum lipid levels

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the apolipoprotein (Apo) A1/C3/A4/A5 gene cluster and serum lipid profiles is inconsistent. The present study was undertaken to detect the association between the ApoA1/C3/A5 gene polymorphisms and their haplotypes with serum lipid levels in the general Chinese population. Methods A total of 1030 unrelated subjects (492 males and 538 females) aged 15-89 were randomly selected from our previous stratified randomized cluster samples. Genotyping of the ApoA1 -75 bp G>A, ApoC3 3238C>G, ApoA5 -1131T>C, ApoA5 c.553G>T and ApoA5 c.457G>A was performed by polymerse chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Pair-wise linkage disequilibria and haplotype analysis among the five SNPs were estimated. Results The levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and ApoA1 were lower in males than in femailes (P < 0.05 for each). The allelic and genotypic frequencies of the SNPs were no significant difference between males and females except ApoC3 3238C>G. There were 11 haplotypes with a frequency >1% identified in the cluster in our population. At the global level, the haplotypes comprised of all five SNPs were significantly associated with all seven lipid traits. In particular, haplotype G-G-C-C-A (6%; in the order of ApoA5 c.553G>T, ApoA5 c.457G>A, ApoA5 -1131T>C, ApoC3 3238C>G, and ApoA1 -75bp G>A) and G-A-T-C-G (4%) showed consistent association with total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), ApoA1, ApoB, and the ApoA1/ApoB ratio. In addition, carriers of haplotype G-G-T-C-G (26%) had increased serum concentration of HDL-C and ApoA1, whereas carriers of G-G-C-G-G (15%) had high concentrations of TC, triglyceride (TG) and ApoB. We also found that haplotypes with five SNPs explain much more serum lipid variation than any single SNP alone, especially for TG (4.4% for haplotype vs. 2.4% for -1131T>C max based on R-square) and HDL-C (5.1% for haplotype vs. 0.9% for c.553G>T based on R-square). Serum lipid parameters were also correlated with genotypes and several environment factors. Conclusions Several common SNPs and their haplotypes in the ApoA1/C3/A5 gene cluster are closely associated with modifications of serum lipid parameters in the general Chinese population. PMID:21854571

  14. Identity by Descent Mapping of Founder Mutations in Cancer Using High-Resolution Tumor SNP Data

    PubMed Central

    Letouzé, Eric; Sow, Aliou; Petel, Fabien; Rosati, Roberto; Figueiredo, Bonald C.; Burnichon, Nelly; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule

    2012-01-01

    Dense genotype data can be used to detect chromosome fragments inherited from a common ancestor in apparently unrelated individuals. A disease-causing mutation inherited from a common founder may thus be detected by searching for a common haplotype signature in a sample population of patients. We present here FounderTracker, a computational method for the genome-wide detection of founder mutations in cancer using dense tumor SNP profiles. Our method is based on two assumptions. First, the wild-type allele frequently undergoes loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the tumors of germline mutation carriers. Second, the overlap between the ancestral chromosome fragments inherited from a common founder will define a minimal haplotype conserved in each patient carrying the founder mutation. Our approach thus relies on the detection of haplotypes with significant identity by descent (IBD) sharing within recurrent regions of LOH to highlight genomic loci likely to harbor a founder mutation. We validated this approach by analyzing two real cancer data sets in which we successfully identified founder mutations of well-characterized tumor suppressor genes. We then used simulated data to evaluate the ability of our method to detect IBD tracts as a function of their size and frequency. We show that FounderTracker can detect haplotypes of low prevalence with high power and specificity, significantly outperforming existing methods. FounderTracker is thus a powerful tool for discovering unknown founder mutations that may explain part of the “missing” heritability in cancer. This method is freely available and can be used online at the FounderTracker website. PMID:22567117

  15. High diversity of {alpha}-globin haplotypes in a senegalese population, including many previously unreported variants

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, J.J.; Swinburn, C.; Clegg, J.B.

    1995-11-01

    RFLP haplotypes at the {alpha}-globin gene complex have been examined in 190 individuals from the Niokolo Mandenka population of Senegal: haplotypes were assigned unambiguously for 210 chromosomes. The Mandenka share with other African populations a sample size-independent haplotype diversity that is much greater than that in any non-African population: the number of haplotypes observed in the Mandenka is typically twice that seen in the non-African populations sampled to date. Of these haplotypes, 17.3% had not been observed in any previous surveys, and a further 19.1% have previously been reported only in African populations. The haplotype distribution shows clear differences between African and non-African peoples, but this is on the basis of population-specific haplotypes combined with haplotypes common to all. The relationship of the newly reported haplotypes to those previously recorded suggests that several mutation processes, particularly recombination as homologous exchange or gene conversion, have been involved in their production. A computer program based on the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain maximum-likelihood estimates of haplotype frequencies for the entire data set: good concordance between the unambiguous and EM-derived sets was seen for the overall haplotype frequencies. Some of the low-frequency haplotypes reported by the estimation algorithm differ greatly, in structure, from those haplotypes known to be present in human populations, and they may not represent haplotypes actually present in the sample. 43 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Genotype error detection using Hidden Markov Models of haplotype diversity.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Justin; Măndoiu, Ion; Paşaniuc, Bogdan

    2008-11-01

    The presence of genotyping errors can invalidate statistical tests for linkage and disease association, particularly for methods based on haplotype analysis. Becker et al. have recently proposed a simple likelihood ratio approach for detecting errors in trio genotype data. Under this approach, a SNP genotype is flagged as a potential error if the likelihood associated with the original trio genotype data increases by a multiplicative factor exceeding a user selected threshold when the SNP genotype under test is deleted. In this article we give improved error detection methods using the likelihood ratio test approach in conjunction with likelihood functions that can be efficiently computed based on a Hidden Markov Model of haplotype diversity in the population under study. Experimental results on both simulated and real datasets show that proposed methods have highly scalable running time and achieve significantly improved detection accuracy compared to previous methods. PMID:18973433

  17. Adiponectin gene ADIPOQ SNP associations with serum adiponectin in two female populations and effects of SNPs on promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Kyriakou, Theodosios; Collins, Laura J; Spencer-Jones, Nicola J; Malcolm, Claire; Wang, Xiaoling; Snieder, Harold; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Burling, Keith A; Hart, Deborah J; Spector, Tim D; O'Dell, Sandra D

    2008-01-01

    Adiponectin is an insulin sensitiser in muscle and liver, and low serum levels characterise obesity and insulin resistance. Eight tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) in the ADIPOQ gene and promoter were selected, and association with serum adiponectin was tested, in two independent samples of Caucasian women: the Chingford Study (n = 808, mean age 62.8 +/- 5.9 years) and Twins UK (n = 2,718, mean age 47.4 +/- 12.6 years). In the Chingford cohort, -11391 G/A, -10066 G/A (rs182052), -7734 C/A (rs16861209), +276 G/T (rs1501299) and +3228 C/T (rs1063537) were significantly associated with fasting serum adiponectin (Ps = 1.00 x 10(-4) to 1.40 x 10(-2)). Associations with all except +3228 C/T were replicated in the Twins UK cohort (Ps = 3.19 x 10(-9) to 6.00 x 10(-3)). In Chingford subjects, the 12 most common 8-SNP haplotypes (frequency 1.90%) explained 2.85% (p = 5.00 x 10(-2)) and in Twins UK subjects, the four most common 5-SNP haplotypes (frequency > 5.00%) explained 1.66% of the variance (p = 5.83 x 10(-7)). To investigate effects of -11391 G/A (rs17300539) and -11377 C/G (rs266729) on promoter activity, 1.2 kb of the ADIPOQ promoter region was cloned in a luciferase reporter plasmid, and the four haplotypes were transfected in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. No significant allelic effects on promoter activity were found. PMID:18523726

  18. Tumor necrosis factor haplotype diversity in Mestizo and native populations of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Castro-Martínez, X H; Leal-Cortés, C; Flores-Martínez, S E; García-Zapién, A G; Sánchez-Corona, J; Portilla-de Buen, E; Gómez-Espinel, I; Zamora-Ginez, I; Pérez-Fuentes, R; Islas-Andrade, S; Revilla-Monsalve, C; Guerrero-Romero, F; Rodríguez-Morán, M; Mendoza-Carrera, F

    2014-04-01

    The so-called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) block includes the TNFA, lymphotoxin alpha and beta (LTA and LTB) genes with single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and microsatellites with an allele frequency that exhibits interpopulation variability. To date, no reports have included both SNPs and microsatellites at the TNF block to study Mestizo or Amerindian populations from Mexico. In this study, samples of five Mexican Mestizo populations (Durango, Guadalajara, Monterrey, Puebla, and Tierra Blanca) and four native-Mexican populations (North Lacandonians, South Lacandonians, Tepehuanos, and Yaquis) were genotyped for two SNPs (LTA+252A>G and TNFA-308G>A) and four microsatellites (TNFa, d, e, and f), to analyze the genetic substructure of the Mexican population. Allele and haplotype frequencies, linkage disequilibrium (LD), and interpopulation genetic relationships were calculated. There was significant LD along almost all of the TNF block but the lowest D' values were observed for the TNFf-TNFd pair. Mestizos showed higher allele and haplotype diversity than did natives. The genetic differentiation level was reduced among Mestizos; however, a slightly, but significant genetic substructure was observed between northern and southern Mexican Mestizos. Among the Amerindian populations, the genetic differentiation level was significantly elevated, particularly in both North and South Lacandonians. Furthermore, among Southern Lacandonians, inhabitants of Lacanja town were the most differentiated from all the Mexicans analyzed. The data presented here will serve as a reference for further population and epidemiological studies including these TNF polymorphisms in the Mexican population. PMID:24517517

  19. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes of non-coding area in the CP gene are correlated with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Xiao, Jianqiu; Zheng, Zhiyong; Fei, Guoqiang; Zhang, Feng; Jin, Lirong; Zhong, Chunjiu

    2015-04-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that ceruloplasmin (CP) dysmetabolism is correlated with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the causes of decreased serum CP levels in PD patients remain to be clarified. This study aimed to explore the potential association between genetic variants of the CP gene and PD. Clinical features, serum CP levels, and the CP gene (both promoter and coding regions) were analyzed in 60 PD patients and 50 controls. A luciferase reporter system was used to investigate the function of promoter single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). High-density comparative genomic hybridization microarrays were also used to detect large-scale copy-number variations in CP and an additional 47 genes involved in PD and/or copper/iron metabolism. The frequencies of eight SNPs (one intronic SNP and seven promoter SNPs of the CP gene) and their haplotypes were significantly different between PD patients, especially those with lowered serum CP levels, and controls. However, the luciferase reporter system revealed no significant effect of the risk haplotype on promoter activity of the CP gene. Neither these SNPs nor their haplotypes were correlated with the Hoehn and Yahr staging of PD. The results of this study suggest that common genetic variants of CP are associated with PD and further investigation is needed to explore their functions in PD. PMID:25758665

  20. Fast Sampling-Based Whole-Genome Haplotype Block Recognition.

    PubMed

    Taliun, Daniel; Gamper, Johann; Leser, Ulf; Pattaro, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Scaling linkage disequilibrium (LD) based haplotype block recognition to the entire human genome has always been a challenge. The best-known algorithm has quadratic runtime complexity and, even when sophisticated search space pruning is applied, still requires several days of computations. Here, we propose a novel sampling-based algorithm, called S-MIG (++), where the main idea is to estimate the area that most likely contains all haplotype blocks by sampling a very small number of SNP pairs. A subsequent refinement step computes the exact blocks by considering only the SNP pairs within the estimated area. This approach significantly reduces the number of computed LD statistics, making the recognition of haplotype blocks very fast. We theoretically and empirically prove that the area containing all haplotype blocks can be estimated with a very high degree of certainty. Through experiments on the 243,080 SNPs on chromosome 20 from the 1,000 Genomes Project, we compared our previous algorithm MIG (++) with the new S-MIG (++) and observed a runtime reduction from 2.8 weeks to 34.8 hours. In a parallelized version of the S-MIG (++) algorithm using 32 parallel processes, the runtime was further reduced to 5.1 hours. PMID:27045830

  1. An algorithm for haplotype analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shili; Speed, T.P.

    1997-12-01

    This paper proposes an algorithm for haplotype analysis based on a Monte Carlo method. Haplotype configurations are generated according to the distribution of joint haplotypes of individuals in a pedigree given their phenotype data, via a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. The haplotype configuration which maximizes this conditional probability distribution can thus be estimated. In addition, the set of haplotype configurations with relatively high probabilities can also be estimated as possible alternatives to the most probable one. This flexibility enables geneticists to choose the haplotype configurations which are most reasonable to them, allowing them to include their knowledge of the data under analysis. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Construction of a versatile SNP array for pyramiding useful genes of rice.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Yusuke; Noda, Tomonori; Yamagata, Yoshiyuki; Angeles-Shim, Rosalyn; Sunohara, Hidehiko; Uehara, Kanako; Furuta, Tomoyuki; Nagai, Keisuke; Jena, Kshirod Kumar; Yasui, Hideshi; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Doi, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    DNA marker-assisted selection (MAS) has become an indispensable component of breeding. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are the most frequent polymorphism in the rice genome. However, SNP markers are not readily employed in MAS because of limitations in genotyping platforms. Here the authors report a Golden Gate SNP array that targets specific genes controlling yield-related traits and biotic stress resistance in rice. As a first step, the SNP genotypes were surveyed in 31 parental varieties using the Affymetrix Rice 44K SNP microarray. The haplotype information for 16 target genes was then converted to the Golden Gate platform with 143-plex markers. Haplotypes for the 14 useful allele are unique and can discriminate among all other varieties. The genotyping consistency between the Affymetrix microarray and the Golden Gate array was 92.8%, and the accuracy of the Golden Gate array was confirmed in 3 F2 segregating populations. The concept of the haplotype-based selection by using the constructed SNP array was proofed. PMID:26566831

  3. Analysis of DAZL SNP260 and SNP386 in infertile Chinese males using multi-analyte suspension array.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yijian; Ma, Mingfu; Wan, Ling; Zhang, Danyan; Zhao, Letian; Wei, Li; Li, Lianbing

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and infertility in Chinese males using multi-analyte suspension array (MASA). A total of 196 male patients with azoospermia or severe oligospermia (sperm density <5x106/ml, non‑obstructed) who had a normal karyotype and no azoospermia factor microdeletions were recruited, along with 40 healthy, fertile males as controls. Two SNPs of the deleted in azoospermia-like (DAZL) gene, SNP260 and SNP386, were genotyped by allele‑specific primer extension (ASPE) combined with MASA technology. The SNP260A>G and SNP386A>G mutations were found in the males with infertility. The SNP260, but not the SNP386, mutation was detectable in the control group. The mutation rates in the controls and patients were 2.5 and 3.06% for SNP260, and 0 and 2.04% for SNP386, respectively. A χ2 analysis did not identify any significant differences in the frequency of either mutation between the fertile and infertile males. In conclusion, the combination of ASPE and MASA methods for SNP genotyping was high‑throughput, accurate and cost‑efficient. The method was applied to detect SNP polymorphisms in the DAZL gene; and neither the A260G nor the A386G polymorphism of DAZL appeared to be involved in male infertility in the Chinese population. PMID:25323654

  4. Detecting rare variant associations: methods for testing haplotypes and multiallelic genotypes.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Rita M; Wilcox, Marsha

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the work done by the contributors to Group 13 at Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 (GAW17) and provide a synthesis of their data analyses. The Group 13 contributors used a variety of approaches to test associations of both rare variants and common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with the GAW17 simulated traits, implementing analytic methods that incorporate multiallelic genotypes and haplotypes. In addition to using a wide variety of statistical methods and approaches, the contributors exhibited a remarkable amount of flexibility and creativity in coding the variants and their genes and in evaluating their proposed approaches and methods. We describe and contrast their methods along three dimensions: (1) selection and coding of genetic entities for analysis, (2) method of analysis, and (3) evaluation of the results. The contributors consistently presented a strong rationale for using multiallelic analytic approaches. They indicated that power was likely to be increased by capturing the signals of multiple markers within genetic entities defined by sliding windows, haplotypes, genes, functional pathways, and the entire set of SNPs and rare variants taken in aggregate. Despite this variability, the methods were fairly consistent in their ability to identify two associated genes for each simulated trait. The first gene was selected for the largest number of causal alleles and the second for a high-frequency causal SNP. The presumed model of inheritance and choice of genetic entities are likely to have a strong effect on the outcomes of the analyses. PMID:22128065

  5. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP)-Strings: An Alternative Method for Assessing Genetic Associations

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Douglas S.; Khankhanian, Pouya

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identify disease-associations for single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) from scattered genomic-locations. However, SNPs frequently reside on several different SNP-haplotypes, only some of which may be disease-associated. This circumstance lowers the observed odds-ratio for disease-association. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we develop a method to identify the two SNP-haplotypes, which combine to produce each person’s SNP-genotype over specified chromosomal segments. Two multiple sclerosis (MS)-associated genetic regions were modeled; DRB1 (a Class II molecule of the major histocompatibility complex) and MMEL1 (an endopeptidase that degrades both neuropeptides and β-amyloid). For each locus, we considered sets of eleven adjacent SNPs, surrounding the putative disease-associated gene and spanning ∼200 kb of DNA. The SNP-information was converted into an ordered-set of eleven-numbers (subject-vectors) based on whether a person had zero, one, or two copies of particular SNP-variant at each sequential SNP-location. SNP-strings were defined as those ordered-combinations of eleven-numbers (0 or 1), representing a haplotype, two of which combined to form the observed subject-vector. Subject-vectors were resolved using probabilistic methods. In both regions, only a small number of SNP-strings were present. We compared our method to the SHAPEIT-2 phasing-algorithm. When the SNP-information spanning 200 kb was used, SHAPEIT-2 was inaccurate. When the SHAPEIT-2 window was increased to 2,000 kb, the concordance between the two methods, in both of these eleven-SNP regions, was over 99%, suggesting that, in these regions, both methods were quite accurate. Nevertheless, correspondence was not uniformly high over the entire DNA-span but, rather, was characterized by alternating peaks and valleys of concordance. Moreover, in the valleys of poor-correspondence, SHAPEIT-2 was also inconsistent with itself, suggesting that the SNP-string method is more accurate across the entire region. Conclusions/Significance Accurate haplotype identification will enhance the detection of genetic-associations. The SNP-string method provides a simple means to accomplish this and can be extended to cover larger genomic regions, thereby improving a GWAS’s power, even for those published previously. PMID:24727690

  6. SNP panels/Imputation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Participants from thirteen countries discussed services that Interbull can perform or recommendations that Interbull can make to promote harmonization and assist member countries in improving their genomic evaluations in regard to SNP panels and imputation. The panel recommended: A mechanism to shar...

  7. Application of a posteriori granddaughter and modified granddaughter designs to determine Holstein haplotype effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A posteriori and modified granddaughter designs were applied to determine haplotype effects for Holstein bulls and cows with BovineSNP50 genotypes. The a posteriori granddaughter design was applied to 52 sire families, each with >100 genotyped sons with genetic evaluations based on progeny tests. Fo...

  8. Application of a posteriori granddaughter and modified granddaughter designs to determine Holstein haplotype effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A posteriori and modified granddaughter designs were applied to determine haplotype effects for Holstein bulls and cows with BovineSNP50 genotypes. The a posteriori granddaughter design was applied to 52 sire families, each with '100 genotyped sons with genetic evaluations based on progeny tests. Fo...

  9. Beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes of Amerindian populations from the Brazilian Amazon region.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, J F; Figueiredo, M S; Zago, M A

    1994-01-01

    We have determined the beta-globin cluster haplotypes for 80 Indians from four Brazilian Amazon tribes: Kayapó, Wayampí, Wayana-Apalaí, and Arára. The results are analyzed together with 20 Yanomámi previously studied. From 2 to 4 different haplotypes were identified for each tribe, and 7 of the possible 32 haplotypes were found in a sample of 172 chromosomes for which the beta haplotypes were directly determined or derived from family studies. The haplotype distribution does not differ significantly among the five populations. The two most common haplotypes in all tribes were haplotypes 2 and 6, with average frequencies of 0.843 and 0.122, respectively. The genetic affinities between Brazilian Indians and other human populations were evaluated by estimates of genetic distance based on haplotype data. The lowest values were observed in relation to Asians, especially Chinese, Polynesians, and Micronesians. PMID:8039797

  10. HLA Haplotype Validator for quality assessments of HLA typing.

    PubMed

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Mack, Steven J; Udell, Julia; Noonan, David A; Ozanne, Steven; Trachtenberg, Elizabeth; Prestegaard, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    HLA alleles are observed in specific haplotypes, due to Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) between particular alleles. Haplotype frequencies for alleles in strong LD have been established for specific ethnic groups and racial categories. Application of high-resolution HLA typing using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is becoming a common practice in research and clinical laboratory settings. HLA typing errors using NGS occasionally occur due to allelic sequence imbalance or misalignment. Manual inspection of HLA genotypes is labor intensive and requires an in-depth knowledge of HLA alleles and haplotypes. We developed the "HLA Haplotype Validator (HLAHapV)" software, which inspects an HLA genotype for both the presence of common and well-documented alleles and observed haplotypes. The software also reports warnings when rare alleles, or alleles that do not belong to recognized haplotypes, are found. The software validates observable haplotypes in genotype data, providing increased confidence regarding the accuracy of the HLA typing, and thus reducing the effort involved in correcting potential HLA typing errors. The HLAHapV software is a powerful tool for quality control of HLA genotypes prior to the application of downstream analyses. We demonstrate the use of the HLAHapV software for identifying unusual haplotypes, which can lead to finding potential HLA typing errors. PMID:26546873

  11. HLA Type Inference via Haplotypes Identical by Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Manu N.; Gusev, Alexander; Pe'Er, Itsik

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genes play a major role in adaptive immune response and are used to differentiate self antigens from non self ones. HLA genes are hyper variable with nearly every locus harboring over a dozen alleles. This variation plays an important role in susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases and needs to be matched on for organ transplantation. Unfortunately, HLA typing by serological methods is time consuming and expensive compared to high throughput Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) data. We present a new computational method to infer per-locus HLA types using shared segments Identical By Descent (IBD), inferred from SNP genotype data. IBD information is modeled as graph where shared haplotypes are explored among clusters of individuals with known and unknown HLA types to identify the latter. We analyze performance of the method in a previously typed subset of the HapMap population, achieving accuracy of 96% in HLA-A, 94% in HLA-B, 95% in HLA-C, 77% in HLA-DR1, 93% in HLA-DQA1 and 90% in HLA-DQB1 genes. We compare our method to a tag SNP based approach and demonstrate higher sensitivity and specificity. Our method demonstrates the power of using shared haplotype segments for large-scale imputation at the HLA locus.

  12. Development of Vibrio spp. infection resistance related SNP markers using multiplex SNaPshot genotyping method in the clam Meretrix meretrix.

    PubMed

    Nie, Qing; Yue, Xin; Liu, Baozhong

    2015-04-01

    The clam Meretrix meretrix is a commercially important mollusc species in the coastal areas of South and Southeast Asia. In the present study, large-scale SNPs were genotyped by the Multiplex SNaPshot genotyping method among the stocks of M.meretrix with different Vibrio spp. infection resistance profile. Firstly, the AUTOSNP software was applied to mine SNPs from M.meretrix transcriptome, and 323 SNP loci (including 120 indels) located on 64 contigs were selected based on Uniprot-GO associations. Then, 38 polymorphic SNP loci located on 15 contigs were genotyped successfully in the clam stocks with different resistance to Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection (11-R and 11-S groups). Pearson's Chi-square test was applied to compare the allele and genotype frequency distributions of the SNPs between the different stocks, and seven SNP markers located on three contigs were found to be associated with V.parahaemolyticus infection resistance trait. Haplotype-association analysis showed that six haplotypes had significantly different frequency distributions in 11-S and 11-R (P<0.05). With selective genotyping between 09-R and 09-C populations, which had different resistance to Vibrio harveyi infection, four out of the seven selected SNPs had significantly different distributions (P<0.05) and therefore they were considered to be associated with Vibrio spp. infection resistance. Sequence alignments and annotations indicated that the contigs containing the associated SNPs had high similarity to the immune related genes. All these results would be useful for the future marker-assisted selection of M.meretrix strains with high Vibrio spp. infection resistance. PMID:25655323

  13. Association of kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR) gene polymorphism/ haplotypes with recurrent spontaneous abortion and genetic structure

    PubMed Central

    Shahsavari, Shiva; Noormohammadi, Zahra; Zare Karizi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent spontaneous abortion is one of the diseases that can lead to physical, psychological, and, economical problems for both individuals and society. Recently a few numbers of genetic polymorphisms in kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR) gene are examined that can endanger the life of the fetus in pregnant women. Objective: The risk of KDR gene polymorphisms was investigated in Iranian women with idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). Materials and Methods: A case controlled study was performed. One hundred idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion patients with at least two consecutive pregnancy losses before 20 weeks of gestational age with normal karyotypes were included in the study. Also, 100 healthy women with at least one natural pregnancy were studied as control group. Two functional SNPs located in KDR gene; rs1870377 (Q472H), and rs2305948 (V297I) as well as one tag SNP in the intron region (rs6838752) were genotyped by using PCR based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. Haplotype frequency was determined for these three SNPs’ genotypes. Analysis of genetic STRUCTURE and K means clustering were performed to study genetic variation. Results: Functional SNP (rs1870377) was highly linked to tag SNP (rs6838752) (D´ value=0. 214; χ2 = 16.44, p<0. 001). K means clustering showed that k = 8 as the best fit for the optimal number of genetic subgroups in our studied materials. This result was in agreement with Neighbor Joining cluster analysis. Conclusion: In our study, the allele and genotype frequencies were not associated with RSA between patient and control individuals. Inconsistent results in different populations with different allele frequencies among RSA patients and controls may be due to ethnic variation and used sample size. PMID:27141535

  14. Genetic analysis of 15 mtDNA SNP loci in Chinese Yi ethnic group using SNaPshot minisequencing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chun-Ting; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Qing-Xia; Wang, Hong-Dan; Yin, Cai-Yong; Fan, Han-Ting; Hu, Ling-Li; Shen, Chun-Mei; Meng, Hao-Tian; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2016-01-15

    SNaPshot minisequencing is a rapid and robust methodology based on a single base extension with a labeled ddNTP. The present study detected 15 selected SNPs in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control and coding regions by minisequencing methodology using SNaPshot for forensic purpose. The samples were collected from 99 unrelated individuals of the Yi ethnic minority group in Yunnan Province. We have predominantly found high-frequency transitions (91.7%) and a significantly lower frequency of transversions (8.3%). The nt152, 489, 8701, 10,398, 16,183, and 16,362 loci were highly polymorphic, while the nt231, 473 and 581 loci were not polymorphic in the studied population. Based on these 15 SNPs, a total of 28 mtDNA haplotypes were defined in 99 individuals with the haplotype diversity of 0.9136. Also, we compared the mtDNA sequences of Yi group and other 9 populations worldwide and drew a Neighbor-Joining tree based on the shared 12 mtDNA SNP loci, which demonstrated a close relationship between Yi and Bai groups. In conclusion, the analysis of the 15 selected SNPs increases considerably the discrimination power of mtDNA. Moreover, the SNaPshot minisequencing method could quickly detect mtDNA SNPs, and is economical and sensitive. The set of selected 15 SNPs is highly informative and is capable for anthropology genetic analysis. PMID:26432004

  15. Addictions Biology: Haplotype-Based Analysis for 130 Candidate Genes on a Single Array

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Colin A.; Yuan, Qiaoping; Xu, Ke; Shen, Pei-Hong; Heinz, Elizabeth; Lobos, Elizabeth A.; Binder, Elizabeth B.; Cubells, Joe; Ehlers, Cindy L.; Gelernter, Joel; Mann, John; Riley, Brien; Roy, Alec; Tabakoff, Boris; Todd, Richard D.; Zhou, Zhifeng; Goldman, David

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To develop a panel of markers able to extract full haplotype information for candidate genes in alcoholism, other addictions and disorders of mood and anxiety. Methods: A total of 130 genes were haplotype tagged and genotyped in 7 case/control populations and 51 reference populations using Illumina GoldenGate SNP genotyping technology, determining haplotype coverage. We also constructed and determined the efficacy of a panel of 186 ancestry informative markers. Results: An average of 1465 loci were genotyped at an average completion rate of 91.3%, with an average call rate of 98.3% and replication rate of 99.7%. Completion and call rates were lowered by the performance of two datasets, highlighting the importance of the DNA quality in high throughput assays. A comparison of haplotypes captured by the Addictions Array tagging SNPs and commercially available whole-genome arrays from Illumina and Affymetrix shows comparable performance of the tag SNPs to the best whole-genome array in all populations for which data are available. Conclusions: Arrays of haplotype-tagged candidate genes, such as this addictions-focused array, represent a cost-effective approach to generate high-quality SNP genotyping data useful for the haplotype-based analysis of panels of genes such as these 130 genes of interest to alcohol and addictions researchers. The inclusion of the 186 ancestry informative markers allows for the detection and correction for admixture and further enhances the utility of the array. PMID:18477577

  16. General Framework for Meta-Analysis of Haplotype Association Tests.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Jing Hua; An, Ping; Guo, Xiuqing; Jensen, Richard A; Marten, Jonathan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Meidtner, Karina; Boeing, Heiner; Campbell, Archie; Rice, Kenneth M; Scott, Robert A; Yao, Jie; Schulze, Matthias B; Wareham, Nicholas J; Borecki, Ingrid B; Province, Michael A; Rotter, Jerome I; Hayward, Caroline; Goodarzi, Mark O; Meigs, James B; Dupuis, Josée

    2016-04-01

    For complex traits, most associated single nucleotide variants (SNV) discovered to date have a small effect, and detection of association is only possible with large sample sizes. Because of patient confidentiality concerns, it is often not possible to pool genetic data from multiple cohorts, and meta-analysis has emerged as the method of choice to combine results from multiple studies. Many meta-analysis methods are available for single SNV analyses. As new approaches allow the capture of low frequency and rare genetic variation, it is of interest to jointly consider multiple variants to improve power. However, for the analysis of haplotypes formed by multiple SNVs, meta-analysis remains a challenge, because different haplotypes may be observed across studies. We propose a two-stage meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype analysis results. In the first stage, each cohort estimate haplotype effect sizes in a regression framework, accounting for relatedness among observations if appropriate. For the second stage, we use a multivariate generalized least square meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype effect estimates from multiple cohorts. Haplotype-specific association tests and a global test of independence between haplotypes and traits are obtained within our framework. We demonstrate through simulation studies that we control the type-I error rate, and our approach is more powerful than inverse variance weighted meta-analysis of single SNV analysis when haplotype effects are present. We replicate a published haplotype association between fasting glucose-associated locus (G6PC2) and fasting glucose in seven studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium and we provide more precise haplotype effect estimates. PMID:27027517

  17. Quantification of the Pirimicarb Resistance Allele Frequency in Pooled Cotton Aphid (Aphis gossypii Glover) Samples by TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yizhou; Bogema, Daniel R.; Barchia, Idris M.; Herron, Grant A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pesticide resistance monitoring is a crucial part to achieving sustainable integrated pest management (IPM) in agricultural production systems. Monitoring of resistance in arthropod populations is initially performed by bioassay, a method that detects a phenotypic response to pesticides. Molecular diagnostic assays, offering speed and cost improvements, can be developed when the causative mutation for resistance has been identified. However, improvements to throughput are limited as genotyping methods cannot be accurately applied to pooled DNA. Quantifying an allele frequency from pooled DNA would allow faster and cheaper monitoring of pesticide resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate a new method to quantify a resistance allele frequency (RAF) from pooled insects via TaqMan assay by using raw fluorescence data to calculate the transformed fluorescence ratio k at the inflexion point based on a four parameter sigmoid curve. Our results show that k is reproducible and highly correlated with RAF (r >0.99). We also demonstrate that k has a non-linear relationship with RAF and that five standard points are sufficient to build a prediction model. Additionally, we identified a non-linear relationship between runs for k, allowing the combination of samples across multiple runs in a single analysis. Conclusions/Significance The transformed fluorescence ratio (k') method can be used to monitor pesticide resistance in IPM and to accurately quantify allele frequency from pooled samples. We have determined that five standards (0.0, 0.2, 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0) are sufficient for accurate prediction and are statistically-equivalent to the 13 standard points used experimentally PMID:24614533

  18. MHC Class II haplotypes of Colombian Amerindian tribes

    PubMed Central

    Yunis, Juan J.; Yunis, Edmond J.; Yunis, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed 1041 individuals belonging to 17 Amerindian tribes of Colombia, Chimila, Bari and Tunebo (Chibcha linguistic family), Embera, Waunana (Choco linguistic family), Puinave and Nukak (Maku-Puinave linguistic families), Cubeo, Guanano, Tucano, Desano and Piratapuyo (Tukano linguistic family), Guahibo and Guayabero (Guayabero Linguistic Family), Curripaco and Piapoco (Arawak linguistic family) and Yucpa (Karib linguistic family). for MHC class II haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1). Approximately 90% of the MHC class II haplotypes found among these tribes are haplotypes frequently encountered in other Amerindian tribes. Nonetheless, striking differences were observed among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes. The DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:11, DRB1*09:01 carrying haplotypes were frequently found among non-Chibcha speaking tribes, while the DRB1*04:07 haplotype showed significant frequencies among Chibcha speaking tribes, and only marginal frequencies among non-Chibcha speaking tribes. Our results suggest that the differences in MHC class II haplotype frequency found among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes could be due to genetic differentiation in Mesoamerica of the ancestral Amerindian population into Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking populations before they entered into South America. PMID:23885196

  19. Short communication: casein haplotype variability in sicilian dairy goat breeds.

    PubMed

    Gigli, I; Maizon, D O; Riggio, V; Sardina, M T; Portolano, B

    2008-09-01

    In the Mediterranean region, goat milk production is an important economic activity. In the present study, 4 casein genes were genotyped in 5 Sicilian goat breeds to 1) identify casein haplotypes present in the Argentata dell'Etna, Girgentana, Messinese, Derivata di Siria, and Maltese goat breeds; and 2) describe the structure of the Sicilian goat breeds based on casein haplotypes and allele frequencies. In a sample of 540 dairy goats, 67 different haplotypes with frequency >or=0.01 and 27 with frequency >or=0.03 were observed. The most common CSN1S1-CSN2-CSN1S2-CSN3 haplotype for Derivata di Siria and Maltese was FCFB (0.17 and 0.22, respectively), whereas for Argentata dell'Etna, Girgentana and Messinese was ACAB (0.06, 0.23, and 0.10, respectively). According to the haplotype reconstruction, Argentata dell'Etna, Girgentana, and Messinese breeds presented the most favorable haplotype for cheese production, because the casein concentration in milk of these breeds might be greater than that in Derivata di Siria and Maltese breeds. Based on a cluster analysis, the breeds formed 2 main groups: Derivata di Siria, and Maltese in one group, and Argentata dell'Etna and Messinese in the other; the Girgentana breed was between these groups but closer to the latter. PMID:18765627

  20. MHC Class II haplotypes of Colombian Amerindian tribes.

    PubMed

    Yunis, Juan J; Yunis, Edmond J; Yunis, Emilio

    2013-07-01

    We analyzed 1041 individuals belonging to 17 Amerindian tribes of Colombia, Chimila, Bari and Tunebo (Chibcha linguistic family), Embera, Waunana (Choco linguistic family), Puinave and Nukak (Maku-Puinave linguistic families), Cubeo, Guanano, Tucano, Desano and Piratapuyo (Tukano linguistic family), Guahibo and Guayabero (Guayabero Linguistic Family), Curripaco and Piapoco (Arawak linguistic family) and Yucpa (Karib linguistic family). for MHC class II haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1). Approximately 90% of the MHC class II haplotypes found among these tribes are haplotypes frequently encountered in other Amerindian tribes. Nonetheless, striking differences were observed among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes. The DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:11, DRB1*09:01 carrying haplotypes were frequently found among non-Chibcha speaking tribes, while the DRB1*04:07 haplotype showed significant frequencies among Chibcha speaking tribes, and only marginal frequencies among non-Chibcha speaking tribes. Our results suggest that the differences in MHC class II haplotype frequency found among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes could be due to genetic differentiation in Mesoamerica of the ancestral Amerindian population into Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking populations before they entered into South America. PMID:23885196

  1. NABIC SNP: an integrated database for SNP markers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Kug; Won, So-Youn; Seol, Young-Joo; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The National Agricultural Biotechnology Information Center (NABIC) constructed a web-based database to provide information about 54,310 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in the seven species in a high-throughput manner. The database consists of three major functional categories: SNP marker search, detailed information viewer and download of SNP sequence. The SNP annotation table provides detailed information such as ownership information, basic information, bio-entry information, reference, comments, features, and sequence data. Availability The database is available online for free at http://nabic.rda.go.kr/SNP PMID:26339155

  2. Compression and fast retrieval of SNP data

    PubMed Central

    Sambo, Francesco; Di Camillo, Barbara; Toffolo, Gianna; Cobelli, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The increasing interest in rare genetic variants and epistatic genetic effects on complex phenotypic traits is currently pushing genome-wide association study design towards datasets of increasing size, both in the number of studied subjects and in the number of genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This, in turn, is leading to a compelling need for new methods for compression and fast retrieval of SNP data. Results: We present a novel algorithm and file format for compressing and retrieving SNP data, specifically designed for large-scale association studies. Our algorithm is based on two main ideas: (i) compress linkage disequilibrium blocks in terms of differences with a reference SNP and (ii) compress reference SNPs exploiting information on their call rate and minor allele frequency. Tested on two SNP datasets and compared with several state-of-the-art software tools, our compression algorithm is shown to be competitive in terms of compression rate and to outperform all tools in terms of time to load compressed data. Availability and implementation: Our compression and decompression algorithms are implemented in a C++ library, are released under the GNU General Public License and are freely downloadable from http://www.dei.unipd.it/~sambofra/snpack.html. Contact: sambofra@dei.unipd.it or cobelli@dei.unipd.it. PMID:25064564

  3. Probability Theory-based SNP Association Study Method for Identifying Susceptibility Loci and Genetic Disease Models in Human Case-Control Data

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiguo; Zhang, Junying; Wang, Yue

    2010-01-01

    One of the most challenging points in studying human common complex diseases is to search for both strong and weak susceptibility single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and identify forms of genetic disease models. Currently, a number of methods have been proposed for this purpose. Many of them have not been validated through applications into various genome datasets, so their abilities are not clear in real practice. In this paper, we present a novel SNP association study method based on probability theory, called ProbSNP. The method firstly detects SNPs by evaluating their joint probabilities in combining with disease status and selects those with the lowest joint probabilities as susceptibility ones, and then identifies some forms of genetic disease models through testing multiple-locus interactions among the selected SNPs. The joint probabilities of combined SNPs are estimated by establishing Gaussian distribution probability density functions, in which the related parameters (i.e., mean value and standard deviation) are evaluated based on allele and haplotype frequencies. Finally, we test and validate the method using various genome datasets. We find that ProbSNP has shown remarkable success in the applications to both simulated genome data and real genome-wide data. PMID:20840904

  4. Compound inheritance of a low-frequency regulatory SNP and a rare null mutation in exon-junction complex subunit RBM8A causes TAR syndrome.

    PubMed

    Albers, Cornelis A; Paul, Dirk S; Schulze, Harald; Freson, Kathleen; Stephens, Jonathan C; Smethurst, Peter A; Jolley, Jennifer D; Cvejic, Ana; Kostadima, Myrto; Bertone, Paul; Breuning, Martijn H; Debili, Najet; Deloukas, Panos; Favier, Rémi; Fiedler, Janine; Hobbs, Catherine M; Huang, Ni; Hurles, Matthew E; Kiddle, Graham; Krapels, Ingrid; Nurden, Paquita; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Sambrook, Jennifer G; Smith, Kenneth; Stemple, Derek L; Strauss, Gabriele; Thys, Chantal; van Geet, Chris; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Ouwehand, Willem H; Ghevaert, Cedric

    2012-04-01

    The exon-junction complex (EJC) performs essential RNA processing tasks. Here, we describe the first human disorder, thrombocytopenia with absent radii (TAR), caused by deficiency in one of the four EJC subunits. Compound inheritance of a rare null allele and one of two low-frequency SNPs in the regulatory regions of RBM8A, encoding the Y14 subunit of EJC, causes TAR. We found that this inheritance mechanism explained 53 of 55 cases (P < 5 × 10(-228)) of the rare congenital malformation syndrome. Of the 53 cases with this inheritance pattern, 51 carried a submicroscopic deletion of 1q21.1 that has previously been associated with TAR, and two carried a truncation or frameshift null mutation in RBM8A. We show that the two regulatory SNPs result in diminished RBM8A transcription in vitro and that Y14 expression is reduced in platelets from individuals with TAR. Our data implicate Y14 insufficiency and, presumably, an EJC defect as the cause of TAR syndrome. PMID:22366785

  5. Japonica array: improved genotype imputation by designing a population-specific SNP array with 1070 Japanese individuals

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Yosuke; Mimori, Takahiro; Kojima, Kaname; Nariai, Naoki; Danjoh, Inaho; Saito, Rumiko; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Nagasaki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    The Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization constructed the reference panel (referred to as the 1KJPN panel), which contains >20 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from whole-genome sequence data from 1070 Japanese individuals. The 1KJPN panel contains the largest number of haplotypes of Japanese ancestry to date. Here, from the 1KJPN panel, we designed a novel custom-made SNP array, named the Japonica array, which is suitable for whole-genome imputation of Japanese individuals. The array contains 659?253 SNPs, including tag SNPs for imputation, SNPs of Y chromosome and mitochondria, and SNPs related to previously reported genome-wide association studies and pharmacogenomics. The Japonica array provides better imputation performance for Japanese individuals than the existing commercially available SNP arrays with both the 1KJPN panel and the International 1000 genomes project panel. For common SNPs (minor allele frequency (MAF)>5%), the genomic coverage of the Japonica array (r2>0.8) was 96.9%, that is, almost all common SNPs were covered by this array. Nonetheless, the coverage of low-frequency SNPs (0.5%SNP arrays based on a population-specific reference panel is a practical way to facilitate further association studies through genome-wide genotype imputations. PMID:26108142

  6. Genotype frequencies of VKORC1 and CYP2C9 in native and Mestizo populations from Mexico, potential impact for coumarin dosing.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Torres, Beatriz; Snchez-Girn, Francisco; Jaramillo-Villafuerte, Karla; Sobern, Xavier; Gonzalez-Covarrubias, Vanessa

    2015-03-10

    The collection of pharmacogenetic variants in Mexican populations remains incomplete, thus, we aimed to characterize the genotype frequency of 11 SNP on CYP2C9 and VKORC1 in more than one-thousand individuals, and to explore their potential impact on coumarin dosing. In natives, genotype frequencies indicate that over 92% would reflect an extensive metabolism. For Mestizo populations, the proportion of CYP2C9 extensive (79%), intermediate (20.0%) and poor metabolizers (1.0%) was significantly different from that of natives, and varied among the different states of Mexico. Genotype frequencies of 7 SNP on VKORC1, were more homogenously distributed among natives and Mestizos. VKORC1 haplotype analysis revealed that most natives can be grouped into haplotypes H1 or H7-H8, while Mestizos showed a wider frequency distribution for other haplotypes. Our observations confirm previous reports on the genotype distribution of major CYP2C9 alleles, and contribute to the collection of genotype frequencies on relevant VKORC1 variants. PMID:25560189

  7. Bootstrap study of genome-enabled prediction reliabilities using haplotype blocks across Nordic Red cattle breeds.

    PubMed

    Cuyabano, B C D; Su, G; Rosa, G J M; Lund, M S; Gianola, D

    2015-10-01

    This study compared the accuracy of genome-enabled prediction models using individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) or haplotype blocks as covariates when using either a single breed or a combined population of Nordic Red cattle. The main objective was to compare predictions of breeding values of complex traits using a combined training population with haplotype blocks, with predictions using a single breed as training population and individual SNP as predictors. To compare the prediction reliabilities, bootstrap samples were taken from the test data set. With the bootstrapped samples of prediction reliabilities, we built and graphed confidence ellipses to allow comparisons. Finally, measures of statistical distances were used to calculate the gain in predictive ability. Our analyses are innovative in the context of assessment of predictive models, allowing a better understanding of prediction reliabilities and providing a statistical basis to effectively calibrate whether one prediction scenario is indeed more accurate than another. An ANOVA indicated that use of haplotype blocks produced significant gains mainly when Bayesian mixture models were used but not when Bayesian BLUP was fitted to the data. Furthermore, when haplotype blocks were used to train prediction models in a combined Nordic Red cattle population, we obtained up to a statistically significant 5.5% average gain in prediction accuracy, over predictions using individual SNP and training the model with a single breed. PMID:26233439

  8. Selection of minimum subsets of single nucleotide polymorphisms to capture haplotype block diversity.

    PubMed

    Avi-Itzhak, Hadar I; Su, Xiaoping; De La Vega, Francisco M

    2003-01-01

    We present a simple numerical algorithm to select the minimal subset of SNPs required to capture the diversity of haplotype blocks or other genetic loci. This algorithm can be used to quickly select the minimum SNP subset with no loss of haplotype information. In addition, the method can be used in a more aggressive mode to further reduce the original SNP set, with minimal loss of information. We demonstrate the algorithm performance with data from over 11,000 SNPs with average spacing of 6 to 11 Kb, across all the genes of chromosomes 6, 21, and 22, genotyped on DNA samples of 45 unrelated African-Americans and 45 Caucasians from the Coriell Human Diversity Collection. With no loss of information, we reduced the number of SNPs required to capture the haplotype block diversity by 25% for the African-American and 36% for the Caucasian populations. With a maximum loss of 10% of haplotype distribution information, the SNP reduction was 38% and 49% respectively for the two populations. All computations were performed in less than 1 minute for the entire dataset used. PMID:12603050

  9. Sequence-Level Analysis of the Major European Huntington Disease Haplotype

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Shin, Aram; Chao, Michael J.; Abu Elneel, Kawther; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi Srinidhi; Kaye, Julia A.; Zahed, Hengameh; Kratter, Ian H.; Daub, Aaron C.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Li, Hong; Roach, Jared C.; Goodman, Nathan; Hood, Leroy; Myers, Richard H.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Gusella, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) reflects the dominant consequences of a CAG-repeat expansion in HTT. Analysis of common SNP-based haplotypes has revealed that most European HD subjects have distinguishable HTT haplotypes on their normal and disease chromosomes and that ∼50% of the latter share the same major HD haplotype. We reasoned that sequence-level investigation of this founder haplotype could provide significant insights into the history of HD and valuable information for gene-targeting approaches. Consequently, we performed whole-genome sequencing of HD and control subjects from four independent families in whom the major European HD haplotype segregates with the disease. Analysis of the full-sequence-based HTT haplotype indicated that these four families share a common ancestor sufficiently distant to have permitted the accumulation of family-specific variants. Confirmation of new CAG-expansion mutations on this haplotype suggests that unlike most founders of human disease, the common ancestor of HD-affected families with the major haplotype most likely did not have HD. Further, availability of the full sequence data validated the use of SNP imputation to predict the optimal variants for capturing heterozygosity in personalized allele-specific gene-silencing approaches. As few as ten SNPs are capable of revealing heterozygosity in more than 97% of European HD subjects. Extension of allele-specific silencing strategies to the few remaining homozygous individuals is likely to be achievable through additional known SNPs and discovery of private variants by complete sequencing of HTT. These data suggest that the current development of gene-based targeting for HD could be extended to personalized allele-specific approaches in essentially all HD individuals of European ancestry. PMID:26320893

  10. Sequence-Level Analysis of the Major European Huntington Disease Haplotype.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Shin, Aram; Chao, Michael J; Abu Elneel, Kawther; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi Srinidhi; Kaye, Julia A; Zahed, Hengameh; Kratter, Ian H; Daub, Aaron C; Finkbeiner, Steven; Li, Hong; Roach, Jared C; Goodman, Nathan; Hood, Leroy; Myers, Richard H; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F

    2015-09-01

    Huntington disease (HD) reflects the dominant consequences of a CAG-repeat expansion in HTT. Analysis of common SNP-based haplotypes has revealed that most European HD subjects have distinguishable HTT haplotypes on their normal and disease chromosomes and that ∼50% of the latter share the same major HD haplotype. We reasoned that sequence-level investigation of this founder haplotype could provide significant insights into the history of HD and valuable information for gene-targeting approaches. Consequently, we performed whole-genome sequencing of HD and control subjects from four independent families in whom the major European HD haplotype segregates with the disease. Analysis of the full-sequence-based HTT haplotype indicated that these four families share a common ancestor sufficiently distant to have permitted the accumulation of family-specific variants. Confirmation of new CAG-expansion mutations on this haplotype suggests that unlike most founders of human disease, the common ancestor of HD-affected families with the major haplotype most likely did not have HD. Further, availability of the full sequence data validated the use of SNP imputation to predict the optimal variants for capturing heterozygosity in personalized allele-specific gene-silencing approaches. As few as ten SNPs are capable of revealing heterozygosity in more than 97% of European HD subjects. Extension of allele-specific silencing strategies to the few remaining homozygous individuals is likely to be achievable through additional known SNPs and discovery of private variants by complete sequencing of HTT. These data suggest that the current development of gene-based targeting for HD could be extended to personalized allele-specific approaches in essentially all HD individuals of European ancestry. PMID:26320893

  11. Dimensional anxiety mediates linkage of GABRA2 haplotypes with alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Enoch, Mary-Anne; Schwartz, Lori; Albaugh, Bernard; Virkkunen, Matti; Goldman, David

    2006-09-01

    The GABAAalpha2 receptor gene (GABRA2) modulates anxiety and stress response. Three recent association studies implicate GABRA2 in alcoholism, however in these papers both common, opposite-configuration haplotypes in the region distal to intron3 predict risk. We have now replicated the GABRA2 association with alcoholism in 331 Plains Indian men and women and 461 Finnish Caucasian men. Using a dimensional measure of anxiety, harm avoidance (HA), we also found that the association with alcoholism is mediated, or moderated, by anxiety. Nine SNPs were genotyped revealing two haplotype blocks. Within the previously implicated block 2 region, we identified the two common, opposite-configuration risk haplotypes, A and B. Their frequencies differed markedly in Finns and Plains Indians. In both populations, most block 2 SNPs were significantly associated with alcoholism. The associations were due to increased frequencies of both homozygotes in alcoholics, indicating the possibility of alcoholic subtypes with opposite genotypes. Congruently, there was no significant haplotype association. Using HA as an indicator variable for anxiety, we found haplotype linkage to alcoholism with high and low dimensional anxiety, and to HA itself, in both populations. High HA alcoholics had the highest frequency of the more abundant haplotype (A in Finns, B in Plains Indians); low HA alcoholics had the highest frequency of the less abundant haplotype (B in Finns, A in Plains Indians) (Finns: P = 0.007, OR = 2.1, Plains Indians: P = 0.040, OR = 1.9). Non-alcoholics had intermediate frequencies. Our results suggest that within the distal GABRA2 region is a functional locus or loci that may differ between populations but that alters risk for alcoholism via the mediating action of anxiety. PMID:16874763

  12. Dimensional Anxiety Mediates Linkage of GABRA2 Haplotypes With Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Enoch, Mary-Anne; Schwartz, Lori; Albaugh, Bernard; Virkkunen, Matti; Goldman, David

