Science.gov

Sample records for sobre lo sublime

  1. The Sublime Corpse in Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda's Women's Journal "Album Cubano de lo Bueno y lo Bello" (1860)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaGreca, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This article examines Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda's choice to include articles depicting the advanced decay of cadavers, which are simultaneously horrible and awesome, in her women's periodical "Album Cubano de lo Bueno y lo Bello". Background on Avellaneda's biography, women's print culture, and theories of the sublime provide a frame for the…

  2. The Sublime and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Jamin

    2006-01-01

    The sublime is a theory of aesthetics that reached its highest popularity in British literature during the Romantic period (c. 1785-1832). This article (1) explicates philosophers' different meanings of the sublime; (2) show how the sublime is relevant to education; and (3) show how the sublime "works" in literature by analyzing William Blake's…

  3. Heat rejection sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingell, Charles W. (Inventor); Quintana, Clemente E. (Inventor); Le, Suy (Inventor); Clark, Michael R. (Inventor); Cloutier, Robert E. (Inventor); Hafermalz, David Scott (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A sublimator includes a sublimation plate having a thermal element disposed adjacent to a feed water channel and a control point disposed between at least a portion of the thermal element and a large pore substrate. The control point includes a sintered metal material. A method of dissipating heat using a sublimator includes a sublimation plate having a thermal element and a control point. The thermal element is disposed adjacent to a feed water channel and the control point is disposed between at least a portion of the thermal element and a large pore substrate. The method includes controlling a flow rate of feed water to the large pore substrate at the control point and supplying heated coolant to the thermal element. Sublimation occurs in the large pore substrate and the controlling of the flow rate of feed water is independent of time. A sublimator includes a sublimation plate having a thermal element disposed adjacent to a feed water channel and a control point disposed between at least a portion of the thermal element and a large pore substrate. The control point restricts a flow rate of feed water from the feed water channel to the large pore substrate independent of time.

  4. A sublimation heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Gary G.; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; McHale, Glen; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-03-01

    Heat engines are based on the physical realization of a thermodynamic cycle, most famously the liquid-vapour Rankine cycle used for steam engines. Here we present a sublimation heat engine, which can convert temperature differences into mechanical work via the Leidenfrost effect. Through controlled experiments, quantified by a hydrodynamic model, we show that levitating dry-ice blocks rotate on hot turbine-like surfaces at a rate controlled by the turbine geometry, temperature difference and solid material properties. The rotational motion of the dry-ice loads is converted into electric power by coupling to a magnetic coil system. We extend our concept to liquid loads, generalizing the realization of the new engine to both sublimation and the instantaneous vapourization of liquids. Our results support the feasibility of low-friction in situ energy harvesting from both liquids and ices. Our concept is potentially relevant in challenging situations such as deep drilling, outer space exploration or micro-mechanical manipulation.

  5. Sublimation, culture, and creativity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Emily; Zeppenfeld, Veronika; Cohen, Dov

    2013-10-01

    Combining insights from Freud and Weber, this article explores whether Protestants (vs. Catholics and Jews) are more likely to sublimate their taboo feelings and desires toward productive ends. In the Terman sample (Study 1), Protestant men and women who had sexual problems related to anxieties about taboos and depravity had greater creative accomplishments, as compared to those with sexual problems unrelated to such concerns and to those reporting no sexual problems. Two laboratory experiments (Studies 2 and 3) found that Protestants produced more creative artwork (sculptures, poems, collages, cartoon captions) when they were (a) primed with damnation-related words, (b) induced to feel unacceptable sexual desires, or (c) forced to suppress their anger. Activating anger or sexual attraction was not enough; it was the forbidden or suppressed nature of the emotion that gave the emotion its creative power. The studies provide possibly the first experimental evidence for sublimation and suggest a cultural psychological approach to defense mechanisms. PMID:23834638

  6. X-38 Advanced Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingell, Chuck; Quintana, Clemente; Le, Suy; Hafemalz, David S.; Clark, Mike; Cloutier, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses a heat rejection device for transferring heat from a space vehicle by venting water into space through the use of a novel, two-stage water distribution system. The system consists of two different, porous media that stop water-borne contaminants from clogging the system and causing operational failures. Feedwater passes through a small nozzle, then into a porous disk made of sintered stainless steel, and then finally into large-pore aluminum foam. The smaller pore layer of the steel disk controls the pressure drop of the feedwater. The ice forms in the foam layer, and then sublimates, leaving any contaminants behind. The pore-size of the foam is two orders of magnitude larger than the current porous plate sublimators, allowing for a greater tolerance for contaminants. Using metallic fibers in the foam also negates problems with compression seen in the use of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) felt.

  7. A sublimation heat engine

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Gary G.; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; McHale, Glen; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-01-01

    Heat engines are based on the physical realization of a thermodynamic cycle, most famously the liquid–vapour Rankine cycle used for steam engines. Here we present a sublimation heat engine, which can convert temperature differences into mechanical work via the Leidenfrost effect. Through controlled experiments, quantified by a hydrodynamic model, we show that levitating dry-ice blocks rotate on hot turbine-like surfaces at a rate controlled by the turbine geometry, temperature difference and solid material properties. The rotational motion of the dry-ice loads is converted into electric power by coupling to a magnetic coil system. We extend our concept to liquid loads, generalizing the realization of the new engine to both sublimation and the instantaneous vapourization of liquids. Our results support the feasibility of low-friction in situ energy harvesting from both liquids and ices. Our concept is potentially relevant in challenging situations such as deep drilling, outer space exploration or micro-mechanical manipulation. PMID:25731669

  8. A sublimation heat engine.

    PubMed

    Wells, Gary G; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; McHale, Glen; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-01-01

    Heat engines are based on the physical realization of a thermodynamic cycle, most famously the liquid-vapour Rankine cycle used for steam engines. Here we present a sublimation heat engine, which can convert temperature differences into mechanical work via the Leidenfrost effect. Through controlled experiments, quantified by a hydrodynamic model, we show that levitating dry-ice blocks rotate on hot turbine-like surfaces at a rate controlled by the turbine geometry, temperature difference and solid material properties. The rotational motion of the dry-ice loads is converted into electric power by coupling to a magnetic coil system. We extend our concept to liquid loads, generalizing the realization of the new engine to both sublimation and the instantaneous vapourization of liquids. Our results support the feasibility of low-friction in situ energy harvesting from both liquids and ices. Our concept is potentially relevant in challenging situations such as deep drilling, outer space exploration or micro-mechanical manipulation. PMID:25731669

  9. Modelling Sublimation of Carbon Dioxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author reports results in their efforts to model sublimation of carbon dioxide and the associated kinetics order and parameter estimation issues in their model. They have offered the reader two sets of data and several approaches to determine the rate of sublimation of a piece of solid dry ice. They presented several models…

  10. Sublimation systems and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D.; McKellar, Michael G.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2016-02-09

    A system for vaporizing and sublimating a slurry comprising a fluid including solid particles therein. The system includes a first heat exchanger configured to receive the fluid including solid particles and vaporize the fluid and a second heat exchanger configured to receive the vaporized fluid and solid particles and sublimate the solid particles. A method for vaporizing and sublimating a fluid including solid particles therein is also disclosed. The method includes feeding the fluid including solid particles to a first heat exchanger, vaporizing the fluid, feeding the vaporized fluid and solid particles to a second heat exchanger and sublimating the solid particles. In some embodiments the fluid including solid particles is liquid natural gas or methane including solid carbon dioxide particles.

  11. Displacement, Substitution, Sublimation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Sigmund Freund worked with the mechanisms of displacement, substitution, and sublimation. These mechanisms have many similarities and have been studied diagnostically and therapeutically. Displacement and substitution seem to fit in well with phobias, hysterias, somatiyations, prejudices, and scapegoating. Phobias, prejudices, and scapegoating…

  12. Eisenhower and the American Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Gorman, Ned

    2008-01-01

    This essay presents Dwight D. Eisenhower's presidential rhetoric as an iteration of an American synecdochal sublime. Eisenhower's rhetoric sought to re-aim civic sight beyond corporeal objects to the nation's transcendental essence. This rhetoric is intimately connected to prevailing political anxieties and exigencies, especially the problem of…

  13. Membrane evaporator/sublimator investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, J.; Ruder, J.; Strumpf, H.

    1974-01-01

    Data are presented on a new evaporator/sublimator concept using a hollow fiber membrane unit with a high permeability to liquid water. The aim of the program was to obtain a more reliable, lightweight and simpler Extra Vehicular Life Support System (EVLSS) cooling concept than is currently being used.

  14. APPARATUS FOR CONDENSATION AND SUBLIMATION

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, R.J.; Fuis, F. Jr.

    1958-10-01

    An apparatus is presented for the sublimation and condensation of uranium compounds in order to obtain an improved crystalline structure of this material. The apparatus comprises a vaporizing chamber and condensing structure connected thereto. There condenser is fitted with a removable liner having a demountable baffle attached to the liner by means of brackets and a removable pin. The baffle is of spiral cross-section and is provided with cooling coils disposed between the surfaces of the baffle for circulation of a temperature controlling liquid within the baffle. The cooling coll provides for controlllng the temperature of the baffle to insure formatlon of a satisfactory condensate, and the removable liner facilitates the removal of condensate formed during tbe sublimation process.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Transient Sublimator Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephen, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2010-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. Sublimators can be used as a topper during mission phases such as low lunar or low earth orbit. In these mission phases, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will investigate the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization during various feedwater timing scenarios. The X-38 sublimator and Contamination Insensitive Sublimator (CIS) were tested in a ground vacuum chamber to understand this behavior and to quantify the feedwater performance. Data from various scenarios will be analyzed to investigate feedwater utilization under the cyclical conditions. This paper will also provide recommendations for future sublimator designs and/or feedwater control.

  16. Investigation of Transient Performance for a Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Sheth, Rubik; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode during low lunar orbit for Altair and possibly Orion, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. In this mission phase, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will investigate the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization during various feedwater timing scenarios. The X-38 sublimator, which represents the state of the art in sublimator technology, was used to understand this behavior and to quantify the feedwater performance. Data from various scenarios will be analyzed to investigate feedwater utilization under the cyclical conditions. This paper will also provide recommendations for future sublimator designs and/or feedwater control.

  17. Investigation of Transient Performance for a Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. Sublimators can be used as a topper during mission phases such as low lunar or low earth orbit. In these mission phases, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will investigate the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization during various feedwater timing scenarios. The X-38 sublimator and Contamination Insensitive Sublimator (CIS) were tested in a ground vacuum chamber to understand this behavior and to quantify the feedwater performance. Data from various scenarios will be analyzed to investigate feedwater utilization under the cyclical conditions

  18. Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and the Aesthetically Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenabeele, Bart

    2003-01-01

    Much has been written on the relationship between Arthur Schopenhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche. Much remains to be said, however, concerning their respective theories of the sublime. In this article, the author first argues against the traditional, dialectical view of Schopenhauer's theory of the sublime that stresses the crucial role the sublime…

  19. Cooling-Trough Condenser for Sublimation Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenbraun, E. J.; Lucas, J. M.

    1995-11-01

    A wrap-around, trough condenser for use with large diameter (2.5") sublimation tubes is described. The design permits attachment of the condenser to the sublimation tube without removing the tube from the heater. It also permits the use of a variety of liquid (tap water, Dry Ice, and alcohol or acetone) or solid (ice or Dry Ice) coolants.

  20. Investigation of Transient Performance for a Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2010-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100 %. However, Sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode during low lunar orbit for Altair and possibly Orion. The cyclical topping mode represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. In this operational mode, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will investigate the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization for various feedwater timing scenarios.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Transient Sublimator Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2012-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered for operations in a cyclical topping mode, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. Sublimators can be used as a supplemental heat rejection device during mission phases where the environmental temperature or heat rejection requirement changes rapidly. This scenario may occur during low lunar orbit, low earth orbit, or other planetary orbits. In these mission phases, the need for supplemental heat rejection will vary between zero and some fraction of the overall heat load. In particular, supplemental heat rejection is required for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will describe the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization during various feedwater timing scenarios. Experimental data from various scenarios is analyzed to investigate feedwater consumption efficiency under the cyclical conditions. Start up utilization tests were conducted to better understand the transient performance. This paper also provides recommendations for future sublimator design and transient operation.

  2. Coating Thermoelectric Devices To Suppress Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Caillat, Thierry; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    A technique for suppressing sublimation of key elements from skutterudite compounds in advanced thermoelectric devices has been demonstrated. The essence of the technique is to cover what would otherwise be the exposed skutterudite surface of such a device with a thin, continuous film of a chemically and physically compatible metal. Although similar to other sublimation-suppression techniques, this technique has been specifically tailored for application to skutterudite antimonides. The primary cause of deterioration of most thermoelectric materials is thermal decomposition or sublimation - one or more elements sublime from the hot side of a thermoelectric couple, changing the stoichiometry of the device. Examples of elements that sublime from their respective thermoelectric materials are Ge from SiGe, Te from Pb/Te, and now Sb from skutterudite antimonides. The skutterudite antimonides of primary interest are CoSb3 [electron-donor (n) type] and CeFe(3-x)Co(x)Sb12 [electron-acceptor (p) type]. When these compounds are subjected to typical operating conditions [temperature of 700 C and pressure <10(exp -5) torr (0.0013 Pa)], Sb sublimes from their surfaces, with the result that Sb depletion layers form and advance toward their interiors. As the depletion layer advances in a given device, the change in stoichiometry diminishes the thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency of the device. The problem, then, is to prevent sublimation, or at least reduce it to an acceptably low level. In preparation for an experiment on suppression of sublimation, a specimen of CoSb3 was tightly wrapped in a foil of niobium, which was selected for its chemical stability. In the experiment, the wrapped specimen was heated to a temperature of 700 C in a vacuum of residual pressure <10(exp -5) torr (0.0013 Pa), then cooled and sectioned. Examination of the sectioned specimen revealed that no depletion layer had formed, indicating the niobium foil prevented sublimation of antimony at 700 C

  3. Experimental determination of ice sublimation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, R.; Canto, J.; Satorre, M. A.; Domingo, M.

    2011-11-01

    In Astrophysics, the study of ices is important due to the wide range of scenarios in which they are present. Their physical and chemical characteristics play an important role in the study of the interstellar medium (ISM). The assessment of the energy of sublimation allows us to improve our understanding of physical and/or chemical processes that take place where ices are present. The energy of sublimation E_sub is defined as the change of energy between solid and gas phase of certain molecule. This value is important to determinate other thermodynamical parameters such as the reticular energy of ionic compounds, the energy of formation in gas phase from the energy of formation in condensed phase, or to estimate the sublimation rate, which is very important in determining the evolution of surfaces of astrophysical objects.

  4. Heat of Sublimation of I-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Giles; Robarts, Ronald A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive double-beam laser photometry experiment to determine the molar heat of sublimation of I-2. The experiment employs common laboratory materials and components and gives results with a two percent to three percent accuracy. (Author/GA)

  5. No reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with NHCO into a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  6. NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  7. Energy dissipation during sublimation from porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, H. U.; Skorov, Yu. V.

    2002-09-01

    Several physical processes during the sublimation from and inside porous media have been investigated in detail in a series our papers (Skorov et al., 1999, Icarus 140, 173, Skorov et al., 2001, Icarus 153, 180, Davidsson and Skorov, 2002, Icarus 156, 223, Davidsson and Skorov, 2002, Icarus, in press) in order to analyse the gas production of cometary nuclei . New features are the absorption of the irradiation within the uppermost layers of the pores (rather than on the surface), taking into account the gas pressure of the coma, and temperature dependent condensation and sublimation coefficients. Detailed kinetic calculations revealed deviations from the canonical gasdynamic models. We will summarize the impact of these new calculations on the physics of sublimation from a cometary nucleus. The absorption of the irradiation below the surface leads to a decrease of sublimation flux near the subsolar point but to an increase near the evening terminator and nightside of a rotating nucleus. More absorbed energy is available to be transferred into the interior of the nucleus. This effect and consequences for the development of cometary nuclei will be discussed.

  8. System and method for suppressing sublimation using opacified aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeff S. (Inventor); Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Calliat, Thierry (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Jones, Steven M. (Inventor); Palk, Jong-Ah (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a castable, aerogel-based, ultra-low thermal conductivity opacified insulation to suppress sublimation. More specifically, the present invention relates to an aerogel opacified with various opacifying or reflecting constituents to suppress sublimation and provide thermal insulation in thermoelectric modules. The opacifying constituent can be graded within the aerogel for increased sublimation suppression, and the density of the aerogel can similarly be graded to achieve optimal thermal insulation and sublimation suppression.

  9. Numerical simulation of drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaoqing; Huang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Snow sublimation is an important hydrological process and one of the main causes of the temporal and spatial variation of snow distribution. Compared with surface sublimation, drifting snow sublimation is more effective due to the greater surface exposure area of snow particles in the air. Previous studies of drifting snow sublimation have focused on suspended snow, and few have considered saltating snow, which is the main form of drifting snow. In this study, a numerical model is established to simulate the process of drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer. The simulated results show 1) the average sublimation rate of drifting snow particles increases linearly with the friction velocity; 2) the sublimation rate gradient with the friction velocity increases with increases in the environmental temperature and the undersaturation of air; 3) when the friction velocity is less than 0.525 m/s, the snowdrift sublimation of saltating particles is greater than that of suspended particles; and 4) the snowdrift sublimation in the saltation layer is less than that of the suspended particles only when the friction velocity is greater than 0.625 m/s. Therefore, the drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer constitutes a significant portion of the total snow sublimation. PMID:25312383

  10. Sublimed C60 films for tribology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Gupta, B. K.; Van Cleef, Garrett W.; Capp, Cindy; Coe, James V.

    1993-06-01

    Fullerenes take the form of hollow, geodesic domes, which are formed from a network of pentagons and hexagons. The C60 molecule has the highest possible symmetry (icosahedral) and assumes the shape of a soccer ball. At room temperature, fullerene molecules pack in a face-centered-cubic lattice bonded with weak van der Waals attractions. Fullerenes can be dissolved in solvents such as toluene and benzene and easily sublimed. The resilience, high load bearing capacity, low surface energy, high chemical stability, and spherical shape of C60 molecules and weak intermolecular bonding offer great potential for various mechanical and tribological applications. Sublimed films of C60 have been produced and friction and wear performance of these films in various operating environments are the subject of this letter.

  11. Psychotherapy. Sublimation and the psychodynamics of birding.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Norman A

    2012-07-01

    An adventure in extreme birding prompted the psychoanalyst author to reflect on "why do people do this?" Like myriad human interests, vocations, and avocations, the activity of bird watching is a socially acceptable activity that is the final pathway for multiple motivations that are likely to have a long history in the individual's development. It may have origins in basic survival skills. Various psychological defense mechanisms may be involved, the most mature and successful one being sublimation. Success of a defense-like sublimation may be viewed in terms of freedom from anxiety or from obsessive extremes that interfere with the individual's wellbeing, important relationships, or physical or financial health. The author considers whether the characters in the film The Big Year exemplify such success or the lack of it. PMID:22805903

  12. No reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid and CO or other H-atom generating species is also present or added to the gas stream.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Sublimator Performance at Transient Heat Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephen, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. Sublimators can be used as a topper during mission phases such as low lunar or low earth orbit. In these mission phases, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will summarize the effort put into understanding sublimator response under a transient heat load. The performance will be assessed by detailing the changes in feedwater utilization due to transient starts and stops during various feedwater timing scenarios. Sublimator start up utilization will be assessed as a possible relationship to transient performance of a sublimator. This paper will also provide recommendations for future sublimator designs and/or feedwater control.

  14. Sublimating grains model of cometary coma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Tozzi, G. P.; Brucato, J. R.

    Billion years of space weathering produces a crust of organic matter (see e.g. Kanuchova et al. 2012) that will be released when a comet enter for the first time in the inner Solar System. New comets, coming form the Oort Colud at their first passage close to the Sun, are particularly important because they are not differentiated by the Solar radiation and they are supposed to have a large quantity of ice organic matter close to the surface. When a comet approach to the Sun, its activity is driven by the sublimation of these nucleus ices: if the heliocentric distances, R_H , is greater than 3 AU the sublimation of CO and CO_2 ices is the main source of comet activity, otherwise at shorter distances, the sublimation of water become the most important mechanism of activity. These gases, escaping from the nucleus, drag in the coma grains that can be refractory dust (silicates, carbon), water ice and/or organic ices. Oort comets at their first passage in the inner Solar System, should produce an halo of organic or water icy particles. Our group has been monitoring new, inbound, bright Oort comets (C/2011 F1, C/2012 S1, C/2012 K1, C/2013 V5, C/2012 F3, C/2013 US10, C/2013 X1) to search for these icy grains. The method consists in detecting the cloud of sublimating grains in the inner coma by using the Sigma Af function (Tozzi et al. 2007) directly from images. However this over-population of grains, beside the sublimation, can be also due to short time activity (outburst) or too big grains expanding at very slow velocity, as it has been found in comet 67P/C-G (Tozzi eta al, 2011, A&A, 531, 54). To disentangle between the phenomena it is necessary to monitor the comet both at short timescale, for the outbursts (by repeating the observations after few nights), and at long term (weeks-months). If the cloud does not expand with the decreasing of the heliocentric distance there is high probability that we are in presence of organic and/or water ice grains. We can disentangle

  15. GFEChutes Lo-Fi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gist, Emily; Turner, Gary; Shelton, Robert; Vautier, Mana; Shaikh, Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    NASA needed to provide a software model of a parachute system for a manned re-entry vehicle. NASA has parachute codes, e.g., the Descent Simulation System (DSS), that date back to the Apollo Program. Since the space shuttle did not rely on parachutes as its primary descent control mechanism, DSS has not been maintained or incorporated into modern simulation architectures such as Osiris and Antares, which are used for new mission simulations. GFEChutes Lo-Fi is an object-oriented implementation of conventional parachute codes designed for use in modern simulation environments. The GFE (Government Furnished Equipment), low-fidelity (Lo-Fi) parachute model (GFEChutes Lo-Fi) is a software package capable of modeling the effects of multiple parachutes, deployed concurrently and/or sequentially, on a vehicle during the subsonic phase of reentry into planetary atmosphere. The term "low-fidelity" distinguishes models that represent the parachutes as simple forces acting on the vehicle, as opposed to independent aerodynamic bodies. GFEChutes Lo-Fi was created from these existing models to be clean, modular, certified as NASA Class C software, and portable, or "plug and play." The GFE Lo-Fi Chutes Model provides basic modeling capability of a sequential series of parachute activities. Actions include deploying the parachute, changing the reefing on the parachute, and cutting away the parachute. Multiple chutes can be deployed at any given time, but all chutes in that case are assumed to behave as individually isolated chutes; there is no modeling of any interactions between deployed chutes. Drag characteristics of a deployed chute are based on a coefficient of drag, the face area of the chute, and the local dynamic pressure only. The orientation of the chute is approximately modeled for purposes of obtaining torques on the vehicle, but the dynamic state of the chute as a separate entity is not integrated - the treatment is simply an approximation. The innovation in GFEChutes

  16. Science Sublime: The Philosophy of the Sublime, Dewey's Aesthetics, and Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Feelings of awe, wonder, and appreciation have been largely ignored in the working lives of scientists and, in turn, science education has not accurately portrayed science to students. In an effort to bring the affective qualities of science into the classroom, this work draws on the writings of the sublime by Burke, Kant, Emerson, and Wordsworth…

  17. Reassessing Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature in the Kantian Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The sublime has been a relatively neglected topic in recent work in philosophical aesthetics, with existing discussions confined mainly to problems in Kant's theory. Given the revival of interest in his aesthetic theory and the influence of the Kantian sublime compared to other eighteenth-century accounts, this focus is not surprising. Kant's…

  18. Sublimation Growth of Titanium Nitride Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Li; Edgar, J H; Kenik, Edward A; Meyer III, Harry M

    2009-01-01

    The sublimation-recondensation growth of titanium nitride crystal with N/Ti ratio of 0.99 on tungsten substrate is reported. The growth rate dependence on temperature and pressure was determined, and the calculated activation energy is 775.8 29.8kJ/mol. The lateral and vertical growth rates changed with the time of growth and the fraction of the tungsten substrate surface covered. The orientation relationship of TiN (001) || W (001) with TiN [100] || W [110], a 45o angle between TiN [100] and W [100], occurs not only for TiN crystals deposited on W (001) textured tungsten but also for TiN crystals deposited on randomly orientated tungsten. This study demonstrates that this preferred orientational relationship minimizes the lattice mismatch between the TiN and tungsten.

  19. Sublime science: Teaching for scientific sublime experiences in middle school classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanaugh, Shane

    Due to a historical separation of cognition and emotion, the affective aspects of learning are often seen as trivial in comparison to the more 'essential' cognitive qualities - particularly in the domain of science. As a result of this disconnect, feelings of awe, wonder, and astonishment as well as appreciation have been largely ignored in the working lives of scientists. In turn, I believe that science education has not accurately portrayed the world of science to our students. In an effort to bring the affective qualities of science into the science classroom, I have drawn on past research in the field of aesthetic science teaching and learning as well as works by, Burke, Kant, and Dewey to explore a new construct I have called the "scientific sublime". Scientific sublime experiences represent a sophisticated treatment of the cognitive as well as affective qualities of science learning. The scientific sublime represents feelings of awe, wonder, and appreciation that come from a deep understanding. It is only through this understanding of a phenomenon that we can appreciate its true complexity and intricacies, and these understandings when mixed with the emotions of awe and reverence, are sublime. Scientific sublime experiences are an attempt at the re-integration of cognition and feeling. The goal of this research was twofold: to create and teach a curriculum that fosters scientific sublime experiences in middle school science classes, and to better understand how these experiences are manifested in students. In order to create an approach to teaching for scientific sublime experiences, it was first necessary for me to identify key characteristics of such an experience and a then to create a pedagogical approach, both of which are described in detail in the dissertation. This research was conducted as two studies in two different middle schools. My pedagogical approach was used to create and teach two five-week 7 th grade science units---one on weather

  20. Prediction of Sublimation Pressures of Low Volatility Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Bruce Douglas

    Sublimation pressures are required for solid-vapor phase equilibrium models in design of processes such as supercritical fluid extraction, sublimation purification and vapor epitaxy. The objective of this work is to identify and compare alternative methods for predicting sublimation pressures. A bibliography of recent sublimation data is included. Corresponding states methods based on the triple point (rather than critical point) are examined. A modified Trouton's rule is the preferred method for estimating triple point pressure in the absence of any sublimation data. Only boiling and melting temperatures are required. Typical error in log_{10} P _{rm triple} is 0.3. For lower temperature estimates, the slope of the sublimation curve is predicted by a correlation based on molar volume. Typical error is 10% of slope. Molecular dynamics methods for surface modeling are tested as estimators of vapor pressure. The time constants of the vapor and solid phases are too different to allow the vapor to come to thermal equilibrium with the solid. The method shows no advantages in prediction of sublimation pressure but provides insight into appropriate models and experimental methods for sublimation. Density-dependent augmented van der Waals equations of state based on hard-sphere distribution functions are examined. The perturbation term is almost linear and is well fit by a simple quadratic. Use of the equation provides reasonable fitting of sublimation pressures from one data point. Order-of-magnitude estimation is possible from melting temperature and solid molar volume. The inverse -12 fluid is used to develop an additional equation of state. Sublimation pressure results, including quality of pressure predictions, are similar to the hard-sphere results. Three-body (Axilrod -Teller) interactions are used to improve results.

  1. The formation of filamentary sublimate residues (FSR) from mineral grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storrs, A. D.; Fanale, F. P.; Saunders, R. S.; Stephens, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    The significant interparticle forces observed between solar system dust grains upon desorption or sublimation of excess volatiles in simulated Martian or cometary environments are presently investigated, in order to more precisely define these mechanisms and to simulate the types of deposits thereby formed. Some classes of phyllosilicate mineral grains are noted to bond together to form a highly porous filamentary sublimate residue (FSR) exhibiting an exceptionally high tensile strength for its density; this may be important in its control of erosion and sublimation in Martian and cometary environments. It is concluded that FSR formation from clean mineral grains in water ice may be important in the formation of the Martian polar layered terrain.

  2. Sublimation in bright spots on (1) Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathues, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Schaefer, M.; Le Corre, L.; Reddy, V.; Platz, T.; Cloutis, E. A.; Christensen, U.; Kneissl, T.; Li, J.-Y.; Mengel, K.; Schmedemann, N.; Schaefer, T.; Russell, C. T.; Applin, D. M.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Keller, H. U.; O'Brien, D. P.; Pieters, C. M.; Raymond, C. A.; Ripken, J.; Schenk, P. M.; Schmidt, B. E.; Sierks, H.; Sykes, M. V.; Thangjam, G. S.; Vincent, J.-B.

    2015-12-01

    The dwarf planet (1) Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt with a mean diameter of about 950 kilometres, is located at a mean distance from the Sun of about 2.8 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Thermal evolution models suggest that it is a differentiated body with potential geological activity. Unlike on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, where tidal forces are responsible for spewing briny water into space, no tidal forces are acting on Ceres. In the absence of such forces, most objects in the main asteroid belt are expected to be geologically inert. The recent discovery of water vapour absorption near Ceres and previous detection of bound water and OH near and on Ceres (refs 5, 6, 7) have raised interest in the possible presence of surface ice. Here we report the presence of localized bright areas on Ceres from an orbiting imager. These unusual areas are consistent with hydrated magnesium sulfates mixed with dark background material, although other compositions are possible. Of particular interest is a bright pit on the floor of crater Occator that exhibits probable sublimation of water ice, producing haze clouds inside the crater that appear and disappear with a diurnal rhythm. Slow-moving condensed-ice or dust particles may explain this haze. We conclude that Ceres must have accreted material from beyond the ‘snow line’, which is the distance from the Sun at which water molecules condense.

  3. Sublimation in bright spots on (1) Ceres.

    PubMed

    Nathues, A; Hoffmann, M; Schaefer, M; Le Corre, L; Reddy, V; Platz, T; Cloutis, E A; Christensen, U; Kneissl, T; Li, J-Y; Mengel, K; Schmedemann, N; Schaefer, T; Russell, C T; Applin, D M; Buczkowski, D L; Izawa, M R M; Keller, H U; O'Brien, D P; Pieters, C M; Raymond, C A; Ripken, J; Schenk, P M; Schmidt, B E; Sierks, H; Sykes, M V; Thangjam, G S; Vincent, J-B

    2015-12-10

    The dwarf planet (1) Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt with a mean diameter of about 950 kilometres, is located at a mean distance from the Sun of about 2.8 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Thermal evolution models suggest that it is a differentiated body with potential geological activity. Unlike on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, where tidal forces are responsible for spewing briny water into space, no tidal forces are acting on Ceres. In the absence of such forces, most objects in the main asteroid belt are expected to be geologically inert. The recent discovery of water vapour absorption near Ceres and previous detection of bound water and OH near and on Ceres (refs 5-7) have raised interest in the possible presence of surface ice. Here we report the presence of localized bright areas on Ceres from an orbiting imager. These unusual areas are consistent with hydrated magnesium sulfates mixed with dark background material, although other compositions are possible. Of particular interest is a bright pit on the floor of crater Occator that exhibits probable sublimation of water ice, producing haze clouds inside the crater that appear and disappear with a diurnal rhythm. Slow-moving condensed-ice or dust particles may explain this haze. We conclude that Ceres must have accreted material from beyond the 'snow line', which is the distance from the Sun at which water molecules condense. PMID:26659183

  4. Sulfur "Concrete" for Lunar Applications - Sublimation Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Toutanji, Houssam

    2006-01-01

    Melting sulfur and mixing it with an aggregate to form "concrete" is commercially well established and constitutes a material that is particularly well-suited for use in corrosive environments. Discovery of the mineral troilite (FeS) on the moon poses the question of extracting the sulfur for use as a lunar construction material. This would be an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. However, the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. Here it is assumed that the lunar ore can be mined, refined, and the raw sulfur melded with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. This study evaluates pure sulfur and two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar stimulant and SiO2 powder as aggregate additions. Each set was subjected to extended periods in a vacuum environment to evaluate sublimation issues. Results from these experiments are presented and discussed within the context of the lunar environment.

  5. Carbon-Sublimation Production of Fullerenes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinker, Frank Albert

    1995-01-01

    Carbon-sublimation production of fullerenes enjoys wide use in both experimental and industrial application worldwide. Although it has been nearly five years since the inception of the technique, little is known about the roles various parameters play in the production process. This work attempts to shed light, both experimentally and theoretically, on the basic processes at work in this type of fullerene production. Experimental results herein show that a functional relationship exists among the C_{60 }, C_{70}, C_{76}, C_ {78}, and C_{84} fullerenes produced in carbon arcs. This result is interpreted to mean that an equilibrium description of the production process may be valid. Theoretical calculations are then offered in support of such a view. The theory goes on to show details of an equilibrium description that reproduce essential features of fullerene mass-spectra. It is shown that equilibrium abundances of n-atom -sized clusters are highly dependent on the stoichiometric equation chosen to describe the system. However, common traits of the investigated equilibrium descriptions lead to useful conclusions.

  6. Mass spectrometry study of the sublimation of aliphatic dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badelin, V. G.; Tyunina, E. Yu.; Krasnov, A. V.; Tyunina, V. V.; Giricheva, N. I.; Girichev, A. V.

    2012-03-01

    The sublimation of glycyl-L-α-alanine (Gly-Ala), L-α-alanyl-L-α-alanine (Ala-Ala), and DL-α-alanyl-DL-α-valine (Ala-Val) aliphatic dipeptides is studied by electron ionization mass spectrometry in combination with Knudsen effusion. The temperature range in which substances sublime as monomer molecular forms is determined. Enthalpies of sublimation Δs H°( T) are determined for Gly-Ala, Ala-Ala, and Ala-Val. It is shown that the enthalpy of sublimation of dipeptides increases with an increase in the side hydrocarbon radical. The unknown Δs H°(298) values for 17 amino acids and nine dipeptides are estimated using the proposed "structure-property" correlation model, in which the geometry and electron characteristics of molecules are used as structural descriptors.

  7. Nietzsche's View of Sublimation in the Educational Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Ann Margaret

    1975-01-01

    Article outlined Nietzsche's beliefs on the primary aim of education, the conscious production of the free man through the process of sublimation, the active redirecting of one's life energy in the service of creativity. (Editor/RK)

  8. Development and Testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2007-01-01

    Sublimators have been used for heat rejection for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Some of the attractive features of sublimators are that they are compact, lightweight, and self-regulating. One of the drawbacks of previous designs has been sensitivity to non-volatile contamination in the feedwater, which can clog relatively small pores (approx. 3-6 micrometers) in the porous plates where ice forms and sublimates. A new design that is less sensitive to contaminants is being developed at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator (CIS) Engineering Development Unit (EDU).

  9. Development and Testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Westheimer, David T.

    2006-01-01

    Sublimators have been used for heat rejection for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Some of the attractive features of sublimators are that they are compact, lightweight, and self-regulating. One of the drawbacks of previous designs has been sensitivity to non-volatile contamination in the feedwater, which can clog relatively small pores (approx.3-6 microns) in the porous plates where ice forms and sublimates. A new design that is less sensitive to contaminants is being developed at the Johnson Space Center. This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator (CIS) Engineering Development Unit (EDU).

  10. Scanning electron microscope observations of sublimates from Merapi Volcano, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.

    1993-01-01

    Sublimates were sampled from high-temperature (up to 800??C) fumaroles at Merapi volcano in January 1984. Sampling is accomplished by inserting silica tubes into high-temperature vents. Volcanic glass flows through the tubes and sublimates precipitate on the inner walls in response to the temperature gradient. With decreasing temperature (800-500??C) in the tubes, there are five sublimate zones. Texturally, the sublimate phases grade from large, well-formed crystals at their highest-temperature occurrence to more numerous, smaller crystals that are less perfect at lower temperatures. These changes imply that the crystal nucleation and growth rates increase and decrease, respectively, as temperature decreases. Overall, the textural data suggest that the gas is saturated or slightly super-saturated with the phases at their hottest occurrence, but that the gas becomes increasingly super-saturated with the phases at lower temperatures. -from Author

  11. Dynamics and Mechanisms of Exfoliated Black Phosphorus Sublimation.

    PubMed

    Fortin-Deschênes, Matthieu; Levesque, Pierre L; Martel, Richard; Moutanabbir, Oussama

    2016-05-01

    We report on real time observations of the sublimation of exfoliated black phosphorus layers throughout annealing using in situ low energy electron microscopy. We found that sublimation manifests itself above 375 ± 20 °C through the nucleation and expansion of asymmetric, faceted holes with the long axis aligned along the [100] direction and sharp tips defined by edges consisting of alternating (10) and (11) steps. This thermally activated process repeats itself via successive sublimation of individual layers. Calculations and simulations using density functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo allowed to determine the involved atomic pathways. Sublimation is found to occur via detachments of phosphorus dimers rather than single atoms. This behavior and the role of defects is described using an analytical model that captures all essential features. This work establishes an atomistic-level understanding of the thermal stability of exfoliated black phosphorus and defines the temperature window available for material and device processing. PMID:27097073

  12. Sublimation of a crystal slowed by sorption of foreign molecules from a gaseous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, A. A.; Polyakova, V. I.

    2014-07-01

    Numerical simulation of the sublimation of the surface of an ice crystal has shown that the presence of a non-condensable gas substantially reduces the sublimation rate. It has been found that the slowing of the sublimation due to the adsorption of gas molecules on the crystal surface that fill the vacancies during sublimation prevents the formation of vacancy islands on the surface of the crystal required for evaporation of the surface molecular layer. The available results of studies that explain the slowing of the sublimation by the presence of a diffusion layer formed in the vapor medium near the sublimating surface are supplemented with new data showing that molecular processes on the crystal surface play an equally important role as the diffusion layer. Cases have been found where crystal sublimation is accelerated by the sorption of gas molecules. The obtained results refining the theory of sublimation can be used to develop methods for controlling sublimation.

  13. Sublimation rates of explosive materials : method development and initial results.

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, James M.; Patton, Robert Thomas

    2004-08-01

    Vapor detection of explosives continues to be a technological basis for security applications. This study began experimental work to measure the chemical emanation rates of pure explosive materials as a basis for determining emanation rates of security threats containing explosives. Sublimation rates for TNT were determined with thermo gravimetric analysis using two different techniques. Data were compared with other literature values to provide sublimation rates from 25 to 70 C. The enthalpy of sublimation for the combined data was found to be 115 kJ/mol, which corresponds well with previously reported data from vapor pressure determinations. A simple Gaussian atmospheric dispersion model was used to estimate downrange concentrations based on continuous, steady-state conditions at 20, 45 and 62 C for a nominal exposed block of TNT under low wind conditions. Recommendations are made for extension of the experimental vapor emanation rate determinations and development of turbulent flow computational fluid dynamics based atmospheric dispersion estimates of standoff vapor concentrations.

  14. Alumina Paste Sublimation Suppression Barrier for Thermoelectric Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah (Inventor); Caillat, Thierry (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Alumina as a sublimation suppression barrier for a Zintl thermoelectric material in a thermoelectric power generation device operating at high temperature, e.g. at or above 1000K, is disclosed. The Zintl thermoelectric material may comprise Yb.sub.14MnSb.sub.11. The alumina may be applied as an adhesive paste dried and cured on a substantially oxide free surface of the Zintl thermoelectric material and polished to a final thickness. The sublimation suppression barrier may be finalized by baking out the alumina layer on the Zintl thermoelectric material until it becomes substantially clogged with ytterbia.

  15. Enthalpy of sublimation as measured using a silicon oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Hamza; Pomeroy, J. M.

    In this study, we report the enthalpy of sublimation of common gases (nitrogen, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, neon, krypton, xenon, and water vapor) using a large area silicon oscillator with a sub-ng (~0.027 ng/cm2) mass sensitivity. The double paddle oscillator design enables high frequency stability (17 ppb) at cryogenic temperatures and provides a consistent technique for enthalpy measurements. The enthalpies of sublimation are derived from the rate of mass loss during programmed thermal desorption and are detected as a change in the resonance frequency of the self-tracking oscillator. These measured enthalpy values show excellent agreement with the accepted literature values.

  16. Contactless prompt tumbling rebound of drops from a sublimating slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Carlo; Jung, Stefan; Wetzel, Andreas; Heer, Emmanuel; Schoch, Philippe; Moqaddam, Ali Mazloomi; Chikatamarla, Shyam S.; Karlin, Ilya; Marengo, Marco; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2016-05-01

    We have uncovered a drop rebound regime, characteristic of highly viscous liquids impacting tilted sublimating surfaces. Here the drops, rather than showing a slide, spread, recoil, and rebound behavior, exhibit a prompt tumbling rebound. As a result, glycerol surprisingly rebounds faster than three orders of magnitude less viscous water. When a viscous drop impacts a sublimating surface, part of its initial linear momentum is converted into angular momentum: Lattice Boltzmann simulations confirmed that tumbling owes its appearance to the rapid transition of the internal angular velocity prior to rebound to a constant value, as in a tumbling solid body.

  17. Isotopic Fractionation of Water-Ice from Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, E.; Boyer, C.; Park, M.; Gormally, J.; Benitez, E.; Dominguez, G.

    2015-12-01

    Elizabeth Christensen, Charisa Boyer, Manesseh Park, Ezra Benitez, Gerardo Dominguez Understanding the multi-isotopic fractionation of water-ice that results from its sublimation may be important for understanding the isotopic composition of cometary ices. Here we describe an experimental setup whose purpose is to understand the effects of various astrophysical processes on the δD and δ18O and δ17O composition of water-ices. Our setup consists of an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber with oil free pumping, a closed cycle He cryostat to achieve low temperatures (capable of reaching 6K), and a vacuum line connected to the chamber via a UHV feed-through. Water isotopologues H216O, H218O, H217O, and HD16O samples can be measured after sublimation of water-ice with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (Picarro L2120-i) that is connected to the vacuum line. To perform these experiments, ambient water vapor was introduced into, frozen, and purified inside the UHV chamber (T< 150 K). Water-ice samples were sublimated for varying amounts of time to collect various fractions of the original reservoir. We will present the first results on the oxygen and deuterium isotopic fractionation of water-ice sublimation and discuss their implications for interpreting the isotopic compositions of cometary ices.

  18. The Digital Sublime: Lessons from Kelli Connell's "Double Life"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yi-hui

    2012-01-01

    The digital sublime refers to digital-composite photography that presents "the existence of something unpresentable" and that renders a matchless look a sophisticated fabrication, a perfect and clean composition, a maximum color saturation, a multiple-point perspective, and stunning or newfangled content. Abandoning the traditional one-shot mode…

  19. System for NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, R.A.

    1989-01-24

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid. 1 fig.

  20. Optimization of fast dissolving etoricoxib tablets prepared by sublimation technique.

    PubMed

    Patel, D M; Patel, M M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop fast dissolving tablets of etoricoxib. Granules containing etoricoxib, menthol, crospovidone, aspartame and mannitol were prepared by wet granulation technique. Menthol was sublimed from the granules by exposing the granules to vacuum. The porous granules were then compressed in to tablets. Alternatively, tablets were first prepared and later exposed to vacuum. The tablets were evaluated for percentage friability and disintegration time. A 3(2) full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of 2 formulation variables: amount of menthol and crospovidone. The results of multiple regression analysis indicated that for obtaining fast dissolving tablets; optimum amount of menthol and higher percentage of crospovidone should be used. A surface response plots are also presented to graphically represent the effect of the independent variables on the percentage friability and disintegration time. The validity of a generated mathematical model was tested by preparing a checkpoint batch. Sublimation of menthol from tablets resulted in rapid disintegration as compared with the tablets prepared from granules that were exposed to vacuum. The optimized tablet formulation was compared with conventional marketed tablets for percentage drug dissolved in 30 min (Q(30)) and dissolution efficiency after 30 min (DE(30)). From the results, it was concluded that fast dissolving tablets with improved etoricoxib dissolution could be prepared by sublimation of tablets containing suitable subliming agent. PMID:20390084

  1. Optimization of Fast Dissolving Etoricoxib Tablets Prepared by Sublimation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Patel, D. M.; Patel, M. M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop fast dissolving tablets of etoricoxib. Granules containing etoricoxib, menthol, crospovidone, aspartame and mannitol were prepared by wet granulation technique. Menthol was sublimed from the granules by exposing the granules to vacuum. The porous granules were then compressed in to tablets. Alternatively, tablets were first prepared and later exposed to vacuum. The tablets were evaluated for percentage friability and disintegration time. A 32 full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of 2 formulation variables: amount of menthol and crospovidone. The results of multiple regression analysis indicated that for obtaining fast dissolving tablets; optimum amount of menthol and higher percentage of crospovidone should be used. A surface response plots are also presented to graphically represent the effect of the independent variables on the percentage friability and disintegration time. The validity of a generated mathematical model was tested by preparing a checkpoint batch. Sublimation of menthol from tablets resulted in rapid disintegration as compared with the tablets prepared from granules that were exposed to vacuum. The optimized tablet formulation was compared with conventional marketed tablets for percentage drug dissolved in 30 min (Q30) and dissolution efficiency after 30 min (DE30). From the results, it was concluded that fast dissolving tablets with improved etoricoxib dissolution could be prepared by sublimation of tablets containing suitable subliming agent. PMID:20390084

  2. Modeling the development of martian sublimation thermokarst landforms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dundas, Colin M.; Byrne, Shane; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-01-01

    Sublimation-thermokarst landforms result from collapse of the surface when ice is lost from the subsurface. On Mars, scalloped landforms with scales of decameters to kilometers are observed in the mid-latitudes and considered likely thermokarst features. We describe a landscape evolution model that couples diffusive mass movement and subsurface ice loss due to sublimation. Over periods of tens of thousands of Mars years under conditions similar to the present, the model produces scallop-like features similar to those on the Martian surface, starting from much smaller initial disturbances. The model also indicates crater expansion when impacts occur in surfaces underlain by excess ice to some depth, with morphologies similar to observed landforms on the Martian northern plains. In order to produce these landforms by sublimation, substantial quantities of excess ice are required, at least comparable to the vertical extent of the landform, and such ice must remain in adjacent terrain to support the non-deflated surface. We suggest that Martian thermokarst features are consistent with formation by sublimation, without melting, and that significant thicknesses of very clean excess ice (up to many tens of meters, the depth of some scalloped depressions) are locally present in the Martian mid-latitudes. Climate conditions leading to melting at significant depth are not required.

  3. Modeling the development of martian sublimation thermokarst landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dundas, Colin M.; Byrne, Shane; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-12-01

    Sublimation-thermokarst landforms result from collapse of the surface when ice is lost from the subsurface. On Mars, scalloped landforms with scales of decameters to kilometers are observed in the mid-latitudes and considered likely thermokarst features. We describe a landscape evolution model that couples diffusive mass movement and subsurface ice loss due to sublimation. Over periods of tens of thousands of Mars years under conditions similar to the present, the model produces scallop-like features similar to those on the martian surface, starting from much smaller initial disturbances. The model also indicates crater expansion when impacts occur in surfaces underlain by excess ice to some depth, with morphologies similar to observed landforms on the martian northern plains. In order to produce these landforms by sublimation, substantial quantities of excess ice are required, at least comparable to the vertical extent of the landform, and such ice must remain in adjacent terrain to support the non-deflated surface. We suggest that martian thermokarst features are consistent with formation by sublimation, without melting, and that significant thicknesses of very clean excess ice (up to many tens of meters, the depth of some scalloped depressions) are locally present in the martian mid-latitudes. Climate conditions leading to melting at significant depth are not required.

  4. Literary Study, Measurement, and the Sublime: Disciplinary Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiland, Donna, Ed.; Rosenthal, Laura J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This collection of essays, "Literary Study, Measurement, and the Sublime: Disciplinary Assessment," edited by Donna Heiland and Laura J. Rosenthal, represents an important new venture in the Foundation's communication program. The book is the product of many authors, including the editors, both of whom have written essays for it. But it is the…

  5. System for NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  6. Modular Porous Plate Sublimator /MPPS/ requires only water supply for coolant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathbun, R. J.

    1966-01-01

    Modular porous plate sublimators, provided for each location where heat must be dissipated, conserve the battery power of a space vehicle by eliminating the coolant pump. The sublimator requires only a water supply for coolant.

  7. Alumina Paste Layer as a Sublimation Suppression Barrier for Yb14MnSb11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah; Caillat, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Sublimation is a major cause of degradation of thermoelectric power generation systems. Most thermoelectric materials tend to have peak values at the temperature where sublimation occurs. A sublimation barrier is needed that is stable at operating temperatures, inert against thermoelectric materials, and able to withstand thermal cycling stress. A porous alumina paste layer is suitable as a sublimation barrier for Yb14MnSb11. It can accommodate stress generated by the thermal expansion discrepancy between the suppression layer and thermoelectric materials. Sublimation suppression is achieved by filling pores naturally with YbO2, a natural byproduct of sublimation. YbO2 generated during the sublimation of Yb14MnSb11 fills the porous structure of the alumina paste, causing sublimation to decrease with time as the pores become filled.

  8. Advances in sublimation studies for particles of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Nguyen, Viet; Fischer, Thomas; Abrishami, Tara; Papantonakis, Michael; Kendziora, Chris; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2015-05-01

    When handling explosives, or related surfaces, the hands routinely become contaminated with particles of explosives and related materials. Subsequent contact with a solid surface results in particle crushing and deposition. These particles provide an evidentiary trail which is useful for security applications. As such, the opto-physico-chemical characteristics of these particles are critical to trace explosives detection applications in DOD or DHS arenas. As the persistence of these particles is vital to their forensic exploitation, it is important to understand which factors influence their persistence. The longevity or stability of explosives particles on a substrate is a function of several environmental parameters or particle properties including: Vapor pressure, particle geometry, airflow, particle field size, substrate topography, humidity, reactivity, adlayers, admixtures, particle areal density, and temperature. In this work we deposited particles of 2,4-dinitrotoluene on standard microscopy glass slides by particle sieving and studied their sublimation as a function of airflow velocity, areal particle density and particle field size. Analysis of 2D microscopic images was used to compute and track particle size and geometrical characteristics. The humidity, temperature and substrate type were kept constant for each experiment. A custom airflow cell, using standard microscopy glass slide, allowed in-situ photomicroscopy. Areal particle densities and airflow velocities were selected to provide relevant loadings and flow velocities for a range of potential applications. For a chemical of interest, we define the radial sublimation velocity (RSV) for the equivalent sphere of a particle as the parameter to characterize the sublimation rate. The RSV is a useful parameter because it is independent of particle size. The sublimation rate for an ensemble of particles was found to significantly depend on airflow velocity, the areal density of the particles, and the

  9. Relationship between molecular descriptors and the enthalpies of sublimation of natural amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badelin, V. G.; Tyunina, V. V.; Girichev, G. V.; Tyunina, E. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    A multiparameter correlation between the enthalpies of sublimation and molecular descriptors of natural amino acids is proposed, based on generalized experimental and literature data on the heat effects of sublimation. The contributions from Van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bond formation, and electrostatic effects into enthalpy of sublimation has been evaluated using regression coefficients.

  10. Robust Magnetic Properties of a Sublimable Single-Molecule Magnet.

    PubMed

    Kiefl, Evan; Mannini, Matteo; Bernot, Kevin; Yi, Xiaohui; Amato, Alex; Leviant, Tom; Magnani, Agnese; Prokscha, Thomas; Suter, Andreas; Sessoli, Roberta; Salman, Zaher

    2016-06-28

    The organization of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) on surfaces via thermal sublimation is a prerequisite for the development of future devices for spintronics exploiting the richness of properties offered by these magnetic molecules. However, a change in the SMM properties due to the interaction with specific surfaces is usually observed. Here we present a rare example of an SMM system that can be thermally sublimated on gold surfaces while maintaining its intact chemical structure and magnetic properties. Muon spin relaxation and ac susceptibility measurements are used to demonstrate that, unlike other SMMs, the magnetic properties of this system in thin films are very similar to those in the bulk, throughout the full volume of the film, including regions near the metal and vacuum interfaces. These results exhibit the robustness of chemical and magnetic properties of this complex and provide important clues for the development of nanostructures based on SMMs. PMID:27139335

  11. Trust: the sublime duty in health care leadership.

    PubMed

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2010-01-01

    Trust is the essence of human social existence. From the moment of birth, trust is the basic component in any human relationship and interaction. Trust is the Holy Grail for human confidence in others. From human survival to organizational survival, trust is the primordial bond. No organization is more dependent on trust than health care. This article views trust as the most basic fundamental quality for leadership. Trust is a sublime duty of a leader and the leadership of an organization. Leadership sets the culture of trust. Trust is the one quality that is essential for guiding an organization toward serving others. This article addresses trust from many perspectives. Trust is viewed from our subordinates, our peers, our superiors, and the public we serve. This article postulates how trust in an organization is the sublime duty of leadership that unites all human understanding and without it destroys all human relationships. PMID:20145465

  12. Sublimator Driven Coldplate Engineering Development Unit Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2010-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a traditional thermal control scheme. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially increasing reliability and reducing complexity while saving both mass and power. Because the SDC requires a consumable feedwater, it can only be used for short mission durations. Additionally, the SDC is ideal for a vehicle with small transport distances and low heat rejection requirements. An SDC Engineering Development Unit was designed and fabricated. Performance tests were performed in a vacuum chamber to quantify and assess the performance of the SDC. The test data was then used to develop correlated thermal math models. Nonetheless, an Integrated Sublimator Driven Coldplate (ISDC) concept is being developed. The ISDC couples a coolant loop with the previously described SDC hardware. This combination allows the SDC to be used as a traditional coldplate during long mission phases and provides for dissimilar system redundancy

  13. Astrometric Study of Lo 1339

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiramihardja, S. D.; Arifyanto, M. I.; Sugianto, Y.; Kunjaya, C.

    2010-10-01

    We presented a preliminary result of astrometric study of galactic cluster Lo 1339 using proper motion data from UCAC2 catalog. We applied the maximum likelihood method to determine cluster membership by using the proper motion data. The Padova isochrones lines with solar metallicity were fitted upon the Color Magnitude Diagram in near-infrared to derive physical parameters of the cluster, where we obtained the age of cluster log t = 8.4+/-0.2, the distance of 1284+/-140 pc, and the absorption AJ = 0.26+/-0.13 mag with cluster diameter of 4.9+/-0.5 pc.

  14. Sublimation measurements and analysis of high temperature thermoelectric materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, V.; Noon, L.

    1983-01-01

    High temperature thermoelectric device sublimation effects are compared for rare earth sulfides, selenides, and state-of-the-art Si-Ge alloys. Although rare earth calcogenides can potentially exhibit superior sublimation characteristics, the state-of-the-art Si-Ge alloy with silicon nitride sublimation-inhibitive coating has been tested to 1000 C. Attention is given to the ceramic electrolyte cells, forming within electrical and thermal insulation, which affect leakage conductance measurements in Si-Ge thermoelectric generators.

  15. Adhesive coated electrical apparatus having sublimable protective covering and an assembly method

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, R.E.

    1982-08-10

    Electrical apparatus including an enclosure, an electrode disposed within the enclosure, and supports for insulatably supporting the electrode within the enclosure has a permanently sticky adhesive material which is disposed on the interior surface of the outer enclosure. A high-vapor-pressure sublimable material is disposed on the permanently sticky adhesive material, with the sublimable material capable of subliming away in the presence of a vacuum. The presence of the sublimable material enables the apparatus to be non-sticky during assembly and handling operations, while being rendered sticky upon commissioning of the apparatus.

  16. Dynamic sublimation pressure and the catastrophic breakup of Comet ISON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckloff, Jordan K.; Johnson, Brandon C.; Bowling, Timothy; Jay Melosh, H.; Minton, David; Lisse, Carey M.; Battams, Karl

    2015-09-01

    Previously proposed mechanisms have difficulty explaining the disruption of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) as it approached the Sun. We describe a novel cometary disruption mechanism whereby comet nuclei fragment and disperse through dynamic sublimation pressure, which induces differential stresses within the interior of the nucleus. When these differential stresses exceed its material strength, the nucleus breaks into fragments. We model the sublimation process thermodynamically and propose that it is responsible for the disruption of Comet ISON. We estimate the bulk unconfined crushing strength of Comet ISON's nucleus and the resulting fragments to be 0.5 Pa and 1-9 Pa, respectively, assuming typical Jupiter Family Comet (JFC) albedos. However, if Comet ISON has an albedo similar to Pluto, this strength estimate drops to 0.2 Pa for the intact nucleus and 0.6-4 Pa for its fragments. Regardless of assumed albedo, these are similar to previous strength estimates of JFCs. This suggests that, if Comet ISON is representative of dynamically new comets, then low bulk strength is a primordial property of some comet nuclei, and not due to thermal processing during migration into the Jupiter Family.

  17. The thermal sublimation process and atmosphere of Iapetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, I. L.; Wang, Y. C.; Ip, W. H.

    Iapetus one of the outer icy satellites of Saturn is characterized by a large albedo asymmetry 0 04 vs 0 5 between the leading and trailing hemispheres The origin of this color dichotomy is still a puzzle A related question is whether the long-term surface icy material transport driven by thermal sublimation might be effective in modifying or shaping some of the observed features We have made used the preliminary results reported by the CIRS observations on Cassini to construct a surface temperature map The peak temperature on the dark side reaches 130K and the corresponding value on the bright side is about 100K If the dark material is composed mainly of water ice the related sublimation process - in addition to ion sputtering and photo-sputtering - could support the formation of a thin atmosphere This surface-bound atmosphere is of exospheric nature and the surface transport of the water molecules is characterized by ballistic motion from low latitude region to the poles We will present our simulation results on the short-term and long-term mass transport and atmospheric processes

  18. Cerium Tetrafluoride: Sublimation, Thermolysis, and Atomic Fluorine Migration.

    PubMed

    Chilingarov, N S; Knot'ko, A V; Shlyapnikov, I M; Mazej, Z; Kristl, M; Sidorov, L N

    2015-08-01

    Saturated vapor pressure p° and enthalpy of sublimation (ΔsH°) of cerium tetrafluoride CeF4 were determined by means of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry in the range of 750-920 K. It was discovered that sublimation of cerium tetrafluoride from a platinum effusion cell competes with thermal decomposition to CeF3 in the solid phase, but no accompanying release of fluorine to the gas phase occurs. Thus, fluorine atoms migrate within the surface layer of CeF4(s) to the regions of their irreversible drain. We used scanning electron microscopy to study the distribution of the residual CeF3(s) across the inner surface of the effusion cell after complete evaporation of CeF4(s). It was observed that CeF3 accumulates near the edge of the effusion orifice and near the junction of the lid and the body of the cell, that is, in those regions where the fluorine atoms can migrate to a free platinum surface and thus be depleted from the system. Distribution of CeF3(s) solid particles indicates the ways of fluorine atoms migration providing CeF3(s) formation inside the CeF4(s) surface layer. PMID:26165149

  19. The SCITEAS experiment: Optical characterizations of sublimating icy planetary analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Jost, B.; Poch, O.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Vuitel, B.; Thomas, N.

    2015-05-01

    We have designed and built a laboratory facility to investigate the spectro-photometric and morphologic properties of different types of ice-bearing planetary surface analogs and follow their evolution upon exposure to a low pressure and low temperature environment. The results obtained with this experiment are used to verify and improve our interpretations of current optical remote-sensing datasets. They also provide valuable information for the development and operation of future optical instruments. The Simulation Chamber for Imaging the Temporal Evolution of Analogue Samples (SCITEAS) is a small thermal vacuum chamber equipped with a variety of ports and feedthroughs that permit both in-situ and remote characterizations as well as interacting with the sample. A large quartz window located directly above the sample is used to observe its surface from outside with a set of visible and near-infrared cameras. The sample holder can be easily and quickly inserted and removed from the chamber and is compatible with the other measurement facilities of the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy) at the University of Bern. We report here on the results of two of the first experiments performed in the SCITEAS chamber. In the first experiment, fine-grained water ice mixed with dark organic and mineral matter was left to sublime in vacuum and at low temperature, simulating the evolution of the surface of a comet nucleus approaching the Sun. We observed and characterized the formation and evolution of a crust of refractory organic and mineral matter at the surface of the sample and linked the evolution of its structure and texture to its spectro-photometric properties. In the second experiment, a frozen soil was prepared by freezing a mixture of smectite mineral and water. The sample was then left to sublime for 6 h to simulate the loss of volatiles from icy soil at high latitudes on Mars. Colour images were produced using the definitions of the

  20. Matrix isolation sublimation: An apparatus for producing cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sacramento, R. L.; Alves, B. X.; Silva, B. A.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.; Oliveira, A. N.; Li, M. S.

    2015-07-15

    We describe the apparatus to generate cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules based on matrix isolation sublimation. Isolation matrices of Ne and H{sub 2} are hosts for atomic and molecular species which are sublimated into vacuum at cryogenic temperatures. The resulting cryogenic beams are used for high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The technique also aims at loading atomic and molecular traps.

  1. Direct Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from Nucleic Acids Using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Schubert, Michael; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    A sublimation technique was developed to isolate purines and pyrimidines directly from lambda-deoxyribonucleic acid (lambda-DNA) and Escherichia coli cells. The sublimation of adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine from lambda-DNA was tested under reduced pressure (approx. 0.5 Torr) at temperatures of >150 C. With the exception of guanine, approximately 60 -75% of each base was sublimed directly from the lambda-DNA and recovered on a coldfinger of the sublimation apparatus after heating to 450 C. Several nucleobases including adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil were also recovered from E. coli bacteria after heating the cells to the same temperature, although some thermal decomposition of the bases also occurred. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from native E. coli DNA and RNA without any chemical treatment of the cells.

  2. Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.

    1993-02-01

    Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF{sub 6} in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % {sup 235}U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

  3. Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.

    1993-02-01

    Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF[sub 6] in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % [sup 235]U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

  4. Testing and Model Correlation of Sublimator Driven Coldplate Coupons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik; Stephan, Ryan; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2008-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a traditional thermal control scheme. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially saving mass, power, and complexity. Because this concept relies on evaporative heat rejection techniques, it is primarily useful for short mission durations. Additionally, the concept requires a conductive path between the heat-generating component and the heat rejection device. Therefore, it is mostly a relevant solution for a vehicle with a relatively low heat rejection requirement. Coupon level tests were performed at NASA's Johnson Space Center to better understand the basic operational principles and to validate the analytical methods being used for the SDC development. This paper outlines the results of the SDC coupon tests, the subsequent thermal model correlation, and a description of the SDC Engineering Development Unit design.

  5. Methods of conveying fluids and methods of sublimating solid particles

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-10-01

    A heat exchanger and associated methods for sublimating solid particles therein, for conveying fluids therethrough, or both. The heat exchanger includes a chamber and a porous member having a porous wall having pores in communication with the chamber and with an interior of the porous member. A first fluid is conveyed into the porous member while a second fluid is conveyed into the porous member through the porous wall. The second fluid may form a positive flow boundary layer along the porous wall to reduce or eliminate substantial contact between the first fluid and the interior of the porous wall. The combined first and second fluids are conveyed out of the porous member. Additionally, the first fluid and the second fluid may each be conveyed into the porous member at different temperatures and may exit the porous member at substantially the same temperature.

  6. Sublimation Model for Formation of Martian Residual Cap Depressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, S.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2000-10-01

    In an effort for explain the formation of the 'Swiss-cheese' terrain visible on the southern residual cap of Mars, we have developed a radiative model to follow the growth/decay of an initial depression due to sublimation/condensation of carbon dioxide. The pits making up this terrain have many distinctive features, they are shallow ( 10m deep), with steep walls and flat floors and contain an interior moat which runs along the bottom of the walls. They have lateral sizes ranging from a few 10's of meters to a kilometer and are quasi-circular. The model accounts for incident sunlight, emitted thermal radiation, and scattered short and long wave radiation. We have investigated many cases involving pure dry-ice with constant albedo, albedo as a function of insolation, and differing albedo for fresh and residual frost (the latter has lower albedo). The last case mentioned shows the most promising results to date. With these conditions it is possible for the depressions to grow and develop flat central portions although they still lack the observed steep walls of the pits. In the other cases mentioned the initial depressions heal themselves and disappear into the surrounding terrain. Other processes or materials could be responsible for the remainder of the observed features. Water ice stored a few meters under a carbon dioxide covering would have dramatic effects on the growth of any depression which encounters it, both due to its low sublimation rate and its ability to store heat. We will extend the current model to include a water ice layer and account for the subsequent heat storage which could possibly follow. For water ice models, a challenge is to reproduce the low brightness temperatures that persist throughout the summer at the residual south polar cap.

  7. Estimating surface sublimation losses from snowpacks in a mountain catchment using eddy covariance and turbulent transfer calculations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sublimation is a critical component of the snow cover mass balance. While sublimation can be directly measured using eddy covariance (EC), such measurements are relatively uncommon in complex mountainous environments. EC measurements of surface snowpack sublimation from three consecutive winter sea...

  8. A neurobiological enquiry into the origins of our experience of the sublime and beautiful.

    PubMed

    Ishizu, Tomohiro; Zeki, Semir

    2014-01-01

    Philosophies of aesthetics have posited that experience of the sublime-commonly but not exclusively derived from scenes of natural grandeur-is distinct from that of beauty and is a counterpoint to it. We wanted to chart the pattern of brain activity which correlates with the declared intensity of experience of the sublime, and to learn whether it differs from the pattern that correlates with the experience of beauty, reported in our previous studies (e.g., Ishizu and Zeki, 2011). 21 subjects participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Prior to the experiment, they viewed pictures of landscapes, which they rated on a scale of 1-5, with 5 being the most sublime and 1 being the least. This allowed us to select, for each subject, five sets of stimuli-from ones experienced as very sublime to those experienced as not at all sublime-which subjects viewed and re-rated in the scanner while their brain activity was imaged. The results revealed a distinctly different pattern of brain activity from that obtained with the experience of beauty, with none of the areas active with the latter experience also active during experience of the sublime. Sublime and beautiful experiences thus appear to engage separate and distinct brain systems. PMID:25426046

  9. Increase of SiC sublimation growth rate by optimizing of powder packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Cai, Dang; Zhang, Hui

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive model for silicon carbide (SiC) sublimation crystal growth considering powder packaging is presented. This model is based on heat and mass transfer of porous powder charge with different sizes of the particle and accounts for induction heating, powder charge sublimation, vapor transport, and porosity evolution in a SiC sublimation crystal growth system. The mechanism of vapor transport is proposed by introducing a driving force arising from temperature difference between powder charge and seed in the growth system. Powder porosity evolution and sublimation rate variations are predicted based on vapor transport mechanism. Effects of powder geometry, such as particle sizes, volume and size ratios of different particles, and driving forces on the sublimation rate are studied. In addition, simulation results for powder sublimation with and without a central hole are presented. The results indicate that the sublimation rate can be increased by optimizing the powder packaging, or by creating a hole in the center of packed powder.