    2015-01-01

    The GABAAα2 receptor gene (GABRA2) modulates anxiety and stress response. Three recent association studies implicate GABRA2 in alcoholism, however in these papers both common, opposite-configuration haplotypes in the region distal to intron3 predict risk. We have now replicated the GABRA2 association with alcoholism in 331 Plains Indian men and women and 461 Finnish Caucasian men. Using a dimensional measure of anxiety, harm avoidance (HA), we also found that the association with alcoholism is mediated, or moderated, by anxiety. Nine SNPs were genotyped revealing two haplotype blocks. Within the previously implicated block 2 region, we identified the two common, opposite-configuration risk haplotypes, A and B. Their frequencies differed markedly in Finns and Plains Indians. In both populations, most block 2 SNPs were significantly associated with alcoholism. The associations were due to increased frequencies of both homozygotes in alcoholics, indicating the possibility of alcoholic subtypes with opposite genotypes. Congruently, there was no significant haplotype association. Using HA as an indicator variable for anxiety, we found haplotype linkage to alcoholism with high and low dimensional anxiety, and to HA itself, in both populations. High HA alcoholics had the highest frequency of the more abundant haplotype (A in Finns, B in Plains Indians); low HA alcoholics had the highest frequency of the less abundant haplotype (B in Finns, A in Plains Indians) (Finns: P α0.007, OR α2.1, Plains Indians: P α0.040, OR α1.9). Non-alcoholics had intermediate frequencies. Our results suggest that within the distal GABRA2 region is a functional locus or loci that may differ between populations but that alters risk for alcoholism via the mediating action of anxiety. PMID:16874763

  13. BNTagger: improved tagging SNP selection using Bayesian networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Phil Hyoun; Shatkay, Hagit

    2006-07-15

    Genetic variation analysis holds much promise as a basis for disease-gene association. However, due to the tremendous number of candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), there is a clear need to expedite genotyping by selecting and considering only a subset of all SNPs. This process is known as tagging SNP selection. Several methods for tagging SNP selection have been proposed, and have shown promising results. However, most of them rely on strong assumptions such as prior block-partitioning, bi-allelic SNPs, or a fixed number or location of tagging SNPs. We introduce BNTagger, a new method for tagging SNP selection, based on conditional independence among SNPs. Using the formalism of Bayesian networks (BNs), our system aims to select a subset of independent and highly predictive SNPs. Similar to previous prediction-based methods, we aim to maximize the prediction accuracy of tagging SNPs, but unlike them, we neither fix the number nor the location of predictive tagging SNPs, nor require SNPs to be bi-allelic. In addition, for newly-genotyped samples, BNTagger directly uses genotype data as input, while producing as output haplotype data of all SNPs. Using three public data sets, we compare the prediction performance of our method to that of three state-of-the-art tagging SNP selection methods. The results demonstrate that our method consistently improves upon previous methods in terms of prediction accuracy. Moreover, our method retains its good performance even when a very small number of tagging SNPs are used. PMID:16873474

  14. Novel Nucleotide Variations, Haplotypes Structure and Associations with Growth Related Traits of Goat AT Motif-Binding Factor (ATBF1) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xianfeng; Jia, Wenchao; Pan, Chuanying; Li, Xiangcheng; Lei, Chuzhao; Chen, Hong; Lan, Xianyong

    2015-01-01

    The AT motif-binding factor (ATBF1) not only interacts with protein inhibitor of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) (PIAS3) to suppress STAT3 signaling regulating embryo early development and cell differentiation, but is required for early activation of the pituitary specific transcription factor 1 (Pit1) gene (also known as POU1F1) critically affecting mammalian growth and development. The goal of this study was to detect novel nucleotide variations and haplotypes structure of the ATBF1 gene, as well as to test their associations with growth-related traits in goats. Herein, a total of seven novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (SNP 1-7) within this gene were found in two well-known Chinese native goat breeds. Haplotypes structure analysis demonstrated that there were four haplotypes in Hainan black goat while seventeen haplotypes in Xinong Saanen dairy goat, and both breeds only shared one haplotype (hap1). Association testing revealed that the SNP2, SNP5, SNP6, and SNP7 loci were also found to significantly associate with growth-related traits in goats, respectively. Moreover, one diplotype in Xinong Saanen dairy goats significantly linked to growth related traits. These preliminary findings not only would extend the spectrum of genetic variations of the goat ATBF1 gene, but also would contribute to implementing marker-assisted selection in genetics and breeding in goats. PMID:26323396

  15. Haplotype Analysis Improved Evidence for Candidate Genes for Intramuscular Fat Percentage from a Genome Wide Association Study of Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Barendse, William

    2011-01-01

    In genome wide association studies (GWAS), haplotype analyses of SNP data are neglected in favour of single point analysis of associations. In a recent GWAS, we found that none of the known candidate genes for intramuscular fat (IMF) had been identified. In this study, data from the GWAS for these candidate genes were re-analysed as haplotypes. First, we confirmed that the methodology would find evidence for association between haplotypes in candidate genes of the calpain-calpastatin complex and musculus longissimus lumborum peak force (LLPF), because these genes had been confirmed through single point analysis in the GWAS. Then, for intramuscular fat percent (IMF), we found significant partial haplotype substitution effects for the genes ADIPOQ and CXCR4, as well as suggestive associations to the genes CEBPA, FASN, and CAPN1. Haplotypes for these genes explained 80% more of the phenotypic variance compared to the best single SNP. For some genes the analyses suggested that there was more than one causative mutation in some genes, or confirmed that some causative mutations are limited to particular subgroups of a species. Fitting the SNPs and their interactions simultaneously explained a similar amount of the phenotypic variance compared to haplotype analyses. Haplotype analysis is a neglected part of the suite of tools used to analyse GWAS data, would be a useful method to extract more information from these data sets, and may contribute to reducing the missing heritability problem. PMID:22216329

  16. Association of Nrf2 Polymorphism Haplotypes with Acute Lung Injury Phenotypes in Inbred Strains of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jedlicka, Anne E.; Gladwell, Wesley; Marzec, Jacqui; McCaw, Zackary R.; Bienstock, Rachelle J.; Kleeberger, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Nrf2 is a master transcription factor for antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated cytoprotective gene induction. A protective role for pulmonary Nrf2 was determined in model oxidative disorders, including hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury (ALI). To obtain additional insights into the function and genetic regulation of Nrf2, we assessed functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of Nrf2 in inbred mouse strains and tested whether sequence variation is associated with hyperoxia susceptibility. Results: Nrf2 SNPs were compiled from publicly available databases and by re-sequencing DNA from inbred strains. Hierarchical clustering of Nrf2 SNPs categorized the strains into three major haplotypes. Hyperoxia susceptibility was greater in haplotypes 2 and 3 strains than in haplotype 1 strains. A promoter SNP −103 T/C adding an Sp1 binding site in haplotype 2 diminished promoter activation basally and under hyperoxia. Haplotype 3 mice bearing nonsynonymous coding SNPs located in (1862 A/T, His543Gln) and adjacent to (1417 T/C, Thr395Ile) the Neh1 domain showed suppressed nuclear transactivation of pulmonary Nrf2 relative to other strains, and overexpression of haplotype 3 Nrf2 showed lower ARE responsiveness than overexpression of haplotype 1 Nrf2 in airway cells. Importantly, we found a significant correlation of Nrf2 haplotypes and hyperoxic lung injury phenotypes. Innovation and Conclusion: The results indicate significant influence of Nrf2 polymorphisms and haplotypes on gene function and hyperoxia susceptibility. Our findings further support Nrf2 as a genetic determinant in ALI pathogenesis and provide useful tools for investigators who use mouse strains classified by Nrf2 haplotypes to elucidate the role for Nrf2 in oxidative disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 325–338. PMID:25268541

  17. Haplotype Phasing and Inheritance of Copy Number Variants in Nuclear Families

    PubMed Central

    Palta, Priit; Kaplinski, Lauris; Nagirnaja, Liina; Veidenberg, Andres; Möls, Märt; Nelis, Mari; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Laan, Maris; Remm, Maido

    2015-01-01

    DNA copy number variants (CNVs) that alter the copy number of a particular DNA segment in the genome play an important role in human phenotypic variability and disease susceptibility. A number of CNVs overlapping with genes have been shown to confer risk to a variety of human diseases thus highlighting the relevance of addressing the variability of CNVs at a higher resolution. So far, it has not been possible to deterministically infer the allelic composition of different haplotypes present within the CNV regions. We have developed a novel computational method, called PiCNV, which enables to resolve the haplotype sequence composition within CNV regions in nuclear families based on SNP genotyping microarray data. The algorithm allows to i) phase normal and CNV-carrying haplotypes in the copy number variable regions, ii) resolve the allelic copies of rearranged DNA sequence within the haplotypes and iii) infer the heritability of identified haplotypes in trios or larger nuclear families. To our knowledge this is the first program available that can deterministically phase null, mono-, di-, tri- and tetraploid genotypes in CNV loci. We applied our method to study the composition and inheritance of haplotypes in CNV regions of 30 HapMap Yoruban trios and 34 Estonian families. For 93.6% of the CNV loci, PiCNV enabled to unambiguously phase normal and CNV-carrying haplotypes and follow their transmission in the corresponding families. Furthermore, allelic composition analysis identified the co-occurrence of alternative allelic copies within 66.7% of haplotypes carrying copy number gains. We also observed less frequent transmission of CNV-carrying haplotypes from parents to children compared to normal haplotypes and identified an emergence of several de novo deletions and duplications in the offspring. PMID:25853576

  18. Haplotype phasing and inheritance of copy number variants in nuclear families.

    PubMed

    Palta, Priit; Kaplinski, Lauris; Nagirnaja, Liina; Veidenberg, Andres; Möls, Märt; Nelis, Mari; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Laan, Maris; Remm, Maido

    2015-01-01

    DNA copy number variants (CNVs) that alter the copy number of a particular DNA segment in the genome play an important role in human phenotypic variability and disease susceptibility. A number of CNVs overlapping with genes have been shown to confer risk to a variety of human diseases thus highlighting the relevance of addressing the variability of CNVs at a higher resolution. So far, it has not been possible to deterministically infer the allelic composition of different haplotypes present within the CNV regions. We have developed a novel computational method, called PiCNV, which enables to resolve the haplotype sequence composition within CNV regions in nuclear families based on SNP genotyping microarray data. The algorithm allows to i) phase normal and CNV-carrying haplotypes in the copy number variable regions, ii) resolve the allelic copies of rearranged DNA sequence within the haplotypes and iii) infer the heritability of identified haplotypes in trios or larger nuclear families. To our knowledge this is the first program available that can deterministically phase null, mono-, di-, tri- and tetraploid genotypes in CNV loci. We applied our method to study the composition and inheritance of haplotypes in CNV regions of 30 HapMap Yoruban trios and 34 Estonian families. For 93.6% of the CNV loci, PiCNV enabled to unambiguously phase normal and CNV-carrying haplotypes and follow their transmission in the corresponding families. Furthermore, allelic composition analysis identified the co-occurrence of alternative allelic copies within 66.7% of haplotypes carrying copy number gains. We also observed less frequent transmission of CNV-carrying haplotypes from parents to children compared to normal haplotypes and identified an emergence of several de novo deletions and duplications in the offspring. PMID:25853576

  19. Beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes in Afro-Uruguayans from two geographical regions (South and North).

    PubMed

    Da Luz, Julio; Kimura, Elza Miyuki; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Sonati, Maria de Fatima; Sans, Mónica

    2010-01-01

    The beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes were identified in 52 and 40 chromosomes from two Afro-Uruguayan populations located in the South and North of the country, respectively. In both regions, the 5' haplotype 2 (+ - - - -), characteristic of non-African populations, was the most frequent, reflecting a strong process of admixture in Afro-Uruguayans (0.355 and 0.262, respectively). The haplotypes 3 (- - - - +) and 4 (- + - - +), characteristics of African sub-Saharan populations, present inverse frequencies in North and South: whereas in the South haplotype 3 is the second most frequent (0.232), and haplotype 4 presents a low frequency (0.019), in the North haplotype 4 is the third most frequent (0.140), and haplotype 3 only reaches an intermediate frequency (0.088). The pairwise F(ST) and the exact test of differentiation show genetic heterogeneity between both regions. Nei's genetic distance show that South and North present affinities with Bantu groups, although the North present the smallest genetic distance with the Mandenka, a Senegalese population. With respect to 3' haplotypes, haplotype I was the most frequent in both populations, followed by haplotype II, characteristic of sub-Saharan Africans. The high frequencies of haplotype III-Asian could indicate admixture with Native American populations. The differences observed between both Uruguayan regions could be explained by microevolutionary events as genetic drift, founder effects, differential admixture, and/or distinct origin of the African slaves introduced in those regions. PMID:19533614

  20. Haplotype-based quantitative trait mapping using a clustering algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Yingyao; Elston, Robert C

    2006-01-01

    Background With the availability of large-scale, high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, substantial effort has been made in identifying disease-causing genes using linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping by haplotype analysis of unrelated individuals. In addition to complex diseases, many continuously distributed quantitative traits are of primary clinical and health significance. However the development of association mapping methods using unrelated individuals for quantitative traits has received relatively less attention. Results We recently developed an association mapping method for complex diseases by mining the sharing of haplotype segments (i.e., phased genotype pairs) in affected individuals that are rarely present in normal individuals. In this paper, we extend our previous work to address the problem of quantitative trait mapping from unrelated individuals. The method is non-parametric in nature, and statistical significance can be obtained by a permutation test. It can also be incorporated into the one-way ANCOVA (analysis of covariance) framework so that other factors and covariates can be easily incorporated. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated by extensive experimental studies using both simulated and real data sets. The results show that our haplotype-based approach is more robust than two statistical methods based on single markers: a single SNP association test (SSA) and the Mann-Whitney U-test (MWU). The algorithm has been incorporated into our existing software package called HapMiner, which is available from our website at . Conclusion For QTL (quantitative trait loci) fine mapping, to identify QTNs (quantitative trait nucleotides) with realistic effects (the contribution of each QTN less than 10% of total variance of the trait), large samples sizes (≥ 500) are needed for all the methods. The overall performance of HapMiner is better than that of the other two methods. Its effectiveness further depends on other factors such as recombination rates and the density of typed SNPs. Haplotype-based methods might provide higher power than methods based on a single SNP when using tag SNPs selected from a small number of samples or some other sources (such as HapMap data). Rank-based statistics usually have much lower power, as shown in our study. PMID:16709248

  1. Evolution of haplotypes at the DRD2 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Castiglione, C.M.; Deinard, A.S.; Speed, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    We present here the first evolutionary perspective on haplotypes at DRD2, the locus for the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor. The dopamine D{sub 2} receptor plays a critical role in the functioning of many neural circuits in the human brain. If functionally relevant variation at the DRD2 locus exists, understanding the evolution of haplotypes on the basis of polymorphic sites encompassing the gene should provide a powerful framework for identifying that variation. Three DRD2 polymorphisms (TaqI {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} RFLPs and the (CA){sub n} short tandem repeat polymorphism) encompassing the coding sequences have been studied in 15 populations; these markers are polymorphic in all the populations studied, and they display strong and significant linkage disequilibria with each other. The common haplotypes for the two TaqI RFLPs are separately derived from the ancestral haplotype but predate the spread of modern humans around the world. The knowledge of how the various haplotypes have evolved, the allele frequencies of the haplotypes in human populations, and the physical relationships of the polymorphisms to each other and to the functional parts of the gene should now allow proper design and interpretation of association studies. 48 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Dual origins of Finns revealed by Y chromosome haplotype variation.

    PubMed Central

    Kittles, R A; Perola, M; Peltonen, L; Bergen, A W; Aragon, R A; Virkkunen, M; Linnoila, M; Goldman, D; Long, J C

    1998-01-01

    The Finnish population has often been viewed as an isolate founded 2, 000 years ago via a route across the Gulf of Finland. The founding event has been characterized as involving a limited number of homogeneous founders, isolation, and subsequent rapid population growth. Despite the purported isolation of the population, levels of gene diversity for the Finns at autosomal and mitochondrial DNA loci are indistinguishable from those of other Europeans. Thus, mixed or dual origins for the Finns have been proposed. Here we present genetic evidence for the dual origins of Finns by evaluating the pattern of Y chromosome variation in 280 unrelated males from nine Finnish provinces. Phylogenetic analysis of 77 haplotype configurations revealed two major star-shaped clusters of Y haplotypes, indicative of a population expansion from two common Y haplotypes. Dramatic and quite significant differences in Y haplotype variation were observed between eastern and western regions of Finland, revealing contributions from different paternal types. The geographic distribution and time of expansion for the two common Y haplotypes correlate well with archeological evidence for two culturally and geographically distinct groups of settlers. Also, a northeastern to southwestern gradient of Y haplotype frequencies provides convincing evidence for recent male migration from rural areas into urban Finland. PMID:9545401

  3. Dual origins of Finns revealed by Y chromosome haplotype variation.

    PubMed

    Kittles, R A; Perola, M; Peltonen, L; Bergen, A W; Aragon, R A; Virkkunen, M; Linnoila, M; Goldman, D; Long, J C

    1998-05-01

    The Finnish population has often been viewed as an isolate founded 2, 000 years ago via a route across the Gulf of Finland. The founding event has been characterized as involving a limited number of homogeneous founders, isolation, and subsequent rapid population growth. Despite the purported isolation of the population, levels of gene diversity for the Finns at autosomal and mitochondrial DNA loci are indistinguishable from those of other Europeans. Thus, mixed or dual origins for the Finns have been proposed. Here we present genetic evidence for the dual origins of Finns by evaluating the pattern of Y chromosome variation in 280 unrelated males from nine Finnish provinces. Phylogenetic analysis of 77 haplotype configurations revealed two major star-shaped clusters of Y haplotypes, indicative of a population expansion from two common Y haplotypes. Dramatic and quite significant differences in Y haplotype variation were observed between eastern and western regions of Finland, revealing contributions from different paternal types. The geographic distribution and time of expansion for the two common Y haplotypes correlate well with archeological evidence for two culturally and geographically distinct groups of settlers. Also, a northeastern to southwestern gradient of Y haplotype frequencies provides convincing evidence for recent male migration from rural areas into urban Finland. PMID:9545401

  4. Polymorphic DNA haplotypes at the LDL receptor locus.

    PubMed Central

    Leitersdorf, E; Chakravarti, A; Hobbs, H H

    1989-01-01

    Mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene result in the autosomal dominant disorder familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Many different LDL receptor mutations have been identified and characterized, demonstrating a high degree of allelic heterogeneity at this locus. The ability to identify mutant LDL receptor genes for prenatal diagnosis of homozygous FH or to study the role of the LDL receptor gene in polygenic hypercholesterolemia requires the use of closely linked RFLPs. In the present study we used 10 different RFLPs, including three newly described polymorphisms, to construct 123 independent haplotypes from 20 Caucasian American pedigrees. Our sample contained 31 different haplotypes varying in frequency from 0.8% to 29.3%; the five most common haplotypes account for 67.5% of the sample. The heterozygosity and PIC of each site were determined, and these values disclosed that eight of the RFLPs were substantially polymorphic. Linkage-disequilibrium analysis of the haplotype data revealed strong nonrandom associations among all 10 RFLPs, especially among those sites clustered in the 3' region of the gene. Evolutionary analysis suggests the occurrence of both mutational and recombinational events in the generation of the observed haplotypes. A strategy for haplotype analysis of the LDL receptor gene in individuals of Caucasian American descent is presented. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2563635

  5. Combining an Evolution-guided Clustering Algorithm and Haplotype-based LRT in Family Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With the completion of the international HapMap project, many studies have been conducted to investigate the association between complex diseases and haplotype variants. Such haplotype-based association studies, however, often face two difficulties; one is the large number of haplotype configurations in the chromosome region under study, and the other is the ambiguity in haplotype phase when only genotype data are observed. The latter complexity may be handled based on an EM algorithm with family data incorporated, whereas the former can be more problematic, especially when haplotypes of rare frequencies are involved. Here based on family data we propose to cluster long haplotypes of linked SNPs in a biological sense, so that the number of haplotypes can be reduced and the power of statistical tests of association can be increased. Results In this paper we employ family genotype data and combine a clustering scheme with a likelihood ratio statistic to test the association between quantitative phenotypes and haplotype variants. Haplotypes are first grouped based on their evolutionary closeness to establish a set containing core haplotypes. Then, we construct for each family the transmission and non-transmission phase in terms of these core haplotypes, taking into account simultaneously the phase ambiguity as weights. The likelihood ratio test (LRT) is next conducted with these weighted and clustered haplotypes to test for association with disease. This combination of evolution-guided haplotype clustering and weighted assignment in LRT is able, via its core-coding system, to incorporate into analysis both haplotype phase ambiguity and transmission uncertainty. Simulation studies show that this proposed procedure is more informative and powerful than three family-based association tests, FAMHAP, FBAT, and an LRT with a group consisting exclusively of rare haplotypes. Conclusions The proposed procedure takes into account the uncertainty in phase determination and in transmission, utilizes the evolutionary information contained in haplotypes, reduces the dimension in haplotype space and the degrees of freedom in tests, and performs better in association studies. This evolution-guided clustering procedure is particularly useful for long haplotypes containing linked SNPs, and is applicable to other haplotype-based association tests. This procedure is now implemented in R and is free for download. PMID:21592403

  6. Detection of copy number variation by SNP-allelotyping

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Brett; Alexander, Ryan; Wu, Xingyao; Feely, Shawna; Shy, Michael; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is caused by an abnormal copy number variation (CNV) with a trisomy of chromosome 17p12. The increase of the DNA-segment copy number is expected to alter the allele frequency of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the duplicated region. We tested whether SNP allele frequency determined by a Sequenom MassArray can be used to detect the CMT1A mutation. Our results revealed distinct patterns of SNP allele frequency distribution, which reliably differentiated CMT1A patients from controls. This finding suggests that this technique may serve as an alternative approach to identifying CNV in certain diseases, including CMT1A. PMID:24830919

  7. Detection of copy number variation by SNP-allelotyping.

    PubMed

    Parker, Brett; Alexander, Ryan; Wu, Xingyao; Feely, Shawna; Shy, Michael; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie; Li, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is caused by an abnormal copy number variation (CNV) with a trisomy of chromosome 17p12. The increase of the DNA-segment copy number is expected to alter the allele frequency of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the duplicated region. We tested whether SNP allele frequency determined by a Sequenom MassArray can be used to detect the CMT1A mutation. Our results revealed distinct patterns of SNP allele frequency distribution, which reliably differentiated CMT1A patients from controls. This finding suggests that this technique may serve as an alternative approach to identifying CNV in certain diseases, including CMT1A. PMID:24830919

  8. Y-SNP L1034: limited genetic link between Mansi and Hungarian-speaking populations.

    PubMed

    Fehr, T; Nmeth, E; Vndor, A; Kornienko, I V; Csji, L K; Pamjav, H

    2015-02-01

    Genetic studies noted that the Hungarian Y-chromosomal gene pool significantly differs from other Uralic-speaking populations. Hungarians show very limited or no presence of haplogroup N-Tat, which is frequent among other Uralic-speaking populations. We proposed that some genetic links need to be observed between the linguistically related Hungarian and Mansi populations.This is the first attempt to divide haplogroup N-Tat into subhaplogroups by testing new downstream SNP markers L708 and L1034. Sixty Northern Mansi samples were collected in Western Siberia and genotyped for Y-chromosomal haplotypes and haplogroups. We found 14 Mansi and 92 N-Tat samples from 7 populations. Comparative results showed that all N-Tat samples carried the N-L708 mutation. Some Hungarian, Sekler, and Uzbek samples were L1034 SNP positive, while all Mongolians, Buryats, Khanty, Finnish, and Roma samples yielded a negative result for this marker. Based on the above, L1034 marker seems to be a subgroup of N-Tat, which is typical for Mansi and Hungarian-speaking ethnic groups so far. Based on our time to most recent common ancestor data, the L1034 marker arose 2,500 years before present. The overall frequency of the L1034 is very low among the analyzed populations, thus it does not necessarily mean that proto-Hungarians and Mansi descend from common ancestors. It does provide, however, a limited genetic link supporting language contact. Both Hungarians and Mansi have much more complex genetic population history than the traditional tree-based linguistic model would suggest. PMID:25258186

  9. RNA-Seq Identifies SNP Markers for Growth Traits in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Mohamed; Vallejo, Roger L.; Leeds, Timothy D.; Palti, Yniv; Liu, Sixin; Sabbagh, Annas; Rexroad, Caird E.; Yao, Jianbo

    2012-01-01

    Fast growth is an important and highly desired trait, which affects the profitability of food animal production, with feed costs accounting for the largest proportion of production costs. Traditional phenotype-based selection is typically used to select for growth traits; however, genetic improvement is slow over generations. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) explain 90% of the genetic differences between individuals; therefore, they are most suitable for genetic evaluation and strategies that employ molecular genetics for selective breeding. SNPs found within or near a coding sequence are of particular interest because they are more likely to alter the biological function of a protein. We aimed to use SNPs to identify markers and genes associated with genetic variation in growth. RNA-Seq whole-transcriptome analysis of pooled cDNA samples from a population of rainbow trout selected for improved growth versus unselected genetic cohorts (10 fish from 1 full-sib family each) identified SNP markers associated with growth-rate. The allelic imbalances (the ratio between the allele frequencies of the fast growing sample and that of the slow growing sample) were considered at scores >5.0 as an amplification and <0.2 as loss of heterozygosity. A subset of SNPs (n = 54) were validated and evaluated for association with growth traits in 778 individuals of a three-generation parent/offspring panel representing 40 families. Twenty-two SNP markers and one mitochondrial haplotype were significantly associated with growth traits. Polymorphism of 48 of the markers was confirmed in other commercially important aquaculture stocks. Many markers were clustered into genes of metabolic energy production pathways and are suitable candidates for genetic selection. The study demonstrates that RNA-Seq at low sequence coverage of divergent populations is a fast and effective means of identifying SNPs, with allelic imbalances between phenotypes. This technique is suitable for marker development in non-model species lacking complete and well-annotated genome reference sequences. PMID:22574143

  10. Reflections on ancestral haplotypes: medical genomics, evolution, and human individuality.

    PubMed

    Steele, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC), once labelled the "sphinx of immunology" by Jan Klein, provides powerful challenges to evolutionary thinking. This essay highlights the main discoveries that established the block ancestral haplotype structure of the MHC and the wider genome, focusing on the work by the Perth (Australia) group, led by Roger Dawkins, and the Boston group, led by Chester Alper and Edmond Yunis. Their achievements have been overlooked in the rush to sequence the first and subsequent drafts of the human genome. In Caucasoids, where most of the detailed work has been done, about 70% of all known allelic MHC diversity can be accounted for by 30 or so ancestral haplotypes (AHs), or conserved sequences of many mega-bases, and their recombinants. The block haplotype structure of the genome, as shown for the MHC (and other genetic regions), is a story that needs to be understood in its own right, particularly given the promotion of the "HapMap" project and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis, which has been wrongly touted as the only way to pinpoint those genes that are important in genetic disorders or other desired (qualitative) characteristics. PMID:25544323

  11. Intrahaplotypic Variants Differentiate Complex Linkage Disequilibrium within Human MHC Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tze Hau; Tay, Matthew Zirui; Wang, Bei; Xiao, Ziwei; Ren, Ee Chee

    2015-01-01

    Distinct regions of long-range genetic fixation in the human MHC region, known as conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs), possess unique genomic characteristics and are strongly associated with numerous diseases. While CEHs appear to be homogeneous by SNP analysis, the nature of fine variations within their genomic structure is unknown. Using multiple, MHC-homozygous cell lines, we demonstrate extensive sequence conservation in two common Asian MHC haplotypes: A33-B58-DR3 and A2-B46-DR9. However, characterization of phase-resolved MHC haplotypes revealed unique intra-CEH patterns of variation and uncovered 127 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) which are missing from public databases. We further show that the strong linkage disequilibrium structure within the human MHC that typically confounds precise identification of genetic features can be resolved using intra-CEH variants, as evidenced by rs3129063 and rs448489, which affect expression of ZFP57, a gene important in methylation and epigenetic regulation. This study demonstrates an improved strategy that can be used towards genetic dissection of diseases. PMID:26593880

  12. Introgression of a rare haplotype from Southeastern Africa to breed California blackeyes with larger seeds.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Mitchell R; Huynh, Bao-Lam; Roberts, Philip A; Close, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Seed size distinguishes most crops from their wild relatives and is an important quality trait for the grain legume cowpea. In order to breed cowpea varieties with larger seeds we introgressed a rare haplotype associated with large seeds at the Css-1 locus from an African buff seed type cultivar, IT82E-18 (18.5 g/100 seeds), into a blackeye seed type cultivar, CB27 (22 g/100 seed). Four recombinant inbred lines derived from these two parents were chosen for marker-assisted breeding based on SNP genotyping with a goal of stacking large seed haplotypes into a CB27 background. Foreground and background selection were performed during two cycles of backcrossing based on genome-wide SNP markers. The average seed size of introgression lines homozygous for haplotypes associated with large seeds was 28.7g/100 seed and 24.8 g/100 seed for cycles 1 and 2, respectively. One cycle 1 introgression line with desirable seed quality was selfed for two generations to make families with very large seeds (28-35 g/100 seeds). Field-based performance trials helped identify breeding lines that not only have large seeds but are also desirable in terms of yield, maturity, and plant architecture when compared to industry standards. A principal component analysis was used to explore the relationships between the parents relative to a core set of landraces and improved varieties based on high-density SNP data. The geographic distribution of haplotypes at the Css-1 locus suggest the haplotype associated with large seeds is unique to accessions collected from Southeastern Africa. Therefore this quantitative trait locus has a strong potential to develop larger seeded varieties for other growing regions which is demonstrated in this work using a California pedigree. PMID:25852699

  13. PAX6 Haplotypes Are Associated with High Myopia in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bo; Yap, Maurice K. H.; Leung, Kim Hung; Ng, Po Wah; Fung, Wai Yan; Lam, Wai Wa; Gu, Yang-shun; Yip, Shea Ping

    2011-01-01

    Background The paired box 6 (PAX6) gene is considered as a master gene for eye development. Linkage of myopia to the PAX6 region on chromosome 11p13 was shown in several studies, but the results for association between myopia and PAX6 were inconsistent so far. Methodology/Principal Findings We genotyped 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PAX6 gene and its regulatory regions in an initial study for 300 high myopia cases and 300 controls (Group 1), and successfully replicated the positive results with another independent group of 299 high myopia cases and 299 controls (Group 2). Five SNPs were genotyped in the replication study. The spherical equivalent of subjects with high myopia was ≤−8.0 dioptres. The PLINK package was used for genetic data analysis. No association was found between each of the SNPs and high myopia. However, exhaustive sliding-window haplotype analysis highlighted an important role for rs12421026 because haplotypes containing this SNP were found to be associated with high myopia. The most significant results were given by the 4-SNP haplotype window consisting of rs2071754, rs3026393, rs1506 and rs12421026 (P = 3.54×10−10, 4.06×10−11 and 1.56×10−18 for Group 1, Group 2 and Combined Group, respectively) and the 3-SNP haplotype window composed of rs3026393, rs1506 and rs12421026 (P = 5.48×10−10, 7.93×10−12 and 6.28×10−23 for the three respective groups). The results remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons by permutations. The associated haplotyes found in a previous study were also successfully replicated in this study. Conclusions/Significance PAX6 haplotypes are associated with susceptibility to the development of high myopia in Chinese. The PAX6 locus plays a role in high myopia. PMID:21589860

  14. Introgression of a rare haplotype from Southeastern Africa to breed California blackeyes with larger seeds

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Mitchell R.; Huynh, Bao-Lam; Roberts, Philip A.; Close, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Seed size distinguishes most crops from their wild relatives and is an important quality trait for the grain legume cowpea. In order to breed cowpea varieties with larger seeds we introgressed a rare haplotype associated with large seeds at the Css-1 locus from an African buff seed type cultivar, IT82E-18 (18.5 g/100 seeds), into a blackeye seed type cultivar, CB27 (22 g/100 seed). Four recombinant inbred lines derived from these two parents were chosen for marker-assisted breeding based on SNP genotyping with a goal of stacking large seed haplotypes into a CB27 background. Foreground and background selection were performed during two cycles of backcrossing based on genome-wide SNP markers. The average seed size of introgression lines homozygous for haplotypes associated with large seeds was 28.7g/100 seed and 24.8 g/100 seed for cycles 1 and 2, respectively. One cycle 1 introgression line with desirable seed quality was selfed for two generations to make families with very large seeds (28–35 g/100 seeds). Field-based performance trials helped identify breeding lines that not only have large seeds but are also desirable in terms of yield, maturity, and plant architecture when compared to industry standards. A principal component analysis was used to explore the relationships between the parents relative to a core set of landraces and improved varieties based on high-density SNP data. The geographic distribution of haplotypes at the Css-1 locus suggest the haplotype associated with large seeds is unique to accessions collected from Southeastern Africa. Therefore this quantitative trait locus has a strong potential to develop larger seeded varieties for other growing regions which is demonstrated in this work using a California pedigree. PMID:25852699

  15. Gender-Dimorphic Impact of PXR Genotype and Haplotype on Hepatotoxicity During Antituberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jann Yuan; Tsai, Ching Hui; Lee, Yungling Leo; Lee, Li Na; Hsu, Chia Lin; Chang, Hsiu Ching; Chen, Jong Ming; Hsu, Cheng An; Yu, Chong Jen; Yang, Pan Chyr

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Women have a higher risk of drug-induced hepatotoxicity during antituberculosis treatment (HATT) than men. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype and derived haplotype of pregnane X receptor (PXR) gene, which could regulate the expression of phase I enzyme cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, had a sex-specific influence on the risk of HATT. Six SNPs of the PXR gene were sequenced. Genotypes and haplotypes of the PXR SNPs, and other potential risk factors for HATT were compared between pulmonary TB patients with and those without HATT. HATT was defined as an increase in serum transaminase level >3 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) with symptoms, or >5 times ULN without symptoms. We performed the study in a derivation and a validation cohort. Among the 355 patients with pulmonary TB in the derivation cohort, 70 (19.7%) developed HATT. Logistic regression analysis revealed the risk of HATT increased in female genotype AA at rs2461823 (OR: 6.87 [2.55–18.52]) and decreased in female genotype AA at rs7643645 (OR: 0.14 [0.02–1.02]) of PXR gene. Haplotype analysis showed that female h001101 (OR: 2.30 [1.22–4.32]) and female h000110 (OR: 2.25 [1.08–4.69]) haplotype were associated with increased HATT risk. The identified predictors were also significantly associated with female HATT risk among the 182 patients in the validation cohort. Two PXR SNP genotypes and 2 haplotypes influenced the risk of HATT only in females. The PXR SNP showed a sex-specific impact that contributed to an increased HATT risk in females. PMID:26091473

  16. Genealogical analysis of cystic fibrosis families and chromosome 7q RFLP haplotypes in the Hutterite Brethren.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, T M; Morgan, K; Schwartz, R H; Doherty, R A; Miller, S R; Klinger, K; Stanislovitis, P; Stuart, N; Watkins, P C

    1989-01-01

    In the 100-year period 1880-1980 the Hutterite population increased from about 442 to 23,000 individuals in North America. There are three endogamous subdivisions in this Caucasian genetic isolate. A total of 11 cystic fibrosis (CF) families from Canada and the United States were investigated, including at least two families from each of the three subdivisions, the Dariusleut, Lehrerleut, and Schmiedeleut. A study of RFLPs for the loci D7S8, D7S23, MET, and D7S18 (also called D7S16) in the region of the CF gene in 10 families shows considerable genetic variability. There were three different extended CF gene-region haplotypes on CF chromosomes (CF haplotypes), and there were 13 different extended CF gene-region haplotypes on normal chromosomes (normal haplotypes). The three CF haplotypes have different D7S23 and MET haplotypes. Parents who have the same CF haplotype are, on the average, more closely related than parents who have different haplotypes, but only within the same subdivision. A marriage node graph of 11 families illustrates the complexity of Hutterite genealogies. The frequency distribution of CF haplotypes in the Hutterite sample differs notably from those of larger agglomerates of family data from collaborative studies, with respect to D7S8, MET haplotypes, and D7S23 haplotypes. We propose that there were at least three CF carriers among the founders of the Hutterite population and that copies of a particular CF haplotype in current individuals are identical by descent. The alternative that one or more genetically distinguishable CF haplotypes resulted from recombination since the founding of the population is considered to be less likely. PMID:2563632

  17. Beta-globin gene evolution in the ruminants: evidence for an ancient origin of sheep haplotype B.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Wang, X; Kijas, J W; Dalrymple, B P

    2015-10-01

    Domestic sheep (Ovis aries) can be divided into two groups with significantly different responses to hypoxic environments, determined by two allelic beta-globin haplotypes. Haplotype A is very similar to the goat beta-globin locus, whereas haplotype B has a deletion spanning four globin genes, including beta-C globin, which encodes a globin with high oxygen affinity. We surveyed the beta-globin locus using resequencing data from 70 domestic sheep from 42 worldwide breeds and three Ovis canadensis and two Ovis dalli individuals. Haplotype B has an allele frequency of 71.4% in O. aries and was homozygous (BB) in all five wild sheep. This shared ancestry indicates haplotype B is at least 2-3 million years old. Approximately 40 kb of the sequence flanking the ~37-kb haplotype B deletion had unexpectedly low identity between haplotypes A and B. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the divergent region of sheep haplotype B is remarkably distinct from the beta-globin loci in goat and cattle but still groups with the Ruminantia. We hypothesize that this divergent ~40-kb region in haplotype B may be from an unknown ancestral ruminant and was maintained in the lineage to O. aries, but not other Bovidae, evolving independently of haplotype A. Alternatively, the ~40-kb sequence in haplotype B was more recently acquired by an ancestor of sheep from an unknown non-Bovidae ruminant, replacing part of haplotype A. Haplotype B has a lower nucleotide diversity than does haplotype A, suggesting a recent bottleneck, whereas the higher frequency of haplotype B suggests a subsequent spread through the global population of O. aries. PMID:26096044

  18. Use of haplotypes to estimate Mendelian sampling effects and selection limits.

    PubMed

    Cole, J B; VanRaden, P M

    2011-12-01

    Limits to selection and Mendelian sampling (MS) terms can be calculated using haplotypes by summing the individual additive effects on each chromosome. Haplotypes were imputed for 43 382 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 1455 Brown Swiss, 40 351 Holstein and 4064 Jersey bulls and cows using the Fortran program findhap.f90, which combines population and pedigree haplotyping methods. Lower and upper bounds of MS variance were calculated for daughter pregnancy rate (a measure of fertility), milk yield, lifetime net merit (a measure of profitability) and protein yield assuming either no or complete linkage among SNP on the same chromosome. Calculated selection limits were greater than the largest direct genomic values observed in all breeds studied. The best chromosomal genotypes generally consisted of two copies of the same haplotype even after adjustment for inbreeding. Selection of animals rather than chromosomes may result in slower progress, but limits may be the same because most chromosomes will become homozygous with either strategy. Selection on functions of MS could be used to change variances in later generations. PMID:22059578

  19. Haplotype studies in Wilson disease.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G. R.; Bull, P. C.; Roberts, E. A.; Walshe, J. M.; Cox, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    In 51 families with Wilson disease, we have studied DNA haplotypes of dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms (CA repeats) in the 13q14.3 region, to examine these markers for association with the Wilson disease gene (WND). In addition to a marker (D13S133) described elsewhere, we have developed three new highly polymorphic markers (D13S314, D13S315, and D13S316) close to the WND locus. We have examined the distribution of marker alleles at the loci studied and have found that D13S314, D13S133, and D13S316 each show nonrandom distribution on chromosomes carrying the WND mutation. We have studied haplotypes of these three markers and have found that there are highly significant differences between WND and normal haplotypes in northern European families. These findings have important implications for mutation detection and molecular diagnosis in families with Wilson disease. PMID:8279472

  20. Haplotype phasing after joint estimation of recombination and linkage disequilibrium in breeding populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for haplotype phasing in families after joint estimation of recombination fraction and linkage disequilibrium is developed. Results from Monte Carlo computer simulations show that the newly developed E.M. algorithm is accurate if true recombination fraction is 0 even for single families of relatively small sizes. Estimates of recombination fraction and linkage disequilibrium were 0.00 (SD 0.00) and 0.19 (SD 0.03) for simulated recombination fraction and linkage disequilibrium of 0.00 and 0.20, respectively. A genome fragmentation phasing strategy was developed and used for phasing haplotypes in a sire and 36 progeny using the 50 k Illumina BeadChip by: a) estimation of the recombination fraction and LD in consecutive SNPs using family information, b) linkage analyses between fragments, c) phasing of haplotypes in parents and progeny and in following generations. Homozygous SNPs in progeny allowed determination of paternal fragment inheritance, and deduction of SNP sequence information of haplotypes from dams. The strategy also allowed detection of genotyping errors. A total of 613 recombination events were detected after linkage analysis was carried out between fragments. Hot and cold spots were identified at the individual (sire level). SNPs for which the sire and calf were heterozygotes became informative (over 90%) after the phasing of haplotypes. Average of regions of identity between half-sibs when comparing its maternal inherited haplotypes (with at least 20 SNP) in common was 0.11 with a maximum of 0.29 and a minimum of 0.05. A Monte-Carlo simulation of BTA1 with the same linkage disequilibrium structure and genetic linkage as the cattle family yielded a 99.98 and 99.94% of correct phases for informative SNPs in sire and calves, respectively. PMID:23916349

  1. Alpha-globin gene haplotypes in South American Indians.

    PubMed

    Zago, M A; Melo Santos, E J; Clegg, J B; Guerreiro, J F; Martinson, J J; Norwich, J; Figueiredo, M S

    1995-08-01

    The haplotypes of the alpha-globin gene cluster were determined for 99 Indians from the Brazilian Amazon region who belong to 5 tribes: Wayampí, Wayana-Apalaí, Kayapó, Arára, and Yanomámi. Three predominant haplotypes were identified: Ia (present in 38.9% of chromosomes), IIIa (25.8%), and IIe (22.1%). The only alpha-globin gene rearrangement detected was alpha alpha alpha 3.7 I gene triplication associated with haplotype IIIa, found in high frequencies (5.6% and 10.6%) in two tribes and absent in the others. alpha-Globin gene deletions that cause alpha-thalassemia were not seen, supporting the argument that malaria was absent in these populations until recently. The heterogeneous distribution of alpha-globin gene haplotypes and rearrangements among the different tribes differs markedly from the homogeneous distribution of beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes and reflects the action of various genetic mechanisms (genetic drift, founder effect, consanguinity) on small isolated population groups with a complicated history of divergence-fusion events. The alpha-globin gene haplotype distribution has some similarities to distributions observed in Southeast Asian and Pacific Island populations, indicating that these populations have considerable genetic affinities. However, the absence of several features of the alpha-globin gene cluster that are consistently present among the Pacific Islanders suggests that the similarity of haplotypes between Brazilian Indians and people from Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia is more likely to result of ancient common ancestry rather than the consequence of recent direct genetic contribution through immigration. PMID:7649529

  2. A new SNP panel for evaluating genetic diversity in a composite cattle breed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A custom 60K SNP panel, extracted from Bovine HD SNP chip was used to evaluate genotypic frequency changes in Braford (BF, a composite breed) when compared to progenitor breeds: Hereford (HF), Brahman (BR), and Nelore (NE). Samples from both the U. S. and Brazil were used. The new panel differentiat...

  3. Polymorphic DNA haplotypes at the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus in European families with phenylketonuria (PKU)

    PubMed Central

    Daiger, Stephen P.; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Reed, Lori; Fekete, György; Schuler, Dezso; Berenssi, György; Nasz, Istvan; Brdička, Radim; Kamarýt, Jaromir; Pijáčková, Anna; Moore, Sharon; Sullivan, Susan; Woo, Savio L. C.

    1989-01-01

    DNA haplotype data from the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus are available from a number of European populations as a result of RFLP testing for genetic counseling in families with phenylketonuria (PKU). We have analyzed data from Hungary and Czechoslovakia together with published data from five additional countries–Denmark, Switzerland, Scotland, Germany, and France–representing a broad geographic and ethnographic range. The data include 686 complete chromosomal haplotypes for eight RFLP sites assayed in 202 unrelated Caucasian families with PKU. Forty-six distinct RFLP haplotypes have been observed to date, 10 unique to PKU-bearing chromosomes, 12 unique to non-PKU chromosomes, and the remainder found in association with both types. Despite the large number of haplotypes observed (still much less than the theoretical maximum of 384), five haplotypes alone account for more than 76% of normal European chromosomes and four haplotypes alone account for more than 80% of PKU-bearing chromosomes. We evaluated the distribution of haplotypes and alleles within these populations and calculated pairwise disequilibrium values between RFLP sites and between these sites and a hypothetical PKU “locus.” There are statistically significant differences between European populations in the frequencies of non-PKU chromosomal haplotypes (P = .025) and PKU chromosomal haplotypes (P < < .001). Haplotype frequencies of the PKU and non-PKU chromosomes also differ significantly (P < < .001. Disequilibrium values are consistent with the PAH physical map and support the molecular evidence for multiple, independent PKU mutations in Caucasians. However, the data do not support a single geographic origin for these mutations. Within these European populations a parent carrying a PKU mutation has an average probability of greater than 86% of being heterozygous–and hence informative for linkage–at one or more PAH RFLP sites. Thus these RFLP alleles and haplotypes provide an effective tool for linkage diagnosis of disease and carrier status in PKU families. PMID:2569271

  4. Detecting structure of haplotypes and local ancestry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present a two-layer hidden Markov model to detect the structure of haplotypes for unrelated individuals. This allows us to model two scales of linkage disequilibrium (one within a group of haplotypes and one between groups), thereby taking advantage of rich haplotype information to infer local an...

  5. Haplotype-based approach for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia by maternal plasma DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dingyuan; Ge, Huijuan; Li, Xuchao; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Yanyan; Hu, Ping; Chen, Shengpei; Zhang, Jingjing; Ji, Xiuqing; Xu, Xun; Jiang, Hui; Chen, Minfeng; Wang, Wei; Xu, Zhengfeng

    2014-07-10

    Prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is of clinical significance because in utero treatment is available to prevent virilization of an affected female fetus. However, traditional prenatal diagnosis of CAH relies on genetic testing of fetal genomic DNA obtained using amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling, which is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a new haplotype-based approach for the noninvasive prenatal testing of CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Parental haplotypes were constructed using target-region sequencing data of the parents and the proband. With the assistance of the parental haplotypes, we recovered fetal haplotypes using a hidden Markov model (HMM) through maternal plasma DNA sequencing. In the genomic region around the CYP21A2 gene, the fetus inherited the paternal haplotype '0' alleles linked to the mutant CYP21A2 gene, but the maternal haplotype '1' alleles linked to the wild-type gene. The fetus was predicted to be an unaffected carrier of CAH, which was confirmed by genetic analysis of fetal genomic DNA from amniotic fluid cells. This method was further validated by comparing the inferred SNP genotypes with the direct sequencing data of fetal genomic DNA. The result showed an accuracy of 96.41% for the inferred maternal alleles and an accuracy of 97.81% for the inferred paternal alleles. The haplotype-based approach is feasible for noninvasive prenatal testing of CAH. PMID:24768736

  6. Gene polymorphisms of novel immunotolerant molecule BTLA: distribution of alleles, genotypes and haplotypes in Polish Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Anna; Woszczyk, Dariusz; Strzała, Tomasz; Szczepańska, Anna; Tomkiewicz, Anna; Frydecka, Irena; Karabon, Lidia

    2015-02-01

    B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) is one of the members of immunoglobulin superfamily which, like CTLA-4 and PD-1, is involved in down regulation of immune response. Despite the important role of BTLA in maintaining immune homeostasis, relatively little studies were devoted to the relationship of polymorphisms in the gene encoding BTLA with susceptibility to autoimmune disease and cancer. Moreover, all published works were done in Asian populations. BTLA gene is located on chromosome 3 in q13.2 and consists of five exons. The aim of this study was to investigate the alleles, genotypes and haplotypes frequency of selected BTLA gene polymorphisms in Caucasian population originating from Poland. For this study, the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were chosen on the basis of literature data. Additionally, the tag dSNP under linkage equilibrium r (2) > 0.8 and available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) for Caucasian population of rare alleles at a frequency greater than 5 % have been chosen using the NCBI database. The ten BTLA SNPs investigated were: rs1844089, rs2705535, rs9288952, rs9288953, rs1982809, rs2633580, rs2705511, rs2705565, rs76844316, rs16859633. For all SNPs selected on the basis of literature data the significantly different distributions of genotypes between Asian and Caucasian populations were observed. PMID:25182981

  7. Polymorphic DNA haplotypes at the phenlalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus in Asian families with phenylketonuria (PKU)

    PubMed Central

    Daiger, Stephen P.; Reed, Lori; Huang, Shu-Shen; Zeng, Yi-Tao; Wang, Tao; Lo, Wilson H. Y.; Okano, Yoshiyuki; Hase, Yutaka; Fukuda, Y.; Oura, Toshiaki; Tada, Keiya; Woo, Savio L. C.