  10. In Situ Observation on Dislocation-Controlled Sublimation of Mg Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Mao, Min-Min; Li, Qing-Jie; Fu, Xiao-Qian; Tian, He; Li, Ji-Xue; Mao, Scott X; Zhang, Ze

    2016-02-10

    Sublimation is an important endothermic phase transition in which the atoms break away from their neighbors in the crystal lattice and are removed into the gas phase. Such debonding process may be significantly influenced by dislocations, the crystal defect that changes the bonding environment of local atoms. By performing systematic defects characterization and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tests on a core--shell MgO-Mg system, which enables us to "modulate" the internal dislocation density, we investigated the role of dislocations on materials' sublimation with particular focus on the sublimation kinetics and mechanism. It was observed that the sublimation rate increases significantly with dislocation density. As the density of screw dislocations is high, the intersection of screw dislocation spirals creates a large number of monatomic ledges, resulting in a "liquid-like" motion of solid-gas interface, which significantly deviates from the theoretically predicted sublimation plane. Our calculation based on density functional theory demonstrated that the remarkable change of sublimation rate with dislocation density is due to the dramatic reduction in binding energy of the monatomic ledges. This study provides direct observation to improve our understanding on this fundamental phase transition as well as to shed light on tuning materials' sublimation by "engineering" dislocation density in applications. PMID:26799861

  11. Sublimation characterization and vapor pressure estimation of an HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor using thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Minli; Ziemba, Theresa M; Maurin, Michael B

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the sublimation process of DPC 963, a second-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor for HIV-1 retrovirus, and to better understand the effect of sublimation during active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) manufacture and formulation development, especially the drying processes. Sublimation of DPC 963 at 150 degrees C and above was determined by thermogravimetric analysis-Fourier transform infrared (TGA-FTIR). The rates of sublimation at different temperatures were measured using isothermal TGA. Condensed material was collected and analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), x-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and infrared (IR) spectrometry. Benzoic acid was used as a reference standard to derive a linear logarithmic relationship between sublimation/evaporation rate and vapor pressure specific to the TGA system used in this study. Sublimation and evaporation of DPC 963 were found to follow apparent zero-order kinetics. Using the Eyring equation, the enthalpy and entropy of the sublimation and evaporation processes were obtained. The enthalpies of sublimation and evaporation were found to be 29 and 22 kcal/mol, respectively. The condensed material from the vapor phase was found to exist in 2 physical forms, amorphous and crystalline. Using benzoic acid as a reference standard, vapor pressure of DPC 963 at different temperatures was calculated using the linear logarithmic relationship obtained. DPC 963 undergoes sublimation at appreciable rates at 150 degrees C and above but this is not likely to pose a serious issue during the manufacturing process. Vapor pressure estimation using thermogravimetric analysis provided sufficient accuracy to be used as a fast, simple, and safe alternative to the traditional methods of vapor pressure determination. PMID:12916905

  12. Ice sublimation and rheology - Implications for the Martian polar layered deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofstadter, Mark D.; Murray, Bruce C.

    1990-01-01

    If the sublimation and creep of water ice are important processes in the Martian polar layered deposits, ice-rich scenario formation and evolution schemes must invoke a mechanism for the inhibition of sublimation, such as a dust layer derived from the residue of the sublimating deposits. This layer could be of the order of 1 m in thickness. If the deposits are ice-rich, flows of more than 1 km should have occurred. It is noted that the dust particles in question may be cemented by such ice that may be present, but that impurities may also have served to cement dust particles together even in the absence of ice.

  13. Sublimation rates of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from comets at large heliocentric distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1992-01-01

    Using a simple model for outgassing from a small flat surface area, the sublimation rates of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, two species more volatile than water ice that are known to be present in comets, are calculated for a suddenly activated discrete source on the rotating nucleus. The instantaneous sublimation rate depends upon the comet's heliocentric distance and the Sun's zenith angle at the location of the source. The values are derived for the constants of CO and CO2 in an expression that yields the local rotation-averaged sublimation rate as a function of the comet's spin parameters and the source's cometocentric latitude.

  14. Technological possibilities of processing the sublimates of electron-beam remelting of niobium to form ferroniobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumarev, V. M.; Leont'ev, L. I.; Potapov, V. I.; Udoeva, L. Yu.; Upolovnikova, A. G.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of melting of ferroniobium from the sublimates of electron-beam remelting of niobium ingots is studied using thermodynamic analysis and a "hot" simulation. The basic requirements for the conditions of processing of sublimates with various (Nb/Al)met ratios are evaluated and determined. A ferroalloy the contents of controlled impurities in which correspond to certain ferroniobium grades of Russian and foreign standards is produced by melting of charges containing the sublimates, a deoxidizer (Fe2O3), and a flux (CaO, CaF2) in an electroslag furnace.

  15. Titanium Nitride Epitaxy on Tungsten (100) by Sublimation Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mercurio, Lisa; Du, Li; Edgar, J H; Kenik, Edward A

    2007-01-01

    Titanium nitride crystals were grown from titanium nitride powder on tungsten by the sublimation-recondensation technique. The bright golden TiN crystals displayed a variety of shapes including cubes, truncated tetrahedrons, truncated octahedrons, and tetrahedrons bounded by (111) and (100) crystal planes. The TiN crystals formed regular, repeated patterns within individual W grains that suggested epitaxy. X-ray diffraction and electron backscattering diffraction revealed that the tungsten foil was highly textured with a preferred foil normal of (100) and confirmed that the TiN particles deposited epitaxially with the orientation TiN(100)/W(100) and TiN[100]/W[110], that is, the unit cells of the TiN crystals were rotated 45{sup o} with respect to the tungsten. Because of its larger coefficient of thermal expansion compared to W, upon cooling from the growth temperature, the TiN crystals were under in-plane tensile strain, causing many of the TiN crystals to crack.

  16. Generalized Orbital Projections of a Sublimating Ice Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menkin, Evgeny; Bacon, Jack

    2006-01-01

    The issue of orbital debris resulting from human activities in space is a growing concern for the space users' community. Waste generated in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) can stay in orbit for a long time, creating significant hazards for other spacecraft flying at lower intercepting orbits. Many spacecraft, especially crewed vehicles, are required to vent fluids into space. These fluids include propellant, wastewater, excess condensate, and others. It is important to analyze the behavior of particles that result from these activities, since each individual particle is capable of damaging or destroying a spacecraft in a lower, crossing orbit, and such particles are invisible to tracking radar systems on the ground. The deorbit trajectory of an ice particle is complex. It depends on factors including attitude of the vehicle during vent, initial velocities of particles, altitude at which the vent occurred, and numerous evaporation and sublimation factors. These include contamination within the vented water, evolution of bubbles within the clear water, and sun flux factors such as time of the year and current beta angle. The purpose of this study is to examine the influences of these factors on the trajectories of ice particles resulting from condensate water dumps, and to bound the safe trajectories of spacecraft that lie below the venting spacecraft.

  17. Transformation of Polar Ice Sublimate Residue into Martian Circumpolar Sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. S.; Parker, T. J.; Stephens, J. B.; Laue, E. G.; Fanale, F. P.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental demonstration that a credible Martian sand may be formed from dust-bearing ice provides a new set of possible explanations for some of the observed Martian aeolian landforms. It is hypothesized that a light-weight fluffy rind is formed on the polar caps. This could provide material easily entrainable by Martian winds, which generally blow equatorward from the poles. These winds would peel the fluffy rind from the surface of the sublimating summer polar caps and from the equatorward slopes of the polar troughs. These pieces of material would then be rolled into lumps (of high sailarea/mass ratio) by the wind. They would become pigmented as they saltate across the surface, perhaps gathering carbonaceous meteoritic dust or other impurities on their surfaces, or through chemical reactions with the ice-free environment away from their point of origin. Once they became trapped in topographic wind shadows, they would form dune structures because they are hydraulically equivalent to sand particles.

  18. Possibility of graphene growth by close space sublimation.

    PubMed

    Sopinskyy, Mykola V; Khomchenko, Viktoriya S; Strelchuk, Viktor V; Nikolenko, Andrii S; Olchovyk, Genadiy P; Vishnyak, Volodymyr V; Stonis, Viktor V

    2014-01-01

    Carbon films on the Si/SiO2 substrate are fabricated using modified method of close space sublimation at atmospheric pressure. The film properties have been characterized by micro-Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and monochromatic ellipsometry methods. Ellipsometrical measurements demonstrated an increase of the silicon oxide film thickness in the course of manufacturing process. The XPS survey spectra of the as-prepared samples indicate that the main elements in the near-surface region are carbon, silicon, and oxygen. The narrow-scan spectra of C1s, Si2p, O1s regions indicate that silicon and oxygen are mainly in the SiOx (x ≈ 2) oxide form, whereas the main component of C1s spectrum at 284.4 eV comes from the sp2-hybridized carbon phase. Micro-Raman spectra confirmed the formation of graphene films with the number of layers that depended on the distance between the graphite source and substrate. PMID:24731549

  19. Imaging the dust sublimation front of a circumbinary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillen, M.; Kluska, J.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Van Winckel, H.; Berger, J.-P.; Kamath, D.; Bujarrabal, V.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We present the first near-IR milli-arcsecond-scale image of a post-AGB binary that is surrounded by hot circumbinary dust. Methods: A very rich interferometric data set in six spectral channels was acquired of IRAS 08544-4431 with the new RAPID camera on the PIONIER beam combiner at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). A broadband image in the H-band was reconstructed by combining the data of all spectral channels using the SPARCO method. Results: We spatially separate all the building blocks of the IRAS 08544-4431 system in our milliarcsecond-resolution image. Our dissection reveals a dust sublimation front that is strikingly similar to that expected in early-stage protoplanetary disks, as well as an unexpected flux signal of ~4% from the secondary star. The energy output from this companion indicates the presence of a compact circum-companion accretion disk, which is likely the origin of the fast outflow detected in Hα. Conclusions: Our image provides the most detailed view into the heart of a dusty circumstellar disk to date. Our results demonstrate that binary evolution processes and circumstellar disk evolution can be studied in detail in space and over time. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 094.D-0865.

  20. Climatological observations and predicted sublimation rates at Lake Hoare, Antarctica.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, G.D.; McKay, C.P.; Simmons, G.M., Jr.; Wharton, R.A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    In December 1985, an automated meteorological station was established at Lake Hoare in the dry valley region of Antarctica. Here, we report on the first year-round observations available for any site in Taylor Valley. This dataset augments the year-round data obtained at Lake Vanda (Wright Valley) by winter-over crews during the late 1960s and early 1970s. The mean annual solar flux at Lake Hoare was 92 W m-2 during 1986, the mean air temperature -17.3 degrees C, and the mean 3-m wind speed 3.3 m s-1. The local climate is controlled by the wind regime during the 4-month sunless winter and by seasonal and diurnal variations in the incident solar flux during the remainder of the year. Temperature increases of 20 degrees-30 degrees C are frequently observed during the winter due to strong fo??hn winds descending from the Polar Plateau. A model incorporating nonsteady molecular diffusion into Kolmogorov-scale eddies in the interfacial layer and similarity-theory flux-profiles in the surface sublayer, is used to determine the rate of ice sublimation from the acquired meteorological data. Despite the frequent occurrence of strong winter fo??hns, the bulk of the annual ablation occurs during the summer due to elevated temperatures and persistent moderate winds. The annual ablation from Lake Hoare is estimated to have been 35.0 +/- 6.3 cm for 1986.

  1. Bion and the sublime: the origins of an aesthetic paradigm.

    PubMed

    Civitarese, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    In constructing his theory Bion drew on a number of symbolic matrices: psychoanalysis, philosophy, mathematics, literature, aesthetics. The least investigated of these is the last. True, we know that Bion cites many authors of the Romantic period, such as Coleridge, Keats, Blake and Wordsworth, as well as others who were held in high esteem in the Romantic period, such as Milton. However, less is known about the influence exerted on him by the aesthetics of the sublime, which while chronologically preceding Romanticism is in fact one of its components. My working hypothesis is that tracing a number of Bion's concepts back to this secret model can serve several purposes: firstly, it contributes to the study of the sources, and, secondly, it makes these concepts appear much less occasional and idiosyncratic than we might believe, being as they are mostly those less immediately understandable but not less important (O, negative capability, nameless dread, the infinite, the language of achievement, unison etc.). Finally, connecting these notions to a matrix, that is, disclosing the meaning of elements that are not simply juxtaposed but dynamically interrelated, in my view significantly increases not only their theoretical intelligibility but also their usefulness in clinical practice. In conclusion, one could legitimately argue that Bion gradually subsumed all the other paradigms he drew on within the aesthetic paradigm. PMID:25388282

  2. Sublimation TiN Coating of RF Power Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorkiewicz, J.; Kula, J.; Pszona, S.; Sobczak, J.; Bilinski, A.

    2008-03-01

    Titanium evaporation in a reactive atmosphere of ammonia has been chosen to deposit thin (up to 10 nm) protective surface layers containing titanium nitride and titanium oxinitrides which suppress secondary electron emission. The coating procedure, applied by the author in DESY (Hamburg) for TESLA couplers anti-multipactor protection, has been recently implemented in The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ) where a new coating device is used, equipped with a special titanium sublimation setup in a 100 1 vacuum chamber. Several arrays of cylindrical and coaxial RF coupler windows have been coated so far after optimizing the processing parameters. A check of the obtained surface layers ability to attenuate secondary electron emission has been performed; measurements of the secondary electron yield from TiN layers deposited on alumina samples were done in IPJ on as-delivered coated samples, then after vacuum bake-out and finally after additional electron bombardment of their surfaces. Also chemical composition of the surface layers has been studied using XPS in the Institute of Physical Chemistry (IChF).

  3. Experimental Results on Isotopic Fractionation of Dusty Deuterated Water Ice During Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, J. E.; Smith, P. H.; Brown, R. H.; Lauretta, D. S.; Boynton, W. V.; Drake, M. J.

    2008-03-01

    Observed heavy fractionation of HDO during sublimation of water ice when mixed with or overlain by (regolith) fine particulate dust is described. Results from two sets of apparatus simulating comets and the Mars polar environment will be presented.

  4. Schiller Goes to the Movies: Locating the Sublime in "Thelma and Louise."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyng, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Endeavors to make students aware of similarities between today's movie culture and the theater of the 18th century; parallels between a traditional drama and a movie script; and Schiller's understanding of the sublime. (36 references) (Author/CK)

  5. Collection-efficient, axisymmetric vacuum sublimation module for the purification of solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Michael; Paul, Elizabeth; Katovic, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    A vacuum sublimation module of axisymmetric geometry was developed and employed to purify solid-phase materials. The module provides certain practical advantages and it comprises: a metering valve, glass collector, glass lower body, main seal, threaded bushing, and glass internal cartridge (the latter to contain starting material). A complementary process was developed to de-solvate, sublime, weigh, and collect solid chemical materials exemplified by oxalic acid, ferrocene, pentachlorobenzene, chrysene, and urea. The oxalic acid sublimate was analyzed by titration, melting range, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and its (aqueous phase) electrolytically generated gas. The analytical data were consistent with a high-purity, anhydrous oxalic acid sublimate. Cyclic voltammograms of 0.11 mol. % oxalic acid in water displayed a 2.1 V window on glassy carbon electrode beyond which electrolytic decomposition occurs. During module testing, fifteen relatively pure materials were sublimed with (energy efficient) passive cooling and the solid-phase recovery averaged 95 mass %. Key module design features include: compact vertical geometry, low-angle conical collector, uniformly compressed main seal, modest power consumption, transparency, glovebox compatibility, cooling options, and preferential conductive heat transfer. To help evaluate the structural (module) heat transfer, vertical temperature profiles along the dynamically evacuated lower body were measured versus electric heater power: for example, an input of 18.6 W generated a temperature 443-K at the bottom. Experimental results and engineering calculations indicate that during sublimation, solid conduction is the primary mode of heat transfer to the starting material.

  6. Comet 67P/CG: Influence of the sublimation coefficient on the temperature and outgassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossacki, Konrad J.; Markiewicz, Wojciech J.

    2013-05-01

    The sublimation rate of ice is commonly calculated using simple Hertz-Knudsen formula. This formula is derived from the kinetic theory of gases and ignores microphysical processes determining the actual sublimation rate. The microphysical processes can be accounted for by including in the Herz-Knudsen equation a temperature dependent sublimation coefficient (Kossacki, K.J., Markiewicz, W.J., Skorov, Y., Koemle, N.I. [1999]. Planet. Space Sci. 47, 1521-1530; Gundlach, B., Skorov, Y.V., Blum, J. [2011]. Icarus, 213, 710-719). Here we address the question to what extent inaccuracy of the simple Hertz-Knudsen equation affects the calculated temperature of a cometary nucleus and the emission rate of water vapor to space. We performed numerical simulations dealing with evolution of a model comet of the orbit the same as Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, target comet of the Rosetta mission (Glassmeier, K.H., Boehnardt, H., Koshny, D., Kuhrt, E., Richter, I. [2007]. Space Sci. Rev. 128, 1-21). We have found, that the temperature below dust mantle is most sensitive to the value of the sublimation coefficient when the mantle is coarse grained, while the sublimation rate is most affected when the mantle is fine grained. We also conclude that derivation of the temperature below the mantle from the measured water production rate ignoring temperature dependence of the sublimation coefficient leads to an underestimate of the temperature by more than 10 K when the nucleus is fine grained.

  7. Desorption and sublimation kinetics for fluorinated aluminum nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    an additional high temperature peak at 910 °C with E{sub d} = 370 ± 10 kJ/mol that is consistent with both the dehydrogenation of surface AlOH species and H{sub 2} assisted sublimation of AlN. Similarly, N{sub 2} exhibited a similar higher temperature desorption peak with E{sub d} = 535 ± 40 kJ/mol that is consistent with the activation energy for direct sublimation of AlN.

  8. Como Lo Hago Yo: Mielomeningocele En Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Dabdoub, Carlos F.; Dabdoub, Carlos B.; Villavicencio, Ramiro; Quevedo, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: Las malformaciones del tubo neural (MTN) representan la segunda causa más frecuente de anomalías congénitas, luego de las cardiopatías. En este grupo se destaca el mielomeningocele (MMC) por su mayor incidencia, y por ser la más incapacitante y la más compleja entre todas las demás malformaciones del sistema nervioso c`entral (SNC). En Bolivia, como en muchos países de Sudamérica, los bajos niveles socio-culturales y la debilidad en el sistema sanitario, hacen que su incidencia y su morbilidad, sean mayores que en las naciones más desarrolladas. Material y Métodos: Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo y descriptivo de 70 casos de MMC, atendidos por un equipo multidisciplinario en el Hospital Universitario Japonés (HUJ) de Santa Cruz de la Sierra, entre 2008-2011. De ellos, 60 fueron intervenidos quirúrgicamente. Resultados: Se realizaron controles prenatales sólo en 27 mujeres (38.6%), diagnosticándose una disrafia espinal en apenas dos casos (7.4%). La edad de ingreso del MMC en su mayoría fue después de las 24 horas (65.6%), predominando su localización en la región lumbosacra (64.3%). De ellos, 67.2% eran abiertos, presentando un 32.9% un daño neurológico motor parcial mientras que 47.1% tenían paraplejia por debajo de la lesión. De los 70 casos, tres (4.3%) no fueron intervenidos, por presentar defectos congénitos severos o estado general grave. Las principales complicaciones posoperatorias inmediatas fueron: dehiscencia de sutura y/o infección de la herida (16.6%), fístula de líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR) (10%) e infección del SNC (11.7%). La mortalidad general y postoperatoria fue de 7.1% y 3.3%, respectivamente. Al mes de vida presentaban hidrocefalia un 80% de los pacientes operados, colocándose una derivación ventriculoperitoneal (DVP) de presión media. De 9 pacientes que tuvieron un acompanamiento de dos o más años, seis presentaron una médula anclada, que fueron intervenidas quirúrgicamente. Conclusi

  9. LoWMob: Intra-PAN Mobility Support Schemes for 6LoWPAN.

    PubMed

    Bag, Gargi; Raza, Muhammad Taqi; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Yoo, Seung-Wha

    2009-01-01

    Mobility in 6LoWPAN (IPv6 over Low Power Personal Area Networks) is being utilized in realizing many applications where sensor nodes, while moving, sense and transmit the gathered data to a monitoring server. By employing IEEE802.15.4 as a baseline for the link layer technology, 6LoWPAN implies low data rate and low power consumption with periodic sleep and wakeups for sensor nodes, without requiring them to incorporate complex hardware. Also enabling sensor nodes with IPv6 ensures that the sensor data can be accessed anytime and anywhere from the world. Several existing mobility-related schemes like HMIPv6, MIPv6, HAWAII, and Cellular IP require active participation of mobile nodes in the mobility signaling, thus leading to the mobility-related changes in the protocol stack of mobile nodes. In this paper, we present LoWMob, which is a network-based mobility scheme for mobile 6LoWPAN nodes in which the mobility of 6LoWPAN nodes is handled at the network-side. LoWMob ensures multi-hop communication between gateways and mobile nodes with the help of the static nodes within a 6LoWPAN. In order to reduce the signaling overhead of static nodes for supporting mobile nodes, LoWMob proposes a mobility support packet format at the adaptation layer of 6LoWPAN. Also we present a distributed version of LoWMob, named as DLoWMob (or Distributed LoWMob), which employs Mobility Support Points (MSPs) to distribute the traffic concentration at the gateways and to optimize the multi-hop routing path between source and destination nodes in a 6LoWPAN. Moreover, we have also discussed the security considerations for our proposed mobility schemes. The performance of our proposed schemes is evaluated in terms of mobility signaling costs, end-to-end delay, and packet success ratio. PMID:22346730

  10. The sublimation coefficient of water ice: influence on the temperature and outgassing of Comet 67P/C-G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossacki, K. J.; Markiewicz, W. J.

    2013-09-01

    In most published works dealing with evolution of cometary nuclei, the sublimation rate of ices is calculated with simple Hertz-Knudsen equation. This formulation, derived from the kinetic theory of gases, ignores microphysical processes which determine the sublimation rate. To correctly account for these processes the modified Herz-Knudsen equation must include temperature dependent sublimation coefficient. Including this temperature dependence we find, that the temperature below dust mantle is most sensitive to the value of the sublimation coefficient when the mantle is coarse grained, while the sublimation rate is most affected when the mantle is fine grained. Most importantly, we also find that derivation of the temperature below the dust mantle from the measured water production rate ignoring temperature dependence of the sublimation coefficient can lead to an underestimate of the sub-dust temperature by more than 10 K.

  11. Mechanism and kinetics for ammonium dinitramide (ADN) sublimation: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, R S; Chen, Hui-Lung; Lin, M C

    2012-11-01

    The mechanism for sublimation of NH(4)N(NO(2))(2) (ADN) has been investigated quantum-mechanically with generalized gradient approximation plane-wave density functional theory calculations; the solid surface is represented by a slab model and the periodic boundary conditions are applied. The calculated lattice constants for the bulk ADN, which were found to consist of NH(4)(+)[ON(O)NNO(2)](-) units, instead of NH(4)(+)[N(NO(2))(2)](-), agree quite well with experimental values. Results show that three steps are involved in the sublimation/decomposition of ADN. The first step is the relaxation of the surface layer with 1.6 kcal/mol energy per NH(4)ON(O)NNO(2) unit; the second step is the sublimation of the surface layer to form a molecular [NH(3)]-[HON(O)NNO(2)] complex with a 29.4 kcal/mol sublimation energy, consistent with the experimental observation of Korobeinichev et al. (10) The last step is the dissociation of the [H(3)N]-[HON(O)NNO(2)] complex to give NH(3) and HON(O)NNO(2) with the dissociation energy of 13.9 kcal/mol. Direct formation of NO(2) (g) from solid ADN costs a much higher energy, 58.3 kcal/mol. Our calculated total sublimation enthalpy for ADN(s) → NH(3)(g) + HON(O)NNO(2)) (g), 44.9 kcal/mol via three steps, is in good agreement with the value, 42.1 kcal/mol predicted for the one-step sublimation process in this work and the value 44.0 kcal/mol computed by Politzer et al. (11) using experimental thermochemical data. The sublimation rate constant for the rate-controlling step 2 can be represented as k(sub) = 2.18 × 10(12) exp (-30.5 kcal/mol/RT) s(-1), which agrees well with available experimental data within the temperature range studied. The high pressure limit decomposition rate constant for the molecular complex H(3)N···HON(O)NNO(2) can be expressed by k(dec) = 3.18 × 10(13) exp (-15.09 kcal/mol/RT) s(-1). In addition, water molecules were found to increase the sublimation enthalpy of ADN, contrary to that found in the ammonium

  12. In situ observation of graphene sublimation and multi-layer edge reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian Yu; Ding, Feng; Yakobson, Boris I.; Lu, Ping; Qi, Liang; Li, Ju

    2009-01-01

    We induced sublimation of suspended few-layer graphene by in situ Joule-heating inside a transmission electron microscope. The graphene sublimation fronts consisted of mostly {1100} zigzag edges. Under appropriate conditions, a fractal-like “coastline” morphology was observed. Extensive multiple-layer reconstructions at the graphene edges led to the formation of unique carbon nanostructures, such as sp2-bonded bilayer edges (BLEs) and nanotubes connected to BLEs. Flat fullerenes/nanopods and nanotubes tunneling multiple layers of graphene sheets were also observed. Remarkably, >99% of the graphene edges observed during sublimation are BLEs rather than monolayer edges (MLEs), indicating that BLEs are the stable edges in graphene at high temperatures. We reproduced the “coastline” sublimation morphologies by kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) simulations. The simulation revealed geometrical and topological features unique to quasi-2-dimensional (2D) graphene sublimation and reconstructions. These reconstructions were enabled by bending, which cannot occur in first-order phase transformations of 3D bulk materials. These results indicate that substrate of multiple-layer graphene can offer unique opportunities for tailoring carbon-based nanostructures and engineering novel nano-devices with complex topologies. PMID:19515820

  13. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars: I. Spring sublimation activity and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Byrne, S.; Portyankina, G.; Bourke, M.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-08-01

    Spring sublimation of the seasonal CO2 northern polar cap is a dynamic process in the current Mars climate. Phenomena include dark fans of dune material propelled out onto the seasonal ice layer, polygonal cracks in the seasonal ice, sand flow down slipfaces, and outbreaks of gas and sand around the dune margins. These phenomena are concentrated on the north polar erg that encircles the northern residual polar cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit for three Mars years, allowing us to observe three northern spring seasons. Activity is consistent with and well described by the Kieffer model of basal sublimation of the seasonal layer of ice applied originally in the southern hemisphere. Three typical weak spots have been identified on the dunes for escape of gas sublimed from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer: the crest of the dune, the interface of the dune with the interdune substrate, and through polygonal cracks in the ice. Pressurized gas flows through these vents and carries out material entrained from the dune. Furrows in the dunes channel gas to outbreak points and may be the northern equivalent of southern radially-organized channels ("araneiform" terrain), albeit not permanent. Properties of the seasonal CO2 ice layer are derived from timing of seasonal events such as when final sublimation occurs. Modification of dune morphology shows that landscape evolution is occurring on Mars today, driven by seasonal activity associated with sublimation of the seasonal CO2 polar cap.

  14. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars: I. Spring sublimation activity and processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, C.J.; Byrne, S.; Portyankina, G.; Bourke, M.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-01-01

    Spring sublimation of the seasonal CO2 northern polar cap is a dynamic process in the current Mars climate. Phenomena include dark fans of dune material propelled out onto the seasonal ice layer, polygonal cracks in the seasonal ice, sand flow down slipfaces, and outbreaks of gas and sand around the dune margins. These phenomena are concentrated on the north polar erg that encircles the northern residual polar cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit for three Mars years, allowing us to observe three northern spring seasons. Activity is consistent with and well described by the Kieffer model of basal sublimation of the seasonal layer of ice applied originally in the southern hemisphere. Three typical weak spots have been identified on the dunes for escape of gas sublimed from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer: the crest of the dune, the interface of the dune with the interdune substrate, and through polygonal cracks in the ice. Pressurized gas flows through these vents and carries out material entrained from the dune. Furrows in the dunes channel gas to outbreak points and may be the northern equivalent of southern radially-organized channels (“araneiform” terrain), albeit not permanent. Properties of the seasonal CO2 ice layer are derived from timing of seasonal events such as when final sublimation occurs. Modification of dune morphology shows that landscape evolution is occurring on Mars today, driven by seasonal activity associated with sublimation of the seasonal CO2 polar cap.

  15. A neurobiological enquiry into the origins of our experience of the sublime and beautiful

    PubMed Central

    Ishizu, Tomohiro; Zeki, Semir

    2014-01-01

    Philosophies of aesthetics have posited that experience of the sublime—commonly but not exclusively derived from scenes of natural grandeur—is distinct from that of beauty and is a counterpoint to it. We wanted to chart the pattern of brain activity which correlates with the declared intensity of experience of the sublime, and to learn whether it differs from the pattern that correlates with the experience of beauty, reported in our previous studies (e.g., Ishizu and Zeki, 2011). 21 subjects participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Prior to the experiment, they viewed pictures of landscapes, which they rated on a scale of 1–5, with 5 being the most sublime and 1 being the least. This allowed us to select, for each subject, five sets of stimuli—from ones experienced as very sublime to those experienced as not at all sublime—which subjects viewed and re-rated in the scanner while their brain activity was imaged. The results revealed a distinctly different pattern of brain activity from that obtained with the experience of beauty, with none of the areas active with the latter experience also active during experience of the sublime. Sublime and beautiful experiences thus appear to engage separate and distinct brain systems. PMID:25426046

  16. Distributed modelling of climate change impacts on snow sublimation in Northern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, F.; Schlaffer, S.; Aus der Beek, T.; Menzel, L.

    2009-08-01

    Sublimation of snow is an important factor of the hydrological cycle in Mongolia and is likely to increase according to future climate projections. In this study the hydrological model TRAIN was used to assess spatially distributed current and future sublimation rates based on interpolated daily data of precipitation, air temperature, air humidity, wind speed and solar radiation. An automated procedure for the interpolation of the input data is provided. Depending on the meteorological parameter and the data availability for the individual days, the most appropriate interpolation method is chosen automatically from inverse distance weighting, Ordinary Least Squares interpolation, Ordinary or Universal Kriging. Depending on elevation simulated annual sublimation in the period 1986-2006 was 23 to 35 mm, i.e. approximately 80% of total snowfall. Moreover, future climate projections for 2071-2100 of ECHAM5 and HadCM3, based on the A1B emission scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, were analysed with TRAIN. In the case of ECHAM5 simulated sublimation increases by up to 17% (26...41 mm) while it remains at the same level for HadCM3 (24...34 mm). The differences are mainly due to a distinct increase in winter precipitation for ECHAM5. Simulated changes of the all-season hydrological conditions, e.g. the sublimation-to-precipitation ratio, were ambiguous due to diverse precipitation patterns derived by the global circulation models.

  17. A New Method for Estimating Bacterial Abundances in Natural Samples using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Cleaves, H. James; Schubert, Michael; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new method based on the sublimation of adenine from Escherichia coli to estimate bacterial cell counts in natural samples. To demonstrate this technique, several types of natural samples including beach sand, seawater, deep-sea sediment, and two soil samples from the Atacama Desert were heated to a temperature of 500 C for several seconds under reduced pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger and the amount of adenine released from the samples then determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV absorbance detection. Based on the total amount of adenine recovered from DNA and RNA in these samples, we estimated bacterial cell counts ranging from approx. l0(exp 5) to l0(exp 9) E. coli cell equivalents per gram. For most of these samples, the sublimation based cell counts were in agreement with total bacterial counts obtained by traditional DAPI staining. The simplicity and robustness of the sublimation technique compared to the DAPI staining method makes this approach particularly attractive for use by spacecraft instrumentation. NASA is currently planning to send a lander to Mars in 2009 in order to assess whether or not organic compounds, especially those that might be associated with life, are present in Martian surface samples. Based on our analyses of the Atacama Desert soil samples, several million bacterial cells per gam of Martian soil should be detectable using this sublimation technique.

  18. Specialized and independent processing of orientation and shape in visual field maps LO1 and LO2.

    PubMed

    Silson, Edward H; McKeefry, Declan J; Rodgers, Jessica; Gouws, Andre D; Hymers, Mark; Morland, Antony B

    2013-03-01

    We identified human visual field maps, LO1 and LO2, in object-selective lateral occipital cortex. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we assessed the functions of these maps in the perception of orientation and shape. TMS of LO1 disrupted orientation, but not shape, discrimination, whereas TMS of LO2 disrupted shape, but not orientation, discrimination. This double dissociation suggests that specialized and independent processing of different visual attributes occurs in LO1 and LO2. PMID:23377127

  19. New method for estimating bacterial cell abundances in natural samples by use of sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Cleaves, H. James; Schubert, Michael; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new method based on the sublimation of adenine from Escherichia coli to estimate bacterial cell counts in natural samples. To demonstrate this technique, several types of natural samples, including beach sand, seawater, deep-sea sediment, and two soil samples from the Atacama Desert, were heated to a temperature of 500 degrees C for several seconds under reduced pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger, and the amount of adenine released from the samples was then determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection. Based on the total amount of adenine recovered from DNA and RNA in these samples, we estimated bacterial cell counts ranging from approximately 10(5) to 10(9) E. coli cell equivalents per gram. For most of these samples, the sublimation-based cell counts were in agreement with total bacterial counts obtained by traditional DAPI (4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining.

  20. The Effect of CO2 Ice Cap Sublimation on Mars Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterson, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Sublimation of the polar CO2 ice caps on Mars is an ongoing phenomenon that may be contributing to secular climate change on Mars. The transfer of CO2 between the surface and atmosphere via sublimation and deposition may alter atmospheric mass such that net atmospheric mass is increasing despite seasonal variations in CO2 transfer. My study builds on previous studies by Kahre and Haberle that analyze and compare data from the Phoenix and Viking Landers 1 and 2 to determine whether secular climate change is happening on Mars. In this project, I use two years worth of temperature, pressure, and elevation data from the MSL Curiosity rover to create a program that allows for successful comparison of Curiosity pressure data to Viking Lander pressure data so a conclusion can be drawn regarding whether CO2 ice cap sublimation is causing a net increase in atmospheric mass and is thus contributing to secular climate change on Mars.

  1. Iridium-bearing sublimates at a hot-spot volcano (Piton de la Fournaise, Indian Ocean)

    SciTech Connect

    Toutain, J.P. ); Meyer, G.

    1989-12-01

    Sublimates and incrustations derived upon the cooling of volcanic gases have been collected on various sites (Piton de la Fournaise, Poas, Momotombo, Etna, Ardoukoba and Erta-Ale). They have been analyzed for Ir and other volatile elements (Se, As, Cu, Au, Ag, Pb, Tl) by means of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and proton induced X-Ray emission (PIXE). Among the investigated volcanoes, only Piton de la Fournaise is found to release detectable amounts of iridium. Ir in Piton de la Fournaise sublimates is associated with F-minerals. This confirms its gaseous transport as a volatile fluoride compound. Iridium seems to be preferentialy released by hot-spot type volcanoes, and its detection in Piton de la Fournaise sublimates provides a positive argument in favor of a volcanic hypothesis to explain the KTB events.

  2. Modifications of comet materials by the sublimation process: Results from simulation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruen, E.; Bar-Nun, Akiva; Lammerzahl, P.; Klinger, J.; Kochan, H.; Keller, H. U.; Neukum, G.; Roessler, K.; Stoeffler, D.; Spohn, T.

    1989-01-01

    An active comet like comet Halley loses by sublimation a surface layer of the order of 1 m thickness per perihelion passage. In situ measurements show that water ice is the main constituent which contributes to the gas emission although even more volatile species (CO, NH3, CH4, CO2 etc.) have been identified. Dust particles which were embedded in the ices are carried by the sublimating gases. Measurements of the chemical composition of cometary grains indicate that they are composed of silicates of approximate chondritic composition and refractory carbonaceous material. Comet simulation experiments show that significant modifications of cometary materials occur due to sublimation process in near surface layers which have to be taken into account in order to derive the original state of the material.

  3. The Sublimation Rate of CO2 Under Simulated Mars Conditions and the Possible Climatic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Kathryn; Chevrier, V.; Roe, L.; White, K.; Blackburn, D.

    2008-09-01

    In order to understand the behavior of CO2 on Mars, we have studied the sublimation of dry ice under simulated martian conditions. Our experiments resulted in an average sublimation rate for CO2 ice of 1.20 ± 0.27 mm h-1. These results are very close to those observed of the martian polar caps retreat, and suggest a common process for the sublimation mechanism on Mars and in our chamber. Based on these results we created a model where irradiance from the sun is the primary source of heat on the martian polar surface. Our model predicts a 32 cm offset between the amount of CO2 ice sublimated and deposited in the southern polar region. The eccentricity of the martian orbit causes the southern hemisphere to sublimate more then it deposits back during one martian year. We have compared MOC and HiRISE images from approximately the same season (Ls 285.57º and 289.5º, respectively) from three martian years apart. These images indicate an average sublimation rate of 0.43 ± 0.04 m y-1, very close to the 0.32 m y-1 predicted by our model. Due to the length of Mars’ precession cycle, 93,000 martian years, it will take an extensive amount of time for the equinoxes to change. Therefore, we predict that the CO2 of the south polar cap will migrate entirely to the northern polar cap before such changes could occur. If the CO2 ice is only a thin layer above a much thicker water ice layer, this could expose large amounts of water ice, having a drastic climactic affect.

  4. Crystallization and sublimation of non-racemic mixtures of natural amino acids: a path towards homochirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2012-07-01

    Homochirality of biologically important molecules such as amino acids and sugars is a prerequisite for the origin of life. There are different forces or mechanisms in the Universe to trigger off the primary imbalance in the enantiomeric ratio. Very likely the initial bias of one type of enantiomers over the other on Earth was arisen from the inflow of extraterrestrial matter (carbonaceous meteorites). The phase transitions (crystallization, sublimation) of non-racemic mixtures of enantiomers are ones of the most probable mechanisms for the homochirogenesis[1]. The sublimation, almost uninvestigated subject and forgotten for 30 years, revealed recently a pathway to the enantioenrichment of natural amino acids[2]. Starting from a mixture with a low content of an enantiopure amino acid a partial sublimation gives a considerable enrichment. In our further experiments we combined two first-order phase transitions of amino acid(s) mixtures: crystallization and sublimation. The results show the possibility of the transfer of enantiopurity between different amino acids[3]. Subliming a crystallized mixture of racemic amino acids with an enantiopure one we found that the sublimate is a non-racemic mixture of the same handedness for all components. The significance of the studies can be realized taking into account that just 5 of 22 proteinogenic amino acids are able to homochiral self-organization. The relevance of these studies to the Prebiotic Earth and to the evolution of the single handedness of biological molecules will be discussed. [1] Blackmond, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 2011, 366, 2878. [2] Guillemin et al., Chem. Commun. 2010 , 46, 1482. [3] Tarasevych, Guillemin et al., submitted.

  5. Collection-efficient, axisymmetric vacuum sublimation module for the purification of solid materials.

    PubMed

    May, Michael; Paul, Elizabeth; Katovic, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    A vacuum sublimation module of axisymmetric geometry was developed and employed to purify solid-phase materials. The module provides certain practical advantages and it comprises: a metering valve, glass collector, glass lower body, main seal, threaded bushing, and glass internal cartridge (the latter to contain starting material). A complementary process was developed to de-solvate, sublime, weigh, and collect solid chemical materials exemplified by oxalic acid, ferrocene, pentachlorobenzene, chrysene, and urea. The oxalic acid sublimate was analyzed by titration, melting range, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and its (aqueous phase) electrolytically generated gas. The analytical data were consistent with a high-purity, anhydrous oxalic acid sublimate. Cyclic voltammograms of 0.11 mol. % oxalic acid in water displayed a 2.1 V window on glassy carbon electrode beyond which electrolytic decomposition occurs. During module testing, fifteen relatively pure materials were sublimed with (energy efficient) passive cooling and the solid-phase recovery averaged 95 mass %. Key module design features include: compact vertical geometry, low-angle conical collector, uniformly compressed main seal, modest power consumption, transparency, glovebox compatibility, cooling options, and preferential conductive heat transfer. To help evaluate the structural (module) heat transfer, vertical temperature profiles along the dynamically evacuated lower body were measured versus electric heater power: for example, an input of 18.6 W generated a temperature 443-K at the bottom. Experimental results and engineering calculations indicate that during sublimation, solid conduction is the primary mode of heat transfer to the starting material. PMID:26628150

  6. Thermal Stability and Anisotropic Sublimation of Two-Dimensional Colloidal Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Buha, Joka; Gaspari, Roberto; Del Rio Castillo, Antonio Esau; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Manna, Liberato

    2016-07-13

    The structural and compositional stabilities of two-dimensional (2D) Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 nanocrystals, produced by both colloidal synthesis and by liquid phase exfoliation, were studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) during annealing at temperatures between 350 and 500 °C. The sublimation process induced by annealing is structurally and chemically anisotropic and takes place through the preferential dismantling of the prismatic {011̅0} type planes, and through the preferential sublimation of Te (or Se). The observed anisotropic sublimation is independent of the method of nanocrystal's synthesis, their morphology, or the presence of surfactant molecules on the nanocrystals surface. A thickness-dependent depression in the sublimation point has been observed with nanocrystals thinner than about 15 nm. The Bi2Se3 nanocrystals were found to sublimate below 280 °C, while the Bi2Te3 ones sublimated at temperatures between 350 and 450 °C, depending on their thickness, under the vacuum conditions in the TEM column. Density functional theory calculations confirm that the sublimation of the prismatic {011̅0} facets is more energetically favorable. Within the level of modeling employed, the sublimation occurs at a rate about 700 times faster than the sublimation of the {0001} planes at the annealing temperatures used in this work. This supports the distinctly anisotropic mechanisms of both sublimation and growth of Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 nanocrystals, known to preferentially adopt a 2D morphology. The anisotropic sublimation behavior is in agreement with the intrinsic anisotropy in the surface free energy brought about by the crystal structure of Bi2Te3 or Bi2Se3. PMID:27231980

  7. Matrix sublimation method for the formation of high-density amorphous ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouchi, A.; Hama, T.; Kimura, Y.; Hidaka, H.; Escribano, R.; Watanabe, N.

    2016-08-01

    A novel method for the formation of amorphous ice involving matrix sublimation has been developed. A CO-rich CO:H2O mixed ice was deposited at 8-10 K under ultra-high vacuum condition, which was then allowed to warm. After the sublimation of matrix CO at 35 K, amorphous ice remained. The amorphous ice formed exhibits a highly porous microscale texture; however, it also rather exhibits a density similar to that of high-density amorphous ice formed under high pressure. Furthermore, unlike conventional vapor-deposited amorphous ice, the amorphous ice is stable up to 140 K, where it transforms directly to cubic ice Ic.

  8. Sulfur in vacuum - Sublimation effects on frozen melts, and applications to Io's surface and torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Douglas B.

    1987-01-01

    Vacuum sublimation effects on solid sulfur yield a form of the element that is white at room temperature, is fluffy in texture, and forms on frozen sulfur in vacuum through differential evaporation of molecular species in the solid. This vacuum sulfur should exist in large quantity on Io, if the solid free sulfur there has solidified from a melt; a sulfur volcanism model for Io is accordingly developed on this basis which implies that the color and spectra of different sulfur regions of Io could indicate their relative crystallization ages and cooling histories. The flux of sublimating hotspot sulfur appears consistent with estimated turnover rates of the Io surface.

  9. On the sublimation of blowing snow and of snow in canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. A.; Simon, K.; Gordon, M.; Weng, W.

    2003-04-01

    Tests have been made within the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) of various parameterizations of sublimation of blowing snow, and tested in the context of data from weather stations (Goose Bay and Resolute) in northern Canada. We will focus on parameterization schemes based on results obtained with the PIEKTUK model of blowing snow. In addition we will present preliminary results concerning the parameterization of sublimation of snow caught in tree canopies, using schemes similar to those for evaporation from wet canopies. This is considered to be a major factor in the water budgets of forested areas in northern Canada.

  10. PRECISION POINTING OF IBEX-Lo OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hlond, M.; Bzowski, M.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Heirtzler, D.; Schwadron, N. A.; Neill, M. E. O'; Clark, G.; Crew, G. B.; Fuselier, S.; McComas, D. J. E-mail: eberhard.moebius@unh.edu E-mail: stephen.a.fuselier@linco.com E-mail: DMcComas@swri.edu

    2012-02-01

    Post-launch boresight of the IBEX-Lo instrument on board the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is determined based on IBEX-Lo Star Sensor observations. Accurate information on the boresight of the neutral gas camera is essential for precise determination of interstellar gas flow parameters. Utilizing spin-phase information from the spacecraft attitude control system (ACS), positions of stars observed by the Star Sensor during two years of IBEX measurements were analyzed and compared with positions obtained from a star catalog. No statistically significant differences were observed beyond those expected from the pre-launch uncertainty in the Star Sensor mounting. Based on the star observations and their positions in the spacecraft reference system, pointing of the IBEX satellite spin axis was determined and compared with the pointing obtained from the ACS. Again, no statistically significant deviations were observed. We conclude that no systematic correction for boresight geometry is needed in the analysis of IBEX-Lo observations to determine neutral interstellar gas flow properties. A stack-up of uncertainties in attitude knowledge shows that the instantaneous IBEX-Lo pointing is determined to within {approx}0.{sup 0}1 in both spin angle and elevation using either the Star Sensor or the ACS. Further, the Star Sensor can be used to independently determine the spacecraft spin axis. Thus, Star Sensor data can be used reliably to correct the spin phase when the Star Tracker (used by the ACS) is disabled by bright objects in its field of view. The Star Sensor can also determine the spin axis during most orbits and thus provides redundancy for the Star Tracker.

  11. Precision Pointing of IBEX-Lo Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hłond, M.; Bzowski, M.; Möbius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Heirtzler, D.; Schwadron, N. A.; O'Neill, M. E.; Clark, G.; Crew, G. B.; Fuselier, S.; McComas, D. J.

    2012-02-01

    Post-launch boresight of the IBEX-Lo instrument on board the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is determined based on IBEX-Lo Star Sensor observations. Accurate information on the boresight of the neutral gas camera is essential for precise determination of interstellar gas flow parameters. Utilizing spin-phase information from the spacecraft attitude control system (ACS), positions of stars observed by the Star Sensor during two years of IBEX measurements were analyzed and compared with positions obtained from a star catalog. No statistically significant differences were observed beyond those expected from the pre-launch uncertainty in the Star Sensor mounting. Based on the star observations and their positions in the spacecraft reference system, pointing of the IBEX satellite spin axis was determined and compared with the pointing obtained from the ACS. Again, no statistically significant deviations were observed. We conclude that no systematic correction for boresight geometry is needed in the analysis of IBEX-Lo observations to determine neutral interstellar gas flow properties. A stack-up of uncertainties in attitude knowledge shows that the instantaneous IBEX-Lo pointing is determined to within ~0fdg1 in both spin angle and elevation using either the Star Sensor or the ACS. Further, the Star Sensor can be used to independently determine the spacecraft spin axis. Thus, Star Sensor data can be used reliably to correct the spin phase when the Star Tracker (used by the ACS) is disabled by bright objects in its field of view. The Star Sensor can also determine the spin axis during most orbits and thus provides redundancy for the Star Tracker.

  12. DIRECT STELLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AT THE DUST SUBLIMATION FRONT IN MASSIVE STAR FORMATION: EFFECTS OF A DUST-FREE DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2011-10-01

    In massive star formation ({approx}> 40 M{sub sun}) by core accretion, the direct stellar radiation pressure acting on the dust particles exceeds the gravitational force and interferes with mass accretion at the dust sublimation front, the first absorption site. Ram pressure generated by high accretion rates of 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} is thought to be required to overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We investigate the direct stellar irradiation on the dust sublimation front, including the inner accretion disk structure. We show that the ram pressure of the accretion disk is lower than the stellar radiation pressure at the dust sublimation front. Thus, another mechanism must overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We suggest that the inner hot dust-free region is optically thick, shielding the dust sublimation front from direct stellar irradiation. Thus, accretion would not halt at the dust sublimation front, even at lower accretion rates.

  13. Structure-property relationships in halogenbenzoic acids: Thermodynamics of sublimation, fusion, vaporization and solubility.

    PubMed

    Zherikova, Kseniya V; Svetlov, Aleksey A; Kuratieva, Natalia V; Verevkin, Sergey P

    2016-10-01

    Temperature dependences of vapor pressures for 2-, 3-, and 4-bromobenzoic acid, as well as for five isomeric bromo-methylbenzoic acids were studied by the transpiration method. Melting temperatures and enthalpies of fusion for all isomeric bromo-methylbenzoic acids and 4-bromobenzoic acid were measured with a DSC. The molar enthalpies of sublimation and vaporization were derived. These data together with results available in the literature were collected and checked for internal consistency using a group-additivity procedure and results from X-ray structural diffraction studies. Specific (hydrogen bonding) interactions in the liquid and in the crystal phase of halogenbenzoic acids were quantified based on experimental values of vaporization and sublimation enthalpies. Structure-property correlations of solubilities of halogenobenzoic acids with sublimation pressures and sublimation enthalpies were developed and solubilities of bromo-benzoic acids were estimated. These new results resolve much of the ambiguity in the available thermochemical and solubility data on bromobenzoic acids. The approach based on structure property correlations can be applied for the assessment of water solubility of sparingly soluble drugs. PMID:27424058

  14. Using Mass Transport to Guide the Purification of Small Molecule Organic Semiconductors via Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Nathan T.; Zhang, Yi; Grandbois, Matthew L.; Bell, Bruce M.; Holmes, Russell J.; Cussler, E. L.

    2015-03-01

    Organic electronic materials have garnered considerable commercial attention for next generation display and solid-state lighting applications. Widespread adoption of these technologies is slowed by considerable production costs, partially due to an expensive purification step. This work explores the current method of industrial purification, thermal gradient sublimation, in order to isolate the fundamental mechanisms limiting sublimation rate and controlling product deposition. For the archetypical hole transport materials, N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)-benzidine (NPD) and 4,4',4''-tris(carbazol-9-yl) triphenylamine (TCTA), a combination of viscous flow and physical vapor deposition are shown to be rate-limiting at constant sublimation temperature. Surprisingly, diffusion within the solid feed, reaction at the feed particle surface, and mass transfer within the bed of feed particles are not rate limiting in the case. This mechanism is different from that which is observed in many industrial sublimation systems. These results can be used to guide the design and operation of future large-scale purification systems, which are critical for the widespread adoption of organic optoelectronic devices.

  15. Application of ion beam analysis to the selective sublimation processing of thin films for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vomiero, A.; Scian, C.; Della Mea, G.; Guidi, V.; Martinelli, G.; Schiffrer, G.; Comini, E.; Ferroni, M.; Sberveglieri, G.

    2006-08-01

    Ion beam analysis was successfully applied to a novel technique, named selective sublimation process (SSP), for deposition of nanostructured gas-sensing films through reactive sputtering. The method consists of the co-deposition of a mixed oxide, one of which has a relatively low sublimation temperature. Annealing at suitable temperature causes the sublimation of the most volatile compound, leaving a layer with adjustable composition. The appropriate choice of thermal treatments and the consequent tailoring of the composition play a crucial role in the determination of the microstructural properties. We developed a model based on diffusion equations that provides a useful guide to control the deposition and processing parameters and we applied the model on the systems TiO2-WO3 and TiO2-MoO3. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) was demonstrated to be effective for the characterization of the diffusion and sublimation processes during SSP. Experimental results fully agree with theoretical prediction, and allowed the calculation of all the parameters involved in SSP.

  16. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Facilitating Active Learning of Concepts in Transport Phenomena: Experiment with a Subliming Solid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utgikar, Vivek P.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment based on the sublimation of a solid was introduced in the undergraduate Transport Phenomena course. The experiment required the students to devise their own apparatus and measurement techniques. The theoretical basis, assignment of the experiment, experimental results, and student/instructor observations are described in this paper.…

  17. How to Kill a Journalism School: The Digital Sublime in the Discourse of Discontinuance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, Michael; Sindorf, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    The authors argue that journalism's uncertain identity in academia has made it vulnerable to unreflective instrumentalism in the digital era. They show how instrumentalism intertwined with the digital sublime constitutes a rhetorically resonate rationale for closing a journalism school. Evidence comes from documents and testimony associated with…

  18. Sublimation-induced orbital perturbations of extrasolar active asteroids and comets: application to white dwarf systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri; Eggl, Siegfried; Gänsicke, Boris T.

    2015-09-01

    The metal budgets in some white dwarf (WD) atmospheres reveal that volatile-rich circumstellar bodies must both exist in extrasolar systems and survive the giant branch phases of stellar evolution. The resulting behaviour of these active asteroids or comets which orbit WDs is not well-understood, but may be strongly influenced by sublimation due to stellar radiation. Here we develop a model, generally applicable to any extrasolar system with a main-sequence or WD star, that traces sublimation-induced orbital element changes in approximately km-sized extrasolar minor planets and comets travelling within hundreds of au. We derive evolution equations on orbital time-scales and for arbitrarily steep power-law sublimation dependences on distance, and place our model in a Solar system context. We also demonstrate the importance of coupling sublimation and general relativity, and the orbital consequences of outgassing in arbitrary directions. We prove that non-gravitational accelerations alone cannot result in orbit crossing with the WD disruption radius, but may shrink or expand the orbit by up to several au after a single pericentre passage, potentially affecting subsequent interactions with remnant debris and planets. Our analysis suggests that extant planets must exist in polluted WD systems.

  19. Sublimation of natural amino acids and induction of asymmetry by meteoritic amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    It is believed that the homochirality of building blocks of life like amino acids (AAs) and sugars is a prerequisite requirement for the origin and evolution of life. Among different mechanisms that might have triggered the initial disparity in the enantiomeric ratio on the primitive Earth, the key roles were assigned to: (i) local chiral symmetry breaking and (ii) the inflow of extraterrestrial matter (eg the carbonaceous meteorites containing non-racemic AAs). Recently it has been revealed that sublimation, a subject almost completely neglected for a long time, gives a pathway to enantioenrichment of natural AAs (1,2 and references herein). Sublimation is however one of the key physical processes that occur on comets. Starting from a mixture with a low content of an enantiopure AA, a partial sublimation gives an important enrichment of the sublimate (1,2). The resulted disparity in the ratio between enantiomers of a partial sublimate is determined by the crystalline nature of the starting mixture: we observed a drastic difference in the behavior of (i) mixtures based on true racemic compounds and (ii) mechanical mixtures of two enantiopure solid phases. On the other hand, combination of crystallization and sublimation can lead to segregation of enantioenriched fractions starting from racemic composition of sublimable aliphatic AAs (Ala, Leu, Pro, Val) in mixtures with non-volatile enantiopure ones (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) (3). The resulted sense of chirality correlates with the handedness of the non-volatile AAs: the observed changes in enantiomeric ratios clearly demonstrate the preferential homochiral interactions and a tendency of natural amino acids to homochiral self-organization. It is noteworthy that just these 5 (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) out of 22 proteinogenic amino acids are able to local symmetry breaking. On the other hand, recent data on the enantiomeric composition of the Tagish Lake, a C2-type carbonaceous meteorite, revealed a large L

  20. Sublimation of ice-tholins mixtures: A morphological and spectro-photometric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, Olivier; Pommerol, Antoine; Jost, Bernhard; Carrasco, Nathalie; Szopa, Cyril; Thomas, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Sublimation, the direct transition from solid to gas phase, is a process responsible for shaping and changing the reflectance properties of many Solar System surfaces. In this study, we have characterized the evolution of the structure/texture and of the visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR) spectral reflectance of surfaces made of water ice mixed with analogues of complex extraterrestrial organic matter, named tholins, under low temperature (<-70 °C) and pressure (10-5 mbar) conditions. The experiments were carried out in the SCITEAS simulation setup recently built as part of the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy) at the University of Bern (Pommerol, A. et al. [2015a]. Planet. Space Sci. 109-110, 106-122). As the water ice sublimated, we observed in situ the formation of a sublimation lag deposit made of a water-free porous (>90% porosity) network of organic filaments on top of the ice. The temporal evolution of the tholins and water ice spectral features (reflectance at the absorption bands wavelengths, red slope, from 0.40 to 1.90 μm) are analyzed throughout the sublimation of the samples. We studied how different mixtures of tholins with water (0.1 wt.% tholins as coating or inclusions within the water particles), and different ice particle sizes (4.5 ± 2.5 or 67 ± 31 μm) influence the morphological and spectral evolutions of the samples. The sublimation of the ice below the mantle produces a gas flow responsible for the ejection of mm to cm-sized fragments of the deposit in outbursts-like events. The results show remarkable differences between these samples in term of mantle structure, speed of mantle building, rates and surface area of mantle ejections. These data provide useful references for interpreting remote-sensing observations of icy Solar System surfaces, in particular the activity of comet nuclei where sublimation of organic-rich ices and deposition of organic-dust particles likely play a major role. Consequently, the

  1. Static sublimation purification process and characterization of LiZnAs semiconductor material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montag, Benjamin W.; Reichenberger, Michael A.; Edwards, Nathaniel S.; Ugorowski, Philip B.; Sunder, Madhana; Weeks, Joseph; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2016-03-01

    Refinement of the class AIBIICV materials continue as a candidate for solid-state neutron detectors. Such a device would have greater efficiency, in a compact form, than present day gas-filled 3He and 10BF3 detectors. The 6Li(n,t)4He reaction yields a total Q value of 4.78 MeV, larger than 10B, and easily identified above background radiations. Hence, devices composed of either natural Li (nominally 7.5% 6Li) or enriched 6Li (usually 95% 6Li) may provide a semiconductor material for compact high efficiency neutron detectors. A sub-branch of the III-V semiconductors, the filled tetrahedral compounds, AIBIICV, known as Nowotny-Juza compounds, are known for their desirable cubic crystal structure. Starting material was synthesized by equimolar portions of Li, Zn, and As sealed under vacuum (10-6 Torr) in quartz ampoules with a boron nitride lining, and reacted in a compounding furnace [1]. The synthesized material showed signs of high impurity levels from material and electrical property characterization. In the present work, a static vacuum sublimation of synthesized LiZnAs loaded in a quartz vessel was performed to help purify the synthesized material. The chemical composition of the sublimed material and remains material was confirmed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Lithium was not detected in the sublimed material, however, near stoichiometric amounts of each constituent element were found in the remains material for LiZnAs. X-ray diffraction phase identification scans of the remains material and sublimed material were compared, and further indicated the impurity materials were removed from the synthesized materials. The remaining powder post the sublimation process showed characteristics of a higher purity ternary compound.

  2. Spatial and temporal variation of sublimation on Antarctica: Results of a high-resolution general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    1997-12-01

    In this paper we use output of a high-resolution general circulation model (ECHAM-3 T106, resolution 1.1°×1.1°) to study the spatial and temporal variation of sublimation on Antarctica. First, we compare model results with available observations of sublimation rates. The yearly cycle, with small latent heat fluxes during the winter, is well reproduced, and the agreement with sparsely available spot observations is fair. The model results suggest that a significant 10-15% of the annual precipitation over Antarctica is lost through sublimation and that sublimation plays an important role in the formation of blue ice areas. A preliminary analysis of the atmospheric boundary layer moisture budget shows that the spatial variation of sublimation in the coastal zone of East Antarctica can be explained by variations of horizontal advection of dry air. Dry air advection, and thus surface sublimation, is enhanced in areas where katabatic winds are strong and have a large downslope component and where the Antarctic topography drops suddenly from the plateau to the coastal zone. In areas where horizontal advection is small, like the plateau and the large ice shelves, special conditions must be met to make significant sublimation at the surface possible.

  3. Lo Gnomone Clementino Astronomia Meridiana in Basilica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2014-05-01

    Costruito per chiara volontà del papa 70 anni dopo il caso Galileo, lo Gnomone Clementino è un grande telescopio solare che non fa uso di lenti a 92 anni dall’invenzione del cannocchiale. Queste due caratteristiche basterebbero da sole a giustificare l’interesse verso questo strumento. L’astronomia meridiana è alla base dell’astrometria e dell’astrofisica moderna. Lo Gnomone Clementino sta oggi all’astronomia, come il veliero “Amerigo Vespucci” sta alla Marina Italiana. E’ possibile svolgere ogni genere di osservazione e studio su questo strumento, e dal 2002 vi tengo lezioni teorico-pratiche del corso di Storia dell’Astronomia e La Terra nel Sistema Solare della Sapienza, Università di Roma, Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia. Questo testo aggiunge alcuni tasselli alla ricerca storica sulla meridiana, appoggiandosi, com’è naturale, sulle spalle di giganti che mi hanno preceduto in questi studi. In particolare la misura dell’azimut della meridiana, ed il suo inquadramento tra gli strumenti simili ed alcuni studi di astrometria sui dati del 1701-1703 di Bianchini, che sono apparsi fin’ora soltanto su riviste specializzate ed in Inglese vengono qui proposti in Italiano e semplificati, per valorizzare sempre più questa straordinaria opera d’arte e di scienza.

  4. Starspots on LO Pegasi, 2006-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Chalmers, Mark; Geda, Robel; Henry, Brandi; Sliupas, Viesulas

    2016-01-01

    LO Pegasi is a rapidly rotating (P = 10.154 hr) young solar analog (spectral class K5-7V) variable star of BY Dra type that exhibits dark starspots on its surface that modulate its brightness as they are carried into and out of view by the star's rotation. Surface maps of the spot distribution were produced based on BVRI photometry obtained at Perkins Observatory from 2006-2015. The maps were generated from the light curves via a non-linear inversion algorithm that uses the differences in the limb darkening through different filter passbands to improve the latitude resolution of the maps. We present an analysis of variations in the size of a polar spot suggested by changes in the average brightness and the amplitude of the rotational modulation from year to year.

  5. Starspots on LO Pegasi, 2006-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Berry, Dominique; Chalmers, Mark; Denison, Josh; Stevens, Don; Yuhas, Kaylee

    2015-01-01

    BVRI light curves of LO Pegasi obtained at Perkins Observatory (Ohio Wesleyan University) from 2006-2014 were used to study the evolution of starspots on its surface over that interval. We present surface maps obtained via a constrained non-linear inversion algorithm that uses variations in limb darkening as seen through different filters to improve the latitude resolution of the reconstructions. In addition, a detailed period analysis of the entire data set using the ANOVA method was performed to search for variations associated with differential rotation. No evidence of period change was found, as the periods for each year were equal to within their uncertainties. For the data set as a whole, the period of rotation was determined to be 10.1538 ± 0.0009 hr, in agreement with previously published results.

  6. Stellar Surface Imaging of LO Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Rachel; Moore, Conrad; Harmon, Robert

    2008-10-01

    We present images of dark starspots on the surface of the K8 main-sequence star LO Pegasi. CCD camera images of the star and surrounding field were acquired through B, V, R and I filters at Perkins Observatory in Delaware, OH on clear nights in June and July, 2008. The images were dark-subtracted and flat-fielded and then aperture photometry was performed to yield light curves through each of the four filters. These light curves were then simultaneously inverted via an algorithm devised by one of us (Harmon) so as to yield images of the spots based on the rotational modulation they produced in the light curves. The use of multiple filters significantly improves the latitude resolution of the reconstructions. Comparison of our results with results from 2006 and 2007 shows that the spot structure was more complex in 2008 than in the prior years.

  7. Effects of Atmospheric and Surface Dust on the Sublimation Rates of CO2 on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonev, B. P.; James, P. B.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Hansen, G. B.; Wolff, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    We present an overview of our modeling work dedicated to study the effects of atmospheric dust on the sublimation of CO2 on Mars. The purpose of this study is to better understand the extent to which dust storm activity can be a root cause for interannual variability in the planetary CO2 seasonal cycle, through modifying the springtime regression rates of the south polar cap. We obtain calculations of the sublimation fluxes for various types of polar surfaces and different amounts of atmospheric dust. These calculations have been compared qualitatively with the regression patterns observed by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) in both visible and infrared wavelengths, for two years of very different dust histories (1999, and 2001).

  8. Controlling Gaussian and mean curvatures at microscale by sublimation and condensation of smectic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Seok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Kim, Mun Ho; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-01-01

    Soft materials with layered structure such as membranes, block copolymers and smectics exhibit intriguing morphologies with nontrivial curvatures. Here, we report restructuring the Gaussian and mean curvatures of smectic A films with free surface in the process of sintering, that is, reshaping at elevated temperatures. The pattern of alternating patches of negative, zero and positive mean curvature of the air-smectic interface has a profound effect on the rate of sublimation. As a result of sublimation, condensation and restructuring, initially equilibrium smectic films with negative and zero Gaussian curvature are transformed into structures with pronounced positive Gaussian curvature of layers packing, which are rare in the samples obtained by cooling from the isotropic melt. The observed relationship between the curvatures, bulk elastic behaviour and interfacial geometries in sintering of smectic liquid crystals might pave the way for new approaches to control soft morphologies at micron and submicron scales.

  9. Three-dimensional textures and defects of soft material layering revealed by thermal sublimation

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Dong Ki; Kim, Yun Ho; Kim, Dae Seok; Oh, Seong Dae; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Clark, Noel A.; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Layering is found and exploited in a variety of soft material systems, ranging from complex macromolecular self-assemblies to block copolymer and small-molecule liquid crystals. Because the control of layer structure is required for applications and characterization, and because defects reveal key features of the symmetries of layered phases, a variety of techniques have been developed for the study of soft-layer structure and defects, including X-ray diffraction and visualization using optical transmission and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and SEM and transmission electron microscopy, including freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy. Here, it is shown that thermal sublimation can be usefully combined with such techniques to enable visualization of the 3D structure of soft materials. Sequential sublimation removes material in a stepwise fashion, leaving a remnant layer structure largely unchanged and viewable using SEM, as demonstrated here using a lamellar smectic liquid crystal. PMID:24218602

  10. Controlling Gaussian and mean curvatures at microscale by sublimation and condensation of smectic liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Seok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Kim, Mun Ho; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-01-01

    Soft materials with layered structure such as membranes, block copolymers and smectics exhibit intriguing morphologies with nontrivial curvatures. Here, we report restructuring the Gaussian and mean curvatures of smectic A films with free surface in the process of sintering, that is, reshaping at elevated temperatures. The pattern of alternating patches of negative, zero and positive mean curvature of the air–smectic interface has a profound effect on the rate of sublimation. As a result of sublimation, condensation and restructuring, initially equilibrium smectic films with negative and zero Gaussian curvature are transformed into structures with pronounced positive Gaussian curvature of layers packing, which are rare in the samples obtained by cooling from the isotropic melt. The observed relationship between the curvatures, bulk elastic behaviour and interfacial geometries in sintering of smectic liquid crystals might pave the way for new approaches to control soft morphologies at micron and submicron scales. PMID:26725975

  11. Practical sublimation source for large-scale chromium gettering in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, J.E.; Emerson, L.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the technique of chromium gettering with a large-scale sublimation source which resembles in its design the VARIAN Ti-Ball. It consists of a hollow chromium sphere with a diameter of approximately 3 cm and an incandescent filament for radiation heating from inside the ball. While the fabrication of the source is described in a companion paper, we discuss here the gettering technique. The experimental arrangement consists of an UHV system instrumented for total- and partial-pressure measurements, a film-thickness monitor, thermocouples, an optical pyrometer, and appropriate instrumentation to measure the heating power. The results show the temperature and corresponding sublimation rate of the Cr-Ball as function of input power. In addition, an example of the total pumping speed of a gettered surface is shown.

  12. Adamantane derivatives of sulfonamides: sublimation, solubility, solvation and transfer processes in biologically relevant solvents.

    PubMed

    Perlovich, G L; Volkova, T V; Sharapova, A V; Kazachenko, V P; Strakhova, N N; Proshin, A N

    2016-04-01

    Eight adamantane derivatives of sulfonamides were synthesized and characterized. Temperature dependencies of saturation vapor pressure were obtained using the transpiration method and thermodynamic functions of the sublimation processes were calculated. Solubility values of the selected compounds in buffer (pH 7.4), 1-octanol and 1-hexane were determined at different temperatures using the isothermal saturation method. Thermophysical characteristics of fusion processes (melting points and fusion enthalpies) of the substances were studied using the DSC method. Transfer processes from buffer to 1-octanol, from buffer to 1-hexane and 1-hexane to 1-octanol were analyzed. The impact of the molecules' structural modification on sublimation, solubility and solvation/hydration processes in the solvents was studied. Correlation equations connecting the thermodynamic functions with physicochemical descriptors were obtained. PMID:26976747

  13. Sublimating icy planetesimals as the source of nucleation seeds for grain condensation in classical novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matese, John J.; Whitmire, D. P.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of grain nucleation during novae outbursts is a major obstacle to our understanding of dust formation in these systems. How nucleation seeds can form in the hostile post-outburst environment remains an unresolved matter. It is suggested that the material for seeding the condensation of ejecta outflow is stored in a primordial disk of icy planetesimals surrounding the system. Evidence is presented that the requisite number of nucleation seeds can be released by sublimation of the planetesimals during outbursts.

  14. Glaciers of the McMurdo dry valleys: Terrestrial analog for Martian polar sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacClune, Karen Lewis; Fountain, Andrew G.; Kargel, Jeffery S.; MacAyeal, Douglas R.

    2003-04-01

    The surfaces of the Martian north and south polar residual caps are marked by unusual ice features: Dark spiralesque troughs up to 1 km deep, 10 km wide, and 300 km long appear on both ice caps, and circular pits that make up the ``Swiss cheese'' terrain appear on the south polar cap. Both types of features are of interest to researchers as a potential means of understanding ice composition and flow rates. Some glaciers of the McMurdo dry valleys have surface features unknown elsewhere on terrestrial glaciers, including canyons over 6 km long, 100 m wide, and tens of meters deep and basins up to 100 m across. High sublimation, dust accumulation, and very little melting is key to their origin. These processes and ice landforms are suggested as terrestrial analogs for the sublimation behavior of Martian ice caps, where dust accumulation and sublimation are significant but surface melting is absent. We have developed a solar radiation model of canyon formation and have applied it to the Martian polar caps. The modeled processes do well to describe direct and reflected radiation within V grooves, a process that may be significant in the development of the spiral troughs and Swiss cheese terrain. The model fails to reproduce the low observed slopes of the Martian troughs. The grooves are too shallow, with opening angles of ~165° compared with model predictions of ~90°. The reason for the failure may be that we have not included creep closure, which should flatten their slopes.

  15. Properties of Filamentary Sublimation Residues from Dispersions of Clay in Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Parker, T. J.; Saunders, R. S.; Laue, E. G.; Fanale, F. P.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of sublimate residues are of considerable interest in studies of the thermal modeling of Martian and cometary ice surfaces. The study of the formation of sand grains from this mantle on Martian polar ice is also supported by these experiments. To understand these properties, a series of low temperature vacuum experiments were run during which dirty ices that might be expected to be found in Martian polar caps and in comet nuclei were made and then freeze dried. In addition to using particulate material of appropriate grain size and minerology, particle nucleated ices were simulated by dispersing the particulates in the ice so that they did not contact one another. This noncontact dispersion was the most difficult requirement to achieve but the most rewarding in that it produced a new filamentary sublimate residue that was not a relic of the frozen dispersion. If the siliceous particles are allowed to touch one another in the ice the structure of the contacting particles in the ice will remain as a relic after the ice is sublimed away.

  16. Inter-vial Variance of the Sublimation Rate in Shelf Freeze-dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Masakazu; Harashima, Konomi; Ariyama, Hiroichi; Yao, Ai-Ru

    Significant inter-vial variance in the sublimation rate has been pointed out by several authors in relation to the placement of the vials on a well controlled shelf. All the previous reports have described the phenomena observed in the experiments or the production processes, and have made some suggestive remarks, but have not clearly proposed a solution to the problem. In the shelf freeze-drying of pharmaceuticals, one of the major ploblems is how to achieve inter-vial uniformity and batch to batch uniformity or consistency. In this study, We have developed a new model of laboratory-scale freeze-dryer which has temperature-controllable chamber walls, and using this new model we have analyzed causes of inter-vial variance in the sublimation rate. The higher sublimation rate for the vials placed on the shelf edge is due to additional heat input from the wall and also due to further additional heat from the shelf surface on which no kissing vial is placed. It is possible to cancel out the additional heat input from the shelf by maintaining an optimum wall temperature, which must be lower than the material temperature. This paper discusses a method for eliminating the inter-vail variance in drying conditions and shortening the drying time by means of chamber wall temperature control.

  17. Evidence for a Receding Dust Sublimation Region around a Supermassive Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Makoto; Hönig, Sebastian F.; Antonucci, Robert; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Barvainis, Richard; Millour, Florentin; Kotani, Takayuki; Tristram, Konrad R. W.; Weigelt, Gerd

    2013-10-01

    The near-IR emission in Type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is thought to be dominated by the thermal radiation from dust grains that are heated by the central engine in the UV/optical and are almost at the sublimation temperature. A brightening of the central source can thus further sublimate the innermost dust, leading to an increase in the radius of the near-IR emitting region. Such changes in radius have been indirectly probed by the measurements of the changes in the time lag between the near-IR and UV/optical light variation. Here we report direct evidence for such a receding sublimation region through the near-IR interferometry of the brightest Type 1 AGN in NGC 4151. The increase in radius follows a significant brightening of the central engine with a delay of at least a few years, which is thus the implied destruction timescale of the innermost dust distribution. Compiling historic flux variations and radius measurements, we also infer the reformation timescale for the inner dust distribution to be several years in this galactic nucleus. More specifically and quantitatively, we find that the radius at a given time seems to be correlated with a long-term average of the flux over the previous several (~6) years, instead of the instantaneous flux. Finally, we also report measurements of three more Type 1 AGNs newly observed with the Keck interferometer, as well as the second epoch measurements for three other AGNs.

  18. Formulation Design and Optimization of Orodispersible Tablets of Quetiapine Fumarate by Sublimation Method

    PubMed Central

    Kalyankar, P.; Panzade, P.; Lahoti, S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of present study was to formulate directly compressible orodispersible tablets of quetiapine fumarate by sublimation method with a view to enhance patient compliance. A full 32 factorial design was used to investigate the effect of two variables viz., concentration of Indion 414 and camphor. Indion 414 (3-5 % w/w) was used as superdisintegrant and camphor (5-15 % w/w) as subliming agent. The tablets were evaluated for thickness, weight variation, hardness, friability, content uniformity, wetting time, porosity, in vitro disintegration time and in vitro drug release. The formulation containing 5% w/w of Indion 414 and 5% w/w camphor was emerged as promising based on evaluation parameters. The disintegration time for optimized formulation was 18.66 s. The tablet surface was evaluated for presence of pores by scanning electron microscopy before and after sublimation. Differential scanning colorimetric study did not indicate any drug excipient incompatibility, either during mixing or after compression. The effect of independent variables on disintegration time, % drug release and friability is presented graphically by surface response plots. Short-term stability studies on the optimized formulation indicated no significant changes in drug content and in vitro disintegration time. The directly compressible orodispersible tablets of quetiapine fumarate with lower friability, greater drug release and shorter disintegration times were obtained using Indion 414 and camphor at optimum concentrations. PMID:26180271

  19. Formulation Design and Optimization of Orodispersible Tablets of Quetiapine Fumarate by Sublimation Method.

    PubMed

    Kalyankar, P; Panzade, P; Lahoti, S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of present study was to formulate directly compressible orodispersible tablets of quetiapine fumarate by sublimation method with a view to enhance patient compliance. A full 3(2) factorial design was used to investigate the effect of two variables viz., concentration of Indion 414 and camphor. Indion 414 (3-5 % w/w) was used as superdisintegrant and camphor (5-15 % w/w) as subliming agent. The tablets were evaluated for thickness, weight variation, hardness, friability, content uniformity, wetting time, porosity, in vitro disintegration time and in vitro drug release. The formulation containing 5% w/w of Indion 414 and 5% w/w camphor was emerged as promising based on evaluation parameters. The disintegration time for optimized formulation was 18.66 s. The tablet surface was evaluated for presence of pores by scanning electron microscopy before and after sublimation. Differential scanning colorimetric study did not indicate any drug excipient incompatibility, either during mixing or after compression. The effect of independent variables on disintegration time, % drug release and friability is presented graphically by surface response plots. Short-term stability studies on the optimized formulation indicated no significant changes in drug content and in vitro disintegration time. The directly compressible orodispersible tablets of quetiapine fumarate with lower friability, greater drug release and shorter disintegration times were obtained using Indion 414 and camphor at optimum concentrations. PMID:26180271

  20. A method to measure winter precipitation and sublimation under global warming conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndl, Markus; Slawitsch, Veronika; von Unold, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Winter precipitation and snow sublimation are fundamental components of the alpine moisture budget. Much work has been done in the study of these processes and its important contribution to the annual water balance. Due to the above-average sensitivity of the alpine region to climate change, a change in the importance and magnitude of these water balance parameters can be expected. To determine these effects, a lysimeter-facility enclosed in an open-field climate manipulation experiment was established in 2015 at AREC Raumberg-Gumpenstein which is able to measure winter precipitation and sublimation under global warming conditions. In this facility, six monolithic lysimeters are equipped with a snow cover monitoring system, which separates the snow cover above the lysimeter automatically from the surrounding snow cover. Three of those lysimeters were exposed to a +3°C scenario and three lysimeters to ambient conditions. Weight data are recorded every minute and therefore it is possible to get high-resolution information about the water balance parameter in winter. First results over two snow event periods showed that the system can measure very accurately winter precipitation and sublimation especially in comparison with other measurement systems and usually used models. Also first trends confirm that higher winter temperatures may affect snow water equivalent and snow cover duration. With more data during the next years using this method, it is possible to quantify the influence of global warming on water balance parameters during the winter periods.

  1. Ceres water regime: surface temperature, water sublimation and transient exo(atmo)sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formisano, M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Magni, G.; Federico, C.; Capria, M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations of water emission around Ceres suggest the presence of an ice layer on or beneath the surface of this asteroid. Several mechanisms have been suggested to explain these plumes, among which cometary-like sublimation seems to be plausible, since there is a correlation between the magnitude of the emission and the change in the heliocentric distance along the orbit. In this work, we applied a comet sublimation model to study the plausible scenarios that match with Herschel observations of the water flux (1026 molecules s-1). Each scenario is characterized by a well-defined set of physical and orbital parameters. Moreover, a study of the dynamic evolution of the H2O plume has been performed, showing that an optically thin transient atmospheric envelope, with a typical timescale of some tens of days, can be maintained by the H2O surface emission. Our simulations could be useful theoretical support for the Dawn NASA mission by giving a better understanding of the physical conditions for water sublimation and ice stability.

  2. EVIDENCE FOR A RECEDING DUST SUBLIMATION REGION AROUND A SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Kishimoto, Makoto; Tristram, Konrad R. W.; Weigelt, Gerd; Hönig, Sebastian F.; Antonucci, Robert; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Barvainis, Richard; Millour, Florentin; Kotani, Takayuki

    2013-10-01

    The near-IR emission in Type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is thought to be dominated by the thermal radiation from dust grains that are heated by the central engine in the UV/optical and are almost at the sublimation temperature. A brightening of the central source can thus further sublimate the innermost dust, leading to an increase in the radius of the near-IR emitting region. Such changes in radius have been indirectly probed by the measurements of the changes in the time lag between the near-IR and UV/optical light variation. Here we report direct evidence for such a receding sublimation region through the near-IR interferometry of the brightest Type 1 AGN in NGC 4151. The increase in radius follows a significant brightening of the central engine with a delay of at least a few years, which is thus the implied destruction timescale of the innermost dust distribution. Compiling historic flux variations and radius measurements, we also infer the reformation timescale for the inner dust distribution to be several years in this galactic nucleus. More specifically and quantitatively, we find that the radius at a given time seems to be correlated with a long-term average of the flux over the previous several (∼6) years, instead of the instantaneous flux. Finally, we also report measurements of three more Type 1 AGNs newly observed with the Keck interferometer, as well as the second epoch measurements for three other AGNs.

  3. Enhancement of Sublimation of Single Graphene Layer by Interacting with Gas Molecules in Rarefied Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, Ramki; Park, Jae Hyun

    2014-11-01

    Graphene has excellent mechanical properties. One of them is the resistance to high temperature environment. Since the sublimation temperature of graphene is over 4500 K, it has been used for diverse high temperature applications in order to protect the system. In this study, using extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the sublimation of graphene could be enhanced (occurs at the lower temperature) by interacting with the gas molecules. With increase in temperature, the bonds in graphene becomes so sensitive to interact with the incoming gas molecules. When the temperature is low, the graphene is stable to the impingement of gas molecules: The light H2 gases are stick to the graphene surface and remains being attached while the heavy CO2 and H2O are bounced back from the surface. However, at high temperature H2 gases are absorbed on the graphene and destroy the C -C bonds by forming C -H bonds. The local breakage of bond at the impingement spot spreads the entire graphene soon, causing a complete sublimation. Even though the heavy CO2 and H2O molecules also break the C -C bonds at high temperature,but their impingement effect is localized and the breakage does not propagate over the entire surface. This research was supported by Agency for Defence Development (ADD).

  4. Sublimation kinetics and diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX in air by thermogravimetry.

    PubMed

    Hikal, Walid M; Weeks, Brandon L

    2014-07-01

    The diffusion coefficients of explosives are crucial in their trace detection and lifetime estimation. We report on the experimental values of diffusion coefficients of three of the most important explosives in both military and industry: TNT, PETN, and RDX. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to determine the sublimation rates of TNT, PETN, and RDX powders in the form of cylindrical billets. The TGA was calibrated using ferrocene as a standard material of well-characterized sublimation rates and vapor pressures to determine the vapor pressures of TNT, PETN, and RDX. The determined sublimation rates and vapor pressures were used to indirectly determine the diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX for the first time. A linear log-log dependence of the diffusion coefficients on temperature is observed for the three materials. The diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX at 273 K were determined to be 5.76×10(-6)m(2)/sec, 4.94×10(-6)m(2)/s, and 5.89×10(-6)m(2)/s, respectively. Values are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values in literature. PMID:24840410

  5. Formulation Development and Characterization of Meclizine Hydrochloride Sublimated Fast Dissolving Tablets.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Sateesh Kumar; Vangala, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    The intention of present research is to formulate and develop the meclizine hydrochloride fast dissolving tablets using sublimation method to enhance the dissolution rate. In this study an attempt was made to fasten the drug release from the oral tablets by incorporating the superdisintegrants and camphor as sublimating agent. The prepared fast dissolving tablets were subjected to precompression properties and characterized for hardness, weight variation, friability, wetting time, water absorption ratio, and disintegration time. From in vitro release studies, the formulation F9 exhibited fast release profile of about 98.61% in 30 min, and disintegration time 47 sec when compared with other formulations. The percent drug release in 30 min (Q 30) and initial dissolution rate for formulation F9 was 98.61 ± 0.25%, 3.29%/min. These were very much higher compared to marketed tablets (65.43 ± 0.57%, 2.18%/min). The dissolution efficiency was found to be 63.37 and it is increased by 1.4-fold with F9 FDT tablets compared to marketed tablets. Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies revealed that there was no possibility of interactions. Thus the development of meclizine hydrochloride fast dissolving tablets by sublimation method is a suitable approach to improve the dissolution rate. PMID:27355021

  6. Formulation Development and Characterization of Meclizine Hydrochloride Sublimated Fast Dissolving Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Vangala, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    The intention of present research is to formulate and develop the meclizine hydrochloride fast dissolving tablets using sublimation method to enhance the dissolution rate. In this study an attempt was made to fasten the drug release from the oral tablets by incorporating the superdisintegrants and camphor as sublimating agent. The prepared fast dissolving tablets were subjected to precompression properties and characterized for hardness, weight variation, friability, wetting time, water absorption ratio, and disintegration time. From in vitro release studies, the formulation F9 exhibited fast release profile of about 98.61% in 30 min, and disintegration time 47 sec when compared with other formulations. The percent drug release in 30 min (Q30) and initial dissolution rate for formulation F9 was 98.61 ± 0.25%, 3.29%/min. These were very much higher compared to marketed tablets (65.43 ± 0.57%, 2.18%/min). The dissolution efficiency was found to be 63.37 and it is increased by 1.4-fold with F9 FDT tablets compared to marketed tablets. Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies revealed that there was no possibility of interactions. Thus the development of meclizine hydrochloride fast dissolving tablets by sublimation method is a suitable approach to improve the dissolution rate. PMID:27355021

  7. Experimental Investigation of Sublimation of Ice at Subsonic and Supersonic Speeds and Its Relation to Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, Willard D.; Ruggeri, Robert S.

    1954-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in a 3.84- by 10-inch tunnel to determine the mass transfer by sublimation, heat transfer, and skin friction for an iced surface on a flat plate for Mach numbers of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 and pressure altitudes to 30,000 feet. Measurements of rates of sublimation were also made for a Mach number of 1.3 at a pressure altitude of 30,000 feet. The results show that the parameters of sublimation and heat transfer were 40 to 50 percent greater for an iced surface than was the bare-plate heat-transfer parameter. For iced surfaces of equivalent roughness, the ratio of sublimation to heat-transfer parameters was found to be 0.90. The sublimation data obtained at a Mach number of 1.3 showed no appreciable deviation from that obtained at subsonic speeds. The data obtained indicate that sublimation as a means of removing ice formations of appreciable thickness is usually too slow to be of mach value in the de-icing of aircraft at high altitudes.

  8. Impact of sublimation losses in the mass balance of glaciers in semi-arid mountain regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alvaro; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Burlando, Paolo; MacDonell, Shelley; McPhee, James

    2016-04-01

    Glaciers in semiarid mountain regions may lose an important part of their winter snow accumulation through sublimation processes that are enhanced by the high-elevation, intense radiation and dry atmosphere of these environments. As glaciers in these regions secure freshwater resources to lower valleys during summer and drought periods, it is important to advance in a detailed quantification of their sublimation losses. However, logistical concerns and complex meteorological features make the measuring and modelling of glacier mass balances a difficult task. In this study, we estimated the spring-summer mass balances of Tapado and Juncal Norte glaciers in the semiarid Andes of north-central Chile by running a distributed energy balance model that accounts for melt, refreezing and sublimation from the surface and blowing snow. Meteorological input data were available from on-glacier Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) that were installed during the ablation season of years 2005-06, 2008-09, 2013-14 and 2014-15. Snow pits, ablation stakes and a time-lapse camera that provided surface albedo were also available. Distributed air temperature and wind speed were dynamically downscaled from NASA MERRA reanalysis using the software WINDSIM and validated against the data from the AWSs. The rest of the meteorological variables were distributed using statistical relations with air temperature derived from the AWSs data. Initial snow conditions were estimated using satellite images and distributed manual snow depth measurements. Preliminary results show that total ablation diminishes with elevation and that, during the early ablation season (October-November), melt is the main ablation component below 4500 m with sublimation dominating the ablation above this elevation. Above 4500 m an important fraction of meltwater refreezes during night. As the ablation season advances (December-February), melt extends to higher elevations, refreezing plays a smaller role and sublimation is

  9. Sublimating grains in the coma of new comets originating from the Oort Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Tozzi, G.; Brucato, J.; Bruni, I.; Licandro, J.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Meech, K.; Mottola, S.

    2014-07-01

    It is expected that a billion of years of space weathering (see, e.g., Kanuchova et al., 2012, Icarus, 221, 12) produces a crust of organic matter that will be released when a comet enters, for the first time, in the inner Solar System. When approaching to the Sun, a comet is at heliocentric distances r_h greater than 3 au, the sublimation of CO and CO_2 is the main source of cometary activity. At shorter distances, the sublimation of water becomes the most important mechanism of activity. The gases escaping from the nucleus cause drag for the coma grains that can be refractory dust (silicates, carbon), water ice, and/or organic ices. Oort comets at their first passage in the inner Solar System, should produce an halo of organic or water ice particles. Recently, our group started to monitor new, inbound, bright Oort comets (C/2011 F1, C/2012 S1, C/2012 K1, C/2013 V5, C/2012 F3) to search for these grains. The method consists of detecting the cloud of sublimating grains in the inner coma by using the ΣAf(ρ) function (Tozzi et al., 2007, A&A, 476, 979). However, this over-population of grains, beside the sublimation, can be also due to short-time activity (outburst) or too large grains expanding at very slow velocity, as it has been found in comet 67P/C-G (Tozzi et al., 2011, A&A, 531, 54). To discriminate between the phenomena, it is necessary to monitor the comet both at short timescales for the outbursts (by repeating the observations after a few nights), and in a longer term (weeks to months). If the cloud does not expand with decreasing heliocentric distance, there is a high probability that organic and/or water-ice grains are present. We can discriminate between organic and water-ice grains by measuring their color and spectra. In this work, we will present the results obtained from the observations of C/2011 F1 (LINEAR) and C/2012 S1 (ISON). The comparison between data and theoretical simulations, obtained with a simple model assuming sublimating grains

  10. Laboratory experiments to explore the sediment transport capacity of carbon dioxide sublimation under martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvest, Matthew; Conway, Susan; Patel, Manish; Dixon, John; Barnes, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Every spring, the solid carbon dioxide deposited over the martian high latitudes sublimates. Several, unusual surface features, including dark spots and flows on sand dunes, as well as recent activity in martian gullies, have been associated with this CO2 sublimation. Water and/or brines have also been proposed as potential agents for these events, but the timing of these phenomena suggest CO2 sublimation is more likely. However, the exact mechanism by which CO2 sublimation moves sediment is not fully understood, and this understanding is required to validate the CO2 hypothesis. Here we present the results of the first ever laboratory simulations of this process under martian conditions, and show that significant quantities of loose sediment can be transported. The centrepiece of the apparatus is a 1m diameter, 2m long Mars simulation chamber, housed at The Open University, UK. JSC Mars-1A regolith simulant was formed into a slope, inside a box, ~30 cm long, 23 cm wide by 12 cm deep. The box is constructed of coiled, copper tubing to allow cooling of the regolith by liquid nitrogen. The experimental procedure consists of four stages: 1) establishment of a dry atmosphere in the chamber, 2) cooling the regolith sufficiently to support condensation of CO2 frost at reduced pressure, 3) introduction of cooled CO2 gas above the regolith to deposit as frost, and 4) video recording the surface evolution under radiant heating (~100 mins). Two High Definition digital video cameras were mounted above the box and image pairs taken from the videos were then used to create digital elevation models (DEMs) in Agisoft Photoscan at regular intervals. In our initial experiments we performed four experimental runs where the slope was set at or near the angle of repose (~30°). In each case we observed mass wasting events triggered by the sublimation of the deposited CO2 over the whole duration of the insolation. The highest levels of activity occurred in the first third of the run

  11. Graphite Sublimation Tests for the Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory Target Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, JR

    2002-02-07

    A passively cooled graphite target was proposed for a 1.5 MW neutrino production research facility because of its simplicity and favorable performance as a target material for neutrino production (Ref. 1). The conceptual design for the target in the Reference 1 study was a graphite rod 15 mm in diameter by 800 mm long. Figure 1 shows the graphite target rod supported by graphite spokes, which are mounted to a water-cooled stainless steel support tube. The target is radiatively cooled to the water-cooled surface of the support tube. Based on nuclear analysis results (Ref. 2), the time-averaged power deposition in the target is 35 kW. If this power is deposited uniformly along the axial length of the target, the volumetric power deposition in the target is about 250 MW/m{sup 3}. The target surface temperature required to radiate the deposited power to a water-cooled tube is estimated to be about 1850 C, and the temperature at the center of the target is about 75 C hotter. The sublimation erosion rate (e), estimated assuming that the graphite is submersed in a perfect vacuum environment, can be derived from kinetic theory and is given by: e = p{sub sat} (m/2{pi} kT){sup 1/2} where p{sub sat} is the saturation pressure, m is the molecular weight, k is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the surface temperature. The saturation pressure given in Ref. 3 can be approximated by: p{sub sat} = exp(-A/T + B) where A = 9.47 x 10{sup 3}, B = 24.2, and the units of p{sub sat} and T are atmospheres and K, respectively. Using these equations, the saturation pressure and sublimation erosion rate are plotted in Fig. 2 as a function of temperature. The surface recession rate shown with units of mm/s in Fig. 2 assumes one-sided erosion. At the average power deposition value of 250 MW/m{sup 3}, the surface temperature is 1850 C resulting in a sublimation erosion rate of only 2.2 mm/day. However, if the actual power deposition were peaked by a factor of two in the axial direction, then the

  12. Starspots on LO Pegasi, 2006-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Cole, B.; Denison, J.; Gray, K.

    2014-01-01

    LO Pegasi is a K8 main-sequence variable of BY Dra type, exhibiting dark starspots on its surface which modulate its brightness as they are carried into and out of view by the star's rotation. We present the results of BVRI photometry obtained at Perkins Observatory in Delaware, OH from 2006-2013. The light curve shape and by implication the spot configuration is stable on a time scale of several months, but shows substantial year-to-year variations. In particular, the V modulation was a maximum of approximately 0.15 mag in June-July 2011, and a minimum of approximately 0.04 mag in 2012 and 2013. In addition, the mean brightness was lowest in 2012, suggesting the growth of a large spot on the visible rotation pole, which would simultaneously account for the small modulation and lowered mean brightness. In 2013, the mean brightness increased by about 0.05 mag compared to 2012, suggesting that the polar spot is shrinking in size.

  13. Advances in LO2 Propellant Conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Gopal; Orth, Michael; Stone, William; Perry, Gretchen; Holt, Kimberly; Suter, John

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the cryogenic testing and analysis that has recently been completed as part of a multi-year effort to develop a new, more robust and operable LO2 propellant conditioning system. Phase 1 of the program consisted of feasibility demonstrations ot four novel propellant conditioning concepts. A no-bleed, passive propellant conditioning option was shown for the first time to successfully provide desired propellant inlet conditions. The benefits of passive conditioning are reduced operations costs, decreased hardware costs, enhanced operability and increased reliability on future expendable launch vehicles In Phase 2 of the test program, effects of major design parameters were studied and design correlation for future vehicle design were developed. Simultaneously, analytical models were developed and validated. Over 100 tests were conducted with a full-scale feedline using LN2 as the test fluid. A circulation pump provided a range of pressure and flow conditions. The test results showed that the passive propellant conditioning system is insensitive to variations in many of the parameters. The test program provides the validation necessary to incorporate the passive conditioning system into the baseline of future vehicles. Modeling of these systems using computational fluid dynamics seems highly promising.

  14. Carbon deposition characteristics of LO2/HC propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Rosemary; Mercer, Steve D.

    1987-01-01

    The generation and deposition of carbon have been studied using subscale hardware with LO2/RP-1, LO2/propane, and LO2/methane at low mixture ratio conditions. The deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60, and at chamber pressures from 720 to 1650 psia. The carbon-deposition rate is a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. There is a mixture ratio that will minimize deposition for LO2/RP-1; a threshold mixture ratio for LO2/propane; and no deposition for LO2/methane at any mixture ratio tested. The turbine drive operating limits were defined for each fuel tested.

  15. Sublime Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girod, Mark

    2007-01-01

    One of the shortcomings in most efforts to integrate art and science is that many people have a shallow understanding of art, which inevitably leads to shallow connections between art and science. Coloring drawings of planets, building sculptures of volcanoes, and decorating scientific diagrams are fine activities, but they do not link science and…

  16. Martian circumpolar sulfate-rich deposits: sublimation tills derived from the North Polar Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masse, M.; Bourgeois, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Verpoorter, C.; Le Deit, L.

    2009-12-01

    The North Polar Cap of Mars is an accumulation of ice layers with various amounts of interstratified dust particles. A dune field surrounds this polar cap. On one of the densest part of this dune field, Olympia Undae, Langevin et al. (Science, 2005) have detected calcium-rich sulfates (gypsum). To constrain the origin of these gypsum deposits, we performed an integrated morphological, structural and compositional analyses of a key area where it is possible to see the circum-polar dune field, the surface of the ice cap and a cross-section through the ice cap. The mineralogical composition of this area is investigated by applying a spectral derivative method to data acquired by OMEGA and CRISM hyperspectral imaging spectrometers. These are compared to laboratory spectra of ice-gypsum mixtures in simulated martian pressure and temperature conditions. We find that dunes of the circumpolar field and dust interstratified in the ice cap have the same composition. Both contain gypsum. Landforms produced by sublimation of ice are also visible on dust-rich layers of the ice cap. We therefore infer that the superficial circumpolar dust deposits correspond to a sublimation till produced by the ice cap. Circumpolar gypsum-rich deposits thus derive directly from the ice cap. Gypsum crystals are released at the surface of the cap as the ice sublimes. This material is then reworked by winds and forms the circumpolar dunes. There are two hypotheses for the ultimate origin of the gypsum crystals. (1) Pre-existing gypsum crystals might have been deposited together with ice crystals during the formation of the ice cap. (2) Authigenic gypsum crystals might have grown within the ice cap by weathering of dust trapped in the ice. The second hypothesis is consistent with the existence of authigenic sulfate inclusions in terrestrial polar ice (Ohno et al., GRL, 2006) and with the formation process suggested by Niles et al. (Nature, 2009) for martian equatorial sulfates.

  17. Novel Strategy to Fabricate Floating Drug Delivery System Based on Sublimation Technique.

    PubMed

    Huanbutta, Kampanart; Limmatvapirat, Sontaya; Sungthongjeen, Srisagul; Sriamornsak, Pornsak

    2016-06-01

    The present study aims to develop floating drug delivery system by sublimation of ammonium carbonate (AMC). The core tablets contain a model drug, hydrochlorothiazide, and various levels (i.e., 0-50% w/w) of AMC. The tablets were then coated with different amounts of the polyacrylate polymers (i.e., Eudragit® RL100, Eudragit® RS100, and the mixture of Eudragit® RL100 and Eudragit® RS100 at 1:1 ratio). The coated tablets were kept at ambient temperature (25°C) or cured at 70°C for 12 h before further investigation. The floating and drug release behaviors of the tablets were performed in simulated gastric fluid USP without pepsin at 37°C. The results showed that high amount of AMC induced the floating of the tablets. The coated tablets containing 40 and 50% AMC floated longer than 8 h with a time-to-float of about 3 min. The sublimation of AMC from the core tablets decreased the density of system, causing floating of the tablets. The tablets coated with Eudragit® RL100 floated at a faster rate than those of Eudragit® RS100. Even the coating level of polymer did not influence the time-to-float and floating time of coated tablets containing the same amount of AMC, the drug release from the tablets coated with higher coating level of polymer showed slower drug release. The results suggested that the sublimation technique using AMC is promising for the development of floating drug delivery system. PMID:26314245

  18. Sublimation-driven erosion on Hyperion: Topographic analysis and landform simulation model tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Alan D.; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Schenk, Paul M.; White, Oliver L.; Spencer, John

    2012-07-01

    The unique appearance of Hyperion can be explained in part by the loss to space of ballistic ejecta during impact events, as was proposed by Thomas et al. (Thomas, P.C. et al. [2007a]. Icarus 190, 573-584). We conclude that such loss is a partial explanation, accounting for the lack of appreciable intercrater plains on a saturation-cratered surface. In order to create the smooth surfaces and the reticulate, honeycomb pattern of narrow divides between old craters, appreciable subsequent modification of crater morphology must occur through mass-wasting processes accompanied by sublimation, probably facilitated by the loss of CO2 as a component of the relief-supporting matrix of the bedrock. During early stages of crater degradation, steep, crenulate bedrock slopes occupy the upper crater walls with abrupt transitions downslope onto smooth slopes near the angle of repose mantled by mass wasting debris, as can be seen within young craters. Long-continued mass wasting eventually results in slopes totally mantled with particulate debris. This mass wasting effectively destroys small craters, at least in part accounting for the paucity of sub-kilometer craters on Hyperion. Surface temperatures measured by Cassini CIRS range from 58 K to 127 K and imply a surface thermal inertia of 11 ± 2 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2 and bolometric albedo ranging from 0.05 to 0.33. Resulting H2O sublimation rates are only tens of cm per billion years for most of the surface, so the evolution of the observed landforms is likely to require sublimation of more volatile species such as CO2.

  19. Piezoelectric crystal microbalance measurements of enthalpy of sublimation of C2-C9 dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirri, F.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Zampetti, E.

    2015-07-01

    We present here a novel experimental setup able to measure the enthalpy of sublimation of a given compound by means of Piezoelectric Crystal Microbalances (PCM). This experiment was performed in the TG-Lab facility in IAPS-INAF, dedicated to the development of TGA sensors for space measurements, such as detection of organic and non-organic volatile species and refractory materials in planetary environments. In order to study physical-chemical processes concerning the Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) present in atmospheric environments, the setup has been tested on Dicarboxylic acids. Acids with low molecular weight are among the components of organic fraction of particulate matter in the atmosphere, coming from different sources (biogenic and anthropogenic). Considering their relative abundance, it is useful to consider Dicarboxylic acid as "markers" to define the biogenic or anthropogenic origin of the aerosol, thus obtaining some information of the emission sources. In this work, a temperature controlled effusion cell was used to sublimate VOC, creating a molecular flux that was collimated onto a cold PCM. The VOC re-condensed onto the PCM quartz crystal allowing the determination of the deposition rate. From the measurements of deposition rates, it was possible to infer the enthalpy of sublimation of Adipic acid, i.e. Δ Hsub: 141.6 ± 0.8 kJ mol-1, Succinic acid, i.e. 113.3 ± 1.3 kJ mol-1, Oxalic acid, i.e. 62.5 ± 3.1 kJ mol-1 and Azelaic acid, i.e. 124.2 ± 1.2 kJ mol-1 (weight average values). The results obtained are in very good agreement with literature within 10 % for the Adipic, Succinic and Oxalic acid.

  20. Piezoelectric crystal microbalance measurements of enthalpy of sublimation of C2-C9 dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirri, F.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Zampetti, E.

    2016-02-01

    We present here a novel experimental set-up that is able to measure the enthalpy of sublimation of a given compound by means of piezoelectric crystal microbalances (PCMs). The PCM sensors have already been used for space measurements, such as for the detection of organic and non-organic volatile species and refractory materials in planetary environments. In Earth atmospherics applications, PCMs can be also used to obtain some physical-chemical processes concerning the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in atmospheric environments. The experimental set-up has been developed and tested on dicarboxylic acids. In this work, a temperature-controlled effusion cell was used to sublimate VOC, creating a molecular flux that was collimated onto a cold PCM. The VOC recondensed onto the PCM quartz crystal, allowing the determination of the deposition rate. From the measurements of deposition rates, it has been possible to infer the enthalpy of sublimation of adipic acid, i.e. ΔHsub : 141.6 ± 0.8 kJ mol-1, succinic acid, i.e. 113.3 ± 1.3 kJ mol-1, oxalic acid, i.e. 62.5 ± 3.1 kJ mol-1, and azelaic acid, i.e. 124.2 ± 1.2 kJ mol-1. The results obtained show an accuracy of 1 % for succinic, adipic, and azelaic acid and within 5 % for oxalic acid and are in very good agreement with previous works (within 6 % for adipic, succinic, and oxalic acid and within 11 % or larger for azelaic acid).

  1. Near-infrared Emission from Sublimating Dust in Collisionally Active Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lieshout, Rik; Dominik, Carsten; Kama, Mihkel; Michiel, Min

    2013-07-01

    Hot exozodiacal dust is thought to be responsible for excess near-infrared (NIR) emission emanating from the innermost parts of some debris disks. The origin of this dust, however, is still a matter of debate. We test whether hot exozodiacal dust can be supplied from an exterior parent belt by Poynting-Robertson (P-R) drag, paying special attention to the pile-up of dust that occurs due to the interplay of P-R drag and dust sublimation. Specifically, we investigate whether pile-ups still occur when collisions are taken into account, and if they can explain the observed NIR excess. We compute the steady-state distribution of dust in the inner disk by solving the continuity equation. First, we derive an analytic solution under a number of simplifying assumptions. Second, we develop a numerical debris disk model that for the first time treats the complex interaction of collisions, P-R drag, and sublimation in a self-consistent way. From the resulting dust distributions we generate simple emission spectra and compare these to observed excess NIR fluxes. We confirm that P-R drag always supplies a small amount of dust to the sublimation zone, but find that a fully consistent treatment yields a maximum amount of dust that is about 7 times lower than that given by analytical estimates. The NIR excess due this material is much smaller (<10^-3 for A-type stars with parent belts at >1 AU) than the values derived from interferometric observations (~10^-2). Furthermore, the pile-up of dust still occurs when collisions are considered, but its effect on the NIR flux is insignificant. Finally, the cross-section in the innermost regions is clearly dominated by barely bound grains.

  2. Near-infrared emission from sublimating dust in collisionally active debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lieshout, R.; Dominik, C.; Kama, M.; Min, M.

    2014-11-01

    Context. Hot exozodiacal dust is thought to be responsible for excess near-infrared (NIR) emission emanating from the innermost parts of some debris disks. The origin of this dust, however, is still a matter of debate. Aims: We test whether hot exozodiacal dust can be supplied from an exterior parent belt by Poynting-Robertson (P-R) drag, paying special attention to the pile-up of dust that occurs owing to the interplay of P-R drag and dust sublimation. Specifically, we investigate whether pile-ups still occur when collisions are taken into account, and if they can explain the observed NIR excess. Methods: We computed the steady-state distribution of dust in the inner disk by solving the continuity equation. First, we derived an analytical solution under a number of simplifying assumptions. Second, we developed a numerical debris disk model that for the first time treats the complex interaction of collisions, P-R drag, and sublimation in a self-consistent way. From the resulting dust distributions, we generated thermal emission spectra and compare these to observed excess NIR fluxes. Results: We confirm that P-R drag always supplies a small amount of dust to the sublimation zone, but find that a fully consistent treatment yields a maximum amount of dust that is about 7 times lower than that given by analytical estimates. The NIR excess due to this material is much less (≲10-3 for A-type stars with parent belts at ≳1 AU) than the values derived from interferometric observations (~10-2). Pile-up of dust still occurs when collisions are considered, but its effect on the NIR flux is insignificant. Finally, the cross-section in the innermost regions is clearly dominated by barely bound grains. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Dynamical screening of van der Waals interactions in nanostructured solids: Sublimation of fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jianmin; Yang, Jing; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2015-04-01

    Sublimation energy is one of the most important properties of molecular crystals, but it is difficult to study, because the attractive long-range van der Waals (vdW) interaction plays an important role. Here, we apply efficient semilocal density functional theory (DFT), corrected with the dynamically screened vdW interaction (DFT + vdW), the Rutgers-Chalmers nonlocal vdW-DF, and the pairwise-based dispersion-corrected DFT-D2 developed by Grimme and co-workers, to study the sublimation of fullerenes. We find that the short-range part, which accounts for the interaction due to the orbital overlap between fullerenes, is negligibly small. Our calculation shows that there exists a strong screening effect on the vdW interaction arising from the valence electrons of fullerenes. On the other hand, higher-order contributions can be as important as the leading-order term. The reasons are that (i) the surface of fullerene molecules is metallic and thus highly polarizable, (ii) the band gap of fullerene solids is small (less than 2 eV), and (iii) fullerene molecules in the solid phase are so densely packed, yielding the high valence electron density and small equilibrium intermolecular distances (the first nearest neighbor distance is only about 10 Å for C60). However, these two effects make opposite contributions, leading to significant error cancellation between these two contributions. We demonstrate that, by considering higher-order contributions and the dynamical screening, the DFT + vdW method can yield sublimation energies of fullerenes in good agreement with reference values, followed by vdW-DF and DFT-D2. The insights from this study are important for a better understanding of the long-range nature of vdW interactions in nanostructured solids.

  4. Dynamical screening of van der Waals interactions in nanostructured solids: Sublimation of fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Jianmin; Yang, Jing; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2015-04-28

    Sublimation energy is one of the most important properties of molecular crystals, but it is difficult to study, because the attractive long-range van der Waals (vdW) interaction plays an important role. Here, we apply efficient semilocal density functional theory (DFT), corrected with the dynamically screened vdW interaction (DFT + vdW), the Rutgers-Chalmers nonlocal vdW-DF, and the pairwise-based dispersion-corrected DFT-D2 developed by Grimme and co-workers, to study the sublimation of fullerenes. We find that the short-range part, which accounts for the interaction due to the orbital overlap between fullerenes, is negligibly small. Our calculation shows that there exists a strong screening effect on the vdW interaction arising from the valence electrons of fullerenes. On the other hand, higher-order contributions can be as important as the leading-order term. The reasons are that (i) the surface of fullerene molecules is metallic and thus highly polarizable, (ii) the band gap of fullerene solids is small (less than 2 eV), and (iii) fullerene molecules in the solid phase are so densely packed, yielding the high valence electron density and small equilibrium intermolecular distances (the first nearest neighbor distance is only about 10 Å for C{sub 60}). However, these two effects make opposite contributions, leading to significant error cancellation between these two contributions. We demonstrate that, by considering higher-order contributions and the dynamical screening, the DFT + vdW method can yield sublimation energies of fullerenes in good agreement with reference values, followed by vdW-DF and DFT-D2. The insights from this study are important for a better understanding of the long-range nature of vdW interactions in nanostructured solids.

  5. Formation of graphene layers by vacuum sublimation of silicon carbide using a scanning heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, A. N.; Cherednichenko, D. I.

    2011-12-15

    The kinetics of surface graphitization during dissociative vacuum evaporation of silicon carbide, under the effect of a scanning heat source, is studied. A model of the process is developed. The model provides a means for theoretically treating the dynamics of formation and the number of residual carbon atomic layers. The vapor stoichiometric coefficient which ensures the minimization of the number of structural defects in graphene, is optimized at the sublimation temperature: {theta} = 1/{eta}(T{sub max}). The proposed method can be used as a basis for graphene production technology.

  6. The Anomalous Drift of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) due to Sublimating Volatiles near Perihelion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckloff, J. K.; Keane, J. V.; Milam, S.; Coulson, I.; Knight, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Prior to perihelion passage on 28 November 2013, the observed right ascension (RA) and declination (Dec) coordinates of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) significantly lagged the predicted JPL (# 53) ephemeris. We show that this "braking effect" is due to a dynamic pressure exerted by sublimating gases on the sunward side of the nucleus [1]. Comet ISON was observed November 23 through November 28 using the SCUBA-2 sub-millimeter camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Imaging is achieved simultaneously at wavelengths of 850 μm and 450 μm, with RA and Dec determined from the central peak in the coma brightness [2]. When comet ISON was first detected at 850 μm, the 1-mm-sized dust particles were tightly bound to the comet nucleus until at least November 23. Three days later, the dust was less tightly bound, elongated and diffuse, spread out over as much as 120 arc seconds (80,000 km) in the anti-solar direction, suggesting a fragmentation event. We compute the average braking velocity of the nucleus of comet ISON by first measuring the distance between the central RA position and the predicted JPL ephemeris. We then calculate the change in this distance between subsequent observations, and divide this value by the elapsed time between the two observations to yield an average drift velocity of the nucleus over this time interval. We assume that comet ISON, like a number of Jupiter Family Comets visited by spacecraft [3], has low thermal inertia. Thus, the sublimating gases are emitted predominantly on the sunward side of the nucleus. Additionally, we assume that water ice dominates the sublimating gases [4]. We then calculate the pressure on the surface of the nucleus due to the emitted gases using the procedure described in [1]. We match the average drift velocity of the nucleus due to this sublimation pressure with the observed average drift velocity from the JCMT observations, which is sensitive to the size of the body, allowing us to estimate the size of the

  7. Induced Recrystallization of CdTe Thin Films Deposited by Close-Spaced Sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Levi, D. H.; Kazmerski, L. L.; Mayo, B.

    1998-10-29

    We have deposited CdTe thin films by close-spaced sublimation at two different temperature ranges. The films deposited at the lower temperature partially recrystallized after CdCl{sub 2} treatment at 350 C and completely recrystallized after the same treatment at 400 C. The films deposited at higher temperature did not recrystallize at these two temperatures. These results confirmed that the mechanisms responsible for changes in physical properties of CdTe films treated with CdCl{sub 2} are recrystallization and grain growth, and provided an alternative method to deposit CSS films using lower temperatures.

  8. Induced Recrystallization of CdTe Thin Films Deposited by Close-Spaced Sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Levi, D. H.; Kazmerski, L. L.; Mayo, B.

    1998-10-26

    We have deposited CdTe thin films by close-spaced sublimation at two different temperature ranges. The films deposited at the lower temperature partially recrystallized after CdCl2 treatment at 350 C and completely recrystallized after the same treatment at 400 C. The films deposited at higher temperature did not recrystallize at these two temperatures. These results confirmed that the mechanisms responsible for changes in physical properties of CdTe films treated with CdCl2 are recrystallization and grain growth, and provided an alternative method to deposit CSS films using lower temperatures.

  9. Modeling of Sublimation-Driven Erosion and Ice Pinnacle Formation on Callisto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Oliver; Umurhan, Orkan M.; Howard, Alan D.; Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2014-11-01

    Most of the areas observed at high resolution on the Galilean satellite Callisto have a morphology that implies sublimation-driven landform modification and mass wasting is at work [Moore et al., 1999]. These areas comprise rolling dark plains with interspersed bright pinnacles. Howard and Moore [2008], using the MARSSIM landform evolution model, simulated evolution of this landscape as a combination of bedrock volatile sublimation, mass wasting of the dark, non-coherent residue, and redeposition of ice at high-elevation cold traps sheltered from thermal re-radiation to form the pinnacles.The goal of our study is to further investigate the details of pinnacle formation by refining this model, and by constraining values for the variable environmental parameters within the model such that they are consistent with the current understanding of Callisto’s surface environment. We present the results of the updated model and our experimentation with varying key parameters.Our refinement of the model has caused us to revise the result of Howard and Moore [2008] that the pinnacles represent an ice cover of several tens to hundreds of meters. Instead, our results indicate an ice coverage reaching several meters at most, a figure that is consistent with the prediction of Moore et al. [2004]. We have also modified the model such that ice contained within the pinnacles is now subject to sublimation itself.Using Fick’s Law to solve for the diffusive transport rate between a volatile table and an atmosphere [Moore et al., 1996], we have determined that the loss rate of H2O ice from the volatile-refractory bedrock through sublimation is too slow 10-20 kg m-2 s-1) to account for the formation of the ice pinnacles, and that a volatile mixture that contains H2O ice is necessary to facilitate its loss. We find that CO2 hydrate fulfills this role well: loss rates of CO2●6H2O 10-10 kg m-2 s-1) are sufficient to produce deposited ice thicknesses reaching several meters, with the

  10. Dust clouds around red giant stars - Evidence of sublimating comet disks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matese, J. J.; Whitmire, D. P.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1989-09-01

    The dust production by disk comets around intermediate mass stars evolving into red giants is studied, focusing on AGB supergiants. The model of Iben and Renzini (1983) is used to study the observed dust mass loss for AGB stars. An expression is obtained for the comet disk net dust production rate and values of the radius and black body temperature corresponding to peak sublimation are calculated for a range of stellar masses. Also, the fractional amount of dust released from a cometesimal disk during a classical nova outburst is estimated.

  11. Time-resolved photoluminescence of polycrystalline CdTe grown by close-spaced sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, B.; Dhere, R.; Ramanathan, K. )

    1994-06-30

    Polycrystalline CdTe has shown great promise as a low-cost material for thin-film, terrestrial photovoltaic applications, with efficiencies approaching 16% achieved with close-spaced sublimation (CSS)-grown CdTe. Due to the inherent complexities of polycrystalline material, much of the progress in this area has occurred through a slow trial-and-error process. This report uses time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) to characterize the CdTe material quality as a function of one basic growth parameter---substrate temperature. This characterization is done for two different glass substrate materials, soda-lime silicate and borosilicate.

  12. The formation of striae within cometary dust tails by a sublimation-driven YORP-like effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckloff, Jordan K.; Jacobson, Seth A.

    2016-01-01

    Sublimating gas molecules scatter off of the surface of an icy body in the same manner as photons (Lambertian Scattering). This means that for every photon-driven body force, there should be a sublimation-driven analog that affects icy bodies. Thermal photons emitted from the surfaces of asymmetrically shaped bodies in the Solar System generate net torques that change the spin rates of these bodies over time. The long-term averaging of this torque is called the YORP effect. Here we propose a sublimation-driven analog to the YORP effect (Sublimation-YORP or SYORP), in which sublimating gas molecules emitted from the surfaces of icy bodies in the Solar System also generate net torques on the bodies. However, sublimating gas molecules carry ∼104-105 times more momentum away from the body than thermal photons, resulting in much greater body torques. Previous studies of sublimative torques focused on emissions from highly localized sources on the surfaces of Jupiter Family Comet nuclei, and have therefore required extensive empirical observations to predict the resulting behavior of the body. By contrast, SYORP applies to non-localized emissions across the entire body, which likely dominates sublimation-drive torques on small icy chunks and dynamically young comets outside the Jupiter Family, and can therefore be applied without high-resolution spacecraft observations of their surfaces. Instead, we repurpose the well-tested mathematical machinery of the YORP effect to account for sublimation-driven torques. We show how an SYORP-driven mechanism best matches observations of the rarely observed, Sun-oriented linear features (striae) in the tails of comets, whose formation mechanism has remained enigmatic for decades. The SYORP effect naturally explains why striae tend to be observed between near-perihelion and ∼1 AU from the Sun for comets with perihelia less than 0.6 AU, and solves longstanding problems with moving enough material into the cometary tail to form

  13. The growth of sublimation crystals and surface hoar on the Antarctic plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, J.-C.; Domine, F.; Savarino, J.; Dumont, M.; Brun, E.

    2013-12-01

    On the Antarctic plateau, the budget of water vapor and energy is in part determined by precipitation, but these are so low that the dynamic of snow crystal growth and sublimation at the surface can be important factors. At Dome C (75° S, 123° E), we have frequently observed the growth of crystals on the snow surface under calm sunny weather. Here, we present the time variations of specific surface area and density of these crystals. Using the detailed snow model Crocus, we conclude that these crystals were very likely due to the nighttime formation of surface hoar crystals and to the daytime formation of sublimation crystals. These latter crystals form by processes similar to those involved in the formation of frost flowers on young sea ice. The formation of these crystals impact the albedo, mass and energy budget of the Antarctic plateau. In particular, the specific surface area variations of the surface layer can induce an instantaneous forcing of up to -10 W m-2 at noon, resulting in a surface temperature drop of 0.45 K.

  14. Formation of gullies on Mars by debris flows triggered by CO2 sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilorget, C.; Forget, F.

    2016-01-01

    Martian gully landforms resemble terrestrial debris flows formed by the action of liquid water and have thus been interpreted as evidence for potential habitable environments on Mars within the past few millennia. However, ongoing gully formation has been detected under surface conditions much too cold for liquid water, but at times in the martian year when a thin layer of seasonal CO2 frost is present and defrosting above the regolith. These observations suggest that the CO2 condensation-sublimation cycle could play a role in gully formation. Here we use a thermo-physical numerical model of the martian regolith underlying a CO2 ice layer and atmosphere to show that the pores beneath the ice layer can be filled with CO2 ice and subjected to extreme pressure variations during the defrosting season. The subsequent gas fluxes can destabilize the regolith material and induce gas-lubricated debris flows with geomorphic characteristics similar to martian gullies. Moreover, we find that subsurface CO2 ice condensation, sublimation and pressurization occurs at conditions found at latitudes and slope orientations where gullies are observed. We conclude that martian gullies can result from geologic dry ice processes that have no terrestrial analogues and do not require liquid water. Such dry ice processes may have helped shape the evolution of landforms elsewhere on the martian surface.

  15. Formulation and evaluation of fast dissolving tablets of cinnarizine using superdisintegrant blends and subliming material.

    PubMed

    Basu, Biswajit; Bagadiya, Abhishek; Makwana, Sagar; Vipul, Vora; Batt, Devraj; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop fast dissolving tablet of cinnarizine. A combination of super disintegrants, i.e., sodium starch glycolate (SSG) and crosscarmellose sodium (CCS) were used along with camphor as a subliming material. An optimized concentration of camphor was added to aid the porosity of the tablet. A 3(2) full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of two formulation variables: Amount of SSG and CCS. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy was performed to identify the physicochemical interaction between drug and polymer. IR spectroscopy showed that there is no interaction of drug with polymer. In the present study, direct compression was used to prepare the tablets. The powder mixtures were compressed into tablet using flat face multi punch tablet machine. Camphor was sublimed from the tablet by exposing the tablet to vacuum drier at 60°C for 12 hours. All the formulations were evaluated for their characteristics such as average weight, hardness, wetting time, friability, content uniformity, dispersion time (DT), and dissolution rate. An optimized tablet formulation (F 9) was found to have good hardness of 3.30 ± 0.10 kg/cm(2), wetting time of 42.33 ± 4.04 seconds, DT of 34.67 ± 1.53 seconds, and cumulative drug release of not less than 99% in 16 minutes. PMID:22247895

  16. Vapor pressures and enthalpies of sublimation of D-glucose, D-xylose, cellobiose, and levoglucosan

    SciTech Connect

    Oja, V.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    The vapor pressures of {alpha}-D-glucose (or dextrose), D-xylose, D-cellobiose (or 4-{beta}-D-glucopyranosyl-D-glucopyranose), and levoglucosan (or 1,6-anhydro-{beta}-D-glucopyranose) have been measured using the Knudsen effusion technique, in the range of temperatures from 344 to 488 K. The measurements were all made in the solid sublimation regime, and enthalpies of sublimation were calculated from the Clausius-Claperon equation. The vapor pressures may be correlated by ln(P/Pa) = A {minus} B/(T/K), where A = 53.16, B = 23.382 ({+-}600) for D-glucose (395--406 K), A = 46.29 and B = 19,006 ({+-} 375) for D-xylose (370--395 K), and A = 70.30 and B = 36,264 ({+-} 5,220) for cellobiose (474--488 K). Levoglucosan displayed a solid phase transition at approximately 386 K, and its vapor pressure was affected accordingly. For this material, A = 38.96 and B = 15,049 ({+-} 123) in the temperature range 344--386 K and A = 31.19 and B = 12,066 ({+-} 709) in the temperature range 386--405 K.

  17. Computational analysis for dry-ice sublimation assisted CO2 jet impingement flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Songmi; Lee, Jaeseon

    2015-11-01

    The flow and heat transfer characteristics of the novel gas-solid two-phase jet impingement are investigated computationally. When the high pressure carbon dioxide (CO2) flow passes through a nozzle or orifice, it experiences the sudden expansion and the rapid temperature drop occurred by Joule-Thomson effect. This temperature drop causes the lower bulk jet fluid temperature than the CO2 sublimation line, so dry-ice becomes formed. By using CO2 gas-solid mixture as a working fluid of jet impingement, it is expected the heat transfer enhancement can be achieved due to the low bulk temperature and the additional phase change latent heat. In this study, 2D CFD model is created to predict the cooling effect of gas-solid CO2 jet. The gas-solid CO2 flow is considered by Euler-Lagrangian approach of mixed phase and the additional heat transfer module is embedded to account for the sublimation phenomena of the solid state CO2. The jet flow and heat transfer performance of gas-solid CO2 jet is investigated by the variance of flow parameter like Reynolds number, solid phase concentration and jet geometries.

  18. Sublimator Driven Coldplate Engineering Development Unit Test Results and Development of Second Generation SDC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, Ryan A.; Sheth, Rubik B.

    2009-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a traditional thermal control scheme. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially increasing reliability and reducing complexity while saving both mass and power. Furthermore, the Integrated Sublimator Driven Coldplate (ISDC) concept couples a coolant loop with the previously described SDC hardware. This combination allows the SDC to be used as a traditional coldplate during long mission phases. The previously developed SDC technology cannot be used for long mission phases due to the fact that it requires a consumable feedwater for heat rejection. Adding a coolant loop also provides for dissimilar redundancy on the Altair Lander ascent module thermal control system, which is the target application for this technology. Tests were performed on an Engineering Development Unit at NASA s Johnson Space Center to quantify and assess the performance of the SDC. Correlated thermal math models were developed to help explain the test data. The paper also outlines the preliminary results of an ISDC concept being developed.

  19. GaAs surface cleaning by thermal oxidation and sublimation in molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Junji; Nanbu, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Tomonori; Kondo, Kazuo

    1988-01-01

    GaAs surface cleaning by thermal oxidation and sublimation prior to molecular-beam-epitaxial growth has been investigated as a means of reducing the carrier depletion at the substrate and epitaxial layer interface. The carrier depletion between the substrate and epitaxial films, measured by a C-V carrier profiling technique, was shown to decrease significantly with an increase in the thickness of the thermal oxidation. The concentration of carbon contamination near the substrate-epitaxial interface was measured using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The carbon concentration correlated very well with the carrier depletion. Therefore, the main origin of the carrier depletion is believed to be the carbon concentration of the initial growth surface. Based on these results, the thermal oxidation and sublimation of a semi-insulating GaAs substrate was successfully applied to improve the mobility and sheet concentration of the two-dimensional electron gas in selectively doped GaAs/N-Al0.3Ga0.7As heterostructures with very thin GaAs buffer layers.

  20. Lo/Ld phase coexistence modulation induced by GM1.

    PubMed

    Puff, Nicolas; Watanabe, Chiho; Seigneuret, Michel; Angelova, Miglena I; Staneva, Galya

    2014-08-01

    Lipid rafts are assumed to undergo biologically important size-modulations from nanorafts to microrafts. Due to the complexity of cellular membranes, model systems become important tools, especially for the investigation of the factors affecting "raft-like" Lo domain size and the search for Lo nanodomains as precursors in Lo microdomain formation. Because lipid compositional change is the primary mechanism by which a cell can alter membrane phase behavior, we studied the effect of the ganglioside GM1 concentration on the Lo/Ld lateral phase separation in PC/SM/Chol/GM1 bilayers. GM1 above 1mol % abolishes the formation of the micrometer-scale Lo domains observed in GUVs. However, the apparently homogeneous phase observed in optical microscopy corresponds in fact, within a certain temperature range, to a Lo/Ld lateral phase separation taking place below the optical resolution. This nanoscale phase separation is revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy, including C12NBD-PC self-quenching and Laurdan GP measurements, and is supported by Gaussian spectral decomposition analysis. The temperature of formation of nanoscale Lo phase domains over an Ld phase is determined, and is shifted to higher values when the GM1 content increases. A "morphological" phase diagram could be made, and it displays three regions corresponding respectively to Lo/Ld micrometric phase separation, Lo/Ld nanometric phase separation, and a homogeneous Ld phase. We therefore show that a lipid only-based mechanism is able to control the existence and the sizes of phase-separated membrane domains. GM1 could act on the line tension, "arresting" domain growth and thereby stabilizing Lo nanodomains. PMID:24835016

  1. [Sublimation-dried mare's milk and the possibility of its use in creating infant and dietary food products].

    PubMed

    Stoianova, L G; Abramova, L A; Ladodo, K S

    1988-01-01

    The main biological parameters were studied in sublimated mare's milk: protein fraction composition, amino-acid spectrum, fatty-acid composition of lipids and the content of vitamins and mineral substances. A high biological value of the sublimated mare's milk has been proved, as well as significant proximity of its composition to human milk. Preliminary data have evidenced expediency of mare's milk use for the development of adapted milk mixtures for baby foods. However, the fatty component of the mixtures needs certain correction by addition of vegetable oil. The sublimated mare's milk can be used for the production of kumiss, that would extend its application in dietotherapy by removing season and territory limitations. PMID:3388813

  2. 77 FR 50185 - LoCorr Fund Management, LLC and LoCorr Investment Trust; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... standard. 3. Applicants assert that the shareholders expect the Adviser and the Board to select the... shareholder approval. Applicants: LoCorr Fund Management, LLC (``LFM'' or the ``Adviser'') and LoCorr... materially amend Subadvisory Agreements without obtaining shareholder approval. The requested relief will...

  3. An investigation on the mechanism of sublimed DHB matrix on molecular ion yields in SIMS imaging of brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Dowlatshahi Pour, Masoumeh; Malmberg, Per; Ewing, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    We have characterized the use of sublimation to deposit matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) matrices in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis, i.e. matrix-enhanced SIMS (ME-SIMS), a common surface modification method to enhance sensitivity for larger molecules and to increase the production of intact molecular ions. We use sublimation to apply a thin layer of a conventional MALDI matrix, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), onto rat brain cerebellum tissue to show how this technique can be used to enhance molecular yields in SIMS while still retaining a lateral resolution around 2 μm and also to investigate the mechanism of this enhancement. The results here illustrate that cholesterol, which is a dominant lipid species in the brain, is decreased on the tissue surface after deposition of matrix, particularly in white matter. The decrease of cholesterol is followed by an increased ion yield of several other lipid species. Depth profiling of the sublimed rat brain reveals that the lipid species are de facto extracted by the DHB matrix and concentrated in the top most layers of the sublimed matrix. This extraction/concentration of lipids directly leads to an increase of higher mass lipid ion yield. It is also possible that the decrease of cholesterol decreases the potential suppression of ion yield caused by cholesterol migration to the tissue surface. This result provides us with significant insights into the possible mechanisms involved when using sublimation to deposit this matrix in ME-SIMS. Graphical Abstract Schematic representation of the enhancement on the molecular ion yields in SIMS by deposition of DHB matrix on the brain tissue using sublimation. PMID:26922337

  4. Evaluations of University of Wisconsin Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitors 300 LO and 400 LO B

    SciTech Connect

    K. L. Davis; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; B. M. Chase; T. C. Unruh

    2011-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors 05R4-02-A KG1403 (300 LO) and 05R4-01-A KG1415 (400 LO B) were evaluated at the High Temperature Test Lab (HTTL) to determine their peak irradiation temperatures. HTTL measurements indicate that the peak irradiation temperature for the 300 LO monitor was 295 {+-} 20 C and the peak irradiation temperature for the 400 LO B monitor was 294 {+-} 25 C. Two silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) were evaluated at the High Temperature Test Lab (HTTL) to determine their peak temperature during irradiation. These monitors were irradiated as part of the University of Wisconsin Pilot Project with a target dose of 3 dpa. Temperature monitors were fabricated from high density (3.203 g/cm3) SiC manufactured by Rohm Haas with a nominal size of 12.5 mm x 1.0 mm x 0.75 mm (see Attachment A). Table 1 provides identification for each monitor with an expected peak irradiation temperature range based on preliminary thermal analysis (see Attachment B). Post irradiation calculations are planned to reduce uncertainties in these calculated temperatures. Since the early 1960s, SiC has been used as a post-irradiation temperature monitor. As noted in Reference 2, several researchers have observed that neutron irradiation induced lattice expansion of SiC annealed out when the post-irradiation annealing temperature exceeds the peak irradiation temperature. As noted in Reference 3, INL uses resistivity measurements to infer peak irradiation temperature from SiC monitors. Figure 1 depicts the equipment at the HTTL used to evaluate the SiC monitors. The SiC monitors are heated in the annealing furnace using isochronal temperature steps that, depending on customer needs, can range from 50 to 800 C. This furnace is located under a ventilation hood within the stainless steel enclosure. The ventilation system is activated during heating so that any released vapors are vented through this system. Annealing

  5. Sublimation of water ice mixed with silicates and tholins: Evolution of surface texture and reflectance spectra, with implications for comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, Olivier; Pommerol, Antoine; Jost, Bernhard; Carrasco, Nathalie; Szopa, Cyril; Thomas, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    The surfaces of many objects in the Solar System comprise substantial quantities of water ice sometimes mixed with minerals and/or organic molecules. The sublimation of the ice changes the structural and optical properties of these objects. We present laboratory data on the evolution of the structure and the visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance of icy surface analogues of cometary ices, made of water ice, complex organic matter (tholins) and silicates, as they undergo sublimation under low temperature (<-70 °C) and pressure (10-5 mbar) conditions inside the SCITEAS simulation chamber. As the water ice sublimated, we observed in situ the formation of a porous sublimation lag deposit, or sublimation mantle, at the top of the ice. This mantle is a network of filaments made of the non-volatile particles. Organics or phyllosilicates grains, able to interact via stronger inter-particulate forces than olivine grains, can form a foam-like structure having internal cohesiveness, holding olivine grains together. As this mantle builds-up, the band depths of the sub-surface water ice are attenuated until complete extinction under only few millimeters of mantle. Optically thick sublimation mantles are mainly featureless in the near infrared. The absorption bands of the minerals present in the mantle are weak, or even totally absent if minerals are mixed with organics which largely dominate the VIS-NIR reflectance spectrum. During sublimation, ejections of large fragments of mantle, triggered by the gas flow, expose ice particles to the surface. The contrast of brightness between mantled and ice-exposed areas depends on the wavelength range and the dust/ice ratio considered. We describe how the chemical nature of the non-volatiles, the size of their particles, the way they are mixed with the ice and the dust/ice mass ratio influence the texture, activity and spectro-photometric properties of the sublimation mantles. These data provide useful references for

  6. Graphite Sublimation Tests for the Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory Target Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, JR

    2002-03-25

    A passively cooled graphite target was proposed for a 1.5 MW neutrino production research facility because of its simplicity and favorable performance as a target material for neutrino production. The conceptual design for the target in the Reference 1 study was a graphite rod 15 mm in diameter by 800 mm long. Figure 1 shows the graphite target rod supported by graphite spokes, which are mounted to a water-cooled stainless steel support tube. The target is radiatively cooled to the water-cooled surface of the support tube. Based on nuclear analysis results, the time-averaged power deposition in the target is 35 kW. If this power is deposited uniformly along the axial length of the target, the volumetric power deposition in the target is about 250 MW/m{sup 3}. The target surface temperature required to radiate the deposited power to a water-cooled tube is estimated to be about 1850 C, and the temperature at the center of the target is about 75 C hotter. The sublimation erosion rate (e), estimated assuming that the graphite is submersed in a perfect vacuum environment, can be derived from kinetic theory and is given by: e = p{sub sat}(m/2{pi} kT){sup 1/2} where p{sub sat} is the saturation pressure, m is the molecular weight, k is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the surface temperature. The saturation pressure given in Ref. 3 can be approximated by: p{sub sat} =exp(-A/T + B) where A = 9.47 x 10{sup 3}, B = 24.2, and the units of p{sub sat} and T are atmospheres and K, respectively. Using these equations, the saturation pressure and sublimation erosion rate are plotted in Fig. 2 as a function of temperature. The surface recession rate shown with units of mm/s in Fig. 2 assumes one-sided erosion. At the average power deposition value of 250 MW/m{sup 3}, the surface temperature is 1850 C resulting in a sublimation erosion rate of only 2.2 {micro}m/day. However, if the actual power deposition were peaked by a factor of two in the axial direction, then the surface

  7. 12. DETAIL VIEW OF WEST ABUTMENT AT Lo, SHOWING BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW OF WEST ABUTMENT AT Lo, SHOWING BRIDGE SEAT, TIMBER PILES, STEEL SILL AND BACKWALL/WlNGWALL BOARDS, LOOKING NORTH - Cottonville Bridge, County Road D-61 at Farmer's Creek, Maquoketa, Jackson County, IA

  8. Low-z LoBAL QSOs: orientation or evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarova, M.

    2015-09-01

    Low-ionization Broad Absorption Line QSOs (LoBALs) are redder type-1 QSOs characterized by broad, blue-shifted absorptions of Mg II, indicating gas outflows at velocities up to 0.2c. There is still much debate regarding the nature of these objects. In the orientation paradigm, LoBALs are present in all QSOs, but can only be observed along limited lines of sight that skim the obscuring torus. Conversely, in the evolution paradigm LoBALS have been interpreted as being a short phase in the early stages of the QSO lifecycle, when QSO-driven winds are expelling gas and dust from the central regions. To explore the suggestion by previous work that LoBALS are more likely to be observed in mergers and recently fueled QSOs, we conducted a morphological analysis of a volume-limited sample of 22 SDSS-selected LoBALs at 0.5 < z < 0.6 using HST/WFC3. We find signs of recent or ongoing tidal interaction in 2/3 of the host galaxies, and detailed surface brightness analysis with GALFIT indicates that the vast majority have early-type morphologies. Our results confirm the high rate of mergers in LoBAL hosts and they further show that LoBALs can be observed at any stage of the merger when QSO activity is expected, according to numerical simulations. While the morphologies of these objects may support the evolution paradigm, their SEDs do not suggest they are a population of QSOs statistically different from optically-selected type-1 QSOs. We discuss the two possible explanations for LoBALs implied by our results.

  9. Testing and Model Correlation of Sublimator Driven Coldplate Coupons and EDU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2009-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a more traditional thermal control system. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially saving mass, power, and complexity. Because this concept relies on evaporative heat rejection techniques, it is primarily useful for short mission durations. Additionally, the concept requires a conductive path between the heat-generating component and the heat rejection device. Therefore, it is mostly a relevant solution for a vehicle with a relatively low heat rejection requirement and/or short transport distances. Tests were performed on coupons and an Engineering Development Unit (EDU) at NASA s Johnson Space Center to better understand the basic operational principles and to validate the analytical methods being used for the SDC development. This paper outlines the results of the SDC tests, the subsequent thermal model correlation, and a description of the SDC Engineering Development Unit test results.