    1989-01-01

    DNA polymorphisms at the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus have proved highly efiective in linkage diagnosis of phenylketonuria (PKU) in Caucasian families. More than 10 RFLP sites have been reported within the PAH structural locus in Caucasians. With information from affected and unaffected offspring in PKU families it is often possible to reconstruct complete RFLP haplotypes in parents and to use these haplotypes to follow the segregation of PKU within families and to determine the distribution of PKU chromosomes within populations. To establish the utility of these RFLPs in charaterizing Asian families with PKU, we typed eight DNA sites in 21 Chinese families and 12 Japanese families with classical PKU. The eight RFLPs were chosen for their informativeness in Caucasians. From these families we reconstructed a total of 91 complete PAH haplotypes, 44 from non-PKU chromosomes and 47 from PKU-bearing chromosomes. Although all eight marker sites are polymorphic in both Chinese and Japanese, there is much less haplotypic variation in Asians than in Caucasians. In particular, one haplotype alone, haplotype 4, accounts for more than 77% of non-PKU chromosomes and for more than 80% of PKU-bearing chromosomes. Haplotype 4 is also relatively common in Caucasians. The next most common Asian haplotype is 10 times less frequent than haplotype 4. By contrast, in many Caucasian populations the sum of the frequencies of the five most common haplotypes is still less than 80%, and several of the most common haplotypes are equally frequent. Even though the extent of haplotypic variation in Asians is severely limited, the few haplotypes that are found often differ at a number of RFLP sites. This accounts for the observation that haplotypes show little variation in Chinese and Japanese but that the individual RFLP sites are all polymorphic in both populations. It appears that these RFLPs predate the separation of Asians and Caucasians but that the haplotypic variation has either decreased or increased in one or the other racial group since then. Although the PAH RFLPs and haplotypes will not be as useful in Asian families with PKU as in Caucasian families with PKU, at least 36% of Asian carriers of PKU are heterozygous–and hence informative–at one or more RFLP sites. PMID:2569272

  8. Kinesin light chain 1 gene haplotypes in three conformational diseases.

    PubMed

    von Otter, Malin; Landgren, Sara; Nilsson, Staffan; Lundvall, Caroline; Minthon, Lennart; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Andreasen, Niels; Gustafson, Deborah R; Skoog, Ingmar; Wallin, Anders; Håkansson, Anna; Nissbrandt, Hans; Zetterberg, Madeleine; Tasa, Gunnar; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2010-09-01

    A functional intracellular transport system is essential to maintain cell shape and function especially in elongated cells, e.g. neurons and lens fibre cells. Impaired intracellular transport has been suggested as a common pathological mechanism for age-related diseases characterised by protein aggregation. Here, we hypothesise that common genetic variation in the transport protein kinesin may influence the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-related cataract. This case-control study involves a PD material (165 cases and 190 controls), an AD material (653 cases and 845 controls) and a cataract material (495 cases and 183 controls). Genetic variation in the kinesin light chain 1-encoding gene (KLC1) was tagged by six tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Single SNPs and haplotypes were analysed for associations with disease risk, age parameters, mini-mental state examination scores and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for AD using logistic or linear regression. Genetic variation in KLC1 did not influence risk of PD. Weak associations with risk of AD were seen for rs8007903 and rs3212079 (P (c) = 0.04 and P (c) = 0.02, respectively). Two SNPs (rs8007903 and rs8702) influenced risk of cataract (P (c) = 0.0007 and P (c) = 0.04, respectively). However, the allele of rs8007903 that caused increased risk of AD caused reduced risk of cataract, speaking against a common functional effect of this particular SNP in the two diseases. Haplotype analyses did not add significantly to the associations found in the single SNP analyses. Altogether, these results do not convincingly support KLC1 as a major susceptibility gene in any of the studied diseases, although there is a small effect of KLC1 in relation to cataract. PMID:19911314

  9. Plastid DNA sequencing and nuclear SNP genotyping help resolve the puzzle of central American Platanus

    PubMed Central

    De Castro, Olga; Di Maio, Antonietta; Lozada García, José Armando; Piacenti, Danilo; Vázquez-Torres, Mario; De Luca, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Recent research on the history of Platanus reveals that hybridization phenomena occurred in the central American species. This study has two goals: to help resolve the evolutive puzzle of central American Platanus, and to test the potential of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detecting ancient hybridization. Methods Sequencing of a uniparental plastid DNA marker [psbA-trnH(GUG) intergenic spacer] and qualitative and quantitative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping of biparental nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) markers [LEAFY intron 2 (LFY-i2) and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2)] were used. Key Results Based on the SNP genotyping results, several Platanus accessions show the presence of hybridization/introgression, including some accessions of P. rzedowskii and of P. mexicana var. interior and one of P. mexicana var. mexicana from Oaxaca (= P. oaxacana). Based on haplotype analyses of the psbA-trnH spacer, five haplotypes were detected. The most common of these is present in taxa belonging to P. orientalis, P. racemosa sensu lato, some accessions of P. occidentalis sensu stricto (s.s.) from Texas, P. occidentalis var. palmeri, P. mexicana s.s. and P. rzedowskii. This is highly relevant to genetic relationships with the haplotypes present in P. occidentalis s.s. and P. mexicana var. interior. Conclusions Hybridization and introgression events between lineages ancestral to modern central and eastern North American Platanus species occurred. Plastid haplotypes and qualitative and quantitative SNP genotyping provide information critical for understanding the complex history of Mexican Platanus. Compared with the usual molecular techniques of sub-cloning, sequencing and genotyping, real-time PCR assay is a quick and sensitive technique for analysing complex evolutionary patterns. PMID:23798602

  10. Analysis of HLA-DRB1,DQA1,DQB1 haplotypes in Sardinian centenarians

    PubMed Central

    Scola, Letizia; Lio, Domenico; Candore, Giuseppina; Forte, Giusi I.; Crivello, Antonio; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Pes, Mario G.; Carru, Ciriaco; Ferrucci, Luigi; Deiana, Luca; Baggio, Giovannella; Franceschi, Claudio; Caruso, Calogero

    2009-01-01

    Some genetic determinants of longevity might reside in those polymorphisms for the immune system genes that regulate immune responses. Many longevity association studies focused their attention on HLA (the human MHC) polymorphisms, but discordant results have been obtained. Sardinians are a relatively isolate population and represent a suitable population for association studies. Some HLA-DR and DQ alleles form very stable haplotypes with a strong linkage disequilibrium. In a previous study on Sardinian centenarians we have suggested that HLA-DRB1∗15 allele might be marginally associated to longevity. HLA-DR,DQ haplotypes are in strong linkage disequilibrium and well conserved playing a role in the association to diseases. Hence, we have evaluated, by amplification refractory mutation system/polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) the HLADQA1 and HLA-DQB1 allele frequencies in 123 centenarians and 92 controls from Sardinia to assess whether the association to HLA-DRB1∗15 allele may be due to the other genes involved in the HLA-DR,DQ haplotypes. The frequencies of HLA-DQA1,DQB1 haplotypes were not significantly modified in centenarians. Nevertheless by evaluating the frequency of DRB1∗15 linked haplotypes, we observed a not significant increase in centenarians of HLA-DQA1∗01,DQB1∗05 and HLA-DQA1∗01,DQB1∗06 haplotypes. These data suggest that these haplotypes might have a role in determining life span expectancy and longevity. PMID:17714903

  11. Detecting disease-predisposing variants: The haplotype method

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, A.M.; Thomson, G.

    1997-03-01

    For many HLA-associated diseases, multiple alleles - and, in some cases, multiple loci - have been suggested as the causative agents. The haplotype method for identifying disease-predisposing amino acids in a genetic region is a stratification analysis. We show that, for each haplotype combination containing all the amino acid sites involved in the disease process, the relative frequencies of amino acid variants at sites not involved in disease but in linkage disequilibrium with the disease-predisposing sites are expected to be the same in patients and controls. The haplotype method is robust to mode of inheritance and penetrance of the disease and can be used to determine unequivocally whether all amino acid sites involved in the disease have not been identified. Using a resampling technique, we developed a statistical test that takes account of the nonindependence of the sites sampled. Further, when multiple sites in the genetic region are involved in disease, the test statistic gives a closer fit to the null expectation when some - compared with none - of the true predisposing factors are included in the haplotype analysis. Although the haplotype method cannot distinguish between very highly correlated sites in one population, ethnic comparisons may help identify the true predisposing factors. The haplotype method was applied to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) HLA class II DQA1-DQB1 data from Caucasian, African, and Japanese populations. Our results indicate that the combination DQA1 No. 52 (Arg predisposing) DQB1 No. 57 (Asp protective), which has been proposed as an important IDDM agent, does not include all the predisposing elements. With rheumatoid arthritis HLA class H DRB1 data, the results were consistent with the shared-epitope hypothesis. 35 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Bovine exome sequence analysis and targeted SNP genotyping of recessive fertility defects HH2, HH3, and BH1 reveals causative mutation in SMC2 for HH3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent discovery of bovine haplotypes with negative effects on fertility in the Holstein, Jersey, and Brown Swiss breeds has allowed producers to identify carrier animals using current commercial single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assays. This study was devised to identify the caus...

  13. LRRC4 haplotypes are associated with pituitary adenoma in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lan; Tu, Chaofeng; Chen, Shuai; Yu, Zhibin; Lei, Qianqian; Wang, Zeyou; Xu, Gang; Wu, Minghua; Li, Guiyuan

    2014-04-01

    Pituitary adenoma results from accumulation of multiple genetic and/or epigenetic aberrations such as GNAS, MEN1, CNC, and FIPA. LRRC4 is relatively tissue-specific expressed gene in the normal brain and downregulated expression in glioma (87.5%), meningioma (80.9%), and pituitary adenoma (85.5%). It has been suggested that the aberrant expression of LRRC4 contributes to tumorigenesis in glioma. However, little is known yet about association between LRRC4 and risk of pituitary adenoma. In this study, we genotyped three LRRC4 haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNP) by direct sequencing in case-control studies, which included 183 Han Chinese patients diagnosed with pituitary adenoma and 183 age-, gender-matched, and geographically matched Han Chinese controls. Haplotypes were reconstructed according to the genotyping data and linkage disequilibrium status of the htSNP. We observed statistically significant differences regarding the genotype TT + CT of rs6944446 in the NCA. Haplotype AC of rs3823994-rs6944446 is suggested to have a protective effect in the development of pituitary adenoma (OR 0.339; 95% CI 0.123-0.934). However, haplotype GT of rs3808058-rs6944446 (OR 1.575; 95% CI 1.048-2.368) and AGT of rs3823994-rs6944446-rs3808058 (OR 1.673; 95% CI 1.056-2.651) might be a risk factor for pituitary adenoma development. In a brief, the results support the hypothesis that polymorphisms or haplotypes in the LRRC4 may have important research significance and could be used to predict the risk of pituitary adenoma. PMID:24563334

  14. Haplotype studies in Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.R.; Bull, P.C.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.; Walshe, J.M. )

    1994-01-01

    In 51 families with Wilson disease, the authors have studied DNA haplotypes of dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms (CA repeats) in the 13q14.3 region, to examine these markers for association with the Wilson disease gene (WND). In addition to a marker (D13S133) described elsewhere, the authors have developed three new highly polymorphic markers (D13S314, D13S315, and D13S316) close to the WND locus. The authors have examined the distribution of marker alleles at the loci studied and have found that D13S314, D13S133, and D13S316 each show nonrandom distribution on chromosomes carrying the WND mutation. The authors have studied haplotypes of these three markers and have found that there are highly significant differences between WND and normal haplotypes in northern European families. These findings have important implications for mutation detection and molecular diagnosis in families with Wilson disease. 25 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Mini-haplotypes as lineage informative SNPs and ancestry inference SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Pakstis, Andrew J; Fang, Rixun; Furtado, Manohar R; Kidd, Judith R; Kidd, Kenneth K

    2012-01-01

    We propose that haplotyped loci with high heterozygosity can be useful in human identification, especially within families, if recombination is very low among the sites. Three or more SNPs extending over small molecular intervals (<10 KB) can be identified in the human genome to define miniature haplotypes with moderate levels of linkage disequilibrium. Properly selected, these mini-haplotypes (or minihaps) consist of multiple haplotype lineages (alleles) that have evolved from the ancestral human haplotype but show no evidence of recurring recombination, allowing each distinct haplotype to be equated with an allele, all copies of which are essentially identical by descent. Historic recombinants, representing rare events that have drifted to common frequencies over many generations, can be identified in some cases, they do not equate to frequently recurring recombination. We have identified examples in our data collected on various projects and present eight such mini-haplotypes comprised of informative SNPs. We also discuss the ideal characteristics and advantages of minihaps for human familial identification and ancestry inference, and compare them to other types of forensic markers in use and/or that have been proposed. We expect that it is possible to carry out a systematic search and identify a useful panel of mini-haplotypes, with even better properties than the examples presented here. PMID:22535184

  16. Mining of haplotype-based expressed sequence tag single nucleotide polymorphisms in citrus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the most abundant variations in a genome, have been widely used in various studies. Detection and characterization of citrus haplotype-based expressed sequence tag (EST) SNPs will greatly facilitate further utilization of these gene-based resources. Results In this paper, haplotype-based SNPs were mined out of publicly available citrus expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from different citrus cultivars (genotypes) individually and collectively for comparison. There were a total of 567,297 ESTs belonging to 27 cultivars in varying numbers and consequentially yielding different numbers of haplotype-based quality SNPs. Sweet orange (SO) had the most (213,830) ESTs, generating 11,182 quality SNPs in 3,327 out of 4,228 usable contigs. Summed from all the individually mining results, a total of 25,417 quality SNPs were discovered – 15,010 (59.1%) were transitions (AG and CT), 9,114 (35.9%) were transversions (AC, GT, CG, and AT), and 1,293 (5.0%) were insertion/deletions (indels). A vast majority of SNP-containing contigs consisted of only 2 haplotypes, as expected, but the percentages of 2 haplotype contigs varied widely in these citrus cultivars. BLAST of the 25,417 25-mer SNP oligos to the Clementine reference genome scaffolds revealed 2,947 SNPs had “no hits found”, 19,943 had 1 unique hit / alignment, 1,571 had one hit and 2+ alignments per hit, and 956 had 2+ hits and 1+ alignment per hit. Of the total 24,293 scaffold hits, 23,955 (98.6%) were on the main scaffolds 1 to 9, and only 338 were on 87 minor scaffolds. Most alignments had 100% (25/25) or 96% (24/25) nucleotide identities, accounting for 93% of all the alignments. Considering almost all the nucleotide discrepancies in the 24/25 alignments were at the SNP sites, it served well as in silico validation of these SNPs, in addition to and consistent with the rate (81%) validated by sequencing and SNaPshot assay. Conclusions High-quality EST-SNPs from different citrus genotypes were detected, and compared to estimate the heterozygosity of each genome. All the SNP oligo sequences were aligned with the Clementine citrus genome to determine their distribution and uniqueness and for in silico validation, in addition to SNaPshot and sequencing validation of selected SNPs. PMID:24175923

  17. Increased Power for Detection of Parent-of-Origin Effects via the Use of Haplotype Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Howey, Richard; Mamasoula, Chrysovalanto; Töpf, Ana; Nudel, Ron; Goodship, Judith A.; Keavney, Bernard D.; Cordell, Heather J.

    2015-01-01

    Parent-of-origin (or imprinting) effects relate to the situation in which traits are influenced by the allele inherited from only one parent and the allele from the other parent has little or no effect. Given SNP genotype data from case-parent trios, the parent of origin of each allele in the offspring can often be deduced unambiguously; however, this is not true when all three individuals are heterozygous. Most existing methods for investigating parent-of-origin effects operate on a SNP-by-SNP basis and either perform some sort of averaging over the possible parental transmissions or else discard ambiguous trios. If the correct parent of origin at a SNP could be determined, this would provide extra information and increase the power for detecting the effects of imprinting. We propose making use of the surrounding SNP information, via haplotype estimation, to improve estimation of parent of origin at a test SNP for case-parent trios, case-mother duos, and case-father duos. This extra information is then used in a multinomial modeling approach for estimating parent-of-origin effects at the test SNP. We show through computer simulations that our approach has increased power over previous approaches, particularly when the data consist only of duos. We apply our method to two real datasets and find a decrease in significance of p values in genomic regions previously thought to possibly harbor imprinting effects, thus weakening the evidence that such effects actually exist in these regions, although some regions retain evidence of significant effects. PMID:26320892

  18. Increased Power for Detection of Parent-of-Origin Effects via the Use of Haplotype Estimation.

    PubMed

    Howey, Richard; Mamasoula, Chrysovalanto; Töpf, Ana; Nudel, Ron; Goodship, Judith A; Keavney, Bernard D; Cordell, Heather J

    2015-09-01

    Parent-of-origin (or imprinting) effects relate to the situation in which traits are influenced by the allele inherited from only one parent and the allele from the other parent has little or no effect. Given SNP genotype data from case-parent trios, the parent of origin of each allele in the offspring can often be deduced unambiguously; however, this is not true when all three individuals are heterozygous. Most existing methods for investigating parent-of-origin effects operate on a SNP-by-SNP basis and either perform some sort of averaging over the possible parental transmissions or else discard ambiguous trios. If the correct parent of origin at a SNP could be determined, this would provide extra information and increase the power for detecting the effects of imprinting. We propose making use of the surrounding SNP information, via haplotype estimation, to improve estimation of parent of origin at a test SNP for case-parent trios, case-mother duos, and case-father duos. This extra information is then used in a multinomial modeling approach for estimating parent-of-origin effects at the test SNP. We show through computer simulations that our approach has increased power over previous approaches, particularly when the data consist only of duos. We apply our method to two real datasets and find a decrease in significance of p values in genomic regions previously thought to possibly harbor imprinting effects, thus weakening the evidence that such effects actually exist in these regions, although some regions retain evidence of significant effects. PMID:26320892

  19. Accuracy of direct genomic values in Holstein bulls and cows using subsets of SNP markers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background At the current price, the use of high-density single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) genotyping assays in genomic selection of dairy cattle is limited to applications involving elite sires and dams. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of low-density assays to predict direct genomic value (DGV) on five milk production traits, an overall conformation trait, a survival index, and two profit index traits (APR, ASI). Methods Dense SNP genotypes were available for 42,576 SNP for 2,114 Holstein bulls and 510 cows. A subset of 1,847 bulls born between 1955 and 2004 was used as a training set to fit models with various sets of pre-selected SNP. A group of 297 bulls born between 2001 and 2004 and all cows born between 1992 and 2004 were used to evaluate the accuracy of DGV prediction. Ridge regression (RR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) were used to derive prediction equations and to rank SNP based on the absolute value of the regression coefficients. Four alternative strategies were applied to select subset of SNP, namely: subsets of the highest ranked SNP for each individual trait, or a single subset of evenly spaced SNP, where SNP were selected based on their rank for ASI, APR or minor allele frequency within intervals of approximately equal length. Results RR and PLSR performed very similarly to predict DGV, with PLSR performing better for low-density assays and RR for higher-density SNP sets. When using all SNP, DGV predictions for production traits, which have a higher heritability, were more accurate (0.52-0.64) than for survival (0.19-0.20), which has a low heritability. The gain in accuracy using subsets that included the highest ranked SNP for each trait was marginal (5-6%) over a common set of evenly spaced SNP when at least 3,000 SNP were used. Subsets containing 3,000 SNP provided more than 90% of the accuracy that could be achieved with a high-density assay for cows, and 80% of the high-density assay for young bulls. Conclusions Accurate genomic evaluation of the broader bull and cow population can be achieved with a single genotyping assays containing ~ 3,000 to 5,000 evenly spaced SNP. PMID:20950478

  20. SNP-set analysis replicates acute lung injury genetic risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We used a gene – based replication strategy to test the reproducibility of prior acute lung injury (ALI) candidate gene associations. Methods We phenotyped 474 patients from a prospective severe trauma cohort study for ALI. Genomic DNA from subjects’ blood was genotyped using the IBC chip, a multiplex single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. Results were filtered for 25 candidate genes selected using prespecified literature search criteria and present on the IBC platform. For each gene, we grouped SNPs according to haplotype blocks and tested the joint effect of all SNPs on susceptibility to ALI using the SNP-set kernel association test. Results were compared to single SNP analysis of the candidate SNPs. Analyses were separate for genetically determined ancestry (African or European). Results We identified 4 genes in African ancestry and 2 in European ancestry trauma subjects which replicated their associations with ALI. Ours is the first replication of IL6, IL10, IRAK3, and VEGFA associations in non-European populations with ALI. Only one gene – VEGFA – demonstrated association with ALI in both ancestries, with distinct haplotype blocks in each ancestry driving the association. We also report the association between trauma-associated ALI and NFKBIA in European ancestry subjects. Conclusions Prior ALI genetic associations are reproducible and replicate in a trauma cohort. Kernel - based SNP-set analysis is a more powerful method to detect ALI association than single SNP analysis, and thus may be more useful for replication testing. Further, gene-based replication can extend candidate gene associations to diverse ethnicities. PMID:22742663

  1. Results of a haplotype-based GWAS for recurrent laryngeal neuropathy in the horse.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Marie-Capucine; Zhang, Zhiyan; Druet, Tom; Denoix, Jean-Marie; Charlier, Carole; Lekeux, Pierre; Georges, Michel

    2011-10-01

    Recurrent laryngeal neuropathy (RLN) is a major upper-airway disease of horses that causes abnormal respiratory noise during exercise and can impair performance. Etiopathogenesis remains unclear but genetic factors have been suspected for many decades. The objective of this study was to identify risk loci associated with RLN. To that end we genotyped 234 cases (196 Warmbloods, 20 Trotters, 14 Thoroughbreds, and 4 Draft horses), 228 breed-matched controls, and 69 parents with the Illumina Equine SNP50 BeadChip. Using these data, we quantified population structure and performed single-marker and haplotype-based association studies, as well as family-based linkage analyses. We accounted for population stratification by modeling a random polygenic background effect with covariance structure estimated from genome-wide SNP data. Using the haplotype-based approach, we identified two genome-wide suggestive loci in Warmbloods, respectively on chromosomes 21 (p = 1.62 × 10(-6)) and 31 (p = 1.69 × 10(-5)). The two signals were driven by the enrichment of a "protective" haplotype in controls compared to cases. PMID:21698472

  2. Weighted SNP set analysis in genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hui; Zhao, Yang; Qian, Cheng; Cai, Min; Zhang, Ruyang; Chu, Minjie; Dai, Juncheng; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are popular for identifying genetic variants which are associated with disease risk. Many approaches have been proposed to test multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a region simultaneously which considering disadvantages of methods in single locus association analysis. Kernel machine based SNP set analysis is more powerful than single locus analysis, which borrows information from SNPs correlated with causal or tag SNPs. Four types of kernel machine functions and principal component based approach (PCA) were also compared. However, given the loss of power caused by low minor allele frequencies (MAF), we conducted an extension work on PCA and used a new method called weighted PCA (wPCA). Comparative analysis was performed for weighted principal component analysis (wPCA), logistic kernel machine based test (LKM) and principal component analysis (PCA) based on SNP set in the case of different minor allele frequencies (MAF) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structures. We also applied the three methods to analyze two SNP sets extracted from a real GWAS dataset of non-small cell lung cancer in Han Chinese population. Simulation results show that when the MAF of the causal SNP is low, weighted principal component and weighted IBS are more powerful than PCA and other kernel machine functions at different LD structures and different numbers of causal SNPs. Application of the three methods to a real GWAS dataset indicates that wPCA and wIBS have better performance than the linear kernel, IBS kernel and PCA. PMID:24098741

  3. Weighted SNP Set Analysis in Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Cheng; Cai, Min; Zhang, Ruyang; Chu, Minjie; Dai, Juncheng; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are popular for identifying genetic variants which are associated with disease risk. Many approaches have been proposed to test multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a region simultaneously which considering disadvantages of methods in single locus association analysis. Kernel machine based SNP set analysis is more powerful than single locus analysis, which borrows information from SNPs correlated with causal or tag SNPs. Four types of kernel machine functions and principal component based approach (PCA) were also compared. However, given the loss of power caused by low minor allele frequencies (MAF), we conducted an extension work on PCA and used a new method called weighted PCA (wPCA). Comparative analysis was performed for weighted principal component analysis (wPCA), logistic kernel machine based test (LKM) and principal component analysis (PCA) based on SNP set in the case of different minor allele frequencies (MAF) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structures. We also applied the three methods to analyze two SNP sets extracted from a real GWAS dataset of non-small cell lung cancer in Han Chinese population. Simulation results show that when the MAF of the causal SNP is low, weighted principal component and weighted IBS are more powerful than PCA and other kernel machine functions at different LD structures and different numbers of causal SNPs. Application of the three methods to a real GWAS dataset indicates that wPCA and wIBS have better performance than the linear kernel, IBS kernel and PCA. PMID:24098741

  4. Inferring Selection Intensity and Allele Age from Multilocus Haplotype Structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    It is a challenging task to infer selection intensity and allele age from population genetic data. Here we present a method that can efficiently estimate selection intensity and allele age from the multilocus haplotype structure in the vicinity of a segregating mutant under positive selection. We use a structured-coalescent approach to model the effect of directional selection on the gene genealogies of neutral markers linked to the selected mutant. The frequency trajectory of the selected allele follows the Wright-Fisher model. Given the position of the selected mutant, we propose a simplified multilocus haplotype model that can efficiently model the dynamics of the ancestral haplotypes under the joint influence of selection and recombination. This model approximates the ancestral genealogies of the sample, which reduces the number of states from an exponential function of the number of single-nucleotide polymorphism loci to a quadratic function. That allows parameter inference from data covering DNA regions as large as several hundred kilo-bases. Importance sampling algorithms are adopted to evaluate the probability of a sample by exploring the space of both allele frequency trajectories of the selected mutation and gene genealogies of the linked sites. We demonstrate by simulation that the method can accurately estimate selection intensity for moderate and strong positive selection. We apply the method to a data set of the G6PD gene in an African population and obtain an estimate of 0.0456 (95% confidence interval 0.0144−0.0769) for the selection intensity. The proposed method is novel in jointly modeling the multilocus haplotype pattern caused by recombination and mutation, allowing the analysis of haplotype data in recombining regions. Moreover, the method is applicable to data from populations under exponential growth and a variety of other demographic histories. PMID:23797107

  5. Practical interpretation of CYP2D6 haplotypes: Comparison and integration of automated and expert calling.

    PubMed

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Kocherla, Mohan; Graydon, James S; Holford, Theodore R; Makowski, Gregory S; Goethe, John W

    2016-05-01

    We describe a population genetic approach to compare samples interpreted with expert calling (EC) versus automated calling (AC) for CYP2D6 haplotyping. The analysis represents 4812 haplotype calls based on signal data generated by the Luminex xMap analyzers from 2406 patients referred to a high-complexity molecular diagnostics laboratory for CYP450 testing. DNA was extracted from buccal swabs. We compared the results of expert calls (EC) and automated calls (AC) with regard to haplotype number and frequency. The ratio of EC to AC was 1:3. Haplotype frequencies from EC and AC samples were convergent across haplotypes, and their distribution was not statistically different between the groups. Most duplications required EC, as only expansions with homozygous or hemizygous haplotypes could be automatedly called. High-complexity laboratories can offer equivalent interpretation to automated calling for non-expanded CYP2D6 loci, and superior interpretation for duplications. We have validated scientific expert calling specified by scoring rules as standard operating procedure integrated with an automated calling algorithm. The integration of EC with AC is a practical strategy for CYP2D6 clinical haplotyping. PMID:26908082

  6. A 48 SNP set for grapevine cultivar identification

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rapid and consistent genotyping is an important requirement for cultivar identification in many crop species. Among them grapevine cultivars have been the subject of multiple studies given the large number of synonyms and homonyms generated during many centuries of vegetative multiplication and exchange. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers have been preferred until now because of their high level of polymorphism, their codominant nature and their high profile repeatability. However, the rapid application of partial or complete genome sequencing approaches is identifying thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) that can be very useful for such purposes. Although SNP markers are bi-allelic, and therefore not as polymorphic as microsatellites, the high number of loci that can be multiplexed and the possibilities of automation as well as their highly repeatable results under any analytical procedure make them the future markers of choice for any type of genetic identification. Results We analyzed over 300 SNP in the genome of grapevine using a re-sequencing strategy in a selection of 11 genotypes. Among the identified polymorphisms, we selected 48 SNP spread across all grapevine chromosomes with allele frequencies balanced enough as to provide sufficient information content for genetic identification in grapevine allowing for good genotyping success rate. Marker stability was tested in repeated analyses of a selected group of cultivars obtained worldwide to demonstrate their usefulness in genetic identification. Conclusions We have selected a set of 48 stable SNP markers with a high discrimination power and a uniform genome distribution (2-3 markers/chromosome), which is proposed as a standard set for grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) genotyping. Any previous problems derived from microsatellite allele confusion between labs or the need to run reference cultivars to identify allele sizes disappear using this type of marker. Furthermore, because SNP markers are bi-allelic, allele identification and genotype naming are extremely simple and genotypes obtained with different equipments and by different laboratories are always fully comparable. PMID:22060012

  7. Impact of Migration and Fitness on the Stability of Lethal T-Haplotype Polymorphism in Mus Musculus: A Computer Study

    PubMed Central

    Durand, D.; Ardlie, K.; Buttel, L.; Levin, S. A.; Silver, L. M.

    1997-01-01

    The t-haplotype is a chromosomal region in Mus musculus characterized by meiotic drive such that heterozygous males transmit t-bearing chromosomes to roughly 90% of their offspring. Most naturally occurring t-haplotypes express a recessive embryonic lethality, preventing fixation of the t-haplotype. Surprisingly, the t-haplotype occurs in nature as a persistent, low-frequency polymorphism. Early modeling studies led LEWONTIN to hypothesize that this low level polymorphism results from a balance between genetic drift in small demes and interdemic migration. Here, we show that while combinations of deme size and migration rate that predict natural t-haplotype frequencies exist, the range of such values is too narrow to be biologically plausible, suggesting that small deme size and interdemic migration alone do not explain the observed t-haplotype frequencies. In response, we tested other factors that might explain the observed t-polymorphism. Two led to biologically plausible models: substantially reduced heterozygous fitness and reduced meiotic drive. This raises the question whether these phenomena occur in nature. Our data suggest an alternative explanation: there is no stable, low-level t-polymorphism. Rather wild populations are in one of two stable states characterized by extinction of the t-haplotype and a high t-haplotype frequency, respectively, or in transition between the two. PMID:9093861

  8. Identification of Novel SNP in Promoter Sequence of TaGW2-6A Associated with Grain Weight and Other Agronomic Traits in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Vandana; Gahlaut, Vijay; Mathur, Saloni; Agarwal, Priyanka; Khandelwal, Manoj Kumar; Khurana, Jitendra Paul; Tyagi, Akhilesh Kumar; Balyan, Harindra Singh; Gupta, Pushpendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    TaGW2 is an orthologue of rice gene OsGW2, which encodes E3 RING ubiquitin ligase and controls the grain size in rice. In wheat, three copies of TaGW2 have been identified and mapped on wheat homoeologous group 6 viz. TaGW2-6A, TaGW2-6B and TaGW2-6D. In the present study, using as many as 207 Indian wheat genotypes, we identified four SNPs including two novel SNPs (SNP-988 and SNP-494) in the promoter sequence of TaGW2-6A. All the four SNPs were G/A or A/G substitutions (transitions). Out of the four SNPs, SNP-494 was causal, since it was found associated with grain weight. The mean TGW (41.1 g) of genotypes with the allele SNP-494_A was significantly higher than mean TGW (38.6 g) of genotypes with the allele SNP-494_G. SNP-494 also regulates the expression of TaGW2-6A so that the wheat genotypes with SNP-494_G have higher expression and lower TGW and the genotypes with SNP-494_A have lower expression but higher TGW. Besides, SNP-494 was also found associated with grain length-width ratio, awn length, spike length, grain protein content, peduncle length and plant height. This suggested that gene TaGW2-6A not only controls grain size, but also controls other agronomic traits. In the promoter region, SNP-494 was present in ‘CGCG’ motif that plays an important role in Ca2+/calmodulin mediated regulation of genes. A user-friendly CAPS marker was also developed to identify the desirable allele of causal SNP (SNP-494) for use in marker-assisted selection for improvement of grain weight in wheat. Using four SNPs, five haplotypes were identified; of these, Hap_5 (G_A_G_A) was found to be a desirable haplotype having significantly higher grain weight (41.13g) relative to other four haplotypes (36.33-39.16 g). PMID:26076351

  9. HLA class II SNP interactions and the association with type 1 diabetes mellitus in Bengali speaking patients of Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated a fundamental role for the HLA in the susceptibility of, or protection to, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, this has not been adequately studied in Asian Indian populations. To assess the frequency of HLA class II (DPA1, DPB1, DQA1, DQB1 and DRB1) associated to susceptibility or protection toT1DM in a Bengali population of India with diabetes. Results Single nucleotide polymorphism study. The HLA genotyping was performed by a polymerase chain reaction followed by their HLA-DP, DQ, and DRB1 genotypes and haplotypes by sequencing method. The results are studied by Plink software. The χ2 tests were used for the inferential statistics. To our knowledge, this study is the first of a kind which has attempted to check the HLA association with T1DM by SNPs analysis. The study recruited 151 patients with T1DM and same number of ethno-linguistic, sex matched non-diabetic controls. The present study found a significant SNP rs7990 of HLA-DQA1 (p = 0.009) negative correlation, again indicating that risk from HLA is considerably more with T1DM. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the HLA class-II alleles play a major role in genetic basis of T1DM. PMID:23441825

  10. A New SNP Haplotype associated with blue disease resistance gene in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to cotton blue disease (CBD) was evaluated in 364 F2.3 families of 3 populations derived from resistant variety ‘Delta Opal’. The CBD resistance in ‘Delta Opal’ was controlled by one single dominant gene designated Cbd. Two simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were identified as linked t...

  11. A Genomic Portrait of Haplotype Diversity and Signatures of Selection in Indigenous Southern African Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chimusa, Emile R.; Meintjies, Ayton; Tchanga, Milaine; Mulder, Nicola; Seoighe, Cathal; Soodyall, Himla; Ramesar, Rajkumar

    2015-01-01

    We report a study of genome-wide, dense SNP (∼900K) and copy number polymorphism data of indigenous southern Africans. We demonstrate the genetic contribution to southern and eastern African populations, which involved admixture between indigenous San, Niger-Congo-speaking and populations of Eurasian ancestry. This finding illustrates the need to account for stratification in genome-wide association studies, and that admixture mapping would likely be a successful approach in these populations. We developed a strategy to detect the signature of selection prior to and following putative admixture events. Several genomic regions show an unusual excess of Niger-Kordofanian, and unusual deficiency of both San and Eurasian ancestry, which were considered the footprints of selection after population admixture. Several SNPs with strong allele frequency differences were observed predominantly between the admixed indigenous southern African populations, and their ancestral Eurasian populations. Interestingly, many candidate genes, which were identified within the genomic regions showing signals for selection, were associated with southern African-specific high-risk, mostly communicable diseases, such as malaria, influenza, tuberculosis, and human immunodeficiency virus/AIDs. This observation suggests a potentially important role that these genes might have played in adapting to the environment. Additionally, our analyses of haplotype structure, linkage disequilibrium, recombination, copy number variation and genome-wide admixture highlight, and support the unique position of San relative to both African and non-African populations. This study contributes to a better understanding of population ancestry and selection in south-eastern African populations; and the data and results obtained will support research into the genetic contributions to infectious as well as non-communicable diseases in the region. PMID:25811879

  12. Probabilistic single-individual haplotyping

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Accurate haplotyping—determining from which parent particular portions of the genome are inherited—is still mostly an unresolved problem in genomics. This problem has only recently started to become tractable, thanks to the development of new long read sequencing technologies. Here, we introduce ProbHap, a haplotyping algorithm targeted at such technologies. The main algorithmic idea of ProbHap is a new dynamic programming algorithm that exactly optimizes a likelihood function specified by a probabilistic graphical model and which generalizes a popular objective called the minimum error correction. In addition to being accurate, ProbHap also provides confidence scores at phased positions. Results: On a standard benchmark dataset, ProbHap makes 11% fewer errors than current state-of-the-art methods. This accuracy can be further increased by excluding low-confidence positions, at the cost of a small drop in haplotype completeness. Availability: Our source code is freely available at: https://github.com/kuleshov/ProbHap. Contact: kuleshov@stanford.edu PMID:25161223

  13. Target SNP selection in complex disease association studies

    PubMed Central

    Wjst, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Background The massive amount of SNP data stored at public internet sites provides unprecedented access to human genetic variation. Selecting target SNP for disease-gene association studies is currently done more or less randomly as decision rules for the selection of functional relevant SNPs are not available. Results We implemented a computational pipeline that retrieves the genomic sequence of target genes, collects information about sequence variation and selects functional motifs containing SNPs. Motifs being considered are gene promoter, exon-intron structure, AU-rich mRNA elements, transcription factor binding motifs, cryptic and enhancer splice sites together with expression in target tissue. As a case study, 396 genes on chromosome 6p21 in the extended HLA region were selected that contributed nearly 20,000 SNPs. By computer annotation ~2,500 SNPs in functional motifs could be identified. Most of these SNPs are disrupting transcription factor binding sites but only those introducing new sites had a significant depressing effect on SNP allele frequency. Other decision rules concern position within motifs, the validity of SNP database entries, the unique occurrence in the genome and conserved sequence context in other mammalian genomes. Conclusion Only 10% of all gene-based SNPs have sequence-predicted functional relevance making them a primary target for genotyping in association studies. PMID:15248903

  14. New generation pharmacogenomic tools: a SNP linkage disequilibrium Map, validated SNP assay resource, and high-throughput instrumentation system for large-scale genetic studies.

    PubMed

    De La Vega, Francisco M; Dailey, David; Ziegle, Janet; Williams, Julie; Madden, Dawn; Gilbert, Dennis A

    2002-06-01

    Since public and private efforts announced the first draft of the human genome last year, researchers have reported great numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We believe that the availability of well-mapped, quality SNP markers constitutes the gateway to a revolution in genetics and personalized medicine that will lead to better diagnosis and treatment of common complex disorders. A new generation of tools and public SNP resources for pharmacogenomic and genetic studies--specifically for candidate-gene, candidate-region, and whole-genome association studies--will form part of the new scientific landscape. This will only be possible through the greater accessibility of SNP resources and superior high-throughput instrumentation-assay systems that enable affordable, highly productive large-scale genetic studies. We are contributing to this effort by developing a high-quality linkage disequilibrium SNP marker map and an accompanying set of ready-to-use, validated SNP assays across every gene in the human genome. This effort incorporates both the public sequence and SNP data sources, and Celera Genomics' human genome assembly and enormous resource ofphysically mapped SNPs (approximately 4,000,000 unique records). This article discusses our approach and methodology for designing the map, choosing quality SNPs, designing and validating these assays, and obtaining population frequency ofthe polymorphisms. We also discuss an advanced, high-performance SNP assay chemisty--a new generation of the TaqMan probe-based, 5' nuclease assay-and high-throughput instrumentation-software system for large-scale genotyping. We provide the new SNP map and validation information, validated SNP assays and reagents, and instrumentation systems as a novel resource for genetic discoveries. PMID:12083398

  15. MaCH: Using Sequence and Genotype Data to Estimate Haplotypes and Unobserved Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Willer, Cristen J.; Ding, Jun; Scheet, Paul; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) can identify common alleles that contribute to complex disease susceptibility. Despite the large number of SNPs assessed in each study, the effects of most common SNPs must be evaluated indirectly using either genotyped markers or haplotypes thereof as proxies. We have previously implemented a computationally efficient Markov Chain framework for genotype imputation and haplotyping in the freely available MaCH software package. The approach describes sampled chromosomes as mosaics of each other and uses available genotype and shotgun sequence data to estimate unobserved genotypes and haplotypes, together with useful measures of the quality of these estimates. Our approach is already widely used to facilitate comparison of results across studies as well as meta-analyses of GWAS. Here, we use simulations and experimental genotypes to evaluate its accuracy and utility, considering choices of genotyping panels, reference panel configurations, and designs where genotyping is replaced with shotgun sequencing. Importantly, we show that genotype imputation not only facilitates cross study analyses but also increases power of genetic association studies. We show that genotype imputation of common variants using HapMap haplotypes as a reference is very accurate using either genome-wide SNP data or smaller amounts of data typical in fine-mapping studies. Furthermore, we show the approach is applicable in a variety of populations. Finally, we illustrate how association analyses of unobserved variants will benefit from ongoing advances such as larger HapMap reference panels and whole genome shotgun sequencing technologies. PMID:21058334

  16. The effect of MAPT haplotype on neocortical Lewy body pathology in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Robakis, Daphne; Cortes, Etty; Clark, Lorraine N; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G; Virmani, Tuhin; Alcalay, Roy N; Crary, John F; Levy, Oren A

    2016-06-01

    The H1 haplotype of the microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson disease (PD) compared with the H2 haplotype, but its effect on Lewy body (LB) formation is unclear. In this study, we compared the MAPT haplotype frequency between pathologically confirmed PD patients (n = 71) and controls (n = 52). We analyzed Braak LB stage, Braak neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) stage, and CERAD amyloid score by haplotype. We further tested the association between MAPT haplotype and semi-quantitative counts of LBs, NFTs, and neuritic plaques (NPs) in multiple neocortical regions. Consistent with previous reports, PD cases had an increased likelihood of carrying an H1/H1 genotype compared to controls (OR = 5.72, 95 % CI 1.80-18.21, p = 0.003). Braak LB, Braak NFT and CERAD scores did not differ by haplotype. However, H1/H1 carriers had higher LB counts in parietal cortex (p = 0.02) and in overall neocortical LBs (p = 0.03) compared to non-H1/H1 cases. Our analyses suggest that PD patients homozygous for the H1 haplotype have a higher burden of neocortical LB pathology. PMID:27098667

  17. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Haplotype Diversity in Chinese Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Julie A.; Bohn, Patrick S.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Nimityongskul, Francesca A.; Lank, Simon M.; Starrett, Gabriel J.; O’Connor, David H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of Chinese-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) for infectious disease immunity research is increasing despite the relative lack of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I immunogenetics information available for this population. We determined transcript-based MHC class I haplotypes for 385 Chinese rhesus macaques from five different experimental cohorts, providing a concise representation of the full complement of MHC class I major alleles expressed by each animal. In total, 123 Mamu-A and Mamu-B haplotypes were defined in the full Chinese rhesus macaque cohort. We then performed an analysis of haplotype frequencies across the experimental cohorts of Chinese rhesus macaques, as well as a comparison against a group of 96 Indian rhesus macaques. Notably, 35 of the 51 Mamu-A and Mamu-B haplotypes observed in Indian rhesus macaques were also detected in the Chinese population, with 85% of the 385 Chinese-origin rhesus macaques expressing at least one of these class I haplotypes. This unexpected conservation of Indian rhesus macaque MHC class I haplotypes in the Chinese rhesus macaque population suggests that immunologic insights originally gleaned from studies using Indian rhesus macaques may be more applicable to Chinese rhesus macaques than previously appreciated and may provide an opportunity for studies of CD8+ T-cell responses between populations. It may also be possible to extend these studies across multiple species of macaques, as we found evidence of shared ancestral haplotypes between Chinese rhesus and Mauritian cynomolgus macaques. PMID:23696100

  18. Major histocompatibility complex class I haplotype diversity in Chinese rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Karl, Julie A; Bohn, Patrick S; Wiseman, Roger W; Nimityongskul, Francesca A; Lank, Simon M; Starrett, Gabriel J; O'Connor, David H

    2013-07-01

    The use of Chinese-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) for infectious disease immunity research is increasing despite the relative lack of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I immunogenetics information available for this population. We determined transcript-based MHC class I haplotypes for 385 Chinese rhesus macaques from five different experimental cohorts, providing a concise representation of the full complement of MHC class I major alleles expressed by each animal. In total, 123 Mamu-A and Mamu-B haplotypes were defined in the full Chinese rhesus macaque cohort. We then performed an analysis of haplotype frequencies across the experimental cohorts of Chinese rhesus macaques, as well as a comparison against a group of 96 Indian rhesus macaques. Notably, 35 of the 51 Mamu-A and Mamu-B haplotypes observed in Indian rhesus macaques were also detected in the Chinese population, with 85% of the 385 Chinese-origin rhesus macaques expressing at least one of these class I haplotypes. This unexpected conservation of Indian rhesus macaque MHC class I haplotypes in the Chinese rhesus macaque population suggests that immunologic insights originally gleaned from studies using Indian rhesus macaques may be more applicable to Chinese rhesus macaques than previously appreciated and may provide an opportunity for studies of CD8(+) T-cell responses between populations. It may also be possible to extend these studies across multiple species of macaques, as we found evidence of shared ancestral haplotypes between Chinese rhesus and Mauritian cynomolgus macaques. PMID:23696100

  19. Development of a temperature-switch PCR-based SNP typing method for Mycobacterium ulcerans.

    PubMed

    Röltgen, Katharina; Assan-Ampah, Kobina; Danso, Emelia; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Pluschke, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans (M. ulcerans), the causative agent of the devastating skin disease Buruli ulcer (BU), is characterized by an extremely low level of genetic diversity. Recently, we have reported the first discrimination of closely related M. ulcerans variants in the BU endemic Densu River Valley of Ghana. In the study real-time PCR-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing at 89 predefined loci revealed the presence of ten M. ulcerans haplotypes circulating in the BU endemic region. Here we describe the development of temperature-switch PCR (TSP) assays that allow distinguishing these haplotypes by conventional agarose gel-based analysis of the PCR products. After validation of the accuracy of typing results, the TSP assays were successfully established in a reference laboratory in Ghana. Development of the cost-effective and rapid TSP-based genetic fingerprinting method will thus allow investigating the spread of M. ulcerans clones by regular genetic monitoring in BU endemic countries. PMID:23166851

  20. Ethnic heterogeneity of IRF6 AP-2α binding site promoter SNP association with nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Blanton, Susan H.; Burt, Amber; Garcia, Elizabeth; Mulliken, John B.; Stal, Samuel; Hecht, Jacqueline T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to confirm the reported association between a noncoding SNP (rs642961) in IRF6 and nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate (NSCLP). Design, Setting and Participants Two SNPs in IRF6 (rs2235371 and rs64296) were genotyped in Hispanic and nonHispanic white multiplex (122) and simplex (308) NSCLP families. Linkage and family-based association analyses were performed on the individual SNPs as well as the 2-SNP haplotype. Results We find only modest evidence for an association with rs642961 and the 2-SNP haplotype. In contrast, we found strong evidence for association with rs2235371; this was most evident in the nonHispanic white simplex families. Conclusions While we confirm that variation in IRF6 is associated with NSCLP, our results do not support the reported association with SNP rs64296. Importantly, the association varies between ethnic groups. This finding underscores the need for evaluating additional variations in IRF6 across multiple populations to better determine its role in NSCLP. PMID:21039277

  1. Major soybean maturity gene haplotypes revealed by SNPViz analysis of 72 sequenced soybean genomes.

    PubMed

    Langewisch, Tiffany; Zhang, Hongxin; Vincent, Ryan; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Bilyeu, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    In this Genomics Era, vast amounts of next-generation sequencing data have become publicly available for multiple genomes across hundreds of species. Analyses of these large-scale datasets can become cumbersome, especially when comparing nucleotide polymorphisms across many samples within a dataset and among different datasets or organisms. To facilitate the exploration of allelic variation and diversity, we have developed and deployed an in-house computer software to categorize and visualize these haplotypes. The SNPViz software enables users to analyze region-specific haplotypes from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) datasets for different sequenced genomes. The examination of allelic variation and diversity of important soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] flowering time and maturity genes may provide additional insight into flowering time regulation and enhance researchers' ability to target soybean breeding for particular environments. For this study, we utilized two available soybean genomic datasets for a total of 72 soybean genotypes encompassing cultivars, landraces, and the wild species Glycine soja. The major soybean maturity genes E1, E2, E3, and E4 along with the Dt1 gene for plant growth architecture were analyzed in an effort to determine the number of major haplotypes for each gene, to evaluate the consistency of the haplotypes with characterized variant alleles, and to identify evidence of artificial selection. The results indicated classification of a small number of predominant haplogroups for each gene and important insights into possible allelic diversity for each gene within the context of known causative mutations. The software has both a stand-alone and web-based version and can be used to analyze other genes, examine additional soybean datasets, and view similar genome sequence and SNP datasets from other species. PMID:24727730

  2. Dog Y chromosomal DNA sequence: identification, sequencing and SNP discovery

    PubMed Central

    Natanaelsson, Christian; Oskarsson, Mattias CR; Angleby, Helen; Lundeberg, Joakim; Kirkness, Ewen; Savolainen, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Background Population genetic studies of dogs have so far mainly been based on analysis of mitochondrial DNA, describing only the history of female dogs. To get a picture of the male history, as well as a second independent marker, there is a need for studies of biallelic Y-chromosome polymorphisms. However, there are no biallelic polymorphisms reported, and only 3200 bp of non-repetitive dog Y-chromosome sequence deposited in GenBank, necessitating the identification of dog Y chromosome sequence and the search for polymorphisms therein. The genome has been only partially sequenced for one male dog, disallowing mapping of the sequence into specific chromosomes. However, by comparing the male genome sequence to the complete female dog genome sequence, candidate Y-chromosome sequence may be identified by exclusion. Results The male dog genome sequence was analysed by Blast search against the human genome to identify sequences with a best match to the human Y chromosome and to the female dog genome to identify those absent in the female genome. Candidate sequences were then tested for male specificity by PCR of five male and five female dogs. 32 sequences from the male genome, with a total length of 24 kbp, were identified as male specific, based on a match to the human Y chromosome, absence in the female dog genome and male specific PCR results. 14437 bp were then sequenced for 10 male dogs originating from Europe, Southwest Asia, Siberia, East Asia, Africa and America. Nine haplotypes were found, which were defined by 14 substitutions. The genetic distance between the haplotypes indicates that they originate from at least five wolf haplotypes. There was no obvious trend in the geographic distribution of the haplotypes. Conclusion We have identified 24159 bp of dog Y-chromosome sequence to be used for population genetic studies. We sequenced 14437 bp in a worldwide collection of dogs, identifying 14 SNPs for future SNP analyses, and giving a first description of the dog Y-chromosome phylogeny. PMID:17026745

  3. Y chromosome probe p49a detects complex PvuII haplotypes and many new TaqI haplotypes in southern African populations.

    PubMed Central

    Spurdle, A; Jenkins, T

    1992-01-01

    Y-specific 49a/TaqI haplotypes were determined for 831 individuals drawn from 21 different southern African populations. A total of 31 new haplotypes were observed, some of which contained new alleles or allelic variants. Duplication, in addition to CpG mutation, is implicated in the generation of certain allelic variants. Cluster analysis of genetic distances between the populations, calculated using the 49a/TaqI haplotype frequencies, revealed a basic split between African and non-African populations. Hybrid groups cluster with the caucasoid groups, indicating that male gene flow has occurred from the latter into the former. Clustering of the negroid and Khoisan groups is not what might have been expected from the known linguistic affinities. It is suggested that the 49a/TaqI haplotype analysis of these populations is not sufficiently sensitive to distinguish between many of the populations. The Y-specific 49a/PvuII polymorphism was studied in 127 individuals from southern African populations, and 17 polymorphic fragments ranging in size from 3.6 kb to greater than 48 kb were identified. A total of 53 PvuII haplotypes were observed, corresponding to only 30 TaqI haplotypes. There appears to be poor correlation between the two polymorphisms. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:1729883

  4. Filling in missing genotypes using haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unknown genotypes can be made known (imputed) from observed genotypes at the same or nearby loci of relatives using pedigree haplotyping, or from matching allele patterns (regardless of pedigree) using population haplotyping. Fortran program findhap.f90 was designed to combine population and pedigre...