  10. Deracemization of Amino Acids by Partial Sublimation and via Homochiral Self-Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Sorochinsky, Alexander E.; Kukhar, Valery P.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2013-04-01

    Deracemization of a 50/50 mixture of enantiomers of aliphatic amino acids (Ala, Leu, Pro, Val) can be achieved by a simple sublimation of a pre-solubilized solid mixture of the racemates with a huge amount of a less-volatile optically active amino acid (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr). The choice of chirality correlates with the handedness of the enantiopure amino acids—Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, and Thr. The deracemization, enantioenrichment and enantiodepletion observed in these experiments clearly demonstrate the preferential homochiral interactions and a tendency of natural amino acids to homochiral self-organization. These data may contribute toward an ultimate understanding of the pathways by which prebiological homochirality might have emerged.

  11. Homo-epitaxial growth of CdTe by sublimation under low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Yasushi; Yoda, Hiroki; Kasuga, Masanobu

    1991-12-01

    A new method to obtain a twin-free single crystal of CdTe on a CdTe substrate by sublimation is described. When CdTe(111)A substrates were employed for the homo-epitaxial growth of CdTe, twin crystals were frequently obtained. The substrate of CdTe(211)A and (211)B, however, gave no twins resulting in single crystals of high quality. The difference may come from the existence of many steps, sufficient to suppress two-dimensional nucleation and to promote step flow mechanism. To obtain twin-free films, therefore, a fairly large tilt angle of the substrate from a singular plane and a fairly low supersaturation are essential.

  12. The source of sublimates on the Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange glass samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C., Jr.; Mckay, D. S.; Anderson, D. H.; Butler, P., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Elemental analyses of the thin film of micromounds which coat the surfaces of Apollo 15 green glass and Apollo 17 orange glass are reported. It is thought that Zn, Ga, Pb, Cu, Tl, S, F, and Cl condensed as a sublimate on the outside surface of these glass particles in lava fountains about 3.4 and 3.6 b.y. ago (Apollos 15 and 17, respectively). The heavy metals enriched in these samples may have been mobilized in a halide- and sulfide-rich vapor, while the source of these elements and of the glass may be a sulfide- and halide-rich pyroxenite inside the moon. The isotopic composition of lead on the surface of individual particles was determined, and the composition is considered with respect to the evolution of the source region. The lead on the surfaces is similar to lead that has been mixed into other soils and breccias at nearby sites.

  13. Growth of CdTe thin films on graphene by close-spaced sublimation method

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Younghun; Yang, Gwangseok; Kim, Jihyun; Chun, Seungju; Kim, Donghwan

    2013-12-02

    CdTe thin films grown on bi-layer graphene were demonstrated by using the close-spaced sublimation method, where CdTe was selectively grown on the graphene. The density of the CdTe domains was increased with increasing the number of the defective sites in the graphene, which was controlled by the duration of UV exposure. The CdTe growth rate on the bi-layer graphene electrodes was 400 nm/min with a bandgap energy of 1.45–1.49 eV. Scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, micro-photoluminescence, and X-ray diffraction technique were used to confirm the high quality of the CdTe thin films grown on the graphene electrodes.

  14. Induced recrystallization of CdTe thin films deposited by close-spaced sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H.R.; Dhere, R.G.; Al-Jassim, M.M.; Levi, D.H.; Kazmerski, L.L.; Mayo, B.

    1999-03-01

    We have deposited CdTe thin films by close-spaced sublimation at two different temperature ranges. The films deposited at the lower temperature partially recrystallized after CdCl{sub 2} treatment at 350&hthinsp;{degree}C and completely recrystallized after the same treatment at 400&hthinsp;{degree}C. The films deposited at higher temperature did not recrystallize at these two temperatures. These results confirmed that the mechanisms responsible for changes in physical properties of CdTe films treated with CdCl{sub 2} are recrystallization and grain growth, and provided an alternative method to deposit CSS films using lower temperatures. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Evaluation of explosive sublimation as the mechanism of nanosecond laser ablation of tungsten under vacuum conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oderji, Hassan Yousefi; Farid, Nazar; Sun, Liying; Fu, Cailong; Ding, Hongbin

    2016-08-01

    A non-equilibrium mechanism for nanosecond laser ablation is suggested herein, and its predictions are compared to the results of W experiments performed under vacuum conditions. A mechanism of particle formation is explained via this model, with partial sublimation of the superheated irradiated zone of the target considered to be the mechanism of laser ablation. In this study, a mixture of vapor and particles was explosively generated and subsequently prevented the rest of a laser pulse from reaching its intended target. This mechanism was found to play an essential role in the ablation of W under vacuum conditions, and it provides a theoretical justification for particle formation. Moreover, special considerations were taken into account for the expansion of plasma into a vacuum. The model was evaluated by measuring the mass of ablated particles using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The results of this model were found to be in good agreement with experimental values.

  16. Growth of SiC single crystals on patterned seeds by a sublimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xianglong; Chen, Xiufang; Peng, Yan; Xu, Xiangang; Hu, Xiaobo

    2016-04-01

    Growth of 6H-SiC on patterned seeds with the vertical sidewalls composed of {11-20} and {1-100} faces by a sublimation method at 1700-2000 °C was studied. Anisotropy in lateral growth rates was observed, i.e the growth rate towards <11-20> was faster than that along <1-100>. It was found that free lateral growth on mesas was accompanied by a sharp decrease in the density of threading dislocation. The dependence of lateral growth rate on growth conditions such as reactor pressure and growth temperature was investigated. The factors governing the process of lateral growth of 6H-SiC on patterned seeds were discussed.

  17. Near-equilibrium growth of thick, high quality beta-SiC by sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B.; Fekade, Konjit; Spencer, Michael G.

    1993-01-01

    A close spaced near-equilibrium growth technique was used to produce thick, high quality epitaxial layers of beta-silicon carbide. The process utilized a sublimation method to grow morphologically smooth layers. The beta silicon carbide growth layers varied from about 200 to 750 microns in thickness. Chemical vapor deposition grown, 2-10 microns, beta silicon carbide films were used as seeds at 1860 and 1910 C growth temperatures. The respective average growth rates were 20 and 30 microns per hour. The layers are p-type with a 3.1 x 10 exp 17/cu cm carrier concentration. Electrical measurements indicate considerable improvement in the breakdown voltage of Schottky barriers on growth samples. Breakdown values ranged from 25 to 60 V. These measurements represent the highest values reported for 3C-SiC.

  18. HiRISE Images of the Sublimation of the Southern Seasonal Polar Cap of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; McEwen, A. S.; Okubo, C.; Byrne, S.; Becker, T.; Kieffer, H.; Mellon, M.; HiRISE Team

    2007-12-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has returned images with unprecedented resolution of Mars southern seasonal CO2 polar cap. Several high latitude sites were selected for systematic monitoring throughout the spring as the seasonal cap sublimed away. The capability of MRO to turn off-nadir enabled acquisition of stereo pairs to study the topography. HiRISE color capability distinguishes processes involving dust and frost. Color images show evidence of localized migration of frost as dark spots sublimate. Unique landforms are found in the cryptic terrain[1] region of Mars polar cap. These unusual landforms have narrow channels emanating radially, dubbed spiders[2]. Fans of dust blown by the prevailing wind are hypothesized to come from gas jets of CO2 subliming beneath translucent seasonal ice [3]. HiRISE images show a wide variety of morphologies of narrow channels. In some regions deep narrow channels converge radially, while in others the high channel density is more akin to lace. A smooth evolution of one form to another has been observed. Channels converge dendritically, often uphill, consistent with formation by flowing gas, not liquid. More dust fans are observed in regions of spiders than in lace, suggesting that the sublimating gas under the seasonal ice builds up more pressure and can entrain more dust in spidery areas. These differing terrain types are found within a single 6 x 10 km image, which has presumably homogeneous weather, thus a uniform layer of ice and exposure to atmospheric dust. HiRiSE images show that the dust fans tend to emerge from low spots, where the subsurface is accessed, then are blown up and out onto the surface of the seasonal ice. The fans evolve from a thin diffuse covering to thick blankets filling in the narrow channels. We hypothesize that dust collects in the channels, and that these relatively more permeable dust-filled channels form pathways for the next seasons

  19. Switchover software reliability estimate for Paducah Freezer/Sublimer computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, D.M.; Davis, J.N.

    1993-04-01

    K-25 Engineering Division purchased a series of redundant computer systems and developed software for the purpose of providing continuous process monitoring and control for the Freezer/Sublimer equipment in the gaseous diffusion process at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The application software is loaded on two central processing units (CPU) so that in the event of a failure of the primary unit, the processing can switch to the backup unit and continue processing without error. It is the purpose of this document to demonstrate the reliability of this system with respect to its ability to switch properly between redundant CPU. The total reliability estimation problem -- which considers the computer hardware, the operating system software, and the application software -- has been reduced to one that considers only the application software directly involved in the switchover process. Estimates are provided for software reliability and the testing coverage. Software and hardware reliability models and reliability growth models are considered in addition to Bayesian approaches.

  20. Formation of the molecular crystal structure during the vacuum sublimation of paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, A. P.; Rubets, V. P.; Antipov, V. V.; Bordei, N. S.

    2015-04-01

    The results from structural and thermal studies on the formation of molecular crystals during the vacuum sublimation of paracetamol from its vapor phase are given. It is established that the vapor-crystal phase transition proceeds in a complicated way as the superposition of two phase transitions: a first-order phase transition with a change in density, and a second-order phase transition with a change in ordering. It is shown that the latter is a smeared phase transition that proceeds with the formation of a pretransitional phase that is irreversibly dissipated during phase transformation, leading to the formation of crystals of the rhombic syngony. Data from differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction analysis are presented along with microphotographs.

  1. Main-belt comets: sublimation-driven activity in the asteroid belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Henry H.

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of main-belt comets (MBCs), which exhibit comet-like activity likely due to the sublimation of volatile ices, yet orbit in the main asteroid belt, has increased greatly since the discovery of the first known MBC, 133P/Elst-Pizarro, in 1996, and their recognition as a new class of solar system objects after the discovery of two more MBCs in 2005. I review work that has been done over the last 10 years to improve our understanding of these enigmatic objects, including the development of systematic discovery methods and diagnostics for distinguishing MBCs from disrupted asteroids (which exhibit comet-like activity due to physical disruptions such as impacts or rotational destabilization). I also discuss efforts to understand the dynamical and thermal properties of these objects.

  2. Formulation Design and Optimization of Fast Dissolving Clonazepam Tablets by Sublimation Method

    PubMed Central

    Shirsand, S. B.; Suresh, Sarasija; Kusumdevi, V.; Swamy, P. V.

    2011-01-01

    Fast dissolving tablets of clonazepam were prepared by sublimation method with a view to enhance patient compliance. A 32 full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of two formulation variables: amount of croscarmellose sodium and camphor. Croscarmellose sodium (2-8% w/w) was used as superdisintegrant and camphor (20-40% w/w) was used as subliming agent, to increase the porosity of the tablets, since it helps water to penetrate into the tablets, along with directly compressible mannitol to enhance mouth feel. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, thickness, drug content uniformity, in vitro dispersion time, wetting time and water absorption ratio. Based on in vitro dispersion time (approximately 11 s); the formulation containing 5% w/w croscarmellose sodium and 40% w/w camphor was found to be promising and tested for in vitro drug release pattern (in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer). Short-term stability (at 40°/75% relative humidity for 3 mo) and drug-excipient interaction. Surface response plots are presented to graphically represent the effect of independent variables on the in vitro dispersion time. The validity of the generated mathematical model was tested by preparing two extra-design checkpoints. The optimized tablet formulation was compared with conventional commercial tablet formulation for drug release profiles. This formulation showed nearly nine-fold faster drug release (t50% 1.8 min) compared to the conventional commercial tablet formulation (t50% 16.4 min). Short-term stability studies on the formulation indicated that there are no significant changes in drug content and in vitro dispersion time (P<0.05). PMID:22923860

  3. Formulation design and optimization of fast dissolving clonazepam tablets by sublimation method.

    PubMed

    Shirsand, S B; Suresh, Sarasija; Kusumdevi, V; Swamy, P V

    2011-09-01

    Fast dissolving tablets of clonazepam were prepared by sublimation method with a view to enhance patient compliance. A 3(2) full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of two formulation variables: amount of croscarmellose sodium and camphor. Croscarmellose sodium (2-8% w/w) was used as superdisintegrant and camphor (20-40% w/w) was used as subliming agent, to increase the porosity of the tablets, since it helps water to penetrate into the tablets, along with directly compressible mannitol to enhance mouth feel. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, thickness, drug content uniformity, in vitro dispersion time, wetting time and water absorption ratio. Based on in vitro dispersion time (approximately 11 s); the formulation containing 5% w/w croscarmellose sodium and 40% w/w camphor was found to be promising and tested for in vitro drug release pattern (in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer). Short-term stability (at 40°/75% relative humidity for 3 mo) and drug-excipient interaction. Surface response plots are presented to graphically represent the effect of independent variables on the in vitro dispersion time. The validity of the generated mathematical model was tested by preparing two extra-design checkpoints. The optimized tablet formulation was compared with conventional commercial tablet formulation for drug release profiles. This formulation showed nearly nine-fold faster drug release (t(50%) 1.8 min) compared to the conventional commercial tablet formulation (t(50%) 16.4 min). Short-term stability studies on the formulation indicated that there are no significant changes in drug content and in vitro dispersion time (P<0.05). PMID:22923860

  4. Fe embedded in ice: The impacts of sublimation and energetic particle bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankland, Victoria L.; Plane, John M. C.

    2015-05-01

    Icy particles containing a variety of Fe compounds are present in the upper atmospheres of planets such as the Earth and Saturn. In order to explore the role of ice sublimation and energetic ion bombardment in releasing Fe species into the gas phase, Fe-dosed ice films were prepared under UHV conditions in the laboratory. Temperature-programmed desorption studies of Fe/H2O films revealed that no Fe atoms or Fe-containing species co-desorbed along with the H2O molecules. This implies that when noctilucent ice cloud particles sublimate in the terrestrial mesosphere, the metallic species embedded in them will coalesce to form residual particles. Sputtering of the Fe-ice films by energetic Ar+ ions was shown to be an efficient mechanism for releasing Fe into the gas phase, with a yield of 0.08 (Ar+ energy=600 eV). Extrapolating with a semi-empirical sputtering model to the conditions of a proton aurora indicates that sputtering by energetic protons (>100 keV) should also be efficient. However, the proton flux in even an intense aurora will be too low for the resulting injection of Fe species into the gas phase to compete with that from meteoric ablation. In contrast, sputtering of the icy particles in the main rings of Saturn by energetic O+ ions may be the source of recently observed Fe+ in the Saturnian magnetosphere. Electron sputtering (9.5 keV) produced no detectable Fe atoms or Fe-containing species. Finally, it was observed that Fe(OH)2 was produced when Fe was dosed onto an ice film at 140 K (but not at 95 K). Electronic structure theory shows that the reaction which forms this hydroxide from adsorbed Fe has a large barrier of about 0.7 eV, from which we conclude that the reaction requires both translationally hot Fe atoms and mobile H2O molecules on the ice surface.

  5. Estimating snow sublimation using natural chemical and isotopic tracers across a gradient of solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafson, Joseph R.; Brooks, P. D.; Molotch, N. P.; Veatch, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    Changes in both climate and vegetation may dramatically impact the amount of water stored in seasonal snow cover and the timing of spring snowmelt. This study quantifies how spatial variability in solar radiation affects the spatial and temporal patterns in snow water equivalent (SWE), snow chemistry, and snow water isotopes in the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico. Depth, density, stratigraphy, temperature, and snow samples were collected approximately monthly from five locations between January and April 2007 to quantify the effects of solar forcing on snowpack water and chemical balance. Locations varied in solar forcing due to topography and vegetation, while minimizing variability in precipitation, elevation, aspect, interception, and wind redistribution. Snowfall (340 ± 5 mm) was similar across all sites, but peak SWE at maximum accumulation ranged from 187 to 340 mm. Solute concentrations were highest directly under canopies, intermediate in nonshaded forest openings, and lowest in shaded forest openings. Conservative solute concentrations (SO42-, R2 = 0.80), Cl- (R2 = 0.60), and isotope values (δ18O R2 = 0.96) were inversely related to SWE at maximum accumulation. Mass balance estimates of snowpack water balance using solute concentrations and isotopes indicated that sublimation ranged from <2% to ˜20% of winter precipitation, consistent with previous studies at the site. The strong relationships between solar forcing, SWE, and chemistry suggest that snow chemistry at maximum accumulation can be used to estimate overwinter sublimation. Furthermore, variability in solar forcing also can be used to refine spatial estimates of catchment solute and isotope input at melt.

  6. CURVED WALLS: GRAIN GROWTH, SETTLING, AND COMPOSITION PATTERNS IN T TAURI DISK DUST SUBLIMATION FRONTS

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Ingleby, L.; D'Alessio, P.; Espaillat, C.; Sargent, B.; Watson, D. M.; Hernández, J. E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu

    2013-10-01

    The dust sublimation walls of disks around T Tauri stars represent a directly observable cross-section through the disk atmosphere and midplane. Their emission properties can probe the grain size distribution and composition of the innermost regions of the disk, where terrestrial planets form. Here we calculate the inner dust sublimation wall properties for four classical T Tauri stars with a narrow range of spectral types and inclination angles and a wide range of mass accretion rates to determine the extent to which the walls are radially curved. Best fits to the near- and mid-IR excesses are found for curved, two-layer walls in which the lower layer contains larger, hotter, amorphous pyroxene grains with Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.6 and the upper layer contains submicron, cooler, mixed amorphous olivine and forsterite grains. As the mass accretion rates decrease from 10{sup –8} to 10{sup –10} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, the maximum grain size in the lower layer decreases from ∼3 to 0.5 μm. We attribute this to a decrease in fragmentation and turbulent support for micron-sized grains with decreasing viscous heating. The atmosphere of these disks is depleted of dust with dust-gas mass ratios 1 × 10{sup –4} of the interstellar medium (ISM) value, while the midplane is enhanced to eight times the ISM value. For all accretion rates, the wall contributes at least half of the flux in the optically thin 10 μm silicate feature. Finally, we find evidence for an iron gradient in the disk, suggestive of that found in our solar system.

  7. The effect of plasma heating on sublimation-driven flow in Io's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Mau C.; Johnson, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    The atmospheric flow on Io is numerically computed in a flat 2-D axisymmetric geometry for a sublimation atmosphere on the trailing hemisphere subjected to plasma bombardment, UV heating, and IR cooling. Calculations are performed for subsolar vapor pressures of approximately 6.5 x 10(exp -3) Pa (approximately 3 x 10(exp 18) SO2/sq cm) and 6.8 x 10(exp -4) Pa (approximately 4 x 10(exp 17) SO2/sq cm); the latter approximates the vapor pressure of F. P. Fanale et al. (1982). The amount of plasma energy deposited in the atmosphere is 20% of the plasma flow energy due to corotation (J. A. Linker et al., 1988). It is found that plasma heating significantly inflates the upper atmosphere, increasing both the exobase altitude and the amount of surface covered by more than an exospheric column of gas. This in turn controls the supply of the Io plasma torus (M. A. McGrath and R. E. Johnson, 1987). The horizontal flow of mass and energy is also important in determining the exobase altitude; and it is shown that IR cooling can be important, although our use of the equilibrium, cool-to-space approximation for a pure SO2 gas (E. Lellouch et al., 1992) may overestimate this effect. The calculated exobase altitudes are somewhat lower than those suggested by McGrath and Johnson (1987) for supplying the torus, indicating the details of the plasma energy deposition and sputter ejection rate near the exobase, as well as the IR emission from this region need to be examined. In addition, the molecules sublimed (or sputtered) from the surface are transported to the exobase in times short compared to the molecular photodissociation time. Therefore, the exobase is dominated by molecular species and the exobase is supplied by a small region of the surface.

  8. LoFASM's FPGA-based Digital Acquisition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartez, Louis P.; Jenet, F.; Creighton, T. D.; Ford, A. J.; Hicks, B.; Hinojosa, J.; Kassim, N. E.; Price, R. H.; Stovall, K.; Ray, P. S.; Taylor, G. B.

    2014-01-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a distributed array of dipole antennas that are sensitive to radio frequencies from 10 to 88 MHz. LoFASM consists of antennas and front end electronics that were originally developed for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) by the U.S. Naval Research Lab, the University of New Mexico, Virginia Tech, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. LoFASM, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, will initially consist of 4 stations, each consisting of 12 dual-polarization dipole antenna stands. The primary science goals of LoFASM will be the detection and study of low-frequency radio transients, a high priority science goal as deemed by the National Research Council's decadal survey. The data acquisition system for the LoFASM antenna array will be using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology to implement a real time full Stokes spectrometer and data recorder. This poster presents an overview of the current design and digital architecture of a single station of the LoFASM array as well as the status of the entire project.

  9. Sublimation on the glaciers of the upper Huasco valley, Chile, using eddy covariance data and energy balance modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonell, Shelley; Cullen, Nicolas; Nicholson, Lindsey; Mölg, Thomas; Kinnard, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    On the cold, arid glaciers of the Norte Chico region, Chile, sublimation plays an important role in mass loss from the glacier surface. The ratio of sublimation : melt on these glaciers dictates not only the amount of meltwater delivered to the watershed, but it also drives the development of morphological features on the glacier surface, such as penitentes. As the rate of sublimation is driven by the latent heat flux, understanding the behaviour of the turbulent heat flux across the glacier surface is key to quantifying the spatial and temporal patterns of ablation. We measured the turbulent heat fluxes at a point on the surface of the Guanaco Glacier during 23-31 January, 2008 using an open-path eddy covariance system. The eddy covariance system was installed adjacent to an existing automatic weather station operating at 5325 m on the glacier surface, in a region devoid of penitents and other surface deformities. The results from the eddy covariance measurements were subsequently used to assess the sublimation results calculated using a point energy balance model. Results showed that 0.5-3 mm w.e. of sublimation occurred per day during the study period, which corresponded well with the energy balance results. However to assess the total sublimation rate on this glacier, sublimation rates from penitentes, ablation cusps and debris-covered regions must also be calculated. Thus this paper will also take a first look at another set of eddy covariance measurements made in a penitente field on the Toro 1 Glacier between December 2009-January 2010 to quantify the importance of penitentes for producing ablation on these glaciers as well. The eddy covariance system was installed adjacent to an existing automatic weather station operating at 5200 m on the glacier surface, in a location with a 100 m fetch of penitentes. From these measurements we are able to ascertain the role that penitentes play in modifying turbulent heat fluxes in the main part of the ablation season

  10. Sublimation of Ices Containing Organics and/or Minerals and Implications for Icy Bodies Surface Structure and Spectral Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, O.; Pommerol, A.; Jost, B.; Yoldi, Z.; Carrasco, N.; Szopa, C.; Thomas, N.

    2015-12-01

    The surfaces of many objects in the Solar System comprise substantial quantities of water ice either in pure form or mixed with minerals and/or organic molecules. Sublimation is a process responsible for shaping and changing the reflectance properties of these objects. We present laboratory data on the evolution of the structure and the visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance of icy surfaces made of mixtures of water ice and non-volatile components (complex organic matter and silicates), as they undergo sublimation of the water ice under low temperature and pressure conditions (Poch et al., under review). We prepared icy surfaces which are potential analogues of ices found on comets, icy satellites or trans-neptunian objects (TNOs). The experiments were carried out in the SCITEAS simulation setup recently built as part of the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy) at the University of Bern (Pommerol et al., 2015a). As the water ice sublimated, we observed in situ the formation of a sublimation lag deposit, or sublimation mantle, made of the non-volatiles at the top of the samples. The texture (porosity, internal cohesiveness etc.), the activity (outbursts and ejection of mantle fragments) and the spectro-photometric properties of this mantle are found to differ strongly depending on the chemical nature of the non-volatiles, the size of their particles, the way they are mixed with the volatile component and the dust/ice mass ratio. The results also indicate how the band depths of the sub-surface water ice evolve during the build-up of the sublimation mantle. These data provide useful references for interpreting remote-sensing observations of Rosetta (see Pommerol et al., 2015b), and also New Horizons. Poch, O., et al., under review in IcarusPommerol, A., et al., 2015a, Planet. Space Sci. 109-110, 106-122. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pss.2015.02.004Pommerol, A., et al., 2015b, Astronomy and Astrophysics, in press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201525977

  11. Effect of recondensation of sublimed species on nanoparticle temperature evolution in time-resolved laser-induced incandescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memarian, F.; Liu, F.; Thomson, K. A.; Daun, K. J.; Snelling, D. R.; Smallwood, G. J.

    2015-03-01

    In high-fluence laser-induced incandescence (LII), current LII models significantly overpredict the soot nanoparticle temperature decay rate compared to that inferred from two-color pyrometry at the first 100 ns after the peak laser pulse in atmospheric pressure flames. One possible cause is the back flow of sublimed species, which to date has been neglected in LII modeling. In this study, the transient direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method has been used, for the first time, to calculate the temperature evolution of soot particles, taking into account recondensation of sublimed species. In this algorithm, the physical time is discretized into a number of time steps called ensemble time steps, and the heat flux is calculated by performing several DSMC runs in each ensemble time step before proceeding to the next ensemble time step until the variance reaches an acceptable value. This heat flux is then used to update the nanoparticle temperature over the ensemble time step. Using the new algorithm, the temperature evolution of the particle can be predicted by the DSMC code, which is an improvement to previous DSMC simulations in which predetermined temperature decay curves must be prescribed. The results show that recondensation of sublimed species on the originating nanoparticle is not significant. Although accounting for condensation of sublimed species originating from neighboring soot particles enhances the role of recondensation of sublimed species in slowing down the soot particle temperature decay, it is still not sufficient to be considered as a plausible cause for the discrepancy between modeled soot temperature and the two-color pyrometry measured one in high-fluence LII.

  12. Origin of Sublimation Polygons in the Antarctic Western Dry Valleys: Implications for Patterned Ground Development on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, D. R.; Head, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    Two hypotheses have been developed in order to address the age, origin, and evolution of surface polygons in the western Dry Valleys region of southern Victoria Land. Resolution of this debate has direct relevance and implications for patterned ground in ice-rich terrain on Mars. One hypothesis, the dynamic hypothesis, states that growth of sand-wedges pervasively deforms sediment across polygonal terrain, recycling sediment from troughs to polygon centers and back again over time scales of thousands of years. A second hypothesis, the stability hypothesis, states that deformation associated with sand-wedge polygons, particularly those that form over buried ice, is restricted to polygon troughs; the implication is that polygon centers may contain undisturbed soils >1 million years old. Evidence comes from field data that show that the age, origin, and morphology of polygons that form over buried ice in the western Dry Valleys region is tied collectively to the location and rate of sublimation of underlying ice. In Beacon Valley, sublimation of debris-rich ice produces a dry surface lag that insulates and slows loss of remaining ice. Sub-zero temperature cycling of near-surface ice and soil creates tensile stresses that result in a network of hexagonal cracks, extending upward from buried ice toward the ground surface. Where fines sift downward into open thermal-contraction cracks, a coarse-grained lag deposit forms on top of the ice. Owing to spatial variations in till texture, rates of sublimation vary across the ice surface. High rates occur below coarse-grained lags that cap contraction cracks; low rates are found at polygon centers beneath fine-grained low porosity/permeability debris. Measured concentrations of in-situ produced cosmogenic 3He in two depth profiles through sublimation till show a steady decrease with depth, indicating negligible recycling of surface materials on million-year time scales. These data suggest that once polygon troughs deepen

  13. Thermal alteration in carbonaceous chondrites and implications for sublimation in rock comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springmann, Alessondra; Lauretta, Dante S.; Steckloff, Jordan K.

    2015-11-01

    Rock comets are small solar system bodies in Sun-skirting orbits (perihelion q < ~0.15 AU) that form comae rich in mineral sublimation products, but lack typical cometary ice sublimation products (H2O, CO2, etc.). B-class asteroid (3200) Phaethon, considered to be the parent body of the Geminid meteor shower, is the only rock comet currently known to periodically eject dust and form a coma. Thermal fracturing or thermal decomposition of surface materials may be driving Phaethon’s cometary activity (Li & Jewitt, 2013). Phaethon-like asteroids have dynamically unstable orbits, and their perihelia can change rapidly over their ~10 Myr lifetimes (de León et al., 2010), raising the possibility that other asteroids may have been rock comets in the past. Here, we propose using spectroscopic observations of mercury (Hg) as a tracer of an asteroid’s thermal metamorphic history, and therefore as a constraint on its minimum achieved perihelion distance.B-class asteroids such as Phaethon have an initial composition similar to aqueously altered primitive meteorites such as CI- or CM-type meteorites (Clark et al., 2010). Laboratory heating experiments of ~mm sized samples of carbonaceous chondrite meteorites from 300K to 1200K at a rate of 15K/minute show mobilization and volatilization of various labile elements at temperatures that could be reached by Mercury-crossing asteroids. Samples became rapidly depleted in labile elements and, in particular, lost ~75% of their Hg content when heated from ~500-700 K, which corresponds to heliocentric distances of ~0.15-0.3 au, consistent with our thermal models. Mercury has strong emission lines in the UV (~ 185 nm) and thus its presence (or absence) relative to carbonaceous chondrite abundances would indicate if these bodies had perihelia in their dynamical histories inside of 0.15 AU, and therefore may have previously been Phaethon-like rock comets. Future space telescopes or balloon-borne observing platforms equipped with a UV

  14. Quadrature Mixer LO Leakage Suppression Through Quadrature DC Bias

    SciTech Connect

    BALDWIN, JESSE G; DUBBERT, DALE F.

    2002-05-01

    A new concept has been developed which allows direct-to-RF conversion of digitally synthesized waveforms. The concept named Quadrature Error Corrected Digital Waveform Synthesis (QECDWS) employs quadrature amplitude and phase predistortion to the complex waveform to reduce the undesirable quadrature image. Another undesirable product of QECDWS-based RF conversion is the Local Oscillator (LO) leakage through the quadrature upconverter (mixer). A common technique for reducing this LO leakage is to apply a quadrature bias to the mixer I and Q inputs. This report analyzes this technique through theory, lab measurement, and data analysis for a candidate quadrature mixer for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) applications.

  15. The growth of sublimation crystals and surface hoar on the Antarctic plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, J.-C.; Domine, F.; Savarino, J.; Dumont, M.; Brun, E.

    2014-07-01

    On the Antarctic plateau, precipitation quantities are so low that the surface mass budget is for an important part determined by exchanges of water vapor between the snow surface and the atmosphere surface. At Dome C (75° S, 123° E), we have frequently observed the growth of crystals on the snow surface under calm sunny weather. Here we present the time variations of specific surface area (SSA) and density of these crystals. Using the detailed snow model Crocus, we conclude that the formation of these crystals was very likely due to the nighttime formation of surface hoar crystals and to the daytime formation of sublimation crystals. These latter crystals form by processes similar to those involved in the formation of frost flowers on young sea ice. The formation of these crystals impacts the albedo, mass and energy budget of the Antarctic plateau. In particular, the SSA variations of the surface layer can induce an instantaneous forcing at the snow surface up to -10 W m-2 at noon, resulting in a surface temperature drop of 0.45 K. This result confirms that snow SSA is a crucial variable to consider in the energy budget and climate of snow-covered surfaces.

  16. The impacts of moisture transport on drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ning; Dai, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Drifting snow sublimation (DSS) is an important physical process related to moisture and heat transfer that happens in the atmospheric boundary layer, which is of glaciological and hydrological importance. It is also essential in order to understand the mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheets and the global climate system. Previous studies mainly focused on the DSS of suspended snow and ignored that in the saltation layer. Here, a drifting snow model combined with balance equations for heat and moisture is established to simulate the physical DSS process in the saltation layer. The simulated results show that DSS can strongly increase humidity and cooling effects, which in turn can significantly reduce DSS in the saltation layer. However, effective moisture transport can dramatically weaken the feedback effects. Due to moisture advection, DSS rate in the saltation layer can be several orders of magnitude greater than that of the suspended particles. Thus, DSS in the saltation layer has an important influence on the distribution and mass-energy balance of snow cover.

  17. Conceptual design of a low-pressure micro-resistojet based on a sublimating solid propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervone, Angelo; Mancas, Alexandru; Zandbergen, Barry

    2015-03-01

    In the current and future trend towards smaller satellite missions, the development of a simple and reliable propulsion system with performance and characteristics in line with the typical requirements of nano-satellites and CubeSats plays a crucial role for enhancing the capabilities of this type of missions. This paper describes the design of a micro-resistojet using water stored in the frozen state (ice) as propellant, operating under sublimation conditions at low pressure. The low operating pressure allows for using the vapor pressure of ice as the only method of propellant feeding, thereby allowing for extremely low thrust and electric power usage. The results of an extensive set of numerical simulations for optimizing the thruster geometry in terms of power ratio and specific impulse produced are discussed. In addition, the design of the complete propulsion system is described. It makes use of a limited number of moving parts and two power sources, one in the thruster to increase the propellant temperature and one in the tank to maintain the propellant storage conditions. Results show that the proposed design represents an alternative option capable of meeting the typical requirements of small satellite missions by means of an intrinsically green propellant such as water, with the pressure inside the system never exceeding 600 Pa. Optimization results showed an optimum thrust to power ratio in range 0.2-1.2 mN/W for an expansion slot aspect ratio of 2.5.

  18. [Purification of PTCDA by Vacuum Sublimation and Spectral Test and Analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Jie; Yan, Zhao-wen; Zhou, Xing-yu; Zhang, Fu-jia

    2015-04-01

    The organic semiconductor 3, 4, 9, 10 perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) with the purity of 97.5% was purified by sublimation to 99.9%. The high-purity PTCDA material was measured by mass spectra, infrared spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed analysis revealed its molecular structure, the forming of chemical bond, the vibration modes of atoms in equilibrium lattice position, electronic configuration and the shift of binding energy of atoms. Based on the infrared spectrum analysis, the molecular structure of PTCDA is consisting of perylene core group with five C rings and two anhydrides located at both ends of perylene core, which is mainly bonded with covalent bond. The stretching vibration of C atoms in the crystal lattice dominates in their equilibrium positions. The PTCDA molecules have a large number of π electrons which can move freely; the intermolecular delocalized π bond overlap determines the conductivity of PTCDA. Based on XPS analysis, it can be found that there exist two kinds of C atoms with different binding energy: 285.3 and 288.7 eV, respectively, corresponding to the C atoms in the perylene ring and anhydride. In addition, there are two kinds of O atoms, i. e. C==0 and C--O--C, whose bonding energy is 531.3 and 533.1 eV, respectively. PMID:26197568

  19. Sublimation and combustion of coal particles in the erosion laser torch

    SciTech Connect

    Bulat, A.; Shumrikov, V.; Osenny, V.

    2005-07-01

    Rate of coal particles' combustion in low-temperature plasma is of interest both from application and scientific points of view. Necessity of knowing parameters of the process of coal particles' combustion in plasma torch with the temperature of 2500-3000 K is governed by arising a number of state-of-the-art technological tasks related to the problems of finding new methods of power production, generation of high-calorific synthetic gases and using carbon as a high temperature structural material in nuclear power engineering. The present work deals with a rate of combustion of the sorbed coal particles in the erosion laser torch formed by means of interaction of pulse laser radiation (wave length {lambda} = 1,06 {mu}m, power density j = 10{sup 5} - 10{sup 7} Wcm{sup 2} with coals of various grades (in the wide range of carbon concentrations (80-95 %)). Physical and mathematical modeling of the process of coal particles' sublimation and combustion in non-equilibrium plasma flows with weight-average temperature of 2500-3000 K showed a good convergence of results for the particles of 10-100 {mu}m diameter and satisfactory one for the particles of {gt} 250{mu}m diameter.

  20. Native Defect Control of CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells by Close-Spaced Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Tamotsu; Kitamoto, Shinji; Yamada, Akira; Konagai, Makoto

    2001-05-01

    The control of native defects in the CdTe thin film solar cells was investigated using a novel source for close-spaced sublimation (CSS) process which was prepared by vacuum evaporation with elemental Cd and Te (evaporated source). The evaporated sources were prepared on glass substrates at room temperature, and the Cd/Te ratio was controlled by varying the Cd and Te beam equivalent pressures. In the cells using the Te-rich source, the conversion efficiency was less than 0.2% because of the extremely low shunt resistance. On the other hand, a conversion efficiency above 15% was obtained by using the Cd-rich source. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics revealed that the acceptor concentration in the CdTe layer increased with increasing Cd/Te ratio of the evaporated source. Furthermore, photoluminescence spectra implied that the formation of the Cd vacancies in the CdTe layer was suppressed using the Cd-rich source.

  1. Modeling Io's Sublimation-Driven Atmosphere: Gas Dynamics and Radiation Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Andrew C.; Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.; Trafton, Laurence M.; Moore, Chris H.; Stewart, Benedicte; Gratiy, Sergey L.; Levin, Deborah A.

    2008-12-31

    Io's sublimation-driven atmosphere is modeled using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. These rarefied gas dynamics simulations improve upon earlier models by using a three-dimensional domain encompassing the entire planet computed in parallel. The effects of plasma impact heating, planetary rotation, and inhomogeneous surface frost are investigated. Circumplanetary flow is predicted to develop from the warm subsolar region toward the colder night-side. The non-equilibrium thermal structure of the atmosphere, including vibrational and rotational temperatures, is also presented. Io's rotation leads to an asymmetric surface temperature distribution which is found to strengthen circumplanetary flow near the dusk terminator. Plasma heating is found to significantly inflate the atmosphere on both day- and night-sides. The plasma energy flux also causes high temperatures at high altitudes but permits relatively cooler temperatures at low altitudes near the dense subsolar point due to plasma energy depletion. To validate the atmospheric model, a radiative transfer model was developed utilizing the backward Monte Carlo method. The model allows the calculation of the atmospheric radiation from emitting/absorbing and scattering gas using an arbitrary scattering law and an arbitrary surface reflectivity. The model calculates the spectra in the {nu}{sub 2} vibrational band of SO{sub 2} which are then compared to the observational data.

  2. Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Drosophila Brain Using Matrix Sublimation versus Modification with Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Phan, Nhu T N; Mohammadi, Amir Saeid; Dowlatshahi Pour, Masoumeh; Ewing, Andrew G

    2016-02-01

    Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is used to image brain lipids in the fruit fly, Drosophila, a common invertebrate model organism in biological and neurological studies. Three different sample preparation methods, including sublimation with two common organic matrixes for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) using gold nanoparticles, are examined for sample profiling and imaging the fly brain. Recrystallization with trifluoroacetic acid following matrix deposition in MALDI is shown to increase the incorporation of biomolecules with one matrix, resulting in more efficient ionization, but not for the other matrix. The key finding here is that the mass fragments observed for the fly brain slices with different surface modifications are significantly different. Thus, these approaches can be combined to provide complementary analysis of chemical composition, particularly for the small metabolites, diacylglycerides, phosphatidylcholines, and triacylglycerides, in the fly brain. Furthermore, imaging appears to be beneficial using modification with gold nanoparticles in place of matrix in this application showing its potential for cellular and subcellular imaging. The imaging protocol developed here with both MALDI and SALDI provides the best and most diverse lipid chemical images of the fly brain to date with LDI. PMID:26705612

  3. Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from the Murchison Meteorite Using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    The origin of life on Earth, and possibly on other planets such as Mars, would have required the presence of liquid water and a continuous supply of prebiotic organic compounds. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by asteroids, comets, and carbonaceous meteorites could have contributed to the early Earth s prebiotic inventory by seeding the planet with biologically important organic compounds. A wide variety of prebiotic organic compounds have previously been detected in the Murchison CM type carbonaceous chondrite including amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. These compounds dominate terrestrial biochemistry and are integral components of proteins, DNA and RNA. Several purines including adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine, as well as the pyrimidine uracil, have previously been detected in water or formic acid extracts of Murchison using ion-exclusion chromatography and ultraviolet spectroscopy. However, even after purification of these extracts, the accurate identification and quantification of nucleobases is difficult due to interfering UV absorbing compounds. In order to reduce these effects, we have developed an extraction technique using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from other non-volatile organic compounds in Murchison acid extracts.

  4. Sublimation studies of NpO sub 2 F sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinschmidt, P.D. ); Lau, K.H.; Hildenbrand, D.L. )

    1992-08-15

    Using Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry, we have identified the following reaction as the sublimation decomposition mechanism of NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}({ital s}): 2NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}({ital s})=NpO{sub 2}({ital s})+O{sub 2}({ital g})+NpF{sub 4}({ital g}). From second-law analysis of the measured pressures of NpF{sub 4}({ital g}) over the temperature range 820--985 K the derived enthalpy change at 298 K is 556.8{plus minus}12.2 kJ/mol and the entropy change is 342.4 {plus minus}13.8 J/K mol. From these values and enthalpies of formation and entropies reported in the literature for the other species we calculate the enthalpy of formation of NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}({ital s}) to be {minus}1608{plus minus}10 kJ/mol and the entropy to be 147{plus minus}9 J/K mol.

  5. Direct Observation of Sublimation Behaviors in One-Dimensional In2Se3/In2O3 Nanoheterostructures.

    PubMed

    Hsin, Cheng-Lun; Huang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Jui-Yuan; Liao, Kuo-Cheng; Liu, Po-Liang; Wu, Wen-Wei; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2015-06-01

    Recently, in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has provided a route to analyze structural characterization and chemical evolution with its powerful and unique applications. In this paper, we disclose the detailed phenomenon of sublimation on the atomic scale. In2Se3/In2O3 nanowires were synthesized via the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism and studied in an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) TEM at high temperature in real time. During in situ observation of the sublimation process of the nanowires, the evolution and reconstruction of the exposed In2Se3 surface progressed in different manners with time. The surface structure was decomposed by mass-desorption and stepwise-migration processes, which are also energetically favored processes in the ab initio calculation. This study developed a new concept and will be essential in the development of atomic kinetics. PMID:25942426

  6. Selective Growth of CdTe on Nano-patterned CdS via Close-Space Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Brandon A.; Zubia, David; Ordonez, Rafael; Anwar, Farhana; Prieto, Heber; Sanchez, Carlos A.; Salazar, Maria T.; Pimentel, Alejandro. A.; Michael, Joseph R.; Zhou, Xiaowang; Mcclure, John C.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Cruz-Campa, Jose L.

    2014-07-01

    Selective-area deposition of CdTe on CdS via close-space sublimation is used to study the effect of window size (2 μm and 300 nm) on grain growth. The basic fabrication procedures for each of the layers (CdS, SiO2, and CdTe) and for achieving selective-area growth are presented. Selective-area growth of both micro- and nano-scale CdTe islands on CdS substrates using close-spaced sublimation is demonstrated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction microstructure analysis show that the micro-scale CdTe islands remain polycrystalline. However, when the island size is reduced to 300 nm, single crystal CdTe can be achieved within the windows. The CdTe grains were most often in the (101) orientation for both the micro- and nano-sized CdTe islands.

  7. Sublimation rate of ice under simulated Mars conditions and the effect of layers of mock regolith JSC Mars-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrier, Vincent; Sears, Derek W. G.; Chittenden, Julie D.; Roe, Larry A.; Ulrich, Richard; Bryson, Kathryn; Billingsley, Lisa; Hanley, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the sublimation of ice buried beneath ≤200 mm of JSC Mars-1 model regolith under simulated Mars conditions. As expected, even thin layers of regolith cause large decreases in sublimation rate, up to one order of magnitude at 50 mm. When the depth of the regolith was 50 to 200 mm we detected water desorbing from the overlying layers for which we were able to determine a desorption coefficient of 1.45 ± 0.5 × 10-3 h-1. After allowing for the effect of desorption, we found that the diffusion coefficient for water vapor through our regolith is 1.74 ± 0.70 × 10-4 m2 s-1, in excellent agreement with theoretical values. We thus find that a 1-m thick layer of ice buried below a meter of regolith resembling JSC Mars-1 on Mars at 235 K would last ˜800 years.

  8. Modelling of the sublimation of icy grains in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gicquel, A.; Vincent, J.-B.; Shi, X.; Sierks, H.; Rose, M.; Güttler, C.; Tubiana, C.

    2015-10-01

    The ESA (European Space Agency) Rosetta spacecraft was launched on 2 March 2004, to reach comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August 2014. Since March 2014, images of the nucleus and the coma (gas and dust) of the comet have been acquired by the OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) camera system [1] using both, the wide angle camera (WAC) and the narrow angle camera (NAC). The orbiter will be maintained in the vicinity of the comet until perihelion (Rh=1.3 AU) or even until Rh=1.8 AU post-perihelion (December 2015). Nineteen months of uninterrupted, close-up observations of the gas and dust coma will be obtained and will help to characterize the evolution of comet gas and dust activity during its approach to the Sun. Indeed, for the first time, we will follow the development of a comet's coma from a close distance. Also the study of the dust-gas interaction in the coma will highlight the sublimation of icy grains. Even if the sublimation of icy grains is known, it is not yet integrated in a complete dust-gas model. We are using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to study the gas flow close to the nucleus. The code called PI-DSMC (www.pidsmc. com) can simulate millions of molecules for multiple species.When the gas flow is simulated, we inject the dust particle with a zero velocity and we take into account the 3 forces acting on the grains in a cometary environment (drag force, gravity and radiative pressure). We used the DLL (Dynamic Link Library) model to integrate the sublimation of icy grains in the gas flowand allow studying the effect of the additional gas on the dust particle trajectories. For a quantitative analysis of the sublimation of icy, outflowing grains we will consider an ensemble of grains of various radii with different compositions [2] The evolution of the grains, once they are ejected into the coma, depends on their initial size, their composition and the heliocentric distance (because the temperature of

  9. Low energy neutron deuteron scattering to N3LO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaryan, Arman; Vanasse, Jared; Springer, Roxanne

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO) nd scattering amplitude in the framework of nonrelativistic pionless effective field theory (EFTπ/). This theory is only valid when the typical momentum exchange in the scattering is smaller then the mass of the pion. The power counting parameter for EFTπ/ is the ratio Q/Λπ /, where Q is the typical momentum exchange in the scattering and Λπ / is the EFTπ/ breakdown scale, Λπ / LO. At N3LO new 2-body forces appear, which introduce four new EFTπ/ coefficients. These coefficients are fixed by the 3PJ and 1P1 phase shifts of NN scattering. We find that these terms have an important impact. The results of this calculation at N3LO will be important for understanding spin polarization observables in nd scattering, in particular the longstanding Ay puzzle. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Award Number DE-FG02-05ER41368.

  10. BabeLO--An Extensible Converter of Programming Exercises Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queiros, R.; Leal, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, there was a proliferation of programming exercise formats that hinders interoperability in automatic assessment. In the lack of a widely accepted standard, a pragmatic solution is to convert content among the existing formats. BabeLO is a programming exercise converter providing services to a network of heterogeneous…

  11. Strong Near-Infrared Emission Interior to the Dust Sublimation Radius of Young Stellar Objects MWC 275 and AB Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannirkulam, A.; Monnier, J. D.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Harries, T. J.; Pedretti, E.; ten Brummelaar, T. A.; McAlister, H.; Turner, N.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.

    2008-04-01

    Using the longest optical-interferometeric baselines currently available, we have detected strong near-infrared (NIR) emission from inside the dust destruction radius of Herbig Ae stars MWC 275 and AB Aur. Our submilliarcsecond resolution observations unambiguously place the emission between the dust destruction radius and the magnetospheric corotation radius. We argue that this new component corresponds to hot gas inside the dust sublimation radius, confirming recent claims based on spectrally resolved interferometry and dust evaporation front modeling.

  12. Properties of filamentary sublimation residues from dispersions of clay in ice. [on Martian poles, comet nuclei, and icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. S.; Parker, T. J.; Stephens, J. B.; Fanale, F. P.; Sutton, S.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from experimental studies of the formation of ice mixed with mineral particles in an effort to simulate similar processes on natural surfaces such as at the Martian poles, on comet nuclei and on icy satellites. The study consisted of low-pressure, low-temperature sublimations of water ice from dilutions of water-clay (montmorillonite and Cabosil) dispersions of various component ratios. Liquid dispersions were sprayed into liquid nitrogen to form droplets at about -50 C. Both clay-water dispersions left a filamentary residue on the bottom of the Dewar after the water ice had sublimated off. The residue was studied with optical and SEM microscopy, the latter method revealing a high electrical conductivity in the residue. The results suggest that the sublimation of the water ice can leave a surface crust, which may be analogous to processes at the Martian poles and on comet nuclei. The process could proceed by the attachment of water molecules to salt crystals during the hottest part of the Martian year. The residue remaining was found to remain stable up to 370 C, be porous, and remain resilient, which could allow it to insulate ice bodies such as comets in space.

  13. Measurement of vapor pressures and heats of sublimation of dicarboxylic acids using atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Emily A; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2012-06-21

    Vapor pressures of low volatility compounds are important parameters in several atmospheric processes, including the formation of new particles and the partitioning of compounds between the gas phase and particles. Understanding these processes is critical for elucidating the impacts of aerosols on climate, visibility, and human health. Dicarboxylic acids are an important class of compounds in the atmosphere for which reported vapor pressures often vary by more than an order of magnitude. In this study, atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry (ASAP-MS), a relatively new atmospheric pressure ionization technique, is applied for the first time to the measurement of vapor pressures and heats of sublimation of a series of dicarboxylic acids. Pyrene was also studied because its vapor pressures and heat of sublimation are relatively well-known. The heats of sublimation measured using ASAP-MS were in good agreement with published values. The vapor pressures, assuming an evaporation coefficient of unity, were typically within a factor of ∼3 lower than published values made at similar temperatures for most of the acids. The underestimation may be due to diffusional constraints resulting from evaporation at atmospheric pressure. However, this study establishes that ASAP-MS is a promising new technique for such measurements. PMID:22432524

  14. Investigating the Persistence of a Snowpack Sublimation Stable Isotope Signal in Tree Xylem Water during the Growing Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, E. S.; Bowling, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Previous work identified a riparian meadow in the Rocky Mountains where streamside box elder (Acer negundo) trees did not use stream water, the most reliable and readily available source. A follow-up study showed that the water used by trees appears to be more evaporatively enriched than all available measured sources, including stream water, precipitation-derived soil water, and groundwater. While it is unlikely that there is a missing pool of water these trees are accessing, they may be tapping into a distinct subset of the bulk soil water available, possibly derived from much colder and older snowmelt. In this study, we investigated whether snowpack sublimation and subsequent melt water may impart an enriched isotopic signature that persists throughout the following growing season in less-mobile soil water pools. Profile samples of the snowpack, bulk melt water, and early season soil lysimeter water were collected throughout the winter and analyzed for hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes. As snow began to melt in the spring, water samples for isotope analysis were taken from soil profiles, stream water, groundwater, and stems. Although sublimation likely occurred at the site, such processes did not impart an evaporative isotope enrichment on the snowpack throughout the season. Both snow pack and melt water remained closely tied to the local meteoric water line as they infiltrated soil. These findings suggest that snowpack sublimation processes preceding melt water infiltration are not the source of evaporative enrichment in tree water at our site.

  15. Coupled fluid-thermal analysis of low-pressure sublimation and condensation with application to freeze-drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Arnab

    Freeze-drying is a low-pressure, low-temperature condensation pumping process widely used in the manufacture of bio-pharmaceuticals for removal of solvents by sublimation. The goal of the process is to provide a stable dosage form by removing the solvent in such a way that the sensitive molecular structure of the active substance is least disturbed. The vacuum environment presents unique challenges for understanding and controlling heat and mass transfer in the process. As a result, the design of equipment and associated processes has been largely empirical, slow and inefficient. A comprehensive simulation framework to predict both, process and equipment performance is critical to improve current practice. A part of the dissertation is aimed at performing coupled fluid-thermal analysis of low-pressure sublimation-condensation processes typical of freeze-drying technologies. Both, experimental and computational models are used to first understand the key heat transfer modes during the process. A modeling and computational framework, validated with experiments for analysis of sublimation, water-vapor flow and condensation in application to pharmaceutical freeze-drying is developed. Augmented with computational fluid dynamics modeling, the simulation framework presented here allows to predict for the first time, dynamic product/process conditions taking into consideration specifics of equipment design. Moreover, by applying the modeling framework to process design based on a design-space approach, it has demonstrated that there is a viable alternative to empiricism.

  16. Effects of interfacial interaction potential on the sublimation rates of TNT films on a silica surface examined by QCM and AFM techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, R.; Ueda, A.; Liu, Y. C.; Wu, M.; Henderson, D. O.; Lareau, R. T.; Chamberlain, R. T.

    2003-04-01

    The study of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) sublimation rates from the bulk surface and a substrate surface have been evaluated quantitatively with both atomic force microscopy and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) techniques. A first principle theoretical model is proposed, which allows obtaining three critical parameters, bulk sublimation rate, surface interaction potential, and the effective decay length, with no arbitrary parameters. The bulk sublimation rate predicted by the model is quantitatively confirmed by QCM experiments. The isothermal measurements with QCM showed that the sublimation activation energy of bulk TNT is 131 kJ/mol. More importantly, all results were obtained at one atmosphere and near room temperature. Thus, it should have direct impacts on explosive trace detection device applications.

  17. In-Situ Growth of Yb2O3 Layer for Sublimation Suppression for Yb14MnSb11 Thermoelectric Material for Space Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    The compound Yb14MnSb11 is a p-type thermoelectric material of interest to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a candidate replacement for the state-of-the-art Si-Ge used in current radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Ideally, the hot end of this leg would operate at 1000 C in the vacuum of space. Although Yb14MnSb11 shows the potential to double the value of the thermoelectric figure of merit (zT) over that of Si-Ge at 1000 C, it suffers from a high sublimation rate at elevated temperatures and would require a coating in order to survive the required RTG lifetime of 14 years. The purpose of the present work is to measure the sublimation rate of Yb14MnSb11 and to investigate sublimation suppression for this material. This paper reports on the sublimation rate of Yb14MnSb11 at 1000 C (approximately 3 x 10(exp -3) grams per square centimeter hour) and efforts to reduce the sublimation rate with an in situ grown Yb2O3 layer. Despite the success in forming thin, dense, continuous, and adherent oxide scales on Yb14MnSb11, the scales did not prove to be sublimation barriers.

  18. In Situ Growth of a Yb2O3 Layer for Sublimation Suppression for Yb14MnSb11 Thermoelectric Material for Space Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2012-06-01

    The compound Yb14MnSb11 is a p-type thermoelectric material of interest to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a candidate replacement for the state-of-the-art Si-Ge used in current radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Ideally, the hot end of this leg would operate at 1000°C in the vacuum of space. Although Yb14MnSb11 shows the potential to double the value of the thermoelectric figure of merit ( zT) over that of Si-Ge at 1000°C, it suffers from a high sublimation rate at elevated temperatures and would require a coating in order to survive the required RTG lifetime of 14 years. The purpose of the present work is to measure the sublimation rate of Yb14MnSb11 and to investigate sublimation suppression for this material. This paper reports on the sublimation rate of Yb14MnSb11 at 1000°C (˜3 × 10-3 g/cm2 h) and efforts to reduce the sublimation rate with an in situ grown Yb2O3 layer. Despite the success in forming thin, dense, continuous, and adherent oxide scales on Yb14MnSb11, the scales did not prove to be sublimation barriers.

  19. Sublimation extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: A new technique for future in situ analyses of purines and pyrimidines on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Cleaves, H. J.; Buch, A.; Schubert, M.; Aubrey, A.; Bada, J. L.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2006-12-01

    We have developed a sublimation technique coupled with chemical derivatization and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect nucleobases and other volatile organic compounds derived from bacteria in Mars analog materials. To demonstrate this technique, a sample of serpentine inoculated with Escherichia coli ( E. coli) cells was heated to 500 °C for several seconds under Martian ambient pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger, then derivatized and analyzed by GC-MS. We found that adenine, cytosine, thymine and uracil were the most abundant molecules detected in the sublimed E. coli extract by GC-MS. In addition, nucleobases were also detected in sublimed extracts of a deep-sea sediment sample, seawater, and soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile after heating the samples under the same conditions. Our results indicate that nucleobases can be easily isolated directly from natural samples using sublimation and then detected by GC-MS after chemical derivatization. The sublimation-based extraction technique is one approach that should be considered for use by future in situ instruments designed to detect organic compounds relevant to life in the Martian regolith.

  20. Characterization of the Sublimation and Vapor Pressure of 2-(2-Nitrovinyl) Furan (G-0) Using Thermogravimetric Analysis: Effects of Complexation with Cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Ruz, Vivian; González, Mirtha Mayra; Winant, Danny; Rodríguez, Zenaida; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the sublimation of crystalline solid 2-(2-nitrovinyl) furan (G-0) in the temperature range of 35 to 60 °C (below the melting point of the drug) was studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The sublimated product was characterized using Fourier-transformed-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thin layer chromatography (TLC). The sublimation rate at each temperature was obtained using the slope of the linear regression model and followed apparent zero-order kinetics. The sublimation enthalpy from 35 to 60 °C was obtained from the Eyring equation. The Gückel method was used to estimate the sublimation rate and vapor pressure at 25 °C. Physical mixtures, kneaded and freeze-dried complexes were prepared with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) and analyzed using isothermal TGA at 50 °C. The complexation contributed to reducing the sublimation process. The best results were achieved using freeze-dried complexes with both cyclodextrins. PMID:26295385

  1. Meteorological conditions associated to high sublimation amounts in semiarid high-elevation Andes decrease the performance of empirical melt models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alvaro; Pellicciotti, Francesca; MacDonell, Shelley; McPhee, James; Burlando, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Empirical melt (EM) models are often preferred to surface energy balance (SEB) models to calculate melt amounts of snow and ice in hydrological modelling of high-elevation catchments. The most common reasons to support this decision are that, in comparison to SEB models, EM models require lower levels of meteorological data, complexity and computational costs. However, EM models assume that melt can be characterized by means of a few index variables only, and their results strongly depend on the transferability in space and time of the calibrated empirical parameters. In addition, they are intrinsically limited in accounting for specific process components, the complexity of which cannot be easily reconciled with the empirical nature of the model. As an example of an EM model, in this study we use the Enhanced Temperature Index (ETI) model, which calculates melt amounts using air temperature and the shortwave radiation balance as index variables. We evaluate the performance of the ETI model on dry high-elevation sites where sublimation amounts - that are not explicitly accounted for the EM model - represent a relevant percentage of total ablation (1.1 to 8.7%). We analyse a data set of four Automatic Weather Stations (AWS), which were collected during the ablation season 2013-14, at elevations between 3466 and 4775 m asl, on the glaciers El Tapado, San Francisco, Bello and El Yeso, which are located in the semiarid Andes of central Chile. We complement our analysis using data from past studies in Juncal Norte Glacier (Chile) and Haut Glacier d'Arolla (Switzerland), during the ablation seasons 2008-09 and 2006, respectively. We use the results of a SEB model, applied to each study site, along the entire season, to calibrate the ETI model. The ETI model was not designed to calculate sublimation amounts, however, results show that their ability is low also to simulate melt amounts at sites where sublimation represents larger percentages of total ablation. In fact, we

  2. 77 FR 2715 - D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on December 29, 2011, D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC (D'Lo), 1002 East St. Mary Blvd., Lafayette, Louisiana 70503, filed in... D'Lo to construct, operate, and maintain a new natural gas storage project to be located in...

  3. Sublimation-Driven Activity in Main-Belt Comet 313p/Gibbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Hainaut, Olivier; Novaković, Bojan; Bolin, Bryce; Denneau, Larry; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Haghighipour, Nader; Kleyna, Jan; Kokotanekova, Rosita; Lacerda, Pedro; Meech, Karen J.; Micheli, Marco; Moskovitz, Nick; Schunova, Eva; Snodgrass, Colin; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Wasserman, Lawrence; Waszczak, Adam

    2015-02-01

    We present an observational and dynamical study of newly discovered main-belt comet 313P/Gibbs. We find that the object is clearly active both in observations obtained in 2014 and in precovery observations obtained in 2003 by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, strongly suggesting that its activity is sublimation-driven. This conclusion is supported by a photometric analysis showing an increase in the total brightness of the comet over the 2014 observing period, and dust modeling results showing that the dust emission persists over at least three months during both active periods, where we find start dates for emission no later than 2003 July 24 ± 10 for the 2003 active period and 2014 July 28 ± 10 for the 2014 active period. From serendipitous observations by the Subaru Telescope in 2004 when the object was apparently inactive, we estimate that the nucleus has an absolute R-band magnitude of HR = 17.1 ± 0.3, corresponding to an effective nucleus radius of re ∼ 1.00 ± 0.15 km. The object’s faintness at that time means we cannot rule out the presence of activity, and so this computed radius should be considered an upper limit. We find that 313P’s orbit is intrinsically chaotic, having a Lyapunov time of Tl = 12,000 yr and being located near two three-body mean-motion resonances with Jupiter and Saturn, 11J-1S-5A and 10J+12S-7A, yet appears stable over >50 Myr in an apparent example of stable chaos. We furthermore find that 313P is the second main-belt comet, after P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS), to belong to the ∼155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family.

  4. Vacuum sublimed α ,ω-dihexylsexithiophene thin films: Correlating electronic structure and molecular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhm, S.; Salzmann, I.; Koch, N.; Fukagawa, H.; Kataoka, T.; Hosoumi, S.; Nebashi, K.; Kera, S.; Ueno, N.

    2008-08-01

    In order to correlate the molecular orientation of organic thin films with charge injection barriers at organic/metal interfaces, the electronic structure and molecular orientation of vacuum sublimed thin films of α ,ω-dihexylsexithiophene (DH6T) on the substrates Ag(111), highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), and tetratetracontane (TTC) precovered Ag(111) were investigated. Results from metastable atom electron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction were used to derive growth models (including molecular orientation and conformation) of DH6T on the different substrates. On Ag(111), DH6T exhibits a transition from lying molecules in the monolayer/bilayer range to almost standing upright molecules in multilayers. This is accompanied by a shift of the molecular energy levels to a lower binding energy by 0.65 eV with respect to the vacuum level. The unit cell of standing DH6T on lying DH6T on Ag(111) is estimated to be similar to the DH6T bulk phase. On HOPG, DH6T grows in the bulk phase with lying orientation, starting already from the monolayer coverage. DH6T on TTC precovered Ag(111) grows in an almost lying orientation and a conformation that allows a strong overlap of the hexyl chains of DH6T with the alkyl chains of TTC. In all cases, the electronic structure and, particulary, the ionization energy of DH6T is dependent on the orientation of DH6T, i.e., lying DH6T has higher ionization energy than standing DH6T.

  5. SUBLIMATION-DRIVEN ACTIVITY IN MAIN-BELT COMET 313P/GIBBS

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Hainaut, Olivier; Novaković, Bojan; Bolin, Bryce; Denneau, Larry; Haghighipour, Nader; Kleyna, Jan; Meech, Karen J.; Schunova, Eva; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Kokotanekova, Rosita; Snodgrass, Colin; Lacerda, Pedro; Micheli, Marco; Moskovitz, Nick; Wasserman, Lawrence; Waszczak, Adam

    2015-02-10

    We present an observational and dynamical study of newly discovered main-belt comet 313P/Gibbs. We find that the object is clearly active both in observations obtained in 2014 and in precovery observations obtained in 2003 by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, strongly suggesting that its activity is sublimation-driven. This conclusion is supported by a photometric analysis showing an increase in the total brightness of the comet over the 2014 observing period, and dust modeling results showing that the dust emission persists over at least three months during both active periods, where we find start dates for emission no later than 2003 July 24 ± 10 for the 2003 active period and 2014 July 28 ± 10 for the 2014 active period. From serendipitous observations by the Subaru Telescope in 2004 when the object was apparently inactive, we estimate that the nucleus has an absolute R-band magnitude of H{sub R} = 17.1 ± 0.3, corresponding to an effective nucleus radius of r{sub e} ∼ 1.00 ± 0.15 km. The object’s faintness at that time means we cannot rule out the presence of activity, and so this computed radius should be considered an upper limit. We find that 313P’s orbit is intrinsically chaotic, having a Lyapunov time of T{sub l} = 12,000 yr and being located near two three-body mean-motion resonances with Jupiter and Saturn, 11J-1S-5A and 10J+12S-7A, yet appears stable over >50 Myr in an apparent example of stable chaos. We furthermore find that 313P is the second main-belt comet, after P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS), to belong to the ∼155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family.

  6. CdZnS thin films sublimated by closed space using mechanical mixing: A new approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Waqar; Shah, Nazar Abbas

    2014-06-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) is a prominent material for its tunable band gap used as a window layer in II-VI semiconductor solar cells. The light trapping capability of window layer is one of the powerful tools to enhance the efficiency of the cell. CdS and zinc (Zn) powders were mixed mechanically with different weight percents to make CdZnS (CZS) powder. CZS was deposited onto an ultrasonically cleaned glass substrate using close spaced sublimation (CSS) technique. CZS as-deposited thin films were characterized for structural, surface morphology with energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) and optical properties for the use of window layer in CdS/CdTe based solar cells. The different Zn concentrations in CZS played a vital role on crystallite size in structural analysis and optical properties e.g. transmission, absorption coefficient and energy band gap, etc. The crystallite size of as-deposited CZS thin films were increased as Zn concentration was increased up to certain value. The energy band gap varies from 2.42 eV to 2.57 eV for as-deposited CZS thin films with increasing Zn concentrations and surface morphology changes also. These changes were occurred due to zinc diffusion in CdS thin films. An angle resolved transmission data was taken to check the behavior of CdS and CZS thin film at different angles. A comparative study was carried out between CdS thin films and CZS thin films for the use of good window layer material.

  7. Aluminum Nitride-Silicon Carbide Alloy Crystals Grown on SiC Substrates by Sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Z; Du, Li; Edgar, J H; Payzant, E Andrew; Walker, Larry R; Liu, R; Engelhard, M H

    2005-01-01

    AlN-SiC alloy crystals, with a thickness greater than 500μm, were grown on 4H- and 6H-SiC substrates from a mixture of AlN and SiC powders by the sublimation-recondensation method at 1860-1990 C. On-axis SiC substrates produced a rough surface covered with hexagonal grains, while 6H- and 4H- off-axis SiC substrates with different miscut angles (8 or 3.68 ) formed a relatively smooth surface with terraces and steps. The substrate misorientation ensured that the AlNSiC alloy crystals grew two dimensionally as identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Xray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that the AlN-SiC alloys had the wurtzite structure. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) demonstrated that the resultant alloy crystals had non-stoichiometric ratios of Al:N and Si:C and a uniform composition throughout the alloy crystal from the interface to the surface. The composition ratio of Al:Si of the alloy crystals changed with the growth temperature, and differed from the original source composition, which was consistent with the results predicted by thermodynamic calculation of the solid-vapor distribution of each element. XPS detected the bonding between Si-C, Si-N, Si-O for the Si 2p spectra. The dislocation density decreased with the growth, which was lower than 10^6cm-2 at the alloy surface, more than two orders of magnitude lower compared to regions close to the crystal/substrate interface, as determined by TEM.