  5. Design and Characterization of a 52K SNP Chip for Goats

    PubMed Central

    Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Bardou, Philippe; Bouchez, Olivier; Cabau, Cédric; Crooijmans, Richard; Dong, Yang; Donnadieu-Tonon, Cécile; Eggen, André; Heuven, Henri C. M.; Jamli, Saadiah; Jiken, Abdullah Johari; Klopp, Christophe; Lawley, Cynthia T.; McEwan, John; Martin, Patrice; Moreno, Carole R.; Mulsant, Philippe; Nabihoudine, Ibouniyamine; Pailhoux, Eric; Palhière, Isabelle; Rupp, Rachel; Sarry, Julien; Sayre, Brian L.; Tircazes, Aurélie; Jun Wang; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Wenguang

    2014-01-01

    The success of Genome Wide Association Studies in the discovery of sequence variation linked to complex traits in humans has increased interest in high throughput SNP genotyping assays in livestock species. Primary goals are QTL detection and genomic selection. The purpose here was design of a 50–60,000 SNP chip for goats. The success of a moderate density SNP assay depends on reliable bioinformatic SNP detection procedures, the technological success rate of the SNP design, even spacing of SNPs on the genome and selection of Minor Allele Frequencies (MAF) suitable to use in diverse breeds. Through the federation of three SNP discovery projects consolidated as the International Goat Genome Consortium, we have identified approximately twelve million high quality SNP variants in the goat genome stored in a database together with their biological and technical characteristics. These SNPs were identified within and between six breeds (meat, milk and mixed): Alpine, Boer, Creole, Katjang, Saanen and Savanna, comprising a total of 97 animals. Whole genome and Reduced Representation Library sequences were aligned on >10 kb scaffolds of the de novo goat genome assembly. The 60,000 selected SNPs, evenly spaced on the goat genome, were submitted for oligo manufacturing (Illumina, Inc) and published in dbSNP along with flanking sequences and map position on goat assemblies (i.e. scaffolds and pseudo-chromosomes), sheep genome V2 and cattle UMD3.1 assembly. Ten breeds were then used to validate the SNP content and 52,295 loci could be successfully genotyped and used to generate a final cluster file. The combined strategy of using mainly whole genome Next Generation Sequencing and mapping on a contig genome assembly, complemented with Illumina design tools proved to be efficient in producing this GoatSNP50 chip. Advances in use of molecular markers are expected to accelerate goat genomic studies in coming years. PMID:24465974

  6. Using Hamming Distance as Information for SNP-Sets Clustering and Testing in Disease Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Charlotte; Kao, Wen-Hsin; Hsiao, Chuhsing Kate

    2015-01-01

    The availability of high-throughput genomic data has led to several challenges in recent genetic association studies, including the large number of genetic variants that must be considered and the computational complexity in statistical analyses. Tackling these problems with a marker-set study such as SNP-set analysis can be an efficient solution. To construct SNP-sets, we first propose a clustering algorithm, which employs Hamming distance to measure the similarity between strings of SNP genotypes and evaluates whether the given SNPs or SNP-sets should be clustered. A dendrogram can then be constructed based on such distance measure, and the number of clusters can be determined. With the resulting SNP-sets, we next develop an association test HDAT to examine susceptibility to the disease of interest. This proposed test assesses, based on Hamming distance, whether the similarity between a diseased and a normal individual differs from the similarity between two individuals of the same disease status. In our proposed methodology, only genotype information is needed. No inference of haplotypes is required, and SNPs under consideration do not need to locate in nearby regions. The proposed clustering algorithm and association test are illustrated with applications and simulation studies. As compared with other existing methods, the clustering algorithm is faster and better at identifying sets containing SNPs exerting a similar effect. In addition, the simulation studies demonstrated that the proposed test works well for SNP-sets containing a large proportion of neutral SNPs. Furthermore, employing the clustering algorithm before testing a large set of data improves the knowledge in confining the genetic regions for susceptible genetic markers. PMID:26302001

  7. Extended Islands of Tractability for Parsimony Haplotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Rudolf; Guo, Jiong; Niedermeier, Rolf; Uhlmann, Johannes; Wang, Yihui; Weller, Mathias; Wu, Xi

    Parsimony haplotyping is the problem of finding a smallest size set of haplotypes that can explain a given set of genotypes. The problem is NP-hard, and many heuristic and approximation algorithms as well as polynomial-time solvable special cases have been discovered. We propose improved fixed-parameter tractability results with respect to the parameter "size of the target haplotype set" k by presenting an O *(k 4k )-time algorithm. This also applies to the practically important constrained case, where we can only use haplotypes from a given set. Furthermore, we show that the problem becomes polynomial-time solvable if the given set of genotypes is complete, i.e., contains all possible genotypes that can be explained by the set of haplotypes.

  8. Development of the catfish 250K SNP array for genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Quantitative traits, such as disease resistance, are most often controlled by a set of genes involving a complex array of regulation. The dissection of genetic basis of quantitative traits requires large numbers of genetic markers with good genome coverage. The application of next-generation sequencing technologies has allowed discovery of over eight million SNPs in catfish, but the challenge remains as to how to efficiently and economically use such SNP resources for genetic analysis. Results In this work, we developed a catfish 250K SNP array using Affymetrix Axiom genotyping technology. The SNPs were obtained from multiple sources including gene-associated SNPs, anonymous genomic SNPs, and inter-specific SNPs. A set of 640K high-quality SNPs obtained following specific requirements of array design were submitted. A panel of 250,113 SNPs was finalized for inclusion on the array. The performance evaluated by genotyping individuals from wild populations and backcross families suggested the good utility of the catfish 250K SNP array. Conclusions This is the first high-density SNP array for catfish. The array should be a valuable resource for genome-wide association studies (GWAS), fine QTL mapping, high-density linkage map construction, haplotype analysis, and whole genome-based selection. PMID:24618043

  9. Haplotype analysis in Huntington desease provides insights into mechanisms of CAG repeat expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, S.E.; Goldberg, Y.P.; Squitieri, F.

    1994-09-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is one of 7 disorders now known to be caused by expansion of a trinucleotide repeat. The HD mutation is a polymorphic trinucleotide (CAG) repeat in the 5{prime} region of a novel gene that expands beyond the normal range of 10-35 repeats in persons destined to develop the disease. Haplotype analysis of other dynamic mutation disorders such as myotonic dystrophy and Fragil X have suggested that a rare ancestral expansion event on a normal chromosome is followed by subsequent expansion events, resulting in a pool of chromosomes in the premutation range, which is inherently unstable and prone to further multiple expansion events leading to disease range chromosomes. Haplotype analysis of 67 HD and 84 control chromosomes using 5 polymorphic markers, both intragenic and 5{prime} to the disease mutation, demonstrate that multiple haplotypes underlie HD. However, 94% of the chromosomes can be grouped under two major haplotypes. These two haplotypes are also present in the normal population. A third major haplotype is seen on 38% of normal chromosomes but rarely on HD chromosomes (6%). CAG lengths on the normal chromosomes with the two haplotypes seen in the HD population are higher than those seen on the normal chromosomes with the haplotype rarely seen on HD chromosomes. Furthermore, in populations with a diminished frequency of HD, CAG length on normal chromosomes is significantly less than other populations with higher prevalence rates for HD. These data suggest that CAG length on normal chromosomes may be a significant factor contributing to repeat instability that eventually leads to chromosomes with CAG repeat lengths in the HD range. Haplotypes on the HD chromosomes are identical to those normal chromosomes which have CAG lengths in the high range of normal, suggesting that further expansions of this pool of chromosomes leads to chromosomes with CAG repeat sizes within the disease range, consistent with a multistep model.

  10. Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Haplotypes in Hungarian Patients with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Griger, Zoltán; Dankó, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are autoimmune diseases characterized by symmetrical proximal muscle weakness. Our aim was to identify a correlation between VDR polymorphisms or haplotypes and myositis. We studied VDR-BsmI, VDR-ApaI, VDR-TaqI, and VDR-FokI polymorphisms and haplotypes in 89 Hungarian poly-/dermatomyositis patients (69 females) and 93 controls (52 females). We did not obtain any significant differences for VDR-FokI, BsmI, ApaI, and TaqI genotypes and allele frequencies between patients with myositis and healthy individuals. There was no association of VDR polymorphisms with clinical manifestations and laboratory profiles in myositis patients. Men with myositis had a significantly different distribution of BB, Bb, and bb genotypes than female patients, control male individuals, and the entire control group. Distribution of TT, Tt, and tt genotypes was significantly different in males than in females in patient group. According to four-marker haplotype prevalence, frequencies of sixteen possible haplotypes showed significant differences between patient and control groups. The three most frequent haplotypes in patients were the fbAt, FBaT, and fbAT. Our findings may reveal that there is a significant association: Bb and Tt genotypes can be associated with myositis in the Hungarian population we studied. We underline the importance of our result in the estimated prevalence of four-marker haplotypes. PMID:25649962

  11. Depletion of potential A2M risk haplotype for Alzheimer's disease in long-lived individuals.

    PubMed

    Flachsbart, Friederike; Caliebe, Amke; Nothnagel, Michael; Kleindorp, Rabea; Nikolaus, Susanna; Schreiber, Stefan; Nebel, Almut

    2010-01-01

    Risk alleles for age-related diseases are expected to decrease in frequency in the population strata of increasing age. Consistent with this hypothesis, earlier studies showed a depletion of the Alzheimer's disease risk factor APOE*epsilon4 in long-lived individuals (LLIs). To evaluate whether this observation also holds for a previously suggested Alzheimer's disease risk haplotype in the A2M gene, we analyzed this particular haplotype in 1042 German LLIs (aged 95-100 years) and 1040 younger individuals (aged 60-75 years). Our results show a significant depletion of this haplotype in LLIs, thus confirming it as a mortality factor in the elderly. Consequently, our data support an involvement of the suggested A2M risk haplotype in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and adds new evidence to the risk-allele depletion hypothesis. PMID:19639019

  12. Depletion of potential A2M risk haplotype for Alzheimer's disease in long-lived individuals

    PubMed Central

    Flachsbart, Friederike; Caliebe, Amke; Nothnagel, Michael; Kleindorp, Rabea; Nikolaus, Susanna; Schreiber, Stefan; Nebel, Almut

    2010-01-01

    Risk alleles for age-related diseases are expected to decrease in frequency in the population strata of increasing age. Consistent with this hypothesis, earlier studies showed a depletion of the Alzheimer's disease risk factor APOE*ɛ4 in long-lived individuals (LLIs). To evaluate whether this observation also holds for a previously suggested Alzheimer's disease risk haplotype in the A2M gene, we analyzed this particular haplotype in 1042 German LLIs (aged 95–100 years) and 1040 younger individuals (aged 60–75 years). Our results show a significant depletion of this haplotype in LLIs, thus confirming it as a mortality factor in the elderly. Consequently, our data support an involvement of the suggested A2M risk haplotype in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and adds new evidence to the risk-allele depletion hypothesis. PMID:19639019

  13. DXS998-DXS548-FRAXAC1 represents a novel informative haplotype at the FMR1 locus in the Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Shirani, Mahsa; Vallian, Sadeq

    2015-10-10

    Fragile X syndrome, which is caused by mutation in the FMR1 gene region, is one of the most prevalent forms of mental retardation. Direct diagnosis of the disease is based on PCR and southern blot analysis, but because of technical problems, use of polymorphic DNA markers can be helpful for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis in families with an affected individual. The polymorphic markers usually show a population-based haplotype frequency and heterozygosity. In the present study, genotyping and analysis of haplotype frequency of three microsatellite markers including DXS998, DXS548 and FRAXAC1 at the FMR1 gene region were carried out in 140 unrelated healthy women and 26 families from the Iranian population. The data indicated the presence of a novel allele for DXS998 in the Iranian population. Estimation of haplotype frequency using Arlequin program showed 50 different DXS998-DXS548-FRAXAC1 haplotypes for the input data of 5, 7 and 4 alleles, respectively. Among these haplotypes five of them showed relatively high frequencies (≥0.05). Analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) for the unrelated individuals using the PowerMarker computer program, showed that this haplotype combination can be an informative haplotype for linkage analysis in carrier detection and possible molecular diagnosis of fragile X in the Iranian population. PMID:26095802

  14. Local mitochondrial DNA haplotype databases needed for domestic dog populations that have experienced founder effect.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Amanda; Ream, Kelsey; Braham, Caitlyn; Webb, Kristen M

    2015-03-01

    Biological material from pets is often collected as evidence from crime scenes. Due to sample type and quality, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is frequently evaluated to identify the potential contributor. MtDNA has a lower discriminatory power than nuclear DNA with multiple individuals in a population potentially carrying the same mtDNA sequence, or haplotype. The frequency distribution of mtDNA haplotypes in a population must be known in order to determine the evidentiary value of a match between crime scene evidence and the potential contributor of the biological material. This is especially important in geographic areas that include remote and/or isolated populations where founder effect may have lead to a decrease in genetic diversity and a non-random distribution of haplotypes relative to the population at large. Here we compared the haplotype diversity in dogs from the noncontiguous states of Alaska and Hawaii relative to the contiguous United States (US). We report a greater proportion of dogs carrying an A haplotype in Alaska relative to any other US population. Significant variation in the distribution of haplotype frequencies was discovered when comparing the haplotype diversity of dogs in Hawaii to that of the continental US. Each of these regions exhibits reduced genetic diversity relative to the contiguous US, likely due to founder effect. We recommend that specific databases be created to accurately represent the mitochondrial haplotype diversity in these remote areas. Furthermore, our work demonstrates the importance of local surveys for populations that may have experienced found effect. PMID:25612881

  15. Haplotypes and mutations in Wilson disease.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G R; Roberts, E A; Walshe, J M; Cox, D W

    1995-01-01

    Wilson disease is a disorder of copper transport, resulting in neurological and hepatic damage due to copper toxicity. We have recently identified > 20 mutations in the copper-transporting ATPase defective in this disease. Given the difficulties of searching for mutations in a gene spanning > 80 kb of genomic DNA, haplotype data are important as a guide to mutation detection. Here we examine the haplotypes associated with specific mutations. We have extended previous studies of DNA haplotypes of dinucleotide-repeat polymorphisms (CA repeats) in the Wilson disease region to include an additional marker, in 58 families. These haplotypes, combining three markers (D13S314, D13S316, and D13S301), are usually specific for each different mutation, even though highly polymorphic CA repeat markers have been used. Haplotypes, as well as their accompanying mutations, differ between populations. In the patients whom we have studied, the haplotype data indicate that as many as 20 mutations may still be unidentified. The use of the haplotypes that we have identified provides an important guide for the identification of known mutations and can facilitate future mutation searches. PMID:7762553

  16. Haplotypes and mutations in Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.R.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    Wilson disease is a disorder of copper transport, resulting in neurological and hepatic damage due to copper toxicity. We have recently identified >20 mutations in the copper-transporting ATPase defective in this disease. Given the difficulties of searching for mutations in a gene spanning >80 kb of genomic DNA, haplotype data are important as a guide to mutation detection. Here we examine the haplotypes associated with specific mutations. We have extended previous studies of DNA haplotypes of dinucleotide-repeat polymorphisms (CA repeats) in the Wilson disease region to include an additional marker, in 58 families. These haplotypes, combining three markers (D13S314, D12S316, and D13S301), are usually specific for each different mutation, even though highly polymorphic CA repeat markers have been used. Haplotypes, as well as their accompanying mutations, differ between populations. In the patients whom we have studied, the haplotype data indicate that as many as 20 mutations may still be unidentified. The use of the haplotypes that we have identified provides an important guide for the identification of known mutations and can facilitate future mutation searches. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Haplotypes extending across ACE are associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, Patrick G; Katzov, Hagit; Feuk, Lars; Bennet, Anna M; Johansson, Boo; Wiman, Björn; de Faire, Ulf; Cairns, Nigel J; Wilcock, Gordon K; Brookes, Anthony J; Blennow, Kaj; Prince, Jonathan A

    2003-04-15

    Numerous genes have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but, with the exception of a demonstrated association with the epsilon 4 allele of APOE, findings have not been consistently replicated across populations. One of the most widely studied is the gene for angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE ). A meta-analysis of published data on a common Alu indel polymorphism in ACE was performed which indicated highly significant association of the insertion allele with AD (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.19 - 1.41; P=4 x 10(-8)). To further explore the influence of ACE on AD, several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in five independent populations represented by over 3100 individuals. Analyses based upon single markers and haplotypes revealed strong evidence of association in case-control models and also in a model examining the influence of variation in ACE upon cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid beta42 peptide (Abeta42). The most significant evidence for association with AD was found for an SNP, A-262T, located in the ACE promoter (OR 1.64; 95% CI 1.33 -1.94; P=2 x 10(-5)). Estimates of population attributable risk for the common allele of this SNP suggest that it, or an allele in tight linkage disequilibrium (LD) with it, may contribute to as much as 35% of AD in the general population. Results support a model whereby decreased ACE activity may influence AD susceptibility by a mechanism involving beta-amyloid metabolism. PMID:12668609

  18. Haplotype analyses of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and their role in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Bardia, Avinash; Tiwari, Santosh K; Vishwakarma, Sandeep K; Habeeb, Md Aejaz; Nallari, Pratibha; Sultana, Shaik A; Pasha, Shaik A; Reddy, Yugandhar P; Khan, Aleem A

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a major clinical form of inflammatory bowel disease. UC is characterized by mucosal inflammation limited to the colon, always involving the rectum and a variable extent of the more proximal colon in a continuous manner. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes may influence the extent of repair functions, DNA damage, and thus the manifestations of UC. This study thus evaluated the role of polymorphisms of the genes involved in DNA repair mechanisms. A total of 171 patients and 213 controls were included. Genotyping was carried out by ARMS PCR and PCR-RFLP analyses for RAD51, XRCC3 and hMSH2 gene polymorphisms. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were computed in both control & patient groups and data was analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. The frequency of 'A' allele of hMSH2 in the UC group caused statistically significant increased risk for UC compared to controls (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.16-2.31, p = 0.004). Similarly, the CT genotype of XRCC3 gene was predominant in the UC group and increased the risk for UC by 1.75 fold compared to controls (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.15-2.67, p = 0.03), further confirming the risk of 'T' allele in UC. The GC genotype frequency of RAD51 gene was significantly increased (p = 0.02) in the UC group (50.3%) compared to controls (38%). The GC genotype significantly increased the risk for UC compared to GG genotype by 1.73 fold (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.14-2.62, p = 0.02) confirming the strong association of 'C' allele with UC. Among the controls, the SNP loci combination of hMSH2:XRCC3 were in perfect linkage. The GTC and ACC haplotypes were found to be predominant in UC than controls with a 2.28 and 2.93 fold significant increase risk of UC. PMID:25247297

  19. Haplotype Analyses of DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Their Role in Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bardia, Avinash; Tiwari, Santosh K.; Vishwakarma, Sandeep K.; Habeeb, Md. Aejaz; Nallari, Pratibha; Sultana, Shaik A.; Pasha, Shaik A.; Reddy, Yugandhar P.; Khan, Aleem A.

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a major clinical form of inflammatory bowel disease. UC is characterized by mucosal inflammation limited to the colon, always involving the rectum and a variable extent of the more proximal colon in a continuous manner. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes may influence the extent of repair functions, DNA damage, and thus the manifestations of UC. This study thus evaluated the role of polymorphisms of the genes involved in DNA repair mechanisms. A total of 171 patients and 213 controls were included. Genotyping was carried out by ARMS PCR and PCR-RFLP analyses for RAD51, XRCC3 and hMSH2 gene polymorphisms. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were computed in both control & patient groups and data was analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. The frequency of ‘A’ allele of hMSH2 in the UC group caused statistically significant increased risk for UC compared to controls (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.16–2.31, p = 0.004). Similarly, the CT genotype of XRCC3 gene was predominant in the UC group and increased the risk for UC by 1.75 fold compared to controls (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.15–2.67, p = 0.03), further confirming the risk of ‘T’ allele in UC. The GC genotype frequency of RAD51 gene was significantly increased (p = 0.02) in the UC group (50.3%) compared to controls (38%). The GC genotype significantly increased the risk for UC compared to GG genotype by 1.73 fold (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.14–2.62, p = 0.02) confirming the strong association of ‘C’ allele with UC. Among the controls, the SNP loci combination of hMSH2:XRCC3 were in perfect linkage. The GTC and ACC haplotypes were found to be predominant in UC than controls with a 2.28 and 2.93 fold significant increase risk of UC. PMID:25247297

  20. Selection of Genetic Markers for Association Analyses, Using Linkage Disequilibrium and Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhaoling; Zaykin, Dmitri V.; Xu, Chun-Fang; Wagner, Michael; Ehm, Margaret G.

    2003-01-01

    The genotyping of closely spaced single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers frequently yields highly correlated data, owing to extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) between markers. The extent of LD varies widely across the genome and drives the number of frequent haplotypes observed in small regions. Several studies have illustrated the possibility that LD or haplotype data could be used to select a subset of SNPs that optimize the information retained in a genomic region while reducing the genotyping effort and simplifying the analysis. We propose a method based on the spectral decomposition of the matrices of pairwise LD between markers, and we select markers on the basis of their contributions to the total genetic variation. We also modify Clayton’s “haplotype tagging SNP” selection method, which utilizes haplotype information. For both methods, we propose sliding window–based algorithms that allow the methods to be applied to large chromosomal regions. Our procedures require genotype information about a small number of individuals for an initial set of SNPs and selection of an optimum subset of SNPs that could be efficiently genotyped on larger numbers of samples while retaining most of the genetic variation in samples. We identify suitable parameter combinations for the procedures, and we show that a sample size of 50–100 individuals achieves consistent results in studies of simulated data sets in linkage equilibrium and LD. When applied to experimental data sets, both procedures were similarly effective at reducing the genotyping requirement while maintaining the genetic information content throughout the regions. We also show that haplotype-association results that Hosking et al. obtained near CYP2D6 were almost identical before and after marker selection. PMID:12796855

  1. No association between microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) haplotype and longevity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Nebel, Almut; Croucher, Peter J. P.; Stiegeler, Rieke; Nikolaus, Susanna; Krawczak, Michael; Schreiber, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Human longevity is a multifactorial condition with a significant genetic contribution. A recent association study in two independent samples of long-lived U.S. Caucasians [long-lived individuals (LLI)] identified a SNP haplotype of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP, 4q25) that was underrepresented among LLI when compared with younger controls. This suggested that variation in the MTP gene might modify human longevity. Because of its function in lipid metabolism, the MTP gene product could plausibly play a pivotal role in the physiology of aging. However, the association observed in the U.S. samples could not be replicated by the same authors in a larger French LLI sample. We have therefore investigated the MTP “risk” haplotype in our own collection of 1,589 German nonagenarians, centenarians, and appropriately matched controls. No statistically significant differences were observed between LLI and controls at the allele, genotype, or haplotype level. This indicates that a noteworthy influence of the respective MTP haplotype on human longevity in the German population is unlikely. Furthermore, in comparison with all other U.S. and European samples analyzed, the MTP “risk” haplotype was found to be overrepresented only in the U.S. controls. This implies that the putative association is more likely to reflect recent changes in the genetic structure of the U.S. Caucasian population as a whole, rather than genetic effects upon survival to old age. In our view, the original study therefore highlights potential problems that arise when the case-control design is used as a means to map longevity genes in humans. PMID:15911777

  2. Distribution of HLA class II alleles and haplotypes in Mexican Mestizo population: comparison with other populations.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Parga, Carlos; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Rey, Diego; Zuñiga, Joaquín; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    We describe the analysis of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II polymorphism in Mexican Mestizo population. The study provides the HLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 allele frequencies in 99 Mexican Mestizos. DNA from these individuals was typed by PCR followed by hybridization using sequence specific oligonucleotides (PCR-SSO). The relationship with other worldwide populations was studied by using HLA data from 69 different populations and calculating neighbor-joining dendrograms and correspondence multidimensional values. The highest frequencies were for DRB1*0802 (allele frequency = 0.151), DRB1*0701 (allele frequency = 0.111) and DRB1*0407 (allele frequency = 0.106). Among the eight DQA1 alleles detected, the most frequent were DQA1*03011 (allele frequency = 0.257), DQA1*0501 (allele frequency = 0.227) and DQA1*0401 (allele frequency = 0.166). Twelve DQB1 alleles were found and four of them, DQB1*0302 (allele frequency = 0.237), DQB1*0301 (allele frequency = 0.176), DQB1*0201 (allele frequency = 0.166) and DQB1*0402 (allele frequency = 0.166) showed the highest frequencies. The haplotype DRB1*0802-DQA1*0401-DQB1*0402 (0.151) predominated clearly, followed by DRB1*0701-DQA1*0201-DQB1*0201 (0.111) and DRB1*0407-DQA1*03011-DQB1*0302 (0.101). Both genetic distances and correspondence analyses showed that Mexicans clustered with Amerindian population. These results suggest that the Mexican Mestizo population be principally characterized by haplotypes presents in Amerindian and Caucasian populations with a low frequency of Black haplotypes. In summary, the HLA class II haplotype frequencies demonstrated the tri-racial component existing in Mexican Mestizos. PMID:20380523

  3. Linkage and haplotype analysis for chemokine receptors clustered on chromosome 3p21.3 and transmitted in family pedigrees with asthma and atopy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abdulhadi, Saleh A.; Al-Rabia, Mohammed W. O.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Genomic scan analyses have suggested that the chemokine receptor cluster (CCR2, CCR3, CCR5 <300 kb span) on the short arm of chromosome 3 may contribute to susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and to the expression of a number of inflammatory diseases. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and a deletion in these chemokine receptors have also been found in case-control studies to be associated with susceptibility for asthma and related phenotypes. We extended these case-control studies by establishing whether these polymorphisms were in linkage and linkage disequilibrium with asthma and related phenotypes using linkage and haplotype analyses. METHODS: We genotyped 154 nuclear families identified through two child probands with physician-diagnosed asthma (453 unrelated individuals) including 303 unrelated parents and 150 unrelated children. Atopy was defined as a positive skin prick test (SPT 3 mm) to a panel of common inhaled allergens. RESULTS: From a panel of ten known SNPs, only three polymorphisms: –G190A in CCR2, –T51C in CCR3, and a 32 bp deletion in CCR5 were found to occur at clinically relevant frequencies. All 154 families were used for haplotype analysis but only 12 nuclear families were eligible for linkage analysis. Both analyses confirmed that the mutations were in linkage with asthma, but not with atopy. CONCLUSION: The chemokine receptor genes on 3p21.3 are significantly plausible candidate genes that can influence the expression of asthma. The previous association of the CCR5Δ32 deletion with protection from childhood asthma appears to be explained by linkage disequilibrium with the –G190A mutation in the CCR2 receptor gene. PMID:20220260

  4. Haplotype-Based Study of the Association of Alcohol Metabolizing Genes with Alcohol Dependence in Four Independent Populations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jixia; Zhou, Zhifeng; Hodgkinson, Colin A.; Yuan, Qiaoping; Shen, Pei-Hong; Mulligan, Connie J.; Wang, Alex; Gray, Rebecca R.; Roy, Alec; Virkkunen, Matti; Goldman, David; Enoch, Mary-Anne

    2010-01-01

    Background Ethanol is metabolized by two rate limiting reactions: alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) convert ethanol to acetaldehyde, subsequently metabolized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH). Approximately 50% of East Asians have genetic variants that significantly impair this pathway and influence alcohol dependence (AD) vulnerability. We investigated whether variation in alcohol metabolism genes might alter the AD risk in four non-East Asian populations by performing systematic haplotype association analyses in order to maximize the chances of capturing functional variation. Methods Haplotype-tagging SNPs were genotyped using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. Genotypes were available for 40 SNPs across the ADH genes cluster and 24 SNPs across the two ALDH genes in four diverse samples that included cases (lifetime AD) and controls (no Axis 1 disorders). The case, control sample sizes were: Finnish Caucasians: 232, 194; African Americans: 267, 422; Plains American Indians: 226, 110; Southwestern American (SW) Indians: 317, 72. Results In all four populations, as well as HapMap populations, five haplotype blocks were identified across the ADH gene cluster: (1) ADH5-ADH4; (2) ADH6-ADH1A-ADH1B; (3) ADH1C; (4) intergenic; (5) ADH7. The ALDH1A1 gene was defined by four blocks and ALDH2 by one block. No haplotype or SNP association results were significant after correction for multiple comparisons; however several results, particularly for ALDH1A1 and ADH4, replicated earlier findings. There was an ALDH1A1 block 1 and 2 (extending from intron 5 to the 3′ UTR) yin yang haplotype (haplotypes that have opposite allelic configuration) association with AD in the Finns driven by SNPs rs3764435 and rs2303317 respectively, and an ALDH1A1 block 3 (including the promoter region) yin yang haplotype association in SW Indians driven by 5 SNPs, all in allelic identity. The ADH4 SNP rs3762894 was associated with AD in Plains Indians. Conclusions The systematic evaluation of alcohol metabolizing genes in four non-East Asian populations has shown only modest associations with AD, largely for ALDH1A1 and ADH4. A concentration of signals for AD with ALDH1A1 yin yang haplotypes in several populations warrants further study. PMID:21083667

  5. Recombination of haplotypes leads to biased estimates of admixture proportions in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, R.; Smouse, P.E.

    1988-05-01

    A population formed by genetic admixture of two or more source populations may exhibit considerable linkage disequilibrium between genetic loci. In the presence of recombination, this linkage disequilibrium declines with time, a fact that is often ignored when considering haplotypes of closely linked systems (e.g., Gm serum group (gamma globulins), HLA and, more recently, restriction fragment length polymorphisms). Recombination alters haplotype frequencies over time, and the haplotype-derived measures of admixture proportions from haplotype frequencies in generations following the admixture event become progressively more biased. The direction and extent of this bias can be predicted only when the history of admixture is known. Numerical illustration suggests that this bias is problematic whenever rt > 0.05, where r is the recombination rate between linked loci and t is the time (in generations) that has elapsed since the admixture extent. In general, even the haplotype frequencies defined by multiple restriction fragment length polymorphisms should be used with caution for admixture analysis. When recombination rates or the time since admixture are not precisely known, it is advantageous to consider each restriction fragment length polymorphism site separately for admixture analysis.

  6. The Longest Haplotype Reconstruction Problem Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondi, Riccardo

    The Longest Haplotype Reconstruction (LHR) problem has been introduced in Computational Biology for the reconstruction of the haplotypes of an individual, starting from a matrix of incomplete haplotype fragments. In this paper, we reconsider the LHR problem, proving that it is NP-hard even in the restricted case when the input matrix is error-free. Then, we investigate the approximation complexity of the problem, showing that it cannot be approximated within factor 2^{log^{?}nm } for any constant ?< 1, unless NP ? DTIME[2 polylognm ]. Finally, we give a fixed-parameter algorithm, where the parameter is the size of the reconstructed haplotypes.

  7. Combination Testing Using a Single MSH5 Variant alongside HLA Haplotypes Improves the Sensitivity of Predicting Coeliac Disease Risk in the Polish Population

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowska, Michalina; Goryca, Krzysztof; Piatkowska, Magdalena; Kluska, Anna; Mikula, Michal; Karczmarski, Jakub; Oralewska, Beata; Rybak, Anna; Socha, Jerzy; Balabas, Aneta; Zeber-Lubecka, Natalia; Ambrozkiewicz, Filip; Konopka, Ewa; Trojanowska, Ilona; Zagroba, Malgorzata; Szperl, Malgorzata; Ostrowski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of non-HLA variants alongside standard HLA testing was previously shown to improve the identification of potential coeliac disease (CD) patients. We intended to identify new genetic variants associated with CD in the Polish population that would improve CD risk prediction when used alongside HLA haplotype analysis. DNA samples of 336 CD and 264 unrelated healthy controls were used to create DNA pools for a genome wide association study (GWAS). GWAS findings were validated with individual HLA tag single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing of 473 patients and 714 healthy controls. Association analysis using four HLA-tagging SNPs showed that, as was found in other populations, positive predicting genotypes (HLA-DQ2.5/DQ2.5, HLA-DQ2.5/DQ2.2, and HLA-DQ2.5/DQ8) were found at higher frequencies in CD patients than in healthy control individuals in the Polish population. Both CD-associated SNPs discovered by GWAS were found in the CD susceptibility region, confirming the previously-determined association of the major histocompatibility (MHC) region with CD pathogenesis. The two most significant SNPs from the GWAS were rs9272346 (HLA-dependent; localized within 1 Kb of DQA1) and rs3130484 (HLA-independent; mapped to MSH5). Specificity of CD prediction using the four HLA-tagging SNPs achieved 92.9%, but sensitivity was only 45.5%. However, when a testing combination of the HLA-tagging SNPs and the MSH5 SNP was used, specificity decreased to 80%, and sensitivity increased to 74%. This study confirmed that improvement of CD risk prediction sensitivity could be achieved by including non-HLA SNPs alongside HLA SNPs in genetic testing. PMID:26406233

  8. Whole-Genome Analysis of Diversity and SNP-Major Gene Association in Peach Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Diego; Dettori, Maria Teresa; Micali, Sabrina; Aramini, Valeria; Pacheco, Igor; Da Silva Linge, Cassia; Foschi, Stefano; Banchi, Elisa; Barreneche, Teresa; Quilot-Turion, Bénédicte; Lambert, Patrick; Pascal, Thierry; Iglesias, Ignasi; Carbó, Joaquim; Wang, Li-rong; Ma, Rui-juan; Li, Xiong-wei; Gao, Zhong-shan; Nazzicari, Nelson; Troggio, Michela; Bassi, Daniele; Rossini, Laura; Verde, Ignazio; Laurens, François; Arús, Pere; Aranzana, Maria José

    2015-01-01

    Peach was domesticated in China more than four millennia ago and from there it spread world-wide. Since the middle of the last century, peach breeding programs have been very dynamic generating hundreds of new commercial varieties, however, in most cases such varieties derive from a limited collection of parental lines (founders). This is one reason for the observed low levels of variability of the commercial gene pool, implying that knowledge of the extent and distribution of genetic variability in peach is critical to allow the choice of adequate parents to confer enhanced productivity, adaptation and quality to improved varieties. With this aim we genotyped 1,580 peach accessions (including a few closely related Prunus species) maintained and phenotyped in five germplasm collections (four European and one Chinese) with the International Peach SNP Consortium 9K SNP peach array. The study of population structure revealed the subdivision of the panel in three main populations, one mainly made up of Occidental varieties from breeding programs (POP1OCB), one of Occidental landraces (POP2OCT) and the third of Oriental accessions (POP3OR). Analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) identified differential patterns of genome-wide LD blocks in each of the populations. Phenotypic data for seven monogenic traits were integrated in a genome-wide association study (GWAS). The significantly associated SNPs were always in the regions predicted by linkage analysis, forming haplotypes of markers. These diagnostic haplotypes could be used for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in modern breeding programs. PMID:26352671

  9. Whole-Genome Analysis of Diversity and SNP-Major Gene Association in Peach Germplasm.

    PubMed

    Micheletti, Diego; Dettori, Maria Teresa; Micali, Sabrina; Aramini, Valeria; Pacheco, Igor; Da Silva Linge, Cassia; Foschi, Stefano; Banchi, Elisa; Barreneche, Teresa; Quilot-Turion, Bénédicte; Lambert, Patrick; Pascal, Thierry; Iglesias, Ignasi; Carbó, Joaquim; Wang, Li-Rong; Ma, Rui-Juan; Li, Xiong-Wei; Gao, Zhong-Shan; Nazzicari, Nelson; Troggio, Michela; Bassi, Daniele; Rossini, Laura; Verde, Ignazio; Laurens, François; Arús, Pere; Aranzana, Maria José

    2015-01-01

    Peach was domesticated in China more than four millennia ago and from there it spread world-wide. Since the middle of the last century, peach breeding programs have been very dynamic generating hundreds of new commercial varieties, however, in most cases such varieties derive from a limited collection of parental lines (founders). This is one reason for the observed low levels of variability of the commercial gene pool, implying that knowledge of the extent and distribution of genetic variability in peach is critical to allow the choice of adequate parents to confer enhanced productivity, adaptation and quality to improved varieties. With this aim we genotyped 1,580 peach accessions (including a few closely related Prunus species) maintained and phenotyped in five germplasm collections (four European and one Chinese) with the International Peach SNP Consortium 9K SNP peach array. The study of population structure revealed the subdivision of the panel in three main populations, one mainly made up of Occidental varieties from breeding programs (POP1OCB), one of Occidental landraces (POP2OCT) and the third of Oriental accessions (POP3OR). Analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) identified differential patterns of genome-wide LD blocks in each of the populations. Phenotypic data for seven monogenic traits were integrated in a genome-wide association study (GWAS). The significantly associated SNPs were always in the regions predicted by linkage analysis, forming haplotypes of markers. These diagnostic haplotypes could be used for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in modern breeding programs. PMID:26352671

  10. Unique haplotypes of cacao trees as revealed by trnH-psbA chloroplast DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-López, Nidia; Ovando-Medina, Isidro; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel; Molina-Freaner, Francisco; Avendaño-Arrazate, Carlos H.

    2016-01-01

    Cacao trees have been cultivated in Mesoamerica for at least 4,000 years. In this study, we analyzed sequence variation in the chloroplast DNA trnH-psbA intergenic spacer from 28 cacao trees from different farms in the Soconusco region in southern Mexico. Genetic relationships were established by two analysis approaches based on geographic origin (five populations) and genetic origin (based on a previous study). We identified six polymorphic sites, including five insertion/deletion (indels) types and one transversion. The overall nucleotide diversity was low for both approaches (geographic = 0.0032 and genetic = 0.0038). Conversely, we obtained moderate to high haplotype diversity (0.66 and 0.80) with 10 and 12 haplotypes, respectively. The common haplotype (H1) for both networks included cacao trees from all geographic locations (geographic approach) and four genetic groups (genetic approach). This common haplotype (ancient) derived a set of intermediate haplotypes and singletons interconnected by one or two mutational steps, which suggested directional selection and event purification from the expansion of narrow populations. Cacao trees from Soconusco region were grouped into one cluster without any evidence of subclustering based on AMOVA (FST = 0) and SAMOVA (FST = 0.04393) results. One population (Mazatán) showed a high haplotype frequency; thus, this population could be considered an important reservoir of genetic material. The indels located in the trnH-psbA intergenic spacer of cacao trees could be useful as markers for the development of DNA barcoding. PMID:27076998

  11. Interrelationships between Amerindian tribes of lower Amazonia as manifest by HLA haplotype disequilibria.

    PubMed Central

    Black, F L

    1984-01-01

    HLA B-C haplotypes exhibit common disequilibria in populations drawn from four continents, indicating that they are subject to broadly active selective forces. However, the A-B and A-C associations we have examined show no consistent disequilibrium pattern, leaving open the possibility that these disequilibria are due to descent from common progenitors. By examining HLA haplotype distributions, I have explored the implications that would follow from the hypothesis that biological selection played no role in determining A-C disequilibria in 10 diverse tribes of the lower Amazon Basin. Certain haplotypes are in strong positive disequilibria across a broad geographic area, suggesting that members of diverse tribes descend from common ancestors. On the basis of the extent of diffusion of the components of these haplotypes, one can estimate that the progenitors lived less than 6,000 years ago. One widely encountered lineage entered the area within the last 1,200 years. When haplotype frequencies are used in genetic distance measurements, they give a pattern of relationships very similar to that obtained by conventional chord measurements based on several genetic markers; but more than that, when individual haplotype disequilibria in the several tribes are compared, multiple origins of a single tribe are discernible and relationships are revealed that correlate more closely to geographic and linguistic patterns than do the genetic distance measurements. PMID:6595946

  12. Benchmarking of viral haplotype reconstruction programmes: an overview of the capacities and limitations of currently available programmes.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Melanie; Sloan, William T; Quince, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Viral haplotype reconstruction from a set of observed reads is one of the most challenging problems in bioinformatics today. Next-generation sequencing technologies enable us to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of haplotypes-even if the haplotypes appear at low frequencies. However, there are two major problems. First, we need to distinguish real SNPs from sequencing errors. Second, we need to determine which SNPs occur on the same haplotype, which cannot be inferred from the reads if the distance between SNPs on a haplotype exceeds the read length. We conducted an independent benchmarking study that directly compares the currently available viral haplotype reconstruction programmes. We also present nine in silico data sets that we generated to reflect biologically plausible populations. For these data sets, we simulated 454 and Illumina reads and applied the programmes to test their capacity to reconstruct whole genomes and individual genes. We developed a novel statistical framework to demonstrate the strengths and limitations of the programmes. Our benchmarking demonstrated that all the programmes we tested performed poorly when sequence divergence was low and failed to recover haplotype populations with rare haplotypes. PMID:23257116

  13. Conditional probability methods for haplotyping in pedigrees.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guimin; Hoeschele, Ina; Sorensen, Peter; Du, Fengxing

    2004-01-01

    Efficient haplotyping in pedigrees is important for the fine mapping of quantitative trait locus (QTL) or complex disease genes. To reconstruct haplotypes efficiently for a large pedigree with a large number of linked loci, two algorithms based on conditional probabilities and likelihood computations are presented. The first algorithm (the conditional probability method) produces a single, approximately optimal haplotype configuration, with computing time increasing linearly in the number of linked loci and the pedigree size. The other algorithm (the conditional enumeration method) identifies a set of haplotype configurations with high probabilities conditional on the observed genotype data for a pedigree. Its computing time increases less than exponentially with the size of a subset of the set of person-loci with unordered genotypes and linearly with its complement. The size of the subset is controlled by a threshold parameter. The set of identified haplotype configurations can be used to estimate the identity-by-descent (IBD) matrix at a map position for a pedigree. The algorithms have been tested on published and simulated data sets. The new haplotyping methods are much faster and provide more information than several existing stochastic and rule-based methods. The accuracies of the new methods are equivalent to or better than those of these existing methods. PMID:15342540

  14. Association of MAPT haplotypes with Alzheimer’s disease risk and MAPT brain gene expression levels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction MAPT encodes for tau, the predominant component of neurofibrillary tangles that are neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Genetic association of MAPT variants with late-onset AD (LOAD) risk has been inconsistent, although insufficient power and incomplete assessment of MAPT haplotypes may account for this. Methods We examined the association of MAPT haplotypes with LOAD risk in more than 20,000 subjects (n-cases = 9,814, n-controls = 11,550) from Mayo Clinic (n-cases = 2,052, n-controls = 3,406) and the Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC, n-cases = 7,762, n-controls = 8,144). We also assessed associations with brain MAPT gene expression levels measured in the cerebellum (n = 197) and temporal cortex (n = 202) of LOAD subjects. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which tag MAPT haplotypes with frequencies greater than 1% were evaluated. Results H2-haplotype tagging rs8070723-G allele associated with reduced risk of LOAD (odds ratio, OR = 0.90, 95% confidence interval, CI = 0.85-0.95, p = 5.2E-05) with consistent results in the Mayo (OR = 0.81, p = 7.0E-04) and ADGC (OR = 0.89, p = 1.26E-04) cohorts. rs3785883-A allele was also nominally significantly associated with LOAD risk (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.01-1.13, p = 0.034). Haplotype analysis revealed significant global association with LOAD risk in the combined cohort (p = 0.033), with significant association of the H2 haplotype with reduced risk of LOAD as expected (p = 1.53E-04) and suggestive association with additional haplotypes. MAPT SNPs and haplotypes also associated with brain MAPT levels in the cerebellum and temporal cortex of AD subjects with the strongest associations observed for the H2 haplotype and reduced brain MAPT levels (β = -0.16 to -0.20, p = 1.0E-03 to 3.0E-03). Conclusions These results confirm the previously reported MAPT H2 associations with LOAD risk in two large series, that this haplotype has the strongest effect on brain MAPT expression amongst those tested and identify additional haplotypes with suggestive associations, which require replication in independent series. These biologically congruent results provide compelling evidence to screen the MAPT region for regulatory variants which confer LOAD risk by influencing its brain gene expression. PMID:25324900

  15. Development of a forensic identity SNP panel for Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Augustinus, Daniel; Gahan, Michelle E; McNevin, Dennis

    2015-07-01

    Genetic markers included in forensic identity panels must exhibit Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium (HWE and LE). "Universal" panels designed for global use can fail these tests in regional jurisdictions exhibiting high levels of genetic differentiation such as the Indonesian archipelago. This is especially the case where a single DNA database is required for allele frequency estimates to calculate random match probabilities (RMPs) and associated likelihood ratios (LRs). A panel of 65 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a reduced set of 52 SNPs have been selected from 15 Indonesian subpopulations in the HUGO Pan Asian SNP database using a SNP selection strategy that could be applied to any panel of forensic identity markers. The strategy consists of four screening steps: (1) application of a G test for HWE; (2) ranking for high heterozygosity; (3) selection for LE; and (4) selection for low inbreeding depression. SNPs in our Indonesian panel perform well in comparison to some other universal SNP and short tandem repeat (STR) panels as measured by Fisher's exact test for HWE and LE and Wright's F statistics. PMID:25104323

  16. Ribosomal DNA haplotype distribution of Bursaphelenchus xylophilus in Kyushu and Okinawa islands, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nose, Mine; Miyahara, Fumihiko; Ohira, Mineko; Matsunaga, Koji; Tobase, Masashi; Koyama, Takao; Yoshimoto, Kikuo

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA region sequences (partial 18S, 28S and complete ITS1, 5.8S, and ITS2) of the pinewood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) were obtained from DNA extracted directly from wood pieces collected from wilted pine trees throughout the Kyushu and Okinawa islands, Japan. Either a 2569bp or 2573bp sequence was obtained from 88 of 143 samples. Together with the 45 rDNA sequences of pinewood nematode isolates previously reported, there were eight single nucleotide polymorphisms and two indels of two bases. Based on these mutations, nine haplotypes were estimated. The haplotype frequencies differed among regions in Kyushu island (northwest, northeast and center, southeast, and southwest), and the distribution was consistent with the invasion and spreading routes of the pinewood nematode previously estimated from past records of pine wilt and wood importation. There was no significant difference in haplotype frequencies among the collection sites on Okinawa island. PMID:22736814

  17. A genome-wide SNP scan accelerates trait-regulatory genomic loci identification in chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Kujur, Alice; Bajaj, Deepak; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Das, Shouvik; Ranjan, Rajeev; Shree, Tanima; Saxena, Maneesha S.; Badoni, Saurabh; Kumar, Vinod; Tripathi, Shailesh; Gowda, C.L.L.; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2015-01-01

    We identified 44844 high-quality SNPs by sequencing 92 diverse chickpea accessions belonging to a seed and pod trait-specific association panel using reference genome- and de novo-based GBS (genotyping-by-sequencing) assays. A GWAS (genome-wide association study) in an association panel of 211, including the 92 sequenced accessions, identified 22 major genomic loci showing significant association (explaining 23–47% phenotypic variation) with pod and seed number/plant and 100-seed weight. Eighteen trait-regulatory major genomic loci underlying 13 robust QTLs were validated and mapped on an intra-specific genetic linkage map by QTL mapping. A combinatorial approach of GWAS, QTL mapping and gene haplotype-specific LD mapping and transcript profiling uncovered one superior haplotype and favourable natural allelic variants in the upstream regulatory region of a CesA-type cellulose synthase (Ca_Kabuli_CesA3) gene regulating high pod and seed number/plant (explaining 47% phenotypic variation) in chickpea. The up-regulation of this superior gene haplotype correlated with increased transcript expression of Ca_Kabuli_CesA3 gene in the pollen and pod of high pod/seed number accession, resulting in higher cellulose accumulation for normal pollen and pollen tube growth. A rapid combinatorial genome-wide SNP genotyping-based approach has potential to dissect complex quantitative agronomic traits and delineate trait-regulatory genomic loci (candidate genes) for genetic enhancement in crop plants, including chickpea. PMID:26058368

  18. Family-Based Multi-SNP X Chromosome Analysis Using Parent Information.

    PubMed

    Wise, Alison S; Shi, Min; Weinberg, Clarice R

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for association analysis of haplotypes on the X chromosome that offers both improved power and robustness to population stratification in studies of affected offspring and their parents if all three have been genotyped. The method makes use of assumed parental haplotype exchangeability (PHE), a weaker assumption than Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). PHE requires that in the source population, of the three X chromosome haplotypes carried by the two parents, each is equally likely to be carried by the father. We propose a pseudo-sibling approach that exploits that exchangeability assumption. Our method extends the single-SNP PIX-LRT method to multiple SNPs in a high linkage block. We describe methods for testing the PHE assumption and also for determining how apparent violations can be distinguished from true fetal effects or maternally-mediated effects. We show results of simulations that demonstrate nominal type I error rate and good power. The methods are then applied to dbGaP data on the birth defect oral cleft, using both Asian and Caucasian families with cleft. PMID:26941777

  19. Family-Based Multi-SNP X Chromosome Analysis Using Parent Information

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Alison S.; Shi, Min; Weinberg, Clarice R.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for association analysis of haplotypes on the X chromosome that offers both improved power and robustness to population stratification in studies of affected offspring and their parents if all three have been genotyped. The method makes use of assumed parental haplotype exchangeability (PHE), a weaker assumption than Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). PHE requires that in the source population, of the three X chromosome haplotypes carried by the two parents, each is equally likely to be carried by the father. We propose a pseudo-sibling approach that exploits that exchangeability assumption. Our method extends the single-SNP PIX-LRT method to multiple SNPs in a high linkage block. We describe methods for testing the PHE assumption and also for determining how apparent violations can be distinguished from true fetal effects or maternally-mediated effects. We show results of simulations that demonstrate nominal type I error rate and good power. The methods are then applied to dbGaP data on the birth defect oral cleft, using both Asian and Caucasian families with cleft. PMID:26941777

  20. Recovery of Native Genetic Background in Admixed Populations Using Haplotypes, Phenotypes, and Pedigree Information – Using Cika Cattle as a Case Breed

    PubMed Central

    Simčič, Mojca; Smetko, Anamarija; Sölkner, Johann; Seichter, Doris; Gorjanc, Gregor; Kompan, Dragomir; Medugorac, Ivica

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain unbiased estimates of the diversity parameters, the population history, and the degree of admixture in Cika cattle which represents the local admixed breeds at risk of extinction undergoing challenging conservation programs. Genetic analyses were performed on the genome-wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Illumina Bovine SNP50 array data of 76 Cika animals and 531 animals from 14 reference populations. To obtain unbiased estimates we used short haplotypes spanning four markers instead of single SNPs to avoid an ascertainment bias of the BovineSNP50 array. Genome-wide haplotypes combined with partial pedigree and type trait classification show the potential to improve identification of purebred animals with a low degree of admixture. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated unique genetic identity of Cika animals. Genetic distance matrix presented by rooted Neighbour-Net suggested long and broad phylogenetic connection between Cika and Pinzgauer. Unsupervised clustering performed by the admixture analysis and two-dimensional presentation of the genetic distances between individuals also suggest Cika is a distinct breed despite being similar in appearance to Pinzgauer. Animals identified as the most purebred could be used as a nucleus for a recovery of the native genetic background in the current admixed population. The results show that local well-adapted strains, which have never been intensively managed and differentiated into specific breeds, exhibit large haplotype diversity. They suggest a conservation and recovery approach that does not rely exclusively on the search for the original native genetic background but rather on the identification and removal of common introgressed haplotypes would be more powerful. Successful implementation of such an approach should be based on combining phenotype, pedigree, and genome-wide haplotype data of the breed of interest and a spectrum of reference breeds which potentially have had direct or indirect historical contribution to the genetic makeup of the breed of interest. PMID:25923207

  1. SNP Set Association Analysis for Familial Data

    PubMed Central

    Schifano, Elizabeth D.; Epstein, Michael P.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Jhun, Min A.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Peyser, Patricia A.; Lin, Xihong

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a popular approach for identifying common genetic variants and epistatic effects associated with a disease phenotype. The traditional statistical analysis of such GWAS attempts to assess the association between each individual Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) and the observed phenotype. Recently, kernel machine-based tests for association between a SNP set (e.g., SNPs in a gene) and the disease phenotype have been proposed as a useful alternative to the traditional individual SNP approach, and allow for flexible modeling of the potentially complicated joint SNP effects in a SNP set while adjusting for covariates. We extend the kernel machine framework to accommodate related subjects from multiple independent families, and provide a score-based variance component test for assessing the association of a given SNP set with a continuous phenotype, while adjusting for additional covariates and accounting for within-family correlation. We illustrate the proposed method using simulation studies and an application to genetic data from the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA) study. PMID:22968922

  2. Transmission disequilibrium and haplotype analyses of the G72/G30 locus: suggestive linkage to schizophrenia in Palestinian Arabs living in the North of Israel.

    PubMed

    Korostishevsky, M; Kremer, I; Kaganovich, M; Cholostoy, A; Murad, I; Muhaheed, M; Bannoura, I; Rietschel, M; Dobrusin, M; Bening-Abu-Shach, U; Belmaker, R H; Maier, W; Ebstein, R P; Navon, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    Association of the G72/G30 locus with schizophrenia was recently reported in French Canadian, Russian, and Ashkenazi populations using case-control studies. In the present study we hypothesize the existence of a G72/G30 risk allele over-transmitted to affected sibs in Palestinian Arab families. A total of 223 Palestinian Arab families that included an affected offspring and parents were genotyped with 11 SNPs encompassing the G72/G30 genes. The families were recruited from three regions of Israel: 56 from the North (Afula), 136 from the central hill region (Bethlehem, Palestinian Authority), and 31 from the South (Beersheva). Individual SNP analyses disclosed a risk allele in SNP rs3916970 by both haplotype relative risk (HRR: chi(2) = 5.59, P = 0.018) and transmission disequilibrium test (TDT: chi(2) = 6.03, P = 0.014) in the Afula families. Follow-up multilocus analysis using family-based association tests (FBAT: z = 2.197, P = 0.028) exposed the adjacent haplotype. SNP rs3916970 is located about 8 kb from the linkage disequilibrium block that was reported to be associated with schizophrenia in Ashkenazi Jews. Excess of similar haplotypes of this region was observed in the Palestinian Arabs and the Ashkenazi patients. These data suggest a common risk factor for schizophrenia susceptibility in the G72/G30 locus among Ashkenazi Jews and Palestinian Arabs. The results strengthen previous reports on the role of this locus in the etiology of schizophrenia. PMID:16082701

  3. Evaluation of approaches for identifying population informative markers from high density SNP Chips

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic markers can be used to identify and verify the origin of individuals. Motivation for the inference of ancestry ranges from conservation genetics to forensic analysis. High density assays featuring Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers can be exploited to create a reduced panel containing the most informative markers for these purposes. The objectives of this study were to evaluate methods of marker selection and determine the minimum number of markers from the BovineSNP50 BeadChip required to verify the origin of individuals in European cattle breeds. Delta, Wright's FST, Weir & Cockerham's FST and PCA methods for population differentiation were compared. The level of informativeness of each SNP was estimated from the breed specific allele frequencies. Individual assignment analysis was performed using the ranked informative markers. Stringency levels were applied by log-likelihood ratio to assess the confidence of the assignment test. Results A 95% assignment success rate for the 384 individually genotyped animals was achieved with < 80, < 100, < 140 and < 200 SNP markers (with increasing stringency threshold levels) across all the examined methods for marker selection. No further gain in power of assignment was achieved by sampling in excess of 200 SNP markers. The marker selection method that required the lowest number of SNP markers to verify the animal's breed origin was Wright's FST (60 to 140 SNPs depending on the chosen degree of confidence). Certain breeds required fewer markers (< 100) to achieve 100% assignment success. In contrast, closely related breeds require more markers (~200) to achieve > 95% assignment success. The power of assignment success, and therefore the number of SNP markers required, is dependent on the levels of genetic heterogeneity and pool of samples considered. Conclusions While all SNP selection methods produced marker panels capable of breed identification, the power of assignment varied markedly among analysis methods. Thus, with effective exploration of available high density genetic markers, a diagnostic panel of highly informative markers can be produced. PMID:21569514

  4. Founder mitochondrial haplotypes in Amerindian populations.

    PubMed Central

    Bailliet, G.; Rothhammer, F.; Carnese, F. R.; Bravi, C. M.; Bianchi, N. O.

    1994-01-01

    It had been proposed that the colonization of the New World took place by three successive migrations from northeastern Asia. The first one gave rise to Amerindians (Paleo-Indians), the second and third ones to Nadene and Aleut-Eskimo, respectively. Variation in mtDNA has been used to infer the demographic structure of the Amerindian ancestors. The study of RFLP all along the mtDNA and the analysis of nucleotide substitutions in the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome apparently indicate that most or all full-blooded Amerindians cluster in one of four different mitochondrial haplotypes that are considered to represent the founder maternal lineages of Paleo-Indians. We have studied the mtDNA diversity in 109 Amerindians belonging to 3 different tribes, and we have reanalyzed the published data on 482 individuals from 18 other tribes. Our study confirms the existence of four major Amerindian haplotypes. However, we also found evidence supporting the existence of several other potential founder haplotypes or haplotype subsets in addition to the four ancestral lineages reported. Confirmation of a relatively high number of founder haplotypes would indicate that early migration into America was not accompanied by a severe genetic bottleneck. PMID:7517626

  5. Phylogeny- and Parsimony-Based Haplotype Inference with Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elberfeld, Michael; Tantau, Till

    Haplotyping, also known as haplotype phase prediction, is the problem of predicting likely haplotypes based on genotype data. One fast computational haplotyping method is based on an evolutionary model where a perfect phylogenetic tree is sought that explains the observed data. In their CPM 2009 paper, Fellows et al. studied an extension of this approach that incorporates prior knowledge in the form of a set of candidate haplotypes from which the right haplotypes must be chosen. While this approach may help to increase the accuracy of haplotyping methods, it was conjectured that the resulting formal problem constrained perfect phylogeny haplotyping might be NP-complete. In the present paper we present a polynomial-time algorithm for it. Our algorithmic ideas also yield new fixed-parameter algorithms for related haplotyping problems based on the maximum parsimony assumption.

  6. Harmful recessive effects on fertility detected by absence of homozygous haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five new lethal recessive defects were discovered in Holsteins, Jerseys, and Brown Swiss by examining haplotypes that had high population frequency but were never homozygous. The method required genotypes only from apparently normal individuals and not from affected embryos. Genotypes from the Bovin...

  7. Phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCE1) Haplotypes are Associated with Increased Risk of Gastric Cancer in Kashmir Valley

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Manzoor A.; Srivastava, Priya; Zargar, Showkat A.; Mittal, Balraj

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim: Phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCE1) plays a crucial role in carcinogenesis and progression of several types of cancers. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs2274223) in PLCE1 has been identified as a novel susceptibility locus. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of three potentially functional SNPs (rs2274223A > G, rs3765524C > T, and rs7922612C > T) of PLCE1 in gastric cancer patients from Kashmir Valley. Patients and Methods: The study was conducted in 108 GC cases and 195 healthy controls from Kashmir Valley. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Data were statistically analyzed using χ2 test and logistic regression models. A P value of less than 0.05 was regarded as statistically significant. Results: The frequency of PLCE1 A2274223C3765524T7922612, G2274223C3765524T7922612, and G2274223T3765524C7922612 haplotypes were higher in patients compared with controls, conferred high risk for GC [odds ratio (OR) =6.29; P = 0.001; Pcorr = 0.003], (OR = 3.23; P = 0.011; Pcorr = 0.033), and (OR = 5.14; P = 0.011; Pcorr = 0.033), respectively. Smoking and salted tea are independent risk factors for GC, but we did not find any significant modulation of cancer risk by PLCE1 variants with smoking or excessive consumption of salted tea. Conclusion: These results suggest that variation in PLCE1 may be associated with GC risk in Kashmir Valley. PMID:25434319

  8. Genetic stock structure of walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) inferred by PCR-RFLP analysis of the mitochondrial DNA and SNP analysis of nuclear DNA.

    PubMed

    Yanagimoto, Takashi; Kitamura, Toru; Kobayashi, Takanori

    2012-09-01

    Walleye pollock, Theragra chalocogramma, is one of the most important species in the North Pacific and Bering Sea ecosystems. However genetic population structuring of walleye pollock is uncertain. In the present study, genetic variation of walleye pollock collected in several spawning areas ranging from the Japan Sea to the Gulf of Alaska was investigated by DNA analysis. Three regions of the spacer control region, the ND5 and ND6 region (ND complex), and the ND1 and 16S rRNA region (rDNA complex) were amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was conducted on these PCR products and composite haplotypes were calculated. Furthermore, several nuclear DNA regions (actin, Calmodulin, S7 ribosomal protein, creatin kinase, and SypI gene) were investigated to study the stock structure of walleye pollock. It was considered that Calmodulin gene was one of good genetic marker, therefore we conducted SNP analysis for Calmodulin gene by SnaPshot kits. In RFLP analyses, there were no area-specific fragment patterns in the three regions, control region, ND complex and rDNA complex of mtDNA. However compositions of the fragment patterns for the three digested sets, control region/HinfI, rDNA complex/MspI and ND complex/MspI indicated that there are significant differences between around the Japan (Sado-Funka Bay-Wakkanai-Rausu) and the Bering Sea (Western Bering Sea-Nabarin-Atka I.-Bogoslof I). Furthermore, in the case of haplotype frequency, composition showed also significant genetic difference between two areas. Moreover, in Calmodulin analyses, haplotype compositions were changing from western area to eastern area gradually and the results of AMOVA analysis showed that there are interesting differences between western Pacific, western Bering Sea, and eastern Bering Sea. Judging from these results, it was considered that there are three populations of walleye pollock in the Northern Ocean. However, area-specific pattern was not found in some populations in the Northern Ocean. Therefore, we suggested that these populations were related by weak gene flow, and the walleye pollock was formed with meta-population around the Japan and the Bering Sea. PMID:22897958

  9. Selection at Work in Self-Incompatible Arabidopsis lyrata. II. Spatial Distribution of S Haplotypes in Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Schierup, Mikkel H.; Bechsgaard, Jesper S.; Christiansen, Freddy B.

    2008-01-01

    We survey the distribution of haplotypes at the self-incompatibility (SI) locus of Arabidopsis lyrata (Brassicaceae) at 12 locations spread over the species' natural distribution in Iceland. Previous investigations of the system have identified 34 functionally different S haplotypes maintained by frequency-dependent selection and arranged them into four classes of dominance in their phenotypic expression. On the basis of this model of dominance and the island model of population subdivision, we compare the distribution of S haplotypes with that expected from population genetic theory. We observe 18 different S haplotypes, recessive haplotypes being more common than dominant ones, and dominant ones being shared by fewer populations. As expected, differentiation, although significant, is very low at the S locus even over distances of up to 300 km. The frequency of the most recessive haplotype is slightly larger than expected for a panmictic population, but consistent with a subdivided population with the observed differentiation. Frequencies in nature reflect effects of segregation distortion previously observed in controlled crosses. The dynamics of the S-locus variation are, however, well represented by a 12-island model and our simplified model of dominance interactions. PMID:18780752

  10. Efficient haplotype block recognition of very long and dense genetic sequences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The new sequencing technologies enable to scan very long and dense genetic sequences, obtaining datasets of genetic markers that are an order of magnitude larger than previously available. Such genetic sequences are characterized by common alleles interspersed with multiple rarer alleles. This situation has renewed the interest for the identification of haplotypes carrying the rare risk alleles. However, large scale explorations of the linkage-disequilibrium (LD) pattern to identify haplotype blocks are not easy to perform, because traditional algorithms have at least Θ(n2) time and memory complexity. Results We derived three incremental optimizations of the widely used haplotype block recognition algorithm proposed by Gabriel et al. in 2002. Our most efficient solution, called MIG ++, has only Θ(n) memory complexity and, on a genome-wide scale, it omits >80% of the calculations, which makes it an order of magnitude faster than the original algorithm. Differently from the existing software, the MIG ++ analyzes the LD between SNPs at any distance, avoiding restrictions on the maximal block length. The haplotype block partition of the entire HapMap II CEPH dataset was obtained in 457 hours. By replacing the standard likelihood-based D′ variance estimator with an approximated estimator, the runtime was further improved. While producing a coarser partition, the approximate method allowed to obtain the full-genome haplotype block partition of the entire 1000 Genomes Project CEPH dataset in 44 hours, with no restrictions on allele frequency or long-range correlations. These experiments showed that LD-based haplotype blocks can span more than one million base-pairs in both HapMap II and 1000 Genomes datasets. An application to the North American Rheumatoid Arthritis Consortium (NARAC) dataset shows how the MIG ++ can support genome-wide haplotype association studies. Conclusions The MIG ++ enables to perform LD-based haplotype block recognition on genetic sequences of any length and density. In the new generation sequencing era, this can help identify haplotypes that carry rare variants of interest. The low computational requirements open the possibility to include the haplotype block structure into genome-wide association scans, downstream analyses, and visual interfaces for online genome browsers. PMID:24423111

  11. Genome-wide SNP detection, validation, and development of an 8K SNP array for apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As high-throughput genetic marker screening systems are essential for a range of genetics studies and plant breeding applications, the International RosBREED SNP Consortium (IRSC) has utilized the Illumina Infinium® II system to develop a medium- to high-throughput SNP screening tool for genome-wide...

  12. SNPMeta: SNP annotation and SNP metadata collection without a reference genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increase in availability of resequencing data is greatly accelerating SNP discovery and has facilitated the development of SNP genotyping assays. This, in turn, is increasing interest in annotation of individual SNPs. Currently, these data are only available through curation, or comparison to a ...

  13. DNA haplotype analyses of patients with hyperphenylalaninemia.

    PubMed Central

    Di Silvestre, D; Pandya, A; Koch, R; Groffen, J

    1990-01-01

    Linkage analysis of phenylketonurics has shown a strong association between the DNA haplotype at the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus and phenylketonuria (PKU). Similarly, a genetic linkage between less severe forms of hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) and the PAH locus has been suggested. In the present study we analyzed this linkage in more detail. Haplotypes at the PAH locus were determined for 19 individuals with moderately elevated plasma phenylalanine and normal urinary neopterin/biopterin ratios. Fourteen of these individuals had plasma phenylalanine levels of 4-10 mg/dl (mild HPA), and the other five had plasma phenylalanine levels of 10-19 mg/dl (atypical PKU). Thirteen of the 15 HPA families consisted of an affected child and at least one other sibling. Elevated plasma phenylalanine was seen to genetically segregate with specific PAH alleles in each family. Summation of the LOD scores for both categories of moderate plasma phenylalanine elevation gave a maximum value of 3.556 at theta = 0. At theta = 0 this gives a probability of linkage between the PAH locus and the locus for moderate phenylalanine elevations that is approximately 3,600:1. None of the alleles segregating with either mild HPA or atypical PKU were of haplotype 2 or 3, and 13/20 were of types 1 or 4. This is in agreement with the most deleterious mutations being on haplotypes 2 and 3 and with the less severe mutations being on haplotypes 1 and 4. chi 2 Analyses indicated no statistically significant correlation between HPA and a particular haplotype or restriction-enzyme site. Images Figure 1 PMID:2220810

  14. Powerful haplotype-based Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium tests for tightly linked loci.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wei-Gao; He, Hai-Qiang; Xu, Yan; Chen, Ping-Yan; Zhou, Ji-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there have been many case-control studies proposed to test for association between haplotypes and disease, which require the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) assumption of haplotype frequencies. As such, haplotype inference of unphased genotypes and development of haplotype-based HWE tests are crucial prior to fine mapping. The goodness-of-fit test is a frequently-used method to test for HWE for multiple tightly-linked loci. However, its degrees of freedom dramatically increase with the increase of the number of loci, which may lack the test power. Therefore, in this paper, to improve the test power for haplotype-based HWE, we first write out two likelihood functions of the observed data based on the Niu's model (NM) and inbreeding model (IM), respectively, which can cause the departure from HWE. Then, we use two expectation-maximization algorithms and one expectation-conditional-maximization algorithm to estimate the model parameters under the HWE, IM and NM models, respectively. Finally, we propose the likelihood ratio tests LRT[Formula: see text] and LRT[Formula: see text] for haplotype-based HWE under the NM and IM models, respectively. We simulate the HWE, Niu's, inbreeding and population stratification models to assess the validity and compare the performance of these two LRT tests. The simulation results show that both of the tests control the type I error rates well in testing for haplotype-based HWE. If the NM model is true, then LRT[Formula: see text] is more powerful. While, if the true model is the IM model, then LRT[Formula: see text] has better performance in power. Under the population stratification model, LRT[Formula: see text] is still more powerful. To this end, LRT[Formula: see text] is generally recommended. Application of the proposed methods to a rheumatoid arthritis data set further illustrates their utility for real data analysis. PMID:24167573

  15. Development of SNP markers for genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway and their association to kernel and malting traits in barley

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Flavonoids are an important class of secondary compounds in angiosperms. Next to certain biological functions in plants, they play a role in the brewing process and have an effect on taste, color and aroma of beer. The aim of this study was to reveal the haplotype diversity of candidate genes involved in the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway in cultivated barley varieties (Hordeum vulgare L.) and to determine associations to kernel and malting quality parameters. Results Five genes encoding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H), chalcone synthase (CHS), flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H) and dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR) of the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway were partially resequenced in 16 diverse barley reference genotypes. Their localization in the barley genome, their genetic structure, and their genetic variation e.g. single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and Insertion/Deletion (InDel) patterns were revealed. In total, 130 SNPs and seven InDels were detected. Of these, 21 polymorphisms were converted into high-throughput pyrosequencing markers. The resulting SNP and haplotype patterns were used to calculate associations with kernel and malting quality parameters. Conclusions SNP patterns were found to be highly variable for the investigated genes. The developed high-throughput markers are applicable for assessing the genetic variability and for the determination of haplotype patterns in a set of barley accessions. The candidate genes PAL, C4H and F3H were shown to be associated to several malting properties like glassiness (PAL), viscosity (C4H) or to final attenuation (F3H). PMID:24088365

  16. The extent of linkage disequilibrium and haplotype sharing around a polymorphic site.

    PubMed Central

    Innan, Hideki; Nordborg, Magnus

    2003-01-01

    Various expressions related to the length of a conserved haplotype around a polymorphism of known frequency are derived. We obtain exact expressions for the probability that no recombination has occurred in a sample or subsample. We obtain an approximation for the probability that no recombination that could give rise to a detectable recombination event (through the four-gamete test) has occurred. The probabilities can be used to obtain approximate distributions for the length of variously defined haplotypes around a polymorphic site. The implications of our results for data analysis, and in particular for detecting selection, are discussed. PMID:14504248

  17. Haplotype analysis in Australian hemochromatosis patients: evidence for a predominant ancestral haplotype exclusively associated with hemochromatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Jazwinska, E C; Pyper, W R; Burt, M J; Francis, J L; Goldwurm, S; Webb, S I; Lee, S C; Halliday, J W; Powell, L W

    1995-01-01

    Hemochromatosis (HC), an inherited disorder of iron metabolism, shows a very strong founder effect in Australia, with the majority of patients being of Celtic (Scots/Irish) origin. Australian HC patients thus provide an ideal group in which to examine HC-gene-region haplotypes, to analyze the extent of linkage disequilibrium and genetic heterogeneity in HC. We have analyzed chromosomes from 26 multiply affected HC pedigrees, and we were able to assign HC status unambiguously to 107 chromosomes--64 as affected and 43 as unaffected. The haplotypes examined comprise the following highly polymorphic markers: the serological marker HLA-A and the microsatellites D6S248, D6S265, HLA-F, and D6S105. All show highly significant allelic association with HC and no evidence of separation from the disease locus by recombination. Analysis identified a predominant ancestral haplotype comprising alleles 5-1-3-2-8 (marker order: D6S248-D6S265-HLA-A-HLA-F-D6S105), present in 21 (33%) of 64 affected chromosomes, and exclusively associated with HC (haplotype relative risk 903). No other common haplotype was significantly associated with HC. Haplotype analysis in Australian HC patients thus provides strong evidence for (a) the introduction of HC into this population on an ancestral haplotype, (b) a common mutation associated with HC in Australian patients, and (c) a candidate HC-gene region extending between and including D6S248 and D6S105. PMID:7847378

  18. Analysis of Polymorphisms and Haplotype Structure of the Human Thymidylate Synthase Genetic Region: A Tool for Pharmacogenetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Soma; Hossain, M. Zulfiquer; Borges, Michael; Goggins, Michael G.; Ingersoll, Roxann G.; Eshleman, James R.; Klein, Alison P.; Kern, Scott E.

    2012-01-01

    5-fluorouracil (5FU), a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, inhibits the DNA replicative enzyme, thymidylate synthase (Tyms). Prior studies implicated a VNTR (variable numbers of tandem repeats) polymorphism in the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of the TYMS gene as a determinant of Tyms expression in tumors and normal tissues and proposed that these VNTR genotypes could help decide fluoropyrimidine dosing. Clinical associations between 5FU-related toxicity and the TYMS VNTR were reported, however, results were inconsistent, suggesting that additional genetic variation in the TYMS gene might influence Tyms expression. We thus conducted a detailed genetic analysis of this region, defining new polymorphisms in this gene including mononucleotide (poly A:T) repeats and novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) flanking the VNTR in the TYMS genetic region. Our haplotype analysis of this region used data from both established and novel genetic variants and found nine SNP haplotypes accounting for more than 90% of the studied population. We observed non-exclusive relationships between the VNTR and adjacent SNP haplotypes, such that each type of VNTR commonly occurred on several haplotype backgrounds. Our results confirmed the expectation that the VNTR alleles exhibit homoplasy and lack the common ancestry required for a reliable marker of a linked adjacent locus that might govern toxicity. We propose that it may be necessary in a clinical trial to assay multiple types of genetic polymorphisms in the TYMS region to meaningfully model linkage of genetic markers to 5FU-related toxicity. The presence of multiple long (up to 26 nt), polymorphic monothymidine repeats in the promoter region of the sole human thymidylate synthetic enzyme is intriguing. PMID:22496803

  19. Analysis of polymorphisms and haplotype structure of the human thymidylate synthase genetic region: a tool for pharmacogenetic studies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soma; Hossain, M Zulfiquer; Borges, Michael; Goggins, Michael G; Ingersoll, Roxann G; Eshleman, James R; Klein, Alison P; Kern, Scott E

    2012-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5FU), a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, inhibits the DNA replicative enzyme, thymidylate synthase (Tyms). Prior studies implicated a VNTR (variable numbers of tandem repeats) polymorphism in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the TYMS gene as a determinant of Tyms expression in tumors and normal tissues and proposed that these VNTR genotypes could help decide fluoropyrimidine dosing. Clinical associations between 5FU-related toxicity and the TYMS VNTR were reported, however, results were inconsistent, suggesting that additional genetic variation in the TYMS gene might influence Tyms expression. We thus conducted a detailed genetic analysis of this region, defining new polymorphisms in this gene including mononucleotide (poly A:T) repeats and novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) flanking the VNTR in the TYMS genetic region. Our haplotype analysis of this region used data from both established and novel genetic variants and found nine SNP haplotypes accounting for more than 90% of the studied population. We observed non-exclusive relationships between the VNTR and adjacent SNP haplotypes, such that each type of VNTR commonly occurred on several haplotype backgrounds. Our results confirmed the expectation that the VNTR alleles exhibit homoplasy and lack the common ancestry required for a reliable marker of a linked adjacent locus that might govern toxicity. We propose that it may be necessary in a clinical trial to assay multiple types of genetic polymorphisms in the TYMS region to meaningfully model linkage of genetic markers to 5FU-related toxicity. The presence of multiple long (up to 26 nt), polymorphic monothymidine repeats in the promoter region of the sole human thymidylate synthetic enzyme is intriguing. PMID:22496803

  20. SNP-based association mapping of the polled gene in divergent cattle breeds.

    PubMed

    Seichter, D; Russ, I; Rothammer, S; Eder, J; Förster, M; Medugorac, I

    2012-10-01

    Naturally, hornless cattle are called polled. Although the POLL locus could be assigned to a c. 1.36-Mb interval in the centromeric region of BTA1, the underlying genetic basis for the polled trait is still unknown. Here, an association mapping design was set up to refine the candidate region of the polled trait for subsequent high-throughput sequencing. The case group comprised 101 homozygous polled animals from nine divergent cattle breeds, the majority represented by Galloway, Angus, Fleckvieh and Holstein Friesian. Additionally, this group included some polled individuals of Blonde d'Aquitaine, Charolais, Hereford, Jersey and Limousin breeds. The control group comprised horned Belgian Blue, Fleckvieh, Holstein Friesian and Illyrian Buša cattle. A genome-wide scan using 49,163 SNPs was performed, which revealed one shared homozygous haplotype block consisting of nine neighbouring SNPs in all polled animals. This segment defines a 381-kb interval on BTA1 that we consider to be the most likely location of the POLL mutation. Our results further demonstrate that the polled-associated haplotype is also frequent in horned animals included in this study, and thus the haplotype as such cannot be used for population-wide genetic testing. The actual trait-associated haplotype may be revealed by using higher-density SNP arrays. For the final identification of the causal mutation, we suggest high-throughput sequencing of the entire candidate region, because the identification of functional candidate genes is difficult owing to the lack of a comparable model. PMID:22497248

  1. TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 genotypes and haplotypes in the susceptibility to and clinical course of Chlamydia trachomatis infections in Dutch women.

    PubMed

    Verweij, Stephan P; Karimi, Ouafae; Pleijster, Jolein; Lyons, Joseph M; de Vries, Henry J C; Land, Jolande A; Morr, Servaas A; Ouburg, Sander

    2016-02-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infections demonstrate remarkable differences in clinical course that are approximately 40% based on host genetic variation. Here, we study the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and their haplotypes in TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 (TLR2 +2477G>A; TLR2 -16934T>A; TLR4+896A>G; TLR9 -1237T>C and TLR9 +2848G>A) in relation to the susceptibility to, and severity of C. trachomatis infections. We analysed the five SNPs in a cohort of 770 Dutch Caucasian women either attending a sexually transmitted diseases outpatient clinic (n = 731) or having complaints of subfertility (n = 39). Haplotype analyses showed a trend for TLR2 haplotype I (-16934T/+2477G) to protect against the development of symptoms and tubal pathology (Ptrend = 0.03) after Chlamydia infection. In the susceptibility cohort, TLR9 haplotype III (-1237C/+2848A) showed a significant decreasing trend in the development of symptoms after C. trachomatis infection (P = 0.02, OR: 0.55, 95%CI: 0.33-0.91). Logistic regression of the TLR2 haplotypes, TLR4+896A>G, and TLR9 haplotypes showed that the TLR2 haplotype combinations AG-TA and AG-TG confer risk (OR 3.4 (P = 0.01) and 1.6 (P = 0.03)), while the TLR9 haplotype combination TG-TA protects against C. trachomatis infections (OR: 0.4, P = 0.004). Our study shows that both TLR2 and TLR9 genes and SNP combinations do influence the clinical course of Chlamydia infections. PMID:26568059

  2. Separation of Y-chromosomal haplotypes from male DNA mixtures via multiplex haplotype-specific extraction.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Jessica; Nagy, Marion

    2015-11-01

    In forensic analysis, the interpretation of DNA mixtures is the subject of ongoing debate and requires expertise knowledge. Haplotype-specific extraction (HSE) is an alternative method that enables the separation of large chromosome fragments or haplotypes by using magnetic beads in conjunction with allele-specific probes. HSE thus allows physical separation of the components of a DNA mixture. Here, we present the first multiplex HSE separation of a Y-chromosomal haplotype consisting of six Yfiler short tandem repeat markers from a mixture of male DNA. PMID:26275613

  3. Haplotype diversity of 17 Y-str loci in an admixed population from the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Francez, Pablo Abdon da Costa; Ramos, Luiz Patrick Vidal; de Jesus Brabo Ferreira Palha, Teresinha; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2012-01-01

    The allelic and haplotype frequencies of 17 Y-STR loci most commonly used in forensic testing were estimated in a sample of 138 unrelated healthy males from Macapá, in the northern Amazon region of Brazil. The average gene diversity was 0.6554 ± 0.3315. 134 haplotypes of the 17 loci were observed, 130 of them unique and four present in two individuals each. The haplotype diversity index was 0.9996 + 0.0009, with the most frequent haplogroups being R1b (52.2%), E1b1b (11.6%), J2 (10.1%) and Q (7.2%). Most haplogroups of this population belonged to European male lineages (89.2%), followed by Amerindian (7.2%) and African (3.6%) lineages. PMID:22481873

  4. Extended major histocompatibility complex haplotypes in patients with gluten-sensitive enteropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Alper, C A; Fleischnick, E; Awdeh, Z; Katz, A J; Yunis, E J

    1987-01-01

    We have studied major histocompatibility complex markers in randomly ascertained Caucasian patients with gluten-sensitive enteropathy and their families. The frequencies of extended haplotypes, defined as haplotypes of specific HLA-B, DR, BF, C2, C4A, and C4B allelic combinations, occurring more frequently than expected, were compared on patient chromosomes, on normal chromosomes from the study families, and on chromosomes from normal families. Over half of patient chromosomes consisted almost entirely of two extended haplotypes [HLA-B8, DR3, SC01] and [HLA-B44, DR7, FC31] which, with nonextended HLA-DR7, accounted for the previously observed HLA markers of this disease: HLA-B8, DR3, and DR7. There was no increase in HLA-DR3 on nonextended haplotypes or in other extended haplotypes with HLA-DR3 or DR7. The distribution of homozygotes and heterozygotes for HLA-DR3 and DR7 was consistent with recessive inheritance of the major histocompatibility complex-linked susceptibility gene for gluten-sensitive enteropathy. On the other hand, by odds ratio analysis and from the sum of DR3 and DR7 homozygotes compared with DR3/DR7 heterozygotes, there was an increase in heterozygotes and a decrease in homozygotes suggesting the presence of modifying phenomena. PMID:3793924

  5. Impact of haplotypes of TNF in the natural course of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Giannitsioti, E; Damoraki, G; Rokkas, C; Tsaganos, T; Fragou, A; Kannelaki, S; Athanasia, S; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, E J

    2014-05-01

    Based on previous findings for the role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of TNF for the predisposition for bloodstream infections, this study investigates the role of these SNPs at the promoter positions -376, -308, -238 in infective endocarditis (IE). In a case-control study, 83 patients with IE and 83 controls were enrolled. Blood genotyping for the presence of G or A alleles of the three SNPs was carried out using restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Haplotypes were calculated. Patients were mostly infected by Staphylococcus aureus (32.5%) and by species of enterococci (14.3%) and streptococci (14.3%). Carriage of the minor frequency A alleles at -238 of the promoter region of TNF was greater than in controls (8.4% versus 1.2%, p 0.003). The presence of any of the three GGA/GAA/AGA haplotypes was more frequent in patients with IE (OR 8.22, 95CI% 1.8-37.4, p 0.001). After multivariate logistic regression analysis, it was found that the only factor related to fatal outcome was carriage of the wild-type GGG haplotype (OR, 3.29, 95CI%, 1.05-10.29, p 0.04). GGA, AGA and GAA haplotypes were more frequent in patients with IE than in controls, suggesting a predisposition for IE and a potential protective role against fatal outcome, as the wild-type GGG haplotype was independently related with death. PMID:24165416

  6. A Haplotype of the GOSR2 Gene Is Associated with Myocardial Infarction in Japanese Men

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shuo; Sato, Naoyuki; Izumi, Yoichi; Soma, Masayoshi; Aoi, Noriko; Ma, Yitong; Hinohara, Shigeaki; Doba, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The Golgi SNAP Receptor Complex Member 2 (GOSR2) gene is a Golgi-associated soluble factor attachment receptor (SNARE) protein. Some single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the GOSR2 gene have been found to be associated with myocardial infarction (MI). The aim of the present study was to assess the association between the human GOSR2 gene and MI using a haplotype-based case–control study. Methods: A total of 238 MI patients and 284 controls were genotyped for the five SNPs used as genetic markers for the human GOSR2 gene (rs197932, rs3785889, rs197922, rs17608766, and rs16941382). Data were analyzed for three separate groups: the total subjects, men, and women. Results: The overall distribution of the haplotypes in the total subjects and the men was significantly different between the MI patients and the control subjects (p=0.001, p=0.005, respectively). Additionally, the frequency of the T-G-G haplotype (rs197932-rs3785889-rs197922) for men was significantly lower in the MI patients than in the control subjects (p=0.040). Multiple logistic regression analysis also revealed that the frequency of the subjects with the T-G-G haplotype (homozygous and heterozygous diplotypes) was significantly lower compared with subjects without this haplotype in men after adjustment for the major confounding factors (odds ratio=0.455, p=0.041). Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that the T-G-G haplotype may be a protective genetic marker for MI in Japanese men. PMID:23675987

  7. An Arabidopsis haplotype map takes root

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laying the foundation for an A. thaliana haplotype map, Clark et al.1 conducted a thorough array resequencing of 20 diverse A. thaliana genomes at single-base resolution. This provided a powerful catalog of genetic diversity, with more than 1 million SNPs and hypervariable regions (50-bp to >10-kb d...

  8. Applications of haplotypes in dairy farm management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haplotypes from genomic tests are now available for almost 100,000 dairy cows and heifers in the U.S.. Genomic EBV values are accelerating the rate of genetic improvement in dairy cattle, but genomic information also is useful for making improved decisions on the farm. Mate selection strategies have...

  9. Dissecting risk haplotypes in sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Soldner, Frank; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2015-04-01

    Understanding how genetic risk variants contribute to complex diseases is crucial for predicting disease susceptibility and developing patient-tailored therapies. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Young et al. (2015) dissect the function of common non-coding risk haplotypes in the SORL1 locus in the pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer's disease using patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25842969

  10. Identification of Laying-Related SNP Markers in Geese Using RAD Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, ShiGang; Chu, WeiWei; Zhang, LiFan; Han, HouMing; Zhao, RongXue; Wu, Wei; Zhu, JiangNing; Dodson, Michael V; Wei, Wei; Liu, HongLin; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Laying performance is an important economical trait of goose production. As laying performance is of low heritability, it is of significance to develop a marker-assisted selection (MAS) strategy for this trait. Definition of sequence variation related to the target trait is a prerequisite of quantitating MAS, but little is presently known about the goose genome, which greatly hinders the identification of genetic markers for the laying traits of geese. Recently developed restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing is a possible approach for discerning large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and reducing the complexity of a genome without having reference genomic information available. In the present study, we developed a pooled RAD sequencing strategy for detecting geese laying-related SNP. Two DNA pools were constructed, each consisting of equal amounts of genomic DNA from 10 individuals with either high estimated breeding value (HEBV) or low estimated breeding value (LEBV). A total of 139,013 SNP were obtained from 42,291,356 sequences, of which 18,771,943 were for LEBV and 23,519,413 were for HEBV cohorts. Fifty-five SNP which had different allelic frequencies in the two DNA pools were further validated by individual-based AS-PCR genotyping in the LEBV and HEBV cohorts. Ten out of 55 SNP exhibited distinct allele distributions in these two cohorts. These 10 SNP were further genotyped in a goose population of 492 geese to verify the association with egg numbers. The result showed that 8 of 10 SNP were associated with egg numbers. Additionally, liner regression analysis revealed that SNP Record-111407, 106975 and 112359 were involved in a multiplegene network affecting laying performance. We used IPCR to extend the unknown regions flanking the candidate RAD tags. The obtained sequences were subjected to BLAST to retrieve the orthologous genes in either ducks or chickens. Five novel genes were cloned for geese which harbored the candidate laying-related SNP, including membrane associated guanylate kinase (MAGI-1), KIAA1462, Rho GTPase activating protein 21 (ARHGAP21), acyl-CoA synthetase family member 2 (ACSF2), astrotactin 2 (ASTN2). Collectively, our data suggests that 8 SNP and 5 genes might be promising candidate markers or targets for marker-assisted selection of egg numbers in geese. PMID:26181055

  11. Identification of Laying-Related SNP Markers in Geese Using RAD Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, ShiGang; Chu, WeiWei; Zhang, LiFan; Han, HouMing; Zhao, RongXue; Wu, Wei; Zhu, JiangNing; Dodson, Michael V.; Wei, Wei; Liu, HongLin; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Laying performance is an important economical trait of goose production. As laying performance is of low heritability, it is of significance to develop a marker-assisted selection (MAS) strategy for this trait. Definition of sequence variation related to the target trait is a prerequisite of quantitating MAS, but little is presently known about the goose genome, which greatly hinders the identification of genetic markers for the laying traits of geese. Recently developed restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing is a possible approach for discerning large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and reducing the complexity of a genome without having reference genomic information available. In the present study, we developed a pooled RAD sequencing strategy for detecting geese laying-related SNP. Two DNA pools were constructed, each consisting of equal amounts of genomic DNA from 10 individuals with either high estimated breeding value (HEBV) or low estimated breeding value (LEBV). A total of 139,013 SNP were obtained from 42,291,356 sequences, of which 18,771,943 were for LEBV and 23,519,413 were for HEBV cohorts. Fifty-five SNP which had different allelic frequencies in the two DNA pools were further validated by individual-based AS-PCR genotyping in the LEBV and HEBV cohorts. Ten out of 55 SNP exhibited distinct allele distributions in these two cohorts. These 10 SNP were further genotyped in a goose population of 492 geese to verify the association with egg numbers. The result showed that 8 of 10 SNP were associated with egg numbers. Additionally, liner regression analysis revealed that SNP Record-111407, 106975 and 112359 were involved in a multiplegene network affecting laying performance. We used IPCR to extend the unknown regions flanking the candidate RAD tags. The obtained sequences were subjected to BLAST to retrieve the orthologous genes in either ducks or chickens. Five novel genes were cloned for geese which harbored the candidate laying-related SNP, including membrane associated guanylate kinase (MAGI-1), KIAA1462, Rho GTPase activating protein 21 (ARHGAP21), acyl-CoA synthetase family member 2 (ACSF2), astrotactin 2 (ASTN2). Collectively, our data suggests that 8 SNP and 5 genes might be promising candidate markers or targets for marker-assisted selection of egg numbers in geese. PMID:26181055

  12. Association of hypothyroid disease in Doberman Pinscher dogs with a rare major histocompatibility complex DLA class II haplotype.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, L J; Huson, H J; Leonard, J; Angles, J M; Fox, L E; Wojciechowski, J W; Yuncker, C; Happ, G M

    2006-01-01

    Canine hypothyroid disease is similar to Hashimoto's disease in humans, which has been shown to be associated with human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. We have collected 27 Doberman Pinschers affected with primary hypothyroid disease and compared their MHC class II haplotypes with 129 unaffected Doberman Pinschers. Three dog-leucocyte antigen (DLA) genes, DLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1, were characterized by sequence-based typing and assigned to haplotypes for each dog. One rare haplotype was found at an increased frequency in the affected dogs compared to the unaffected dogs (Odds ratio = 2.43, P < 0.02). This haplotype has only been found in Doberman Pinschers and Labradors to date. PMID:16451201

  13. Short KIR Haplotypes in Pygmy Chimpanzee (Bonobo) Resemble the Conserved Framework of Diverse Human KIR Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rajalingam, Raja; Hong, Mei; Adams, Erin J.; Shum, Benny P.; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Parham, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Some pygmy chimpanzees (also called Bonobos) give much simpler patterns of hybridization on Southern blotting with killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) cDNA probes than do either humans or common chimpanzees. Characterization of KIRs from pygmy chimpanzees having simple and complex banding patterns identified nine different KIRs, representing seven genes. Five of these genes have orthologs in the common chimpanzee, and three of them (KIRCI, KIR2DL4, and KIR2DL5) also have human orthologs. The remaining two genes are KIR3D paralogous to the human and common chimpanzee major histocompatibility complex A– and/or -B–specific KIRs. Within a pygmy chimpanzee family, KIR haplotypes were defined. Simple patterns on Southern blot were due to inheritance of “short” KIR haplotypes containing only three KIR genes, KIRCI, KIR2DL4, and KIR3D, each of which represents one of the three major KIR lineages. These three genes in pygmy chimpanzees or their corresponding genes in humans and common chimpanzees form the conserved “framework” common to all KIR haplotypes in these species and upon which haplotypic diversity is built. The fecundity and health of individual pygmy chimpanzees who are homozygotes for short KIR haplotypes attest to the viability of short KIR haplotypes, indicating that they can provide minimal, essential KIRs for the natural killer and T cells of the hominoid immune system. PMID:11136827

  14. Haplotypes and Sequence Variation in the Ovine Adiponectin Gene (ADIPOQ)

    PubMed Central

    An, Qing-Ming; Zhou, Hui-Tong; Hu, Jiang; Luo, Yu-Zhu; Hickford, Jon G. H.

    2015-01-01

    The adiponectin gene (ADIPOQ) plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In this study five separate regions (regions 1 to 5) of ovine ADIPOQ were analysed using PCR-SSCP. Four different PCR-SSCP patterns (A1-D1, A2-D2) were detected in region-1 and region-2, respectively, with seven and six SNPs being revealed. In region-3, three different patterns (A3-C3) and three SNPs were observed. Two patterns (A4-B4, A5-B5) and two and one SNPs were observed in region-4 and region-5, respectively. In total, nineteen SNPs were detected, with five of them in the coding region and two (c.46T/C and c.515G/A) putatively resulting in amino acid changes (p.Tyr16His and p.Lys172Arg). In region-1, -2 and -3 of 316 sheep from eight New Zealand breeds, variants A1, A2 and A3 were the most common, although variant frequencies differed in the eight breeds. Across region-1 and region-3, nine haplotypes were identified and haplotypes A1-A3, A1-C3, B1-A3 and B1-C3 were most common. These results indicate that the ADIPOQ gene is polymorphic and suggest that further analysis is required to see if the variation in the gene is associated with animal production traits. PMID:26610572

  15. TNFA Haplotype Genetic Testing Improves HLA in Estimating the Risk of Celiac Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, Carlo-Federico; Navaglia, Filippo; Greco, Eliana; Pelloso, Michela; Artuso, Serena; Padoan, Andrea; Pescarin, Matilde; Aita, Ada; Bozzato, Dania; Moz, Stefania; Cananzi, Mara; Guariso, Graziella; Plebani, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Background TNF-α and IFN-γ play a role in the development of mucosal damage in celiac disease (CD). Polymorphisms of TNFA and IFNG genes, as well as of the TNFRSF1A gene, encoding the TNF-α receptor 1, might underlie different inter-individual disease susceptibility over a common HLA risk background. The aims of this study were to ascertain whether five SNPs in the TNFA promoter (-1031T>C,-857C>T,-376G>A,-308G>A,-238G>A), sequence variants of the TNFRSF1A gene and IFNG +874A>T polymorphism are associated with CD in a HLA independent manner. Methods 511 children (244 CD, 267 controls) were genotyped for HLA, TNFA and INFG (Real Time PCR). TNFRSF1A variants were studied (DHPLC and sequence). Results Only the rare TNFA-1031C (OR=0.65, 95% CI:0.44-0.95), -857T (OR=0.42, 95% CI:0.27-0.65), -376A (OR=2.25, 95% CI:1.12-4.51) and -308A (OR=4.76, 95% CI:3.12-7.26) alleles were significantly associated with CD. One TNFRSF1A variant was identified (c.625+10A>G, rs1800693), but not associated with CD. The CD-correlated TNFA SNPs resulted in six haplotypes. Two haplotypes were control-associated (CCGG and TTGG) and three were CD-associated (CCAG, TCGA and CCGA). The seventeen inferred haplotype combinations were grouped (A to E) based on their frequencies among CD. Binary logistic regression analysis documented a strong association between CD and HLA (OR for intermediate risk haplotypes=178; 95% CI:24-1317; OR for high risk haplotypes=2752; 95% CI:287-26387), but also an HLA-independent correlation between CD and TNFA haplotype combination groups. The CD risk for patients carrying an intermediate risk HLA haplotype could be sub-stratified by TNFA haplotype combinations. Conclusion TNFA promoter haplotypes associate with CD independently from HLA. We suggest that their evaluation might enhance the accuracy in estimating the CD genetic risk. PMID:25915602

  16. A SNP-Based Molecular Barcode for Characterization of Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Gao, LiFeng; Jia, JiZeng; Kong, XiuYing

    2016-01-01

    Wheat is grown as a staple crop worldwide. It is important to develop an effective genotyping tool for this cereal grain both to identify germplasm diversity and to protect the rights of breeders. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping provides a means for developing a practical, rapid, inexpensive and high-throughput assay. Here, we investigated SNPs as robust markers of genetic variation for typing wheat cultivars. We identified SNPs from an array of 9000 across a collection of 429 well-known wheat cultivars grown in China, of which 43 SNP markers with high minor allele frequency and variations discriminated the selected wheat varieties and their wild ancestors. This SNP-based barcode will allow for the rapid and precise identification of wheat germplasm resources and newly released varieties and will further assist in the wheat breeding program. PMID:26985664

  17. On the relationship between an Asian haplotype on chromosome 6 that reduces androstenone levels in boars and the differential expression of SULT2A1 in the testis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Androstenone is one of the major compounds responsible for boar taint, a pronounced urine-like odor produced when cooking boar meat. Several studies have identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) for androstenone level on Sus scrofa chromosome (SSC) 6. For one of the candidate genes in the region SULT2A1, a difference in expression levels in the testis has been shown at the protein and RNA level. Results Haplotypes were predicted for the QTL region and their effects were estimated showing that haplotype 1 was consistently related with a lower level, and haplotype 2 with a higher level of androstenone. A recombinant haplotype allowed us to narrow down the QTL region from 3.75 Mbp to 1.94 Mbp. An RNA-seq analysis of the liver and testis revealed six genes that were differentially expressed between homozygotes of haplotypes 1 and 2. Genomic sequences of these differentially expressed genes were checked for variations within potential regulatory regions. We identified one variant located within a CpG island that could affect expression of SULT2A1 gene. An allele-specific expression analysis in the testis did not show differential expression between the alleles of SULT2A1 located on the different haplotypes in heterozygous animals. However a synonymous mutation C166T (SSC6: 49,117,861 bp in Sscrofa 10.2; C/T) was identified within the exon 2 of SULT2A1 for which the haplotype 2 only had the C allele which was higher expressed than the T allele, indicating haplotype-independent allelic-imbalanced expression between the two alleles. A phylogenetic analysis for the 1.94 Mbp region revealed that haplotype 1, associated with low androstenone level, originated from Asia. Conclusions Differential expression could be observed for six genes by RNA-seq analysis. No difference in the ratio of C:T expression of SULT2A1 for the haplotypes was found by the allele-specific expression analysis, however, a difference in expression between the C over T allele was found for a variation within SULT2A1, showing that the difference in androstenone levels between the haplotypes is not caused by the SNP in exon 2. PMID:24405739

  18. Toward accurate high-throughput SNP genotyping in the presence of inherited copy number variation

    PubMed Central

    MacConaill, Laura E; Aldred, Micheala A; Lu, Xincheng; LaFramboise, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Background The recent discovery of widespread copy number variation in humans has forced a shift away from the assumption of two copies per locus per cell throughout the autosomal genome. In particular, a SNP site can no longer always be accurately assigned one of three genotypes in an individual. In the presence of copy number variability, the individual may theoretically harbor any number of copies of each of the two SNP alleles. Results To address this issue, we have developed a method to infer a "generalized genotype" from raw SNP microarray data. Here we apply our approach to data from 48 individuals and uncover thousands of aberrant SNPs, most in regions that were previously unreported as copy number variants. We show that our allele-specific copy numbers follow Mendelian inheritance patterns that would be obscured in the absence of SNP allele information. The interplay between duplication and point mutation in our data shed light on the relative frequencies of these events in human history, showing that at least some of the duplication events were recurrent. Conclusion This new multi-allelic view of SNPs has a complicated role in disease association studies, and further work will be necessary in order to accurately assess its importance. Software to perform generalized genotyping from SNP array data is freely available online [1]. PMID:17608949

  19. An Improved Opposition-Based Learning Particle Swarm Optimization for the Detection of SNP-SNP Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Junliang; Sun, Yan; Li, Shengjun; Liu, Jin-Xing; Zheng, Chun-Hou; Zhang, Junying

    2015-01-01

    SNP-SNP interactions have been receiving increasing attention in understanding the mechanism underlying susceptibility to complex diseases. Though many works have been done for the detection of SNP-SNP interactions, the algorithmic development is still ongoing. In this study, an improved opposition-based learning particle swarm optimization (IOBLPSO) is proposed for the detection of SNP-SNP interactions. Highlights of IOBLPSO are the introduction of three strategies, namely, opposition-based learning, dynamic inertia weight, and a postprocedure. Opposition-based learning not only enhances the global explorative ability, but also avoids premature convergence. Dynamic inertia weight allows particles to cover a wider search space when the considered SNP is likely to be a random one and converges on promising regions of the search space while capturing a highly suspected SNP. The postprocedure is used to carry out a deep search in highly suspected SNP sets. Experiments of IOBLPSO are performed on both simulation data sets and a real data set of age-related macular degeneration, results of which demonstrate that IOBLPSO is promising in detecting SNP-SNP interactions. IOBLPSO might be an alternative to existing methods for detecting SNP-SNP interactions. PMID:26236727

  20. RAD tag sequencing as a source of SNP markers in Cynara cardunculus L

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus) genome is relatively poorly explored, especially compared to those of the other major Asteraceae crops sunflower and lettuce. No SNP markers are in the public domain. We have combined the recently developed restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) approach with the Illumina DNA sequencing platform to effect the rapid and mass discovery of SNP markers for C. cardunculus. Results RAD tags were sequenced from the genomic DNA of three C. cardunculus mapping population parents, generating 9.7 million reads, corresponding to ~1 Gbp of sequence. An assembly based on paired ends produced ~6.0 Mbp of genomic sequence, separated into ~19,000 contigs (mean length 312 bp), of which ~21% were fragments of putative coding sequence. The shared sequences allowed for the discovery of ~34,000 SNPs and nearly 800 indels, equivalent to a SNP frequency of 5.6 per 1,000 nt, and an indel frequency of 0.2 per 1,000 nt. A sample of heterozygous SNP loci was mapped by CAPS assays and this exercise provided validation of our mining criteria. The repetitive fraction of the genome had a high representation of retrotransposon sequence, followed by simple repeats, AT-low complexity regions and mobile DNA elements. The genomic k-mers distribution and CpG rate of C. cardunculus, compared with data derived from three whole genome-sequenced dicots species, provided a further evidence of the random representation of the C. cardunculus genome generated by RAD sampling. Conclusion The RAD tag sequencing approach is a cost-effective and rapid method to develop SNP markers in a highly heterozygous species. Our approach permitted to generate a large and robust SNP datasets by the adoption of optimized filtering criteria. PMID:22214349

  1. A hidden Markov model for investigating recent positive selection through haplotype structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Hey, Jody; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2015-02-01

    Recent positive selection can increase the frequency of an advantageous mutant rapidly enough that a relatively long ancestral haplotype will be remained intact around it. We present a hidden Markov model (HMM) to identify such haplotype structures. With HMM identified haplotype structures, a population genetic model for the extent of ancestral haplotypes is then adopted for parameter inference of the selection intensity and the allele age. Simulations show that this method can detect selection under a wide range of conditions and has higher power than the existing frequency spectrum-based method. In addition, it provides good estimate of the selection coefficients and allele ages for strong selection. The method analyzes large data sets in a reasonable amount of running time. This method is applied to HapMap III data for a genome scan, and identifies a list of candidate regions putatively under recent positive selection. It is also applied to several genes known to be under recent positive selection, including the LCT, KITLG and TYRP1 genes in Northern Europeans, and OCA2 in East Asians, to estimate their allele ages and selection coefficients. PMID:25446961

  2. Bis-SNP: Combined DNA methylation and SNP calling for Bisulfite-seq data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Bisulfite treatment of DNA followed by high-throughput sequencing (Bisulfite-seq) is an important method for studying DNA methylation and epigenetic gene regulation, yet current software tools do not adequately address single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Identifying SNPs is important for accurate quantification of methylation levels and for identification of allele-specific epigenetic events such as imprinting. We have developed a model-based bisulfite SNP caller, Bis-SNP, that results in substantially better SNP calls than existing methods, thereby improving methylation estimates. At an average 30× genomic coverage, Bis-SNP correctly identified 96% of SNPs using the default high-stringency settings. The open-source package is available at http://epigenome.usc.edu/publicationdata/bissnp2011. PMID:22784381

  3. Genome-wide haplotype association study identifies the FRMD4A gene as a risk locus for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, J-C; Grenier-Boley, B; Harold, D; Zelenika, D; Chouraki, V; Kamatani, Y; Sleegers, K; Ikram, M A; Hiltunen, M; Reitz, C; Mateo, I; Feulner, T; Bullido, M; Galimberti, D; Concari, L; Alvarez, V; Sims, R; Gerrish, A; Chapman, J; Deniz-Naranjo, C; Solfrizzi, V; Sorbi, S; Arosio, B; Spalletta, G; Siciliano, G; Epelbaum, J; Hannequin, D; Dartigues, J-F; Tzourio, C; Berr, C; Schrijvers, E M C; Rogers, R; Tosto, G; Pasquier, F; Bettens, K; Van Cauwenberghe, C; Fratiglioni, L; Graff, C; Delepine, M; Ferri, R; Reynolds, C A; Lannfelt, L; Ingelsson, M; Prince, J A; Chillotti, C; Pilotto, A; Seripa, D; Boland, A; Mancuso, M; Bossù, P; Annoni, G; Nacmias, B; Bosco, P; Panza, F; Sanchez-Garcia, F; Del Zompo, M; Coto, E; Owen, M; O'Donovan, M; Valdivieso, F; Caffara, P; Scarpini, E; Combarros, O; Buée, L; Campion, D; Soininen, H; Breteler, M; Riemenschneider, M; Van Broeckhoven, C; Alpérovitch, A; Lathrop, M; Trégouët, D-A; Williams, J; Amouyel, P

    2013-01-01

    Recently, several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have led to the discovery of nine new loci of genetic susceptibility in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the landscape of the AD genetic susceptibility is far away to be complete and in addition to single-SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) analyses as performed in conventional GWAS, complementary strategies need to be applied to overcome limitations inherent to this type of approaches. We performed a genome-wide haplotype association (GWHA) study in the EADI1 study (n=2025 AD cases and 5328 controls) by applying a sliding-windows approach. After exclusion of loci already known to be involved in AD (APOE, BIN1 and CR1), 91 regions with suggestive haplotype effects were identified. In a second step, we attempted to replicate the best suggestive haplotype associations in the GERAD1 consortium (2820 AD cases and 6356 controls) and observed that 9 of them showed nominal association. In a third step, we tested relevant haplotype associations in a combined analysis of five additional case–control studies (5093 AD cases and 4061 controls). We consistently replicated the association of a haplotype within FRMD4A on Chr.10p13 in all the data set analyzed (OR: 1.68; 95% CI: (1.43–1.96); P=1.1 × 10−10). We finally searched for association between SNPs within the FRMD4A locus and Aβ plasma concentrations in three independent non-demented populations (n=2579). We reported that polymorphisms were associated with plasma Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio (best signal, P=5.4 × 10−7). In conclusion, combining both GWHA study and a conservative three-stage replication approach, we characterised FRMD4A as a new genetic risk factor of AD. PMID:22430674

  4. A functional haplotype implicated in vulnerability to develop cocaine dependence is associated with reduced PDYN expression in human brain.