  8. Aluminum Nitride-Silicon Carbide Alloy Crystals Grown on SiC Substrates by Sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Zheng; Du, L; Edgar, James H.; Payzant, Edward A.; Walker, L. R.; Liu, R.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2005-12-20

    AlN-SiC alloy crystals, with a thickness greater than 500 m, were grown on 4H- and 6H-SiC substrates from a mixture of AlN and SiC powders by the sublimation-recondensation method at 1860-1990 C. On-axis SiC substrates produced a rough surface covered with hexagonal grains, while 6H- and 4H- off-axis SiC substrates with different miscut angles (8? or 3.68?) formed a relatively smooth surface with terraces and steps. The substrate misorientation ensured that the AlN-SiC alloy crystals grew two dimensionally as identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that the AlN-SiC alloys had the wurtzite structure. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) demonstrated that the resultant alloy crystals had non-stoichiometric ratios of Al:N and Si:C and a uniform composition throughout the alloy crystal from the interface to the surface. The composition ratio of Al:Si of the alloy crystals changed with the growth temperature, and differed from the original source composition, which was consistent with the results predicted by thermodynamic calculation of the solid-vapor distribution of each element. XPS detected the bonding between Si-C, Si-N, Si-O for the Si 2p spectra. The dislocation density decreased with the growth, which was lower than 106 cm-2 at the alloy surface, more than two orders of magnitude lower compared to regions close to the crystal/substrate interface, as determined by TEM.

  9. AdS/QCD, Light-Front Holography, and Sublimated Gluons

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2012-02-16

    The gauge/gravity duality leads to a simple analytical and phenomenologically compelling nonperturbative approximation to the full light-front QCD Hamiltonian - 'Light-Front Holography', which provides a Lorentz-invariant first-approximation to QCD, and successfully describes the spectroscopy of light-quark meson and baryons, their elastic and transition form factors, and other hadronic properties. The bound-state Schroedinger and Dirac equations of the soft-wall AdS/QCD model predict linear Regge trajectories which have the same slope in orbital angular momentum L and radial quantum number n for both mesons and baryons. Light-front holography connects the fifth-dimensional coordinate of AdS space z to an invariant impact separation variable {zeta} in 3+1 space at fixed light-front time. A key feature is the determination of the frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons - the relativistic analogs of the Schroedinger wavefunctions of atomic physics which allow one to compute form factors, transversity distributions, spin properties of the valence quarks, jet hadronization, and other hadronic observables. One thus obtains a one-parameter color-confining model for hadron physics at the amplitude level. AdS/QCD also predicts the form of the non-perturbative effective coupling {alpha}{sub s}{sup AdS} (Q) and its {beta}-function with an infrared fixed point which agrees with the effective coupling a{sub g1} (Q{sup 2}) extracted from measurements of the Bjorken sum rule below Q{sup 2} < 1 GeV{sup 2}. This is consistent with a flux-tube interpretation of QCD where soft gluons with virtualities Q{sup 2} < 1 GeV{sup 2} are sublimated into a color-confining potential for quarks. We discuss a number of phenomenological hadronic properties which support this picture.

  10. Imaging Starspots on LO Pegasi via Light-curve Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Deskins, R.; Vutisalchavakul, N.

    2007-12-01

    We present maps of the star LO Pegasi obtained via Light-curve Inversion, a computational technique which produces an image of a star's surface features based on variations in the star's observed brightness as dark starspots rotate into and out of view from Earth. LO Pegasi is a rapidly rotating (P=10.17 hr) K8V young solar analog. We inverted BVRI light curves obtained from CCD images acquired on July 7-9 and July 22-23, 2007 at Perkins Observatory in Delaware, OH. Using multiple filters significantly improves the latitude resolution of our maps. Our inversions revealed the presence of a large mid-latitude spot or spotted region on the map from July 7-9, which appears to have evolved into a more complex two-spot configuration by July 22-23. The authors wish to acknowledge the support of the NSF REU Program and the Ohio Wesleyan University Summer Science Research Program.

  11. Liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning concept testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Gretchen L. E.; Orth, Michael S.; Mehta, Gopal K.

    1993-01-01

    Testing of a simplified LO2 propellant conditioning concept for future expendable launch vehicles is discussed. Four different concepts are being investigated: no-bleed, low-bleed, use of a recirculation line, and He bubbling. A full-scale test article, which is a facsimile of a propellant feed duct with an attached section to simulate heat input from an LO2 turbopump, is to be tested at the Cold Flow Facility of the Marshall Space Flight Center West Test Area. Work to date includes: design and fabrication of the test article, design of the test facility and initial fabrication, development of a test matrix and test procedures, initial predictions of test output, and heat leak calibration and heat exchanger tests on the test articles.

  12. Liquid Oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning concept testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Gretchen L. E.; Orth, Michael S.; Mehta, Gopal K.

    1993-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and industry contractors have undertaken activities to develop a simplified liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning concept for future expendable launch vehicles. The objective of these activities is to reduce operations costs and timelines and to improve safety of these vehicles. The approach followed has been to identify novel concepts through system level studies and demonstrate the feasibility of these concepts through small-scale and full-scale testing. Testing will also provide data for design guidelines and validation of analytical models. Four different concepts are being investigated: no-bleed, low-bleed, use of a recirculation line, and helium (He) bubbling. This investigation is being done under a Joint Institutional Research and Development (JIRAD) program currently in effect between MSFC and General Dynamics Space Systems (GDSS). A full-scale test article, which is a facsimile of a propellant feed duct with an attached section to simulate heat input from a LO2 turbopump, will be tested at the Cold Flow Facility at MSFC's West Test Area. Liquid nitrogen (LN2), which has similar properties to LO2, will be used in place of LO2 for safety and budget reasons. Work to date includes design and fabrication of the test article, design of the test facility and initial fabrication, development of a test matrix and test procedures, initial predictions of test output, and heat leak calibration and heat exchanger tests on the test article. The tests for all propellant conditioning concepts will be conducted in the summer of 1993, with the final report completed by October, 1993.

  13. LoCuSS: Testing hydrostatic equilibrium in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. P.; Mazzotta, P.; Okabe, N.; Ziparo, F.; Mulroy, S. L.; Babul, A.; Finoguenov, A.; McCarthy, I. G.; Lieu, M.; Bahé, Y. M.; Bourdin, H.; Evrard, A. E.; Futamase, T.; Haines, C. P.; Jauzac, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Martino, R.; May, P. E.; Taylor, J. E.; Umetsu, K.

    2016-02-01

    We test the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium in an X-ray luminosity selected sample of 50 galaxy clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.3 from the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS). Our weak-lensing measurements of M500 control systematic biases to sub-4 per cent, and our hydrostatic measurements of the same achieve excellent agreement between XMM-Newton and Chandra. The mean ratio of X-ray to lensing mass for these 50 clusters is β_X= 0.95± 0.05, and for the 44 clusters also detected by Planck, the mean ratio of Planck mass estimate to LoCuSS lensing mass is β_P= 0.95± 0.04. Based on a careful like-for-like analysis, we find that LoCuSS, the Canadian Cluster Comparison Project, and Weighing the Giants agree on β_P ≃ 0.9-0.95 at 0.15 < z < 0.3. This small level of hydrostatic bias disagrees at ˜5σ with the level required to reconcile Planck cosmology results from the cosmic microwave background and galaxy cluster counts.

  14. Quadrature mixture LO suppression via DSW DAC noise dither

    DOEpatents

    Dubbert, Dale F.; Dudley, Peter A.

    2007-08-21

    A Quadrature Error Corrected Digital Waveform Synthesizer (QECDWS) employs frequency dependent phase error corrections to, in effect, pre-distort the phase characteristic of the chirp to compensate for the frequency dependent phase nonlinearity of the RF and microwave subsystem. In addition, the QECDWS can employ frequency dependent correction vectors to the quadrature amplitude and phase of the synthesized output. The quadrature corrections cancel the radars' quadrature upconverter (mixer) errors to null the unwanted spectral image. A result is the direct generation of an RF waveform, which has a theoretical chirp bandwidth equal to the QECDWS clock frequency (1 to 1.2 GHz) with the high Spurious Free Dynamic Range (SFDR) necessary for high dynamic range radar systems such as SAR. To correct for the problematic upconverter local oscillator (LO) leakage, precision DC offsets can be applied over the chirped pulse using a pseudo-random noise dither. The present dither technique can effectively produce a quadrature DC bias which has the precision required to adequately suppress the LO leakage. A calibration technique can be employed to calculate both the quadrature correction vectors and the LO-nulling DC offsets using the radar built-in test capability.

  15. Basal sublimation and venting of the north seasonal cap of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2007-12-01

    Spots, fans and dark polygonal patterns form during the spring on the southern seasonal cap of Mars as a consequence of 1) the basal sublimation of the translucent and impermeable slab of carbon dioxide and 2) the venting of the CO2 gas loaded with dust and sand size material scoured from the surface of the polar layered deposits. The dark polygons on the cap have a similar formation process as the spots but the dust and sand erupt from elongated vents rather than point sources. In the summer, spiders and etched polygons remain on the southern polar layered deposits. The spiders are shaped by the scouring action of confined CO2 gas flowing between the cap and the basement and converging toward point sources, whereas the etched polygons result form the forced migration of the CO2 gas over longer distances. Comparable observations during the spring near the north pole on the seasonal cap indicate that similar processes occur in both polar regions and that the venting model developed for the south seasonal cap also operates near the north pole. However, spider and etched polygonal features are extremely uncommon on the north substrate, indicating that the conditions for their formation (e.g. mechanical strength of the slab and the substrate, transparency of the seasonal cap) are not met. The continual erosion and re-sedimentation occurring at the surface of the polar layered deposits by the seasonal degassing is a major geomorphological agent shaping the polar regions. The polar layered deposits have been proposed to contain the stratigraphic record of climatic changes and catastrophic events of very high interest for future missions. Our observations suggest that both polar regions deposits may have been locally disrupted by the seasonal sub-ice gas flow and that the stratigraphic record may have been partially lost. The Phoenix landing site might have been affected in the past and the stratigraphic information associated with the original deposition of the polar

  16. Effect of acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from a sublimating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, N.; Yarin, A. L.; Brenn, G.; Kastner, O.; Durst, F.

    2000-04-01

    particles much smaller than the sound wavelength. Good agreement between experiment and the theory of Yarin et al. is demonstrated. The time-averaged heat and mass transfer rates over a sphere surface are greatest at the sphere's equator and least at its poles in the experiment as predicted by the theory (the ultrasonic standing wave spans the vertical axis passing through the poles). The measured distribution of the mass transfer rate over the sphere surface also agrees with the theoretical predictions, which shows that in strong acoustic fields sublimation (or evaporation) results from the acoustic streaming.

  17. Martian polar and circum-polar sulfate-bearing deposits: Sublimation tills derived from the North Polar Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massé, M.; Bourgeois, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Verpoorter, C.; Le Deit, L.; Bibring, J. P.

    2010-10-01

    Previous spectroscopic studies have shown the presence of hydrated minerals in various kinds of sedimentary accumulations covering and encircling the martian North Polar Cap. More specifically, gypsum, a hydrated calcium sulfate, has been detected on Olympia Planum, a restricted part of the Circum-Polar Dune Field. To further constrain the geographical distribution and the process of formation and accumulation of these hydrated minerals, we performed an integrated morphological, structural and compositional analysis of a key area where hydrated minerals were detected and where the main polar landforms are present. By the development of a spectral processing method based on spectral derivation and by the acquisition of laboratory spectra of gypsum-ice mixtures we find that gypsum-bearing sediment is not restricted to the Olympia Planum dunes but is also present in all kinds of superficial sediment covering the surface of the North Polar Cap and the Circum-Polar Dune Field. Spectral signatures consistent with perchlorates are also detected on these deposits. The interpretation of landforms reveals that this gypsum-bearing sediment was released from the ice cap by sublimation. We thus infer that gypsum crystals that are now present in the Circum-Polar Dune Field derive from the interior of the North Polar Cap. Gypsum crystals that were initially trapped in the ice cap have been released by sublimation of the ice and have accumulated in the form of ablation tills at the surface of the ice cap. These gypsum-bearing sublimation tills are reworked by winds and are transported towards the Circum-Polar Dune Field. Comparison with sulfates found in terrestrial glaciers suggests that gypsum crystals in the martian North Polar Cap have formed by weathering of dust particles, either in the atmosphere prior to their deposition during the formation of the ice cap, and/or in the ice cap after their deposition.

  18. Physical chemistry of freeze-drying: measurement of sublimation rates for frozen aqueous solutions by a microbalance technique.

    PubMed

    Pikal, M J; Shah, S; Senior, D; Lang, J E

    1983-06-01

    The sublimation rate of frozen solutions was studied as a function of freezing rate, thickness of dried product (l), temperature, residual air pressure, and solute concentration. Data are presented for pure water, aqueous potassium chloride, aqueous povidone, and aqueous dobutamine hydrochloride-mannitol (System I). The resistance of the dried product to water vapor flow (Rp) was evaluated from the sublimation rate and the sample temperature. The primary experimental technique was based on freeze-drying a cylindrical microsample isothermally, with the sample suspended from one arm of a vacuum microbalance. Methodology to evaluate resistance data from vial freeze-drying experiments is also described. In separate experiments, samples in the form of a thin (15-microns) film were visually observed through a microscope during freeze-drying. Freeze-drying of most samples appeared to occur by water vapor escaping through open channels created by prior sublimation of ice. Contrary to the usual theoretical model, Rp is neither independent of temperature nor directly proportional to l. Rather, Rp decreases with increasing temperature and the l dependence is normally of the form Rp = (A0 + A1l)/(1 + A2l), where Ai (i = 0, 1, 2) are constants. In several cases, Rp is very large near l = 0, decreases sharply at l congruent to 0.1 cm, and obeys the above equation where l greater than 0.2 cm, a result suggesting an amorphous surface skin which cracks on desorption of water. The temperature dependence of Rp suggests that, as the sample temperature approaches the eutectic (or collapse) temperature, hydrodynamic surface flow of adsorbed water is an important flow mechanism. PMID:6875825

  19. Single Nanoparticle Mass Spectrometry as a High Temperature Kinetics Tool: Sublimation, Oxidation, and Emission Spectra of Hot Carbon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Howder, Collin R; Long, Bryan A; Gerlich, Dieter; Alley, Rex N; Anderson, Scott L

    2015-12-17

    In single nanoparticle mass spectrometry, individual charged nanoparticles (NPs) are trapped in a quadrupole ion trap and detected optically, allowing their mass, charge, and optical properties to be monitored continuously. Previous experiments of this type probed NPs that were either fluorescent or large enough to detect by light scattering. Alternatively, small NPs can be heated to temperatures where thermally excited emission is strong enough to allow detection, and this approach should provide a new tool for measurements of sublimation and surface reaction kinetics of materials at high temperatures. As an initial test, we report a study of carbon NPs in the 20-50 nm range, heated by 10.6 μm, 532 nm, or 445 nm lasers. The kinetics for sublimation and oxidation of individual carbon NPs were studied, and a model is presented for the factors that control the NP temperature, including laser heating, and cooling by sublimation, buffer gas collisions, and radiation. The estimated NP temperatures were in the 1700-2000 K range, and the NP absorption cross sections ranged from ∼0.8 to 0.2% of the geometric cross sections for 532 nm and 10.6 μm excitation, respectively. Emission spectra of single NPs and small NP ensembles show a feature in the IR that appears to be the high energy tail of the thermal (blackbody-like) emission expected from hot particles but also a discrete feature peaking around 750 nm. Both the IR tail and 750 nm peak are observed for all particles and for both IR and visible laser excitation. No significant difference was observed between graphite and amorphous carbon NPs. PMID:26513667

  20. Age and stability of sublimation till over buried glacier ice, inferred from 21Ne measurements, Ong Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibby, T.; Putkonen, J.; Morgan, D. J.; Balco, G.

    2014-12-01

    Ong Valley, in the Central Transantarctic Mountains, contains three distinct glacial drifts deposited by past advances of the Argosy glacier into the valley. Massive ice occurs below two of the till deposits. Potentially, such buried ice under shallow regolith cover could provide access to past climate and biological records more easily than deep ice coring. We measured cosmic-ray produced 21Ne in these tills as a means of constraining the age and stability of the three drifts, as well as the ice below them. We collected samples in vertical profiles from two hand-dug sections through each drift. The pits from two drifts overlying buried ice extended to the buried ice surface. The hypothesis that these are sublimation tills implies that 21Ne concentrations are a function of i) any inheritance from prior exposure; ii) the age since emplacement of the ice and till; iii) the sublimation rate of the ice; and iv) the surface erosion rate of the till. 21Ne concentrations in the youngest drift are ca. 10 M atoms/g and invariant with depth, indicating that they are predominantly due to inheritance, and provide only a weak maximum age constraint of ca. 0.1 Mya. The two older drifts have surface 21Ne concentrations of 200-250 M atoms/ g and depth concentration profiles consistent with a sublimation till origin. Given that 21Ne concentrations in the deepest samples in each of the two older drifts provide an upper limit on the inherited 21Ne concentration, these imply minimum ages of 1 Mya for the middle drift and 1.6 Mya for the oldest. This implies a 1 Mya minimum age for the ice underlying the middle drift.

  1. The role of sublimation and condensation on the development of ice sedimentation waves on the North Polar Cap of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herny, C.; Carpy, S.; Bourgeois, O.; Masse, M.; Spiga, A.; Le Mouélic, S.; Perret, L.; Smith, I. B.; Rodriguez, S.

    2015-10-01

    Mass and energy balance of ice sheets are driven by complex interactions between the atmosphere and the cryosphere. For instance, it has been demonstrated that feedbacks between katabatic winds and the cryosphere lead to the formation of sedimentation waves at the surface of Martian and terrestrial ice sheets [1, 2, 3 and 4]. Here we explore the role of sublimation and condensation of water vapor in the development of these sedimentation waves. We conduct this study by complementary observational and numerical investigations on the North Polar Cap of Mars.

  2. Sublimation rates of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from comet nuclei at large distances from the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1991-01-01

    One of the more attractive among the plausible scenarios for the major emission event recently observed on Comet Halley at a heliocentric distance of 14.3 AU is activation of a source of ejecta driven by an icy substance much more volatile than water. As prerequisite for the forthcoming detailed analysis of the imaging observations of this event, a simple model is proposed that yields the sublimation rate versus time at any location on the surface of a rotating cometary nucleus for two candidate ices: carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The model's variable parameters are the comet's heliocentric distance r and the Sun's instantaneous zenith angle z.

  3. Optimization of the design of a crucible for a SiC sublimation growth system using a global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. J.; Liu, L. J.; Tezuka, H.; Usuki, Y.; Kakimoto, K.

    2008-04-01

    Induction heating, temperature field and growth rate for a sublimation growth system of silicon carbide were calculated by using a global simulation model. The effects of shape of the crucible on temperature distribution and growth rate were investigated. It was found that thickness of the substrate holder, distance between the powder and substrate, and angle between the crucible wall and powder free surface are important for growth rate and crystal quality. Finally, a curved powder free surface was also studied. The results indicate that the use of a curved powder free surface is also an effective method for obtaining a higher growth rate.

  4. An atomic beam of 6Li — 7Li for high resolution spectroscopy from matrix isolation sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. N.; Sacramento, R. L.; Silva, B. A.; Uhlmann, F. O.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.

    2016-07-01

    We propose the Matrix Isolation Sublimation (MlSu) technique for generating cold lithium atoms for the measurement of the 6Li - 7Li isotope shift in D1 and D2 transitions. The technique is capable of generating cold 6Li and 7Li beams at 4 K with forward velocity of 125 m/s. Using this beam we offer a distinguished source of lithium atoms for transitions measurements, adding a new possibility to make high resolution spectroscopy towards improving the experimental checks of the theory.

  5. Photometry of LO Pegasi in B, V, R colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csorvási, R.

    2006-09-01

    Variable magnetic activity manifested by starspot distribution is investigated on the single K5-K7 dwarf LO Peg, using one month long photometric observations. We supposed three circular spots for light curve solution. We find variable spot temperature, whose average is 3960 K. The sizes of spots were stable for two spots and one spot showed a significant decrease. Different migration periods on two spots indicate differential rotation, the magnitude of the migration is slow. During the measured 90 stellar rotations (38.5 days) the location of the activity remained on the same hemisphere of the star.

  6. On the LO-polaron dispersion in D dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, B.; Kalina, F.; Smondyrev, M.

    2003-05-01

    We discuss the (LO)polaron dispersion for arbitrary spatial dimension D. Firstly, we review the existing literature; recent numerical work is critically analyzed. Secondly, we derive novel upper bounds for the dispersion, which incorporate the correct behaviour of the dispersion up to third order of the coupling constant . A totally analytical evaluation is performed in the case D = 1. We compare the upper bounds with previously published lower bounds. Apart from a surrounding of zero dispersion, the relative deviation is on a few-percent scale.

  7. Volumetric HiLo microscopy employing an electrically tunable lens.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Katrin; Smolarski, André; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Fischer, Andreas; Stürmer, Moritz; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Czarske, Jürgen W

    2016-06-27

    Electrically tunable lenses exhibit strong potential for fast motion-free axial scanning in a variety of microscopes. However, they also lead to a degradation of the achievable resolution because of aberrations and misalignment between illumination and detection optics that are induced by the scan itself. Additionally, the typically nonlinear relation between actuation voltage and axial displacement leads to over- or under-sampled frame acquisition in most microscopic techniques because of their static depth-of-field. To overcome these limitations, we present an Adaptive-Lens-High-and-Low-frequency (AL-HiLo) microscope that enables volumetric measurements employing an electrically tunable lens. By using speckle-patterned illumination, we ensure stability against aberrations of the electrically tunable lens. Its depth-of-field can be adjusted a-posteriori and hence enables to create flexible scans, which compensates for irregular axial measurement positions. The adaptive HiLo microscope provides an axial scanning range of 1 mm with an axial resolution of about 4 μm and sub-micron lateral resolution over the full scanning range. Proof of concept measurements at home-built specimens as well as zebrafish embryos with reporter gene-driven fluorescence in the thyroid gland are shown. PMID:27410654

  8. Fast optically sectioned fluorescence HiLo endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Daryl; Mertz, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We describe a nonscanning, fiber bundle endomicroscope that performs optically sectioned fluorescence imaging with fast frame rates and real-time processing. Our sectioning technique is based on HiLo imaging, wherein two widefield images are acquired under uniform and structured illumination and numerically processed to reject out-of-focus background. This work is an improvement upon an earlier demonstration of widefield optical sectioning through a flexible fiber bundle. The improved device features lateral and axial resolutions of 2.6 and 17 μm, respectively, a net frame rate of 9.5 Hz obtained by real-time image processing with a graphics processing unit (GPU) and significantly reduced motion artifacts obtained by the use of a double-shutter camera. We demonstrate the performance of our system with optically sectioned images and videos of a fluorescently labeled chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) in the developing G. gallus embryo. HiLo endomicroscopy is a candidate technique for low-cost, high-speed clinical optical biopsies. PMID:22463023

  9. Advanced liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning concept testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, G. L. E.; Suter, J. D.; Turner, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    Advanced methods of liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning were studied as part of an effort for increasing reliability and operability while reducing cost of future heavy lift launch vehicles. The most promising conditioning concept evaluated was no-bleed (passive recirculation) followed by low-bleed, helium injection, and use of a recirculation line. Full-scale cryogenic testing was performed with a sloped feedline test article to validate models of behavior of LO2 in the feedline and to prove no-bleed feasibility. Test data are also intended to help generate design guidelines for the development of a main propulsion system feed duct. A design-of-experiments matrix of over 100 tests was developed to test all four propellant conditioning concepts and the impact of design parameters on the concepts. Liquid nitrogen was used as the test fluid. The work for this project was conducted from October 1992 through January 1994 at the hydrogen cold flow facility of the west test area of MSFC. Test data have shown that satisfactory temperatures are being obtained for the no-bleed conditioning concept.

  10. Human CD34(lo)CD133(lo) fetal liver cells support the expansion of human CD34(hi)CD133(hi) hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yong, Kylie Su Mei; Keng, Choong Tat; Tan, Shu Qi; Loh, Eva; Chang, Kenneth Te; Tan, Thiam Chye; Hong, Wanjin; Chen, Qingfeng

    2016-09-01

    We have recently discovered a unique CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cell population in the human fetal liver (FL) that gives rise to cells in the hepatic lineage. In this study, we further characterized the biological functions of FL CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells. Our findings show that these CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells express markers of both endodermal and mesodermal lineages and have the capability to differentiate into hepatocyte and mesenchymal lineage cells by ex vivo differentiation assays. Furthermore, we show that CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells express growth factors that are important for human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion: stem cell factor (SCF), insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12), and factors in the angiopoietin-like protein family. Co-culture of autologous FL HSCs and allogenic HSCs derived from cord blood with CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells supports and expands both types of HSCs.These findings are not only essential for extending our understanding of the HSC niche during the development of embryonic and fetal hematopoiesis but will also potentially benefit adult stem cell transplantations in clinics because expanded HSCs demonstrate the same capacity as primary cells to reconstitute the human immune system and mediate long-term hematopoiesis in vivo. Together, CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells not only serve as stem/progenitor cells for liver development but are also an essential component of the HSC niche in the human FL. PMID:27593483

  11. Single-crystal field-effect transistors of new Cl2-NDI polymorph processed by sublimation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tao; Stolte, Matthias; Burschka, Christian; Hansen, Nis Hauke; Musiol, Thomas; Kälblein, Daniel; Pflaum, Jens; Tao, Xutang; Brill, Jochen; Würthner, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Physical properties of active materials built up from small molecules are dictated by their molecular packing in the solid state. Here we demonstrate for the first time the growth of n-channel single-crystal field-effect transistors and organic thin-film transistors by sublimation of 2,6-dichloro-naphthalene diimide in air. Under these conditions, a new polymorph with two-dimensional brick-wall packing mode (β-phase) is obtained that is distinguished from the previously reported herringbone packing motif obtained from solution (α-phase). We are able to fabricate single-crystal field-effect transistors with electron mobilities in air of up to 8.6 cm2 V-1 s-1 (α-phase) and up to 3.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 (β-phase) on n-octadecyltriethoxysilane-modified substrates. On silicon dioxide, thin-film devices based on β-phase can be manufactured in air giving rise to electron mobilities of 0.37 cm2 V-1 s-1. The simple crystal and thin-film growth procedures by sublimation under ambient conditions avoid elaborate substrate modifications and costly vacuum equipment-based fabrication steps.

  12. The not-so-sublime early Earth recorded in Hadean zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavosie, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    oxygen isotope ratios (up to 7.5 %) are evidence that the early formed crust was evolved (granitic), rather than primitive (gabbroic). (4) Variable oxygen and Li isotope ratios in zircon record processes of surface alteration and subsequent magmatic recycling of altered crust, constraining the appearance of low surface temperatures and liquid water oceans by 4.3 to 4.2 Ga. (5) Evidence for the Late Heavy Bombardment has not been identified in Hadean zircons; planar microstructures known to form in shock metamorphosed zircon have not been found in Hadean grains. (6) Other claims, including reports of modern-style plate interactions based on zircon mineral inclusion barometry, and the presence of diamond inclusions in Hadean zircons, remain controversial, and open to interpretation. Many aspects of the Hadean are therefore similar to the Archean; distinguishing the two eons thus remains a challenge. However, the cooling and condensation of liquid surface water and its subsequent effect on magma chemistry, as recorded in Hadean zircons from 4.3 to 4.2 Ga, suggests a global-scale process that created habitats for life, and clearly marked the end of 'hell-like' Hadean surface conditions. As the timescale and processes active on the early Earth become better quantified through careful documentation and measurement of these ancient zircons, the Hadean becomes somewhat less sublime.

  13. An enhanced model of the contemporary and long-term (200 ka) sublimation of the massive subsurface ice in Beacon Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lu; Sletten, Ronald S.; Hagedorn, Birgit; Hallet, Bernard; McKay, Christopher P.; Stone, John O.

    2015-08-01

    A massive ice body buried under several decimeters of dry regolith in Beacon Valley, Antarctica, is believed to be more than 1 Ma old and perhaps over 8.1 Ma; however, vapor diffusion models suggest that subsurface ice in this region is not stable under current climate conditions. To better understand the controls on sublimation rates and stability of this massive ice, we have modeled vapor diffusion using 12 years of climate and soil temperature data from 1999 to 2011, including field measurements of episodic snow cover and snowmelt events that have not been represented in previous models of ground ice sublimation. The model is then extended to reconstruct the sublimation history over the last 200 ka using paleotemperatures estimated from ice core data from nearby Taylor Dome and a relationship between atmospheric temperature and humidity derived from our meteorological records. The model quantifies the impact of episodic snow events; they account for a nearly 30% reduction in the massive ice loss. The sublimation rate of ground ice averages 0.11 mm a-1 between 1999 and 2011 in Beacon Valley. Parameterized with past environmental conditions and assuming the same regolith thickness, the modeled sublimation rate of ground ice in Beacon Valley averages 0.09 mm a-1 for the last 200 ka, comparable to the long-term average rate estimated independently from various studies based on cosmogenic isotopes. This study provides a realistic estimate of the long-term sublimation history and supports the inference that the buried ice in Beacon Valley is older than 1 Ma.

  14. Risk assessment of Cumberland unit 2 L-O blades

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, T.C.T.; Puri, A.

    1996-12-31

    Concern about the reliability of the 1,300 mw Cumberland steam turbine units after an unexpected blade tip failure in the fall of 1995 caused TVA to conduct an investigation into the current reliability of the L-O blades. A probabilistic model based on the measured frequencies, damping and material fatigue data was generated. The influence of significant erosion damage on the blade natural frequencies and on the local stresses was estimated. A probabilistic model of the local fatigue limit was generated based on test data. Monte Carlo simulation was employed to estimate the probability of blade failure by comparing the dynamic stress with the fatigue limit. Risk assessment of the blade failure is presented.

  15. Karhunen-Loéve expansion for random earthquake excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun

    2015-03-01

    This paper develops a trigonometric-basis-function based Karhunen-Loéve (KL) expansion for simulating random earthquake excitations with known covariance functions. The methods for determining the number of the KL terms and defining the involved random variables are described in detail. The simplified form of the KL expansion is given, whereby the relationship between the KL expansion and the spectral representation method is investigated and revealed. The KL expansion is of high efficiency for simulating long-term earthquake excitations in the sense that it needs a minimum number of random variables, as compared with the spectral representation method. Numerical examples demonstrate the convergence and accuracy of the KL expansion for simulating two commonly-used random earthquake excitation models and estimating linear and nonlinear random responses to the random excitations.

  16. Building an LO source at 1036 GHz for a receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Neal R.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the UMass work on this grant was to build an LO source at 1036 GHz for a receiver which was to be built at JPL. The 1 THz source will consist of a high power Gunn oscillator at 86 GHz followed by a cascaded pair of planar diode doublers and finally a whisker contacted tripler. All multipliers will use single mode waveguide mounts. This use of single mode waveguide even for the final mount is a departure from the original plan, and reflects the progress that has been made in fabricating small structures. The advantages to the use of waveguide over a quasi-optical approach are that the complete system is much more compact, and much easier to use.

  17. The reduction of the LO number for heterodyne coherent detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinying; Yu, Jianjun; Chi, Nan; Dong, Ze; Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianguo

    2012-12-31

    Relative to homodyne coherent detection, heterodyne coherent detection has simple architecture because no 90° hybrid and only half number of photodiodes and analog-to-digital convertor (ADC) chips are required. We experimentally demonstrate that the architecture of heterodyne coherent receivers can be further simplified. When the frequency offset is one half of the channel frequency spacing, one local oscillator (LO) laser can be used for two neighboring wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) channels, and therefore the number of LO lasers can be reduced into half compared to homodyne detection. We experimentally demonstrate simplified heterodyne coherent detection of 4 × 196.8-Gb/s polarization-division-multiplexing carrier-suppressed return-to-zero quadrature-phase-shift-keying (PDM-CSRZ-QPSK) modulation after transmission over 1040-km single-mode fiber (SMF)-28 on a 50-GHz grid with bit-error ratio (BER) smaller than pre-forward-error-correction (pre-FEC) limit of 3.8 × 10(-3). To our best knowledge, 196.8 Gb/s is the highest bit rate per channel for heterodyne coherent WDM transmission system. An arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) instead of wavelength selective switch (WSS) is used at the transmitter to spectrally shape and multiplex the WDM signal. We also experimentally demonstrate that heterodyne detection causes 3-dB optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) penalty at the BER of 3.8 × 10(-3) for a certain single channel compared to homodyne detection. PMID:23388788

  18. Material composition assessment and discovering sublimation activity on asteroids 145 Adeona, 704 Interamnia, 779 Nina, and 1474 Beira

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busarev, V. V.; Barabanov, S. I.; Puzin, V. B.

    2016-07-01

    Spectrophotometric observations of 145 Adeona, 704 Interamnia, 779 Nina, and 1474 Beira—asteroids of close primitive types—allowed us to detect similar mineralogical absorption bands in their reflectance spectra centered in the range 0.35 to 0.92 μm; the bands are at 0.38, 0.44, and 0.67-0.71 μm. On the same asteroids, the spectral signs of simultaneous sublimation activity were found for the first time. Namely, there are maxima at ˜0.35-0.60 μm in the reflectance spectra of Adeona, Interamnia, and Nina and at ˜0.55-075 μm in the spectra of Beira. We connect this activity with small heliocentric distances of the asteroids and, consequently, with a high insolation at their surfaces. Examination of the samples of probable analogues allowed us to identify Fe3+ and Fe2+ in the material of these asteroids through the mentioned absorption bands. For analogues, we took powdered samples of carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil (CI), Mighei (CM2), Murchison (CM2), and Boriskino (CM2), as well as hydrosilicates of the serpentine group. Laboratory spectral reflectance study of the samples of low-iron Mg serpentines (<2 wt % FeO) showed that the equivalent width of the absorption band centered at 0.44-0.46 μm strongly correlates with the content of Fe3+ in octahedral and tetrahedral coordinations. Our conclusion is that this absorption band can be used as a qualitative indicator of Fe3+ in the surface matter of asteroids and other solid celestial bodies. The comparison of the listed analog samples and the asteroids by parameters of the spectral features suggests that the silicate component of the asteroids' surface material is a mixture of hydrated and oxidized compounds, including oxides and hydroxides of bivalent and trivalent iron and carbonaceous-chondritic material. At the same time, the sublimation activity of Adeona, Interamnia, Nina, and Beira at high surface temperatures points to a substantial content of water ice in their material. This contradicts the

  19. Origin, Evolution, and Preservation of Cold Based Debris Covered Glaciers: Quantifying Sublimation Rates of Ancient Buried Ice in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, D. E.; Marchant, D. R.

    2007-12-01

    Growing interest in our planet's climate history has placed a premium on acquiring detailed records of past climate change. Of considerable interest are archives of ancient atmosphere trapped within the debris-covered alpine glaciers of the western Dry Valleys region of Antarctica. The Mullins Valley debris-covered glacier (~8 km in length) is sourced from local snowfall at the steep headwall of the valley. The first 1.2 km of this glacier is generally free of overlying debris except for isolated cobbles and boulders. Thereafter, the ice surface is covered with a thin, continuous sheet of dolerite-rich rubble. Factors that influence the origin and modification of this ice include atmospheric temperature and relative humidity, precipitation, incoming solar radiance, surface albedo, till texture, winds, surface roughness, salts, and secondary ice lenses. We applied a diffusion model to track vapor flux within a sublimation till overlying the Mullins Valley debris-covered glacier, purportedly the world's oldest debris-covered alpine glacier. As input, we used meteorological data from HOBO data loggers that captured climate change and till temperatures. Results show that vapor flows into and out of the sublimation till at rates dependent on the non-linear variation of soil temperature with depth. Sublimation rates along the Mullins Glacier varied as a function of till thickness, local climate (using a calculated regional lapse rate of 0.88°C per 100 m), and till texture. Ice loss during the study interval (November 27, 2006 to December 24, 2006) ranged from as high as 2.12 mm for exposed glacier ice in the upper ablation zone, to as low as 0.01 mm for buried ice beneath till >50 cm in thickness. Averaged over the entire ablation zone (6.7 km2), this yields a net ice-surface lowering of 0.32 mm during the study interval. Numerical modeling suggests that a modest ice accumulation rate at the headwall of ~1 cm a-1 appears sufficient to maintain current ice volumes

  20. Multivariate Patterns in the Human Object-Processing Pathway Reveal a Shift from Retinotopic to Shape Curvature Representations in Lateral Occipital Areas, LO-1 and LO-2

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Richard J. W.; Gouws, André D.; Lawrence, Samuel J. D.; Wade, Alex R.

    2016-01-01

    Representations in early visual areas are organized on the basis of retinotopy, but this organizational principle appears to lose prominence in the extrastriate cortex. Nevertheless, an extrastriate region, such as the shape-selective lateral occipital cortex (LO), must still base its activation on the responses from earlier retinotopic visual areas, implying that a transition from retinotopic to “functional” organizations should exist. We hypothesized that such a transition may lie in LO-1 or LO-2, two visual areas lying between retinotopically defined V3d and functionally defined LO. Using a rapid event-related fMRI paradigm, we measured neural similarity in 12 human participants between pairs of stimuli differing along dimensions of shape exemplar and shape complexity within both retinotopically and functionally defined visual areas. These neural similarity measures were then compared with low-level and more abstract (curvature-based) measures of stimulus similarity. We found that low-level, but not abstract, stimulus measures predicted V1–V3 responses, whereas the converse was true for LO, a double dissociation. Critically, abstract stimulus measures were most predictive of responses within LO-2, akin to LO, whereas both low-level and abstract measures were predictive for responses within LO-1, perhaps indicating a transitional point between those two organizational principles. Similar transitions to abstract representations were not observed in the more ventral stream passing through V4 and VO-1/2. The transition we observed in LO-1 and LO-2 demonstrates that a more “abstracted” representation, typically considered the preserve of “category-selective” extrastriate cortex, can nevertheless emerge in retinotopic regions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Visual areas are typically identified either through retinotopy (e.g., V1–V3) or from functional selectivity [e.g., shape-selective lateral occipital complex (LOC)]. We combined these approaches to explore

  1. Volatilization, transport and sublimation of metallic and non-metallic elements in high temperature gases at Merapi Volcano, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.B.; Rose, William I., Jr.; Reed, M.H.; Lichte, F.E.; Finnegan, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Condensates, silica tube sublimates and incrustations were sampled from 500-800??C fumaroles and lava samples were collected at Merapi Volcano, Indonesia in Jan.-Feb., 1984. With respect to the magma, Merapi gases are enriched by factors greater than 105 in Se, Re, Bi and Cd; 104-105 in Au, Br, In, Pb and W; 103-104 in Mo, Cl, Cs, S, Sn and Ag; 102-103 in As, Zn, F and Rb; and 1-102 in Cu, K, Na, Sb, Ni, Ga, V, Fe, Mn and Li. The fumaroles are transporting more than 106 grams/day ( g d) of S, Cl and F; 104-106 g/d of Al, Br, Zn, Fe, K and Mg; 103-104 g d of Pb, As, Mo, Mn, V, W and Sr; and less than 103 g d of Ni, Cu, Cr, Ga, Sb, Bi, Cd, Li, Co and U. With decreasing temperature (800-500??C) there were five sublimate zones found in silica tubes: 1) cristobalite and magnetite (first deposition of Si, Fe and Al); 2) K-Ca sulfate, acmite, halite, sylvite and pyrite (maximum deposition of Cl, Na, K, Si, S, Fe, Mo, Br, Al, Rb, Cs, Mn, W, P, Ca, Re, Ag, Au and Co); 3) aphthitalite (K-Na sulfate), sphalerite, galena and Cs-K. sulfate (maximum deposition of Zn, Bi, Cd, Se and In; higher deposition of Pb and Sn); 4) Pb-K chloride and Na-K-Fe sulfate (maximum deposition of Pb, Sn and Cu); and 5) Zn, Cu and K-Pb sulfates (maximum deposition of Pb, Sn, Ti, As and Sb). The incrustations surrounding the fumaroles are also chemically zoned. Bi, Cd, Pb, W, Mo, Zn, Cu, K, Na, V, Fe and Mn are concentrated most in or very close to the vent as expected with cooling, atmospheric contamination and dispersion. The highly volatile elements Br, Cl, As and Sb are transported primarily away from high temperature vents. Ba, Si, P, Al, Ca and Cr are derived from wall rock reactions. Incomplete degassing of shallow magma at 915??C is the origin of most of the elements in the Merapi volcanic gas, although it is partly contaminated by particles or wall rock reactions. The metals are transported predominantly as chloride species. As the gas cools in the fumarolic environment, it becomes saturated

  2. Comparative study of 3C-SiC layers sublimation-grown on a 6H-SiC substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Shustov, D. B.; Lebedev, A. A. Lebedev, S. P.; Nelson, D. K.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Zamoryanskaya, M. V.

    2013-09-15

    n-3C-SiC/n-6H-SiC heterostructures grown by vacuum sublimation on CREE commercial 6H-SiC substrates are studied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that a transitional layer of varying thickness, composed of a mixture of 3C- and 6H-SiC polytypes, is formed on the substrate. A 3C polytype layer was obtained on the interlayer. Cathodoluminescence study of the surface of the film demonstrated that defects in the form of inclusions of another phase (6H-polytype), stacking faults, and twin boundaries (separating domains of cubic modification, grown in various orientations) are found on the surface and in the surface layer with a thickness on the order of 100 {mu}m. Varying the growth conditions changes the concentration of various types of defects.

  3. Sublimation behavior of silicon nitride /Si3N4/ coated silicon germanium /SiGe/ unicouples. [for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapfer, G.; Truscello, V. C.

    1975-01-01

    For the Multi-Hundred Watt (MHW) Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG), the silicon germanium unicouples are coated with silicon nitride to minimize degradation mechanisms which are directly attributable to material sublimation effects. A program is under way to determine the effective vapor suppression of this coating as a function of temperature and gas environment. The results of weight loss experiments, using Si3N4 coated hot shoes (SiMo), operating over a temperature range from 900 C to 1200 C, are analyzed and discussed. These experiments were conducted both in high vacuum and at different pressures of carbon monoxide (CO) to determine its effect on the coating. Although the results show a favorable vapor suppression at all operating temperatures, the pressure of the CO and the thickness of the coating have a decided effect on the useful lifetime of the coating.

  4. The role of oxygen in CdS/CdTe solar cells deposited by close-spaced sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D.H.; Levi, D.H.; Matson, R.J.

    1996-05-01

    The presence of oxygen during close-spaced sublimation (CSS) of CdTe has been previously reported to be essential for high-efficiency CdS/CdTe solar cells because it increases the acceptor density in the absorber. The authors find that the presence of oxygen during CSS increases the nucleation site density of CdTe, thus decreasing pinhole density and grain size. Photoluminescence showed that oxygen decreases material quality in the bulk of the CdTe film, but positively impacts the critical CdS/CdTe interface. Through device characterization the authors were unable to verify an increase in acceptor density with increased oxygen. These results, along with the achievement of high-efficiency cells (13% AM1.5) without the use of oxygen, led the authors to conclude that the use of oxygen during CSS deposition of CdTe can be useful but is not essential.

  5. Method of fabricating conducting oxide-silicon solar cells utilizing electron beam sublimation and deposition of the oxide

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1979-01-01

    In preparing tin oxide and indium tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells by electron beam sublimation of the oxide and subsequent deposition thereof on the silicon, the engineering efficiency of the resultant cell is enhanced by depositing the oxide at a predetermined favorable angle of incidence. Typically the angle of incidence is between 40.degree. and 70.degree. and preferably between 55.degree. and 65.degree. when the oxide is tin oxide and between 40.degree. and 70.degree. when the oxide deposited is indium tin oxide. gi The Government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Department of Energy Contract No. EY-76-C-03-1283.

  6. Epitaxial Growth of High-Resistivity CdTe Thick Films Grown Using a Modified Close Space Sublimation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Quanzhong; Brinkman, Andy W.; Veeramani, Perumal; Sellin, Paul. J.

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports the growth of high-resistivity CdTe thick epitaxial films of single crystal nature using a modified close space sublimation method (MCSS) in a Te-rich environment. We propose that the high Te2 partial pressure results in an increased concentration of TeCd antisites acting as deep donors to produce the high-resistivity CdTe, as well as improved quality of thick films. This is in agreement with the deep-donor model introduced by Fiderele et al. [Cryst. Res. Technol. 38 (2003) 588]. The thick films have a µeτe value in the order 10-4 cm2 V-1 and as expected, the TeCd antisites appeared not to act as electron traps.

  7. Sorbent, Sublimation, and Icing Modeling Methods: Experimental Validation and Application to an Integrated MTSA Subassembly Thermal Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Chad; Padilla, Sebastian; Iacomini, Christie; Paul, Heather L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper details the validation of modeling methods for the three core components of a Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) subassembly, developed for use in a Portable Life Support System (PLSS). The first core component in the subassembly is a sorbent bed, used to capture and reject metabolically produced carbon dioxide (CO2). The sorbent bed performance can be augmented with a temperature swing driven by a liquid CO2 (LCO2) sublimation heat exchanger (SHX) for cooling the sorbent bed, and a condensing, icing heat exchanger (CIHX) for warming the sorbent bed. As part of the overall MTSA effort, scaled design validation test articles for each of these three components have been independently tested in laboratory conditions. Previously described modeling methodologies developed for implementation in Thermal Desktop and SINDA/FLUINT are reviewed and updated, their application in test article models outlined, and the results of those model correlations relayed. Assessment of the applicability of each modeling methodology to the challenge of simulating the response of the test articles and their extensibility to a full scale integrated subassembly model is given. The independent verified and validated modeling methods are applied to the development of a MTSA subassembly prototype model and predictions of the subassembly performance are given. These models and modeling methodologies capture simulation of several challenging and novel physical phenomena in the Thermal Desktop and SINDA/FLUINT software suite. Novel methodologies include CO2 adsorption front tracking and associated thermal response in the sorbent bed, heat transfer associated with sublimation of entrained solid CO2 in the SHX, and water mass transfer in the form of ice as low as 210 K in the CIHX.

  8. Influence of snow surface sublimation on stable isotope and chemical records and on surface energy balance over a Bolivian glacier, Illimani.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagnon, P.; Vimeux, F.; Bonnaveira, H.; Berthier, E.; de Angelis, M.; Petit, J.

    2001-12-01

    Post deposition processes like sublimation of surface snow are on primary importance in cold high latitude glaciers in the tropical Andes. Such a process modifies surface energy balance, isotopic and chemical composition of deposited snow. This is a real problem for interpretation of isotopic and chemical profiles from tropical ice cores. A sublimation experiment has been carried out during May 2001 where a 137 m ice core has been drilled down to the bedrock in June 1999 (Illimani, 17oS, 68oW, 6340 m). Variations of surface snow composition (both water stable isotopes and chemistry) have been monitoring over one week, twice a day while measurements of surface enegy balance were made with an automatic weather station. We present here the combination of these results. Main result from energy balance surface study is that sublimation rate is very hight. Chemical and isotopic compositions of surface snow, show also that sublimation probably affects climate signal recorded in the ice. Thus, interpretation of stable isotopes and chemical records from ice cores have to be carefully done under a certain temporal resolution.

  9. Experimental and theoretical simulation of sublimating dusty water ice with implications for D/H ratios of water ice on Comets and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, John E.; Brown, Robert H.; Lauretta, Dante S.; Smith, Peter H.

    2012-04-01

    Sublimation experiments have been carried out to determine the effect of the mineral dust content of porous ices on the isotopic composition of the sublimate gas over medium (days to weeks) timescales. Whenever mineral dust of any kind was present, the D/H ratio of the sublimated gas was seen to decrease with time from the bulk ratio. Fractionations of up to 2.5 were observed for dust mixing ratios of 9 wt% and higher of JSC MARS-1 regolith simulant 1-10 μm crushed and sieved fraction. These favored the presence of the light isotope, H2O, in the gas phase. The more dust was added to the mixture, the more pronounced was this effect. Theoretical modeling of gas migration within the porous samples and adsorption on the excavated dust grains was undertaken to explain the results. Adsorption onto the dust grains is able to explain the low D/H ratios in the sublimate gas if adsorption favors retention of HDO over H2O. This leads to significant isotopic enrichment of HDO on the dust over time and depletion in the amount of HDO escaping the system as sublimate gas. This effect is significant for planetary bodies on which water moves mainly through the gas phase and a significant surface reservoir of dust may be found, such as on Comets and Mars. For each of these, inferences about the bulk water D/H ratio as inferred from gas phase measurements needs to be reassessed in light of the volatile cycling history of each body.

  10. Experimental and theoretical simulation of sublimating dusty water ice with implications for D/H ratios of water ice on Comets and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, John E.; Brown, Robert H.; Lauretta, Dante S.; Smith, Peter H.

    2012-12-01

    Sublimation experiments have been carried out to determine the effect of the mineral dust content of porous ices on the isotopic composition of the sublimate gas over medium (days to weeks) timescales. Whenever mineral dust of any kind was present, the D/H ratio of the sublimated gas was seen to decrease with time from the bulk ratio. Fractionations of up to 2.5 were observed for dust mixing ratios of 9 wt% and higher of JSC MARS-1 regolith simulant 1-10 μm crushed and sieved fraction. These favored the presence of the light isotope, H2O, in the gas phase. The more dust was added to the mixture, the more pronounced was this effect. Theoretical modeling of gas migration within the porous samples and adsorption on the excavated dust grains was undertaken to explain the results. Adsorption onto the dust grains is able to explain the low D/H ratios in the sublimate gas if adsorption favors retention of HDO over H2O. This leads to significant isotopic enrichment of HDO on the dust over time and depletion in the amount of HDO escaping the system as sublimate gas. This effect is significant for planetary bodies on which water moves mainly through the gas phase and a significant surface reservoir of dust may be found, such as on Comets and Mars. For each of these, inferences about the bulk water D/H ratio as inferred from gas phase measurements needs to be reassessed in light of the volatile cycling history of each body.

  11. Dexamethasone promotes tolerance in vivo by enriching CD11clo CD40lo tolerogenic macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoxing; Zhong, Shibo; Geng, Yajun; Munirathinam, Gnanasekar; Cha, Isaac; Reardon, Catherine; Getz, Godfrey S; van Rooijen, Nico; Kang, Youmin; Wang, Bin; Chen, Aoshuang

    2013-01-01

    We previously showed that antigen immunization in the presence of the immunosuppressant dexamethasone (a strategy we termed "suppressed immunization") could tolerize established recall responses of T cells. However, the mechanism by which dexamethasone acts as a tolerogenic adjuvant has remained unclear. In the present study, we show that dexamethasone enriches CD11c(lo) CD40(lo) macrophages in a dose-dependent manner in the spleen and peripheral lymph nodes of mice by depleting all other CD11c(+) CD40(+) cells including dendritic cells. The enriched macrophages display a distinct MHC class II (MHC II)(lo) CD86(hi) phenotype. Upon activation by antigen in vivo, CD11c(lo) CD40(lo) macrophages upregulate IL-10, a classic marker for tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells, and elicit a serum IL-10 response. When presenting antigen in vivo, these cells do not elicit recall responses from memory T cells, but rather stimulate the expansion of antigen-specific regulatory T cells. Moreover, the depletion of CD11c(lo) CD40(lo) macrophages during suppressed immunization diminishes the tolerogenic efficacy of the treatment. These results indicate that dexamethasone acts as a tolerogenic adjuvant partly by enriching the CD11c(lo) CD40(lo) tolerogenic macrophages. PMID:23001956

  12. A field study of the geomorphic effects of sublimating CO2 blocks on dune slopes at Coral Pink Dunes, Utah.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Mary; Nield, Jo; Diniega, Serina; Hansen, Candy; McElwaine, Jim

    2016-04-01

    The seasonal sublimation of CO2 ice is an active driver of present-day surface change on Mars. Diniega et al (2013) proposed that a discrete type of Martian gully, found on southern hemisphere dunes, were formed by the movement of CO2 seasonal ice blocks. These 'Linear Gullies' consist primarily of long (100 m - 2.5 km) grooves with near-uniform width (few-10 m wide), and typical depth of <2 m. They are near-linear throughout most of their length but sometimes contains zones of low-to-high sinuosity. They are commonly bounded by levées. The groove is generally prefaced by a small alcove that originates at the dune brink. We present the results of a set of field experiments that were undertaken at the Coral Pink sand dunes, Utah. These are sister experiments to those undertaken in Arizona (Bourke et al, 2016). The experiments were undertaken on an active barchan dune with a 16 m long lee slope (30.3°). Ambient air temperature was 30°C and relative humidity was 25%; sand surface temperatures were 26.5°C. A CO2 ice block (60x205x210 mm) was placed at the dune brink and with a gentle nudge it moved downslope. The dynamics of the block movement were recorded using a pair of high resolution video cameras. Geomorphological observations were noted and topographic change was quantified using a Leica P20 terrestrial laser scanner with a resolution of 0.8 mm at 10 m, and change detection limits less than 3 mm. The block run was repeated a total of 10 times and launched from the same location at the dune brink. The experiment ran for 45 minutes. The block size was reduced to (45 x 190 x 195 mm) by the end of the run series. The resultant geomorphology shows that the separate block runs occupied different tracks leading to a triangular plan form shape with a maximum width of 3.5 m. This is different from the findings in Arizona where a narrower track span was recorded (1.7m) (Bourke et al, 2016). Similar block dynamics were observed at both sites (as blocks moved straight

  13. Adsorptive fractionation of HDO on JSC MARS-1 during sublimation with implications for the regolith of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, John E.; Smith, Peter H.; Boynton, William V.

    2011-02-01

    A chamber was constructed to simulate the boundary between the ice table, regolith and atmosphere of Mars and to examine fractionation between H 2O and HDO during sublimation under realistic martian conditions of temperature and pressure. Thirteen experimental runs were conducted with regolith overlying the ice. The thickness and characteristic grain size of the regolith layer as well as the temperature of the underlying ice was varied. From these runs, values for the effective diffusivity, taking into account the effects of adsorption, of the regolith were derived. These effective diffusivities ranged from 1.8 × 10 -4 m 2 s -1 to 2.2 × 10 -3 m 2 s -1 for bare ice and from 2.4 × 10 -11 m 2 s -1 to 2.0 × 10 -9 m 2 s -1 with an adsorptive layer present. From these, latent heats of adsorption of 8.6 ± 2.6 kJ mol -1 and 9.3 ± 2.8 kJ mol -1 were derived at ice-surface temperatures above 223 ± 8 K and 96 ± 28 kJ mol -1 and 104 ± 31 kJ mol -1 respectively for H 2O and HDO were derived at colder temperatures. For temperatures below 223 K, the effective diffusivity of HDO was found to be lower than the diffusivity of H 2O by 40% on average, suggesting that the regolith was adsorptively fractionating the sublimating gas with a fractionation factor of 1.96 ± 0.74. Applying these values to Mars predicts that adsorbed water on the regolith is enriched in HDO compared to the atmosphere, particularly where the regolith is colder. Based on current observations, the D/H ratio of the regolith may be as high as 21 ± 8 times VSMOW at 12°S and L S = 357° if the regolith is hydrated primarily by the atmosphere, neglecting any hydration from subsurface ice.

  14. Going LO (laparoscopic oviductal) for ET and AI in Felids – Challenges, Strategies and Successes

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, WF

    2012-01-01

    Contents Embryo transfer (ET) and artificial insemination (AI) are potentially invaluable techniques for the propagation and management of genetically valuable domestic cat and endangered nondomestic cat populations. Many of the challenges that impair the effective application of ET and AI in felids may be overcome by using laparoscopic oviductal (LO) approaches. LO-ET and LO-AI are minimally-invasive procedures, requiring only two small skin incisions for insertion of a laparoscope and grasping forceps into the abdominal cavity to permit visualization and catheterization of the oviduct for embryo or semen deposition. With concurrent improvements in embryo culture systems and ovarian synchronization protocols, LO-ET has proven effective over the past decade for propagation of laboratory cats, cat models of hereditary disease and nondomestic cats. To date, viable offspring have been produced following LO-ET of non-frozen and frozen-thawed IVF-derived embryos in eight cat hereditary disease models and two nondomestic cat species, the ocelot and sand cat. LO-AI with low sperm numbers (~2–8 million motile) has shown similar efficacy to LO-ET, resulting in high pregnancy percentages (50–70%) following insemination of gonadotropin-treated domestic cats. Multiple kittens also have been produced in two hereditary disease models following LO-AI with frozen semen, and both ocelot and Pallas’ cat kittens have been born after LO-AI with freshly-collected semen. The application of LO-ET and LO-AI to felids has resulted in substantial improvement in the efficiency of assisted reproduction for genetic management of these invaluable domestic cat and wild cat populations. PMID:23279483

  15. A SCUBA-2 survey of FeLoBAL QSOs. Are FeLoBALs in a `transition phase' between ULIRGs and QSOs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violino, Giulio; Coppin, Kristen E. K.; Stevens, Jason A.; Farrah, Duncan; Geach, James E.; Alexander, Dave M.; Hickox, Ryan; Smith, Daniel J. B.; Wardlow, Julie L.

    2016-04-01

    It is thought that a class of broad absorption line (BAL) QSOs, characterized by Fe absorption features in their UV spectra (called `FeLoBALs'), could mark a transition stage between the end of an obscured starburst event and a youthful QSO beginning to shed its dust cocoon, where Fe has been injected into the interstellar medium by the starburst. To test this hypothesis, we have undertaken deep Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2) 850 μm observations of a sample of 17 FeLoBAL QSOs with 0.89 ≤ z ≤ 2.78 and -23.31 ≤ MB ≤ -28.50 to directly detect an excess in the thermal emission of the dust which would probe enhanced star formation activity. We find that FeLoBALs are not luminous sources in the sub-mm, none of them are individually detected at 850 μm, nor as a population through stacking (Fs = 1.14 ± 0.58 mJy). Statistical and survival analyses reveal that FeLoBALs have sub-mm properties consistent with BAL and non-BAL QSOs with matched redshifts and magnitudes. An Spectral Energy Distribution fitting analysis shows that the far-infrared emission is dominated by active galactic nuclei activity, and a starburst component is required only in 6/17 sources of our sample; moreover the integrated total luminosity of 16/17 sources is L ≥ 1012 L⊙, high enough to classify FeLoBALs as infrared luminous. In conclusion, we do not find any evidence in support of FeLoBAL QSOs being a transition population between an ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) and an unobscured QSO; in particular, FeLoBALs are not characterized by a cold starburst which would support this hypothesis.

  16. Resonant tunnelling diode oscillator as an alternative LO for SIS receiver applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blundell, R.; Papa, D. C.; Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.

    1993-01-01

    The resonant tunnelling diode (RTD) oscillator has been demonstrated for the first time as a local oscillator (LO) in a heterodyne receiver. Noise measurements made on a sensitive 200 GHz superconductor-insulator-superconductor receiver using both a multiplied Gunn diode and an RTD oscillator as the LO revealed no difference in receiver noise as a function of oscillator type.

  17. Growth optimization and applicability of thick on-axis SiC layers using sublimation epitaxy in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokubavicius, Valdas; Sun, Jianwu; Liu, Xinyu; Yazdi, Gholamreza; Ivanov, Ivan. G.; Yakimova, Rositsa; Syväjärvi, Mikael

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate growth of thick SiC layers (100-200 μm) on nominally on-axis hexagonal substrates using sublimation epitaxy in vacuum (10-5 mbar) at temperatures varying from 1700 to 1975 °C with growth rates up to 270 μm/h and 70 μm/h for 6H- and 4H-SiC, respectively. The stability of hexagonal polytypes are related to process growth parameters and temperature profile which can be engineered using different thermal insulation materials and adjustment of the induction coil position with respect to the graphite crucible. We show that there exists a range of growth rates for which single-hexagonal polytype free of foreign polytype inclusions can be maintained. Further on, foreign polytypes like 3C-SiC can be stabilized by moving out of the process window. The applicability of on-axis growth is demonstrated by growing a 200 μm thick homoepitaxial 6H-SiC layer co-doped with nitrogen and boron in a range of 1018 cm-3 at a growth rate of about 270 μm/h. Such layers are of interest as a near UV to visible light converters in a monolithic white light emitting diode concept, where subsequent nitride-stack growth benefits from the on-axis orientation of the SiC layer.

  18. CO2 jets formed by sublimation beneath translucent slab ice in Mars' seasonal south polar ice cap.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Hugh H; Christensen, Philip R; Titus, Timothy N

    2006-08-17

    The martian polar caps are among the most dynamic regions on Mars, growing substantially in winter as a significant fraction of the atmosphere freezes out in the form of CO2 ice. Unusual dark spots, fans and blotches form as the south-polar seasonal CO2 ice cap retreats during spring and summer. Small radial channel networks are often associated with the location of spots once the ice disappears. The spots have been proposed to be simply bare, defrosted ground; the formation of the channels has remained uncertain. Here we report infrared and visible observations that show that the spots and fans remain at CO2 ice temperatures well into summer, and must be granular materials that have been brought up to the surface of the ice, requiring a complex suite of processes to get them there. We propose that the seasonal ice cap forms an impermeable, translucent slab of CO2 ice that sublimates from the base, building up high-pressure gas beneath the slab. This gas levitates the ice, which eventually ruptures, producing high-velocity CO2 vents that erupt sand-sized grains in jets to form the spots and erode the channels. These processes are unlike any observed on Earth. PMID:16915284

  19. Pedestal Craters in Utopia Planitia and Malea Planum: Evidence for a Past Ice-Rich Substrate from Marginal Sublimation Pits.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadish, S. J.; Head, J. W.; Barlow, N. G.; Marchant, D. R.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction: Pedestal craters (Pd) are a subclass of impact craters unique to Mars [1] characterized by a crater perched near the center of a pedestal (mesa or plateau) that is surrounded by a quasi-circular, outward-facing scarp. The marginal scarp is usually several crater diameters from the crater rim (Figs. 2,4,5), and tens to over 100 meters above the surrounding plains (Fig. 2). Pd have been interpreted to form by armoring of the proximal substrate during the impact event. Hypotheses for the armoring mechanism include an ejecta covering [e.g., 3], increased ejecta mobilization caused by volatile substrates [4], distal glassy/melt-rich veneers [5], and/or an atmospheric blast/thermal effect [6]. Subsequently, a marginal scarp forms by preferential erosion of the substrate surrounding the armored region, most commonly thought to involve eolian removal of fine-grained, non-armored material [e.g., 3]. An understanding of the distribution of Pd, which form predominantly poleward of ~40°N and S latitude [7-9] (Fig. 1), and the role of redistribution of ice and dust during periods of climate change [e.g., 10-11], suggests that the substrate might have been volatile-rich [8-9, 12-14]. As such, some researchers [e.g., 8-9] have proposed a model for Pd formation that involves impact during periods of higher obliquity, when mid- to high-latitude substrates were characterized by thick deposits of snow and ice [e.g., 15]. Subsequent sublimation of the volatile units, except below the armored regions, yielded the perched Pd. Thus, this model predicts that thick deposits of snow/ice should underlie Pd. This is in contrast to the eolian model [3], which calls primarily for deflation of sand and dust. Here, we show the results of our study [8,16] that has documented and characterized 2461 Pd on Mars equatorward of ~65° N and S latitude (Fig. 1) in order to test these hypotheses for the origin of pedestal craters. In particular, we report on the detection of 50 Pd in Utopia

  20. Effect of the duration of the growth process on the properties of GaN grown by the sublimation method

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfson, A. A.; Mokhov, E. N.

    2009-03-15

    Variation in the structural and morphological features and luminescent characteristics of thick epitaxial GaN layers grown by the sublimation sandwich method with the duration of the crystallization process has been studied. This was, in particular, done by means of scanning electron microscopy in the secondary-electron and color-cathodoluminescence modes. It was found that rather high-quality GaN layers with a thickness of up to 0.5 mm can be grown in a time of about 1.5 h, with their surface hardly exhibiting any luminescence in the visible spectral range. However, making the growth process longer in order to obtain thicker layers impairs the quality of a crystal being grown, which is accompanied by an increase in the intensity of cathodoluminescence from its surface layer in the visible (predominantly yellow) region of the spectrum. Reasons for the poorer quality of GaN layers in this case are discussed. It is suggested that, as the evaporation rate from the source decreases, the amount of active nitrogen near the growth surface becomes lower.

  1. CO2 jets formed by sublimation beneath translucent slab ice in Mars' seasonal south polar ice cap

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, H.H.; Christensen, P.R.; Titus, T.N.

    2006-01-01

    The martian polar caps are among the most dynamic regions on Mars, growing substantially in winter as a significant fraction of the atmosphere freezes out in the form of CO2 ice. Unusual dark spots, fans and blotches form as the south-polar seasonal CO2 ice cap retreats during spring and summer. Small radial channel networks are often associated with the location of spots once the ice disappears. The spots have been proposed to be simply bare, defrosted ground; the formation of the channels has remained uncertain. Here we report infrared and visible observations that show that the spots and fans remain at CO2 ice temperatures well into summer, and must be granular materials that have been brought up to the surface of the ice, requiring a complex suite of processes to get them there. We propose that the seasonal ice cap forms an impermeable, translucent slab of CO2 ice that sublimates from the base, building up high-pressure gas beneath the slab. This gas levitates the ice, which eventually ruptures, producing high-velocity CO 2 vents that erupt sand-sized grains in jets to form the spots and erode the channels. These processes are unlike any observed on Earth. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  2. Characterization of CdMnTe films deposited from polycrystalline powder source using closed-space sublimation method

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Jianming; Wang, Junnan; Wang, Lin; Ji, Huanhuan; Xu, Run; Zhang, Jijun; Huang, Jian; Shen, Yue; Min, Jiahua; Wang, Linjun Xia, Yiben

    2015-09-15

    CdMnTe films were prepared on quartz substrates by closed-space sublimation of polycrystalline Cd{sub 0.74}Mn{sub 0.26}Te powders. This was performed at different substrate temperatures (T{sub s} = 200, 300, 350, and 400 °C). The interfacial adhesion strength between the films and substrates, when fabricated from polycrystalline powders, was greater than that of films grown using a bulk source. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the as-deposited films had a zinc blende structure with a preferential (111) orientation. Precipitation of Te occurred in the films deposited at T{sub s} = 200 °C, as confirmed using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. The growth mode and re-evaporation dependence on the value of T{sub s} of the films were investigated. Our results suggested that materials suitable for radiation detection can be grown from a powder source at lower substrate temperatures then when grown from a bulk source.

  3. Optical and electrical characterizations of highly efficient CdTe thin film solar cells prepared by close-spaced sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, T.; Yamada, A.; Konagai, M.

    2000-06-01

    The effects of the Cu diffusion on the optical and electrical properties of CdTe thin film solar cells prepared by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) were investigated by capacitance-voltage ( C- V) measurement and low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurement. C- V measurement revealed that the net acceptor concentration in the CdTe layer was independent of the heat treatment after screen printing of the Cu-doped graphite electrode for Cu diffusion into the CdTe layer, although it greatly affected the solar cell performance. Furthermore, the depth profile of PL spectrum of CdTe layer implies that the heat treatment for Cu diffusion facilitates the formation of low-resistance contact to CdTe through the formation of a heavily doped (p +) region in the CdTe adjacent to the back electrode, but Cu atoms do not act as effective acceptors in the CdTe layer except the region near the back electrode.

  4. Solid sulfur in vacuum: Sublimation effects on surface microtexture, color and spectral reflectance, and applications to planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    A form of sulfur that is white at room temperature and very fluffy in texture has been found in laboratory experiments on the effects of vacuum sublimation (evaporation) on solid sulfur. This work is an outgrowth of proton sputtering experiments on sulfur directed toward understanding Jovian magnetospheric effects on the surface of Io. Fluffy white sulfur is formed on the surface of solid yellow, tan, or brown sulfur melt freezes in vacuum by differential (fractional) evaporation of two or more sulfur molecular species present in the original sulfur; S(8) ring sulfur is thought to be the dominant sublimination phase lost to the vacuum sink, and polymeric chain sulfur S(u) the dominant residual phase that remains in place, forming the residual fluffy surface layer. The reflectance spectrum of the original sulfur surface is greaty modified by formation of the fluffy layer: the blue absorption band-edge and shoulder move 0.05 to 0.06 microns toward shorter wavelengths resulting in a permanent increase in reflectivity near 0.42 to 0.46 microns; the UV reflectivity below 0.40 microns is reduced. This form of sulfur should exist in large quantity on the surface of Io, especially in hotspot regions if there is solid free sulfur there that has solidified from a melt. Its color and spectra will indicate relative crystallization age on a scale of days to months and/or surface temperature distribution history.