    PubMed

    Yuferov, Vadim; Ji, Fei; Nielsen, David A; Levran, Orna; Ho, Ann; Morgello, Susan; Shi, Ruijin; Ott, Jurg; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2009-04-01

    Dynorphin peptides and the kappa-opioid receptor are important in the rewarding properties of cocaine, heroin, and alcohol. We tested polymorphisms of the prodynorphin gene (PDYN) for association with cocaine dependence and cocaine/alcohol codependence. We genotyped six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), located in the promoter region, exon 4 coding, and 3' untranslated region, in 106 Caucasians and 204 African Americans who were cocaine dependent, cocaine/alcohol codependent, or controls. In Caucasians, we found point-wise significant associations of 3'UTR SNPs (rs910080, rs910079, and rs2235749) with cocaine dependence and cocaine/alcohol codependence. These SNPs are in high linkage disequilibrium, comprising a haplotype block. The haplotype CCT was significantly experiment-wise associated with cocaine dependence and with combined cocaine dependence and cocaine/alcohol codependence (false discovery rate, q=0.04 and 0.03, respectively). We investigated allele-specific gene expression of PDYN, using SNP rs910079 as a reporter, in postmortem human brains from eight heterozygous subjects, using SNaPshot assay. There was significantly lower expression for C allele (rs910079), with ratios ranging from 0.48 to 0.78, indicating lower expression of the CCT haplotype of PDYN in both the caudate and nucleus accumbens. Analysis of total PDYN expression in 43 postmortem brains also showed significantly lower levels of preprodynorphin mRNA in subjects having the risk CCT haplotype. This study provides evidence that a 3'UTR PDYN haplotype, implicated in vulnerability to develop cocaine addiction and/or cocaine/alcohol codependence, is related to lower mRNA expression of the PDYN gene in human dorsal and ventral striatum. PMID:18923396

  5. Haplotype structure in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Im, Kate M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Wang, Xianshu; Green, Todd; Chow, Clement Y; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua; Gaudet, Mia M; Fredericksen, Zachary; Shane Pankratz, V; Guiducci, Candace; Crenshaw, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Hogervorst, Frans B; Rookus, Matti A; Collée, J Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Asperen, Christi J; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Van Roozendaal, Cees E; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez-Segura, Pedro; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Blecharz, Paweł; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Neuhausen, Susan L; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Singer, Christian F; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Beattie, Mary S; Chan, Salina; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Phelan, Catherine; Narod, Steven; John, Esther M; Hopper, John L; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Southey, Melissa C; Terry, Mary-Beth; Tung, Nadine; Hansen, Thomas V O; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Durán, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Porteous, Mary; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T; Side, Lucy E; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Laitman, Yael; Meindl, Alfons; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Klein, Robert J; Daly, Mark J; Friedman, Eitan; Dean, Michael; Clark, Andrew G; Altshuler, David M; Antoniou, Antonis C; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Gold, Bert

    2011-11-01

    Three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). They are observed at increased frequency in the AJ compared to other BRCA mutations in Caucasian non-Jews (CNJ). Several authors have proposed that elevated allele frequencies in the surrounding genomic regions reflect adaptive or balancing selection. Such proposals predict long-range linkage disequilibrium (LD) resulting from a selective sweep, although genetic drift in a founder population may also act to create long-distance LD. To date, few studies have used the tools of statistical genomics to examine the likelihood of long-range LD at a deleterious locus in a population that faced a genetic bottleneck. We studied the genotypes of hundreds of women from a large international consortium of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and found that AJ women exhibited long-range haplotypes compared to CNJ women. More than 50% of the AJ chromosomes with the BRCA1 185delAG mutation share an identical 2.1 Mb haplotype and nearly 16% of AJ chromosomes carrying the BRCA2 6174delT mutation share a 1.4 Mb haplotype. Simulations based on the best inference of Ashkenazi population demography indicate that long-range haplotypes are expected in the context of a genome-wide survey. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that a local bottleneck effect from population size constriction events could by chance have resulted in the large haplotype blocks observed at high frequency in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 regions of Ashkenazi Jews. PMID:21597964

  6. MHC class II alleles and haplotypes in patients with pemphigus vulgaris from India.

    PubMed

    Delgado, J C; Yunis, D E; Bozón, M V; Salazar, M; Deulofeut, R; Turbay, D; Mehra, N K; Pasricha, J S; Raval, R S; Patel, H; Shah, B K; Bhol, K; Alper, C A; Ahmed, A R; Yunis, E J

    1996-12-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes characterized by an autoantibody response against a keratinocyte adhesion molecule, desmoglein 3, causing acantholysis and blister formation. We compared high resolution MHC class II alleles and haplotype frequencies (HLA-DRB, DQA1 and DQB1) in 37 patients with PV to 89 haplotypes of normal relatives from New Delhi and Ahmedabad. We found that PV patients had significantly increased frequencies of DRB1*1404 (P < 0.0001), DQA1*0101 (P = 0.001), and DQB1*0503 (P < 0.0001). These associations were due to the increased frequencies of the haplotype HLA-DRB1*1404, DRB3*0202, DQA1*0101, DQB1*0503 in patients compared to control haplotypes (p < 0.0001). Also, patients from Ahmedabad had a significant increase in HLA-DQB1*0302 (p = 0.03). An identical amino acid sequence (Leu-Leu-Glu-Arg-Arg-Arg-Ala-Glu), in positions 67-74 of the beta domain of DRB alleles is restricted to some DR14 alleles. Therefore, there are three possible explanations for class II allele involvement in autoantibody in PV patients with class II haplotypes marked by HLA-DR14. First, the class II alleles could be markers for an unidentified susceptibility gene in linkage disequilibrium with them. Second, the primary association could be with DQB1*0503 and the association with HLA-DR14 alleles would be the result of linkage disequilibrium. Third, the HLA-DRB1 locus susceptibility could involve a specific amino acid sequence in the third hypervariable region shared by several HLA-DR14 alleles. PMID:9008309

  7. Haplotype structure in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Im, Kate M.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Wang, Xianshu; Green, Todd; Chow, Clement Y.; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua; Gaudet, Mia M.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Guiducci, Candace; Crenshaw, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Van Roozendaal, Cees E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez-Segura, Pedro; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Blecharz, Paweł; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Singer, Christian F.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Beattie, Mary S.; Chan, Salina; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Phelan, Catherine; Narod, Steven; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary-Beth; Tung, Nadine; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Durán, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Laitman, Yael; Meindl, Alfons; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Klein, Robert J.; Daly, Mark J.; Friedman, Eitan; Dean, Michael; Clark, Andrew G.; Altshuler, David M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Gold, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). They are observed at increased frequency in the AJ compared to other BRCA mutations in Caucasian non-Jews (CNJ). Several authors have proposed that elevated allele frequencies in the surrounding genomic regions reflect adaptive or balancing selection. Such proposals predict long-range linkage dis-equilibrium (LD) resulting from a selective sweep, although genetic drift in a founder population may also act to create long-distance LD. To date, few studies have used the tools of statistical genomics to examine the likelihood of long-range LD at a deleterious locus in a population that faced a genetic bottleneck. We studied the genotypes of hundreds of women from a large international consortium of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and found that AJ women exhibited long-range haplotypes compared to CNJ women. More than 50% of the AJ chromosomes with the BRCA1 185delAG mutation share an identical 2.1 Mb haplotype and nearly 16% of AJ chromosomes carrying the BRCA2 6174delT mutation share a 1.4 Mb haplotype. Simulations based on the best inference of Ashkenazi population demography indicate that long-range haplotypes are expected in the context of a genome-wide survey. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that a local bottleneck effect from population size constriction events could by chance have resulted in the large haplotype blocks observed at high frequency in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 regions of Ashkenazi Jews. PMID:21597964

  8. SNP-PRAGE: SNP-based parametric robust analysis of gene set enrichment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The current genome-wide association (GWA) analysis mainly focuses on the single genetic variant, which may not reveal some the genetic variants that have small individual effects but large joint effects. Considering the multiple SNPs jointly in Genome-wide association (GWA) analysis can increase power. When multiple SNPs are jointly considered, the corresponding SNP-level association measures are likely to be correlated due to the linkage disequilibrium (LD) among SNPs. Methods We propose SNP-based parametric robust analysis of gene-set enrichment (SNP-PRAGE) method which handles correlation adequately among association measures of SNPs, and minimizes computing effort by the parametric assumption. SNP-PRAGE first obtains gene-level association measures from SNP-level association measures by incorporating the size of corresponding (or nearby) genes and the LD structure among SNPs. Afterward, SNP-PRAGE acquires the gene-set level summary of genes that undergo the same biological knowledge. This two-step summarization makes the within-set association measures to be independent from each other, and therefore the central limit theorem can be adequately applied for the parametric model. Results & conclusions We applied SNP-PRAGE to two GWA data sets: hypertension data of 8,842 samples from the Korean population and bipolar disorder data of 4,806 samples from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). We found two enriched gene sets for hypertension and three enriched gene sets for bipolar disorder. By a simulation study, we compared our method to other gene set methods, and we found SNP-PRAGE reduced many false positives notably while requiring much less computational efforts than other permutation-based gene set approaches. PMID:22784568

  9. Unique haplotypes of cacao trees as revealed by trnH-psbA chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-López, Nidia; Ovando-Medina, Isidro; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel; Molina-Freaner, Francisco; Avendaño-Arrazate, Carlos H; Vázquez-Ovando, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Cacao trees have been cultivated in Mesoamerica for at least 4,000 years. In this study, we analyzed sequence variation in the chloroplast DNA trnH-psbA intergenic spacer from 28 cacao trees from different farms in the Soconusco region in southern Mexico. Genetic relationships were established by two analysis approaches based on geographic origin (five populations) and genetic origin (based on a previous study). We identified six polymorphic sites, including five insertion/deletion (indels) types and one transversion. The overall nucleotide diversity was low for both approaches (geographic = 0.0032 and genetic = 0.0038). Conversely, we obtained moderate to high haplotype diversity (0.66 and 0.80) with 10 and 12 haplotypes, respectively. The common haplotype (H1) for both networks included cacao trees from all geographic locations (geographic approach) and four genetic groups (genetic approach). This common haplotype (ancient) derived a set of intermediate haplotypes and singletons interconnected by one or two mutational steps, which suggested directional selection and event purification from the expansion of narrow populations. Cacao trees from Soconusco region were grouped into one cluster without any evidence of subclustering based on AMOVA (F ST = 0) and SAMOVA (F ST = 0.04393) results. One population (Mazatán) showed a high haplotype frequency; thus, this population could be considered an important reservoir of genetic material. The indels located in the trnH-psbA intergenic spacer of cacao trees could be useful as markers for the development of DNA barcoding. PMID:27076998

  10. Global selection on sucrose synthase haplotypes during a century of wheat breeding.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jian; Jiang, Qiyan; Hao, Chenyang; Wang, Yuquan; Zhang, Hongna; Zhang, Xueyong

    2014-04-01

    Spike number per unit area, number of grains per spike, and thousand kernel weight (TKW) are important yield components. In China, increases in wheat (Triticum aestivum) yields are mainly due to increases in grain number per spike and TKW. TKW mainly depends on starch content, as starch accounts for about 70% of the grain endosperm. Sucrose synthase catalysis is the first step in the conversion of sucrose to starch, that is, the conversion of sucrose to fructose and UDP-glucose by the wheat sucrose synthase genes (TaSus1 and TaSus2) that are located on chromosomes 7A/7B/7D and 2A/2B/2D, respectively. A total of 1,520 wheat accessions were genotyped at the six loci. Two, two, five, and two haplotypes were identified at the TaSus2-2A, TaSus2-2B, TaSus1-7A, and TaSus1-7B loci, respectively. Their main variations were detected within the introns. Significant differences between the haplotypes correlated with TKW differences among 348 modern Chinese cultivars from the core collection. Frequency changes for favored haplotypes showed gradual increases in cultivars released since beginning of the last century in China, Europe, and North America. Geographic distributions and time changes of favored haplotypes were characterized in six major wheat production regions worldwide. Strong selection bottlenecks to haplotype variations occurred at polyploidization and domestication and during breeding of wheat. Genetic-effect differences between haplotypes at the same locus influence the selection time and intensity. This work shows that the endosperm starch synthesis pathway is a major target of indirect selection in global wheat breeding for higher yield. PMID:24402050

  11. Polymorphic HLA-C Receptors Balance the Functional Characteristics of KIR Haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Hugo G; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Goyos, Ana; Nemat-Gorgani, Neda; Bushnell, David A; Norman, Paul J; Parham, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The human killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) locus comprises two groups of KIR haplotypes, termed A and B. These are present in all human populations but with different relative frequencies, suggesting they have different functional properties that underlie their balancing selection. We studied the genomic organization and functional properties of the alleles of the inhibitory and activating HLA-C receptors encoded by KIR haplotypes. Because every HLA-C allotype functions as a ligand for KIR, the interactions between KIR and HLA-C dominate the HLA class I-mediated regulation of human NK cells. The C2 epitope is recognized by inhibitory KIR2DL1 and activating KIR2DS1, whereas the C1 epitope is recognized by inhibitory KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3. This study shows that the KIR2DL1, KIR2DS1, and KIR2DL2/3 alleles form distinctive phylogenetic clades that associate with specific KIR haplotypes. KIR A haplotypes are characterized by KIR2DL1 alleles that encode strong inhibitory C2 receptors and KIR2DL3 alleles encoding weak inhibitory C1 receptors. In striking contrast, KIR B haplotypes are characterized by KIR2DL1 alleles that encode weak inhibitory C2 receptors and KIR2DL2 alleles encoding strong inhibitory C1 receptors. The wide-ranging properties of KIR allotypes arise from substitutions throughout the KIR molecule. Such substitutions can influence cell surface expression, as well as the avidity and specificity for HLA-C ligands. Consistent with the crucial role of inhibitory HLA-C receptors in self-recognition, as well as NK cell education and response, most KIR haplotypes have both a functional C1 and C2 receptor, despite the considerable variation that occurs in ligand recognition and surface expression. PMID:26311903

  12. Beta-Globin Gene Haplotypes Among Cameroonians and Review of the Global Distribution: Is There a Case for a Single Sickle Mutation Origin in Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Bitoungui, Valentina J. Ngo; Pule, Gift D.; Hanchard, Neil; Ngogang, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Studies of hemoglobin S haplotypes in African subpopulations have potential implications for patient care and our understanding of genetic factors that have shaped the prevalence of sickle cell disease (SCD). We evaluated HBB gene cluster haplotypes in SCD patients from Cameroon, and reviewed the literature for a global distribution. We reviewed medical records to obtain pertinent socio-demographic and clinical features for 610 Cameroonian SCD patients, including hemoglobin electrophoresis and full blood counts. RFLP-PCR was used to determine the HBB gene haplotype on 1082 chromosomes. A systematic review of the current literature was undertaken to catalogue HBB haplotype frequencies in SCD populations around the world. Benin (74%; n=799) and Cameroon (19%; n=207) were the most prevalent haplotypes observed among Cameroonian patients. There was no significant association between HBB haplotypes and clinical life events, anthropometric measures, hematological parameters, or fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels. The literature review of the global haplotype distributions was consistent with known historical migrations of the people of Africa. Previously reported data from Sudan showed a distinctly unusual pattern; all four classical haplotypes were reported, with an exceptionally high proportion of the Senegal, Cameroon, and atypical haplotypes. We did not observe any significant associations between HBB haplotype and SCD disease course in this cohort. Taken together, the data from Cameroon and from the wider literature suggest that a careful reassessment of African HBB haplotypes may shed further light on the evolutionary dynamics of the sickle allele, which could suggest a single origin of the sickle mutation. PMID:25748438

  13. A SNP transferability survey within the genus Vitis

    PubMed Central

    Vezzulli, Silvia; Micheletti, Diego; Riaz, Summaira; Pindo, Massimo; Viola, Roberto; This, Patrice; Walker, M Andrew; Troggio, Michela; Velasco, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    Background Efforts to sequence the genomes of different organisms continue to increase. The DNA sequence is usually decoded for one individual and its application is for the whole species. The recent sequencing of the highly heterozygous Vitis vinifera L. cultivar Pinot Noir (clone ENTAV 115) genome gave rise to several thousand polymorphisms and offers a good model to study the transferability of its degree of polymorphism to other individuals of the same species and within the genus. Results This study was performed by genotyping 137 SNPs through the SNPlex™ Genotyping System (Applied Biosystems Inc.) and by comparing the SNPlex sequencing results across 35 (of the 137) regions from 69 grape accessions. A heterozygous state transferability of 31.5% across the unrelated cultivars of V. vinifera, of 18.8% across the wild forms of V. vinifera, of 2.3% among non-vinifera Vitis species, and of 0% with Muscadinia rotundifolia was found. In addition, mean allele frequencies were used to evaluate SNP informativeness and develop useful subsets of markers. Conclusion Using SNPlex application and corroboration from the sequencing analysis, the informativeness of SNP markers from the heterozygous grape cultivar Pinot Noir was validated in V. vinifera (including cultivars and wild forms), but had a limited application for non-vinifera Vitis species where a resequencing strategy may be preferred, knowing that homology at priming sites is sufficient. This work will allow future applications such as mapping and diversity studies, accession identification and genomic-research assisted breeding within V. vinifera. PMID:19087337

  14. A new genotype calling method for affymetrix SNP arrays.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bilin; Xu, Jin

    2011-12-01

    Current genotype-calling methods such as Robust Linear Model with Mahalanobis Distance Classifier (RLMM) and Corrected Robust Linear Model with Maximum Likelihood Classification (CRLMM) provide accurate calling results for Affymetrix Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) chips. However, these methods are computationally expensive as they employ preprocess procedures, including chip data normalization and other sophisticated statistical techniques. In the small sample case the accuracy rate may drop significantly. We develop a new genotype calling method for Affymetrix 100 k and 500 k SNP chips. A two-stage classification scheme is proposed to obtain a fast genotype calling algorithm. The first stage uses unsupervised classification to quickly discriminate genotypes with high accuracy for the majority of the SNPs. And the second stage employs a supervised classification method to incorporate allele frequency information either from the HapMap data or from a self-training scheme. Confidence score is provided for every genotype call. The overall performance is shown to be comparable to that of CRLMM as verified by the known gold standard HapMap data and is superior in small sample cases. The new algorithm is computationally simple and standalone in the sense that a self-training scheme can be used without employing any other training data. A package implementing the calling algorithm is freely available at http://www.sfs.ecnu.edu.cn/teachers/xuj_en.html. PMID:22084010

  15. Genome-wide haplotype association study identify TNFRSF1A, CASP7, LRP1B, CDH1 and TG genes associated with Alzheimer's disease in Caribbean Hispanic individuals

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Zhenwei; Lv, Hongchao; Zhang, Mingming; Duan, Lian; Wang, Situo; Li, Jin; Liu, Guiyou; Ruijie, Zhang; Jiang, Yongshuai

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an acquired disorder of cognitive and behavioral impairment. It is considered to be caused by variety of factors, such as age, environment and genetic factors. In order to identify the genetic affect factors of AD, we carried out a bioinformatic approach which combined genome-wide haplotype-based association study with gene prioritization. The raw SNP genotypes data was downloaded from GEO database (GSE33528). It contains 615 AD patients and 560 controls of Caribbean Hispanic individuals. Firstly, we identified the linkage disequilibrium (LD) haplotype blocks and performed genome-wide haplotype association study to screen significant haplotypes that were associated with AD. Then we mapped these significant haplotypes to genes and obtained candidate genes set for AD. At last, we prioritized AD candidate genes based on their similarity with 36 known AD genes, so as to identify AD related genes. The results showed that 141 haplotypes on 134 LD blocks were significantly associated with AD (P<1E-4), and these significant haplotypes were mapped to 132 AD candidate genes. After prioritizing these candidate genes, we found seven AD related genes: APOE, APOC1, TNFRSF1A, LRP1B, CDH1, TG and CASP7. Among these genes, APOE and APOC1 are known AD risk genes. For the other five genes TNFRSF1A, CDH1, CASP7, LRP1B and TG, this is the first genetic association study which showed the significant association between these five genes and AD susceptibility in Caribbean Hispanic individuals. We believe that our findings can provide a new perspective to understand the genetic affect factors of AD. PMID:26621834

  16. The Wilson disease gene: Haplotypes and mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.R.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.; Walshe, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease (WND) is an autosomal recessive defect of copper transport. The gene involved in WND, located on chromosome 13, has recently been shown to be a putative copper transporting P-type ATPase, designated ATP7B. The gene is highly similar to ATP7A, located on the X chromosome, which is defective in Menkes disease, another disorder of copper transport. We have available for study WND families from Canada (34 families), the United Kingdom (32 families), Japan (4 families), Iceland (3 families) and Hong Kong (2 families). We have utilized four highly polymorphic CA repeat markers (D13S296, D13S301, D13S314 and D13S316) surrounding the ATP7B locus to construct haplotypes in these families. Analysis indicates that there are many unique WND haplotypes not present on normal chromosomes and that there may be a large number of different WND mutations. We have screened the WND patients for mutations in the ATP7B gene. Fifty six patients, representing all of the identified haplotypes, have been screened using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP), followed by selective sequencing. To date, 19 mutations and 12 polymorphisms have been identified. All of the changes are nucleotide substitutions or small insertions/deletions and there is no evidence for larger deletions as seen in the similar gene on the X chromosome, ATP7A. Haplotypes of close markers and the ability to detect some of the mutations present in the gene allow for more reliable molecular diagnosis of presymptomatic sibs of WND patients. A reassessment of individuals previously diagnosed in the presymptomatic phase is now required, as we have have identified some heterozygotes who are biochemically indistinguishable from affected homozygotes. The identification of specific mutations will soon allow direct diagnosis of WND patients with a high level of certainty.

  17. An integrative variant analysis pipeline for accurate genotype/haplotype inference in population NGS data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Lu, James; Yu, Jin; Gibbs, Richard A.; Yu, Fuli

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing is a powerful approach for discovering genetic variation. Sensitive variant calling and haplotype inference from population sequencing data remain challenging. We describe methods for high-quality discovery, genotyping, and phasing of SNPs for low-coverage (approximately 5×) sequencing of populations, implemented in a pipeline called SNPTools. Our pipeline contains several innovations that specifically address challenges caused by low-coverage population sequencing: (1) effective base depth (EBD), a nonparametric statistic that enables more accurate statistical modeling of sequencing data; (2) variance ratio scoring, a variance-based statistic that discovers polymorphic loci with high sensitivity and specificity; and (3) BAM-specific binomial mixture modeling (BBMM), a clustering algorithm that generates robust genotype likelihoods from heterogeneous sequencing data. Last, we develop an imputation engine that refines raw genotype likelihoods to produce high-quality phased genotypes/haplotypes. Designed for large population studies, SNPTools' input/output (I/O) and storage aware design leads to improved computing performance on large sequencing data sets. We apply SNPTools to the International 1000 Genomes Project (1000G) Phase 1 low-coverage data set and obtain genotyping accuracy comparable to that of SNP microarray. PMID:23296920

  18. A Common Haplotype within the PON1 Promoter Region is Associated with Sporadic ALS

    PubMed Central

    Landers, John E.; Shi, Lijia; Cho, Ting-Jan; Glass, Jonathan D.; Shaw, Christopher E.; Leigh, P. Nigel; Diekstra, Frank; Polak, Meraida; Rodriguez-Leyza, Ildefonso; Niemann, Stephan; Traynor, Bryan J.; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Sapp, Peter C.; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Wills, Anne-Marie A.; Brown, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder of upper and lower motor neurons. Genetic variants in the paraoxonase gene cluster have been associated with susceptibility to sporadic ALS. Because these studies have yielded conflicting results, we have further investigated this association in a larger data set. Twenty SNPs spanning the paraoxonase gene cluster were genotyped on a panel of 835 case and 924 control samples and tested for association with risk of sporadic ALS and with ALS sub-phenotypes. Our study revealed 2 SNPs, rs2074351 and rs705382, within the paraoxonase gene cluster that are associated with susceptibility to sporadic ALS (uncorrected p=0.0016 and 0.0022, respectfully). None of the 20 SNPs displayed significant associations with age of onset, site of onset or disease survival. Using a sliding window approach, we have also identified a 5-SNP haplotype that is significantly associated with risk of sporadic ALS (p=2.42E-04). We conclude that a common haplotype within the PON1 promoter region is associated with susceptibility to sporadic ALS. PMID:18618303

  19. Haplotypes of NOS3 Gene Polymorphisms in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Matsa, Lova Satyanarayana; Rangaraju, Advithi; Vengaldas, Viswamitra; Latifi, Mona; Jahromi, Hossein Mehraban; Ananthapur, Venkateshwari; Nallari, Pratibha

    2013-01-01

    Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by systolic dysfunction, followed by heart failure necessitating cardiac transplantation. The genetic basis is well established by the identification of mutations in sarcomere and cytoskeleton gene/s. Modifier genes and environmental factors are also considered to play a significant role in the variable expression of the disease, hence various mechanisms are implicated and one such mechanism is oxidative stress. Nitric Oxide (NO), a primary physiological transmitter derived from endothelium seems to play a composite role with diverse anti-atherogenic effects as vasodilator. Three functional polymorphisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene viz., T-786C of the 5′ flanking region, 27bp VNTR in intron4 and G894T of exon 7 were genotyped to identify their role in DCM. A total of 115 DCM samples and 454 controls were included. Genotyping was carried out by PCR -RFLP method. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were computed in both control & patient groups and appropriate statistical tests were employed. A significant association of TC genotype (T-786C) with an odds ratio of 1.74, (95% CI 1.14 - 2.67, p = 0.01) was observed in DCM. Likewise the GT genotypic frequency of G894T polymorphism was found to be statistically significant (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.34–3.27, p = 0.0011), with the recessive allele T being significantly associated with DCM (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.18 - 2.30, p = 0.003). The haplotype carrying the recessive alleles of G894T and T-786C, C4bT was found to exhibit 7 folds increased risk for DCM compared to the controls. Hence C4bT haplotype could be the risk haplotype for DCM. Our findings suggest the possible implication of NOS3 gene in the disease phenotype, wherein NOS3 may be synergistically functioning in DCM associated heart failure via the excessive production of NO in cardiomyocytes resulting in decreased myocardial contractility and systolic dysfunction, a common feature of DCM phenotype. PMID:23923002

  20. Evidence that the ancestral haplotype in Australian hemochromatosis patients may be associated with a common mutation in the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.H.G.; Powell, L.W.; Leggett, B.A.

    1995-08-01

    Hemochromatosis (HC) is a common inherited disorder of iron metabolism for which neither the gene nor biochemical defect have yet been identified. The aim of this study was to look for clinical evidence that the predominant ancestral haplotype in Australian patients is associated with a common mutation in the gene. We compared indices of iron metabolism and storage in three groups of HC patients categorized according to the presence of the ancestral haplotype (i.e., patients with two copies, one copy, and no copies of the ancestral haplotype). We also examined iron indices in two groups of HC heterozygotes (those with the ancestral haplotype and those without) and in age-matched controls. These analyses indicate that (i) HC patients with two copies of the ancestral haplotype show significantly more severe expression of the disorder than those with one copy or those without, (ii) HC heterozygotes have partial clinical expression, which may be influenced by the presence of the ancestral haplotype in females but not in males, and (iii) the high population frequency of the HC gene may be the result of the selective advantage conferred by protecting heterozygotes against iron deficiency. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. Effect of the G72 (DAOA) putative risk haplotype on cognitive functions in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Andreas; Krach, Sören; Krug, Axel; Markov, Valentin; Eggermann, Thomas; Zerres, Klaus; Thimm, Markus; Nöthen, Markus M; Treutlein, Jens; Rietschel, Marcella; Kircher, Tilo

    2009-01-01

    Background In the last years, several susceptibility genes for psychiatric disorders have been identified, among others G72 (also named D-amino acid oxidase activator, DAOA). Typically, the high-risk variant of a vulnerability gene is associated with decreased cognitive functions already in healthy individuals. In a recent study however, a positive effect of the high-risk variant of G72 on verbal working memory was reported. In the present study, we therefore examined the relationship between G72 genotype status and a broad range of cognitive functions in 423 healthy individuals. Methods The G72 carrier status was assessed by the two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) M23 and M24. Subjects were divided into three risk groups (low, intermediate and high risk). Results G72 status influenced a number of cognitive functions, such as verbal working memory, attention, and, at a trend level, spatial working memory and executive functions. Interestingly, the high-risk allele carriers scored better than one or even both other groups. Conclusion Our data show that the putative high-risk haplotype (i.e. homozygote C/C-allele carriers in SNP M23 and homozygote T/T-allele carriers in SNP M24) is in healthy individuals not necessarily associated with worse performance in cognitive functions, but even with better performance in some domains. Further work is required to identify the mechanisms of G72 on brain functions. PMID:19778423

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphism and haplotype effects associated with somatic cell score in German Holstein cattle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To better understand the genetic determination of udder health, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on a population of 2354 German Holstein bulls for which daughter yield deviations (DYD) for somatic cell score (SCS) were available. For this study, we used genetic information of 44 576 informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 11 725 inferred haplotype blocks. Results When accounting for the sub-structure of the analyzed population, 16 SNPs and 10 haplotypes in six genomic regions were significant at the Bonferroni threshold of P ≤ 1.14 × 10-6. The size of the identified regions ranged from 0.05 to 5.62 Mb. Genomic regions on chromosomes 5, 6, 18 and 19 coincided with known QTL affecting SCS, while additional genomic regions were found on chromosomes 13 and X. Of particular interest is the region on chromosome 6 between 85 and 88 Mb, where QTL for mastitis traits and significant SNPs for SCS in different Holstein populations coincide with our results. In all identified regions, except for the region on chromosome X, significant SNPs were present in significant haplotypes. The minor alleles of identified SNPs on chromosomes 18 and 19, and the major alleles of SNPs on chromosomes 6 and X were favorable for a lower SCS. Differences in somatic cell count (SCC) between alternative SNP alleles reached 14 000 cells/mL. Conclusions The results support the polygenic nature of the genetic determination of SCS, confirm the importance of previously reported QTL, and provide evidence for the segregation of additional QTL for SCS in Holstein cattle. The small size of the regions identified here will facilitate the search for causal genetic variations that affect gene functions. PMID:24898131

  3. Convergent myotonic dystrophy (DM) haplotypes on 19q13.3: Potential inconsistencies in human disease gene localization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsilfidis, C.; Whiting, E.J.; Korneluk, R.G. |

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disease which has been shown to be caused by an unstable trinucleotide repeat located on chromosome 19q. We have conducted extensive haplotype analysis on 103 DM chromosome using thirteen 19q13.3 loci identifying 18 RFLPs, spanning a physical distance of 1.3 Mb containing the myotonic dystrophy gene. Three major haplotypes, H1, H2 and H3, comprising 45.6% of the DM chromosomes, were observed in our population. The later two haplotypes, observed exclusively on DM chromosomes of French Canadian origin, contain a 500 kb core region that is identical. The low frequency of this core on normal chromosomes (0.8%) is consistent with a mapping of the DM gene within this region. However, the DM mutation is found 160 kb distal to the point of divergence between these two haplotypes. In contrast, the 450 kb shared by haplotypes H1 and H2 contain the DM mutation. Further, analysis of the DM region using a polymorphic microsatellite GJ-VSSM2 located 15 kb telomeric to the DM gene revealed strong allelic association of allele V on DM chromosomes (present on 6% of normal and 88.2% of DM chromosomes). The fact that allele V was found on all DM chromosomes with the three major haplotypes is indicative of their common origin and includes the two French Canadian haplotypes which share a region proximal to the DM mutation. This analysis indicates that convergent haplotypes, in the absence of a more extensive linkage disequilibrium analysis, may lead to a spurious disease gene localization.

  4. Strong association between microsatellites and an HLA-B, DR haplotype (B18-DR3): Implication for microsatellite evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Crouau-Roy, B.; Bouzekri, N.; Clayton, J.

    1996-09-01

    The HLA haplotype B18-DR3 has a widespread geographical distribution, but has its greatest frequencies in Southern Europe, probably vestigial of the earliest populations of this region, particularly in the Pays Basque and Sardinia. This haplotype is of medical significance, being that most implicated as a factor of risk in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this study, the closely linked microsatellite markers (TNFa,b,c) in the region of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) genes have been used in an attempt to subtype this haplotype in the two populations and/or in healthy and diabetic populations. A total of 79 HLA-B18-DR3 haplotypes were analyzed: 54 in Basques (12 from healthy individuals and 42 from diabetics or their first-degree relatives) and 25 in Sardinians (13 from healthy and 13 from diabetic individuals). The TNF haplotype a1-b5-c2 is completely associated with B18-DR3 in both populations. The homogeneity of the B18-DR3 haplotype in two ethnically pure populations implies stability in evolution, which suggest that the mutation rate of these microsatellite markers must be less than is usually assumed (i.e., {approximately} 5x10{sup {minus}6} per site per generation). Such markers should be powerful tools for studying genetic drift and admixture of populations, but it remains to be established whether this stability is a rule for all microsatellites in HLA haplotypes or whether or whether it is restricted to some microsatellites and/or some HLA haplotypes. The population genetics of those microsatellites associated with HLA B18-DR3 was also studied in a random sample of the Basque population. 44 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. Genotype and haplotype analysis of cell cycle genes in sporadic colorectal cancer in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Polakova, V; Pardini, B; Naccarati, A; Landi, S; Slyskova, J; Novotny, J; Vodickova, L; Bermejo, J L; Hanova, M; Smerhovsky, Z; Tulupova, E; Kumar, R; Hemminki, K; Vodicka, P

    2009-04-01

    The Czech Republic has one of the highest incidences of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the world. To assess the role of genetic variants on the disease, we genotyped polymorphisms in the TP53 (rs17878362:A(1)>A(2), rs1042522:G>C, rs12947788:C>T, and rs17884306:G>A), CDKN1A (rs1801270:C>A and rs1059234:C>T), and CDKN2A (rs3731249:G>A, rs11515:C>G, and rs3088440:C>T) genes in 614 hospital-based CRC cases and 614 matched controls from the country. Despite the tendency toward differential distribution of variant allele frequencies for some polymorphisms, none was significantly associated with CRC risk. We observed differential distribution of major haplotypes arising from four polymorphisms in the TP53 gene between cases and controls (global P<0.0001). The two most common haplotypes, A(1)GCG and A(2)CCG, were present in 81% of the cases compared to 71% of the controls. In comparison to the most common haplotype (A(1)GCG), the haplotype A(2)CCG was associated with an increased risk (odds ratio [OR], 1.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.82), while the four other haplotypes A(1)CCG (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.45-0.79), A(2)GCG (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.35-0.81), A(1)GTG (OR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.15-0.64), and A(1)GCA (OR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.07-0.51) were associated with a decreased risk. The effect of haplotypes in the TP53 gene was similar in colon (global P<0.0001) and rectal cancers (P=0.006). No association with the disease was observed with haplotypes of the CDKN1A and CDKN2A polymorphisms. The results from this study suggest that prevalent haplotypes within the TP53 gene may modulate CRC risks in the population. PMID:19224585

  6. QualitySNPng: a user-friendly SNP detection and visualization tool.

    PubMed

    Nijveen, Harm; van Kaauwen, Martijn; Esselink, Danny G; Hoegen, Brechtje; Vosman, Ben

    2013-07-01

    QualitySNPng is a new software tool for the detection and interactive visualization of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). It uses a haplotype-based strategy to identify reliable SNPs; it is optimized for the analysis of current RNA-seq data; but it can also be used on genomic DNA sequences derived from next-generation sequencing experiments. QualitySNPng does not require a sequenced reference genome and delivers reliable SNPs for di- as well as polyploid species. The tool features a user-friendly interface, multiple filtering options to handle typical sequencing errors, support for SAM and ACE files and interactive visualization. QualitySNPng produces high-quality SNP information that can be used directly in genotyping by sequencing approaches for application in QTL and genome-wide association mapping as well as to populate SNP arrays. The software can be used as a stand-alone application with a graphical user interface or as part of a pipeline system like Galaxy. Versions for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux, as well as the source code, are available from http://www.bioinformatics.nl/QualitySNPng. PMID:23632165

  7. Assigning linkage haplotypes from parent and progeny genotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Nejati-Javaremi, A.; Smith, C.

    1996-04-01

    Given the genotypes of parents and progeny, their haplotypes over several or many linked loci can be easily assigned by listing the allele type at each locus along the haplotype known to be from each parent. Only a small number (5-10) of progeny per family is usually needed to assign the parental and progeny haplotypes. Any gaps left in the haplotypes may be filled in from the assigned haplotypes of relatives. The process is facilitated by having multiple alleles at the loci and by using more linked loci in the haplotype and with more progeny from the mating. Crossover haplotypes in the progeny can be identified by their being unique or uncommon, and the crossover point can often be detected if the locus linkage map order is known. The haplotyping method applies to outbreeding populations in plants, animals, and man, as well as to traditional experimental crosses of inbred lines. The method also applies to half-sib families, whether the genotype of the mates are known or unknown. The haplotyping procedure is already used in linkage analysis but does not seem to have been published. It should be useful in teaching and in genetic applications of haplotypes. 15 refs., 5 tabs.

  8. Genotypes and haplotypes of the methyl-CpG-binding domain 2 modify breast cancer risk dependent upon menopausal status

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong; Brown, Heather N; Zhang, Yawei; Holford, Theodore R; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2005-01-01

    Introduction MBD2, the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD)2, is a major methylation related gene and functions as a transcriptional repressor that can specifically bind to the methylated regions of other genes. MBD2 may also mediate gene activation because of its potential DNA demethylase activity. The present case-control study investigated associations between two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MBD2 gene and breast cancer risk. Methods DNA samples from 393 Caucasian patients with breast cancer (cases) and 436 matched control individuals, collected in a recently completed breast cancer case–control study conducted in Connecticut, were included in the study. Because no coding SNPs were found in the MBD2 gene, one SNP in the noncoding exon (rs1259938) and another in the intron 3 (rs609791) were genotyped. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to estimate cancer risk associated with the variant genotypes and the reconstructed haplotypes. Results The variant genotypes at both SNP loci were significantly associated with reduced risk among premenopausal women (OR = 0.41 for rs1259938; OR = 0.54 for rs609791). Further haplotype analyses showed that the two rare haplotypes (A-C and A-G) were significantly associated with reduced breast cancer risk (OR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.20–0.83 for A-C; OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.26–0.84 for A-G) in premenopausal women. No significant associations were detected in the postmenopausal women and the whole population. Conclusion Our results demonstrate a role for the MBD2 gene in breast carcinogenesis in premenopausal women. These findings suggest that genetic variations in methylation related genes may potentially serve as a biomarker in risk estimates for breast cancer. PMID:16168120

  9. Enhancing the mathematical properties of new haplotype homozygosity statistics for the detection of selective sweeps.

    PubMed

    Garud, Nandita R; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2015-06-01

    Soft selective sweeps represent an important form of adaptation in which multiple haplotypes bearing adaptive alleles rise to high frequency. Most statistical methods for detecting selective sweeps from genetic polymorphism data, however, have focused on identifying hard selective sweeps in which a favored allele appears on a single haplotypic background; these methods might be underpowered to detect soft sweeps. Among exceptions is the set of haplotype homozygosity statistics introduced for the detection of soft sweeps by Garud et al. (2015). These statistics, examining frequencies of multiple haplotypes in relation to each other, include H12, a statistic designed to identify both hard and soft selective sweeps, and H2/H1, a statistic that conditional on high H12 values seeks to distinguish between hard and soft sweeps. A challenge in the use of H2/H1 is that its range depends on the associated value of H12, so that equal H2/H1 values might provide different levels of support for a soft sweep model at different values of H12. Here, we enhance the H12 and H2/H1 haplotype homozygosity statistics for selective sweep detection by deriving the upper bound on H2/H1 as a function of H12, thereby generating a statistic that normalizes H2/H1 to lie between 0 and 1. Through a reanalysis of resequencing data from inbred lines of Drosophila, we show that the enhanced statistic both strengthens interpretations obtained with the unnormalized statistic and leads to empirical insights that are less readily apparent without the normalization. PMID:25891325

  10. Disclosing the Genetic Structure of Brazil through Analysis of Male Lineages with Highly Discriminating Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Palha, Teresinha; Gusmão, Leonor; Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Elzemar; Guerreiro, João Farias; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea; Santos, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    In a large variety of genetic studies, probabilistic inferences are made based on information available in population databases. The accuracy of the estimates based on population samples are highly dependent on the number of chromosomes being analyzed as well as the correct representation of the reference population. For frequency calculations the size of a database is especially critical for haploid markers, and for countries with complex admixture histories it is important to assess possible substructure effects that can influence the coverage of the database. Aiming to establish a representative Brazilian population database for haplotypes based on 23 Y chromosome STRs, more than 2,500 Y chromosomes belonging to Brazilian, European and African populations were analyzed. No matter the differences in the colonization history of the five geopolitical regions that currently exist in Brazil, for the Y chromosome haplotypes of the 23 studied Y-STRs, a lack of genetic heterogeneity was found, together with a predominance of European male lineages in all regions of the country. Therefore, if we do not consider the diverse Native American or Afro-descendent isolates, which are spread through the country, a single Y chromosome haplotype frequency database will adequately represent the urban populations in Brazil. In comparison to the most commonly studied group of 17 Y-STRs, the 23 markers included in this work allowed a high discrimination capacity between haplotypes from non-related individuals within a population and also increased the capacity to discriminate between paternal relatives. Nevertheless, the expected haplotype mutation rate is still not enough to distinguish the Y chromosome profiles of paternally related individuals. Indeed, even for rapidly mutating Y-STRs, a very large number of markers will be necessary to differentiate male lineages from paternal relatives. PMID:22808085

  11. Distribution of HLA class II alleles and haplotypes in insulin-dependent Moroccan diabetics.

    PubMed

    Izaabel, H; Garchon, H J; Beaurain, G; Biga, M; Akhayat, O; Bach, J F; Caillat-Zucman, S

    1996-09-01

    HLA class II polymorphism in Moroccan IDDM patients has not been investigated so far. In this study, HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 allele and haplotype frequencies were analyzed in 125 unrelated Moroccan IDDM patients and 93 unrelated healthy controls, all originating from the Souss region and mostly of Berber origin. Some common features with other Caucasian groups were observed, in particular, a predisposing effect of the DRB1*03-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 and DRB1*04-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 alleles or allelic combinations. The Moroccan IDDM group also presented with more specific characteristics. Among DRB1*04 subtypes, DRB1*0405 was associated with susceptibility to and DRB1*0406 with protection from the disease. The haplotype and the relative predispositional effect (RPE) analyses indicated that the DRB1*08-DQA1*0401-DQB1*0402 haplotype was also associated with susceptibility to IDDM. Interestingly, the DRB1*09-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0201 haplotype, completely absent from the control group and very rare in North African populations, was observed in 7.2% of the Moroccan diabetics. Conversely, the DRB1*07-DQA1*0201-DQB1*0201 and DRB1*15-DQA1*0102-DQB1*0602 haplotypes were associated with protection from IDDM. Finally, we observed an age-dependent genetic heterogeneity of IDDM, the frequencies of predisposing alleles being higher and those of protective alleles lower in childhood- than in adult-onset diabetics. Our data on Moroccan diabetics, together with data on European and Northern Mediterranean patients, suggest a gradient of various HLA class II predisposing and protective markers that link these populations. PMID:8872168

  12. A Bayesian Framework for SNP Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Havre, Susan L.; Payne, Deborah A.

    2005-07-01

    Current proteomics techniques, such as mass spectrometry, focus on protein identification, usually ignoring most types of modifications beyond post-translational modifications, with the assumption that only a small number of peptides have to be matched to a protein for a positive identification. However, not all proteins are being identified with current techniques and improved methods to locate points of mutation are becoming a necessity. In the case when single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are observed, brute force is the most common method to locate them, quickly becoming computationally unattractive as the size of the database associated with the model organism grows. We have developed a Bayesian model for SNPs, BSNP, incorporating evolutionary information at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels. Formulating SNPs as a Bayesian inference problem allows probabilities of interest to be easily obtained, for example the probability of a specific SNP or specific type of mutation over a gene or entire genome. Three SNP databases were observed in the evaluation of the BSNP model; the first SNP database is a disease specific gene in human, hemoglobin, the second is also a disease specific gene in human, p53, and the third is a more general SNP database for multiple genes in mouse. We validate that the BSNP model assigns higher posterior probabilities to the SNPs defined in all three separate databases than can be attributed to chance under specific evolutionary information, for example the amino acid model described by Majewski and Ott in conjunction with either the four-parameter nucleotide model by Bulmer or seven-parameter nucleotide model by Majewski and Ott.