  5. Plasma assisted growth of MoO3 films on different substrate locations relative to sublimation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rabindar K.; Saini, Sujit K.; Kumar, Prabhat; Singh, Megha; Reddy, G. B.

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, we reported the role of substrate locations relative to source on the growth of MoO3 films deposited on Ni coated glass substrates using plasma assisted sublimation process (PASP). According to the XRD and SEM results, substrate location is very crucial factor to control the morphology of MoO3 films and the best nanostructure growth (in terms of alignments and features) is obtained in case of Sample B (in which substrate is placed on source). The structural results point out that all films exhibit only orthorhombic phase of molybdenum oxide (i.e. α-MoO3)but the most preferential growth is recorded in Sample B due to the presence of intense peaks crossponding to only (0 k 0) family of crystal planes (k = 2, 4,6..). The Raman analysis again confirms the orthorhombic nature of MoO3 NFs and details of vibrational bondsin Sample B have been given in the present report. The MoO3 NFs show intense PL emission in wavelength range of 300-700 nm with three peaks located at 415, 490, and 523 nm in accordance to the improved crystallinity in Sample B.

  6. In-Space Propulsion Engine Architecture Based on Sublimation of Planetary Resources: From Exploration Robots to NED Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Mantovani, James G.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile solids occur naturally on most planetary bodies including the Moon, Mars, asteroids and comets. Examples of recent discoveries include water ice, frozen carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons. The ability to utilize readily available resources for in-space propulsion and for powering surface systems during a planetary mission will help minimize the overall cost and extend the op.erational life of a mission. The utilization of volatile solids to achieve these goals is attractive for its simplicity. We have investigated the potential of subliming in situ volatiles and silicate minerals to power propulsion engines for a wide range of in-space applications where environmental conditions are favorable. This paper addresses the' practicality of using planetary solid volatiles as a power source for propulsion and surface systems by presenting results of modeling involving thermodynamic and physical mechanics calculations, and laboratory testing to measure the thrust obtained from ,a volatile solid engine (VSE). Applications of a VSE for planetary exploration are discussed as a means for propulsion and for mechanical actuators and surface mobility platforms.

  7. A ROACH Based Data Acquisition System for the Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartez, Louis P.; Jenet, F.; Cohen, S.; Creighton, T. D.; Ford, A.; Garcia, A.; Hicks, B.; Hinojosa, J.; Kassim, N. E.; Longoria, C.; Lunsford, G.; Mata, A.; Miller, R. B.; Price, R. H.; Quintero, L.; Ray, P. S.; Reser, J.; Rivera, J.; Stovall, K.; Taylor, G. B.

    2013-01-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a distributed array of dipole antennas that are sensitive to radio frequencies from 5 to 88 MHz. The primary science goals will be the detection and study of low-frequency radio transients. LoFASM consists of antennas and front end electronics that were originally developed for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) by the U.S. Naval Research Lab, the University of New Mexico, Virginia Tech, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. LoFASM, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, will initially consist of 4 stations, each consisting of 12 dual-polarization dipole antenna stands. The signals received by LoFASM are digitized and processed using Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware (ROACH) boards. This poster will describe the LoFASM project with an emphasis on the ROACH data processing pipe-line.

  8. HiRISE observations of gas sublimation-driven activity in Mars' southern polar regions: III. Models of processes involving translucent ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Portyankina, G.; Markiewicz, W.J.; Thomas, N.; Hansen, C.J.; Milazzo, M.

    2010-01-01

    Enigmatic surface features, known as 'spiders', found at high southern martian latitudes, are probably caused by sublimation-driven erosion under the seasonal carbon dioxide ice cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) has imaged this terrain in unprecedented details throughout southern spring. It has been postulated [Kieffer, H.H., Titus, T.N., Mullins, K.F., Christensen, P.R., 2000. J. Geophys. Res. 105, 9653-9700] that translucent CO2 slab ice traps gas sublimating at the ice surface boundary. Wherever the pressure is released the escaping gas jet entrains loose surface material and carries it to the top of the ice where it is carried downslope and/or downwind and deposited in a fan shape. Here we model two stages of this scenario: first, the cleaning of CO2 slab ice from dust, and then, the breaking of the slab ice plate under the pressure built below it by subliming ice. Our modeling results and analysis of HiRISE images support the gas jet hypothesis and show that outbursts happen very early in spring. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A redetermination of the ice/vapor ratio of Enceladus’ plumes: Implications for sublimation and the lack of a liquid water reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieffer, Susan W.; Lu, Xinli; McFarquhar, Greg; Wohletz, Kenneth H.

    2009-09-01

    The discovery of plumes of H 2O vapor and ice particles erupting from the south pole of Enceladus, the tiny frigid satellite of Saturn, sparked controversy over whether these plumes are produced by boiling, or by sublimation with subsequent recondensation of the sublimated vapor [Porco, C.C., Helfenstein, P., Thomas, P.C., Ingersoll, A.P., Wisdom, J., West, R., Neukum, G., Denk, T., Wagner, R., Roatsch, T., Kieffer, S., Turtle, E., McEwen, A., Johnson, T.V., Rathbun, J., Veverka, J., Wilson, D., Perry, J., Spitale, J., Brahic, A., Burns, J.A., DelGenio, A.D., Dones, L., Murray, C.D., Squyres, S., 2006. Science 311, 1393-1401]. Porco et al.'s analysis that the masses of ice (I) and vapor (V) in the plume were comparable was taken to argue against the occurrence of sublimation and recondensation, leading to the hypothesis that the reservoir was boiling water, possibly as close as 7 m to the surface. Thus, it has been advocated that Enceladus should be a target for astrobiology exploration. Here we show, with recalculations using the original data and methodologies, as well as with new sensitivity studies, that the mass of ice in the column is significantly less than the mass of water vapor, and that by considering three additional effects, I/V is likely to be <0.2-0.1. This means that the plume is dominated by vapor that the thermodynamics permits to be easily produced by sublimation with recondensation. The low I/V ratio provides no compelling criterion for consideration of a liquid water reservoir. The uncertainties on the I/V ratio have not previously been discussed in the literature. Although the I/V ratio is sensitive to particle sizes and size distributions, the masses of ice (I) and vapor (V) are not comparable in any scenario constrained by available observations. We thus discuss the implications of sublimation from a thermodynamic point of view in a context that has not been presented previously. Constraints on I/V ratio from future spacecraft measurements

  10. An Enhanced Vapor Transport and Sublimation Model using 10+ Years of Field Measurements of Earth's Oldest Ground Ice in Beacon Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Sletten, R. S.; Hagedorn, B.; Stone, J. O.; Hallet, B.; McKay, C. P.

    2011-12-01

    Ground ice in the Antarctic Dry Valleys is fundamentally important as a reservoir of water, proxy for climatic information, and a major component of the periglacial landscape. It is also one of Earth's closest analog for widespread, near-surface ice found in Martian soils. While the exact antiquity of the ground ice at Beacon Valley is still under discussion, considerable evidence suggests that it is the oldest known ice on Earth. Why this ice can persist for so long is still unclear since models based solely on water vapor fluxes predict drying of the soil to depths of several meters within only a few thousand years; however, ice persists in the ground at depths of only a few decimeters. Other independent data of a profile of cosmogenic isotopes of 10Be in the ice and quartz grains within the ice indicates that, on time scales of ~105 years or more, ice sublimates much more slowly. The interest in determining the age of relict ice in Beacon Valley, Antarctica, as well as the discrepancy between theoretical modeled and field sample-based ground ice sublimation rates are bringing renewed attention to this ice. Here we present an enhanced model of water vapor diffusion and corresponding sublimation using detailed climate and soil temperature data from 1999 to 2011 in Beacon Valley, where the massive ground ice is found as close as ~0.30 m below the surface. This is the first model to incorporate the effect of snow cover and snow melt on the soil vapor pressure that is based on actual field measurements using a camera and electrical conductivity probes. It suggests that water vapor condenses in the upper dry soil during the winter but is completely lost to the atmosphere during the austral summer. Episodic snowmelt events and snow cover in the summer temporarily reverses the vapor transport and reduces the annual ice loss. These episodic events slow down the sublimation rates by one-third; this effect is likely to be extended due to persistence of water in the top

  11. TriLoNet: Piecing Together Small Networks to Reconstruct Reticulate Evolutionary Histories.

    PubMed

    Oldman, James; Wu, Taoyang; van Iersel, Leo; Moulton, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Phylogenetic networks are a generalization of evolutionary trees that can be used to represent reticulate processes such as hybridization and recombination. Here, we introduce a new approach called TriLoNet (Trinet Level- one Network algorithm) to construct such networks directly from sequence alignments which works by piecing together smaller phylogenetic networks. More specifically, using a bottom up approach similar to Neighbor-Joining, TriLoNet constructs level-1 networks (networks that are somewhat more general than trees) from smaller level-1 networks on three taxa. In simulations, we show that TriLoNet compares well with Lev1athan, a method for reconstructing level-1 networks from three-leaved trees. In particular, in simulations we find that Lev1athan tends to generate networks that overestimate the number of reticulate events as compared with those generated by TriLoNet. We also illustrate TriLoNet's applicability using simulated and real sequence data involving recombination, demonstrating that it has the potential to reconstruct informative reticulate evolutionary histories. TriLoNet has been implemented in JAVA and is freely available at https://www.uea.ac.uk/computing/TriLoNet. PMID:27189565

  12. Contrast Invariant Interest Point Detection by Zero-Norm LoG Filter.

    PubMed

    Zhenwei Miao; Xudong Jiang; Kim-Hui Yap

    2016-01-01

    The Laplacian of Gaussian (LoG) filter is widely used in interest point detection. However, low-contrast image structures, though stable and significant, are often submerged by the high-contrast ones in the response image of the LoG filter, and hence are difficult to be detected. To solve this problem, we derive a generalized LoG filter, and propose a zero-norm LoG filter. The response of the zero-norm LoG filter is proportional to the weighted number of bright/dark pixels in a local region, which makes this filter be invariant to the image contrast. Based on the zero-norm LoG filter, we develop an interest point detector to extract local structures from images. Compared with the contrast dependent detectors, such as the popular scale invariant feature transform detector, the proposed detector is robust to illumination changes and abrupt variations of images. Experiments on benchmark databases demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed zero-norm LoG detector in terms of the repeatability and matching score of the detected points as well as the image recognition rate under different conditions. PMID:26302514

  13. LoCoH: Non-parameteric kernel methods for constructing home ranges and utilization distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Getz, Wayne M.; Fortmann-Roe, Scott; Cross, Paul C.; Lyons, Andrew J.; Ryan, Sadie J.; Wilmers, Christopher C.

    2007-01-01

    Parametric kernel methods currently dominate the literature regarding the construction of animal home ranges (HRs) and utilization distributions (UDs). These methods frequently fail to capture the kinds of hard boundaries common to many natural systems. Recently a local convex hull (LoCoH) nonparametric kernel method, which generalizes the minimum convex polygon (MCP) method, was shown to be more appropriate than parametric kernel methods for constructing HRs and UDs, because of its ability to identify hard boundaries (e.g., rivers, cliff edges) and convergence to the true distribution as sample size increases. Here we extend the LoCoH in two ways: ‘‘fixed sphere-of-influence,’’ or r -LoCoH (kernels constructed from all points within a fixed radius r of each reference point), and an ‘‘adaptive sphere-of-influence,’’ or a -LoCoH (kernels constructed from all points within a radius a such that the distances of all points within the radius to the reference point sum to a value less than or equal to a ), and compare them to the original ‘‘fixed-number-of-points,’’ or k -LoCoH (all kernels constructed from k -1 nearest neighbors of root points). We also compare these nonparametric LoCoH to parametric kernel methods using manufactured data and data collected from GPS collars on African buffalo in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Our results demonstrate that LoCoH methods are superior to parametric kernel methods in estimating areas used by animals, excluding unused areas (holes) and, generally, in constructing UDs and HRs arising from the movement of animals influenced by hard boundaries and irregular structures (e.g., rocky outcrops). We also demonstrate that a -LoCoH is generally superior to k - and r -LoCoH (with software for all three methods available at http://locoh.cnr.berkeley.edu).

  14. LoCoH: Nonparameteric Kernel Methods for Constructing Home Ranges and Utilization Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Wayne M.; Fortmann-Roe, Scott; Wilmers, Christopher C.

    2007-01-01

    Parametric kernel methods currently dominate the literature regarding the construction of animal home ranges (HRs) and utilization distributions (UDs). These methods frequently fail to capture the kinds of hard boundaries common to many natural systems. Recently a local convex hull (LoCoH) nonparametric kernel method, which generalizes the minimum convex polygon (MCP) method, was shown to be more appropriate than parametric kernel methods for constructing HRs and UDs, because of its ability to identify hard boundaries (e.g., rivers, cliff edges) and convergence to the true distribution as sample size increases. Here we extend the LoCoH in two ways: “fixed sphere-of-influence,” or r-LoCoH (kernels constructed from all points within a fixed radius r of each reference point), and an “adaptive sphere-of-influence,” or a-LoCoH (kernels constructed from all points within a radius a such that the distances of all points within the radius to the reference point sum to a value less than or equal to a), and compare them to the original “fixed-number-of-points,” or k-LoCoH (all kernels constructed from k-1 nearest neighbors of root points). We also compare these nonparametric LoCoH to parametric kernel methods using manufactured data and data collected from GPS collars on African buffalo in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Our results demonstrate that LoCoH methods are superior to parametric kernel methods in estimating areas used by animals, excluding unused areas (holes) and, generally, in constructing UDs and HRs arising from the movement of animals influenced by hard boundaries and irregular structures (e.g., rocky outcrops). We also demonstrate that a-LoCoH is generally superior to k- and r-LoCoH (with software for all three methods available at http://locoh.cnr.berkeley.edu). PMID:17299587

  15. Cadmium sulfide thin films deposited by close spaced sublimation and cadmium sulfide/cadmium telluride solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinskiy, Dmitriy Nikolaevich

    1998-12-01

    One of the applications of CdS films is as a window layer in CdTe and Cu(In,Ga)Sesb2 solar cells. The study of the optical and structural properties of CdS films deposited by close spaced sublimation as well as their influence on CdS/CdTe solar cell performance is part of the CdTe solar cell program at the University of South Florida. CdS films have been deposited by the close-spaced sublimation technique. The influence of the main process parameters, the substrate and source temperatures, and the ambient in the deposition chamber has been investigated. As-deposited films have been subjected to heat treatments in Hsb2 ambient, in CdClsb2 atmosphere, and in atmosphere with small amounts of oxygen. A special annealing chamber was built to carry out the annealing experiments in the presence of CdClsb2 vapor and oxygen. Several CSS chambers were assembled to study the influence of various process parameters simultaneously and validate the results. Results of scanning electron microscopy and photoluminescence measurements have been used as the primary characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, and transmission measurements have also been carried out. It was found that as deposited CdS films have a hexagonal structure independent of the process parameters used. The presence of a CdO phase was detected in the samples grown with the highest oxygen concentration in the ambient. The resistivity of CdS films is controlled by intergrain barriers. Photoluminescence measurements showed the presence of oxygen-acceptor transition and a wide variation in the intensity of deep emission bands. The variation in the intensities was correlated with the variation in the deposition and annealing conditions. However, no correlation was found between the PL intensities of defect bands and cell performance. CdS/CdTe junctions have been fabricated using standard deposition and postgrowth techniques developed in the USF solar cells laboratory. All cells have

  16. Higgs boson gluon-fusion production beyond threshold in N3LO QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; Furlan, Elisabetta; Gehrmann, Thomas; Herzog, Franz; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2015-03-18

    In this study, we compute the gluon fusion Higgs boson cross-section at N3LO through the second term in the threshold expansion. This calculation constitutes a major milestone towards the full N3LO cross section. Our result has the best formal accuracy in the threshold expansion currently available, and includes contributions from collinear regions besides subleading corrections from soft and hard regions, as well as certain logarithmically enhanced contributions for general kinematics. We use our results to perform a critical appraisal of the validity of the threshold approximation at N3LO in perturbative QCD.

  17. Development of HiLo Microscope and its use in In-Vivo Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Shreyas J.

    The functionality of achieving optical sectioning in biomedical research is invaluable as it allows for visualization of a biological sample at different depths while being free of background scattering. Most current microscopy techniques that offer optical sectioning, unfortunately, require complex instrumentation and thus are generally costly. HiLo microscopy, on the other hand, offers the same functionality and advantage at a relatively low cost. Hence, the work described in this thesis involves the design, build, and application of a HiLo microscope. More specifically, a standalone HiLo microscope was built in addition to implementing HiLo microscopy on a standard fluorescence microscope. In HiLo microscopy, optical sectioning is achieved by acquiring two different types of images per focal plane. One image is acquired under uniform illumination and the other is acquired under speckle illumination. These images are processed using an algorithm that extracts in-focus information and removes features and glare that occur as a result of background fluorescence. To show the benefits of the HiLo microscopy, several imaging experiments on various samples were performed under a HiLo microscope and compared against a traditional fluorescence microscope and a confocal microscope, which is considered the gold standard in optical imaging. In-vitro and ex-vivo imaging was performed on a set of pollen grains, and optically cleared mouse brain and heart slices. Each of these experiments showed great reduction in background scattering at different depths under HiLo microscopy. More importantly, HiLo imaging of optically cleared heart slice demonstrated emergence of different vasculature at different depths. Reduction of out-of-focus light increased the spatial resolution and allowed better visualization of capillary vessels. Furthermore, HiLo imaging was tested in an in-vivo model of a rodent dorsal window chamber model. When imaging the same sample under confocal microscope

  18. Effect of Propellant Flowrate and Purity on Carbon Deposition in LO2/Methane Gas Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossard, J. A.; Burkhardt, W. M.; Niiya, K. Y.; Braam, F.

    1989-01-01

    The generation and deposition of carbon was studied in the Carbon Deposition Program using subscale hardware with LO2/Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) and LO2/Methane propellants at low mixture ratios. The purpose of the testing was to evaluate the effect of methane purity and full scale injection density on carbon deposition. The LO2/LNG gas generator/preburner testing was performed at mixture ratios between 0.24 and 0.58 and chamber pressures from 5.8 to 9.4 MPa (840 to 1370 psia). A total of seven 200 second duration tests were performed. The LNG testing occurred at low injection densities, similar to the previous LO2/RP-1, LO2/propane, and LO2/methane testing performed on the carbon deposition program. The current LO2/methane test series occurred at an injection density factor of approximately 10 times higher than the previous testing. The high injection density LO2/methane testing was performed at mixture ratios between from 0.23 to 0.81 and chamber pressures from 6.4 to 15.2 MPa (925 to 2210 psia). A total of nine high injection density tests were performed. The testing performed demonstrated that low purity methane (LNG) did not produce any detectable change in carbon deposition when compared to pure methane. In addition, the C* performance and the combustion gas temperatures measured were similar to those obtained for pure methane. Similar results were obtained testing pure methane at higher propellant injection densities with coarse injector elements.

  19. Measurement Properties of the Low Back Activity Confidence Scale (LoBACS).

    PubMed

    Davenport, Todd E; Cleland, Joshua A; Yamada, Kimiko A; Kulig, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the measurement properties of the Low Back Activity Confidence Scale (LoBACS) in individuals with post-acute low back pain (LBP) receiving nonsurgical intervention, including construct validity, factorial validity, and internal consistency reliability. Data were analyzed from an existing randomized clinical trial involving 112 patients with LBP. Evidence for convergent validity was observed through significant correlations between LoBACS subscale scores and other function, pain, and psychobehavioral measures. LoBACS subscales accounted for 36% of the unique variance in dependent variable measurements, suggesting a satisfactory level of statistical divergence between the LoBACS and other psychobehavioral measurements in this study. Cronbach's α ranged from .88 to .92 for LoBACS subscales, and item-total correlations exceeded .6, indicating high internal consistency reliability. Principal axis factoring confirmed the hypothesized three-subscale structure by correctly classifying 14 of the 15 items. These findings indicate the LoBACS is valid and internally consistent to measure domain-specific self-efficacy beliefs. PMID:24686745

  20. Sublimation of icy aggregates in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko detected with the OSIRIS cameras onboard Rosetta.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gicquel, A.; Vincent, J.-B.; Agarwal, J.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Bertini, I.; Bodewits, D.; Sierks, H.; Lin, Z.-Y.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P. L.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; Keller, H. U.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Besse, S.; Cremonese, G.; Da Deppo, V.; Davidsson, B.; Debei, S.; Deller, J.; De Cecco, M.; Frattin, E.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Fornasier, S.; Fulle, M.; Groussin, O.; Gutiérrez, P. J.; Gutiérrez-Marquez, P.; Güttler, C.; Höfner, S.; Hofmann, M.; Hu, X.; Hviid, S. F.; Ip, W.-H.; Jorda, L.; Knollenberg, J.; Kovacs, G.; Kramm, J.-R.; Kührt, E.; Küppers, M.; Lara, L. M.; Lazzarin, M.; Moreno, J. J. Lopez; Lowry, S.; Marzari, F.; Masoumzadeh, N.; Massironi, M.; Moreno, F.; Mottola, S.; Naletto, G.; Oklay, N.; Pajola, M.; Pommerol, A.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Shi, X.; Thomas, N.; Toth, I.; Tubiana, C.

    2016-08-01

    Beginning in March 2014, the OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) cameras began capturing images of the nucleus and coma (gas and dust) of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko using both the wide angle camera (WAC) and the narrow angle camera (NAC). The many observations taken since July of 2014 have been used to study the morphology, location, and temporal variation of the comet's dust jets. We analyzed the dust monitoring observations shortly after the southern vernal equinox on May 30 and 31, 2015 with the WAC at the heliocentric distance R_h = 1.53 AU, where it is possible to observe that the jet rotates with the nucleus. We found that the decline of brightness as a function of the distance of the jet is much steeper than the background coma, which is a first indication of sublimation. We adapted a model of sublimation of icy aggregates and studied the effect as a function of the physical properties of the aggregates (composition and size). The major finding of this article was that through the sublimation of the aggregates of dirty grains (radius a between 5μm and 50μm) we were able to completely reproduce the radial brightness profile of a jet beyond 4 km from the nucleus. To reproduce the data we needed to inject a number of aggregates between 8.5 × 1013 and 8.5 × 1010 for a = 5μm and 50μm respectively, or an initial mass of H_2O ice around 22kg.

  1. An examination of the thermodynamics of fusion, vaporization, and sublimation of (R,S)- and (R)-flurbiprofen by correlation gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Umnahanant, Patamaporn; Hasty, Darrell; Chickos, James

    2012-06-01

    The vaporization, fusion, and sublimation enthalpies of (R,S)- and (R)-flurbiprofen at T = 298.15 K are reported and compared with literature values when available. Correlation gas chromatography experiments were first performed to identify appropriate standards that could be used for materials containing a single fluorine substituent. Subsequent correlations resulted in a vaporization enthalpy for (R,S)-flurbiprofen and (R)-flurbiprofen, ΔH(vap) (298.15 K), of (127.5 ± 5.5) and (127.4 ± 4.7) kJ mol, respectively. Fusion enthalpies, ΔH(fus) (387 K), of (28.2 ± and, ΔH(fus) (381 K), (22.8 ± kJ mol(-1) were also measured by differential scanning calorimetry for the racemic and chiral forms of flurbiprofen. Adjusted to T = 298.15 K and combined with the vaporization enthalpy resulted in sublimation enthalpies, ΔH(sub) (298.15 K), of (155.6 ± 5.8) and (145.1 ± 5.7) kJ mol(-1) for (R,S)- and (R)-flurbiprofen, respectively. The fusion enthalpy measured for the racemic form was in excellent agreement with the literature value, while the sublimation enthalpy varies substantially from previous work. Two weak solid-solid phase transitions were also observed for (R)-flurbiprofen at T = 353.9 K (0.30 ± 0.1) and 363.2 K (0.21 ± 0.03) kJ · mol(-1). PMID:22411450

  2. First-order feasibility analysis of a space suit radiator concept based on estimation of water mass sublimation using Apollo mission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metts, Jonathan G.; Klaus, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal control of a space suit during extravehicular activity (EVA) is typically accomplished by sublimating water to provide system cooling. Spacecraft, on the other hand, primarily rely on radiators to dissipate heat. Integrating a radiator into a space suit has been proposed as an alternative design that does not require mass consumption for heat transfer. While providing cooling without water loss offers potential benefits for EVA application, it is not currently practical to rely on a directional, fixed-emissivity radiator to maintain thermal equilibrium of a spacesuit where the radiator orientation, environmental temperature, and crew member metabolic heat load fluctuate unpredictably. One approach that might make this feasible, however, is the use of electrochromic devices that are capable of infrared emissivity modulation and can be actively controlled across the entire suit surface to regulate net heat flux for the system. Integrating these devices onto the irregular, compliant space suit material requires that they be fabricated on a flexible substrate, such as Kapton film. An initial assessment of whether or not this candidate technology presents a feasible design option was conducted by first characterizing the mass of water loss from sublimation that could theoretically be saved if an electrochromic suit radiator was employed for thermal control. This is particularly important for lunar surface exploration, where the expense of transporting water from Earth is excessive, but the technology is potentially beneficial for other space missions as well. In order to define a baseline for this analysis by comparison to actual data, historical documents from the Apollo missions were mined for comprehensive, detailed metabolic data from each lunar surface outing, and related data from NASA's more recent "Advanced Lunar Walkback" tests were also analyzed. This metabolic database was then used to validate estimates for sublimator water consumption during surface

  3. Deep analysis of Raman spectra of ZnO:Mo and ZnO:In sprayed thin films along with LO and TA+LO bands investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souissi, A.; Amlouk, M.; Khemakhem, H.; Guermazi, S.

    2016-04-01

    ZnO and Mo, In doped ZnO thin films with the molar ratios (Mo/Zn) and (In/Zn) were dosed at 1%, 2% and 3%, respectively. These films were deposited on amorphous SiO2 substrate at 460 °C by the spray-pyrolysis process. A useful and concise reminder of the spatial resolutions of Raman spectroscopy was presented. The vibrational responses of these films at high doping exhibited strong fluctuations that were resolved by successive digital processing, choice of the optimal profile of the baseline, suppression of fluorescence and/or photoluminescence, and noise reduction. These treated spectra have allowed to identify possible multi-modes in highly doped studied samples and revealed the presence of LO and TA+LO broad bands, whose second was at cascade and could be explored in optoelectronic and sensitive systems.

  4. A close-space sublimation driven pathway for the manipulation of substrate-supported micro- and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Aarthi

    gold beneath the grid selectively attaches to it due to the surface energy gradient which drives gold from the low surface energy oxide surface to the higher surface energy nickel mesh. With this process being confined to areas adjacent to and in contact with the grid surface the film ruptures at well-defined locations to form isolated islands of gold and subsequently, a periodic array of microstructures. The process can be carried out on substrates of different crystallographic orientations leading to nanostructures which are formed epitaxially and have orientations based on underlying substrate orientations. The process can be extended by placing a metallic foil of Pt or Ni over preformed templates, in which case a reduction in the size of the initial structures is observed. Placing a foil on structures with random placement and a wide size distribution results, not only in a size reduction, but also a narrowed size distribution. Additive processes are carried out by using materials which possess high vapor pressures much below the sublimation temperature of the template materials. In this case a germanium substrate was used as a source of germanium adatoms while gold or silver nanostructures were used as heterogeneous nucleation sites. At elevated temperatures the adatoms collect in sufficient quantities to transform each site into a liquid alloy which, upon cooling, phase separates into elemental components sharing a common interface and, hence, resulting in the formation of heterodimers and hollowed metal nanocrescents upon etching away the Ge. A process which combined aspects of the additive and subtractive process was carried out by using a metallic foil with a high vapor pressure and higher surface energy than the substrate surface (in this case Pd foil). This process resulted in the initial preformed gold templates being annihilated and replaced by nanostructures of palladium, thereby altering their chemical composition. The assembly process relies on the

  5. Laminarin-induced apoptosis in human colon cancer LoVo cells

    PubMed Central

    JI, CHEN-FENG; JI, YU-BIN

    2014-01-01

    A number of scientific studies have revealed that laminarin has antitumor effects. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the apoptosis of LoVo cells and the underlying mechanisms induced by laminarin. LoVo cells were treated with various concentrations of laminarin and fluorescence-inverted microscopy was used to observe the morphology of LoVo cells treated with laminarin. In addition, western blotting was performed to analyze the expression levels of death receptor (DR)4, DR5, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD), caspase-8, caspase-3, Bid and tBid. Flow cytometry was conducted to analyze the expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax, and spectrophotometry was performed to quantify the activity of caspases-8, -3, -6 and -7. Following the treatment of LoVo cells with laminarin for 24 h, the expression levels of DR4, DR5, TRAIL, FADD, Bid, tBid and Bax were observed to be upregulated, whereas the expression levels of pro-caspase-8, pro-caspase-3 and Bcl-2 were downregulated. In addition, the activities of casapse-8, -3, -6 and -7 were observed to increase, which was a significant difference when compared with those of the control group. Therefore, laminarin is considered to induce the apoptosis of LoVo cells, which may occur via a DR pathway, suggesting that laminarin may be a potent agent for cancer treatment. PMID:24765209

  6. Kinetic description of an electron--LO-phonon system with finite phonon lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, V.T.; Mahler, G. )

    1992-02-15

    We study the cooling of an electron plasma from a kinetic point of view. For this purpose, a quantum theory of fluctuations is applied to derive the kinetic equations for an electron--LO-phonon system from various model Hamiltonians. A polarization approximation is provided that goes beyond perturbation theory of the electron-phonon interaction. The description of electron-phonon energy exchange is shown to be impossible with the interacting Hamiltonian in Froehlich's one-phonon form unless dissipation of the bare LO phonon is included. For a Hamiltonian including effects of the scattering of LO phonons by acoustic phonons, kinetic equations are derived. The equation for LO phonons is shown to describe the collective excitations with finite lifetime, in the limiting case of weak damping of the plasmon-phonon coupled modes. A reduction of the cooling rate similar to the hot-phonon'' effect is shown to occur for the case of weak coupling without assuming a steady state of the LO phonons. Finally, an electron-phonon interaction Hamiltonian in two-phonon form is considered and it is shown that electron-phonon energy exchange may be described in the polarization approximation without introducing a finite phonon lifetime.

  7. Selenoprotein X Gene Knockdown Aggravated H2O2-Induced Apoptosis in Liver LO2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiayong; Cao, Lei; Li, Qiang; Wang, Longqiong; Jia, Gang; Liu, Guangmang; Chen, Xiaoling; Cai, Jingyi; Shang, Haiying; Zhao, Hua

    2016-09-01

    To determine the roles of selenoprotein X gene (Selx) in protecting liver cells against oxidative damage, the influences of Selx knockdown on H2O2-induced apoptosis in human normal hepatocyte (LO2) cells were studied. pSilencer 3.1 was used to develop knockdown vector targeting the 3'-UTR of human Selx. The Selx knockdown and control cells were further exposed to H2O2, and cell viability, cell apoptosis rate, and the expression levels of mRNA and protein of apoptosis-related genes were detected. The results showed that vector targeting the 3'-UTR of Selx successfully silenced mRNA or protein expression of SelX in LO2 cells. Selx knockdown resulted in decreased cell viability, increased percentage of early apoptotic cells, decreased Bcl2A1 and Bcl-2 expression, and increased phosphorylation of P38 in LO2 cells. When Selx knockdown LO2 cells were exposed to H2O2, characteristics of H2O2-induced cell dysfunctions were further exacerbated. Taken together, our findings suggested that SelX played important roles in protecting LO2 cells against oxidative damage and reducing H2O2-induced apoptosis in liver cells. PMID:26899321

  8. Optically sectioned in vivo imaging with speckle illumination HiLo microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Daryl; Ford, Tim N.; Chu, Kengyeh K.; Mertz, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple wide-field imaging technique, called HiLo microscopy, that is capable of producing optically sectioned images in real time, comparable in quality to confocal laser scanning microscopy. The technique is based on the fusion of two raw images, one acquired with speckle illumination and another with standard uniform illumination. The fusion can be numerically adjusted, using a single parameter, to produce optically sectioned images of varying thicknesses with the same raw data. Direct comparison between our HiLo microscope and a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope is made on the basis of sectioning strength and imaging performance. Specifically, we show that HiLo and confocal 3-D imaging of a GFP-labeled mouse brain hippocampus are comparable in quality. Moreover, HiLo microscopy is capable of faster, near video rate imaging over larger fields of view than attainable with standard confocal microscopes. The goal of this paper is to advertise the simplicity, robustness, and versatility of HiLo microscopy, which we highlight with in vivo imaging of common model organisms including planaria, C. elegans, and zebrafish.

  9. Optically sectioned in vivo imaging with speckle illumination HiLo microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Daryl; Ford, Tim N; Chu, Kengyeh K; Mertz, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple wide-field imaging technique, called HiLo microscopy, that is capable of producing optically sectioned images in real time, comparable in quality to confocal laser scanning microscopy. The technique is based on the fusion of two raw images, one acquired with speckle illumination and another with standard uniform illumination. The fusion can be numerically adjusted, using a single parameter, to produce optically sectioned images of varying thicknesses with the same raw data. Direct comparison between our HiLo microscope and a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope is made on the basis of sectioning strength and imaging performance. Specifically, we show that HiLo and confocal 3-D imaging of a GFP-labeled mouse brain hippocampus are comparable in quality. Moreover, HiLo microscopy is capable of faster, near video rate imaging over larger fields of view than attainable with standard confocal microscopes. The goal of this paper is to advertise the simplicity, robustness, and versatility of HiLo microscopy, which we highlight with in vivo imaging of common model organisms including planaria, C. elegans, and zebrafish. PMID:21280920

  10. A Study of LoRa: Long Range & Low Power Networks for the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Aloÿs; Yi, Jiazi; Clausen, Thomas; Townsley, William Mark

    2016-01-01

    LoRa is a long-range, low-power, low-bitrate, wireless telecommunications system, promoted as an infrastructure solution for the Internet of Things: end-devices use LoRa across a single wireless hop to communicate to gateway(s), connected to the Internet and which act as transparent bridges and relay messages between these end-devices and a central network server. This paper provides an overview of LoRa and an in-depth analysis of its functional components. The physical and data link layer performance is evaluated by field tests and simulations. Based on the analysis and evaluations, some possible solutions for performance enhancements are proposed. PMID:27618064

  11. Implementation and Evaluation of the Enhanced Header Compression (IPHC) for 6LoWPAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludovici, Alessandro; Calveras, Anna; Catalan, Marisa; Gómez, Carles; Paradells, Josep

    6LoWPAN defines how to carry IPv6 packets over IEEE 802.15.4 low power wireless or sensor networks. Limited bandwidth, memory and energy resources require a careful application of IPv6 in a LoWPAN. The IEEE 802.15.4 standard defines a maximum frame size of 127 bytes that decreases to 102 bytes considering the header overhead. A further reduction is due to the security, network and transport protocols header overhead that, in case of IPv6 and UDP, leave only 33 bytes for application data. A compression algorithm is necessary in order to reduce the overhead and save space in data payload. This paper describes and compares the proposed IPv6 header compression mechanisms for 6LoWPAN environments.

  12. Improving high resolution retinal image quality using speckle illumination HiLo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Metha, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Retinal image quality from flood illumination adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopes is adversely affected by out-of-focus light scatter due to the lack of confocality. This effect is more pronounced in small eyes, such as that of rodents, because the requisite high optical power confers a large dioptric thickness to the retina. A recently-developed structured illumination microscopy (SIM) technique called HiLo imaging has been shown to reduce the effect of out-of-focus light scatter in flood illumination microscopes and produce pseudo-confocal images with significantly improved image quality. In this work, we adopted the HiLo technique to a flood AO ophthalmoscope and performed AO imaging in both (physical) model and live rat eyes. The improvement in image quality from HiLo imaging is shown both qualitatively and quantitatively by using spatial spectral analysis. PMID:25136486

  13. FLOYDS Classification of ASASSN-14lo as a Type Ia Supernova Near Peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcavi, Iair; Sand, David; McCully, Curtis; Valenti, Stefano; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Howell, D. Andrew

    2014-12-01

    We obtained a spectrum of ASASSN-14lo (ATel #6794) on 2014 December 10 (UT) with the robotic FLOYDS instrument mounted on the Faulkes Telescope North. Using Superfit (Howell et al. 2005, ApJ 634, 1190) we find a good fit to the Type Ia SN 1996X around peak at the redshift of the proposed host galaxy (z=0.01993; NED).

  14. Structural Validity of the Professional Development Profile of the LoTi Digital-Age Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Vandhana; Hull, Darrell M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was used to examine the structural construct validity of the Professional Development Profile of the LoTi Digital-Age Survey, a measure of teacher instructional practices with technology in the classroom. Teacher responses ("N" = 2,840) from across the United States were used to assess factor structure of the instrument using…

  15. Registration of WCL-LO4-Gail lesquerella with improved harvest index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    WCL-LO4-Gail lesquerella (Physaria fendleri L.) germplasm line was publicly released jointly by the USDA, Agricultural Research Service and the University of Arizona, in 2012 as part of the new crops breeding program. The germplasm was developed by mass selection originating from lesquerella germpl...

  16. Ka-im's Gift: A St:lo Legend (with Commentary by the Author).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Ethel B.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a modern retelling of a St:lo (Coast Salish) legend about the origin of a tribal treasure, the wondrous Sxwaixwe mask. Discusses the legend's origins, the process of transforming essentially oral sources into an accessible contemporary form, and the educational value of storytelling. Contains 13 references. (SV)

  17. Numerical Investigation of LO2 and LCH4 Storage Tanks on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moder, Jeff; Barsi, Stephen; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    Currently NASA is developing technologies to enable human exploration of the lunar surface for duration of up to 210 days. While trade studies are still underway, a cryogenic ascent stage using liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid methane (LCH4) is being considered for the Altair lunar lander. For a representative Altair cryogenic ascent stage, we present a detailed storage analysis of the LO2 and LCH4 propellant tanks on the lunar surface for durations of up to 210 days. Both the LO2 and LCH4 propellant tanks are assumed to be pressurized with gaseous helium at launch. A two-phase lumped-vapor computational fluid dynamics model has been developed to account for the presence of a noncondensable gas in the ullage. The CFD model is used to simulate the initial pressure response of the propellant tanks while they are subjected to representative heat leak rates on the lunar surface. Once a near stationary state is achieved within the liquid phase, multizone model is used to extrapolate the solution farther in time. For fixed propellant mass and tank size, the long-term pressure response for different helium mass fractions in both the LO2 and LCH4 tanks is examined.

  18. A Simultaneous Discovery: The Case of Johannes Stark and Antonino Lo Surdo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Matteo; Paoletti, Alessandro; Robotti, Nadia

    2004-09-01

    In 1913 the German physicist Johannes Stark (1874 1957) and the Italian physicist Antonino Lo Surdo (1880 1949)discovered virtually simultaneously and independently that hydrogen spectral lines are split into components by an external electric field. Both of their discoveries ensued from studies on the same phenomenon, the Doppler effect in canal rays, but they arose in different theoretical contexts. Stark had been working within the context of the emerging quantum theory, following a research program aimed at studying the effect of an electric field on spectral lines. Lo Surdo had been working within the context of the classical theory, and his was an accidental discovery. Both discoveries, however, played important roles in the history of physics: Stark’s discovery contributed to the establishment of both the old and the new quantum theories; Lo Surdo’s discovery led Antonio Garbasso (1871 1933)to introduce research on the quantum theory into Italian physics. Ironically, soon after their discoveries, both Stark and Lo Surdo rejected developments in modern physics and allied themselves with the political and racial programs of Hitler and Mussolini.

  19. Forwarding techniques for IP fragmented packets in a real 6LoWPAN network.

    PubMed

    Ludovici, Alessandro; Calveras, Anna; Casademont, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are attracting more and more interest since they offer a low-cost solution to the problem of providing a means to deploy large sensor networks in a number of application domains. We believe that a crucial aspect to facilitate WSN diffusion is to make them interoperable with external IP networks. This can be achieved by using the 6LoWPAN protocol stack. 6LoWPAN enables the transmission of IPv6 packets over WSNs based on the IEEE 802.15.4 standard. IPv6 packet size is considerably larger than that of IEEE 802.15.4 data frame. To overcome this problem, 6LoWPAN introduces an adaptation layer between the network and data link layers, allowing IPv6 packets to be adapted to the lower layer constraints. This adaptation layer provides fragmentation and header compression of IP packets. Furthermore, it also can be involved in routing decisions. Depending on which layer is responsible for routing decisions, 6LoWPAN divides routing in two categories: mesh under if the layer concerned is the adaptation layer and route over if it is the network layer. In this paper we analyze different routing solutions (route over, mesh under and enhanced route over) focusing on how they forward fragments. We evaluate their performance in terms of latency and energy consumption when transmitting IP fragmented packets. All the tests have been performed in a real 6LoWPAN implementation. After consideration of the main problems in forwarding of mesh frames in WSN, we propose and analyze a new alternative scheme based on mesh under, which we call controlled mesh under. PMID:22346615

  20. Phase Transition Enthalpy Measurements of Organic and Organometallic Compounds. Sublimation, Vaporization and Fusion Enthalpies From 1880 to 2015. Part 1. C1 - C10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acree, William; Chickos, James S.

    2016-09-01

    A compendium of phase change enthalpies published in 2010 is updated to include the period 1880-2015. Phase change enthalpies including fusion, vaporization, and sublimation enthalpies are included for organic, organometallic, and a few inorganic compounds. Part 1 of this compendium includes organic compounds from C1 to C10. Part 2 of this compendium, to be published separately, will include organic and organometallic compounds from C11 to C192. Sufficient data are presently available to permit thermodynamic cycles to be constructed as an independent means of evaluating the reliability of the data. Temperature adjustments of phase change enthalpies from the temperature of measurement to the standard reference temperature, T = 298.15 K, and a protocol for doing so are briefly discussed.

  1. Enhanced performance of CdS/CdTe thin-film devices through temperature profiling techniques applied to close-spaced sublimation deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaonan Li; Sheldon, P.; Moutinho, H.; Matson, R.

    1996-05-01

    The authors describe a methodology developed and applied to the close-spaced sublimation technique for thin-film CdTe deposition. The developed temperature profiles consisted of three discrete temperature segments, which the authors called the nucleation, plugging, and annealing temperatures. They have demonstrated that these temperature profiles can be used to grow large-grain material, plug pinholes, and improve CdS/CdTe photovoltaic device performance by about 15%. The improved material and device properties have been obtained while maintaining deposition temperatures compatible with commercially available substrates. This temperature profiling technique can be easily applied to a manufacturing environment by adjusting the temperature as a function of substrate position instead of time.

  2. Investigation of induced recrystallization and stress in close-spaced sublimated and radio-frequency magnetron sputtered CdTe thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H.R.; Dhere, R.G.; Al-Jassim, M.M.; Levi, D.H.; Kazmerski, L.L.

    1999-07-01

    We have induced recrystallization of small grain CdTe thin films deposited at low temperatures by close-spaced sublimation (CSS), using a standard CdCl{sub 2} annealing treatment. We also studied the changes in the physical properties of CdTe films deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering after the same post-deposition processing. We demonstrated that the effects of CdCl{sub 2} on the physical properties of CdTe films are similar, and independent of the deposition method. The recrystallization process is linked directly to the grain size and stress in the films. These studies indicated the feasibility of using lower-temperature processes in fabricating efficient CSS CdTe solar cells. We believe that, after the optimization of the parameters of the chemical treatment, these films can attain a quality similar to CSS films grown using current standard conditions. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  3. Influence of substrate temperature on structural and optical properties of bismuth oxide thin films deposited by close-spaced vacuum sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, M. M.; Buryk, I. P.; Latyshev, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. O.; Levchenko, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bi2O3 thin films were deposited on ultrasonically-cleaned glass and mica substrates by close-spaced vacuum sublimation technique. Films surface morphology was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Structural study based on the transmission-electron microscopy (TEM) and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) analysis has been shown that deposited films were polycrystalline with face-centered cubic structure. Optical study was carried out by spectral photometry analysis in the wavelengths range λ = 320-900 nm using the optical transmittance and absorbance measurements. For determination optical band gap Eg the Tauc plot was used and the band gap energy Eg is determined in the range of 3.50-3.62 eV, respectively. Fourier-transform infra-red (FTIR) analysis shown that obtained films are well-crystalline and have a good optical quality.

  4. Towards an understanding of the molecular mechanism of solvation of drug molecules: a thermodynamic approach by crystal lattice energy, sublimation, and solubility exemplified by hydroxybenzoic acids.

    PubMed

    Perlovich, German L; Volkova, Tatyana V; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2006-07-01

    Temperature dependencies of saturated vapor pressure and heat capacities for the 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids were measured and thermodynamic functions of sublimation calculated (2-hydroxybenzoic acid: DeltaG(sub) (298) = 38.5 kJ/mol; DeltaH(sub) (298) = 96.6 +/- 0.8 kJ/mol; DeltaS(sub) (298) = 191 +/- 3 J/mol . K; 3-hydroxybenzoic acid: DeltaG(sub) (298) = 50.6 kJ/mol; DeltaH(sub) (298) = 105.2 +/- 0.8 kJ/mol; DeltaS(sub) (298) = 180 +/- 2 J/mol . K; 4-hydroxybenzoic acid: DeltaG(sub) (298) = 55.0 kJ/mol; DeltaH(sub) (298) = 113.3 +/- 0.7 kJ/mol; DeltaS(sub) (298) = 193 +/- 2 J/mol . K). Analysis of crystal lattice packing energies based on geometry optimization of the molecules in the crystal using diffraction data and the program Dmol(3) was carried out. The energetic contributions of van der Waals, Coulombic, and hydrogen bond terms to the total packing energy were analyzed. The fraction of hydrogen bond energy in the packing energy increases as: 3-hydroxybenzoic (29.7%) < 2-hydroxybenzoic (34.7%) < 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (42.0%). Enthalpies of evaporation were estimated from enthalpies of sublimation and fusion. Temperature dependencies of the solubility in n-octanol and n-hexane were measured. The thermodynamic functions of solubility and solvation processes were deduced. Specific and nonspecific solvation terms were distinguished using the transfer from the "inert" n-hexane to the other solvents. The transfer of the molecules from water to n-octanol is enthalpy driven process. PMID:16729271

  5. The LO-BaFL method and ALS microarray expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (sALS) is a devastating, complex disease of unknown etiology. We studied this disease with microarray technology to capture as much biological complexity as possible. The Affymetrix-focused BaFL pipeline takes into account problems with probes that arise from physical and biological properties, so we adapted it to handle the long-oligonucleotide probes on our arrays (hence LO-BaFL). The revised method was tested against a validated array experiment and then used in a meta-analysis of peripheral white blood cells from healthy control samples in two experiments. We predicted differentially expressed (DE) genes in our sALS data, combining the results obtained using the TM4 suite of tools with those from the LO-BaFL method. Those predictions were tested using qRT-PCR assays. Results LO-BaFL filtering and DE testing accurately predicted previously validated DE genes in a published experiment on coronary artery disease (CAD). Filtering healthy control data from the sALS and CAD studies with LO-BaFL resulted in highly correlated expression levels across many genes. After bioinformatics analysis, twelve genes from the sALS DE gene list were selected for independent testing using qRT-PCR assays. High-quality RNA from six healthy Control and six sALS samples yielded the predicted differential expression for 7 genes: TARDBP, SKIV2L2, C12orf35, DYNLT1, ACTG1, B2M, and ILKAP. Four of the seven have been previously described in sALS studies, while ACTG1, B2M and ILKAP appear in the context of this disease for the first time. Supplementary material can be accessed at: http://webpages.uncc.edu/~cbaciu/LO-BaFL/supplementary_data.html. Conclusion LO-BaFL predicts DE results that are broadly similar to those of other methods. The small healthy control cohort in the sALS study is a reasonable foundation for predicting DE genes. Modifying the BaFL pipeline allowed us to remove noise and systematic errors, improving the power of this

  6. Television Viewing = Lo que los padres de estudiantes dotados necesitan saber sobre ver...television. What Parents of Gifted Students Need To Know about...Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegle, Del, Ed.

    This booklet (Practitioner's Guide), in both an English version and a Spanish version, is intended to help parents apply the findings of research to parental mediation of television viewing by their children, including gifted children. Research facts are briefly summarized and implications for the home are drawn. Suggestions for parents are…

  7. Soft expansion of double-real-virtual corrections to Higgs production at N3LO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; Furlan, Elisabetta; Herzog, Franz; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    We present methods to compute higher orders in the threshold expansion for the one-loop production of a Higgs boson in association with two partons at hadron colliders. This process contributes to the N3LO Higgs production cross section beyond the soft-virtual approximation. We use reverse unitarity to expand the phase-space integrals in the small kinematic parameters and to reduce the coefficients of the expansion to a small set of master integrals. We describe two methods for the calculation of the master integrals. The first was introduced for the calculation of the soft triple-real radiation relevant to N3LO Higgs production. The second uses a particular factorization of the three body phase-space measure and the knowledge of the scaling properties of the integral itself. Our result is presented as a Laurent expansion in the dimensional regulator, although some of the master integrals are computed to all orders in this parameter.

  8. 100-LBF LO2/LCH4 - Reaction Control Engine Technology Development for Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Veith, Eric M.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Jimenez, Rafael; Smith, Timothy D.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has identified liquid oxygen (LO2)/liquid methane (LCH4) propulsion systems as promising options for some future space vehicles. NASA issued a contract to Aerojet to develop a 100-lbf (445 N) LO2/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine (RCE) aimed at reducing the risk of utilizing a cryogenic reaction control system (RCS) on a space vehicle. Aerojet utilized innovative design solutions to develop an RCE that can ignite reliably over a broad range of inlet temperatures, perform short minimum impulse bits (MIB) at small electrical pulse widths (EPW), and produce excellent specific impulse (Isp) across a range of engine mixture ratios (MR). These design innovations also provide a start transient with a benign MR, ensuring good thrust chamber compatibility and long life. In addition, this RCE can successfully operate at MRs associated with main engines, enabling the RCE to provide emergency backup propulsion to minimize vehicle propellant load and overall system mass.

  9. Karhunen-Loève transform for compressive sampling hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Yan, Jingwen; Zheng, Xianwei; Peng, Hong; Guo, Di; Qu, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is a new jointly sampling and compression technology for remote sensing. In hyperspectral imaging, a typical CS method encodes the two-dimensional (2-D) spatial information of each spectral band or encodes the third spectral information simultaneously. However, encoding the spatial information is much easier than encoding the spectral information. Therefore, it is crucial to make use of the spectral information to improve the compression rate on 2-D CS data. We propose to encode the third spectral information with an adaptive Karhunen-Loève transform. With a mathematical proof, we show that interspectral correlations are preserved among 2-D randomly encoded spatial information. This property means that one can compress 2-D CS data effectively with a Karhunen-Loève transform. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method can better reconstruct both spectral curves and spatial images than traditional compression methods at the bit rates 0 to 1.

  10. Pseudo-scalar Higgs boson production at threshold N^3LO and N^3LL QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Taushif; Kumar, M. C.; Mathews, Prakash; Rana, Narayan; Ravindran, V.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first results on the production of pseudo-scalar Higgs boson through gluon fusion at the LHC to N^3LO in QCD taking into account only soft-gluon effects. We have used the effective Lagrangian that describes the coupling of the pseudo-scalar Higgs boson with the gluons in the large top quark mass limit. We have used quantities that have recently become available, namely the three-loop pseudo-scalar Higgs boson form factor and the third order universal soft function in QCD to achieve this. Along with the fixed order results, we also present the process dependent resummation coefficient for a threshold resummation to N^3LL in QCD. Phenomenological impact of these threshold N^3LO corrections to pseudo-scalar Higgs boson production at the LHC is presented and their role in the reduction of the renormalization scale dependence is demonstrated.

  11. Lo que usted necesita saber sobre™ el cáncer de cérvix

    Cancer.gov

    Contiene información sobre las opciones de tratamiento, la obtención de una segunda opinión, los cuidados de seguimiento y las fuentes de apoyo para alguien que ha sido diagnosticado recientemente con cáncer de cérvix o cuello uterino.

  12. Lo que usted necesita saber sobre™ el cáncer de seno

    Cancer.gov

    Contiene información sobre las opciones de tratamiento, los diferentes médicos que tratan el cáncer de seno, la obtención de una segunda opinión, los cuidados de seguimiento y las fuentes de apoyo para alguien que ha sido diagnosticado recientemente con c

  13. Combination of Vandetanib, Radiotherapy, and Irinotecan in the LoVo Human Colorectal Cancer Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsberger, Phyllis; Burd, Randy; Ryan, Anderson; Daskalakis, Constantine; Dicker, Adam P.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: The tumor growth kinetics of the human LoVo colorectal xenograft model was assessed in response to vandetanib, an orally available receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, radiotherapy (RT), or irinotecan (CPT-11), as single therapies and in combination. Methods and Materials: LoVo cells were injected subcutaneously into the right hind limb (5x10{sup 6} cells in 100muL phosphate-buffered saline) of athymic NCR NUM mice and tumors were grown to a volume of 200-300 mm{sup 3} before treatment. Vandetanib was administered at 50 mg/kg daily orally for 14 days starting on Day 1. RT was given as three fractions (3x3 Gy) on Days 1, 2, and 3. CPT-11 was given at 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally on Days 1 and 3. Tumor volumes were measured on a daily basis and calculated by measuring tumor diameters with digital calipers in two orthogonal dimensions. Results: All three single treatments (vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation) significantly slowed LoVo colorectal tumor growth. Vandetanib significantly increased the antitumor effects of CPT-11 and radiation when given in combination with either of these treatments. These treatment combinations resulted in a slow tumor growth rate during the 2 weeks of vandetanib administration. The triple combination of vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation produced the most marked improvement in response as observed by measurable shrinkage of tumors during the first week of treatment. Conclusions: The tumor growth delay kinetics observed in this study of the LoVo colorectal model suggest concurrent and sustained post-sequencing of vandetanib with cytotoxic therapy may be beneficial in tumors of this type.

  14. Two different periods present in the binary nucleus of the planetary nebula LoTr5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuczawska, Ewa; Mikolajewski, M.

    1993-10-01

    We present new photoelectric UBV observations of IN Com -- the binary nucleus of the planetary nebula LoTr5, carried out in April 1993 with the double beam photometer at Mt. Suhora Observatory. Low-amplitude variations were detected with a period of about 5.d92, in agreement with the results of Noskova (1989) and Bond and Livio (1990), but also higher frequency variability was discovered. A preliminary ephemeris is given. We speculate on the origin of the observed variabilities.

  15. A network access control framework for 6LoWPAN networks.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luís M L; Rodrigues, Joel J P C; de Sousa, Amaro F; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Low power over wireless personal area networks (LoWPAN), in particular wireless sensor networks, represent an emerging technology with high potential to be employed in critical situations like security surveillance, battlefields, smart-grids, and in e-health applications. The support of security services in LoWPAN is considered a challenge. First, this type of networks is usually deployed in unattended environments, making them vulnerable to security attacks. Second, the constraints inherent to LoWPAN, such as scarce resources and limited battery capacity, impose a careful planning on how and where the security services should be deployed. Besides protecting the network from some well-known threats, it is important that security mechanisms be able to withstand attacks that have not been identified before. One way of reaching this goal is to control, at the network access level, which nodes can be attached to the network and to enforce their security compliance. This paper presents a network access security framework that can be used to control the nodes that have access to the network, based on administrative approval, and to enforce security compliance to the authorized nodes. PMID:23334610

  16. Ultra-low-voltage CMOS-based current bleeding mixer with high LO-RF isolation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Gim Heng; Sidek, Roslina Mohd; Ramiah, Harikrishnan; Chong, Wei Keat; Lioe, De Xing

    2014-01-01

    This journal presents an ultra-low-voltage current bleeding mixer with high LO-RF port-to-port isolation, implemented on 0.13 μm standard CMOS technology for ZigBee application. The architecture compliments a modified current bleeding topology, consisting of NMOS-based current bleeding transistor, PMOS-based switching stage, and integrated inductors achieving low-voltage operation and high LO-RF isolation. The mixer exhibits a conversion gain of 7.5 dB at the radio frequency (RF) of 2.4 GHz, an input third-order intercept point (IIP3) of 1 dBm, and a LO-RF isolation measured to 60 dB. The DC power consumption is 572 µW at supply voltage of 0.45 V, while consuming a chip area of 0.97 × 0.88 mm(2). PMID:25197694

  17. Stella Surface Imaging of LO Pegasi via Light-Curve Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jessie; Richard, Andrea; Harmon, Robert

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to map the starspots on LO Pegasi (HIP 106231), a K8 main-sequence star, in order to create an image of the star's photosphere. CCD images of LO Pegasi were taken during May, June, and July 2009 through B, V, R, and I photometric filters using a 0.2-m Meade Instruments LX200 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope and Santa Barbara Instruments Group ST-8XE CCD camera at Perkins Observatory. Differential aperture photometry was performed on the images so as to create light curves in the form of plots of intensity vs. rotational phase. The lightcurves were processed via the Light-Curve Inversion (LI) algorithm. This algorithm creates a reconstructed image of the star's surface showing the locations of starspots. The locations of the spots visible on the 2009 are at lower latitudes than those deduced from the 2008 light curves. In addition, overall dimming observed of LO Pegasi since 2008 implies that there is a spot on the visible pole. Since a polar spot does not modulate the rotational light curve, it is not reproduced in our images.

  18. Fast Calcium Imaging with Optical Sectioning via HiLo Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Marcel A; Ronzitti, Emiliano; Sternberg, Jenna R; Wyart, Claire; Emiliani, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Imaging intracellular calcium concentration via reporters that change their fluorescence properties upon binding of calcium, referred to as calcium imaging, has revolutionized our way to probe neuronal activity non-invasively. To reach neurons densely located deep in the tissue, optical sectioning at high rate of acquisition is necessary but difficult to achieve in a cost effective manner. Here we implement an accessible solution relying on HiLo microscopy to provide robust optical sectioning with a high frame rate in vivo. We show that large calcium signals can be recorded from dense neuronal populations at high acquisition rates. We quantify the optical sectioning capabilities and demonstrate the benefits of HiLo microscopy compared to wide-field microscopy for calcium imaging and 3D reconstruction. We apply HiLo microscopy to functional calcium imaging at 100 frames per second deep in biological tissues. This approach enables us to discriminate neuronal activity of motor neurons from different depths in the spinal cord of zebrafish embryos. We observe distinct time courses of calcium signals in somata and axons. We show that our method enables to remove large fluctuations of the background fluorescence. All together our setup can be implemented to provide efficient optical sectioning in vivo at low cost on a wide range of existing microscopes. PMID:26625116

  19. Fast Calcium Imaging with Optical Sectioning via HiLo Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Jenna R.; Wyart, Claire; Emiliani, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Imaging intracellular calcium concentration via reporters that change their fluorescence properties upon binding of calcium, referred to as calcium imaging, has revolutionized our way to probe neuronal activity non-invasively. To reach neurons densely located deep in the tissue, optical sectioning at high rate of acquisition is necessary but difficult to achieve in a cost effective manner. Here we implement an accessible solution relying on HiLo microscopy to provide robust optical sectioning with a high frame rate in vivo. We show that large calcium signals can be recorded from dense neuronal populations at high acquisition rates. We quantify the optical sectioning capabilities and demonstrate the benefits of HiLo microscopy compared to wide-field microscopy for calcium imaging and 3D reconstruction. We apply HiLo microscopy to functional calcium imaging at 100 frames per second deep in biological tissues. This approach enables us to discriminate neuronal activity of motor neurons from different depths in the spinal cord of zebrafish embryos. We observe distinct time courses of calcium signals in somata and axons. We show that our method enables to remove large fluctuations of the background fluorescence. All together our setup can be implemented to provide efficient optical sectioning in vivo at low cost on a wide range of existing microscopes. PMID:26625116

  20. Characterization of secreted proteins in HepG2 and LO2 cells by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Juqiang; Ruan, Qiuyong; Liao, Fadian; Lin, Jinyong; Huang, Zufang; Liu, Nenrong; Chen, Rong

    2014-11-01

    Secreted proteins, the promising source of biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis of cancer, have received considerable attention. Raman spectroscopy and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to characterize the secreted proteins collected from the cell cultures of human hepatoma cell line HepG2 and normal human liver cell line LO2 in this paper. We found the major difference of secreted proteins Raman spectra between HepG2 and LO2 cells were in the range of 1200cm-1-1800cm-1. Compared with LO2 cells, some significant changes based on secondary structure of secreted proteins in HepG2 cells were observed, including the increase in the relative intensity of the band at 1004cm-1, 1445cm-1, 1674cm-1 and the decrease at 1074cm-1. These variations of Raman bands indicated that the species and conformation of secreted proteins in HepG2 cells changed. The measured Raman spectra of the two groups were separated into two distinct clusters with no overlap and high specificity and sensitivity by PCA. These results show that the combination of Raman spectroscopy and PCA analysis may be a powerful tool for distinguishing the secreted proteins between human hepatoma cells and normal human liver cells, provide a new thought to analyze the secreted proteins from cancer cells and find a novel cancer biomarker.

  1. Nature of the X(5568) — A critical Laplace sum rule analysis at N2LO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, R.; Narison, S.; Rabemananjara, A.; Rabetiarivony, D.

    2016-06-01

    We scrutinize recent QCD spectral sum rules (QSSR) results to lowest order (LO) predicting the masses of the BK molecule and (su)(bd¯) four-quark states. We improve these results by adding NLO and N2LO corrections to the PT contributions giving a more precise meaning on the b-quark mass definition used in the analysis. We extract our optimal predictions using Laplace sum rule (LSR) within the standard stability criteria versus the changes of the external free parameters (τ-sum rule variable, tc continuum threshold and subtraction constant μ). The smallness of the higher order PT corrections justifies (a posteriori) the LO order results ⊕ the uses of the ambiguous heavy quark mass to that order. However, our predicted spectra in the range (5173 ˜ 5226) MeV, summarized in Table 7, for exotic hadrons built with four different flavors (buds), do not support some previous interpretations of the D0 candidate,1 X(5568), as a pure molecule or a four-quark state. If experimentally confirmed, it could result from their mixing with an angle: sin 2𝜃 ≈ 0.15. One can also scan the region (2327 ˜ 2444) MeV (where the Ds0∗(2317) might be a good candidate) and the one (5173 ˜ 5226) MeV for detecting these (cuds) and (buds) unmixed exotic hadrons (if any) via, eventually, their radiative or π+hadrons decays.

  2. A Network Access Control Framework for 6LoWPAN Networks

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Luís M. L.; Rodrigues, Joel J. P. C.; de Sousa, Amaro F.; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Low power over wireless personal area networks (LoWPAN), in particular wireless sensor networks, represent an emerging technology with high potential to be employed in critical situations like security surveillance, battlefields, smart-grids, and in e-health applications. The support of security services in LoWPAN is considered a challenge. First, this type of networks is usually deployed in unattended environments, making them vulnerable to security attacks. Second, the constraints inherent to LoWPAN, such as scarce resources and limited battery capacity, impose a careful planning on how and where the security services should be deployed. Besides protecting the network from some well-known threats, it is important that security mechanisms be able to withstand attacks that have not been identified before. One way of reaching this goal is to control, at the network access level, which nodes can be attached to the network and to enforce their security compliance. This paper presents a network access security framework that can be used to control the nodes that have access to the network, based on administrative approval, and to enforce security compliance to the authorized nodes. PMID:23334610

  3. Effects of ADMA on gene expression and metabolism in serum-starved LoVo cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ningning; Wang, Ke; He, Jiaojiao; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2016-01-01

    Serum starvation is a typical way for inducing tumor cell apoptosis and stress. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous metabolite. Our previous study reveals the plasma ADMA level is elevated in colon cancer patients, which can attenuate serum starvation-induced apoptosis in LoVo cells. In current study, we evaluated the effects of ADMA on gene expression and metabolism in serum-starved LoVo cells with gene microarray and metabolomic approaches. Our results indicated that 96 h serum starvation induced comprehensive alterations at transcriptional level, and most of them were restored by ADMA. The main signaling pathways induced by serum starvation included cancers-related pathways, pathways in cell death, apoptosis, and cell cycle etc. Meanwhile, the metabolomic data showed serum-starved cells were clearly separated with control cells, but not with ADMA-treated cells in PCA model. The identified differential metabolites indicated serum starvation significantly suppressed TCA cycle, altered glucose and fatty acids metabolism, as well as nucleic acids metabolism. However, very few differential metabolites were identified between ADMA and serum-starved cells. In summary, our current results indicated serum starvation profoundly altered the gene expression and metabolism of LoVo cells, whereas ADMA could restore most of the changes at transcriptional level, but not at metabolic level. PMID:27180883

  4. Effects of ADMA on gene expression and metabolism in serum-starved LoVo cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ningning; Wang, Ke; He, Jiaojiao; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2016-01-01

    Serum starvation is a typical way for inducing tumor cell apoptosis and stress. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous metabolite. Our previous study reveals the plasma ADMA level is elevated in colon cancer patients, which can attenuate serum starvation-induced apoptosis in LoVo cells. In current study, we evaluated the effects of ADMA on gene expression and metabolism in serum-starved LoVo cells with gene microarray and metabolomic approaches. Our results indicated that 96 h serum starvation induced comprehensive alterations at transcriptional level, and most of them were restored by ADMA. The main signaling pathways induced by serum starvation included cancers-related pathways, pathways in cell death, apoptosis, and cell cycle etc. Meanwhile, the metabolomic data showed serum-starved cells were clearly separated with control cells, but not with ADMA-treated cells in PCA model. The identified differential metabolites indicated serum starvation significantly suppressed TCA cycle, altered glucose and fatty acids metabolism, as well as nucleic acids metabolism. However, very few differential metabolites were identified between ADMA and serum-starved cells. In summary, our current results indicated serum starvation profoundly altered the gene expression and metabolism of LoVo cells, whereas ADMA could restore most of the changes at transcriptional level, but not at metabolic level. PMID:27180883

  5. G-LoSA: An efficient computational tool for local structure-centric biological studies and drug design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui Sun; Im, Wonpil

    2016-04-01

    Molecular recognition by protein mostly occurs in a local region on the protein surface. Thus, an efficient computational method for accurate characterization of protein local structural conservation is necessary to better understand biology and drug design. We present a novel local structure alignment tool, G-LoSA. G-LoSA aligns protein local structures in a sequence order independent way and provides a GA-score, a chemical feature-based and size-independent structure similarity score. Our benchmark validation shows the robust performance of G-LoSA to the local structures of diverse sizes and characteristics, demonstrating its universal applicability to local structure-centric comparative biology studies. In particular, G-LoSA is highly effective in detecting conserved local regions on the entire surface of a given protein. In addition, the applications of G-LoSA to identifying template ligands and predicting ligand and protein binding sites illustrate its strong potential for computer-aided drug design. We hope that G-LoSA can be a useful computational method for exploring interesting biological problems through large-scale comparison of protein local structures and facilitating drug discovery research and development. G-LoSA is freely available to academic users at http://im.compbio.ku.edu/GLoSA/. PMID:26813336

  6. Ultra-broadband IF/LO system of NTU W-band interferometer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Hsiao-Feng; Wu, Jing-Cheng; Li, Huan-Hsin; Chiueh, Tzi-Hong; Niu, Dou-Chih; Hu, Robert

    2010-07-01

    NTU-Array is designed for W-band (78-113Ghz) interferometric observations of Sunyaev-Zeldovich effects. The first phase operation of the telescope with 6 receivers had its first light in 2008 with single-polarization and half the full bandwidth. The second-phase operation of NTU-Array in Nevada will begin the dual-polarization, full-band observation in 2010. One-bit sampling at 18Ghz and digital correlation are in use in this telescope. Due to the ultra broadband coverage, the IF system divides the 35GHz full-band into four 8.7GHz sub-bands. The first stage of IF module containing a 35GHz broadband amplifier with fairly flat-gain performance over 25db gain divides the first-stage IF into two outputs. The 2nd-stage IF module further divides the two input IF signals and down-converts them to four basebands of DC-8.7Ghz. An LO module with 8.7Ghz input is to generate outputs with x2, x3 and x9 harmonics for the down-conversion. The Walsh function is injected into the x9 LO via an IQ mixer. Each IF baseband is transmitted through an optical link to the 18Ghz, 1-bit sampling ADC located in the control room. The analog optical link contains a driver and equalizer to compensate for the path loss. Considering the limited size of the telescope mount, the entire IF/LO system of each receiver has a compact size about 20cm cubed. This physical size can be further reduced to fit the future 19-pixel-receiver upgrade of NTU-Array

  7. Higgs boson gluon-fusion production beyond threshold in N3LO QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; Furlan, Elisabetta; Gehrmann, Thomas; Herzog, Franz; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2015-03-18

    In this study, we compute the gluon fusion Higgs boson cross-section at N3LO through the second term in the threshold expansion. This calculation constitutes a major milestone towards the full N3LO cross section. Our result has the best formal accuracy in the threshold expansion currently available, and includes contributions from collinear regions besides subleading corrections from soft and hard regions, as well as certain logarithmically enhanced contributions for general kinematics. We use our results to perform a critical appraisal of the validity of the threshold approximation at N3LO in perturbative QCD.

  8. Potential NRQCD for unequal masses and the B c spectrum at N3LO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peset, Clara; Pineda, Antonio; Stahlhofen, Maximilian

    2016-05-01

    We determine the 1 /m and 1 /m 2 spin-independent heavy quarkonium potentials in the unequal mass case with {O} ( α 3) and {O} ( α 2) accuracy, respectively. We discuss in detail different methods to calculate the potentials, and show the equivalence among them. In particular we obtain, for the first time, the manifestly gauge invariant 1 /m and 1 /m 2 potentials in terms of Wilson loops with next-to-leading order (NLO) precision. As an application of our results we derive the theoretical expression for the B c spectrum in the weak-coupling limit through next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO).

  9. Surface Maps of LO Pegasi May-July 2011 Generated via BVRI Light Curve Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Johns Vidaurri, P.; Krug, S.

    2012-01-01

    The young solar analog LO Pegasi is a rapidly rotating (P ≈ 10.2 hr) K8 main sequence star known to exhibit large cool spots on its surface. We present surface maps based on BVRI photometry obtained at Perkins Observatory from May-July 2011 and inverted with an algorithm which makes no a priori assumptions regarding the number of spots or their shapes, and compare the results to images generated from 2006-2010. This work was supported by the NSF REU Program.

  10. Hilbert-space Karhunen-Loève transform with application to image analysis.

    PubMed

    Levy, A; Rubinstein, J

    1999-01-01

    A generalization of the Karhunen-Loève (KL) transform to Hilbert spaces is developed. It allows one to find the best low-dimensional approximation of an ensemble of images with respect to a variety of distance functions other than the traditional mean square error (L2 norm). A simple and intuitive characterization of the family of Hilbert norms in finite-dimensional spaces leads to an algorithm for calculating the Hilbert-KL expansion. KL approximations of ensembles of objects and faces optimized with respect to a norm based on the modulation transfer function of the human visual system are compared with the standard L2 approximations. PMID:9919692

  11. Hysteresis and change of transition temperature in thin films of Fe{[Me2Pyrz]3BH}2, a new sublimable spin-crossover molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davesne, V.; Gruber, M.; Studniarek, M.; Doh, W. H.; Zafeiratos, S.; Joly, L.; Sirotti, F.; Silly, M. G.; Gaspar, A. B.; Real, J. A.; Schmerber, G.; Bowen, M.; Weber, W.; Boukari, S.; Da Costa, V.; Arabski, J.; Wulfhekel, W.; Beaurepaire, E.

    2015-05-01

    Thin films of the spin-crossover (SCO) molecule Fe{[Me2Pyrz]3BH}2 (Fe-pyrz) were sublimed on Si/SiO2 and quartz substrates, and their properties investigated by X-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopies, optical absorption, atomic force microscopy, and superconducting quantum interference device. Contrary to the previously studied Fe(phen)2(NCS)2, the films are not smooth but granular. The thin films qualitatively retain the typical SCO properties of the powder sample (SCO, thermal hysteresis, soft X-ray induced excited spin-state trapping, and light induced excited spin-state trapping) but present intriguing variations even in micrometer-thick films: the transition temperature decreases when the thickness is decreased, and the hysteresis is affected. We explain this behavior in the light of recent studies focusing on the role of surface energy in the thermodynamics of the spin transition in nano-structures. In the high-spin state at room temperature, the films have a large optical gap (˜5 eV), decreasing at thickness below 50 nm, possibly due to film morphology.

  12. Qualification of a sublimation tool applied to the case of metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of In2O3 from In(tmhd)3 as a solid precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkutnik, P. D.; Angélidès, L.; Todorova, V.; Jiménez, C.

    2016-02-01

    A solid delivery system consisting of a source canister, a gas management, and temperature controlled enclosure designed and manufactured by Air Liquide Electronics Systems was tested in the context of gas-phase delivery of the In(tmhd)3 solid precursor. The precursor stream was delivered to a thermal metalorganic chemical vapor deposition reactor to quantify deposition yield under various conditions of carrier gas flow and sublimation temperature. The data collected allowed the determination of characteristic parameters such as the maximum precursor flow rate (18.2 mg min-1 in specified conditions) and the critical mass (defined as the minimum amount of precursor able to attain the maximum flow rate) found to be about 2.4 g, as well as an understanding of the influence of powder distribution inside the canister. Furthermore, this qualification enabled the determination of optimal delivery conditions which allowed for stable and reproducible precursor flow rates over long deposition times (equivalent to more than 47 h of experiment). The resulting In2O3 layers was compared with those elaborated via pulsed liquid injection obtained in the same chemical vapor deposition chamber and under the same deposition conditions.

  13. Structural properties and dielectric function of graphene grown by high-temperature sublimation on 4H-SiC(000-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhafs, C. Darakchieva, V.; Persson, I. L.; Persson, P. O. Å.; Yakimova, R.; Tiberj, A.; Paillet, M.; Zahab, A.-A.; Landois, P.; Juillaguet, S.; Schöche, S.; Schubert, M.

    2015-02-28

    Understanding and controlling growth of graphene on the carbon face (C-face) of SiC presents a significant challenge. In this work, we study the structural, vibrational, and dielectric function properties of graphene grown on the C-face of 4H-SiC by high-temperature sublimation in an argon atmosphere. The effect of growth temperature on the graphene number of layers and crystallite size is investigated and discussed in relation to graphene coverage and thickness homogeneity. An amorphous carbon layer at the interface between SiC and the graphene is identified, and its evolution with growth temperature is established. Atomic force microscopy, micro-Raman scattering spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy are combined to determine and correlate thickness, stacking order, dielectric function, and interface properties of graphene. The role of surface defects and growth temperature on the graphene growth mechanism and stacking is discussed, and a conclusion about the critical factors to achieve decoupled graphene layers is drawn.

  14. Structural and optical properties of AgAlTe{sub 2} layers grown on sapphire substrates by closed space sublimation method

    SciTech Connect

    Uruno, A. Usui, A.; Kobayashi, M.

    2014-11-14

    AgAlTe{sub 2} layers were grown on a- and c-plane sapphire substrates using a closed space sublimation method. Grown layers were confirmed to be single phase layers of AgAlTe{sub 2} by X-ray diffraction. AgAlTe{sub 2} layers were grown to have a strong preference for the (112) orientation on both kinds of substrates. The variation in the orientation of grown layers was analyzed in detail using the X-ray diffraction pole figure measurement, which revealed that the AgAlTe{sub 2} had a preferential epitaxial relationship with the c-plane sapphire substrate. The atomic arrangement between the (112) AgAlTe{sub 2} layer and sapphire substrates was compared. It was considered that the high order of the lattice arrangement symmetry probably effectively accommodated the lattice mismatch. The optical properties of the grown layer were also evaluated by transmittance measurements. The bandgap energy was found to be around 2.3 eV, which was in agreement with the theoretical bandgap energy of AgAlTe{sub 2}.

  15. Cryptanalysis of the Hwang-Lo-Lin Scheme Based on an ID-Based Cryptosystem and Its Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Haeryong; Chun, Kilsoo; Ahn, Seungho

    Hwang-Lo-Lin proposed a user identification scheme [3] based on the Maurer-Yacobi scheme [6] that is suitable for application to the mobile environment. Hwang-Lo-Lin argued that their scheme is secure against any attack. Against the Hwang-Lo-Lin argument, Liu-Horng-Liu showed that the Hwang-Lo-Lin scheme is insecure against a Liu-Horng-Liu attack mounted by an eavesdrop attacker. However, Liu-Horng-Liu did not propose any improved version of the original identification scheme which is still secure against the Liu-Horng-Liu attack. In this paper, we propose an identification scheme that can solve this problem and a non-interactive public key distribution scheme also.

  16. THE EXTRAORDINARY MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF FeLoBAL QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Farrah, D.; Urrutia, T.; Lacy, M.; Lebouteiller, V.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Houck, J.; Connolly, N.; Afonso, J.; Connolly, B.

    2010-07-10

    We present mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectra of six FeLoBAL quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) at 1 < z < 1.8, taken with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra span a range of shapes, from hot dust-dominated active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with silicate emission at 9.7 {mu}m to moderately obscured starbursts with strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission. The spectrum of one object, SDSS 1214-0001, shows the most prominent PAHs yet seen in any QSO at any redshift, implying that the starburst dominates the mid-IR emission with an associated star formation rate on the order of 2700 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. With the caveats that our sample is small and not robustly selected, we combine our mid-IR spectral diagnostics with previous observations to propose that FeLoBAL QSOs are at least largely comprised of systems in which (1) a merger-driven starburst is ending, (2) a luminous AGN is in the last stages of burning through its surrounding dust, and (3) we may be viewing over a restricted line-of-sight range.

  17. Pavement crack detection combining non-negative feature with fast LoG in complex scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wanli; Zhang, Xiuhua; Hong, Hanyu

    2015-12-01

    Pavement crack detection is affected by much interference in the realistic situation, such as the shadow, road sign, oil stain, salt and pepper noise etc. Due to these unfavorable factors, the exist crack detection methods are difficult to distinguish the crack from background correctly. How to extract crack information effectively is the key problem to the road crack detection system. To solve this problem, a novel method for pavement crack detection based on combining non-negative feature with fast LoG is proposed. The two key novelties and benefits of this new approach are that 1) using image pixel gray value compensation to acquisit uniform image, and 2) combining non-negative feature with fast LoG to extract crack information. The image preprocessing results demonstrate that the method is indeed able to homogenize the crack image with more accurately compared to existing methods. A large number of experimental results demonstrate the proposed approach can detect the crack regions more correctly compared with traditional methods.

  18. LO Peg: surface differential rotation, flares, and spot-topographic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Subhajeet; Pandey, J. C.; Savanov, I. S.; Taş, G.; Pandey, S. B.; Misra, K.; Joshi, S.; Dmitrienko, E. S.; Sakamoto, T.; Gehrels, N.; Okajima, T.

    2016-07-01

    Using the wealth of ˜24 yr multiband data, we present an in-depth study of the star-spot cycles, surface differential rotations (SDR), optical flares, evolution of star-spot distributions, and coronal activities on the surface of young, single, main-sequence, ultrafast rotator LO Peg. From the long-term V-band photometry, we derive rotational period of LO Peg to be 0.4231 ± 0.0001 d. Using the seasonal variations on the rotational period, the SDR pattern is investigated, and shows a solar-like pattern of SDR. A cyclic pattern with period of ˜2.7 yr appears to be present in rotational period variation. During the observations, 20 optical flares are detected with a flare frequency of ˜1 flare per two days and with flare energy of ˜1031-34 erg. The surface coverage of cool spots is found to be in the range of ˜9-26 per cent. It appears that the high- and low-latitude spots are interchanging their positions. Quasi-simultaneous observations in X-ray, UV, and optical photometric bands show a signature of an excess of X-ray and UV activities in spotted regions.

  19. Non-linear analysis of PESA-Lo electrostatic analyzer data and solar wind temperature anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, B. Z.; Maruca, B.; Bale, S. D.; Wilson, L. B., III; Larson, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, non-linear fitting techniques are applied to ion measurements from the Wind spacecraft's PESA-Lo electrostatic analyzer. Previous studies have relied primarily on moments-analyses, which, although satisfactory for simple distributions and density calculations, often return unreasonable values for higher order moments (e.g., temperature) and fail to account for non-thermal effects (e.g., temperature anisotropy and beams) and multiple ion-species. A Levenberg-Marquadt non-linear algorithm is applied to the PESA-Lo data in order to calculate the characteristic parameters of the proton, alpha-particle, and beam distributions. This analysis is augmented with calibration data from the WIND Faraday cups and magnetic-field data from WIND/MFI. Preliminary results from this non-linear analysis indicate that it indeed provides higher-quality ion parameters than the existing moments-analysis. When this analysis is complete, the set of bulk-parameter values will be suitable for studies of microinstabilities in the solar wind and of possible correlation between magnetic field fluctuations and non-thermal properties of the ion distributions. Applications of thermodynamic principles, such as the Boltzmann H-theorem, will allow for further characterization of the non-thermal properties of the solar wind.

  20. Soft Expansion of Double-Real-Virtual Corrections to Higgs Production at N$^3$LO

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; Furlan, Elisabetta; Herzog, Franz; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2015-05-15

    We present methods to compute higher orders in the threshold expansion for the one-loop production of a Higgs boson in association with two partons at hadron colliders. This process contributes to the N3LO Higgs production cross section beyond the soft-virtual approximation. We use reverse unitarity to expand the phase-space integrals in the small kinematic parameters and to reduce the coefficients of the expansion to a small set of master integrals. We describe two methods for the calculation of the master integrals. The first was introduced for the calculation of the soft triple-real radiation relevant to N3LO Higgs production. The secondmore » uses a particular factorization of the three body phase-space measure and the knowledge of the scaling properties of the integral itself. Our result is presented as a Laurent expansion in the dimensional regulator, although some of the master integrals are computed to all orders in this parameter.« less

  1. Soft Expansion of Double-Real-Virtual Corrections to Higgs Production at N$^3$LO

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; Furlan, Elisabetta; Herzog, Franz; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2015-05-15

    We present methods to compute higher orders in the threshold expansion for the one-loop production of a Higgs boson in association with two partons at hadron colliders. This process contributes to the N3LO Higgs production cross section beyond the soft-virtual approximation. We use reverse unitarity to expand the phase-space integrals in the small kinematic parameters and to reduce the coefficients of the expansion to a small set of master integrals. We describe two methods for the calculation of the master integrals. The first was introduced for the calculation of the soft triple-real radiation relevant to N3LO Higgs production. The second uses a particular factorization of the three body phase-space measure and the knowledge of the scaling properties of the integral itself. Our result is presented as a Laurent expansion in the dimensional regulator, although some of the master integrals are computed to all orders in this parameter.

  2. Karhunen-Loève basis of Kolmogorov phase screens covering a rectangular stripe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathar, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Karhunen-Loève functions are statistically independent base functions to be multiplied with randomized coefficients to generate instances of the underlying statistics with specific covariances. In the context of numerical simulation of atmospheric turbulence, they are tools to generate phase distributions in the input pupil of telescope optics. Within the Taylor frozen screen approximation, the favorable geometry of phase screens is a stripe as wide as the telescope diameter, but much longer. A phase screen movie is generated by dragging the stripe across the telescope pupil. The aim is to avoid the wasteful alternative of cutting through a virtual circular phase screen with a diameter equal to the stripe's length. We calculate Karhunen-Loève functions over rectangular stripes by solving the well-known integral equation for isotropic variance of the phase distribution. They are expanded in products of Legendre functions along the two Cartesian coordinates, represented by spherical Bessel functions in Fourier space. The rectangular shape of the integral's domain breaks the symmetry of the structure function. Yet, the matrix elements of the eigenvalue equation can be calculated by separating the primitive Cartesian basis via a Neumann series of radial and azimuthal terms.

  3. Discussions about the Nature of Science in a Course on the History of Astronomy. (Spanish Title: Discusiones sobre la Naturaleza de la Ciencia en un Curso sobre Historia de la Astronomía.) Discussões sobre a Natureza da Ciência em um Curso sobre a História da Astronomia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires de Andrade, Victória Flório; L'Astorina, Bruno

    2010-07-01

    There are an increasing number of researches in science education that affirm the importance of discussions on the "nature of science" in basic education level as well as in teacher training. The history of science applied to education is a way to contextualize epistemological discussions, allowing both the understanding of scientific content and learning about science concepts. We present some reasonably consensual definitions on the nature of science that have been widely discussed by the academic community. We show also some episodes in the history of astronomy which can lead to discussions involving some aspects of the nature of science, and how they can do it. Hay un número creciente de investigaciones en la enseñanza de las ciencias que afirman la importancia de debates sobre la "naturaleza de la ciencia" en la educación básica y formación del profesorado. La historia de la ciencia aplicada a la educación es una manera de contextualizar los debates de la epistemología, lo que permite tanto la comprensión de los contenidos científicos como el aprendizaje de conceptos científicos. En esto trabajo, presentamos algunas definiciones bastante consensuales sobre la naturaleza de la ciencia que han sido ampliamente discutidas por la comunidad académica y mostramos cómo algunos episodios en la historia de la astronomía pueden llevar a discusiones sobre algunos aspectos de la naturaleza de la ciencia. Há um número crescente de pesquisas na área de ensino de ciências que afirmam a importância de discussões sobre a "natureza da ciência" na educação básica e na formação de professores. A história da ciência aplicada ao ensino é uma maneira de contextualizar discussões epistemológicas, permitindo tanto a compreensão de conteúdos científicos quanto o aprendizado de noções sobre as ciências. Neste trabalho apresentamos algumas definições razoavelmente consensuais sobre a natureza da ciência que foram amplamente discutidas pela

  4. Cocaine withdrawal in rats selectively bred for low (LoS) versus high (HiS) saccharin intake.

    PubMed

    Radke, Anna K; Zlebnik, Natalie E; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2015-02-01

    Cocaine use results in anhedonia during withdrawal, but it is not clear how this emotional state interacts with an individual's vulnerability for addiction. Rats selectively bred for high (HiS) or low (LoS) saccharin intake are a well-established model of drug abuse vulnerability, with HiS rats being more likely to consume sweets and drugs of abuse such as cocaine and heroin (Carroll et al., 2002) than LoS rats. This study examined whether the motivational consequences of cocaine withdrawal are differentially expressed in HiS and LoS rats. HiS and LoS rats were trained to respond for a sucrose reward on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement and breakpoints were measured during and after chronic, continuous exposure to cocaine (30 mg/kg/day). Cocaine, but not saline, treatment resulted in lower breakpoints for sucrose during withdrawal in LoS rats only. These results suggest anhedonia during withdrawal is more pronounced in the less vulnerable LoS rats. Fewer motivational deficits during withdrawal may contribute to greater drug vulnerability in the HiS line. PMID:25482327

  5. Cocaine withdrawal in rats selectively bred for low (LoS) versus high (HiS) saccharin intake

    PubMed Central

    Radke, Anna K.; Zlebnik, Natalie E.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine use results in anhedonia during withdrawal, but it is not clear how this emotional state interacts with an individual's vulnerability for addiction. Rats selectively bred for high (HiS) or low (LoS) saccharin intake are a well-established model of drug abuse vulnerability, with HiS rats being more likely to consume sweets and drugs of abuse such as cocaine and heroin (Carroll et al. 2002) than LoS rats. This study examined whether the motivational consequences of cocaine withdrawal are differentially expressed in HiS and LoS rats. HiS and LoS rats were trained to respond for a sucrose reward on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement and breakpoints were measured during and after chronic, continuous exposure to cocaine (30 mg/kg/day). Cocaine, but not saline, treatment resulted in lower breakpoints for sucrose during withdrawal in LoS rats only. These results suggest anhedonia during withdrawal is more pronounced in the less vulnerable LoS rats. Fewer motivational deficits during withdrawal may contribute to drug vulnerability in the HiS line. PMID:25482327

  6. Screening materials with the XIA UltraLo alpha particle counter at Southern Methodist University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakib, M. Z.; Cooley, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Kara, B.; Qiu, H.; Rielage, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.

    2013-08-01

    Southern Methodist University houses one of five existing commercially available UltraLo 1800 production model alpha counters made by XIA LLC. The instrument has an electron drift chamber with a 707 cm2 or 1800 cm2 counting region which is determined by selecting the inner electrode size. The SMU team operating this device is part of the SuperCDMS screening working group, and uses the alpha counter to study the background rates from the decay of radon in materials used to construct the SuperCDMS experiment. We have studied four acrylic samples obtained from the MiniCLEAN direct dark matter search with the XIA instrument demonstrating its utility in low background experiments by investigating the plate-out of 210Pb and comparing the effectiveness of cleaning procedures in removing 222Rn progenies from the samples.

  7. Screening materials with the XIA UltraLo alpha particle counter at Southern Methodist University

    SciTech Connect

    Nakib, M. Z.; Cooley, J.; Kara, B.; Qiu, H.; Scorza, S.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Rielage, K.; Schnee, R. W.

    2013-08-08

    Southern Methodist University houses one of five existing commercially available UltraLo 1800 production model alpha counters made by XIA LLC. The instrument has an electron drift chamber with a 707 cm{sup 2} or 1800 cm{sup 2} counting region which is determined by selecting the inner electrode size. The SMU team operating this device is part of the SuperCDMS screening working group, and uses the alpha counter to study the background rates from the decay of radon in materials used to construct the SuperCDMS experiment. We have studied four acrylic samples obtained from the MiniCLEAN direct dark matter search with the XIA instrument demonstrating its utility in low background experiments by investigating the plate-out of {sup 210}Pb and comparing the effectiveness of cleaning procedures in removing {sup 222}Rn progenies from the samples.

  8. Starspot Modulation of BVRI Light Curves of LO Pegasi from 2012 June-October

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Avril, R.; Rossi De La Fuente, E.; Brechtel, C. E.

    2013-01-01

    We present BVRI light curves acquired at Perkins Observatory in 2012 June-October of the K8V star LO Pegasi, a young solar analog known to exhibit magnetic activity on its surface in the form of large starspots. We find that the amplitudes of the brightness variations have diminished significantly in comparison to data acquired from 2006-2011, and that the overall brightness is comparable to the brightness minima in the prior years. We speculate that these changes are due to the growth of a polar spot, coupled with a reduction in the relative sizes of projections of the polar spot into lower-latitude regions and/or a reduction in the area covered by independent spots at lower latitudes. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program Award #1003992 and Ohio Wesleyan University.

  9. Stellar Surface Image of LO Pegasi via Light-curve Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Moore, C.; Decker, R.

    2009-01-01

    We present images of dark starspots on the surface of the K8 main-sequence star LO Pegasi. CCD images of the star and surrounding field were acquired through B, V, R and I filters at Perkins Observatory in June and July, 2008. The images were dark-subtracted and flat-fielded and then aperture photometry was performed to yield light curves through each of the four filters. These light curves were then simultaneously inverted via an algorithm devised by one of us (Harmon) so as to yield images of the spots based on the rotational modulation they produced in the light curves. The use of multiple filters significantly improves the latitude resolution of the reconstructions. Comparison of our results with results from 2006 and 2007 shows that the spot structure was more complex in 2008 than in the prior years. This research was funded by the NSF REU Program and the Ohio Wesleyan University Summer Science Research Program.

  10. Photometric Imaging of Starspots on LO Pegasi in May, June and July of 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Miller, J.; Richard, A.

    2010-01-01

    CCD images of the K8 young solar analog LO Pegasi were obtained during May, June and July of 2009 through B, V, R, and I photometric filters at Perkins Observatory. Differential aperture photometry was performed on the images to generate light curves through each filter. The lightcurves were processed via the Light-Curve Inversion algorithm so as to invert the light curves to produce images of the star's photosphere. The locations of the starspots visible in the 2009 images are at lower latitudes than those deduced from the summer 2008 light curves. In addition, secular dimming since 2008 implies that there is a spot on the visible pole, which does not appear in our images because it does not significantly modulate the rotational light curve.

  11. Real-virtual contributions to the inclusive Higgs cross-section at N3LO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; Herzog, Franz; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    We compute the contributions to the N3LO inclusive Higgs boson cross-section from the square of one-loop amplitudes with a Higgs boson and three QCD partons as external states. Our result is a Taylor expansion in the dimensional regulator ɛ, where the coefficients of the expansion are analytic functions of the ratio of the Higgs boson mass and the partonic center of mass energy and they are valid for arbitrary values of this ratio. We also perform a threshold expansion around the limit of soft-parton radiation in the final state. The expressions for the coefficients of the threshold expansion are valid for arbitrary values of the dimension. As a by-product of the threshold expansion calculation, we have developed a soft expansion method at the integrand level by identifying the relevant soft and collinear regions for the loop-momentum.

  12. HIEN-LO: An experiment for charge determination of cosmic rays of interplanetary and solar origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Mason, G. M.; Blake, J. B.; Nicholas, J.

    1988-01-01

    The experiment is designed to measure the heavy ion environment at low altitude (HIEN-LO) in the energy range 0.3 to 100 MeV/nucleon. In order to cover this wide energy range a complement of three sensors is used. A large area ion drift chamber and a time-of-flight telescope are used to determine the mass and energy of the incoming cosmic rays. A third omnidirectional counter serves as a proton monitor. The analysis of mass, energy and incoming direction in combination with the directional geomagnetic cut-off allows the determination of the ionic charge of the cosmic rays. The ionic charge in this energy range is of particular interest because it provides clues to the origin of these particles and to the plasma conditions at the acceleration site. The experiment is expected to be flown in 1988/1989.

  13. Vanishing absorption and blueshifted emission in FeLoBAL quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Alireza; Pirkola, Patrik; Hall, Patrick B.; Galati, Natalee; Rogerson, Jesse; Ameri, Abtin

    2016-07-01

    We study the dramatic decrease in iron absorption strength in the iron low-ionization broad absorption line quasar SDSS J084133.15+200525.8. We report on the continued weakening of absorption in the prototype of this class of variable broad absorption line quasar, FBQS J140806.2+305448. We also report a third example of this class, SDSS J123103.70+392903.6; unlike the other two examples, it has undergone an increase in observed continuum brightness (at 3000 Å rest frame) as well as a decrease in iron absorption strength. These changes could be caused by absorber transverse motion or by ionization variability. We note that the Mg II and UV Fe II lines in several FeLoBAL quasars are blueshifted by thousands of km s-1 relative to the H β emission line peak. We suggest that such emission arises in the outflowing winds normally seen only in absorption.

  14. Non-collinear magnetism calculated using the APW+lo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskowski, Robert; Blaha, Peter; Schwarz, Karlheinz; Madsen, Georg K. H.

    2003-03-01

    Our implementation of non-collinear magnetism (NCM) into the APW+lo - WIEN2k code allows calculations of both, the atomic moment approximation (AMA) as well as a full NCM mode, and includes spin-orbit coupling and LDA+U corrections. In AMA only the diagonal part of spin-potential and density matrices inside the atomic spheres (AS) are taken into account, but the complete potential and density matrices are used in the interstitial region. In full NCM also off-diagonal terms inside the AS are considered. In both cases, the implementation utilizes a basis set of rotated spinors inside the AS and pure-spinors in the interstitial. We present ab-initio calculation of UO_2, where three NCM structures are considered, namely, 1k - antiferromagnetic type-I, 2k with momenta pointing in (110) and equivalent directions, and 3k with momenta along (111) directions.

  15. Bayesian estimation of Karhunen-Loève expansions; A random subspace approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, Kenny; Najm, Habib N.

    2016-08-01

    One of the most widely-used procedures for dimensionality reduction of high dimensional data is Principal Component Analysis (PCA). More broadly, low-dimensional stochastic representation of random fields with finite variance is provided via the well known Karhunen-Loève expansion (KLE). The KLE is analogous to a Fourier series expansion for a random process, where the goal is to find an orthogonal transformation for the data such that the projection of the data onto this orthogonal subspace is optimal in the L2 sense, i.e., which minimizes the mean square error. In practice, this orthogonal transformation is determined by performing an SVD (Singular Value Decomposition) on the sample covariance matrix or on the data matrix itself. Sampling error is typically ignored when quantifying the principal components, or, equivalently, basis functions of the KLE. Furthermore, it is exacerbated when the sample size is much smaller than the dimension of the random field. In this paper, we introduce a Bayesian KLE procedure, allowing one to obtain a probabilistic model on the principal components, which can account for inaccuracies due to limited sample size. The probabilistic model is built via Bayesian inference, from which the posterior becomes the matrix Bingham density over the space of orthonormal matrices. We use a modified Gibbs sampling procedure to sample on this space and then build probabilistic Karhunen-Loève expansions over random subspaces to obtain a set of low-dimensional surrogates of the stochastic process. We illustrate this probabilistic procedure with a finite dimensional stochastic process inspired by Brownian motion.

  16. Downregulation of MDM2 expression by RNAi inhibits LoVo human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells growth and the treatment of LoVo cells with mdm2siRNA3 enhances the sensitivity to cisplatin

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yan . E-mail: gyfyuyan@hotmail.com; Sun Ping . E-mail: sunny19750502@hotmail.com; Sun Lichun; Liu Guoyi; Chen Guohua . E-mail: olivebranch_82@hotmail.com; Shang Lihua . E-mail: leval1000@sina.com; Wu Hongbo . E-mail: whpwl@sina.com; Hu Jing; Li Yue; Mao Yinling; Sui Guangjie; Sun Xiwen

    2006-01-06

    To investigate the biological effect of mdm2 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma LoVo cells, three mdm2siRNA constructions were recombinated and transient transfected into human colorectal adenocarcinoma LoVo cells with low differentiation character in vitro. The results showed that mdm2siRNA3 reduced mRNA level of mdm2 and protein level of mdm2, leading to proliferation inhibition on LoVo cells, and reduced tumor growth in nude mice. It was found that depletion of MDM2 in this pattern promoted apoptosis of LoVo cells and Cisplatin (DDP) treated in the mdm2siRNA3 transfected cell population would result in a substantial decrease by MTT colorimetry. Decreasing the MDM2 protein level in LoVo cells by RNAi could significantly inhibit tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo, which indicated that mdm2 gene played a definite role in the development and aggressiveness of human colon carcinoma. It also could be a therapeutic target in colorectal carcinoma. The synergistic activation of RNAi and cell toxicity agents indicated that the combination of chemotherapy and gene therapy will be a promising approach in the future.

  17. Re-analysis of martian gully orientation and slope for comparison with climate model predictions of freeze-thaw and dry-ice sublimation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Susan; Harrison, Tanya; Lewis, Stephen; Balme, Matthew; Soare, Richard; Britton, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Gullies on Mars are kilometre-scale landforms, comprising an erosional alcove and channel and a terminal debris apron/fan. These landforms are similar to features on Earth carved by the flow of liquid water, or by the action of water rich debris flows. The majority gullies on Mars are believed to be (at most) ˜5 Ma old and both erosion and deposition within these features have been observed within the last 10 years of orbital observations. At present liquid water is not thermodynamically stable at the martian surface and many of the recent changes in surface morphology occur during winter and early spring, when temperatures are too low for even metastable liquid water to be produced. Therefore, researchers have proposed an alternative mechanism for gully-formation - the sublimation of solid CO2, which is deposited on the maritan surface every winter. Previous studies have revealed that gully-density and orientation varies systematically with latitude - a fact that led to the development of many climate-based hypotheses for their formation. Here, we use the global database of martian gullies and extract the orientation and slope-angle of gully-hosting-slopes. We find that gully-orientation is more even strongly controlled by latitude than previous studies, where more sparse data were used. From ˜30-40° latitude in both hemispheres, gullies are almost never found on equator-facing slopes, and polewards of 40° gullies have a tendency to be located on equator-facing slopes. We use a 1D version of the LMD Mars climate model physics to simulate surface temperature on slopes up to 35° , oriented to face north or south, for all latitudes (5° spacing), and for orbital obliquities of 5-55° . We otherwise use current orbital conditions (ellipticity, date of perihelion) and we use a constant thermal inertia of the substrate of 1000 Jm‑2K‑1s‑1/2and a bare soil albedo of 0.2. We extracted two pieces of information from a complete annual cycle: (i) The number of

  18. [Spectral analyzing effects of atmosphere states on the structure and characteristics of CdTe polycrystalline thin films made by close-spaced sublimation].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hua-jing; Zheng, Jia-gui; Feng, Liang-huan; Zhang, Jing-quan; Xie, Er-qing

    2005-07-01

    The structure and characteristics of CdTe thin films are dependent on the working atmosphere states in close-spaced sublimation. In the present paper, CdTe polycrystalline thin films were deposited by CSS in mixture atmosphere of argon and oxygen. The physical mechanism of CSS was analyzed, and the temperature distribution in CSS system was measured. The dependence of preliminary nucleus creation on the atmosphere states (involving component and pressure) was studied. Transparencies were measured and optic energy gaps were calculated. The results show that: (1) The CdTe films deposited in different atmospheres are cubic structure. With increasing oxygen concentration, a increases and reaches the maximum at 6% oxygen concentration, then reduces, and increases again after passing the point at 12% oxygen concentration. Among them, the sample depositing at 9% oxygen concentration is the best. The optic energy gaps are 1.50-1.51 eV for all CdTe films. (2) The samples depositing at different pressures at 9% oxygen concentration are all cubical structure of CdTe, and the diffraction peaks of CdS and SnO2:F still appear. With the gas pressure increasing, the crystal size of CdTe minishes, the transparency of the thin film goes down, and the absorption side shifts to the short-wave direction. (3) The polycrystalline thin films with high quality deposit in 4 minutes under the depositing condition that the substrate temperature is 550 degrees C, and source temperature is 620 degrees C at 9% oxygen concentration. PMID:16241058

  19. Effect of a 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO)/cyclooxygenase (CO) inhibitor, WY-47, 288, on cutaneous models of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Carlson, R P; O'Neill-Davis, L; Calhoun, W; Datko, L; Musser, J H; Kreft, A F; Chang, J Y

    1989-03-01

    WY-47,288 (2-[(1-naphthalenyloxy)methyl]quinoline) demonstrated topical antiinflammatory activity in several animal models of skin inflammation. Application of WY-47,288 to mouse ear surfaces inhibited arachidonic acid (ED50 = 0.3 mg/ear) and tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation (40% at 1 mg/ear). Administration of WY-47,288 (1 mg/ear) at 30 min and 5 h after TPA reduced ear edema and epidermal proliferation by 50%. WY-47,288 also inhibited oxazolone-induced contact hypersensitivity in mouse ears (ED50 = 0.4 mg/ear) and UVB-induced guinea pig skin erythema (ED50 approximately 0.25 mg/spot). These antiinflammatory effects may be due to inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) and cyclooxygenase (CO) since the synthesis of 5-LO and CO products by rat neutrophils and mouse macrophages was dose-dependently reduced by WY-47,288. By contrast, WY-47,288 demonstrated no appreciable inhibition of 12-LO (rabbit platelet), 15-LO (soybean) or phospholipase A2 (human platelet). Furthermore, no systemic adverse effects were observed after topical, parenteral or oral administration of WY-47,288, suggesting that WY-47,288 is a safe topical 5-LO/CO inhibitor for treating skin inflammation. PMID:2500009

  20. Selenoprotein Genes Exhibit Differential Expression Patterns Between Hepatoma HepG2 and Normal Hepatocytes LO2 Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Tang, Jiayong; Xu, Jingyang; Cao, Lei; Jia, Gang; Long, Dingbiao; Liu, Guangmang; Chen, Xiaoling; Wang, Kangning

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of selenoprotein genes between hepatoma HepG2 and normal hepatocytes LO2 cell lines. Liver HepG2 and LO2 cells were cultured in 12-well plates under the same condition until cells grew to complete confluence, and then cells were harvested for total RNA and protein extraction. The qPCRs were performed to compare gene expression of 14 selenoprotein genes and 5 cancer signaling-related genes. Enzyme activities were also assayed. The results showed that human hepatoma HepG2 cells grew faster than normal hepatocytes LO2 cells. Among the genes investigated, 10 selenoprotein genes (Gpx1, Gpx3, Gpx4, Selx, Sepp, Sepw1, Sepn1, Selt, Seli, Selh) and 3 cancer signaling-related genes (Bcl-2A, caspase-3, and P38) were upregulated (P < 0.05), while Selo and Bcl-2B were downregulated (P < 0.05) in hepatoma HepG2 cells compared to LO2 cells. Significant correlations were found between selenoprotein genes and the cancer signaling-related genes Caspase3, P53, Bc1-2A, and Bc1-2B. Our results revealed that selenoprotein genes were aberrantly expressed in hepatoma HepG2 cells compared to normal liver LO2 cells, which indicated that those selenoprotein genes may play important roles in the occurrence and development of liver carcinogenesis. PMID:25846212

  1. LoFEx — A local framework for calculating excitation energies: Illustrations using RI-CC2 linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudin, Pablo; Kristensen, Kasper

    2016-06-01

    We present a local framework for the calculation of coupled cluster excitation energies of large molecules (LoFEx). The method utilizes time-dependent Hartree-Fock information about the transitions of interest through the concept of natural transition orbitals (NTOs). The NTOs are used in combination with localized occupied and virtual Hartree-Fock orbitals to generate a reduced excitation orbital space (XOS) specific to each transition where a standard coupled cluster calculation is carried out. Each XOS is optimized to ensure that the excitation energies are determined to a predefined precision. We apply LoFEx in combination with the RI-CC2 model to calculate the lowest excitation energies of a set of medium-sized organic molecules. The results demonstrate the black-box nature of the LoFEx approach and show that significant computational savings can be gained without affecting the accuracy of CC2 excitation energies.

  2. Summary of LO2/Ethanol OMS/RCS Technology and Advanced Development 99-2744

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Leslie A.; Hurlbert, Eric A.

    1999-01-01

    NASA is pursuing non-toxic propellant technologies applicable to RLV and Space Shuttle orbital maneuvering system (OMS) and reaction control system (RCS). The primary objectives of making advancements in an OMS/RCS system are improved safety, reliability, and reduced operations and maintenance cost, while meeting basic operational and performance requirements. An OMS/RCS has a high degree of direct interaction with the vehicle and crew and requires subsystem and components that are compatible with integration into the vehicle with regard to external mold-line, power, and thermal control. In July 1997, a Phase I effort for the technology and advanced development of an upgrade of the space shuttle was conducted to define the system architecture, propellant tank, feed system, RCS thrusters, and OMS engine. Phase I of the project ran from July 1997 to October 1998. Phase II is currently being planned for the development and test of full-scale prototype of the system in 1999 and 2000. The choice of pressure-fed liquid oxygen (LO2) and ethanol is the result of numerous trade studies conducted from 1980 to 1996. Liquid oxygen and ethanol are clean burning, high-density propellants that provide a high degree of commonality with other spacecraft subsystems including life support, power, and thermal control, and with future human exploration and development of space missions. The key to this pressure-fed system is the use of subcooled liquid oxygen at 350 psia. In this approach, there is 80 degrees R of subcooling, which means that boil-off will not occur until the temperature has risen 80 R. The sub-cooling results naturally from loading propellants at 163 R, which is the saturation temperature at 14.7 psia, and then pressurizing to 350 psia on the launch pad. Thermal insulation and conditioning techniques are then used to limit the LO2 temperature to 185 R maximum, and maintain the sub-cooling. The other key is the wide temperature range of ethanol, -173 F to +300 F, which

  3. Karhunen-Loève expansion revisited for vector-valued random fields: Scaling, errors and optimal basis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, G.; Soize, C.; Duhamel, D.; Funfschilling, C.

    2013-06-01

    Due to scaling effects, when dealing with vector-valued random fields, the classical Karhunen-Loève expansion, which is optimal with respect to the total mean square error, tends to favorize the components of the random field that have the highest signal energy. When these random fields are to be used in mechanical systems, this phenomenon can introduce undesired biases for the results. This paper presents therefore an adaptation of the Karhunen-Loève expansion that allows us to control these biases and to minimize them. This original decomposition is first analyzed from a theoretical point of view, and is then illustrated on a numerical example.

  4. The Repression of the Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haronian, Frank

    1977-01-01

    Psychosynthesis is one approach that strives to reach from the lower unconscious to the self, helping man to recognize his higher as well as his lower impulses, to accept the responsibility of deciding which to express and which to renounce, and to deal with the anxiety that is an inescapable aspect of the process of self-actualization. (Author)

  5. Optimized suppression of coherent noise from seismic data using the Karhunen-Loève transform.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Raúl; Vasconcelos, Giovani L

    2006-07-01

    Signals obtained in land seismic surveys are usually contaminated with coherent noise, among which the ground roll (Rayleigh surface waves) is of major concern for it can severely degrade the quality of the information obtained from the seismic record. This paper presents an optimized filter based on the Karhunen-Loève transform for processing seismic images contaminated with ground roll. In this method, the contaminated region of the seismic record, to be processed by the filter, is selected in such way as to correspond to the maximum of a properly defined coherence index. The main advantages of the method are that the ground roll is suppressed with negligible distortion of the remnant reflection signals and that the filtering procedure can be automated. The image processing technique described in this study should also be relevant for other applications where coherent structures embedded in a complex spatiotemporal pattern need to be identified in a more refined way. In particular, it is argued that the method is appropriate for processing optical coherence tomography images whose quality is often degraded by coherent noise (speckle). PMID:16907183

  6. Tolerance of the frequency deviation of LO sources at a MIMO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jiangnan; Li, Xingying; Zhang, Zirang; Xu, Yuming; Chen, Long; Yu, Jianjun

    2015-11-01

    We analyze and simulate the tolerance of frequency offset at a W-band optical-wireless transmission system. The transmission system adopts optical polarization division multiplexing (PDM), and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) reception. The transmission signal adopts optical quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulation, and the generation of millimeter-wave is based on the optical heterodyning technique. After 20-km single-mode fiber-28 (SMF-28) transmission, tens of Gb/s millimeter-wave signal is delivered. At the receiver, two millimeter-wave signals are down-converted into electrical intermediate-frequency (IF) signals in the analog domain by mixing with two electrical local oscillators (LOs) with different frequencies. We investigate the different frequency LO effect on the 2×2 MIMO system performance for the first time, finding that the process during DSP of implementing frequency offset estimation (FOE) before cascaded multi-modulus-algorithm (CMMA) equalization can get rid of the inter-channel interference (ICI) and improve system bit-error-ratio (BER) performance in this type of transmission system.

  7. On the application of Karhunen-Loève transform to transient dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glüsmann, Philipp; Kreuzer, Edwin

    2009-12-01

    The Karhunen-Loève transform (KLT) has become a popular method in various fields of engineering science. Due to its ability to identify the most prominent features in the underlying system dynamics the KLT is a favorable method for such tasks as process monitoring, model order reduction or optimum control. However, it is a well-known fact that the KLT is 'case sensitive'. That is that changes in the dynamic system behavior can decisively affect the KLT results. As much as this property is desired for monitoring problems, it limits the performance of KLT in model order reduction or optimum control problems, if systems are subject to structural changes. Recent research interest focuses on extending applications of KLT to systems with transient dynamic behavior or changing boundary conditions. Approaches have been published that circumvent the limitations of KLT by either assuming reasonable comparability of system dynamics or by measuring the representative performance of KLT-bases a posteriori. However, such methods require additional simulations of the full size system and thus jeopardize the idea of model order reduction. In this paper, we introduce a novel a priori measure to evaluate the performance of the current KLT-basis. This procedure can be of great help in either monitoring or adaptive control of systems that show intermittent transient and (quasi-)stationary dynamic behavior. This a priori measure prepares the path for adaptive model order reduction schemes. Moreover, it can be used to measure the stationarity of multidimensional dynamic processes.

  8. Aggregation of LoD 1 building models as an optimization problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guercke, R.; Götzelmann, T.; Brenner, C.; Sester, M.

    3D city models offered by digital map providers typically consist of several thousands or even millions of individual buildings. Those buildings are usually generated in an automated fashion from high resolution cadastral and remote sensing data and can be very detailed. However, not in every application such a high degree of detail is desirable. One way to remove complexity is to aggregate individual buildings, simplify the ground plan and assign an appropriate average building height. This task is computationally complex because it includes the combinatorial optimization problem of determining which subset of the original set of buildings should best be aggregated to meet the demands of an application. In this article, we introduce approaches to express different aspects of the aggregation of LoD 1 building models in the form of Mixed Integer Programming (MIP) problems. The advantage of this approach is that for linear (and some quadratic) MIP problems, sophisticated software exists to find exact solutions (global optima) with reasonable effort. We also propose two different heuristic approaches based on the region growing strategy and evaluate their potential for optimization by comparing their performance to a MIP-based approach.

  9. Study of LO-phonon decay in semiconductors for hot carrier solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levard, Hugo; Vidal, Julien; Laribi, Sana; Guillemoles, Jean-François

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge of phonon decay is of crucial importance when studying basic properties of semiconductors, since they are closely related to Raman linewidth and non-equilibrium-hot-carriers cooling. The latter indeed cools down to the bottom of the conduction band within a picosecond range because of electron-phonon interaction. The eventual emitted hot phonons then decay in few picoseconds. The hot carriers cooling can be slowed down by considering the decay rate dependence of phonon on conservation rules, whose tuning may reduce the allowed two-phonon final states density. This is of direct interest for the third generation photovoltaic devices that are Hot Carrier Solar Cells (HCSC), in which the photoexcited carriers are extracted at an energy higher than thermal equilibrium. One of the HCSC main challenges then is to find an absorber material in which the hot phonons has a relaxation time longer than the carriers cooling time, so that we can expect the electron to ``reabsorb'' a phonon, slowing down the electronic cooling. HCSC yield is ultimately limited by LO phonon decay, though. In this work, we present theoretical results obtained from ab initio calculations of phonon lifetime in III-V and IV-IV semiconductors through a three-phonon process. Common approximations in the literature are questioned. In particular, we show that the usual ``zone-center approximation'' is not valid in some specific semiconductors. The analysis allows to correctly investigate phonon decay mechanisms in bulk and nanostructured materials.

  10. Transport phenomena in the close-spaced sublimation deposition process for manufacture of large-area cadmium telluride photovoltaic panels: Modeling and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, C. P.

    With increasing national and global demand for energy and concerns about the effect of fossil fuels on global climate change, there is an increasing emphasis on the development and use of renewable sources of energy. Solar cells or photovoltaics constitute an important renewable energy technology but the major impediment to their widespread adoption has been their high initial cost. Although thin-film photovoltaic semiconductors such as cadmium sulfide-cadmium telluride (CdS/CdTe) can potentially be inexpensively manufactured using large area deposition techniques such as close-spaced sublimation (CSS), their low stability has prevented them from becoming an alternative to traditional polycrystalline silicon solar cells. A key factor affecting the stability of CdS/CdTe cells is the uniformity of deposition of the thin films. Currently no models exist that can relate the processing parameters in a CSS setup with the film deposition uniformity. Central to the development of these models is a fundamental understanding of the complex transport phenomena which constitute the deposition process which include coupled conduction and radiation as well as transition regime rarefied gas flow. This thesis is aimed at filling these knowledge gaps and thereby leading to the development of the relevant models. The specific process under consideration is the CSS setup developed by the Materials Engineering Group at the Colorado State University (CSU). Initially, a 3-D radiation-conduction model of a single processing station was developed using the commercial finite-element software ABAQUS and validated against data from steady-state experiments carried out at CSU. A simplified model was then optimized for maximizing the steady-state thermal uniformity within the substrate. It was inferred that contrary to traditional top and bottom infrared lamp heating, a lamp configuration that directs heat from the periphery of the sources towards the center results in the minimum temperature

  11. Fabrication of quasi-superlattices at the interface between 3 C-SiC epitaxial layer and substrates of hexagonal SiC polytypes by sublimation epitaxy in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. A.; Davydov, S. Yu.; Sorokin, L. M.; Shakhov, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to study the structure of a transition layer between a hexagonal substrate (6 H-SiC and 4 H-SiC) and a cubic silicon carbide layer grown by sublimation epitaxy in vacuum. It is shown by microdiffraction analysis that the transition layer with a thickness of 210 nm is constituted by alternating layers of cubic (3 C) and hexagonal (6 H) silicon carbide. It is demonstrated that 6 H-SiC/3 C-SiC and 4 H-SiC/3 C-SiC quasi-superlattices can be produced by this method.

  12. Nonlinear Analysis of the Space Shuttle Superlightweight LO2 Tank. Part 1; Bahavior Under Booster Ascent Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Collins, Timothy J.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Results of linear bifurcation and nonlinear analyses of the Space Shuttle superlightweight (SLWT) external liquid-oxygen (LO2) tank for an important early booster ascent loading condition are presented. These results for thin-walled linear elastic shells that are subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads illustrate an important type of response mode that may be encountered in the design of other liquid-fuel launch vehicles. Linear bifurcation analyses are presented that predict several nearly equal eigenvalues that correspond to local buckling modes in the forward ogive section of the LO2 tank. In contrast, the nonlinear response phenomenon is shown to consist of short-wavelength bending deformations in the forward ogive and barrel sections of the LO2 tank that growing amplitude in a stable manner increasing load. Imperfection sensitivity analyses are presented that show that the presence of several nearly equal eigenvalues does not lead to a premature general instability mode for the forward ogive section. For the linear bifurcation and nonlinear analyses, the results show that accurate predictions of the response of the shield generally require a large-scale, high-fidelity finite-element model. Results are also presented that show that the SLWT LO2 tank can support loads in excess of approximately 2.6 times the values of the operational loads considered.

  13. CXCR6 marks a novel subset of T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) natural killer cells residing in human liver.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Kerstin A; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Gill, Upkar; Pallant, Celeste; Christophides, Theodoros; Pallett, Laura J; Peppa, Dimitra; Dunn, Claire; Fusai, Giuseppe; Male, Victoria; Davidson, Brian R; Kennedy, Patrick; Maini, Mala K

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NK) are highly enriched in the human liver, where they can regulate immunity and immunopathology. We probed them for a liver-resident subset, distinct from conventional bone-marrow-derived NK. CXCR6+ NK were strikingly enriched in healthy and diseased liver compared to blood (p < 0.0001). Human hepatic CXCR6+ NK had an immature phenotype (predominantly CD56(bright)CD16-CD57-), and expressed the tissue-residency marker CD69. CXCR6+ NK produced fewer cytotoxic mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines than the non-liver-specific CXCR6- fraction. Instead CXCR6+ NK could upregulate TRAIL, a key death ligand in hepatitis pathogenesis. CXCR6 demarcated liver NK into two transcriptionally distinct populations: T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo)(CXCR6-) and T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi)(CXCR6+); the latter was virtually absent in the periphery. The small circulating CXCR6+ subset was predominantly T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo), suggesting its lineage was closer to CXCR6- peripheral than CXCR6+ liver NK. These data reveal a large subset of human liver-resident T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) NK, distinguished by their surface expression of CXCR6, adapted for hepatic tolerance and inducible anti-viral immunity. PMID:27210614

  14. Breeding for reduced post-harvest seed dormancy in switchgrass: registration of TEM-LoDorm switchgrass germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) germplasm line TEM-LoDorm (Reg. No. GP-98, PI 636468) was developed by the USDA-ARS in cooperation with the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (currently Texas AgriLife Research) and was released in May 2007. Establishment of desirable stands of switchgrass ...

  15. The LO Model and the Traditional French Organisational Culture: A Paradigmatic Contradiction Leading to a Limited Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belet, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with the issue of the very weak implementation of the LO model in France, although it appears as an appealing new management paradigm that can allow companies to better face a fast changing environment. The author argues that there is a strong philosophical contradiction between this innovative management model and the still…

  16. High-contrast 3D image acquisition using HiLo microscopy with an electrically tunable lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Katrin; Smolarski, André; Fischer, Andreas; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Stürmer, Moritz; Wallrabe, Ulricke; Czarske, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We present a HiLo microscope with an electrically tunable lens for high-contrast three-dimensional image acquisition. HiLo microscopy combines wide field and speckled illumination images to create optically sectioned images. Additionally, the depth-of-field is not fixed, but can be adjusted between wide field and confocal-like axial resolution. We incorporate an electrically tunable lens in the HiLo microscope for axial scanning, to obtain three-dimensional data without the need of moving neither the sample nor the objective. The used adaptive lens consists of a transparent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane into which an annular piezo bending actuator is embedded. A transparent fluid is filled between the membrane and the glass substrate. When actuated, the piezo generates a pressure in the lens which deflects the membrane and thus changes the refractive power. This technique enables a large tuning range of the refractive power between 1/f = (-24 . . . 25) 1/m. As the NA of the adaptive lens is only about 0.05, a fixed high-NA lens is included in the setup to provide high resolution. In this contribution, the scan properties and capabilities of the tunable lens in the HiLo microscope are analyzed. Eventually, exemplary measurements are presented and discussed.

  17. Mode sequence, frequency change of nonsoft phonons, and LO-TO splitting in strained tetragonal BaTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeliarijaona, Aldo; Fu, Huaxiang

    2015-09-01

    Ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy revealed the existence of an unusual large-frequency shift occurring to a nonsoft mode of E (TO4 ) when BaTiO3 is strained to a SrTiO3 substrate [D. Tenne et al., Science 313, 1614 (2006), 10.1126/science.1130306]. It raised two interesting questions: (i) whether there are other nonsoft modes that possess similar or even larger strain-induced frequency shifts and (ii) how the mode sequence is altered by these shifts in frequency. Note that mode sequence is also pivotal in correctly indexing and assigning the spectroscopy peaks observed in all Raman experiments. By mapping out the evolutions of individual phonon modes as a function of strain using first-principles density functional perturbation calculations, we determine the mode sequence and strain-induced phonon frequency shifts in prototypical BaTiO3. Our study reveals that the mode sequence is drastically different when BaTiO3 is strained to SrTiO3 compared to that in the unstrained structure, caused by multiple mode crossings. Furthermore, we predict that three other nonsoft modes, A1(TO2), E (LO4 ), and A1(TO3), display even larger strain-induced frequency shifts than E (TO4 ). The strain responses of individual modes are found to be highly mode specific, and a mechanism that regulates the magnitude of the frequency shift is provided. As another key outcome of this study, we tackle a long-standing problem of LO-TO splitting in ferroelectrics. A rigorous definition for the LO-TO splitting is formulated, which allows this critical quantity to be calculated quantitatively. The definition immediately reveals a new finding; that is, a large LO-TO splitting not only exists for E (LO4 ), which is previously known and originates from a soft mode, it also occurs for a nonsoft A1(LO3) mode. The LO-TO splitting is shown to decrease drastically with compressive strain, and this decrease cannot be explained by the Born effective charges and high-frequency dielectric constants.

  18. LoComatioN: a software tool for the analysis of low copy number DNA profiles.

    PubMed

    Gill, Peter; Kirkham, Amanda; Curran, James

    2007-03-01

    Previously, the interpretation of low copy number (LCN) STR profiles has been carried out using the biological or 'consensus' method-essentially, alleles are not reported, unless duplicated in separate PCR analyses [P. Gill, J. Whitaker, C. Flaxman, N. Brown, J. Buckleton, An investigation of the rigor of interpretation rules for STRs derived from less than 100 pg of DNA, Forens. Sci. Int. 112 (2000) 17-40]. The method is now widely used throughout Europe. Although a probabilistic theory was simultaneously introduced, its time-consuming complexity meant that it could not be easily applied in practice. The 'consensus' method is not as efficient as the probabilistic approach, as the former wastes information in DNA profiles. However, the theory was subsequently extended to allow for DNA mixtures and population substructure in a programmed solution by Curran et al. [J.M. Curran, P. Gill, M.R. Bill, Interpretation of repeat measurement DNA evidence allowing for multiple contributors and population substructure, Forens. Sci. Int. 148 (2005) 47-53]. In this paper, we describe an expert interpretation system (LoComatioN) which removes this computational burden, and enables application of the full probabilistic method. This is the first expert system that can be used to rapidly evaluate numerous alternative explanations in a likelihood ratio approach, greatly facilitating court evaluation of the evidence. This would not be possible with manual calculation. Finally, the Gill et al. and Curran et al. papers both rely on the ability of the user to specify two quantities: the probability of allelic drop-out, and the probability of allelic contamination ("drop-in"). In this paper, we offer some guidelines on how these quantities may be specified. PMID:16759831

  19. Spark Ignition Characteristics of a LO2/LCH4 Engine at Altitude Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Sarmiento, Charles; Marshall, William

    2012-01-01

    The use of non-toxic propellants in future exploration vehicles would enable safer, more cost effective mission scenarios. One promising "green" alternative to existing hypergols is liquid methane/liquid oxygen. To demonstrate performance and prove feasibility of this propellant combination, a 100lbf LO2/LCH4 engine was developed and tested under the NASA Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project. Since high ignition energy is a perceived drawback of this propellant combination, a test program was performed to explore ignition performance and reliability versus delivered spark energy. The sensitivity of ignition to spark timing and repetition rate was also examined. Three different exciter units were used with the engine's augmented (torch) igniter. Propellant temperature was also varied within the liquid range. Captured waveforms indicated spark behavior in hot fire conditions was inconsistent compared to the well-behaved dry sparks (in quiescent, room air). The escalating pressure and flow environment increases spark impedance and may at some point compromise an exciter.s ability to deliver a spark. Reduced spark energies of these sparks result in more erratic ignitions and adversely affect ignition probability. The timing of the sparks relative to the pressure/flow conditions also impacted the probability of ignition. Sparks occurring early in the flow could trigger ignition with energies as low as 1-6mJ, though multiple, similarly timed sparks of 55-75mJ were required for reliable ignition. An optimum time interval for spark application and ignition coincided with propellant introduction to the igniter and engine. Shifts of ignition timing were manifested by changes in the characteristics of the resulting ignition.

  20. Balm mint extract (Lo-701) for topical treatment of recurring herpes labialis.

    PubMed

    Koytchev, R; Alken, R G; Dundarov, S

    1999-10-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was carried out with the aim of proving efficacy of standardized balm mint cream [active ingredient: 1% Lo-701--dried extract from Melissa officinalis L. leaves (70:1)] for the therapy of herpes simplex labialis. Sixty six patients with a history of recurrent herpes labialis (at least four episodes per year) in one center were treated topically; 34 of them with verum and 32 with placebo. The cream had to be smeared on the affected area four times daily over five days. A combined symptom score of the values for complaints, size of affected area and blisters at day 2 of therapy was formed as the primary target parameter. There was a significant difference in the values of the primary target parameter between both treatment groups: verum 4.03 +/- 0.33 (3.0); placebo 4.94 +/- 0.40 (5.0); values given are mean +/- SEM (median) of the symptoms score on day 2 of therapy. The tested formulation is effective for the treatment of herpes simplex labialis. The significant difference in the combined symptom score on the second day of treatment is of particular importance having in mind that the complaints in patients suffering from herpes labialis are usually most intensive at that time. In addition to the shortening of the healing period, the prevention of a spreading of the infection and the rapid effect on typical symptoms of herpes like itching, tingling, burning, stabbing, swelling, tautness and erythema, the balm mint cream has a further advantage. The different mechanism of action of the balm mint extract rules out the development of resistance of the herpes virus. Some indication exists that the intervals between the periods with herpes might be prolonged with balm mint cream treatment. PMID:10589440

  1. Nectary Structure and Nectar Secretion in Maxillaria coccinea (Jacq.) L.O. Williams ex Hodge (Orchidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    STPICZYŃSKA, M.; DAVIES, K. L.; GREGG, A.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims It had previously been assumed that Maxillaria spp. produce no nectar. However, nectar has recently been observed in Maxillaria coccinea (Jacq.) L.O. Williams ex Hodge amongst other species. Furthermore, it is speculated that M. coccinea may be pollinated by hummingbirds. The aim of this paper is to investigate these claims further. • Methods Light microscopy, histochemistry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. • Key Results This is the first detailed account of nectar secretion in Maxillaria Ruiz & Pav. A ‘faucet and sink’ arrangement occurs in M. coccinea. Here, the nectary is represented by a small protuberance upon the ventral surface of the column and nectar collects in a semi‐saccate reservoir formed by the fusion of the labellum and the base of the column‐foot. The nectary comprises a single‐layered epidermis and three or four layers of small subepidermal cells. Beneath these occur several layers of larger parenchyma cells. Epidermal cells lack ectodesmata and have a thin, permeable, reticulate cuticle with associated swellings that coincide with the middle lamella between adjoining epidermal cells. Nectar is thought to pass both along the apoplast and symplast and eventually through the stretched and distended cuticle. The secretory cells are collenchymatous, nucleated and have numerous pits with plasmodesmata, mitochondria, rough ER and plastids with many plastoglobuli but few lamellae. Subsecretory cells have fewer plastids than secretory cells. Nectary cells also contain large intravacuolar protein bodies. The floral morphology of M. coccinea is considered in relation to ornithophily and its nectary compared with a similar protuberance found in the entomophilous species M. parviflora (Poepp. & Endl.) Garay. • Conclusions Flowers of M. coccinea produce copious amounts of nectar and, despite the absence of field data, their morphology and the exact configuration of their parts argue strongly in favour of

  2. More food, low pollution (mo fo lo Po): a grand challenge for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Eric A; Suddick, Emma C; Rice, Charles W; Prokopy, Linda S

    2015-03-01

    Synthetic nitrogen fertilizer has been a double-edged sword, greatly improving human nutrition during the 20th century but also posing major human health and environmental challenges for the 21st century. In August 2013, about 160 agronomists, scientists, extension agents, crop advisors, economists, social scientists, farmers, representatives of regulatory agencies and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and other agricultural experts gathered to discuss the vexing challenge of how to produce more food to nourish a growing population while minimizing pollution to the environment. This collection of 14 papers authored by conference participants provides a much needed analysis of the many technical, economic, and social impediments to improving nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in crop and animal production systems. These papers demonstrate that the goals of producing more food with low pollution (Mo Fo Lo Po) will not be achieved by technological developments alone but will also require policies that recognize the economic and social factors affecting farmer decision-making. Take-home lessons from this extraordinary interdisciplinary effort include the need (i) to develop partnerships among private and public sectors to demonstrate the most current, economically feasible, best management NUE practices at local and regional scales; (ii) to improve continuing education to private sector retailers and crop advisers; (iii) to tie nutrient management to performance-based indicators on the farm and in the downwind and downstream environment; and (iv) to restore investments in research, education, extension, and human resources that are essential for developing the interdisciplinary knowledge and innovative skills needed to achieve agricultural sustainability goals. PMID:26023950

  3. Estradiol agonists inhibit human LoVo colorectal-cancer cell proliferation and migration through p53

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Ju, Da-Tong; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Tu, Chuan-Chou; Tsai, Ying-Lan; Shen, Chia-Yao; Chang, Sheng-Huang; Chung, Li-Chin; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of 17β-estradiol via estrogen receptors (ER) or direct administration of ER agonists on human colorectal cancer. METHODS: LoVo cells were established from the Bioresource Collection and Research Center and cultured in phenol red-free DMEM (Sigma, United States). To investigate the effects of E2 and/or ER selective agonists on cellular proliferation, LoVo colorectal cells were treated with E2 or ER-selective agonists for 24 h and 48 h and subjected to the MTT (Sigma) assay to find the concentration. And investigate the effects of E2 and/or ER selective agonists on cell used western immunoblotting to find out the diversification of signaling pathways. In order to observe motility and migration the wound healing assay and a transwell chamber (Neuro Probe) plate were tased. For a quantitative measure, we counted the number of migrating cells to the wound area post-wounding for 24 h. We further examined the cellular migration-regulating factors urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in human LoVo cells so gelatin zymography that we used and gelatinolytic activity was visualized by Coomassie blue staining. And these results are presented as means ± SE, and statistical comparisons were made using Student’s t-test. RESULTS: The structure was first compared with E2 and ER agonists. We then treated the LoVo cells with E2 and ER agonists (10-8 mol/L) for 24 h and 48 h and subsequently measured the cell viability using MTT assay. Our results showed that treatment with 17β-estradiol and/or ER agonists in human LoVo colorectal cancer cells activated p53 and then up-regulated p21 and p27 protein levels, subsequently inhibiting the downstream target gene, cyclin D1, which regulates cell proliferation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the anti-tumorigenesis effects of 17β-estradiol and/or ER agonists and suggest that these compounds may prove to be a

  4. Volatile organic compound fluxes and concentrations in London (ClearfLo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valach, Amy; Langford, Ben; Nemitz, Eiko; MacKenzie, Rob; Hewitt, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from anthropogenic sources such as fuel combustion or evaporative emissions can directly and indirectly affect human health. Some VOCs, such as benzene and 1,3- butadiene are carcinogens. These and other VOCs contribute to the formation of ozone (O3) and aerosol particles, which have effects on human health and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Although in the UK VOC emissions are subject to control under European Commission Directive 2008/50/EC and emission reducing technologies have been implemented, urban air pollution remains a concern. Urban air quality is likely to remain a priority since currently >50% of the global population live in urban areas with trends in urbanization and population migration predicted to increase. The ClearfLo project is a large multi-institutional consortium funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and provides integrated measurements of meteorology, gas phase and particulate composition of the atmosphere over London. Both long term and IOP measurements were made at street and elevated locations at a range of sites across London and its surroundings during 2011 and 2012. Mixing ratios of a selection of nine VOCs were measured using a high sensitivity proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) at a ground level urban background (North Kensington) and kerbside (Marylebone Road) site during the winter IOP. VOC fluxes were measured by virtually disjunct eddy covariance (vDEC) at an elevated urban site (King's College Strand) in Aug-Dec 2012. Our results for the first IOP showed that most of the selected compound concentrations depended on traffic emissions, although there was a marked difference between the urban background and kerbside sites. We identified some temperature effects on VOC concentrations. We also present the first analyses of VOC flux measurements over London. Preliminary analyses indicate most compounds associated with vehicle emissions closely

  5. 100-Lb(f) LO2/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine Technology Development for Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Veith, Eric M.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Jimenez, Rafael; Smith, Timothy D.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has identified liquid oxygen (LO2)/liquid methane (LCH4) propulsion systems as promising options for some future space vehicles. NASA issued a contract to Aerojet to develop a 100-lbf (445 N) LO2/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine (RCE) aimed at reducing the risk of utilizing a cryogenic reaction control system (RCS) on a space vehicle. Aerojet utilized innovative design solutions to develop an RCE that can ignite reliably over a broad range of inlet temperatures, perform short minimum impulse bits (MIB) at small electrical pulse widths (EPW), and produce excellent specific impulse (Isp) across a range of engine mixture ratios (MR). These design innovations also provide a start transient with a benign MR, ensuring good thrust chamber compatibility and long life. In addition, this RCE can successfully operate at MRs associated with main engines, enabling the RCE to provide emergency backup propulsion to minimize vehicle propellant load and overall system mass.