  13. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Haplotypes of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 in Uterine Cervical Carcinogenesis in Taiwanese Women.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Hung; Yang, Shun-Fa; Liu, Yu-Fan; Ko, Jiunn-Liang; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Wu, Tzu-Fan; Wang, Po-Hui

    2016-03-01

    The association of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) genetic polymorphisms with uterine cervical carcinogenesis has seldom been reported. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes of ICAM-1 with cervical tumorigenesis in Taiwanese women. Four hundred forty four women, including 91 with cervical invasive cancer, 63 with precancerous lesions, and 290 normal controls, were recruited. The genotypic distribution of 4 SNPs of ICAM-1, rs5498 (A1548G), rs5491 (K56M), rs281432 (C8823G), and rs3093030 (C-286T) was determined using real-time polymerase chain reactions and genotyping. Compared to homozygous wild CC, heterozygous CG, homozygous mutant GG, or genotypes with CG/GG display increased risks or a tendency of precancerous lesions or invasive cancer with strong power in rs281432. The homozygotic mutant alleles TT in rs3093030 and homozygotic mutant alleles GG in rs5498 were associated with a higher risk of invasive cancer and precancerous lesions, respectively, but with lower power. The CG/TA/TG haplotypes of ICAM-1 SNPs rs3093030 and rs5498 exhibited a tendency to increase susceptibility to precancerous lesions and invasive cancer. In conclusion, Taiwanese women with ICAM-1 SNP rs281432 and haplotypes CG/TA/TG of rs3093030 and rs5498 are associated with uterine cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:26377999

  14. Vitis Phylogenomics: Hybridization Intensities from a SNP Array Outperform Genotype Calls

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Allison J.; Matasci, Naim; Schwaninger, Heidi; Aradhya, Mallikarjuna K.; Prins, Bernard; Zhong, Gan-Yuan; Simon, Charles; Buckler, Edward S.; Myles, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Understanding relationships among species is a fundamental goal of evolutionary biology. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified through next generation sequencing and related technologies enable phylogeny reconstruction by providing unprecedented numbers of characters for analysis. One approach to SNP-based phylogeny reconstruction is to identify SNPs in a subset of individuals, and then to compile SNPs on an array that can be used to genotype additional samples at hundreds or thousands of sites simultaneously. Although powerful and efficient, this method is subject to ascertainment bias because applying variation discovered in a representative subset to a larger sample favors identification of SNPs with high minor allele frequencies and introduces bias against rare alleles. Here, we demonstrate that the use of hybridization intensity data, rather than genotype calls, reduces the effects of ascertainment bias. Whereas traditional SNP calls assess known variants based on diversity housed in the discovery panel, hybridization intensity data survey variation in the broader sample pool, regardless of whether those variants are present in the initial SNP discovery process. We apply SNP genotype and hybridization intensity data derived from the Vitis9kSNP array developed for grape to show the effects of ascertainment bias and to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among Vitis species. We demonstrate that phylogenies constructed using hybridization intensities suffer less from the distorting effects of ascertainment bias, and are thus more accurate than phylogenies based on genotype calls. Moreover, we reconstruct the phylogeny of the genus Vitis using hybridization data, show that North American subgenus Vitis species are monophyletic, and resolve several previously poorly known relationships among North American species. This study builds on earlier work that applied the Vitis9kSNP array to evolutionary questions within Vitis vinifera and has general implications for addressing ascertainment bias in array-enabled phylogeny reconstruction. PMID:24236035

  15. SERPINE2 haplotype as a risk factor for panlobular type of emphysema

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background SERPINE2 (serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E, member 2) has previously been identified as a positional candidate gene for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and has subsequently been associated to COPD and emphysema in several populations. We aimed to further examine the role of SERPINE2 polymorphisms in the development of pulmonary emphysema and different emphysema subtypes. Methods Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in SERPINE2 were analyzed from 951 clinically and radiologically examined Finnish construction workers. The genotype and haplotype data was compared to different emphysematous signs confirmed with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), diffusing capacity (DLCO), and specific diffusing capacity (DLCO/VA). Results Three of the studied SERPINE2 SNPs (rs729631, rs975278, and rs6748795) were found to be in tight linkage disequilibrium. Therefore, only one of these SNPs (rs729631) was included in the subsequent analyses, in addition to the rs840088 SNP which was in moderate linkage with the other three studied SNPs. The rs729631 SNP showed a significant association with panlobular emphysema (p = 0.003). In further analysis, the variant allele of the rs729631 SNP was found to pose over two-fold risk (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.05-4.72) for overall panlobular changes and over four-fold risk (OR 4.37, 95% CI 1.61-11.86) for pathological panlobular changes. A haplotype consisting of variant alleles of both rs729631 and rs840088 SNPs was found to pose an almost four-fold risk for overall panlobular (OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.56-8.90) and subnormal (OR 3.98, 95% CI 1.55-10.20) emphysema. Conclusions Our results support the previously found association between SERPINE2 polymorphisms and pulmonary emphysema. As a novel finding, our study suggests that the SERPINE2 gene may in particular be involved in the development of panlobular changes, i.e., the same type of changes that are involved in alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) -deficiency. PMID:22145704

  16. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms within the mtDNA genome of the domestic dog to discriminate individuals with common HVI haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Imes, Donna L; Wictum, Elizabeth J; Allard, Marc W; Sacks, Benjamin N

    2012-09-01

    We sequenced the entire ∼16 kb canine mitochondrial genome (mtGenome) of 100 unrelated domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) and compared these to 246 published sequences to assess hypervariable region I (HVI) haplotype frequencies. We then used all available sequences to identify informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) outside of the control region for use in further resolving mtDNA haplotypes corresponding to common HVI haplotypes. Haplotype frequencies in our data set were highly correlated with previous ones (e.g., F(ST)=0.02, r=0.90), suggesting the total data set reasonably reflected the broader dog population. A total of 128 HVI haplotypes was represented. The 10 most common HVI haplotypes (n=184 dogs) represented 53.3% of the sample. We identified a total 71 SNPs in the mtGenomes (external to the control region) that resolved the 10 most common HVI haplotypes into 63 mtGenome subhaplotypes. The random match probability of the dataset based solely on the HVI sequence was 4%, whereas the random match probability of the mtGenome subhaplotypes was <1%. Thus, the panel of 71 SNPs identified in this study represents a useful forensic tool to further resolve the identity of individual dogs from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). PMID:22436122

  17. Development and evaluation of the first high-throughput SNP array for common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) but, as yet, no high-throughput genotyping platform is available for this species. C. carpio is an important aquaculture species that accounts for nearly 14% of freshwater aquaculture production worldwide. We have developed an array for C. carpio with 250,000 SNPs and evaluated its performance using samples from various strains of C. carpio. Results The SNPs used on the array were selected from two resources: the transcribed sequences from RNA-seq data of four strains of C. carpio, and the genome re-sequencing data of five strains of C. carpio. The 250,000 SNPs on the resulting array are distributed evenly across the reference C.carpio genome with an average spacing of 6.6 kb. To evaluate the SNP array, 1,072 C. carpio samples were collected and tested. Of the 250,000 SNPs on the array, 185,150 (74.06%) were found to be polymorphic sites. Genotyping accuracy was checked using genotyping data from a group of full-siblings and their parents, and over 99.8% of the qualified SNPs were found to be reliable. Analysis of the linkage disequilibrium on all samples and on three domestic C.carpio strains revealed that the latter had the longer haplotype blocks. We also evaluated our SNP array on 80 samples from eight species related to C. carpio, with from 53,526 to 71,984 polymorphic SNPs. An identity by state analysis divided all the samples into three clusters; most of the C. carpio strains formed the largest cluster. Conclusions The Carp SNP array described here is the first high-throughput genotyping platform for C. carpio. Our evaluation of this array indicates that it will be valuable for farmed carp and for genetic and population biology studies in C. carpio and related species. PMID:24762296

  18. Allele-Specific Amplification in Cancer Revealed by SNP Array Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Amplification, deletion, and loss of heterozygosity of genomic DNA are hallmarks of cancer. In recent years a variety of studies have emerged measuring total chromosomal copy number at increasingly high resolution. Similarly, loss-of-heterozygosity events have been finely mapped using high-throughput genotyping technologies. We have developed a probe-level allele-specific quantitation procedure that extracts both copy number and allelotype information from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data to arrive at allele-specific copy number across the genome. Our approach applies an expectation-maximization algorithm to a model derived from a novel classification of SNP array probes. This method is the first to our knowledge that is able to (a) determine the generalized genotype of aberrant samples at each SNP site (e.g., CCCCT at an amplified site), and (b) infer the copy number of each parental chromosome across the genome. With this method, we are able to determine not just where amplifications and deletions occur, but also the haplotype of the region being amplified or deleted. The merit of our model and general approach is demonstrated by very precise genotyping of normal samples, and our allele-specific copy number inferences are validated using PCR experiments. Applying our method to a collection of lung cancer samples, we are able to conclude that amplification is essentially monoallelic, as would be expected under the mechanisms currently believed responsible for gene amplification. This suggests that a specific parental chromosome may be targeted for amplification, whether because of germ line or somatic variation. An R software package containing the methods described in this paper is freely available at http://genome.dfci.harvard.edu/~tlaframb/PLASQ. PMID:16322765

  19. Wide distribution and altitude correlation of an archaic high-altitude-adaptive EPAS1 haplotype in the Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Hackinger, Sophie; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Xue, Yali; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Asan; van Driem, George; Jobling, Mark A; de Knijff, Peter; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Ayub, Qasim

    2016-04-01

    High-altitude adaptation in Tibetans is influenced by introgression of a 32.7-kb haplotype from the Denisovans, an extinct branch of archaic humans, lying within the endothelial PAS domain protein 1 (EPAS1), and has also been reported in Sherpa. We genotyped 19 variants in this genomic region in 1507 Eurasian individuals, including 1188 from Bhutan and Nepal residing at altitudes between 86 and 4550 m above sea level. Derived alleles for five SNPs characterizing the core Denisovan haplotype (AGGAA) were present at high frequency not only in Tibetans and Sherpa, but also among many populations from the Himalayas, showing a significant correlation with altitude (Spearman's correlation coefficient = 0.75, p value 3.9 × 10(-11)). Seven East- and South-Asian 1000 Genomes Project individuals shared the Denisovan haplotype extending beyond the 32-kb region, enabling us to refine the haplotype structure and identify a candidate regulatory variant (rs370299814) that might be interacting in an additive manner with the derived G allele of rs150877473, the variant previously associated with high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans. Denisovan-derived alleles were also observed at frequencies of 3-14 % in the 1000 Genomes Project African samples. The closest African haplotype is, however, separated from the Asian high-altitude haplotype by 22 mutations whereas only three mutations, including rs150877473, separate the Asians from the Denisovan, consistent with distant shared ancestry for African and Asian haplotypes and Denisovan adaptive introgression. PMID:26883865

  20. Identification of haplotypes in promoter of prolactin gene and their effect on egg production and quality traits in layer chicken.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, T K; Chatterjee, R N; Sharma, R P; Niranjan, M; Rajkumar, U; Reddy, B L N

    2011-04-01

    Expression of prolactin hormone is a crucial event in regulating egg production in chickens for which promoter plays the vital role in expressing the prolactin gene. The objective of the present study was to identify haplotypes in the prolactin promoter and their effects on egg production and egg quality traits in White Leghorn chicken. Single stranded conformation polymorphism followed by sequencing was conducted to explore polymorphism at 561 bp promoter of prolactin gene. The effect of haplotype combinations on egg production and quality traits were estimated following general linear model technique. The expression of prolactin by different haplogroups was quantified by qPCR. Total 28 haplotypes were found in White Leghorn chicken of which h1 haplotype possessed the highest frequency of 0.46 and h8, h14, h16, h25, h26, and h28 haplotypes had the lowest frequency (0.1%). The egg production up to 52 and 64 weeks of age were found to be significantly (p < 0.05) associated with haplotype combinations where the highest 52-w (52 weeks) egg production was found in animals with h1/h22 combination and the lowest production was observed in the birds with h1/h2 haplogroup. The haplotype combinations had the significant effect (p < 0.05) on Haugh Unit, yolk index and albumen weight at 40 weeks of age; Haugh Unit and albumen weight at 52 weeks of age and Haugh unit, yolk weight and yolk percentage at 64 weeks of age. The prolactin expression in h1/h22 birds was found to be the lowest and in h1/h5 birds to be the highest. The prolactin expression showed significant effect on 52-w egg production and albumin weight at 52 weeks age. In conclusion, it may be stated that the prolactin promoter was highly polymorphic and had the significant association with egg production and quality traits in White Leghorn chicken. PMID:21500109

  1. Generation of SNP datasets for orangutan population genomics using improved reduced-representation sequencing and direct comparisons of SNP calling algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-throughput sequencing has opened up exciting possibilities in population and conservation genetics by enabling the assessment of genetic variation at genome-wide scales. One approach to reduce genome complexity, i.e. investigating only parts of the genome, is reduced-representation library (RRL) sequencing. Like similar approaches, RRL sequencing reduces ascertainment bias due to simultaneous discovery and genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and does not require reference genomes. Yet, generating such datasets remains challenging due to laboratory and bioinformatical issues. In the laboratory, current protocols require improvements with regards to sequencing homologous fragments to reduce the number of missing genotypes. From the bioinformatical perspective, the reliance of most studies on a single SNP caller disregards the possibility that different algorithms may produce disparate SNP datasets. Results We present an improved RRL (iRRL) protocol that maximizes the generation of homologous DNA sequences, thus achieving improved genotyping-by-sequencing efficiency. Our modifications facilitate generation of single-sample libraries, enabling individual genotype assignments instead of pooled-sample analysis. We sequenced ~1% of the orangutan genome with 41-fold median coverage in 31 wild-born individuals from two populations. SNPs and genotypes were called using three different algorithms. We obtained substantially different SNP datasets depending on the SNP caller. Genotype validations revealed that the Unified Genotyper of the Genome Analysis Toolkit and SAMtools performed significantly better than a caller from CLC Genomics Workbench (CLC). Of all conflicting genotype calls, CLC was only correct in 17% of the cases. Furthermore, conflicting genotypes between two algorithms showed a systematic bias in that one caller almost exclusively assigned heterozygotes, while the other one almost exclusively assigned homozygotes. Conclusions Our enhanced iRRL approach greatly facilitates genotyping-by-sequencing and thus direct estimates of allele frequencies. Our direct comparison of three commonly used SNP callers emphasizes the need to question the accuracy of SNP and genotype calling, as we obtained considerably different SNP datasets depending on caller algorithms, sequencing depths and filtering criteria. These differences affected scans for signatures of natural selection, but will also exert undue influences on demographic inferences. This study presents the first effort to generate a population genomic dataset for wild-born orangutans with known population provenance. PMID:24405840

  2. Association between vitamin D receptor polymorphisms and haplotypes with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    SALIMI, SAEEDEH; FARAJIAN-MASHHADI, FARZANEH; ALAVI-NAINI, ROYA; TALEBIAN, GOLBARG; NAROOIE-NEJAD, MEHRNAZ

    2015-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is an important factor in activating immune response in different infectious diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between the VDR gene polymorphisms and pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). The case control study was performed on 120 PTB patients and 131 healthy controls. Genetic analysis was performed by polymerase chain reaction and the restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The VDR Fok1 Ff genotype was associated with TB and the risk of PTB was two times higher in individuals with the Ff genotype. A higher frequency of f allele was observed in PTB patients and therefore, the f allele may be a risk factor for PTB susceptibility. There were no associations between the Taq1 and Bsm1 polymorphisms and PTB. In addition, haplotype analysis showed that the f-T-B and f-t-b haplotypes (Fok1, Taq1 and Bsm1) may have the potential to increase PTB susceptibility. In conclusion, the Ff genotype and f allele of the VDR Fok1 polymorphism were associated with PTB susceptibility. In addition, the f-T-B and f-t-b haplotypes may be the susceptible haplotypes for PTB. PMID:26075071

  3. Haplotype test reveals departure from neutrality in a segment of the white gene of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, D.A.; Stephan, W.

    1995-12-01

    Restriction map studies previously revealed extensive linkage disequilibria in the transcriptional unit of the white locus in natural Drosophila melanogaster populations. To understand the causes of these disequilibria, we sequenced a 4722-bp region of the white gene from 15 lines of D. melanogaster and 1 line of Drosophila simulans. Statistical tests applied to the entire 4722-bp region do not reject neutrality. In contrast, a test for high-frequency haplotypes ({open_quotes}Haplotype test{close_quotes}) revealed an 834-bp segment, encompassing the 3{prime} end of intron 1 to the 3{prime} end of intron 2, in which the structure of variation deviates significantly from the predictions of a neutral equilibrium model. The variants in this 834-bp segment segregate as single haplotype blocks. We propose that these unusually large haplotype blocks are due to positive selection on polymorphisms within the white gene, including a replacement polymorphism, Arg{yields}Leu, within this segment. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. HLA class II linkage disequilibrium and haplotype evolution in the Cayapa Indians of Ecuador

    SciTech Connect

    Trachtenberg, E.A.; Erlich, H.A.; Klitz, W.

    1995-08-01

    DNA-based typing of the HLA class II loci in a sample of the Cayapa Indians of Ecuador reveals several lines of evidence that selection has operated to maintain and to diversify the existing level of polymorphism in the class II region. As has been noticed for other Native American groups, the overall level of polymorphism at the DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, and DPB1 loci is reduced relative to that found in other human populations. Nonetheless, the relative eveness in the distribution of allele frequencies at each of the four loci points to the role of balancing selection in the maintenance of the polymorphism. The DQA1 and DQB1 loci, in particular, have near-maximum departures from the neutrality model, which suggests that balancing selection has been especially strong in these cases. Several novel DQA1-DQB1 haplotypes and the discovery of a new DRB1 allele demonstrate an evolutionary tendency favoring the diversification of class II alleles and haplotypes. The recombination interval between the centromeric DPB1 locus and the other class II loci will, in the absence of other forces such as selection, reduce disequilibrium across this region. However, nearly all common alleles were found to be part of DR-DP haplotypes in strong disequilibrium, consistent with the recent action of selection acting on these haplotypes in the Cayapa. 50 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Patterns of haplotypes for 92 cystic fibrosis mutations: Variability, association and recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Morral, N.; Llevadot, R.; Estivill, X.

    1994-09-01

    Most CFTR mutations are very uncommon among the cystic fibrosis population, with frequencies of less than 1%, and many are found only in specific areas. We have analyzed 92 CF mutations for several markers (4 microsatellites and 3 other polymorphisms) scattered in the CFTR gene. Haplotypes associated with these mutations can be used as a framework in the screening of chromosomes carrying unknown mutations. The association between mutation and haplotype reduces the number of mutations it is necessary to search for to a maximum of 16 for the same haplotype. Only mutations {triangle}F508, G542X and N1303K are associated with more than one haplotype as a result of slippage at more than one microsatellite loci, suggesting that these three are the most ancient CF mutations. Recurrence has been found for at least 7 mutations: H199Y, R347P, L558S, R553X, 2184insA, 3272-26A{r_arrow}G, 3849+10kbC{r_arrow}T and R1162X. Also microsatellite analysis of chromosomes of several ethnic origins (Czech, Italian, Russian, Slovac and Spanish) suggested that possibility of three or more independent origins for mutations R334W, R347P, R1162X, and 3849+10kbC{r_arrow}T, which was confirmed by analysis of markers flanking these mutations.

  6. HLA class II linkage disequilibrium and haplotype evolution in the Cayapa Indians of Ecuador.

    PubMed Central

    Trachtenberg, E A; Erlich, H A; Rickards, O; DeStefano, G F; Klitz, W

    1995-01-01

    DNA-based typing of the HLA class II loci in a sample of the Cayapa Indians of Ecuador reveals several lines of evidence that selection has operated to maintain and to diversify the existing level of polymorphism in the class II region. As has been noticed for other Native American groups, the overall level of polymorphism at the DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, and DPB1 loci is reduced relative to that found in other human populations. Nonetheless, the relative evenness in the distribution of allele frequencies at each of the four loci points to the role of balancing selection in the maintenance of the polymorphism. The DQA1 and DQB1 loci, in particular, have near-maximum departures from the neutrality model, which suggests that balancing selection has been especially strong in these cases. Several novel DQA1-DQB1 haplotypes and the discovery of a new DRB1 allele demonstrate an evolutionary tendency favoring the diversification of class II alleles and haplotypes. The recombination interval between the centromeric DPB1 locus and the other class II loci will, in the absence of other forces such as selection, reduce disequilibrium across this region. However, nearly all common alleles were found to be part of DR-DP haplotypes in strong disequilibrium, consistent with the recent action of selection acting on these haplotypes in the Cayapa. PMID:7668268

  7. Identification of the ancestral haplotype for apolipoprotein B suggests an African origin of Homo sapiens sapiens and traces their subsequent migration to Europe and the Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Rapacz, J.; Hasler-Rapacz, J.O. ); Chen, L.; Wu, Mingjiuan; Schumaker, V.N. ); Butler-Brunner, E.; Butler, R. )

    1991-02-15

    The probable ancestral haplotype for human apolipoprotein B (apoB) has been identified through immunological analysis of chimpanzee and gorilla serum and sequence analysis of their DNA. Moreover, the frequency of this ancestral apoB haplotype among different human populations provides strong support for the African origin of Homo sapiens sapiens and their subsequent migration from Africa to Europe and to the Pacific. The approach used here for the identification of the ancestral human apoB haplotype is likely to be applicable to many other genes.

  8. Allele diversity for abiotic stress responsive candidate genes in chickpea reference set using gene based SNP markers

    PubMed Central

    Roorkiwal, Manish; Nayak, Spurthi N.; Thudi, Mahendar; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Brunel, Dominique; Mournet, Pierre; This, Dominique; Sharma, Prakash C.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume crop for the semi-arid regions, however, its productivity is adversely affected by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Identification of candidate genes associated with abiotic stress response will help breeding efforts aiming to enhance its productivity. With this objective, 10 abiotic stress responsive candidate genes were selected on the basis of prior knowledge of this complex trait. These 10 genes were subjected to allele specific sequencing across a chickpea reference set comprising 300 genotypes including 211 genotypes of chickpea mini core collection. A total of 1.3 Mbp sequence data were generated. Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) revealed 79 SNPs and 41 indels in nine genes while the CAP2 gene was found to be conserved across all the genotypes. Among 10 candidate genes, the maximum number of SNPs (34) was observed in abscisic acid stress and ripening (ASR) gene including 22 transitions, 11 transversions and one tri-allelic SNP. Nucleotide diversity varied from 0.0004 to 0.0029 while polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.01 (AKIN gene) to 0.43 (CAP2 promoter). Haplotype analysis revealed that alleles were represented by more than two haplotype blocks, except alleles of the CAP2 and sucrose synthase (SuSy) gene, where only one haplotype was identified. These genes can be used for association analysis and if validated, may be useful for enhancing abiotic stress, including drought tolerance, through molecular breeding. PMID:24926299

  9. Possible Positive Selection for an Arsenic-Protective Haplotype in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Schlebusch, Carina M.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Vahter, Marie; Engström, Karin; Tito, Raúl Y.; Obregón-Tito, Alexandra J.; Huerta, Doris; Polo, Susan I.; Medina, Ángel C.; Brutsaert, Tom D.; Concha, Gabriela; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    Background: Arsenic in drinking water causes severe health effects. Indigenous people in the South American Andes have likely lived with arsenic-contaminated drinking water for thousands of years. Inhabitants of San Antonio de los Cobres (SAC) in the Argentinean highlands generally carry an AS3MT (the major arsenic-metabolizing gene) haplotype associated with reduced health risks due to rapid arsenic excretion and lower urinary fraction of the monomethylated metabolite. Objectives: We hypothesized an adaptation to high-arsenic living conditions via a possible positive selection for protective AS3MT variants and compared AS3MT haplotype frequencies among different indigenous groups. Methods: Indigenous groups we evaluated were a) inhabitants of SAC and villages near Salta in northern Argentina (n = 346), b) three Native American populations from the Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP; n = 25), and c) five Peruvian populations (n = 97). The last two groups have presumably lower historical exposure to arsenic. Results: We found a significantly higher frequency of the protective AS3MT haplotype in the SAC population (68.7%) compared with the HGDP (14.3%, p < 0.001, Fisher exact test) and Peruvian (50.5%, p < 0.001) populations. Genome-wide microsatellite (n = 671) analysis showed no detectable level of population structure between SAC and Peruvian populations (measure of population differentiation FST = 0.006) and low levels of structure between SAC and HGDP populations (FST < 0.055 for all pairs of populations compared). Conclusions: Because population stratification seems unlikely to explain the differences in AS3MT haplotype frequencies, our data raise the possibility that, during a few thousand years, natural selection for tolerance to the environmental stressor arsenic may have increased the frequency of protective variants of AS3MT. Further studies are needed to investigate this hypothesis. PMID:23070617

  10. SNP sets and reading ability: testing confirmation of a 10-SNP set in a population sample.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Michelle; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Bates, Timothy C

    2011-06-01

    A set of 10 SNPs associated with reading ability in 7-year-olds was reported based on initial pooled analyses of 100K SNP chip data, with follow-up testing stages using pooling and individual testing. Here we examine this association in an adolescent population sample of Australian twins and siblings (N = 1177) aged 12 to 25 years. One (rs1842129) of the 10 SNPs approached significance (P = .05) but no support was found for the remaining 9 SNPs or the SNP set itself. Results indicate that these SNPs are not associated with reading ability in an Australian population. The results are interpreted as supporting use of much larger SNP sets in common disorders where effects are small. PMID:21623652

  11. Distribution of HLA haplotypes across Japanese Archipelago: similarity, difference and admixture.

    PubMed

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Inoue, Ituro

    2015-11-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region is the most polymorphic region in the human genome. The polymorphic nature of the HLA region is thought to have been shaped from balancing selection. The complex migration events during the Out-of-Africa expansion have influenced geographic patterns of HLA allele frequencies and diversities across present-day human populations. Differences in the HLA allele frequency may contribute geographic differences in the susceptibility to many diseases, such as infectious, autoimmune and metabolic diseases. Here we briefly reviewed characteristics of frequency distribution of HLA alleles and haplotypes in Japanese population. A large part of HLA alleles and haplotypes that are common in Japanese are shared with neighboring Asian populations. The differentiations in HLA alleles and haplotypes across Japanese regional populations may provide clues to model for peopling of Japanese Archipelago and for design of genetic association studies. Finally, we introduce recent topics that new HLA alleles derived from ancient admixtures with Neanderthals and Denisovans are thought to have played an important role in the adaptation of modern humans to local pathogens during Out-of-Africa expansion. PMID:26202576

  12. Bayesian Modeling of Haplotype Effects in Multiparent Populations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Wang, Wei; Valdar, William

    2014-01-01

    A general Bayesian model, Diploffect, is described for estimating the effects of founder haplotypes at quantitative trait loci (QTL) detected in multiparental genetic populations; such populations include the Collaborative Cross (CC), Heterogeneous Socks (HS), and many others for which local genetic variation is well described by an underlying, usually probabilistically inferred, haplotype mosaic. Our aim is to provide a framework for coherent estimation of haplotype and diplotype (haplotype pair) effects that takes into account the following: uncertainty in haplotype composition for each individual; uncertainty arising from small sample sizes and infrequently observed haplotype combinations; possible effects of dominance (for noninbred subjects); genetic background; and that provides a means to incorporate data that may be incomplete or has a hierarchical structure. Using the results of a probabilistic haplotype reconstruction as prior information, we obtain posterior distributions at the QTL for both haplotype effects and haplotype composition. Two alternative computational approaches are supplied: a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler and a procedure based on importance sampling of integrated nested Laplace approximations. Using simulations of QTL in the incipient CC (pre-CC) and Northport HS populations, we compare the accuracy of Diploffect, approximations to it, and more commonly used approaches based on Haley–Knott regression, describing trade-offs between these methods. We also estimate effects for three QTL previously identified in those populations, obtaining posterior intervals that describe how the phenotype might be affected by diplotype substitutions at the modeled locus. PMID:25236455

  13. Genomic evolution in domestic cattle: ancestral haplotypes and healthy beef.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Joseph F; Steele, Edward J; Lester, Susan; Kalai, Oscar; Millman, John A; Wolrige, Lindsay; Bayard, Dominic; McLure, Craig; Dawkins, Roger L

    2011-05-01

    We have identified numerous Ancestral Haplotypes encoding a 14-Mb region of Bota C19. Three are frequent in Simmental, Angus and Wagyu and have been conserved since common progenitor populations. Others are more relevant to the differences between these 3 breeds including fat content and distribution in muscle. SREBF1 and Growth Hormone, which have been implicated in the production of healthy beef, are included within these haplotypes. However, we conclude that alleles at these 2 loci are less important than other sequences within the haplotypes. Identification of breeds and hybrids is improved by using haplotypes rather than individual alleles. PMID:21338665

  14. Bayesian modeling of haplotype effects in multiparent populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Wang, Wei; Valdar, William

    2014-09-01

    A general Bayesian model, Diploffect, is described for estimating the effects of founder haplotypes at quantitative trait loci (QTL) detected in multiparental genetic populations; such populations include the Collaborative Cross (CC), Heterogeneous Socks (HS), and many others for which local genetic variation is well described by an underlying, usually probabilistically inferred, haplotype mosaic. Our aim is to provide a framework for coherent estimation of haplotype and diplotype (haplotype pair) effects that takes into account the following: uncertainty in haplotype composition for each individual; uncertainty arising from small sample sizes and infrequently observed haplotype combinations; possible effects of dominance (for noninbred subjects); genetic background; and that provides a means to incorporate data that may be incomplete or has a hierarchical structure. Using the results of a probabilistic haplotype reconstruction as prior information, we obtain posterior distributions at the QTL for both haplotype effects and haplotype composition. Two alternative computational approaches are supplied: a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler and a procedure based on importance sampling of integrated nested Laplace approximations. Using simulations of QTL in the incipient CC (pre-CC) and Northport HS populations, we compare the accuracy of Diploffect, approximations to it, and more commonly used approaches based on Haley-Knott regression, describing trade-offs between these methods. We also estimate effects for three QTL previously identified in those populations, obtaining posterior intervals that describe how the phenotype might be affected by diplotype substitutions at the modeled locus. PMID:25236455

  15. A SNP Haplotype Associated with a gene resistant to Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. malvacearum in Upland Cotton (Gossyium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An F5 population of 285 families with each tracing back to a different F2 plant , derived from a cotton bacterial blight resistant line ‘DeltaOpal’ and a susceptible line ‘DP388’, was artificially inoculated with bacterial blight race 18 (Xanthomonas campestris pv. Malvacearum) to assay their resist...

  16. Hereditary tyrosinemia type I: strong association with haplotype 6 in French Canadians permits simple carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Demers, S. I.; Phaneuf, D.; Tanguay, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1), a severe inborn error of tyrosine catabolism, is caused by deficiency of the terminal enzyme, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH). The highest reported frequency of HT1 is in the French Canadian population, especially in the Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean region. Using human FAH cDNA probes, we have identified 10 haplotypes with TaqI, KpnI, RsaI, BglII, and MspI RFLPs in 118 normal chromosomes from the French Canadian population. Interestingly, in 29 HT1 children, a prevalent haplotype, haplotype 6, was found to be strongly associated with the disease, at a frequency of 90% of alleles, as compared with approximately 18% in 35 control individuals. This increased to 96% in the 24 patients originating from Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean. These results suggest that one or only a few prevailing mutations are responsible for most of the HT1 cases in Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean. Since most patients were found to be homozygous for a specific haplotype in this population, FAH RFLPs have permitted simple carrier detection in nine different informative HT1 families, with a confidence level of 99.9%. Heterozygosity rate values obtained from 52 carriers indicated that approximately 88% of families at risk from Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean are fully or partially informative. Prenatal diagnosis was also achieved in an American family. Analysis of 24 HT1 patients from nine countries gave a frequency of approximately 52% for haplotype 6, suggesting a relatively high association, worldwide, of HT1 with this haplotype. Images Figure 1 PMID:7913582

  17. Development of an Italian RM Y-STR haplotype database: Results of the 2013 GEFI collaborative exercise.

    PubMed

    Robino, C; Ralf, A; Pasino, S; De Marchi, M R; Ballantyne, K N; Barbaro, A; Bini, C; Carnevali, E; Casarino, L; Di Gaetano, C; Fabbri, M; Ferri, G; Giardina, E; Gonzalez, A; Matullo, G; Nutini, A L; Onofri, V; Piccinini, A; Piglionica, M; Ponzano, E; Previderè, C; Resta, N; Scarnicci, F; Seidita, G; Sorçaburu-Cigliero, S; Turrina, S; Verzeletti, A; Kayser, M

    2015-03-01

    Recently introduced rapidly mutating Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (RM Y-STR) loci, displaying a multiple-fold higher mutation rate relative to any other Y-STRs, including those conventionally used in forensic casework, have been demonstrated to improve the resolution of male lineage differentiation and to allow male relative separation usually impossible with standard Y-STRs. However, large and geographically-detailed frequency haplotype databases are required to estimate the statistical weight of RM Y-STR haplotype matches if observed in forensic casework. With this in mind, the Italian Working Group (GEFI) of the International Society for Forensic Genetics launched a collaborative exercise aimed at generating an Italian quality controlled forensic RM Y-STR haplotype database. Overall 1509 male individuals from 13 regional populations covering northern, central and southern areas of the Italian peninsula plus Sicily were collected, including both "rural" and "urban" samples classified according to population density in the sampling area. A subset of individuals was additionally genotyped for Y-STR loci included in the Yfiler and PowerPlex Y23 (PPY23) systems (75% and 62%, respectively), allowing the comparison of RM and conventional Y-STRs. Considering the whole set of 13 RM Y-STRs, 1501 unique haplotypes were observed among the 1509 sampled Italian men with a haplotype diversity of 0.999996, largely superior to Yfiler and PPY23 with 0.999914 and 0.999950, respectively. AMOVA indicated that 99.996% of the haplotype variation was within populations, confirming that genetic-geographic structure is almost undetected by RM Y-STRs. Haplotype sharing among regional Italian populations was not observed at all with the complete set of 13 RM Y-STRs. Haplotype sharing within Italian populations was very rare (0.27% non-unique haplotypes), and lower in urban (0.22%) than rural (0.29%) areas. Additionally, 422 father-son pairs were investigated, and 20.1% of them could be discriminated by the whole set of 13 RM Y-STRs, which was very close to the theoretically expected estimate of 19.5% given the mutation rates of the markers used. Results obtained from a high-coverage Italian haplotype dataset confirm on the regional scale the exceptional ability of RM Y-STRs to resolve male lineages previously observed globally, and attest the unsurpassed value of RM Y-STRs for male-relative differentiation purposes. PMID:25457630

  18. The mutated S1-haplotype in sour cherry has an altered S-haplotype-specific F-box protein gene.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Nathanael R; Ikeda, Kazuo; Tao, Ryutaro; Iezzoni, Amy F

    2006-01-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) is an outcrossing mechanism in flowering plants that is genetically controlled by 2 separate genes located at the highly polymorphic S-locus, termed S-haplotype. This study characterizes a pollen part mutant of the S(1)-haplotype present in sour cherry (Rosaceae, Prunus cerasus L.) that contributes to the loss of GSI. Inheritance of S-haplotypes from reciprocal interspecific crosses between the self-compatible sour cherry cultivar Ujfehértói Fürtös carrying the mutated S(1)-haplotype (S(1)'S(4)S(d)S(null)) and the self-incompatible sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) cultivars carrying the wild-type S(1)-haplotype revealed that the mutated S(1)-haplotype confers unilateral incompatibility with a functional pistil component and a nonfunctional pollen component. The altered sour cherry S(1)-haplotype pollen part mutant, termed S(1)', contains a 615-bp Ds-like element within the S(1)-haplotype-specific F-box protein gene (SFB(1)'). This insertion generates a premature in-frame stop codon that would result in a putative truncated SFB(1) containing only 75 of the 375 amino acids present in the wild-type SFB(1). S(1)' along with 2 other previously characterized Prunus S-haplotype mutants, S(f) and S(6m), illustrate that mobile element insertion is an evolutionary force contributing to the breakdown of GSI. PMID:16985081

  19. Integrated Genetic and Epigenetic Analysis Identifies Haplotype-Specific Methylation in the FTO Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Gareth A.; Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Akan, Pelin; Stupka, Elia; Down, Thomas A.; Prokopenko, Inga; Morison, Ian M.; Mill, Jonathan; Pidsley, Ruth; Deloukas, Panos; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Beck, Stephan; Hitman, Graham A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent multi-dimensional approaches to the study of complex disease have revealed powerful insights into how genetic and epigenetic factors may underlie their aetiopathogenesis. We examined genotype-epigenotype interactions in the context of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), focussing on known regions of genomic susceptibility. We assayed DNA methylation in 60 females, stratified according to disease susceptibility haplotype using previously identified association loci. CpG methylation was assessed using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation on a targeted array (MeDIP-chip) and absolute methylation values were estimated using a Bayesian algorithm (BATMAN). Absolute methylation levels were quantified across LD blocks, and we identified increased DNA methylation on the FTO obesity susceptibility haplotype, tagged by the rs8050136 risk allele A (p = 9.40×10−4, permutation p = 1.0×10−3). Further analysis across the 46 kb LD block using sliding windows localised the most significant difference to be within a 7.7 kb region (p = 1.13×10−7). Sequence level analysis, followed by pyrosequencing validation, revealed that the methylation difference was driven by the co-ordinated phase of CpG-creating SNPs across the risk haplotype. This 7.7 kb region of haplotype-specific methylation (HSM), encapsulates a Highly Conserved Non-Coding Element (HCNE) that has previously been validated as a long-range enhancer, supported by the histone H3K4me1 enhancer signature. This study demonstrates that integration of Genome-Wide Association (GWA) SNP and epigenomic DNA methylation data can identify potential novel genotype-epigenotype interactions within disease-associated loci, thus providing a novel route to aid unravelling common complex diseases. PMID:21124985

  20. Susceptible and protective associations of HLA DRB1*/DQB1* alleles and haplotypes with ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Murali, V; Rathika, C; Ramgopal, S; Padma Malini, R; Arun Kumar, M J; Neethi Arasu, V; Jeyaram Illiayaraja, K; Balakrishnan, K

    2016-06-01

    Stroke has emerged as the second commonest cause of mortality worldwide and is a major public health problem. For the first time, we present here the association of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*/DQB1* alleles and haplotypes with ischaemic stroke in South Indian patients. Ischaemic stroke (IS) cases and controls were genotyped for HLA-DRB1*/DQB1* alleles by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) method. The frequencies of HLA class II alleles such as DRB1*04, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*12, DRB1*13, DQB1*02 and DQB1*07 were high in IS patients than in the age- and gender-matched controls, suggesting that the individuals with these alleles are susceptible to ischaemic stroke in South India. The frequencies of alleles such as DRB1*03, DRB1*10, DRB1*14, DQB1*04 and DQB1*05 were less in IS cases than in the controls, suggesting a protective association. Haplotypes DRB1*04-DQB1*0301, DRB1*07-DQB1*02, DRB1*07-DQB1*0301, DRB1*11-DQB1*0301 and DRB1*13-DQB1*06 were found to be high in IS patients conferring susceptibility. The frequency of haplotype DRB1*10-DQB1*05 was high in controls conferring protection. IS-LVD and gender-stratified analysis too confirmed these susceptible and protective associations. Thus, HLA-DRB1*/DQB1* alleles and haplotypes strongly predispose South Indian population to ischaemic stroke. Further studies in different populations with large sample size or the meta-analysis are needed to explain the exact mechanism of associations of HLA gene(s) with IS. PMID:27105925

  1. Apolipoprotein E Variation at the Sequence Haplotype Level: Implications for the Origin and Maintenance of a Major Human Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Clark, Andrew G.; Weiss, Kenneth M.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Taylor, Scott L.; Stengrd, Jari H.; Salomaa, Veikko; Vartiainen, Erkki; Perola, Markus; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sing, Charles F.

    2000-01-01

    Three common protein isoforms of apolipoprotein E (apoE), encoded by the ?2, ?3, and ?4 alleles of the APOE gene, differ in their association with cardiovascular and Alzheimer's disease risk. To gain a better understanding of the genetic variation underlying this important polymorphism, we identified sequence haplotype variation in 5.5 kb of genomic DNA encompassing the whole of the APOE locus and adjoining flanking regions in 96 individuals from four populations: blacks from Jackson, MS (n=48 chromosomes), Mayans from Campeche, Mexico (n=48), Finns from North Karelia, Finland (n=48), and non-Hispanic whites from Rochester, MN (n=48). In the region sequenced, 23 sites varied (21 single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs, 1 diallelic indel, and 1 multiallelic indel). The 22 diallelic sites defined 31 distinct haplotypes in the sample. The estimate of nucleotide diversity (site-specific heterozygosity) for the locus was 0.00050.0003. Sequence analysis of the chimpanzee APOE gene showed that it was most closely related to human ?4-type haplotypes, differing from the human consensus sequence at 67 synonymous (54 substitutions and 13 indels) and 9 nonsynonymous fixed positions. The evolutionary history of allelic divergence within humans was inferred from the pattern of haplotype relationships. This analysis suggests that haplotypes defining the ?3 and ?2 alleles are derived from the ancestral ?4s and that the ?3 group of haplotypes have increased in frequency, relative to ?4s, in the past 200,000 years. Substantial heterogeneity exists within all three classes of sequence haplotypes, and there are important interpopulation differences in the sequence variation underlying the protein isoforms that may be relevant to interpreting conflicting reports of phenotypic associations with variation in the common protein isoforms. PMID:10986041

  2. Annexin A5 Promoter Haplotype M2 Is Not a Risk Factor for Recurrent Pregnancy Loss in Northern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Rull, Kristiina; Christiansen, Ole B.; Nielsen, Henriette S.; Laan, Maris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Annexin A5 is an essential component of placental integrity that may potentially mediate susceptibility to phenotypes of compromised pregnancy. A promoter haplotype termed M2 of the coding gene ANXA5 has been implicated in various pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL), however with inconclusive results. Study subjects and methods A retrospective case-control study combining resequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was undertaken in 313 women with unexplained RPL and 214 fertile women from Estonia and Denmark to estimate the RPL disease risk of the M2 haplotype in Northern Europe. Comparative prevalence of the studied ANXA5 genetic variants in human populations was estimated based on the 1000 Genomes Project (n = 675, whole-genome sequencing data) and the KORA S3 500K dataset of South German samples (n = 1644, genome-wide genotyping data). Results Minor allele frequency of common polymorphisms in ANXA5 promoter was up to two-fold lower among Estonian RPL subjects than fertile controls. The M2 haplotype was not associated with RPL and a trend for decreased prevalence was observed among RPL patients compared to controls both in Estonia (8.1% vs 15.2%, respectively) and Denmark (9.7% vs 12.6%). The high M2 prevalence in fertile controls was consistent with estimations for European and East Asian populations (9.6%-16.0%). Conclusions This study cautions to consider the M2 haplotype as a deterministic factor in early pregnancy success because: i) no RPL disease risk was associated with the haplotype in two clinically well-characterized RPL case-control study samples, ii) high prevalence of the haplotype among fertile controls and world-wide populations is inconsistent with the previously proposed severe impact on early pregnancy success, iii) weak impact of M2 haplotype on the production of ANXA5 protein has been established by others. PMID:26135579

  3. A genome-wide association study of production traits in a commercial population of Large White pigs: evidence of haplotypes affecting meat quality

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been detected in pigs over the past 20 years using microsatellite markers. However, due to the low density of these markers, the accuracy of QTL location has generally been poor. Since 2009, the dense genome coverage provided by the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip has made it possible to more accurately map QTL using genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Our objective was to perform high-density GWAS in order to identify genomic regions and corresponding haplotypes associated with production traits in a French Large White population of pigs. Methods Animals (385 Large White pigs from 106 sires) were genotyped using the PorcineSNP60 BeadChip and evaluated for 19 traits related to feed intake, growth, carcass composition and meat quality. Of the 64 432 SNPs on the chip, 44 412 were used for GWAS with an animal mixed model that included a regression coefficient for the tested SNPs and a genomic kinship matrix. SNP haplotype effects in QTL regions were then tested for association with phenotypes following phase reconstruction based on the Sscrofa10.2 pig genome assembly. Results Twenty-three QTL regions were identified on autosomes and their effects ranged from 0.25 to 0.75 phenotypic standard deviation units for feed intake and feed efficiency (four QTL), carcass (12 QTL) and meat quality traits (seven QTL). The 10 most significant QTL regions had effects on carcass (chromosomes 7, 10, 16, 17 and 18) and meat quality traits (two regions on chromosome 1 and one region on chromosomes 8, 9 and 13). Thirteen of the 23 QTL regions had not been previously described. A haplotype block of 183 kb on chromosome 1 (six SNPs) was identified and displayed three distinct haplotypes with significant (0.0001 < P < 0.03) associations with all evaluated meat quality traits. Conclusions GWAS analyses with the PorcineSNP60 BeadChip enabled the detection of 23 QTL regions that affect feed consumption, carcass and meat quality traits in a LW population, of which 13 were novel QTL. The proportionally larger number of QTL found for meat quality traits suggests a specific opportunity for improving these traits in the pig by genomic selection. PMID:24528607

  4. iXora1: exact haplotype inferencing and trait association

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: We address the task of extracting accurate haplotypes from genotype data of individuals of large F1 populations for mapping studies. While methods for inferring parental haplotype assignments on large F1 populations exist in theory, these approaches do not work in practice at high levels...

  5. Bayesian quantitative trait locus mapping using inferred haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Caroline; Mott, Richard

    2010-03-01

    We describe a fast hierarchical Bayesian method for mapping quantitative trait loci by haplotype-based association, applicable when haplotypes are not observed directly but are inferred from multiple marker genotypes. The method avoids the use of a Monte Carlo Markov chain by employing priors for which the likelihood factorizes completely. It is parameterized by a single hyperparameter, the fraction of variance explained by the quantitative trait locus, compared to the frequentist fixed-effects model, which requires a parameter for the phenotypic effect of each combination of haplotypes; nevertheless it still provides estimates of haplotype effects. We use simulation to show that the method matches the power of the frequentist regression model and, when the haplotypes are inferred, exceeds it for small QTL effect sizes. The Bayesian estimates of the haplotype effects are more accurate than the frequentist estimates, for both known and inferred haplotypes, which indicates that this advantage is independent of the effect of uncertainty in haplotype inference and will hold in comparison with frequentist methods in general. We apply the method to data from a panel of recombinant inbred lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, descended from 19 inbred founders. PMID:20048050

  6. Use of haplotypes to predict selection limits and Mendelian sampling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limits to selection and Mendelian sampling terms can be calculated using haplotypes, which are sums of individual additive effects on a chromosome. Haplotypes were imputed for 43,385 actual markers of 3,765 Jerseys using the Fortran program findhap.f90, which combines population and pedigree haploty...

  7. Restriction digestion method for haplotyping the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A restriction digestion method has been developed for haplotyping the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli Sulc., an economically important pest of solanaceous crops. This method differentiates the four known potato psyllid haplotypes by utilizing restriction enzyme digestion of a portion of the ...

  8. Review: can diet influence the selective advantage of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes?

    PubMed

    Ballard, J William O; Youngson, Neil A

    2015-01-01

    This review explores the potential for changes in dietary macronutrients to differentially influence mitochondrial bioenergetics and thereby the frequency of mtDNA haplotypes in natural populations. Such dietary modification may be seasonal or result from biogeographic or demographic shifts. Mechanistically, mtDNA haplotypes may influence the activity of the electron transport system (ETS), retrograde signalling to the nuclear genome and affect epigenetic modifications. Thus, differential provisioning by macronutrients may lead to selection through changes in the levels of ATP production, modulation of metabolites (including AMP, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the NAD(+)/NADH ratio) and potentially complex epigenetic effects. The exquisite complexity of dietary influence on haplotype frequency is further illustrated by the fact that macronutrients may differentially influence the selective advantage of specific mutations in different life-history stages. In Drosophila, complex I mutations may affect larval growth because dietary nutrients are fed through this complex in immaturity. In contrast, the majority of electrons are provided to complex III in adult flies. We conclude the review with a case study that considers specific interactions between diet and complex I of the ETS. Complex I is the first enzyme of the mitochondrial ETS and co-ordinates in the oxidation of NADH and transfer of electrons to ubiquinone. Although the supposition that mtDNA variants may be selected upon by dietary macronutrients could be intuitively consistent to some and counter intuitive to others, it must face a multitude of scientific hurdles before it can be recognized. PMID:26543031

  9. Review: can diet influence the selective advantage of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes?

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, J. William O.; Youngson, Neil A.

    2015-01-01

    This review explores the potential for changes in dietary macronutrients to differentially influence mitochondrial bioenergetics and thereby the frequency of mtDNA haplotypes in natural populations. Such dietary modification may be seasonal or result from biogeographic or demographic shifts. Mechanistically, mtDNA haplotypes may influence the activity of the electron transport system (ETS), retrograde signalling to the nuclear genome and affect epigenetic modifications. Thus, differential provisioning by macronutrients may lead to selection through changes in the levels of ATP production, modulation of metabolites (including AMP, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the NAD+/NADH ratio) and potentially complex epigenetic effects. The exquisite complexity of dietary influence on haplotype frequency is further illustrated by the fact that macronutrients may differentially influence the selective advantage of specific mutations in different life-history stages. In Drosophila, complex I mutations may affect larval growth because dietary nutrients are fed through this complex in immaturity. In contrast, the majority of electrons are provided to complex III in adult flies. We conclude the review with a case study that considers specific interactions between diet and complex I of the ETS. Complex I is the first enzyme of the mitochondrial ETS and co-ordinates in the oxidation of NADH and transfer of electrons to ubiquinone. Although the supposition that mtDNA variants may be selected upon by dietary macronutrients could be intuitively consistent to some and counter intuitive to others, it must face a multitude of scientific hurdles before it can be recognized. PMID:26543031

  10. Does the pain-protective GTP cyclohydrolase haplotype significantly alter the pattern or severity of pain in humans with chronic pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Lazarev, Mark; Lamb, Janette; Barmada, M Michael; Dai, Feng; Anderson, Michelle A; Max, Mitchell B; Whitcomb, David C

    2008-01-01

    Background Pain is often a dominant clinical feature of chronic pancreatitis but the frequency and severity is highly variable between subjects. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms contribute to variations in clinical pain patterns. Since genetic variations in the GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH1) gene have been reported to protect some patients from pain, we investigated the effect of the "pain protective haplotype" in well characterized patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) or recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) from the North American Pancreatitis Study 2 (NAPS2). Results Subjects in the NAPS2 study were asked to rank their pain in one of 5 categories reflecting different levels of pain frequency and severity. All subjects were genotyped at rs8007267 and rs3783641 to determine the frequency of the GCH1 pain-protective haplotype. In Caucasian subjects the frequency of the pain-protective GCH1 haplotype was no different in the control group (n = 236), CP patients (n = 265), RAP patients (N = 131), or in CP patients subclassified by pain category compared to previously reported haplotype frequencies in the general Caucasian population. Conclusion The GCH1 pain-protective haplotype does not have a significant effect on pain patterns or severity in RAP or CP. These results are important for helping to define the regulators of visceral pain, and to distinguish different mechanisms of pain. PMID:19014702

  11. SNP marker detection and genotyping in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Van Bers, N E M; Crooijmans, R P M A; Groenen, M A M; Dibbits, B W; Komen, J

    2012-09-01

    We have generated a unique resource consisting of nearly 175 000 short contig sequences and 3569 SNP markers from the widely cultured GIFT (Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia) strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). In total, 384 SNPs were selected to monitor the wider applicability of the SNPs by genotyping tilapia individuals from different strains and different geographical locations. In all strains and species tested (O. niloticus, O. aureus and O. mossambicus), the genotyping assay was working for a similar number of SNPs (288-305 SNPs). The actual number of polymorphic SNPs was, as expected, highest for individuals from the GIFT population (255 SNPs). In the individuals from an Egyptian strain and in individuals caught in the wild in the basin of the river Volta, 197 and 163 SNPs were polymorphic, respectively. A pairwise calculation of Nei's genetic distance allowed the discrimination of the individual strains and species based on the genotypes determined with the SNP set. We expect that this set will be widely applicable for use in tilapia aquaculture, e.g. for pedigree reconstruction. In addition, this set is currently used for assaying the genetic diversity of native Nile tilapia in areas where tilapia is, or will be, introduced in aquaculture projects. This allows the tracing of escapees from aquaculture and the monitoring of effects of introgression and hybridization. PMID:22524158

  12. Haplotype map of sickle cell anemia in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Moumni, Imen; Ben Mustapha, Maha; Sassi, Sarra; Zorai, Amine; Ben Mansour, Ikbel; Douzi, Kais; Chouachi, Dorra; Mellouli, Fethi; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Abbes, Salem

    2014-01-01

    β-Globin haplotypes are important to establish the ethnic origin and predict the clinical development of sickle cell disease patients (SCD). To determine the chromosomal background of β (S) Tunisian sickle cell patients, in this first study in Tunisia, we have explored four polymorphic regions of β-globin cluster on chromosome 11. It is the 5' region of β-LCR-HS2 site, the intervening sequence II (IVSII) region of two fetal ((G)γ and (A)γ) genes and the 5' region of β-globin gene. The results reveal a high molecular diversity of a microsatellite configuration describing the sequences haplotypes. The linkage disequilibrium analysis showed various haplotype combinations giving 22 "extended haplotypes". These results confirm the utility of the β-globin haplotypes for population studies and contribute to knowledge of the Tunisian gene pool, as well as establishing the role of genetic markers in physiopathology of SCD. PMID:25197158

  13. Mathematical properties and bounds on haplotyping populations by pure parsimony.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Lin; Chang, Chia-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    Although the haplotype data can be used to analyze the function of DNA, due to the significant efforts required in collecting the haplotype data, usually the genotype data is collected and then the population haplotype inference (PHI) problem is solved to infer haplotype data from genotype data for a population. This paper investigates the PHI problem based on the pure parsimony criterion (HIPP), which seeks the minimum number of distinct haplotypes to infer a given genotype data. We analyze the mathematical structure and properties for the HIPP problem, propose techniques to reduce the given genotype data into an equivalent one of much smaller size, and analyze the relations of genotype data using a compatible graph. Based on the mathematical properties in the compatible graph, we propose a maximal clique heuristic to obtain an upper bound, and a new polynomial-sized integer linear programming formulation to obtain a lower bound for the HIPP problem. PMID:21354185

  14. Chromosomal Haplotypes by Genetic Phasing of Human Families

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Jared C.; Glusman, Gustavo; Hubley, Robert; Montsaroff, Stephen Z.; Holloway, Alisha K.; Mauldin, Denise E.; Srivastava, Deepak; Garg, Vidu; Pollard, Katherine S.; Galas, David J.; Hood, Leroy; Smit, Arian F.A.