  6. Enhancement of the HIF-1α/15-LO/15-HETE Axis Promotes Hypoxia-Induced Endothelial Proliferation in Preeclamptic Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Zhang, Yanhua; Li, Huiying; Li, Peiling; Zhu, Daling

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is an extremely serious condition in pregnant women and the leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Despite active research, the etiological factors of this disorder remain elusive. The increased release of 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) in the placenta of preeclamptic patients has been studied, but its exact role in PE pathogenesis remains unknown. Mounting evidence shows that PE is associated with placental hypoxia, impaired placental angiogenesis, and endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we confirmed the upregulated expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and 15-lipoxygenase-1/2 (15-LO-1/2) in patients with PE. Production of the arachidonic acid metabolite, 15-HETE, also increased in the preeclamptic placenta, which suggests enhanced activation of the HIF-1α–15-LO–15-HETE axis. Furthermore, this study is the first to show that the umbilical cord of preeclamptic women contains significantly higher serum concentrations of 15-HETE than that of healthy pregnant women. The results also show that expression of 15-LO-1/2 is upregulated in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) collected from preeclamptic women and in those cultured under hypoxic conditions. Exogenous 15-HETE promotes the migration of HUVECs and in vitro tube formation and promotes cell cycle progression from the G0/G1 phase to the G2/M + S phase, whereas the 15-LO inhibitor, NDGA, suppresses these effects. The HIF-1α/15-LO/15-HETE pathway is therefore significantly associated within the pathology of PE. PMID:24796548

  7. Rosiglitazone-induced CD36 up-regulation resolves inflammation by PPARγ and 5-LO-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Iván; Cuartero, María I; Pradillo, Jesús M; de la Parra, Juan; Pérez-Ruiz, Alberto; Corbí, Angel; Ricote, Mercedes; Hamilton, John A; Sobrado, Mónica; Vivancos, José; Nombela, Florentino; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Moro, María A

    2014-04-01

    PPARγ-achieved neuroprotection in experimental stroke has been explained by the inhibition of inflammatory genes, an action in which 5-LO, Alox5, is involved. In addition, PPARγ is known to promote the expression of CD36, a scavenger receptor that binds lipoproteins and mediates bacterial recognition and also phagocytosis. As phagocytic clearance of neutrophils is a requisite for resolution of the inflammatory response, PPARγ-induced CD36 expression might help to limit inflammatory tissue injury in stroke, an effect in which 5-LO might also be involved. Homogenates, sections, and cellular suspensions were prepared from brains of WT and Alox5(-/-) mice exposed to distal pMCAO. BMMs were obtained from Lys-M Cre(+) PPARγ(f/f) and Lys-M Cre(-) PPARγ(f/f) mice. Stereological counting of double-immunofluorescence-labeled brain sections and FACS analysis of cell suspensions was performed. In vivo and in vitro phagocytosis of neutrophils by microglia/macrophages was analyzed. PPARγ activation with RSG induced CD36 expression in resident microglia. This process was mediated by the 5-LO gene, which is induced in neurons by PPARγ activation and at least by one of its products--LXA4--which induced CD36 independently of PPARγ. Moreover, CD36 expression helped resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis, concomitantly to neuroprotection. Based on these findings, in addition to a direct modulation by PPARγ, we propose in brain a paracrine model by which products generated by neuronal 5-LO, such as LXA4, increase the microglial expression of CD36 and promote tissue repair in pathologies with an inflammatory component, such as stroke. PMID:24338629

  8. Immune Reconstitution after Autologous Hematopoietic Transplantation with Lin−, CD34+, Thy-1LO Selected or Intact Stem Cell Products*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rakesh K.; Varney, Michelle L.; Leutzinger, Cheryl; Vose, Julie M.; Bierman, Philip J.; Buyukberber, Suleyman; Ino, Kazuhiko; Loh, Kevin; Nichols, Craig; Inwards, David; Rifkin, Robert; Talmadge, James E.

    2007-01-01

    In sequential studies, we compared immune reconstitution following high dose chemotherapy (HDT) and stem cell transplantation (SCT) using intact mobilized peripheral blood stem cell (PSC) in intermediate grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients and CD34+, lineage negative (Lin−), Thy-1lo (CD34+Lin−Thy-1lo) stem cells in low-grade NHL patients. Cytokine expression and cellular phenotype and function were used as the basis for comparison. Despite differences in cellular composition of the stem cell grafts, immune reconstitution in both groups was similar. Significantly higher levels of type 1 and 2-associated cytokine messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) were observed both prior to and following transplant in the peripheral blood (PB) of both cohorts as compared to normal individuals. Similar levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) mRNA were seen in PB mononuclear cells following transplant with either product. In contrast, patients receiving isolated CD34+Lin−Thy-1lo cells expressed significantly higher IL-2 levels at all times examined post-transplant. Despite the high levels of cytokine gene expression and rapid restoration to pretransplant levels of CD3 cell number by day 30, T cell function and CD4:CD8 and CD4+CD45RA:CD4+CD45RO+ ratios were significantly depressed in both cohorts compared to normal donors, and significantly lower in patients transplanted with CD34+Lin−Thy-1lo compared to patients receiving an intact PSC product. These data suggest that the peripheral tolerance in patients receiving HDT and an autologous SCT occurs independent of graft composition, although immune function and CD4 recovery is better facilitated by transplantation of an intact product. PMID:17570320

  9. 77 FR 6793 - D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the PROPOSED D...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the PROPOSED D'LO Gas Storage Project, Request for Comments on Environmental Issues, and Notice of Onsite Environmental Review...

  10. A Study of the Relationship between Levels of Technology Implementation (LoTi) and Student Performance on Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkeley-Jones, Catherine Spotswood

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine teacher Levels of Technology Implementation (LoTi) self-ratings and student Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) scores. The study assessed the relationship between LoTi ratings and TAKS scores of 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students as reported in student records at Alamo Heights Independent School…

  11. The Host Galaxies of LoBAL QSOs at Low z: A Perspective from HST UVIS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behn, Wyatt Alan; Lazarova, Mariana; Canalizo, Gabriela

    2016-06-01

    We present GALFIT models of a complete optically-selected volume-limited sample of Low-Ionization Broad Absorption Line QSOs (LoBALs) in the redshift range 0.5-0.6 observed with HST WFC3 UVIS F475W. We investigate the morphologies in the rest frame u which map the younger stellar populations. In addition, we present statistics on the number of neighborhood galaxies within 150 kpc and possible trends between clustering and host galaxy properties. This sample of LoBALs is selected from QSOs characterized by their extreme blue-shifted absorption in the Mg II line—which is a signature of high velocity winds towards the observer. Only ~1-3% of optically selected QSOs are LoBALs. Their low fraction could be explained by their orientation or by a short period of outflow manifest in all QSOs during their lifetime. We aim to better understand the possibility of the evolutionary model by studying their morphologies in detail. Previous work on this sample, from images with F125W filter (rest frame i), shows that at least 60% of these objects exhibit signs of recent merger activity. We complement those results with our results from the UVIS observations and neighborhood clustering statistics.

  12. Lava bubble-wall fragments formed by submarine hydrovolcanic explosions on Lo'ihi Seamount and Kilauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Davis, A.S.; Bischoff, J.L.; Dixon, J.E.; Geyer, R.

    2000-01-01

    Glassy bubble-wall fragments, morphologically similar to littoral limu o Pele, have been found in volcanic sands erupted on Lo'ihi Seamount and along the submarine east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano. The limu o Pele fragments are undegassed with respect to H2O and S and formed by mild steam explosions. Angular glass sand fragments apparently form at similar, and greater, depths by cooling-contraction granulation. The limu o Pele fragments from Lo'ihi Seamount are dominantly tholeiitic basalt containing 6.25-7.25% MgO. None of the limu o Pele samples from Lo'ihi Seamount contains less than 5.57% MgO, suggesting that higher viscosity magmas do not form lava bubbles. The dissolved CO2 and H2O contents of 7 of the limu o Pele fragments indicate eruption at 1200??300 m depth (120??30 bar). These pressures exceed that generally thought to limit steam explosions. We conclude that hydrovolcanic eruptions are possible, with appropriate pre-mixing conditions, at pressures as great as 120 bar.

  13. Three dimensional HiLo-based structured illumination for a digital scanned laser sheet microscopy (DSLM) in thick tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Dipanjan; Singh, Vijay Raj; Zhi, Chen; So, Peter T. C.; Matsudaira, Paul; Barbastathis, George

    2012-01-01

    Laser sheet based microscopy has become widely accepted as an effective active illumination method for real time three-dimensional (3D) imaging of biological tissue samples. The light sheet geometry, where the camera is oriented perpendicular to the sheet itself, provides an effective method of eliminating some of the scattered light and minimizing the sample exposure to radiation. However, residual background noise still remains, limiting the contrast and visibility of potentially interesting features in the samples. In this article, we investigate additional structuring of the illumination for improved background rejection, and propose a new technique, “3D HiLo” where we combine two HiLo images processed from orthogonal directions to improve the condition of the 3D reconstruction. We present a comparative study of conventional structured illumination based demodulation methods, namely 3Phase and HiLo with a newly implemented 3D HiLo approach and demonstrate that the latter yields superior signal-to-background ratio in both lateral and axial dimensions, while simultaneously suppressing image processing artifacts. PMID:23262684

  14. Intracranial self-stimulation reward thresholds during morphine withdrawal in rats bred for high (HiS) and low (LoS) saccharin intake

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Nathan A.; Radke, Anna K.; Zlebnik, Natalie E.; Harris, Andrew C.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    Rational Sweet preference is a marker of vulnerability to substance use disorders, and rats selectively bred for high (HiS) vs. low saccharin (LoS) intake display potentiated drug-seeking behaviors. Recent work indicated that LoS rats were more responsive to the negative effects of drugs in several assays. Objective The current study used the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure to investigate the anhedonic component of morphine withdrawal in male HiS and LoS rats. Methods Rats were administered morphine (10 mg/kg) or saline for 8 days. To evaluate withdrawal effects, reward thresholds were measured 24 and 28 h following the 8th morphine injection (spontaneous withdrawal) and again for 4 days following daily acute morphine and naloxone (1 mg/kg) administration (precipitated withdrawal). Results Twenty-four hr following the final morphine injection, reward thresholds in LoS rats were significantly elevated compared to reward thresholds in LoS controls, indicating spontaneous withdrawal. This effect was not observed in HiS rats. LoS rats also showed greater elevations of reward thresholds on several days during naloxone-precipitated withdrawal compared to their HiS counterparts. Conclusions LoS rats were more sensitive to morphine withdrawal-mediated elevations in ICSS thresholds than HiS rats. While these differences were generally modest, our data suggest that severity of the negative affective component of opiate withdrawal may be influenced by genotypes related to addiction vulnerability. PMID:25582876

  15. Reduced emotional signs of opiate withdrawal in rats selectively bred for low (LoS) versus high (HiS) saccharin intake

    PubMed Central

    Radke, Anna K.; Holtz, Nathan A.; Gewirtz, Jonathan C.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Rats bred for high (HiS) and low (LoS) saccharin intake exhibit divergent behavioral responses to multiple drugs of abuse, with HiS rats displaying greater vulnerability to drug taking. Previous research indicates that this effect may be due to increased sensitivity to reward in HiS rats and to the aversive effects of acute drug administration in LoS rats. Objective The current study investigated whether HiS and LoS rats also exhibit different behavioral signs of withdrawal following one or repeated opiate exposures. Methods Emotional signs of opiate withdrawal were assessed with potentiation of the acoustic startle reflex and conditioned place aversion (CPA) in male and female HiS and LoS rats. Startle was measured before and 4 h after a 10 mg/kg injection of morphine on days 1, 2, and 7 of opiate exposure. CPA was induced with a two-day, naloxone-precipitated conditioning paradigm. Somatic signs of withdrawal and weight loss were used also measured. Results Male and female LoS rats exhibited lower startle potentiation than HiS rats on the seventh day of morphine exposure. LoS male rats also failed to develop a CPA to morphine withdrawal. No differences in physical withdrawal signs were observed between HiS and LoS rats, but males of both lines had more physical signs of withdrawal than females. Conclusions These results suggest that LoS rats are less vulnerable to the negative emotional effects of morphine withdrawal than HiS rats. A less severe withdrawal syndrome may contribute to decreased levels of drug taking in the LoS line. PMID:23254375

  16. Interstellar Hydrogen Fluxes Measured by IBEX-Lo in 2009: Numerical Modeling and Comparison with the Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katushkina, O. A.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Alexashov, D. B.; Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we perform numerical modeling of the interstellar hydrogen fluxes measured by IBEX-Lo during orbit 23 (spring 2009) using a state-of-the-art kinetic model of the interstellar neutral hydrogen distribution in the heliosphere. This model takes into account the temporal and heliolatitudinal variations of the solar parameters as well as the non-Maxwellian kinetic properties of the hydrogen distribution due to charge exchange in the heliospheric interface. We found that there is a qualitative difference between the IBEX-Lo data and the modeling results obtained with the three-dimensional, time-dependent model. Namely, the model predicts a larger count rate in energy bin 2 (20-41 eV) than in energy bin 1 (11-21 eV), while the data shows the opposite case. We perform study of the model parameter effects on the IBEX-Lo fluxes and the ratio of fluxes in two energy channels. We show that the most important parameter, which has a major influence on the ratio of the fluxes in the two energy bins, is the solar radiation pressure. The parameter fitting procedure shows that the best agreement between the model result and the data occurs when the ratio of the solar radiation pressure to the solar gravitation, μ0, is {1.26}-0.076+0.06, and the total ionization rate of hydrogen at 1 AU is {β }E,0={3.7}-0.35+0.39× {10}-7 s-1. We have found that the value of μ0 is much larger than μ0 = 0.89, which is the value derived from the integrated solar Lyα flux data for the period of time studied. We discuss possible reasons for the differences.

  17. The origins of metamodality in visual object area LO: Bodily topographical biases and increased functional connectivity to S1

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Zohar; Geva, Ran; Amedi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence from blind participants suggests that visual areas are task-oriented and sensory modality input independent rather than sensory-specific to vision. Specifically, visual areas are thought to retain their functional selectivity when using non-visual inputs (touch or sound) even without having any visual experience. However, this theory is still controversial since it is not clear whether this also characterizes the sighted brain, and whether the reported results in the sighted reflect basic fundamental a-modal processes or are an epiphenomenon to a large extent. In the current study, we addressed these questions using a series of fMRI experiments aimed to explore visual cortex responses to passive touch on various body parts and the coupling between the parietal and visual cortices as manifested by functional connectivity. We show that passive touch robustly activated the object selective parts of the lateral–occipital (LO) cortex while deactivating almost all other occipital–retinotopic-areas. Furthermore, passive touch responses in the visual cortex were specific to hand and upper trunk stimulations. Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis suggests that LO is functionally connected to the hand area in the primary somatosensory homunculus (S1), during hand and shoulder stimulations but not to any of the other body parts. We suggest that LO is a fundamental hub that serves as a node between visual-object selective areas and S1 hand representation, probably due to the critical evolutionary role of touch in object recognition and manipulation. These results might also point to a more general principle suggesting that recruitment or deactivation of the visual cortex by other sensory input depends on the ecological relevance of the information conveyed by this input to the task/computations carried out by each area or network. This is likely to rely on the unique and differential pattern of connectivity for each visual area with the rest of the

  18. The origins of metamodality in visual object area LO: Bodily topographical biases and increased functional connectivity to S1.

    PubMed

    Tal, Zohar; Geva, Ran; Amedi, Amir

    2016-02-15

    Recent evidence from blind participants suggests that visual areas are task-oriented and sensory modality input independent rather than sensory-specific to vision. Specifically, visual areas are thought to retain their functional selectivity when using non-visual inputs (touch or sound) even without having any visual experience. However, this theory is still controversial since it is not clear whether this also characterizes the sighted brain, and whether the reported results in the sighted reflect basic fundamental a-modal processes or are an epiphenomenon to a large extent. In the current study, we addressed these questions using a series of fMRI experiments aimed to explore visual cortex responses to passive touch on various body parts and the coupling between the parietal and visual cortices as manifested by functional connectivity. We show that passive touch robustly activated the object selective parts of the lateral-occipital (LO) cortex while deactivating almost all other occipital-retinotopic-areas. Furthermore, passive touch responses in the visual cortex were specific to hand and upper trunk stimulations. Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis suggests that LO is functionally connected to the hand area in the primary somatosensory homunculus (S1), during hand and shoulder stimulations but not to any of the other body parts. We suggest that LO is a fundamental hub that serves as a node between visual-object selective areas and S1 hand representation, probably due to the critical evolutionary role of touch in object recognition and manipulation. These results might also point to a more general principle suggesting that recruitment or deactivation of the visual cortex by other sensory input depends on the ecological relevance of the information conveyed by this input to the task/computations carried out by each area or network. This is likely to rely on the unique and differential pattern of connectivity for each visual area with the rest of the

  19. Advantages of Karhunen Loève transform over fast Fourier transform for planetary radar and space debris detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2007-04-01

    The present article describes that the range of any radiotelescope (and radar in general) may be increased by virtue of software, if one replaces the fast Fourier transform by the Karhunen Loève transform. The range increases with the inverse of the fourth root of the signal-to-noise ratio when this ratio decreases. Thus, the range on any radiotelescope (and radar) may be increased without changing the hardware at all, but by changing the software only. This improvement in the range of the radiotelescope is currently implemented at the 32-m antenna located at Medicina, near Bologna, in Italy, for both SETI and general radioastronomy.

  20. Seasonality and paleoecology of the late Cretaceous multi-taxa vertebrate assemblage of "Lo Hueco" (central eastern Spain).

    PubMed

    Domingo, Laura; Barroso-Barcenilla, Fernando; Cambra-Moo, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic studies of multi-taxa terrestrial vertebrate assemblages allow determination of paleoclimatic and paleoecological aspects on account of the different information supplied by each taxon. The late Campanian-early Maastrichtian "Lo Hueco" Fossil-Lagerstätte (central eastern Spain), located at a subtropical paleolatitude of ~31°N, constitutes an ideal setting to carry out this task due to its abundant and diverse vertebrate assemblage. Local δ18OPO4 values estimated from δ18OPO4 values of theropods, sauropods, crocodyliforms, and turtles are close to δ18OH2O values observed at modern subtropical latitudes. Theropod δ18OH2O values are lower than those shown by crocodyliforms and turtles, indicating that terrestrial endothermic taxa record δ18OH2O values throughout the year, whereas semiaquatic ectothermic taxa δ18OH2O values represent local meteoric waters over a shorter time period when conditions are favorable for bioapatite synthesis (warm season). Temperatures calculated by combining theropod, crocodyliform, and turtle δ18OH2O values and gar δ18OPO4 have enabled us to estimate seasonal variability as the difference between mean annual temperature (MAT, yielded by theropods) and temperature of the warmest months (TWMs, provided by crocodyliforms and turtles). ΔTWMs-MAT value does not point to a significantly different seasonal thermal variability when compared to modern coastal subtropical meteorological stations and Late Cretaceous rudists from eastern Tethys. Bioapatite and bulk organic matter δ13C values point to a C3 environment in the "Lo Hueco" area. The estimated fractionation between sauropod enamel and diet is ~15‰. While waiting for paleoecological information yielded by the ongoing morphological study of the "Lo Hueco" crocodyliforms, δ13C and δ18OCO3 results point to incorporation of food items with brackish influence, but preferential ingestion of freshwater. "Lo Hueco" turtles showed the lowest δ13C and δ18OCO3 values of the

  1. Seasonality and Paleoecology of the Late Cretaceous Multi-Taxa Vertebrate Assemblage of “Lo Hueco” (Central Eastern Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Laura; Barroso-Barcenilla, Fernando; Cambra-Moo, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic studies of multi-taxa terrestrial vertebrate assemblages allow determination of paleoclimatic and paleoecological aspects on account of the different information supplied by each taxon. The late Campanian-early Maastrichtian “Lo Hueco” Fossil-Lagerstätte (central eastern Spain), located at a subtropical paleolatitude of ~31°N, constitutes an ideal setting to carry out this task due to its abundant and diverse vertebrate assemblage. Local δ18OPO4 values estimated from δ18OPO4 values of theropods, sauropods, crocodyliforms, and turtles are close to δ18OH2O values observed at modern subtropical latitudes. Theropod δ18OH2O values are lower than those shown by crocodyliforms and turtles, indicating that terrestrial endothermic taxa record δ18OH2O values throughout the year, whereas semiaquatic ectothermic taxa δ18OH2O values represent local meteoric waters over a shorter time period when conditions are favorable for bioapatite synthesis (warm season). Temperatures calculated by combining theropod, crocodyliform, and turtle δ18OH2O values and gar δ18OPO4 have enabled us to estimate seasonal variability as the difference between mean annual temperature (MAT, yielded by theropods) and temperature of the warmest months (TWMs, provided by crocodyliforms and turtles). ΔTWMs-MAT value does not point to a significantly different seasonal thermal variability when compared to modern coastal subtropical meteorological stations and Late Cretaceous rudists from eastern Tethys. Bioapatite and bulk organic matter δ13C values point to a C3 environment in the “Lo Hueco” area. The estimated fractionation between sauropod enamel and diet is ~15‰. While waiting for paleoecological information yielded by the ongoing morphological study of the “Lo Hueco” crocodyliforms, δ13C and δ18OCO3 results point to incorporation of food items with brackish influence, but preferential ingestion of freshwater. “Lo Hueco” turtles showed the lowest δ13C and δ18OCO3

  2. Optical and X-ray studies of chromospherically active stars: FR Cancri, HD 95559 and LO Pegasi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, J. C.; Singh, K. P.; Drake, S. A.; Sagar, R.

    2005-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of three chromospherically active stars, namely FR Cnc (= BD +16 degrees 1753), HD 95559 and LO Peg (=BD +22 degrees 4409), including newly obtained optical photometry, (for FR Cnc) low-resolution optical spectroscopy, as well as archival IR and X-ray observations. The BVR photometry carried out during the years 2001 - 2004 has found significant photometric variability to be present in all three stars. For FR Cnc, a photometric period 0.826685 +/- 0.000034 d has been established. The strong variation in the phase and amplitude of the FR Cnc light curves when folded on this period implies the presence of evolving and migrating spots or spot groups on its surface. Two independent spots with migration periods of 0.97 and 0.93 years respectively are inferred. The photometry of HD 95559 suggests the formation of a spot (group) during the interval of our observations. We infer the existence of two independent spots or groups in the photosphere of LO Peg, one of which has a migration period of 1.12 years. The optical spectroscopy of FR Cnc carried out during 2002-2003, reveals the presence of strong and variable Ca I1 H and K, H(sub beta) and H(sub alpha) emission features indicative of high level of chromospheric activity. The value of 5.3 for the ratio of the excess emission in H(sub alpha) to H(sub beta), EH(sub alpha)/EH(sub beta), suggests that the chromospheric emission may arise from an extended off-limb region. We have searched for the presence of color excesses in the near-IR JHK bands of these stars using 2MASS data, but none of them appear to have any significant color excess. We have also analyzed archival X-ray observations of HD 95559 and LO Peg carried out by with the ROSAT observatory. The best fit models to their X-ray spectra imply the presence of two coronal plasma components of differing temperatures and with sub-solar metal abundances. The inferred emission measures and temperatures of these systems are similar to

  3. Investigation of lightweight designs and materials for LO2 and LH2 propellant tanks for space vehicles, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Design, analysis, and fabrication studies were performed on nonintegral (suspended) tanks using a representative space tug design. The LH2 and LO2 tank concept selection was developed. Tank geometries and support relationships were investigated using tug design propellant inertias and ullage pressures, then compared based on total tug systems effects. The tank combinations which resulted in the maximum payload were selected. Tests were conducted on samples of membrane material which was processed in a manner simulating production tank fabrication operations to determine fabrication effects on the fracture toughness of the tank material. Fracture mechanics analyses were also performed to establish a preliminary set of allowables for initial defects.

  4. Optical and X-Ray Studies of Chromospherically Active Stars: FR Cancri, HD 95559, and LO Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, J. C.; Singh, K. P.; Drake, S. A.; Sagar, R.

    2005-09-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of three chromospherically active stars, namely, FR Cnc (BD +16°1753), HD 95559, and LO Peg (BD +22°4409), including newly obtained optical photometry and low-resolution optical spectroscopy for FR Cnc, as well as archival IR and X-ray observations. The BVR photometry carried out from 2001 to 2004 has found significant photometric variability to be present in all three stars. For FR Cnc, a photometric period of 0.8267+/-0.0004 days has been established. The strong variation in the phase and amplitude of the FR Cnc light curves when folded on this period implies the presence of evolving and migrating spots or spot groups on its surface. Two independent spots with migration periods of 0.97 and 0.93 yr, respectively, are inferred. The photometry of HD 95559 suggests the formation of a spot (group) during the interval of our observations. We infer the existence of two independent spots or groups in the photosphere of LO Peg, one of which has a migration period of 1.12 yr. The optical spectroscopy of FR Cnc carried out during 2002-2003 reveals the presence of strong and variable Ca II H and K, Hβ, and Hα emission features indicative of a high level of chromospheric activity. The value of 5.3 for the ratio of the excess emission in Hα to Hβ, EHα/EHβ, suggests that the chromospheric emission may arise from an extended off-limb region. We have searched for the presence of color excesses in the near-IR JHK bands of these stars using Two Micron All Sky Survey data, but none of them appear to have any significant color excess. We have also analyzed archival X-ray observations of HD 95559 and LO Peg carried out with the ROSAT observatory. The best-fit models to their X-ray spectra imply the presence of two coronal plasma components of differing temperatures and with subsolar metal abundances. The inferred emission measures and temperatures of these systems are similar to those found for other active dwarf stars. The kinematics of FR

  5. Jet-vetoed Higgs cross section in gluon fusion at N3LO+NNLL with small-R resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfi, Andrea; Caola, Fabrizio; Dreyer, Frédéric A.; Monni, Pier Francesco; Salam, Gavin P.; Zanderighi, Giulia; Dulat, Falko

    2016-04-01

    We present new results for the jet-veto efficiency and zero-jet cross section in Higgs production through gluon fusion. We incorporate the N3LO corrections to the total cross section, the NNLO corrections to the 1-jet rate, NNLL resummation for the jet p t and LL resummation for the jet radius dependence. Our results include known finite-mass corrections and are obtained using the jet-veto efficiency method, updated relative to earlier work to take into account what has been learnt from the new precision calculations that we include. For 13 TeV collisions and using our default choice for the renormalisation and factorisation scales, μ 0 = m H /2, the matched prediction for the jet-veto efficiency increases the pure N3LO prediction by about 2% and the two have comparable uncertainties. Relative to NNLO+NNLL results, the new prediction is 2% smaller and the uncertainty reduces from about 10% to a few percent. Results are also presented for the central scale μ 0 = m H .

  6. Metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells and induced a time-dependent metabolic and transcriptional alteration.

    PubMed

    He, Jiaojiao; Wang, Ke; Zheng, Ningning; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2015-01-01

    Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug with potential anti-tumor activity. However, little is known about its global metabolic and transcriptional impacts on tumor cells. In current study, we performed a metabolic profiling on human-derived colon cancer LoVo cells treated by 10 mM metformin for 8, 24 and 48 h. An obvious time-dependent metabolic alteration was observed from 8 to 48 h, prior to the reduction of cell viability. A total of 47, 45 and 66 differential metabolites were identified between control and metformin-treated cells at three time points. Most of the metabolites were up-regulated at 8 h, but down-regulated at 24 and 48 h by metformin. These metabolites were mainly involved in carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides metabolism pathways. Meanwhile, the transcirptomic profile revealed 134 and 3061 differentially expressed genes at 8 and 24 h by metformin. In addition to the cancer signaling pathways, expression of genes involved in cell energy metabolism pathways was significantly altered, which were further validated with genes in glucose metabolism pathway. Altogether, our current data indicate that metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells, which may be due to the modulation on cell energy metabolism at both metabolic and transcriptional levels in a time-dependent way. PMID:26616174

  7. Metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells and induced a time-dependent metabolic and transcriptional alteration

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiaojiao; Wang, Ke; Zheng, Ningning; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2015-01-01

    Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug with potential anti-tumor activity. However, little is known about its global metabolic and transcriptional impacts on tumor cells. In current study, we performed a metabolic profiling on human-derived colon cancer LoVo cells treated by 10 mM metformin for 8, 24 and 48 h. An obvious time-dependent metabolic alteration was observed from 8 to 48 h, prior to the reduction of cell viability. A total of 47, 45 and 66 differential metabolites were identified between control and metformin-treated cells at three time points. Most of the metabolites were up-regulated at 8 h, but down-regulated at 24 and 48 h by metformin. These metabolites were mainly involved in carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides metabolism pathways. Meanwhile, the transcirptomic profile revealed 134 and 3061 differentially expressed genes at 8 and 24 h by metformin. In addition to the cancer signaling pathways, expression of genes involved in cell energy metabolism pathways was significantly altered, which were further validated with genes in glucose metabolism pathway. Altogether, our current data indicate that metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells, which may be due to the modulation on cell energy metabolism at both metabolic and transcriptional levels in a time-dependent way. PMID:26616174

  8. Navier-Stokes computations with finite-rate chemistry for LO2/LH2 rocket engine plume flow studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, N. Sam; Liu, Baw-Lin

    1991-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics methods have been developed and applied to Space Shuttle Main Engine LO2/LH2 plume flow simulation/analysis of airloading and convective base heating effects on the vehicle at high flight velocities and altitudes. New methods are described which were applied to the simulation of a Return-to-Launch-Site abort where the vehicle would fly briefly at negative angles of attack into its own plume. A simplified two-perfect-gases-mixing approach is used where one gas is the plume and the other is air at 180-deg and 135-deg flight angle of attack. Related research has resulted in real gas multiple-plume interaction methods with finite-rate chemistry described herein which are applied to the same high-altitude-flight conditions of 0 deg angle of attack. Continuing research plans are to study Orbiter wake/plume flows at several Mach numbers and altitudes during ascent and then to merge this model with the Shuttle 'nose-to-tail' aerodynamic and SRB plume models for an overall 'nose-to-plume' capability. These new methods are also applicable to future launch vehicles using clustered-engine LO2/LH2 propulsion.

  9. Inhibition of migration and induction of apoptosis in LoVo human colon cancer cells by polysaccharides from Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zeng-Enni; Yi, You-Jin; Guo, Yu-Tong; Wang, Ren-Cai; Hu, Qiu-Long; Xiong, Xing-Yao

    2015-11-01

    Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLPs), which were purified from the medicinal herb G. lucidum followed by ethanol precipitation, protein depletion using the Sevage assay, purification using DEAE‑cellulose (DE-52), dialysis and the use of ultrafiltration membranes, are used as an ingredient in traditional anticancer treatments in China. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the anticancer effects and investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of GLPs on LoVo human colon cancer cells. The results demonstrated that the GLP‑mediated anticancer effect in LoVo cells was characterized by cytotoxicity, migration inhibition, enhanced DNA fragmentation, morphological alterations and increased lactate dehydrogenase release. Furthermore, the activation of caspases‑3, ‑8 and ‑9 was involved in GLP‑stimulated apoptosis. Additionally, treatment with GLPs promoted the expression of Fas and caspase‑3 proteins, whilst reducing the expression of cleaved poly(ADP‑ribose) polymerase. These data indicate that GLPs demonstrate potential antitumor activity in human colon cancer cells, predominantly through the inhibition of migration and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, activation of the Fas/caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway is involved in the cytotoxicity of GLPs. PMID:26397202

  10. Titanosaur Osteoderms from the Upper Cretaceous of Lo Hueco (Spain) and Their Implications on the Armor of Laurasian Titanosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Daniel; Ortega, Francisco; Sanz, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Titanosaurs are the only sauropod dinosaurs known to bear a dermal armor. Their osteoderms are relatively rare finds, with few more than a hundred specimens recovered worldwide. Also, little is known about their intra-individual, intra-specific or inter-specific variability. The macrovertebrate site of Lo Hueco (Upper Cretaceous; Cuenca, Spain) has yielded several complete specimens of osteoderms, some associated with fairly articulated specimens. They are all variations of the morphotype known as bulb and root. The presence of only this morphotype in Europe, which is considered as the primitive condition among titanosaurs, seems to indicate that the known Upper Cretaceous Laurasian titanosaurs only bore these referred bulb and root osteoderms. An eliptic Fourier analysis on the outline of complete specimens from this morphotype reveals: i) that they truly are part of a morphological cline; and ii) the existence of a consistent correlation between the outline and the morphology of the bulb. Such variation along a cline is more consistent with intra-individual rather than inter-specific variation. The osteoderms associated with a single titanosaur individual from Lo Hueco reinforce this hypothesis. PMID:25118985

  11. Listeria monocytogenes LO28: Surface Physicochemical Properties and Ability To Form Biofilms at Different Temperatures and Growth Phases

    PubMed Central

    Chavant, Patrick; Martinie, Brigitte; Meylheuc, Thierry; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie-Noëlle; Hebraud, Michel

    2002-01-01

    The surface physicochemical properties of Listeria monocytogenes LO28 under different conditions (temperature and growth phase) were determined by use of microelectrophoresis and microbial adhesion to solvents. The effect of these parameters on adhesion and biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes LO28 on hydrophilic (stainless steel) and hydrophobic (polytetrafluoroethylene [PTFE]) surfaces was assessed. The bacterial cells were always negatively charged and possessed hydrophilic surface properties, which were negatively correlated with growth temperature. The colonization of the two surfaces, monitored by scanning electron microscopy, epifluorescence microscopy, and cell enumeration, showed that the strain had a great capacity to colonize both surfaces whatever the incubation temperature. However, biofilm formation was faster on the hydrophilic substratum. After 5 days at 37 or 20°C, the biofilm structure was composed of aggregates with a three-dimensional shape, but significant detachment took place on PTFE at 37°C. At 8°C, only a bacterial monolayer was visible on stainless steel, while no growth was observed on PTFE. The growth phase of bacteria used to inoculate surfaces had a significant effect only in some cases during the first steps of biofilm formation. The surface physicochemical properties of the strain are correlated with adhesion and surface colonization. PMID:11823213

  12. English vowel production by native Mandarin speakers: Influences of AoA, LoR, education, perception, and orthography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell-Berti, Fredericka; Yu, Yan Helen

    2005-09-01

    This study investigates relations among several factors that are expected to influence vowel production in second language learning, including AoA, LoR, L2 and general education, L2 perception, and orthography. Vowel production will be examined through duration and formant frequency measurements and listener identification. The results will be analyzed in relation to educational background and language use. Among the educational factors examined are general education level, English education (in their native land and/or New York City), and sound-annotating system experiences in Mandarin (Pinyin or Zhuyin). The language-use factors include AoA, LoR, language spoken at work and at home, and perception of English vowels. The hypotheses addressed include: (1) educational background, language use, and sound-annotating system experiences in Mandarin all influence L2 English speakers perception and production of English vowels; (2) the more accurately an L2 listener discriminates a vowel contrast, the more distinctly he/she produces that contrast.

  13. Investigation of lightweight designs and materials for LO2 and LH2 propellant tanks for space vehicles, phase 2 and phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Full size Tug LO2 and LH2 tank configurations were defined, based on selected tank geometries. These configurations were then locally modeled for computer stress analysis. A large subscale test tank, representing the selected Tug LO2 tank, was designed and analyzed. This tank was fabricated using procedures which represented production operations. An evaluation test program was outlined and a test procedure defined. The necessary test hardware was also fabricated.

  14. Overexpression of molecular chaperons GRP78 and GRP94 in CD44hi/CD24lo breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Nami, Babak; Ghasemi-Dizgah, Armin; Vaseghi, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Breast cancer stem cell with CD44hi/CD24lo phonotype is described having stem cell properties and represented as the main driving factor in breast cancer initiation, growth, metastasis and low response to anti-cancer agents. Glucoseregulated proteins (GRPs) are heat shock protein family chaperons that are charged with regulation of protein machinery and modulation of endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis whose important roles in stem cell development and invasion of various cancers have been demonstrated. Here, we investigated the expression levels of GRP78 and GRP94 in CD44hi/CD24lo phenotype breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). Methods: MCF7, T-47D and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines were used. CD44hi/CD24lo phenotype cell population were analyzed and sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Transcriptional and translational expression of GRP78 and GRP94 were investigated by western blotting and quantitative real time PCR. Results: Results showed different proportion of CD44hi/CD24lo phenotype cell population in their original bulk cells. The ranking of the cell lines in terms of CD44hi/CD24lo phenotype cell population was as MCF7lo phenotype cells exhibited higher mRNA and protein expression level of GRP78 and GRP94 compared to their original bulk cells. Conclusion: Our results show a relationship between overexpression of GRP78 and GRP94 and exhibiting CD44hi/CD24lo phenotype in breast cancer cells. We conclude that upregulation of GRPs may be an important factor in the emergence of CD44hi/CD24lo phenotype BCSCs features. PMID:27525228

  15. A Passive Thermal Carrier (LoTEC(c )) for Temperature Sensitive Materials Being Moved to and From ISS and for Shuttle (STS) Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessling, F. C.; Blackwood, J. M.; Holt, H. R.

    2002-01-01

    the use of power for transporting temperature sensitive materials to and from the International Space Station. LoTEC uses a combination of high thermal resistance insulation, careful thermal design and phase change materials to maintain temperature. It has been tested with phase change materials for three different interior temperatures (-16C, 0C, +4C). These temperatures are usable for preservation of many biological materials during transport. The exterior dimensions of LoTEC are approximately 250.7 x 436.9 x 514.1 mm. Thus, LoTEC fits into a standard mid-deck locker, an Express Rack, a SpaceHab rack or a rack in the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM). LoTEC has an empty mass of approximately 9.6 kg and an internal volume of 22 Liters. This volume is reduced by the amount and type of phase change material (PCM) used. For example, eight kg of water ice and its containers would take up approximately half of the internal volume, leaving 11 Liters of space for the payload. Several different configurations have been considered to accommodate different payload dimensions.The interior dimensions of LoTEC are approximately 406 x 343 x 158 mm. Measured energy gain by LoTEC is approximately 0.14 watts per degrees Celsius. Performance data in the form of temperature versus time curves are included. Eight kg of PCM gives approximately eight days of constant temperature at typical STS interior temperatures. The temperature distribution in LoTEC is dependent on the PCM containers, the PCM used, and the location of the containers in LoTEC. Small, stand-alone data loggers record the temperatures. Refreezing of phase change materials depends on the facilities on board the ISS or the STS. Various methods of refreezing of phase change materials on the ISS are discussed.

  16. ‘Introducing Michael Gove to Loïc Wacquant’: Why Social Work Needs Critical Sociology

    PubMed Central

    Michael Garrett, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, Michael Gove, then Secretary of State for Education and Health in the UK coalition government, criticised social workers for laying insufficient emphasis on the ‘agency’ of individuals and for being too preoccupied with social and economic inequalities. Such a perspective, which is not unique to Gove, needs to be countered by reaffirming the significance of an expansively critical sociology for social work. In this context, the thematic concerns of the French theorist, Loïc Wacquant, illuminates key aspects of social work engagement with clients which Gove and his ideological associates appear intent on ignoring. The issues raised have significant political resonances given the pending UK General Election taking place in May 2015. PMID:27559203

  17. Modelling and simulation of passive Lab-on-a-Chip (LoC) based micromixer for clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikat, Chakraborty; Sharath, M.; Srujana, M.; Narayan, K.; Pattnaik, Prasant Kumar

    2016-03-01

    In biomedical application, micromixer is an important component because of many processes requires rapid and efficient mixing. At micro scale, the flow is Laminar due to small channel size which enables controlled rapid mixing. The reduction in analysis time along with high throughput can be achieved with the help of rapid mixing. In LoC application, micromixer is used for mixing of fluids especially for the devices which requires efficient mixing. Micromixer of this type of microfluidic devices with a rapid mixing is useful in application such as DNA/RNA synthesis, drug delivery system & biological agent detection. In this work, we design and simulate a microfluidic based passive rapid micromixer for lab-on-a-chip application.

  18. A green laser at 517 nm based on intracavity frequency doubling of the diode-pumped Yb:LO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-liang; Li, Xiu-fei; Hu, Hong-wei; Hai, Xiao-quan; Liu, Yang; Wang, Jin-nan

    2014-09-01

    We report for the first time, to our knowledge, the diode-pumped continuous-wave (CW) thin-disk Yb3+-doped Lu2O3 (Yb:LO) laser at 1 034 nm and the second-harmonic generation at 517 nm. With a 6.3% output coupler, the maximum output power is 1.17 W under a pump power of 18.5 W. Moreover, the intracavity second-harmonic generation (SHG) is also achieved with power of 193 mW at 517 nm by using an LiB3O5 (LBO) nonlinear crystal. The beam quality factor M 2 is about 1.28. The fluctuation of the output power is about 3% in 1 h.

  19. [Rousseau on the couch. "La nouvelle Héloïse as a key to his childhood trauma].

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, C

    1993-05-01

    Whereas many interpreters and biographers of Rousseau tend to present their subject as a pathological figure, Niemeyer will have no truck with such ascriptions. His reading of Rousseau's epistolary novel Julie ou la Nouvelle Héloïse (1761) draws upon the autobiographical Confessions and reveals that Rousseau uses this novel as a species of self-therapy. In the novel the constellations in which certain scenes recur invite their interpretation as complementary scenes to Rousseau's traumatic "Urszene"--the death of his mother when giving birth to him. In Niemeyer's view, the way in which Rousseau turns his re-working of his childhood trauma to literary account qualifies him as a predecessor of psychoanalysis. PMID:8511325

  20. Observation of the distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the IBEX-Lo all-sky maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Kucharek, H.; Moebius, E.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the spatial distribution of heavy energetic neutral atoms, mostly oxygen and neon, in the sky maps taken with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) in 2009 - 2011. The IBEX-Lo sensor, one of two highly sensitive single-pixel cameras on the IBEX spacecraft, measures neutral particles within an energy range from 0.01 to 2 keV. In the time-of-flight detector of IBEX-Lo these neutral atoms can be identified as hydrogen or heavier atoms, such as oxygen. These measurements have provided all-sky maps of neutral hydrogen and oxygen. The dominant feature in these maps is the interstellar oxygen and neon gas flow. Its peak location is approximately consistent with the interstellar helium gas flow (Möbius et al., 2009, Science, 326, 969). The flow distribution is distributed over 210° - 240° ecliptic longitude and -6° - 12° ecliptic latitude. Another prominent feature in the oxygen sky maps at 0.2 to 0.8 keV is an extended tail of the oxygen signal toward lower longitude and higher positive latitude (180° - 210° ecliptic longitude and 0° - 24° ecliptic latitude). The measured peak rates in the extended tail is 3 - 5% of the maximum count rate in the primary oxygen and neon gas flow, but is four times higher than any other surrounding oxygen signals. The extended tail may indicate the secondary component of the interstellar oxygen, which is likely generated by charge exchange between local O+ ions and interstellar neutral H in the outer heliosheath. In this poster, we will discuss these two most prominent features in the oxygen sky maps and their implications for the source and the mechanism generating an extended tail in the oxygen signal.

  1. Doppler imaging of the young late-type star LO Pegasi (BD+22°4409) in 2003 September

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piluso, N.; Lanza, A. F.; Pagano, I.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Donati, J.-F.

    2008-06-01

    A Doppler image of the zero-age main-sequence (ZAMS) late-type rapidly rotating star LO Pegasi, based on spectra acquired between 2003 September 12 and 15 is presented. The least-squares deconvolution technique is applied to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the mean rotational broadened line profiles extracted from the observed spectra. In the present application, an unbroadened spectrum is used as a reference, instead of a simple line list, to improve the deconvolution technique applied to extract the mean profiles. The reconstructed image is similar to those previously obtained from observations taken in 1993 and 1998, and shows that LO Peg photospheric activity is dominated by high-latitude spots with a non-uniform polar cap. The latter seems to be a persistent feature as it has been observed since 1993 with little modifications. Small spots, observed between ~10° and ~60° of latitude, appears to be different with respect to those present in the 1993 and 1998 maps. Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo operated on the island of La Palma by the Centro Galileo Galilei of INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque del los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. E-mail: nicolo.piluso@oact.inaf.it (NP); nuccio.lanza@oact.inaf.it (AFL); isabella.pagano@oact.inaf.it (IP); alessandro.lanzafame@oact.inaf.it (ACL); donati@ast.obs-mip.fr (J-FD)

  2. Evaluation of imaging performance of a taper optics CCD; FReLoN' camera designed for medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Coan, Paola; Peterzol, Angela; Fiedler, Stefan; Ponchut, Cyril; Labiche, Jean Claude; Bravin, Alberto

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the imaging performance of an indirect conversion detector (taper optics CCD; FReLoN' camera) in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Measurements were made with a synchrotron radiation laminar beam at various monochromatic energies in the 20-51.5 keV range for a gadolinium-based fluorescent screen varying in thickness; data acquisition and analysis were made by adapting to this beam geometry protocols used for conventional cone beams. The pre-sampled MTFs of the systems were measured using an edge method. The NNPS of the systems were determined for a range of exposure levels by two-dimensional Fourier analysis of uniformly exposed radiographs. The DQEs were assessed from the measured MTF, NNPS, exposure and incoming number of photons. The MTF, for a given screen, was found to be almost energy independent and, for a given energy, higher for the thinnest screen. At 33 keV and for the 40 (100) microm screen, at 10% the MTF is 9.2 (8.6) line-pairs mm(-1). The NNPS was found to be different in the two analyzed directions in relation to frequency. Highest DQE values were found for the combination 100 microm and 25 keV (0.5); it was still equal to 0.4 at 51.5 keV (above the gadolinium K-edge). The DQE is limited by the phosphor screen conversion yield and by the CCD efficiency. At the end of the manuscript the results of the FReLoN characterization and those from a selected number of detectors presented in the literature are compared. PMID:16645252

  3. Simulating the Compton-Getting effect for hydrogen flux measurements: Implications for IBEX-Hi and -Lo observations

    SciTech Connect

    Zirnstein, E. J.; Heerikhuisen, J.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX), launched in 2008 October, has improved our understanding of the solar wind-local interstellar medium interaction through its detection of neutral atoms, particularly that of hydrogen (H). IBEX is able to create full maps of the sky in six-month intervals as the Earth orbits the Sun, detecting H with energies between ∼0.01 and 6 keV. Due to the relative motion of IBEX to the solar inertial frame, measurements made in the spacecraft frame introduce a Compton-Getting (CG) effect, complicating measurements at the lowest energies. In this paper we provide results from a numerical simulation that calculates fluxes of H atoms at 1 AU in the inertial and spacecraft frames (both ram and anti-ram), at energies relevant to IBEX-Hi and -Lo. We show theory behind the numerical simulations, applying a simple frame transformation to derived flux equations that provides a straightforward way to simulate fluxes in the spacecraft frame. We then show results of H energetic neutral atom fluxes simulated at IBEX-Hi energy passbands 2-6 in all frames, comparing with IBEX-Hi data along selected directions, and also show results simulated at energies relevant to IBEX-Lo. Although simulations at IBEX-Hi energies agree reasonably well with the CG correction method used for IBEX-Hi data, we demonstrate the importance of properly modeling low energy H fluxes due to inherent complexities involved with measurements made in moving frames, as well as dynamic radiation pressure effects close to the Sun.

  4. Preliminary base heating environments for a generalized ALS LO2/LH2 launch vehicle, appendix 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Robert L.; Reardon, John E.

    1989-01-01

    A secondary objective of contract NAS8-39141 is to provide base heating assessments, as required, to support Advanced Launch System (ALS) preliminary launch vehicle and propulsion system design studies. The ALS propulsion systems integration working group meeting (No. 3) recently completed in San Diego, California, focused attention on the need for base heating environment determination to provide preliminary requirements for LO2/LH2 propulsion systems currently being considered for ALS. We were requested to provide these environments for a range of possible propellant mixture and nozzle area ratios. Base heating environments can only be determined as a function of altitude when the engine operating conditions and vehicle base region geometry (engine arrangement) are known. If time dependent environments are needed to assess thermal loads, a trajectory must also be provided. These parameters are not fixed at this time since the ALS configurations and propulsion operating conditions are varied and continue to be studied by Phase B contractors. Therefore, for this study, a generalized LO2/LH2 system was selected along with a vehicle configuration consisting of a seven-engine booster and a three-engine core. MSFC provided guidance for the selection. We also selected a limited number of body points on the booster and core vehicles and engines for the environment estimates. Environments at these locations are representative of maximum heating conditions in the base region and are provided as a function of altitude only. Guidelines and assumptions for this assessment, methodology for determining the environments, and preliminary results are provided in this technical note. Refinements in the environments will be provided as the ALS design matures.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Augmented Spark Ignition of a LO2/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine at Altitude Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Sarmiento, Charles; Marshall, William

    2012-01-01

    The use of nontoxic propellants in future exploration vehicles would enable safer, more cost-effective mission scenarios. One promising green alternative to existing hypergols is liquid methane (LCH4) with liquid oxygen (LO2). A 100 lbf LO2/LCH4 engine was developed under the NASA Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development project and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center Altitude Combustion Stand in a low pressure environment. High ignition energy is a perceived drawback of this propellant combination; so this ignition margin test program examined ignition performance versus delivered spark energy. Sensitivity of ignition to spark timing and repetition rate was also explored. Three different exciter units were used with the engine s augmented (torch) igniter. Captured waveforms indicated spark behavior in hot fire conditions was inconsistent compared to the well-behaved dry sparks. This suggests that rising pressure and flow rate increase spark impedance and may at some point compromise an exciter s ability to complete each spark. The reduced spark energies of such quenched deliveries resulted in more erratic ignitions, decreasing ignition probability. The timing of the sparks relative to the pressure/flow conditions also impacted the probability of ignition. Sparks occurring early in the flow could trigger ignition with energies as low as 1 to 6 mJ, though multiple, similarly timed sparks of 55 to 75 mJ were required for reliable ignition. Delayed spark application and reduced spark repetition rate both correlated with late and occasional failed ignitions. An optimum time interval for spark application and ignition therefore coincides with propellant introduction to the igniter.

  6. MicroRNA-674-5p/5-LO axis involved in autoimmune reaction of Concanavalin A-induced acute mouse liver injury.

    PubMed

    Su, Kunkai; Wang, Qi; Qi, Luoyang; Hua, Dasong; Tao, Jingjing; Mangan, Connor J; Lou, Yijia; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-09-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is characterized, in part, by the pathways involving cysteinyl-leukotriene metabolites of arachidonic acid, the dynamics of which remain unclear. Here, we explored post-transcriptional regulation in the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway of arachidonic acid in a Concanavalin A (Con A) induced mouse model. We found that Con A administration lead to 5-LO overexpression and cysteinyl-leukotriene release in early hepatic injury, which was attenuated by cyclosporin A pretreatment. Subsequent microarray and qRT-PCR analysis further showed that microRNA-674-5p (miR-674-5p) displayed a significant decrease in expression in Con A-damaged liver. Noting that miR-674-5p harbors a potential binding region for 5-LO, we further transfected hepatic cell lines with overexpressing miR-674-5p mimic and discovered a negative regulating effect of miR-674-5p on 5-LO expression in the presence of IL-6 or TNF-α. These findings suggest that miR-674-5p might be a negative regulator in 5-LO mediated autoimmune liver injury, representing a compelling avenue towards future therapeutic interventions. PMID:27313091

  7. Hysteresis and change of transition temperature in thin films of Fe([Me{sub 2}Pyrz]{sub 3}BH){sub 2}, a new sublimable spin-crossover molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Davesne, V.; Gruber, M.; Studniarek, M.; Doh, W. H.; Zafeiratos, S.; Joly, L.; Schmerber, G.; Bowen, M.; Weber, W.; Boukari, S.; Da Costa, V.; Arabski, J.; Beaurepaire, E.; Sirotti, F.; Silly, M. G.; Gaspar, A. B.; Real, J. A. [Institut de Ciència Molecular , Universitat de València, C and others

    2015-05-21

    Thin films of the spin-crossover (SCO) molecule Fe([Me{sub 2}Pyrz]{sub 3}BH){sub 2} (Fe-pyrz) were sublimed on Si/SiO{sub 2} and quartz substrates, and their properties investigated by X-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopies, optical absorption, atomic force microscopy, and superconducting quantum interference device. Contrary to the previously studied Fe(phen){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}, the films are not smooth but granular. The thin films qualitatively retain the typical SCO properties of the powder sample (SCO, thermal hysteresis, soft X-ray induced excited spin-state trapping, and light induced excited spin-state trapping) but present intriguing variations even in micrometer-thick films: the transition temperature decreases when the thickness is decreased, and the hysteresis is affected. We explain this behavior in the light of recent studies focusing on the role of surface energy in the thermodynamics of the spin transition in nano-structures. In the high-spin state at room temperature, the films have a large optical gap (∼5 eV), decreasing at thickness below 50 nm, possibly due to film morphology.

  8. Segregative clustering of Lo and Ld membrane microdomains induced by local pH gradients in GM1-containing giant vesicles: a lipid model for cellular polarization.

    PubMed

    Staneva, Galya; Puff, Nicolas; Seigneuret, Michel; Conjeaud, Hélène; Angelova, Miglena I

    2012-11-27

    Several cell polarization processes are coupled to local pH gradients at the membrane surface. We have investigated the involvement of a lipid-mediated effect in such coupling. The influence of lateral pH gradients along the membrane surface on lipid microdomain dynamics in giant unilamellar vesicles containing phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and the ganglioside GM1 was studied. Lo/Ld phase separation was generated by photosensitization. A lateral pH gradient was established along the external membrane surface by acid local microinjection. The gradient promotes the segregation of microdomains: Lo domains within an Ld phase move toward the higher pH side, whereas Ld domains within an Lo phase move toward the lower pH side. This results in a polarization of the vesicle membrane into Lo and Ld phases poles in the axis of the proton source. A secondary effect is inward tubulation in the Ld phase. None of these processes occurs without GM1 or with the analog asialo-GM1. These are therefore related to the acidic character of the GM1 headgroup. LAURDAN fluorescence experiments on large unilamellar vesicles indicated that, with GM1, an increase in lipid packing occurs with decreasing pH, attributed to the lowering of repulsion between GM1 molecules. Packing increase is much higher for Ld phase vesicles than for Lo phase vesicles. It is proposed that the driving forces for domain vectorial segregative clustering and vesicle polarization are related to such differences in packing variations with pH decrease between the Lo and Ld phases. Such pH-driven domain clustering might play a role in cellular membrane polarization processes in which local lateral pH gradients are known to be important, such as migrating cells and epithelial cells. PMID:23121205

  9. Conversation with Lara about the Earth and Land. (Spanish Title: Conversando con Lara sobre la Tierra y la Teirra.) Conversando com Lara sobre a Terra e a Terra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Conceição Barbosa-Lima, Maria

    2010-12-01

    The present article is the analysis of a conversation between the author and Lara, a four-yearold- girl, enrolled in nursery school, while she makes a drawing of the Earth. It took place outside school environment and without any other person around to avoid interference during the interview. According to Ferreira & Silva (2004), a researcher can only comprehend a child's drawing, or form, by listening to him/her while he/she is creating it. Lara presented the traditional flat drawing, picturing the sky parallel to the ground, as reported by Nardi & Carvalho (1996). However, when asked to draw the World - term used by Butterworth et al. (2002), in order to avoid unnecessary confusion - she represented it by a circle, with herself on the surface. Her drawings led to the conclusion that such girl does not know yet the World in which she lives is the Earth, and probably because of that, within her age and consequent maturity, she accurately differentiates the concepts of land and Earth. El presente artículo analiza una entrevista libre, mientras una niña de 4 años y 4 meses, matriculada en el pregrado, dibuja la Tierra. Esta entrevista se realizó fuera del ambiente escolar y sin otra persona alrededor que pudiera interferir. De acuerdo con Ferreira Silva (2004), para quien investiga es posible conocer realmente lo que un niño o una niña pone en el papel a través de grafismos y/o dibujos si se lo escucha durante el proceso de creación de la escritura con imágenes. La niña, en este caso, representa la Tierra con el tradicional dibujo plano y el "cielo" paralelo al suelo, conforme analizaron Nardi & Carvalho (1996). Pero, cuando se Le solicita dibujar el "Mundo" - palabra empleada en un trabajo de Butterworth et al. (2002), con intención de no provocar "confusiones" innecesarias a sus sujetos de investigación- lo representa de forma circular, poniéndose sobre su superficie. Sus dibujos llevan a concluir que esta niña aún no tiene conocimiento que el mundo

  10. Analysis of 100-lb(sub f) (445-N) LO2-LCH4 Reaction Control Engine Impulse Bit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, William M.; Klenhenz, Julie E.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, liquid oxygen-liquid methane (LO2-LCH4) has been considered as a potential green propellant alternative for future exploration missions. The Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project was tasked by NASA to develop this propulsion combination to enable safe and cost-effective exploration missions. To date, limited experience with such combinations exist, and as a result a comprehensive test program is critical to demonstrating with the viability of implementing such a system. The NASA Glenn Research Center conducted a test program of a 100-lbf (445-N) reaction control engine (RCE) at the Center s Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS), focusing on altitude testing over a wide variety of operational conditions. The ACS facility includes unique propellant conditioning feed systems (PCFS), which allow precise control of propellant inlet conditions to the engine. Engine performance as a result of these inlet conditions was examined extensively during the test program. This paper is a companion to the previous specific impulse testing paper, and discusses the pulsed-mode operation portion of testing, with a focus on minimum impulse bit (MIB) and repeatable pulse performance. The engine successfully demonstrated target MIB performance at all conditions, as well as successful demonstration of repeatable pulse widths. Some anomalous conditions experienced during testing are also discussed, including a double pulse phenomenon, which was not noted in previous test programs for this engine.

  11. Spectral Line Measurements in Exceptionally Low SNR Achieved by Virtue of the KLT (Karhunen-Loève Transform)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, C.; Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.

    2009-12-01

    A little-known tool for spectral line measurements is the KLT (Karhunen-Loève Transform). This mathematical algorithm is superior to the classical FFT in that: 1) The KLT can filter signals out of the background noise over both wide and narrow bands. On the contrary, the FFT rigorously applies to narrow-band signals only. 2) The KLT can be applied to random functions that are non-stationary in time, i.e. whose autocorrelation is a function of the two independent variables t1 and t2 separately. Again, this is a sheer advantage of the KLT over the FFT, since the FFT rigorously applies to stationary processes only, i.e. when the autocorrelation is a function of the absolute value of the difference of t1 and t2. 3) The KLT can detect signals embedded in noise to unbelievably small values of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), like 10-3 or so. This particular feature of the KLT is described in detail in this paper.

  12. Karhunen-Loève treatment to remove noise and facilitate data analysis in sensing, spectroscopy and other applications.

    PubMed

    Zaharov, V V; Farahi, R H; Snyder, P J; Davison, B H; Passian, A

    2014-11-21

    Resolving weak spectral variations in the dynamic response of materials that are either dominated or excited by stochastic processes remains a challenge. Responses that are thermal in origin are particularly relevant examples due to the delocalized nature of heat. Despite its inherent properties in dealing with stochastic processes, the Karhunen-Loève expansion has not been fully exploited in measurement of systems that are driven solely by random forces or can exhibit large thermally driven random fluctuations. Here, we present experimental results and analysis of the archetypes (a) the resonant excitation and transient response of an atomic force microscope probe by the ambient random fluctuations and nanoscale photothermal sample response, and (b) the photothermally scattered photons in pump-probe spectroscopy. In each case, the dynamic process is represented as an infinite series with random coefficients to obtain pertinent frequency shifts and spectral peaks and demonstrate spectral enhancement for a set of compounds including the spectrally complex biomass. The considered cases find important applications in nanoscale material characterization, biosensing, and spectral identification of biological and chemical agents. PMID:25252650

  13. Local coupling (LoCo) vs. large-scale coupled (LsCo) land-atmosphere interactions in idealized experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentine, P.; Lintner, B. R.; Findell, K. L.; Rochetin, N.; Sobel, A. H.; Anber, U. M.

    2014-12-01

    We will present two idealized epxeriments/methodologies to investigate local (LoCo) and large-scale (LsCo) coupling between the surface and the atmsophere: the contiental Radiative-Convective Equilibrium (RCE) and the continental Weak Temperature Gradient (WTG). The RCE defines an equilibrium state of coupling between the surafce and the atmosphere isolated from any large-scale dependence, which were investigated within the single column model of the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (LMD) coupled to a simple bucket land model. This studies emphasizes the role of low-level cloud and the diurnal cylce of the boundary layer on the final state of the system. In the WTG we investigate the coupling between the surface and the atmosphere during the dry and wet season of the Amazon with the WRF model coupled to the NOAH land-surface model. Large-scale coupling is obtained with the WTG. The dry and wet season demonstrate very fundamental behavior: in the dry season deep convection is generated by radiative cooling in the higher troposhere and is disconnected from the surface. In the wet season the coupling between the surface and the atmosphere is much tighter. We suggest that the WTG is a powerful tool to investigate the coupling between the surface and the atmosphere, which solves two major issues: the limited resolution of convection in GCMs and the lack of large-scale coupling in CRM. Later investigation will look at the effect of deforestation, water table and distance from the ocean.

  14. Nonlinear Analysis of the Space Shuttle Superlightweight LO2 Tank. Part 2; Behavior Under 3g End-of-Flight Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Young, Richard D.; Collins, Timothy J.; Starnes, James H.,Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Results of linear bifurcation and nonlinear analyses of the Space Shuttle super lightweight (SLWT) external liquid-oxygen (LO2) tank are presented for an important end-of-flight loading condition. These results illustrate an important type of response mode for thin-walled shells, that are subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads, that may be encountered in the design of other liquid-fuel launch vehicles. Linear bifurcation analyses are presented that predict several nearly equal eigenvalues that correspond to local buckling modes in the aft dome of the LO2 tank. In contrast, the nonlinear response phenomenon is shown to consist of a short-wavelength bending deformation in the aft elliptical dome of the LO2 tank that grows in amplitude in a stable manner with increasing load. Imperfection sensitivity analyses are presented that show that the presence of several nearly equal eigenvalues does not lead to a premature general instability mode for the aft dome. For the linear bifurcation and nonlinear analyses, the results show that accurate predictions of the response of the shell generally require a large-scale, high fidelity finite-element model. Results are also presented that show that the SLWT LO2 tank can support loads in excess of approximately 1.9 times the values of the operational loads considered.

  15. The Design of the Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) for the Study of Radio Transients and Student Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenet, Fredrick; Cohen, S.; Dartez, L. P.; Ford, A.; Garcia, A.; Hinojosa, J.; Longoria, C.; Lunsford, G.; Mata, A.; Miller, R. B.; Reser, J.; Rivera, J.; Stovall, K.; Creighton, T. D.; Hicks, B.; Price, R. H.; Taylor, G. B.

    2013-01-01

    The Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey (Astro2010) identified transient science and time-domain studies as one of the most promising discovery areas of the coming decade. The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a new distributed radio array designed specifically to search for and to study transient radio phenomena in the 5-88 MHz frequency range. LoFASM consists of four stations, each made up of 12 cross dipole-antennas. The stations were constructed by undergraduates at the University of Texas at Brownsville's Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy. LoFASM utilizes the same antennas and front-end electronics developed for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) project by the Naval Research Laboratory. The stations are located at Port Mansfield, Texas, the LWA North Arm site of the LWA1 Radio Observatory in New Mexico, the Green Bank Radio Observatory, West Virginia, and NASA's Goldstone tracking center in California. Having the stations in these geographically distinct regions allows for the immediate discrimination between bonafide astronomical transient events and radio frequency interference. In this presentation, we will give an overview of LoFASM's design and capabilities as well as the project's primary scientific objectives

  16. Representations of Mexican American Migrant Childhood in Rivera's "...y no se lo trago la tierra" and Viramontes's "Under the Feet of Jesus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Scott A.; Rangel, Dolores E.

    2009-01-01

    This article gives an analysis of two books: Thomas Rivera's "...y no se lo trago la tierra" and Helena Maria Viramontes's "Under the Feet of Jesus". The two books are strong and important literary texts that stand in close relation to each other. Both texts treat the subject of migrant childhood by affirming central themes of Chicano literature.…

  17. 76 FR 50152 - Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines (L)O-360, (L)IO-360, AEIO-360, O-540, IO-540, AEIO-540...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ...-14778 (71 FR 57407, September 29, 2006), for Lycoming Engines (L)O-360, (L)IO-360, AEIO-360, O-540, IO... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034...-09, Amendment 39-14778 (71 FR 57407, September 29, 2006), and adding the following new AD:...

  18. Core-shell-like Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS heterostructure synthesized by super-close-space sublimation for broadband down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaojie; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Meng, Fanzhi; Yu, Yingning; Han, Lin; Liu, Xiaojuan; Meng, Jian

    2014-04-01

    Combination with semiconductors is a promising approach to the realization of broadband excitation of light conversion materials based on rare earth compounds, to boost the energy efficiency of silicon solar cells. Cd1-xZnxS is a wide bandgap semiconductor with large exciton binding energy. By changing its composition, the bandgap of Cd1-xZnxS can be tuned to match the absorption of trivalent lanthanide (Ln) ions, which makes it a competent energy donor for the Ln3+-Yb3+ couple. In this work, we designed a clean route to a broadband down-converter based on a core-shell-like Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/Cd0.81Zn0.19S (CdZnS) heterostructure. By hot-pressing and subsequent annealing of a Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS mixture, highly pure CdZnS was sublimated and deposited on the Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+] grains while maintaining the original composition of the precursor. The CdZnS shell acted as a light absorber and energy donor for the Tb3+-Yb3+ quantum cutting couple. Because the use of solvents was avoided during the formation of the heterostructures, few impurities were incorporated into the samples, and the non-radiative transition was therefore markedly suppressed. The Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS heterostructures possess strong near-infrared (NIR) luminescence from Yb3+. Broadband down-conversion to the Yb3+ NIR emission was obtained in a wide range of 250-650 nm.

  19. Sea-Level Flight Demonstration and Altitude Characterization of a LO2/LCH4 Based Accent Propulsion Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jacob; Hurlbert, Eric; Romig, Kris; Melcher, John; Hobson, Aaron; Eaton, Phil

    2009-01-01

    A 1,500 lbf thrust-class liquid oxygen (LO2)/Liquid Methane (LCH4) rocket engine was developed and tested at both sea-level and simulated altitude conditions. The engine was fabricated by Armadillo Aerospace (AA) in collaboration with NASA Johnson Space Center. Sea level testing was conducted at Armadillo Aerospace facilities at Caddo Mills, TX. Sea-level tests were conducted using both a static horizontal test bed and a vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) test bed capable of lift-off and hover-flight in low atmosphere conditions. The vertical test bed configuration is capable of throttling the engine valves to enable liftoff and hover-flight. Simulated altitude vacuum testing was conducted at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), which is capable of providing altitude simulation greater than 120,000 ft equivalent. The engine tests demonstrated ignition using two different methods, a gas-torch and a pyrotechnic igniter. Both gas torch and pyrotechnic ignition were demonstrated at both sea-level and vacuum conditions. The rocket engine was designed to be configured with three different nozzle configurations, including a dual-bell nozzle geometry. Dual-bell nozzle tests were conducted at WSTF and engine performance data was achieved at both ambient pressure and simulated altitude conditions. Dual-bell nozzle performance data was achieved over a range of altitude conditions from 90,000 ft to 50,000 ft altitude. Thrust and propellant mass flow rates were measured in the tests for specific impulse (Isp) and C* calculations.

  20. Establishing an Appropriate Level of Detail (LoD) for a Building Information Model (BIM) - West Block, Parliament Hill, Ottawa, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fai, S.; Rafeiro, J.

    2014-05-01

    In 2011, Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) embarked on a comprehensive rehabilitation of the historically significant West Block of Canada's Parliament Hill. With over 17 thousand square meters of floor space, the West Block is one of the largest projects of its kind in the world. As part of the rehabilitation, PWGSC is working with the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS) to develop a building information model (BIM) that can serve as maintenance and life-cycle management tool once construction is completed. The scale and complexity of the model have presented many challenges. One of these challenges is determining appropriate levels of detail (LoD). While still a matter of debate in the development of international BIM standards, LoD is further complicated in the context of heritage buildings because we must reconcile the LoD of the BIM with that used in the documentation process (terrestrial laser scan and photogrammetric survey data). In this paper, we will discuss our work to date on establishing appropriate LoD within the West Block BIM that will best serve the end use. To facilitate this, we have developed a single parametric model for gothic pointed arches that can be used for over seventy-five unique window types present in the West Block. Using the AEC (CAN) BIM as a reference, we have developed a workflow to test each of these window types at three distinct levels of detail. We have found that the parametric Gothic arch significantly reduces the amount of time necessary to develop scenarios to test appropriate LoD.