    2011-01-01

    Assignment of alleles to haplotypes for nearly all the variants on all chromosomes can be performed by genetic analysis of a nuclear family with three or more children. Whole-genome sequence data enable deterministic phasing of nearly all sequenced alleles by permitting assignment of recombinations to precise chromosomal positions and specific meioses. We demonstrate this process of genetic phasing on two families each with four children. We generate haplotypes for all of the children and their parents; these haplotypes span all genotyped positions, including rare variants. Misassignments of phase between variants (switch errors) are nearly absent. Our algorithm can also produce multimegabase haplotypes for nuclear families with just two children and can handle families with missing individuals. We implement our algorithm in a suite of software scripts (Haploscribe). Haplotypes and family genome sequences will become increasingly important for personalized medicine and for fundamental biology. PMID:21855840

  15. Restricted dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II haplotypes and genotypes in Beagles.

    PubMed

    Soutter, Francesca; Kennedy, Lorna J; Ollier, William E R; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Catchpole, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Beagles are commonly used in vaccine trials as part of the regulatory approval process. Genetic restriction within this breed and the impact this might have on vaccine responses are rarely considered. This study was designed to characterise diversity of dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II genes in a breeding colony of laboratory Beagles, whose offspring are used in vaccine studies. DLA haplotypes were determined by PCR and sequence-based typing from genomic DNA extracted from blood. Breeding colony Beagles had significantly different DLA haplotype frequencies in comparison with pet Beagles and both groups showed limited DLA diversity. Restricted DLA class II genetic variability within Beagles might result in selective antigen presentation and vaccine responses that are not necessarily representative of those seen in other dog breeds. PMID:25634081

  16. Restricted dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II haplotypes and genotypes in Beagles

    PubMed Central

    Soutter, Francesca; Kennedy, Lorna J.; Ollier, William E.R.; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Catchpole, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Beagles are commonly used in vaccine trials as part of the regulatory approval process. Genetic restriction within this breed and the impact this might have on vaccine responses are rarely considered. This study was designed to characterise diversity of dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II genes in a breeding colony of laboratory Beagles, whose offspring are used in vaccine studies. DLA haplotypes were determined by PCR and sequence-based typing from genomic DNA extracted from blood. Breeding colony Beagles had significantly different DLA haplotype frequencies in comparison with pet Beagles and both groups showed limited DLA diversity. Restricted DLA class II genetic variability within Beagles might result in selective antigen presentation and vaccine responses that are not necessarily representative of those seen in other dog breeds. PMID:25634081

  17. The Holstein Friesian Lethal Haplotype 5 (HH5) Results from a Complete Deletion of TBF1M and Cholesterol Deficiency (CDH) from an ERV-(LTR) Insertion into the Coding Region of APOB

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Ekkehard; Wehrhahn, Christin; Wanjek, Marius; Bortfeld, Ralf; Wemheuer, Wilhelm E.; Beck, Julia; Brenig, Bertram

    2016-01-01

    Background With the availability of massive SNP data for several economically important cattle breeds, haplotype tests have been performed to identify unknown recessive disorders. A number of so-called lethal haplotypes, have been uncovered in Holstein Friesian cattle and, for at least seven of these, the causative mutations have been identified in candidate genes. However, several lethal haplotypes still remain elusive. Here we report the molecular genetic causes of lethal haplotype 5 (HH5) and cholesterol deficiency (CDH). A targeted enrichment for the known genomic regions, followed by massive parallel sequencing was used to interrogate for causative mutations in a case/control approach. Methods Targeted enrichment for the known genomic regions, followed by massive parallel sequencing was used in a case/control approach. PCRs for the causing mutations were developed and compared to routine imputing in 2,100 (HH5) and 3,100 (CDH) cattle. Results HH5 is caused by a deletion of 138kbp, spanning position 93,233kb to 93,371kb on chromosome 9 (BTA9), harboring only dimethyl-adenosine transferase 1 (TFB1M). The deletion breakpoints are flanked by bovine long interspersed nuclear elements Bov-B (upstream) and L1ME3 (downstream), suggesting a homologous recombination/deletion event. TFB1M di-methylates adenine residues in the hairpin loop at the 3’-end of mitochondrial 12S rRNA, being essential for synthesis and function of the small ribosomal subunit of mitochondria. Homozygous TFB1M-/- mice reportedly exhibit embryonal lethality with developmental defects. A 2.8% allelic frequency was determined for the German HF population. CDH results from a 1.3kbp insertion of an endogenous retrovirus (ERV2-1-LTR_BT) into exon 5 of the APOB gene at BTA11:77,959kb. The insertion is flanked by 6bp target site duplications as described for insertions mediated by retroviral integrases. A premature stop codon in the open reading frame of APOB is generated, resulting in a truncation of the protein to a length of only <140 amino acids. Such early truncations have been shown to cause an inability of chylomicron excretion from intestinal cells, resulting in malabsorption of cholesterol. The allelic frequency of this mutation in the German HF population was 6.7%, which is substantially higher than reported so far. Compared to PCR assays inferring the genetic variants directly, the routine imputing used so far showed a diagnostic sensitivity of as low as 91% (HH5) and 88% (CDH), with a high specificity for both (≥99.7%). Conclusion With the availability of direct genetic tests it will now be possible to more effectively reduce the carrier frequency and ultimately eliminate the disorders from the HF populations. Beside this, the fact that repetitive genomic elements (RE) are involved in both diseases, underline the evolutionary importance of RE, which can be detrimental as here, but also advantageous over generations. PMID:27128314

  18. A haplotype map of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Inherited genetic variation has a critical but as yet largely uncharacterized role in human disease. Here we report a public database of common variation in the human genome: more than one million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for which accurate and complete genotypes have been obtained in 269 DNA samples from four populations, including ten 500-kilobase regions in which essentially all information about common DNA variation has been extracted. These data document the generality of recombination hotspots, a block-like structure of linkage disequilibrium and low haplotype diversity, leading to substantial correlations of SNPs with many of their neighbours. We show how the HapMap resource can guide the design and analysis of genetic association studies, shed light on structural variation and recombination, and identify loci that may have been subject to natural selection during human evolution. PMID:16255080

  19. SNP Discovery in the Transcriptome of White Pacific Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei by Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Wei, Jiankai; Zhang, Xiaojun; Liu, Jingwen; Liu, Chengzhang; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2014-01-01

    The application of next generation sequencing technology has greatly facilitated high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and genotyping in genetic research. In the present study, SNPs were discovered based on two transcriptomes of Litopenaeus vannamei (L. vannamei) generated from Illumina sequencing platform HiSeq 2000. One transcriptome of L. vannamei was obtained through sequencing on the RNA from larvae at mysis stage and its reference sequence was de novo assembled. The data from another transcriptome were downloaded from NCBI and the reads of the two transcriptomes were mapped separately to the assembled reference by BWA. SNP calling was performed using SAMtools. A total of 58,717 and 36,277 SNPs with high quality were predicted from the two transcriptomes, respectively. SNP calling was also performed using the reads of two transcriptomes together, and a total of 96,040 SNPs with high quality were predicted. Among these 96,040 SNPs, 5,242 and 29,129 were predicted as non-synonymous and synonymous SNPs respectively. Characterization analysis of the predicted SNPs in L. vannamei showed that the estimated SNP frequency was 0.21% (one SNP per 476 bp) and the estimated ratio for transition to transversion was 2.0. Fifty SNPs were randomly selected for validation by Sanger sequencing after PCR amplification and 76% of SNPs were confirmed, which indicated that the SNPs predicted in this study were reliable. These SNPs will be very useful for genetic study in L. vannamei, especially for the high density linkage map construction and genome-wide association studies. PMID:24498047

  20. Genetic Characterization and Linkage Disequilibrium Estimation of a Global Maize Collection Using SNP Markers

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jianbing; Shah, Trushar; Warburton, Marilyn L.; Buckler, Edward S.; McMullen, Michael D.; Crouch, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    A newly developed maize Illumina GoldenGate Assay with 1536 SNPs from 582 loci was used to genotype a highly diverse global maize collection of 632 inbred lines from temperate, tropical, and subtropical public breeding programs. A total of 1229 informative SNPs and 1749 haplotypes within 327 loci was used to estimate the genetic diversity, population structure, and familial relatedness. Population structure identified tropical and temperate subgroups, and complex familial relationships were identified within the global collection. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) was measured overall and within chromosomes, allelic frequency groups, subgroups related by geographic origin, and subgroups of different sample sizes. The LD decay distance differed among chromosomes and ranged between 1 to 10 kb. The LD distance increased with the increase of minor allelic frequency (MAF), and with smaller sample sizes, encouraging caution when using too few lines in a study. The LD decay distance was much higher in temperate than in tropical and subtropical lines, because tropical and subtropical lines are more diverse and contain more rare alleles than temperate lines. A core set of inbreds was defined based on haplotypes, and 60 lines capture 90% of the haplotype diversity of the entire panel. The defined core sets and the entire collection can be used widely for different research targets. PMID:20041112

  1. Haplotype structure strongly affects recombination in a maize genetic interval polymorphic for Helitron and retrotransposon insertions

    PubMed Central

    He, Limei; Dooner, Hugo K.

    2009-01-01

    We have asked here how the remarkable variation in maize haplotype structure affects recombination. We compared recombination across a genetic interval of 9S in 2 highly dissimilar heterozygotes that shared 1 parent. The genetic interval in the common haplotype is ≈100 kb long and contains 6 genes interspersed with gene-fragment-bearing Helitrons and retrotransposons that, together, comprise 70% of its length. In one heterozygote, most intergenic insertions are homozygous, although polymorphic, enabling us to determine whether any recombination junctions fall within them. In the other, most intergenic insertions are hemizygous and, thus, incapable of homologous recombination. Our analysis of the frequency and distribution of recombination in the interval revealed that: (i) Most junctions were circumscribed to the gene space, where they showed a highly nonuniform distribution. In both heterozygotes, more than half of the junctions fell in the stc1 gene, making it a clear recombination hotspot in the region. However, the genetic size of stc1 was 2-fold lower when flanked by a hemizygous 25-kb retrotransposon cluster. (ii) No junctions fell in the hypro1 gene in either heterozygote, making it a genic recombination coldspot. (iii) No recombination occurred within the gene fragments borne on Helitrons nor within retrotransposons, so neither insertion class contributes to the interval's genetic length. (iv) Unexpectedly, several junctions fell in an intergenic region not shared by all 3 haplotypes. (v) In general, the ability of a sequence to recombine correlated inversely with its methylation status. Our results show that haplotypic structural variability strongly affects the frequency and distribution of recombination events in maize. PMID:19416860

  2. Armenian Y chromosome haplotypes reveal strong regional structure within a single ethno-national group.

    PubMed

    Weale, M E; Yepiskoposyan, L; Jager, R F; Hovhannisyan, N; Khudoyan, A; Burbage-Hall, O; Bradman, N; Thomas, M G

    2001-12-01

    Armenia has been little-studied genetically, even though it is situated in an important area with respect to theories of ancient Middle Eastern population expansion and the spread of Indo-European languages. We screened 734 Armenian males for 11 biallelic and 6 microsatellite Y chromosome markers, segregated them according to paternal grandparental region of birth within or close to Armenia, and compared them with data from other population samples. We found significant regional stratification, on a level greater than that found in some comparisons between different ethno-national identities. A diasporan Armenian sub-sample (collected in London) was not sufficient to describe this stratified haplotype distribution adequately, warning against the use of such samples as surrogates for the non-diasporan population in future studies. The haplotype distribution and pattern of genetic distances suggest a high degree of genetic isolation in the mountainous southern and eastern regions, while in the northern, central and western regions there has been greater admixture with populations from neighbouring Middle Eastern countries. Georgia, to the north of Armenia, also appears genetically more distinct, suggesting that in the past Trans-Caucasia may have acted as a genetic barrier. A Bayesian full-likelihood analysis of the Armenian sample yields a mean estimate for the start of population growth of 4.8 thousand years ago (95% credible interval: 2.0-11.1), consistent with the onset of Neolithic farming. The more isolated southern and eastern regions have high frequencies of a microsatellite defined cluster within haplogroup 1 that is centred on a modal haplotype one step removed from the Atlantic Modal Haplotype, the centre of a cluster found at high frequencies in England, Friesland and Atlantic populations, and which may represent a remnant paternal signal of a Paleolithic migration event. PMID:11810279

  3. Large-Scale SNP Marker Development and Genotyping in Oat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, our goals are to develop genome-wide SNP markers using next generation sequencing technologies and to apply a highly parallel SNP genotyping system developed by Illumina for genetics and breeding applications in oat. The large amount of DNA sequence sources generated from cDNAs and Di...

  4. Accelerating genetic improvement with SNP chips and DNA sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays is expected to have a profound impact on genetic progress in the U.S. dairy industry. In the 16 months since its initial availability, the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip has been used to genotype nearly 20,000 Holsteins. Thes...

  5. A Potential Relationship among Beta-Defensins Haplotype, SOX7 Duplication and Cardiac Defects

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shaohai; Xu, Yuejuan; Sun, Kun; Chen, Sun; Xu, Rang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the pathogenesis of a patient born with congenital heart defects, who had appeared normal in prenatal screening. Methods In routine prenatal screening, G-banding was performed to analyse the karyotypes of the family and fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to investigate the 22q11.2 deletion in the fetus. After birth, the child was found to be suffering from heart defects by transthoracic echocardiography. In the following study, sequencing was used to search for potential mutations in pivotal genes. SNP-array was employed for fine mapping of the aberrant region and quantitative real-time PCR was used to confirm the results. Furthermore, other patients with a similar phenotype were screened for the same genetic variations. To compare with a control, these variations were also assessed in the general population. Results The child and his mother each had a region that was deleted in the beta-defensin repeats, which are usually duplicated in the general population. Besides, the child carried a SOX7-gene duplication. While this duplication was not detected in his mother, it was found in two other patients with cardiac defects who also had the similar deletion in the beta-defensin repeats. Conclusion The congenital heart defects of the child were probably caused by a SOX7-gene duplication, which may be a consequence of the partial haplotype of beta-defensin regions at 8p23.1. To our knowledge, this is the first congenital heart defect case found to have the haplotype of beta-defensin and the duplication of SOX7. PMID:24009689

  6. Identification of rheumatoid arthritis biomarkers based on single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotype blocks: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Saad, Mohamed N; Mabrouk, Mai S; Eldeib, Ayman M; Shaker, Olfat G

    2016-01-01

    Genetics of autoimmune diseases represent a growing domain with surpassing biomarker results with rapid progress. The exact cause of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is unknown, but it is thought to have both a genetic and an environmental bases. Genetic biomarkers are capable of changing the supervision of RA by allowing not only the detection of susceptible individuals, but also early diagnosis, evaluation of disease severity, selection of therapy, and monitoring of response to therapy. This review is concerned with not only the genetic biomarkers of RA but also the methods of identifying them. Many of the identified genetic biomarkers of RA were identified in populations of European and Asian ancestries. The study of additional human populations may yield novel results. Most of the researchers in the field of identifying RA biomarkers use single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) approaches to express the significance of their results. Although, haplotype block methods are expected to play a complementary role in the future of that field. PMID:26843965

  7. Identification of rheumatoid arthritis biomarkers based on single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotype blocks: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Mohamed N.; Mabrouk, Mai S.; Eldeib, Ayman M.; Shaker, Olfat G.

    2015-01-01

    Genetics of autoimmune diseases represent a growing domain with surpassing biomarker results with rapid progress. The exact cause of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is unknown, but it is thought to have both a genetic and an environmental bases. Genetic biomarkers are capable of changing the supervision of RA by allowing not only the detection of susceptible individuals, but also early diagnosis, evaluation of disease severity, selection of therapy, and monitoring of response to therapy. This review is concerned with not only the genetic biomarkers of RA but also the methods of identifying them. Many of the identified genetic biomarkers of RA were identified in populations of European and Asian ancestries. The study of additional human populations may yield novel results. Most of the researchers in the field of identifying RA biomarkers use single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) approaches to express the significance of their results. Although, haplotype block methods are expected to play a complementary role in the future of that field. PMID:26843965

  8. Atomic Force Microscopy for DNA SNP Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbusa, Ugo; Ierardi, Vincenzo

    The knowledge of the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome greatly contributes to better comprehension of the relation between genetic factors and diseases. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA in different individuals reveals positions where variations that involve individual base substitutions can occur. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms are highly abundant and can have different consequences at phenotypic level. Several attempts were made to apply atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect and map SNP sites in DNA strands. The most promising approach is the study of DNA mutations producing heteroduplex DNA strands and identifying the mismatches by means of a protein that labels the mismatches. MutS is a protein that is part of a well-known complex of mismatch repair, which initiates the process of repairing when the MutS binds to the mismatched DNA filament. The position of MutS on the DNA filament can be easily recorded by means of AFM imaging.

  9. A spatial haplotype copying model with applications to genotype imputation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Yun; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Eskin, Eleazar; Pasaniuc, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    Ever since its introduction, the haplotype copy model has proven to be one of the most successful approaches for modeling genetic variation in human populations, with applications ranging from ancestry inference to genotype phasing and imputation. Motivated by coalescent theory, this approach assumes that any chromosome (haplotype) can be modeled as a mosaic of segments copied from a set of chromosomes sampled from the same population. At the core of the model is the assumption that any chromosome from the sample is equally likely to contribute a priori to the copying process. Motivated by recent works that model genetic variation in a geographic continuum, we propose a new spatial-aware haplotype copy model that jointly models geography and the haplotype copying process. We extend hidden Markov models of haplotype diversity such that at any given location, haplotypes that are closest in the genetic-geographic continuum map are a priori more likely to contribute to the copying process than distant ones. Through simulations starting from the 1000 Genomes data, we show that our model achieves superior accuracy in genotype imputation over the standard spatial-unaware haplotype copy model. In addition, we show the utility of our model in selecting a small personalized reference panel for imputation that leads to both improved accuracy as well as to a lower computational runtime than the standard approach. Finally, we show our proposed model can be used to localize individuals on the genetic-geographical map on the basis of their genotype data. PMID:25526526

  10. Human dopamine transporter gene: differential regulation of 18-kb haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Xiong, Nian; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Yanhong; Li, Nuomin; Qing, Hong; Lin, Zhicheng

    2013-01-01

    Aim Since previous functional studies of short haplotypes and polymorphic sites of SLC6A3 have shown variant-dependent and drug-sensitive promoter activity, this study aimed to understand whether a large SLC6A3 regulatory region, containing these small haplotypes and polymorphic sites, can display haplotype-dependent promoter activity in a drug-sensitive and pathway-related manner. Materials & methods By creating and using a single copy number luciferase-reporter vector, we examined regulation of two different SLC6A3 haplotypes (A and B) of the 5′ 18-kb promoter and two known downstream regulatory variable number tandem repeats by 17 drugs in four different cellular models. Results The two regulatory haplotypes displayed up to 3.2-fold difference in promoter activity. The regulations were drug selective (37.5% of the drugs showed effects), and both haplotype and cell type dependent. Pathway analysis revealed at least 13 main signaling hubs targeting SLC6A3, including histone deacetylation, AKT, PKC and CK2 α-chains. Conclusion SLC6A3 may be regulated via either its promoter or the variable number tandem repeats independently by specific signaling pathways and in a haplotype-dependent manner. Furthermore, we have developed the first pathway map for SLC6A3 regulation. These findings provide a framework for understanding complex and variant-dependent regulations of SLC6A3. PMID:24024899

  11. An approximation algorithm for haplotype inference by maximum parsimony.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Ting; Chao, Kun-Mao; Chen, Ting

    2005-12-01

    This paper studies haplotype inference by maximum parsimony using population data. We define the optimal haplotype inference (OHI) problem as given a set of genotypes and a set of related haplotypes, find a minimum subset of haplotypes that can resolve all the genotypes. We prove that OHI is NP-hard and can be formulated as an integer quadratic programming (IQP) problem. To solve the IQP problem, we propose an iterative semidefinite programming-based approximation algorithm, (called SDPHapInfer). We show that this algorithm finds a solution within a factor of O(log n) of the optimal solution, where n is the number of genotypes. This algorithm has been implemented and tested on a variety of simulated and biological data. In comparison with three other methods, (1) HAPAR, which was implemented based on the branching and bound algorithm, (2) HAPLOTYPER, which was implemented based on the expectation-maximization algorithm, and (3) PHASE, which combined the Gibbs sampling algorithm with an approximate coalescent prior, the experimental results indicate that SDPHapInfer and HAPLOTYPER have similar error rates. In addition, the results generated by PHASE have lower error rates on some data but higher error rates on others. The error rates of HAPAR are higher than the others on biological data. In terms of efficiency, SDPHapInfer, HAPLOTYPER, and PHASE output a solution in a stable and consistent way, and they run much faster than HAPAR when the number of genotypes becomes large. PMID:16379533

  12. Combining Markers into Haplotypes Can Improve Population Structure Inference

    PubMed Central

    Gattepaille, Lucie M.; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput genotyping and sequencing technologies can generate dense sets of genetic markers for large numbers of individuals. For most species, these data will contain many markers in linkage disequilibrium (LD). To utilize such data for population structure inference, we investigate the use of haplotypes constructed by combining the alleles at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We introduce a statistic derived from information theory, the gain of informativeness for assignment (GIA), which quantifies the additional information for assigning individuals to populations using haplotype data compared to using individual loci separately. Using a two-locitwo-allele model, we demonstrate that combining markers in linkage equilibrium into haplotypes always leads to nonpositive GIA, suggesting that combining the two markers is not advantageous for ancestry inference. However, for loci in LD, GIA is often positive, suggesting that assignment can be improved by combining markers into haplotypes. Using GIA as a criterion for combining markers into haplotypes, we demonstrate for simulated data a significant improvement of assigning individuals to candidate populations. For the many cases that we investigate, incorrect assignment was reduced between 26% and 97% using haplotype data. For empirical data from French and German individuals, the incorrectly assigned individuals can, for example, be decreased by 73% using haplotypes. Our results can be useful for challenging population structure and assignment problems, in particular for studies where large-scale populationgenomic data are available. PMID:21868606

  13. How much are we missing in SNP-by-SNP analyses of GWAS?

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Weinberg, Clarice R.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have discovered common genetic variants associated with susceptibility for several complex diseases; but they have been unfruitful for many others. Typically analysis is done by “agnostically” considering one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at a time, controlling the overall Type I error rate by correcting for multiple testing. In this short report we use oral clefting as a disease model to develop a range of toy example scenarios: risk might only involve genes, might involve both genes and exposure and might involve genes, exposure and their super-multiplicative interaction. These examples illustrate that important genetic variants can be obscured by using a one-SNP-at-a-time analysis when in fact multiple biological pathways and multiple genes jointly influence etiology. These examples highlight the need for better methods for gene-by-environment and gene-by-gene analyses. PMID:21878815

  14. Validation of pooled genotyping on the Affymetrix 500 k and SNP6.0 genotyping platforms using the polynomial-based probe-specific correction

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of pooled DNA on SNP microarrays (SNP-MaP) has been shown to be a cost effective and rapid manner to perform whole-genome association evaluations. While the accuracy of SNP-MaP was extensively evaluated on the early Affymetrix 10 k and 100 k platforms, there have not been as many similarly comprehensive studies on more recent platforms. In the present study, we used the data generated from the full Affymetrix 500 k SNP set together with the polynomial-based probe-specific correction (PPC) to derive allele frequency estimates. These estimates were compared to genotyping results of the same individuals on the same platform, as the basis to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of pooled genotyping on these high-throughput platforms. We subsequently extended this comparison to the new SNP6.0 platform capable of genotyping 1.8 million genetic variants. Results We showed that pooled genotyping on the 500 k platform performed as well as those previously shown on the relatively lower throughput 10 k and 100 k array sets, with high levels of accuracy (correlation coefficient: 0.988) and low median error (0.036) in allele frequency estimates. Similar results were also obtained from the SNP6.0 array set. A novel pooling strategy of overlapping sub-pools was attempted and comparison of estimated allele frequencies showed this strategy to be as reliable as replicate pools. The importance of an appropriate reference genotyping data set for the application of the PPC algorithm was also evaluated; reference samples with similar ethnic background to the pooled samples were found to improve estimation of allele frequencies. Conclusion We conclude that use of the PPC algorithm to estimate allele frequencies obtained from pooled genotyping on the high throughput 500 k and SNP6.0 platforms is highly accurate and reproducible especially when a suitable reference sample set is used to estimate the beta values for PPC. PMID:20003400

  15. HLA-G UTR Haplotype Conservation in the Malian Population: Association with Soluble HLA-G

    PubMed Central

    Carlini, Federico; Traore, Karim; Cherouat, Nissem; Roubertoux, Pierre; Buhler, Stéphane; Cortey, Martì; Simon, Sophie; Doumbo, Ogobara; Chiaroni, Jacques; Picard, Christophe; Di Cristofaro, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The HLA-G molecule plays an important role in immunomodulation. In a previous study carried out on a southern French population our team showed that HLA-G haplotypes, defined by SNPs in the coding region and specific SNPs located in 5′URR and 3′UTR regulatory regions, are associated with differential soluble HLA-G expression (sHLA-G). Furthermore, the structure of these HLA-G haplotypes appears to be conserved in geographically distant populations. The aim of our study is to confirm these expectations in a sub-Saharan African population and to explore additional factors, such as HLA-A alleles, that might influence sHLA-G expression. DNA and plasma samples were collected from 229 Malians; HLA-G and HLA-A genotyping were respectively performed by the Snap Shot® method and by Luminex™ technology. sHLA-G dosage was performed using an ELISA kit. HLA-G and HLA-A allelic and haplotypic frequencies were estimated using an EM algorithm from the Gene[Rate] program. Associations between genetic and non genetic parameters with sHLA-G were performed using a non-parametric test with GRAPH PAD Prism 5. Our results reveal a good conservation of the HLA-G UTR haplotype structure in populations with different origins and demographic histories. These UTR haplotypes appear to be involved in different sHLA-G expression patterns. Specifically, the UTR-2 haplotype was associated with low sHLA-G levels, displaying a dominant negative effect. Furthermore, an allelic effect of both HLA-G and HLA-A, as well as non genetic parameters, such as age and gender possibly linked to osteogenesis and sexual hormones, also seem to be involved in the modulation of sHLA-G. These data suggest that further investigation in larger cohorts and in populations from various ethnical backgrounds is necessary not only to detect new functional polymorphism in HLA-G regulatory regions, but also to reveal the extent of biological phenomena that influence sHLA-G secretion and this might therefore have an impact on transplantation practice. PMID:24376542

  16. Simultaneous inference of haplotypes and alleles at a causal gene

    PubMed Central

    Larribe, Fabrice; Dupont, Mathieu J.; Boucher, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    We present a methodology which jointly infers haplotypes and the causal alleles at a gene influencing a given trait. Often in human genetic studies, the available data consists of genotypes (series of genetic markers along the chromosomes) and a phenotype. However, for many genetic analyses, one needs haplotypes instead of genotypes. Our methodology is not only able to estimate haplotypes conditionally on the disease status, but is also able to infer the alleles at the unknown disease locus. Some applications of our methodology are in genetic mapping and in genetic counseling. PMID:26500677

  17. Investigation of the Annexin A5 M2 haplotype in 500 white European couples who have experienced recurrent spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Demetriou, Charalambos; Abu-Amero, Sayeda; White, Shawnelle; Peskett, Emma; Markoff, Arseni; Stanier, Philip; Moore, Gudrun E; Regan, Lesley

    2015-11-01

    Annexin A5 is a placental anti-coagulant protein that contains four nucleotide substitutions (M2 haplotype) in its promoter. This haplotype is a risk factor for recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). The influence of the M2 haplotype in the gestational timing of spontaneous abortions, paternal risk and relationships with known risk factors were investigated. European couples (n = 500) who had experienced three or more consecutive spontaneous abortions, and two fertile control groups, were selected for this study. The allele frequency of M2 was significantly higher among patients who had experienced early RSA than among controls (P = 0.002). No difference was found between controls and patients who had undergone late spontaneous abortions. No difference was found between patients who had experienced RSA who had a live birth or no live births, or between patients who were positive or negative for known risk factors. Male and female partners in each group had similar allele frequencies of M2. The M2 haplotype is a risk factor for early spontaneous abortions, before the 12th week of gestation, and confers about the same relative risk to carriers of both sexes. Having one or more M2 allele(s) in combination with other risk factors further increases the RSA risk. PMID:26371709

  18. Mitochondrial genome haplotype hypervariation within the isopod parasitic nematode Thaumamermis cosgrovei.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sha; Hyman, Bradley C

    2007-06-01

    Characterization of mitochondrial genomes from individual Thaumamermis cosgrovei nematodes, obligate parasites of the isopod Armadillidium vulgare, revealed that numerous mtDNA haplotypes, ranging in size from 19 to 34 kb, are maintained in several spatially separated isopod populations. The magnitude and frequency of conspecific mtDNA size variation is unprecedented among all studied size-polymorphic metazoan mitochondrial genomes. To understand the molecular basis of this hypervariation, complete nucleotide sequences of two T. cosgrovei mtDNA haplotypes were determined. A hypervariable segment, residing between the atp6 and rrnL genes, contributes exclusively to T. cosgrovei mtDNA size variation. Within this region, mtDNA coding genes and putative nonfunctional sequences have accumulated substitutions and are duplicated and rearranged to varying extents. Hypervariation at this level has enabled a first insight into the life history of T. cosgrovei. In five A. vulgare hosts infected with multiple nematodes, four carried nematodes with identical mtDNA haplotypes, suggesting that hosts may become infected by ingesting a recently hatched egg clutch or become parasitized by individuals from the same brood prior to dispersal of siblings within the soil. PMID:17435228

  19. Pronounced intraspecific haplotype divergence at the RPP5 complex disease resistance locus of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Noël, L; Moores, T L; van Der Biezen, E A; Parniske, M; Daniels, M J; Parker, J E; Jones, J D

    1999-01-01

    In Arabidopsis ecotype Landsberg erecta (Ler), RPP5 confers resistance to the pathogen Peronospora parasitica. RPP5 is part of a clustered multigene family encoding nucleotide binding-leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins. We compared 95 kb of DNA sequence carrying the Ler RPP5 haplotype with the corresponding 90 kb of Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia (Col-0). Relative to the remainder of the genome, the Ler and Col-0 RPP5 haplotypes exhibit remarkable intraspecific polymorphism. The RPP5 gene family probably evolved by extensive recombination between LRRs from an RPP5-like progenitor that carried only eight LRRs. Most members have variable LRR configurations and encode different numbers of LRRs. Although many members carry retroelement insertions or frameshift mutations, codon usage analysis suggests that regions of the genes have been subject to purifying or diversifying selection, indicating that these genes were, or are, functional. The RPP5 haplotypes thus carry dynamic gene clusters with the potential to adapt rapidly to novel pathogen variants by gene duplication and modification of recognition capacity. We propose that the extremely high level of polymorphism at this complex resistance locus is maintained by frequency-dependent selection. PMID:10559437

  20. A synonymous polymorphism in a common MDR1 (ABCB1) haplotype shapes protein function

    PubMed Central

    Fung, King Leung; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    The MDR1 (ABCB1) gene encodes a membrane-bound transporter that actively effluxes a wide range of compounds from cells. The overexpression of MDR1 by multidrug-resistant cancer cells is a serious impediment to chemotherapy. MDR1 is expressed in various tissues to protect them from the adverse effect of toxins. The pharmacokinetics of drugs that are also MDR1 substrates also influence disease outcome and treatment efficacy. Although MDR1 is a well conserved gene, there is increasing evidence that its polymorphisms affect substrate specificity. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) occur frequently and have strong linkage, creating a common haplotype at positions 1236C>T (G412G), 2677G>T (A893S) and 3435C>T (I1145I). The frequency of the synonymous 3435C>T polymorphism has been shown to vary significantly according to ethnicity. Existing literature suggests that the haplotype plays a role in response to drugs and disease susceptibility. This review summarizes recent findings on the 3435C>T polymorphism of MDR1 and the haplotype to which it belongs. A possible molecular mechanism of action by ribosome stalling that can change protein structure and function by altering protein folding is discussed. PMID:19285158

  1. COMT Val158Met variant and functional haplotypes associated with childhood ADHD history in women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Zeynep; Kaplan, Allan S; Zai, Clement C; Levitan, Robert D; Kennedy, James L

    2011-06-01

    Up to one third of patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) report a history of ADHD symptoms, and both disorders may also be associated with dopaminergic abnormalities. COMT gene, coding for an enzyme responsible for the degradation of dopamine, may play a part in the etiology of ADHD and BN. This study aimed to (1) examine if certain variants of the COMT genetic markers (rs6269, rs4633, rs4818 and rs4680) are more common in BN versus controls; (2) assess transmission of COMT alleles in BN families; and (3) explore the role of COMT genotypes and haplotypes in bulimic women with childhood ADHD history. 72 BN probands and unaffected relatives were genotyped for COMT rs4680 (Val158Met) and three adjacent markers. The remaining 165 probands were matched with nonpsychiatric controls. We also investigated if COMT variants and haplotypes were associated with childhood ADHD history in a subgroup of 86 BN probands who completed the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS). Our results showed that cases and controls did not differ in COMT allele and haplotype frequencies. In contrast, specific alleles of all four COMT markers and the medium-activity haplotype were preferentially transmitted to the offspring with BN. COMT Val158 allele was overrepresented and the medium-activity haplotype was underrepresented in BN with childhood ADHD history (p=0.010). These findings suggest a possible role for COMT variants and related haplotypes in BN and its subphenotypes. If replicated, these preliminary findings may have implications for the prevention and treatment of BN that emerges in the context of childhood ADHD. PMID:21300128

  2. Insights into HLA-G Genetics Provided by Worldwide Haplotype Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Erick C.; Ramalho, Jaqueline; Porto, Iane O. P.; Lima, Thálitta H. A.; Felício, Leandro P.; Sabbagh, Audrey; Donadi, Eduardo A.; Mendes-Junior, Celso T.

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) belongs to the family of non-classical HLA class I genes, located within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). HLA-G has been the target of most recent research regarding the function of class I non-classical genes. The main features that distinguish HLA-G from classical class I genes are (a) limited protein variability, (b) alternative splicing generating several membrane bound and soluble isoforms, (c) short cytoplasmic tail, (d) modulation of immune response (immune tolerance), and (e) restricted expression to certain tissues. In the present work, we describe the HLA-G gene structure and address the HLA-G variability and haplotype diversity among several populations around the world, considering each of its major segments [promoter, coding, and 3′ untranslated region (UTR)]. For this purpose, we developed a pipeline to reevaluate the 1000Genomes data and recover miscalled or missing genotypes and haplotypes. It became clear that the overall structure of the HLA-G molecule has been maintained during the evolutionary process and that most of the variation sites found in the HLA-G coding region are either coding synonymous or intronic mutations. In addition, only a few frequent and divergent extended haplotypes are found when the promoter, coding, and 3′UTRs are evaluated together. The divergence is particularly evident for the regulatory regions. The population comparisons confirmed that most of the HLA-G variability has originated before human dispersion from Africa and that the allele and haplotype frequencies have probably been shaped by strong selective pressures. PMID:25339953

  3. A founder haplotype of APOE-Sendai mutation associated with lipoprotein glomerulopathy.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kentaro; Hashimoto, Taeko; Ogino, Daisuke; Matsunaga, Akira; Ito, Minoru; Masakane, Ikuto; Degawa, Noriyuki; Sato, Hiroshi; Shirai, Sayuri; Umetsu, Kazuo; Tamiya, Gen; Saito, Takao; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Lipoprotein glomerulopathy (LPG) is a hereditary disease characterized by lipoprotein thrombi in the glomerulus, hyperlipoproteinemia, and a marked increase in serum apolipoprotein E (APOE). More than 12 APOE mutations have been identified as causes of LPG, and APOE-Sendai (Arg145Pro) mutation was frequently detected in patients from the eastern part of Japan including Yamagata prefecture. Recently, effective therapy with intensive lipid-lowering agents was established, and epidemiologic data are required for early diagnosis. We determined the haplotype structure of APOE-Sendai in 13 patients from 9 unrelated families with LPG, and found that the haplotype of all APOE-Sendai mutations was identical, suggesting that APOE-Sendai mutation is common in Japanese patients probably through a founder effect. We also studied the gene frequency of APOE-Sendai in 2023 control subjects and 418 patients receiving hemodialysis in Yamagata prefecture using the TaqMan method, but did not identify any subjects carrying the mutation, indicating that it is very rare in the general population even in the eastern part of Japan. In addition to APOE mutation, other genetic and/or epigenetic factors are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of LPG because of its low penetrance. The patients did not have a common haplotype of the counterpart APOE allele, and some patients had the same haplotype of the counterpart APOE allele as the asymptomatic carriers. These results suggest that the counterpart APOE allele is not likely associated with the onset of LPG. Further study is required to clarify the pathogenesis of LPG. PMID:23407349

  4. Association of interleukin-1 gene cluster polymorphisms and haplotypes with multiple sclerosis in an Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Ayyoob; Javan, Bita; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Ebadi, Hamid; Fathi, Davood; Shahbazi, Majid

    2015-11-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multi-factorial autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. The exact etiology of MS is still unknown. Due to the important roles that cytokines play as mediators in immune and inflammatory responses, we have evaluated the association of IL-1 gene cluster polymorphisms and haplotypes with MS susceptibility in 306 unrelated MS patients and 312 healthy matched controls. A significant association was found for the IL-1? +3953 T allele [OR=1.43, 95% CI (1.14-1.79), P value=0.002, Pc=0.01] and for IL-1? +3953 T/T genotype and MS risk [OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.25-2.96), P value=0.005, Pc=0.01]. Interestingly, the genotypes of the polymorphisms remained significant under recessive, co-recessive and dominant models. However, no significant differences were found between MS patients and controls in the genotype and allele frequencies of the IL-1? -511, -31 and IL-1Ra polymorphisms. Haplotype analysis for IL-1? -31 and IL-1? -511, with moderate linkage disequilibrium (LD), using the EM algorithm revealed a significant global association of haplotype differences between the two groups. Lower presence of two haplotypes (H3: C-T and H4: T-C) was observed in the MS patients than healthy controls. However, after applying Bonferroni's correction the differences were not significant. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the association of the IL-1? +3953 gene polymorphism and MS susceptibility. PMID:26531703

  5. Genetic link between Asians and native Americans: evidence from HLA genes and haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, K; Ohashi, J; Bannai, M; Juji, T

    2001-09-01

    We have been studying polymorphisms of HLA class I and II genes in East Asians including Buryat in Siberia, Mongolian, Han Chinese, Man Chinese, Korean Chinese, South Korean, and Taiwan indigenous populations in collaboration with many Asian scientists. Regional populations in Japan, Hondo-Japanese, Ryukyuan, and Ainu, were also studied. HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 gene frequencies were subjected to the correspondence analysis and calculation of DA distances. The correspondence analysis demonstrated several major clusters of human populations in the world. "Mongoloid" populations were highly diversified, in which several clusters such as Northeast Asians, Southeast Asians, Oceanians, and Native Americans were observed. Interestingly, an indigenous population in North Japan, Ainu, was placed relatively close to Native Americans in the correspondence analysis. Distribution of particular HLA-A, -B, -DRB1 alleles and haplotypes was also analyzed in relation to migration and dispersal routes of ancestral populations. A number of alleles and haplotypes showed characteristic patterns of regional distribution. For example, B39-HR5-DQ7 (B*3901-DRB1*1406-DQB1*0301) was shared by Ainu and Native Americans. A24-Cw8-B48 was commonly observed in Taiwan indigenous populations, Maori in New Zealand, Orochon in Northeast China, Inuit, and Tlingit. These findings further support the genetic link between East Asians and Native Americans. We have proposed that various ancestral populations in East Asia, marked by different HLA haplotypes, had migrated and dispersed through multiple routes. Moreover, relatively small genetic distances and the sharing of several HLA haplotypes between Ainu and Native Americans suggest that these populations are descendants of some Upper Paleolithic populations of East Asia. PMID:11543902

  6. IL23R Haplotypes Provide A Large Population Attributable Risk for Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kent D.; Targan, Stephan R.; Mei, Ling; Ippoliti, Andrew F.; McGovern, Dermot; Mengesha, Emebet; King, Lily; Rotter, Jerome I.

    2008-01-01

    The IL-23 pathway plays a pivotal role in the development of chronic mucosal inflammation seen in the inflammatory bowel diseases. Multiple studies have now established the contribution of the interleukin 23 receptor gene (IL23R) to Crohn’s Disease (CD) risk in general and of the IL23R R381Q variant in particular. The aim of this work was to estimate the total contribution of this gene to CD risk test using a haplotype approach. Methods 763 CD subjects and 254 controls were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms in the IL23R gene using Illumina and ABI methods. Haplotypes were assigned using PHASEv2 and tested for association with CD by chi-square and permutation. Results Haplotypes with both increased and decreased risk for CD were observed in 2 of the 4 observed blocks (Block 2 H1: 55.4% control, 64% CD, p=0.019; H2: 64.5% control, 54.4% CD, p=0.006; Block 3 H1: 55.8% control, 64.4% CD, p=0.013; H2: 47.0% control, 36.6% CD, p=0.001). The population attributable risk for these haplotypes was substantially larger than that estimated for the IL23R R381Q variant (Block 2 H1 and block 3 H1 ~20%, compared with ~4% for Block 3 H6, containing the variant). Discussion These observations suggest that IL23R makes a substantial contribution to Crohn’s disease susceptibility, larger than that estimated from the population frequency of the R381Q variant. These observations also support the expectation that finding “hits” from genome wide association studies will be but an important chapter in the story of unraveling the genetic contribution to Crohn’s disease, rather than the final chapter that brings clarity to all the plot twists of a complicated story. PMID:18470928

  7. Mitochondrial haplotype analysis for differentiation of isolates of Phytophthora cinnamomi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While Phytophthora cinnamomi is heterothallic, there are few instances of successful crossing in laboratory experiments and analysis of field populations indicates a clonally reproducing population. In the absence of sexual recombination the ability to monitor mitochondrial haplotypes may provide a...

  8. Association of a bovine prion gene haplotype with atypical BSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSEs) are recently recognized prion diseases of cattle. Atypical BSEs are rare; approximately 30 cases have been identified worldwide. We tested prion gene (PRNP) haplotypes for an association with atypical BSE. Methodology/Principal Findin...

  9. Haplotype Map of Sickle Cell Anemia in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Ben Mustapha, Maha; Zorai, Amine; Ben Mansour, Ikbel; Chouachi, Dorra; Mellouli, Fethi; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Abbes, Salem

    2014-01-01

    β-Globin haplotypes are important to establish the ethnic origin and predict the clinical development of sickle cell disease patients (SCD). To determine the chromosomal background of βS Tunisian sickle cell patients, in this first study in Tunisia, we have explored four polymorphic regions of β-globin cluster on chromosome 11. It is the 5′ region of β-LCR-HS2 site, the intervening sequence II (IVSII) region of two fetal (Gγ and Aγ) genes and the 5′ region of β-globin gene. The results reveal a high molecular diversity of a microsatellite configuration describing the sequences haplotypes. The linkage disequilibrium analysis showed various haplotype combinations giving 22 “extended haplotypes”. These results confirm the utility of the β-globin haplotypes for population studies and contribute to knowledge of the Tunisian gene pool, as well as establishing the role of genetic markers in physiopathology of SCD. PMID:25197158

  10. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang; Huang, Shujia; Sun, Yuhui; Tong, Xin; Xie, Yinlong; Liu, Binghang; Yang, Hailong; Zheng, Hancheng; Li, Jian; Li, Bo; Wang, Yu; Yang, Fang; Sun, Peng; Liu, Siyang; Gao, Peng; Huang, Haodong; Sun, Jing; Chen, Dan; He, Guangzhu; Huang, Weihua; Huang, Zheng; Li, Yue; Tellier, Laurent C A M; Liu, Xiao; Feng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Xiuqing; Bolund, Lars; Krogh, Anders; Kristiansen, Karsten; Drmanac, Radoje; Drmanac, Snezana; Nielsen, Rasmus; Li, Songgang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Li, Yingrui; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should aid in translating genotypes to phenotypes for the development of personalized medicine. PMID:26006006

  11. Haplotype analysis of the genes encoding glutamine synthetase plastic isoforms and their association with nitrogen-use- and yield-related traits in bread wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Peng; Zhao, Xue-Qiang; He, Xue; Zhao, Guang-Yao; Li, Bin; Liu, Dong-Cheng; Zhang, Ai-Min; Zhang, Xue-Yong; Tong, Yi-Ping; Li, Zhen-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) plays a key role in the growth, nitrogen (N) use and yield potential of cereal crops. Investigating the haplotype variation of GS genes and its association with agronomic traits may provide useful information for improving wheat N-use efficiency and yield. We isolated the promoter and coding region sequences of the plastic glutamine synthetase isoform (GS2) genes located on chromosomes 2A, 2B and 2D in bread wheat. By analyzing nucleotide sequence variations of the coding region, two, six and two haplotypes were distinguished for TaGS2-A1 (a and b), TaGS2-B1 (a-f) and TaGS2-D1 (a and b), respectively. By analyzing the frequency data of different haplotypes and their association with N use and agronomic traits, four major and favorable TaGS2 haplotypes (A1b, B1a, B1b, D1a) were revealed. These favorable haplotypes may confer better seedling growth, better agronomic performance, and improved N uptake during vegetative growth or grain N concentration. Our data suggest that certain TaGS2 haplotypes may be valuable in breeding wheat varieties with improved agronomic performance and N-use efficiency. PMID:21039562

  12. Analysis of DR4 haplotypes in insulin dependent diabetes (IDD)

    SciTech Connect

    Monos, D.S.; Radka, S.F.; Zmijewski, C.M.; Kamoun, M.

    1986-03-05

    Population studies indicate that HLA-DR4 is implicated in the susceptibility of IDD. However, biochemical characterization of the serologically defined DR4 haplotype from normal individuals revealed five DR4 and three DQW3 molecular forms. Hence, in this study, they investigated the heterogeneity of the DR4 haplotype, using B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL) generated from patients with IDD and seropositive for DR4. Class II molecules, metabolically labeled with /sup 35/S-methionine, were immunoprecipitated with monoclonal antibodies specific for DR(L243), DQ(N297), DQW3(IVD12) or DR and DQ(SG465) and analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). The isoelectrofocusing (IEF) conditions employed in this study allow representation only of the DR4 haplotype from either DR3/4 or DR4/4 cell lines. The analysis of six different DR4 haplotypes from seven IDD patients, revealed the presence of two DR4 ..beta.. and two DQW3 ..beta.. chains. Three of the six DR4 ..beta.. haplotypes analyzed shared the same DR4 ..beta.. chain and three others shared a different one. Additionally five of the six haplotypes shared a different one. Additionally five of the six haplotypes shared the same DQW3 ..beta.. chain and only one was carrying a different one. Different combinations of the two DR4 and two DQW3 ..beta.. chains constitute three distinct patterns of DR4 haplotypes. These results suggest the prevalence of a DQW3 ..beta.. chain in the small sample of IDD patients studied. Studies of a large number of patients should clarify whether IDD is associated with unique variants of DR4 or DQW3 ..beta.. chains.

  13. Characterization of Bison bison major histocompatibility complex class IIa haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Traul, Donald L; Bhushan, Bharat; Eldridge, Jennifer A; Crawford, Timothy B; Li, Hong; Davies, Christopher J

    2005-12-01

    American bison (Bison bison) and domestic cattle (Bos taurus and Bos indicus) evolved from a common ancestor 1-1.4 million years ago. Nevertheless, they show dramatic differences in their susceptibility to infectious diseases, including malignant catarrhal fever (MCF). Although bison are highly susceptible to ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2) associated MCF, about 20% of healthy domesticated and wild bison are positive for OvHV-2 antibody. We are interested in testing the hypothesis that, within the bison population, the polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes influences resistance to MCF. However, since little was known about the MHC class II genes of bison, it was necessary to first characterize class II haplotypes present in Bi. bison (Bibi). Thus, the MHC class II haplotypes carried by 14 bison were characterized by the PCR-based cloning and sequencing of their DRB3, DQA, and DQB alleles. Twelve MHC class II haplotypes were identified in the 14 bison. These haplotypes comprised six previously reported and six new Bibi-DRB3 alleles, along with 11 Bibi-DQA and 10 Bibi-DQB alleles. For each bison class II allele, it was possible to identify closely related cattle sequences. The closest bison and bovine DQA, DQB, and DRB3 alleles, on average, differed by only 1.3, 3.5, and 5.8 amino acids, respectively. Furthermore, bison MHC haplotypes with both nonduplicated and duplicated DQ genes were identified; these haplotypes appear to have originated from the same ancestral haplotypes as orthologous cattle haplotypes. PMID:16331512

  14. The identification of an ESCC susceptibility SNP rs920778 that regulates the expression of lncRNA HOTAIR via a novel intronic enhancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojiao; Zhou, Liqing; Fu, Guobin; Sun, Fang; Shi, Juan; Wei, Jinyu; Lu, Chao; Zhou, Changchun; Yuan, Qipeng; Yang, Ming

    2014-09-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR), which could induce genome-wide retargeting of polycomb-repressive complex 2, trimethylates histone H3 lysine-27 (H3K27me3) and deregulation of multiple downstream genes, is involved in development and progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We hypothesized that the functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in HOTAIR may affect HOTAIR expression and/or its function and, thus, ESCC risk. Therefore, we examined the association between three haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNP) across the whole HOTAIR locus and ESCC risk as well as the functional relevance of an ESCC susceptibility SNP rs920778. Genotypes were determined in three independent case-control sets consisted of 2098 ESCC patients and 2150 controls. The allele-specific regulation on HOTAIR expression by the rs920778 SNP was investigated in vitro and in vivo. We found that the HOTAIR rs920778 TT carriers had a 1.37-fold, 1.78-fold and 2.08-fold increased ESCC risk in Jinan, Shijiazhuang and Huaian populations, respectively, compared with the CC carriers (P = 0.003, 7.7 × 10(-4) and 5.9 × 10(-4)). During inspecting functional relevance of the rs920778 SNP, we identified a novel intronic HOTAIR enhancer locating between +1719bp and +2353bp from the transcriptional start site through reporter assays. Moreover, there is an allelic regulation of rs920778 on HOTAIR expression via this enhancer in both ESCC cell lines and normal esophageal tissue specimens, with higher HOTAIR expression among T allele carriers. These results demonstrate that functional genetic variants influencing lncRNA regulation may explain a fraction of ESCC genetic basis. PMID:24788237

  15. A susceptibility haplotype within the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene influences bone mineral density in hypertensive women.

    PubMed

    Singh, Monica; Singh, Puneetpal; Singh, Surinder; Juneja, Pawan Kumar; Kaur, Taranpal

    2014-09-01

    The influence of the coordinated effect of various single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene on the risk of osteoporosis in hypertension has remained undetermined. Four pertinent SNPs of the eNOS gene, rs2070774, rs1799983, rs1800780 and rs3918181, were examined for the risk of osteoporosis in 313 hypertensive postmenopausal women in Northwest India. All the hypertensive women were verified with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and categorized as 150 with osteoporosis and 163 without osteoporosis. The minor allele (T) of rs1799983 exerts a statistically significant risk for osteoporosis both in dominant [odds ratio (OR) 3.71, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.12-6.49, P < 0.001] and recessive mode (OR 5.75, 95 % CI 1.24-26.69, P = 0.036) after Bonferroni correction. Bone mineral density (BMD) values (corrected for the effects of risk variables) according to eNOS SNP genotypes revealed a significant association with rs1799983 at both the lumbar spine (P = 0.001) and femoral neck (P = 0.023). Risk association analyses revealed a susceptibility haplotype TTAG which influences the risk of osteoporosis (OR 2.02, 95 % CI 1.05-3.39, P = 0.042) in hypertension after adjusting for the effects of risk factors. Furthermore, this haplotype was significantly associated with BMD at the lumbar spine (P = 0.029) and femoral neck (P = 0.021) in a dose-dependent manner. The results suggest that possession of the TTAG haplotype of the eNOS gene may increase the risk of osteoporosis two-fold in hypertensive postmenopausal women in Northwest India. PMID:24213141

  16. Haplotype Reconstruction in Large Pedigrees with Many Untyped Individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Li, Jing

    Haplotypes, as they specify the linkage patterns between dispersed genetic variations, provide important information for understanding the genetics of human traits. However haplotypes are not directly available from current genotyping platforms, and hence there are extensive investigations of computational methods to recover such information. Two major computational challenges arising in current family-based disease studies are large family sizes and many ungenotyped family members. Traditional haplotyping methods can neither handle large families nor families with missing members. In this paper, we propose a method which addresses these issues by integrating multiple novel techniques. The method consists of three major components: pairwise identical-bydescent (IBD) inference, global IBD reconstruction and haplotype restoring. By reconstructing the global IBD of a family from pairwise IBD and then restoring the haplotypes based on the inferred IBD, this method can scale to large pedigrees, and more importantly it can handle families with missing members. Compared with existing methods, this method demonstrates much higher power to recover